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Sample records for faculty attitude barriers

  1. E-Learning in a Mega Open University: Faculty Attitude, Barriers and Motivators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Santosh; Mishra, Sanjaya

    2007-01-01

    In the distance teaching institutions where e-learning initiatives are underway and where the planners and administrators grapple with effective adoption and deployment of technology-enabled education, faculty attitude and motivation assume considerable significance. Attitudinal pre-dispositions and institutional and allied barriers (including…

  2. Experiences, attitudes and barriers towards research amongst junior faculty of Pakistani medical universities

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    Kauser Samreen

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The developing world has had limited quality research and in Pakistan, research is still in its infancy. We conducted a study to assess the proportion of junior faculty involved in research to highlight their attitude towards research, and identify the factors associated with their research involvement. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted in four medical universities/teaching hospitals in Pakistan, representing private and public sectors. A pre-tested, self-administered questionnaire was used to collect information from 176 junior faculty members of studied universities/hospitals. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify factors related to attitudes and barriers in research among those currently involved in research with those who were not. Results Overall, 41.5% of study subjects were currently involved in research. A highly significant factor associated with current research involvement was research training during the post-graduate period (p Conclusion Less than half of the study participants were currently involved in research. Research output may improve if identified barriers are rectified. Further studies are recommended in this area.

  3. Faculty attitudes about interprofessional education

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    Gary L. Beck Dallaghan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Interprofessional education (IPE is an important component to training health care professionals. Research is limited in exploring the attitudes that faculty hold regarding IPE and what barriers they perceive to participating in IPE. The purpose of this study was to identify faculty attitudes about IPE and to identify barriers to participating in campus-wide IPE activities. Methods: A locally used questionnaire called the Nebraska Interprofessional Education Attitudes Scale (NIPEAS was used to assess attitudes related to interprofessional collaboration. Questions regarding perceived barriers were included at the end of the questionnaire. Descriptive and non-parametric statistics were used to analyze the results in aggregate as well as by college. In addition, open-ended questions were analyzed using an immersion/crystallization framework to identify themes. Results: The results showed that faculty had positive attitudes of IPE, indicating that is not a barrier to participating in IPE activities. Most common barriers to participation were scheduling conflicts (x24,285=19.17, p=0.001, lack of department support (4,285=10.09, p=0.039, and lack of awareness of events (x24,285=26.38, p=0.000. Narrative comments corroborated that scheduling conflicts are an issue because of other priorities. Those who commented also added to the list of barriers, including relevance of the activities, location, and prior negative experiences. Discussion: With faculty attitudes being positive, the exploration of faculty's perceived barriers to IPE was considered even more important. Identifying these barriers will allow us to modify our IPE activities from large, campus-wide events to smaller activities that are longitudinal in nature, embedded within current curriculum and involving more authentic experiences.

  4. Attitudes on Barriers and Benefits of Distance Education among Mississippi Delta Allied Health Community College Faculty, Staff, and Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayfield-Johnson, Susan; Mohn, Richard S.; Mitra, Amal K.; Young, Rebekah; McCullers, Elizabeth M.

    2014-01-01

    Online distance education creates increased opportunities for continuing education and advanced training for allied health professionals living in underserved and geographically isolated areas. The purpose of this article was to explore attitudes on barriers and benefits of distance education technology among underrepresented minority allied…

  5. Faculty Perceptions about Barriers to Active Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, Joel

    2007-01-01

    Faculty may perceive many barriers to active learning in their classrooms. Four groups of participants in a faculty development workshop were asked to list their perceived barriers to active learning. Many of the problems identified were present on more than one list. The barriers fall into three categories: student characteristics, issues…

  6. A national study on the attitudes of Irish dental faculty members to faculty development.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Sullivan, E M

    2010-02-01

    International studies suggest that dental faculty are resistant to the concept and practice of faculty development. This paper analyses the demographic and educational profile of Irish Dental Faculty, exploring their attitudes to educational initiatives.

  7. Health science center faculty attitudes towards interprofessional education and teamwork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gary, Jodie C; Gosselin, Kevin; Bentley, Regina

    2018-03-01

    The attitudes of faculty towards interprofessional education (IPE) and teamwork impact the education of health professions education (HPE) students. This paper reports on a study evaluating attitudes from health professions educators towards IPE and teamwork at one academic health science center (HSC) where modest IPE initiatives have commenced. Drawing from the results of a previous investigation, this study was conducted to examine current attitudes of the faculty responsible for the training of future healthcare professionals. Survey data were collected to evaluate attitudes from HSC faculty, dentistry, nursing, medicine, pharmacy and public health. In general, positive HSC faculty attitudes towards interprofessional learning, education, and teamwork were significantly predicted by those affiliated with the component of nursing. Faculty development aimed at changing attitudes and increasing understanding of IPE and teamwork are critical. Results of this study serve as an underpinning to leverage strengths and evaluate weakness in initiating IPE.

  8. Engineering Faculty Attitudes to General Chemistry Courses in Engineering Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garip, Mehmet; Erdil, Erzat; Bilsel, Ayhan

    2006-01-01

    A survey on the attitudes of engineering faculty to chemistry, physics, and mathematics was conducted with the aim of clarifying the attitudes of engineering faculty to chemistry courses in relation to engineering education or curricula and assessing their expectations. The results confirm that on the whole chemistry is perceived as having a…

  9. Attitudes of health sciences faculty members towards interprofessional teamwork and education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, Vernon R; Sharpe, Dennis; Forristall, Jennifer

    2007-09-01

    Faculty attitudes are believed to be a barrier to successful implementation of interprofessional education (IPE) initiatives within academic health sciences settings. The purpose of this study was to examine specific attributes of faculty members, which might relate to attitudes towards IPE and interprofessional teamwork. A survey was distributed to all faculty members in the medicine, nursing, pharmacy and social work programmes at our institution. Respondents were asked to rate their attitudes towards interprofessional health care teams, IPE and interprofessional learning in an academic setting using scales adopted from the peer-reviewed literature. Information on the characteristics of the respondents was also collected, including data on gender, prior experience with IPE, age and years of practice experience. A total response rate of 63.0% was achieved. Medicine faculty members reported significantly lower mean scores (P nursing faculty on attitudes towards IPE, interprofessional teams and interprofessional learning in the academic setting. Female faculty and faculty who reported prior experience in IPE reported significantly higher mean scores (P teamwork. The findings have implications for both the advancement of IPE within academic institutions and strategies to promote faculty development initiatives. In terms of IPE evaluation, the findings also highlight the importance of measuring baseline attitudinal constructs as part of systematic evaluative activities when introducing new IPE initiatives within academic settings.

  10. The Relationship Between Student and Faculty Attitudes Toward Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnell, Virginia

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine student and faculty attitudes toward computer technology in advanced arts classes at a southeastern university in the United States. This one semester study was focused on the traditional arts disciplines of art, dance, music, and theatre. This correlational analysis limited to faculty members and students…

  11. Senior Law Faculty Attitudes toward Retirement.

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    Day, David S.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    This article examines the retirement plans and personal characteristics of 273 senior law school faculty, focusing on health status, income, job satisfaction, and preferred age of retirement. The study suggests that early retirement incentives and a "senior faculty" alternative to full retirement are positive institutional options. (DB)

  12. Attitudes of Australian and Turkish veterinary faculty toward animal welfare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izmirli, Serdar; Phillips, Clive J C

    2012-01-01

    The attitudes of veterinary faculty toward animal welfare were surveyed in four Australian and three Turkish veterinary schools. The former were considered to be typical of modern Western schools, with a faculty of more than 40% women and a primary focus on companion animals, whereas the latter were considered to represent more traditional veterinary teaching establishments, with a faculty of 88% men and a primary focus on livestock. A total of 116 faculty responded to the survey (42 Australian and 74 Turkish faculty members), for response rates of 30% and 33%, respectively. This survey included demographic questions as well as questions about attitudes toward animal-welfare issues. Women were more concerned than men about animal-welfare issues, especially the use of animals in experiments, zoos, entertainment, and sports and for food and clothing. Total scores demonstrated different concerns among Turkish and Australian faculty. The study demonstrates that the veterinary faculty of these two countries have different concerns for animal welfare, concerns that should be acknowledged in considering the welfare attitudes that students may adopt.

  13. Knowledge and attitudes of pain management among nursing faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voshall, Barbara; Dunn, Karen S; Shelestak, Debra

    2013-12-01

    A descriptive correlational design was used in this study to examine nursing faculty knowledge and attitudes in pain management. Relationships between age, education level, pain management preparation, length of time practicing as a nurse, length of time teaching nursing, time teaching pain management in the classroom, taught pain guidelines in the classroom, and additional continuing education about pain management were explored. Ninety-six nursing faculty participated from 16 schools of nursing in one Midwestern U.S. region. Findings identified that most of the nursing faculty recalled being taught about pain management in their basic education, but less than one-half felt adequately prepared. Most respondents said that they taught pain management, yet fewer than one-half identified that they used specific pain management guidelines. Faculty demonstrated adequate knowledge of pain assessment, spiritual/cultural issues, and pathophysiology. Areas of weakness were found in medications, interventions, and addiction. Faculty that reported teaching pain management in the classroom and reported more continuing education missed fewer items. Older nursing faculty reported more years of practice, more years of teaching, and more continuing education in pain management than younger faculty. Younger nursing faculty remembered being taught pain management in nursing school and felt more adequately prepared than older nursing faculty. Faculty that reported practicing for longer periods of time felt less prepared in pain management than faculty who practiced for shorter periods of time. More continuing education in pain management may be needed for older nurses to meet the recommendations of the Institute of Medicines' report on relieving pain in the U.S. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Dental Student, Resident, and Faculty Attitudes Toward Treating Medicaid Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behar-Horenstein, Linda S; Feng, Xiaoying

    2017-11-01

    Failure to receive proper oral health care including both prevention and maintenance is influenced by myriad and complex social, economic, and dental factors, including access to care. Reducing oral health disparities requires changes in the preparation of future dentists as well as measuring and influencing the attitudes and knowledge of practicing dentists. The aim of this study was to determine the likelihood that future dentists (students and residents) and faculty members at one U.S. dental school would treat Medicaid participants. Attitudes were measured using the Deamonte Driver scenario survey, which assesses factors affecting dentists' participation in Medicaid. In October 2012, all 113 full-time faculty members were invited to participate, and 60 completed the survey, for a response rate of 53.1%. In January and February 2013, all 18 residents in the dental clinics and university hospital were invited to participate, and 16 completed the survey, for a response rate of 88.9%. From 2013 to 2015, all 267 students in three classes were invited to participate: first-year students in the Classes of 2017 and 2018 and fourth-year students in the Class of 2015. A total of 255 students completed the survey, for an overall student response rate of 95.5%. The results showed that the students were more likely to participate in caring for Medicaid patients than the faculty and residents. The white and male students had stronger negative stereotypes about Medicaid patients than the females and underrepresented minority students, while residents had stronger negative stereotypes about Medicaid patients than the students and faculty. Overall, the cultural competency skills, beliefs, and attitudes of these faculty members and residents were less developed than those of their students, signaling a need for broad educational and faculty development programs to fully prepare the future dental workforce to care for these patients.

  15. Attitude toward plagiarism among Iranian medical faculty members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghajarzadeh, Mahsa; Norouzi-Javidan, Abbas; Hassanpour, Kiana; Aramesh, Kiarash; Emami-Razavi, Seyed Hassan

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this study was to assess attitude towards plagiarism in faculty members of Medical School at Tehran University of Medical Sciences. One hundred and twenty medical faculty members of Tehran University of Medical Sciences were enrolled in this cross-sectional study. They were asked to answer to valid and reliable Persian version of attitude towards plagiarism questionnaire. Attitude toward plagiarism, positive attitude toward self-plagiarism and plagiarism acceptance were assessed. Eighty seven filled-up questionnaires were collected. Mean total number of correct answers was 11.6±3.1. Mean number of correct answers to questions evaluating self-plagiarism was 1.7±0.4 and mean number of correct answers to questions evaluating plagiarism acceptance was 1.4±0.2. There was no significant correlation between plagiarism acceptance and self-plagiarism (r=0.17, P=0.1). It is essential to provide materials (such as workshops, leaflets and mandatory courses) to make Iranian medical faculty members familiar with medical research ethics issues such as plagiarism.

  16. Attitude toward Plagiarism among Iranian Medical Faculty Members

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    Seyed Hassan Emami-Razavi

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study was to assess attitude towards plagiarism in faculty members of Medical School at Tehran University of Medical Sciences. One hundred and twenty medical faculty members ofTehran University of Medical Sciences were enrolled in this cross-sectional study. They were asked to answer to valid and reliable Persian version of attitude towards plagiarism questionnaire. Attitude toward plagiarism, positive attitude toward self-plagiarism and plagiarism acceptance were assessed. Eighty seven filled-up questionnaires were collected. Mean total number of correct answers was 11.6 ± 3.1. Mean number of correct answers to questions evaluating self-plagiarism was 1.7 ± 0.4 and mean number of correct answers to questions evaluating plagiarism acceptance was 1.4 ± 0.2. There was no significant correlation between plagiarism acceptance and self-plagiarism (r=0.17, P=0.1. It is essential to provide materials (such as workshops, leaflets and mandatory courses to make Iranian medical faculty members familiar with medicalresearch ethics issues such as plagiarism.

  17. An Investigation of Faculty Perspectives on Barriers, Incentives, and Benefits of the OER Movement in Turkey

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    Engin Kursun

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this survey study is to investigate faculty’s perceptions of the main incentives, barriers, and benefits to publishing their course materials for free within the open educational resources (OER movement. Data were collected from an online survey of 1,637 faculty from 56 universities in Turkey. Results showed that even though the majority of the participants’ perceptions of OER benefits and their attitudes toward publishing their course materials were positive, legal issues were perceived as an obstacle to effective application. Intellectual property protection mechanisms were perceived as the most important incentive to facilitate their contribution.

  18. How Faculty can Affect Student Texting, Distraction, Grades, and Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Douglas K.; Hoekstra, A.; Wilcox, B.

    2014-01-01

    There is considerable pressure on faculty members to use technology in teaching. Students also bring technology into class in the form of laptop computers, smart phones, and iPads. Does this technology increase or decrease learning? We report two years of data studying 14 different classes with a total of approximately 1200 students. We find that, on the average, approximately 70% of students use their own digital devices during class and 30% do not. The grades earned by the former group average nearly half a grade point average lower than the non-use group. Faculty policies are found to dramatically influence student behavior. Extensive student interview data will be reported that shows that students expect faculty members to set technology policies and summarizes their attitudes about technology use.

  19. Faculty Attitudes towards Computer Assisted Instruction at the University of Gaziantep

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    Filiz Yalçın TILFARLIOĞLU

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available This study aims at revealing faculty attitudes towards computer assistedinstruction at University of Gaziantep, Turkey in a multifaceted way. Additionally, ittries to determine underlying factors that shape these attitudes. After a pilot study, thequestionnaire was applied to a sample population of 145 faculty that were chosenrandomly. The results revealed that faculty attitudes towards computer assistedinsruction are positive. Age, sex, teaching experience, level of proficiency in Englishand computer usage skills have no or little effects over these attitudes.According to theresults of the study, faculty who have prior knowledge on computers expose ratherpositive attitudes towards computers in education.Another important outcome of thestudy is the existence of a gender gap in terms of computer assisted instruction.Althoughthere seems to be no difference between male and female faculty concerning theirbackground education regarding computers, male faculty feel confident about thematter, whereas female faculty feel uncomfortable about using computers in theirlessons.

  20. Attitudes towards students who plagiarize: a dental hygiene faculty perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel-Bhakta, Hemali G; Muzzin, Kathleen B; Dewald, Janice P; Campbell, Patricia R; Buschang, Peter H

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine baccalaureate dental hygiene faculty members' attitudes and practices regarding student plagiarism. An email containing a link to a thirty-two-item survey was sent to fifty-two baccalaureate dental hygiene program directors in the United States; thirty of those agreed for their faculty members to participate. Of the 257 faculty members who received the survey link, 106 completed the survey, for a response rate of 41.2 percent. The responding faculty members reported thinking plagiarism is a rising concern in their dental hygiene programs (54.5 percent, 54/99). The majority said they check for plagiarism on student class assignment/projects (67.1 percent, 53/79). For those who did not check for plagiarism, 45.8 percent (11/24) stated it took "too much time to check" or it was "too hard to prove" (16.6 percent, 4/24). The most frequent form of student plagiarism observed by the respondents was "copying directly from a source electronically" (78.0 percent, 39/50). Most respondents reported checking for plagiarism through visual inspection (without technological assistance) (73.0 percent, 38/52). Of those who said they use plagiarism detection software/services, 44.4 percent (16/36) always recommended their students use plagiarism detection software/services to detect unintentional plagiarism. For those faculty members who caught students plagiarizing, 52.9 percent (27/51) reported they "always or often" handled the incident within their dental hygiene department, and 76.5 percent (39/51) said they had never reported the student's violation to an academic review board.

  1. Self-Expression, Social Roles, and Faculty Members' Attitudes towards Online Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Chris R.

    2017-01-01

    There is a widening gap between administrators' and faculty members' attitudes towards online education. This post-positivist grounded theory study explored features of the experiences that shaped sixteen faculty members' attitudes towards online education. Two features are identified: (a) they strived to express subject matter of personal…

  2. Barriers to advancement in academic surgery: views of senior residents and early career faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochran, Amalia; Elder, William B; Crandall, Marie; Brasel, Karen; Hauschild, Tricia; Neumayer, Leigh

    2013-11-01

    A significant faculty attrition rate exists in academic surgery. The authors hypothesized that senior residents and early-career faculty members have different perceptions of advancement barriers in academic surgery. A modified version of the Career Barriers Inventory-Revised was administered electronically to surgical residents and early-career surgical faculty members at 8 academic medical centers. Residents identified a lack of mentorship as a career barrier about half as often as faculty members. Residents were twice as likely as faculty members to view childbearing as a career barrier. Many early-career faculty members cite a lack of mentors as a limitation to their career development in academic surgery. Childbearing remains a complex perceived influence for female faculty members in particular. Female faculty members commonly perceive differential treatment and barriers on the basis of their sex. Faculty development programs should address both systemic and sex-specific obstacles if academic surgery is to remain a vibrant field. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Associations between Prior Disability-Focused Training and Disability-Related Attitudes and Perceptions among University Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Christopher; Lombardi, Allison; Wren, Carol T.; Keys, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    This investigation examined the relationship between prior disability-focused training and university faculty members' attitudes towards students with learning disabilities (LD). A survey containing items designed to measure faculty attitudes was sent to all full-time faculty at one university. Analyses of 198 responses indicated that faculty who…

  4. Comparison of Attitudes between Generation X and Baby Boomer Veterinary Faculty and Residents

    OpenAIRE

    Freeman, Lisa M.; Trower, Cathy A.; Tan, Rachael J.B.; Terkla, Dawn Geronimo

    2009-01-01

    Understanding the characteristics and preferences of the different generations in the veterinary workforce is important if we are to help optimize current and future veterinary schools and teaching hospitals. The purpose of this study was to compare the attitudes of different generations of veterinary faculty and those of faculty and house officers. A survey administered to faculty and house officers asked respondents to identify their level of agreement with a series of statements addressing...

  5. Communicating in a Multicultural Classroom: A Study of Students' Nonverbal Behavior and Attitudes toward Faculty Attire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okoro, Ephraim; Washington, Melvin

    2011-01-01

    Economic and market globalization in the United States has engendered a multicultural learning environment that challenges both faculty and students. Diversity in the classroom is further complicated by nonverbal communication, which impacts on students' attitudes toward faculty members. Because today's classrooms are changing and undergoing rapid…

  6. Attitudes of Faculty Members at Najran University towards Students' Assessment for Their Teaching Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakri, Ali; Qablan, Yahya

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the attitudes of faculty members at Najran University towards students' assessment for their teaching performance. The sample of the study consisted of (184) faculty members from Najran University, Kingdome of Saudi Arabia. A questionnaire was developed and distributed to the sample of the study. The result showed…

  7. Knowledge, Attitude and Practice, and service barriers in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-02-01

    Feb 1, 2018 ... South Sudan Medical Journal Vol 11. No 1. February 2018. ORIGINAL RESEARCH. KAP Barriers. In Lakes State, a barrier to both detection and treatment of TB is the knowledge, attitudes, and practices .... In hospital, TB and HIV are treated under the same roof because according to hospital data, 12% of ...

  8. Perceived Online Education Barriers of Administrators and Faculty at a U.S. University in Lebanon

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Turk, Sahar; Cherney, Isabelle D.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative study was to identify the perceived barriers obstructing the implementation of online education by administrators and faculty at the School of Arts and Sciences of a U.S. university located in Lebanon. The aim of this study was to offer a solution to the most important perceived barriers to online education that…

  9. The Attitudes of Kuwait University Faculty Members and Undergraduate Students toward the Use of Distance Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    AL-Masoud, Fawzeah A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to examine the attitude of the faculty members and the undergraduate students of the College of Education at Kuwait University toward Distance of Education. The study illustrates a comparison in the attitude between the two groups toward Distance Education. In addition, the study tries to find if there are significant…

  10. From Passion to Emotion: Emotional Quotient as Predictor of Work Attitude Behaviour among Faculty Members

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    Relojo, Dennis; Pilao, Sonia Janice; Dela Rosa, Rona

    2015-01-01

    Positive thinking, in conjunction with a robust attitude, can affect one's well-being and coping strategies under stressful events. This study sought to identify the role of Emotional Quotient (EQ) to Work Attitude Behaviour (WAB) of selected faculty members from three higher educational institutions in the Philippines. Using a non-experimental…

  11. The assessment of barriers to research from the viewpoint of faculty members of Lorestan University of Medical Sciences and relationship to research performance of them

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    farzad Ebrahimzadeh

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: The first step in improving research conduction in society can be conceived as identifying the weak points of research. Given that faculty members of universities carry out most of the research activities, the present study attempts to study the relationship between barriers to research from the viewpoint of the faculty members of Lorestan University of Medical Sciences and the research activities of them. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study, using census method, assessed all of the faculty members of Lorestan university of medical sciences. A self-administered questionnaire analyzing the faculty members’ demographic variables, knowledge about and attitudes toward barriers to different steps of research was designed and the self-report questionnaires were filled out and their relationship with the annual assessment scores in research criteria were assessed by chi-square, Mann-Whitney and Kruskal-Wallis tests. Results: Variables such as the faculty members’ department, number of their modules, primary motivation for research conduction, knowledge about variables such as research methodologies, searching strategies in medical databases, putting forward proposals, research article writing and also, attitude towards vaiables such as approved research priorities, putting forward proposals, quality of research advice, approval of proposals in research councils,  research facilities, the process of peer review of national scientific articles, presenting papers in conferences and participating in theses were related to the research performance of them (p<0.05. Conclusion: If seems that giving special privileges to the faculty members of faculty of medicine,  those with many modules and those with no optimal knowledge and attitude, we can enhance their motivation to participate in research activities.

  12. Knowledge, Attitude and Faculty Members’ performance on e-Learning in Tehran University of Medical Sciences

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    Aeen Mohammadi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : E-learning is used in the worldwide in higher education to improve the quality of the learning experience by students; at the same time using this approach requires behavioral changes in the faculty members. One of the steps in the implementation and monitoring of e-learning, is audience analysis using techniques such as knowledge, attitude and practices (KAP. This study investigates the knowledge, attitude and faculty members’ performance of Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS on e-learning. Methods: This descriptive, cross-sectional study was conducted in 2014-15 through a research-made questionnaire. Face validity was determined by expert opinion, Cronbach’s alpha was measured to assess the reliability and its construct validity was investigated through exploratory factor analysis. . The questionnaire was e-mailed to all TUMS faculty members . 218 faculty members responded to the questionnaire. Results: The reliability score of the questionnaire was assessed using Cronbach alphs, and it was 0.79. Exploratory factor analysis of the attitude part of the questionnaire produced a single factor that explained 53% of the variance. The results showed the positive attitude of faculty members regarding e-learning, although their knowledge and practice scores was less than half of the total score. There wass not found any meaningful differences between knowledge, attitude and performance of the participants based on sex, rank and work experience. ANOVA test showed that the difference of scores among schools was statistically significant (  = 0.000;  = 0.003 and  = 0.000, respectively. Conclusion: The findings of this study showed the state of knowledge, attitude and faculty members’ performance of TUMS on e-learning. Over the past years, TUMS has established suitable e-learning infrastructure such as educational websites and virtual programs as well as training workshop for faculty members. The results of this study can

  13. Incentives and barriers to OER adoption: A qualitative analysis of faculty perceptions

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    Olga Maria Belikov

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, 218 U.S faculty responses regarding Open Educational Resources (OER were qualitatively analyzed. Ten categories emerged in the coding process. The top three categories that indicated barriers to the adoption of OER were need more information (faculty wanted more information before they would be willing to adopt OER, lack of discoverability (faculty wanted to be able to easily find repositories of OER, and confusing OER with digital resources (faculty were unaware of the difference between digital resources and OER. The top incentives identified in this analysis to overcome these barriers include student cost benefits (saving students money, student pedagogical benefits (faculty being able to make changes to OER to improve course content and instruction, and institutional support for the adoption of OER (whether in the form of course load reduction, curricular research assistance, or library support for finding and adopting OER. Future research is needed to better understand how to address and overcome these barriers to OER adoption.

  14. Pain management knowledge and attitudes of baccalaureate nursing students and faculty.

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    Duke, Gloria; Haas, Barbara K; Yarbrough, Susan; Northam, Sally

    2013-03-01

    Pain affects approximately 76 million adults in the US. Though pain management has been targeted as a top priority, it continues to be inadequately addressed. Nursing faculty are in a unique position to significantly address the problem through facilitating the acquisition and utilization of knowledge by student nurses. The purpose of this study was to determine the knowledge of and attitudes toward pain in baccalaureate nursing students and faculty to establish a foundation for a systematic and comprehensive integration of pain content in the curricula. The descriptive design included a sample of 162 junior and senior students enrolled in a baccalaureate nursing program in Texas and 16 nursing faculty. The Knowledge and Attitudes Survey Regarding Pain (KASRP) was used to measure knowledge and attitudes toward pain. A direct correlation was found between the level of education and the percentage correct score. Differences found in knowledge and attitudes among the three levels of students and faculty were significant (df = 3.173; F = 14.07, p pain through case scenarios of a patient who was smiling and talking as compared to a patient who was lying quietly and grimacing (X2 = 37.13, p pain assessment and treatment are taught is indicated. Further studies are needed to assess changes in knowledge and attitudes toward pain as curricular revisions are made. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. ATTITUDE AND PERCEPTION OF FACULTIES TOWARDS TEACHING EVIDENCE BASED MEDICINE TO PRE - CLINICAL & PARA - CLINICAL MEDICAL STUDENTS

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    Bhavita Patel

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available NTRODUCTION: Evidence - based medicine (EBM is defined as the „conscientious, explicit, and judicious use of current best evidence‟. It i s an important tool for lifelong learning in medicine, and medical students can develop the skills necessary to understand and use EBM. The teaching of EBM in Sumandeep Vidyapeeth is as part of Evidence Based Education System (EBES. The university has imp lemented the 16 hours of teaching with project work on Evidence Based Medicine in 1st MBBS and 2nd MBBS curriculum in addition to MBBS syllabus. AIMS & OBJECTIVES: This study was planned to take feedback from all the faculties those who are involved in Evi dence based Medicine teaching to evaluate their attitude and perception towards this innovative teaching method and to recommend improvements. MATERIAL & METHODS: A Descriptive, self - structured , pilot pretested questionnaire based cross sectional study was conducted in the year 2013 - 2014 among 40 faculties from 7 Departments like Anatomy, Physiology, Biochemistry, Microbiology, Pharmacology, Pathology and Forensic Medicine teaching Evidence Base d Medicine to students at S.B.K.S MI & RC, Sumandeep Vidyapeeth. Data was expressed as percentage. RESULTS: The response rate for the study was 75%. Almost 87% of faculties agreed that teaching EBM is a welcoming development during pre and para clinical ye ars. About 80% faculties agreed that it will help them in future clinical learning. 87% faculties agreed that literature and research searching improves their day to day teaching. About 77% of faculties have attended workshop and training held in Universit y and 83% of faculties agreed that they are interested in more learning and improving skills necessary to incorporate Evidence based medicine into their discipline. Barriers included shortage of time and need for training in teaching EBM. CONCLUSION: Facul ties of this University teaching Pre - clinical and Para - clinical medical students recognized

  16. Knowledge and attitude towards preventive dental care among dental faculties in Bangalore city

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    Nikhil Ahuja

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Preventive approach in dental practice has been cited as a reason for the decline in oral diseases and as a predominant part of the service-mix of dental practices in the future. Dental faculty′s knowledge and attitude toward prevention are important, since they have exceptionally important direct and indirect roles in shaping student′s preventive orientation and also potentially influencing their patient′s ability to take care of their teeth. Thus, this study was conducted to assess knowledge and attitudes toward preventive dental care among dental faculties and their relation to demographic and professional characteristics. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among dental faculties in Bangalore city. Of 17 dental colleges, 4 were selected by simple random sampling. A total of 218 dental faculties was individually asked to complete a pretested questionnaire. The questionnaire requested information on dental faculty′s demographic and professional characteristics and their knowledge and attitudes toward preventive dental care. Descriptive, Chi-square tests, and ANOVA were used to analyze the data. Results: The highest knowledge was seen among dental faculties regarding prevention of malocclusion (3.51 ± 1.02 followed by oral cancer (2.95 ± 1.09 and periodontal diseases (2.86 ± 1.02. The least knowledge was seen for the prevention of caries (2.63 ± 1.35. The most positive attitudes regarding preventive dentistry was characterized as being essential (6.34 ± 1.05, useful (6.32 ± 1.07 and valuable (6.27 ± 1.00. Statistically significant differences were found in relation to knowledge and attitudes for all demographic and professional characteristics except for gender and Department of Teaching. Conclusion: Dental faculty seems to have differing levels of knowledge regarding oral diseases with positive attitudes seen regarding preventive dentistry. Continuing education activities and

  17. Comparison of attitudes between Generation X and Baby Boomer veterinary faculty and residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Lisa M; Trower, Cathy A; Tan, Rachael J B; Terkla, Dawn Geronimo

    2009-01-01

    Understanding the characteristics and preferences of the different generations in the veterinary workforce is important if we are to help optimize current and future veterinary schools and teaching hospitals. The purpose of this study was to compare the attitudes of different generations of veterinary faculty and those of faculty and house officers. A survey administered to faculty and house officers asked respondents to identify their level of agreement with a series of statements addressing work and lifestyle issues and feedback preferences. In addition, the survey included an open-ended question on non-monetary rewards for hard work. Thirty-eight of 48 faculty members (79%) and 45 of 54 house officers (83%) completed the survey. Among faculty, there were no significant differences between the Generation X and Baby Boomer subgroups or between genders. More faculty than house officers responded that delayed gratification is acceptable (p = 0.03) and that it is difficult to balance home and work life (p generations within the faculty group, but a number of significant differences emerged between faculty and house officers. Increased awareness of the importance of balance and rewards for hard work, as well as modification of feedback styles, may be beneficial in teaching and mentoring current and future generations.

  18. Nurses' attitude and perceived barriers to pressure ulcer prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etafa, Werku; Argaw, Zeleke; Gemechu, Endalew; Melese, Belachew

    2018-01-01

    The presence or absence of pressure ulcers has been generally regarded as a performance measure of quality nursing care and overall patient health. The aim of this study- wasto explorenurses' attitude about pressure ulcer prevention'and to identify staff nurses' perceived barriers to pressure ulcer prevention public hospitals in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. A self-reported multi-center institutional based cross sectional study design was employed to collect data from staff nurses ( N  = 222) working in six (6) selected public hospitals in Addis Ababa, from April 01-28/2015. Majority of the nurses had ( n  = 116, 52.2%) negative attitude towards pressure ulcer prevention. The mean scores of the test for all participants was 3.09out of 11(SD =0.92, range = 1-5). Similarly, the study revealed several barriers need to be resolved to put in to practice the strategies of pressure ulcer prevention; Heavy workload and inadequate staff (lack of tie) (83.1%), shortage of resources/equipment (67.7%) and inadequate training (63.2%) were among the major barriers identified in the study. The study finding suggests that Addis Ababa nurses have negative attitude to pressure ulcer prevention. Also several barriers exist for implementing pressure ulcer prevention protocols in public hospitals in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Suggestion for improving this situation is attractive.

  19. Professional Socialization in Nurse Anesthesia Educational Programs: Attitudes and Beliefs of Faculty Members and Recent Graduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buettner, Kevin Charles

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to better understand professional socialization in nurse anesthesia educational programs through an exploration of the attitudes and beliefs of faculty members and recent graduates. Participants for this cross-sectional, quasi-experimental online study included a convenience sample of 178 nurse anesthesia faculty…

  20. The Teaching Researcher: Faculty Attitudes towards the Teaching and Research Roles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpay, E.; Verschoor, R.

    2014-01-01

    Results from a survey on faculty attitudes towards the teaching and research roles are presented. Attention is given to: (i) the perceived value of teaching (and teaching achievements) relative to research, (ii) approaches for research and teaching integration, (iii) the satisfaction gained from typical work tasks, and (iv) the importance of…

  1. Factors Affecting Faculty Attitude for Adopting Online Learning at Aljouf University, Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alanazy, Salim M.

    2018-01-01

    This study aims to take an initial step toward investigating the readiness of faculty members for adopting online learning at Aljouf University, a Saudi newly established university. Participants (n = 156) were asked to complete a Web-based questionnaire that starts with eight demographic questions and has four other parts: attitude toward online…

  2. Community College Faculty Members' Perceived Multicultural Teaching Competence and Attitudes Regarding Cultural Diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fittz, Mia Web

    2015-01-01

    This study utilized the Survey of Community College Faculty (SCCF), a combined survey of the Multicultural Teaching Scale (MTS) and Pluralism and Diversity Attitude Assessment (PADAA) that framed the research. The MTS assessed self-reported cultural competencies categorized into five dimensions: (a) Content Integration, (b) Knowledge Construction,…

  3. The Attitudes of University Faculty toward Humor as a Pedagogical Tool: Can We Take a Joke?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huss, John; Eastep, Shannon

    2016-01-01

    Faculty members in a College of Education responded to a mixed methods questionnaire regarding their attitudes toward the use of humor as a pedagogical tool. Quantitative data and coding of open response questions revealed that instructors overall considered humor to be an integral part of their teaching plan and that humor relaxes students,…

  4. Health research barriers in the faculties of two medical institutions in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alamdari A

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available A Alamdari,1 S Venkatesh,2 A Roozbehi,3 AT Kannan41Research Center of Factors Affecting Health, Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery, Yasouj University of Medical Sciences, Yasouj, Iran; 2National AIDS Control Organization, Janpath Road, Chandralok Building, New Delhi, India; 3Education Development Office, Yasouj University of Medical Sciences, Yasouj, Iran; 4Department of Community Medicine, University College of Medical Sciences and Guru Tegh Bahadur Hospital, Delhi, IndiaBackground: Health policy formation refers to the design of a conceptual framework to find possibilities, facilitate feasibilities, and identify strong and weak points, as well as insufficiencies, by research. Doing research should clarify qualities and standards for policy and decision-making to enable the success of development of health care in a country. Evaluation of the impact of health interventions is particularly poorly represented in public health research. This study attempted to identify barriers and facilitators of health research among faculty members in two major institutions in India, ie, the All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS and the University College of Medical Sciences (UCMS and Guru Tegh Bahadur (GTB Hospital in Delhi.Methods: The participants were asked to fill in a questionnaire that canvassed individual characteristics, ie, years of experience, place of work, academic rank, final educational qualification, work setting, educational group, primary activity, and number of publications in the previous 5 years. Barriers and facilitators were categorized into personal, resources, access, and administration groups. The data were processed using SPSS version 16, independent t-tests, Chi-square tests, and multivariate logistic regression.Results: The total number of faculty members at both institutions was 599, 456 (76% of whom participated in this study. The primary activities reported by faculty at UCMS (teaching and Faculty at AIIMS reported

  5. Attitudes of University of Botswana Faculty of Humanities students ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We administered a questionnaire to undergraduate students at the University of Botswana to find out the languages the students speak, and their attitudes towards minority languages spoken in their country as well as to determine what their views were towards including the said languages in the curriculum. We found out ...

  6. Neuropsychiatry and neuroscience education of psychiatry trainees: attitudes and barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin, Sheldon; Travis, Michael J; Cooper, Joseph J; Dickey, Chandlee C; Reardon, Claudia L

    2014-04-01

    The American Association of Directors of Psychiatric Residency Training (AADPRT) Task Force on Neuropsychiatry and Neuroscience Education of Psychiatry Residents was established in 2011 with the charge to seek information about what the field of psychiatry considers the core topics in neuropsychiatry and neuroscience to which psychiatry residents should be exposed; whether there are any "competencies" in this area on which the field agrees; whether psychiatry departments have the internal capacity to teach these topics if they are desirable; and what the reception would be for "portable curricula" in neuroscience. The task force reviewed the literature and developed a survey instrument to be administered nationwide to all psychiatry residency program directors. The AADPRT Executive Committee assisted with the survey review, and their feedback was incorporated into the final instrument. In 2011-2012, 226 adult and child and adolescent psychiatry residency program directors responded to the survey, representing over half of all US adult and child psychiatry training directors. About three quarters indicated that faculty resources were available in their departments but 39% felt the lack of neuropsychiatry faculty and 36% felt the absence of neuroscience faculty to be significant barriers. Respectively, 64 and 60% felt that neuropsychiatry and psychiatric neuroscience knowledge were very important or critically important to the provision of excellent care. Ninety-two percent were interested in access to portable neuroscience curricula. There is widespread agreement among training directors on the importance of neuropsychiatry and neuroscience knowledge to general psychiatrists but barriers to training exist, including some programs that lack faculty resources and a dearth of portable curricula in these areas.

  7. Contingent Faculty Perceptions of Organizational Support, Workplace Attitudes, and Teaching Evaluations at a Public Research University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Young Cha

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This research examines contingent faculty’s perception of organizational support, workplace attitudes, and Student Ratings of Teaching (SRT in a large public research university to investigate their employee-organization relationship. According to t-tests and regression analyses for samples of 2,229 faculty and instructional staff who answered the survey and had SRT data (tenured and tenure-track faculty: 1,708, 76.6% of total; contingent faculty: 521, 23.4% of total, employment relationship of contingent faculty in this institution was closer to a combined economic and social exchange model than to a pure economic exchange model or underinvestment model. Contingent faculty’s satisfaction with work, satisfaction with coworkers, perception of being supported at work, and affective organizational commitment were higher than tenured and tenure-track faculty at a statistically significant level. In addition, contingent faculty had higher SRT mean results in all areas of SRT items in medium-size (10-30 classes and in ‘class presentation,’ ‘feedback,’ ‘deeper understanding,’ and ‘interest stimulated’ in large-size (30-50 classes than Tenured and Tenure-track Faculty. These results not only refute the misconception that contingent faculty have too little time to provide students with feedback but also support that they provide students with good teaching, at least in medium-size and large-size classes. Whereas these results might be partially attributable to the relatively stable status of contingent faculty in this study (who work for more than 50 percent FTE, they indicate that, as a collective, contingent faculty also represent a significant contributor to the university, who are satisfied with their work, enjoy the community they are in, and are committed to their institution.

  8. Faculty Communication Knowledge, Attitudes, and Skills Around Chronic Non-Malignant Pain Improve with Online Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Anna K; Wood, Gordon J; Rubio, Doris M; Day, Hollis D; Spagnoletti, Carla L

    2016-11-01

    Many physicians struggle to communicate with patients with chronic, non-malignant pain (CNMP). Through the use of a Web module, the authors aimed to improve faculty participants' communication skills knowledge and confidence, use of skills in clinical practice, and actual communication skills. The module was implemented for faculty development among clinician-educators with university faculty appointments, outpatient clinical practices, and teaching roles. Participants completed the Collaborative Opioid Prescribing Education Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategy (COPE-REMS®) module, a free Web module designed to improve provider communication around opioid prescribing. Main study outcomes were improvements in CNMP communication knowledge, attitudes, and skills. Skills were assessed by comparing a subset of participants' Observed Structured Clinical Exam (OSCE) performance before and after the curriculum. Sixty-two percent of eligible participants completed the curriculum in 2013. Knowledge-based test scores improved with curriculum completion (75% vs. 90%; P communication skills on the OSCE improved after the curriculum (mean 67% vs. 79%, P = 0.03). Experienced clinician-educators improved their communication knowledge, attitudes, and skills in managing patients with CNMP after implementation of this curriculum. The improvements in attitudes were sustained at six months. A Web-based curriculum such as COPE-REMS® may be useful for other programs seeking improvement in faculty communication with patients who have CNMP. © 2016 American Academy of Pain Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. AN ACTIVITY THEORY APPROACH TO STUDY BARRIERS OF FACULTY REGARDING TECHNOLOGY INTEGRATION IN HIGHER EDUCATION

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castro Guzman, Willy

    2016-01-01

    technology. Ertmer’s approach establishes first-order and second-orders barriers as hinderers for teacher’s adoption of technology. The study intends to answer what are the barriers existing in the socalled enthusiastic faculty teachers regarding technology integration in Education? Findings call...... dichotomies between enthusiastic-resistant teachers, the intrinsic-extrinsic barriers, and claims for passing from an individual to a collective approach to ICT integration in education......Information and communication technologies are instruments for supporting new ways of teaching and learning. Nevertheless, its impact concerning scope has not reached the expected level. This strain between benefits and impact has been inquired from the perspective of barriers of teachers to use...

  10. Faculty Members' Attitudes towards the Performance Appraisal Process in the Public Universities in Light of Some Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ashqar, Wafaa Mohammed Ali

    2017-01-01

    The present study aimed to detect the level of faculty members' attitudes at public universities towards the performance appraisal process and its relationship with some variables (gender, college, scientific rank, university, teaching experience, and age). The study sample consisted of (320) faculty members of both sexes in three public…

  11. Examination of Attitudes towards Teaching Online Courses Based on Theory of Reasoned Action of University Faculty in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tzy-Ling; Chen, Tzu-Jung

    2006-01-01

    This study examined attitudes of university faculty specialising in the field of human resource (HR) in Taiwan towards participation in the teaching of online courses using the theory of reasoned action (TRA). The population targeted for investigation consisted of the full-time university faculty in the HR field in Taiwan regardless of their…

  12. The Relationship between the Levels of Alienation of the Education Faculty Students and Their Attitudes towards the Teaching Profession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caglar, Caglar

    2013-01-01

    It was intended in this study to ascertain the relationship between the levels of alienation of the education faculty students, and their attitudes towards the teaching profession. The sample of the research was composed of the 875 students appointed via simple random sampling out of the total population of 2600 of the Education Faculty of…

  13. The attitude of the faculty of sport and physical education students toward cross-country running

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juhas Irina

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The syllabus of the track and field subject at the Faculty of Sport and Physical Education includes cross-country running - running in nature. The main objective of this study was to determine the structure and intensity of students' attitude toward the cross-country running. Besides, the objective was to check the connection of the students' attitude towards the cross-country running and the achieved results of cross-country running, as well as of doing sport and recreational running. The sample comprised 69 students of the second year of studies who attended the cross-country running classes. For measuring the attitude toward the cross-country running, the Connotative differential instrument was used consisting of 15 pairs of opposite adjectives presented in a form of seven-part bipolar scale grouped into three dimensions: affective, cognitive and conative. This instrument was applied within an extensive questionnaire which included questions about doing sports, jogging, as well as the results of cross-country running at the end of the teaching period. The descriptive analysis has shown that students have a positive attitude of moderate intensity toward cross-country running, observed through all three dimensions of attitude. The correlation analysis between the dimensions of attitude toward cross country running and the results achieved at cross country running showed that the correlations are negative and statistically significant, suggesting that if the result of running is better, the students' attitude toward cross country running is more positive. Competitive sport is not connected with the quality of attitude toward cross-country running. The results obtained by the study give grounds for assuming that, given that attitudes are an important component of the motivational aspect of personality, it can be expected that the students' positive attitude toward cross country running would contribute to cross country running application in

  14. A Study of Faculty Attitudes toward Internet-Based Distance Education: A Survey of Two Jordanian Public Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasaymeh, Al-Mothana M.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the attitudes toward internet-based distance education by the faculty members of two Jordanian public universities, Al-Hussein Bin Talal University and Yarmouk University, as well as to explore the relationship between their attitudes toward internet-based distance education and their perceptions of their…

  15. Attitude of teaching faculty towards statistics at a medical university in Karachi, Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Nazeer; Mumtaz, Yasmin

    2009-01-01

    Statistics is mainly used in biological research to verify the clinicians and researchers findings and feelings, and gives scientific validity for their inferences. In Pakistan, the educational curriculum is developed in such a way that the students who are interested in entering in the field of biological sciences do not study mathematics after grade 10. Therefore, due to their fragile background of mathematical skills, the Pakistani medical professionals feel that they do not have adequate base to understand the basic concepts of statistical techniques when they try to use it in their research or read a scientific article. The aim of the study was to assess the attitude of medical faculty towards statistics. A questionnaire containing 42 close-ended and 4 open-ended questions, related to the attitude and knowledge of statistics, was distributed among the teaching faculty of Dow University of Health Sciences (DUHS). One hundred and sixty-seven filled questionnaires were returned from 374 faculty members (response rate 44.7%). Forty-three percent of the respondents claimed that they had 'introductive' level of statistics courses, 63% of the respondents strongly agreed that a good researcher must have some training in statistics, 82% of the faculty was in favour (strongly agreed or agreed) that statistics was really useful for research. Only 17% correctly stated that statistics is the science of uncertainty. Half of the respondents accepted that they have problem of writing the statistical section of the article. 64% of the subjects indicated that statistical teaching methods were the main reasons for the impression of its difficulties. 53% of the faculty indicated that the co-authorship of the statistician should depend upon his/her contribution in the study. Gender did not show any significant difference among the responses. However, senior faculty showed higher level of the importance for the use of statistics and difficulties of writing result section of

  16. The teaching researcher: faculty attitudes towards the teaching and research roles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpay, E.; Verschoor, R.

    2014-07-01

    Results from a survey on faculty attitudes towards the teaching and research roles are presented. Attention is given to: (i) the perceived value of teaching (and teaching achievements) relative to research, (ii) approaches for research and teaching integration, (iii) the satisfaction gained from typical work tasks, and (iv) the importance of various work-life factors. Factors such as academic freedom, an intellectual work environment, flexible work hours, inspirational colleagues, and work diversity are found to be highly valued. Support from peers and colleagues is also seen as a key in learning to manage the different academic roles. A relatively low value is attributed to teaching achievements. Likewise, there is often little utilisation of teaching opportunities to support research work (other than senior-year research projects). Female faculty were found to give marginally a higher importance to teaching recognition and collaborative teaching opportunities. Based on the findings, general recommendations for supporting the teaching researcher are presented.

  17. Healthy eating in Ukraine: attitudes, barriers and information sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biloukha, O; Utermohlen, V

    2001-04-01

    To identify the major perceived influences on food choice, to examine the use of and trust in information sources concerning healthy eating, and to assess attitudes towards and barriers to adopting healthy eating practices in a post-USSR country (Ukraine). A survey of an urban adult population. The questions were adopted from the Pan-European Union (EU) Survey of Consumer Attitudes to Food, Nutrition and Health (1995-1996). Lviv city, Ukraine. The survey included 296 adults (84 males, 212 females) aged 18-55 years; they were primarily college students and subjects with tertiary education--the groups most likely to be both interested in healthy eating and affected by current socioeconomic downturns. The major factors in food choice were: 'quality/freshness' (cited by 80%), 'price' (58%) and 'taste' (47%); only 34% cited 'trying to eat healthily'. More older people cited 'price' than 'quality/freshness', and men were more likely than women to cite 'taste'. Sources of healthy eating information included: 'relatives/friends' (cited by 65%, trusted by 85%) and health professionals (trusted by 92%, but used by only 35%); while advertising was the least trusted source (cited by 28%). Fifty-three per cent of respondents considered their diet to be healthy enough without further changes; 50% thought of the nutritional aspects of the food they ate; fewer women than men considered their diet healthy, and more women than men thought about nutrition. Barriers to healthy eating included: 'cost' (cited by 65%), 'lack of time' (55%), 'self-control' (54%), 'selection influences' (41%), 'lack of knowledge' (32%), 'unpleasant foods' and 'resistance to change' (both 30%). Strategies to encourage healthy eating in this population should involve word-of-mouth nutrition education concerning low-cost healthy alternatives.

  18. Medical faculty members' attitude on lesson planning Semnan University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masomeh Saberian

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Lesson planning has a distinct role in enhancing education quality, as well as maintaining the friendly and dynamic atmosphere of the academic environment and increasing student's initiatives for achieving better educational attainments. Lesson planning is a process for defining the goals, understanding the needs, and specifying available tools and possible limitations. Lesson planning is a written description of this process, which shows the materials, the route, the time, and the place of instructions, as well as a method for evaluating students. Purpose: to identify the attitudes of Semnan University of Medical Sciences (SUMS on lesson planning. Methods: Fifty-three faculty members of the SUMS participated in this study. A questionnaire was used, which contained 8 demographic questions, and 24 r questions for identification the faculty members' attitude. Questionnaires were distributed among the faculty members in sealed envelopes, without denoting their names. The questionnaires were gathered after being completed. Results were analyzed by calculating the mean, standard deviation, absolute and relative frequencies, and using Chi-square and Fischer exact test at the level of 5%. Results: II was shown that 88% of faculty members favoured lesson planning before the beginning of the semester. But they found lesson planning a difficult task, because of their heavy workload. Of the faculty members, 60.4% organized their teaching classes according to a designed lesson plan, and believed that it did affect the quality of their teaching, but 49.1% disagreed with distributing the designed lesson plan among the students. Discussion: Although professor favoured lesson planning and find it necessary to work according to such a plan, workload and lack of knowledge are defined as two main obstacles in doing so. It is believed that by decreasing the professor's workload and provision of lesson planning workshops, these problems could be solved

  19. Research utilisation in sonographic practice: Attitudes and barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elliott, Vicki; Wilson, Stephanie E.; Svensson, Jon; Brennan, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    Statutory agents have stipulated that research activity is a fundamental component of the healthcare professional's activity. Whilst the College of Radiographers have emphasised the importance of imaging personnel embracing this research ethos, there is little available data on the level of research activity within sonographic practice or on the factors that influence a sonographer's involvement in research activities. This work attempts to address these deficiencies. A questionnaire was sent to 300 UK-based sonographers of whom 218 responded (72%). The questionnaire was specifically designed to establish the level of involvement in research, the utilisation of research findings, attitudes towards research and perceived barriers to active research involvement. Responses were analysed investigating any correlations with the population demographics. The data collected showed the majority of sonographers (89%) were enthusiastic about research but with only 33% and 60% currently or previously performing research, respectively, and 73% using research findings to modify their clinical practice. Certain barriers to an active research involvement were shown, with 63%, 55% and 40% citing lack of time, education and collegial support, respectively. A range of statistical findings were linked to particular sonographer groups. The importance of good organisational structures and effective support from fellow health professionals was highlighted. The results confirm sonographers' appreciation of the benefits of research and it is suggested that if this enthusiasm is translated into effective research strategies, research output from ultrasound and other clinical departments should be enhanced.

  20. Assessing Pharmacists' Attitudes and Barriers Involved with Immunizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Aldrich

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pharmacists are considered the most accessible health care professional. Immunizations create an opportunity for the profession to grow and develop toward direct patient care. Between 1995 and 2004 programs involving immunizations led to a national initiative to train pharmacists that became a significant leap toward pharmacist's involvement in direct patient care. Although immunizations can be considered a catalyst to change the pharmacist's role, little was known about pharmacist's attitudes and the barriers involved with immunizing. Few studies have assessed barriers, attitudes, and practice issues experienced by immunizing pharmacists. The objective of this study was to determine pharmacists' attitudes toward immunizations and more specifically to assess possible barriers involved with this practice. Five hundred pharmacists were randomly selected for inclusion in the study from the State of Ohio Board of Pharmacy Database, of which 137 (27.4% completed the survey. A 37- item questionnaire was administered via an e-mail invitation to take an online survey using Qualtrics software with a Likert-type scale, where 1 = strongly disagree and 7 = strongly agree. Several topics were assessed regarding immunizations including time constraints, workflow constraints, adequacy of training, technician support, worksite conditions and space, immunization processes, reimbursement issues, safety issues, documentation issues, and the future direction of immunizations. Demographics included gender, age, degree, number of years practicing, practice site, and number of years immunizing. Seventy-three percent of pharmacists believed that immunizing could lead to prescription filling errors (mean=4.45, SD=1.79. Pharmacists strongly agreed that having more technicians on staff would make providing immunizations easier (mean=5.80, SD=1.39 and that they play a vital role in keeping the process running smoothly (mean=6.08, SD=1.16. Also, pharmacists strongly agreed

  1. A comparison of professional-level faculty and student perceptions of active learning: its current use, effectiveness, and barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metz, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Active learning is an instructional method in which students become engaged participants in the classroom through the use of in-class written exercises, games, problem sets, audience-response systems, debates, class discussions, etc. Despite evidence supporting the effectiveness of active learning strategies, minimal adoption of the technique has occurred in many professional programs. The goal of this study was to compare the perceptions of active learning between students who were exposed to active learning in the classroom (n = 116) and professional-level physiology faculty members (n = 9). Faculty members reported a heavy reliance on lectures and minimal use of educational games and activities, whereas students indicated that they learned best via the activities. A majority of faculty members (89%) had observed active learning in the classroom and predicted favorable effects of the method on student performance and motivation. The main reported barriers by faculty members to the adoption of active learning were a lack of necessary class time, a high comfort level with traditional lectures, and insufficient time to develop materials. Students hypothesized similar obstacles for faculty members but also associated many negative qualities with the traditional lecturers. Despite these barriers, a majority of faculty members (78%) were interested in learning more about the alternative teaching strategy. Both faculty members and students indicated that active learning should occupy portions (29% vs. 40%) of face-to-face class time. PMID:25179615

  2. A comparison of professional-level faculty and student perceptions of active learning: its current use, effectiveness, and barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Cynthia J; Metz, Michael J

    2014-09-01

    Active learning is an instructional method in which students become engaged participants in the classroom through the use of in-class written exercises, games, problem sets, audience-response systems, debates, class discussions, etc. Despite evidence supporting the effectiveness of active learning strategies, minimal adoption of the technique has occurred in many professional programs. The goal of this study was to compare the perceptions of active learning between students who were exposed to active learning in the classroom (n = 116) and professional-level physiology faculty members (n = 9). Faculty members reported a heavy reliance on lectures and minimal use of educational games and activities, whereas students indicated that they learned best via the activities. A majority of faculty members (89%) had observed active learning in the classroom and predicted favorable effects of the method on student performance and motivation. The main reported barriers by faculty members to the adoption of active learning were a lack of necessary class time, a high comfort level with traditional lectures, and insufficient time to develop materials. Students hypothesized similar obstacles for faculty members but also associated many negative qualities with the traditional lecturers. Despite these barriers, a majority of faculty members (78%) were interested in learning more about the alternative teaching strategy. Both faculty members and students indicated that active learning should occupy portions (29% vs. 40%) of face-to-face class time. Copyright © 2014 The American Physiological Society.

  3. Community/public health nursing faculty's knowledge, skills and attitudes of the Quad Council Competencies for Public Health Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, Barbara L; Harmon, Monica; Johnson, Regina Gina H; Hicks, Vicki; Brown-Schott, Nancy; Pilling, Lucille; Brownrigg, Vicki

    2018-05-02

    A multisite collaborative team of community/public health nursing (C/PHN) faculty surveyed baccalaureate nursing faculty to explore their knowledge, skills, attitudes, and application of the Quad Council Competencies for Public Health Nurses (QCC-PHN). (1) Evaluate the knowledge, skills, and attitudes of the 2011 QCC-PHN by academic C/PHN faculty; (2) Evaluate the application of 2011 QCC-PHN by C/PHN faculty in the clinical practicum for undergraduate baccalaureate C/PHN students; and (3) Determine if a significant difference existed in the knowledge for each domain. A mixed methods descriptive research design was used to answer three specific hypotheses related to the study objectives. A convenience sample of 143 faculty teaching C/PHN in baccalaureate schools of nursing completed an online survey. ANOVA was used to determine the difference between knowledge, skills, attitudes, and application of nursing faculty regarding the QCC-PHN based on years of nursing experience, C/PHN experience, and nursing specialty preparation. Participants' qualitative comments for each domain were analyzed for themes. C/PHN nursing faculty are described and differences in knowledge, skills, and attitudes delineated. A statistically significant difference was found in skills based on years of experience in C/PHN and in the application of the competencies based on nursing specialty preparation. Variations in knowledge of the QCC-PHN are identified. Ten recommendations are proposed for key skill sets and necessary preparation for faculty to effectively teach C/PHN in baccalaureate schools of nursing. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Examining E-Learning Barriers as Perceived by Faculty Members of Engineering Colleges in the Jordanian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Alawneh, Muhammad K.

    2014-01-01

    Employing computer's technology that includes e-learning system in the field of Engineering is a vital issue which needs to be discussed. Therefore, this study purposed to examine e-learning barriers as perceived by faculty members of engineering in three major universities in Jordan (Yarmouk University, Jordan University of Science and…

  5. Receptive Audiences for Climate Change Education: Understanding Attitudes and Barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, L. D.; Luebke, J. F.; Clayton, S.; Saunders, C. D.; Matiasek, J.; Grajal, A.

    2012-12-01

    Much effort has been devoted to finding ways to explain climate change to uninterested audiences and encourage mitigation behaviors among dismissive audiences. Most approaches have focused on conveying information about climate change processes or threats. Here we report the results of a national survey designed to characterize the readiness of zoo and aquarium visitors to engage with the issue of climate change. Two survey forms, one focused primarily on attitudes (N=3,594) and another on behaviors (N=3,588), were administered concurrently in summer 2011 at 15 Association of Zoos and Aquariums accredited institutions. The attitudes survey used Global Warming's Six Americas segmentation protocols (climatechangecommunication.org) to compare climate change attitudes of zoo and aquarium visitors with the American public (Leiserowitz et al., 2011). Our results reveal that visitors are receptive audiences for climate change education and want to do more to address climate change. Even these favorable audiences, however, perceive barriers to engaging in the issue, signifying the importance of meeting the learning needs of those who acknowledge anthropogenic climate change, and not only of climate change 'deniers.' While 39% of the general public is 'concerned' or 'alarmed' about global warming, 64% of zoo and aquarium visitors fall into these two "Six Americas" segments. Visitors also differ from the national sample in key attitudinal characteristics related to global warming. For example, nearly two-thirds believe human actions are related to global warming, versus less than one-half of the general public; and approximately 60% think global warming will harm them personally, moderately or a great deal, versus less than 30% of the general public. Moreover, 69% of visitors would like to do more to address climate change. Despite zoo and aquarium visitors' awareness of climate change and motivation to address it, survey results indicate they experience barriers to

  6. A Quantitative Study of Faculty Perceptions and Attitudes on Asynchronous Virtual Teamwork Using the Technology Acceptance Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolusky, G. Anthony

    2016-01-01

    This quantitative study used a web-based questionnaire to assess the attitudes and perceptions of online and hybrid faculty towards student-centered asynchronous virtual teamwork (AVT) using the technology acceptance model (TAM) of Davis (1989). AVT is online student participation in a team approach to problem-solving culminating in a written…

  7. Attitudes, barriers and enablers to physical activity in pregnant women: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne L Harrison

    2018-01-01

    Registration: PROSPERO CRD42016037643. [Harrison AL, Taylor NF, Shields N, Frawley HC (2018 Attitudes, barriers and enablers to physical activity in pregnant women: a systematic review. Journal of Physiotherapy 64: 24–32

  8. Teachers' Readiness to Implement Nutrition Education Programs: Beliefs, Attitudes, and Barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perikkou, Anastasia; Kokkinou, Eleni; Panagiotakos, Demosthenes B.; Yannakoulia, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Teachers' attitudes about school food environments and their readiness to implement school-based nutrition programs were investigated. A total of 1,436 primary-school teachers filled out a questionnaire on their demographic and professional characteristics and their attitudes, beliefs, and barriers for implementing health educational programs. The…

  9. Asking the Participants: Students' Views on Their Environmental Attitudes, Behaviours, Motivators and Barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabawa-Sear, Kelsie; Baudains, Catherine

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated student views on the relationship between their environmental attitudes and behaviours and their thoughts about barriers and motivators to environmentally responsible behaviours. The environmental attitudes and behaviours of students participating in a classroom-based environmental education program were measured using two…

  10. Team-based Learning Strategy in Biochemistry: Perceptions and Attitudes of Faculty and 1st-Year Medical Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhabra, Namrata; Kukreja, Sahiba; Chhabra, Sarah; Chhabra, Sahil; Khodabux, Sameenah; Sabane, Harshal

    2017-12-01

    Team-based learning (TBL) strategy has been widely adapted by medical schools all over the world, but the reports regarding the perceptions and the attitudes of faculty and undergraduate medical students towards TBL approach have been conflicting. The study aimed to introduce TBL strategy in curriculum of Biochemistry after evaluating its effectiveness through perceptions and attitudes of faculty and 1 st -year medical students. One hundred and fifty students of first professional M.B.B.S and five faculty members participated in the study. Their responses regarding perceptions and attitudes towards TBL strategy were collected using structured questionnaires, focus group discussions, and in-depth interviews. Data were analyzed using Wilcoxon signed-rank test, paired sample t -test, and Mann-Whitney U-test. Majority of the students expressed satisfaction with team approach and reported improvement in the academic scores, learning styles, and development of problem-solving, interpersonal, and professional skills. The faculty, however, recommended a modified TBL approach to benefit all sections of the students for the overall success of this intervention. TBL is an effective technique to enable the students to master the core concepts and develop professional and critical thinking skills; however, for the 1 st -year medical students, a modified TBL approach might be more appropriate for the effective outcomes.

  11. Exploring the attitudes of medical faculty members and students in Pakistan towards plagiarism: a cross sectional survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathore, Farooq Azam; Zia, Ahmad Marjan; Mavrinac, Martina; Farooq, Fareeha

    2015-01-01

    Objective. The objective of this survey was to explore the attitudes towards plagiarism of faculty members and medical students in Pakistan. Methods. The Attitudes Toward Plagiarism questionnaire (ATP) was modified and distributed among 550 medical students and 130 faculty members in 7 medical colleges of Lahore and Rawalpindi. Data was entered in the SPSS v.20 and descriptive statistics were analyzed. The questionnaire was validated by principal axis factoring analysis. Results. Response rate was 93% and 73%, respectively. Principal axis factoring analysis confirmed one factor structure of ATP in the present sample. It had an acceptable Cronbach’s alpha value of 0.73. There were 421 medical students (218 (52%) female, 46% 3rd year MBBS students, mean age of 20.93 ± 1.4 years) and 95 faculty members (54.7% female, mean age 34.5 ± 8.9 years). One fifth of the students (19.7%) trained in medical writing (19.7%), research ethics (25.2%) or were currently involved in medical writing (17.6%). Most of the faculty members were demonstrators (66) or assistant professors (20) with work experience between 1 and 10 years. Most of them had trained in medical writing (68), research ethics (64) and were currently involved in medical writing (64). Medical students and faculty members had a mean score of 43.21 (7.1) and 48.4 (5.9) respectively on ATP. Most of the respondents did not consider that they worked in a plagiarism free environment and reported that self-plagiarism should not be punishable in the same way as plagiarism. Opinion regarding leniency in punishment of younger researchers who were just learning medical writing was divided. Conclusions. The general attitudes of Pakistani medical faculty members and medical students as assessed by ATP were positive. We propose training in medical writing and research ethics as part of the under and post graduate medical curriculum. PMID:26157615

  12. Examining E-Learning Barriers As Perceived By Faculty 
Members Of Engineering Colleges In The Jordanian Universities

    OpenAIRE

    Muhammad K. AL-ALAWNEH,

    2014-01-01

    Employing computer's technology that includes e-learning system in the field of Engineering is a vital issue which needs to be discussed. Therefore, this study purposed to examine e-learning barriers as perceived by faculty members of engineering in three major universities in Jordan (Yarmouk University, Jordan University of Science and Technology, and Al-Balqaa Applied University) in the second semester of 2012. The study's instrument was distributed to collect the data from a sam...

  13. Perceptions of Unprofessional Attitudes and Behaviors: Implications for Faculty Role Modeling and Teaching Professionalism During Pathology Residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brissette, Mark D; Johnson, Kristen A; Raciti, Patricia M; McCloskey, Cindy B; Gratzinger, Dita A; Conran, Richard Michael; Domen, Ronald E; Hoffman, Robert D; Post, Miriam D; Roberts, Cory Anthony; Rojiani, Amyn M; Powell, Suzanne Zein-Eldin

    2017-10-01

    - Changes occurring in medicine have raised issues about medical professionalism. Professionalism is included in the Core Competencies and Milestones for all pathology residents. Previous studies have looked at resident professionalism attitudes and behaviors in primary care but none have looked specifically at pathology. - To examine behavior and attitudes toward professionalism within pathology and to determine how professionalism is taught in residency programs. - Surveys were sent to all College of American Pathologists junior members and all pathology residency program directors, and responses were compared. - Although no single behavior received the same professionalism rating among residents and program directors, both groups identified the same behaviors as being the most unprofessional: posting identifiable patient information or case images to social media, making a disparaging comment about a physician colleague or member of the support staff on social media or in a public hospital space, and missing work without reporting the time off. Faculty were observed displaying most of these behaviors as often or more often than residents by both groups. The most common means to teach professionalism in pathology residencies is providing feedback as situations arise and teaching by example. Age differences were found within each group and between groups for observed behaviors and attitudes. - As teaching by example was identified as a common educational method, faculty must be aware of the role their behavior and attitudes have in shaping resident behavior and attitudes. These results suggest a need for additional resources to teach professionalism during pathology residency.

  14. Saudi high school students' attitudes and barriers toward the use of computer technologies in learning English.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabti, Ahmed Abdulateef; Chaichan, Rasha Sami

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the attitudes of Saudi Arabian high school students toward the use of computer technologies in learning English. The study also discusses the possible barriers that affect and limit the actual usage of computers. Quantitative approach is applied in this research, which involved 30 Saudi Arabia students of a high school in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. The respondents comprised 15 males and 15 females with ages between 16 years and 18 years. Two instruments, namely, Scale of Attitude toward Computer Technologies (SACT) and Barriers affecting Students' Attitudes and Use (BSAU) were used to collect data. The Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) of Davis (1989) was utilized. The analysis of the study revealed gender differences in attitudes toward the use of computer technologies in learning English. Female students showed high and positive attitudes towards the use of computer technologies in learning English than males. Both male and female participants demonstrated high and positive perception of Usefulness and perceived Ease of Use of computer technologies in learning English. Three barriers that affected and limited the use of computer technologies in learning English were identified by the participants. These barriers are skill, equipment, and motivation. Among these barriers, skill had the highest effect, whereas motivation showed the least effect.

  15. A Case Study of Faculty Attitudes toward Library Instruction: The Citadel Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynard, J. Edmund

    1990-01-01

    Describes a survey of the teaching faculty at the Citadel that examined how the English faculty compared to other faculty in their perceptions and use of library instruction. It is concluded that the findings may be used to support an integrated, across-the-curriculum approach to library instruction. The questionnaire used is appended. (12…

  16. African American Social Work Faculty: Overcoming Existing Barriers and Achieving Research Productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Junior Lloyd; Huggins-Hoyt, Kimberly Y.; Holosko, Michael J.; Briggs, Harold E.

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: This study explored the scholarship experiences of top-ranked African American faculty in schools of social work. Method: Qualitative interviews were conducted with N = 10 top-ranked African American faculty identified as achieving considerable productivity and impact of scholarship. Findings: Four major themes were identified, each of…

  17. Perception and attitudes towards street sexual harassment among female students of a private Human Medicine Faculty.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth Corazón Llerena Benites

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Determinate the perception and attitudes towards street sexual harassment among female students of the Human Medicine Faculty at San Martin de Porres University. Methods: Descriptive and transversal study in which the previously validated “Likert” questionnaires, “Scale of Acceptance of Modern Myths about Sexual Aggression” and “Street Harassment Scale” where applied in a virtual way to 227 female students from the 4th, 5th, 6th academic year of the Human Medicine Faculty at San Martin de Porres University. The analysis was made in the SPSS v22 program using descriptive statistics like media, mode, tables of frequency and percentage to determine the prevalence of street harassment and the level of acceptance of beliefs about sexual harassment. Results: We found that 91% of the participants considered that they had been (sexually harassed at least once in the last year. 48% of participants were absolutely disagree with the statements about the myths of sexual aggression. The th percentage of students that mentioned never have been harassed lowered for every year of study, from 13% in the 4 year th to 7.9% in the 6 year. Most of the students came from Central South Lima of which 88% were harassed at least once the past year. Approximately, about half of the participants, independent of the mean of transport they have used, said that they had been harassed once last year. The group of 22 years old was the most affected Conclusion: Even though the participants considered that the Street harassment only happened a few times the past year, we didn't underestimate the fact that for almost everyone this harassment had happened at least once. Also, the majority considered to be strongly disagree regarding the myths about sexual harassment. So, it appears that street harassment, despite acting as a social problem that affects the physical and mental well-being of the Young female community, hasn't been properly managed by the

  18. Mobile Learning in Nursing Undergraduates in China: Current Status, Attitudes and Barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Qian; Zhang, Qiannan; Wang, Lanlan; Wang, Yanling; Sun, Liu; Wu, Ying

    2017-01-01

    To explore the current status, attitudes and barriers of nursing undergraduates toward mobile learning, 157 nursing students were investigated. more than half of them used mobile learning frequently in past half year. The mean score of students' intention towards mobile learning was 10.5 (ranged from 6 to 15), and it related to students' gender, expected effect, ease of operation, influence of other students, self-learning management and perceived interest. Some barriers affected students' mobile learning. Therefore, students had positive attitude and perception toward mobile learning, then we should create enough conditions to promote students' mobile learning.

  19. Extracurricular research activities among senior medical students in Kuwait: experiences, attitudes, and barriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Halabi B

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Becher Al-Halabi,1 Yousef Marwan,2 Mohammad Hasan,3 Sulaiman Alkhadhari41Department of Surgery, Mubarak Al-Kabeer Hospital, Ministry of Health, Kuwait; 2Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Al-Razi Hospital, Al-Sabah Medical Area, Ministry of Health, Kuwait; 3Department of Radiation Oncology, Kuwait Cancer Control Center, Al-Sabah Medical Area, Ministry of Health, Kuwait; 4Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, Health Sciences Center, Kuwait University, KuwaitBackground: Research is the foundation of scientific advancement and improvement in quality of health care, which ensures the good health of the community. The aim of this study is to explore experiences, attitudes, and barriers of medical students in Kuwait University (KU in regards to extracurricular research.Methods: A questionnaire about extracurricular research activities (ie, any research activity that is not part of the required undergraduate curriculum, such as publishing a paper, research elective, etc was distributed to 175 senior medical students (years 6 and 7. Descriptive and chi-square analyses were used to analyze the responses, considering a P-value of <0.05 as the cut-off level for significance. The main outcome was defined as taking part in any of the extracurricular research activities.Results: Of the 150 participants (response rate = 85.7%, 26 (17.3%, 68 (45.3%, 52 (34.7%, and 17 (11.3% had published their required medical school research, presented abstracts in conferences, conducted extracurricular research, and completed a research elective/course, respectively; 99 (66.0% took part in any of these activities. Participants who read medical journals regularly (81; 54% reported higher participation in extracurricular research activities than those who did not read journals (P=0.003. Improving the availability of mentors for students' extracurricular research was ranked by the participants as the most important factor to improve their participation in

  20. Effect of book reviewing workshop on awareness of, aptitude for and attitude toward book reviews in faculty members of faculty of management and medical information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafi, Nayere Sadat Soleimanzade; Ashrafi-rizi, Hasan; Yarmohammadian, Mohammad Hossein; Shahrzadi, Leila; Hasanzade, Akbar

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Works evaluation and critique is one of the most important phases in scientific production cycle. Reviewers need some aptitude about rules and principles of writing good review. Considering the important role of books for storage and transferring the scientific findings, book reviewing is vital to scientific progress. Despite this fact, investigation of Isfahan University of Medical Science's journal, demonstrated the number of published book reviews to be very small. This study aims to investigate the influence of reviewing training courses on participants’ book reviewing awareness, attitude, and aptitude. Materials and Methods: The study method is experimental with two group design (with pre-test and post-test) and applied. Statistical population is of all faculty members of the faculty of management and medical information of Isfahan University of Medical Science, including both hired and contracted employees, which, according to faculty's department of Education, consists of 86 people. The sampling method used in this study is random. Number of samples in case and control groups was calculated using the following equation of n= (z1 + z2) 2 (2s2)/d2 and is 15 people. One checklist and two questionnaires were the means of data collection. Data were analyzed using SPSS 18.0 software and two level of descriptive (mean and SD) and inferential statistics (t-test and t-paired). Results: Findings showed that the mean score of awareness of book reviews in case group increased meaningfully after the training course (55.7) compared to the score prior to the intervention (33.1), P book reviews in control group remained mostly the same before (31.6) and after intervention (35.1), P = 0.35. The mean score of attitude toward book reviews showed no significant difference before and after intervention in both case group (71.4 before intervention and 74.4 after intervention, P = 0.11) and control group (70.9 before intervention and 74.4 after intervention, P = 0

  1. Attitudes and barriers to evidence-based practice in optometry educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suttle, Catherine M; Challinor, Kirsten L; Thompson, Rachel E; Pesudovs, Konrad; Togher, Leanne; Chiavaroli, Neville; Lee, Adrian; Junghans, Barbara; Stapleton, Fiona; Watt, Kathleen; Jalbert, Isabelle

    2015-04-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) is an essential component of good quality, patient-centered health care. This requires practitioners to acquire EBP skills and knowledge during undergraduate and continuing education. Evidence-based practice education exists in a range of health care disciplines, including optometry. Evidence-based practice education, however, depends on relevant skills and knowledge in educators. Courses and workshops exist for the development of EBP teaching skills in some areas of health care but not in optometry. Here, we describe a pilot workshop designed to enhance the teaching of EBP and to investigate the perspectives of optometric educators on EBP including their attitudes and perceived barriers to EBP and its teaching. Twenty-seven optometric educators including 8 facilitators participated. Of these, 14 were academics (including the 8 facilitators) and 13 were practitioners. Evidence-based practice attitudes were assessed using the Evidence-Based Practice Attitude Scale-50 with appropriate modifications for optometry. Workshop design incorporated strategies to trigger discussion among participants. A nominal group technique was used to identify, prioritize, and reach consensus on barriers to EBP. Although some participants expressed reservations about EBP, a common understanding of the contemporary definition of EBP emerged in educators. Thirty-five barriers to EBP were identified; "time" was selected in the top five barriers by most participants and attracted the highest total score, well above any other barrier (negative attitude to EBP, volume of evidence, integration with clinical practice, and lack of lifelong learning mind-set). Attitudes toward EBP were generally positive and negatively correlated with age and time since graduation, respectively. A group of optometrists and academics new to implementing education in EBP displayed positive attitudes to EBP but considered that its application and teaching could be significantly hindered

  2. Pharmacists’ Attitudes and Perceived Barriers about Community Pharmacy-Based Cardiovascular Risk Screening Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Jahangard-Rafsanjani

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available  Background: Community pharmacies are considered as ideal settings to provide cardiovascular risk screening (CRS. However, little is known about pharmacists’ views on providing such services in developing countries including Iran. In the present study, we evaluated the pharmacists’ attitudes and perceived barriers to providing CRS services. Methods:In a cross-sectional study, a questionnaire in three sections was developed by the investigators (attitudes, perceived barriers, and demographics. Five likert items (5 points bipolar scale were designed to evaluate pharmacists’ attitudes about their professional role in providing CRS services in community pharmacies. Seven likert items were designed to assess the pharmacists’ perceived importance of possible barriers to providing the services. The study tool was distributed among a convenient sample of 500 pharmacists, who had participated in a national continuing education event. Results:The response rate was 44% and descriptive statistics and Chi squared test were used to analyze data. Results showed that 70.4% participants had an overall positive attitude to providing CRS services. Pharmacists who were pharmacy owner and pharmacist-in-charge simultaneously were more positive about providing CRS services. Lack of regulatory policy and compensation mechanism, limited physical space in pharmacy and time limitation were reported to be the most important barriers to providing CRS services (> 50% rated as highly important. Low human resource and time limitation were significantly associated with negative attitudes (P: 0.02 and 0.001, respectively.Conclusion:The Iranian pharmacists’ attitudes seem to be positive about providing CRS services; however, their perceived barriers should be addressed prior to CRS service implementation.

  3. DR services in Fiji: attitudes, barriers and screening practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bridget Kool

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to describe the attitudes and perceptions of primary health care doctors in Fiji regarding the importance of eye care in diabetes mellitus (DM management, to explore current eye care practice, and to investigate awareness and use of relevant clinical practice guidelines. The study builds on earlier research conducted in Fiji that identified a rapid increase of late-stage DR patients presenting for treatment, at a time when surgery was the only option.

  4. Barriers in adopting blended learning in a private university of Pakistan and East Africa: faculty members' perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizvi, Nusrat Fatima; Gulzar, Saleema; Nicholas, Wachira; Nkoroi, Beatrice

    2017-01-01

    Education methods have undergone transformation over the centuries. Use of technology is the cornerstone for innovation in teaching methods. Hence, blended learning which includes face to face and online modalities is being increasingly explored as effective method for learning. This pilot study determines the perceptions of faculty members in a private international university on barriers influencing adoption of technology for teaching and learning. A cross-sectional survey was conducted through a self-reported questionnaire using 'survey monkey'. The data was entered and analyzed using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS version 20). Frequencies and proportions are reported. Findings indicated that 51.6% faculty members perceived the importance of integration of technology in their teaching. Around 54% of the participants recognized that they do possess the ability and accessibility to integrate information communication technology (ICT) in teaching and learning, but there is a need to hone the basic information technology (IT) skills to initiate technology driven teaching. Findings revealed that 55% faculty members acknowledged the constraint of not getting protective time to develop and deliver technology driven courses. Further, results showed that 45% faculty members perceived that their innovation efforts in terms of teaching as blended learning do not count towards their professional promotion or recognition, as usually priority is given to research over teaching innovation. The findings also indicated that 54.5% participants asserted that university lack mentorship in the field of blended learning. Therefore, study suggests that universities should provide adequate mentorship programmes for the faculty members in enhancing their skills of integrating technology in their teaching.

  5. Barriers in adopting blended learning in a private university of Pakistan and East Africa: faculty members’ perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulzar, Saleema; Nicholas, Wachira; Nkoroi, Beatrice

    2017-01-01

    Background Education methods have undergone transformation over the centuries. Use of technology is the cornerstone for innovation in teaching methods. Hence, blended learning which includes face to face and online modalities is being increasingly explored as effective method for learning. This pilot study determines the perceptions of faculty members in a private international university on barriers influencing adoption of technology for teaching and learning. Methods A cross-sectional survey was conducted through a self-reported questionnaire using ‘survey monkey’. The data was entered and analyzed using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS version 20). Frequencies and proportions are reported. Results Findings indicated that 51.6% faculty members perceived the importance of integration of technology in their teaching. Around 54% of the participants recognized that they do possess the ability and accessibility to integrate information communication technology (ICT) in teaching and learning, but there is a need to hone the basic information technology (IT) skills to initiate technology driven teaching. Findings revealed that 55% faculty members acknowledged the constraint of not getting protective time to develop and deliver technology driven courses. Further, results showed that 45% faculty members perceived that their innovation efforts in terms of teaching as blended learning do not count towards their professional promotion or recognition, as usually priority is given to research over teaching innovation. The findings also indicated that 54.5% participants asserted that university lack mentorship in the field of blended learning. Conclusions Therefore, study suggests that universities should provide adequate mentorship programmes for the faculty members in enhancing their skills of integrating technology in their teaching. PMID:28567414

  6. Attitudes toward School Preparation and Work Barriers of Nontraditional Vocational Education Completers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendall, Elizabeth L.

    Nontraditional and traditional secondary vocational education program completers in West Virginia were surveyed to determine their attitudes toward their school preparation, work, and encountered work barriers. A questionnaire was mailed to 100 nontraditional and 100 traditional program completers, and a 10 percent sample was contacted by…

  7. Barriers and attitudes towards hIV Voluntary counselling and Testing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Official Publication of the Tanzania Medical Students' Association. 20. Barriers and attitudes towards hIV ... risk reduction in certain groups, behaviour change and reduced transmission2. Young people are the ... Of those who ever used VCT services 32.7% were just interested in knowing their HIV status and to get HIV ...

  8. Psychological Help-Seeking Attitudes and Barriers to Help-Seeking in Young People in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koydemir, Selda; Erel, Ozge; Yumurtaci, Duygu; Sahin, Gozde Nur

    2010-01-01

    This qualitative research sought to understand the needs of Turkish university students related to adjustment to university, the sources they seek help from, their attitudes about and barriers to psychological help-seeking. Data analysis of interview transcriptions from 15 undergraduates identified several themes. Interpersonal problems,…

  9. Primary School Teachers' Knowledge, Attitudes and Views on Barriers to Inclusion in Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amr, Muna; Al-Natour, Mayada; Al-Abdallat, Bassam; Alkhamra, Hatem

    2016-01-01

    This study explores teachers' knowledge and attitudes toward the inclusion of students with special education needs (SEN) in mainstream schools in Jordan. It also examines the barriers the teachers perceived to hinder successful inclusions. The study sample consisted of 87 primary school teachers who responded to an open-ended questionnaire asking…

  10. Evidence-based practice among speech-language pathologists: attitudes, utilization, and barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zipoli, Richard P; Kennedy, Marianne

    2005-08-01

    A total of 240 speech-language pathologists responded to a questionnaire examining attitudes toward and use of research and evidence-based practice (EBP). Perceived barriers to EBP were also explored. Positive attitudes toward research and EBP were reported. Attitudes were predicted by exposure to research and EBP practice during graduate training and the clinical fellowship year (CFY). Clinical experience and opinions of colleagues were used to guide decision making more frequently than research studies or clinical practice guidelines. Only exposure to research and EBP during the CFY predicted use of evidence-based resources. Respondents reported a decline in exposure to research and EBP as they moved from graduate training into the CFY. A lack of time was perceived as a barrier to EBP.

  11. Sexuality and gender identity teaching within preclinical medical training in New Zealand: content, attitudes and barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Oscar; Rapsey, Charlene M; Treharne, Gareth J

    2018-06-22

    To investigate inclusion of sexuality and gender identity content, attitudes and barriers to inclusion of content in preclinical curricula of New Zealand medical schools from the perspective of key teaching staff. Staff responsible for curriculum oversight at New Zealand's two medical schools were invited to complete a mixed-methods survey about sexuality and gender identity content in their modules. Of 24 respondents, the majority included very little content relating to sexuality or gender identity (33%) or none at all (54%). This content was deemed important by most participants (69%), and none believed there should be less such content in their curriculum. Time was reported to be the main barrier limiting inclusion of such content. Our finding of limited content is consistent with international literature. Our findings extend the literature by revealing that barriers to greater inclusion of content are not due to overt negative attitudes. Staff responsible for preclinical medical curriculum oversight have positive attitudes about content relating to sexuality and gender identity but perceive curriculum space to be a limiting barrier. This is important as it informs approaches to change. Future interventions with medical schools should focus on methods to increase diverse content as part of existing teaching, education to increase knowledge of LGBTQI relevant material and potentially incorporate strategies used to address unconscious bias. Addressing the perceived barriers of time constraints and lack of relevance is required to ensure medical students receive training to develop the competencies to provide positive healthcare experiences for all patients regardless of sexuality and gender identity.

  12. Muslim Scholars' Knowledge, Attitudes and Perceived Barriers Towards Polio Immunization in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Muhammad Umair; Ahmad, Akram; Salman, Saad; Ayub, Maria; Aqeel, Talieha; Haq, Noman-Ul; Saleem, Fahad; Khan, Muhammad Ubaid

    2017-04-01

    Pakistan is one of the two countries where polio remains endemic. Among multiple reasons of polio prevalence, false religious beliefs are accounted as major barriers towards polio immunization in Pakistan. Within this context, religious scholars are now engaged in polio immunization campaigns to dismantle the myths and battle the resurgence of polio in Pakistan. The objective of this study was to assess knowledge, attitudes and perceived barriers of Muslim scholars towards polio immunization in Pakistan. A descriptive, cross-sectional survey of Muslim scholars was conducted in Quetta and Peshawar divisions of Pakistan. From October to December 2015, a convenience sample of 770 Muslim scholars was recruited from the local mosques and religious institutions to participate in this study. Knowledge, attitudes, and perceived barriers were assessed by using self-administered, anonymous and pretested questionnaire. Descriptive and regression analyses were used to express the results with p polio with a mean score of 7.16 ± 2.12 (based on 14 questions). Knowledge gaps were identified about the transmission (32.6 %) and consequences of poliovirus (39.9 %). Overall, 527 (68.4 %) participants showed positive attitudes towards polio immunization with a mean attitude score of 27.35 ± 2.68 (based on nine statements). The majority of participants agreed on the need of depoliticizing polio immunization issues (87.1 %), while reservations were noted about their willingness to participate in future polio immunization programs (44.6 %). Security (75.8 %) and vaccine management issues (64 %) were reported by the participants as the major barriers towards polio immunization in Pakistan. The findings showed poor knowledge of Muslim scholars towards polio; however, their attitudes were positive towards polio immunization. More studies are required to assess the knowledge and attitudes of Muslim scholars at the national level to validate the findings of this study.

  13. Latina Faculty Transcending Barriers: Peer Mentoring in a Hispanic-Serving Institution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Elizabeth T.; Núñez, Anne-Marie

    2014-01-01

    In this article, the authors conducted a research metasynthesis of publications by a group of Latina tenure-track faculty participating in a peer mentoring group, the Research for the Educational Advancement of Latin@s (REAL) collaborative, housed in one Hispanic Serving Institution. Due to the small representation of Latinas in the academy, the…

  14. Academic Bullying: A Barrier to Tenure and Promotion for African-American Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazier, Kimberly N.

    2011-01-01

    The author discusses the problem of retention of African American faculty due to tenure and promotion issues. The author outlines obstacles that African American face in the workplace while seeking tenure and promotion in academia. A case example is presented that illuminates how these stressors manifest in the academic setting and recommendations…

  15. Predictors of a positive attitude of medical students towards general practice - a survey of three Bavarian medical faculties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Antonius; Karsch-Völk, Marlies; Rupp, Alica; Fischer, Martin R; Drexler, Hans; Schelling, Jörg; Berberat, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    Germany is witnessing an increasing shortage of general practitioners (GPs). The aim was to determine predictors of the job-related motivation of medical students of three medical faculties with different institutionalisation of general practice as an academic discipline. Medical students were surveyed with a standardised questionnaire about their attitudes towards general practice and their motivation to work as a GP in different working conditions. Predictors for positive attitudes and motivation were calculated using logistic regression models. 940 (15.2%) out of 6182 medical students from three Bavarian medical faculties participated in an online survey. 585 (62.7%) were female, and the average age was 25.0 (standard deviation 3.7). The average grade of a university-entrance diploma was 1.6 (standard deviation 0.5). 718 (76.4%) could imagine working as a GP. However, they favoured being employed within another organisation and not having their own private practice (65.5% vs. 35.1%). "Presence of a professorship of general practice" was associated with a positive attitude towards general practice (OR 1.57; 95%CI 1.13-2.417). Motivation for working as a GP was associated with "being female" (OR 2.56; 95%CI 1.80-3.56) and "presence of a professorship of general practice" (OR 1.68; 95%CI 1.14-2.46). Having a lower grade for one's university-entrance diploma was associated with a higher preference to work in one's own practice (OR 1.39; 95%CI 1.02-1.90). A high amount of medical students were open-minded towards general practice. However, they favoured employment within an organization over working in their own practice. Institutionalisation of general practice as an academic discipline might be of importance to gain positive attitudes towards general practice and motivate medical students to work as a GP.

  16. Physical activity preferences, motivators, barriers and attitudes of adults with mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Justin J; Fraser, Sarah J; Brown, Wendy J; Burton, Nicola W

    2016-10-01

    Adults with mental illness may have specific attitudes toward physical activity (PA). To assess the PA attitudes of non-institutionalised adults with mental illness, and associations with psychological distress. Participants completed questionnaires on activity preferences (type, context and sources of support), motivators, barriers and attitudes toward personal training (PT). Relationships between responses and distress were assessed using logistic regressions. One-hundred forty-two participants completed the questionnaires. PA context preferences included activities done close to home, outdoors, with professional instruction, with people of the same ability, as part of a healthy lifestyle program and with a social component. The most commonly endorsed source of support was an exercise instructor. Most respondents had never received PT; however, PT had high acceptability. Common barriers included poor physical and mental health, and lack of money. Distress was positively associated with barriers of poor mental health, tiredness, disorganisation, exhaustion and being shy/embarrassed (p ≤ 0.001). Local outdoor walking groups that include social and healthy lifestyle components, and that are led by an exercise instructor who can provide support for overcoming barriers, may best meet PA interests of this group. PT could be an acceptable method for offering individualised support.

  17. Disclosure of Mental Disability by College and University Faculty: The Negotiation of Accommodations, Supports, and Barriers

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    Margaret Price

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available High-profile shootings and student suicides have made mental health issues on college campuses a major national issue. College students are usually the focus of this conversation, while little attention beyond anecdotal accounts has been paid to faculty with mental health issues. In response to this lack of broad-scale research, a first-of-its-kind cross-institutional survey of faculty with mental disabilities was conducted. Respondents self-identified as faculty with mental disabilities, mental illness or mental-health histories. Results from 267 respondents indicated that nearly 70% had no or limited familiarity with accommodations, and even fewer used them (87%. A majority of respondents (62% disclosed to at least one person on campus, primarily colleagues (50% and department chairs (21%. Respondents felt most supported by spouses/significant others (75% very or extremely supported and friends (51% rather than colleagues (29% and supervisors (25%. In our discussion of these findings, we offer suggestions for practice that will improve environments, rather than focusing on case-by-case "fixes" for those who disclose. We also suggest directions for further research into this topic, which is frequently mentioned (in both scholarly and popular publications but rarely investigated systematically or on a wide scale.

  18. Awareness, Attitude, and Knowledge of Basic Life Support among Medical, Dental, and Nursing Faculties and Students in the University Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangamesh, N C; Vidya, K C; Pathi, Jugajyoti; Singh, Arpita

    2017-01-01

    To assess the awareness, attitude, and knowledge about basic life support (BLS) among medical, dental, and nursing students and faculties and the proposal of BLS skills in the academic curriculum of undergraduate (UG) course. Recognition, prevention, and effective management of life-threatening emergencies are the responsibility of health-care professionals. These situations can be successfully managed by proper knowledge and training of the BLS skills. These life-saving maneuvers can be given through the structured resuscitation programs, which are lacking in the academic curriculum. A questionnaire study consisting of 20 questions was conducted among 659 participants in the Kalinga Institute of Dental Sciences, Kalinga Institute of Medical Sciences, KIIT University. Medical junior residents, BDS faculties, interns, nursing faculties, and 3 rd -year and final-year UG students from both medical and dental colleges were chosen. The statistical analysis was carried out using SPSS software version 20.0 (Armonk, NY:IBM Corp). After collecting the data, the values were statistically analyzed and tabulated. Statistical analysis was performed using Mann-Whitney U-test. The results with P life-threatening emergencies.

  19. Integrating Internet into Engineering Education: A Case Study of Students' Usage and Attitudes in Faculty of Engineering, Ahmadu Bello University

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    F.O. Anafi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The attitude of students towards the integration of the internet as a study tool and communication channel in teaching and learning in engineering has been investigated. A study was carried out in the Faculty of Engineering, Ahmadu Bello University Zaria, Nigeria, aimed at investigating the effect of certain variables such as gender, course of study, computer experience, and the percentage of internet usage on teaching and learning processes. A well-structured questionnaire was administered to a randomly selected five hundred (500 male and female students across the seven (7 departments of the faculty and about 85% were filled and returned. The study also examines the university management's perspectives and strategies to incorporate internet usage in teaching and learning processes especially in engineering. Amazingly, responses received showed that experience in the use of the computer in surfing the internet for problem based activities mainly affects the level of internet usage across the faculty. This factor makes some students to misplace their priority in internet usage emphasizing on e-mail correspondence and social networking rather than sourcing for information and solving problems as it is done by a few students. Furthermore, findings support that internet cannot entirely substitute for traditional teaching and learning processes like text reading but can serve as a reasonable alternative when the latter is unavailable

  20. Knowledge of, and Attitudes to, Indoor Air Pollution in Kuwaiti Students, Teachers and University Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Khamees, Nedaa A.; Alamari, Hanaa

    2009-01-01

    The concentrations of air pollutants in residences can be many times those in outside air, and many of these pollutants are known to have adverse health consequences. Despite this, there have been very few attempts to delineate knowledge of, and attitudes to, indoor air pollution. This study aimed to establish the knowledge of, and attitudes to,…

  1. Effective Communication Barriers in Clinical Teaching among Malaysian Medical Students in Zagazig Faculty of Medicine (Egypt).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abass, Marwa Ahmed; Said, Nagwa Samy; Zahed, Eman Salah El; Hussein, Wafaa Fawzy; Hamid, Omaima Ibrahim Abdel

    2015-12-01

    effective communication in a clinical environment plays a vital role in patient assessment and treatment. The aim of this study was to understand the experiences of Malaysian medical students concerning communication barriers during clinical practice. The goal was to provide answers for three important research questions, i.e., 1) Are communication barriers an impediment to Malaysian students during clinical teaching? 2) What is the nature of the language barriers that the students encounter? and 3) What are the best ways of reducing these barriers during clinical teaching? The qualitative method was used to conduct the research, and open-ended questionnaires were used to collect the data. The study was conducted on 95 fourth-, fifth-, and sixth-year students, 80% of whom completed the study. Medical students from Malaysia who have limited knowledge of the Arabic language experience some difficulties in communicating with staff members, patients, and nurses during their clinical practices. Successful orientation of students to the language used in the clinical environment will help the students overcome the communication barriers they encounter during their clinical practices.

  2. Pharmacists’ Attitudes and Perceived Barriers to Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccination Services

    OpenAIRE

    Hastings, Tessa J.; Hohmann, Lindsey A.; McFarland, Stuart J.; Teeter, Benjamin S.; Westrick, Salisa C.

    2017-01-01

    Use of non-traditional settings such as community pharmacies has been suggested to increase human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination uptake and completion rates. The objectives of this study were to explore HPV vaccination services and strategies employed by pharmacies to increase HPV vaccine uptake, pharmacists’ attitudes towards the HPV vaccine, and pharmacists’ perceived barriers to providing HPV vaccination services in community pharmacies. A pre-piloted mail survey was sent to 350 randomly...

  3. Barriers, facilitators and attitudes influencing health promotion activities in general practice: an explorative pilot study

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    Geense Wytske W

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The number of chronically ill patients increases every year. This is partly due to an unhealthy lifestyle. However, the frequency and quality of (evidence-based health promotion activities conducted by Dutch general practitioners (GPs and practice nurses (PNs are limited. The aim of this pilot study was to explore which lifestyle interventions Dutch GPs and PNs carry out in primary care, which barriers and facilitators can be identified and what main topics are with respect to attitudes towards health promoting activities. These topic areas will be identified for a future, larger scale study. Method This qualitative study consisted of 25 semi-structured interviews with sixteen GPs and nine PNs. ATLAS.ti was used to analyse the transcripts of the interviews. Results All GPs and PNs said they discuss lifestyle with their patients. Next to this, GPs and PNs counsel patients, and/or refer them to other disciplines. Only few said they refer patients to specific lifestyle programs or interventions in their own practice or in the neighbourhood. Several barriers and facilitators were identified. The main topics as barriers are: a lack of patients’ motivation to make lifestyle changes, insufficient reimbursement, a lack of proven effectiveness of interventions and a lack of overview of health promoting programs in their neighbourhood. The most cited facilitators are availability of a PN, collaboration with other disciplines and availability of interventions in their own practice. With respect to attitudes, six different types of GPs were identified reflecting the main topics that relate to attitudes, varying from ‘ignorer’ to ‘nurturer’. The topics relating to PNs attitudes towards health promotion activities, were almost unanimously positive. Conclusion GPs and PNs all say they discuss lifestyle issues with their patients, but the health promotion activities that are organized in their practice vary. Main topics that hinder

  4. Iranian nurses and nursing students' attitudes on barriers and facilitators to patient education: a survey study.

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    Ghorbani, Raheb; Soleimani, Mohsen; Zeinali, Mohammad-Reza; Davaji, Mohammad

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study is to describe the attitudes of Iranian nurses and students on barriers and facilitators to patient education. In this descriptive quantitative study, 103 nurses and 84 nursing students in two teaching hospitals in an urban area of Iran responded to a questionnaire investigating their attitudes on patient education. Results showed that all nurses and the majority (87.3%) of the students mentioned that they performed patient education. Moreover, 95% and 63.3% of the nurses and students respectively accepted that patient education was one of their roles. The nurses stated that heavy workload, inadequate time and lack of educational facilities were main barriers to patient education. The students believed that lack of knowledge, lack of communication skills and heavy workload were main barriers to patient education from their perspectives. While Iranian nurses and nursing students had positive attitudes towards patient education, it could not guarantee the implementation of patient education. Therefore, the clarification of patient education activities and development of a patient education team with the support of healthcare settings' administrators can facilitate the process of patient education in the Iranian healthcare settings. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. A systematic review on barriers, facilities, knowledge and attitude toward evidence-based medicine in Iran

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    Morteza Ghojazadeh

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Evidence-based medicine (EBM is the ability and skill in using and integration of the best up-to-date evidences. The aim of this study was a systematic review of barriers, facilities, knowledge and attitude of EBM in Iran. Methods: In this study, database and manual search was used with keywords such as, "evidence-based, EBM, evidence-based nursing, evidence-based practice, evidence-based care, evidence-based activities, evidence-based education" and their combination with the keywords of the barrier, facilitator, attitude, awareness, prospective, knowledge, practice and Iran. The databases of SID (Scientific information database, Magiran, MEDLIB, PubMed, Google scholar, IranMedex and CINAHL (Cumulative index to nursing and allied health literature were used for data collection. Results: Finally, 28 papers were included in this study. The lack of facilities, time and skill in research methodology were the most important barriers to EBM. The most and least important factors were orderly creating ample opportunity and detecting needs and problems. The degree of familiarity with the terminology of evidence-based performance was low (44.2%. The textbooks have been considered as the most significant source of obtaining information. The level of awareness, knowledge, and evidence-based performance was less than 50.0%. Conclusion: There are many various barriers in use of EBM and healthcare providers despite the positive attitude toward EBM had a low level knowledge in EBM setting. Consideration of the importance of EBM proper planning and effective intervention are necessary to removing the barriers and increase the knowledge of healthcare providers.

  6. Knowledge, attitudes and barriers for human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccines among Malaysian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Dubai, Sami Abdo Radman; Alshagga, Mustafa Ahmed; Al-Naggar, Redhwan Ahmed; Al-Jashamy, Karim; Baobaid, Mohammed Faez; Tuang, Chua Pie; Abd Kadir, Samiah Yasmin

    2010-01-01

    A cross-sectional study was conducted among 300 Malaysian women in the obstetrics and gynecology outpatient clinic in a selected hospital in Bangi, Selangor to determine the level of knowledge of HPV and HPV vaccines, attitudes toward HPV vaccination and barriers of being vaccinated. Factors associated with knowledge and attitudes were also addressed with a questionnaire. Seventy eight women (26%) had heard about the HPV virus and 65 about HPV vaccines (21.7%). Marital status was associated significantly with awareness of HPV and HPV vaccine (p=0.002, p=0.002; respectively), in addition to level of education (p=0.042). The percentages of women who reported correct answers for the questions on knowledge of HPV and HPV vaccine ranged from 12% to 25%. One hundred fifty nine respondents (53%) had a positive attitude toward HPV vaccination. Age, marital status, and level of education were associated significantly with attitude (plevel of knowledge of HPV and HPV vaccine. Education of population is highly recommended and barriers to being vaccinated should be dealt with seriously.

  7. Liberal Arts Faculty and Co-op: Attitudes for Success at a Small Private College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Dawn K.

    1987-01-01

    Results of a study indicate that faculty in a small private liberal arts institution which has an established co-op program value it for its ability to enhance students' career and professional development as well as for its contribution to students' total learning process. (JOW)

  8. Faculty lecturers’ attitudes towards some educational indicators at Lorestan university of medical sciences

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    faride malekshahi

    2011-03-01

    Meanwhile their evaluations regarding officials’ attention to educational problems and appropriateness of students numbers to educational facilities were rated weak. Paying more attention to the quality and quantity of workshops , continuous education and solving university educational problems were of great emphasis. Besides, participation of all the faculty lectures in the educational planning and managemant is recommended.

  9. Pharmacists' Attitudes and Perceived Barriers to Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccination Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastings, Tessa J; Hohmann, Lindsey A; McFarland, Stuart J; Teeter, Benjamin S; Westrick, Salisa C

    2017-08-07

    Use of non-traditional settings such as community pharmacies has been suggested to increase human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination uptake and completion rates. The objectives of this study were to explore HPV vaccination services and strategies employed by pharmacies to increase HPV vaccine uptake, pharmacists' attitudes towards the HPV vaccine, and pharmacists' perceived barriers to providing HPV vaccination services in community pharmacies. A pre-piloted mail survey was sent to 350 randomly selected community pharmacies in Alabama in 2014. Measures included types of vaccines administered and marketing/recommendation strategies, pharmacists' attitudes towards the HPV vaccine, and perceived system and parental barriers. Data analysis largely took the form of descriptive statistics. 154 pharmacists completed the survey (response rate = 44%). The majority believed vaccination is the best protection against cervical cancer (85.3%), HPV is a serious threat to health for girls (78.8%) and boys (55.6%), and children should not wait until they are sexually active to be vaccinated (80.1%). Perceived system barriers included insufficient patient demand (56.5%), insurance plans not covering vaccination cost (54.8%), and vaccine expiration before use (54.1%). Respondents also perceived parents to have inadequate education and understanding about HPV infection (86.6%) and vaccine safety (78.7%). Pharmacists have positive perceptions regarding the HPV vaccine. Barriers related to system factors and perceived parental concerns must be overcome to increase pharmacist involvement in HPV vaccinations.

  10. Parental Attitudes, Behaviors, and Barriers to School Readiness among Parents of Low-Income Latino Children

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    Jaime Peterson

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We sought to explore parental attitudes, behaviors, and barriers regarding school readiness in a county clinic serving low income, Latino children. Between December 2013–September 2014, we conducted a cross sectional survey of parents during 3–6 years well-child appointments about school readiness (SR across: (1 attitudes/behaviors; (2 barriers; and (3 awareness; and (4 use of local resources. Most parents (n = 210, response rate 95.6% find it very important/important for their child to know specific skills prior to school: take turns and share (98.5%, use a pencil and count (97.6%, know letters (99.1%, colors (97.1%, and shapes (96.1%. Over 80% of parents find education important and engage in positive SR behaviors: singing, practicing letters, or reading. Major barriers to SR were lack of knowledge for kindergarten readiness, language barriers, access to books at home, constraints on nightly reading, difficulty completing school forms, and limited free time with child. Awareness of local resources such as preschool programs was higher than actual utilization. These low-income, Latino parents value SR but lack knowledge to prepare their child for school and underutilize community resources such as free preschool programs. Pediatricians are uniquely positioned to address these needs, but more evidence-based interventions are needed.

  11. Older adults' attitudes and barriers toward the use of mobile phones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navabi, Nasrin; Ghaffari, Fatemeh; Jannat-Alipoor, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    The limitations caused by the process of aging and the prevalence of chronic diseases contribute to reduced performance in physical, psychological, and social areas of life in older people. The use of mobile phones as easily accessible portable tools with a high performance is associated with an increased health literacy, self-care, and independence in older people. The present study was conducted to determine older people's attitudes toward the use of mobile phones and the barriers to their use. The present descriptive study was conducted on a sample population of 328 individuals older than 60 years presenting to health centers across cities in west Mazandaran, Iran. The data collection tools used included a mobile phone use checklist, a questionnaire on older people's attitude toward the use of mobile phones, and a questionnaire on the barriers to the use of mobile phones. The reliability and validity of these questionnaires were confirmed by the researchers. The data obtained were recorded and then analyzed using SPSS. The level of statistical significance was set at P ≤0.05. According to the results, 80% of the older people had regular mobile phones and 20% had smartphones. In 95% of the male and 80% of the female participants, the greatest use of mobile phones pertained to making phone calls. A total of 5% of the male and 2% of the female participants used the Internet in their mobile phones. A total of 44% of the female and 42.80% of the male participants had poor attitudes (score from 0 to 40) toward mobile phone use. As for the different dimensions of the attitude toward mobile phone use, the highest score obtained by the female participants (71.66%) pertained to the psychoemotional dimension and the highest score in the male participants (72.85%) to the instrumental dimension. The results also revealed the lack of knowledge of English as the greatest barrier to mobile phone use in both sexes. There was a significant relationship between sex and the

  12. Knowledge, Attitude and Practice of Female Employees in Khalkhal Faculty of Medical Sciences of Breast Self-Examination and Its Relationship with Some Individual Characteristics

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    Reyhane Eyvanbagha

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ​Background and Objectives : Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers among women that early diagnosis greatly increases the chance of recovery. Self-examination is one of the ways for screening and early detection of breast cancer. The aim of this study was to determine the knowledge, attitude and practice of women employed in the Khalkhal Faculty of Medical Sciences towards breast self-examination (BSE and its relationship with some individual characteristics. Material and Methods : This study cross-sectional study was conducted on 300 women who were employed in Khalkhal Faculty of Medical Sciences. A researcher-made questionnaire designed in four categories was used which contained demographic and questions related to the knowledge, attitude and performance. Data were analyzed using SPSS v. 13 software. Results : The level of knowledge, attitude and practice of BSE among the majority of women was partially favorable (5/56, 6/53 and 70/84 percent, respectively. Knowledge, attitudes and practices of women about BSE was affected by their field of study (P Conclusion : Women working in Khalkhal Faculty of Medical Sciences have relatively good level of knowledge, attitude and practice about BSE but with regard to the role of health workers in education and improving health; it is recommended to implement programs to achieve an ideal level regarding the knowledge, attitude and performance.

  13. The Analysis of the Relationship between Organizational Structure and Information Technology (IT): And the Barriers to Its Establishment at the University of Isfahan from the Faculty Member's Viewpoints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyman, Yarmohammadzadeh; Mohsen, Allammeh Sayyed; Hassan, Ghalavandi; Aboulghassim, Farhang; Zaman, Ajdari

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to investigate the relationship between organizational structure between IT and the barriers to its establishment in University of Isfahan from faculty member's viewpoints in 2007-2008. The questionnaires were prepared and examined based on the organization dimensions of organizational structures (formality,…

  14. Qatar pharmacists' understanding, attitudes, practice and perceived barriers related to providing pharmaceutical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Hajj, Maguy Saffouh; Al-Saeed, Hassna Sohil; Khaja, Maryam

    2016-04-01

    Pharmaceutical care (PC) is the philosophy of practice that includes identifying and resolving medication therapy problems to improve patient outcomes. The study objectives were to examine the extent of pharmaceutical care practice and the barriers to pharmaceutical care provision as perceived by Qatar pharmacists and to assess their level of understanding of pharmaceutical care and their attitudes about pharmaceutical care provision. Setting Qatar pharmacies. A cross sectional survey of all pharmacists in Qatar was made. Consenting pharmacists were given the option to complete the survey either online using an online software or as paper by fax or by hand. 1. Extent of pharmaceutical care practice in Qatar. 2. Barriers to pharmaceutical care provision in Qatar. 3. Qatar pharmacists' level of understanding of pharmaceutical care. 4. Qatar pharmacists' attitudes toward pharmaceutical care provision. Over 8 weeks, 274 surveys were collected (34 % response rate). More than 80 % of respondents had correct understanding of the aim of PC and of the pharmacist role in PC. However, only 47 % recognized the patient role in PC and only 35 % were aware of the differences between clinical pharmacy and PC. Yet, more than 80 % believed that they could be advocates when it comes to patients' medications and health matters. Concerning their practice, respondents reported spending little time on PC activities. Offering feedback to the physician about the patient progress was always or most of the time performed by 21 % of respondents. The top perceived barriers for PC provision included inconvenient access to patient medical information (78 %) and lack of staff and time (77 and 74 % respectively). Although PC is not incorporated into pharmacy practice, Qatar pharmacists showed positive attitudes toward PC provision. Further work should focus on improving their PC understanding and on overcoming all barriers.

  15. Attitudes of Students and Faculty toward Using Computer Technology and Twitter for Online Learning and Student Engagement: A Cross-Sectional Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Dulce M.

    2017-01-01

    The increasing use of online pedagogy in higher education has revealed a need to analyze factors contributing to student engagement in online courses. Throughout the past decade, social media has been a growing influence in higher education. This quantitative cross-sectional study examined the attitudes of students and faculty towards computer…

  16. Hip-Hop High School: A Study of the Attitudes, Beliefs and Perceptions of Suburban High School Faculty towards Representation of the Hip-Hop Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, Ronald K.

    2011-01-01

    Research historically has demonstrated that a generational disconnect between the popular cultures from which students and teachers define normative behavior can impact classroom management and student learning. The purpose of this study was to examine attitudes, beliefs and perceptions of high school faculty toward the hip-hop culture and its…

  17. Perceptions and Attitudes of Occupational Therapy Faculty towards the Scholarship of Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordinetz, Sue Ann

    2009-01-01

    Occupational therapy educators have been encouraged to engage in the scholarship of teaching as a form of best practice in education. Despite professional documents and encouragement by leaders in the field of occupational therapy, there is very little known about occupational therapy educators' perceptions, attitudes, and engagement in the…

  18. Awareness Knowledge Attitude Skills of Telemedicine among Health Professional Faculty Working in Teaching Hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zayapragassarazan, Zayabalaradjane; Kumar, Santosh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Telemedicine is an emerging technology in health sector in India. The success of any new technology depends on many factors including the knowledge and understanding of the concept, skills acquired, attitude towards technology and working environment by the concerned professionals. Aim: The main objective of this study was to assess…

  19. Smoking Habits and Attitudes in Students of the Third Faculty of Medicine of Charles University in Prague.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneidrová, Dagmar; Herotová, Tereza Kopřivová; Šustková, Magdaléna; Hynčica, Viktor

    2016-06-01

    This study seeks to assess smoking habits, attitudes and intention to quit in students of the Third Faculty of Medicine of Charles University in Prague, Czech Republic. A cross-sectional survey designed to obtain information on smoking history, current smoking status, cessation attempts, and attitudes towards smoking among health professionals was conducted in 452 students of the first and last years of a 6-year Master's Study Programme (General Medicine) and a 3-year Bachelor's Study Programme (Public Health). An anonymous questionnaire was administered during the classes in the course of academic years 2011-12 and 2012-13. 5.7% of the Master's Study Programme students (3.3% women and 9.0% men ) and 4.8% of the Bachelor's Study Programme students reported that they are regular smokers. The share of regular smokers was almost twice as big in students of the English Curriculum of the Master's Programme (10.7%) in comparison with the students of the Czech Curriculum (4.5%), and more than twice as big in students of the last years of both study programmes (3.9% in students of the 1st year and 10.8% in students of the 6th year of the Master's Programme; 3.2% in students of the 1st year and 7.0% in students of the 3rd year of the Bachelor's Study Programme). At the time of the research, 18.9% of students of the Master's Programme and 17.1% of students of the Bachelor's Programme were occasional smokers. 5.9% of students of the Master's Programme and 19.0% of students of the Bachelor's Programme reported that they quit smoking during their studies at the medical faculty; on the contrary, 9.8% of students of the Master's Programme and 14.3% of students of the Bachelor's Programme started smoking during that time. Smoking in health professionals undermines their significant role in health promotion and prevention of chronic diseases in their patients. Therefore, education at the medical faculty should focus on motivation of future health professionals towards non

  20. Older adults’ attitudes and barriers toward the use of mobile phones

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    Navabi N

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Nasrin Navabi, Fatemeh Ghaffari, Zahra Jannat-Alipoor Nursing and Midwifery Department, Babol University of Medical Sciences, Mazandaran, Iran Background and objectives: The limitations caused by the process of aging and the prevalence of chronic diseases contribute to reduced performance in physical, psychological, and social areas of life in older people. The use of mobile phones as easily accessible portable tools with a high performance is associated with an increased health literacy, self-care, and independence in older people. The present study was conducted to determine older people’s attitudes toward the use of mobile phones and the barriers to their use. Materials and methods: The present descriptive study was conducted on a sample population of 328 individuals older than 60 years presenting to health centers across cities in west Mazandaran, Iran. The data collection tools used included a mobile phone use checklist, a questionnaire on older people’s attitude toward the use of mobile phones, and a questionnaire on the barriers to the use of mobile phones. The reliability and validity of these questionnaires were confirmed by the researchers. The data obtained were recorded and then analyzed using SPSS. The level of statistical significance was set at P≤0.05. Results: According to the results, 80% of the older people had regular mobile phones and 20% had smartphones. In 95% of the male and 80% of the female participants, the greatest use of mobile phones pertained to making phone calls. A total of 5% of the male and 2% of the female participants used the Internet in their mobile phones. A total of 44% of the female and 42.80% of the male participants had poor attitudes (score from 0 to 40 toward mobile phone use. As for the different dimensions of the attitude toward mobile phone use, the highest score obtained by the female participants (71.66% pertained to the psychoemotional dimension and the highest score in the male

  1. Hydration and Fluid Replacement Knowledge, Attitudes, Barriers, and Behaviors of NCAA Division 1 American Football Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judge, Lawrence W; Kumley, Roberta F; Bellar, David M; Pike, Kim L; Pierson, Eric E; Weidner, Thomas; Pearson, David; Friesen, Carol A

    2016-11-01

    Judge, LW, Kumley, RF, Bellar, DM, Pike, KL, Pierson, EE, Weidner, T, Pearson, D, and Friesen, CA. Hydration and fluid replacement knowledge, attitudes, barriers, and behaviors of NCAA Division 1 American football players. J Strength Cond Res 30(11): 2972-2978, 2016-Hydration is an important part of athletic performance, and understanding athletes' hydration knowledge, attitudes, barriers, and behaviors is critical for sport practitioners. The aim of this study was to assess National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division 1 (D1) American football players, with regard to hydration and fluid intake before, during, and after exercise, and to apply this assessment to their overall hydration practice. The sample consisted of 100 student-athletes from 2 different NCAA D1 universities, who participated in voluntary summer football conditioning. Participants completed a survey to identify the fluid and hydration knowledge, attitudes and behaviors, demographic data, primary football position, previous nutrition education, and barriers to adequate fluid consumption. The average Hydration Knowledge Score (HKS) for the participants in the present study was 11.8 ± 1.9 (69.4% correct), with scores ranging from 42 to 100% correct. Four key misunderstandings regarding hydration, specifically related to intervals of hydration habits among the study subjects, were revealed. Only 24% of the players reported drinking enough fluids before, during, immediately after, and 2 hours after practice. Generalized linear model analysis predicted the outcome variable HKS (χ = 28.001, p = 0.045), with nutrition education (Wald χ = 8.250, p = 0.041) and position on the football team (χ = 9.361, p = 0.025) being significant predictors. "Backs" (e.g., quarterbacks, running backs, and defensive backs) demonstrated significantly higher hydration knowledge than "Linemen" (p = 0.014). Findings indicated that if changes are not made to increase hydration awareness levels among football teams

  2. Knowledge, attitudes, practices, and barriers related to research utilization: a survey among pharmacists in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Sin Yee; Hatah, Ernieda

    2017-04-01

    Background Research utilization is part of evidence-based practice referring to the process of reviewing and critiquing scientific research and applying the findings to one's own clinical practice. Many studies on research utilization have been conducted with doctors and nurses, but to our knowledge, none have been investigated amongst pharmacists. Objective To assess research utilization and its barriers among pharmacists and identify potential influencing factors. Setting Malaysia. Methods This cross-sectional survey was administered online and by mail to a convenient sample of pharmacists working in hospitals, health clinics, and retail pharmacies in rural and urban areas. Main outcome measure Pharmacists' research utilization knowledge, attitudes, and practices. Results Six hundred surveys were mailed to potential respondents, and 466 were returned (77.7% response rate). Twenty-eight respondents completed the survey online. The respondents' research utilization knowledge, attitudes, and practices were found to be moderate. Research utilization was associated with respondents' knowledge and attitude scores (P < 0.001). When factors related to research utilization were modelled, higher educational level was associated with higher level of research utilization (P < 0.001) while less involvement in journal clubs, more years of service (3-7 years and more than 7 years) were associated with low and moderate research utilization, respectively. The main reported barrier to research utilization was lack of sufficient authority to change patient care procedures. Conclusion Pharmacists' research utilization knowledge, attitudes, and practices can be improved by encouraging pharmacists to pursue higher degrees, promoting active participation in institutions' journal clubs, and introducing senior clinical pharmacist specialization.

  3. Breast cancer screening behavior, attitude, barriers among middle-aged Chinese women in Macao, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Yan Xiang; Lao, Cheng-Kin; Chan, Alexandre

    2018-05-08

    Breast cancer is the third leading cause of death from cancer among females in Macao, but little is known about local practice of breast cancer screening. The study aims to evaluate breast cancer screening behaviors and to identify the predictors of insufficient knowledge and attitudes towards breast cancer and its screening among female residents. This was a cross-sectional study conducted from April to June 2016 in Macao. Quota sampling of women completed the modified Chinese Breast Cancer Screening Beliefs questionnaire (CBCSB) to assess their breast cancer-related perceptions, screening attitudes and behaviors. Univariate and multivariate logistic regressions were performed to identify the predictors of poor-screening practices, attitudes, knowledge and perceived barriers to mammography. A total of 417 women (mean age±SD: 50.5±5.7) completed surveys, with 160 (38.4%), 196 (47.0%) and 103 (24.7%) women received breast self-examination, clinical breast examination and mammography as recommended, respectively. Nulliparity (OR=2.56, 95% CI = 1.14-5.73) and low education (OR = 1.72, 95% CI = 1.04-2.84) were significantly associated with negative attitude towards health check-ups. Women did not know anyone with breast cancer (OR = 2.30, 95% CI = 1.50-3.55) were more likely to have insufficient knowledge about breast cancer. Low education (OR = 1.95, 95% CI = 1.25-3.04) and not knowing anyone with breast cancer (OR = 2.02, 95% CI = 1.31-3.13) were identified as predictors for perceived barriers to mammography. Recommendations for breast cancer screening are poorly followed by the residents in Macao, and a culturally tailored educational program is urgently needed to raise the public's awareness of the disease and the screening practices.

  4. Language barriers in medical education and attitudes towards Arabization of medicine: student and staff perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbour, S M; Dewedar, S A; Kandil, S K

    2012-12-04

    Students and staff perspectives on language barriers in medical education in Egypt and their attitude towards Arabization of the medical curriculum were explored in a questionnaire survey of 400 medical students and 150 staff members. Many students (56.3%) did not consider learning medicine in English an obstacle, and 44.5% of staff considered it an obstacle only in the 1st year of medical school. Many other barriers to learning other than language were mentioned. However, 44.8% of students translated English terms to Arabic to facilitate studying and 70.6% of students in their clinical study years would prefer to learn patient history-taking in Arabic. While Arabization in general was strongly declined, teaching in Arabic language was suggested as appropriate in some specialties.

  5. Interacting in the Smog Factors that Shape Faculty Attitudes and Beliefs about Race and Inclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodari, Apriel K.

    2006-03-01

    Many faculty members realize that we must interact productively with diverse colleagues and students, and we must find ways to benefit from the talents of all members of our intellectual community. Put simply, we must aim for the ceiling rather than the floor. This means that we approach our work informed that engaging diversity in our classrooms will increase our success and the success of all our students. But in physics, it is often difficult to measure and address diversity issues because doing so is not perceived as central to our discipline. To address this apparent disconnection, we present some ideas on race [1] and inclusion [2] within the context of the physics instruction. Specifically, we speak to how university faculty might use inclusive pedagogy in physics education research and curriculum. Our goal here is to open a frank dialogue and present concrete avenues to explore as you create activities that serve your classroom best. *Tatum, Beverly Daniel. (2004). Changing demographics and challenges of the future. Draft Proceedings of the National Science Board Workshop on Broadening the Participation in Science and Engineering Research and Education. Arlington, VA: National Science Board; Tatum, Beverly Daniel. (1997). Why are All the Black Kids Sitting Together in the Cafeteria? And Other Conversations about Race. New York: Basic Books. *Bonilla-Silva, Eduardo. (2003). Racism without Racists: Color-blind Racism and the Persistence of Racial Inequality in the United States. Lanham, MD: Rowan & Littlefield; Thiederman, Sondra. (2003). Making Diversity Work: 7 Steps for Defeating Bias in the Workplace. Chicago: Dearborn Trade Publishing.

  6. UK consumer attitudes, beliefs and barriers to increasing fruit and vegetable consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, D N; Anderson, A S; Lean, M E; Mela, D J

    1998-03-01

    To assess attitudes, predictors of intention, and identify perceived barriers to increasing fruit and vegetable (F&V) intakes. UK nationwide postal survey utilizing the theory of planned behaviour. Stratified (by social class and region) random sample of 2020 UK adults providing a modest response rate of 37% (n = 741). Belief measures (e.g. health, cost, taste, etc.) were strongly associated with overall attitudes which were reported as being largely favourable towards fruit, vegetables and, to a lesser extent, vegetable dishes, and were strongly associated with reported intention to increase consumption. Subjects reported they could increase their consumption, but this was only weakly associated with intention to do so. Approximately 50% of respondents reported an intention to increase intakes. Social pressure was strongly associated with reported intention to increase; however, scores indicated low perceived social pressure to change. Evidence of unrealistic optimism concerning perceived intakes and the perceived high cost of fruit may also act as barriers. Results from this study suggest a lack of perceived social pressure to increase F&V intakes and suggests that public health efforts require stronger and broader health messages that incorporate consumer awareness of low present consumption.

  7. Childhood Obesity: Dental hygienists' beliefs attitudes and barriers to patient education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Doreen Dawn M; Boyd, Linda D; Vineyard, Jared; Giblin-Scanlon, Lori J

    2018-04-01

    Purpose: Increasing childhood obesity rates present a significant threat to public health. The purpose of this study was to explore dental hygienists' (DH) beliefs, attitudes, knowledge, current practices, and barriers for assessing and educating patients about childhood obesity. Methods: A random sample of DHs (n=13,357) was selected and emailed a link to the validated survey. Of the 1046 respondents who accessed the survey, 919 completed the survey for a completion rate of 89%. Results: A majority of the respondents understood the risk of chronic disease and obesity (99%), role sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) play as added sugar content in the diet (76%), and the amount of SSBs consumed by youth (91%). Participants felt current research showed an association between obesity and periodontal disease (62%), but were unsure of the association between obesity and dental caries (51%). Most respondents never measure height and weight (91%) or plot BMI (94%). Fifty-one percent always provide nutritional counseling to reduce consumption of SSBs, but only sometimes provide nutritional counseling for healthy eating (61%). Respondents had a slightly positive attitude (mean score=4.15, SD=14.58) about assessing and educating for childhood obesity. Major barriers reported were time constraints (63%), and fear of offending the patient or parent (47%). Regression showed attitudes towards patient's nutrition, exercise, and weight predicted the dental hygienist behavior. Conclusion: DHs have some understanding of the risks of obesity and general/oral health, but lack adequate training, knowledge, and confidence to provide obesity counseling in clinical practice settings. There is a need for further education to address the lack of knowledge about nutritional guidelines and practitioners' beliefs regarding addressing childhood obesity without offending the patient or parent. Copyright © 2018 The American Dental Hygienists’ Association.

  8. Older adults’ attitudes and barriers toward the use of mobile phones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navabi, Nasrin; Ghaffari, Fatemeh; Jannat-Alipoor, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Background and objectives The limitations caused by the process of aging and the prevalence of chronic diseases contribute to reduced performance in physical, psychological, and social areas of life in older people. The use of mobile phones as easily accessible portable tools with a high performance is associated with an increased health literacy, self-care, and independence in older people. The present study was conducted to determine older people’s attitudes toward the use of mobile phones and the barriers to their use. Materials and methods The present descriptive study was conducted on a sample population of 328 individuals older than 60 years presenting to health centers across cities in west Mazandaran, Iran. The data collection tools used included a mobile phone use checklist, a questionnaire on older people’s attitude toward the use of mobile phones, and a questionnaire on the barriers to the use of mobile phones. The reliability and validity of these questionnaires were confirmed by the researchers. The data obtained were recorded and then analyzed using SPSS. The level of statistical significance was set at P≤0.05. Results According to the results, 80% of the older people had regular mobile phones and 20% had smartphones. In 95% of the male and 80% of the female participants, the greatest use of mobile phones pertained to making phone calls. A total of 5% of the male and 2% of the female participants used the Internet in their mobile phones. A total of 44% of the female and 42.80% of the male participants had poor attitudes (score from 0 to 40) toward mobile phone use. As for the different dimensions of the attitude toward mobile phone use, the highest score obtained by the female participants (71.66%) pertained to the psychoemotional dimension and the highest score in the male participants (72.85%) to the instrumental dimension. The results also revealed the lack of knowledge of English as the greatest barrier to mobile phone use in both sexes

  9. MVP and Faculty Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theall, Michael

    2017-01-01

    This chapter considers faculty evaluation and motivational and volitional issues. The focus is on the ways in which faculty evaluation influences not only faculty attitudes and beliefs but also willingness to engage in professional development and instructional improvement programs. Recommendations for effective practice that enhances motivation…

  10. How do faculty conceptions on reading, writing and their role in the teaching of academic literacies influence their inclusive attitude

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Colombo

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/2175-8026.2016v69n3p115 This study explored faculty conceptions about reading and writing, the student body, reasons for student low-performance as well as their declared teaching practices aimed at helping students to better understand readings and write academic texts. The objective was to understand what type of professors´ conceptions contributed with a more inclusive attitude towards first-year students. Content analysis from data gathered from in-depth interviews indicates that professors who acknowledged the complexity of the reading and writing processes tend to be more inclusive and to use reading and writing to teach and not just to evaluate. Those who taught writing courses tended to consider writing as a general skill, transferable to other contexts and spheres of knowledge. Less-inclusive teachers, explaining why they did not offer guidance or proposed remedial solutions, claimed that students should already have mastered academic reading and writing when entering the university and that teaching these skills implied being overprotective and not allowing them to mature.

  11. How do faculty conceptions on reading, writing and their role in the teaching of academic literacies influence their inclusive attitude

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Colombo

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This study explored faculty conceptions about reading and writing, the student body, reasons for student low-performance as well as their declared teaching practices aimed at helping students to better understand readings and write academic texts. The objective was to understand what type of professors´ conceptions contributed with a more inclusive attitude towards first-year students. Content analysis from data gathered from in-depth interviews indicates that professors who acknowledged the complexity of the reading and writing processes tend to be more inclusive and to use reading and writing to teach and not just to evaluate. Those who taught writing courses tended to consider writing as a general skill, transferable to other contexts and spheres of knowledge. Less-inclusive teachers, explaining why they did not offer guidance or proposed remedial solutions, claimed that students should already have mastered academic reading and writing when entering the university and that teaching these skills implied being overprotective and not allowing them to mature.

  12. Evidence-based surgery: knowledge, attitudes, and perceived barriers among surgical trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Rohin; Perakath, Benjamin

    2010-01-01

    This study was conducted to assess the knowledge and attitude of surgical trainees toward evidence-based medicine (EBM) and their perceived barriers to its practice. The McColl questionnaire and the BARRIERS scale were modified and incorporated into a single questionnaire, which was administered to all surgical trainees attending a Continuing Surgical Education meeting. Department of Surgery, Christian Medical College, Vellore, India. One hundred ten surgical trainees from 22 medical colleges. In all, 84.5% (93/110) trainees returned the questionnaire. The attitudes toward EBM were welcoming, although individual participants reported they welcomed EBM more than their colleagues did. Participants agreed that EBM was useful in everyday practice and that it improved patient care. About 50% of actual practice was considered evidence based. In all, 12.6% (10/89) of participants had received formal training in EBM, and 64.3% (54/84) of participants were aware of the Cochrane database of systemic reviews, but only 35.7% (30/84) read it regularly. Also, 67.8% (61/90) of respondents used protocols and guidelines developed by colleagues. However, 61.5% (56/91) of participants were interested in learning the skills of EBM. The terms absolute risk, relative risk, and clinical effectiveness were understood by >80% of respondents, whereas publication bias, confidence interval, and heterogeneity were poorly understood. The major barriers to practice of EBM were the inability to understand statistical analysis, inadequate facilities for implementation, lack of a single compiled source of literature, relevant literature not being readily available, and insufficient time on the job. Surgical trainees have a positive attitude towards EBM and have some familiarity with the common terms used in EBM. There is a need to increase awareness of, and provide access to, available sources of medical literature. Formal training in EBM, as well as basic statistical analysis, should form a part

  13. Practice Patterns, Attitudes, and Barriers to Palliative Care Consultation by Gynecologic Oncologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley de Meritens, Alexandre; Margolis, Benjamin; Blinderman, Craig; Prigerson, Holly G; Maciejewski, Paul K; Shen, Megan J; Hou, June Y; Burke, William M; Wright, Jason D; Tergas, Ana I

    2017-09-01

    We sought to describe practice patterns, attitudes, and barriers to the integration of palliative care services by gynecologic oncologists. Members of the Society of Gynecologic Oncology were electronically surveyed regarding their practice of incorporating palliative care services and to identify barriers for consultation. Descriptive statistics were used, and two-sample z-tests of proportions were performed to compare responses to related questions. Of the 145 respondents, 71% were attending physicians and 58% worked at an academic medical center. The vast majority (92%) had palliative care services available for consultation at their hospital; 48% thought that palliative care services were appropriately used, 51% thought they were underused, and 1% thought they were overused. Thirty percent of respondents thought that palliative care services should be incorporated at first recurrence, whereas 42% thought palliative care should be incorporated when prognosis for life expectancy is ≤ 6 months. Most participants (75%) responded that palliative care consultation is reasonable for symptom control at any stage of disease. Respondents were most likely to consult palliative care services for pain control (53%) and other symptoms (63%). Eighty-three percent of respondents thought that communicating prognosis is the primary team's responsibility, whereas the responsibilities for pain and symptom control, resuscitation status, and goals of care discussions were split between the primary team only and both teams. The main barrier for consulting palliative care services was the concern that patients and families would feel abandoned by the primary oncologist (73%). Ninety-seven percent of respondents answered that palliative care services are useful to improve patient care. The majority of gynecologic oncologists perceived palliative care as a useful collaboration that is underused. Fear of perceived abandonment by the patient and family members was identified as a

  14. Barriers to Innovation in Urban Wastewater Utilities: Attitudes of Managers in California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiparsky, Michael; Thompson, Barton H; Binz, Christian; Sedlak, David L; Tummers, Lars; Truffer, Bernhard

    2016-06-01

    In many regions of the world, urban water systems will need to transition into fundamentally different forms to address current stressors and meet impending challenges-faster innovation will need to be part of these transitions. To assess the innovation deficit in urban water organizations and to identify means for supporting innovation, we surveyed wastewater utility managers in California. Our results reveal insights about the attitudes towards innovation among decision makers, and how perceptions at the level of individual managers might create disincentives for experimentation. Although managers reported feeling relatively unhindered organizationally, they also spend less time on innovation than they feel they should. The most frequently reported barriers to innovation included cost and financing; risk and risk aversion; and regulatory compliance. Considering these results in the context of prior research on innovation systems, we conclude that collective action may be required to address underinvestment in innovation.

  15. Barriers to Colorectal Cancer Screening in Primary Care Settings: Attitudes and Knowledge of Nurses and Physicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua Kanaabi Muliira

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Healthcare providers (HCPs play a critical role in reducing colorectal cancer (CRC related morbidity and mortality. This study aimed at exploring the attitudes and knowledge of nurses and physicians working in primary care settings regarding CRC screening. Methods: A total of 142 HCPs (57.7% nurses and 42.3% physicians participated in a cross-sectional survey. Data were collected using a Self-administered Questionnaire. The participants were clinically experienced (mean = 9.39 years; standard deviation [SD] = 6.13, regularly taking care of adults eligible for CRC screening (62% and had positive attitudes toward CRC screening (83.1%. Most participants (57% had low levels of knowledge about CRC screening (mean = 3.23; SD = 1.50. The participants were most knowledgeable about the recommended age for initiating screening (62.7% and the procedures not recommended for screening (90.8%. Results: More than 55% did not know the frequency of performing specific screening procedures, the upper age limit at which screening is not recommended, and the patients at high-risk for CRC. There were no significant differences between nurses′ and physicians′ attitudes and knowledge. The participants′ perceptions about professional training (odds ratio [OR] = 2.17, P = 0.003, colonoscopy (OR = 2.60, P = 0.014, and double-contrast barium enema (OR = 0.53, P = 0.041, were significantly associated with knowledge about CRC screening. Conclusions: The inadequate knowledge levels among nurses and physicians may be one of the barriers affecting CRC screening. Enhancing HCPs knowledge about CRC screening should be considered a primary intervention in the efforts to promote CRC screening and prevention.

  16. Mobile Learning as a Method of Ubiquitous Learning: Students' Attitudes, Readiness, and Possible Barriers to Implementation in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhassan, Riyadh

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the attitudes and level of readiness, and possible barriers to implementing Mobile Learning as a part of ubiquitous learning. In addition, the study attempted to find out to what extent students are interested in mobile learning. It also aimed to answer the question regarding the readiness of college…

  17. Vegetable and fruit breaks in Australian primary schools: prevalence, attitudes, barriers and implementation strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathan, Nicole; Wolfenden, Luke; Butler, Michelle; Bell, Andrew Colin; Wyse, Rebecca; Campbell, Elizabeth; Milat, Andrew J; Wiggers, John

    2011-08-01

    School-based vegetable and fruit programs can increase student consumption of vegetables and fruit and have been recommended for adoption by Australian schools since 2005. An understanding of the prevalence and predictors of and the barriers to the adoption of school-based vegetable and fruit programs is necessary to maximize their adoption by schools and ensure that the health benefits of such programs to children are realized. The aim of this study was to determine Australian primary school Principals' attitudes and barriers to the implementation of vegetable and fruit breaks; the prevalence of vegetable and fruit breaks in schools and the implementation strategies used and associated with their recommended adoption (daily in at least 80% of classes). A random sample of 384 school Principals completed a 20-min telephone interview. While Principals were highly supportive of vegetable and fruit breaks, only 44% were implementing these to a recommended level. When controlling for all school characteristics, recommended vegetable and fruit break adoption was 1.9 and 2.2 times greater, respectively, in schools that had parent communication strategies and teachers trained. A substantial opportunity exists to enhance the health of children through the adoption of vegetable and fruit breaks in schools.

  18. Survey of family physicians' perspectives on management of immigrant patients: attitudes, barriers, strategies, and training needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papic, Ognjen; Malak, Ziad; Rosenberg, Ellen

    2012-02-01

    Immigrants in Canada form a significant portion of the population and have unique and complex health needs. This study was undertaken to evaluate family physicians' perspectives on the care of this population. Questionnaires were distributed to family physicians in Montreal (n=598). The main outcomes of interest were attitudes of family physicians to care of immigrants including barriers perceived, resources and strategies used to accommodate immigrant patients, as well as physicians' training in immigrant care. Family physicians find communication difficulties to be the key barrier and would like to see the access to interpreters improved. Very few physicians make use of professional interpreters. Only a minority of physicians have received specific cross-cultural competence training but those who have seem to provide better quality of care. Knowledge of physician perspectives is an essential element on which to base interventions to improve the quality of care to this population. Physicians should be reminded of the importance of using professional interpretation services in multi-lingual encounters. Cross-cultural training should be further advanced in Canadian medical curricula. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Barriers to widespread adoption of electric vehicles: An analysis of consumer attitudes and perceptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egbue, Ona; Long, Suzanna

    2012-01-01

    Electric Vehicles (EVs) are promoted as a viable near-term vehicle technology to reduce dependence on fossil fuels and resulting greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with conventional vehicles (CVs). In spite of the benefits of EVs, several obstacles need to be overcome before EVs will be widely adopted. A major barrier is that consumers tend to resist new technologies that are considered alien or unproved, thus, policy decisions that consider their critical concerns will have a higher level of success. This research identifies potential socio-technical barriers to consumer adoption of EVs and determines if sustainability issues influence consumer decision to purchase an EV. This study provides valuable insights into preferences and perceptions of technology enthusiasts; individuals highly connected to technology development and better equipped to sort out the many differences between EVs and CVs. This group of individuals will likely be early adopters of EVs only if they perceive them to be superior in performance compared to CVs. These results can guide policymakers in crafting energy and transportation policy. It can also provide guidance to EV engineers' decision in incorporating consumer preference into EV engineering design. - Highlights: ► We sample technology enthusiasts to determine attitudes toward electric vehicles. ► Knowledge and perceptions differ across gender, age, and education groups. ► High degree of uncertainty is associated with electric vehicles. ► Battery range is the biggest concern followed by cost. ► Sustainability has less weight compared to electric vehicle cost and performance.

  20. Attitudes and perceived barriers influencing incident reporting by nurses and their correlation with reported incidents: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Wing Mei; Koh, Serena Siew Lin; Chow, Yeow Leng

    Clinical incident reporting is an integral feature of risk management system in the healthcare sector. By reporting clinical incidents, nurses allow for learning from errors, identification of error patterns and development of error preventive strategies. The need to understand attitudes to reporting, perceived barriers and incident reporting patterns by nurses are the core highlights of this review. INCLUSION CRITERIA: This review considered descriptive quantitative studies that examined nurses' attitudes or perceived barriers towards incident reporting.The participants in this review were nurses working in acute care settings or step-down care settings. Studies that included non-nursing healthcare personnel were excluded.This review considered studies which examined nurses' attitudes towards incident reporting, perceived barriers and incident reporting practices.The outcomes of interest were the attitudes that nurses have towards incident reporting, perceived barriers and the types of reported incidents in correlation with nurses' attitudes and barriers. A three-step search strategy was utilised in this review. An initial limited search of CINAHL and MEDLINE was undertaken. Search strategies were then developed using identified keywords and index terms. Lastly, the reference lists of all identified articles were examined. All searches were limited to studies published in English, between 1991 and 2010. The studies were independently assessed by two reviewers using the Joanna Briggs Institute Critical Appraisal Checklist for Descriptive/ Case Series studies. The reviewers extracted data independently from included studies using the Joanna Briggs Institute Data Extraction Form for Descriptive/ Case Series studies. Due to the descriptive nature of the study designs, statistical pooling was not possible. Therefore, the findings of this systematic review are presented in a narrative summary. Fifty-five papers were identified from the searches based on their titles and

  1. Mothers' attitudes and beliefs about infant feeding highlight barriers to exclusive breastfeeding in American Samoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawley, Nicola L; Rosen, Rochelle K; Strait, E Ashton; Raffucci, Gabriela; Holmdahl, Inga; Freeman, Joshua R; Muasau-Howard, Bethel T; McGarvey, Stephen T

    2015-09-01

    In American Samoa, initiation of breastfeeding is almost universal but exclusive breastfeeding, a promising target for obesity prevention, is short in duration. (1) To examine American Samoan mothers' feeding experiences and attitudes and beliefs about infant feeding and (2) to identify potential barriers to exclusive breastfeeding. Eighteen semi-structured interviews were conducted with American Samoan mothers at 16-32 days postpartum. Interviews focused on mother's knowledge and beliefs about infant feeding, how their infants were fed, why the mother had chosen this mode of infant feeding, and how decisions about feeding were made within her social surroundings. A thematic qualitative analysis was conducted to identify salient themes in the data. Intention to exclusively breastfeed did not predict practice; most women supplemented with formula despite intending to exclusively breastfeed. The benefits of breastfeeding were well-recognized, but the importance of exclusivity was missed. Formula-use was not preferred but considered an innocuous "back-up option" where breastfeeding was not possible or not sufficient for infant satiety. Identified barriers to exclusive breastfeeding included: the convenience of formula; perceptions among mothers that they were not producing enough breast milk; and pain while breastfeeding. The important support role of family for infant feeding could be utilized in intervention design. This study identified barriers to exclusive breastfeeding that can be immediately addressed by providers of breastfeeding support services. Further research is needed to address the common perception of insufficient milk in this setting. Copyright © 2015 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Students' voices: the lived experience of faculty incivility as a barrier to professional formation in associate degree nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Prato, Darlene

    2013-03-01

    Nursing faculty play an important role in constructing learning environments that foster the positive formation of future nurses. The students' construction of a nursing identity is grounded in social interactions with faculty and is shaped by values and norms learned in both the formal and informal curriculum. The informal curriculum is communicated in faculty teaching practices and relationships established with students. To acquire an understanding of the students' lived experience in associate degree nursing education and identify educational practices that support students' professional formation. A phenomenological design was chosen to study the lived experience of nursing education. In-depth interviews were conducted with 13 participants. Five students participated in second interviews for a total of 18 interviews. Symbolic interactionism guided data analysis. Participants represented three ADN programs in the northeastern U.S. and were diverse in terms of gender and age and to a lesser extent race, and sexual orientation. Faculty incivility included demeaning experiences, subjective evaluation, rigid expectations, and targeting and weeding out practices. Targeting practices contributed to a perceived focus on clinical evaluation and inhibited clinical learning. Faculty incivility hindered professional formation by interfering with learning, self-esteem, self-efficacy, and confidence. Faculty who model professional values in the formal and hidden curriculum contribute to the positive formation of future nurses. Nursing faculty should be formally prepared as educators to establish respectful, connected relationships with students. Faculty should role model professional values, deemphasize their evaluative role, provide constructive formative feedback, and remain open to the student's potential for growth. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Attitudes of Select Music Performance Faculty toward Students Teaching Private Lessons after Graduation: A USA Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredrickson, William E.; Moore, Christopher; Gavin, Russell

    2013-01-01

    The present study was designed to pilot test an adjusted version of a questionnaire, used in earlier studies with college music students, to determine opinions of college music faculty on the topic of private lesson teaching. Full-time tenure-track college music faculty, with primary appointments in applied music at two universities in the United…

  4. Development of self-report measures of social attitudes that act as environmental barriers and facilitators for people with disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Sofia F; Hahn, Elizabeth A; Magasi, Susan; Lai, Jin-Shei; Semik, Patrick; Hammel, Joy; Heinemann, Allen W

    2015-04-01

    To describe the development of new self-report measures of social attitudes that act as environmental facilitators or barriers to the participation of people with disabilities in society. A mixed-methods approach included a literature review; item classification, selection, and writing; cognitive interviews and field testing of participants with spinal cord injury (SCI), traumatic brain injury (TBI), or stroke; and rating scale analysis to evaluate initial psychometric properties. General community. Individuals with SCI, TBI, or stroke participated in cognitive interviews (n=9); community residents with those same conditions participated in field testing (n=305). None. Self-report item pool of social attitudes that act as facilitators or barriers to people with disabilities participating in society. An interdisciplinary team of experts classified 710 existing social environment items into content areas and wrote 32 new items. Additional qualitative item review included item refinement and winnowing of the pool prior to cognitive interviews and field testing of 82 items. Field test data indicated that the pool satisfies a 1-parameter item response theory measurement model and would be appropriate for development into a calibrated item bank. Our qualitative item review process supported a social environment conceptual framework that includes both social support and social attitudes. We developed a new social attitudes self-report item pool. Calibration testing of that pool is underway with a larger sample to develop a social attitudes item bank for persons with disabilities. Copyright © 2015 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The critical factors that influence faculty attitudes and perceptions of teaching English as Second Language nursing students: A grounded theory research study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starkey, Traci J

    2015-05-01

    As the demographics of the United States change, nursing will need to become more ethnically diverse in order to provide culturally responsive healthcare. Enrollment of English as Second Language nursing students is increasing; however, these students often encounter academic difficulties. The increase in English as Second Language nursing students in the classroom and clinical setting has posed challenges for nurse faculty. To explore the critical factors that influence faculty attitudes and perceptions of teaching English as Second Language nursing students. A grounded theory method based on the philosophical underpinnings of symbolic interactionism and pragmatism was used to explore the critical factors that influence faculty attitudes and perceptions of teaching English as Second Language nursing students. The study took place at various schools of nursing in the Southeast Florida area. Educators teaching in an associate, baccalaureate, and/or graduate nursing program at an accredited school of nursing. Semi-structured interviews and a focus group were conducted to collect data from nurse faculty. Data segments from interviews were coded, categorized, and analyzed. Theoretical sampling and a focus group interview were used to validate the concepts, themes, and categories identified during the individual interviews. A substantive level theory was developed. The core category that developed was conscientization. The three dominant categories that emerged from the data were overcoming, coming to know, and facilitating. The theoretical framework of conscientization provided an explanation of the social processes involved in teaching English as Second Language nursing students. The theoretical framework developed from this study can be used to increase the effectiveness of teaching English as Second Language nursing students, improve their chances of success, and enhance diversity in the nursing profession. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Assessment of Knowledge, Attitudes and Practice of Clinical Faculty Members of Alborz University of Medical Sciences Towards Evidence Based Medicine (EBM and Its Using

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. salehifar

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Evidence based medicine (EBM is an approach to improve the quality of clinical decision making, treatment and care provided to patients. This study aimed to assess the knowledge, attitude and practice of faculty members of Alborz University of Medical Sciences about EBM. Methods: A cross sectional study was conducted in 2015 and 40 physicians participated. Data were collected by a valid and reliable structured questionnaire consisting 17 knowledge items, 8 attitude items and 12 items for practices about EBM. Using SPSS software version 19 data analyses was done. Results: From a total of 49 faculty members 40 responded the questionnaires in which 62.5% were female, the mean average age was 40.6 years and mean time of job experience was 8.1 years. About half of the respondents had participated in an EBM workshop, 10% of the participants have stated that do not know EBM and 37.5% had low knowledge, only 7.5% had adequate knowledge. Ninety percent of the respondents believed that EBM has an important role in promoting quality of care and 82% of them were interested to take part in EBM workshops. The information source for clinical practice in 70% of the participants was the text book, 55% Cochrane, and 45% clinical experience. Conclusion: Faculty members had a positive attitude toward EBM; although a vast majority of them claimed that they practice based on evidence in clinical settings, about half of them stated had not adequate knowledge about EBM. Therefore, it is necessary to keep their knowledge up to date. 

  7. Consumer attitudes, barriers, and meal satisfaction associated with sodium-reduced meal intake at worksite cafeterias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jounghee; Park, Sohyun

    2015-12-01

    Targeting consumers who consume lunches at their worksite cafeterias would be a valuable approach to reduce sodium intake in South Korea. To assess the relationships between socio-demographic factors, consumer satisfaction, attitudes, barriers and the frequency of sodium-reduced meal intake. We implemented a cross-sectional research, analyzing data from 738 consumers aged 18 years or older (327 males and 411 females) at 17 worksite cafeterias in South Korea. We used the ordinary least squares regression analysis to determine the factors related to overall satisfaction with sodium-reduced meal. General linear models with LSD tests were employed to examine the variables that differed by the frequency of sodium-reduced meal intake. Most subjects always or usually consumed the sodium-reduced meal (49%), followed by sometimes (34%) and rarely or never (18%). Diverse menus, taste and belief in the helpfulness of the sodium-reduced meal significantly increased overall satisfaction with the sodium-reduced diet (P < 0.05). We found importance of needs in the following order: 1) 'menu diversity' (4.01 points), 2) 'active promotion' (3.97 points), 3) 'display of nutrition labels in a visible location' (3.96 points), 4) 'improvement of taste' (3.88 points), and 5) 'education of sodium-reduction self-care behaviors' (3.82 points). Dietitians could lead consumers to choose sodium-reduced meals by improving their taste and providing diverse menus for the sodium-reduced meals at worksite cafeterias.

  8. Perioperative registered nurses knowledge, attitudes, behaviors, and barriers regarding pressure ulcer prevention in perioperative patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tallier, Peggy C; Reineke, Patricia R; Asadoorian, Kathy; Choonoo, John G; Campo, Marc; Malmgreen-Wallen, Christine

    2017-08-01

    Hospital acquired pressure ulcers have a detrimental effect on patient quality of life, morbidity, mortality, and cost to the healthcare industry. Little is known about pressure ulcer prevention in perioperative services. The objectives of this study were to describe perioperative registered nurses (RNs) knowledge, attitudes, behaviors, and barriers about pressure ulcer prevention and to determine if knowledge and the availability of a pressure ulcer staging tool are predictors of pressure ulcer prevention behavior. A cross-sectional descriptive pilot study was conducted. Sixty-two perioperative RNs from 10 acute care hospitals participated. Perioperative nurses believed carrying out pressure ulcer prevention strategies is essential to nursing practice but only two-thirds reported conducting pressure ulcer risk assessment on all patients and daily assessment on at risk patients. Results indicated a knowledge deficit regarding assessment and prevention of pressure ulcers as performance on the PUKT (72%) fell below the recommended score of 90%. Results of binary logistic regression indicated that knowledge as measured by the PUKT and availability of a pressure ulcer staging tool were statistically significant (p=0.03) predictors of pressure ulcer prevention behavior. The initial model without the predictor variables, indicated an overall success rate of correct predictions of 64% which increase to 73% when the predictor variables were added to the initial model. Although perioperative nurses believe that pressure ulcer prevention is important, a knowledge deficit exists and there is a need for pressure ulcer prevention education. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Attitudes Of Distance Learning Students At 
Ukm’s Faculty Of Islamic Studies Towards Learning
Arabic Language Skill Courses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zamri ARIFIN

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Attitude is the most important element in determining one’s achievements in learning the Arabic language either as a full or part-time student. This study is based on the Gardner's socio-educational model, and focuses on two types of motivational orientation, which are integrative and instrumental, and attitudes toward the learning conditions. The main purpose of this study is to identify the level of integrative orientation, attitudes toward the learning conditions and instrumental orientation among students in a Distance Learning (DL program at the Faculty of Islamic Studies (FPI, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM, The National University of Malaysia. This study used a quantitative research design. Data were collected through questionnaires and analyzed descriptively. A total of 170 distance learning students were selected using the simple random sampling technique. Findings show that the students possessed a high level of integrative orientation and their attitudes toward learning environment were positive. The level of instrumental orientation, on the other hand, was very high with the instrumental orientation obtaining the highest mean score. One of the implications that can be drawn from this study is that teachers and students need to take into account and emphasize integrative orientation, attitudes toward learning conditions and instrumental orientation in order to develop a positive attitude in students who aim to master the Arabic language. Other than that, educational institutions should provide support and carry out other related activities and programs in order to ensure that students consistently have positive attitudes whilst achieving excellent results in learning the Arabic language.

  10. Research awareness, attitudes and barriers among clinical staff in a regional cancer centre. Part 1: a quantitative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, B; Coltart, K; Hutchison, C; McJury, M; Morrison, A; Paterson, C; Thomson, M

    2017-09-01

    Research is of key importance in delivering high-quality patient care through evidence-based practice. Attitude towards research and barriers to research can have an impact on research activity. A survey was conducted to establish the levels of research awareness and attitudes among clinical staff groups in this regional cancer centre and identify any barriers to participation in research. The survey consisted of 26 questions and was distributed electronically and completed online. The response rate was 22.3% (n = 123). All participants felt that clinical research will help the regional cancer centre develop and progress treatments in the future. A positive attitude towards research was evident and consistent across professional groups. The main identified barriers to research included lacking the required knowledge, skills and training, lacking support from managers, and lack of opportunity or time to be involved in research, in particular for allied health professionals. However, there appears to be the foundation of a healthy research culture for nurses supported by management. The results of the survey support the implementation of an action plan based on the recommendations of this journal article. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Social media and impression management: Veterinary Medicine students? and faculty members? attitudes toward the acceptability of social media posts

    OpenAIRE

    KEDROWICZ, APRIL A.; ROYAL, KENNETH; FLAMMER, KEVEN

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: While social media has the potential to be used to make professional and personal connections, it can also be used inappropriately, with detrimental ramifications for the individual in terms of their professional reputation and even hiring decisions. This research explored students’ and faculty members’ perceptions of the acceptability of various social media postings. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in 2015. All students and faculty member...

  12. Evidence-based practice in radiology: Knowledge, attitude and perceived barriers to practice among residents in radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anuradha, Chandramohan, E-mail: anuradhachandramohan@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Christian Medical College, Vellore, Tamil Nadu 632 004 (India); Jacob, K.S., E-mail: ksjacob@cmcvellore.ac.in [Department of Psychiatry, Christian Medical College, Vellore, Tamil Nadu 632 004 (India); Specialist Mental Health Service for Older People, Suite 106, 64–68 Derby Street, Kingswood, Penrith 2750 (Australia); Shyamkumar, N.K., E-mail: aparnashyam@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Christian Medical College, Vellore, Tamil Nadu 632 004 (India); Sridhar, Gibikote, E-mail: gibikote@cmcvellore.ac.in [Department of Radiology, Christian Medical College, Vellore, Tamil Nadu 632 004 (India)

    2013-05-15

    Aim: We examinted the attitude, knowledge and perceived barriers to evidence-based practice of radiology (EBPR) among residents in radiology. Study design and setting: We used the McColl questionnaire (1) and the BARRIERS scale (2) to assess the issues among radiology trainees attending an annual refresher course. Ninety six residents from 32 medical colleges from Southern India attended the course. Results: Eighty (83.3%) residents, 55 male and 25 female of age range 24–34 years, consented and returned the questionnaire. The majority of the participants had a positive attitude towards EBPR. However, 45% were unaware of sources for evidence based literature although many had access to Medline (45%) and the internet (80%). The majority (70%) were aware of the common technical terms (e.g. odds ratio, absolute and relative risk) but other complex details (e.g. meta-analysis, clinical effectiveness, confidence interval, publication bias and number needed to treat) were poorly understood. Though majority of residents (59%) were currently following guidelines and protocols laid by colleagues within their departments, 70% of residents were interested in learning the skills of EBPR and were willing to appraise primary literature or systematic reviews by themselves. Insufficient time on the job to implement new ideas (70.1%); relevant literature is not being complied in one place (68.9%); not being able to understand statistical methods (68.5%) were considered to be the major barriers to EBPR. Training in critical appraisal significantly influence usage of bibliographic databases (p < 0.0001). Attitude of collegues (p = 0.006) influenced attitude of the trainees towards EBPR. Those with higher knowledge scores (p = 0.02) and a greater awareness of sources for seeking evidence based literature (p = 0.05) held stronger beliefs that EBPR significantly improved patient care. Conclusions: The large knowledge gap related to EBPR suggests the need to incorporate structured

  13. Evidence-based practice in radiology: Knowledge, attitude and perceived barriers to practice among residents in radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anuradha, Chandramohan; Jacob, K.S.; Shyamkumar, N.K.; Sridhar, Gibikote

    2013-01-01

    Aim: We examinted the attitude, knowledge and perceived barriers to evidence-based practice of radiology (EBPR) among residents in radiology. Study design and setting: We used the McColl questionnaire (1) and the BARRIERS scale (2) to assess the issues among radiology trainees attending an annual refresher course. Ninety six residents from 32 medical colleges from Southern India attended the course. Results: Eighty (83.3%) residents, 55 male and 25 female of age range 24–34 years, consented and returned the questionnaire. The majority of the participants had a positive attitude towards EBPR. However, 45% were unaware of sources for evidence based literature although many had access to Medline (45%) and the internet (80%). The majority (70%) were aware of the common technical terms (e.g. odds ratio, absolute and relative risk) but other complex details (e.g. meta-analysis, clinical effectiveness, confidence interval, publication bias and number needed to treat) were poorly understood. Though majority of residents (59%) were currently following guidelines and protocols laid by colleagues within their departments, 70% of residents were interested in learning the skills of EBPR and were willing to appraise primary literature or systematic reviews by themselves. Insufficient time on the job to implement new ideas (70.1%); relevant literature is not being complied in one place (68.9%); not being able to understand statistical methods (68.5%) were considered to be the major barriers to EBPR. Training in critical appraisal significantly influence usage of bibliographic databases (p < 0.0001). Attitude of collegues (p = 0.006) influenced attitude of the trainees towards EBPR. Those with higher knowledge scores (p = 0.02) and a greater awareness of sources for seeking evidence based literature (p = 0.05) held stronger beliefs that EBPR significantly improved patient care. Conclusions: The large knowledge gap related to EBPR suggests the need to incorporate structured

  14. Going global: do consumer preferences, attitudes, and barriers to using e-mental health services differ across countries?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clough, Bonnie A; Zarean, Mostafa; Ruane, Ilse; Mateo, Niño Jose; Aliyeva, Turana A; Casey, Leanne M

    2017-08-31

    e-Mental health services have the capacity to overcome barriers to care and reduce the unmet need for psychological services, particularly in developing countries. However, it is unknown how acceptable e-mental health interventions may be to these populations. The purpose of the current study was to examine consumer attitudes and perceived barriers to e-mental health usage across four countries: Australia, Iran, the Philippines and South Africa. An online survey was completed by 524 adults living in these countries, assessing previous contact with e-mental health services, willingness to use e-mental health services, and perceived barriers and needs for accessing e-mental health services. Although previous contact with e-mental health services was low, the majority of respondents in each sample reported a willingness to try e-mental health services if offered. Barriers toward e-mental health usage were higher among the developing countries than Australia. The most commonly endorsed barriers concerned needing information and assurances regarding the programmes. Across countries, participants indicated a willingness to use e-mental health programmes if offered. With appropriate research and careful implementation, e-mental health has the potential to be a valuable part of mental healthcare in developing countries.

  15. Social media and impression management: Veterinary Medicine students' and faculty members' attitudes toward the acceptability of social media posts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kedrowicz, April A; Royal, Kenneth; Flammer, Keven

    2016-10-01

    While social media has the potential to be used to make professional and personal connections, it can also be used inappropriately, with detrimental ramifications for the individual in terms of their professional reputation and even hiring decisions. This research explored students' and faculty members' perceptions of the acceptability of various social media postings. This cross-sectional study was conducted in 2015. All students and faculty members at the College of Veterinary Medicine were invited to participate. The sample size included 140 students and 69 faculty members who completed the Social Media Scale (SMS), a 7-point semantic differential scale. The SMS consisted of 12 items that measured the extent to which a variety of behaviors, using social media, constituted acceptable and unacceptable behaviors. Items appearing on the SMS were an amalgamation of modified items previously presented by Coe, Weijs, Muise et al. (2012) and new items generated specifically for this study. The data were collected during the spring semester of 2015 using Qualtrics online survey software and analyzed using t-tests and ANOVA. The results showed that statistically significant differences existed between the students' and faculty members' ratings of acceptable behavior, as well as gender differences and differences across class years. These findings have implications for the development of policy and educational initiatives around professional identity management in the social sphere.

  16. Social media and impression management: Veterinary medicine students’ and faculty members’ attitudes toward the acceptability of social media posts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    APRIL A. KEDROWICZ

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: While social media has the potential to be used to make professional and personal connections, it can also be used inappropriately, with detrimental ramifications for the individual in terms of their professional reputation and even hiring decisions. This research explored students’ and faculty members’ perceptions of the acceptability of various social media postings. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in 2015. All students and faculty members at the College of Veterinary Medicine were invited to participate. The sample size included 140 students and 69 faculty members who completed the Social Media Scale (SMS, a 7-point semantic differential scale. The SMS consisted of 12 items that measured the extent to which a variety of behaviors, using social media, constituted acceptable and unacceptable behaviors. Items appearing on the SMS were an amalgamation of modified items previously presented by Coe, Weijs, Muise et al. (2012 and new items generated specifically for this study. The data were collected during the spring semester of 2015 using Qualtrics online survey software and analyzed using t-tests and ANOVA. Results: The results showed that statistically significant differences existed between the students’ and faculty members’ ratings of acceptable behavior, as well as gender differences and differences across class years. Conclusion: These findings have implications for the development of policy and educational initiatives around professional identity management in the social sphere.

  17. Social Media and Impression Management: Veterinary Medicine Students' and Faculty Members' Attitudes toward the Acceptability of Social Media Posts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kedrowicz, April A.; Royal, Kenneth; Flammer, Keven

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: While social media has the potential to be used to make professional and personal connections, it can also be used inappropriately, with detrimental ramifications for the individual in terms of their professional reputation and even hiring decisions. This research explored students' and faculty members' perceptions of the…

  18. Benefits and barriers among volunteer teaching faculty: comparison between those who precept and those who do not in the core pediatrics clerkship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael S. Ryan

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Community-based outpatient experiences are a core component of the clinical years in medical school. Central to the success of this experience is the recruitment and retention of volunteer faculty from the community. Prior studies have identified reasons why some preceptors volunteer their time however, there is a paucity of data comparing those who volunteer from those who do not. Methods: A survey was developed following a review of previous studies addressing perceptions of community-based preceptors. A non-parametric, Mann–Whitney U test was used to compare active preceptors (APs and inactive preceptors (IPs and all data were analyzed in SPSS 20.0. Results: There was a 28% response rate. Preceptors showed similar demographic characteristics, valued intrinsic over extrinsic benefits, and appreciated Continuing Medical Education (CME/Maintenance of Certification (MOC opportunities as the highest extrinsic reward. APs were more likely to also precept at the M1/M2 level and value recognition and faculty development opportunities (p<0.05. IPs denoted time as the most significant barrier and, in comparison to APs, rated financial compensation as more important (p<0.05. Conclusions: Community preceptors are motivated by intrinsic benefits of teaching. Efforts to recruit should initially focus on promoting awareness of teaching opportunities and offering CME/MOC opportunities. Increasing the pool of preceptors may require financial compensation.

  19. Pedagogic Barriers in Cameroon Inclusive Classrooms: The Impact of Curriculum, Teachers' Attitudes and Classroom Infrastructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanyi, Maureen Ebanga

    2016-01-01

    This study sought to examine if the curriculum, infrastructures and teachers' attitudes may influence school exclusion amongst disabled pupils. Three hypotheses were formulated based on the three variables: curriculum (teaching programmes), infrastructures and teachers' attitudes. 150 public primary school personnel from 12 primary schools in…

  20. Attitudes, experiences, and barriers to research and publishing among dental postgraduate students of Bengaluru City: A cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aditi Hegde

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Research experience not only enhances understanding but also instills evidence-based practice and improves skills. A natural successor to research is academic publishing. Unfortunately, student research itself is plagued by a number of barriers. Aim: To identify the attitudes, experiences, and barriers to research and publishing among dental postgraduate students of Bangalore city. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional survey using purposive sampling technique was conducted among the dental postgraduate students of all specialties in Bengaluru city in the months of July–August 2015. A prevalidated, close-ended, self-administered questionnaire consisting of 26 questions was used. Data from 638 completed questionnaires were entered into and analyzed using Microsoft Excel 2013 and SPSS software version 14. Results: The majority of the students displayed a positive attitude towards research and stated that they would like more opportunities to take part in research (89%. Most students were positive toward publishing research; 94% agreed that it is important to publish, although only 43.7% had submitted an article for publication. The single most often stated barrier to conducting research was a lack of funding from the institution (15.7%, followed by workload and time constraints (15.0%. Lack of training and good mentorship was the most often (23.3% faced barrier to publishing, along with high publication fee for indexed journals (17.9%. Conclusion: Dental postgraduate students show an urge to conduct research and publish their results. Research-related workshops for teachers and students are suggestions for improving the status of research in dental colleges.

  1. Physical activity and mental disorders: a case-control study on attitudes, preferences and perceived barriers in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpiniello, Bernardo; Primavera, Diego; Pilu, Alessandra; Vaccargiu, Nicola; Pinna, Federica

    2013-12-01

    Mentally ill people experience greater difficulty than the general population in exercising regularly. We aimed to evaluate attitudes displayed and barriers perceived towards physical activity in a sample of psychiatric patients. A total of 138 (M = 48, F = 90) patients attending a community mental health centre were compared with a control group made up of 138 subjects not affected by mental disorders matched for gender, mean age and education. Both groups underwent a self-administered questionnaire. Patients reported a more sedentary lifestyle in terms of weekly physical activities and daily hours of exercise; their body mass index (BMI) was significantly higher compared with the BMI of controls (p barriers to physical activity; moreover, stating how feeling sad or "distressed" reduced their propensity to physical exercise (p = 0.002). A higher number of patients (p physical activity, and the experiencing of scarce enjoyment (p barriers may limit regular physical activity in subjects affected by mental disorders; these barriers should be taken into account and appropriately addressed.

  2. The Relationship between Faculty and Administrator Attitudes toward Internet-Based Technologies and Virtual Networking and the Development and Support of Social Capital in Six Selected Rural Secondary Schools in Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frick, John Edward

    2012-01-01

    Social capital (or the ways in which people in an organization collaborate and to a greater extent the quality of professional community in that context) has a variety of implications for organizations, specifically schools. This study examined the relationship between attitudes of administrators and faculty at the secondary level toward…

  3. Assessment of Attitudes Regarding Tobacco-Free Campus Policy and Secondhand Smoke Exposure among College Students, Faculty, and Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Michael E.; Williams, Ronald D., Jr.; Hunt, Barry

    2015-01-01

    Background: Recently there has been a push to implement tobacco-free policies on college campuses. Policies creating tobacco-free college campuses have increased with changes in social norms. The campus environment provides a setting for individuals to express their attitudes regarding tobacco use. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess…

  4. Attitudes, barriers and facilitators for health promotion in the elderly in primary care. A qualitative focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badertscher, Nina; Rossi, Pascal Olivier; Rieder, Arabelle; Herter-Clavel, Catherine; Rosemann, Thomas; Zoller, Marco

    2012-07-11

    Effective health promotion is of great importance from clinical as well as from public health perspectives and therefore should be encouraged. Especially regarding health promotion in the elderly, general practitioners (GPs) have a key role. Nevertheless, evidence suggests a lack of health promotion by GPs, especially in this age group. The aim of our study was to assess self-perceived attitudes, barriers and facilitators of GPs to provide health promotion in the elderly. We performed a qualitative focus group study with 37 general practitioners. The focus group interviews were recorded digitally, transcribed literally and analysed with ATLAS.ti, a software program for qualitative text analysis. Among the participating GPs, definitions of health promotion varied widely and the opinions regarding its effectiveness were very heterogeneous. The two most important self-perceived barriers for GPs to provide health promotion in the elderly were lack of time and insufficient reimbursement for preventive and health promotion advice. As intervention to increase health promotion in the elderly, GPs suggested, for example, integration of health promotion into under and postgraduate training. Changes at the practice level such as involving the practice nurse in health promotion and counselling were discussed very controversially. Health promotion, especially in the elderly, is crucial but in the opinion of the GPs we involved in our study, there is a gap between public health requirements and the reimbursement system. Integration of health promotion in medical education may be needed to increase knowledge as well as attitudes of GPs regarding this issue.

  5. Attitude toward depression, its complications, prevention and barriers to seeking help among ethnic groups in Penang, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    This study aims to explore attitudes towards, complications of and preventive measures for depression and the barriers that result in delays in seeking help among the various ethnic groups in Penang, Malaysia. In June 2007 a questionnaire‐based survey was undertaken in Penang. Face‐to‐face interviews were conducted, and 1855 respondents were approached to participate in the study by adopting a cluster random sampling method. A 25‐item questionnaire was used to explore public attitudes towards, complications of and preventive measures for depression and delays in seeking help. A total of 1149 (61.94%) showed willingness to participate in the survey. Ethnically, 490 (42.6%) of the respondents who participated in the survey were Malay, while 413 (35.9%) were Chinese, 149 (13%) Indian and 97 (8.4%) from other ethnic minorities. The mean age of the respondents was 30 years (SD ± 11.5). In evaluating public attitudes, the majority (n = 910, 79.2%) agreed with the statement that family and friends can enhance the depression recovery process by providing more care and attention to the patient and this was found to be statistically significant (P ≤0.001). More than one‐third of the respondents (n = 437, 38.0%) perceived depression as a normal medical condition and believed that it subsides automatically. The majority (n = 830, 72.2%) stated that depression results in social problems, while some felt that it can lead to raised blood pressure (n = 518, 45.1%). In terms of prevention, most of the respondents indicated that one can prevent depression by maintaining a good social life. In evaluating the barriers to seeking professional help, the majority (n = 582, 50.7%) stated that they did not believe they were at risk, with the next largest group identifying a lack of awareness regarding the signs and symptoms. However, a positive attitude was observed towards the complications and prevention of depression. Initiatives to increase mental health literacy will

  6. Attitude of clinical faculty members in Shiraz Medical University towards private practice physicians' participation in ambulatory care education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khatereh Mahori

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Improvement of medical education is necessary for meeting health care demands. Participation of private practice physicians in ambulatory care training is an effective method for enhancing medical students' skills. Purpose This study was undertaken to determine clinical professors' views about participation of physicians with private office in ambulatory care training. Methods: Participants composed of 162 Shiraz Medical University faculty members from 12 disciplines. A questionnaire requesting faculty members' views on different aspects of ambulat01y care teaching and interaction of community-based organizations was distributed. Results: Of 120 (74.1% respondents, 64 (54.2% believed that clinical settings of medical university are appropriate for ambulatory care training. Private practice physicians believed more than academic physicians without private office that private offices have wider range of patients, more common cases, and better follow up chance; and is also a better setting for learning ambulatory care compared with medical university clinical centers. Overall, 32 (29.1% respondent’s found the participation of physicians with private practice on medical education positive. Key words medical education, ambulatory medicine, private practice

  7. A study of Knowledge, Attitude and Self-Assessment of Residents on Evidence-Based Dentistry at Faculty of Dentistry of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Pourkazemi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Evidence-based dentistry is the combination of individual clinical experiences withthe highest-quality evidence available as the result of systematic studies.Evidence-based dentistryis an approach in which the clinician uses the best evidence available to make the most appropriatedecision for the patient. In this descriptive study, the knowledge, attitude and self-assessment ofTabriz dental school residents were examined on evidence-based dentistry in the academic year2014-2015. Methods: All residents of Tabriz Dentistry Faculty (100 in total were enrolled in the study.Thedata collection tool was a questionnaire, and the validity of the questionnaire was determined inprevious studies. To determine the reliability of the questionnaire, it was distributed among the20 residents ina pilot study. Descriptive statistical methods were used to study the data obtained.Chi-square, t-test, and Kruskal-Wallis tests were used to assess the relationship between variablesusing SPSS 20. Results: The results showed that the level of residents’ knowledge on evidence-based dentistrywas moderate and 94.4% of residents had a positive attitude toward EBD. The highest and lowestself-assessments were related to the terms PubMed and Cochrane Collaboration (CI=29.27-30.73,CI=42.06-43.32 CI=28.69-31.09with 95%confidence interval, respectively. Conclusion: Given the increasing importance of evidence-based dentistry and considering themoderate knowledge of the residents on the topic, a need is felt for proper planning to teach itat Tabriz University of Medical Sciences. Considering dentists’ positive attitude toward EBD, Itseems that there is an appropriate background for EBD education in the country

  8. Japanese Resident Physicians' Attitudes, knowledge, and Perceived Barriers on the Practice of Evidence Based Medicine: a Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emura Sei SE

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evidence based medicine plays a crucial role as a tool that helps integrate research evidence into clinical practice. However, few reports have yet to examine its application in daily practice among resident physicians in Japan. The aim of this study was to assess the attitudes towards and knowledge of EBM among resident physicians in Japanese and determine perceived barriers to its use. Findings A cross-sectional, self-administered anonymous questionnaire was distributed to 60 resident staffs at Saga University Hospital in Japan. Forty residents completed and returned the questionnaire. Fifty four percent of respondents understood the basic terminology of EBM, 3% could explain this to others, and 41% indicated they would like to understand the terminology more. Thirteen percent admitted having a good understanding of EBM basic skills. Fifty respondents indicated having read EBM sources, but only 3% indicated that they use these sources in clinical decision making. The most prominent barriers of EBM application revealed in this study were insufficient time to access the sources, a lack of native language references, and insufficient basic EBM skills, but not scepticism about the EBM concept. Conclusions In general, respondents positively welcomed EBM, and moderately understood and knew basic EBM skill; however, barriers in its application were shown to exist.

  9. Mental Health Attitudes and Beliefs in a Community Sample on the Central Coast in Australia: Barriers to Help Seeking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, Dominiek; Saleeba, Christine; Howe, Deborah

    2018-03-27

    There continues to be call for greater community awareness actions and strategies to reduce stigma and enhance mental health literacy nationally and internationally. To identify local barriers to help-seeking and perceptions around stigma, we developed a 'mental health attitudes and beliefs' survey which was administered at a range of community events on the Central Coast in New South Wales, Australia. The aim was for the results of this survey to inform the development of strategies that enhance local help-seeking behaviours that are sensitive to the role of age, gender and Indigenous status. People who approached our Mental Health Information stall were invited to complete the survey and 282 individuals completed the survey. The data was analysed descriptively with a focus on comparing subgroups based on age, gender, Indigenous status, and previous service access or experience of mental illness. Cost, stigma and mental health literacy were found to be prominent barriers to help-seeking for the overall cohort; however, the ways in which or extent to which these barriers impact on help seeking varied between subgroups. A discussion of these differences and their implications for practice is the focus of this paper.

  10. Assessment of Nurses’ Knowledge, Attitude, and Perceived Barriers to Expressed Pressure Ulcer Prevention Practice in Addis Ababa Government Hospitals, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, 2015

    OpenAIRE

    Abebe Dilie; Daniel Mengistu

    2015-01-01

    Background. Although pressure ulcer development is now generally considered as an indicator for quality of nursing care, questions and concerns about situations in which they are unavoidable remain. Awareness about the significance of the problem, positive attitude towards prevention, and an adequate level of knowledge are cornerstones to effectively prevent pressure ulcers. Objective. To assess nurses’ knowledge, attitudes, and perceived barriers to expressed pressure ulcer prevention practi...

  11. Managerial attitudes and perceived barriers regarding evidence-based practice : An international survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barends, Eric; Villanueva, Josh; Rousseau, Denise M.; Briner, Rob B.; Jepsen, Denise M.; Houghton, Edward; Ten Have, Steven

    2017-01-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) in management is still in its infancy. Several studies suggest that managers in businesses and other organizations do not consult the scientific evidence when making decisions. To facilitate its uptake, we need to better understand practitioner attitudes and perceived

  12. Interagency Collaboration between Child Protection and Mental Health Services: Practices, Attitudes and Barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darlington, Yvonne; Feeney, Judith A.; Rixon, Kylie

    2005-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this paper is to examine some of the factors that facilitate and hinder interagency collaboration between child protection services and mental health services in cases where there is a parent with a mental illness and there are protection concerns for the child(ren). The paper reports on agency practices, worker attitudes and…

  13. General practitioners and carers: a questionnaire survey of attitudes, awareness of issues, barriers and enablers to provision of services

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    Atkins Christine

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Approximately one in ten of the UK population are unpaid carers supporting a family member or friend who could not manage without their help, saving the UK economy an estimated £87 billion. This role is known to sometimes have a negative impact on carers and to require support both informally and from statutory services. General practice is a first point of contact for carers but research investigating general practitioners' (GPs' attitudes towards carers and awareness of issues facing carers is rare. This study therefore aimed to identify GPs' attitudes, awareness of issues, and perceptions of the barriers and enablers to provision of services. Methods Using a self-completion questionnaire distributed at a series of workshops, this study investigates GPs' attitudes to carers; awareness and knowledge of carers' issues; services offered in general practice and barriers to supporting carers. Results Seventy eight out of a total of 95 GPs (82% response rate from a variety of areas in England completed the questionnaires. The GPs identified time, resources and lack of knowledge as barriers, but only 9% agreed with the statement that there is little support they can offer carers. However, nine in ten GPs (89% feel they have insufficient training here and approximately half of them (47% lack confidence that they are meeting carers' needs. Confidence in identifying carers is also low (45%. Issues that GPs would look out for amongst carers include emotional and physical health problems and financial and isolation difficulties. GPs specifically highlighted educational and isolation issues for young carers. Few services were described that targeted carers. Conclusions GPs recognise that they have an important role to play in supporting carers but would like training and support. Further investigation is needed both to determine how best to train and facilitate GPs and general practice teams in their role in supporting carers and to

  14. Preventing Sexual Violence Through Bystander Intervention: Attitudes, Behaviors, Missed Opportunities, and Barriers to Intervention Among Australian University Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kania, Rachel; Cale, Jesse

    2018-03-01

    The concept of bystander intervention is gaining popularity in universities as a mechanism to prevent sexual violence. Prior research has focused on correlates of bystanders' intentions to intervene and intervention behaviors in situations where there is a risk of sexual violence. The current study builds on this literature by exploring the nature of missed opportunities, including perceived barriers to intervention. In all, 380 Australian undergraduate university students completed an online survey. Measures included a rape myth acceptance scale, bystander intentions to intervene, actual intervention behaviors, missed opportunities for intervention, and perceived barriers for missed opportunities. Promisingly, students reported high levels of intentions to intervene in situations where there was a risk of sexual violence and reported relatively few missed opportunities to do so when these situations did occur. Intervention behaviors varied by important demographic characteristics such as gender, age, attitudes toward sexual violence, and the nature of the situation. Younger female students, with lower levels of rape myth acceptance, who had previously engaged in bystander intervention behaviors were more likely to report intentions to intervene in future risky situations, and female international students reported fewer missed opportunities for intervention. The most common barrier to intervention for identified missed opportunities was a failure to recognize situations as having a potential risk for sexual violence, and students were most likely to intervene in situations when the opportunity to help a friend in distress arose. This study provides some preliminary empirical evidence about bystander intervention against sexual violence among Australian university students, and identifies unique contexts for intervention and what current barriers to intervention may be.

  15. Getting Vaccinated against HPV: Attitudes, Intentions and Perceived Barriers of Female Undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Sloane C.; Vail-Smith, Karen; White, David M.; Baker, Elizabeth; Mitchell, Terri

    2010-01-01

    This study examines college women's intention to receive the Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) vaccine and their perceived barriers to being vaccinated. The study reports findings from an online questionnaire completed by 856 undergraduate women enrolled in a required personal health course at a large (27,000 plus) southeastern university. The majority…

  16. Evaluation of Drug Use Attitudes of Patient and Its Relatives Attending to Cukurova University Medical Faculty Balcali Hospital

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    Yusuf Karatas

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Irrational drug usage is one of the important public health problems in all countries. Also in our country irrational drug usage patterns is a serious problem and it increases the drug’s share of public health care costs. The aim of our study was evaluate the drug use patterns of patients and relatives of patients in Cukurova University Medical Faculty Balcali Hospital. Material and Methods: Face-to-face interviews (using a questionnaire about Rational Drug Use Survey with 209 patients and patients relatives, admitted to Cukurova University Medical Faculty Balcali Hospital clinics. Results: 209 people participated in this study and 58 % (124 of these are women. The mean age of women was 41,39±13,76 and the mean age of the man was 44,67±13,55. If we decompose the participants to their educational attainment; primary school (34,4 %, secondary school (18,7 %, high school (26,3 % and university (20,6 %. 11,0 % of the participants have no social security. 5,7 % of the participants have acute disease, 54,5 % of them have chronic disease and 39,7 % of them have no medical problems. 53,1 % of the participants said that they do not use drugs without consulting a medical doctor, 11,0 % of the participants said that they sometimes use drugs, 30,6 % of the participants said that they rarely use drugs and 5,3 % of the participants said that they often use drugs without consulting a medical doctor. 14,8 % of the participants said that they use drugs with advise of their relatives, friends and neighbors, 17,2 % of the participants said that they advise the drugs to their relatives, friends and neighbors when they were sick. 16,7 % of the participants said that they often use antibiotics and 77,5 % of the participants said that they sometimes use antibiotics without consulting a doctor when they had common cold or flu. 40,2 % of the participants said that they do not use herbal medicine in treatment. Patients with canser 2,4 %, patients with

  17. Attitudes of Students at the Faculty of Education, University of Ljubljana, Towards Slovenian as the Language of Instruction

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    Skubic Darija

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses the Slovenian language as the language of instruction inhigher education context. First, the status of Slovenian throughout history isbriefly described. Second, the author points out the role of the Slovenian standardlanguage in the educational system from kindergarten to the university, and the fullfunctional role of the Slovenian language within higher education, i.e. Slovenianas the academic language in different disciplines. Further, the paper provides anoutline of language guidelines as included in various documents, such as TheCountry Profile of Slovenia (2003, The National Programme for Language Policy(2007-2011, The White Paper (2011, The Common European Framework forLanguages (2001, and the draft of the National Programme for Language Policy2012-2016. The empirical part focuses on a survey, which investigated into theattitudes of students at the Faculty of Education towards Slovenian as the languageof instruction. The conclusions drawn from the survey suggest some strategies forimproving the current language practice in the higher education context.

  18. Correlates of smoking, quit attempts and attitudes towards total smoking bans at university: findings from eleven faculties in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Ansari, Walid; Labeeb, Shokria; Kotb, Safaa; Yousafzai, Mohammad T; El-Houfey, Amira; Stock, Christiane

    2012-01-01

    Smoking among university students represents a formidable and global public health challenge. We assessed the associations between socio-demographic, health and wellbeing variables as independent variables, with daily smoking, attempts to quit smoking, and agreement with smoking ban as dependent variables. A sample of 3258 undergraduate students from eleven faculties at Assiut University, Assiut, Egypt, completed a general health questionnaire. Overall daily or occasional smoking in last three months prior to the survey was about 9% (8% occasional and 1% daily smokers), and smoking was generally more prevalent among males (male=17%, female=0.6%, P non-smoking policies on university premises, as well as regular up-to-date information on, and the periodic/yearly monitoring of tobacco use by university students employing standardised data collection instruments and reference periods. In addition, it would be valuable to develop campus-based educational/ awareness campaigns designed to counteract tobacco advertisement directed towards young people in Middle East countries. Otherwise, the danger could be that the current relatively low smoking prevalence among university students may escalate in the future.

  19. South African Teachers' Attitudes toward Learners with Barriers to Learning: Attention-Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorder and Little or No Functional Speech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornman, Juan; Donohue, Dana K.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined teachers' attitudes toward learners with two types of barriers to learning: a learner with attention-deficit and hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and a learner with little or no functional speech (LNFS). The results indicated that although teachers reported that the learner with ADHD would be more disruptive in class and have a…

  20. A qualitative study exploring nurses’ attitudes, confidence, and perceived barriers to implementing a traumatic brain injury nursing chart in Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leslie Wynveen

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In Africa, traumatic brain injuries frequently result from road traffic injuries and assaults. Despite limited resources and the high costs of life-saving neurosurgical interventions, secondary brain injury prevention has the potential for improving outcomes. However, nurses and other medical personnel infrequently monitor vital signs, blood sugar, and pulse oximetry and only sporadically re-assess neurological status. Methods: In one-on-one, semi-structured interviews, 27 nurses from Mulago Hospital’s emergency centre, a tertiary care trauma hospital in Kampala, Uganda, provided feedback regarding a traumatic brain injury-focused education session and use of a nursing chart for detecting secondary brain injury. The interviews explored the nurses’ confidence and perceived barriers to long-term chart implementation and traumatic brain injury care, as well as their ideas for improving this intervention. Interviews were audio recorded, transcribed, and coded using ATLAS.ti: Qualitative Data Analysis and Research Software (Cleverbridge, Inc., Chicago, USA and Microsoft Word and Excel (Microsoft Office, Redmond, USA for thematic content analysis. Results: Key findings identified in the interviews included the nurses’ attitudes toward the chart and their feelings of increased confidence in assessing and caring for these patients. The main barriers to continuous implementation included inadequate staffing and resources. Conclusion: Nurses were receptive to the education session and nursing chart, and felt that it increased their confidence and improved their ability to care for traumatic brain injured patients. However, lack of supplies, overwhelming numbers of patients, and inadequate staffing interfered with consistent monitoring of patients. The nurses offered various suggestions for improving traumatic brain injury care that should be further investigated. More research is needed to assess the applicability of a standardised

  1. A Qualitative Exploration of the DIGCOMP Digital Competence Framework: Attitudes of students, academics and administrative staff in the health faculty of a UK HEI

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    George Evangelinos

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports upon findings of a series of semi-structured interviews with students, academics and administrative staff from a health care faculty in a UK Higher Education Institution (HEI. Exploring their experiences of mapping to the EU DIGCOMP Digital Competence Framework, a hermeneutic lens enables a more nuanced approach to attitudes towards Digital Competence (DC. One of the eight lifelong learning key-competences required for managers, doctors, nurses and other health-related professionals, DC is crucial to professional development. Defined by 14 themes, the findings express the participants’ experiences, knowledge and level of comprehension of the subject. Our findings indicate students are conflating digital social media skills with their skills for the workplace, resulting in over-confidence; academics raising concerns about work/private life balance offered by the affordances of handheld devices; administrative staff that are far more confident and managing a range of technology’s effectively. The research further reveals that the DIGICOMP framework is applicable as a generic framework for professional practice.

  2. Reproductive tract infections: Attitude and barriers among marginalized fisher women in Kerala, South India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Manoj A; Narayan, Poornima

    2017-04-01

    Reproductive tract infections (RTIs) are the cause of severe gynecological and maternal morbidity in India. In marginalized communities, women persevere quietly when faced with a culturally sensitive health issue such as an RTI. To hypothesize on the differential health behavior and low levels of reported incidents among women living in marginalized communities, we undertake an exploratory study in a coastal fishermen community in South India. We identify barriers influencing decisions to seek curative and preventive medical care. Public health practitioners and social workers may find our recommendations relevant for addressing health issues in marginalized communities.

  3. [Smoking habits, attitudes and knowledges of medical students of Medicine, Pharmacy and Odonto-Stomatology's Faculty of Dakar, Senegal].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndiaye, M; Ndir, M; Quantin, X; Demoly, P; Godard, P; Bousquet, J

    2003-11-01

    Smoking is a public health problem that does not spare the medical profession. We set out to determine the prevalence of smoking in medical students in Dakar and to assess their attitudes and knowledge in the face of this problem. A cross sectional study was conducted by means of an auto-questionnaire among 1547 medical students between 3 and 31 May 2001. There were 1061 males (68.6%) and 486 females (31.4%). The overall prevalence of regular or occasional smoking was 34.6%, with 42.8% in the first cycle, 38% in the second and 19% in the third. It was significantly higher among males at 76.4%. The average age of starting smoking ranged from 10 to 22 years and average duration from 5 to 26 years. The influence of fashion was the most frequent initiating factor at 37.4% and 96.6% smoked commercial cigarettes. Nicotine dependence, assessed by the Fagerstrom score, was average in 59.3%, strong in 14% and very strong in 4.7%. 58.8% smoked in public places and 78.2% thought they could give up smoking within the next 5 years. 8.4% were unaware of the effects of tobacco on health and 20.5% of the relationship between tobacco and the diseases quoted. 37.7% of future doctors would not systematically avoid smoking in the presence of patients but 79% wished to ban advertising and 70.4% to ban the use of tobacco in hospitals. 94.4% of students wanted health care workers to be educated about the effects of smoking. Tobacco smoking among medical students has increased between 1989 (28.7%) and 2001 (35.6%). This observation should stimulate the establishment of a course on the pathology of tobacco smoking and the integration of education and prevention within the medical curriculum, increase the awareness of smokers and above all help them stop.

  4. Knowledge, Attitude, and Perception of Barriers for Eye Care among Diabetic Persons Registered at Employee Health Department of a Tertiary Eye Hospital of Central Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Alawi, Abeer; Al-Hassan, Arif; Chauhan, Deepti; Al-Futais, Muneera; Khandekar, Rajiv

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the level of knowledge, attitudes, and barriers to diabetic retinopathy (DR) screening among diabetic healthcare staff at a tertiary eye hospital in central Saudi Arabia. Methods: This was a descriptive survey using a closed-ended questionnaire. A. 5-grade. Likert scale was used for responses to each question. Data were collected on patient demographics and the status of diabetes. Survey responses related to knowledge, attitude, and barriers were grouped. Results: The study sample was comprised of 45 diabetics employed at the hospital. The mean age was 49 ± 11 years and 33 diabetics were males. One-third of the study population was referred to the eye clinic for DR screening. DR screening was performed in 25% of diabetics over the previous year. Twenty-nine (64%; 95% confidence intervals: 50–78) participants had excellent knowledge of eyecare for diabetic complications. Thirteen percent of participants had a positive attitude toward periodic eye checkups. Travel distance to an eyecare unit, no referral from family physicians for annual eye checkups and the lack of availability of gender-specific eyecare professionals were the main perceived barriers. Conclusion: Annual DR screening needs to be promoted to primary healthcare providers and diabetic patients. Barriers should be addressed to improve the uptake of DR screening. PMID:26957842

  5. 'Before reaching the last mile'- Knowledge, attitude, practice and perceived barriers related to tuberculosis directly observed therapy among ASHA workers in Central India: A mixed method study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Akash Ranjan; Pakhare, Abhijit; Kokane, Arun M; Shewade, Hemant Deepak; Chauhan, Ashish; Singh, Abhishek; Gangwar, Arti; Thakur, Prahlad Singh

    2017-12-01

    Community-based direct observed treatment (DOT) providers are an important bridge for the national tuberculosis programme in India to reach the unreached. The present study has explored the knowledge, attitude, practice and barriers perceived by the community-based DOT providers. Mixed-methods study design was used among 41 community-based DOT providers (Accredited Social Health Activist (ASHAs)) working in 67 villages from a primary health center in Raisen district of Madhya Pradesh, India. The cross-sectional quantitative component assessed the knowledge and practices and three focus-group discussions explored the attitude and perceived barriers related to DOT provision. 'Adequate knowledge' and 'satisfactory practice' related to DOT provision was seen in 14 (34%) and 13 (32%) ASHAs respectively. Only two (5%) received any amount of honorarium for completion of DOT in last 3years. The focus-group discussions revealed unfavourable attitude; inadequate training and supervision, non-payment of honorarium, issues related to assured services after referral and patient related factors as the barriers to satisfactory practice of DOT. Study revealed inadequate knowledge and unsatisfactory practice related to DOT provision among ASHAs. Innovations addressing the perceived barriers to improve practice of DOT provision by ASHAs are urgently required. Copyright © 2017 Ministry of Health, Saudi Arabia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Knowledge, Attitude, and Perception of Barriers for Eye Care among Diabetic Persons Registered at Employee Health Department of a Tertiary Eye Hospital of Central Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Alawi, Abeer; Al-Hassan, Arif; Chauhan, Deepti; Al-Futais, Muneera; Khandekar, Rajiv

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the level of knowledge, attitudes, and barriers to diabetic retinopathy (DR) screening among diabetic healthcare staff at a tertiary eye hospital in central Saudi Arabia. This was a descriptive survey using a closed-ended questionnaire. A. 5-grade. Likert scale was used for responses to each question. Data were collected on patient demographics and the status of diabetes. Survey responses related to knowledge, attitude, and barriers were grouped. The study sample was comprised of 45 diabetics employed at the hospital. The mean age was 49 ± 11 years and 33 diabetics were males. One-third of the study population was referred to the eye clinic for DR screening. DR screening was performed in 25% of diabetics over the previous year. Twenty-nine (64%; 95% confidence intervals: 50-78) participants had excellent knowledge of eyecare for diabetic complications. Thirteen percent of participants had a positive attitude toward periodic eye checkups. Travel distance to an eyecare unit, no referral from family physicians for annual eye checkups and the lack of availability of gender-specific eyecare professionals were the main perceived barriers. Annual DR screening needs to be promoted to primary healthcare providers and diabetic patients. Barriers should be addressed to improve the uptake of DR screening.

  7. Electronic clinical decision support systems attitudes and barriers to use in the oncology setting.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Collins, I M

    2012-03-02

    BACKGROUND: There is little evidence regarding attitudes to clinical decision support systems (CDSS) in oncology. AIMS: We examined the current usage, awareness, and concerns of Irish medical oncologists and oncology pharmacists in this area. METHODS: A questionnaire was sent to 27 medical oncologists and 34 oncology pharmacists, identified through professional interest groups. Respondents ranked concerns regarding their use of a CDSS on a scale from 1 to 4, with 4 being most important. RESULTS: Overall, 67% (41\\/61) responded, 48% (13\\/27) of oncologists and 82% (28\\/34) of pharmacists surveyed. Concerns included "difficulty defining complex clinical situations with a set of rules" (mean ± SD) (3.2 ± 0.9), "ensuring evidence base is up to date and relevant" (3.2 ± 0.9) and "lack of clinically relevant suggestions" (2.9 ± 0.9). Ninety-three percent reported using a CDSS but 54% were unaware of this. CONCLUSION: While there are benefits to using a CDSS, concerns must be addressed through user education. This may be a starting point for a user-centred design approach to the development of future local systems through a consultative process.

  8. Adolescents and Young Adults With Cancer: Oncology Nurses Report Attitudes and Barriers to Discussing Fertility Preservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobel Murray, Alexandra; Chrisler, Joan C; Robbins, Mark L

    2016-08-01

    Fertility issues have been found to be an important topic for adolescents and young adults (AYAs) with cancer. Medical technology has made fertility preservation (FP) increasingly effective for postpubertal patients whose treatment course may inhibit their future ability to achieve biologic parenthood. Oncology providers' recommendations have been shown to vary, potentially affecting patients' decision-making processes regarding FP. This study was designed to assess oncology nurses' recommendations for patients to consider FP options and to explore what patient-related factors may influence discussion of FP with AYAs with cancer. 116 oncology nurses participated in this study and were randomized to read one of four vignettes about a patient whose proposed treatment course could affect his or her fertility. Participants' recommendations to partake in FP were analyzed to test for differences by patient age and gender. Open-ended responses to questions about their experiences as oncology nurses were analyzed descriptively. Nurses strongly recommended that all patients explore FP options before the start of treatment. Oncology nurses endorsed stronger opinions that young adult female patients should be given independent decision-making power to delay treatment for FP, compared to male and female adolescent patients and young adult male patients. Participants mentioned barriers to discussions that included concerns about exacerbating negative emotions and the decision-making capacity of young patients.

  9. Performer's attitudes toward seeking health care for voice issues: understanding the barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilman, Marina; Merati, Albert L; Klein, Adam M; Hapner, Edie R; Johns, Michael M

    2009-03-01

    Contemporary commercial music (CCM) performers rely heavily on their voice, yet may not be aware of the importance of proactive voice care. This investigation intends to identify perceptions and barriers to seeking voice care among CCM artists. This cross-sectional observational study used a 10-item Likert-based response questionnaire to assess current perceptions regarding voice care in a population of randomly selected participants of professional CCM conference. Subjects (n=78) were queried regarding their likelihood to seek medical care for minor medical problems and specifically problems with their voice. Additional questions investigated anxiety about seeking voice care from a physician specialist, speech language pathologist, or voice coach; apprehension regarding findings of laryngeal examination, laryngeal imaging procedures; and the effect of medical insurance on the likelihood of seeking medical care. Eighty-two percent of subjects reported that their voice was a critical part of their profession; 41% stated that they were not likely to seek medical care for problems with their voice; and only 19% were reluctant to seek care for general medical problems (Peducation about the importance of voice care is needed in this population of vocal performers.

  10. Assessing Transplant Attitudes: Understanding Minority Men's Perspectives on the Multifarious Barriers to Organ Donation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinck, Bryan D; Naelitz, Bryan D; Jackson, Brielle; Howard, Mariah; Nowacki, Amy; Modlin, Charles S

    2017-08-01

    African Americans comprise 11 % of living organ donors, yet constitute 34 % of the kidney transplant waiting list. There are many barriers to organ donation among minorities that include decreased awareness of transplantation, cultural mistrust of the medical community, financial concerns, and fear of the transplant operation. This study investigates the societal misconceptions and demographic health factors that correlate with minority participation in organ and tissue donation. A 57 question Health and Wellness survey was designed to assess participants' demographic information, medical history, professional background, and opinions regarding organ transplantation. Participants were also asked to complete Quality Metric's Short Form-8 (SF-8) survey to assess physical health, mental health, and quality-of-life. Three hundred twenty-six surveys were administered to minority men. The majority of men were identified as African American, and 55 % were below the age of 40. Though 44 % of participants were willing to donate, only 27 % were registered as organ and tissue donors. Minorities who held misconceptions about organ donation-including the belief that they were too old or unhealthy to donate, for example-had lower general, physical, and mental health scores than those who did not (p = Minorities aware of the shortage for organs or who know a registered donor, an organ recipient, a dialysis patient, or someone on the waiting list were more willing to donate organs. Improving the general, physical, and mental health of minorities, coupled with an active educational outreach program, could result in a greater percentage of minorities registering and willing to be organ and tissue donors.

  11. Attitudes, motivators, and barriers to a career in surgery: a national study of U.K. undergraduate medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Paul A; Mason, John; Vimalachandran, Dale; McNally, Scarlett

    2014-01-01

    Numerous factors influence the career choices of undergraduate medical students, although little work has focused specifically on the surgical specialties. We aimed to investigate medical students' early experiences of surgery along with the motivators and barriers to selecting a surgical career. All final-year medical students were invited to participate in an online survey. A range of quantitative data (expressed as a proportion of total respondents) and qualitative data (grouped and thematically analyzed) were collected to evaluate students' attitudes to careers in surgery and potential influences on these. A total of 482 students from 20 medical schools throughout England and Wales completed the survey. Overall, 91% of respondents had work experience before medical school, in which the greatest satisfaction was reported in the 21% who undertook placements in surgery. In addition, 58% expressed a desire to spend time working abroad and 59% to undertake a period of research; the primary motivator for both was career/professional development. Surgery was the most popular career choice amongst respondents. The 2 most important factors in decisions pertaining to their career were reported as interest in the specialty and work-life balance. Students draw career advice from numerous sources, most commonly mentors (49%) and student surgical societies (46%). Only 1% wanted more website information, with personal contact being paramount. It is vital for the continuing strength of the profession and the quality of surgery for the public that we continue to attract the best undergraduates into careers in surgery. Surgeons of all grades must be aware that how they are perceived by students affects future career choices. Early experiences of surgery are fundamental in assisting medical students to make informed career choices. Copyright © 2014 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The effect of a multifaceted evidence-based practice programme for nurses on knowledge, skills, attitudes, and perceived barriers: A cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Goot, Wieke E; Keers, Joost C; Kuipers, Ruud; Nieweg, Roos M B; de Groot, Martijn

    2018-04-01

    The Dutch professional nursing standard of 2012 stipulates that Dutch nursing practices are to be evidence-based. Not all practicing nurses can satisfy these requirements, therefore, an educational programme about Evidence-Based Practice (EBP) was developed for a Dutch teaching hospital. The aim of this study was to measure the effects of a six month in-house EBP programme on knowledge, skills, attitudes, and perceived barriers of nurses (four European Credits equals two US Credit Hours). A multiple-cohort study was conducted with a pre-post-test design. In the period of 2011-2015, a total of 58 nurses (9 cohorts) followed the programme. Baseline and follow-up assessments consisted of three questionnaires each: the Dutch Modified Fresno, the two subscales of the McColl questionnaire, and the BARRIER scale to assess knowledge and skills, attitudes, and perceived barriers, respectively. Fifty nurses completed both assessments. The results demonstrated that actual knowledge and skills significantly increased by approximately 40%. Self-perceived knowledge increased significantly, while attitudes towards EBP remained (moderately) positive. Perceived barriers did not notably change except for the Research subscale which received many "no opinion" responses prior to the programme but fewer afterwards. Our multifaceted in-house EBP programme led to a significant improvement of approximately 40% in EBP knowledge and skills of participating nurses. Most nurses who followed the EBP programme are currently applying their knowledge and skills in practice. Managerial support and allocated time for EBP are important facilitators for its implementation. Furthermore, to maintain and expand nurses' EBP knowledge and skills and translate them into practice, follow-up interventions, such as journal clubs, may well be beneficial. Based on the positive results of our programme, we will implement it throughout the hospital with an emphasis on training more groups of nurses. Copyright

  13. Attitudes toward euthanasia, assisted suicide and termination of life-sustaining treatment of Puerto Rican medical students, medical residents, and faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez Rivera, J; Rodríguez, R; Otero Igaravidez, Y

    2000-01-01

    To elicit the opinion of Puerto Rican medical students, residents and internal medicine faculty as to the appropriateness of euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide and end-of-life management. Survey using a 16-item questionnaire answered within a two-month period in the fall of 1996. Rounds or faculty meetings at teaching hospitals located in the north, south and southwest of the island of Puerto Rico. There were 424 participants. The questionnaires of 279 medical students, 75 medical residents, and 35 internal medicine faculty members were analyzed. Thirty-five questionnaires, which were incomplete or answered by non-Puerto Rican participants, were excluded. Frequency of support of active euthanasia, physician-assisted suicide, withholding or withdrawing life-sustaining treatment with informed consent was determined. Whether it was ethical to prescribe full doses of drugs needed to alleviate pain even if it would hasten death, or agree to limit or restrict resources for the terminally ill was also determined. Forty per cent of the students, 33% of the residents, and 20% of the faculty supported euthanasia. If physician-assisted suicide were legalized, 50 per cent of the students, 43 per cent of the residents and 45 percent of the faculty would not be opposed to it. Sixty-eight per cent of the students, 67 per cent of the residents and 88 per cent of the faculty would support withholding or withdrawing life-sustaining treatment for dying patients with informed consent. Seventy-nine per cent of residents, 80 per cent of the faculty but only 54 per cent of medical students would prescribe full doses of drugs needed to alleviate pain in dying patients even if they would hasten death. Thirty-six per cent of the residents and faculty would agree to limit the use of medical resources for the terminally ill but only sixteen per cent of medical students would do so. The acceptance of euthanasia was inversely proportional to the clinical experience of the respondents: 40

  14. CAI: Overcoming Attitude Barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netusil, Anton J.; Kockler, Lois H.

    During each of two school quarters, approximately 60 college students enrolled in a mathematics course were randomly assigned to an experimental group or a control group. The control group received instruction by the lecture method only; the experimental group received the same instruction, except that six computer-assisted instruction (CAI) units…

  15. Attitudes and barriers to exercise in adults with type 1 diabetes (T1DM and how best to address them: a qualitative study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Lascar

    Full Text Available Regular physical activity has recognised health benefits for people with T1DM. However a significant proportion of them do not undertake the recommended levels of activity. Whilst questionnaire-based studies have examined barriers to exercise in people with T1DM, a formal qualitative analysis of these barriers has not been undertaken. Our aims were to explore attitudes, barriers and facilitators to exercise in patients with T1DM.A purposeful sample of long standing T1DM patients were invited to participate in this qualitative study. Twenty-six adults were interviewed using a semi-structured interview schedule to determine their level of exercise and barriers to initiation and maintenance of an exercise programme.Six main barriers to exercise were identified: lack of time and work related factors; access to facilities; lack of motivation; embarrassment and body image; weather; and diabetes specific barriers (low levels of knowledge about managing diabetes and its complications around exercise. Four motivators to exercise were identified: physical benefits from exercise; improvements in body image; enjoyment and the social interaction of exercising at gym or in groups. Three facilitators to exercise were identified: free or reduced admission to gyms and pools, help with time management, and advice and encouragement around managing diabetes for exercise.Many of the barriers to exercise in people with T1DM are shared with the non-diabetic population. The primary difference is the requirement for education about the effect of exercise on diabetes control and its complications. There was a preference for support to be given on a one to one basis rather than in a group environment. This suggests that with the addition of the above educational requirements, one to one techniques that have been successful in increasing activity in patients with other chronic disease and the general public should be successful in increasing activity in patients with T1DM.

  16. Attitudes and barriers to exercise in adults with type 1 diabetes (T1DM) and how best to address them: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lascar, Nadia; Kennedy, Amy; Hancock, Beverley; Jenkins, David; Andrews, Robert C; Greenfield, Sheila; Narendran, Parth

    2014-01-01

    Regular physical activity has recognised health benefits for people with T1DM. However a significant proportion of them do not undertake the recommended levels of activity. Whilst questionnaire-based studies have examined barriers to exercise in people with T1DM, a formal qualitative analysis of these barriers has not been undertaken. Our aims were to explore attitudes, barriers and facilitators to exercise in patients with T1DM. A purposeful sample of long standing T1DM patients were invited to participate in this qualitative study. Twenty-six adults were interviewed using a semi-structured interview schedule to determine their level of exercise and barriers to initiation and maintenance of an exercise programme. Six main barriers to exercise were identified: lack of time and work related factors; access to facilities; lack of motivation; embarrassment and body image; weather; and diabetes specific barriers (low levels of knowledge about managing diabetes and its complications around exercise). Four motivators to exercise were identified: physical benefits from exercise; improvements in body image; enjoyment and the social interaction of exercising at gym or in groups. Three facilitators to exercise were identified: free or reduced admission to gyms and pools, help with time management, and advice and encouragement around managing diabetes for exercise. Many of the barriers to exercise in people with T1DM are shared with the non-diabetic population. The primary difference is the requirement for education about the effect of exercise on diabetes control and its complications. There was a preference for support to be given on a one to one basis rather than in a group environment. This suggests that with the addition of the above educational requirements, one to one techniques that have been successful in increasing activity in patients with other chronic disease and the general public should be successful in increasing activity in patients with T1DM.

  17. Open access behaviours and perceptions of health sciences faculty and roles of information professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lwoga, Edda T; Questier, Frederik

    2015-03-01

    This study sought to investigate the faculty's awareness, attitudes and use of open access, and the role of information professionals in supporting open access (OA) scholarly communication in Tanzanian health sciences universities. A cross-sectional survey was conducted. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 16 librarians, while questionnaires were physically distributed to 415 faculty members in all eight Tanzanian health sciences universities, with a response rate of 71.1%. The study found that most faculty members were aware about OA issues. However, the high level of OA awareness among faculty members did not translate into actual dissemination of faculty's research outputs through OA web avenues. A small proportion of faculty's research materials was made available as OA. Faculty were more engaged with OA journal publishing than with self-archiving practices. Senior faculty with proficient technical skills were more likely to use open access than junior faculty. Major barriers to OA usage were related to ICT infrastructure, awareness, skills, author-pay model, and copyright and plagiarism concerns. Interviews with librarians revealed that there was a strong support for promoting OA issues on campus; however, this positive support with various open access-related tasks did not translate into actual action. It is thus important for librarians and OA administrators to consider all these factors for effective implementation of OA projects in research and academic institutions. This is the first comprehensive and detailed study focusing on the health sciences faculty's and librarians' behaviours and perceptions of open access initiatives in Tanzania and reveals findings that are useful for planning and implementing open access initiatives in other institutions with similar conditions. © 2015 Health Libraries Journal.

  18. Student versus Faculty Perceptions of Missing Class.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleigh, Merry J.; Ritzer, Darren R.; Casey, Michael B.

    2002-01-01

    Examines and compares student and faculty attitudes towards students missing classes and class attendance. Surveys undergraduate students (n=231) in lower and upper level psychology courses and psychology faculty. Reports that students found more reasons acceptable for missing classes and that the amount of in-class material on the examinations…

  19. Open educational resources: staff attitudes and awareness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivien Rolfe

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Attitudes are changing in education globally to promote the open sharing of educational courses and resources. The aim of this study was to explore staff awareness and attitudes toward ‘open educational resources’ (OER as a benchmark for monitoring future progress. Faculty staff (n=6 were invited to participate in semi-structured interviews which facilitated the development of a questionnaire. Staff respondents (n=50 were not familiar with the term OER but had a clear notion of what it meant. They were familiar with open content repositories within the university but not externally. A culture of borrowing and sharing of resources exists between close colleagues, but not further a field, and whilst staff would obtain resources from the Internet they were reticent to place materials there. Drivers for mobilising resources included a strong belief in open education, the ability of OER to enhance individual and institutional reputations, and economic factors. Barriers to OER included confusion over copyright and lack of IT support. To conclude, there is a positive collegiate culture within the faculty, and overcoming the lack of awareness and dismantling the barriers to sharing will help advance the open educational practices, benefiting both faculty staff and the global community.

  20. Attitudes of oncology healthcare practitioners towards smoking cessation: A systematic review of the facilitators, barriers and recommendations for delivery of advice and support to cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conlon, K.; Pattinson, L.; Hutton, D.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: A systematic review of the literature was conducted. The review was conducted using a search of the literature for all years up to October 2016. Statements that identified facilitators, barriers or recommendations surrounding smoking cessation delivery were extracted and analogous statements aggregated to enable thematic analysis. After searching multiple databases and the application of exclusion and inclusion criteria, a total of 19 acceptable studies were identified. Key findings: Delivery of cessation by oncology professionals was impacted by their own knowledge and views, their perception of the benefits to patient health and by the workplace procedures within their institution. Conclusion: Oncology practitioners worldwide face similar issues in delivering smoking cessation advice. By improving training programs that address the attitudes and beliefs which facilitate or block delivery of smoking cessation and by implementing systemic changes within cancer centres, delivery of smoking cessation should be enabled. - Highlights: • Oncology professional attitudes towards smoking cessation are relatively ubiquitous. • Lack of training is frequently reported to be a barrier to smoking interventions. • Oncology healthcare practitioners have a desire to be trained in smoking cessation. • Required improvements to training programs to facilitate delivery are addressed. • Integration of smoking assessment and advice into workplace policy is required.

  1. Understanding Barriers to Optimal Cleaning and Disinfection in Hospitals: A Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices Survey of Environmental Services Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Daniel A; Salsgiver, Elizabeth; Simon, Matthew S; Greendyke, William; Eiras, Daniel P; Ito, Masahiro; Caruso, Dean A; Woodward, Timothy M; Perriel, Odette T; Saiman, Lisa; Furuya, E Yoko; Calfee, David P

    2016-12-01

    In this study, we used an online survey to assess knowledge, attitudes, and practices related to environmental cleaning and other infection prevention strategies among environmental services workers (ESWs) at 5 hospitals. Our findings suggest that ESWs could benefit from additional education and feedback as well as new strategies to address workflow challenges. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2016;1492-1495.

  2. Faculty Viewpoints on Teaching Quantway®

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    Heather Howington

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantway is a quantitative reasoning-based pathway for developmental math that has been developed as an alternative to the traditional remedial algebra sequence. To explore the experiences of faculty involved with Quantway, we interviewed eight individuals who have taught the course in the past year to survey their attitudes and opinions about students in their classes, the materials and pedagogies in use, and the collegial interaction of networked faculty. Faculty were selected with the intention of gathering a broad set of opinions resulting from differences of location, experience, and other factors. In this paper, we summarize those interviews by identifying common themes reported by the faculty that highlight strengths and challenges of teaching Quantway. Themes include perceptions about changes in student engagement and attitudes as well as changes in their own mindset; the evolution of teaching strategies and materials used inside and outside the classroom; and the relevance of connections between faculty at different institutions involved in the project.

  3. Attitudes of Canadian psychiatry residents if mentally ill: awareness, barriers to disclosure, and help-seeking preferences

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    Tariq Mahmood Hassan

    2016-10-01

    Conclusions: At the level of residency training, psychiatrists are reporting barriers to disclosure and help-seeking if they were to experience mental illness. A majority of psychiatry residents would only disclose to informal supports. Those with a history of mental illness would prefer formal treatment services over informal services.

  4. Diabetes and hypertension guidelines and the primary health care practitioner in Barbados: knowledge, attitudes, practices and barriers-a focus group study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carter Anne O

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Audits have shown numerous deficiencies in the quality of hypertension and diabetes primary care in Barbados, despite distribution of regional guidelines. This study aimed to evaluate the knowledge, attitudes and practices, and the barriers faced by primary care practitioners in Barbados concerning the recommendations of available diabetes and hypertension guidelines. Methods Focus groups using a moderator's manual were conducted at all 8 public sector polyclinics, and 5 sessions were held for private practitioners. Results Polyclinic sessions were attended by 63 persons (17 physicians, 34 nurses, 3 dieticians, 3 podiatrists, 5 pharmacists, and 1 other, and private sector sessions by 20 persons (12 physicians, 1 nurse, 3 dieticians, 2 podiatrists and 2 pharmacists. Practitioners generally thought they gave a good quality of care. Commonwealth Caribbean Medical Research Council 1995 diabetes and 1998 hypertension guidelines, and the Ministry of Health 2001 diabetes protocol had been seen by 38%, 32% and 78% respectively of polyclinic practitioners, 67%, 83%, and 33% of private physicians, and 25%, 0% and 38% of non-physician private practitioners. Current guidelines were considered by some to be outdated, unavailable, difficult to remember and lacking in advice to tackle barriers. Practitioners thought that guidelines should be circulated widely, promoted with repeated educational sessions, and kept short. Patient oriented versions of the guidelines were welcomed. Patient factors causing barriers to ideal outcome included denial and fear of stigma; financial resources to access an appropriate diet, exercise and monitoring equipment; confusion over medication regimens, not valuing free medication, belief in alternative medicines, and being unable to change habits. System barriers included lack of access to blood investigations, clinic equipment and medication; the lack of human resources in polyclinics; and an uncoordinated

  5. Diabetes and hypertension guidelines and the primary health care practitioner in Barbados: knowledge, attitudes, practices and barriers--a focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, O Peter; Carter, Anne O

    2010-12-03

    Audits have shown numerous deficiencies in the quality of hypertension and diabetes primary care in Barbados, despite distribution of regional guidelines. This study aimed to evaluate the knowledge, attitudes and practices, and the barriers faced by primary care practitioners in Barbados concerning the recommendations of available diabetes and hypertension guidelines. Focus groups using a moderator's manual were conducted at all 8 public sector polyclinics, and 5 sessions were held for private practitioners. Polyclinic sessions were attended by 63 persons (17 physicians, 34 nurses, 3 dieticians, 3 podiatrists, 5 pharmacists, and 1 other), and private sector sessions by 20 persons (12 physicians, 1 nurse, 3 dieticians, 2 podiatrists and 2 pharmacists). Practitioners generally thought they gave a good quality of care. Commonwealth Caribbean Medical Research Council 1995 diabetes and 1998 hypertension guidelines, and the Ministry of Health 2001 diabetes protocol had been seen by 38%, 32% and 78% respectively of polyclinic practitioners, 67%, 83%, and 33% of private physicians, and 25%, 0% and 38% of non-physician private practitioners. Current guidelines were considered by some to be outdated, unavailable, difficult to remember and lacking in advice to tackle barriers. Practitioners thought that guidelines should be circulated widely, promoted with repeated educational sessions, and kept short. Patient oriented versions of the guidelines were welcomed. Patient factors causing barriers to ideal outcome included denial and fear of stigma; financial resources to access an appropriate diet, exercise and monitoring equipment; confusion over medication regimens, not valuing free medication, belief in alternative medicines, and being unable to change habits. System barriers included lack of access to blood investigations, clinic equipment and medication; the lack of human resources in polyclinics; and an uncoordinated team approach. Patients faced cultural barriers with

  6. Breaking the Barriers of a "Silenced Identity": Teacher Trainees' Attitudes towards the Bilingual Presentation in Hebrew and Amharic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baratz Lea

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The current study investigated the attitudes of students in a teacher training college training regarding the bilingual presentation of children's literature -- in Hebrew and Amharic. A questionnaire on the importance of bilingual books was used with a group of students of Ethiopian descent (of the Beta Israel community and a group of students who do not belong to this community, with the expectation that a substantial difference would be found between the attitudes of the two groups. The study population, students training to be literature teachers, was aware of the qualities that make "a good story". The main findings emphasize that participants have a substantial understanding of the significance of bilingual books, both in terms of its function in the curriculum and in building a cultural narrative in order to break out of the silenced identity and eliminate cultural visibility.

  7. Investigating the Attitudes and Views of the Librarians and Faculty members of Shiraz University over deploying Wi-Fi in Academic Libraries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jafar Mehrad

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Given the importance and wide scope of Wi-Fi applications within academic environs in developed countries and its use in library services, its utilization within academic libraries in Iran is felt. While presenting Wi-Fi networks, the present study employed a survey of librarians and faculty members in Shiraz University to investigate their the outlook and viewpoints regarding the deployment of such networks in academic libraries. Findings demonstrated that librarians are very inclined to use Wi-Fi in library services such as listing, shelf-reading and OPAC and demand comprehensive network coverage throughout the entire library spaces. Meanwhile, faculty members expressed the necessity of increasing use of such networks all over the campus and remote access to library resources. Generally given the outcome of the present investigation, although Wi-Fi application in libraries is a novel and emerging phenomenon yet to catch on in Iran, librarians, researchers and professors are very keen about its use and application within academic environments.

  8. Social Work Faculty and Mental Illness Stigma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Amy C.; Fulambarker, Anjali; Kondrat, David C.; Holley, Lynn C.; Kranke, Derrick; Wilkins, Brittany T.; Stromwall, Layne K.; Eack, Shaun M.

    2017-01-01

    Stigma is a significant barrier to recovery and full community inclusion for people with mental illnesses. Social work educators can play critical roles in addressing this stigma, yet little is known about their attitudes. Social work educators were surveyed about their general attitudes about people with mental illnesses, attitudes about practice…

  9. Medication assisted treatment in US drug courts: results from a nationwide survey of availability, barriers and attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matusow, Harlan; Dickman, Samuel L; Rich, Josiah D; Fong, Chunki; Dumont, Dora M; Hardin, Carolyn; Marlowe, Douglas; Rosenblum, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Drug treatment courts are an increasingly important tool in reducing the census of those incarcerated for non-violent drug offenses; medication assisted treatment (MAT) is proven to be an effective treatment for opioid addiction. However, little is known about the availability of and barriers to MAT provision for opioid-addicted people under drug court jurisdiction. Using an online survey, we assessed availability, barriers, and need for MAT (especially agonist medication) for opioid addiction in drug courts. Ninety-eight percent reported opioid-addicted participants, and 47% offered agonist medication (56% for all MAT including naltrexone). Barriers included cost and court policy. Responses revealed significant uncertainty, especially among non-MAT providing courts. Political, judicial and administrative opposition appear to affect MAT's inconsistent use and availability in drug court settings. These data suggest that a substantial, targeted educational initiative is needed to increase awareness of the treatment and criminal justice benefits of MAT in the drug courts. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Barriers and enablers to implementing scalp cooling in Australia: a qualitative study of health professionals' attitudes to and experience with scalp cooling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Joanne M; O'Brien, Jane; Chua, Susan; De Boer, Richard; Dear, Rachel; Murray, Nicholas; Boyle, Fran

    2018-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced alopecia is a common and distressing adverse event for patients. Scalp cooling to reduce this alopecia has been available in Europe for more than a decade, but only recently introduced in Australia. The aim of this study was to qualitatively explore health professionals' perceptions of the barriers and enablers to the implementation of scalp cooling in Australian cancer centres. Using a qualitative methodology, telephone interviews were conducted with 21 health professionals working in a tumour stream where chemotherapy-induced alopecia is an adverse event of treatment. Participants were recruited from five centres in Australia where scalp cooling is currently available and one centre without access to the technology. Four interrelated themes were identified: (1) health professional attitudes, (2) concerns for patient equity, (3) logistical considerations and (4) organisational support. This qualitative study provides the first methodological exploration of Australian health professionals' perceptions of barriers and enablers to scalp cooling uptake. The results highlighted health professional support drives the introduction of scalp cooling. Integration of the technology requires adjustments to nursing practice to manage the increased time, workload and change in patient flow. Strategies to manage the change in practice and organisational support for change in work flow are essential for successful implementation into routine care.

  11. Faculty development: a 'field of dreams'?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinert, Yvonne; McLeod, Peter J; Boillat, Miriam; Meterissian, Sarkis; Elizov, Michelle; Macdonald, Mary Ellen

    2009-01-01

    Participants in faculty development workshops often comment that 'those who need faculty development the most attend the least'. The goals of this study were to explore the reasons why some clinical teachers do not participate in centralised faculty development activities and to learn how we can make faculty development programmes more relevant to teachers' needs. In 2006, we conducted focus groups with 16 clinical teachers, who had not participated in faculty development activities, to ascertain their perceptions of faculty development, reasons for non-participation and perceived barriers to involvement. Content analysis and team consensus guided the data interpretation. Focus group participants were aware of faculty development offerings and valued the goals of these activities. Important reasons for non-participation emerged: clinical reality, which included volume of work and lack of (protected) time; logistical issues, such as timing and the central location of organised activities; a perceived lack of financial reward and recognition for teaching, and a perceived lack of direction from, and connection to, the university. Clinical reality and logistical issues appeared to be greater deterrents to participation than faculty development goals, content or strategies. Moreover, when asked to discuss faculty development, teachers referred to their development as faculty members in the broadest sense, which included personal and career development. They also expressed the desire for clear guidance from the university, financial rewards and recognition for teaching, and a sense of 'belonging'. Faculty development programmes should try to address these organisational issues as well as teachers' personal and professional needs.

  12. Examining Differences among Online Faculty Reporting Student Plagiarism Using the Theory of Planned Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeder Stowe, Susan A.

    2013-01-01

    Among higher education faculty, having to address academic misconduct and plagiarism is often viewed as a negative aspect of teaching resulting in inconsistent reporting by faculty. Some faculty members take no action in response. Differences exist in attitudes between traditional regular full-time and part-time adjunct faculty members in terms of…

  13. Dental Provider Attitudes Are a Barrier to Expanded Oral Health Care for Children ≤3 Years of Age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah J. Clark MPH

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To describe the perspectives of general dentists regarding oral health care for children ≤3 years. Methods. Mailed survey of 444 general dentists in Michigan. Results. Although most dentists were aware of recommendations for early dental visits, only 36% recommended their own patients begin dental visits by 1 year of age. Only 37% dentists felt that screening for oral health problems can be done by medical providers, whereas 34% agreed administration of fluoride varnish by medical providers would be effective in preventing dental problems in young children. Conclusions. Dentists’ failure to recommend 1-year dental visits is due neither to lack of awareness nor to capacity problems. The limited enthusiasm for involving children’s medical providers in oral health promotion signals attitudinal barriers that must be overcome to improve children’s oral health. Primary care providers should identify and refer to dentists in their community who are willing to see young children.

  14. Knowledge, attitude, practice and barriers on vaccination against human papillomavirus infection: a cross-sectional study among primary care physicians in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Martin C S; Lee, Albert; Ngai, Karry L K; Chor, Josette C Y; Chan, Paul K S

    2013-01-01

    This study explored the knowledge, attitude, practice and barriers to prescribe human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines among private primary care physicians in Hong Kong. A self-administered questionnaire survey was conducted by sending letters to doctors who had joined a vaccination program for school girls. From 720 surveys sent, 444 (61.7%) completed questionnaires were returned and analyzed. For knowledge, few responded to questions accurately on the prevalence of cervical HPV (27.9%) and genital wart infection (13.1%) among sexually active young women in Hong Kong, and only 44.4% correctly answered the percentage of cervical cancers caused by HPV. For attitude, most agreed that HPV vaccination should be fully paid by the Government (68.3%) as an important public health strategy. Vaccination against HPV was perceived as more important than those for genital herpes (52.2%) and Chlamydia (50.1%) for adolescent health, and the majority selected adolescents aged 12-14 years as the ideal group for vaccination. Gardasil(®) (30.9%) and Cervarix(®) (28.0%) were almost equally preferred. For practice, the factors influencing the choice of vaccine included strength of vaccine protection (61.1%), long-lasting immunity (56.8%) and good antibody response (55.6%). The most significant barriers to prescribe HPV vaccines consisted of parental refusal due to safety concerns (48.2%), and their practice of advising vaccination was mostly affected by local Governmental recommendations (78.7%). A substantial proportion of physicians had recommended HPV vaccines for their female clients/patients aged 18-26 years for protection of cervical cancer (83.8%) or both cervical cancer and genital warts (85.5%). The knowledge on HPV infection was low among physicians in Hong Kong. Prescription of HPV vaccine was hindered by the perceived parental concerns and was mostly relied on Governmental recommendations. Educational initiatives should be targeted towards both physicians and parents, and

  15. Knowledge, attitude, practice and barriers on vaccination against human papillomavirus infection: a cross-sectional study among primary care physicians in Hong Kong.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin C S Wong

    Full Text Available This study explored the knowledge, attitude, practice and barriers to prescribe human papillomavirus (HPV vaccines among private primary care physicians in Hong Kong. A self-administered questionnaire survey was conducted by sending letters to doctors who had joined a vaccination program for school girls. From 720 surveys sent, 444 (61.7% completed questionnaires were returned and analyzed. For knowledge, few responded to questions accurately on the prevalence of cervical HPV (27.9% and genital wart infection (13.1% among sexually active young women in Hong Kong, and only 44.4% correctly answered the percentage of cervical cancers caused by HPV. For attitude, most agreed that HPV vaccination should be fully paid by the Government (68.3% as an important public health strategy. Vaccination against HPV was perceived as more important than those for genital herpes (52.2% and Chlamydia (50.1% for adolescent health, and the majority selected adolescents aged 12-14 years as the ideal group for vaccination. Gardasil(® (30.9% and Cervarix(® (28.0% were almost equally preferred. For practice, the factors influencing the choice of vaccine included strength of vaccine protection (61.1%, long-lasting immunity (56.8% and good antibody response (55.6%. The most significant barriers to prescribe HPV vaccines consisted of parental refusal due to safety concerns (48.2%, and their practice of advising vaccination was mostly affected by local Governmental recommendations (78.7%. A substantial proportion of physicians had recommended HPV vaccines for their female clients/patients aged 18-26 years for protection of cervical cancer (83.8% or both cervical cancer and genital warts (85.5%. The knowledge on HPV infection was low among physicians in Hong Kong. Prescription of HPV vaccine was hindered by the perceived parental concerns and was mostly relied on Governmental recommendations. Educational initiatives should be targeted towards both physicians and parents

  16. Knowledge, attitudes, practices, and barriers reported by patients receiving diabetes and hypertension primary health care in Barbados: a focus group study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adams O Peter

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Deficiencies in the quality of diabetes and hypertension primary care and outcomes have been documented in Barbados. This study aimed to explore the knowledge, attitudes and practices, and the barriers faced by people with diabetes and hypertension in Barbados that might contribute to these deficiencies. Methods Five structured focus groups were conducted for randomly selected people with diabetes and hypertension. Results Twenty-one patients (5 diabetic, 5 hypertensive, and 11 with both diseases with a mean age of 59 years attended 5 focus group sessions. Patient factors that affected care included the difficulty in maintaining behaviour change. Practitioner factors included not considering the "whole person" and patient expectations, and not showing enough respect for patients. Health care system factors revolved around the amount of time spent accessing care because of long waiting times in public sector clinics and pharmacies. Society related barriers included the high cost and limited availability of appropriate food, the availability of exercise facilities, stigma of disease and difficulty taking time off work. Attendees were not familiar with guidelines for diabetes and hypertension management, but welcomed a patient version detailing a place to record results, the frequency of tests, and blood pressure and blood glucose targets. Appropriate education from practitioners during consultations, while waiting in clinic, through support and education groups, and for the general public through the schools, mass media and billboards were recommended. Conclusions Primary care providers should take a more patient centred approach to the care of those with diabetes and hypertension. The care system should provide better service by reducing waiting times. Patient self-management could be encouraged by a patient version of care guidelines and greater educational efforts.

  17. Sense of place as a determinant of people's attitudes towards the environment: implications for natural resources management and planning in the Great Barrier Reef, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Silva; De Freitas, Debora M; Hicks, Christina C

    2013-03-15

    Integrating people's values and perceptions into planning is essential for the successful management of natural resources. However, successful implementation of natural resources management decisions on the ground is a complex task, which requires a comprehensive understanding of a system's social and ecological linkages. This paper investigates the relationship between sense of place and people's attitudes towards their natural environment. Sense of place contributes towards shaping peoples' beliefs, values and commitments. Here, we set out to explore how these theoretical contributions can be operationalized for natural resources management planning in the Great Barrier Reef region of Australia. We hypothesise that the region's diverse range of natural resources, conservation values and management pressures might be reflected in people's attachment to place. To tests this proposition, variables capturing socio-demographics, personal wellbeing and a potential for sense of place were collected via mail-out survey of 372 residents of the region, and tested for relationships using multivariate regression and redundancy orientation analyses. Results indicate that place of residence within the region, involvement in community activities, country of birth and the length of time respondents lived in the region are important determinants of the values assigned to factors related to the natural environment. This type of information is readily available from National Census and thus could be incorporated into the planning of community engagement strategies early in the natural resources management planning process. A better understanding of the characteristics that allow sense of place meanings to develop can facilitate a better understanding of people's perceptions towards environmental and biodiversity issues. We suggest that the insights gained from this study can benefit environmental decision making and planning in the Great Barrier Reef region; and that sense of place

  18. Midwestern Latino caregivers' knowledge, attitudes and sense making of the oral health etiology, prevention and barriers that inhibit their children's oral health: a CBPR approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Kimberly K; Martínez-Mier, E Angeles; Soto-Rojas, Armando E; Jackson, Richard D; Stelzner, Sarah M; Galvez, Lorena C; Smith, Gabriela J; Acevedo, Miriam; Dandelet, Laura; Vega, Dulce

    2017-03-02

    Using community-based participatory research, the Health Protection Model was used to understand the cultural experiences, attitudes, knowledge and behaviors surrounding caries etiology, its prevention and barriers to accessing oral health care for children of Latino parents residing in Central Indiana. A community reference group (CBPR) was established and bi-lingual community research associates were used to conduct focus groups comprised of Latino caregivers. Transcripts were analyzed for thematic content using inductive thematic analysis. Results indicated significant gaps in parental knowledge regarding caries etiology and prevention, with cultural underlays. Most parents believed the etiology of caries was related to the child's ingestion of certain foods containing high amounts of carbohydrates. Fewer parents believed either genetics/biological inheritance or bacteria was the primary causative factor. Fatalism negatively impacted preventive practices, and a clear separation existed concerning the perceived responsibilities of mothers and fathers to provide for the oral needs of their children. Females were more likely to report they were primarily responsible for brushing their children's teeth, overseeing the child's diet and seeking dental care for the child. Fathers believed they were primarily responsible for providing the means to pay for professional care. Perceived barriers to care were related to finances and communication difficulties, especially communicating with providers and completing insurance forms. The main study implication is the demonstration of how the CBPR model provided enhanced understanding of Latino caregivers' experiences to inform improvements in oral prevention and treatment of their children. Current efforts continue to employ CBPR to implement programs to address the needs of this vulnerable population.

  19. Attitudes and barriers towards HIV screening: A qualitative study of people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Syed Imran; Syed Sulaiman, Syed Azhar; Hassali, Mohamed Azmi; Thiruchelvam, Kaeshaelya; Hasan, Syed Shahzad; Lee, Christopher Kc

    2017-09-01

    Understanding patients' perspective towards HIV screening in Malaysia is pivotal to explore challenges faced by these individuals. This would be beneficial for developing local plans to improve the health-seeking behaviours among population at risk of HIV/AIDS. A qualitative research methodology was adopted to explore HIV/AIDS patients' views about disease screening. A semi-structured interview guide was used for in-depth patient interviews. All interviews were audio-recorded and were subjected to a standard content analysis framework for data analysis. Most patients were positive about screening and the value of knowing about their status early. However, fear of social stigma, discrimination, lack of support system and lack of public understanding were identified as major concerns affecting their willingness to be screened. They were concerned about mandatory screening being implemented without improvement in support system and public education. Reluctance to seek HIV screening is an important factor contributing to transmission in developing countries. In the Malaysian context, efforts should be made to strengthen screening strategies especially in the most-at-risk populations to monitor the epidemic and target prevention strategies. In a multicultural context, HIV preventive strategies must include disease awareness, including measure to tackle barriers towards screening.

  20. Factors influencing publication choice: why faculty choose open access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warlick, Stefanie E; Vaughan, Ktl

    2007-03-09

    In an attempt to identify motivating factors involved in decisions to publish in open access and open archives (OA) journals, individual interviews with biomedical faculty members at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC-Chapel Hill) and Duke University, two major research universities, were conducted. The interviews focused on faculty identified as early adopters of OA/free full-text publishing. Searches conducted in PubMed and PubMed Central identified faculty from the two institutions who have published works in OA/free full-text journals. The searches targeted authors with multiple OA citations during a specified 18 month period. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with the most prolific OA authors at each university. Individual interviews attempted to determine whether the authors were aware they published in OA journals, why they chose to publish in OA journals, what factors influenced their publishing decisions, and their general attitude towards OA publishing models. Fourteen interviews were granted and completed. Respondents included a fairly even mix of Assistant, Associate and Full professors. Results indicate that when targeting biomedical faculty at UNC-Chapel Hill and Duke, speed of publication and copyright retention are unlikely motivating factors or incentives for the promotion of OA publishing. In addition, author fees required by some open access journals are unlikely barriers or disincentives. It appears that publication quality is of utmost importance when choosing publication venues in general, while free access and visibility are specifically noted incentives for selection of OA journals. Therefore, free public availability and increased exposure may not be strong enough incentives for authors to choose open access over more traditional and respected subscription based publications, unless the quality issue is also addressed.

  1. An exploration of barriers to insulin initiation for physicians in Japan: findings from the Diabetes Attitudes, Wishes And Needs (DAWN JAPAN study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hitoshi Ishii

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Insulin is recommended as an appropriate treatment in type 2 diabetes patients with suboptimal glycemic control; however, its initiation is often delayed. We therefore conducted the DAWN (Diabetes Attitudes, Wishes and Needs JAPAN study in an attempt to identify specific patient- and physician-related factors which contribute to delay of insulin initiation among Japanese patients with diabetes. In this report, we explored barriers for physicians which prevent timely insulin initiation. METHODS: The DAWN JAPAN study is a multicenter, questionnaire-based survey, conducted between 2004 and 2005. Participating physicians were categorized as follows based on their expertise: Japan Diabetes Society (JDS certified specialists (n = 77, JDS-affiliated physicians (n = 30, and non-JDS-affiliated physicians (n = 27. To assess physician barriers to insulin initiation, we have used a newly developed 27- item questionnaire. RESULTS: The mean age of patients (n = 11,656 treated by participating physicians was 64.1 years. The mean duration of diabetes was 121.6 months, and their mean HbA1c was 7.5%. Insulin was used in 27.4% of total patients. With regard to physician barriers to insulin initiation, the biggest differences in concerns expressed by JDS-certified specialists and non-JDS-affiliated physicians were observed in the following items with statistical significance: "I do not have staff (nurse, pharmacists who can assist with explanations" (1.3% vs 55.5%, respectively, "I have concerns about the use of insulin therapy in elderly patients" (38.1% vs 81.5%, and "It is difficult to provide guidance and education on insulin injection to patients" (16.9% vs 55.5%. The mean HbA1c at which physicians responded they would recommend insulin to their patients was 8.7%; however, they would reduce this level to 8.2% if they themselves required insulin. CONCLUSIONS: Our results demonstrated that physicians have concerns about insulin use, and suggested that

  2. Exploration of knowledge of, adherence to, attitude and barriers toward evidence-based guidelines (EBGs for prevention of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP in healthcare workers of pediatric cardiac intensive care units (PCICUs: A Quali-Quantitative survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Jahansefat

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Implementation of evidence-based guidelines (EBGs is an effective measure for prevention of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP. Appropriate knowledge, attitude and adherence of healthcare workers (HCWs to EBGs are necessary factors for implementation of EBGs. This study was conducted with objective of evaluation of knowledge, attitude, and adherence of HCWs to EBGs for prevention of VAP and exploration of the barriers of their implementation in clinical practice. Totally, a total number of 45 HCWs of two pediatric cardiac surgery ICU (PCICUs participated in this quali-quantitative survey. Knowledge, attitude and adherence of participants was evaluated by a validated multiple-choice questionnaire and barriers of implementation of EBGs was extracted from participants’ answer to an open-ended question of our self-made questionnaire. Knowledge of HCWs was poor and significantly different between nurse assistants (RAs, nurses (RNs, and physicians (MDs (respectively, 1.25±0.95, 4.53±1.73, and 5.54±2.01, P=0.001. Likewise, attit ude of HCWs is not positive and significantly different between NAs, RNs, and MDs (respectively, 32.96±2.42, 34.00±2.44, 36.81±4.35, P=0.003. The adherence of HCWs is not good and different between RAs, RNs, and MDs (respectively, 11.50±1.00, 13.13±1.83, and 17.18±6.06, P= 0.17. The Barriers of implementation of EBGs was categorized into four category of individual, organizational, social, and educational factors. Unsatisfying status of knowledge, attitude, and adherence of HCWs is a challenging concern of health-care system, especially in PICUs. In addition to these well-known factors, poor implementation of EBGs is related to many other barriers which should recognized and taken into consideration for designation of infection controlling programs.

  3. Attitudes and barriers to exercise in adults with a recent diagnosis of type 1 diabetes: a qualitative study of participants in the Exercise for Type 1 Diabetes (EXTOD) study

    OpenAIRE

    Kennedy, Amy; Narendran, Parth; Andrews, Robert C; Daley, Amanda; Greenfield, Sheila M

    2018-01-01

    Objectives To explore attitudes and barriers to exercise in adults with new-onset type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Design Qualitative methodology using focus group (n=1), individual face-to-face (n=4) and telephone interviews (n=8). Thematic analysis using the Framework Method. Setting Nineteen UK hospital sites. Participants Fifteen participants in the Exercise for Type 1 Diabetes study. We explored current and past levels of exercise, understanding of exercise and exercise guidelines, barri...

  4. Associations between sheep farmer attitudes, beliefs, emotions and personality, and their barriers to uptake of best practice: The example of footrot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Kane, Holly; Ferguson, Eamonn; Kaler, Jasmeet; Green, Laura

    2017-04-01

    There is interest in understanding how farmers' behaviour influences their management of livestock. We extend the theory of planned behaviour with farmers attitudes, beliefs, emotions and personality to investigate how these are associated with management of livestock disease using the example of footrot (FR) in sheep. In May 2013 a one-year retrospective questionnaire was sent to 4000 sheep farmers in England, requesting data on lameness prevalence, management of footrot, farm/flock descriptors, and farmer-orientated themes: barriers to treating footrot, opinions and knowledge of footrot, relating to other people and personality. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to make composite variables from explanatory variables and latent class (LC) analysis was used to subgroup farmers, based on nine managements of FR. Associations between LC and composite variables were investigated using multinomial logistic regression. Negative binomial regression was used to investigate associations between the proportion of lame sheep and composite and personality variables. The useable response rate was 32% and 97% of farmers reported having lame sheep; the geometric mean prevalence of lameness (GMPL) was 3.7% (95% CI 3.51%-3.86%). Participants grouped into three latent classes; LC1 (best practice-treat FR within 3days of sheep becoming lame; use injectable and topical antibiotics; avoid foot trimming), 11% farmers), LC2 (slow to act, 57%) and LC3 (slow to act, delayed culling, 32%), with GMPL 2.95%, 3.60% and 4.10% respectively. Farmers who reported the production cycle as a barrier to treating sheep with FR were more likely to be in LC2 (RRR 1.36) than LC1. Negative emotions towards FR were associated with higher risk of being in LC2 (RRR 1.39) than LC1. Knowledge of preventing FR spread was associated with a lower risk of being in LC2 (RRR 0.46) or LC3 (RRR 0.34) than LC1. Knowledge about FR transmission was associated with a lower risk of being in LC3 (RRR 0.64) than LC1

  5. Can Tablet Computers Enhance Faculty Teaching?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Aditee P; Whicker, Shari A; Benjamin, Robert W; Hawley, Jeffrey; McGann, Kathleen A

    2015-06-01

    Learner benefits of tablet computer use have been demonstrated, yet there is little evidence regarding faculty tablet use for teaching. Our study sought to determine if supplying faculty with tablet computers and peer mentoring provided benefits to learners and faculty beyond that of non-tablet-based teaching modalities. We provided faculty with tablet computers and three 2-hour peer-mentoring workshops on tablet-based teaching. Faculty used tablets to teach, in addition to their current, non-tablet-based methods. Presurveys, postsurveys, and monthly faculty surveys assessed feasibility, utilization, and comparisons to current modalities. Learner surveys assessed perceived effectiveness and comparisons to current modalities. All feedback received from open-ended questions was reviewed by the authors and organized into categories. Of 15 eligible faculty, 14 participated. Each participant attended at least 2 of the 3 workshops, with 10 to 12 participants at each workshop. All participants found the workshops useful, and reported that the new tablet-based teaching modality added value beyond that of current teaching methods. Respondents developed the following tablet-based outputs: presentations, photo galleries, evaluation tools, and online modules. Of the outputs, 60% were used in the ambulatory clinics, 33% in intensive care unit bedside teaching rounds, and 7% in inpatient medical unit bedside teaching rounds. Learners reported that common benefits of tablet computers were: improved access/convenience (41%), improved interactive learning (38%), and improved bedside teaching and patient care (13%). A common barrier faculty identified was inconsistent wireless access (14%), while no barriers were identified by the majority of learners. Providing faculty with tablet computers and having peer-mentoring workshops to discuss their use was feasible and added value.

  6. Detecting Adverse Drug Events using Information Technology: Identifying Knowledge, Attitude, Practices & barriers to Adverse Drug Reaction (ADR) reporting in a Secondary Hospital.

    OpenAIRE

    Zeeshan, Hina

    2017-01-01

    Objectives:– To meet compliance of medication management system by modifying ADR reporting form.– Enhance customer satisfaction by providing safe & quality care.– Decrease prolonged length of stay ultimately increasing cost occurring from ADRs.– Improve employee knowledge, attitude & practices towards ADR process.Introduction/Background: Healthcare professional’s knowledge and attitudes to ADR and its reporting play vital role to report any cases of ADR. Positive attitudes may favor A...

  7. The Effects of Demographic, Internal and External University Environment Factors on Faculty Job Satisfaction in Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duong, Minh-Quang

    2016-01-01

    University faculty members with higher job satisfaction are more productive, creative and positive attitude towards their job. Even less is known about university faculty job satisfaction in developing countries like Vietnam. This study examines the effects of demographic, internal and external university environment factors on faculty job…

  8. Attitudes and barriers to exercise in adults with a recent diagnosis of type 1 diabetes: a qualitative study of participants in the Exercise for Type 1 Diabetes (EXTOD) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Amy; Narendran, Parth; Andrews, Robert C; Daley, Amanda; Greenfield, Sheila M

    2018-01-24

    To explore attitudes and barriers to exercise in adults with new-onset type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Qualitative methodology using focus group (n=1), individual face-to-face (n=4) and telephone interviews (n=8). Thematic analysis using the Framework Method. Nineteen UK hospital sites. Fifteen participants in the Exercise for Type 1 Diabetes study. We explored current and past levels of exercise, understanding of exercise and exercise guidelines, barriers to increasing exercise levels and preferences for monitoring of activity in a trial. Five main themes were identified: existing attitudes to exercise, feelings about diagnosis, perceptions about exercise consequences, barriers to increasing exercise and confidence in managing blood glucose. An important finding was that around half the participants reported a reduction in activity levels around diagnosis. Although exercise was felt to positively impact on health, some participants were not sure about the benefits or concerned about potential harms such as hypoglycaemia. Some participants reported being advised by healthcare practitioners (HCPs) not to exercise. Exercise should be encouraged (not discouraged) from diagnosis, as patients may be more amenable to lifestyle change. Standard advice on exercise and T1DM needs to be made available to HCPs and patients with T1DM to improve patients' confidence in managing their diabetes around exercise. ISRCTN91388505; Results. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  9. Perceived gender-based barriers to careers in academic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochran, Amalia; Hauschild, Tricia; Elder, William B; Neumayer, Leigh A; Brasel, Karen J; Crandall, Marie L

    2013-08-01

    Women represent roughly 50% of US medical students and one third of US surgery residents. Within academic surgery departments, however, women are disproportionately underrepresented, particularly at senior levels. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that female surgeons perceive different barriers to academic careers relative to their male colleagues. A modified version of the Career Barriers Inventory-Revised was administered to senior surgical residents and early-career surgical faculty members at 8 academic medical centers using an online survey tool. Likert-type scales were used to measure respondents' agreement with each survey item. Fisher's exact test was used to identify significant differences on the basis of gender. Respondents included 70 women (44 residents, 26 faculty members) and 84 men (41 residents, 43 faculty members). Women anticipated or perceived active discrimination in the form of being treated differently and experiencing negative comments about their sex, findings that differed notably from those for male counterparts. Sex-based negative attitudes inhibited the career aspirations of female surgeons. The presence of overt and implicit bias resulted in a sense that sex is a barrier to female surgeons' career development in academic surgery. No differences were observed between male and female respondents with regard to career preparation or structural barriers. Female academic surgeons experience challenges that are perceived to differ from their male counterparts. Women who participated in this study reported feeling excluded from the dominant culture in departments of surgery. This study may help guide transformative initiatives within academic surgery departments. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Types of Student Intertextuality and Faculty Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecorari, Diane; Shaw, Philip

    2012-01-01

    Intertextuality is a prominent feature of academic writing, and the ability to use sources effectively and appropriately is an essential skill which novice writers must acquire. It is also a complex skill, and student performance is not always successful. It is presumably beneficial for students to receive consistent messages about what source use…

  11. Attitudes towards the Human Genome Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahroudi, Julie; Shaw, Geraldine

    Attitudes concerning the Human Genome Project were reported by faculty (N=40) and students (N=66) from a liberal arts college. Positive attitudes toward the project involved privacy, insurance and health, economic purposes, reproductive purposes, genetic counseling, religion and overall opinions. Negative attitudes were expressed regarding…

  12. Nursing Faculty Members' Perspectives of Faculty-to-Faculty Workplace Incivility among Nursing Faculty Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amos, Kimberly S.

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, nursing faculty incivility has been a searing topic of research. Nursing research included studies on incivility among nursing students, incivility between nursing students and nursing faculty, and incivility in the clinical setting. However, literature specifically on nursing faculty incivility was limited. This descriptive,…

  13. The Faculty at Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, Jack H.; Bowen, Howard R.

    1985-01-01

    Recent changes in the quality of faculty life were traced, and the consequences of these changes for the future of higher education are assessed. Shifts in the faculty's demographic characteristics, compensation, work environment, status, and morale, and in the quality of new faculty are discussed. (MLW)

  14. Communication Faculty Internships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Dirk C.

    2001-01-01

    Offers a first-hand account of a faculty internship at a major international public relations firm. Discusses the internship host and the intern's duties; faculty internship advantages and benefits; and faculty internship disadvantages and limitations. Considers 10 experiential realizations stemming from the author's internship experience. (SR)

  15. Physics and Astronomy New Faculty Workshops: 20 Years of Workshops and 2000 Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilborn, Robert

    Most college and university new faculty members start their teaching careers with almost no formal training in pedagogy. To address this issue, the American Association of Physics Teachers, the American Astronomical Society, and the American Physical Society have been offering since 1996 workshops for physics and astronomy new faculty members (and in recent years for experienced faculty members as well). The workshops introduce faculty members to a variety of interactive engagement teaching (IET) methods and the evidence for their effectiveness, embedded in a framework of general professional development. Currently the workshops engage about 50% of the new tenure-track hires in physics and astronomy. The workshops are quite successful in making the participants aware of IET methods and motivating them to implement them in their classes. However, about 1/3 of the participants stop using IET methods within a year or two. The faculty members cite (a) lack of time and energy to change, (b) content coverage concerns, and (c) difficulty getting students engaged as reasons for their discontinuance. To help overcome these barriers, we have introduced faculty online learning communities (FOLCs). The FOLCs provide peer support and advice through webinars and coaching from more experienced faculty members. Recommendations based on the workshops and the experiences of the participants can enhance the teaching effectiveness of future physics and astronomy faculty members. This work was supported in part by NSF Grant 1431638.

  16. Psychosocial problems and barriers to improved diabetes management: results of the Cross-National Diabetes Attitudes, Wishes and Needs (DAWN) Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peyrot, M.; Rubin, R.R.; Lauritzen, T.; Snoek, F.J.; Matthews, D.R.; Skovlund, S.E.

    2005-01-01

    Aims: To examine patient- and provider-reported psychosocial problems and barriers to effective self-care and resources for dealing with those barriers. Methods: Cross-sectional study using face-to-face or telephone interviews with diabetic patients and health-care providers in 13 countries in Asia,

  17. 大學教師對與圖書館員合作推動資訊素養融入課程之態度 A case study of faculty attitudes toward collaboration with librarians to integrate information literacy into the curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tien-Yu Cha

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available 教師與館員合作將資訊素養融入課程,乃促進資訊素養學習成效之關鍵策略,為探索大學教師與館員進行資訊素養課程合作之態度,本研究以逢甲大學專任教師為對象進行問卷調查,探討教師對於資訊素養融入課程的合作策略、與館員的合作態度及影響教師館員合作的因素,以期作為館員與教師建立或拓展課程合作關係之參考。研究結果顯示,個案機構的教師對協同合作抱持正面的態度,不同年齡層則略有差異。此外,教師對培養高階思維能力與低階思維能力的合作態度不同;而「館員學科知識」、「館員專業素養」、「課程策略」、「學生學習」四大因素構面對教師與館員間的合作具有影響作用。Faculty-librarian partnership in information literacy (IL instruction through subject course has been advocated within LIS field over years. In order to understand faculty attitudes toward collaboration with librarians to integrate IL into their curriculum, a survey was conducted at Feng Chia University. Findings show positive attitudes from faculty while differences were observed among ages. Meanwhile, different attitudes were revealed between teaching higher order thinking skills and lower order thinking skills. Librarian Domain Knowledge, Librarian Professionalism, Curriculum Strategies, and Student Learning were identified as factorial dimensions influencing faculty-librarian collaboration.

  18. Knowledge, attitudes and barriers regarding vaccination against hepatitis A and B in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus infection: a survey of family medicine and internal medicine physicians in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenner, C T; Herzog, K; Chaudhari, S; Bini, E J; Weinshel, E H

    2012-10-01

    Although vaccination against hepatitis A virus (HAV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV) is recommended for all patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, physician vaccination practices are suboptimal. Since training for family medicine (FM) and internal medicine (IM) physicians differ, we hypothesised that there are differences in knowledge, attitudes and barriers regarding vaccination against HAV and HBV in patients with chronic HCV between these two groups. A two-page questionnaire was mailed to 3000 primary care (FM and IM) physicians randomly selected from the AMA Physician Masterfile in 2005. The survey included questions about physician demographics, knowledge and attitudes regarding vaccination. Among the 3000 physicians surveyed, 1209 (42.2%) returned completed surveys. There were no differences between respondents and non-respondents with regard to age, gender, geographic location or specialty. More FM than IM physicians stated that HCV+ patients should not be vaccinated against HAV (23.7% vs. 11.8%, p infection, physicians often do not test or vaccinate susceptible individuals. Interventions are needed to overcome the barriers identified and improve vaccination rates. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Attitudes of Students Enrolled in the Pedagogical Formation Programs towards the Teaching Profession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özdemir, Yalçin; Güngö, Sabri

    2017-01-01

    This study was conducted to examine the attitudes of students enrolled in the pedagogical formation programs in order to become teachers towards the teaching profession. The students either graduated from faculties other than the education faculty or they were still enrolled in undergraduate programs of faculties other than the education faculty.…

  20. Accounting Faculty Internships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill Christopher

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Accounting professionals, business college accrediting bodies, and even accounting academics themselves acknowledge that there is a disconnect between academe and the rigors and requirements of the accounting profession. Among the suggestions proposed in the literature to reduce this gap is the faculty internship, where accounting faculty members work within the field as accountants. Heretofore, individual case studies report benefits of such internships that accrue to a variety of stakeholder groups beyond just the faculty intern and include the academic institution, students, and accounting profession through faculty internships. This research seeks wider support for these benefits. This descriptive study involved surveying a sample of accounting faculty members to get their opinions about the benefits and drawbacks of faculty internships, and to determine the level of use of faculty internships in accounting. In all, 128 usable responses were obtained, representing a 14.6% response rate. The results of this study reveal that although most faculty members acknowledge the benefits cited in the literature, too few take advantage of faculty internships.

  1. Attitudes of College Graduates, Faculty, and Human Resource Managers Regarding the Importance of Skills Acquired in College and Needed for Job Performance and Career Advancement Potential in the Retail Sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimler, Ronald

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to empirically examine college graduate, faculty, and human resource manager descriptions of needed, received, and further training in eight employability dimensions of literacy and numeracy, critical thinking, management, leadership, interpersonal, information technology, systems thinking skills, and work ethic…

  2. Attitudes and attitude change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohner, Gerd; Dickel, Nina

    2011-01-01

    Attitudes and attitude change remain core topics of contemporary social psychology. This selective review emphasizes work published from 2005 to 2009. It addresses constructionist and stable-entity conceptualizations of attitude, the distinction between implicit and explicit measures of attitude, and implications of the foregoing for attitude change. Associative and propositional processes in attitude change are considered at a general level and in relation to evaluative conditioning. The role of bodily states and physical perceptions in attitude change is reviewed. This is followed by an integrative perspective on processing models of persuasion and the consideration of meta-cognitions in persuasion. Finally, effects of attitudes on information processing, social memory, and behavior are highlighted. Core themes cutting across the areas reviewed are attempts at integrative theorizing bringing together formerly disparate phenomena and viewpoints.

  3. The Validity and Reliability Characteristics of the M-BACK Questionnaire to Assess the Barriers, Attitudes, Confidence, and Knowledge of Mental Health Staff Regarding Metabolic Health of Mental Health Service Users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Watkins

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundAddressing the burden of poor physical health and the subsequent gap in life expectancy experienced by people with mental illness is a major priority in mental health services. To equip mental health staff with the competence to deliver evidence-based interventions, targeted staff training regarding metabolic health is required. In order to evaluate the effectiveness of staff training regarding metabolic health, we aimed to develop a succinct measure to determine the barriers, attitudes, confidence, and knowledge of health practitioners through the development and test–retest reliability of the Metabolic-Barriers, Attitudes, Confidence, and Knowledge Questionnaire (M-BACK.MethodsThe M-BACK questionnaire was developed to evaluate the impact of specialized training in metabolic health care for mental health nurses. Content of the M-BACK was developed from a literature review and refined by an expert review panel and validated via a piloting process. To determine the test–retest reliability of the M-BACK, 31 nursing students recruited from the University of Notre Dame, Sydney completed the questionnaire on two separate occasions, 7 days apart. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs were calculated for the total score, as well as each of the four domains.ResultsPilot testing was undertaken with a sample of 106 mental health nurses with a mean age 48.2, ranging from 24 to 63 years of age, who participated in six training courses. Questionnaire development resulted in a 16-item instrument, with each item is scored on a five-point Likert scale ranging from “strongly disagree” to “strongly agree.” Test–retest reliability of the M-BACK was completed by 30 of 31 nursing students recruited, ICCs ranged from 0.62 to 0.96.ConclusionThe M-BACK is a reliable measure of the key elements of practitioner perceptions of barriers, and their knowledge, attitudes, and confidence regarding metabolic monitoring in people with mental

  4. Faculty Handbook. Regis College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regis Coll., Weston, MA.

    Regis College policies and procedures are described in this 1976 faculty handbook. Chapter 1 covers college organization and governance, including roles of academic officers and committees. Specific faculty data are presented in Chapter 2, such as definition of academic ranks and titles, recruitment and appointment, promotion, tenure, review,…

  5. Supporting Faculty Grassroots Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kezar, Adrianna; Lester, Jaime

    2009-01-01

    Various factors are making faculty leadership challenging including the rise in part-time and non-tenure-track faculty, the increasing pressure to publish and teach more courses and adopt new technologies and pedagogies, increasing standards for tenure and promotion, ascension of academic capitalism, and heavy service roles for women and people of…

  6. Faculty Retirement Transitions Revitalized

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Ummersen, Claire; Duranleau, Lauren; McLaughlin, Jean

    2013-01-01

    It has been almost ten years since the American Council on Education (ACE) began to raise awareness of the importance of workplace flexibility in faculty careers and to encourage colleges and universities to support faculty in better integrating their professional and personal lives. With the generous support of the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, ACE…

  7. CBE Faculty and Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    About Us Research Staff Edward Arens Fred Bauman Gail Brager Darryl Dickerhoff Ali Ghahramani Partners Facilities Graduate Programs Visiting Scholar Program Careers CBE Faculty and Staff CBE is an performance of buildings. The core research group for CBE includes faculty and research staff members

  8. Meeting the Late-Career Needs of Faculty Transitioning Through Retirement: One Institution's Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, Joanna M; Felice, Marianne E; Ockene, Judith K; Milner, Robert J; Congdon, John L; Tosi, Stephen; Thorndyke, Luanne E

    2018-03-01

    Medical school faculty are aging, but few academic health centers are adequately prepared with policies, programs, and resources (PPR) to assist late-career faculty. The authors sought to examine cultural barriers to successful retirement and create alignment between individual and institutional needs and tasks through PPR that embrace the contributions of senior faculty while enabling retirement transitions at the University of Massachusetts Medical School, 2013-2017. Faculty 50 or older were surveyed, programs at other institutions and from the literature (multiple fields) were reviewed, and senior faculty and leaders, including retired faculty, were engaged to develop and implement PPR. Cultural barriers were found to be significant, and a multipronged, multiyear strategy to address these barriers, which sequentially added PPR to support faculty, was put in place. A comprehensive framework of sequenced PPR was developed to address the needs and tasks of late-career transitions within three distinct phases: pre-retirement, retirement, and post-retirement. This sequential introduction approach has led to important outcomes for all three of the retirement phases, including reduction of cultural barriers, a policy that has been useful in assessing viability of proposed phased retirement plans, transparent and realistic discussions about financial issues, and consideration of roles that retired faculty can provide. The authors are tracking the issues mentioned in consultations and efficacy of succession planning, and will be resurveying faculty to further refine their work. This framework approach could serve as a template for other academic health centers to address late-career faculty development.

  9. Attitudes and attitude change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scholderer, Joachim

    2010-01-01

    An attitude can be defined as the evaluation of an object as positive or negative. The term "object" in this definition should be understood in a broad sense; an attitude object may be any concrete or abstract entity that is in some way represented in our thoughts and memory. In other words......, attitude objects are simply the things we like or dislike. Consumer researchers are mainly interested in attitude objects of two classes, products and services, including the attributes, issues, persons, communications, situations, and behaviours related to them. Research on consumer attitudes takes two...... perspectives: Understanding attitude structure: how is an attitude cognitively represented in a consumer's mind, including its components (intra-attitudinal structure) and its associations with other psychological variables (inter-attitudinal structure)? Understanding information processing: what...

  10. Attitudes and Attitude Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albarracin, Dolores; Shavitt, Sharon

    2018-01-04

    This review covers research on attitudes and attitude change published between 2010 and 2017. We characterize this period as one of significant progress toward an understanding of how attitudes form and change in three critical contexts. The first context is the person, as attitudes change in connection to values, general goals, language, emotions, and human development. The second context is social relationships, which link attitude change to the communicator of persuasive messages, social media, and culture. The third context is sociohistorical and highlights the influence of unique events, including sociopolitical, economic, and climatic occurrences. In conclusion, many important recent findings reflect the fact that holism, with a focus on situating attitudes within their personal, social, and historical contexts, has become the zeitgeist of attitude research during this period.

  11. Computing Educator Attitudes about Motivation

    OpenAIRE

    Settle, Amber; Sedlak, Brian

    2016-01-01

    While motivation is of great interest to computing educators, relatively little work has been done on understanding faculty attitudes toward student motivation. Two previous qualitative studies of instructor attitudes found results identical to those from other disciplines, but neither study considered whether instructors perceive student motivation to be more important in certain computing classes. In this work we present quantitative results about the perceived importance of student motivat...

  12. Medical and pharmacy students’ attitudes towards physician-pharmacist collaboration in Kuwait

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katoue MG

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess and compare the attitudes of medical and pharmacy students towards physician-pharmacist collaboration and explore their opinions about the barriers to collaborative practice in Kuwait. Methods: A cross-sectional survey of pharmacy and medical students (n=467 was conducted in Faculties of Medicine and Pharmacy, Kuwait University. Data were collected via self-administered questionnaire from first-year pharmacy and medical students and students in the last two professional years of the pharmacy and medical programs. Descriptive and comparative analyses were performed using SPSS, version 22. Statistical significance was accepted at p<0.05. Results: The response rate was 82.4%. Respondents had overall positive attitudes towards physician-pharmacist collaboration. Pharmacy students expressed significantly more positive attitudes than medical students (p< 0.001. Medical students rated the three most significant barriers to collaboration to be: pharmacists’ separation from patient care areas (n=100, 70.0%, lack of pharmacists’ access to patients’ medical record (n=90, 63.0% and physicians assuming total responsibility for clinical decision-making (n=87, 60.8%. Pharmacy students’ top three perceived barriers were: lack of pharmacists’ access to patients’ medical record (n=80, 84.2%, organizational obstacles (n=79, 83.2%, and pharmacists’ separation from patient care areas (n=77, 81.1%. Lack of interprofessional education was rated the fourth-largest barrier by both medical (n=79, 55.2% and pharmacy (n=76, 80.0% students. Conclusions: Medical and pharmacy students in Kuwait advocate physician-pharmacist collaborative practice, but both groups identified substantial barriers to implementation. Efforts are needed to enhance undergraduate/postgraduate training in interprofessional collaboration, and to overcome barriers to physician-pharmacist collaboration to advance a team approach to patient care.

  13. Faculty Development for Medical School Community-Based Faculty: A Council of Academic Family Medicine Educational Research Alliance Study Exploring Institutional Requirements and Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drowos, Joanna; Baker, Suzanne; Harrison, Suzanne Leonard; Minor, Suzanne; Chessman, Alexander W; Baker, Dennis

    2017-08-01

    Community-based faculty play a large role in training medical students nationwide and require faculty development. The authors hypothesized that positive relationships exist between clerkships paying preceptors and requiring faculty development, and between protected clerkship directors' time and delivering face-to-face preceptor training, as well as with the number or length of community-based preceptor visits. Through under standing the quantity, delivery methods, barriers, and institutional support for faculty development provided to community-based preceptors teaching in family medicine clerkships, best practices can be developed. Data from the 2015 Council of Academic Family Medicine's Educational Research Alliance survey of Family Medicine Clerkship Directors were analyzed. The cross-sectional survey of clerkship directors is distributed annually to institutional representatives of U.S. and Canadian accredited medical schools. Survey questions focused on the requirements, delivery methods, barriers, and institutional support available for providing faculty development to community-based preceptors. Paying community-based preceptors was positively correlated with requiring faculty development in family medicine clerkships. The greatest barrier to providing faculty development was community-based preceptor time availability; however, face-to-face methods remain the most common delivery strategy. Many family medicine clerkship directors perform informal or no needs assessment in developing faculty development topics for community-based faculty. Providing payment to community preceptors may allow schools to enhance faculty development program activities and effectiveness. Medical schools could benefit from constructing a formal curriculum for faculty development, including formal preceptor needs assessment and program evaluation. Clerkship directors may consider recruiting and retaining community-based faculty by employing innovative faculty development delivery

  14. University Faculty Perceptions and Utilization of Popular Culture in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peacock, Jessica; Covino, Ralph; Auchter, Jessica; Boyd, Jennifer; Klug, Hope; Laing, Craig; Irvin, Lindsay

    2018-01-01

    This article discusses results of a survey on the utilization of and attitudes and beliefs towards the use of popular culture among faculty in higher education. A total of 212 faculty members from a mid-sized public regional university provided responses, with the majority indicating that they utilize popular culture in their classroom teaching…

  15. Motivations, Costs and Results of AOL: Perceptions of Accounting and Economics Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eschenfelder, Mark J.; Bryan, Lois D.; Lee, Tanya M.

    2014-01-01

    The emphasis of the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) on improving student learning through Assurance of Learning (AOL) makes faculty involvement in the process at AACSB accredited schools important. This study examines the attitudes of accounting and economics faculty at AACSB accredited institutions toward the AOL…

  16. PETE Faculty Beliefs Concerning the Preparation of Preservice Teachers for CSPAP Roles: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Collin A.; Russ, Laura; Webster, Liana; Molina, Sergio; Lee, Hee Su; Cribbs, Jason

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the perceived effectiveness and attitudes of physical education teacher education (PETE) faculty concerning the preparation of preservice teachers for Comprehensive School Physical Activity Program (CSPAP) roles. Faculty (N = 175) responded to an electronic survey assessing perceived effectiveness and…

  17. International Comparisons of Inclusive Instruction among College Faculty in Spain, Canada, and the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, Allison; Vukovic, Boris; Sala-Bars, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    Across the globe, students with disabilities have been increasing in prevalence in higher education settings. Thus, it has become more urgent for college faculty to have a broad awareness of disability and inclusive teaching practices based on the tenets of Universal Design. In this study, we examined faculty attitudes toward disability-related…

  18. Overcoming language barriers with foreign-language speaking patients: a survey to investigate intra-hospital variation in attitudes and practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vilpert Sarah

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Use of available interpreter services by hospital clincial staff is often suboptimal, despite evidence that trained interpreters contribute to quality of care and patient safety. Examination of intra-hospital variations in attitudes and practices regarding interpreter use can contribute to identifying factors that facilitate good practice. The purpose of this study was to describe attitudes, practices and preferences regarding communication with limited French proficiency (LFP patients, examine how these vary across professions and departments within the hospital, and identify factors associated with good practices. Methods A self-administered questionnaire was mailed to random samples of 700 doctors, 700 nurses and 93 social workers at the Geneva University Hospitals, Switzerland. Results Seventy percent of respondents encounter LFP patients at least once a month, but this varied by department. 66% of respondents said they preferred working with ad hoc interpreters (patient's family and bilingual staff, mainly because these were easier to access. During the 6 months preceding the study, ad hoc interpreters were used at least once by 71% of respondents, and professional interpreters were used at least once by 51%. Overall, only nine percent of respondents had received any training in how and why to work with a trained interpreter. Only 23.2% of respondents said the clinical service in which they currently worked encouraged them to use professional interpreters. Respondents working in services where use of professional interpreters was encouraged were more likely to be of the opinion that the hospital should systematically provide a professional interpreter to LFP patients (40.3% as compared with those working in a department that discouraged use of professional interpreters (15.5% and they used professional interpreters more often during the previous 6 months. Conclusion Attitudes and practices regarding communication with

  19. Overcoming language barriers with foreign-language speaking patients: a survey to investigate intra-hospital variation in attitudes and practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudelson, Patricia; Vilpert, Sarah

    2009-10-15

    Use of available interpreter services by hospital clinical staff is often suboptimal, despite evidence that trained interpreters contribute to quality of care and patient safety. Examination of intra-hospital variations in attitudes and practices regarding interpreter use can contribute to identifying factors that facilitate good practice. The purpose of this study was to describe attitudes, practices and preferences regarding communication with limited French proficiency (LFP) patients, examine how these vary across professions and departments within the hospital, and identify factors associated with good practices. A self-administered questionnaire was mailed to random samples of 700 doctors, 700 nurses and 93 social workers at the Geneva University Hospitals, Switzerland. Seventy percent of respondents encounter LFP patients at least once a month, but this varied by department. 66% of respondents said they preferred working with ad hoc interpreters (patient's family and bilingual staff), mainly because these were easier to access. During the 6 months preceding the study, ad hoc interpreters were used at least once by 71% of respondents, and professional interpreters were used at least once by 51%. Overall, only nine percent of respondents had received any training in how and why to work with a trained interpreter. Only 23.2% of respondents said the clinical service in which they currently worked encouraged them to use professional interpreters. Respondents working in services where use of professional interpreters was encouraged were more likely to be of the opinion that the hospital should systematically provide a professional interpreter to LFP patients (40.3%) as compared with those working in a department that discouraged use of professional interpreters (15.5%) and they used professional interpreters more often during the previous 6 months. Attitudes and practices regarding communication with LFP patients vary across professions and hospital departments. In

  20. Expanding Library Support of Faculty Research: Exploring Readiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jeanne M.; Tucker, Cory

    2013-01-01

    The changing research and information environment requires a reexamination of library support for research. This study considers research-related attitudes and practices to identify elements indicating readiness or resistance to expanding the library's role in research support. A survey of faculty conducted at the University of Nevada Las Vegas…

  1. Faculty Perceptions of Plagiarism at Queensborough Community College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Sara; Beck, Sheila

    2011-01-01

    The researchers surveyed English and Speech & Theater faculty members at Queensborough Community College on their perceptions of and attitudes toward plagiarism. The researchers used the Queensborough Community College Academic Integrity Policy as the basis for their analysis. Based on the responses received, it was determined that 50% of the…

  2. The Opinion of Students and Faculty Members about the Effect of the Faculty Performance Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghahrani, Nassim; Siamian, Hasan; Balaghafari, Azita; Aligolbandi, Kobra; Vahedi, Mohammad

    2015-08-01

    One of the most common ways that in most countries and Iran in determining the status of teacher training is the evaluation by students. The most common method of evaluation is the survey questionnaire provided to the study subjects, comprised of questions about educational activities. The researchers plan to evaluate the opinion of students and faculty members about the effect of the faculty performance evaluation at Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences in 2014-15. In this descriptive cross-sectional survey of attitudes of students and professors base their evaluation on the impact on their academic performance, have been studied. The populations were 3904 students and 149 faculty members of basic sciences Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences. Sample of 350 students and 107 students using Cochran formula faculty members through proportional stratified random sampling was performed. The data of the questionnaire with 28 questions on a Likert Spectrum, respectively. Statistical Analysis Data are descriptive and inferential statistics using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U test is done. Based on the results obtained from total of 350 students, 309 students and from total of 107 faculty members, 76 faculty of basic sciences, participated in this study. The most of the students, 80 (25.9%) of the Faculty of Allied Medical Sciences and most of the faculty of basic sciences, 33 (4.43) of the medicine science faculty. Comments Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences in comparison to the scope of the evaluation should test using Binominal test; we can conclude that in the field of regulatory, scientific, educational, and communications arena, there were no significant differences between the views of students. The greatest supporter of the education of 193 (62%) and most challengers of exam 147 (48%), respectively. Regarding the viewpoints of the faculty members at Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences towards the evaluation domains, using binomial test

  3. The Opinion of Students and Faculty Members about the Effect of the Faculty Performance Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghahrani, Nassim; Siamian, Hasan; Balaghafari, Azita; Aligolbandi, Kobra; Vahedi, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Background: One of the most common ways that in most countries and Iran in determining the status of teacher training is the evaluation by students. The most common method of evaluation is the survey questionnaire provided to the study subjects, comprised of questions about educational activities. The researchers plan to evaluate the opinion of students and faculty members about the effect of the faculty performance evaluation at Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences in 2014-15. Methods: In this descriptive cross-sectional survey of attitudes of students and professors base their evaluation on the impact on their academic performance, have been studied. The populations were 3904 students and 149 faculty members of basic sciences Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences. Sample of 350 students and 107 students using Cochran formula faculty members through proportional stratified random sampling was performed. The data of the questionnaire with 28 questions on a Likert Spectrum, respectively. Statistical Analysis Data are descriptive and inferential statistics using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U test is done. Results: Based on the results obtained from total of 350 students, 309 students and from total of 107 faculty members, 76 faculty of basic sciences, participated in this study. The most of the students, 80 (25.9%) of the Faculty of Allied Medical Sciences and most of the faculty of basic sciences, 33 (4.43) of the medicine science faculty. Comments Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences in comparison to the scope of the evaluation should test using Binominal test; we can conclude that in the field of regulatory, scientific, educational, and communications arena, there were no significant differences between the views of students. The greatest supporter of the education of 193 (62%) and most challengers of exam 147 (48%), respectively. Regarding the viewpoints of the faculty members at Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences towards the evaluation

  4. Faculty development: if you build it, they will come.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinert, Yvonne; Macdonald, Mary Ellen; Boillat, Miriam; Elizov, Michelle; Meterissian, Sarkis; Razack, Saleem; Ouellet, Marie-Noel; McLeod, Peter J

    2010-09-01

    The goals of this study were three-fold: to explore the reasons why some clinical teachers regularly attend centralised faculty development activities; to compare their responses with those of colleagues who do not attend, and to learn how we can make faculty development programmes more pertinent to teachers' needs. In 2008-2009, we conducted focus groups with 23 clinical teachers who had participated in faculty development activities on a regular basis in order to ascertain their perceptions of faculty development, reasons for participation, and perceived barriers against involvement. Thematic analysis and research team consensus guided the data interpretation. Reasons for regular participation included the perceptions that: faculty development enables personal and professional growth; learning and self-improvement are valued; workshop topics are viewed as relevant to teachers' needs; the opportunity to network with colleagues is appreciated, and initial positive experiences promote ongoing involvement. Barriers against participation mirrored those cited by non-attendees in an earlier study (e.g. volume of work, lack of time, logistical factors), but did not prevent participation. Suggestions for increasing participation included introducing a 'buddy system' for junior faculty members, an orientation workshop for new staff, and increased role-modelling and mentorship. The conceptualisation of faculty development as a means to achieve specific objectives and the desire for relevant programming that addresses current needs (i.e., expectancies), together with an appreciation of learning, self-improvement and networking with colleagues (i.e., values), were highlighted as reasons for participation by regular attendees. Medical educators should consider these 'lessons learned' in the design and delivery of faculty development offerings. They should also continue to explore the notion of faculty development as a social practice and the application of motivational

  5. Generating Gratitude in the Workplace to Improve Faculty Job Satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stegen, Amy; Wankier, Jamie

    2018-06-01

    The current nursing shortage affects all settings. In an effort to promote retention of nursing faculty, an "attitude of gratitude" was cultivated to improve job satisfaction and increase collaboration in one school of nursing. This was a quantitative study using a convenience sample of faculty at one school of nursing. A presurvey of faculty on perceived gratitude levels and job satisfaction was administered prior to the start of the school year. Multiple gratitude interventions were implemented throughout the year and a postsurvey was administered to measure the effectiveness of interventions. The findings of this study show an improvement of 17.9% in overall job satisfaction, which is consistent with other studies on the topic. Collaboration was not affected by gratitude interventions. Implementing gratitude is a cost-effective and easy way to improve job satisfaction to increase faculty retention rates. [J Nurs Educ. 2018;57(6):375-378.]. Copyright 2018, SLACK Incorporated.

  6. A Case Study for Evaluating the Diffusion of Computing Technology in Teaching Undergraduates by a Faculty in a Journalism and Mass Communication Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, Janet L.; Geske, Joel

    A case study investigated how journalism and mass communication faculty members diffused and used computing technology in teaching. Subjects, 21 tenured and tenure-track faculty members in a mid-sized journalism and mass communication department, completed an indepth questionnaire designed to measure the general attitude of the faculty towards…

  7. Factors Affecting Faculty Use of Learning Technologies: Implications for Models of Technology Adoption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, Tom; Sainter, Phillip; Saunders, Gunter

    2013-01-01

    This study examines factors associated with the use of learning technologies by higher education faculty. In an online survey in a UK university, 114 faculty respondents completed a measure of Internet self-efficacy, and reported on their use of learning technologies along with barriers to their adoption. Principal components analysis suggested…

  8. Latino Faculty in STEM Disciplines: Motivation to Engage in Research Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechuga, Vicente M.

    2012-01-01

    The scarcity of underrepresented faculty members in the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) disciplines is an issue of great concern to education researchers and scholars alike. Despite their low representation, many minority faculty are able to remain motivated, even when facing barriers due to their ethnicity. I present…

  9. Faculty's Perception of Faculty Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premkumar, Kalyani; Moshynskyy, Anton; Sakai, Damon H.; Fong, Sheri F. T.

    2017-01-01

    Faculty Development (FD) is a vital component across the medical education continuum of undergraduate, postgraduate, and continuing medical education. However, the positioning of FD in medical institutions varies widely. The perceptions of faculty on FD should be examined in order to provide effective FD. The perceptions of faculty involved in…

  10. Your Faculty, Reluctantly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trower, Cathy A.

    2000-01-01

    Notes a decline in numbers of doctoral students interested in academic careers and identifies six negatives of an academic career. Reports on a survey of 2,000 doctoral candidates and junior faculty that found that quality of life factors more important to respondents than tenure and salary, especially important were the institution's geographic…

  11. EQUATING FACULTY LOADS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    OOSTING, KENNETH W.

    AT ALPENA COMMUNITY COLLEGE, A NORMAL TEACHING LOAD FOR ANY FACULTY MEMBER IS 14-16 SEMESTER HOURS, WITH 75-125 STUDENTS AND 2-3 PREPARATIONS. VARIATIONS FROM THE SCHEDULE ARE IN ACCORDANCE WITH SPECIFIC FORMULAS RELATING TO TOTAL MEMBERS OF STUDENTS, NUMBERS OF PREPARATIONS, ASSIGNMENT TO ENGLISH COMPOSITION CLASSES, NEW COURSES, AND CLASSES…

  12. The Promise of Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis for Black Men Who Have Sex with Men: An Ecological Approach to Attitudes, Beliefs, and Barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Caroline M.; Parker, Richard G.; Wilson, Patrick A.; Garcia, Jonathan; Hirsch, Jennifer S.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Research has demonstrated the clinical effectiveness of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) for HIV prevention, but little is known about how factors at the individual-, interpersonal-, community-, and structural levels impact PrEP use for black men who have sex with men (BMSM). We advance existing work by examining how all levels of the ecological framework must be addressed for PrEP to be successfully implemented as an effective HIV prevention approach. We interviewed 31 BMSM three times each and 17 community stakeholders once each; interviews were taped, transcribed, and analyzed using the constant comparative method. Factors that influence how BMSM experienced PrEP emerged across all levels of the ecological framework: At the individual level, respondents were wary of giving medication to healthy people and of the potential side-effects. At the interpersonal level, BMSM believed that PrEP use would discourage condom use and that PrEP should only be one option for HIV prevention, not the main option. At the community level, men described not trusting the pharmaceutical industry and described PrEP as an option for others, not for themselves. At the structural level, BMSM talked about HIV and sexuality-related stigmas and how they must overcome those before PrEP engagement. BMSM are a key population in the US National HIV/AIDS Strategy, yet few individuals believe that PrEP would be personally helpful. Our research indicates the urgent need to raise awareness and address structural stigma and policies that could be substantial barriers to the scale-up and implementation of PrEP-related services. PMID:27220036

  13. Attitudes, believes, determinants and organisational barriers behind the low seasonal influenza vaccination uptake in healthcare workers - A cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boey, Lise; Bral, Charlotte; Roelants, Mathieu; De Schryver, Antoon; Godderis, Lode; Hoppenbrouwers, Karel; Vandermeulen, Corinne

    2018-04-28

    Seasonal influenza threatens hospitalised patients and residents of nursing homes annually. Due to age and chronic disease their protection following immunisation is diminished. Additional immunisation of direct contacts and in particular healthcare workers (HCWs) has proven added value. As vaccination coverage in HCWs remains low, we aimed to gain insight in the factors behind the demotivation for influenza vaccination. Attitudes and believes towards influenza vaccination and socio-demographic and professional determinants were surveyed in 5141 Belgian HCWs from 13 hospitals and 14 nursing homes. Additionally, influenza campaign coordinators of the participating healthcare institutions were interviewed about the factors of success/failure in their campaigns. The mean vaccination coverage registered by the participating healthcare institutions was 40.4% in the hospitals and 45.3% in the nursing homes. Overall, up to 90% of HCWs found it important not to infect their patients. However, only 20% of non-vaccinated HCWs considered influenza vaccination a duty to not harm their patients. Up to 40% of unvaccinated staff believed they could get influenza after vaccination and that vaccination weakens their immune system. Also, only about 20% of unvaccinated staff thought to have a high chance of getting influenza. Reasons for unvaccinated staff to get vaccinated in the future are self-protection and protection of family members. Factors that positively influenced vaccination coverage are encouragement by supervisors (OR, hospitals: 7.1, p < 0.001; nursing homes: 7.5, p < 0.001) and well-organized vaccination campaigns with on-site vaccination. Factors that negatively affected vaccination coverage are misconceptions about influenza and its vaccine (OR, range 0.1-0.7, p < 0.001 for most misconceptions) and underestimation of the risk of contracting influenza by patients or HCWs (OR of perceived susceptibility, range 2.1-5.1, p < 0.001 for most factors

  14. Minority faculty members' resilience and academic productivity: are they related?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cora-Bramble, Denice; Zhang, Kehua; Castillo-Page, Laura

    2010-09-01

    To explore whether there is a relationship between resilience and academic productivity of minority faculty members in U.S. academic health centers. For the purposes of the study, the authors defined academic productivity as peer-reviewed and non-peer-reviewed publications, grants, and academic promotion. In 2007, the authors simultaneously collected quantitative and qualitative data by using a triangulation (mixed-method) design. Past participants in the Association of American Medical Colleges' Minority Faculty Career Development Seminar completed the Web-based 70-item Personal Resilience Questionnaire (PRQ). In addition, two focus groups were conducted with past seminar participants. Seventy-four minority faculty members completed the PRQ, and 15 participated in the two focus groups. The quantitative data showed a positive correlation between demographic, educational, and academic productivity variables and certain resilience subscale scores. Common themes that emerged from the qualitative data were categorized under four major domains: existing barriers to academic advancement, internal protective factors or cultural buffers, external institutional or environmental facilitators, and necessary attributes for ensuring academic productivity and advancement. Certain resilience subscales showed correlation with academic productivity of minority faculty members, and specific personal and/or cultural characteristics were identified as enablers. Minority faculty members may benefit from skill development and coaching that extends beyond the traditional scope of faculty development programs and that specifically targets modifiable resilience characteristics. Additional research is needed, but such nontraditional, resilience-centered intervention strategies may positively affect the advancement of minority faculty in academic medicine.

  15. Recognition of Core Elements of Medical Professionalism among Medical Students and Faculty Members

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    irdous Jahan

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Medical students and future physicians have chosen to pursue a profession that requires personal integrity, compassion and a constant awareness of the commitment made by them. Professionalism includes personal behaviors, knowledge, and competency. It includes the attitudes and values one holds and that run through the profession as a whole. Medical students learn professionalism during the course by either direct teaching or experiential learning. We conducted this study to estimate the self-reported level of practice of the core elements of professionalism by medical students and medical faculty and compared the two groups. Methods: One-hundred and nine students and 83 faculty members of Oman Medical College completed a professionalism questionnaire. The survey questions related to core elements of professionalism and were grouped under professional knowledge, professional skills, professional attitude, and qualities essential for professionalism. Results: The response rate was 65.6% (109 of 166 among students and 75.5% (83 of 110 from faculty members. Response to the questions on professional skills between the student and faculty group was significantly different (p < 0.001. Similarly, there was a significant difference in the responses related to professional attitude between the student and faculty group (p < 0.001. Students and faculty members have a significant difference in opinion regarding up to date knowledge of basic and clinical sciences and clinical competency (p = 0.024. Similarly, significant differences in opinion regarding up to date knowledge of basic and clinical sciences and clinical competency in clinical and basic sciences faculty members (p = 0.001. Students identified good communication skills (82.6%, and faculty staff identified up to date professional knowledge (62.7% as the most important aspect of professionalism. Conclusions: Both students and teaching faculty agreed that the top most professional

  16. Preoperative learning goals set by surgical residents and faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pernar, Luise I M; Breen, Elizabeth; Ashley, Stanley W; Peyre, Sarah E

    2011-09-01

    The operating room (OR) remains the main teaching venue for surgical trainees. The OR is considered a pure-discovery learning environment; the downsides of this can be putatively overcome when faculty and trainee arrive at a shared understanding of learning. This study aimed to better understand preoperative learning goals to identify areas of commonalities and potential barrier to intraoperative teaching. Brief, structured preoperative interviews were conducted outside the OR with the resident and faculty member who were scheduled to operate together. Answers were analyzed and grouped using grounded theory. Twenty-seven resident-faculty pairs were interviewed. Nine residents (33.3%) were junior (PGY 1 and 2) and 18 (66.7%) were senior (PGY 3 through 5). Learning goal categories that emerged from the response analysis were anatomy, basic and advanced surgical skills, general and specific procedural tasks, technical autonomy, and pre-, intra-, and postoperative considerations. Residents articulated fewer learning goals than faculty (1.5 versus 2.4; P = 0.024). The most frequently identified learning goal by both groups was one classifiable under general procedural tasks; the greatest divergence was seen regarding perioperative considerations, which were identified frequently by faculty members but rarely by residents. Faculty articulate significantly more learning goals for the residents they will operate with than residents articulate for themselves. Our data suggest that residents and faculty align on some learning goals for the OR but residents tend to be more limited, focusing predominantly on technical aspects of the operation. Faculty members tend to hold a broader view of the learning potential of the OR. These discrepancies may present barriers to effective intraoperative teaching. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Identifying Barriers in Implementing Outcomes-Based Assessment Program Review: A Grounded Theory Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bresciani, Marilee J.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this grounded theory study was to identify the typical barriers encountered by faculty and administrators when implementing outcomes-based assessment program review. An analysis of interviews with faculty and administrators at nine institutions revealed a theory that faculty and administrators' promotion, tenure (if applicable),…

  18. Knowledge of and attitude towards pain relief during labour of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study determined women's knowledge of and attitudes to pain relief during labour. Methods ... Department of Family Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Free State, Bloemfontein, South Africa .... Breathing exercises. 25.

  19. Effect of demographic variables on public attitudes towards ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-09-30

    Sep 30, 2011 ... 5Faculty of Social Sciences and Humanities, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 UKM, Bangi, ..... race formulates a cultural/social network. .... Macer D, Chen Ng MA (2000). Changing Attitudes to Biotechnology in. Japan.

  20. Faculty Internships for Hospitality Instructors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynn, Christine; Hales, Jonathan A; Wiener, Paul

    2007-01-01

    Internships can help hospitality faculty build industry relationships while also ensuring the best and most current training for their students. Many hospitality organizations have structured faculty internships available or are willing to work with faculty to provide individualized internship opportunities. Career and technical educators in…

  1. Medical student and medical school teaching faculty perceptions of conflict of interest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andresen, Nicholas S; Olson, Tyler S; Krasowski, Matthew D

    2017-07-11

    Attitudes towards conflict of interest (COI) and COI policy are shaped during medical school and influence both the education of medical students and their future medical practice. Understanding the current attitudes of medical students and medical school teaching faculty may provide insight into what is taught about COI and COI policy within the 'hidden' medical curriculum. Differences between medical student and medical school teaching faculty perceptions of COI and COI policy have not been compared in detail. The authors surveyed first year medical students and medical school teaching faculty at one academic medical center. The response rate was 98.7% (150/152) for students and 34.2% (69/202) for faculty. Students were less likely than faculty to agree that lecturers should disclose COI to any learners (4.06 vs. 4.31, p = 0.01), but more likely to agree that COI disclosure decreases the presentation of biased material (3.80 vs. 3.21, p < 0.001). Student and faculty responses for all other questions were not different. Many of these responses suggest student and faculty support for stronger COI policy at academic medical centers. Students and faculty perceptions regarding COI and COI policy are largely similar, but differ in terms of the perceived effectiveness of COI disclosure. This study also suggests that medical students and medical school teaching faculty support for stronger COI policy at academic medical centers.

  2. Barriers to Professional Advancement among Female Managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, Virginia E.

    It appears that there is nothing inherently associated with femaleness which should preclude the ascendence of women into management positions. However, barriers do exist and they stem from such factors as societal sex-role stereotypes, attitudes toward women in management, attitudes toward female competence, and the prevalence of the male…

  3. Current Status of Family Medicine Faculty Development in Sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Paul R; Chege, Patrick; Dahlman, Bruce; Gibson, Christine; Evensen, Ann; Colon-Gonzalez, Maria C; Onguka, Stephanie; Lamptey, Roberta; Cayley, William E; Nguyen, Bich-May; Johnson, Brian; Getnet, Sawra; Hasnain, Memoona

    2017-03-01

    Reducing the shortage of primary care physicians in sub-Saharan Africa requires expansion of training programs in family medicine. Challenges remain in preparing, recruiting, and retaining faculty qualified to teach in these pioneering programs. Little is known about the unique faculty development needs of family medicine faculty within the sub-Saharan African context. The purpose of this study was to assess the current status and future needs for developing robust family medicine faculty in sub-Saharan Africa. The results are reported in two companion articles. A cross-sectional study design was used to conduct a qualitative needs assessment comprising 37 in-depth, semi-structured interviews of individual faculty trainers from postgraduate family medicine training programs in eight sub-Saharan African countries. Data were analyzed according to qualitative description. While faculty development opportunities in sub-Saharan Africa were identified, current faculty note many barriers to faculty development and limited participation in available programs. Faculty value teaching competency, but institutional structures do not provide adequate support. Sub-Saharan African family physicians and postgraduate trainee physicians value good teachers and recognize that clinical training alone does not provide all of the skills needed by educators. The current status of limited resources of institutions and individuals constrain faculty development efforts. Where faculty development opportunities do exist, they are too infrequent or otherwise inaccessible to provide trainers the necessary skills to help them succeed as educators.

  4. A comparative study on students' attitudes towards bilingualism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Furlan

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the research was to assess the existence of differences between attitudes towards bilingualism held by students of the Faculty of Humanities Koper and those held by students of Italian language and literacy from the Faculty of Philosophy in Split (Croatia. We investigated whether there are differences between attitudes towards bilingualism of both groups and if attitudes towards bilingualism held by students from Split are more favorable than those held by students from the Faculty of Humanities Koper. The results confirmed the first hypothesis partially, and the second one completely. 11 items out of 20 have shown to conduct to statistically different attitudes, whereas in one case a tendency towards statistically significant difference is to be found. In all cases, where statistically significant differences are to be found, attitudes held by students from Split are more positive, if compared to those held by students from Koper.

  5. A Comparison of the mechanical engineering and safety engineering student’s ICT attitudes at the Obuda University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiss Gabor

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Communication and technology are critical to education. However, using technology in education is not an easy task as communication barriers emerge. The aim of this research is to analyze the ICT attitudes from different faculties at the Obuda University that is between the mechanical engineering students and safety engineering students from the Donát Bánki Mechanical Safety Engineer Faculty. The students from these two groups will use different ICT tool at work after their graduation; the mechanical engineering students will work mostly with designer ICT tools, the safety engineering students will use security systems. It would be important to know whether instructors, when using ICT, have to follow different teaching methods and approaches in these two different groups or not. We measured the ICT attitude with a tool consisting of 23 items (Likert scaled. We worked with 361 students. The data analysis was performed with SPSS software using descriptive statistics and Mann-Whitney test. The results show both groups having the same positive ICT attitude however with one difference.

  6. A Collaborative Approach to Helping Teacher Education Faculty Model Technology Integration in Their Courses: An Informal Case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachariades, Iacovos; Roberts, Sherron Killingsworth

    1995-01-01

    Describes an innovative and collaborative approach to helping teacher educators better prepare preservice teachers to utilize technology for effective instruction. A mentoring program that paired graduate students in instructional technology with interested faculty members is discussed, and attitudes of the mentors and the faculty members are…

  7. Performance Pay Preferences of College of Education Faculty and Administrators at One Historically Black University: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Corey Lee

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the attitudes and perceptions College of Education faculty and administrators have about performance pay at a Historically Black University (HBCU). A secondary purpose of the study was to determine the performance pay plan and specific measures of faculty productivity preferred by College of Education…

  8. Attitudes and anxiety levels of medical students towards the acquisition of competencies in communication skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loureiro, Elizabete M; Severo, Milton; Bettencourt, Paulo; Ferreira, Maria A

    2011-12-01

    Results of third year medical students' attitudes and stress levels towards the acquisition of communication skills before and after a Communication and Clinical Skills Course (CCSC) at the Faculty of Medicine of the University of Porto (FMUP), Portugal, are presented. 115 students attending third-year CCSC completed a demographic questionnaire, State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, Communication Skills Attitudes Scale and Interpersonal Behavior Survey. Significant negative correlation was found between anxiety levels and attitudes towards learning communication skills in general as well as the teaching and learning process. At the end of the Course students reported that when compared to the start, their communication skills are less sufficient. At the end of this CCSC at FMUP, students recognized its major importance and how they need to invest and improve communication skills. However, it seems important to monitor the attitudes and anxiety levels of students towards patient care and communication during the medical course and to identify ways of overcoming barriers towards learning communication skills. It is recommended that there should be a complete (transversal and vertical) integration of communication skills, including effective teaching methods, assessments, and examinations in order to be valued by the students. This would necessitate curricular changes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Faculty Work as Philanthropy or Philanthropy as Faculty Work?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cagla Okten

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Employing Robert Payton’s (1988 definition of philanthropy, “Voluntary action for the public good” (p. 4, Faculty Work and the Public Good:  Philanthropy, Engagement, and Academic Professionalism offers a fresh look at faculty work as philanthropy. The purpose of this review essay is to provide a brief review of some of the key propositions in this book and to explore how faculty work as philanthropy may be understood in non-U.S. cultural contexts. We start our exploration of faculty work as philanthropy in non-U.S. contexts by examining this construct in the U.S. as presented by Faculty Work and the Public Good and by laying out key forces that it sets forth as shaping faculty work as philanthropic practice: institutional structure and employment frameworks, resource constraints, and discretionary constraints.

  10. Attitudes and barriers in implementing the environmental management system in a primary health care center Actitudes y barreras en la implantación del Sistema de Gestión Medioambiental en un centro de salud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Ángel Gata Díaz

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Identify attitudes and analyze the barriers perceived by those responsible for the implementation of SIGA-SAS in the primary health care centers of Distrito Sanitario Jaén.Methods: Between the nine primary health care centers that assisted a population more than 6000 users, were selected four professional with management tasks. We carried out an interview using a standardized questionnaire with 18 open questions, before conducting the interview, a small talk was given training and or delivered an informative documentation about SIGA-SAS. The interviews were recorded and transcribed in order to further analyze the speech in front of each professional to implement the SIGA-SAS.Results: Among the key findings on attitudes stressing the importance of the Managing Director of SAS to succeed in implementing the SIGA-SAS, and must rely on the actions of continuous improvement and active listening to the professionals. In addition there was also a clear consensus on the importance of the Distrito Sanitario Jaén and the ZBS management team to lead the implementation, defining objectives, setting tasks and delegating res- ponsibilities.Conclusions: The success of SIGA-SAS implementing should be based on three pillars, reinforcing the positive attitudes of the health professionals team working in the primary health care centers, the training of individuals with regard to the SIGA-SAS and the careful scheduling of the sequence of tasks to carry at all times.Objetivo: Identificar las actitudes y analizar las barreras percibidas por los responsables de la implantación del Sistema Integral de Gestión Ambiental, del Servicio Andaluz de Salud (SIGA-SAS, en los centros de salud del Distrito Sanitario Jaén.Material y métodos: De los nueve centros de salud, del Distrito Sanitario Jaén, con una población asistida superior a 6.000 habitantes, fueron seleccionados cuatro profesionales con funciones de gestión. Se llevó a cabo una entrevista

  11. Perceptions and use of iPad technology by pharmacy practice faculty members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiVall, Margarita V; Zgarrick, David P

    2014-04-17

    To explore the potential of tablet technology to address the specific workload challenges of pharmacy practice faculty members and to evaluate tablet usage after a department-wide iPad initiative. After conducting a needs assessment to determine pharmacy faculty attitudes towards tablet technology and to identify potential usage scenarios, all faculty members in a department of pharmacy practice received an iPad. After iPad distribution, training sessions and virtual tutorials were provided. An anonymous survey was administered to evaluate the pilot. The needs assessment survey revealed positive attitudes towards iPad technology, identified use scenarios, and led to a department-wide iPad pilot program. Most faculty members used iPads for connectivity with students (86%), paper/project annotation (68%), assessment (57%), and demonstration of tools used in practice (36%). For teaching, 61% of faculty members used iPads in seminars/laboratories, 57% used iPads in the experiential setting, and 43% used iPads in the classroom. Use of iPads for patient-care activities varied and depended on site support for mobile technology. The 23 faculty members with external practice sites used iPads to a greater extent and had more positive attitudes towards this technology compared with campus-based faculty members. Integration of tablet technology into the pharmacy education setting resulted in faculty-reported increased productivity and decreased paper waste. It also allowed faculty members to experiment with new teaching strategies in the classroom and experiential setting. Administrators at institutions exploring the use of tablet technology should allocate resources based on faculty needs and usage patterns.

  12. Religious Attitudes and Home Bias

    OpenAIRE

    C. Reggiani; G. Rossini

    2008-01-01

    Home bias affects trade in goods, services and financial assets. It is mostly generated by "natural" trade barriers. Among these dividers we may list many behavioral and sociological factors, such as status quo biases and a few kind of ‘embeddedness’. Unfortunately these factors are difficult to measure. An important part of ‘embeddedness’ may be related to religious attitudes. Is there any relation between economic home bias and religious attitudes at the individual tier? Our aim is to provi...

  13. Barriers to Career Flexibility in Academic Medicine: A Qualitative Analysis of Reasons for the Underutilization of Family-Friendly Policies, and Implications for Institutional Change and Department Chair Leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shauman, Kimberlee; Howell, Lydia P; Paterniti, Debora A; Beckett, Laurel A; Villablanca, Amparo C

    2018-02-01

    Academic medical and biomedical professionals need workplace flexibility to manage the demands of work and family roles and meet their commitments to both, but often fail to use the very programs and benefits that provide flexibility. This study investigated the reasons for faculty underutilization of work-life programs. As part of a National Institutes of Health-funded study, in 2010 the authors investigated attitudes of clinical and/or research biomedical faculty at the University of California, Davis, toward work-life policies, and the rationale behind their individual decisions regarding use of flexibility policies. The analysis used verbatim responses from 213 of 472 faculty (448 unstructured comments) to a series of open-ended survey questions. Questions elicited faculty members' self-reports of policy use, attitudes, and evaluations of the policies, and their perceptions of barriers that limited full benefit utilization. Data were coded and analyzed using a grounded theory approach. Faculty described how their utilization of workplace flexibility benefits was inhibited by organizational influences: the absence of reliable information about program eligibility and benefits, workplace norms and cultures that stigmatized program participation, influence of uninformed/unsupportive department heads, and concerns about how participation might burden coworkers, damage collegial relationships, or adversely affect workflow and grant funding. Understanding underuse of work-life programs is essential to maximize employee productivity and satisfaction, minimize turnover, and provide equal opportunities for career advancement to all faculty. The findings are discussed in relation to specific policy recommendations, implications for institutional change, and department chair leadership.

  14. Attitude Strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Lauren C; Krosnick, Jon A

    2017-01-03

    Attitude strength has been the focus of a huge volume of research in psychology and related sciences for decades. The insights offered by this literature have tremendous value for understanding attitude functioning and structure and for the effective application of the attitude concept in applied settings. This is the first Annual Review of Psychology article on the topic, and it offers a review of theory and evidence regarding one of the most researched strength-related attitude features: attitude importance. Personal importance is attached to an attitude when the attitude is perceived to be relevant to self-interest, social identification with reference groups or reference individuals, and values. Attaching personal importance to an attitude causes crystallizing of attitudes (via enhanced resistance to change), effortful gathering and processing of relevant information, accumulation of a large store of well-organized relevant information in long-term memory, enhanced attitude extremity and accessibility, enhanced attitude impact on the regulation of interpersonal attraction, energizing of emotional reactions, and enhanced impact of attitudes on behavioral intentions and action. Thus, important attitudes are real and consequential psychological forces, and their study offers opportunities for addressing behavioral change.

  15. Prospective Pre-School Teachers' Attitudes towards Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Türk, Cumhur; Demir, Esra

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the changes in prospective pre-school teachers' attitudes towards astronomy in terms of their grades. The study was conducted with 205 prospective teachers (1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th graders) studying in the education faculty of a university in Eastern Anatolia region of Turkey. Astronomy Attitude Scale (AAS) was…

  16. Barriers to Teaching Introductory Physical Geography Online

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, Michael E.

    2012-01-01

    Learning geography online is becoming an option for more students but not without controversy. Issues of faculty resources, logistics, professional recognition, and pedagogical concerns are cited as barriers to teaching online. Offering introductory physical geography online presents special challenges. As a general education course, an…

  17. Faculty Agency: Departmental Contexts That Matter in Faculty Careers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Corbin M.; O'Meara, KerryAnn

    2014-01-01

    In a modern context of constrained resources and high demands, faculty exert agency to strategically navigate their careers (Baez 2000a; Neumann et al. 2006). Guided by the O'Meara et al. (2011) framework on agency in faculty professional lives, this study used Structural Equation Modeling to investigate which departmental factors…

  18. Barriers against psychosocial communication: oncologists' perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagerlind, Hanna; Kettis, Åsa; Glimelius, Bengt; Ring, Lena

    2013-10-20

    To explore oncologists' psychosocial attitudes and beliefs and their perceptions regarding barriers against psychosocial communication. A questionnaire was distributed to oncologists in Sweden (n = 537). Questions covered demography, the Physician Psychosocial Beliefs Scale (PPBS), and barriers against psychosocial communication. Stepwise multiple regression was used to determine what factors contribute the most to the PPBS score and the total number of barriers and barriers affecting clinical practice, respectively. Spearman rank-order correlation was used to determine correlation between PPBS score and number of barriers. Questionnaire response rate was 64%. Mean PPBS value was 85.5 (range, 49 to 123; SD, 13.0). Most oncologists (93%) perceived one or more barriers in communicating psychosocial aspects with patients. On average, five different communication barriers were perceived, of which most were perceived to affect clinical practice. These barriers included insufficient consultation time, lack of resources for taking care of problems discovered, and lack of methods to evaluate patients' psychosocial health in clinical practice. There was a positive correlation (rs = 0.490; P barriers (ie, less psychosocially oriented oncologists perceived more barriers). Oncologists with supplementary education with a psychosocial focus perceived fewer barriers/barriers affecting clinical practice (P barriers affecting psychosocial communication in clinical practice. Interventions aiming to improve psychosocial communication must therefore be multifaceted and individualized to clinics and individual oncologists. It is important to minimize barriers to facilitate optimal care and treatment of patients with cancer.

  19. Evolución de Motivaciones, Actitudes y Hábitos de los Estudiantes de la Facultad de Ciencias de la Actividad Física y del Deporte de la Universidad de León Motivations, Attitudes and Habits of the students in the Sport Sciences Faculty of the Universit y of Leon (Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Pérez

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available

     

    Conociendo el descenso que se produce en la práctica deportiva al entrar en la Universidad, y la relación existente entre el consumo de sustancias nocivas y la falta de ejercicio físico, hemos querido estudiar si esto también ocurre en los estudiantes de Ciencias de la Actividad Física y el Deporte. Con este objetivo pasamos un cuestionario elaborado por nosotras a estudiantes de nuestra Facultad dónde  analizamos: 1º, motivaciones y actitudes de los alumnos de los diversos cursos hacia la carrera, así como sus preferencias profesionales; 2º, si se ha producido un descenso en la práctica física al estudiar la carrera; y 3º, qué hábitos de consumo de tabaco y alcohol tenían nuestros estudiantes antes de entrar en la Facultad y cómo evolucionan durante la carrera. Entre los resultados más relevantes cabe destacar la marcada disminución de la práctica deportiva al iniciar la carrera; la caída de la motivación hacia estos estudios según avanzan los cursos, y finalmente, que el porcentaje de alumnos que consumen alcohol es alto y aumenta a lo largo de la carrera, ocurriendo lo contrario con el tabaco.
    PALABRAS CLAVE: Práctica deportiva, actitudes, motivación, alcohol y tabaco.

    The aim of this research study is to examine the reduction in sports activity of the students of Sciences of the Physical Activity and Sport of the University of Leon at the beginning of their studies, and the relationship between the consumption of injurious substances and their poor physical exercise. We passed a self elaborated questionnaire to students of our Faculty to analyze: 1st, motivations and attitudes of the students towards their degreeand their professional preferences; 2nd, if the reduction in sports practice had occurred at the beginning of their studies; and 3rd, which habits of consumption of tobacco and alcohol

  20. Barriers to medication taking among Kuwaiti patients with type 2 diabetes: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeragh-Alhaddad FB

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Fatima B Jeragh-Alhaddad,1,2 Mohammad Waheedi,2 Nick D Barber,1 Tina Penick Brock3 1Department of Practice and Policy, University College London School of Pharmacy, London, UK; 2Department of Pharmacy Practice, Faculty of Pharmacy, Kuwait University, Kuwait City, Kuwait; 3Department of Clinical Pharmacy, School of Pharmacy, University of California, San Francisco, CA, USA Background: Nonadherence to medications among Kuwaitis with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM is believed to be a major barrier to appropriate management of the disease. Published studies of barriers to medication adherence in T2DM suggest a Western bias, which may not adequately describe the Kuwaiti experience. Aim: The purpose of this study was to explore barriers to medication adherence among Kuwaiti adults with T2DM. Methods: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 20 Kuwaiti patients with type 2 diabetes. The interviews were digitally recorded, transcribed, and analyzed using thematic analysis. Results: Barriers to medication adherence were identified. Emerging themes were: 1 lack of education/awareness about diabetes/medications, 2 beliefs about medicines/diabetes, 3 spirituality and God-centered locus of control, 4 attitudes toward diabetes 5 perceptions of self-expertise with the disease and body awareness, 6 social stigma, 7 perceptions of social support, 8 impact of illness on patient’s life, 9 perceptions of health care providers’ attitudes toward patients, and 10 health system-related factors, such as access difficulties and inequalities of medication supply and services. Conclusion: Personal, sociocultural, religious, health care provider, and health care system-related factors may impede medication adherence among Kuwaitis with type 2 diabetes. Interventions to improve care and therapeutic outcomes in this particular population must recognize and attempt to resolve these factors. Keywords: medication adherence, type 2 diabetes mellitus, Kuwait

  1. Effectiveness of online simulation training: Measuring faculty knowledge, perceptions, and intention to adopt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sujeong; Park, Chang; O'Rourke, Jennifer

    2017-04-01

    Best practice standards of simulation recommend standardized simulation training for nursing faculty. Online training may offer an effective and more widely available alternative to in-person training. Using the Theory of Planned Behavior, this study evaluated the effectiveness of an online simulation training program, examining faculty's foundational knowledge of simulation as well as perceptions and intention to adopt. One-group pretest-posttest design. A large school of nursing with a main campus and five regional campuses in the Midwestern United States. Convenience sample of 52 faculty participants. Knowledge of foundational simulation principles was measured by pre/post-training module quizzes. Perceptions and the intention to adopt simulation were measured using the Faculty Attitudes and Intent to Use Related to the Human Patient Simulator questionnaire. There was a significant improvement in faculty knowledge after training and observable improvements in attitudes. Attitudes significantly influenced the intention to adopt simulation (B=2.54, p<0.001). Online simulation training provides an effective alternative for training large numbers of nursing faculty who seek to implement best practice of standards within their institutions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. New tools for systematic evaluation of teaching qualities of medical faculty: results of an ongoing multi-center survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onyebuchi A Arah

    Full Text Available Tools for the evaluation, improvement and promotion of the teaching excellence of faculty remain elusive in residency settings. This study investigates (i the reliability and validity of the data yielded by using two new instruments for evaluating the teaching qualities of medical faculty, (ii the instruments' potential for differentiating between faculty, and (iii the number of residents' evaluations needed per faculty to reliably use the instruments.Multicenter cross-sectional survey among 546 residents and 629 medical faculty representing 29 medical (non-surgical specialty training programs in The Netherlands. Two instruments--one completed by residents and one by faculty--for measuring teaching qualities of faculty were developed. Statistical analyses included factor analysis, reliability and validity exploration using standard psychometric methods, calculation of the numbers of residents' evaluations needed per faculty to achieve reliable assessments and variance components and threshold analyses.A total of 403 (73.8% residents completed 3575 evaluations of 570 medical faculty while 494 (78.5% faculty self-evaluated. In both instruments five composite-scales of faculty teaching qualities were detected with high internal consistency and reliability: learning climate (Cronbach's alpha of 0.85 for residents' instrument, 0.71 for self-evaluation instrument, professional attitude and behavior (0.84/0.75, communication of goals (0.90/0.84, evaluation of residents (0.91/0.81, and feedback (0.91/0.85. Faculty tended to evaluate themselves higher than did the residents. Up to a third of the total variance in various teaching qualities can be attributed to between-faculty differences. Some seven residents' evaluations per faculty are needed for assessments to attain a reliability level of 0.90.The instruments for evaluating teaching qualities of medical faculty appear to yield reliable and valid data. They are feasible for use in medical residencies

  3. New tools for systematic evaluation of teaching qualities of medical faculty: results of an ongoing multi-center survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arah, Onyebuchi A; Hoekstra, Joost B L; Bos, Albert P; Lombarts, Kiki M J M H

    2011-01-01

    Tools for the evaluation, improvement and promotion of the teaching excellence of faculty remain elusive in residency settings. This study investigates (i) the reliability and validity of the data yielded by using two new instruments for evaluating the teaching qualities of medical faculty, (ii) the instruments' potential for differentiating between faculty, and (iii) the number of residents' evaluations needed per faculty to reliably use the instruments. Multicenter cross-sectional survey among 546 residents and 629 medical faculty representing 29 medical (non-surgical) specialty training programs in The Netherlands. Two instruments--one completed by residents and one by faculty--for measuring teaching qualities of faculty were developed. Statistical analyses included factor analysis, reliability and validity exploration using standard psychometric methods, calculation of the numbers of residents' evaluations needed per faculty to achieve reliable assessments and variance components and threshold analyses. A total of 403 (73.8%) residents completed 3575 evaluations of 570 medical faculty while 494 (78.5%) faculty self-evaluated. In both instruments five composite-scales of faculty teaching qualities were detected with high internal consistency and reliability: learning climate (Cronbach's alpha of 0.85 for residents' instrument, 0.71 for self-evaluation instrument, professional attitude and behavior (0.84/0.75), communication of goals (0.90/0.84), evaluation of residents (0.91/0.81), and feedback (0.91/0.85). Faculty tended to evaluate themselves higher than did the residents. Up to a third of the total variance in various teaching qualities can be attributed to between-faculty differences. Some seven residents' evaluations per faculty are needed for assessments to attain a reliability level of 0.90. The instruments for evaluating teaching qualities of medical faculty appear to yield reliable and valid data. They are feasible for use in medical residencies, can

  4. Where Do Soldiers Really Come From? A Faculty Development Workshop on Veteran-Centered Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lypson, Monica L; Ross, Paula T; Zimmerman, Natalie; Goldrath, Kathryn E; Ravindranath, Divy

    2016-10-01

    Addressing the medical concerns of veterans in both civilian health care systems and the Veterans Affairs (VA) health care system, where staff are familiar with issues of military reintegration, remains difficult but is increasingly important. In 2013, the authors developed and implemented a faculty development workshop for practicing clinicians using the documentary Where Soldiers Come From. The workshop included topics on unconscious bias, the service member trajectory, health care disparities, and strategies for overcoming barriers to treating veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder and traumatic brain injury. The workshop engaged faculty in the following active-learning techniques: images in education; trigger video; critical thinking and reflective writing; think-pair-share; and large-group discussion. The workshop has been conducted at three locations with 46 health care professionals. Thirty-one of 37 (84%) participants who completed the workshop evaluation were VA employees. The evaluation results show 25/32 (78.1%) participants indicated the workshop activities changed their knowledge, attitudes, and/or skills; 22/34 (64.7%) stated they had a better understanding of how to develop a care plan for veterans; and 27/34 (79.4%) stated they gained a better understanding of how to prepare for issues around returning veterans. To address the issue of veteran-centered care education more broadly, the authors have developed a massive open online course for health professionals, using most of the content from this workshop, which will be offered in spring 2016. Another important next step will be to deliver this workshop to and collect evaluation data from non-VA providers.

  5. Attitudes and Attributes of Hong Kong Academics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postiglione, Gerard A.

    1996-01-01

    Data from a 1993 survey of Hong Kong college and university faculty, part of a larger international study, provide information about teacher demographic characteristics; educational background; attitudes toward working conditions, mobility, and salaries; professional interests; and views on student quality and governance issues. Implications for…

  6. The Development of Critical Thinking Attitudes Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özelçi, Serap Yilmaz; Saracaloglu, A. Seda

    2017-01-01

    This research aims to develop an independent scale that measures the critical thinking attitudes of classroom teacher candidates. The research was designed in a screening model. The universe of the research was composed of 384 prospective teachers who are studying in the education faculty of a university in the western part of Turkey. In the…

  7. Professorship: A Faculty Development Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Todd M.; Davis, Jane F.

    1987-01-01

    A faculty development program at a traditionally black college was designed to enhance the ability of graduate faculty to supervise research activities of graduate students. Focus was on interpersonal problem solving in advisement and professional issues; classroom techniques of discussion teaching, case methods, and psychodrama encouraged the…

  8. The Problem of Faculty Relocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabachnick, Stephen E.

    1992-01-01

    A faculty move to a new campus can be traumatic, but colleges and universities can take steps to lessen the strain. Solutions to faculty relocation problems should be a standard part of any hiring package, not left to chance and individual negotiation. Some problems are inexpensive and easy to solve. (MSE)

  9. Promoting Interdisciplinary Research among Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Elena; Zhao, Weinan; Reiser, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    With the growing recognition of the importance of interdisciplinary research, many faculty have increased their efforts to form interdisciplinary research teams. Oftentimes, attempts to put together such teams are hampered because faculty have a limited picture of the research interests and expertise of their colleagues. This paper reports on…

  10. Nursing Faculty and Academic Integrity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Cecilia E.

    2013-01-01

    Insufficient information exists regarding the process influencing faculty decisions, specifically in the area of maintaining academic integrity in an online environment. The purpose of the study was to explore the experiences and decision-making process of nursing faculty related to maintaining academic integrity in an online environment. The…

  11. Faculty perspectives on the inclusion of work-related learning in engineering curricula

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magnell, Marie; Geschwind, Lars Allan; Kolmos, Anette

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to identify faculty perspectives on the integration of work-related issues in engineering education. A mixed methods approach was used to explore faculty attitudes towards work-related learning, to describe activities related to working life that have been introduced...... into the curriculum and to identify factors that faculty see as important if the amount of work-related learning is to increase. The results show that faculty members are positive about integrating work-related issues into the curriculum. Programmes with more extensive connections to industry offer more integrated...... activities, such as projects with external actors, and use professional contacts established through research in their teaching. In order to increase work-related learning in engineering curricula, faculty request clear goals and pedagogical tools. Other options to increase work-related learning include...

  12. Through the looking glass: how reflective learning influences the development of young faculty members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Stacy; Bernstein, Lisa; Manning, Kimberly; Schneider, Jason; Kho, Anna; Brownfield, Erica; Branch, William T

    2011-01-01

    Faculty development is needed that will influence clinical teachers to better enable them to transmit humanistic values to their learners and colleagues. We sought to understand the processes whereby reflective learning influenced professional growth in a convenience sample of young faculty members. We analyzed appreciative inquiry narratives written over 4 years using the constant comparative method to identify major underlying themes and develop hypotheses concerning how reflective learning influenced participants in the faculty development program. Six of the participants and the facilitator were participant observers in the qualitative analysis. Group support, validation, and cohesion led to adoption of common values that informed the professional development of the participants over 4 years of the study. Common values influenced the group members as they progressed in their careers. Faculty development programs that focus on humanism and reflective learning can facilitate the growth of young faculty members by influencing their values and attitudes at crucial phases of their careers.

  13. Nursing faculty academic incivility: perceptions of nursing students and faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muliira, Joshua K; Natarajan, Jansi; van der Colff, Jacoba

    2017-12-13

    Incivility in nursing education can adversely affect the academic environment, the learning outcomes, and safety. Nursing faculty (NF) and nursing students (NS) contribute to the academic incivility. Little is known about the extent of NF academic incivility in the Middle East region. This study aimed at exploring the perceptions and extent of NF academic incivility in an undergraduate nursing program of a public university in Oman. A cross sectional survey was used to collect data from 155 undergraduate NS and 40 NF about faculty academic incivility. Data was collected using the Incivility in Nursing Education Survey. The majority of NS and NF had similar perceptions about disruptive faculty behaviors. The incidence of faculty incivility was low (Mean = 1.5). The disruptive behaviors with the highest incidence were arriving late for scheduled activities, leaving schedule activities early, cancelling scheduled activities without warning, ineffective teaching styles and methods, and subjective grading. The most common uncivil faculty behaviors reported by participants were general taunts or disrespect to other NF, challenges to other faculty knowledge or credibility, and general taunts or disrespect to NS. The relatively low level of NF academic incivility could still affect the performance of some students, faculty, and program outcomes. Academic institutions need to ensure a policy of zero tolerance to all academic incivility, and regular monitoring and evaluation as part of the prevention strategies.

  14. A computerized faculty time-management system in an academic family medicine department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daugird, Allen J; Arndt, Jane E; Olson, P Richard

    2003-02-01

    The authors describe the development, implementation, and evaluation of a computerized faculty time-management system (FTMS) in the Department of Family Medicine at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill. The FTMS is presented as an integrated set of computerized spreadsheets used annually to allocate faculty time across all mission activities of the department. It was first implemented in 1996 and has been continuously developed since then. An iterative approach has been used to gain consensus among faculty about time resources needed for various tasks of all missions of the department. These time-resource assumptions are used in the computerized system. Faculty time is allocated annually by the department vice chair in negotiation with individual faculty, making sure that the activities planned do not exceed the work time each faculty member has available for the year. During this process, faculty preferences are balanced against department aggregate needs to meet mission commitments and obligations. The authors describe how the computerized FTMS is used for faculty time management and career development, department planning, budget planning, clinical scheduling, and mission cost accounting. They also describe barriers and potential abuses and the challenge of building an organizational culture willing to discuss faculty time openly and committed to developing a system perceived as fair and accurate. The spreadsheet file is available free from the authors for use in other departments.

  15. Multidisciplinary Practice Experience of Nursing Faculty and Their Collaborators for Primary Health Care in Korea

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Mi Ja; Chung, Hyang-In Cho; Ahn, Yang Heui

    2008-01-01

    This study aimed to describe the range of participation of nursing faculty members and their collaborators in multidisciplinary primary health care in Korea and to analyze facilitators, benefits, barriers, and learned lessons. Methods: An exploratory descriptive research design was utilized. A total of 13 nursing faculty members and 13 multidisciplinary collaborators were interviewed face to face using a brief questionnaire and semi-structured interview guide. Descriptive statistics, compa...

  16. Assessment of medical students' attitudes on social media use in medicine: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avcı, Kadriye; Çelikden, Sevda Gerek; Eren, Semih; Aydenizöz, Doğukan

    2015-02-15

    Social media has created a revolution in health services. Information available on the Internet and via social media is now being used as reference guides for sensitive health issues by nonprofessionals, physicians, and medical students. When used by physicians and medical students, social media has the potential to raise issues such as the blurring of the line between professional and private lives, patient relations, and medical ethics. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to evaluate the use of social media and attitudes toward its use in medicine among medical students. Medical students from Afyon Kocatepe University, Faculty of Medicine (Afyonkarahisar, Turkey) were asked to participate in a survey consisting of two sections, the first containing questions assessing the frequency of social media use and the second regarding attitudes toward the use of social media in medicine. Survey responses indicated that 93.4% of medical students used social media and 89.3% used social media for professional purposes. Factor analysis showed that attitudes toward social media are based on five factors: professional usefulness, popularity, ethics, barriers, and innovativeness. A structural equation model revealed the highest positive correlation between usefulness and innovativeness; ethics had a low but positive correlation with other factors. Although social media is being used extensively by medical students, they appear unaware of possible ethical issues. Therefore, social media guidelines should be developed.

  17. Lack of chart reminder effectiveness on family medicine resident JNC-VI and NCEP III guideline knowledge and attitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Upshur Ross EG

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The literature demonstrates that medical residents and practicing physicians have an attitudinal-behavioral discordance concerning their positive attitudes towards clinical practice guidelines (CPG, and the implementation of these guidelines into clinical practice patterns. Methods A pilot study was performed to determine if change in a previously identified CPG compliance factor (accessibility would produce a significant increase in family medicine resident knowledge and attitude toward the guidelines. The primary study intervention involved placing a summary of the Sixth Report of the Joint National Committee on Prevention, Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure (JNC VI and the National Cholesterol Education Program Expert Panel on Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Cholesterol in Adults (NCEP III CPGs in all patient (>18 yr. charts for a period of three months. The JNC VI and NCEP III CPGs were also distributed to each Wayne State family medicine resident, and a copy of each CPG was placed in the preceptor's area of the involved clinics. Identical pre- and post- intervention questionnaires were administered to all residents concerning CPG knowledge and attitude. Results Post-intervention analysis failed to demonstrate a significant difference in CPG knowledge. A stastically significant post-intervention difference was found in only on attitude question. The barriers to CPG compliance were identified as 1 lack of CPG instruction; 2 lack of critical appraisal ability; 3 insufficient time; 4 lack of CPG accessibility; and 5 lack of faculty modeling. Conclusion This study demonstrated no significant post intervention changes in CPG knowledge, and only one question that reflected attitude change. Wider resident access to dedicated clinic time, increased faculty modeling, and the implementation of an electronic record/reminder system that uses a team-based approach are compliance factors that

  18. The impact of student-faculty ratio on pharmacy faculty scholarship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benavides, Sandra; Garcia, Angela S; Caballero, Joshua; Wolowich, William R

    2010-10-11

    To determine the relationship and impact of student-faculty ratio on scholarship of pharmacy faculty members. The number and rank of faculty members, pharmacy program characteristics, and faculty productivity data were collected to determine the impact of student-faculty ratio on faculty scholarship. Faculty scholarship was not predicted by student-faculty ratio. Factors impacting positively on faculty productivity included National Institutes of Health funding; presence of clinical associate professors, instructors, and lecturers; and programs located in public universities. Faculty productivity is not related to the student-faculty ratio, wherein more faculty members and fewer students equates to increased scholarship. However, public universities may have different infrastructures which are associated with greater academic productivity compared to private institutions. Additionally, utilizing instructors and clinical or nontenure-track faculty members can significantly increase scholarship among faculty members.

  19. Faculty Development on Clinical Teaching Skills: An Effective Model for the Busy Clinician

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie B. Damp

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The authors developed and evaluated a faculty development program on clinical teaching skills to address barriers to participation and to impact teaching behaviors. Methods Four one-hour workshops were implemented over five months. Evaluation included participant satisfaction and pre/post self-assessment. Pre/post faculty teaching ratings by trainees were compared. Results A total of 82% of faculty ( N = 41 attended. Participants rated workshops highly (mean, 4.43/5.00. Self-assessment of skills and comfort with teaching activities improved. A total of 59% of residents and 40% of fellows felt that teaching received from participating faculty was highly effective. The majority observed targeted teaching behaviors by the faculty. Teaching ratings improved after the workshops ( P = 0.042. Conclusion Our series of short workshops during a standing conference time was associated with increased self-assessed skill and comfort and an increase in faculty ratings on teaching evaluations. Effective faculty development programs can be implemented in flexible formats and overcome common barriers to participation.

  20. Faculty Development on Clinical Teaching Skills: An Effective Model for the Busy Clinician

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damp, Julie B.; Dewey, Charlene M.; Wells, Quinn; Horn, Leora; Kroop, Susan F.; Mendes, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The authors developed and evaluated a faculty development program on clinical teaching skills to address barriers to participation and to impact teaching behaviors. Methods Four one-hour workshops were implemented over five months. Evaluation included participant satisfaction and pre/post self-assessment. Pre/post faculty teaching ratings by trainees were compared. Results A total of 82% of faculty (N = 41) attended. Participants rated workshops highly (mean, 4.43/5.00). Self-assessment of skills and comfort with teaching activities improved. A total of 59% of residents and 40% of fellows felt that teaching received from participating faculty was highly effective. The majority observed targeted teaching behaviors by the faculty. Teaching ratings improved after the workshops (P = 0.042). Conclusion Our series of short workshops during a standing conference time was associated with increased self-assessed skill and comfort and an increase in faculty ratings on teaching evaluations. Effective faculty development programs can be implemented in flexible formats and overcome common barriers to participation. PMID:29349327

  1. Effects of a Research-Infused Botanical Curriculum on Undergraduates’ Content Knowledge, STEM Competencies, and Attitudes toward Plant Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, H. David; Horton, Jonathan L.

    2014-01-01

    In response to the American Association for the Advancement of Science's Vision and Change in Undergraduate Biology Education initiative, we infused authentic, plant-based research into majors’ courses at a public liberal arts university. Faculty members designed a financially sustainable pedagogical approach, utilizing vertically integrated curricular modules based on undergraduate researchers’ field and laboratory projects. Our goals were to 1) teach botanical concepts, from cells to ecosystems; 2) strengthen competencies in statistical analysis and scientific writing; 3) pique plant science interest; and 4) allow all undergraduates to contribute to genuine research. Our series of inquiry-centered exercises mitigated potential faculty barriers to adopting research-rich curricula, facilitating teaching/research balance by gathering publishable scholarly data during laboratory class periods. Student competencies were assessed with pre- and postcourse quizzes and rubric-graded papers, and attitudes were evaluated with pre- and postcourse surveys. Our revised curriculum increased students’ knowledge and awareness of plant science topics, improved scientific writing, enhanced statistical knowledge, and boosted interest in conducting research. More than 300 classroom students have participated in our program, and data generated from these modules’ assessment allowed faculty and students to present 28 contributed talks or posters and publish three papers in 4 yr. Future steps include analyzing the effects of repeated module exposure on student learning and creating a regional consortium to increase our project's pedagogical impact. PMID:25185223

  2. Professional Development Opportunities for Two-Year College Geoscience Faculty: Issues, Opportunities, and Successes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baer, E. M.; Macdonald, H.; McDaris, J. R.; Granshaw, F. D.; Wenner, J. M.; Hodder, J.; van der Hoeven Kraft, K.; Filson, R. H.; Guertin, L. A.; Wiese, K.

    2011-12-01

    Two-year colleges (2YCs) play a critical role in geoscience education in the United States. Nearly half of the undergraduate students who take introductory geoscience do so at a 2YC. With awide reach and diverse student populations, 2YCs may be key to producing a well-trained, diverse and sufficiently large geoscience workforce. However, faculty at 2YCs often face many barriers to professional development including lack of financial resources, heavy and inflexible teaching loads, lack of awareness of opportunities, and few professional development resources/events targeted at their needs. As an example, at the 2009 GSA meeting in Portland, fewer than 80 of the 6500 attendees were from community colleges, although this was more than twice the 2YC faculty attendance the previous year. Other issues include the isolation described by many 2YC geoscience faculty who may be the only full time geoscientist on a campus and challenges faced by adjunct faculty who may have even fewer opportunities for professional development and networking with other geoscience faculty. Over the past three years we have convened several workshops and events for 2YC geoscience faculty including technical sessions and a workshop on funding opportunities for 2YC faculty at GSA annual meetings, a field trip and networking event at the fall AGU meeting, a planning workshop that examined the role of 2YCs in geoscience education and in broadening participation in the geosciences, two workshops supporting use of the 'Math You Need, When You Need It' educational materials that included a majority of 2YC faculty, and marine science summer institutes offered by COSEE-Pacific Partnerships for 2YC faculty. Our experience indicates that 2YC faculty desire professional development opportunities when the experience is tailored to the needs and character of their students, programs, and institutions. The content of the professional development opportunity must be useful to 2YC faculty -workshops and

  3. Neonatology faculty development using simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Heather M; Hales, Roberta L

    2016-11-01

    The goal of faculty development activities is to supply the public with knowledgeable, skilled, and competent physicians who are prepared for high performance in the dynamic and complex healthcare environment. Current faculty development programs lack evidence-based support and are not sufficient to meet the professional needs of practicing physicians. Simulation activities for faculty development offer an alternative to traditional, teacher-centric educational offerings. Grounded in adult learning theory, simulation is a learner-centric, interactive, efficient, and effective method to train busy professionals. Many of the faculty development needs of clinical neonatologists can be met by participating in simulation-based activities that focus on technical skills, teamwork, leadership, communication, and patient safety. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Burnout in Female Faculty Members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassidy-Vu, Lisa; Beck, Keli; Moore, Justin B

    2017-04-01

    Despite approximately equal numbers of male and female medical school graduates, women are entering academic medicine at a lower rate than their male colleagues. Of those who do assume a faculty position, female faculty members report higher levels of burnout, often attributable to gender-specific difficulties in clinical expectations and maintenance of work-life balance. Many of these struggles are attributable to issues that are amenable to supportive policies, but these policies are inconsistent in their availability and practice. This commentary presents evidence for inconsistencies in the day-to-day experience of female faculty members, and proposes solutions for the mitigation of the challenges experienced more often by female faculty members with the goal of diversifying and strengthening academic medicine.

  5. Exploring faculty perceptions towards electronic health records for nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowitlawakul, Y; Chan, S W C; Wang, L; Wang, W

    2014-12-01

    The use of electronic health records in nursing education is rapidly increasing worldwide. The successful implementation of electronic health records for nursing education software program relies on students as well as nursing faculty members. This study aimed to explore the experiences and perceptions of nursing faculty members using electronic health records for nursing education software program, and to identify the influential factors for successful implementation of this technology. This exploratory qualitative study was conducted using in-depth individual interviews at a university in Singapore. Seven faculty members participated in the study. The data were gathered and analysed at the end of the semester in the 2012/2013 academic year. The participants' perceptions of the software program were organized into three main categories: innovation, transition and integration. The participants perceived this technology as innovative, with both values and challenges for the users. In addition, using the new software program was perceived as transitional process. The integration of this technology required time from faculty members and students, as well as support from administrators. The software program had only been implemented for 2-3 months at the time of the interviews. Consequently, the participants might have lacked the necessary skill and competence and confidence to implement it successfully. In addition, the unequal exposure to the software program might have had an impact on participants' perceptions. The findings show that the integration of electronic health records into nursing education curricula is dependent on the faculty members' experiences with the new technology, as well as their perceptions of it. Hence, cultivating a positive attitude towards the use of new technologies is important. Electronic health records are significant applications of health information technology. Health informatics competency should be included as a required competency

  6. Dedicated training in adult education among otolaryngology faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMains, Kevin C; Peel, Jennifer

    2014-12-01

    Most faculty members undergo ad hoc training in education. This survey was developed to assess the prevalence and type of dedicated training in education received by academic otolaryngology-head and neck surgery (OTO-HNS) faculty in the United States. Survey. An 11-item survey was developed to assess the prevalence of dedicated instruction in education theory and practice, the types of instruction received, and the barriers to receiving instruction. The survey was sent to all OTO-HNS program directors for distribution among their respective faculty. A total of 216 responses were received. Seventy respondents (32.7%) serve as program director, associate program director, or assistant program director in their respective programs. Forty-six respondents (21.8%) had received dedicated training in education. Of the respondents who described the type of education training received, 48.7% participated in didactics/seminar, 35.9% in degree/certificate programs, 10.3% in multimodality training, and 5.1% online training. Among the barriers encountered to participation in instruction in education, time/productivity pressures was the most commonly cited reason (60.2%), followed by not knowing about the opportunity to receive training (36.4%), lack of departmental support (26.2%), lack of available training (22.3%), and the perception that such training would not be useful (7.8%). Presently, only a minority of surveyed academic otolaryngologists in the United States have received any dedicated instruction in the theory and practice of education. Personal, departmental, and institutional barriers exist in many practice environments that hinder otolaryngology faculty from participating in education training. N/A. © 2014 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  7. Measuring Pharmacy Student Attitudes toward Prayer: The Student Prayer Attitude Scale (SPAS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pace, Adam C.; Greene, Joy; Deweese, Joseph E.; Brown, Dana A.; Cameron, Ginger; Nesbit, James M.; Wensel, Terri

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop and validate an instrument to assess the attitude of student pharmacists toward prayer in general and in particular as it relates to their academic performance. To fulfill the study objective, faculty from seven colleges of pharmacy located at Christian universities collaboratively developed the Student…

  8. Gender Differences in Business Faculty's Research Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yining; Zhao, Qin

    2013-01-01

    The authors use expectancy theory to evaluate gender differences in key factors that motivate faculty to conduct research. Using faculty survey data collected from 320 faculty members at 10 business schools, they found that faculty members, both men and women, who displayed higher motivation were more productive in research. Among them, pretenured…

  9. Barrier Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heteren, S. van

    2015-01-01

    Barrier-system dynamics are a function of antecedent topography and substrate lithology, Relative sea-level (RSL) changes, sediment availability and type, climate, vegetation type and cover, and various aero- and hydrodynamic processes during fair-weather conditions and extreme events. Global change

  10. Faculty Internationalization: Experiences, Attitudes, and Involvement of Faculty at Public Universities in South Dakota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Internationalization in higher education is an issue of growing importance as the forces of globalism continue to push both social and economic connections from local to global. While this topic is becoming increasingly vital to the health and influence of educational institutions, many, including those within South Dakota, are unaware of the…

  11. Barriers in the Physics Pipeline from K-12 to Tenure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilburn, Micha

    2016-09-01

    The lack of diversity in physics is a known problem, and yet efforts to change our demographics have only had minor effects during the last decade. I will explain some of the hidden barriers that dissuade underrepresented minorities in becoming physicists using a framework borrowed from sociology, Maslow's hierarchy of needs. I will draw from current research at the undergraduate to faculty levels over a variety of STEM fields that are also addressing a lack of diversity. I will also provide analysis from the Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics Center for the Evolution of Elements (JINA-CEE) outreach programs to understand the likelihood of current K-12 students in becoming physicists. Specifically, I will present results from the pre-surveys from our Art 2 Science Camps (ages 8-14) about their attitudes towards science as well as results from analysis of teacher recommendations for our high school summer program. I will conclude with a positive outlook describing the pipeline created by JINA-CEE to retain students from middle school through college. This work was supported in part by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. PHY-1430152 (JINA Center for the Evolution of the Elements).

  12. Technology and Teaching: A Conversation among Faculty Regarding the Pros and Cons of Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Andrew T.; Preston, John; Page, C. Steven; Harper, Rebecca; Dillard, Benita; Flynn, Joseph; Yamaguchi, Misato

    2014-01-01

    Technology is often touted as the savior of education (Collins & Haverson, 2009). However, is technology the panacea that it is made out to be? This paper is an extended conversation among a group of faculty members at three different universities and their attitudes and beliefs about technology and education. Three professors shared their…

  13. An Examination of Adjunct Faculty Job Satisfaction and Loyalty in Christian Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couch, Jeremy J.

    2014-01-01

    In order to address the deficiency of research regarding the job attitudes of adjunct faculty members in Christian higher education, a quantitative causal-comparative study was conducted for the purpose of examining the influence of six extrinsic and three intrinsic variables on the job satisfaction and loyalty of 388 adjuncts teaching at seven…

  14. Critical Thinking in Teacher Education: Perceptions and Practices of Teacher Candidates and College Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagley, Spencer A.

    2013-01-01

    Educators at all levels are expected to provide instruction that promotes critical thinking, but faculty are hindered by time constraints, expertise, and the attitude that critical thinking is taught and learned automatically. From Socrates to Dewey to Bloom to Facione, a firm foundation has been set for critical thinking pedagogies. This study…

  15. Obesity and Food Choices among Faculty and Staff at a Large Urban University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, Marjorie R.; Rubinstein, Rebecca J.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: In order to address increasing health care costs associated with obesity, this study sought to determine prevalence of overweight and obesity and examine eating behaviors, food choices, health beliefs, and attitudes of university employees. Participants and Methods: An online survey was distributed to greater than 3,800 faculty and…

  16. Faculty Perceptions Regarding Authentication of Online Students' Identities and Academic Dishonesty

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, Stephanie Renee

    2012-01-01

    This study explored undergraduate teaching faculty's perceptions regarding using biometric-based technologies to reduce academic dishonesty in online classes. The first objective was to develop a baseline of the respondents' concerns toward and experience with using biometrics; attitudes, experience, and mitigation strategies used to…

  17. Practice Brief: Faculty Perspectives on Professional Development to Improve Efficacy when Teaching Students with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hye Jin; Roberts, Kelly D.; Stodden, Robert

    2012-01-01

    "Innovative and Sustainable Teaching Methods and Strategies" project staff provided professional development to instructional faculty to enhance their attitudes, knowledge, and skills in meeting the diverse needs of students with disabilities. This practice brief describes one of the professional development programs, delivered over the course of…

  18. Maintenance of Physical Activity among Faculty and Staff in University Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whipple, Kerry; Kinney, Judy; Kattenbraker, Mark

    2008-01-01

    Previous studies have placed little emphasis on maintenance of healthy behaviors longer than six months. This study examined factors that contribute to maintenance of physical activity among faculty and staff in university settings. A 55-item survey on physical activity maintenance was used to assess attitudes towards exercise, exercise…

  19. Detachment, Fear, and Expectation: A Faculty's Response to the Impending Succession of Its Principal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauske, Janice R.; Ogawa, Rodney T.

    1987-01-01

    Describes how an elementary school coped with its principal's impending departure and extends R. Gephart's grounded theory of leader succession--that faculty collectively degrade the departing principal's status. This study finds individual degradation attitudes prevalent among teachers lacking meaningful contact with the departing principal.…

  20. Inclusive Instruction: Perceptions of Community College Faculty and Students Pertaining to Universal Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawronski, Michael; Kuk, Linda; Lombardi, Allison R.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined community college faculty (n = 179) and student (n = 449) attitudes and actions toward inclusive teaching practices based on tenets of Universal Design. Two online surveys, the Inclusive Teaching Strategies Inventory (ITSI) and the Inclusive Teaching Strategies Inventory-Student (ITSI-S), were administered at a medium-sized…

  1. An Investigation of Faculty Perceptions of the Use of a Student Evaluation of Faculty Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulgham, Julie Cordell

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the faculty perception of the use of a student evaluation of faculty instrument. The areas considered were use of the current Student Evaluation of Faculty (SEF) instrument to measure teaching effectiveness; use of the current instrument for annual faculty review; faculty involvement in developing the instrument; utilizing…

  2. The Impact of a Junior Faculty Fellowship Award on Academic Advancement and Retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connelly, Maureen T; Sullivan, Amy M; Chinchilla, Manuel; Dale, Margaret L; Emans, S Jean; Nadelson, Carol Cooperman; Notman, Malkah Tolpin; Tarbell, Nancy J; Zigler, Corwin M; Shore, Eleanor G

    2017-08-01

    Academic faculty experience barriers to career development and promotion. In 1996, Harvard Medical School (HMS) initiated an intramural junior faculty fellowship to address these obstacles. The authors sought to understand whether receiving a fellowship was associated with more rapid academic promotion and retention. Junior faculty fellowship recipients and all other instructor and assistant professors at HMS between 1996 and 2011 were identified. Using propensity score modeling, the authors created a matched comparison group for the fellowship recipients based on educational background, training, academic rank, department, hospital affiliation, and demographics. Time to promotion and time to leaving were assessed by Kaplan-Meier curves. A total of 622 junior faculty received fellowships. Faculty who received fellowships while instructors (n = 480) had shorter times to promotion to assistant professor (P Women instructors advanced more quickly than matched controls, while male instructors' rates of promotions did not differ. Fellowships to support junior faculty were associated with shorter times to promotion for instructors and more sustained faculty retention for both instructors and assistant professors. This suggests that relatively small amounts of funding early in faculty careers can play a critical role in supporting academic advancement and retention.

  3. Information barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuller, J.L.; Wolford, J.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: An information barrier (IB) consists of procedures and technology that prevent the release of sensitive information during a joint inspection of a sensitive nuclear item, and provides confidence that the measurement system into which it has been integrated functions exactly as designed and constructed. Work in the U.S. on radiation detection system information barriers dates back at least to 1990, even though the terminology is more recent. In January 1999 the Joint DoD-DOE Information Barrier Working Group was formed in the United States to help coordinate technical efforts related to information barrier R and D. This paper presents an overview of the efforts of this group, by its Chairs, as well as recommendations for further information barrier R and D. Progress on the demonstration of monitoring systems containing IBs is also provided. From the U.S. perspective, the basic, top-level functional requirements for the information barrier portion of an integrated radiation signature-information barrier inspection system are twofold: The host must be assured that his classified information is protected from disclosure to the inspecting party; and The inspecting party must be confident that the integrated inspection system measures, processes, and presents the radiation-signature-based measurement conclusion in an accurate and reproducible manner. It is the position of the United States that in the absence of any agreement to share classified nuclear weapons design information in the conduct of an inspection regime, the requirement to protect host country classified warhead design information is paramount and admits no tradeoff versus the confidence provided to the inspecting party in the accuracy and reproducibility of the measurements. The U.S. has reached an internal consensus on several critical design elements that define a general standard for radiation signature information barrier design. These criteria have stood the test of time under intense

  4. Medical faculty opinions of peer tutoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudland, Joy R; Rennie, Sarah C

    2014-01-01

    Peer tutoring is a well-researched and established method of learning defined as 'a medical student facilitating the learning of another medical student'. While it has been adopted in many medical schools, other schools may be reluctant to embrace this approach. The attitude of the teaching staff, responsible for organizing and or teaching students in an undergraduate medical course to formal peer teaching will affect how it is introduced and operationalized. This study elicits faculty opinions on how best to introduce peer tutoring for medical students. Structured telephone interviews were recorded, transcribed and analyzed using thematic analysis. The interviews were with medically qualified staff responsible for organizing or teaching undergraduate medical students at a New Zealand medical school. Six questions were posed regarding perceived advantages and disadvantages of peer tutoring and how the school and staff could support a peer-tutoring scheme if one was introduced. Staff generally supported the peer tutoring concept, offering a safe environment for learning with its teachers being so close in career stage to the learners. They also say disadvantages when the student-teachers imparted wrong information and when schools used peer tutoring to justify a reduction in teaching staff. Subjects felt that faculty would be more accepting of peer tutoring if efforts were made to build staff 'buy in' and empowerment, train peer tutors and introduce a solid evaluation process. Staff of our school expressed some concerns about peer tutoring that are not supported in the literature, signaling a need for better communication about the benefits and disadvantages of peer tutoring.

  5. The role of cultural diversity climate in recruitment, promotion, and retention of faculty in academic medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Eboni G; Gozu, Aysegul; Kern, David E; Powe, Neil R; Wand, Gary S; Golden, Sherita; Cooper, Lisa A

    2005-07-01

    Ethnic diversity among physicians may be linked to improved access and quality of care for minorities. Academic medical institutions are challenged to increase representation of ethnic minorities among health professionals. To explore the perceptions of physician faculty regarding the following: (1) the institution's cultural diversity climate and (2) facilitators and barriers to success and professional satisfaction in academic medicine within this context. Qualitative study using focus groups and semi-structured interviews. Nontenured physicians in the tenure track at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Focus groups and interviews were audio-taped, transcribed verbatim, and reviewed for thematic content in a 3-stage independent review/adjudication process. Study participants included 29 faculty representing 9 clinical departments, 4 career tracks, and 4 ethnic groups. In defining cultural diversity, faculty noted visible (race/ethnicity, foreign-born status, gender) and invisible (religion, sexual orientation) dimensions. They believe visible dimensions provoke bias and cumulative advantages or disadvantages in the workplace. Minority and foreign-born faculty report ethnicity-based disparities in recruitment and subtle manifestations of bias in the promotion process. Minority and majority faculty agree that ethnic differences in prior educational opportunities lead to disparities in exposure to career options, and qualifications for and subsequent recruitment to training programs and faculty positions. Minority faculty also describe structural barriers (poor retention efforts, lack of mentorship) that hinder their success and professional satisfaction after recruitment. To effectively manage the diversity climate, our faculty recommended 4 strategies for improving the psychological climate and structural diversity of the institution. Soliciting input from faculty provides tangible ideas regarding interventions to improve an institution's diversity

  6. Exploring Job Satisfaction of Nursing Faculty: Theoretical Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yingchen; Liesveld, Judy

    2015-01-01

    The Future of Nursing report identified the shortage of nursing faculty as 1 of the barriers to nursing education. In light of this, it is becoming increasingly important to understand the work-life of nursing faculty. The current research focused on job satisfaction of nursing faculty from 4 theoretical perspectives: human capital theory, which emphasizes the expected monetary and nonmonetary returns for any career choices; structural theory, which emphasizes the impact of institutional features on job satisfaction; positive extrinsic environment by self-determination theory, which asserts that a positive extrinsic environment promotes competency and effective outcomes at work; and psychological theory, which emphasizes the proposed relationship between job performance and satisfaction. In addition to the measures for human capital theory, institutional variables (from structural theory and self-determination theory), and productivity measures (from psychological theory), the authors also selected sets of variables for personal characteristics to investigate their effects on job satisfaction. The results indicated that variables related to human capital theory, especially salary, contributed the most to job satisfaction, followed by those related to institutional variables. Personal variables and productivity variables as a whole contributed as well. The only other variable with marginal significance was faculty's perception of institutional support for teaching. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Race, Gender, and Affirmative Action Attitudes in American and Canadian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katchanovski, Ivan; Nevitte, Neil; Rothman, Stanley

    2015-01-01

    Direct comparisons of American and Canadian faculty and students' views concerning issues of race, gender, and affirmative action in higher education are rare. The 1999 North American Academic Study Survey provides a unique opportunity to analyze the role of national and positional factors in faculty and student attitudes towards race, gender, and…

  8. Attitudes toward Money and Demographic Variables as Related to Income and Life Satisfaction: USA Vs. Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Thomas Li-Ping; Arocas, Roberto Luna; Whiteside, Harold D.

    A study of 207 faculty at a state university in the southeastern United States and 102 faculty members at the University of Valencia (Spain) examined demographic variables and attitudes toward money, income, and life satisfaction. Demographic variables (sex, age, education, marital status, race, current job experience, total work experience, and…

  9. Floating barrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1968-05-06

    This floating barrier consists of relatively long elements which can be connected to form a practically continuous assembly. Each element consists of an inflatable tube with an apron of certain height, made of impregnated fabric which is resistant to ocean water and also to hydrocarbons. Means for connecting one element to the following one, and means for attaching ballast to the apron are also provided.

  10. The negotiation of writer identity in engineering faculty - writing consultant collaborations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Read

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Negotiating faculty-writing consultant collaborations in engineering contexts can be challenging when the writing consultant originates in the humanities. The author found that one of the sites of negotiation in the formation of working relationships is that of writer identity, and disciplinary writer identity in particular. In order to confirm her experiential knowledge, the author interviewed her faculty collaborators to further investigate their attitudes and experiences about writing. Analysis of two excerpts of these interviews makes visible "clashes" between the faculty engineers' and the writing consultant's autobiographical and disciplinary writer identities. Implications of the role of writer identity in faculty-writing consultant collaborations include considering the value of extending this negotiation explicitly to students and the question of how writing curriculum can explicitly engage students in the formation of positive disciplinary writer identities

  11. Family medicine residency program directors attitudes and knowledge of family medicine CAM competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardiner, Paula; Filippelli, Amanda C; Lebensohn, Patricia; Bonakdar, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about the incorporation of integrative medicine (IM) and complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) into family medicine residency programs. The Society for Teachers of Family Medicine (STFM) approved a set of CAM/IM competencies for family medicine residencies. We hope to evaluate whether residency programs are implementing such competencies into their curriculum using an online survey tool. We also hope to assess the knowledge and attitudes of Residency Directors (RDs) on the CAM/IM competencies. A survey was distributed by the Council of Academic Family Medicine (CAFM) Educational Research Alliance to RDs via e-mail. The survey was distributed to 431 RDs. Of those who received it, 212 responded, giving a response rate of 49.1%. Questions assessed the knowledge and attitudes of CAM/IM competencies and incorporation of CAM/IM into the residency curriculum. Forty-five percent of RDs were aware of the competencies. In terms of RD attitudes, 58% reported that CAM/IM is an important component of residents' curriculum; yet, 60% report not having specific learning objectives for CAM/IM in their residency curriculum. Among all programs, barriers to CAM/IM implementation included time in residents' schedules (77%); faculty training (75%); access to CAM experts (43%); lack of reimbursement (43%); and financial resources (29%). While many RDs are aware of the STFM CAM/IM competencies and acknowledge their role in residence education, there are many barriers that prevent residencies from implementing the STFM CAM/IM competencies. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Deconstructing barriers: perceptions of students labeled with learning disabilities in higher education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denhart, Hazel

    2008-01-01

    This phenomenological study investigated barriers to higher education faced by 11 college students labeled with learning disabilities (LD) using their voice as the primary data. Data were analyzed and interpreted through a disability theory perspective revealing barriers stemmed largely from external social causes rather than individual pathology. Barriers included being misunderstood by faculty, being reluctant to request accommodations for fear of invoking stigma, and having to work considerably longer hours than nonlabeled peers. Findings indicated barriers could be overcome through raising faculty awareness about LD issues, engaging the assistance of the college LD specialist, and participation in a LD democratic empowerment community on campus.

  13. Access and Definition: Exploring how STEM Faculty, Department Heads, and University Policy Administrators Navigate the Implementation of a Parental Leave Policy

    OpenAIRE

    Schimpf, Corey T; Santiago, Marisol Mercado; Pawley, Alice L.

    2012-01-01

    Access and Definition: Exploring how STEM Faculty, Department Heads and University Policy Administrators Navigate the Enactment of a Parental Leave Policy A key feature in various reports exploring women’s persisting underrepresentation in STEM faculty positions in the US is the need to disseminate policy information to all stakeholders involved in issues relating to women STEM faculty underrepresentation and retention. Indeed, the National Academies of Science Beyond Barriers and Bias: Fulfi...

  14. Ambiguity attitudes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trautmann, Stefan; van de Kuilen, Gijs; Keren, Gideon; Wu, George

    2015-01-01

    This chapter reviews the experimental literature on ambiguity attitudes, focusing on three topics. First, it considers various approaches to operationalize ambiguity in experiments. Second, the chapter reviews basic findings in the field regarding the prevalence of ambiguity aversion and ambiguity

  15. Exploring Faculty Developers’ Experiences to Inform Our Understanding of Competence in Faculty Development

    OpenAIRE

    Baker, Lindsay; Leslie, Karen; Panisko, Danny; Walsh, Allyn; Wong, Anne; Stubbs, Barbara; Mylopoulos, Maria

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Now a mainstay in medical education, faculty development has created the role of the faculty developer. However, faculty development research tends to overlook faculty developers’ roles and experiences. This study aimed to develop an empirical understanding of faculty developer competence by digging deeper into the actions, experiences, and perceptions of faculty developers as they perform their facilitator role. Method A constructivist grounded theory approach guided observations of ...

  16. Designing an orientation program for new faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holyfield, Lavern J; Berry, Charles W

    2008-12-01

    The Faculty Development Committee (FDC) at Baylor College of Dentistry (BCD) is charged with providing programs and activities that facilitate the success of existing faculty in the constantly changing environment of academia. In response to concerns regarding the challenges wrought by current and projected shortages of dental faculty across the nation, the FDC was prompted to assess development opportunities available to BCD faculty. A professional development resource that we found deficient was a formal, comprehensive orientation program for newly hired faculty. To guide the efforts of the committee in developing this program, a survey was designed and administered during an annual faculty retreat. Respondents were new and junior faculty, senior faculty, and some administrators. The results of the survey to determine requirements for new faculty orientation became the basis for formalizing BCD's new faculty orientation program. This article provides an overview of the new faculty orientation process from design to program implementation and describes the development and use of a faculty survey to determine the fundamental elements of a faculty development program, identification of essential individuals for designing/implementing the program, and implementation of a new faculty orientation program at BCD.

  17. Student narratives of faculty incivility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasiter, Sue; Marchiondo, Lisa; Marchiondo, Kathleen

    2012-01-01

    Academic incivility remains a problem on college campuses. Nursing research has refocused from student impropriety to aberrant faculty behaviors. Our original study using the Nursing Education Environment Survey showed that 133 of 152 student participants experienced uncivil treatment. Latent, inductive content analysis was undertaken to analyze narratives about their "worst experience" of negative faculty behavior. Four categories were identified: "In front of someone," "Talked to others about me," "Made me feel stupid," and "I felt belittled." Incivility had a profound effect on students and is problematic because it increases already significant academic pressure; it interferes with learning and safe clinical performance; it is contrary to caring, a central nursing concept; and it decreases program satisfaction and retention. Few nursing schools have civility policies for faculty behavior. Formal procedures that promote professional interaction should be crafted and implemented. Equally important is creating ways for nursing students to document incivility without fear of retaliation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Transferring learning from faculty development to the classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rock, Kim Z

    2014-12-01

    This study’s purpose was to better understand the transfer of learning by uncovering how various factors supported the integration of health information technology knowledge and skills gleaned from the Health Resources and Services Administration–funded faculty development programs into nursing education curricula. Through interviews with 20 participants from four programs, this study confirmed the importance of findings related to faculty, program, and work environment characteristics for supporting successful transfer of learning and substantiates a variety of other transfer-of-learning research. New or seldom discussed supportive individual characteristics were found, including leadership abilities, lifelong learning, ability to recognize limitations, persistence, creativity, and risk taking. The importance of networking, diversity of perspectives, postconference support, and teams in program designs were found to positively influence transfer. The variety of supportive factors and barriers in the participants’ work environments strengthens the assertions that transfer may be context dependent. Findings provided insight for recommendations to improve learning transfer. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  19. Number of women faculty in the geosciences increasing, but slowly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Cecily J.

    Why are there so few women faculty in the geosciences, while there are large numbers of women undergraduate and graduate students? According to National Science Foundation (NSF) estimates [e.g.,NSF, 1996] for 1995 in the Earth, atmospheric, and oceanic sciences, women made up 34% of the bachelor's degrees awarded, 35% of the graduate students enrolled, and 22% of the doctorates granted. Yet progress has been slower in achieving adequate representation of women geoscientists in academia, where women represent only 12% of the faculty. The barriers confronting the advancement of women scientists are complex and difficult to unravel. Proposed factors include cultural stereotypes, childhood socialization, lack of women mentors and role models, lack of critical mass, family responsibilities, dual-career-couple status, isolation from collegial networks, different research and publishing strategy, and less adequate access to institutional resources [c.f., Widnall, 1988; Zuckerman et al., 1991].

  20. Faculty development and organizational systems behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henley, C E; Magelssen, D

    1990-06-01

    Faculty development is that process that fosters improvement in faculty members' skills in teaching and research and promotes their career advancement. This study investigated the association between organizational behavior in military medical centers and the faculty development of its medical corps officers assigned to teaching positions. Such organizational behaviors as defining tasks clearly and resolving conflicts satisfactorily correlated well with the faculty members' overall satisfaction and other parameters of good faculty development. The results suggest that a strong relationship exists between the organizational behavior of an institution and the sense of identity, productivity, and continued career growth of its individual faculty members.

  1. A Theory-Based Model for Understanding Faculty Intention to Use Students Ratings to Improve Teaching in a Health Sciences Institution in Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collazo, Andrés A.

    2018-01-01

    A model derived from the theory of planned behavior was empirically assessed for understanding faculty intention to use student ratings for teaching improvement. A sample of 175 professors participated in the study. The model was statistically significant and had a very large explanatory power. Instrumental attitude, affective attitude, perceived…

  2. Smart parking barrier

    KAUST Repository

    Alharbi, Abdulrazaq M.

    2016-01-01

    positioning of the movable parking barrier, and a parking controller configured to initiate movement of the parking barrier, via the barrier drive. The movable parking barrier can be positioned between a first position that restricts access to the parking

  3. Motivations and Barriers in Promoting Preschool Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küçükturan, A. Güler; Akbaba Altun, Sadegül

    2017-01-01

    This study is designed to explore the reasons for sending and not sending preschool age children to preschools at an early age by exploring the motivations for and barriers towards promoting preschool education in Turkey. It aimed to determine various stakeholders' perceptions, attitudes, and knowledge related to preschool education in order to…

  4. Perceived barriers to completing an e-learning program on evidence-based medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Marie-Pierre; Légaré, France; Labrecque, Michel; Frémont, Pierre; Cauchon, Michel; Desmartis, Marie

    2007-01-01

    The Continuing Professional Development Center of the Faculty of Medicine at Laval University offers an internet-based program on evidence-based medicine (EBM). After one year, only three physicians out of the 40 who willingly paid to register had completed the entire program. This descriptive study aimed to identify physicians' beliefs regarding their completion of this online program. Using theoretical concepts from the Theory of Planned Behaviour, a semi-structured telephone interview guide was developed to assess respondents' attitudes, perceived subjective norms, perceived obstacles and facilitating conditions with respect to completing this internet-based program. Three independent reviewers performed content analysis of the interview transcripts to obtain an appropriate level of reliability. Findings were shared and organised according to theoretical categories of beliefs. A total of 35 physicians (88% response rate) were interviewed. Despite perceived advantages to completing the internet-based program, barriers remained, especially those related to physicians' perceptions of time constraints. Lack of personal discipline and unfamiliarity with computers were also perceived as important barriers. This study offers a theoretical basis to understand physicians' beliefs towards completing an internet-based continuing medical education (CME) program on EBM. Based upon respondents' insights, several modifications were carried out to enhance the uptake of the program by physicians and, therefore, its implementation.

  5. Applying Productivity Indices as an Innovation for Motivating Individual and Institutional Initiatives for Faculty Renewal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Merl

    1991-01-01

    A major barrier to the exploitation of college faculty renewal programs has been a lack of tangible measurements of achievement in academic functions. Functional productivity indices can be used as tools to motivate both individuals and institutions to take advantage of renewal opportunities and assess their renewal experiences. (Author/MSE)

  6. Faculty for the Engaged Campus: Advancing Community-Engaged Careers in the Academy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifer, Sarena D.; Blanchard, Lynn W.; Jordan, Catherine; Gelmon, Sherril; McGinley, Piper

    2012-01-01

    Community-Campus Partnerships for Health (CCPH) is a national membership organization that promotes health equity and social justice through partnerships between communities and higher education institutions. In response to faculty concerns about the institutional barriers to community-engaged careers in the academy, CCPH embarked on a series of…

  7. Stereotype Threat-Based Diversity Programming: Helping Students While Empowering and Respecting Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artze-Vega, Isis; Richardson, Leslie; Traxler, Adrienne

    2014-01-01

    As college student populations grow increasingly diverse, centers for teaching and learning are often charged with promoting inclusive teaching practices. Yet faculty cite many affective barriers to diversity training, and we often preach to the choir. These challenges led us to seek alternate routes for diversity programming, and stereotype…

  8. Employee Alcoholism and Assistance Programs: Adapting an Innovation for College and University Faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Paul M.

    1980-01-01

    Strategies for initiating employee alcoholism and assistance programs in higher education institutions are considered. Barriers to faculty utilization of such programs include visibility of work performance and nature of supervision. Modes for adapting existing program designs to higher education are suggested. (Author/JMF)

  9. How Faculty Learn about and Implement Research-Based Instructional Strategies: The Case of Peer Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dancy, Melissa; Henderson, Charles; Turpen, Chandra

    2016-01-01

    The lack of knowledge about how to effectively spread and sustain the use of research-based instructional strategies is currently a significant barrier to the improvement of undergraduate physics education. In this paper we address this lack of knowledge by reporting on an interview study of 35 physics faculty, of varying institution types, who…

  10. Searching for Educational Technology Faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrow, Lloyd H.

    2003-01-01

    Identifies the types of positions available at domestic four-year institutions of higher education for faculty whose specialty is educational technology. Analyzes educational job postings listed in the "Chronicle of Higher Education" from August, 2000, through July, 2001. (Author/SOE)

  11. Faculty Workload: An Analytical Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennison, George M.

    2012-01-01

    Recent discussions of practices in higher education have tended toward muck-raking and self-styled exposure of cynical self-indulgence by faculty and administrators at the expense of students and their families, as usually occurs during periods of economic duress, rather than toward analytical studies designed to foster understanding This article…

  12. Cross-Cultural Faculty Values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keim, Marybelle C.

    1992-01-01

    Compares the terminal values of 24 visiting scholars from the People's Republic of China based at a midwestern community college with resident faculty values. The Chinese scholars ranked freedom, equality, and self-respect highest, whereas U.S. schools gave highest rankings to salvation, family security, and self-respect. Contrasts findings with a…

  13. Junior College Faculty Job Satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankel, Joanne

    Some of the research done to date concerning job satisfaction of junior college faculty is reviewed in this "Brief." Part I of the "Brief" describes four frameworks that have been applied to the analysis of job satisfaction: the traditional approach, the two-factor approach, the need hierarchy, and the cognitive dissonance approach. Part II…

  14. Embedded Neoliberalism within Faculty Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, John S.; Aliyeva, Aida

    2015-01-01

    Although there are claims that neoliberalism has not only commandeered the agenda and actions of universities and colleges but also become identified with the work of academic professionals, there is little empirical evidence to show that neoliberalism has infiltrated the work of faculty. This qualitative field work investigation of three…

  15. Faculty Communication with Governing Boards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiede, Hans-Joerg

    2013-01-01

    College and university governance works best when every constituency within the institution has a clear understanding of its role with respect to the other constituencies. It works best when communication among the governing board, the administration, and the faculty (not to mention the staff and students) is regular, open, and honest. Too often…

  16. Faculty Organizational Commitment and Citizenship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Janet; Ott, Molly; Bell, Alli

    2012-01-01

    Building on a theoretical framework that links characteristics of individuals and their work settings to organizational commitment (OC) and citizenship behavior, this study considers why faculty may be disengaging from institutional service. Analyses of survey data collected from a state system of higher education suggest that job characteristics,…

  17. Faculty Development through Cognitive Coaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bair, Mary Antony

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes a faculty development project in which 12 teacher educators used the Cognitive Coaching model to engage in critical reflections about their teaching. Each identified an aspect of their teaching they wanted to improve and a colleague to serve as coach. Participants engaged in Cognitive Coaching cycles, consisting of planning…

  18. An investigation of the challenges of e-Learning in medical sciences from the faculty members’ viewpoints of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Asghari

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : Regarding the numerous benefits of e-learning, an investigation of its barrier and potential solutions to resolve them will be helpful. This will enable universities to implement this method and convert their traditional teaching-learning methods and approaches to e-learning. Methods: In this descriptive study a total of 242 faculty members at Tabriz University of Medical Sciences were selected randomly. A questionnaire was used to collect data on their attitudes towards barriers of e-Learning. The data were analyzed using SPSS15. Results: The barriers were classified into six categories and twenty-four cases. The average score of the administrative category was 13.18±1.96, electronic categories was 11.66±2.32, educational category was 13.39±2.22, economical category was 9.62±2.09, cultural and psychological categories was 20.43±2.53, and finally, social and cooperative category was 10.09±1.97. The cultural and psychological categories were found as the most important barrier and the electronic category the least important one. Conclusion: The academics believed that they did not have enough time or skills for compiling and evaluating e-learning materials and that there was no proper culture for this. Not only the academics should learn how to compile, use and to take rapid feedback, but also it is essential that they recognize their new roles (as learning facilitators in realizing and expanding their mode of education by their innovations.

  19. Do Family Responsibilities and a Clinical Versus Research Faculty Position Affect Satisfaction with Career and Work–Life Balance for Medical School Faculty?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckett, Laurel; Nettiksimmons, Jasmine; Howell, Lydia Pleotis

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Balancing career and family obligations poses challenges to medical school faculty and contributes to dissatisfaction and attrition from academics. We examined the relationship between family setting and responsibilities, rank, and career and work–life satisfaction for faculty in a large U.S. medical school. Methods: Baseline faculty surveys were analyzed from the first year of a 4-year National Institutes of Health–funded study to evaluate awareness, knowledge, attitudes, and use of family friendly policies and career satisfaction. The study focus was on the impact of family responsibilities and characteristics of the faculty position (rank, clinical vs. nonclinical, and academic series) in multivariate comparisons between primary predictors and outcomes of interest. Results: Both clinical and family responsibilities for children under 18 play a major and interacting role in satisfaction with career and work–life balance. Clinical faculty respondents without children at home reported significantly greater career satisfaction and better work–life balance than their nonclinical counterparts. Nonclinical faculty respondents with children reported greater satisfaction and better balance than counterparts without family responsibilities. However, the advantage in career satisfaction and work–life balance for clinical faculty respondents disappeared for those with responsibility for young children. No gender-based differences were noted in the results or across faculty rank for respondents; however, for women, reaching associate professor resulted in greater career satisfaction. Conclusion: This study suggests that both work-related factors and family responsibilities influence satisfaction with career and work–life balance, but the predictors appear to interact in complex and nuanced ways. Further research is needed to delineate more clearly these interactions and to explore other factors that may play important additional roles. PMID

  20. Do Family Responsibilities and a Clinical Versus Research Faculty Position Affect Satisfaction with Career and Work-Life Balance for Medical School Faculty?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckett, Laurel; Nettiksimmons, Jasmine; Howell, Lydia Pleotis; Villablanca, Amparo C

    2015-06-01

    Balancing career and family obligations poses challenges to medical school faculty and contributes to dissatisfaction and attrition from academics. We examined the relationship between family setting and responsibilities, rank, and career and work-life satisfaction for faculty in a large U.S. medical school. Baseline faculty surveys were analyzed from the first year of a 4-year National Institutes of Health-funded study to evaluate awareness, knowledge, attitudes, and use of family friendly policies and career satisfaction. The study focus was on the impact of family responsibilities and characteristics of the faculty position (rank, clinical vs. nonclinical, and academic series) in multivariate comparisons between primary predictors and outcomes of interest. Both clinical and family responsibilities for children under 18 play a major and interacting role in satisfaction with career and work-life balance. Clinical faculty respondents without children at home reported significantly greater career satisfaction and better work-life balance than their nonclinical counterparts. Nonclinical faculty respondents with children reported greater satisfaction and better balance than counterparts without family responsibilities. However, the advantage in career satisfaction and work-life balance for clinical faculty respondents disappeared for those with responsibility for young children. No gender-based differences were noted in the results or across faculty rank for respondents; however, for women, reaching associate professor resulted in greater career satisfaction. This study suggests that both work-related factors and family responsibilities influence satisfaction with career and work-life balance, but the predictors appear to interact in complex and nuanced ways. Further research is needed to delineate more clearly these interactions and to explore other factors that may play important additional roles.

  1. [Strive, plan and reach the "Summit": the Faculty Development Program at the Ruth & Bruce Rappaport Faculty of Medicine, Technion, Israel Institute of Technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castel, Orit Cohen; Nave, Rachel; Ganor, Margalit; Hasson-Gilad, Dalia R; Brika, Riva

    2010-04-01

    In recent years, faculty development has turned into a central component of medical education and a primary instrument in qualifying physicians to be teachers and educators. The faculty development program at the Ruth & Bruce Rappaport Faculty of Medicine ("Summit" program) was established in order to improve teaching of the clinical professions, to create a community of medical teachers and educators and to develop leadership in medical education within the Faculty of Medicine. This article aims to describe the design, implementation and evaluation of the faculty development program in the Technion's Faculty of Medicine. The program was designed for a group of 20 clinical teachers, of various clinical professions, who had gained at least one year of undergraduate teaching experience and wished to develop a career in medical education. The program included seven monthly, eight-hour meetings throughout the academic year. Learning was based on small group discussions, interactive exercises, role-plays and simulations, self-directed reading and reflective writing. At the end of the final meeting, participants completed an evaluation form. Seventeen of the 20 participants (85%) graduated and received certificates. Learners' overall satisfaction was high. Graduates expressed high motivation to practice medical education within the Faculty of Medicine and reported that they gained new knowledge in medical education and skills regarding various aspects of teaching and learning, such as formulation of learning objectives, designing role plays, and providing effective feedback. The "Summit" program is an innovative initiative in the field of medical education in Israel. The program had a significant impact on participants' knowledge, teaching skills and attitudes. In order to ensure implementation of the acquired tools and skills, its shortterm and long-term effects on teaching behavior and the learning climate have yet to be demonstrated. In addition, it is necessary to

  2. Teaching of nuclear medicine at medical faculties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dienstbier, Z.

    1987-01-01

    The teaching of nuclear medicine at medical faculties in the CSSR is analyzed. It is shown that the teaching conditions are different at the individual faculties of medicine and the respective conditions are exemplified. (author). 4 tabs

  3. A study on Factors Affecting Application of Information and Communication Technology (ICT by Faculty Members of

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Biglari

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper is an attempt to investigate the factors affecting on ICT application by faculty members of University of Razi. A descriptive-correlative research survey method was used. The statistical population of this research consist of faculty members of University of Kermanshah (N=271. Sampling method was stratified randomization (n=116. Questionnaire was used for data collection, the validity of which was confirmed by the opinions of some of professionals and faculty members of Agriculture Education and Extension and for determining reliability Cronbach's Alpha (0.83 was used. The collected data were analyzed using SPSS software. The findings reveal that there’s a significant positive relationship between the number of published papers in internal and external journals and conferences, familiarity with internet services, skill in driving computer, skill in using internet services, using internet for meeting educational and research needs, skill in English language, attitude towards using ICT in education and research, scientific rank and use of internet for supervising over  thesis and dissertation, on the one hand, and the variable of application of ICT by faculty members of University of Kermanshah. In regression analysis, the predicting variables of factors affecting on application of ICT by faculty members, including skill in using internet services, attitude towards using ICT in research and education and the number of published papers in foreign journals and conferences were entered in 3 stages, which in total explain 25.1 percent variance of dependent variable. 

  4. Work-Life Resources for Faculty

    OpenAIRE

    Layne, Peggy

    2013-01-01

    Work-life balance means something different for each faculty member, but the overarching goal is to create a welcoming and supportive environment for all faculty members so they can succeed and are not required to make unacceptable choices between family and career. Retention of a talented faculty workforce is not just a matter of good start-up packages and opportunities for professional development, but also programs and policies that allow faculty members the flexibility to manage family an...

  5. Relationships between teaching faculty and teaching librarians

    CERN Document Server

    Katz, Linda S

    2014-01-01

    Every librarian who teaches in an academic library setting understands the complexities involved in partnering with teaching faculty. Relationships Between Teaching Faculty and Teaching Librarians recounts the efforts of librarians and faculty working together in disciplines across the board to create and sustain connections crucial to the success of library instruction. This unique collection of essays examines various types of partnerships between librarians and faculty (networking, coordination, and collaboration) and addresses the big issues involved, including teaching within an academic

  6. Perceptions of Faculty Status among Academic Librarians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galbraith, Quinn; Garrison, Melissa; Hales, Whitney

    2016-01-01

    This study measures the opinions of ARL librarians concerning the benefits and disadvantages of faculty status in academic librarianship. Average responses from faculty and nonfaculty librarians, as well as from tenured and tenure-track librarians, are analyzed to determine the general perceptions of each group. Overall, faculty librarians…

  7. What Determines Faculty-Engaged Scholarship?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogelgesang, Lori J.; Denson, Nida; Jayakumar, Uma M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines how faculty and institutional characteristics shape engaged scholarship. Controlling for faculty dispositions, disciplinary differences, and institutional characteristics, the authors examined the impact of perceived institutional support for community partnerships, community-based research, and teaching on faculty engagement.…

  8. Faculty Recruitment in an Era of Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Marilyn; Schimpf, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Faculty recruitment is a challenge for administration and departments, especially in an era of change in the academy. This article builds on information from an interactive conference panel session that focused on faculty recruitment best practices. The article addresses faculty recruitment strategies that focus on the optimization of search…

  9. James Madison University Survey of Faculty Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James Madison Univ., Harrisonburg, VA.

    The activities of the faculty at James Madison University during the fall term of the academic year 1978-79 are described. Full-time instructional faculty, part-time faculty involved in resident instruction, administrators and classified employees who taught at least one course, and graduate teaching assistants were surveyed. Information was…

  10. Motivational Issues of Faculty in Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul-Cader, Akram; Anthony, Peter John

    2014-01-01

    This study focused on the factors that affect motivation of faculty in Saudi Arabia. It included two surveys and open-ended queries to a focus group of five academic managers and 25 faculty members of varying nationalities, rank, and institutes in Saudi Arabia. The research showed that the faculties in Saudi Arabia's highest education industry…

  11. Understanding Faculty and Trainee Needs Related to Scholarly Activity in a Large, Nonuniversity Graduate Medical Education Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Davida; Garth, Hanna; Hollander, Rachel; Klein, Felice; Klau, Marc

    2017-01-01

    Graduate medical education (GME) programs must develop curriculum to ensure scholarly activity among trainees and faculty to meet accreditation requirements and to support evidence-based medicine. Test whether research-related needs and interests varied across four groups: primary care trainees, specialty trainees, primary care faculty, and specialty faculty. We surveyed a random sample of trainees and faculty in Kaiser Permanente Southern California's GME programs. We investigated group differences in outcomes using Fisher exact and Kruskal-Wallis tests. Research experiences, skills, barriers, motivators, and interests in specific research skills development. Participants included 47 trainees and 26 faculty (response rate = 30%). Among primary care faculty, 12 (71%) reported little or no research experience vs 1 (11%) for specialty faculty, 14 (41%) for primary care trainees, and 1 (8%) for specialty trainees (p work roles taking priority; desire for work-life balance; and lack of managerial support, research equipment, administrative support, and funding. Faculty and trainees in primary care and specialties have differing research-related needs that GME programs should consider when designing curricula to support scholarly activity. Developing research skills of primary care faculty is a priority to support trainees' scholarly activity.

  12. Nursing faculty academic incivility: perceptions of nursing students and faculty

    OpenAIRE

    Muliira, Joshua K.; Natarajan, Jansi; van der Colff, Jacoba

    2017-01-01

    Background Incivility in nursing education can adversely affect the academic environment, the learning outcomes, and safety. Nursing faculty (NF) and nursing students (NS) contribute to the academic incivility. Little is known about the extent of NF academic incivility in the Middle East region. This study aimed at exploring the perceptions and extent of NF academic incivility in an undergraduate nursing program of a public university in Oman. Methods A cross sectional survey was used to coll...

  13. Dental hygiene faculty calibration in the evaluation of calculus detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garland, Kandis V; Newell, Kathleen J

    2009-03-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to explore the impact of faculty calibration training on intra- and interrater reliability regarding calculus detection. After IRB approval, twelve dental hygiene faculty members were recruited from a pool of twenty-two for voluntary participation and randomized into two groups. All subjects provided two pre- and two posttest scorings of calculus deposits on each of three typodonts by recording yes or no indicating if they detected calculus. Accuracy and consistency of calculus detection were evaluated using an answer key. The experimental group received three two-hour training sessions to practice a prescribed exploring sequence and technique for calculus detection. Participants immediately corrected their answers, received feedback from the trainer, and reconciled missed areas. Intra- and interrater reliability (pre- and posttest) was determined using Cohen's Kappa and compared between groups using repeated measures (split-plot) ANOVA. The groups did not differ from pre- to posttraining (intrarater reliability p=0.64; interrater reliability p=0.20). Training had no effect on reliability levels for simulated calculus detection in this study. Recommendations for future studies of faculty calibration when evaluating students include using patients for assessing rater reliability, employing larger samples at multiple sites, and assessing the impact on students' attitudes and learning outcomes.

  14. Turkish Student Teachers' Attitudes toward Teaching in University-Based and Alternative Certification Programs in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksoy, Erdem

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study is to comparatively analyze the university-based and alternative teacher certification systems in Turkey in terms of the attitudes of trainee teachers toward the teaching profession, explore the reasons of choosing teaching as a career as well as analyze attitudes by gender, department, and graduating faculty type in…

  15. Psychiatry and Emergency Medicine: Medical Student and Physician Attitudes toward Homeless Persons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Ann; Roman, Brenda; Borges, Nicole

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of the study was to explore changes in medical students' attitudes toward homeless persons during the Psychiatry and Emergency Medicine clerkships. Simultaneously, this study explored attitudes toward homeless persons held by Psychiatry and Emergency Medicine residents and faculty in an attempt to uncover the "hidden…

  16. The Relationship between Teacher Candidates' Attitudes towards Teacher Credentialing Courses and Instructor Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gül, Ibrahim

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this research is to examine the relationship between the attitudes of prospective teachers towards teaching profession courses and teaching staff behaviors. The research is a quantitative study. The study's study group is composed of 537 education faculty student. "Attitude Scale towards Credentialing Courses" and…

  17. New England Faculty and College Students Differ in Their Views About Evolution, Creationism, Intelligent Design, and Religiosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paz-y-Miño C, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    students=1.60) and evolution (Evolution Index faculty=2.48 and students=1.65) than the students. Because attitudes toward evolution correlate (1) positively with understanding of science/evolution and (2) negatively with religiosity/political ideology, we conclude that science education combined with vigorous public debate should suffice to increase acceptance of naturalistic rationalism and decrease the negative impact of creationism and ID on society’s evolution literacy. PMID:26962385

  18. Addressing social barriers and closing the gender knowledge gap: exposure to road shows is associated with more knowledge and more positive beliefs, attitudes and social norms regarding exclusive breastfeeding in rural Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Alison L; Tavengwa, Naume V; Chasekwa, Bernard; Chatora, Kumbirai; Taruberekera, Noah; Mushayi, Wellington; Madzima, Rufaro C; Mbuya, Mduduzi N N

    2012-10-01

    Exclusive breastfeeding (EBF) is rarely practiced despite its significant child survival benefits. A key constraint to increasing EBF rates in Zimbabwe and most of the developing world is that key decision makers (fathers/partners and other family members) are often poorly informed about EBF and do not attend antenatal clinics where health information is routinely provided. Informed by formative research, a district-wide campaign was conducted in rural Zimbabwe to encourage EBF and expressing and heat treating (EHT) breast milk as a means to maintain EBF. The campaign combined traditional strategies of education, counselling and outreach through health service delivery with a novel road show 'edutainment' intervention to reach men and other community members. A post campaign evaluation measured the association of road show exposure with 20 knowledge items and summative scores of social norms, beliefs and attitudes obtained through exploratory factor analysis. In adjusted models, road show exposure was associated with correct EBF knowledge (β=1.0, 0.001), EHT knowledge (β=1.3, Pbenefits of condom use during pregnancy and breastfeeding (β=0.5, P<0.001), and more positive EBF social norms (β=0.6, P<0.001), EBF beliefs and attitudes (β=1.0, P<0.001) and attitudes towards condom use during breastfeeding (β=0.6, P<0.001). Road show exposure was more strongly associated with EBF knowledge among men (P-value for gender×exposure group interaction=0.03), suggesting that it also closed the knowledge gap between men and women. Longitudinal studies will determine whether road shows were associated with changes in EBF practices. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Nurse Educator Attitudes Toward People With Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Lori; Houser, Rick

    As educators strongly influence the attitudes of their students, the purpose of this study was to determine nurse educator attitudes toward people with disabilities. Inadequate education of health professionals is a known barrier to care for people with disability. Continuing calls for improved education of health professionals compel an assessment of nurse educator attitudes. This was a cross-sectional, correlational web-based survey of nurse educators (n = 126). Nurse educator attitudes were analyzed using descriptive statistics, analysis of variance, and multiple regression analysis. Nurse educators held discriminatory attitudes toward people with disabilities, though most preferred a biopsychosocial model of disability. Forty-four percent lacked knowledge of disability-related aims, objectives, or outcomes within the curriculum. To advance equity in health care, nurse educators must confront personal bias and teach competent care of people with disabilities.

  20. Exploring Faculty Developers’ Experiences to Inform Our Understanding of Competence in Faculty Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leslie, Karen; Panisko, Danny; Walsh, Allyn; Wong, Anne; Stubbs, Barbara; Mylopoulos, Maria

    2018-01-01

    Purpose Now a mainstay in medical education, faculty development has created the role of the faculty developer. However, faculty development research tends to overlook faculty developers’ roles and experiences. This study aimed to develop an empirical understanding of faculty developer competence by digging deeper into the actions, experiences, and perceptions of faculty developers as they perform their facilitator role. Method A constructivist grounded theory approach guided observations of faculty development activities, field interviews, and formal interviews with 31 faculty developers across two academic institutions from 2013 to 2014. Analysis occurred alongside and informed data collection. Themes were identified using a constant comparison process. Results Consistent with the literature, findings highlighted the knowledge and skills of the faculty developer and the importance of context in the design and delivery of faculty development activities. Three novel processes (negotiating, constructing, and attuning) were identified that integrate the individual faculty developer, her context, and the evolution of her competence. Conclusions These findings suggest that faculty developer competence is best understood as a situated construct. A faculty developer’s ability to attune to, construct, and negotiate her environment can both enhance and minimize the impact of contextual variables as needed. Thus, faculty developers do not passively experience context; rather, they actively interact with their environment in ways that maximize their performance. Faculty developers should be trained for the adaptive, situated use of knowledge. PMID:28678104

  1. Exploring Faculty Developers' Experiences to Inform Our Understanding of Competence in Faculty Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Lindsay; Leslie, Karen; Panisko, Danny; Walsh, Allyn; Wong, Anne; Stubbs, Barbara; Mylopoulos, Maria

    2018-02-01

    Now a mainstay in medical education, faculty development has created the role of the faculty developer. However, faculty development research tends to overlook faculty developers' roles and experiences. This study aimed to develop an empirical understanding of faculty developer competence by digging deeper into the actions, experiences, and perceptions of faculty developers as they perform their facilitator role. A constructivist grounded theory approach guided observations of faculty development activities, field interviews, and formal interviews with 31 faculty developers across two academic institutions from 2013 to 2014. Analysis occurred alongside and informed data collection. Themes were identified using a constant comparison process. Consistent with the literature, findings highlighted the knowledge and skills of the faculty developer and the importance of context in the design and delivery of faculty development activities. Three novel processes (negotiating, constructing, and attuning) were identified that integrate the individual faculty developer, her context, and the evolution of her competence. These findings suggest that faculty developer competence is best understood as a situated construct. A faculty developer's ability to attune to, construct, and negotiate her environment can both enhance and minimize the impact of contextual variables as needed. Thus, faculty developers do not passively experience context; rather, they actively interact with their environment in ways that maximize their performance. Faculty developers should be trained for the adaptive, situated use of knowledge.

  2. Barriers to use of modern contraceptives among women in an inner city area of Osogbo metropolis, Osun State, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asekun–Olarinmoye EO

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available EO Asekun-Olarinmoye,1 WO Adebimpe,1 JO Bamidele,2 OO Odu,2 IO Asekun-Olarinmoye,3 EO Ojofeitimi41Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Clinical Sciences, Osun State University, Osogbo, Osun State, Nigeria; 2Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Clinical Sciences, Ekiti State University, Ado-Ekiti, Ekiti State, Nigeria; 3Department of Community Health, School of Public and Allied Health, Babcock University, Ilishan-Remo, Ogun State, Nigeria; 4Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Clinical Sciences, Ladoke Akintola University of Technology, Osogbo, Osun State, NigeriaObjectives: To determine the knowledge and attitudes on modern contraceptive use of women living in an inner city area of Osogbo.Materials and methods: Three hundred and fifty nine women of childbearing age were studied utilizing a community-based, descriptive, cross-sectional study design. A multistage random sampling technique was used in recruiting respondents to the study. A four-part questionnaire was applied dually, by interviewers and by respondents' self administration, and the data was analyzed using the SPSS software version 17.0.Results: The mean age of respondents was 28.6 ± 6.65 years. The majority (90.3% of respondents were aware of modern methods of family planning (FP, 76.0% claimed awareness of where to obtain FP services, and 74.9% knew of at least five methods. However, only 30.6% had ever used contraceptives, while only 13.1% were current users. The most frequently used method was the male condom. The commonly perceived barriers accounting for low use of FP methods were fear of perceived side effects (44.0%, ignorance (32.6%, misinformation (25.1%, superstition (22.0%, and culture (20.3%. Some reasons were proffered for respondents' nonuse of modern contraception. Predictors of use of modern contraceptives include the awareness of a place of FP service provision, respondents' approval of the use of contraceptives, higher education status, and

  3. Results of an academic promotion and career path survey of faculty at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Patricia A; Diener-West, Marie; Canto, Marcia I; Martin, Don R; Post, Wendy S; Streiff, Michael B

    2004-03-01

    Clinician-educator faculty are increasing in numbers in academic medical centers, but their academic advancement is slower than that of research faculty. The authors sought to quantify the magnitude of this difference in career advancement and to explore the characteristics of faculty that might explain the difference. In 1999, a questionnaire was administered to all MD faculty at the rank of instructor and above (259) in the Department of Medicine at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. A total of 180 (69%) faculty returned questionnaires. Of these, 178 identified with one of four career paths: basic researcher (46), clinical researcher (69), academic clinician (38), or teacher-clinician (25). Career path did not differ by age, gender, rank, years on faculty, hours worked per week, family responsibility, or global work satisfaction. After adjusting for age, gender, time at rank, and work satisfaction, the odds of being at a higher rank were 85% less for academic clinicians (odds ratio,.15; 95% confidence interval, 0.06-0.40) and 69% less for teacher-clinicians (odds ratio,.31; 95% confidence interval, 0.11-0.88) than for basic researchers. Clinical researchers did not differ from basic researchers in the likelihood of being at higher rank. Similarly, compared with basic research faculty, the adjusted odds of being more satisfied with progress towards academic promotion were 92% lower for academic clinicians and 87% lower for teacher-clinicians. Clinician-educator faculty were less likely to be at higher rank at this institution than were faculty in research paths. Differences in rank may be explained by lower rank at hire for faculty in these career paths, time available for scholarly activities, or other resources available to support scholarship. Retaining clinician-educators will require further exploration of barriers to promotion inherent to these career paths and methods of modifying these barriers.

  4. Exploring Nurse Faculty Incivility and Resonant Leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casale, Katherine R

    The purpose of this quantitative correlational study was to explore the relationship between the frequency of interfaculty incivility among nurses in academia and observed levels of resonant leadership of immediate supervisors. Despite mandates to address incivility in health care, nurse faculty report high levels of horizontal incivility among their peers. No known quantitative research has measured the relationship between nurse faculty-to-faculty incivility and resonant leadership traits of leaders. Nursing faculty from 17 universities (n = 260) were emailed an anonymous link to answer survey questions about horizontal peer incivility and leaders' management styles. There was a significant inverse relationship (Pearson's r, -.560) between the frequency of experienced faculty-to-faculty incivility and the level of observed resonant leadership behaviors of participants' immediate supervisors. Resonant supervisory behaviors inversely correlated with nurse faculty peer incivility, with potential to impact satisfaction, recruitment, and retention.

  5. REFLECTIONS ON SCREENAGERS, FACULTY DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mike K. MOULTON

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper outlines a strategy for a faculty development program with respect to net-supported learning. Many universities and colleges are struggling with meeting the demands of a rapidly changing world. Reflections in this paper are based on experiences from the Norwegian University of Life Sciences. Attention has been given to the intelligent use of technology as a means of meeting pressing challenges. What does this mean? I ask a series of questions, the answers of which form the basis for a faculty development program. What qualities and skills should our graduates have? What consequences does this have for the way we approach teaching and learning? And what role does technology play? In short, we must focus on faculty training courses and the ensuing development cycles of trial, error, refinement and sharing. Guiding principles for these activities should be:1. It is about learning.2. It is about easy access.3. It is about emphasizing collaboration.4. It is about support.

  6. Knowledge, Attitude and Practice in Electronic Education Among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Electronic education (E-education) is used worldwide as a basic tool for medical education for its advanced improving in medical training. In spite of its wide use in the system of the medical faculties in Sudan, e-education has not taken its right place yet. Objectives: To explore knowledge, attitude and practice ...

  7. dental services and attitudes towards its regular utilization among

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DENTAL SERVICES AND ATTITUDES TOWARDS ITS REGULAR UTILIZATION. AMONG CIVIL SERVANTS IN IBADAN, NIGERIA. M.E. Osuh1, G.A. Oke1 and M.C. Asuzu2. 1Department of Periodontology and Community Dentistry, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Ibadan. 2Department of Preventive Medicine and Primary ...

  8. Attitudes about Addiction: A National Study of Addiction Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadus, Angela D.; Hartje, Joyce A.; Roget, Nancy A.; Cahoon, Kristy L.; Clinkinbeard, Samantha S.

    2010-01-01

    The following study, funded by the National Institute of Drug Abuse (NIDA), utilized the "Addiction Belief Inventory" (ABI; Luke, Ribisl, Walton, & Davidson, 2002) to examine addiction attitudes in a national sample of U.S. college/university faculty teaching addiction-specific courses (n = 215). Results suggest that addiction educators view…

  9. The Relationship between Personal Values and Attitude towards Teaching Profession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bektas, Fatih; Nalcaci, Ahmet

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to determine to what extent the personal values of class teacher candidates predict their attitude towards teaching. The universe of the research is teacher candidates from the Kazim Karabekir Faculty of Education, Ankara University in the 2010-2011 academic year. 305 teacher candidates from 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th year class were…

  10. Knowledge, attitudes and practices of general practitions in the Free ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to determine the knowledge, attitudes and practice of general practitioners ... identified include the fact that they are time consuming, disrupt schedules, parents are difficult and ... oral administration of methylphenidate. ... Department of Paediatrics and Child Health, Faculty of Health Sciences.

  11. Human Papilloma Virus vaccination: knowledge, attitude and uptake ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Human Papilloma Virus vaccination: knowledge, attitude and uptake among female medical and dental students in a tertiary institution in Benin-City, Nigeria. ... Age (p = 0.001), faculty (p = 0.014) and level of study (p = 0.014) was observed to be significant determinants of knowledge. A higher proportion of respondents ...

  12. Wellness Intervention Effects on Lifestyle, Attitudes and Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, Stephen M.; And Others

    The effect of an on-site health promotion program on lifestyle behavior, health, attitude, and stress was studied with 41 university faculty and nonacademic administrators. The participants were administered a maximal graded exercise tolerance test, hydrostatic weighing, and the Lifestyle Analysis Questionnaire. While 32 staff were assigned to an…

  13. Basic science faculty in surgical departments: advantages, disadvantages and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinoy, Mala R; Moskowitz, Jay; Wilmore, Douglas W; Souba, Wiley W

    2005-01-01

    The number of Ph.D. faculty in clinical departments now exceeds the number of Ph.D. faculty in basic science departments. Given the escalating pressures on academic surgeons to produce in the clinical arena, the recruitment and retention of high-quality Ph.D.s will become critical to the success of an academic surgical department. This success will be as dependent on the surgical faculty understanding the importance of the partnership as the success of the Ph.D. investigator. Tighter alignment among the various clinical and research programs and between surgeons and basic scientists will facilitate the generation of new knowledge that can be translated into useful products and services (thus improving care). To capitalize on what Ph.D.s bring to the table, surgery departments may need to establish a more formal research infrastructure that encourages the ongoing exchange of ideas and resources. Physically removing barriers between the research groups, encouraging the open exchange of techniques and observations and sharing core laboratories is characteristic of successful research teams. These strategies can meaningfully contribute to developing successful training program grants, program projects and bringing greater research recognition to the department of surgery.

  14. Psychiatry and emergency medicine: medical student and physician attitudes toward homeless persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Ann; Roman, Brenda; Borges, Nicole

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of the study was to explore changes in medical students' attitudes toward homeless persons during the Psychiatry and Emergency Medicine clerkships. Simultaneously, this study explored attitudes toward homeless persons held by Psychiatry and Emergency Medicine residents and faculty in an attempt to uncover the "hidden curriculum" in medical education, in which values are communicated from teacher to student outside of the formal instruction. A group of 79 students on Psychiatry and 66 on Emergency Medicine clerkships were surveyed at the beginning and end of their rotation regarding their attitudes toward homeless persons by use of the Health Professionals' Attitudes Toward the Homeless Inventory (HPATHI). The HPATHI was also administered to 31 Psychiatry residents and faculty and 41 Emergency Medicine residents and faculty one time during the course of this study. For Psychiatry clerks, t-tests showed significant differences pre- and post-clerkship experiences on 2 of the 23 items on the HPATHI. No statistically significant differences were noted for the Emergency Medicine students. An analysis of variance revealed statistically significant differences on 7 out of the 23 survey questions for residents and faculty in Psychiatry, as compared with those in Emergency Medicine. Results suggest that medical students showed small differences in their attitudes toward homeless people following clerkships in Psychiatry but not in Emergency Medicine. Regarding resident and faculty results, significant differences between specialties were noted, with Psychiatry residents and faculty exhibiting more favorable attitudes toward homeless persons than residents and faculty in Emergency Medicine. Given that medical student competencies should be addressing the broader social issues of homelessness, medical schools need to first understand the attitudes of medical students to such issues, and then develop curricula to overcome inaccurate or stigmatizing beliefs.

  15. Understanding the challenges to facilitating active learning in the resident conferences: a qualitative study of internal medicine faculty and resident perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawatsky, Adam P; Zickmund, Susan L; Berlacher, Kathryn; Lesky, Dan; Granieri, Rosanne

    2015-01-01

    In the Next Accreditation System, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education outlines milestones for medical knowledge and requires regular didactic sessions in residency training. There are many challenges to facilitating active learning in resident conferences, and we need to better understand resident learning preferences and faculty perspectives on facilitating active learning. The goal of this study was to identify challenges to facilitating active learning in resident conferences, both through identifying specific implementation barriers and identifying differences in perspective between faculty and residents on effective teaching and learning strategies. The investigators invited core residency faculty to participate in focus groups. The investigators used a semistructured guide to facilitate discussion about learning preferences and teaching perspectives in the conference setting and used an 'editing approach' within a grounded theory framework to qualitative analysis to code the transcripts and analyze the results. Data were compared to previously collected data from seven resident focus groups. Three focus groups with 20 core faculty were conducted. We identified three domains pertaining to facilitating active learning in resident conferences: barriers to facilitating active learning formats, similarities and differences in faculty and resident learning preferences, and divergence between faculty and resident opinions about effective teaching strategies. Faculty identified several setting, faculty, and resident barriers to facilitating active learning in resident conferences. When compared to residents, faculty expressed similar learning preferences; the main differences were in motivations for conference attendance and type of content. Resident preferences and faculty perspectives differed on the amount of information appropriate for lecture and the role of active participation in resident conferences. This study highlights several

  16. Opinion & special articles: a guide from fellowship to faculty: Nietzsche and the academic neurologist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmichael, S Thomas

    2012-10-02

    The role of the physician scientist in biomedical research is increasingly threatened. Despite a clear role in clinical advances in translational medicine, the percentage of physicians engaged in research has steadily declined. Several programmatic efforts have been initiated to address this problem by providing time and financial resources to the motivated resident or fellow. However, this decline in physician scientists is due not only to a lack of time and resources but also a reflection of the uncertain path in moving from residency or postdoctoral training toward junior faculty. This article is a practical guide to the milestones and barriers to successful faculty achievement after residency or fellowship training.

  17. The research impact of school psychology faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Marley W; Chan-Park, Christina Y

    2015-06-01

    Hirsch's (2005) h index has become one of the most popular indicators of research productivity for higher education faculty. However, the h index varies across academic disciplines so empirically established norms for each discipline are necessary. To that end, the current study collected h index values from Scopus and Google Scholar databases for 401 tenure-track faculty members from 109 school psychology training programs. Male faculty tended to be more senior than female faculty and a greater proportion of the male faculty held professorial rank. However, female faculty members outnumbered males at the assistant and associate professor ranks. Although strongly correlated (rho=.84), h index values from Google Scholar were higher than those from Scopus. h index distributions were positively skewed with many faculty having low values and a few faculty having high values. Faculty in doctoral training programs exhibited significantly larger h index values than faculty in specialist training programs and there were univariate differences in h index values across academic rank and sex, but sex differences were not significant after taking seniority into account. It was recommended that the h index be integrated with peer review and diverse other indicators when considering individual merit. Copyright © 2015 Society for the Study of School Psychology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Sprache als Barriere (Language as a Barrier)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattheier, Klaus

    1974-01-01

    The concept of language barrier has its derivations in the fields of dialectology, sociology and psychology. In contemporary usage however, the concept has two meanings i.e. regional-cultural barrier and socio-cultural barrier. (Text is in German.) (DS)

  19. Barrier-free dental health care: A situation analysis of the dental care settings and providers' attitudes in private dental clinics for the movement-disabled in Bengaluru City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vyoma Grandhi Venkatesh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Movement-disabled individuals require oral health care like everyone else. However, they face a multitude of accessibility issues. Since private dental clinics are the most commonly utilized type of oral health care in India, it becomes pertinent to know how accessible these clinics are for movement-disabled individuals. Aim: To assess the accessibility of private dental clinics in Bengaluru city to movement-disabled people. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted among a random sample of 250 dentists practicing at private dental clinics in Bengaluru city using a structured questionnaire. The data were entered into the Microsoft Office Excel 2007 and were analyzed. Chi-square test was done to assess the association of dentists' previous experience in treating mobility-disabled patients and their attitude toward treating such patients. Results: In the current study, 81.2% (203 of the respondents expressed willingness to treat mobility-disabled individuals. However, wheelchair provision was present in only 15.6% (39 of the clinic, and only one-fifth of the clinics had a slope or ramp for facilitating entry of wheelchair-bound individuals. Gurneys, stretchers, and ceiling-mounted lifts were present in < 10% of the private dental clinics. The reasons for poor accessibility to movement disabled were reported as lack of financial resources followed by lack of utilization of facilities by movement-disabled individuals. Conclusion: The dentists displayed favorable attitude toward treating movement-disabled individuals. However, only a few private dental clinics met the architectural requirements and were equipped for treating such patients.

  20. Education About Dental Hygienists' Roles in Public Dental Prevention Programs: Dental and Dental Hygiene Students' and Faculty Members' and Dental Hygienists' Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pervez, Anushey; Kinney, Janet S; Gwozdek, Anne; Farrell, Christine M; Inglehart, Marita R

    2016-09-01

    In 2005, Public Act No. 161 (PA 161) was passed in Michigan, allowing dental hygienists to practice in approved public dental prevention programs to provide services for underserved populations while utilizing a collaborative agreement with a supervising dentist. The aims of this study were to assess how well dental and dental hygiene students and faculty members and practicing dental hygienists have been educated about PA 161, what attitudes and knowledge about the act they have, and how interested they are in additional education about it. University of Michigan dental and dental hygiene students and faculty members, students in other Michigan dental hygiene programs, and dental hygienists in the state were surveyed. Respondents (response rate) were 160 dental students (50%), 63 dental hygiene students (82%), 30 dental faculty members (26%), and 12 dental hygiene faculty members (52%) at the University of Michigan; 143 dental hygiene students in other programs (20%); and 95 members of the Michigan Dental Hygienists' Association (10%). The results showed that the dental students were less educated about PA 161 than the dental hygiene students, and the dental faculty members were less informed than the dental hygiene faculty members and dental hygienists. Responding dental hygiene faculty members and dental hygienists had more positive attitudes about PA 161 than did the students and dental faculty members. Most of the dental hygiene faculty members and dental hygienists knew a person providing services in a PA 161 program. Most dental hygiene students, faculty members, and dental hygienists wanted more education about PA 161. Overall, the better educated about the program the respondents were, the more positive their attitudes, and the more interested they were in learning more.

  1. faculties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mardanov Rustam Sh.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyzes some of the psychological problems of the economic faculties’ students arising in the course of study of mathematical disciplines. These problems are primarily related with the lack of students’ awareness, misconception about the calculation methods in their future profession, low motivation and performance, math anxiety, etc. They makeadditional difficulties which impede successful mastering of sophisticated material. Based on the experience of mathematical disciplines teaching, the paper provides some possible solutions to these problems with the lecturer who has to play an important role. The lecturer should orientate students towards serious and profound knowledge of economic and mathematical methods, create conditions for students’ active participation in the educational process and provide them with comprehensive assistance in overcoming difficulties.

  2. The gap between medical faculty's perceptions and use of e-learning resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyong-Jee; Kang, Youngjoon; Kim, Giwoon

    2017-01-01

    e-Learning resources have become increasingly popular in medical education; however, there has been scant research on faculty perceptions and use of these resources. To investigate medical faculty's use of e-learning resources and to draw on practical implications for fostering their use of such resources. Approximately 500 full-time faculty members in 35 medical schools across the nation in South Korea were invited to participate in a 30-item questionnaire on their perceptions and use of e-learning resources in medical education. The questionnaires were distributed in both online and paper formats. Descriptive analysis and reliability analysis were conducted of the data. Eighty faculty members from 28 medical schools returned the questionnaires. Twenty-two percent of respondents were female and 78% were male, and their rank, disciplines, and years of teaching experience all varied. Participants had positive perceptions of e-learning resources in terms of usefulness for student learning and usability; still, only 39% of them incorporated those resources in their teaching. The most frequently selected reasons for not using e-learning resources in their teaching were 'lack of resources relevant to my lectures,' 'lack of time to use them during lectures,' and 'was not aware of their availability.' Our study indicates a gap between medical faculty's positive perceptions of e-learning resources and their low use of such resources. Our findings highlight the needs for further study of individual and institutional barriers to faculty adoption of e-learning resources to bridge this gap.

  3. A Study of Faculty Approaches to Teaching Undergraduate Physical Chemistry Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mack, Michael Ryan

    Chemistry education researchers have not adequately studied teaching and learning experiences at all levels in the undergraduate chemistry curriculum leaving gaps in discipline-based STEM education communities understanding about how the upper- division curricula works (National Research Council, 2012b; Towns, 2013). This study explored faculty approaches to teaching in upper-division physical chemistry course settings using an interview-based methodology. Two conceptualizations of approaches to teaching emerged from a phenomenographic analysis of interview transcripts: (1) faculty beliefs about the purposes for teaching physical chemistry and (2) their conceptions of their role as an instructor in these course settings. Faculty who reported beliefs predominantly centered on helping students develop conceptual knowledge and problem-solving skills in physical chemistry often worked with didactic models of teaching, which emphasized the transfer of expert knowledge to students. When faculty expressed beliefs that were more inclusive of conceptual, epistemic, and social learning goals in science education they often described more student-centered models of teaching and learning, which put more responsibilities on them to facilitate students' interactive engagement with the material and peers during regularly scheduled class time. Knowledge of faculty thinking, as evinced in a rich description of their accounts of their experience, provides researchers and professional developers with useful information about the potential opportunities or barriers that exist for helping faculty align their beliefs and goals for teaching with research-based instructional strategies.

  4. Mentoring programs for underrepresented minority faculty in academic medical centers: a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beech, Bettina M; Calles-Escandon, Jorge; Hairston, Kristen G; Langdon, Sarah E; Latham-Sadler, Brenda A; Bell, Ronny A

    2013-04-01

    Mentoring is critical for career advancement in academic medicine. However, underrepresented minority (URM) faculty often receive less mentoring than their nonminority peers. The authors conducted a comprehensive review of published mentoring programs designed for URM faculty to identify "promising practices." Databases (PubMed, PsycINFO, ERIC, PsychLit, Google Scholar, Dissertations Abstracts International, CINHAL, Sociological Abstracts) were searched for articles describing URM faculty mentoring programs. The RE-AIM framework (Reach, Effectiveness, Adoption, Implementation, and Maintenance) formed the model for analyzing programs. The search identified 73 citations. Abstract reviews led to retrieval of 38 full-text articles for assessment; 18 articles describing 13 programs were selected for review. The reach of these programs ranged from 7 to 128 participants. Most evaluated programs on the basis of the number of grant applications and manuscripts produced or satisfaction with program content. Programs offered a variety of training experiences, and adoption was relatively high, with minor changes made for implementing the intended content. Barriers included time-restricted funding, inadequate evaluation due to few participants, significant time commitments required from mentors, and difficulty in addressing institutional challenges faced by URM faculty. Program sustainability was a concern because programs were supported through external funds, with minimal institutional support. Mentoring is an important part of academic medicine, particularly for URM faculty who often experience unique career challenges. Despite this need, relatively few publications exist to document mentoring programs for this population. Institutionally supported mentoring programs for URM faculty are needed, along with detailed plans for program sustainability.

  5. Scholarly productivity for nursing clinical track faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschannen, Dana; Anderson, Christine; Strobbe, Stephen; Bay, Esther; Bigelow, April; Dahlem, Chin Hwa Gina Y; Gosselin, Ann K; Pollard, Jennifer; Seng, Julia S

    2014-01-01

    Recent years have yielded substantial advancement by clinical track faculty in cohort expansion and collective contributions to the discipline of nursing. As a result, standards for progression and promotion for clinical faculty need to be more fully developed, articulated, and disseminated. Our school formed a task force to examine benchmarks for the progression and promotion of clinical faculty across schools of nursing, with the goal of guiding faculty, reviewers, and decision makers about what constitutes excellence in scholarly productivity. Results from analyses of curriculum vitae of clinical professors or associate professors at six universities with high research activity revealed a variety of productivity among clinical track members, which included notable diversity in the types of scholarly products. Findings from this project help quantify types of scholarship for clinical faculty at the time of promotion. This work provides a springboard for greater understanding of the contributions of clinical track faculty to nursing practice. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Targeting change: Assessing a faculty learning community focused on increasing statistics content in life science curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Loran Carleton; Gleichsner, Alyssa M; Adedokun, Omolola A; Forney, James

    2016-11-12

    Transformation of research in all biological fields necessitates the design, analysis and, interpretation of large data sets. Preparing students with the requisite skills in experimental design, statistical analysis, and interpretation, and mathematical reasoning will require both curricular reform and faculty who are willing and able to integrate mathematical and statistical concepts into their life science courses. A new Faculty Learning Community (FLC) was constituted each year for four years to assist in the transformation of the life sciences curriculum and faculty at a large, Midwestern research university. Participants were interviewed after participation and surveyed before and after participation to assess the impact of the FLC on their attitudes toward teaching, perceived pedagogical skills, and planned teaching practice. Overall, the FLC had a meaningful positive impact on participants' attitudes toward teaching, knowledge about teaching, and perceived pedagogical skills. Interestingly, confidence for viewing the classroom as a site for research about teaching declined. Implications for the creation and development of FLCs for science faculty are discussed. © 2016 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 44(6):517-525, 2016. © 2016 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  7. Survey of outcomes in a faculty development program on simulation pedagogy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Young Sook; Kim, Mi Kang; Tangkawanich, Thitiarpha

    2016-06-01

    Although many nursing programs use simulation as a teaching-learning modality, there are few systematic approaches to help nursing educators learn this pedagogy. This study evaluates the effects of a simulation pedagogy nursing faculty development program on participants' learning perceptions using a retrospective pre-course and post-course design. Sixteen Thai participants completed a two-day nursing faculty development program on simulation pedagogy. Thirteen questionnaires were used in the final analysis. The participants' self-perceived learning about simulation teaching showed significant post-course improvement. On a five-point Likert scale, the composite mean attitude, subjective norm, and perceived behavioral control scores, as well as intention to use a simulator, showed a significant post-course increase. A faculty development program on simulation pedagogy induced favorable learning and attitudes. Further studies must test how faculty performance affects the cognitive, emotional, and social dimensions of learning in a simulation-based learning domain. © 2015 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  8. Impact of Student vs Faculty Facilitators on Motivational Interviewing Student Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widder-Prewett, Rebecca; Draime, Juanita A; Cameron, Ginger; Anderson, Douglas; Pinkerton, Mark; Chen, Aleda M H

    2017-08-01

    Objective. To determine the impact of student or faculty facilitation on student self-assessed attitudes, confidence, and competence in motivational interviewing (MI) skills; actual competence; and evaluation of facilitator performance. Methods. Second-year pharmacy (P2) students were randomly assigned to a student or faculty facilitator for a four-hour, small-group practice of MI skills. MI skills were assessed in a simulated patient encounter with the mMITI (modified Motivational Interviewing Treatment Integrity) tool. Students completed a pre-post, 6-point, Likert-type assessment addressing the research objectives. Differences were assessed using a Mann-Whitney U test. Results. Student (N=44) post-test attitudes, confidence, perceived or actual competence, and evaluations of facilitator performance were not different for faculty- and student-facilitated groups. Conclusion. Using pharmacy students as small-group facilitators did not affect student performance and were viewed as equally favorable. Using pharmacy students as facilitators can lessen faculty workload and provide an outlet for students to develop communication and facilitation skills that will be needed in future practice.

  9. Medical faculty members' perspectives on the components of cross-cultural competence in the Islamic Republic of Iran: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazaz, M Mousavi; Zazoly, A Zabihi; Karimi Moonaghi, H

    2015-02-25

    Despite the importance of cultural competence in health care, there has been no research to develop a framework for cultural competence in the Iranian context. This qualitative study at Mashhad University of Medical Sciences aimed to elucidate the views of medical faculty staff on the components of cross-cultural competence and compare these with similar studies published in English. Using a combination of archival studies, semi-structured interviews and focus group discussions among faculty members 3 major domains (knowledge, attitude and behaviour) and 21 components were identified to describe the cross-cultural competence of faculty members in medical schools. Participants expressed the importance of knowledge as a precursor to changing attitudes and the 6 knowledge components related to knowledge and awareness of values, beliefs and norms of different ethnic, racial and cultural groups. Experts mostly emphasized the importance of interaction between faculty members and clients (students and patients).

  10. Medical faculty members' perspectives on the components of cross-cultural competence in the Islamic Republic of Iran: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazaz, M Mousavi; Zazoly, A Zabihi; Moonaghi, H Karimi

    2015-02-02

    Despite the importance of cultural competence in health care, there has been no research to develop a framework for cultural competence in the Iranian context. This qualitative study at Mashhad University of Medical Sciences aimed to elucidate the views of medical faculty staff on the components of cross-cultural competence and compare these with similar studies published in English. Using a combination of archival studies, semi-structured interviews and focus group discussions among faculty members 3 major domains (knowledge, attitude and behaviour) and 21 components were identified to describe the cross-cultural competence of faculty members in medical schools. Participants expressed the importance of knowledge as a precursor to changing attitudes and the 6 knowledge components related to knowledge and awareness of values, beliefs and norms of different ethnic, racial and cultural groups. Experts mostly emphasized the importance of interaction between faculty members and clients (students and patients).

  11. Evaluation of nursing faculty through observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, L H

    1998-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess current use and faculty perceptions of classroom observation as a method of faculty evaluation in schools of nursing. Baccalaureate schools of nursing were surveyed to determine current use of classroom observation and its worth from the perception of administrators and faculty. Although most schools used classroom observation as a method of faculty evaluation, further clarification and research is needed in the following areas: purpose of classroom observation; number of observations necessary; weight given to classroom observation in relation to other evaluation methods; and tools used.

  12. FACULTY DIVERSITY AND TENURE IN HIGHER EDUCATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul-Raheem, Jalelah

    2016-01-01

    There is a need for minority faculty in higher education due to the increase in minority high school graduates and higher education enrollees. Faculty members who are tenured have the ability to advocate for cultural equality in their institutions and serve as mentors for students. Minority faculty whose tenured process is hindered by inequality may also be unable to become a proper mentor for minority students. The purpose of this paper is to identify why faculty diversity will lead to increased student success and comfort, minority mentors, minority research, and equity advocacy, and representation from all minority groups.

  13. Radiologic sciences. Faculty needs assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Kevin J

    2005-01-01

    A total of 326 programs are represented in the data collected. Based on the average number of full- and part-time faculty members reported per program, this survey represents more than 1500 faculty positions. Based on the forecast of retirement and career change for all faculty members, there will be a turnover of 700 to 800 positions over the next 5 to 10 years. Part-time/adjunct faculty vacancies are expected to create the greatest number of opportunities for technologists to make the transition to education, with approximately one third of current part-time/adjunct educators planning on leaving radiologic sciences education within 5 years. To encourage retention of part-time/adjunct educators, annual evaluations should be modified to recognize the important educational role these instructors play. There is a need to create enthusiasm and interest in education as a career pathway for radiologic technologists. Resources are needed that help radiologic technologists make the transition to teaching. Finally, the retention of educators must be emphasized. Program applicant trends indicate radiologic technology students are older, have prior postsecondary education experience or are making a career change. This data emphasizes the need for educators, both full time and part time, to understand the characteristics and needs of the adult learner. Adult learners bring a wealth of education, experience and life skills that create both opportunities and challenges in the classroom and clinical setting. All categories of respondents indicated that their current salaries were greater than those of program graduates in their firstjob. Of interest is that 1 in 5 (20%) of part-time/adjunct educators indicated the opposite--that program graduates earn more in their firstjob than educators earn. When asked about salaries if working full time in clinical practice, the majority of all groups indicated their salary would be about the same or would decrease. Only 20% of program

  14. Atitudes e barreiras à prática de enfermagem baseada na evidência em contexto comunitário Actitudes y barreras para la práctica de enfermería basada en la evidencia en un contexto comunitário Attitudes and barriers to evidence-based nursing practice in a community context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Pedro Gomes Pereira

    2012-07-01

    adopción de una práctica de enfermería basada en la evidencia en un contexto comunitario, b describir las actitudes de las enfermeras en relación con la práctica basada en la evidencia. Metodología: se desarrolló un estudio transversal, exploratorio y descriptivo que tuvo lugar en una unidad local de salud en el norte de Portugal, recurriendo a la versión de prueba del “Cuestionario de Actitudes Práctica Basada en Evidencias” (McKenna, Ashton y Keeney, 2004. Los resultados coinciden con los de estudios internacionales, aunque tengan en cuenta las especificidades nacionales. En general, las barreras identificadas son de diversas etiologías: personal, organizacional, cultural y científica. En conclusión, una PBE cumple con la obligación social de la enfermería, funda su credibilidad entre las ciencias de la salud y es sostiene eventuales cambios a nivel político. Es fundamental identificar las barreras y actitudes, independientemente de sus orígenes de modo a estructurar futuras estrategias de intervención.Background: Several studies have identified barriers to evidence-based practice (EBP. Most of these investigations were carried out in different contexts. Therefore research is needed to identify barriers and attitudes to EBP in a community context, given the importance and reorganization of primary health care. The research objectives were: a to identify perceived barriers to the adoption of evidence-based nursing practice in a community setting; b to describe nurses’ attitudes related to evidence-based practice. Methodology: we developed an exploratory and descriptive cross-sectional study, which took place in local health unit in northern Portugal, using the test version of the “Questionnaire Attitudes to Evidence Based Practice” (McKenna, Ashton and Keeney, 2004. The results were considered in relation to those of international studies but taking into account national specificities. Overall, the barriers identified have various etiologies

  15. Does formal mentoring for faculty members matter? A survey of clinical faculty members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mylona, Elza; Brubaker, Linda; Williams, Valerie N; Novielli, Karen D; Lyness, Jeffrey M; Pollart, Susan M; Dandar, Valerie; Bunton, Sarah A

    2016-06-01

    Mentoring relationships, for all medical school faculty members, are an important component of lifelong development and education, yet an understanding of mentoring among medical school clinical faculty members is incomplete. This study examined associations between formal mentoring relationships and aspects of faculty members' engagement and satisfaction. It then explored the variability of these associations across subgroups of clinical faculty members to understand the status of mentoring and outcomes of mentoring relationships. The authors hypothesised that academic clinical faculty members currently in formal mentoring relationships experience enhanced employee engagement and satisfaction with their department and institution. Medical school faculty members at 26 self-selected USA institutions participated in the 2011-2014 Faculty Forward Engagement Survey. Responses from clinical faculty members were analysed for relationships between mentoring status and perceptions of engagement by faculty members. Of the 11 953 clinical faculty respondents, almost one-third reported having a formal mentoring relationship (30%; 3529). Most mentored faculty indicated the relationship was important (86%; n = 3027), and over three-fourths were satisfied with their mentoring experience (77%; n = 2722). Mentored faculty members across ranks reported significantly higher levels of satisfaction and more positive perceptions of their roles in the organisation. Faculty members who were not receiving mentoring reported significantly less satisfaction with their workplace environment and lower overall satisfaction. Mentored clinical faculty members have significantly greater satisfaction with their department and institution. This multi-institutional study provides evidence that fostering mentoring opportunities may facilitate faculty members' satisfaction and engagement, which, in turn, may help medical schools retain high-quality faculty staff committed to the multidimensional

  16. Defining a mismatch: differences in usage of social networking sites between medical students and the faculty who teach them.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brisson, Gregory E; Fisher, Matthew J; LaBelle, Mark W; Kozmic, Sarah E

    2015-01-01

    Use of social networking sites (SNS) by medical students is increasing, and some students lack awareness of pitfalls arising from the intersection of social networking and medicine. Many institutions have developed guidelines on using SNS, but they are insufficient for students. Educators need new methods to train students on the appropriate use of this technology, but more information is needed before implementing change. Differences in SNS usage between students and faculty were examined. The goal was to evaluate four content areas: SNS usage patterns, attitudes regarding activity on SNS, experience with patient interactions online, and awareness of institutional guidelines on use of SNS. A cross-sectional survey took place at Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, in 2012. Participants included all students and a cohort of faculty who teach them in a class on professionalism. The response rate was 42% by students (300/711) and 78% by faculty (31/40). Of the students, 94% use SNS, compared to 48% of faculty. Students were more likely than faculty to display content they would not want patients to see (57% vs. 27%), report seeing inappropriate content on colleagues' SNS profiles (64% vs. 42%), and ignore harmful postings by colleagues (25% vs. 7%). Faculty were more likely than students to have been approached by patients on SNS (53% vs. 3%). Most participants were unlikely to conduct Internet searches on patients. Students are more likely than faculty to use SNS and use it very differently than faculty. Students would benefit from training on appropriate use of SNS. Topics that should be addressed include editing one's online presence, managing friend requests from patients, dealing with colleagues who post harmful content, conducting Internet searches on patients, and discussion of boundaries to identify potential harms associated with SNS usage. Differences in usage between students and faculty raise questions if faculty are well suited to

  17. Are anonymous evaluations a better assessment of faculty teaching performance? A comparative analysis of open and anonymous evaluation processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afonso, Nelia M; Cardozo, Lavoisier J; Mascarenhas, Oswald A J; Aranha, Anil N F; Shah, Chirag

    2005-01-01

    We compared teaching performance of medical school faculty using anonymous evaluations and open evaluations (in which the evaluator was not anonymous) and examined barriers to open evaluation. Residents and medical students evaluated faculty using an open evaluation instrument in which their identity was indicated in the evaluation. Following this, they completed anonymous evaluation on the same faculty members. Aggregate outcomes using the two evaluation systems were compared. Outcomes by group of evaluators (residents and students) were analyzed. Trainees were also asked to rate the barriers to the open evaluation process. A statistically significant difference between the open and anonymous evaluations was noted across all items, with faculty receiving lower scores on the anonymous evaluations. The mean score for all the items on the open evaluations was 4.45 +/- 0.65, compared to mean score of 4.07 +/- 0.80 on the anonymous evaluations. There was also a statistically significant difference between open and anonymous evaluations in five clinical teaching domains that were evaluated individually. Residents perceived that the three most common barriers to optimal evaluation were an apprehension of possible encounters with the same attending physician in the future, destruction of working relationships with the attending, and a feeling of frustration with the evaluation system. The evaluation of faculty teaching performance is complex. Most academic medical centers use the open evaluation format. This study supports the case for the use of the anonymous evaluation method as a more accurate reflection of teaching performance.

  18. Mid-Career Faculty Development in Academic Medicine: How Does It Impact Faculty and Institutional Vitality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campion, MaryAnn W.; Bhasin, Robina M.; Beaudette, Donald J.; Shann, Mary H.; Benjamin, Emelia J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Faculty vitality is integral to the advancement of higher education. Strengthening vitality is particularly important for midcareer faculty, who represent the largest and most dissatisfied segment. The demands of academic medicine appear to be another factor that may put faculty at risk of attrition. To address these issues, we initiated…

  19. Faculty Rank System, Research Motivation, and Faculty Research Productivity: Measure Refinement and Theory Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tien, Flora F.; Blackburn, Robert T.

    1996-01-01

    A study explored the relationship between the traditional system of college faculty rank and faculty research productivity from the perspectives of behavioral reinforcement theory and selection function. Six hypotheses were generated and tested, using data from a 1989 national faculty survey. Results failed to support completely either the…

  20. Lodestar of the Faculty: The Increasingly Important Role of Dean of Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilian, Fred

    2012-01-01

    In the tight budget atmosphere of recent years, schools may have chosen to do without a dean of faculty or, at best, to double- hat another middle manager with this responsibility. This is a mistake. That all private schools do not have a dedicated dean of faculty suggests a lack of emphasis on the very component of the school--the faculty--that…

  1. The Experiences of Vietnamese University Faculty in Relation to Their Faculty Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phuong, Tam T.; McLean, Gary N.

    2016-01-01

    As Vietnam higher education has explored ways to integrate into the international community, professional development of faculty is becoming a key element. However, there is a significant shortage of faculty development (FD) in Vietnam, resulting in a large gap in quality, quantity, and qualifications between Vietnamese faculty and their…

  2. Research Resources Survey: Radiology Junior Faculty Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupinski, Elizabeth A; Votaw, John R

    2015-07-01

    To assess resources available to junior faculty in US academic radiology departments for research mentorship and funding opportunities and to determine if certain resources are more common in successful programs. An anonymous survey covering scientific environment and research mentorship and was sent to vice-chairs of research of radiology departments. Results were evaluated to identify practices of research programs with respect to mentorship, resources, and opportunities. Academy of Radiology Research's 2012 National Institutes of Health (NIH) grants and awards list was used to determine if environment and practices correlate with funding. There was a 51% response rate. A greater fraction of clinical faculty gets promoted from assistant to associate professor than research faculty. Research faculty overall submits more funding applications. Most programs support start-up costs and K-awards. Over half of the departments have a vice-chair for faculty development, and most have formal mentorship programs. Faculty members are expected to teach, engage in service, publish, and apply for and get research funding within 3 years of hire. Top-tier programs as judged by NIH awards have a combination of MDs who devote >50% effort to research and PhD faculty. Key factors holding back both clinical and research junior faculty development were motivation, resources, and time, although programs reported high availability of resources and support at the department level. Better marketing of resources for junior faculty, effort devoted to mentoring clinical faculty in research, and explicit milestones/expectations for achievement could enhance junior faculty success, promote interest in the clinician–scientist career path for radiologists, and lead to greater research success.

  3. Exploring Electronic Communication Modes Between Iraqi Faculty and Students of Pharmacy Schools Using the Technology Acceptance Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Jumaili, Ali Azeez; Al-Rekabi, Mohammed D; Alsawad, Oday S; Allela, Omer Q B; Carnahan, Ryan; Saaed, Hiwa; Naqishbandi, Alaadin; Kadhim, Dheyaa J; Sorofman, Bernard

    2017-06-01

    Objective. To explore for the first time the extent to which Iraqi pharmacy students and faculty use Facebook and university email for academic communications, and to examine factors influencing utilization within the framework of the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM). Methods. An electronic survey was administered to convenience samples of students and faculty of six Iraqi public schools and colleges of pharmacy in 2015. Results. Responses included 489 student and 128 faculty usable surveys. Both students and faculty use Facebook more than university email for academic communications. Less than a third of the faculty used university email. Students used Facebook for academic purposes twice as much as faculty. Conclusion. Absence of university email in Iraqi schools and colleges of pharmacy makes Facebook essential for faculty-student communications. The majority (71.1% to 82%) of respondents perceived that Facebook was easy to use. Three TAM variables (intention to use, attitude toward use and perceived usefulness) had significant positive associations with actual use of both Facebook messaging and university email.

  4. Influencing Academic Motivation: The Effects of Student-Faculty Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trolian, Teniell L.; Jach, Elizabeth A.; Hanson, Jana M.; Pascarella, Ernest T.

    2016-01-01

    Using data from the Wabash National Study of Liberal Arts Education, we examined the influence of student-faculty interactions on student academic motivation over 4 years of college. Results suggest that several forms of student-faculty interaction, such as quality of faculty contact, frequency of faculty contact, research with faculty, personal…

  5. Effects of a research-infused botanical curriculum on undergraduates' content knowledge, STEM competencies, and attitudes toward plant sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Jennifer Rhode; Clarke, H David; Horton, Jonathan L

    2014-01-01

    In response to the American Association for the Advancement of Science's Vision and Change in Undergraduate Biology Education initiative, we infused authentic, plant-based research into majors' courses at a public liberal arts university. Faculty members designed a financially sustainable pedagogical approach, utilizing vertically integrated curricular modules based on undergraduate researchers' field and laboratory projects. Our goals were to 1) teach botanical concepts, from cells to ecosystems; 2) strengthen competencies in statistical analysis and scientific writing; 3) pique plant science interest; and 4) allow all undergraduates to contribute to genuine research. Our series of inquiry-centered exercises mitigated potential faculty barriers to adopting research-rich curricula, facilitating teaching/research balance by gathering publishable scholarly data during laboratory class periods. Student competencies were assessed with pre- and postcourse quizzes and rubric-graded papers, and attitudes were evaluated with pre- and postcourse surveys. Our revised curriculum increased students' knowledge and awareness of plant science topics, improved scientific writing, enhanced statistical knowledge, and boosted interest in conducting research. More than 300 classroom students have participated in our program, and data generated from these modules' assessment allowed faculty and students to present 28 contributed talks or posters and publish three papers in 4 yr. Future steps include analyzing the effects of repeated module exposure on student learning and creating a regional consortium to increase our project's pedagogical impact. © 2014 J. R. Ward et al. CBE—Life Sciences Education © 2014 The American Society for Cell Biology. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). It is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http

  6. Faculty perspectives on rewards and incentives for community-engaged work: A multinational exploratory study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trang Vuong

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Universities around the world are grappling with the challenge of how to best recognise and support community-engaged teaching, research and scholarship. The status quo reveals two major problems: many faculty members express the sentiment that such work is often discounted, and there is a dearth of available information on faculty perspectives at non-US, especially non-Western, institutions. Understanding faculty needs and perceptions may help institutions improve reward systems and community research and engagement. Also, filling the information gap between the Global North and Global South may help policy-makers and educators make higher education more civically engaged and socially responsible. As a global coalition of universities moving beyond the ivory tower, the Talloires Network (TN is uniquely positioned to provide support for and conduct research on community-engaged work. To better understand engaged faculty attitudes about rewards and incentives, TN launched a pilot survey involving 14 institutions in 11 countries. All of these institutions are members of TN, an international association of 368 institutions in 77 countries committed to strengthening civic engagement. Thirty-eight respondents were chosen based on diverse recruiting requirements. This exploratory study highlights some common opinions about what kind of faculty work is encouraged; whether institutional policies regarding engaged work exist; and how community-engaged work is perceived by colleagues. More importantly, this study contributes to the design and administration of larger surveys on community-engaged work.

  7. An Investigation into Prospective Science Teachers' Attitudes towards Laboratory Course and Self-Efficacy Beliefs in Laboratory Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aka, Elvan Ince

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the current study is to identify the attitudes towards the laboratory course and self-efficacy beliefs in the laboratory use of prospective teachers who are attending Gazi University Gazi Education Faculty Primary Education Science Teaching program, and to investigate the relationship between the attitudes and self-efficacy beliefs.…

  8. Sexual discrimination in academia. Implications for dental hygiene faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuman, D; Tolle, S L

    1989-02-01

    Despite anti-discriminatory legislation, academic women in the 1980s have not achieved equality, and continue to face diverse problems advancing in an academic system based on a patriarchal paradigm. The purpose of this paper is to provide dental hygiene faculty with insight, awareness, and understanding into four major problem areas that influence women's academic success: values and attitudes learned through socialization; blocks to administrative positions; the male locus of decision making; and double standards of performance evaluation. Additionally, examples of solutions to these problems are discussed in three categories: individual, internal to the university, and external to the university; in an effort to better prepare women in dental hygiene education to succeed in academia despite discriminatory practices.

  9. Women faculty: an analysis of their experiences in academic medicine and their coping strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pololi, Linda H; Jones, Sandra J

    2010-10-01

    Women represent a persistently low proportion of faculty in senior and leadership roles in medical schools, despite an adequate pipeline. This article highlights women's concerns in the context of the academic medical culture in which they work, and considers the ways in which they cope with and resist marginalizing situations. To explore the experiences of faculty in academic medicine, a multidisciplinary faculty research team conducted 96 open-ended interviews with faculty representing a broad set of disciplines at 4 different career stages (early career, leaders, plateaued, and left academic medicine) in 5 medical schools. Coded data from interview transcripts indicated situations in which women were marginalized. Experiences of marginality were examined through a systematic secondary analysis of a subset of 17 representative cases using qualitative analysis. Women had a sense of "not belonging" in the organization, perceiving themselves as cultural outsiders and feeling isolated and invisible. They described barriers to advancement, including bias and gender role expectations. Faculty from underrepresented minority groups and PhDs perceived a double disadvantage. Four strategies were identified that helped women cope with and resist professional barriers: self-silencing, creating microenvironments, balancing life and work, and simultaneously holding dual identities--being successful in the organization while trying to change the culture. Although the sample size was small, this analysis found that many women faculty perceive themselves as outsiders within academic medicine. Because of their marginalization, minority and non-minority women are more able to see the bias and exclusion that may operate in academic medical centers as well as other problematic dimensions of the culture. As cultural outsiders, women may be better able to advance change to improve academic medical culture. A next step is to leverage women's awareness to develop a broader vision of what

  10. How to Evaluate a Faculty Governance Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordes, John W.; Dunbar, David; Gingerich, Jeff

    2013-01-01

    During the 2010-11 academic year, Cabrini College began an evaluation of a faculty governance structure that had been implemented in fall 2007. The processes involved might serve as a roadmap for faculty members and administrators at other institutions who seek to understand the strengths and weaknesses of their governance model and improve shared…

  11. Racial and Gender Differences in Faculty Careers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, Robert; And Others

    The overall study examined job satisfaction among tenured college faculty. This paper compares responses from minority (about 6%) and female (about 18%) faculty with the overall responses (N=1135). Overall, 91% reported being satisfied with their careers with 82% saying they would choose the career again. Race and gender were not related…

  12. The Madness of Weighted Mean Faculty Salaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micceri, Theodore

    2009-01-01

    Higher education frequently uses weighted mean faculty salaries to compare either across institutions, or to evaluate an institution's salary growth over time. Unfortunately, faculty salaries are an extraordinarily complex phenomenon that cannot be legitimately reduced to a single number any more than the academic construct of skills, knowledge,…

  13. Innovation of University Teaching Faculty Management Mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yuzheng; Wang, Boyu

    2015-01-01

    With the deepening of university reform in China, the traditional teaching faculty management mode has been exposed more and more defects. To make innovation of the university teaching faculty management mode becomes the voice of the times. Universities should conduct careful research on this issue in the development. Starting from the…

  14. Academic Faculty Governance and Recruitment Decisions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prüfer, J.; Walz, U.

    2009-01-01

    We analyze the implications of the governance structure in academic faculties for their recruitment decisions when competing for new researchers. The value to individual members through social interaction within the faculty depends on the average status of their fellow members. In recruitment

  15. Faculty Preparedness in Geriatric Optometry Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancil, Gary L.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    A survey of chief academic officers and faculty (n=27) in 16 schools of optometry found that, since 1986, there has been a 75% increase in institutions requiring coursework in geriatric optometry and an 83% increase in those offering continuing professional education in this field. However, 67% of faculty report no formal training. Three faculty…

  16. Faculty Satisfaction Questionnaire: Development, Validity, and Reliability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafin, Ana Gil

    This study sought to design and test a survey instrument which examined college faculty satisfaction with their roles of teaching, research, and service. A panel of experts reviewed the Spanish and English versions of the 39 item survey for quality of items and grammatical accuracy. Thirty randomly selected faculty members from a population of 234…

  17. Faculty Tort Liability for Libelous Student Publications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, George E.

    1976-01-01

    Examines recent court cases to determine whether a school administrator or faculty advisor may be legally responsible for defamation in a student publication. Concludes that the legal position of faculty members is unclear and recommends application of the U.S. Supreme Court's guidelines in Gertz v. Robert Welch, Inc. (JG)

  18. Academic faculty governance and recruitment decisions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prüfer, J.; Walz, U.

    2013-01-01

    We analyze the implications of the governance structure in academic faculties for their recruitment decisions when competing for new researchers. The value to individual members through social interaction within the faculty depends on the average status of their fellow members. In recruitment

  19. Who Are the Part-Time Faculty?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monks, James

    2009-01-01

    The use of contingent faculty in higher education in the United States has grown tremendously over the past three decades. In 1975, only 30.2 percent of faculty were employed part time; by 2005, according to data compiled by the American Association of University Professors (AAUP) from the Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS),…

  20. Factors Affecting Faculty Web Portal Usability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bringula, Rex P.; Basa, Roselle S.

    2011-01-01

    The study investigated the factors that might significantly affect web portal usability. Results of the study were intended to serve as inputs for faculty web portal development of the University of the East-Manila. Descriptive statistics utilized questionnaire data from 82 faculty members. The data showed that most of the respondents were…

  1. Online Faculty Development and Assessment System (OFDAS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villar, Luis M.; Alegre, Olga M.

    2006-01-01

    The rapid growth of online learning has led to the development of faculty inservice evaluation models focused on quality improvement of degree programs. Based on current "best practices" of student online assessment, the Online Faculty Development and Assessment System (OFDAS), created at the Canary Islands, was designed to serve the…

  2. Factors Predicting Faculty Commitment to the University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fjortoft, Nancy

    This paper examines the effect of faculty rank, satisfaction with salary, working conditions, institutional reputation, perceived influence on institutional policies, participation in meetings, and perceived governance on organizational commitment (at both the departmental and institutional level) using a representative sample of 4,925 faculty.…

  3. Study of Faculty and Information Technology, 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlstrom, Eden; Brooks, D. Christopher

    2014-01-01

    In this inaugural year of the faculty technology study, EDUCAUSE Center for Analysis and Research (ECAR) partnered with 151 college/university sites yielding responses from 17,451 faculty respondents across 13 countries. The findings are exploratory in nature, as they cover new ground to help us tell a more comprehensive story about technology…

  4. Faculty Development: An Imperative for the Nineties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nies, Joyce I.

    1990-01-01

    Budget constraints and changing enrollment patterns have expanded the concept of faculty development to include retraining. In home economics, retraining faculty for high demand areas such as hotel/restaurant management and fashion merchandising can be an efficient use of resources and an effective way to meet demand. (SK)

  5. Participative Leadership in Managing a Faculty Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwele, N. S.

    2008-01-01

    Contemporary discourse on the changed role of the Dean of an academic institution underscores the importance of aligning Faculty goals and objectives with the institution's vision and mission. This article focuses on the dean as an academic leader charged with the responsibility of shaping the character of the Faculty within a results-driven…

  6. Business Students' Ethical Evaluations of Faculty Misconduct

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentine, Sean; Kidwell, Roland E.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to gauge business school student perceptions of the academic conduct of college professors, to determine students' ethical evaluations of certain potential faculty behaviors. The relationships between perceived faculty misconduct and several student demographic characteristics including sex and academic classification were…

  7. Faculty ethics: ideal principles with practical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reybold, L Earle

    2009-01-01

    Ethics in higher education is the subject of intense public attention, with considerable focus on faculty roles and responsibilities. Media reports and scholarly research have documented egregious misconduct that includes plagiarism, falsification of data, illicit teacher-student relationships, and grading bias. These accounts of wrongdoing often portray faculty ethicality as only a legal issue of obeying rules and regulations, especially in the teaching and research roles. My discussion challenges this narrow perspective and argues that characterizations of faculty ethicality should take into account broader expectations for professionalism such as collegiality, respect, and freedom of inquiry. First, I review the general principles of faculty ethics developed by the American Association of University Professors, as well as professional codes of ethics in specific professional fields. Second, I juxtapose the experiences of women and minority faculty members in relation to these general codes of ethics. This section examines three issues that particularly affect women and minority faculty experiences of ethicality: "chilly and alienating" academic climates, "cultural taxation" of minority identity, and the snare of conventional reward systems. Third, I suggest practical strategies to reconcile faculty practice with codes of ethics. My challenge is to the faculty as a community of practice to engage professional ethics as social and political events, not just legal and moral failures.

  8. Motivational Issues of Faculty in Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul Cader, Akram

    2012-01-01

    Researchers have suggested that faculty motivation influences profitability of academic programs. The problem researched in this mixed method study was the motivational factors that reduce faculty member effectiveness in improving the profitability of their universities' academic programs. Based on Maslow's theory of needs, the purpose of the…

  9. Faculty Personality: A Factor of Student Retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Cassandra S.; Wu, Xiaodong; Irwin, Kathleen C.; Patrizi, L. A. Chad

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between student retention and faculty personality as it was hypothesized that faculty personality has an effect on student retention. The methodology adopted for this study was quantitative and in two parts 1) using linear regression models to examine the impact or causality of faculty…

  10. Faculty at Work: Focus on Teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackburn, Robert T.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    A study compared selected personal and environmental motivational variables in college faculty with allocation of work effort to teaching. Faculty represented the disciplines of English, chemistry, and psychology and various institution types. Self-valuation and perception of the environment motivators significantly accounted for the explained…

  11. What's Driving Faculty Participation in Distance Education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Ruth Gannon; Ley, Kathryn

    2004-01-01

    This paper reviews more than a decade of investigations undertaken to determine what motivates and what discourages faculty participation in distance education. The presenters describe the evidence that faculty extrinsic and intrinsic conditions both influence willingness to participate. The researchers compare the findings of this study with…

  12. Factors Associated with Veterinary Clinical Faculty Attrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furr, Martin

    Faculty attrition and recruitment for veterinary clinical faculty positions have been reported as significant problems in veterinary medical education. To investigate the factors that may be important in veterinary clinical faculty retention, the perceptions and views of veterinary clinical academic faculty were determined using a web-distributed electronic survey. Responses were dichotomized by whether the respondent had or had not left an academic position and were analyzed for their association with faculty attrition. A total of 1,226 responses were recorded, and results demonstrated that factors other than compensation were associated with veterinary clinical faculty attrition, including departmental culture, work-life balance, and recognition and support of clinical medicine by the administration. Forty-four percent of respondents who had held a faculty appointment reported leaving academia either voluntarily or for non-voluntary reasons such as failure to achieve tenure, retirement, or having their position closed. Attention to correcting deficiencies in workplace culture and professional rewards could be a beneficial means by which to decrease the faculty attrition rates currently observed in clinical academic veterinary medicine.

  13. College Presidents' Role Performance and Faculty Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paxton, Dan R.; Thomas, Darwin L.

    1977-01-01

    Data gathered from 896 faculty members from two technical colleges, three community colleges, two private universities, and three public universities revealed three dimensions of the presidential role: personal-public image, faculty and student interaction with presidents, and absence of autocratic leadership style. (Author/LBH)

  14. Issues Causing Stress among Business Faculty Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adrian, C. Mitchell; Cox, Susie S.; Phelps, Lonnie D.; Schuldt, Barbara A.; Totten, Jeff W.

    2014-01-01

    This study examines factors contributing to faculty stress. Factors including demographics, tenure, discipline, and teaching medium are all examined. Whereas once faculty members were inundated with learning new electronic technology (and the stress it created), many appear to have become somewhat comfortable with this change and have adapted to…

  15. A Call for Faculty Reengagement in Governance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinberg, Nalsey

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author, as a faculty member drawn into administrative service over the past decade, describes how economic and fiscal challenges have steadily eroded, if not entirely eliminated, the crucial tenets of shared faculty and institutional governance. She sees this development as an academic form of the "shock doctrine" eloquently…

  16. AACSB Standards and Accounting Faculty's Intellectual Contributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, B. Brian; Quddus, Munir

    2008-01-01

    The authors performed a content analysis of intellectual contribution portfolios of accounting faculty at various business schools that Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business International recently accredited. The results showed a significant divergence in faculty research (e.g., areas, topics) and their teaching assignments. This…

  17. Department Colleagues and Individual Faculty Publication Productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braxton, John M.

    1983-01-01

    A survey of male Ph.D.s in chemistry and psychology at selective liberal arts colleges showed the publication rate of department colleagues to be positively related to current publication productivity of the focal faculty member. Colleagues influenced research activity of faculty with low prior research levels, but not higher prior levels.…

  18. Enhancing Sustainability Curricula through Faculty Learning Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natkin, L. W.; Kolbe, Tammy

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Although the number of higher education institutions adopting sustainability-focused faculty learning communities (FLCs) has grown, very few of these programs have published evaluation research. This paper aims to report findings from an evaluation of the University of Vermont's (UVM's) sustainability faculty fellows (SFF) program. It…

  19. Attitudes of Health Professional Educators Toward the Use of Social Media as a Teaching Tool: Global Cross-Sectional Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henningham, Lucy; Zou, Runyu; Huang, Jessica; O'Sullivan, Elizabeth; Last, Jason; Ho, Kendall

    2017-01-01

    Background The use of social media in health education has witnessed a revolution within the past decade. Students have already adopted social media informally to share information and supplement their lecture-based learning. Although studies show comparable efficacy and improved engagement when social media is used as a teaching tool, broad-based adoption has been slow and the data on barriers to uptake have not been well documented. Objective The objective of this study was to assess attitudes of health educators toward social media use in education, examine differences between faculty members who do and do not use social media in teaching practice, and determine contributing factors for an increase in the uptake of social media. Methods A cross-sectional Web-based survey was disseminated to the faculty of health professional education departments at 8 global institutions. Respondents were categorized based on the frequency of social media use in teaching as “users” and “nonusers.” Users sometimes, often, or always used social media, whereas nonusers never or rarely used social media. Results A total of 270 health educators (52.9%, n=143 users and 47.0%, n=127 nonusers) were included in the survey. Users and nonusers demonstrated significant differences on perceived barriers and potential benefits to the use of social media. Users were more motivated by learner satisfaction and deterred by lack of technology compatibility, whereas nonusers reported the need for departmental and skill development support. Both shared concerns of professionalism and lack of evidence showing enhanced learning. Conclusions The majority of educators are open-minded to incorporating social media into their teaching practice. However, both users and nonusers have unique perceived challenges and needs, and engaging them to adapt social media into their educational practice will require previously unreported approaches. Identification of these differences and areas of overlap

  20. Cognitive dissonance experienced by nurse practitioner faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontenot, Holly B; Hawkins, Joellen W; Weiss, Josie A

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to explicate the concept of cognitive dissonance as experienced and reported by nurse practitioner (NP) faculty members. Responses from NP faculty members to an online survey about their experiences with cognitive dissonance. The respondents detailed their experiences with cognitive dissonance, citing differences between expectations for which they are rewarded and those for which they are paid. Expecting all faculty members to excel in practice, research, teaching, and service may create unrealistic workloads for NP faculty members. Examining expectations and considering creation of a clinical track for faculty who practice may be options administrators of NP programs might explore. ©2012 The Author(s) Journal compilation ©2012 American Academy of Nurse Practitioners.

  1. Planning for Internationalization By Investing in Faculty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa K. Childress

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Over the last half century, major world events have prompted higher education institutions to develop internationalization plans. In order engage faculty in internationalization, higher education scholars and practitioners have recommended that internationalization plans include allocated resources, such as budgets for academic exchanges, faculty development workshops, and international curricular development and research grants (Olson, Green, & Hill, 2006; Paige, 2005; Siaya & Hayward, 2003. Yet, a frequently cited obstacle to faculty engagement in internationalization plans is lack of funding (Backman, 1984; Bond, 2003; Ellingboe, 1998; Green & Olson, 2003; Steers & Ungsen, 1992; Woolston, 1983. A cross-case analysis reveals that differential investment leads to faculty engagement in internationalization plans. This article discusses how two institutions developed funds from a variety of sources and institutional levels to engage faculty in an institutional planning process. This study offers implications for institutional planning, resource dependency theory, and internationalization.

  2. Perceived barriers to online education by radiologic science educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalczyk, Nina K

    2014-01-01

    Radiologic science programs continue to adopt the use of blended online education in their curricula, with an increase in the use of online courses since 2009. However, perceived barriers to the use of online education formats persist in the radiologic science education community. An electronic survey was conducted to explore the current status of online education in the radiologic sciences and to identify barriers to providing online courses. A random sample of 373 educators from radiography, radiation therapy, and nuclear medicine technology educational programs accredited by the Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology and Joint Review Committee on Educational Programs in Nuclear Medicine Technology was chosen to participate in this study. A qualitative analysis of self-identified barriers to online teaching was conducted. Three common themes emerged: information technology (IT) training and support barriers, student-related barriers, and institutional barriers. Online education is not prevalent in the radiologic sciences, in part because of the need for the clinical application of radiologic science course content, but online course activity has increased substantially in radiologic science education, and blended or hybrid course designs can effectively provide opportunities for student-centered learning. Further development is needed to increase faculty IT self-efficacy and to educate faculty regarding pedagogical methods appropriate for online course delivery. To create an excellent online learning environment, educators must move beyond technology issues and focus on providing quality educational experiences for students.

  3. Dental Student and Faculty Perceptions of Uncivil Behavior by Faculty Members in Classroom and Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, Richard W; Hagan, Joseph L; Fournier, Suzanne E; Townsend, Janice A; Ballard, Mary B; Armbruster, Paul C

    2018-02-01

    Uncivil behavior by a faculty member or student can threaten a classroom environment and make it less conducive to learning. The aim of this study was to explore faculty behaviors that dental faculty and students perceive to be uncivil when exhibited in the classroom and clinic. In 2015, all faculty, administrators, and students at a single academic dental institution were invited to participate in an electronic survey that used a five-point Likert scale for respondents to indicate their agreement that 33 faculty behaviors were uncivil. Response rates were 49% for faculty and 59% for students. Significant differences were found between student and faculty responses on 22 of the 33 behavioral items. None of the three category composite scores differed significantly for students compared to faculty respondents. The category composite scores were not significantly associated with gender, ethnicity, or age for faculty or students. Overall, this study found significant differences between students and faculty about perceived uncivil faculty behaviors, though not for categories of behaviors.

  4. What motivates occasional faculty developers to lead faculty development workshops? A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, Patricia S; Irby, David M

    2015-11-01

    The demand for faculty development is ongoing, and many medical schools will need to expand their pool of faculty developers to include physicians and scientists whose primary expertise is not education. Insight into what motivates occasional faculty developers can guide recruitment and retention strategies. This study was designed to understand the motivations of faculty developers who occasionally (one to three times each year) lead faculty development workshops. Qualitative data were collected in March and April 2012 from interviews with faculty developers who occasionally taught workshops from 2007 to 2012 in the University of California, San Francisco, School of Medicine's faculty development program. The interviews were audiotaped and transcribed. The authors thematically analyzed the transcripts using a general inductive approach and developed codes sensitized by motivation theories. The authors interviewed 29/30 (97%) occasional faculty developers and identified five themes: mastery (desire to learn and develop professionally), relatedness (enjoyment of working with and learning from others), duty (sense of obligation to give back and be a good academic citizen), purpose (commitment to improving local teaching and ultimately patient care), and satisfaction (fun and enjoyment). Four of the themes the authors found are well addressed in motivation theory literature: mastery, relatedness, duty, and purpose. Whereas these four are motivators for occasional faculty developers, it is the fifth theme-satisfaction-that the authors feel is foundational and links the others together. Armed with this understanding, individuals leading faculty development programs can develop strategies to recruit and retain occasional faculty developers.

  5. Smart parking barrier

    KAUST Repository

    Alharbi, Abdulrazaq M.

    2016-05-06

    Various methods and systems are provided for smart parking barriers. In one example, among others, a smart parking barrier system includes a movable parking barrier located at one end of a parking space, a barrier drive configured to control positioning of the movable parking barrier, and a parking controller configured to initiate movement of the parking barrier, via the barrier drive. The movable parking barrier can be positioned between a first position that restricts access to the parking space and a second position that allows access to the parking space. The parking controller can initiate movement of the movable parking barrier in response to a positive identification of an individual allowed to use the parking space. The parking controller can identify the individual through, e.g., a RFID tag, a mobile device (e.g., a remote control, smartphone, tablet, etc.), an access card, biometric information, or other appropriate identifier.

  6. Students' benefits and barriers to mental health help-seeking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidourek, Rebecca A.; King, Keith A.; Nabors, Laura A.; Merianos, Ashley L.

    2014-01-01

    Stigma is recognized as a potential barrier to seeking help for a mental health disorder. The present study assessed college students' perceived benefits and barriers to obtaining mental health treatment and stigma-related attitudes via a four-page survey. A total of 682 students at one Midwestern university participated in the study. Findings indicated that females perceived a greater number of benefits to having participated in mental health services and held significantly lower stigma-related attitudes than did males. Students who had ever received mental health services reported significantly more barriers to treatment than did students who had never received services. Health professionals should target students with educational programs about positive outcomes related to receiving mental health services and work with treatment centers to reduce barriers for receiving services. PMID:25750831

  7. Research Productivity of Teaching Faculty Members in Nigerian Federal Universities: An Investigative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olatokunbo Christopher Okiki

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This study assessed the level of research productivity of teaching faculty members in Nigerian federal universities. The findings of the study show that the research productivity of the teaching faculty members in Nigerian federal universities is high in journal publications, technical reports, conference papers, working papers, and occasional papers. The research productivity is higher in Northeast (M=22.53; SD=25.73, and Southwest (M=21.74; SD=87.28, and North Central (M=20.69; SD=31.24 Nigeria. Also, the mean score of information resources availability (M=2.41; SD=0.90 indicates that information resources are readily available to teaching faculty members in Nigerian federal universities. The barriers to research productivity by teaching faculty members in the universities include low Internet bandwidth (M=3.793; SD=1.162 and financial constraint (M=3.543; SD=1.257. Besides, the study has shown the strengths and weaknesses of the teaching faculty members in Nigerian universities in terms of their research output.

  8. Academic dental public health diplomates: their distribution and recommendations concerning the predoctoral dental public health faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaste, L M; Sadler, Z E; Hayes, K L; Narendran, S; Niessen, L C; Weintraub, J A

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the representation of academically based diplomates of the American Board of Dental Public Health (ABDPH) and to identify their perceptions on the training of dental public health predoctoral faculty. Data were collected by a mailed, self-administered, 13-item questionnaire. The population was the 48 diplomates of the ABDPH as of March 1997 associated with academic institutions. Twenty of the 55 US dental schools had a diplomate of the ABDPH with a mean of 1.8 diplomates per school with a diplomate. An average of 4.5 full-time faculty members per school were associated with teaching dental public health. A master's degree in public health (MPH) was the most frequently suggested educational requirement for dental public health faculty. Continuing education courses were training needs perceived for dental public health faculty. The lack of time, money, and incentives, along with perceived rigidity of requirements for board certification, were reported as major barriers for faculty becoming dental public health board certified. Numerous challenges confront the development of a strong dental public health presence in US dental schools. These challenges include, among others, insufficient numbers of academic dental public health specialists and insufficient motivations to encourage promising candidates to pursue specialty status.

  9. Students' benefits and barriers to mental health help-seeking

    OpenAIRE

    Vidourek, Rebecca A.; King, Keith A.; Nabors, Laura A.; Merianos, Ashley L.

    2014-01-01

    Stigma is recognized as a potential barrier to seeking help for a mental health disorder. The present study assessed college students' perceived benefits and barriers to obtaining mental health treatment and stigma-related attitudes via a four-page survey. A total of 682 students at one Midwestern university participated in the study. Findings indicated that females perceived a greater number of benefits to having participated in mental health services and held significantly lower stigma-rela...

  10. Baccalaureate Minority Nursing Students Perceived Barriers and Facilitators to Clinical Education Practices: An Integrative Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Crystal L; Phillips, Shannon M; Newman, Susan D; Atz, Teresa W

    2016-01-01

    This integrative review synthesized baccalaureate minority nursing students' perceptions of their clinical experiences. The diversity of the nursing workforce does not mirror the United States population. Attrition rates of minority nursing students remain higher than rates for White students. Literature examining facilitators and barriers to minority student success predominantly focuses on academic factors, excluding those relevant to clinical education. An integrative review using literature from nursing and education. Three common perceived barriers were identified: discrimination from faculty, peers, nursing staff, and patients; bias in faculty grading practices; and isolation. Although little is known about the relationship between clinical failures and overall attrition, this review provides evidence that minority students encounter significant barriers in clinical education. To increase the diversity of the nursing workforce, faculty must address these issues and make modifications to ensure an equal opportunity at a quality education for all students.

  11. How faculty learn about and implement research-based instructional strategies: The case of Peer Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dancy, Melissa; Henderson, Charles; Turpen, Chandra

    2016-06-01

    [This paper is part of the Focused Collection on Preparing and Supporting University Physics Educators.] The lack of knowledge about how to effectively spread and sustain the use of research-based instructional strategies is currently a significant barrier to the improvement of undergraduate physics education. In this paper we address this lack of knowledge by reporting on an interview study of 35 physics faculty, of varying institution types, who were self-reported users of, former users of, or knowledgeable nonusers of the research-based instructional strategy Peer Instruction. Interview questions included in this analysis focused on the faculty's experiences, knowledge, and use of Peer Instruction, along with general questions about current and past teaching methods used by the interviewee. The primary findings include the following: (i) Faculty self-reported user status is an unreliable measure of their actual practice. (ii) Faculty generally modify specific instructional strategies and may modify out essential components. (iii) Faculty are often unaware of the essential features of an instructional strategy they claim to know about or use. (iv) Informal social interactions provide a significant communication channel in the dissemination process, in contrast to the formal avenues of workshops, papers, websites, etc., often promoted by change agents, and (v) experience with research-based strategies as a graduate student or through curriculum development work may be highly impactful. These findings indicate that educational transformation can be better facilitated by improving communication with faculty, supporting effective modification by faculty during implementation, and acknowledging and understanding the large impact of informal social interactions as a mode of dissemination.

  12. Faculty and second-year medical student perceptions of active learning in an integrated curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Alexander; Harris, David M

    2016-12-01

    Patients expect physicians to be lifelong learners who are able to interpret and evaluate diagnostic tests, and most medical schools list the development of lifelong learning in their program objectives. However, lecture is the most often utilized form of teaching in the first two years and is considered passive learning. The current generation of medical students has many characteristics that should support active learning pedagogies. The purpose of this study was to analyze student and faculty perceptions of active learning in an integrated medical curriculum at the second-year mark, where students have been exposed to multiple educational pedagogies. The first hypothesis of the study was that faculty would favor active learning methods. The second hypothesis was that Millennial medical students would favor active learning due to their characteristics. Primary faculty for years 1 and 2 and second-year medical students were recruited for an e-mail survey consisting of 12 questions about active learning and lecture. Students perceived that lecture and passive pedagogies were more effective for learning, whereas faculty felt active and collaborative learning was more effective. Students believed that more content should be covered by lecture than faculty. There were also significant differences in perceptions of what makes a good teacher. Students and faculty both felt that lack of time in the curriculum and preparation time were barriers for faculty. The data suggest that students are not familiar with the process of learning and that more time may be needed to help students develop lifelong learning skills. Copyright © 2016 The American Physiological Society.

  13. How faculty members experience workplace-based assessment rater training: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogan, Jennifer R; Conforti, Lisa N; Bernabeo, Elizabeth; Iobst, William; Holmboe, Eric

    2015-07-01

    Direct observation of clinical skills is a common approach in workplace-based assessment (WBA). Despite widespread use of the mini-clinical evaluation exercise (mini-CEX), faculty development efforts are typically required to improve assessment quality. Little consensus exists regarding the most effective training methods, and few studies explore faculty members' reactions to rater training. This study was conducted to qualitatively explore the experiences of faculty staff with two rater training approaches - performance dimension training (PDT) and a modified approach to frame of reference training (FoRT) - to elucidate how such faculty development can be optimally designed. In a qualitative study of a multifaceted intervention using complex intervention principles, 45 out-patient resident faculty preceptors from 26 US internal medicine residency programmes participated in a rater training faculty development programme. All participants were interviewed individually and in focus groups during and after the programme to elicit how the training influenced their approach to assessment. A constructivist grounded theory approach was used to analyse the data. Many participants perceived that rater training positively influenced their approach to direct observation and feedback, their ability to use entrustment as the standard for assessment, and their own clinical skills. However, barriers to implementation and change included: (i) a preference for holistic assessment over frameworks; (ii) challenges in defining competence; (iii) difficulty in changing one's approach to assessment, and (iv) concerns about institutional culture and buy-in. Rater training using PDT and a modified approach to FoRT can provide faculty staff with assessment skills that are congruent with principles of criterion-referenced assessment and entrustment, and foundational principles of competency-based education, while providing them with opportunities to reflect on their own clinical skills

  14. Faculty workload and collegial support related to proportion of part-time faculty composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, D A

    1995-10-01

    Part-time faculty use has become more prevalent in higher education in response to enrollment shifts and budgetary constraints. This descriptive, exploratory study used a mailed survey to investigate whether full-time nursing faculty perceptions of workload and collegial support differ with changes in the proportion of part-time faculty in Comprehensive I baccalaureate nursing programs. Workload was measured by Dick's Workload Instrument. Collegial support was measured by the Survey of Collegial Communication, adapted by Beyer, which was based on Likert's organizational model. Schools were partitioned into three strata based on the proportion of part-time faculty employed (low, medium, and high). A 30% sample of schools were randomly selected from each stratum (10 schools from each). Within each selected school, six full-time undergraduate faculty were chosen by their respective deans to participate. The total response rate was 89.4%. The results of this study did not support assertions about part-time faculty use in the literature and existing accreditation standards. Findings indicated that there were significant differences in reported total faculty workload when varying proportions of part-time faculty are employed. Faculty in nursing programs with medium proportions of part-time faculty reported higher average total workloads per week than faculty in programs with low and high proportions of part-timers. Another finding demonstrated that full-time faculty in nursing programs with high proportions of part-time faculty spend fewer hours in direct clinical supervision of their students when compared with faculty in the other two strata. There were, however, no differences in perceived collegial support among full-time faculty participants. It was recommended that further research be conducted to investigate specific workload differences found in this study using more precise quantitative measures. Communication and collegiality between part-time and full

  15. Concerns and professional development needs of science faculty at Taibah University in adopting blended learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sarrani, Nauaf

    two revealed that there was a statistically significant difference between science faculty's use of technology in teaching by department and their attitudes towards technology integration in the Science curriculum. Lambda MANOVA test result was sig =.019 at the alpha = .05 level. Follow up ANOVA result indicated that Chemistry department was significant in the use of computer-based technology (sig =.049) and instructional technology use (sig =.041). Therefore, null hypothesis 2.1 was rejected (There are no statistically significant differences between science faculty's attitudes towards technology integration in the Science curriculum and faculty's use of technology in teaching by department). The data also revealed that there was no statistically significant difference (ptechnology in teaching by department and their instructional technology use on pedagogy. Therefore, null hypothesis 2.2 was accepted (There are no statistically significant differences between science faculty's perceptions of the effects of faculty IT use on pedagogy and faculty's use of technology in teaching by department). The data also revealed that there was a statistically significant difference between science faculty's use of technology in teaching by department and their professional development needs in adopting BL. Lambda MANOVA test result was .007 at the alpha = .05 level. The follow up ANOVA results showed that the value of significance of Science faculty's professional development needs for adopting BL was smaller than .05 in the Chemistry department with sig =.001 in instructional technology use. Therefore, null hypothesis 2.3 was rejected (There are no statistically significant differences between Science faculty's perceptions of technology professional development needs and faculty's use of technology in teaching by department). Qualitative measures included analyzing data based on answers to three open-ended questions, numbers thirty-six, seventy-four, and seventy-five. These three

  16. Barrier cell sheath formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kesner, J.

    1980-04-01

    The solution for electrostatic potential within a simply modeled tandem mirror thermal barrier is seen to exhibit a sheath at each edge of the cell. The formation of the sheath requires ion collisionality and the analysis assmes that the collisional trapping rate into the barrier is considerably slower than the barrier pump rate

  17. Enablers of and barriers to abortion training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiahi, Maryam; Lim, Sahnah; Westover, Corey; Gold, Marji; Westhoff, Carolyn L

    2013-06-01

    Since the legalization of abortion services in the United States, provision of abortions has remained a controversial issue of high political interest. Routine abortion training is not offered at all obstetrics and gynecology (Ob-Gyn) training programs, despite a specific training requirement by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. Previous studies that described Ob-Gyn programs with routine abortion training either examined associations by using national surveys of program directors or described the experience of a single program. We set out to identify enablers of and barriers to Ob-Gyn abortion training in the context of a New York City political initiative, in order to better understand how to improve abortion training at other sites. We conducted in-depth qualitative interviews with 22 stakeholders from 7 New York City public hospitals and focus group interviews with 62 current residents at 6 sites. Enablers of abortion training included program location, high-capacity services, faculty commitment to abortion training, external programmatic support, and resident interest. Barriers to abortion training included lack of leadership continuity, leadership conflict, lack of second-trimester abortion services, difficulty obtaining mifepristone, optional rather than routine training, and antiabortion values of hospital personnel. Supportive leadership, faculty commitment, and external programmatic support appear to be key elements for establishing routine abortion training at Ob-Gyn residency training programs.

  18. Attitude of Management Students towards Whistleblowing: Evidence from Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Bogdanovic

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the attitude of management students towards whistleblowing in a sample of 121 master students of business ethics at the Faculty of Economics University in Split, Croatia. The three measurement instruments include whistleblowers´ attitudes (3 items, whistleblowing attitudes (2 items and potential types of whistleblowing reactions (8 items, i.e. external reactions (4 items and internal reactions (4 items. The results of the study indicated a positive attitude toward whistleblowing and whistleblowers. The authors also found that female students exhibited more confidence in management and were more prone to whistleblowing than male students. Also, students with professional experience considered whistleblowing to be in the public interest more than students with no professional experience. The results may be of practical use to managers who can benefit from whistleblowing while keeping in mind that whistleblowing can't be avoided and that punishing whistleblowers seems to be a bad managerial practice.

  19. Turkish nursing students' attitudes towards voluntary induced abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanikkerem, Emre; Üstgörül, Sema; Karakus, Asli; Baydar, Ozge; Esmeray, Nicole; Ertem, Gül

    2018-03-01

    To evaluate Turkish nursing students' attitudes towards voluntary induced abortion.. This cross-sectional study was conducted between January and June 2015, comprising students of Ege University Nursing Faculty and Celal Bayar University School of Health, located in two different cities of Turkey. Data was collected with a three-part questionnaire, focussing on students' characteristics, the knowledge of abortion law in Turkey and attitudes towards voluntary induced abortion. SPSS 15 was used for data analysis.. The mean score of students' attitude towards voluntary induced abortion was 39.8±7.9 which shows that nursing students moderately support abortion. Female students, students coming from upper class in society, and students who had higher family income and sexual experiences had more supportiveness attitudes towards voluntary induced abortion (pabortion.

  20. Barriers to fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berriman, A.C.; Butt, R.D.; Dasgupta, M.; Hinde, D.J.; Morton, C.R.; Newton, J.O.

    1999-01-01

    The fusion barrier is formed by the combination of the repulsive Coulomb and attractive nuclear forces. Recent research at the Australian National University has shown that when heavy nuclei collide, instead of a single fusion barrier, there is a set of fusion barriers. These arise due to intrinsic properties of the interacting nuclei such deformation, rotations and vibrations. Thus the range of barrier energies depends on the properties of both nuclei. The transfer of matter between nuclei, forming a neck, can also affect the fusion process. High precision data have been used to determine fusion barrier distributions for many nuclear reactions, leading to new insights into the fusion process