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Sample records for faculty attitude barriers

  1. Faculty attitudes about interprofessional education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary L. Beck Dallaghan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Interprofessional education (IPE is an important component to training health care professionals. Research is limited in exploring the attitudes that faculty hold regarding IPE and what barriers they perceive to participating in IPE. The purpose of this study was to identify faculty attitudes about IPE and to identify barriers to participating in campus-wide IPE activities. Methods: A locally used questionnaire called the Nebraska Interprofessional Education Attitudes Scale (NIPEAS was used to assess attitudes related to interprofessional collaboration. Questions regarding perceived barriers were included at the end of the questionnaire. Descriptive and non-parametric statistics were used to analyze the results in aggregate as well as by college. In addition, open-ended questions were analyzed using an immersion/crystallization framework to identify themes. Results: The results showed that faculty had positive attitudes of IPE, indicating that is not a barrier to participating in IPE activities. Most common barriers to participation were scheduling conflicts (x24,285=19.17, p=0.001, lack of department support (4,285=10.09, p=0.039, and lack of awareness of events (x24,285=26.38, p=0.000. Narrative comments corroborated that scheduling conflicts are an issue because of other priorities. Those who commented also added to the list of barriers, including relevance of the activities, location, and prior negative experiences. Discussion: With faculty attitudes being positive, the exploration of faculty's perceived barriers to IPE was considered even more important. Identifying these barriers will allow us to modify our IPE activities from large, campus-wide events to smaller activities that are longitudinal in nature, embedded within current curriculum and involving more authentic experiences.

  2. Attitudes of Female Faculty toward the Use of Computer Technologies and the Barriers that Limit Their Use of Technologies in Girls' Colleges in Saudi Arabia

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    Almuqayteeb, Taghreed Abdulaziz

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine female faculty members' use of computer technologies, their attitudes toward computers, the factors that best predict their attitudes toward computers, and the barriers that limit their use of computer technologies in girls' colleges in Dammam and Jubail, Saudi Arabia. Also, this study examined how female…

  3. Attitudes on Barriers and Benefits of Distance Education among Mississippi Delta Allied Health Community College Faculty, Staff, and Students

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    Mayfield-Johnson, Susan; Mohn, Richard S.; Mitra, Amal K.; Young, Rebekah; McCullers, Elizabeth M.

    2014-01-01

    Online distance education creates increased opportunities for continuing education and advanced training for allied health professionals living in underserved and geographically isolated areas. The purpose of this article was to explore attitudes on barriers and benefits of distance education technology among underrepresented minority allied…

  4. Faculty Attitudes about Distance Education

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    Smidt, Esther; McDyre, Brian; Bunk, Jennifer; Li, Rui; Gatenby, Tanya

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a dramatic increase in distance learning in higher education. Given this, it is extremely important to understand faculty attitudes about distance education, not only because they can vary widely, but also because it is the faculty, through their design and implementation of online courses, that will shape the…

  5. Faculty and Student Attitudes about Transfer of Learning

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    Robin Lightner

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Transfer of learning is using previous knowledge in novel contexts. While this is a basic assumption of the educational process, students may not always perceive all the options for using what they have learned in different, novel situations. Within the framework of transfer of learning, this study outlines an attitudinal survey concerning faculty and student attitudes about transfer of learning. Faculty and students completed a measure of expectations for transfer and potential barriers to transfer. The survey clarifies unique and common beliefs about transfer in order to promote learning beyond a single course. The results show a clear need for faculty to be explicit about their expectations for transfer.

  6. Faculty Attitudes and Behaviors towards Student Veterans

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    Gonzalez, Carlene A.; Elliott, Marta

    2016-01-01

    According to the U.S. Department of Education (2013), approximately 11% of undergraduate students reported having a disability in the 2007-2008 academic year. Of these students, veterans reported having disabilities more than their non-veteran counterparts (5% vs. 3%). This study investigates faculty members' attitudes and behaviors toward student…

  7. A national study on the attitudes of Irish dental faculty members to faculty development.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Sullivan, E M

    2010-02-01

    International studies suggest that dental faculty are resistant to the concept and practice of faculty development. This paper analyses the demographic and educational profile of Irish Dental Faculty, exploring their attitudes to educational initiatives.

  8. Faculty Attitudes toward Male Revenue and Nonrevenue Student-Athletes.

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    Engstrom, Cathy McHugh; And Others

    1995-01-01

    This study of attitudes of a random sample of faculty at a major, public, research university in the East indicated that faculty perceived male revenue and nonrevenue athletes negatively in situations dealing with athletic competence, special services, and recognition. (JPS)

  9. Health science center faculty attitudes towards interprofessional education and teamwork.

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    Gary, Jodie C; Gosselin, Kevin; Bentley, Regina

    2017-10-12

    The attitudes of faculty towards interprofessional education (IPE) and teamwork impact the education of health professions education (HPE) students. This paper reports on a study evaluating attitudes from health professions educators towards IPE and teamwork at one academic health science center (HSC) where modest IPE initiatives have commenced. Drawing from the results of a previous investigation, this study was conducted to examine current attitudes of the faculty responsible for the training of future healthcare professionals. Survey data were collected to evaluate attitudes from HSC faculty, dentistry, nursing, medicine, pharmacy and public health. In general, positive HSC faculty attitudes towards interprofessional learning, education, and teamwork were significantly predicted by those affiliated with the component of nursing. Faculty development aimed at changing attitudes and increasing understanding of IPE and teamwork are critical. Results of this study serve as an underpinning to leverage strengths and evaluate weakness in initiating IPE.

  10. Engineering Faculty Attitudes to General Chemistry Courses in Engineering Curricula

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    Garip, Mehmet; Erdil, Erzat; Bilsel, Ayhan

    2006-01-01

    A survey on the attitudes of engineering faculty to chemistry, physics, and mathematics was conducted with the aim of clarifying the attitudes of engineering faculty to chemistry courses in relation to engineering education or curricula and assessing their expectations. The results confirm that on the whole chemistry is perceived as having a…

  11. Attitudes of Dental Faculty toward Individuals with AIDS.

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    Cohen, Leonard A.; Grace, Edward G., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    A survey of one dental school's faculty concerning attitudes toward homosexual or heterosexual patients with either Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) or leukemia found significant negative biases both toward individuals with AIDS and toward homosexuals. (MSE)

  12. Faculty Attitudes toward Teaching Adults with Learning Disabilities

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    Reynolds, Sharon; Hitchcock, John

    2014-01-01

    The attitudes of adult basic education faculty members toward teaching adults with learning disabilities are likely to influence the success of their students; however, there are no existing survey instruments that measure this construct or the practical knowledge faculty members should have to effectively serve the population. A new survey…

  13. The Relationship Between Student and Faculty Attitudes Toward Technology

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    Donnell, Virginia

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine student and faculty attitudes toward computer technology in advanced arts classes at a southeastern university in the United States. This one semester study was focused on the traditional arts disciplines of art, dance, music, and theatre. This correlational analysis limited to faculty members and students…

  14. Faculty Attitudes Toward Regulating Speech on College Campuses.

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    Dey, Eric L.; Hurtado, Sylvia

    1996-01-01

    This study used data from a 1992-93 national survey of college teaching faculty (n=29,771) to examine attitudes toward institutional attempts to regulate racist and sexist on-campus speech. Most faculty supported prohibition of hate speech but were less likely to support administrators' right to ban extreme speakers. Unanticipated patterns were…

  15. Faculty and medical student attitudes about preclinical classroom attendance.

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    Zazulia, Allyson R; Goldhoff, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Technological advances have diminished reliance on classroom attendance for mastering preclinical medical school course content, but nonattendance may have unintended consequence on the learning environment. Perceptions among educators and students regarding the value of attendance and implications of nonattendance have not been systematically studied. The purpose of this study was to investigate differences in medical student and faculty attitudes regarding preclinical classroom attendance and the impact of nonattendance on educators and the learning environment. Using Internet-based surveys, we assessed attitudes about preclinical classroom attendance among medical students and teaching faculty at Washington University School of Medicine. Our primary hypothesis was that students would be less likely than faculty to place societal value on attendance and relate it to professionalism. A total of 382 (79%) of 484 eligible students and 248 (64%) of 387 eligible faculty completed the survey. Both groups recognized a negative impact of poor attendance on faculty enthusiasm for teaching (students 83%, faculty 75%), but faculty were significantly more likely to endorse a negative impact on effectiveness of lectures (75% vs. 42%, pattendance and professionalism (88% vs. 68%, plecture videos an adequate substitute for attendance (70% vs. 15%, pimportant functions in the professional socialization process. In this single-center cohort, medical student and teaching faculty attitudes differed regarding the importance of classroom attendance and its relationship to professionalism, findings that were at least partially explained by differing expectations of the purpose of the preclinical classroom experience.

  16. Community College Faculty: Attitudes toward Guns on Campus

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    Dahl, Patricia P.; Bonham, Gene, Jr.; Reddington, Frances P.

    2016-01-01

    This exploratory research surveyed faculty who instruct in community colleges from 18 states about their attitudes toward the concealed carry gun policies that allow appropriately licensed citizens to carry a handgun in public places such as college campuses. Building upon previous research involving 4-year institutions, we surveyed 1,889…

  17. Experiential Learning Practices in Higher Education: Influences on Faculty Attitudes

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    Smith, Lisa R.

    2013-01-01

    Although an association between high-impact experiential learning (HIEL) practices and university students' attainment of employability skills has been documented, factors related to implementation of HIEL practices such as faculty stages of concern, barriers faced, and resources needed from the institution to enhance implementation of HIEL…

  18. Experiential Learning Practices in Higher Education: Influences on Faculty Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Lisa R.

    2013-01-01

    Although an association between high-impact experiential learning (HIEL) practices and university students' attainment of employability skills has been documented, factors related to implementation of HIEL practices such as faculty stages of concern, barriers faced, and resources needed from the institution to enhance implementation of HIEL…

  19. Attitude toward Plagiarism among Iranian Medical Faculty Members

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    Seyed Hassan Emami-Razavi

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study was to assess attitude towards plagiarism in faculty members of Medical School at Tehran University of Medical Sciences. One hundred and twenty medical faculty members ofTehran University of Medical Sciences were enrolled in this cross-sectional study. They were asked to answer to valid and reliable Persian version of attitude towards plagiarism questionnaire. Attitude toward plagiarism, positive attitude toward self-plagiarism and plagiarism acceptance were assessed. Eighty seven filled-up questionnaires were collected. Mean total number of correct answers was 11.6 ± 3.1. Mean number of correct answers to questions evaluating self-plagiarism was 1.7 ± 0.4 and mean number of correct answers to questions evaluating plagiarism acceptance was 1.4 ± 0.2. There was no significant correlation between plagiarism acceptance and self-plagiarism (r=0.17, P=0.1. It is essential to provide materials (such as workshops, leaflets and mandatory courses to make Iranian medical faculty members familiar with medicalresearch ethics issues such as plagiarism.

  20. Attitude toward plagiarism among Iranian medical faculty members.

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    Ghajarzadeh, Mahsa; Norouzi-Javidan, Abbas; Hassanpour, Kiana; Aramesh, Kiarash; Emami-Razavi, Seyed Hassan

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this study was to assess attitude towards plagiarism in faculty members of Medical School at Tehran University of Medical Sciences. One hundred and twenty medical faculty members of Tehran University of Medical Sciences were enrolled in this cross-sectional study. They were asked to answer to valid and reliable Persian version of attitude towards plagiarism questionnaire. Attitude toward plagiarism, positive attitude toward self-plagiarism and plagiarism acceptance were assessed. Eighty seven filled-up questionnaires were collected. Mean total number of correct answers was 11.6±3.1. Mean number of correct answers to questions evaluating self-plagiarism was 1.7±0.4 and mean number of correct answers to questions evaluating plagiarism acceptance was 1.4±0.2. There was no significant correlation between plagiarism acceptance and self-plagiarism (r=0.17, P=0.1). It is essential to provide materials (such as workshops, leaflets and mandatory courses) to make Iranian medical faculty members familiar with medical research ethics issues such as plagiarism.

  1. Attitudes of Medical School Faculty toward Gifts from the Pharmaceutical Industry.

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    Banks, James W., III; Mainous, Arch G., III

    1992-01-01

    A survey of 248 University of Kentucky medical school faculty investigated attitudes toward American Medical Association policy concerning gifts from the pharmaceutical industry. Faculty generally agreed with the guidelines but felt gifts did not influence prescribing behaviors. PhD faculty favored more prescriptive policy than did MD faculty.…

  2. Attitudes of Medical School Faculty toward Gifts from the Pharmaceutical Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, James W., III; Mainous, Arch G., III

    1992-01-01

    A survey of 248 University of Kentucky medical school faculty investigated attitudes toward American Medical Association policy concerning gifts from the pharmaceutical industry. Faculty generally agreed with the guidelines but felt gifts did not influence prescribing behaviors. PhD faculty favored more prescriptive policy than did MD faculty.…

  3. Faculty Attitudes towards Computer Assisted Instruction at the University of Gaziantep

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    Filiz Yalçın TILFARLIOĞLU

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available This study aims at revealing faculty attitudes towards computer assistedinstruction at University of Gaziantep, Turkey in a multifaceted way. Additionally, ittries to determine underlying factors that shape these attitudes. After a pilot study, thequestionnaire was applied to a sample population of 145 faculty that were chosenrandomly. The results revealed that faculty attitudes towards computer assistedinsruction are positive. Age, sex, teaching experience, level of proficiency in Englishand computer usage skills have no or little effects over these attitudes.According to theresults of the study, faculty who have prior knowledge on computers expose ratherpositive attitudes towards computers in education.Another important outcome of thestudy is the existence of a gender gap in terms of computer assisted instruction.Althoughthere seems to be no difference between male and female faculty concerning theirbackground education regarding computers, male faculty feel confident about thematter, whereas female faculty feel uncomfortable about using computers in theirlessons.

  4. Primary care resident, faculty, and patient views of barriers to cultural competence, and the skills needed to overcome them.

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    Shapiro, Johanna; Hollingshead, Judy; Morrison, Elizabeth H

    2002-08-01

    Primary care residencies are expected to provide training in cultural competence. However, we have insufficient information about the perceptions of stakeholders actually involved in healthcare (i.e. residents, faculty and patients) regarding commonly encountered cross-cultural barriers and the skills required to overcome them. This study used a total of 10 focus groups to explore resident, faculty and patient attitudes and beliefs about what culturally competent doctor-patient communication means, what obstacles impede or prevent culturally competent communication, and what kinds of skills are helpful in achieving cultural competence. A content analysis was performed to identify major themes. Residents and faculty defined culturally competent communication in terms of both generic and culture-specific elements, however, patients tended to emphasize only generic attitudes and skills. Residents and patients were liable to blame each other in explaining barriers; faculty were more likely to consider systemic influences contributing to resident-patient difficulties. All groups emphasized appropriate skill and attitude development in learners as the key to successful communication. However, residents were sceptical of sensitivity and communication skills training, and worried that didactic presentations would result in cultural stereotyping. All stakeholders recognized the importance of effective doctor-patient communication. Of concern was the tendency of various stakeholders to engage in person-blame models.

  5. Attitudes towards students who plagiarize: a dental hygiene faculty perspective.

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    Patel-Bhakta, Hemali G; Muzzin, Kathleen B; Dewald, Janice P; Campbell, Patricia R; Buschang, Peter H

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine baccalaureate dental hygiene faculty members' attitudes and practices regarding student plagiarism. An email containing a link to a thirty-two-item survey was sent to fifty-two baccalaureate dental hygiene program directors in the United States; thirty of those agreed for their faculty members to participate. Of the 257 faculty members who received the survey link, 106 completed the survey, for a response rate of 41.2 percent. The responding faculty members reported thinking plagiarism is a rising concern in their dental hygiene programs (54.5 percent, 54/99). The majority said they check for plagiarism on student class assignment/projects (67.1 percent, 53/79). For those who did not check for plagiarism, 45.8 percent (11/24) stated it took "too much time to check" or it was "too hard to prove" (16.6 percent, 4/24). The most frequent form of student plagiarism observed by the respondents was "copying directly from a source electronically" (78.0 percent, 39/50). Most respondents reported checking for plagiarism through visual inspection (without technological assistance) (73.0 percent, 38/52). Of those who said they use plagiarism detection software/services, 44.4 percent (16/36) always recommended their students use plagiarism detection software/services to detect unintentional plagiarism. For those faculty members who caught students plagiarizing, 52.9 percent (27/51) reported they "always or often" handled the incident within their dental hygiene department, and 76.5 percent (39/51) said they had never reported the student's violation to an academic review board.

  6. Concept-Based Curriculum: Changing Attitudes and Overcoming Barriers.

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    Hendricks, Susan M; Wangerin, Virginia

    Many nursing educators have considered the implementation of a concept-based curriculum, with active, conceptual teaching and learning strategies, which offers a way to respond to the overwhelming content saturation in many nursing curricula. However, barriers abound, including faculty concerns about loss of control, changing faculty role and identity, and fear of failure. This article clarifies these legitimate barriers and offers practical strategies for success in curriculum change.

  7. Current Approaches and Perceived Barriers to Scholarship in Women Pharmacy Faculty.

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    Roche, Victoria F.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    A survey of 105 women pharmacy faculty gathered information on workload elements and priorities, motivations for engaging in research activity, and common avenues for and barriers to scholarship. Suggestions for teachers in overcoming barriers and for administrators in promoting faculty scholarly productivity are offered. (Author/MSE)

  8. Self-Expression, Social Roles, and Faculty Members' Attitudes towards Online Teaching

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    Glass, Chris R.

    2017-01-01

    There is a widening gap between administrators' and faculty members' attitudes towards online education. This post-positivist grounded theory study explored features of the experiences that shaped sixteen faculty members' attitudes towards online education. Two features are identified: (a) they strived to express subject matter of personal…

  9. Multiuniversity Comparison of Faculty Attitudes and Use of Universal Design Instructional Techniques

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    Dallas, Bryan K.; Sprong, Matthew E.; Kluesner, Bryon K.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To examine postsecondary faculty attitudes and actions toward inclusive teaching strategies (ITS) designed to benefit all learners. Method: The Inclusive Teaching Strategies Inventory is a self-report survey that measures faculty attitudes toward ITS and traditional academic accommodations, as well as their in-class actions. The authors…

  10. Attitudes of Teaching Faculty toward Inclusive Teaching Strategies at a Midwestern University

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    Dallas, Bryan K.

    2012-01-01

    This study measured postsecondary faculty attitudes toward academic accommodations and an inclusive teaching method called Universal Design for Instruction (UDI). The purpose of the study was to help determine a readiness for change among faculty with regard to implementing UDI principles, compare differences between faculty groups, as well as add…

  11. Correlates of Faculty and Student Attitudes toward Evaluation in Behavioral Aspects of Clinical Practice.

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    Cohen, Leonard; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Current attitudes of students and faculty toward incorporation of behavioral skills such as patient management, patient motivation, control of patient and dentist stress, and communication skills into clinical practice education are reported. (MSE)

  12. Communicating in a Multicultural Classroom: A Study of Students' Nonverbal Behavior and Attitudes toward Faculty Attire

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    Okoro, Ephraim; Washington, Melvin

    2011-01-01

    Economic and market globalization in the United States has engendered a multicultural learning environment that challenges both faculty and students. Diversity in the classroom is further complicated by nonverbal communication, which impacts on students' attitudes toward faculty members. Because today's classrooms are changing and undergoing rapid…

  13. University Faculty Attitudes toward Disability and Inclusive Instruction: Comparing Two Institutions

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    Lombardi, Allison; Murray, Christopher; Dallas, Bryan

    2013-01-01

    It is increasingly important for postsecondary disability services personnel to provide targeted disability-related training to faculty rather than support college students with disabilities on a case-by-case basis. In this study, we examined faculty attitudes toward disability-related topics and inclusive teaching practices at two public…

  14. Attitudes of Faculty Members at Najran University towards Students' Assessment for Their Teaching Performance

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    Zakri, Ali; Qablan, Yahya

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the attitudes of faculty members at Najran University towards students' assessment for their teaching performance. The sample of the study consisted of (184) faculty members from Najran University, Kingdome of Saudi Arabia. A questionnaire was developed and distributed to the sample of the study. The result showed…

  15. An Examination of University Agricultural Education Faculty Attitudes toward the Implementation of High Impact Learning Experiences

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    Murphrey, Theresa Pesl; Odom, Summer F.; Sledd, James

    2016-01-01

    Meaningful learning is a goal across the broad field of agricultural education and high impact learning (HIL) experiences are a mechanism to facilitate that goal. The purpose of this study was to examine university agricultural education faculty attitudes toward the implementation of HIL. Faculty (n=85) from 10 agricultural education departments…

  16. Communicating in a Multicultural Classroom: A Study of Students' Nonverbal Behavior and Attitudes toward Faculty Attire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okoro, Ephraim; Washington, Melvin

    2011-01-01

    Economic and market globalization in the United States has engendered a multicultural learning environment that challenges both faculty and students. Diversity in the classroom is further complicated by nonverbal communication, which impacts on students' attitudes toward faculty members. Because today's classrooms are changing and undergoing rapid…

  17. From Passion to Emotion: Emotional Quotient as Predictor of Work Attitude Behaviour among Faculty Members

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    Relojo, Dennis; Pilao, Sonia Janice; Dela Rosa, Rona

    2015-01-01

    Positive thinking, in conjunction with a robust attitude, can affect one's well-being and coping strategies under stressful events. This study sought to identify the role of Emotional Quotient (EQ) to Work Attitude Behaviour (WAB) of selected faculty members from three higher educational institutions in the Philippines. Using a non-experimental…

  18. Understanding Faculty Attitudes about Distance Education: The Importance of Excitement and Fear

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    Bunk, Jennifer; Li, Rui; Smidt, Esther; Bidetti, Christopher; Malize, Brett

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to further understand faculty attitudes about distance education by exploring the psychological processes through which these attitudes are influenced. We explored the following research question: Do feelings of excitement versus fear mediate and/or moderate the relationship between online teaching experience…

  19. The effects of ego states on democratic attitudes: Nursing students’ opinions of nursing faculty members

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    Ayla Keçeci

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this descriptive study is to identify the ego states in the Transactional Analysis Approach for evaluating the interpersonal communication process, as well as the views of the nursing students regarding the democratic attitudes of their instructors. Consequently, the faculty members had democratic attitudes and there was a very high direct correlation between the Nurturing Parent ego state and democratic attitude.

  20. Participation in Adult Education: Attitudes and Barriers

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    Boeren, Ellen

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we control the intention theory of Fishbein and Ajzen (1980) for the participation in an adult education course. Based on the Flemish Eurostat Adult Education Survey, we reveal that participants in adult education have a more positive attitude towards learning and that within the group of non-participants, those who formulate an…

  1. Bowie State College Teaching Faculty's Attitudes toward Public Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Wanda E.; And Others

    This survey sought the opinions of faculty members at Bowie State College on 40 questions concerning academic and societal issues in public education. Responses to the survey questionnaire by faculty members represented a return of 14.5 percent, or 15 individuals. Tables are included comparing the responses of the Bowie State College sample and…

  2. Student Learning Outcomes: Barriers and Solutions for Faculty Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lightner, Robin; Benander, Ruth

    2010-01-01

    Student learning outcomes clarify the focus of a course. In creating student centered, concrete, measurable outcomes, the instructor creates a framework for coherent, integrated course design. Faculty may be resistant to writing student learning outcomes because of lack of time, teaching philosophy, job descriptions, assessment pressure and…

  3. Identifying Barriers and Facilitators to Future Nurse Faculty Careers for DNP Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Di; Bednash, Geraldine D

    Increasing the pool of doctorally educated nurses pursuing faculty careers is imperative in the development of the nurse faculty workforce. This cross-sectional study aims to identify barriers and facilitators to academic careers for doctor of nursing practice (DNP) students. One thousand five hundred DNP students were randomly selected from nursing schools across the country to participate in our survey, and a 56.9% response rate was achieved. The study found that 32% of respondents planned to pursue faculty careers after graduating. Students with postgraduation plans for academic careers, nonacademic careers, and undecided careers did not show distinct differences in demographic and academic characteristics, except that students who planned to pursue academic careers were more likely to have full-time and part-time faculty status. However, students in the 3 groups perceived facilitators and barriers to academic careers differently. The most influential facilitators were interest in teaching and an appreciation of the impact of nursing research on patient care, and the most considered barriers were poor financial compensation and a negative perception of academia. In terms of academic preparation, a large percentage of DNP students who planned to pursue a faculty career reported that they were not confident in teaching informatics. These findings are also consistent for DNP students who were not a faculty member. The impact of DNP education appeared to have a small, although positive, impact on students' decisions to pursue academic careers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Using cognitive dissonance to enhance faculty members' attitudes toward teaching online courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiou, Wen-Bin

    2006-10-01

    Adopting a reward strategy for inducing college faculty to teach online courses is expected to cause a positive shift of their attitudes. Based upon dissonance theory, a smaller reward will lead to greater attitude change, and this effect will be more pronounced in individualists. The results of an experimental study showed that individualist teachers exhibited greater attitude change under low reward than under high reward, but the reward effect was not prominent in collectivist teachers. Implications for enhancing college teachers' attitudes toward teaching online courses are discussed.

  5. Creating Integrated Facilities: Community College Radiologic Technology Faculty Attitudes towards Instructional Technology, Distance Education, and Continuing Professional Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, Lauren Brower

    This study aims to: (1) determine if a relationship exists between faculty characteristics and attitudes concerning various forms of instructional technology; (2) document information regarding instructional technology training; (3) determine if a relationship exists between faculty characteristics and attitudes concerning distance education; (4)…

  6. Incentives and barriers to OER adoption: A qualitative analysis of faculty perceptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Maria Belikov

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, 218 U.S faculty responses regarding Open Educational Resources (OER were qualitatively analyzed. Ten categories emerged in the coding process. The top three categories that indicated barriers to the adoption of OER were need more information (faculty wanted more information before they would be willing to adopt OER, lack of discoverability (faculty wanted to be able to easily find repositories of OER, and confusing OER with digital resources (faculty were unaware of the difference between digital resources and OER. The top incentives identified in this analysis to overcome these barriers include student cost benefits (saving students money, student pedagogical benefits (faculty being able to make changes to OER to improve course content and instruction, and institutional support for the adoption of OER (whether in the form of course load reduction, curricular research assistance, or library support for finding and adopting OER. Future research is needed to better understand how to address and overcome these barriers to OER adoption.

  7. ATTITUDE AND PERCEPTION OF FACULTIES TOWARDS TEACHING EVIDENCE BASED MEDICINE TO PRE - CLINICAL & PARA - CLINICAL MEDICAL STUDENTS

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    Bhavita Patel

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available NTRODUCTION: Evidence - based medicine (EBM is defined as the „conscientious, explicit, and judicious use of current best evidence‟. It i s an important tool for lifelong learning in medicine, and medical students can develop the skills necessary to understand and use EBM. The teaching of EBM in Sumandeep Vidyapeeth is as part of Evidence Based Education System (EBES. The university has imp lemented the 16 hours of teaching with project work on Evidence Based Medicine in 1st MBBS and 2nd MBBS curriculum in addition to MBBS syllabus. AIMS & OBJECTIVES: This study was planned to take feedback from all the faculties those who are involved in Evi dence based Medicine teaching to evaluate their attitude and perception towards this innovative teaching method and to recommend improvements. MATERIAL & METHODS: A Descriptive, self - structured , pilot pretested questionnaire based cross sectional study was conducted in the year 2013 - 2014 among 40 faculties from 7 Departments like Anatomy, Physiology, Biochemistry, Microbiology, Pharmacology, Pathology and Forensic Medicine teaching Evidence Base d Medicine to students at S.B.K.S MI & RC, Sumandeep Vidyapeeth. Data was expressed as percentage. RESULTS: The response rate for the study was 75%. Almost 87% of faculties agreed that teaching EBM is a welcoming development during pre and para clinical ye ars. About 80% faculties agreed that it will help them in future clinical learning. 87% faculties agreed that literature and research searching improves their day to day teaching. About 77% of faculties have attended workshop and training held in Universit y and 83% of faculties agreed that they are interested in more learning and improving skills necessary to incorporate Evidence based medicine into their discipline. Barriers included shortage of time and need for training in teaching EBM. CONCLUSION: Facul ties of this University teaching Pre - clinical and Para - clinical medical students recognized

  8. Faculty Attitudes for Changing a University's Core and Structure

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    Krug, Kevin S.; Dickson, Kole W.; Lessiter, Julie A.; Vassar, John S.

    2016-01-01

    America's universities and colleges are examining additional ways to raise student enrollment following government reductions in educational funding. Faculty were surveyed regarding their opinions of an administrative proposal to change the status of their commuter university, a school without any on-campus student housing, from teaching…

  9. Neuropsychiatry and neuroscience education of psychiatry trainees: attitudes and barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin, Sheldon; Travis, Michael J; Cooper, Joseph J; Dickey, Chandlee C; Reardon, Claudia L

    2014-04-01

    The American Association of Directors of Psychiatric Residency Training (AADPRT) Task Force on Neuropsychiatry and Neuroscience Education of Psychiatry Residents was established in 2011 with the charge to seek information about what the field of psychiatry considers the core topics in neuropsychiatry and neuroscience to which psychiatry residents should be exposed; whether there are any "competencies" in this area on which the field agrees; whether psychiatry departments have the internal capacity to teach these topics if they are desirable; and what the reception would be for "portable curricula" in neuroscience. The task force reviewed the literature and developed a survey instrument to be administered nationwide to all psychiatry residency program directors. The AADPRT Executive Committee assisted with the survey review, and their feedback was incorporated into the final instrument. In 2011-2012, 226 adult and child and adolescent psychiatry residency program directors responded to the survey, representing over half of all US adult and child psychiatry training directors. About three quarters indicated that faculty resources were available in their departments but 39% felt the lack of neuropsychiatry faculty and 36% felt the absence of neuroscience faculty to be significant barriers. Respectively, 64 and 60% felt that neuropsychiatry and psychiatric neuroscience knowledge were very important or critically important to the provision of excellent care. Ninety-two percent were interested in access to portable neuroscience curricula. There is widespread agreement among training directors on the importance of neuropsychiatry and neuroscience knowledge to general psychiatrists but barriers to training exist, including some programs that lack faculty resources and a dearth of portable curricula in these areas.

  10. The Teaching Researcher: Faculty Attitudes towards the Teaching and Research Roles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpay, E.; Verschoor, R.

    2014-01-01

    Results from a survey on faculty attitudes towards the teaching and research roles are presented. Attention is given to: (i) the perceived value of teaching (and teaching achievements) relative to research, (ii) approaches for research and teaching integration, (iii) the satisfaction gained from typical work tasks, and (iv) the importance of…

  11. Attitudes of faculty and students in medicine and the health professions toward interprofessional education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordano, Carolyn; Umland, Elena; Lyons, Kevin J

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the important relationship between faculty and student attitudes toward interprofessional education using the Interdisciplinary Education Perception Scale (IEPS). Medicine, nursing, occupational therapy, pharmacy, and physical therapy faculty (n = 177) completed the IEPS. Students from these disciplines participate in a 2-year, interdisciplinary curriculum in which they were assigned to a team to work with a patient volunteer. Students (n = 496) completed the IEPS at the end of program year one. The IEPS measures four factors: professional competence/autonomy; perceived need for professional cooperation; perception of actual cooperation/resource sharing within and across professions; and understanding the value of other professions. Overall attitude scores for faculty and students were high, ranging from 3.93 to 4.40 on a 5-point scale. Attitudes on each factor were also high, with the exception of factor 4, "understanding the value of other professions," having the lowest scores, 3.26 to 3.92. The positive attitudes among faculty and students and across professions suggest an acceptance of the principles of interprofessional education and a readiness to engage in interprofessional practice. The lower scores on factor 4 indicate the need for additional educational programs focusing on understanding the roles of each profession.

  12. Professional Socialization in Nurse Anesthesia Educational Programs: Attitudes and Beliefs of Faculty Members and Recent Graduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buettner, Kevin Charles

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to better understand professional socialization in nurse anesthesia educational programs through an exploration of the attitudes and beliefs of faculty members and recent graduates. Participants for this cross-sectional, quasi-experimental online study included a convenience sample of 178 nurse anesthesia faculty…

  13. A Study of Faculty Data Curation Behaviors and Attitudes at a Teaching-Centered University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaramozzino, Jeanine Marie; Ramírez, Marisa L.; McGaughey, Karen J.

    2012-01-01

    Academic libraries need reliable information on researcher data needs, data curation practices, and attitudes to identify and craft appropriate services that support outreach and teaching. This paper describes information gathered from a survey distributed to the College of Science and Mathematics faculty at California Polytechnic State…

  14. Alcohol attitudes and behaviors among faculty at U.S. schools and colleges of pharmacy

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    Schlesselman LS

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite attempts to control college-aged drinking, binge and underage drinking continues at colleges and universities. Although often underutilized, faculty have the potential to influence students’ behaviors and attitudes towards drinking. Little information is available pertaining to college faculty drinking patterns, views on drinking, or their influence on college drinking. What little information is available predates the economic crisis, mandates for increased alcohol education, and the American Pharmacists Association’s call for increased alcohol awareness in pharmacists. Objectives: This study was designed to determine alcohol use patterns and viewpoints among faculty at U.S. colleges of pharmacy, in particular, to identify alcohol practices among faculty, use of alcohol with their students, mentioning alcohol in classroom as a social norm, and perceived drinking norms within their colleagues. Methods: Following Institution Review Board approval, 2809 invitations were emailed to U.S. pharmacy faculty for this survey-based study. The survey consisted of demographic questions, the World Health Organization Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT, and questions pertaining to personal and institution attitudes on drinking and on drinking with students.Results: More than 96% of 753 respondents had a total AUDIT score <8. Males and preceptors were more likely to have higher AUDIT scores. More than 75% of faculty reported never drinking with students.Conclusion: In order to help pharmacy students address the extent of their alcohol use and misuse, pharmacy faculty must address their own use, along with their own and their institutions attitudes and behaviors towards alcohol use.

  15. Comparison of attitudes between Generation X and Baby Boomer veterinary faculty and residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Lisa M; Trower, Cathy A; Tan, Rachael J B; Terkla, Dawn Geronimo

    2009-01-01

    Understanding the characteristics and preferences of the different generations in the veterinary workforce is important if we are to help optimize current and future veterinary schools and teaching hospitals. The purpose of this study was to compare the attitudes of different generations of veterinary faculty and those of faculty and house officers. A survey administered to faculty and house officers asked respondents to identify their level of agreement with a series of statements addressing work and lifestyle issues and feedback preferences. In addition, the survey included an open-ended question on non-monetary rewards for hard work. Thirty-eight of 48 faculty members (79%) and 45 of 54 house officers (83%) completed the survey. Among faculty, there were no significant differences between the Generation X and Baby Boomer subgroups or between genders. More faculty than house officers responded that delayed gratification is acceptable (p = 0.03) and that it is difficult to balance home and work life (p < 0.001). Compared to faculty, house officers preferred more frequent (p = 0.03) and critical (p = 0.02) feedback. The most common responses to the question on effective non-monetary rewards for hard work, from both faculty and house officers, were recognition and time off. No attitudinal differences were detected between generations within the faculty group, but a number of significant differences emerged between faculty and house officers. Increased awareness of the importance of balance and rewards for hard work, as well as modification of feedback styles, may be beneficial in teaching and mentoring current and future generations.

  16. Faculty Attitudes and Knowledge Regarding College Students with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sniatecki, Jessica L.; Perry, Holly B.; Snell, Linda H.

    2015-01-01

    The presence of students with disabilities (SWD) at colleges and universities in the United States has increased significantly in recent years, yet many of these students continue to encounter significant barriers that can have a profound impact on their college experience. Salient factors that contribute to the challenging climate for SWD include…

  17. Examination of Attitudes towards Teaching Online Courses Based on Theory of Reasoned Action of University Faculty in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tzy-Ling; Chen, Tzu-Jung

    2006-01-01

    This study examined attitudes of university faculty specialising in the field of human resource (HR) in Taiwan towards participation in the teaching of online courses using the theory of reasoned action (TRA). The population targeted for investigation consisted of the full-time university faculty in the HR field in Taiwan regardless of their…

  18. Faculty of Education Students' Computer Self-Efficacy Beliefs and Their Attitudes towards Computers and Implementing Computer Supported Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkant, Hasan Güner

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates faculty of education students' computer self-efficacy beliefs and their attitudes towards computers and implementing computer supported education. This study is descriptive and based on a correlational survey model. The final sample consisted of 414 students studying in the faculty of education of a Turkish university. The…

  19. The attitude of the faculty of sport and physical education students toward cross-country running

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    Juhas Irina

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The syllabus of the track and field subject at the Faculty of Sport and Physical Education includes cross-country running - running in nature. The main objective of this study was to determine the structure and intensity of students' attitude toward the cross-country running. Besides, the objective was to check the connection of the students' attitude towards the cross-country running and the achieved results of cross-country running, as well as of doing sport and recreational running. The sample comprised 69 students of the second year of studies who attended the cross-country running classes. For measuring the attitude toward the cross-country running, the Connotative differential instrument was used consisting of 15 pairs of opposite adjectives presented in a form of seven-part bipolar scale grouped into three dimensions: affective, cognitive and conative. This instrument was applied within an extensive questionnaire which included questions about doing sports, jogging, as well as the results of cross-country running at the end of the teaching period. The descriptive analysis has shown that students have a positive attitude of moderate intensity toward cross-country running, observed through all three dimensions of attitude. The correlation analysis between the dimensions of attitude toward cross country running and the results achieved at cross country running showed that the correlations are negative and statistically significant, suggesting that if the result of running is better, the students' attitude toward cross country running is more positive. Competitive sport is not connected with the quality of attitude toward cross-country running. The results obtained by the study give grounds for assuming that, given that attitudes are an important component of the motivational aspect of personality, it can be expected that the students' positive attitude toward cross country running would contribute to cross country running application in

  20. The Doctor of Philosophy Experience of Athletic Trainers: Facilitators and Barriers to Anticipatory Faculty Socialization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Thomas; Klossner, Joanne; Mazerolle, Stephanie

    2017-09-22

      It is important to understand the process whereby athletic trainers learn about their future roles, particularly when the roles can be complex and demanding. Little is known about the experiences of athletic training doctoral students, including facilitators and barriers to socialization as aspiring faculty members.   To investigate factors influencing the anticipatory socialization of athletic training doctoral students into future faculty roles.   Qualitative study.   Universities with athletic training doctoral students.   We recruited 28 students (19 women, 9 men, age = 28 ± 3 years) with a minimum of 1 year of doctoral coursework completed and participating in an assistantship at the time of the study to reach data saturation. Participants were certified for 6 ± 3 years and represented 5 National Athletic Trainers' Association districts and 9 institutions.   We completed semistructured, 1-on-1 telephone interviews with participants. We transcribed each interview verbatim and analyzed the data using an inductive approach. Peer review, multiple-analyst triangulation, and member checks ensured trustworthiness.   We uncovered 4 themes from our analysis: research, teaching, service, and administration. Participants described comprehensive autonomous experiences in research that allowed them to feel confident they could sustain a scholarly agenda. Independent experiences and lack of pedagogy training yielded mixed preparedness relative to teaching responsibilities. Limited formal experience led to incomplete role understanding related to the service component of the professoriate. Finally, with regard to the administrative duties associated with an athletic training faculty position, participants noted a lack of direct exposure to common responsibilities.   Role occupation in various aspects of the professoriate helped doctoral students prepare as future faculty members, although full role understanding was limited. Intentional exposure to

  1. Research utilisation in sonographic practice: Attitudes and barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, Vicki [Radiography, Faculty of Health and Social Care, Anglia Ruskin University, East Road, Cambridge, CB1 9PT Cambridgeshire (United Kingdom)], E-mail: vicki.elliott@anglia.ac.uk; Wilson, Stephanie E. [University of London External System, University of London, Stewart House, 32, Russell Square, London WC1B 5DN (United Kingdom); Svensson, Jon [Radiography, Faculty of Health and Social Care, Anglia Ruskin University, East Road, Cambridge, CB1 9PT Cambridgeshire (United Kingdom); Brennan, Patrick [UCD School of Medicine and Medical Sciences, Health Science Building, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland)

    2009-08-15

    Statutory agents have stipulated that research activity is a fundamental component of the healthcare professional's activity. Whilst the College of Radiographers have emphasised the importance of imaging personnel embracing this research ethos, there is little available data on the level of research activity within sonographic practice or on the factors that influence a sonographer's involvement in research activities. This work attempts to address these deficiencies. A questionnaire was sent to 300 UK-based sonographers of whom 218 responded (72%). The questionnaire was specifically designed to establish the level of involvement in research, the utilisation of research findings, attitudes towards research and perceived barriers to active research involvement. Responses were analysed investigating any correlations with the population demographics. The data collected showed the majority of sonographers (89%) were enthusiastic about research but with only 33% and 60% currently or previously performing research, respectively, and 73% using research findings to modify their clinical practice. Certain barriers to an active research involvement were shown, with 63%, 55% and 40% citing lack of time, education and collegial support, respectively. A range of statistical findings were linked to particular sonographer groups. The importance of good organisational structures and effective support from fellow health professionals was highlighted. The results confirm sonographers' appreciation of the benefits of research and it is suggested that if this enthusiasm is translated into effective research strategies, research output from ultrasound and other clinical departments should be enhanced.

  2. Assessing attitudes toward farm animal welfare: a national survey of animal science faculty members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heleski, C R; Mertig, A G; Zanella, A J

    2004-09-01

    A survey to measure attitudes toward farm animal welfare was developed. We targeted animal science faculty because of their influence on animal production in the United States. We initially interviewed 34 faculty members from a large Midwestern public university to assist with questionnaire development. After our written survey was developed, we pilot-tested our questionnaire at this same university. Thereafter, we sent an e-mail advance notice, first survey, and follow-up survey/thank-you to the national population of animal science faculty members. With an n = 446 (response rate = 45%), we observed the following: 51% (for layer birds), 58% (for meat birds), 66% (for swine), 84% (for dairy), 86% (for sheep), and 87% (for beef) of our respondents agreed that the predominant methods used to produce various types of animal products provided appropriate levels of animal welfare. Our findings showed that greater than 90% of respondents support general principles of animal welfare, such as keeping animals free from unnecessary fear and distress. However, specific practices that have been shown to elicit distress (e.g., castration without anesthetic) were deemed a concern by only 32% of the respondents. Various industry practices/outcomes were assessed for level of concern and varied from a high of 83% of respondents agreeing that flooring effects on lameness in intensively farmed animals are a concern, to a low of 16% agreeing that early weaning in pigs is a concern. Summed attitude scores showed significant relationships with the demographic variables of gender (P farm animal welfare issues. Gaining an awareness of various stakeholders' attitudes (e.g., animal scientists, veterinarians, producers, and consumers) toward farm animal welfare will assist animal welfare scientists in knowing which research topics to emphasize and, perhaps, where critical gaps in accessibility of knowledge exist.

  3. How attitudes and beliefs about physics change from high school to faculty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon P. Bates*

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available We present results of a pseudolongitudinal study of attitudes and beliefs about physics from different cohort groups ranging from final-year high school students in the UK to physics faculty (N=637, using the Colorado Learning Attitudes about Science Survey (CLASS instrument. In terms of overall degree of expertlike thinking, we find little change in cohorts at different stages of their undergraduate degrees, with a flat profile of expertlike thinking across the years of an undergraduate degree. Significant differences in overall CLASS scores occur for cohorts across entry and exit points of the undergraduate program. At the entry boundary, our data for high school students provides strong evidence of a selection effect, with students who intend to major in physics at university displaying more expertlike views than those students who are merely studying the subject to final year in high school. A similar effect is suggested at the exit boundary but is not definitive.

  4. Knowledge and Attitudes of the Faculty of Theology Students on Organ Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürdil Yilmaz, Seher; Opak Yücel, Burcu; Çuhadar, Döndü

    2016-12-29

    The objective in this study is to determine the knowledge and attitudes of the Faculty of Theology students on organ transplantation. The study that was planned as a descriptive study took place between March-May 2014 with the participation of 119 students enrolled at the Faculty of Theology. It was determined as a result of the study that the students see lack of knowledge (49.6%) as the top obstacle for organ transplantation followed by religion (21%), that 52.1% accept that organ transplantation is not forbidden in Islam; that 27.7% agree with the thought that considers it disturbing and unnerving to carry an organ or tissue from another body; that 80.7% agree with the idea stating that organ transplantation should be carried out even if it provides only a possibility for treatment or for prolonging one's life and that 82.4% agree with the opinion that statements in favor of organ transplantation to be declared by the Directorate of Religious Affairs will increase organ transplantation. Clergymen play an important role in affecting the behavior and attitudes of large public masses, and thus it is important that the positive ideas of these individuals with regard to organ donation will thus have indirect but positive effects on the attitudes of the public with regard to organ transplantation. Hence, it is thought that determining the attitudes of clergymen candidates who will educate the public both at schools and at places of prayer and increasing their awareness in this subject will contribute to increasing the awareness of the public with regard to organ donation.

  5. The Attitudes of Freshman Students in Erciyes UniversityFaculty of Medicine towards Absenteeism

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    Zeynep BAYKAN

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the opinions and attitudes of the freshman students in Erciyes University Faculty of Medicine towards absenteeism. It was a descriptive and cross sectional study, which was conducted in May 2015. 81% of 310 students were accessed. A questionnaire including an absenteeism attitude scale was applied to the students. For the analysis of data, Chi square and Mann Whitney U tests were used. 7.2% of students said that they always attended the theoretical lessons whereas 71.1% of them reported that they sometimes did not attend these lessons. 21.7%, on the other hand, stated that they mostly did not attend these lessons. 81.1% of the students indicated that they always attended the practical lessons. Another finding was that foreign students attended the theoretical lessons more than Turkish students. The most common suggestion made by the students for preventing absenteeism was linking the basic courses with clinical information to be used later. The mean score obtained from the absenteeism attitude scale was 54.6 ± 15.0. The mean scores obtained from necessity, responsibility and obligation subscales were 19.6 ± 5.5, 21.4 ± 6.7, and 13.6 ± 6.1, respectively. 73.5% of the students indicated that attendance should not be controlled in the Faculty of Medicine. At the end of the study it was revealed that medical students had negative attitudes towards attendance and there was a need to organize activities that would increase their motivation and prevent absenteeism.

  6. A comparison of professional-level faculty and student perceptions of active learning: its current use, effectiveness, and barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metz, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Active learning is an instructional method in which students become engaged participants in the classroom through the use of in-class written exercises, games, problem sets, audience-response systems, debates, class discussions, etc. Despite evidence supporting the effectiveness of active learning strategies, minimal adoption of the technique has occurred in many professional programs. The goal of this study was to compare the perceptions of active learning between students who were exposed to active learning in the classroom (n = 116) and professional-level physiology faculty members (n = 9). Faculty members reported a heavy reliance on lectures and minimal use of educational games and activities, whereas students indicated that they learned best via the activities. A majority of faculty members (89%) had observed active learning in the classroom and predicted favorable effects of the method on student performance and motivation. The main reported barriers by faculty members to the adoption of active learning were a lack of necessary class time, a high comfort level with traditional lectures, and insufficient time to develop materials. Students hypothesized similar obstacles for faculty members but also associated many negative qualities with the traditional lecturers. Despite these barriers, a majority of faculty members (78%) were interested in learning more about the alternative teaching strategy. Both faculty members and students indicated that active learning should occupy portions (29% vs. 40%) of face-to-face class time. PMID:25179615

  7. Receptive Audiences for Climate Change Education: Understanding Attitudes and Barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, L. D.; Luebke, J. F.; Clayton, S.; Saunders, C. D.; Matiasek, J.; Grajal, A.

    2012-12-01

    Much effort has been devoted to finding ways to explain climate change to uninterested audiences and encourage mitigation behaviors among dismissive audiences. Most approaches have focused on conveying information about climate change processes or threats. Here we report the results of a national survey designed to characterize the readiness of zoo and aquarium visitors to engage with the issue of climate change. Two survey forms, one focused primarily on attitudes (N=3,594) and another on behaviors (N=3,588), were administered concurrently in summer 2011 at 15 Association of Zoos and Aquariums accredited institutions. The attitudes survey used Global Warming's Six Americas segmentation protocols (climatechangecommunication.org) to compare climate change attitudes of zoo and aquarium visitors with the American public (Leiserowitz et al., 2011). Our results reveal that visitors are receptive audiences for climate change education and want to do more to address climate change. Even these favorable audiences, however, perceive barriers to engaging in the issue, signifying the importance of meeting the learning needs of those who acknowledge anthropogenic climate change, and not only of climate change 'deniers.' While 39% of the general public is 'concerned' or 'alarmed' about global warming, 64% of zoo and aquarium visitors fall into these two "Six Americas" segments. Visitors also differ from the national sample in key attitudinal characteristics related to global warming. For example, nearly two-thirds believe human actions are related to global warming, versus less than one-half of the general public; and approximately 60% think global warming will harm them personally, moderately or a great deal, versus less than 30% of the general public. Moreover, 69% of visitors would like to do more to address climate change. Despite zoo and aquarium visitors' awareness of climate change and motivation to address it, survey results indicate they experience barriers to

  8. Teachers' Readiness to Implement Nutrition Education Programs: Beliefs, Attitudes, and Barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perikkou, Anastasia; Kokkinou, Eleni; Panagiotakos, Demosthenes B.; Yannakoulia, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Teachers' attitudes about school food environments and their readiness to implement school-based nutrition programs were investigated. A total of 1,436 primary-school teachers filled out a questionnaire on their demographic and professional characteristics and their attitudes, beliefs, and barriers for implementing health educational programs. The…

  9. Asking the Participants: Students' Views on Their Environmental Attitudes, Behaviours, Motivators and Barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabawa-Sear, Kelsie; Baudains, Catherine

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated student views on the relationship between their environmental attitudes and behaviours and their thoughts about barriers and motivators to environmentally responsible behaviours. The environmental attitudes and behaviours of students participating in a classroom-based environmental education program were measured using two…

  10. Examining Not-for-Profit Higher Education Faculty Attitudes and Knowledge toward For-Profit Higher Education Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpel, Nichole

    2013-01-01

    Over the last decade, for-profit higher education has been the fastest growing segment within higher education. Despite the growth, little research exists about for-profit higher education institutions. The purpose of this exploratory, descriptive, quantitative study was to examine the attitudes and knowledge of higher education faculty toward…

  11. A Quantitative Study of Faculty Perceptions and Attitudes on Asynchronous Virtual Teamwork Using the Technology Acceptance Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolusky, G. Anthony

    2016-01-01

    This quantitative study used a web-based questionnaire to assess the attitudes and perceptions of online and hybrid faculty towards student-centered asynchronous virtual teamwork (AVT) using the technology acceptance model (TAM) of Davis (1989). AVT is online student participation in a team approach to problem-solving culminating in a written…

  12. Research barriers from the viewpoint of faculty members and students of Ardabil University of Medical Sciences, Iran, 2014

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    Esmaeil Farzaneh

    2016-06-01

    Conclusions: Organizational barriers and personal barriers have an important role in doing the research in the Medical Sciences University of Ardabil; these barriers can be passed through. The availability of consulting forces and sufficient and necessary counseling, teaching know-how and attitude correction, compensating the lack of facilities and equipment, creating the motivation by the authorities and educating and empowering as executive working procedures are recommended for overcoming the research barriers in the universities. [Int J Res Med Sci 2016; 4(6.000: 1926-1932

  13. Pediatric resident and faculty attitudes toward self-assessment and self-directed learning: a cross-sectional study

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    Favreau Michele A

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The development of self-assessment and self-directed learning skills is essential to lifelong learning and becoming an effective physician. Pediatric residents in the United States are now required to use Individualized Learning Plans (ILPs to document self-assessment and self-directed learning. A better understanding of resident and faculty attitudes and skills about self-assessment and self-directed learning will allow more successful integration of lifelong learning into residency education. The objective of this study was to compare faculty and resident attitudes, knowledge and skills about self-assessment, self-directed learning and ILPs. Methods Survey of pediatric residents and faculty at a single institution. Respondents rated their attitudes, knowledge, and self-perceived skills surrounding self-assessment, self-directed learning and ILPs. Results Overall survey response rate was 81% (79/97; 100% (36/36 residents and 70% (43/61 faculty. Residents and faculty agreed that lifelong learning is a necessary part of being a physician. Both groups were comfortable with assessing their own strengths and weaknesses and developing specific goals to improve their own performance. However, residents were less likely than faculty to continuously assess their own performance (44% vs. 81%; p Qualitative comments indicated that while ILPs have the potential to help learners develop individualized, goal-directed learning plans based on strengths and weaknesses, successful implementation will require dedicated time and resident and faculty development. Conclusion These findings suggest that training and experience are necessary for physicians to understand the role of self-directed learning in education. Deliberate practice, for example by requiring residents to use ILPs, may facilitate self-directed, lifelong learning.

  14. Knowledge and Attitude of Faculty Members Working in Dental Institutions towards the Dental Treatment of Patients with HIV/AIDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberoi, Sukhvinder Singh; Sharma, Nilima; Mohanty, Vikrant; Marya, Charumohan; Rekhi, Amit; Oberoi, Avneet

    2014-01-01

    Background. Dentists have an ethical responsibility to provide treatment to HIV-infected patients, particularly because oral lesions are common among these patients. However, there are no official guidelines as to how to treat people living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) (PLWHA) or how to screen for potentially infectious people. Materials and Method. A descriptive cross-sectional questionnaire based study which assessed the knowledge and attitude of the faculty members towards the treatment of patients with HIV/AIDS was carried out in the Sudha Rustagi College of Dental Sciences, Faridabad, and Maulana Azad Institute of Dental Sciences, New Delhi. Results. The willingness to treat patients with HIV was found to be 86.0% among the faculty members in the present study. The majority (79%) of the faculty members thought that treating an HIV-positive patient is ethical responsibility of the dentist. There was a positive attitude (88.0%) among faculty members that routine dental care should be a part of the treatment of patients with HIV/AIDS. Conclusion. The level of knowledge regarding HIV and AIDS was acceptable in the present study. However, continuing dental education (CDE) programmes should be conducted on a regular basis for updating the knowledge level of the faculty members towards the dental treatment of patients with HIV/AIDS patients. PMID:27379262

  15. Saudi high school students' attitudes and barriers toward the use of computer technologies in learning English.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabti, Ahmed Abdulateef; Chaichan, Rasha Sami

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the attitudes of Saudi Arabian high school students toward the use of computer technologies in learning English. The study also discusses the possible barriers that affect and limit the actual usage of computers. Quantitative approach is applied in this research, which involved 30 Saudi Arabia students of a high school in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. The respondents comprised 15 males and 15 females with ages between 16 years and 18 years. Two instruments, namely, Scale of Attitude toward Computer Technologies (SACT) and Barriers affecting Students' Attitudes and Use (BSAU) were used to collect data. The Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) of Davis (1989) was utilized. The analysis of the study revealed gender differences in attitudes toward the use of computer technologies in learning English. Female students showed high and positive attitudes towards the use of computer technologies in learning English than males. Both male and female participants demonstrated high and positive perception of Usefulness and perceived Ease of Use of computer technologies in learning English. Three barriers that affected and limited the use of computer technologies in learning English were identified by the participants. These barriers are skill, equipment, and motivation. Among these barriers, skill had the highest effect, whereas motivation showed the least effect.

  16. Re-Attitude of Biochemistry Laboratory Course Contents in Medical, Dentistry and Para-Medical Faculties

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    Durdi Qujeq

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Regarding to development of basic science and new methods in biochemistry in recent years, practical biochemistry contents should be optimized (1. Therefore, re-attitude biochemistry course contents in medical schools has paralleled worldwide trends a moved from current status is needed (2, 3. As reported by investi-gators many medical schools around the world have reformed their medical curriculum in recent years (2. Many authors are convinced that students learn more effectively if the knowledge and skills they acquire are inserted and contextualized in relevant real-life, problem based situations (3. Previous studies demonstrated that biochemistry course content is now incorporated into the clinical beneficial, therefore the evolution of students in many countries has occurred (4. In this respect, the purpose of the current study was to evaluate biochemistry laboratory course contents in medical, dentistry and Para-medicine faculties from view points of the students. This descriptive study was per-formed in years 2010-2013. Questionnaire contained items about appropriateness of biochemistry laboratory contents for students. The first section of questionnaire determines the effectiveness of bioche¬mistry laboratory contents and the factors influence on it. The second section indicates the application of biochemistry laboratory contents, and the third parts of questi¬onnaire demonstrate the laboratory time spent of biochemistry laboratory course contents. For this purpose three faculties were selected. First, Faculty of Medicine (50 medical students, second Faculty of Dentistry (50 dentistry students and third Faculty of Para-medicine (50 laboratory science students were selected. At least 50 students were selected from each faculty and they received a questionnaire. All students were randomly selected to receive a standard questionnaire designed to evaluate their opinions about biochemistry laboratory course contents. The students were asked

  17. Exploring the attitudes of medical faculty members and students in Pakistan towards plagiarism: a cross sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathore, Farooq Azam; Waqas, Ahmed; Zia, Ahmad Marjan; Mavrinac, Martina; Farooq, Fareeha

    2015-01-01

    Objective. The objective of this survey was to explore the attitudes towards plagiarism of faculty members and medical students in Pakistan. Methods. The Attitudes Toward Plagiarism questionnaire (ATP) was modified and distributed among 550 medical students and 130 faculty members in 7 medical colleges of Lahore and Rawalpindi. Data was entered in the SPSS v.20 and descriptive statistics were analyzed. The questionnaire was validated by principal axis factoring analysis. Results. Response rate was 93% and 73%, respectively. Principal axis factoring analysis confirmed one factor structure of ATP in the present sample. It had an acceptable Cronbach's alpha value of 0.73. There were 421 medical students (218 (52%) female, 46% 3rd year MBBS students, mean age of 20.93 ± 1.4 years) and 95 faculty members (54.7% female, mean age 34.5 ± 8.9 years). One fifth of the students (19.7%) trained in medical writing (19.7%), research ethics (25.2%) or were currently involved in medical writing (17.6%). Most of the faculty members were demonstrators (66) or assistant professors (20) with work experience between 1 and 10 years. Most of them had trained in medical writing (68), research ethics (64) and were currently involved in medical writing (64). Medical students and faculty members had a mean score of 43.21 (7.1) and 48.4 (5.9) respectively on ATP. Most of the respondents did not consider that they worked in a plagiarism free environment and reported that self-plagiarism should not be punishable in the same way as plagiarism. Opinion regarding leniency in punishment of younger researchers who were just learning medical writing was divided. Conclusions. The general attitudes of Pakistani medical faculty members and medical students as assessed by ATP were positive. We propose training in medical writing and research ethics as part of the under and post graduate medical curriculum.

  18. Exploring the attitudes of medical faculty members and students in Pakistan towards plagiarism: a cross sectional survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farooq Azam Rathore

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The objective of this survey was to explore the attitudes towards plagiarism of faculty members and medical students in Pakistan.Methods. The Attitudes Toward Plagiarism questionnaire (ATP was modified and distributed among 550 medical students and 130 faculty members in 7 medical colleges of Lahore and Rawalpindi. Data was entered in the SPSS v.20 and descriptive statistics were analyzed. The questionnaire was validated by principal axis factoring analysis.Results. Response rate was 93% and 73%, respectively. Principal axis factoring analysis confirmed one factor structure of ATP in the present sample. It had an acceptable Cronbach’s alpha value of 0.73. There were 421 medical students (218 (52% female, 46% 3rd year MBBS students, mean age of 20.93 ± 1.4 years and 95 faculty members (54.7% female, mean age 34.5 ± 8.9 years. One fifth of the students (19.7% trained in medical writing (19.7%, research ethics (25.2% or were currently involved in medical writing (17.6%. Most of the faculty members were demonstrators (66 or assistant professors (20 with work experience between 1 and 10 years. Most of them had trained in medical writing (68, research ethics (64 and were currently involved in medical writing (64. Medical students and faculty members had a mean score of 43.21 (7.1 and 48.4 (5.9 respectively on ATP. Most of the respondents did not consider that they worked in a plagiarism free environment and reported that self-plagiarism should not be punishable in the same way as plagiarism. Opinion regarding leniency in punishment of younger researchers who were just learning medical writing was divided.Conclusions. The general attitudes of Pakistani medical faculty members and medical students as assessed by ATP were positive. We propose training in medical writing and research ethics as part of the under and post graduate medical curriculum.

  19. Exploring the attitudes of medical faculty members and students in Pakistan towards plagiarism: a cross sectional survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathore, Farooq Azam; Zia, Ahmad Marjan; Mavrinac, Martina; Farooq, Fareeha

    2015-01-01

    Objective. The objective of this survey was to explore the attitudes towards plagiarism of faculty members and medical students in Pakistan. Methods. The Attitudes Toward Plagiarism questionnaire (ATP) was modified and distributed among 550 medical students and 130 faculty members in 7 medical colleges of Lahore and Rawalpindi. Data was entered in the SPSS v.20 and descriptive statistics were analyzed. The questionnaire was validated by principal axis factoring analysis. Results. Response rate was 93% and 73%, respectively. Principal axis factoring analysis confirmed one factor structure of ATP in the present sample. It had an acceptable Cronbach’s alpha value of 0.73. There were 421 medical students (218 (52%) female, 46% 3rd year MBBS students, mean age of 20.93 ± 1.4 years) and 95 faculty members (54.7% female, mean age 34.5 ± 8.9 years). One fifth of the students (19.7%) trained in medical writing (19.7%), research ethics (25.2%) or were currently involved in medical writing (17.6%). Most of the faculty members were demonstrators (66) or assistant professors (20) with work experience between 1 and 10 years. Most of them had trained in medical writing (68), research ethics (64) and were currently involved in medical writing (64). Medical students and faculty members had a mean score of 43.21 (7.1) and 48.4 (5.9) respectively on ATP. Most of the respondents did not consider that they worked in a plagiarism free environment and reported that self-plagiarism should not be punishable in the same way as plagiarism. Opinion regarding leniency in punishment of younger researchers who were just learning medical writing was divided. Conclusions. The general attitudes of Pakistani medical faculty members and medical students as assessed by ATP were positive. We propose training in medical writing and research ethics as part of the under and post graduate medical curriculum. PMID:26157615

  20. Irish Emergency Nurses’ Attitudes towards Role Expansion in, and Barriers to, Nurse Prescribing

    OpenAIRE

    Clancy, Michele

    2011-01-01

    Aim This study set out to explore Irish emergency nurses’ attitudes towards nurse prescribing and also to elicit their attitudes towards potential barriers to nurse prescribing. Method A quantitative descriptive survey was used to answer the research question, a questionnaire was administered to a systematic random sample of Emergency Department nurses. This consisted of a 31 item Likert-type attitudinal scale, previously developed for a similar study. Background Traditionally,...

  1. Effect of supervising students of Healthy and social faculty to mentor´s nurse attitude at offer nursing care.

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    This diploma thesis is focused on the influence of teaching students of the Faculty of Health and Social Studies of the University of South Bohemia in Czech Budejovice on a mentor nurse´s attitude to nursing care provision. In the first chapter of the theoretical section the term nurse is introduced, and it is dealt with her duties, roles, attitudes, it is explained who a mentor nurse is and what topics a pilot certified course contains. The next four chapters are focused on a supervisor´s pe...

  2. Pharmacists’ Attitudes and Perceived Barriers about Community Pharmacy-Based Cardiovascular Risk Screening Services

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    Zahra Jahangard-Rafsanjani

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available  Background: Community pharmacies are considered as ideal settings to provide cardiovascular risk screening (CRS. However, little is known about pharmacists’ views on providing such services in developing countries including Iran. In the present study, we evaluated the pharmacists’ attitudes and perceived barriers to providing CRS services. Methods:In a cross-sectional study, a questionnaire in three sections was developed by the investigators (attitudes, perceived barriers, and demographics. Five likert items (5 points bipolar scale were designed to evaluate pharmacists’ attitudes about their professional role in providing CRS services in community pharmacies. Seven likert items were designed to assess the pharmacists’ perceived importance of possible barriers to providing the services. The study tool was distributed among a convenient sample of 500 pharmacists, who had participated in a national continuing education event. Results:The response rate was 44% and descriptive statistics and Chi squared test were used to analyze data. Results showed that 70.4% participants had an overall positive attitude to providing CRS services. Pharmacists who were pharmacy owner and pharmacist-in-charge simultaneously were more positive about providing CRS services. Lack of regulatory policy and compensation mechanism, limited physical space in pharmacy and time limitation were reported to be the most important barriers to providing CRS services (> 50% rated as highly important. Low human resource and time limitation were significantly associated with negative attitudes (P: 0.02 and 0.001, respectively.Conclusion:The Iranian pharmacists’ attitudes seem to be positive about providing CRS services; however, their perceived barriers should be addressed prior to CRS service implementation.

  3. Faculty Attitudes and Perceptions of Academic Dishonesty at a Career College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Iris

    2013-01-01

    Academic dishonesty in postsecondary education can often transfer to dishonesty in the workplace. Dishonest behavior by students undermines the integrity of the entire institution, including its faculty. The purpose of this study was to explore faculty perceptions of goal orientation and its impact on student cheating behavior, faculty experiences…

  4. Faculty Attitudes and Perceptions of Academic Dishonesty at a Career College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Iris

    2013-01-01

    Academic dishonesty in postsecondary education can often transfer to dishonesty in the workplace. Dishonest behavior by students undermines the integrity of the entire institution, including its faculty. The purpose of this study was to explore faculty perceptions of goal orientation and its impact on student cheating behavior, faculty experiences…

  5. DETERMINATION OF FACULTY OF EDUCATION STUDENTS’ ATTITUDES AS REGARDS LEVEL OF THE RECOGNITION OF HACI BEKTAS VELI AND ATTITUDES ON BEKTASHISM

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    Recep Özkan

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available There are some significant characters shaping the life of societies. Introducing these characters to young generations plays an important role for their upbringing. Hacı Bektasi Veli comes to the fore as one of these characters. The purpose of this study is to determine the Faculty of Education of Nigde University students’ recognition level of Haci Bektas Veli and their attitudes about the Bektashism. In this study, questionnaire and literature review techniques have been applied. According to t test results, male students’ positive attitudes about Hacı Bektasi Veli are higher than female students. Positive attitudes of daytime and evening education students don’t show significant difference. According to one-way variance analysis test results, students of primary school teaching account for 33.61, social sciences teaching account for 34.03, Turkish teaching account for 34.27 and it is observed that there is no statistically significant difference between mean points of students.

  6. DR services in Fiji: attitudes, barriers and screening practices

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    Bridget Kool

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to describe the attitudes and perceptions of primary health care doctors in Fiji regarding the importance of eye care in diabetes mellitus (DM management, to explore current eye care practice, and to investigate awareness and use of relevant clinical practice guidelines. The study builds on earlier research conducted in Fiji that identified a rapid increase of late-stage DR patients presenting for treatment, at a time when surgery was the only option.

  7. Primary School Teachers' Knowledge, Attitudes and Views on Barriers to Inclusion in Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amr, Muna; Al-Natour, Mayada; Al-Abdallat, Bassam; Alkhamra, Hatem

    2016-01-01

    This study explores teachers' knowledge and attitudes toward the inclusion of students with special education needs (SEN) in mainstream schools in Jordan. It also examines the barriers the teachers perceived to hinder successful inclusions. The study sample consisted of 87 primary school teachers who responded to an open-ended questionnaire asking…

  8. Examining E-Learning Barriers As Perceived By Faculty 
Members Of Engineering Colleges In The Jordanian Universities

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    Muhammad K. AL-ALAWNEH,

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Employing computer's technology that includes e-learning system in the field of Engineering is a vital issue which needs to be discussed. Therefore, this study purposed to examine e-learning barriers as perceived by faculty members of engineering in three major universities in Jordan (Yarmouk University, Jordan University of Science and Technology, and Al-Balqaa Applied University in the second semester of 2012. The study's instrument was distributed to collect the data from a sample of 176 faculty members who are involved in delivering online courses through web-based management tool. The finding of the study shows that, overall, the three barriers domains were high. However, the results show that online degree experience and the gender of participants' variables were no significant. Based on the results, the study suggested that institutions of higher education should set a vision and a strategic plan to encourage faculty members to offer online courses and provide them with training and professional development to follow up with technology.

  9. Awareness, Attitude, and Knowledge of Basic Life Support among Medical, Dental, and Nursing Faculties and Students in the University Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangamesh, N C; Vidya, K C; Pathi, Jugajyoti; Singh, Arpita

    2017-01-01

    To assess the awareness, attitude, and knowledge about basic life support (BLS) among medical, dental, and nursing students and faculties and the proposal of BLS skills in the academic curriculum of undergraduate (UG) course. Recognition, prevention, and effective management of life-threatening emergencies are the responsibility of health-care professionals. These situations can be successfully managed by proper knowledge and training of the BLS skills. These life-saving maneuvers can be given through the structured resuscitation programs, which are lacking in the academic curriculum. A questionnaire study consisting of 20 questions was conducted among 659 participants in the Kalinga Institute of Dental Sciences, Kalinga Institute of Medical Sciences, KIIT University. Medical junior residents, BDS faculties, interns, nursing faculties, and 3(rd)-year and final-year UG students from both medical and dental colleges were chosen. The statistical analysis was carried out using SPSS software version 20.0 (Armonk, NY:IBM Corp). After collecting the data, the values were statistically analyzed and tabulated. Statistical analysis was performed using Mann-Whitney U-test. The results with P < 0.05 were considered statistically significant. Our participants were aware of BLS, showed positive attitude toward it, whereas the knowledge about BLS was lacking, with the statistically significant P value. By introducing BLS regularly in the academic curriculum and by routine hands on workshops, all the health-care providers should be well versed with the BLS skills for effectively managing the life-threatening emergencies.

  10. Barriers in adopting blended learning in a private university of Pakistan and East Africa: faculty members' perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizvi, Nusrat Fatima; Gulzar, Saleema; Nicholas, Wachira; Nkoroi, Beatrice

    2017-01-01

    Education methods have undergone transformation over the centuries. Use of technology is the cornerstone for innovation in teaching methods. Hence, blended learning which includes face to face and online modalities is being increasingly explored as effective method for learning. This pilot study determines the perceptions of faculty members in a private international university on barriers influencing adoption of technology for teaching and learning. A cross-sectional survey was conducted through a self-reported questionnaire using 'survey monkey'. The data was entered and analyzed using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS version 20). Frequencies and proportions are reported. Findings indicated that 51.6% faculty members perceived the importance of integration of technology in their teaching. Around 54% of the participants recognized that they do possess the ability and accessibility to integrate information communication technology (ICT) in teaching and learning, but there is a need to hone the basic information technology (IT) skills to initiate technology driven teaching. Findings revealed that 55% faculty members acknowledged the constraint of not getting protective time to develop and deliver technology driven courses. Further, results showed that 45% faculty members perceived that their innovation efforts in terms of teaching as blended learning do not count towards their professional promotion or recognition, as usually priority is given to research over teaching innovation. The findings also indicated that 54.5% participants asserted that university lack mentorship in the field of blended learning. Therefore, study suggests that universities should provide adequate mentorship programmes for the faculty members in enhancing their skills of integrating technology in their teaching.

  11. Faculty Attitudes toward General Education Assessment: A Qualitative Study about Their Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Sarah K.; Williams, Laura M.; Lazowski, Rory A.; Horst, S. Jeanne; Barron, Kenneth E.

    2014-01-01

    As assessment becomes an ever more critical facet of higher education, it is apparent that some faculty do not always value assessment (Crossley & Wang, 2010; Ebersole, 2009). Further, faculty may react with resistance, particularly when they perceive that assessment is being imposed upon them from external sources (Crossley & Wang, 2010;…

  12. Effect of book reviewing workshop on awareness of, aptitude for and attitude toward book reviews in faculty members of faculty of management and medical information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafi, Nayere Sadat Soleimanzade; Ashrafi-Rizi, Hasan; Yarmohammadian, Mohammad Hossein; Shahrzadi, Leila; Hasanzade, Akbar

    2014-01-01

    Works evaluation and critique is one of the most important phases in scientific production cycle. Reviewers need some aptitude about rules and principles of writing good review. Considering the important role of books for storage and transferring the scientific findings, book reviewing is vital to scientific progress. Despite this fact, investigation of Isfahan University of Medical Science's journal, demonstrated the number of published book reviews to be very small. This study aims to investigate the influence of reviewing training courses on participants' book reviewing awareness, attitude, and aptitude. The study method is experimental with two group design (with pre-test and post-test) and applied. Statistical population is of all faculty members of the faculty of management and medical information of Isfahan University of Medical Science, including both hired and contracted employees, which, according to faculty's department of Education, consists of 86 people. The sampling method used in this study is random. Number of samples in case and control groups was calculated using the following equation of n= (z1 + z2) 2 (2s2)/d2 and is 15 people. One checklist and two questionnaires were the means of data collection. Data were analyzed using SPSS 18.0 software and two level of descriptive (mean and SD) and inferential statistics (t-test and t-paired). Findings showed that the mean score of awareness of book reviews in case group increased meaningfully after the training course (55.7) compared to the score prior to the intervention (33.1), P book reviews in control group remained mostly the same before (31.6) and after intervention (35.1), P = 0.35. The mean score of attitude toward book reviews showed no significant difference before and after intervention in both case group (71.4 before intervention and 74.4 after intervention, P = 0.11) and control group (70.9 before intervention and 74.4 after intervention, P = 0.91). The mean score of book reviewing aptitude

  13. Barriers, facilitators and attitudes influencing health promotion activities in general practice: an explorative pilot study

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    Geense Wytske W

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The number of chronically ill patients increases every year. This is partly due to an unhealthy lifestyle. However, the frequency and quality of (evidence-based health promotion activities conducted by Dutch general practitioners (GPs and practice nurses (PNs are limited. The aim of this pilot study was to explore which lifestyle interventions Dutch GPs and PNs carry out in primary care, which barriers and facilitators can be identified and what main topics are with respect to attitudes towards health promoting activities. These topic areas will be identified for a future, larger scale study. Method This qualitative study consisted of 25 semi-structured interviews with sixteen GPs and nine PNs. ATLAS.ti was used to analyse the transcripts of the interviews. Results All GPs and PNs said they discuss lifestyle with their patients. Next to this, GPs and PNs counsel patients, and/or refer them to other disciplines. Only few said they refer patients to specific lifestyle programs or interventions in their own practice or in the neighbourhood. Several barriers and facilitators were identified. The main topics as barriers are: a lack of patients’ motivation to make lifestyle changes, insufficient reimbursement, a lack of proven effectiveness of interventions and a lack of overview of health promoting programs in their neighbourhood. The most cited facilitators are availability of a PN, collaboration with other disciplines and availability of interventions in their own practice. With respect to attitudes, six different types of GPs were identified reflecting the main topics that relate to attitudes, varying from ‘ignorer’ to ‘nurturer’. The topics relating to PNs attitudes towards health promotion activities, were almost unanimously positive. Conclusion GPs and PNs all say they discuss lifestyle issues with their patients, but the health promotion activities that are organized in their practice vary. Main topics that hinder

  14. Saudi high school students’ attitudes and barriers toward the use of computer technologies in learning English

    OpenAIRE

    Sabti, Ahmed Abdulateef; Chaichan, Rasha Sami

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the attitudes of Saudi Arabian high school students toward the use of computer technologies in learning English. The study also discusses the possible barriers that affect and limit the actual usage of computers. Quantitative approach is applied in this research, which involved 30 Saudi Arabia students of a high school in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. The respondents comprised 15 males and 15 females with ages between 16 years and 18 years. Two instruments, namely, Scale of Atti...

  15. Latina Faculty Transcending Barriers: Peer Mentoring in a Hispanic-Serving Institution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Elizabeth T.; Núñez, Anne-Marie

    2014-01-01

    In this article, the authors conducted a research metasynthesis of publications by a group of Latina tenure-track faculty participating in a peer mentoring group, the Research for the Educational Advancement of Latin@s (REAL) collaborative, housed in one Hispanic Serving Institution. Due to the small representation of Latinas in the academy, the…

  16. Academic Bullying: A Barrier to Tenure and Promotion for African-American Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazier, Kimberly N.

    2011-01-01

    The author discusses the problem of retention of African American faculty due to tenure and promotion issues. The author outlines obstacles that African American face in the workplace while seeking tenure and promotion in academia. A case example is presented that illuminates how these stressors manifest in the academic setting and recommendations…

  17. Knowledge, attitudes, practices, and barriers related to research utilization: a survey among pharmacists in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Sin Yee; Hatah, Ernieda

    2017-04-01

    Background Research utilization is part of evidence-based practice referring to the process of reviewing and critiquing scientific research and applying the findings to one's own clinical practice. Many studies on research utilization have been conducted with doctors and nurses, but to our knowledge, none have been investigated amongst pharmacists. Objective To assess research utilization and its barriers among pharmacists and identify potential influencing factors. Setting Malaysia. Methods This cross-sectional survey was administered online and by mail to a convenient sample of pharmacists working in hospitals, health clinics, and retail pharmacies in rural and urban areas. Main outcome measure Pharmacists' research utilization knowledge, attitudes, and practices. Results Six hundred surveys were mailed to potential respondents, and 466 were returned (77.7% response rate). Twenty-eight respondents completed the survey online. The respondents' research utilization knowledge, attitudes, and practices were found to be moderate. Research utilization was associated with respondents' knowledge and attitude scores (P research utilization were modelled, higher educational level was associated with higher level of research utilization (P research utilization, respectively. The main reported barrier to research utilization was lack of sufficient authority to change patient care procedures. Conclusion Pharmacists' research utilization knowledge, attitudes, and practices can be improved by encouraging pharmacists to pursue higher degrees, promoting active participation in institutions' journal clubs, and introducing senior clinical pharmacist specialization.

  18. A systematic review on barriers, facilities, knowledge and attitude toward evidence-based medicine in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morteza Ghojazadeh

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Evidence-based medicine (EBM is the ability and skill in using and integration of the best up-to-date evidences. The aim of this study was a systematic review of barriers, facilities, knowledge and attitude of EBM in Iran. Methods: In this study, database and manual search was used with keywords such as, "evidence-based, EBM, evidence-based nursing, evidence-based practice, evidence-based care, evidence-based activities, evidence-based education" and their combination with the keywords of the barrier, facilitator, attitude, awareness, prospective, knowledge, practice and Iran. The databases of SID (Scientific information database, Magiran, MEDLIB, PubMed, Google scholar, IranMedex and CINAHL (Cumulative index to nursing and allied health literature were used for data collection. Results: Finally, 28 papers were included in this study. The lack of facilities, time and skill in research methodology were the most important barriers to EBM. The most and least important factors were orderly creating ample opportunity and detecting needs and problems. The degree of familiarity with the terminology of evidence-based performance was low (44.2%. The textbooks have been considered as the most significant source of obtaining information. The level of awareness, knowledge, and evidence-based performance was less than 50.0%. Conclusion: There are many various barriers in use of EBM and healthcare providers despite the positive attitude toward EBM had a low level knowledge in EBM setting. Consideration of the importance of EBM proper planning and effective intervention are necessary to removing the barriers and increase the knowledge of healthcare providers.

  19. Nurse Attitude-Related Barriers to Effective Control of Cancer Pain among Iranian Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Name, Name; Mohamadian, Robab; Rahmani, Azad; Fizollah-Zadeh, Hussein; Jabarzadeh, Franak; Azadi, Arman; Rostami, Hussein

    2016-01-01

    Many cancer patients still experience pain worldwide. There are many barriers for effective control of cancer pain and many of these are related to health care providers. There is a need for further investigation of these barriers. The aim of this study was to investigate nurse-related barriers to control of cancer pain among Iranian nurses. In this descriptive study 49 nurses from two hospitals affiliated to Tabriz and Ardebil Universities of Medical Sciences participated using a census sampling method. A demographic and profession related checklist and Barriers Questionnaire II (BQ-II) were used for data collection. The results showed negative attitudes of participants regarding control of cancer pain. Participants believed that cancer pain medications do not manage cancer pain at acceptable levels; patients may become addicted by using these drugs; cancer pain medications have many uncontrollable effects; and controlling cancer pain may distract the physicians from treating disease. Iranian nurses have negative attitudes toward pain control in cancer patients especially about effectiveness of pain medication and their side effects. Educational intervention to reduce these misconceptions is needed.

  20. Attitudes, awareness, and barriers toward evidence-based practice in orthodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhavji, Asha; Araujo, Eustaquio A; Kim, Ki Beom; Buschang, Peter H

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the attitudes, awareness, and barriers toward evidence-based practice. A survey consisting of 35 questions pertaining to the use of scientific evidence in orthodontics was sent to 4771 members of the American Association of Orthodontists in the United States. Each respondent's age, attainment of a master's degree, and whether he or she was currently involved with teaching were ascertained. To minimize bias, the survey questions were phrased as an examination of the use of scientific literature in orthodontics. A total of 1517 surveys were received (response rate, 32%). Most respondents had positive attitudes toward, but a poor understanding of, evidence-based practice. The major barrier identified was ambiguous and conflicting research. Younger orthodontists were more aware, had a greater understanding, and perceived more barriers than did older orthodontists. Orthodontists involved in teaching were more aware, had a greater understanding, and reported fewer barriers than those not involved with teaching. Those with master's degrees had a greater understanding of evidence-based practice than those without degrees. Educational initiatives are needed to increase the understanding and use of evidence-based practice in orthodontics. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Integrating Internet into Engineering Education: A Case Study of Students' Usage and Attitudes in Faculty of Engineering, Ahmadu Bello University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.O. Anafi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The attitude of students towards the integration of the internet as a study tool and communication channel in teaching and learning in engineering has been investigated. A study was carried out in the Faculty of Engineering, Ahmadu Bello University Zaria, Nigeria, aimed at investigating the effect of certain variables such as gender, course of study, computer experience, and the percentage of internet usage on teaching and learning processes. A well-structured questionnaire was administered to a randomly selected five hundred (500 male and female students across the seven (7 departments of the faculty and about 85% were filled and returned. The study also examines the university management's perspectives and strategies to incorporate internet usage in teaching and learning processes especially in engineering. Amazingly, responses received showed that experience in the use of the computer in surfing the internet for problem based activities mainly affects the level of internet usage across the faculty. This factor makes some students to misplace their priority in internet usage emphasizing on e-mail correspondence and social networking rather than sourcing for information and solving problems as it is done by a few students. Furthermore, findings support that internet cannot entirely substitute for traditional teaching and learning processes like text reading but can serve as a reasonable alternative when the latter is unavailable

  2. Physics Faculty and Educational Researchers: Divergent Expectations as Barriers to the Diffusion of Innovations

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    Henderson, C; Dancy, Melissa H.; Henderson, Charles

    2006-01-01

    Physics Education Research (PER) practitioners have engaged in substantial curriculum development and dissemination work in recent years. Yet, it appears that this work has had minimal influence on the fundamental teaching practices of typical physics faculty. To better understand this situation interviews were conducted with 5 likely users of physics education research. All reported making changes in their instructional practices and all were influenced, to some extent, by educational research. Yet, none made full use of educational research and most had complaints about their interactions with educational researchers. In this paper we examine how these instructors used educational research in making instructional decisions and identify divergent expectations about how researchers and faculty can work together to improve student learning. Although different instructors emphasized different aspects of this discrepancy between expectations, we believe that they are all related to a single underlying issue: the...

  3. Disclosure of Mental Disability by College and University Faculty: The Negotiation of Accommodations, Supports, and Barriers

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    Margaret Price

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available High-profile shootings and student suicides have made mental health issues on college campuses a major national issue. College students are usually the focus of this conversation, while little attention beyond anecdotal accounts has been paid to faculty with mental health issues. In response to this lack of broad-scale research, a first-of-its-kind cross-institutional survey of faculty with mental disabilities was conducted. Respondents self-identified as faculty with mental disabilities, mental illness or mental-health histories. Results from 267 respondents indicated that nearly 70% had no or limited familiarity with accommodations, and even fewer used them (87%. A majority of respondents (62% disclosed to at least one person on campus, primarily colleagues (50% and department chairs (21%. Respondents felt most supported by spouses/significant others (75% very or extremely supported and friends (51% rather than colleagues (29% and supervisors (25%. In our discussion of these findings, we offer suggestions for practice that will improve environments, rather than focusing on case-by-case "fixes" for those who disclose. We also suggest directions for further research into this topic, which is frequently mentioned (in both scholarly and popular publications but rarely investigated systematically or on a wide scale.

  4. Effective Communication Barriers in Clinical Teaching among Malaysian Medical Students in Zagazig Faculty of Medicine (Egypt).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abass, Marwa Ahmed; Said, Nagwa Samy; Zahed, Eman Salah El; Hussein, Wafaa Fawzy; Hamid, Omaima Ibrahim Abdel

    2015-12-01

    effective communication in a clinical environment plays a vital role in patient assessment and treatment. The aim of this study was to understand the experiences of Malaysian medical students concerning communication barriers during clinical practice. The goal was to provide answers for three important research questions, i.e., 1) Are communication barriers an impediment to Malaysian students during clinical teaching? 2) What is the nature of the language barriers that the students encounter? and 3) What are the best ways of reducing these barriers during clinical teaching? The qualitative method was used to conduct the research, and open-ended questionnaires were used to collect the data. The study was conducted on 95 fourth-, fifth-, and sixth-year students, 80% of whom completed the study. Medical students from Malaysia who have limited knowledge of the Arabic language experience some difficulties in communicating with staff members, patients, and nurses during their clinical practices. Successful orientation of students to the language used in the clinical environment will help the students overcome the communication barriers they encounter during their clinical practices.

  5. Perinatal Palliative Care: Barriers and Attitudes of Neonatologists and Nurses in Poland

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    Aleksandra Korzeniewska-Eksterowicz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To identify barriers and personnel attitudes towards realization of palliative care principles in neonatological units. Study Design. An anonymous questionnaire was posted to all heads of departments and head nurses of all the 27 neonatological units in the Lodz area. Results. We received 46 (85% questionnaires. Final analysis comprised 42 properly filled-in questionnaires (by 22 doctors and 20 nurses. In case of prenatal diagnosis of a lethal defect, 77.27% of doctors and 65% of nurses opted for informing the mother also about the possibility of pregnancy continuation and organization of palliative care after delivery. Most of respondents accepted conditions for abortion pointed by the Polish law. The most common barriers pointed out by both groups were insufficient knowledge of the personnel on palliative medicine and family preference for life sustaining treatment. Conclusions. Understanding attitudes of personnel towards palliative care and identification of barriers are a starting point for future efforts to improve the system of neonatological care.

  6. AN ACTIVITY THEORY APPROACH TO STUDY BARRIERS OF FACULTY REGARDING TECHNOLOGY INTEGRATION IN HIGHER EDUCATION

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castro Guzman, Willy

    2016-01-01

    Information and communication technologies are instruments for supporting new ways of teaching and learning. Nevertheless, its impact concerning scope has not reached the expected level. This strain between benefits and impact has been inquired from the perspective of barriers of teachers to use...... for a reconceptualization in the study of barriers arguing that the teaching process is a complex and dynamic activity that needs to be examined from a collective perspective. Cultural-Historical Activity Theory is the theoretical framework used in the study. It concludes with the necessity of overcoming the existing...

  7. Faculty lecturers’ attitudes towards some educational indicators at Lorestan university of medical sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    faride malekshahi

    2011-03-01

    Meanwhile their evaluations regarding officials’ attention to educational problems and appropriateness of students numbers to educational facilities were rated weak. Paying more attention to the quality and quantity of workshops , continuous education and solving university educational problems were of great emphasis. Besides, participation of all the faculty lectures in the educational planning and managemant is recommended.

  8. Understanding Faculty Survey Nonrespondents: Their Characteristics, Organizational Citizenship Behaviors, Workplace Attitudes, and Reasons for Nonparticipation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, Kiernan Robert

    2013-01-01

    College and university administrators frequently survey their faculty to inform decisions affecting the academic workplace. Higher education researchers, too, rely heavily on survey methodologies in their scholarly work. Survey response rates, however, have been declining steadily for decades, and when nonrespondents and respondents systematically…

  9. Attitudes of Nursing Faculty towards Nursing Students with Disabilities: An Integrative Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levey, Janet A.

    2014-01-01

    The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA, 1990) and Americans with Disabilities Act Amendments Act (ADAAA, 2008) provide students with disabilities access to postsecondary institutions and are applicable to nursing education in all learning environments. Nursing faculty members are charged with admitting, educating, and graduating students, with…

  10. Attitudes toward Gay Men and Lesbian Women among Heterosexual Social Work Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chonody, Jill M.; Woodford, Michael R.; Brennan, David J.; Newman, Bernie; Wang, Donna

    2014-01-01

    This study reports results from a national Internet-based survey administered anonymously to a cross-section of social work faculty in the United States. Drawn from a sampling frame of 700 accredited or in candidacy schools, data were collected between November 2010 and March 2011. We investigate the role of sex, sexual orientation, race,…

  11. Older adults’ attitudes and barriers toward the use of mobile phones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navabi N

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Nasrin Navabi, Fatemeh Ghaffari, Zahra Jannat-Alipoor Nursing and Midwifery Department, Babol University of Medical Sciences, Mazandaran, Iran Background and objectives: The limitations caused by the process of aging and the prevalence of chronic diseases contribute to reduced performance in physical, psychological, and social areas of life in older people. The use of mobile phones as easily accessible portable tools with a high performance is associated with an increased health literacy, self-care, and independence in older people. The present study was conducted to determine older people’s attitudes toward the use of mobile phones and the barriers to their use. Materials and methods: The present descriptive study was conducted on a sample population of 328 individuals older than 60 years presenting to health centers across cities in west Mazandaran, Iran. The data collection tools used included a mobile phone use checklist, a questionnaire on older people’s attitude toward the use of mobile phones, and a questionnaire on the barriers to the use of mobile phones. The reliability and validity of these questionnaires were confirmed by the researchers. The data obtained were recorded and then analyzed using SPSS. The level of statistical significance was set at P≤0.05. Results: According to the results, 80% of the older people had regular mobile phones and 20% had smartphones. In 95% of the male and 80% of the female participants, the greatest use of mobile phones pertained to making phone calls. A total of 5% of the male and 2% of the female participants used the Internet in their mobile phones. A total of 44% of the female and 42.80% of the male participants had poor attitudes (score from 0 to 40 toward mobile phone use. As for the different dimensions of the attitude toward mobile phone use, the highest score obtained by the female participants (71.66% pertained to the psychoemotional dimension and the highest score in the male

  12. The Analysis of the Relationship between Organizational Structure and Information Technology (IT): And the Barriers to Its Establishment at the University of Isfahan from the Faculty Member's Viewpoints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyman, Yarmohammadzadeh; Mohsen, Allammeh Sayyed; Hassan, Ghalavandi; Aboulghassim, Farhang; Zaman, Ajdari

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to investigate the relationship between organizational structure between IT and the barriers to its establishment in University of Isfahan from faculty member's viewpoints in 2007-2008. The questionnaires were prepared and examined based on the organization dimensions of organizational structures (formality,…

  13. Hydration and Fluid Replacement Knowledge, Attitudes, Barriers, and Behaviors of NCAA Division 1 American Football Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judge, Lawrence W; Kumley, Roberta F; Bellar, David M; Pike, Kim L; Pierson, Eric E; Weidner, Thomas; Pearson, David; Friesen, Carol A

    2016-11-01

    Judge, LW, Kumley, RF, Bellar, DM, Pike, KL, Pierson, EE, Weidner, T, Pearson, D, and Friesen, CA. Hydration and fluid replacement knowledge, attitudes, barriers, and behaviors of NCAA Division 1 American football players. J Strength Cond Res 30(11): 2972-2978, 2016-Hydration is an important part of athletic performance, and understanding athletes' hydration knowledge, attitudes, barriers, and behaviors is critical for sport practitioners. The aim of this study was to assess National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division 1 (D1) American football players, with regard to hydration and fluid intake before, during, and after exercise, and to apply this assessment to their overall hydration practice. The sample consisted of 100 student-athletes from 2 different NCAA D1 universities, who participated in voluntary summer football conditioning. Participants completed a survey to identify the fluid and hydration knowledge, attitudes and behaviors, demographic data, primary football position, previous nutrition education, and barriers to adequate fluid consumption. The average Hydration Knowledge Score (HKS) for the participants in the present study was 11.8 ± 1.9 (69.4% correct), with scores ranging from 42 to 100% correct. Four key misunderstandings regarding hydration, specifically related to intervals of hydration habits among the study subjects, were revealed. Only 24% of the players reported drinking enough fluids before, during, immediately after, and 2 hours after practice. Generalized linear model analysis predicted the outcome variable HKS (χ = 28.001, p = 0.045), with nutrition education (Wald χ = 8.250, p = 0.041) and position on the football team (χ = 9.361, p = 0.025) being significant predictors. "Backs" (e.g., quarterbacks, running backs, and defensive backs) demonstrated significantly higher hydration knowledge than "Linemen" (p = 0.014). Findings indicated that if changes are not made to increase hydration awareness levels among football teams

  14. Dental students and faculty members' attitudes towards care for underserved patients and community service: do community-based dental education and voluntary service-learning matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volvovsky, Mariya; Vodopyanov, Dmitry; Inglehart, Marita R

    2014-08-01

    The objectives of this study were to explore 1) how students across the four years of a dental curriculum differed in attitudes towards underserved patients and community service at the beginning and end of each school year; 2) how these attitudes changed as a function of participating in required vs. voluntary community-based activities; and 3) what attitudes faculty members held about the effects of community service-learning on students. Surveys were distributed to 440 students at one dental school at the beginning and end of the school year. The overall response rate for those surveys was 75 percent, with variations among classes: first year, 94 percent; second year, 92 percent; third year, 69 percent; and fourth year, 43 percent. Survey data were also collected from twenty-two students (out of a possible forty-seven) who participated in voluntary service-learning and from fifty-four faculty members (out of approximately 150). The results showed that, at the beginning of the year, the first-year students' attitudes were more positive than the responses of students in all other cohorts. However, at the end of the year, their attitudes were less positive. Participating in voluntary service-learning improved students' attitudes towards treating underserved patients only in the short run, and experiencing ten weeks of community-based dental education did not improve their attitudes. The faculty respondents' attitudes, however, were quite positive. The decrease in students' positive attitudes towards treating underserved patients and participating in community service should raise questions about why this loss of idealism occurred.

  15. Computer Attitude, and the Impact of Personal Characteristics and Information and Communication Technology Adoption Patterns on Performance of Teaching Faculty in Higher Education in Ghana, West Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larbi-Apau, Josephine A.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined computer attitude, and the impact of personal characteristics and ICT adoption patterns on performance of multidisciplinary teaching faculty in three public universities in Ghana. A cross-sectional research of mixed methods was applied in collecting data and information. Quantitative data from 164 respondents were analyzed…

  16. Language barriers in medical education and attitudes towards Arabization of medicine: student and staff perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbour, S M; Dewedar, S A; Kandil, S K

    2012-12-04

    Students and staff perspectives on language barriers in medical education in Egypt and their attitude towards Arabization of the medical curriculum were explored in a questionnaire survey of 400 medical students and 150 staff members. Many students (56.3%) did not consider learning medicine in English an obstacle, and 44.5% of staff considered it an obstacle only in the 1st year of medical school. Many other barriers to learning other than language were mentioned. However, 44.8% of students translated English terms to Arabic to facilitate studying and 70.6% of students in their clinical study years would prefer to learn patient history-taking in Arabic. While Arabization in general was strongly declined, teaching in Arabic language was suggested as appropriate in some specialties.

  17. Medical grand rounds in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia: Current attitudes and barriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Alqahtani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Medical grand rounds (MGRs are considered key educational tools in most academic medical institutions. In this multi-center cross-sectional survey, we tried to determine the current attitudes of local medical practitioners to MGRs, as well as perceived barriers. Methodology: A total of 120 physicians from the National Guard Hospital, King Fahad Medical City, King Khalid University Hospital and King Faisal Specialist Hospital participated in the survey. The questionnaire consisted of statements on attitudes and perceived barriers against participating in MGRs, as well as participants′ levels of agreement. Results: Most participants attend MGRs regularly (94.2%, claiming that it is mandatory (88%. Participants also agreed that MGRs were important tools for continuing medical education (89.2% and that they provided an opportunity to both present materials and interact with their colleagues in other divisions (86.7% and 81.6%, respectively. The vast majority of respondents agreed that "topic review/update" and "inviting guest speakers" were the two most preferred suggestions for improving MGRs (94.2% and 92.5%, respectively. Major barriers included constraints of time (43.3% and topics that were not patient-related (40.8%. Conclusion: MGRs in the major Tertiary Hospitals in Riyadh are well attended, and the majority of the local practitioners believe in the positive effect of MGRs in delivering quality and up to date medical knowledge. Time and physician-specific issues were identified as major barriers that needed to be addressed in order to maximize participation of medical staff.

  18. Perceptions and Attitudes of Occupational Therapy Faculty towards the Scholarship of Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordinetz, Sue Ann

    2009-01-01

    Occupational therapy educators have been encouraged to engage in the scholarship of teaching as a form of best practice in education. Despite professional documents and encouragement by leaders in the field of occupational therapy, there is very little known about occupational therapy educators' perceptions, attitudes, and engagement in the…

  19. Factors Related to Faculty Members' Attitude and Adoption of a Learning Management System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wichadee, Saovapa

    2015-01-01

    Learning Management Systems (LMS) play a crucial role in organizing the course contents. However, some instructors use LMS in their classes while some do not. This study aimed to discover the factors in relation to the instructors' attitude toward LMS and adoption of LMS in their course. A survey was administered to 62 instructors to follow up the…

  20. Perceptions and Attitudes of Occupational Therapy Faculty towards the Scholarship of Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordinetz, Sue Ann

    2009-01-01

    Occupational therapy educators have been encouraged to engage in the scholarship of teaching as a form of best practice in education. Despite professional documents and encouragement by leaders in the field of occupational therapy, there is very little known about occupational therapy educators' perceptions, attitudes, and engagement in the…

  1. Development of a Scale to Measure Faculty Attitude Towards Open Educational Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Sanjaya; Sharma, Meenu; Sharma, Ramesh Chander; Singh, Alka; Thakur, Atul

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the entire methodology for the development of a scale to measure Attitude towards Open Educational Resources (ATOER). Traditionally, it is observed that some teachers are more willing to share their work than others, indicating the need to understand teachers' psychological and behavioural determinants that influence use of…

  2. Older adults’ attitudes and barriers toward the use of mobile phones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navabi, Nasrin; Ghaffari, Fatemeh; Jannat-Alipoor, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Background and objectives The limitations caused by the process of aging and the prevalence of chronic diseases contribute to reduced performance in physical, psychological, and social areas of life in older people. The use of mobile phones as easily accessible portable tools with a high performance is associated with an increased health literacy, self-care, and independence in older people. The present study was conducted to determine older people’s attitudes toward the use of mobile phones and the barriers to their use. Materials and methods The present descriptive study was conducted on a sample population of 328 individuals older than 60 years presenting to health centers across cities in west Mazandaran, Iran. The data collection tools used included a mobile phone use checklist, a questionnaire on older people’s attitude toward the use of mobile phones, and a questionnaire on the barriers to the use of mobile phones. The reliability and validity of these questionnaires were confirmed by the researchers. The data obtained were recorded and then analyzed using SPSS. The level of statistical significance was set at P≤0.05. Results According to the results, 80% of the older people had regular mobile phones and 20% had smartphones. In 95% of the male and 80% of the female participants, the greatest use of mobile phones pertained to making phone calls. A total of 5% of the male and 2% of the female participants used the Internet in their mobile phones. A total of 44% of the female and 42.80% of the male participants had poor attitudes (score from 0 to 40) toward mobile phone use. As for the different dimensions of the attitude toward mobile phone use, the highest score obtained by the female participants (71.66%) pertained to the psychoemotional dimension and the highest score in the male participants (72.85%) to the instrumental dimension. The results also revealed the lack of knowledge of English as the greatest barrier to mobile phone use in both sexes

  3. Factors That Affect Faculty Attitudes toward Adoption of Technology-Rich Blended Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moukali, Khalid Hussain

    2012-01-01

    Universities worldwide are transitioning to blended learning where technology is used to enhance and augment traditional face-to-face instruction. Investigation of how well blended learning strategies are accepted and adopted in multicultural settings is needed to facilitate this transition. This study investigated factors and barriers that…

  4. Overcoming Barriers for eLearning in Universities--Portfolio Models for eCompetence Development of Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneckenberg, Dirk

    2010-01-01

    This paper explores the role that eCompetence of faculty members play in the integration of eLearning in higher education. Learning technologies have the potential to enhance educational innovation, but the eLearning adoption rate of faculty in universities is so far disappointing. The motivation and capability of faculty to use information and…

  5. Interacting in the Smog Factors that Shape Faculty Attitudes and Beliefs about Race and Inclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodari, Apriel K.

    2006-03-01

    Many faculty members realize that we must interact productively with diverse colleagues and students, and we must find ways to benefit from the talents of all members of our intellectual community. Put simply, we must aim for the ceiling rather than the floor. This means that we approach our work informed that engaging diversity in our classrooms will increase our success and the success of all our students. But in physics, it is often difficult to measure and address diversity issues because doing so is not perceived as central to our discipline. To address this apparent disconnection, we present some ideas on race [1] and inclusion [2] within the context of the physics instruction. Specifically, we speak to how university faculty might use inclusive pedagogy in physics education research and curriculum. Our goal here is to open a frank dialogue and present concrete avenues to explore as you create activities that serve your classroom best. *Tatum, Beverly Daniel. (2004). Changing demographics and challenges of the future. Draft Proceedings of the National Science Board Workshop on Broadening the Participation in Science and Engineering Research and Education. Arlington, VA: National Science Board; Tatum, Beverly Daniel. (1997). Why are All the Black Kids Sitting Together in the Cafeteria? And Other Conversations about Race. New York: Basic Books. *Bonilla-Silva, Eduardo. (2003). Racism without Racists: Color-blind Racism and the Persistence of Racial Inequality in the United States. Lanham, MD: Rowan & Littlefield; Thiederman, Sondra. (2003). Making Diversity Work: 7 Steps for Defeating Bias in the Workplace. Chicago: Dearborn Trade Publishing.

  6. Barriers to Innovation in Urban Wastewater Utilities: Attitudes of Managers in California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiparsky, Michael; Thompson, Barton H; Binz, Christian; Sedlak, David L; Tummers, Lars; Truffer, Bernhard

    2016-06-01

    In many regions of the world, urban water systems will need to transition into fundamentally different forms to address current stressors and meet impending challenges-faster innovation will need to be part of these transitions. To assess the innovation deficit in urban water organizations and to identify means for supporting innovation, we surveyed wastewater utility managers in California. Our results reveal insights about the attitudes towards innovation among decision makers, and how perceptions at the level of individual managers might create disincentives for experimentation. Although managers reported feeling relatively unhindered organizationally, they also spend less time on innovation than they feel they should. The most frequently reported barriers to innovation included cost and financing; risk and risk aversion; and regulatory compliance. Considering these results in the context of prior research on innovation systems, we conclude that collective action may be required to address underinvestment in innovation.

  7. Barriers to Innovation in Urban Wastewater Utilities: Attitudes of Managers in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiparsky, Michael; Thompson, Barton H.; Binz, Christian; Sedlak, David L.; Tummers, Lars; Truffer, Bernhard

    2016-06-01

    In many regions of the world, urban water systems will need to transition into fundamentally different forms to address current stressors and meet impending challenges—faster innovation will need to be part of these transitions. To assess the innovation deficit in urban water organizations and to identify means for supporting innovation, we surveyed wastewater utility managers in California. Our results reveal insights about the attitudes towards innovation among decision makers, and how perceptions at the level of individual managers might create disincentives for experimentation. Although managers reported feeling relatively unhindered organizationally, they also spend less time on innovation than they feel they should. The most frequently reported barriers to innovation included cost and financing; risk and risk aversion; and regulatory compliance. Considering these results in the context of prior research on innovation systems, we conclude that collective action may be required to address underinvestment in innovation.

  8. Mobile Learning as a Method of Ubiquitous Learning: Students' Attitudes, Readiness, and Possible Barriers to Implementation in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhassan, Riyadh

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the attitudes and level of readiness, and possible barriers to implementing Mobile Learning as a part of ubiquitous learning. In addition, the study attempted to find out to what extent students are interested in mobile learning. It also aimed to answer the question regarding the readiness of college…

  9. How do faculty conceptions on reading, writing and their role in the teaching of academic literacies influence their inclusive attitude

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Colombo

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This study explored faculty conceptions about reading and writing, the student body, reasons for student low-performance as well as their declared teaching practices aimed at helping students to better understand readings and write academic texts. The objective was to understand what type of professors´ conceptions contributed with a more inclusive attitude towards first-year students. Content analysis from data gathered from in-depth interviews indicates that professors who acknowledged the complexity of the reading and writing processes tend to be more inclusive and to use reading and writing to teach and not just to evaluate. Those who taught writing courses tended to consider writing as a general skill, transferable to other contexts and spheres of knowledge. Less-inclusive teachers, explaining why they did not offer guidance or proposed remedial solutions, claimed that students should already have mastered academic reading and writing when entering the university and that teaching these skills implied being overprotective and not allowing them to mature.

  10. How do faculty conceptions on reading, writing and their role in the teaching of academic literacies influence their inclusive attitude

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Colombo

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/2175-8026.2016v69n3p115 This study explored faculty conceptions about reading and writing, the student body, reasons for student low-performance as well as their declared teaching practices aimed at helping students to better understand readings and write academic texts. The objective was to understand what type of professors´ conceptions contributed with a more inclusive attitude towards first-year students. Content analysis from data gathered from in-depth interviews indicates that professors who acknowledged the complexity of the reading and writing processes tend to be more inclusive and to use reading and writing to teach and not just to evaluate. Those who taught writing courses tended to consider writing as a general skill, transferable to other contexts and spheres of knowledge. Less-inclusive teachers, explaining why they did not offer guidance or proposed remedial solutions, claimed that students should already have mastered academic reading and writing when entering the university and that teaching these skills implied being overprotective and not allowing them to mature.

  11. Attitudes and behaviours of students from the faculty of theology regarding organ donation: a study from Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naçar, M; Cetinkaya, F; Baykan, Z; Poyrazoğlu, S

    2009-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the knowledge and attitude of students from the Faculty of Theology of Erciyes University regarding organ donation. This study comprising all students (n = 264) showed that 51.6% of subjects to the kidney is an organ that may be donated; other organs were less known. 16.5% of the students thought that organ donation is not in accord with Islamic beliefs; 22.0% thought that it is permitted in Islam for Muslims to donate to non-Muslims, and 23.6% were willing to accept organs from non-Muslims. 23.6% of the students were willing to donate their organs, whereas 57.3% were undecided. None of the students had an organ donation card. Among students who did not consider donation or were undecided, 16.5% stated that it was "religiously inappropriate" and 13.3% stated that they did not "approve the loss of body integrity." Students declared that they had little knowledge regarding organ/tissue donation: 67.9% about the religious aspect, 78.9% about the legal aspect, and 80.5% about the scientific aspect. Only 24.6% of the group noted school education as their source of information, with 51.2% stating that they had been questioned about organ donation by society. With this study, we concluded that the student's knowledge regarding organ donation was not sufficient.

  12. Attitudes and perceived barriers of tertiary level health professionals towards incident reporting in Pakistan

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    Muhammad Raees Malik

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: A limited framework of incident reporting exists in most of the health care system in Pakistan. This poses a risk to the patient population and therefore there is a need to find the causes behind the lack of such a system in healthcare settings in Pakistan. Aims: To determine the attitudes and perceived barriers towards incident reporting among tertiary care health professionals in Pakistan. Materials and Methods: The study was done in Shifa International Hospitals and consisted of a questionnaire given to 217 randomly selected doctors and nurses. Mean ± SD of continuous variables and frequency (percentage % of categorical variables are presented. Chi square statistical analysis was used to test the significance of association among doctors and nurses with various outcome variables (motivators to report, perceived barriers, preferred person to report and patient’s outcome that influence reporting behaviors. P value of <0.05 was considered significant. Student doctors and student nurses were not included in the study. Results: Unlike consultant, registrars, medical officers and nurses (more than 95% are willing to report, only 20% of house officers will report the incident happened through them. Sixty nine percent of doctors and 67% of nurses perceive ‘administration sanction’ as a common barrier to incident reporting. Sixty percent of doctors and 80% of nurses would prefer reporting to the head of the department. Conclusions: By giving immunity from administrative sanction, providing prompt feedback and assurance that the incident reporting will be used to make changes in the system, there is considerable willingness of doctors and nurses to take time out of their busy schedules to submit reports.

  13. Physician Survey Assessing Pelvic Inflammatory Disease Knowledge and Attitudes to Identify Diagnosing and Reporting Barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco, Misty; Katz, Alan R; Hayes, Donald; Maddock, Jay E

    2016-01-01

    Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) is a notifiable disease in Hawaii with legal implications for noncompliance. A previous study comparing PID diagnoses in Hawaii's hospitals and state surveillance data confirmed underreporting in Hawaii. Reasons for noncompliance and underreporting are not well understood. All licensed primary care physicians in Hawaii were mailed a survey addressing PID diagnosis and reporting attitudes and practices. Hierarchical logistic regression was used to determine if physician characteristics, PID knowledge, or attitudes related to the diagnosis or reporting of PID, increased the odds of diagnosing and reporting PID. Among survey respondents (486 of 1,062; response rate of 45.8%), 104 (21.4%) had diagnosed PID. The PID reporting rate was 55.8% (58 of 104). The majority of physicians who diagnosed PID reported that PID reporting was time consuming. In hierarchical regression, obstetrician/gynecologists and family practitioners had the highest odds of diagnosing PID and internists had the lowest odds of reporting PID, those 15 years or longer since residency were less likely to report PID than those fewer than 15 years since residency, and increased PID diagnosing and reporting knowledge increased the odds of PID reporting by 1.63 times. Our findings suggest the need for training of all physicians on reportable diagnoses on a regular basis. There is a need to simplify the reporting process, because the time burden of reporting may present a modifiable barrier to reporting. Increased PID-related communication between local health departments and physicians is essential, and physicians should be provided technical assistance with reporting. Copyright © 2016 Jacobs Institute of Women's Health. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Internal medicine resident knowledge, attitudes, and barriers to naloxone prescription in hospital and clinic settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, J Deanna; Spicyn, Natalie; Matson, Pamela; Alvanzo, Anika; Feldman, Leonard

    2016-01-01

    The United States is facing an epidemic of opioid use and misuse leading to historically high rates of overdose. Community-based overdose education and naloxone distribution has effectively trained lay bystanders to recognize signs of overdose and administer naloxone for reversal. There has been a movement to encourage physicians to prescribe naloxone to all patients at risk of overdose; however, the rate of physician prescribing remains low. This study aims to describe resident knowledge of overdose risk assessment, naloxone prescribing practices, attitudes related to naloxone, and barriers to overdose prevention and naloxone prescription. The HOPE (Hospital-based Overdose Prevention and Education) Initiative is an educational campaign to teach internal medicine residents to assess overdose risk, provide risk reduction counseling, and prescribe naloxone. As part of a needs assessment, internal medicine residents at an academic medical center in Baltimore, Maryland, were surveyed in 2015. Data were collected anonymously using Qualtrics. Ninety-seven residents participated. Residents were overwhelmingly aware of naloxone (80%) and endorsed a willingness to prescribe (90%). Yet despite a high proportion of residents reporting patients in their panels at increased overdose risk (79%), few had prescribed naloxone (15%). Residents were willing to discuss overdose prevention strategies, although only a minority reported doing so (47%). The most common barriers to naloxone prescribing were related to knowledge gaps in how to prescribe and how to assess risk of overdose and identify candidates for naloxone (52% reporting low confidence in ability to identify patients who are at risk). Medicine residents are aware of naloxone and willing to prescribe it to at-risk patients. Due to decreased applied knowledge and limited self-efficacy, few residents have prescribed naloxone in the past. In order to improve rates of physician prescribing, initiatives must help physicians

  15. Benefits, barriers, attitudes, and beliefs about soy meat-alternatives among African American parishioners living in eastern North Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlak, Roman; Malinauskas, Brenda; Corbett, Ashley

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this study was to assess benefits, barriers, attitude, and beliefs about nutrient content and health effects, and sensory analysis of soy meat-alternatives among 40 African Americans, mean (SD) aged 54 (10), 78% of whom were females, participating in a faith-based nutrition program. Perceived benefits received higher scores than perceived barriers to eat soy meat-alternatives. Beliefs about nutrient content and health effects of consuming soy meat-alternatives were consistent with the scientific findings. The results indicate that soy meat-alternatives may be considered viable options to include in a diet of some African Americans.

  16. A survey of patient access to electronic mail: attitudes, barriers, and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fridsma, D. B.; Ford, P.; Altman, R.

    1994-01-01

    The use of electronic mail (e-mail) is increasing among both physicians and patients, although there is limited information in the literature about how patients might use e-mail to communicate with their physician. In our university-based internal medicine clinic, we have studied attitudes toward and access to e-mail among patients. A survey of 444 patients in our clinic showed that 46% of patients in the clinic use e-mail, and 89% of those with e-mail use it at work. Fifty-one percent would use e-mail all or most of the time to communicate with the clinic if it were available, and many of the communications that currently take place by phone could be replaced by e-mail. Barriers to e-mail use include privacy concerns among patients who use e-mail in the workplace, choosing the appropriate tasks for e-mail, and methods for efficiently triaging electronic messages in the clinic. PMID:7949909

  17. Attitude of Dental Prostheses Residents of Faculty of Dentistry of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences to Objective Structured Clinical Examination(OSCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Hafezeqoran

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE is one of the most authentic ways to evaluate clinical skills. The present study aimed at evaluating the attitude of dental prostheses residents of the faculty of dentistry of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences toward this kind of examination. Methods: In this cross sectional-descriptive study, two questionnaires were designed. One questionnaire dealt with nature of OSCE and the other dealt with the attitude of residents about OSCE. After holding the OSCE in July 2012, 2013, and 2014, the questionnaires were delivered to all dental prostheses residents of the Tabriz dental faculty. In total, 40 questionnaires were filled out within three years. Questions included five-choice items based on a Likert scale. Furthermore, the students’ scores in each exam were recorded to evaluate any possible relationship between the acquired grade and the student’s attitude toward the exam. The collected data were analyzed using SPSS17 software (α=5%. Results: Most residents (62.5% referred to the large number of questions as a positive factor. In addition, a majority of residents (90% suffered from high levels of stress during OSCE. There was a close relation between the grade acquired by the residents in the examination and their attitude to OSCE as well as their evaluation about the examination. The students with better grades had more positive attitudes toward OSCE. Conclusion: Considering the satisfaction level of the students in this study, OSCE was held efficiently and may be considered as part of the training program of the residents.

  18. Attitudes of Select Music Performance Faculty toward Students Teaching Private Lessons after Graduation: A USA Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredrickson, William E.; Moore, Christopher; Gavin, Russell

    2013-01-01

    The present study was designed to pilot test an adjusted version of a questionnaire, used in earlier studies with college music students, to determine opinions of college music faculty on the topic of private lesson teaching. Full-time tenure-track college music faculty, with primary appointments in applied music at two universities in the United…

  19. The critical factors that influence faculty attitudes and perceptions of teaching English as Second Language nursing students: A grounded theory research study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starkey, Traci J

    2015-05-01

    As the demographics of the United States change, nursing will need to become more ethnically diverse in order to provide culturally responsive healthcare. Enrollment of English as Second Language nursing students is increasing; however, these students often encounter academic difficulties. The increase in English as Second Language nursing students in the classroom and clinical setting has posed challenges for nurse faculty. To explore the critical factors that influence faculty attitudes and perceptions of teaching English as Second Language nursing students. A grounded theory method based on the philosophical underpinnings of symbolic interactionism and pragmatism was used to explore the critical factors that influence faculty attitudes and perceptions of teaching English as Second Language nursing students. The study took place at various schools of nursing in the Southeast Florida area. Educators teaching in an associate, baccalaureate, and/or graduate nursing program at an accredited school of nursing. Semi-structured interviews and a focus group were conducted to collect data from nurse faculty. Data segments from interviews were coded, categorized, and analyzed. Theoretical sampling and a focus group interview were used to validate the concepts, themes, and categories identified during the individual interviews. A substantive level theory was developed. The core category that developed was conscientization. The three dominant categories that emerged from the data were overcoming, coming to know, and facilitating. The theoretical framework of conscientization provided an explanation of the social processes involved in teaching English as Second Language nursing students. The theoretical framework developed from this study can be used to increase the effectiveness of teaching English as Second Language nursing students, improve their chances of success, and enhance diversity in the nursing profession. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Perceived barriers to care and attitudes towards shared decision-making among low socioeconomic status parents: role of health literacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, H Shonna; Dreyer, Benard P; Vivar, Karina L; MacFarland, Suzanne; van Schaick, Linda; Mendelsohn, Alan L

    2012-01-01

    Although low parent health literacy (HL) has been linked to poor child health outcomes, it is not known whether differences in perceptions related to access to care and provider-parent partnership in care are potential contributing factors. We sought to assess whether parent HL is associated with differences in perceived barriers to care and attitudes regarding participatory decision-making with the provider. This was a cross-sectional analysis of data collected from parents presenting with their child to an urban public hospital pediatric clinic in New York City. Dependent variables were caregiver-reported barriers to care (ability to reach provider at night/on weekends, difficult travel to clinic) and attitudes towards participatory decision-making (feeling like a partner, relying on doctor's knowledge, leaving decisions up to the doctor, being given choices/asked opinion). The primary independent variable was caregiver HL (Short Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults [S-TOHFLA]). A total of 823 parents were assessed; 1 in 4 (27.0%) categorized as having low HL. Parents with low HL were more likely to report barriers to care than those with adequate HL: trouble reaching provider nights/weekends, 64.9% vs. 49.6%, (p parent HL may be helpful in ameliorating barriers to care and promoting provider-parent partnership in care. Copyright © 2012 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Evidence-based practice in radiology: Knowledge, attitude and perceived barriers to practice among residents in radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anuradha, Chandramohan, E-mail: anuradhachandramohan@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Christian Medical College, Vellore, Tamil Nadu 632 004 (India); Jacob, K.S., E-mail: ksjacob@cmcvellore.ac.in [Department of Psychiatry, Christian Medical College, Vellore, Tamil Nadu 632 004 (India); Specialist Mental Health Service for Older People, Suite 106, 64–68 Derby Street, Kingswood, Penrith 2750 (Australia); Shyamkumar, N.K., E-mail: aparnashyam@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Christian Medical College, Vellore, Tamil Nadu 632 004 (India); Sridhar, Gibikote, E-mail: gibikote@cmcvellore.ac.in [Department of Radiology, Christian Medical College, Vellore, Tamil Nadu 632 004 (India)

    2013-05-15

    Aim: We examinted the attitude, knowledge and perceived barriers to evidence-based practice of radiology (EBPR) among residents in radiology. Study design and setting: We used the McColl questionnaire (1) and the BARRIERS scale (2) to assess the issues among radiology trainees attending an annual refresher course. Ninety six residents from 32 medical colleges from Southern India attended the course. Results: Eighty (83.3%) residents, 55 male and 25 female of age range 24–34 years, consented and returned the questionnaire. The majority of the participants had a positive attitude towards EBPR. However, 45% were unaware of sources for evidence based literature although many had access to Medline (45%) and the internet (80%). The majority (70%) were aware of the common technical terms (e.g. odds ratio, absolute and relative risk) but other complex details (e.g. meta-analysis, clinical effectiveness, confidence interval, publication bias and number needed to treat) were poorly understood. Though majority of residents (59%) were currently following guidelines and protocols laid by colleagues within their departments, 70% of residents were interested in learning the skills of EBPR and were willing to appraise primary literature or systematic reviews by themselves. Insufficient time on the job to implement new ideas (70.1%); relevant literature is not being complied in one place (68.9%); not being able to understand statistical methods (68.5%) were considered to be the major barriers to EBPR. Training in critical appraisal significantly influence usage of bibliographic databases (p < 0.0001). Attitude of collegues (p = 0.006) influenced attitude of the trainees towards EBPR. Those with higher knowledge scores (p = 0.02) and a greater awareness of sources for seeking evidence based literature (p = 0.05) held stronger beliefs that EBPR significantly improved patient care. Conclusions: The large knowledge gap related to EBPR suggests the need to incorporate structured

  2. Awareness of Accessibility Barriers in Computer-Based Instructional Materials and Faculty Demographics at South Dakota Public Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Advances in technology and course delivery methods have enabled persons with disabilities to enroll in higher education at an increasing rate. Federal regulations state persons with disabilities must be granted equal access to the information contained in computer-based instructional materials, but faculty at the six public universities in South…

  3. Pedagogic Barriers in Cameroon Inclusive Classrooms: The Impact of Curriculum, Teachers' Attitudes and Classroom Infrastructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanyi, Maureen Ebanga

    2016-01-01

    This study sought to examine if the curriculum, infrastructures and teachers' attitudes may influence school exclusion amongst disabled pupils. Three hypotheses were formulated based on the three variables: curriculum (teaching programmes), infrastructures and teachers' attitudes. 150 public primary school personnel from 12 primary schools in…

  4. Attitudes of Distance Learning Students at UKM's Faculty of Islamic Studies towards Learning Arabic Language Skill Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arifin, Zamri; Riddzwan, Khaulah; Abdul Latif, Muhammad Ridzuan; Ab. Halim, Zulazhan

    2014-01-01

    Attitude is the most important element in determining one's achievements in learning the Arabic language either as a full or part-time student. This study is based on the Gardner's socio-educational model, and focuses on two types of motivational orientation, which are integrative and instrumental, and attitudes toward the learning conditions. The…

  5. Faculty Development: The American Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seldin, Peter

    A growing movement to improve the quality of teaching has been called "faculty development." It is based on three assumptions: the primary professional activity of most faculty is teaching; instructional behaviors are learned skills, attitudes, and goals; and faculty can be taught how to improve their classroom performance. Interest in faculty…

  6. Social media and impression management: Veterinary medicine students’ and faculty members’ attitudes toward the acceptability of social media posts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    APRIL A. KEDROWICZ

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: While social media has the potential to be used to make professional and personal connections, it can also be used inappropriately, with detrimental ramifications for the individual in terms of their professional reputation and even hiring decisions. This research explored students’ and faculty members’ perceptions of the acceptability of various social media postings. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in 2015. All students and faculty members at the College of Veterinary Medicine were invited to participate. The sample size included 140 students and 69 faculty members who completed the Social Media Scale (SMS, a 7-point semantic differential scale. The SMS consisted of 12 items that measured the extent to which a variety of behaviors, using social media, constituted acceptable and unacceptable behaviors. Items appearing on the SMS were an amalgamation of modified items previously presented by Coe, Weijs, Muise et al. (2012 and new items generated specifically for this study. The data were collected during the spring semester of 2015 using Qualtrics online survey software and analyzed using t-tests and ANOVA. Results: The results showed that statistically significant differences existed between the students’ and faculty members’ ratings of acceptable behavior, as well as gender differences and differences across class years. Conclusion: These findings have implications for the development of policy and educational initiatives around professional identity management in the social sphere.

  7. Social media and impression management: Veterinary Medicine students’ and faculty members’ attitudes toward the acceptability of social media posts

    Science.gov (United States)

    KEDROWICZ, APRIL A.; ROYAL, KENNETH; FLAMMER, KEVEN

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: While social media has the potential to be used to make professional and personal connections, it can also be used inappropriately, with detrimental ramifications for the individual in terms of their professional reputation and even hiring decisions. This research explored students’ and faculty members’ perceptions of the acceptability of various social media postings. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in 2015. All students and faculty members at the College of Veterinary Medicine were invited to participate. The sample size included 140 students and 69 faculty members who completed the Social Media Scale (SMS), a 7-point semantic differential scale. The SMS consisted of 12 items that measured the extent to which a variety of behaviors, using social media, constituted acceptable and unacceptable behaviors. Items appearing on the SMS were an amalgamation of modified items previously presented by Coe, Weijs, Muise et al. (2012) and new items generated specifically for this study. The data were collected during the spring semester of 2015 using Qualtrics online survey software and analyzed using t-tests and ANOVA. Results: The results showed that statistically significant differences existed between the students’ and faculty members’ ratings of acceptable behavior, as well as gender differences and differences across class years. Conclusion: These findings have implications for the development of policy and educational initiatives around professional identity management in the social sphere. PMID:27795965

  8. Social Media and Impression Management: Veterinary Medicine Students' and Faculty Members' Attitudes toward the Acceptability of Social Media Posts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kedrowicz, April A.; Royal, Kenneth; Flammer, Keven

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: While social media has the potential to be used to make professional and personal connections, it can also be used inappropriately, with detrimental ramifications for the individual in terms of their professional reputation and even hiring decisions. This research explored students' and faculty members' perceptions of the…

  9. Benefits and barriers among volunteer teaching faculty: comparison between those who precept and those who do not in the core pediatrics clerkship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael S. Ryan

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Community-based outpatient experiences are a core component of the clinical years in medical school. Central to the success of this experience is the recruitment and retention of volunteer faculty from the community. Prior studies have identified reasons why some preceptors volunteer their time however, there is a paucity of data comparing those who volunteer from those who do not. Methods: A survey was developed following a review of previous studies addressing perceptions of community-based preceptors. A non-parametric, Mann–Whitney U test was used to compare active preceptors (APs and inactive preceptors (IPs and all data were analyzed in SPSS 20.0. Results: There was a 28% response rate. Preceptors showed similar demographic characteristics, valued intrinsic over extrinsic benefits, and appreciated Continuing Medical Education (CME/Maintenance of Certification (MOC opportunities as the highest extrinsic reward. APs were more likely to also precept at the M1/M2 level and value recognition and faculty development opportunities (p<0.05. IPs denoted time as the most significant barrier and, in comparison to APs, rated financial compensation as more important (p<0.05. Conclusions: Community preceptors are motivated by intrinsic benefits of teaching. Efforts to recruit should initially focus on promoting awareness of teaching opportunities and offering CME/MOC opportunities. Increasing the pool of preceptors may require financial compensation.

  10. Attitude toward depression, its complications, prevention and barriers to seeking help among ethnic groups in Penang, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Tahir M; Sulaiman, Syed A; Hassali, Mohamed A; Tahir, Humera

    2009-12-01

    This study aims to explore attitudes towards, complications of and preventive measures for depression and the barriers that result in delays in seeking help among the various ethnic groups in Penang, Malaysia. In June 2007 a questionnaire-based survey was undertaken in Penang. Face-to-face interviews were conducted, and 1855 respondents were approached to participate in the study by adopting a cluster random sampling method. A 25-item questionnaire was used to explore public attitudes towards, complications of and preventive measures for depression and delays in seeking help. A total of 1149 (61.94%) showed willingness to participate in the survey. Ethnically, 490 (42.6%) of the respondents who participated in the survey were Malay, while 413 (35.9%) were Chinese, 149 (13%) Indian and 97 (8.4%) from other ethnic minorities. The mean age of the respondents was 30 years (SD ± 11.5). In evaluating public attitudes, the majority (n = 910, 79.2%) agreed with the statement that family and friends can enhance the depression recovery process by providing more care and attention to the patient and this was found to be statistically significant (P ≤0.001). More than one-third of the respondents (n = 437, 38.0%) perceived depression as a normal medical condition and believed that it subsides automatically. The majority (n = 830, 72.2%) stated that depression results in social problems, while some felt that it can lead to raised blood pressure (n = 518, 45.1%). In terms of prevention, most of the respondents indicated that one can prevent depression by maintaining a good social life. In evaluating the barriers to seeking professional help, the majority (n = 582, 50.7%) stated that they did not believe they were at risk, with the next largest group identifying a lack of awareness regarding the signs and symptoms. However, a positive attitude was observed towards the complications and prevention of depression. Initiatives to increase mental health literacy will prove fruitful

  11. Barriers and attitudes towards hIV Voluntary counselling and Testing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Official Publication of the Tanzania Medical Students' Association. 20. Barriers and .... ATTENDANCE. FACTORS ... Rates of and factors associated with self reported prior HIV testing among adult medical patients in an inner city emergency ...

  12. Assessment of Nurses’ Knowledge, Attitude, and Perceived Barriers to Expressed Pressure Ulcer Prevention Practice in Addis Ababa Government Hospitals, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abebe Dilie

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Although pressure ulcer development is now generally considered as an indicator for quality of nursing care, questions and concerns about situations in which they are unavoidable remain. Awareness about the significance of the problem, positive attitude towards prevention, and an adequate level of knowledge are cornerstones to effectively prevent pressure ulcers. Objective. To assess nurses’ knowledge, attitudes, and perceived barriers to expressed pressure ulcer prevention practice in Addis Ababa government hospitals. Methods and Materials. This is a cross-sectional study by design. A total of 217 eligible nurses participated in the study and data were collected through pretested self-administered questionnaire. Results. When queried, 61.2% of the respondents had adequate knowledge on pressure ulcer prevention practices, while 68.4% had favorable attitudes towards prevention practices. Moreover, 67.3% of participants had good pressure ulcer prevention practices. Conclusion and Recommendation. More than half of the nurses were found to have adequate knowledge about pressure ulcer prevention and their attitude towards it was overall favorable. Expressed pressure ulcer prevention practice was affected by the participant’s level of knowledge, attitude, and barriers of care. To provide effective prevention of pressure ulcer, nurses’ level of knowledge and attitude should be enhanced besides resolving these barriers.

  13. General practitioners and carers: a questionnaire survey of attitudes, awareness of issues, barriers and enablers to provision of services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atkins Christine

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Approximately one in ten of the UK population are unpaid carers supporting a family member or friend who could not manage without their help, saving the UK economy an estimated £87 billion. This role is known to sometimes have a negative impact on carers and to require support both informally and from statutory services. General practice is a first point of contact for carers but research investigating general practitioners' (GPs' attitudes towards carers and awareness of issues facing carers is rare. This study therefore aimed to identify GPs' attitudes, awareness of issues, and perceptions of the barriers and enablers to provision of services. Methods Using a self-completion questionnaire distributed at a series of workshops, this study investigates GPs' attitudes to carers; awareness and knowledge of carers' issues; services offered in general practice and barriers to supporting carers. Results Seventy eight out of a total of 95 GPs (82% response rate from a variety of areas in England completed the questionnaires. The GPs identified time, resources and lack of knowledge as barriers, but only 9% agreed with the statement that there is little support they can offer carers. However, nine in ten GPs (89% feel they have insufficient training here and approximately half of them (47% lack confidence that they are meeting carers' needs. Confidence in identifying carers is also low (45%. Issues that GPs would look out for amongst carers include emotional and physical health problems and financial and isolation difficulties. GPs specifically highlighted educational and isolation issues for young carers. Few services were described that targeted carers. Conclusions GPs recognise that they have an important role to play in supporting carers but would like training and support. Further investigation is needed both to determine how best to train and facilitate GPs and general practice teams in their role in supporting carers and to

  14. Assessment of Attitudes Regarding Tobacco-Free Campus Policy and Secondhand Smoke Exposure among College Students, Faculty, and Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Michael E.; Williams, Ronald D., Jr.; Hunt, Barry

    2015-01-01

    Background: Recently there has been a push to implement tobacco-free policies on college campuses. Policies creating tobacco-free college campuses have increased with changes in social norms. The campus environment provides a setting for individuals to express their attitudes regarding tobacco use. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess…

  15. Staff Experience and Attitudes towards Technology-Enhanced Learning Initiatives in One Faculty of Health and Life Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Further to earlier work carried out by the student union (SU) along with strategic discussions regarding technology-enhanced learning (TEL), this research aimed to identify the attitudes and experience of teaching staff in relation to specific uses of technology in learning and teaching. Data obtained through an online questionnaire (n = 100)…

  16. Attitudes and Barriers to Exercise in Adults with Type 1 Diabetes (T1DM) and How Best to Address Them: A Qualitative Study

    OpenAIRE

    Nadia Lascar; Amy Kennedy; Beverley Hancock; David Jenkins; Andrews, Robert C.; Sheila Greenfield; Parth Narendran

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Regular physical activity has recognised health benefits for people with T1DM. However a significant proportion of them do not undertake the recommended levels of activity. Whilst questionnaire-based studies have examined barriers to exercise in people with T1DM, a formal qualitative analysis of these barriers has not been undertaken. Our aims were to explore attitudes, barriers and facilitators to exercise in patients with T1DM.METHODOLOGY:A purposeful sample of long standing T1DM...

  17. South African Teachers' Attitudes toward Learners with Barriers to Learning: Attention-Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorder and Little or No Functional Speech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornman, Juan; Donohue, Dana K.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined teachers' attitudes toward learners with two types of barriers to learning: a learner with attention-deficit and hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and a learner with little or no functional speech (LNFS). The results indicated that although teachers reported that the learner with ADHD would be more disruptive in class and have a…

  18. Barriers, Attitudes, and Dietary Behaviors Regarding Sodium Reduction in the Elderly Korean–Chinese Population in Yanbian, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jounghee; Cui, Wenying; Jin, Meixiang

    2017-01-01

    Objectives This research investigated the barriers, attitudes, and dietary behaviors related to sodium reduction among the elderly Korean–Chinese population in Yanbian, China. Methods We conducted this pilot study using both descriptive research and a focus group interview at the elderly community center in Yanbian. Results In total, 21 elderly Korean–Chinese (average age, 71 years) were examined. The findings showed that the top three barriers to sodium reduction were 1) the difficulties associated with having meals with others, 2) a preference for liquid based-dishes, and 3) the lack of taste in low-sodium dishes. Although the participants strongly believed that a reduced-sodium diet would improve their health, they were poorly aware of the amount of sodium in various foods and dishes. In particular, the focus group interviews with eight participants (mean age, 67 years) revealed that salt-preserved foods (e.g., Korean pickled cabbage called ‘kimchi’ and soybean paste) were frequently consumed as part of their food culture, and that very salty dishes were served at restaurants, both of which lead to a high sodium intake. Conclusion This study provides useful preliminary data to help design a nutrition intervention program for sodium reduction that targets the elderly Korean–Chinese population in China. PMID:28781941

  19. Barriers, Attitudes, and Dietary Behaviors Regarding Sodium Reduction in the Elderly Korean-Chinese Population in Yanbian, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jounghee; Cui, Wenying; Jin, Meixiang

    2017-06-01

    This research investigated the barriers, attitudes, and dietary behaviors related to sodium reduction among the elderly Korean-Chinese population in Yanbian, China. We conducted this pilot study using both descriptive research and a focus group interview at the elderly community center in Yanbian. In total, 21 elderly Korean-Chinese (average age, 71 years) were examined. The findings showed that the top three barriers to sodium reduction were 1) the difficulties associated with having meals with others, 2) a preference for liquid based-dishes, and 3) the lack of taste in low-sodium dishes. Although the participants strongly believed that a reduced-sodium diet would improve their health, they were poorly aware of the amount of sodium in various foods and dishes. In particular, the focus group interviews with eight participants (mean age, 67 years) revealed that salt-preserved foods (e.g., Korean pickled cabbage called 'kimchi' and soybean paste) were frequently consumed as part of their food culture, and that very salty dishes were served at restaurants, both of which lead to a high sodium intake. This study provides useful preliminary data to help design a nutrition intervention program for sodium reduction that targets the elderly Korean-Chinese population in China.

  20. Attitudes about opinions and practices in students of birth control a faculty of humanities in Santa Marta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ubaldo Rodríguez-De Ávila

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study views on contraception and the relationship between the variable gender study and students of the faculty of humanities at the University of Magdalena are determined. This article would provide data on sexual risk behaviors of students, which can be useful for the prevention of this problem, thus a descriptive correlational study was conducted using purposive sampling, with a participation of 120 students. The findings support the conclusion that students pose positive reviews and increased use of condoms and pills also have negative opinions of abstinence, intrauterine devices and implants. On the other hand, there is no relationship between gender and views on contraception, also the opinion of students does not differ according to the program.

  1. Evaluation of Drug Use Attitudes of Patient and Its Relatives Attending to Cukurova University Medical Faculty Balcali Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuf Karatas

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Irrational drug usage is one of the important public health problems in all countries. Also in our country irrational drug usage patterns is a serious problem and it increases the drug’s share of public health care costs. The aim of our study was evaluate the drug use patterns of patients and relatives of patients in Cukurova University Medical Faculty Balcali Hospital. Material and Methods: Face-to-face interviews (using a questionnaire about Rational Drug Use Survey with 209 patients and patients relatives, admitted to Cukurova University Medical Faculty Balcali Hospital clinics. Results: 209 people participated in this study and 58 % (124 of these are women. The mean age of women was 41,39±13,76 and the mean age of the man was 44,67±13,55. If we decompose the participants to their educational attainment; primary school (34,4 %, secondary school (18,7 %, high school (26,3 % and university (20,6 %. 11,0 % of the participants have no social security. 5,7 % of the participants have acute disease, 54,5 % of them have chronic disease and 39,7 % of them have no medical problems. 53,1 % of the participants said that they do not use drugs without consulting a medical doctor, 11,0 % of the participants said that they sometimes use drugs, 30,6 % of the participants said that they rarely use drugs and 5,3 % of the participants said that they often use drugs without consulting a medical doctor. 14,8 % of the participants said that they use drugs with advise of their relatives, friends and neighbors, 17,2 % of the participants said that they advise the drugs to their relatives, friends and neighbors when they were sick. 16,7 % of the participants said that they often use antibiotics and 77,5 % of the participants said that they sometimes use antibiotics without consulting a doctor when they had common cold or flu. 40,2 % of the participants said that they do not use herbal medicine in treatment. Patients with canser 2,4 %, patients with

  2. Knowledge, attitudes, beliefs, and barriers associated with the uptake of influenza vaccine among pregnant women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Y. Mayet

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of the study was to assess the knowledge, attitudes, beliefs, and factors associated with the uptake of the influenza (flu vaccination in women within Saudi Arabia during their pregnancy period. Methods: A cross-sectional prospective survey was conducted on 1085 pregnant women at the antenatal clinic over a period of 6 weeks with the provision of influenza vaccination. The questionnaire collected demographic and other data; it included 12 questions on their general knowledge and assessed their attitude toward influenza vaccination, and their awareness of vaccine risk and the potential benefits during pregnancy. The knowledge score obtained was then calculated and compared. Results: A total of 998 patients took part in the questionnaire with a response rate of 92%. There was poor awareness that the flu vaccine is safe to administer during pregnancy (130, 13.1% and that all pregnant women should receive the flu vaccine (190, 19.1%. Pregnant women with flu vaccine knowledge score of ⩽5 (range 0–12 were significantly less likely to take the vaccine (OR 3.78, 95% CI 2.68–5.26, p < 0.001. There was a low uptake of the vaccine (178, 18.1% and only 29 (3.0% had previously been offered the flu vaccine by any doctor during their pregnancy. In addition, 255 (25.8% were against taking the flu vaccine during pregnancy. Conclusion: The knowledge and uptake of the influenza vaccine among Saudi pregnant women are low. One quarter was against the vaccine during pregnancy. Very few believed the flu vaccine to be safe during pregnancy. Rarely, physicians advise their clients to take flu vaccine.

  3. [Health attitudes and behaviors of students of the faculty of dentistry Jagiellonian university collegium medicum towards tobacco smoking].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chomyszyn-Gajewska, Maria; Cabała, Agnieszka; Virtanen, Jorma

    2012-01-01

    Smoking is a serious medical and social problem in Poland. In a very specific way it affects youth and students because in this period of life health behaviours and habits are formed. The aim of the research was the valuation of the scale of smoking habits, attitude and knowledge of this problem among dental students of CMUJ. The research included 345 students. The study was based on special questionnaire. The results allowed to claim that the frequency of smoking among dental students was lower then among general Polish population. Dental students were conscious how harmful smoking and passive cigarette smoking to health is. They understood their role in anti-nicotine actions, but had a low opinion about the effectiveness of such actions.

  4. A Qualitative Exploration of the DIGCOMP Digital Competence Framework: Attitudes of students, academics and administrative staff in the health faculty of a UK HEI

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    George Evangelinos

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports upon findings of a series of semi-structured interviews with students, academics and administrative staff from a health care faculty in a UK Higher Education Institution (HEI. Exploring their experiences of mapping to the EU DIGCOMP Digital Competence Framework, a hermeneutic lens enables a more nuanced approach to attitudes towards Digital Competence (DC. One of the eight lifelong learning key-competences required for managers, doctors, nurses and other health-related professionals, DC is crucial to professional development. Defined by 14 themes, the findings express the participants’ experiences, knowledge and level of comprehension of the subject. Our findings indicate students are conflating digital social media skills with their skills for the workplace, resulting in over-confidence; academics raising concerns about work/private life balance offered by the affordances of handheld devices; administrative staff that are far more confident and managing a range of technology’s effectively. The research further reveals that the DIGICOMP framework is applicable as a generic framework for professional practice.

  5. Sexuality in the nursing home, part 1: attitudes and barriers to sexual expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajjar, Ramzi R; Kamel, Hosam K

    2004-01-01

    Sexuality is a basic human need that begins at birth and continues throughout life. The sexual needs of the elderly are similar to those of the young, but with variations in frequency, intensity, and mode of expression. Regardless of age, every individual has a need for love, intimacy, and companionship. Unfortunately, however, stereotypical thinking, ignorance, and prejudice dominate Western society's view on sexuality in the elderly. In a youth-oriented culture, sexuality is attributed to the young, healthy, and beautiful, and the myth that the elderly are asexual beings predominates. Consequently, the sexual needs of the elderly are frequently overlooked and ignored. Nowhere is this more emphatic than in the nursing home setting. This article explores barriers to sexual expression in the nursing home setting and discusses strategies to overcome them.

  6. Retaining nursing faculty beyond retirement age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Marvel L; Cook, Linda; Salmeron, Lois; Burton, Denise

    2010-01-01

    The number of nursing faculty planning to retire by 2020 is alarming. To develop strategies for retaining faculty, researchers asked: What factors influence the decision by nursing faculty to stay in the workforce past retirement age? What barriers could be removed that would encourage faculty to stay longer? Using Giorgi's analysis method, findings from 6 faculty teaching past retirement age revealed key meaning units and grand themes that match Maslow's Hierarchy of Inborn Needs.

  7. Electronic clinical decision support systems attitudes and barriers to use in the oncology setting.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Collins, I M

    2012-03-02

    BACKGROUND: There is little evidence regarding attitudes to clinical decision support systems (CDSS) in oncology. AIMS: We examined the current usage, awareness, and concerns of Irish medical oncologists and oncology pharmacists in this area. METHODS: A questionnaire was sent to 27 medical oncologists and 34 oncology pharmacists, identified through professional interest groups. Respondents ranked concerns regarding their use of a CDSS on a scale from 1 to 4, with 4 being most important. RESULTS: Overall, 67% (41\\/61) responded, 48% (13\\/27) of oncologists and 82% (28\\/34) of pharmacists surveyed. Concerns included "difficulty defining complex clinical situations with a set of rules" (mean ± SD) (3.2 ± 0.9), "ensuring evidence base is up to date and relevant" (3.2 ± 0.9) and "lack of clinically relevant suggestions" (2.9 ± 0.9). Ninety-three percent reported using a CDSS but 54% were unaware of this. CONCLUSION: While there are benefits to using a CDSS, concerns must be addressed through user education. This may be a starting point for a user-centred design approach to the development of future local systems through a consultative process.

  8. Survey on public awareness, attitudes, and barriers for herpes zoster vaccination in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tae Un; Cheong, Hee Jin; Song, Joon Young; Noh, Ji Yun; Kim, Woo Joo

    2015-01-01

    A cross-sectional study was performed to assess current public awareness of herpes zoster (HZ) and its vaccine, determine the factors that influence people's intention regarding HZ vaccination, and investigate the barriers for vaccination by changing decisions with sequential questions regarding knowledge, cost, and physician's recommendation in the Department of Infectious Diseases, Korea University Guro Hospital, in South Korea, between August 23 and September 15 of 2013. Among 603 subjects who completed the survey, 85.7% and 43.6% subjects were aware of HZ and HZ vaccination, respectively. Women, younger age group, those with higher income or higher education levels were more likely to be aware of HZ. Overall, 85.8% of subjects aware of HZ were willing to be vaccinated or vaccinate their parents. The main obstacles for the increased acceptance toward vaccination were the high cost and low perceived risk, which decreased acceptance to 60.2%. However, physician's recommendation reversed 69.5% of the refusal to accept HZ vaccine. These results indicate that expanding public education and physician's recommendations are important factors aimed at increasing HZ vaccine coverage rate.

  9. Comparison of the knowledge, attitudes, and perception of barriers regarding adverse drug reaction reporting between pharmacy and medical students in Pakistan

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    Muhammad Umair Khan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The goal of this study was to compare the knowledge and attitudes of pharmacy and medical students regarding adverse drug reactions (ADRs, as well as their perceptions of barriers to ADR reporting, in a Higher Education Commission-recognised Pakistani university. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among final-year pharmacy (n=91 and medical (n=108 students in Pakistan from June 1 to July 31, 2014. A self-administered questionnaire was used to collect the data. The responses of pharmacy students were compared to those of medical students. Results: Pharmacy students had a significantly better knowledge of ADRs than medical students (mean±SD, 5.61±1.78 vs. 3.23±1.60; P<0.001. Gender showed a significant relationship to knowledge about ADRs, and male participants were apparently more knowledgeable than their female counterparts (P<0.001. The attitudes of pharmacy students regarding their capability to handle and report ADRs were significantly more positive than those of medical students (P<0.05. In comparison to pharmacy students, a lack of knowledge of where and how to report ADRs was the main barrier that medical students perceived to ADR reporting (P=0.001. Conclusion: Final-year pharmacy students exhibited more knowledge about ADRs and showed more positive attitudes regarding their capacity to handle and report ADRs than final-year medical students.

  10. Attitudes and barriers to exercise in adults with type 1 diabetes (T1DM and how best to address them: a qualitative study.

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    Nadia Lascar

    Full Text Available Regular physical activity has recognised health benefits for people with T1DM. However a significant proportion of them do not undertake the recommended levels of activity. Whilst questionnaire-based studies have examined barriers to exercise in people with T1DM, a formal qualitative analysis of these barriers has not been undertaken. Our aims were to explore attitudes, barriers and facilitators to exercise in patients with T1DM.A purposeful sample of long standing T1DM patients were invited to participate in this qualitative study. Twenty-six adults were interviewed using a semi-structured interview schedule to determine their level of exercise and barriers to initiation and maintenance of an exercise programme.Six main barriers to exercise were identified: lack of time and work related factors; access to facilities; lack of motivation; embarrassment and body image; weather; and diabetes specific barriers (low levels of knowledge about managing diabetes and its complications around exercise. Four motivators to exercise were identified: physical benefits from exercise; improvements in body image; enjoyment and the social interaction of exercising at gym or in groups. Three facilitators to exercise were identified: free or reduced admission to gyms and pools, help with time management, and advice and encouragement around managing diabetes for exercise.Many of the barriers to exercise in people with T1DM are shared with the non-diabetic population. The primary difference is the requirement for education about the effect of exercise on diabetes control and its complications. There was a preference for support to be given on a one to one basis rather than in a group environment. This suggests that with the addition of the above educational requirements, one to one techniques that have been successful in increasing activity in patients with other chronic disease and the general public should be successful in increasing activity in patients with T1DM.

  11. Knowledge, attitude, and barriers towards the use of evidence based practice among senior dental and medical students in western Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahammam, Maha A; Linjawi, Amal I

    2014-10-01

    To investigate the knowledge, attitude, and barriers using evidence based practice (EBP) by future Saudi dentists and physicians. A questionnaire adapted from an EBP questionnaire was distributed to dental and medical final year students and new graduates at King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia during the 2012 to 2013 academic year. The questionnaire consisted of 14 multiple-choice questions, and 2 open ended questions and was divided into 5 sections assessing different categories. Data were grouped as dental (DS) and medical (MS) students. Descriptive and group comparison statistics were conducted. Out of 400, 297 students responded (DS=207, MS=90) with a 74% response rate. The students' knowledge and attitude were low with no significant difference between the 2 groups. Students` knowledge and attitudes towards EBP were assessed: EBP course attendance (DS=40.1%, MS=13.3%; p=0.000), reading journals (DS=6.3%, MS=3.3%; p=0.313), awareness of EBP components (DS=7.7%, MS=0%; p=0.332), and awareness towards the strongest evidence for EBP (DS=58.9%, MS=53.3%; p=0.370). More than half of the students in both groups did not use EBP in their treatment (DS=85%, MS=84.4%; p=0.842). The greatest reported barriers were;  EBP is difficult to understand (DS=88.9%, MS=72.2%; p=0.000), and no time (DS=54.6%, MS=46.7%; p=0.210). The reported knowledge and attitudes among the junior health care physicians is considered below the required competency standards. These findings highlight the urgent need for changes in the current educational strategies to assure successful implementation of EBP in Saudi Arabia. 

  12. Full-Time Faculty View Information Literacy as Important but Are Unlikely to Incorporate it Into Their Teaching. A Review of: Bury, S. (2011. Faculty attitudes, perceptions and experiences of information literacy: A study across multiple disciplines at York University, Canada. Journal of Information Literacy, 5(1. Retrieved from http://ojs.lboro.ac.uk/ojs/index.php/JIL/article/view/PRA-V5-I1-2011-1

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    Eamon C. Tewell

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective – To explore faculty attitudes towards information literacy (IL; in particular,faculty perception of student IL competencies, importance of IL skills and instruction, and ideal means of planning and delivering IL instruction.Design – Online survey questionnaire.Setting – Large public research university located in Toronto, Canada.Subjects – 221 full-time faculty.Methods – The author designed and distributed an online survey to all full-time York University faculty (n=1,451 in March 2007 using Zoomerang software. The survey consisted of between 26 and 36 questions depending on responses selected by respondents, and included both open- and closed-ended questions. The author handcoded the qualitative data and used SPSS to analyze the quantitative data. The survey had 221 usable responses giving a response rate of 15.2%.Main Results – The study revealed a high degree of concern among survey respondents regarding undergraduate students’ information literacy skills, accompanied by a perceived gradual increase in IL abilities corresponding to student year. Faculty ranked each of the Association of College and Research Libraries’ (ACRL Information Literacy Standards for Higher Education as being extremely important. No ACRL standard ranked below 6 on a scale of 1 to 7, suggesting full agreement with the value of IL proficiency. Of the faculty 78.7% felt that IL education should be a joint collaboration between faculty and librarians. A considerable majority of respondents (81.7% answered that IL instruction should be required for all students. Far fewer faculty incorporated IL teaching in practice, with 52.9% engaging in IL instruction and 47.1% not incorporating IL instruction at all. Of the faculty who incorporated librarian-led IL sessions into their courses, 85% of faculty perceived a “substantial impact” or “some impact” on their students’ IL competencies.Conclusions – The author concludes that this study adds

  13. Open access behaviours and perceptions of health sciences faculty and roles of information professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lwoga, Edda T; Questier, Frederik

    2015-03-01

    This study sought to investigate the faculty's awareness, attitudes and use of open access, and the role of information professionals in supporting open access (OA) scholarly communication in Tanzanian health sciences universities. A cross-sectional survey was conducted. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 16 librarians, while questionnaires were physically distributed to 415 faculty members in all eight Tanzanian health sciences universities, with a response rate of 71.1%. The study found that most faculty members were aware about OA issues. However, the high level of OA awareness among faculty members did not translate into actual dissemination of faculty's research outputs through OA web avenues. A small proportion of faculty's research materials was made available as OA. Faculty were more engaged with OA journal publishing than with self-archiving practices. Senior faculty with proficient technical skills were more likely to use open access than junior faculty. Major barriers to OA usage were related to ICT infrastructure, awareness, skills, author-pay model, and copyright and plagiarism concerns. Interviews with librarians revealed that there was a strong support for promoting OA issues on campus; however, this positive support with various open access-related tasks did not translate into actual action. It is thus important for librarians and OA administrators to consider all these factors for effective implementation of OA projects in research and academic institutions. This is the first comprehensive and detailed study focusing on the health sciences faculty's and librarians' behaviours and perceptions of open access initiatives in Tanzania and reveals findings that are useful for planning and implementing open access initiatives in other institutions with similar conditions. © 2015 Health Libraries Journal.

  14. Provider and Nonprovider Sources of Mental Health Help in the Military and the Effects of Stigma, Negative Attitudes, and Organizational Barriers to Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Paul Y; Toblin, Robin L; Riviere, Lyndon A; Kok, Brian C; Grossman, Sasha H; Wilk, Joshua E

    2016-02-01

    This study examined sources of help (providers or nonproviders) used by soldiers for mental health problems. Differences in perceived barriers to care by type of help used were also assessed. Active-duty soldiers from four brigade combat teams (N=3,380) were surveyed in 2008-2009. Items assessed posttraumatic stress disorder; depression; anxiety; help needed because of a stress, emotional, alcohol, or family problem; stigma; negative attitudes toward care; and organizational barriers. Participants reported receipt of help in the past three months from providers (mental health or medical professionals or an Army resource hotline) or nonproviders (fellow soldier, medic, chaplain, or chain of command). Nearly a third (31%) were identified as being in need of mental health care. Of those, 5% reported using nonprovider help exclusively, 14% used provider help exclusively, and 7% used both types. Stigma was rated significantly lower as a barrier among those who used help exclusively from providers than among those who did not use help from any source; however, no significant differences in stigma scores were found between those who used help from nonproviders and those who did not use help from any source. Soldiers who used help from nonproviders were more likely than those who used help from providers to perceive organizational barriers. Results show that soldiers may view nonproviders as alternative sources of mental health help, suggesting that the Army should ensure that such resources are adequately trained and integrated into the mental health community so that soldiers can receive the help they need.

  15. Open educational resources: staff attitudes and awareness

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    Vivien Rolfe

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Attitudes are changing in education globally to promote the open sharing of educational courses and resources. The aim of this study was to explore staff awareness and attitudes toward ‘open educational resources’ (OER as a benchmark for monitoring future progress. Faculty staff (n=6 were invited to participate in semi-structured interviews which facilitated the development of a questionnaire. Staff respondents (n=50 were not familiar with the term OER but had a clear notion of what it meant. They were familiar with open content repositories within the university but not externally. A culture of borrowing and sharing of resources exists between close colleagues, but not further a field, and whilst staff would obtain resources from the Internet they were reticent to place materials there. Drivers for mobilising resources included a strong belief in open education, the ability of OER to enhance individual and institutional reputations, and economic factors. Barriers to OER included confusion over copyright and lack of IT support. To conclude, there is a positive collegiate culture within the faculty, and overcoming the lack of awareness and dismantling the barriers to sharing will help advance the open educational practices, benefiting both faculty staff and the global community.

  16. A Survey of Homework Use, Experience of Barriers to Homework, and Attitudes about the Barriers to Homework among Couples and Family Therapists

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    Dattilio, Frank M.; Kazantzis, Nikolaos; Shinkfield, Gregg; Carr, Amanda G.

    2011-01-01

    Homework is a therapeutic process that has strong theoretical and empirical basis, but existing research has focused on "compliance" rather than considering the broader and more clinically meaningful construct of "engagement." Absent in the literature is empirical study of the barriers to engagement or study of homework use among couple and family…

  17. The attitudes to and the experience gained from the Erasmus teaching staff mobility project by the staff of the Faculty of education, University of Maribor

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    Nuša Lazar

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Mobility is a consequence of internationalization. The best known form of internationalization is student mobility. Second in importance for internationalization is the mobility of teaching staff, as it fosters international cooperation of institutions at a global level: lecturers of a faculty can receive education abroad and foreign professors can give lectures to domestic students. The Erasmus teaching staff mobility project is an important part of the international activities of the Faculty of Education, University of Maribor (PEF UM and its internationalization. The teaching staff mobility of the Faculty of Education is the highest within the University of Maribor, which shows the importance of this type of activity. We analyzed the questionnaire responses provided by the mobile teaching staff of PEF UM and compared them with the findings of the international research study by Bracht and others (Brachts in drugi 2006, who investigated the Erasmus teaching staff mobility.

  18. Student versus Faculty Perceptions of Missing Class.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleigh, Merry J.; Ritzer, Darren R.; Casey, Michael B.

    2002-01-01

    Examines and compares student and faculty attitudes towards students missing classes and class attendance. Surveys undergraduate students (n=231) in lower and upper level psychology courses and psychology faculty. Reports that students found more reasons acceptable for missing classes and that the amount of in-class material on the examinations…

  19. Connecting Student-Faculty Interaction to Academic Dishonesty

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    Bluestein, Stephanie A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper highlights the results of a study on the effects of student-faculty interaction on academic dishonesty; the results were used to develop an explanatory model showing how faculty's classroom demeanor and attitude can impact the likelihood of cheating. Individual, confidential interviews pertaining to student-faculty interaction and…

  20. Connecting Student-Faculty Interaction to Academic Dishonesty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluestein, Stephanie A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper highlights the results of a study on the effects of student-faculty interaction on academic dishonesty; the results were used to develop an explanatory model showing how faculty's classroom demeanor and attitude can impact the likelihood of cheating. Individual, confidential interviews pertaining to student-faculty interaction and…

  1. The Use of Service-Learning among Special Education Faculty

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    Neeper, Lance S.; Dymond, Stacy K.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the use of service-learning (SL) by special education faculty at 4-year colleges and universities across the United States, and to determine faculty attitudes and beliefs about the application of SL in special education. Participants included faculty with experience in SL teaching and/or research in…

  2. Benefits and barriers among volunteer teaching faculty: comparison between those who precept and those who do not in the core pediatrics clerkship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Michael S; Vanderbilt, Allison A; Lewis, Thasia W; Madden, Molly A

    2013-05-03

    Community-based outpatient experiences are a core component of the clinical years in medical school. Central to the success of this experience is the recruitment and retention of volunteer faculty from the community. Prior studies have identified reasons why some preceptors volunteer their time however, there is a paucity of data comparing those who volunteer from those who do not. A survey was developed following a review of previous studies addressing perceptions of community-based preceptors. A non-parametric, Mann-Whitney U test was used to compare active preceptors (APs) and inactive preceptors (IPs) and all data were analyzed in SPSS 20.0. There was a 28% response rate. Preceptors showed similar demographic characteristics, valued intrinsic over extrinsic benefits, and appreciated Continuing Medical Education (CME)/Maintenance of Certification (MOC) opportunities as the highest extrinsic reward. APs were more likely to also precept at the M1/M2 level and value recognition and faculty development opportunities (pintrinsic benefits of teaching. Efforts to recruit should initially focus on promoting awareness of teaching opportunities and offering CME/MOC opportunities. Increasing the pool of preceptors may require financial compensation.

  3. Breaking the Barriers of a "Silenced Identity": Teacher Trainees' Attitudes towards the Bilingual Presentation in Hebrew and Amharic

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    Baratz Lea

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The current study investigated the attitudes of students in a teacher training college training regarding the bilingual presentation of children's literature -- in Hebrew and Amharic. A questionnaire on the importance of bilingual books was used with a group of students of Ethiopian descent (of the Beta Israel community and a group of students who do not belong to this community, with the expectation that a substantial difference would be found between the attitudes of the two groups. The study population, students training to be literature teachers, was aware of the qualities that make "a good story". The main findings emphasize that participants have a substantial understanding of the significance of bilingual books, both in terms of its function in the curriculum and in building a cultural narrative in order to break out of the silenced identity and eliminate cultural visibility.

  4. Racial Identity Attitudes, Perceived Barriers, Career Self-Efficacy, and Career Outcome Expectations among African American Male Adolescents

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    Townsel, Norman L., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    Social Cognitive Career Theory (SCCT) holds that self-efficacy and outcome expectations are primary predictors of career choice goals and actions, with contextual influences moderating those choices and actions. Racial identity research indicates that African American adolescents perceive more barriers than their White counterparts. The current…

  5. Faculty Viewpoints on Teaching Quantway®

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    Heather Howington

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantway is a quantitative reasoning-based pathway for developmental math that has been developed as an alternative to the traditional remedial algebra sequence. To explore the experiences of faculty involved with Quantway, we interviewed eight individuals who have taught the course in the past year to survey their attitudes and opinions about students in their classes, the materials and pedagogies in use, and the collegial interaction of networked faculty. Faculty were selected with the intention of gathering a broad set of opinions resulting from differences of location, experience, and other factors. In this paper, we summarize those interviews by identifying common themes reported by the faculty that highlight strengths and challenges of teaching Quantway. Themes include perceptions about changes in student engagement and attitudes as well as changes in their own mindset; the evolution of teaching strategies and materials used inside and outside the classroom; and the relevance of connections between faculty at different institutions involved in the project.

  6. and use of barrier techniques

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Attitudes of Nigerian dentists towards hepatitis B vaccination and use of barrier techniques .... tine screening of only high-risk patients has been recommended.“ .... i337-1342. Sote EO. AIDS and infection Control: experiences, attitudes,.

  7. An Exploratory Study of the Relationship between Online Instruction and Faculty Development among Teacher Education Faculty

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    Chaney, Kelly

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to explore factors that influence the intent of teacher education faculty members in the State of Illinois to teach online and their intent to participate in faculty development using Ajzen's theory of planned behavior. Understanding the beliefs and attitudes of teacher educators, their normative frame of reference,…

  8. Social Work Faculty and Mental Illness Stigma

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    Watson, Amy C.; Fulambarker, Anjali; Kondrat, David C.; Holley, Lynn C.; Kranke, Derrick; Wilkins, Brittany T.; Stromwall, Layne K.; Eack, Shaun M.

    2017-01-01

    Stigma is a significant barrier to recovery and full community inclusion for people with mental illnesses. Social work educators can play critical roles in addressing this stigma, yet little is known about their attitudes. Social work educators were surveyed about their general attitudes about people with mental illnesses, attitudes about practice…

  9. Reflections on academic careers by current dental school faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogér, James M; Wehmeyer, Meggan M H; Milliner, Matthew S

    2008-04-01

    During the inaugural year (2006-07) of the Academic Dental Careers Fellowship Program (ADCFP), 110 faculty members at ten different dental schools were interviewed by dental students who were participating as ADCFP fellows in this year-long program designed to introduce them to faculty roles and activities and help them gain an appreciation for the rewards and issues associated with academic life. The goals, format, and components of the ADCFP are described in a companion article in this issue of the Journal of Dental Education. One of the fellows' assignments during the ADCFP was to interview faculty at various academic ranks who had differing degrees of work emphasis in teaching, research, service/patient care, and administration. Sixty-nine (63 percent of the total) of these interviews were reviewed and analyzed by the authors, who were student fellows in the ADCFP during 2006-07. The purpose of these interviews was to provide the fellows with insight into the positive aspects and challenges in becoming and remaining a dental school faculty member. This aggregate perspective of the interviews conducted at ten dental schools highlights the motivations and challenges that confront a dentist during the process of choosing a career in academic dentistry and determining if dental education is a good fit for each individual who elects to pursue this pathway. Thematic analysis of the interviews revealed several factors consistently identified by faculty across the schools as being positive influences on the quality of the academic work environment and career satisfaction: mentorship and student interaction, opportunities for scholarship (research and discovery), job diversity, intellectual challenge, satisfaction with the nature of academic work, lifestyle/family compatibility, flexibility, lifelong learning, professional duty, and lab responsibility. A series of negative themes were also consistently identified: bureaucracy/administrative burdens and barriers, time

  10. Investigating the Attitudes and Views of the Librarians and Faculty members of Shiraz University over deploying Wi-Fi in Academic Libraries

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    Jafar Mehrad

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Given the importance and wide scope of Wi-Fi applications within academic environs in developed countries and its use in library services, its utilization within academic libraries in Iran is felt. While presenting Wi-Fi networks, the present study employed a survey of librarians and faculty members in Shiraz University to investigate their the outlook and viewpoints regarding the deployment of such networks in academic libraries. Findings demonstrated that librarians are very inclined to use Wi-Fi in library services such as listing, shelf-reading and OPAC and demand comprehensive network coverage throughout the entire library spaces. Meanwhile, faculty members expressed the necessity of increasing use of such networks all over the campus and remote access to library resources. Generally given the outcome of the present investigation, although Wi-Fi application in libraries is a novel and emerging phenomenon yet to catch on in Iran, librarians, researchers and professors are very keen about its use and application within academic environments.

  11. Universal Design for Instruction and Learning: A Pilot Study of Faculty Instructional Methods and Attitudes Related to Students with Disabilities in Higher Education

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    Black, R. David; Weinberg, Lois A.; Brodwin, Martin G.

    2014-01-01

    Universal design in the education setting is a framework of instruction that aims to be inclusive of different learners to reduce barriers for all students, including those with disabilities. We used the principles of Universal Design for Learning (UDL focuses on the learner) and Universal Design for Instruction (UDI focuses on instruction) as the…

  12. Examining Differences among Online Faculty Reporting Student Plagiarism Using the Theory of Planned Behavior

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    Moeder Stowe, Susan A.

    2013-01-01

    Among higher education faculty, having to address academic misconduct and plagiarism is often viewed as a negative aspect of teaching resulting in inconsistent reporting by faculty. Some faculty members take no action in response. Differences exist in attitudes between traditional regular full-time and part-time adjunct faculty members in terms of…

  13. Examining Differences among Online Faculty Reporting Student Plagiarism Using the Theory of Planned Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeder Stowe, Susan A.

    2013-01-01

    Among higher education faculty, having to address academic misconduct and plagiarism is often viewed as a negative aspect of teaching resulting in inconsistent reporting by faculty. Some faculty members take no action in response. Differences exist in attitudes between traditional regular full-time and part-time adjunct faculty members in terms of…

  14. Dental Provider Attitudes Are a Barrier to Expanded Oral Health Care for Children ≤3 Years of Age

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    Sarah J. Clark MPH

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To describe the perspectives of general dentists regarding oral health care for children ≤3 years. Methods. Mailed survey of 444 general dentists in Michigan. Results. Although most dentists were aware of recommendations for early dental visits, only 36% recommended their own patients begin dental visits by 1 year of age. Only 37% dentists felt that screening for oral health problems can be done by medical providers, whereas 34% agreed administration of fluoride varnish by medical providers would be effective in preventing dental problems in young children. Conclusions. Dentists’ failure to recommend 1-year dental visits is due neither to lack of awareness nor to capacity problems. The limited enthusiasm for involving children’s medical providers in oral health promotion signals attitudinal barriers that must be overcome to improve children’s oral health. Primary care providers should identify and refer to dentists in their community who are willing to see young children.

  15. Knowledge, attitude, practice and barriers on vaccination against human papillomavirus infection: a cross-sectional study among primary care physicians in Hong Kong.

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    Martin C S Wong

    Full Text Available This study explored the knowledge, attitude, practice and barriers to prescribe human papillomavirus (HPV vaccines among private primary care physicians in Hong Kong. A self-administered questionnaire survey was conducted by sending letters to doctors who had joined a vaccination program for school girls. From 720 surveys sent, 444 (61.7% completed questionnaires were returned and analyzed. For knowledge, few responded to questions accurately on the prevalence of cervical HPV (27.9% and genital wart infection (13.1% among sexually active young women in Hong Kong, and only 44.4% correctly answered the percentage of cervical cancers caused by HPV. For attitude, most agreed that HPV vaccination should be fully paid by the Government (68.3% as an important public health strategy. Vaccination against HPV was perceived as more important than those for genital herpes (52.2% and Chlamydia (50.1% for adolescent health, and the majority selected adolescents aged 12-14 years as the ideal group for vaccination. Gardasil(® (30.9% and Cervarix(® (28.0% were almost equally preferred. For practice, the factors influencing the choice of vaccine included strength of vaccine protection (61.1%, long-lasting immunity (56.8% and good antibody response (55.6%. The most significant barriers to prescribe HPV vaccines consisted of parental refusal due to safety concerns (48.2%, and their practice of advising vaccination was mostly affected by local Governmental recommendations (78.7%. A substantial proportion of physicians had recommended HPV vaccines for their female clients/patients aged 18-26 years for protection of cervical cancer (83.8% or both cervical cancer and genital warts (85.5%. The knowledge on HPV infection was low among physicians in Hong Kong. Prescription of HPV vaccine was hindered by the perceived parental concerns and was mostly relied on Governmental recommendations. Educational initiatives should be targeted towards both physicians and parents

  16. Knowledge, attitudes, practices, and barriers reported by patients receiving diabetes and hypertension primary health care in Barbados: a focus group study

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    Adams O Peter

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Deficiencies in the quality of diabetes and hypertension primary care and outcomes have been documented in Barbados. This study aimed to explore the knowledge, attitudes and practices, and the barriers faced by people with diabetes and hypertension in Barbados that might contribute to these deficiencies. Methods Five structured focus groups were conducted for randomly selected people with diabetes and hypertension. Results Twenty-one patients (5 diabetic, 5 hypertensive, and 11 with both diseases with a mean age of 59 years attended 5 focus group sessions. Patient factors that affected care included the difficulty in maintaining behaviour change. Practitioner factors included not considering the "whole person" and patient expectations, and not showing enough respect for patients. Health care system factors revolved around the amount of time spent accessing care because of long waiting times in public sector clinics and pharmacies. Society related barriers included the high cost and limited availability of appropriate food, the availability of exercise facilities, stigma of disease and difficulty taking time off work. Attendees were not familiar with guidelines for diabetes and hypertension management, but welcomed a patient version detailing a place to record results, the frequency of tests, and blood pressure and blood glucose targets. Appropriate education from practitioners during consultations, while waiting in clinic, through support and education groups, and for the general public through the schools, mass media and billboards were recommended. Conclusions Primary care providers should take a more patient centred approach to the care of those with diabetes and hypertension. The care system should provide better service by reducing waiting times. Patient self-management could be encouraged by a patient version of care guidelines and greater educational efforts.

  17. Sense of place as a determinant of people's attitudes towards the environment: implications for natural resources management and planning in the Great Barrier Reef, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Silva; De Freitas, Debora M; Hicks, Christina C

    2013-03-15

    Integrating people's values and perceptions into planning is essential for the successful management of natural resources. However, successful implementation of natural resources management decisions on the ground is a complex task, which requires a comprehensive understanding of a system's social and ecological linkages. This paper investigates the relationship between sense of place and people's attitudes towards their natural environment. Sense of place contributes towards shaping peoples' beliefs, values and commitments. Here, we set out to explore how these theoretical contributions can be operationalized for natural resources management planning in the Great Barrier Reef region of Australia. We hypothesise that the region's diverse range of natural resources, conservation values and management pressures might be reflected in people's attachment to place. To tests this proposition, variables capturing socio-demographics, personal wellbeing and a potential for sense of place were collected via mail-out survey of 372 residents of the region, and tested for relationships using multivariate regression and redundancy orientation analyses. Results indicate that place of residence within the region, involvement in community activities, country of birth and the length of time respondents lived in the region are important determinants of the values assigned to factors related to the natural environment. This type of information is readily available from National Census and thus could be incorporated into the planning of community engagement strategies early in the natural resources management planning process. A better understanding of the characteristics that allow sense of place meanings to develop can facilitate a better understanding of people's perceptions towards environmental and biodiversity issues. We suggest that the insights gained from this study can benefit environmental decision making and planning in the Great Barrier Reef region; and that sense of place

  18. Exploration of knowledge of, adherence to, attitude and barriers toward evidence-based guidelines (EBGs for prevention of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP in healthcare workers of pediatric cardiac intensive care units (PCICUs: A Quali-Quantitative survey

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    Leila Jahansefat

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Implementation of evidence-based guidelines (EBGs is an effective measure for prevention of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP. Appropriate knowledge, attitude and adherence of healthcare workers (HCWs to EBGs are necessary factors for implementation of EBGs. This study was conducted with objective of evaluation of knowledge, attitude, and adherence of HCWs to EBGs for prevention of VAP and exploration of the barriers of their implementation in clinical practice. Totally, a total number of 45 HCWs of two pediatric cardiac surgery ICU (PCICUs participated in this quali-quantitative survey. Knowledge, attitude and adherence of participants was evaluated by a validated multiple-choice questionnaire and barriers of implementation of EBGs was extracted from participants’ answer to an open-ended question of our self-made questionnaire. Knowledge of HCWs was poor and significantly different between nurse assistants (RAs, nurses (RNs, and physicians (MDs (respectively, 1.25±0.95, 4.53±1.73, and 5.54±2.01, P=0.001. Likewise, attit ude of HCWs is not positive and significantly different between NAs, RNs, and MDs (respectively, 32.96±2.42, 34.00±2.44, 36.81±4.35, P=0.003. The adherence of HCWs is not good and different between RAs, RNs, and MDs (respectively, 11.50±1.00, 13.13±1.83, and 17.18±6.06, P= 0.17. The Barriers of implementation of EBGs was categorized into four category of individual, organizational, social, and educational factors. Unsatisfying status of knowledge, attitude, and adherence of HCWs is a challenging concern of health-care system, especially in PICUs. In addition to these well-known factors, poor implementation of EBGs is related to many other barriers which should recognized and taken into consideration for designation of infection controlling programs.

  19. Understanding attitudes, barriers and challenges in a small island nation to disease and partner notification for HIV and other sexually transmitted infections: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, O Peter; Carter, Anne O; Redwood-Campbell, Lynda

    2015-05-02

    In Barbados sexually transmitted infections (STIs) including HIV are not notifiable diseases and there is not a formal partner notification (PN) programme. Objectives were to understand likely attitudes, barriers, and challenges to introducing mandatory disease notification (DN) and partner notification (PN) for HIV and other STIs in a small island state. Six key informants identified study participants. Interviews were conducted, recorded, transcribed and analysed for content using standard methods. Participants (16 males, 13 females, median age 59 years) included physicians, nurses, and representatives from governmental, youth, HIV, men's, women's, church, and private sector organisations. The median estimated acceptability by society of HIV/STI DN on a scale of 1 (unacceptable) to 5 (completely acceptable) was 3. Challenges included; maintaining confidentiality in a small island; public perception that confidentiality was poorly maintained; fear and stigma; testing might be deterred; reporting may not occur; enacting legislation would be difficult; and opposition by some opinion leaders. For PN, contract referral was the most acceptable method and provider referral the least. Contract referral unlike provider referral was not "a total suspension of rights" while taking into account that "people need a little gentle pressure sometimes". Extra counselling would be needed to elicit contacts or to get patients to notify partners. Shame, stigma and discrimination in a small society may make PN unacceptable and deter testing. With patient referral procrastination may occur, and partners may react violently and not come in for care. With provider referral patients may have concerns about confidentiality including neighbours becoming suspicious if a home visit is used as the contact method. Successful contact tracing required time and effort. With contract referral people may neither inform contacts nor say that they did not. Strategies to overcome barriers to DN and PN

  20. Nursing education progression: associate degree nursing faculty perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neal, Dale; Zomorodi, Meg; Wagner, Jennie

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this survey was to examine the attitudes, influences, and practices of associate degree nursing (ADN) faculty in relation to advising students about nursing education progression. The results indicated that ADN faculty have a sense of moral and personal role responsibility to encourage students to continue their education. Deficits in faculty knowledge of program details and multiple demands on their time are factors that influence advising practices.

  1. Faculty Acceptance of a Workload Survey in One Major University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creswell, John W.

    1978-01-01

    Faculty at a state university were asked how they felt about the workload survey administered on campus and whether the NCHEMS' factors were related to their acceptance of the survey. Results upheld one NCHEMS relationship: that a positive attitude toward a survey is related to perceived value of the data for allocating faculty resources and…

  2. Faculty Usage of Library Tools in a Learning Management System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leeder, Chris; Lonn, Steven

    2014-01-01

    To better understand faculty attitudes and practices regarding usage of library-specific tools and roles in a university learning management system, log data for a period of three semesters was analyzed. Academic departments with highest rates of usage were identified, and faculty users and nonusers within those departments were surveyed regarding…

  3. Faculty Perceptions of Teaching in Undergraduate Computer Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelzaher, Ann M.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this dissertation is to examine the attitudes of computer science faculty members towards undergraduate teaching. The questions addressed in this study are: (1) How important is effective teaching to computer science faculty members at the undergraduate level and how important do they perceive effective teaching to be to their…

  4. Faculty Acceptance of a Workload Survey in One Major University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creswell, John W.

    1978-01-01

    Faculty at a state university were asked how they felt about the workload survey administered on campus and whether the NCHEMS' factors were related to their acceptance of the survey. Results upheld one NCHEMS relationship: that a positive attitude toward a survey is related to perceived value of the data for allocating faculty resources and…

  5. Faculty Perceptions of Teaching in Undergraduate Computer Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelzaher, Ann M.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this dissertation is to examine the attitudes of computer science faculty members towards undergraduate teaching. The questions addressed in this study are: (1) How important is effective teaching to computer science faculty members at the undergraduate level and how important do they perceive effective teaching to be to their…

  6. Faculty Perceptions of Basic Skills Faculty Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Michelle Moreau

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the perceptions of faculty regarding why they choose to attend basic skills faculty development; what they choose to implement in their classrooms; and how they determine the effectiveness of the strategies selected. A survey was completed by 173 full and part-time faculty from a large, suburban single-campus community…

  7. THE BARRIERS TO INCLUSIVE EDU­CA­TION: MAPPING 10 YEARS OF SERBI­AN TEACHERS’ ATTITUDES TO­WARD INCLUSIVE EDUCATION

    OpenAIRE

    Vera RAJOVIC; JOVANOVIC Olja

    2013-01-01

    The study provides a comparative review of 15 independently written studies on teachers’ attitudes toward inclusion in Serbia between 2002 and 2012. It also attempted to describe teachers’ attitudes toward inclusive education depending on the type of special need, as well as the main obstacles and benefits of a successful inclusion from the in-service teachers’ pointof view. The findings show that shifts in teachers’ attitudes toward inclusion are slow despite numerous reform changes. The res...

  8. The Faculty Self-Reported Assessment Survey (FRAS): differentiating faculty knowledge and experience in assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanauer, David I; Bauerle, Cynthia

    2015-01-01

    Science, technology, engineering, and mathematics education reform efforts have called for widespread adoption of evidence-based teaching in which faculty members attend to student outcomes through assessment practice. Awareness about the importance of assessment has illuminated the need to understand what faculty members know and how they engage with assessment knowledge and practice. The Faculty Self-Reported Assessment Survey (FRAS) is a new instrument for evaluating science faculty assessment knowledge and experience. Instrument validation was composed of two distinct studies: an empirical evaluation of the psychometric properties of the FRAS and a comparative known-groups validation to explore the ability of the FRAS to differentiate levels of faculty assessment experience. The FRAS was found to be highly reliable (α = 0.96). The dimensionality of the instrument enabled distinction of assessment knowledge into categories of program design, instrumentation, and validation. In the known-groups validation, the FRAS distinguished between faculty groups with differing levels of assessment experience. Faculty members with formal assessment experience self-reported higher levels of familiarity with assessment terms, higher frequencies of assessment activity, increased confidence in conducting assessment, and more positive attitudes toward assessment than faculty members who were novices in assessment. These results suggest that the FRAS can reliably and validly differentiate levels of expertise in faculty knowledge of assessment.

  9. The Effects of Demographic, Internal and External University Environment Factors on Faculty Job Satisfaction in Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duong, Minh-Quang

    2016-01-01

    University faculty members with higher job satisfaction are more productive, creative and positive attitude towards their job. Even less is known about university faculty job satisfaction in developing countries like Vietnam. This study examines the effects of demographic, internal and external university environment factors on faculty job…

  10. Can Tablet Computers Enhance Faculty Teaching?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Aditee P; Whicker, Shari A; Benjamin, Robert W; Hawley, Jeffrey; McGann, Kathleen A

    2015-06-01

    Learner benefits of tablet computer use have been demonstrated, yet there is little evidence regarding faculty tablet use for teaching. Our study sought to determine if supplying faculty with tablet computers and peer mentoring provided benefits to learners and faculty beyond that of non-tablet-based teaching modalities. We provided faculty with tablet computers and three 2-hour peer-mentoring workshops on tablet-based teaching. Faculty used tablets to teach, in addition to their current, non-tablet-based methods. Presurveys, postsurveys, and monthly faculty surveys assessed feasibility, utilization, and comparisons to current modalities. Learner surveys assessed perceived effectiveness and comparisons to current modalities. All feedback received from open-ended questions was reviewed by the authors and organized into categories. Of 15 eligible faculty, 14 participated. Each participant attended at least 2 of the 3 workshops, with 10 to 12 participants at each workshop. All participants found the workshops useful, and reported that the new tablet-based teaching modality added value beyond that of current teaching methods. Respondents developed the following tablet-based outputs: presentations, photo galleries, evaluation tools, and online modules. Of the outputs, 60% were used in the ambulatory clinics, 33% in intensive care unit bedside teaching rounds, and 7% in inpatient medical unit bedside teaching rounds. Learners reported that common benefits of tablet computers were: improved access/convenience (41%), improved interactive learning (38%), and improved bedside teaching and patient care (13%). A common barrier faculty identified was inconsistent wireless access (14%), while no barriers were identified by the majority of learners. Providing faculty with tablet computers and having peer-mentoring workshops to discuss their use was feasible and added value.

  11. Types of Student Intertextuality and Faculty Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecorari, Diane; Shaw, Philip

    2012-01-01

    Intertextuality is a prominent feature of academic writing, and the ability to use sources effectively and appropriately is an essential skill which novice writers must acquire. It is also a complex skill, and student performance is not always successful. It is presumably beneficial for students to receive consistent messages about what source use…

  12. Some LIS Faculty Indicate Reservations about Open Access

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Hayman

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A Review of: Peekhaus, W., & Proferes, N. (2015. How library and information science faculty perceive and engage with open access. Journal of Information Science, 41(5, 640-661. http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0165551515587855 Objective – To examine the awareness of, attitudes toward, and engagement with open access (OA publishing, based on rank and tenure status among library and information science (LIS faculty in North America. Design – Web-based survey distributed via email. Setting – Accredited library and information science (LIS programs in North America. Subjects – 276 professors and professors emeriti. Methods – Researchers collected email addresses for 1,017 tenure-track, tenured, and emeriti professors from the public websites of the LIS programs. Researchers sent an email invitation to participate in the survey by accessing a URL, with the survey itself delivered using Qualtrics software. The survey included 51 total questions, some with additional sub-questions, and most items used Likert-type rating scale. The researchers analysed the data using SPSS software, and indicated using chi-square tests to measure significance, with a stated intent to get beyond the descriptive statistics commonly seen in other publications. Main Results – This study’s results draw on 276 completed responses, for a response rate of 27%. Researchers reported that 53% of respondents had some experience with publishing in a peer-reviewed OA format. When asked whether they agreed that scholarly articles should be free to access for everyone, pre-tenure assistant professors were most likely to agree (74%, followed by tenured associate professors (62%, full professors (59% and then emeriti professors (8%. However, they found less likelihood that associate professors would have actually published in an OA format, highlighting a “disconnect between beliefs about accessibility of research and actual practice with open access” (p. 646. Researchers also

  13. Does Tenure Matter? Factors Influencing Faculty Contributions to Institutional Repositories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne M. Casey

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Institutional repositories (IRs provide colleges and universities a way to ensure stability of access to and dissemination of digital scholarly communications. Yet, many institutions report that faculty willingness to contribute to IRs is often limited. This study investigates faculty attitudes about IR contributions by tenure status and category of material. METHODS Two focus group interviews were conducted in the spring of 2009 among English department faculty at a large Midwestern university. One group consisted of tenured faculty and the other of tenure-track and adjunct faculty. RESULTS Both groups recognize the benefit of open access to research materials but expressed concern about their intellectual property rights. Untenured faculty spoke more about nonprint research. Both groups also shared concerns about contributing instructional materials, primarily in regard to plagiarism and outdated materials. In regard to faculty service, the tenured group discussed many items they would contribute, while the untenured faculty mentioned very little. DISCUSSION Some minor differences emerged related to experience and tenure status in regard to contributing research and instructional artifacts, but the major variation was the strong support tenured participants gave for contributing service items, compared to the untenured faculty, who did not view this category positively. Tenured faculty viewed the IR as a way to document their own service activities, investigate those of colleagues, and had fewer concerns about plagiarism or other negative effects in the service category. CONCLUSION Promoting faculty contribution of service-related items to an IR may be a way to encourage larger numbers to participate.

  14. Knowledge, attitudes and barriers regarding vaccination against hepatitis A and B in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus infection: a survey of family medicine and internal medicine physicians in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenner, C T; Herzog, K; Chaudhari, S; Bini, E J; Weinshel, E H

    2012-10-01

    Although vaccination against hepatitis A virus (HAV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV) is recommended for all patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, physician vaccination practices are suboptimal. Since training for family medicine (FM) and internal medicine (IM) physicians differ, we hypothesised that there are differences in knowledge, attitudes and barriers regarding vaccination against HAV and HBV in patients with chronic HCV between these two groups. A two-page questionnaire was mailed to 3000 primary care (FM and IM) physicians randomly selected from the AMA Physician Masterfile in 2005. The survey included questions about physician demographics, knowledge and attitudes regarding vaccination. Among the 3000 physicians surveyed, 1209 (42.2%) returned completed surveys. There were no differences between respondents and non-respondents with regard to age, gender, geographic location or specialty. More FM than IM physicians stated that HCV+ patients should not be vaccinated against HAV (23.7% vs. 11.8%, p infection, physicians often do not test or vaccinate susceptible individuals. Interventions are needed to overcome the barriers identified and improve vaccination rates. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. 大學教師對與圖書館員合作推動資訊素養融入課程之態度 A case study of faculty attitudes toward collaboration with librarians to integrate information literacy into the curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tien-Yu Cha

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available 教師與館員合作將資訊素養融入課程,乃促進資訊素養學習成效之關鍵策略,為探索大學教師與館員進行資訊素養課程合作之態度,本研究以逢甲大學專任教師為對象進行問卷調查,探討教師對於資訊素養融入課程的合作策略、與館員的合作態度及影響教師館員合作的因素,以期作為館員與教師建立或拓展課程合作關係之參考。研究結果顯示,個案機構的教師對協同合作抱持正面的態度,不同年齡層則略有差異。此外,教師對培養高階思維能力與低階思維能力的合作態度不同;而「館員學科知識」、「館員專業素養」、「課程策略」、「學生學習」四大因素構面對教師與館員間的合作具有影響作用。Faculty-librarian partnership in information literacy (IL instruction through subject course has been advocated within LIS field over years. In order to understand faculty attitudes toward collaboration with librarians to integrate IL into their curriculum, a survey was conducted at Feng Chia University. Findings show positive attitudes from faculty while differences were observed among ages. Meanwhile, different attitudes were revealed between teaching higher order thinking skills and lower order thinking skills. Librarian Domain Knowledge, Librarian Professionalism, Curriculum Strategies, and Student Learning were identified as factorial dimensions influencing faculty-librarian collaboration.

  16. Nursing Faculty Members' Perspectives of Faculty-to-Faculty Workplace Incivility among Nursing Faculty Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amos, Kimberly S.

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, nursing faculty incivility has been a searing topic of research. Nursing research included studies on incivility among nursing students, incivility between nursing students and nursing faculty, and incivility in the clinical setting. However, literature specifically on nursing faculty incivility was limited. This descriptive,…

  17. Students Evaluation of Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thawabieh, Ahmad M.

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate how students evaluate their faculty and the effect of gender, expected grade, and college on students' evaluation. The study sample consisted of 5291 students from Tafila Technical University Faculty evaluation scale was used to collect data. The results indicated that student evaluation of faculty was high (mean =…

  18. Nursing Faculty Members' Perspectives of Faculty-to-Faculty Workplace Incivility among Nursing Faculty Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amos, Kimberly S.

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, nursing faculty incivility has been a searing topic of research. Nursing research included studies on incivility among nursing students, incivility between nursing students and nursing faculty, and incivility in the clinical setting. However, literature specifically on nursing faculty incivility was limited. This descriptive,…

  19. Towards supporting scholarship in research by clinical pharmacy faculty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pickard AS

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of this study was to assess the need for research support, faculty development, and topics of interest to clinical track pharmacy faculty that would facilitate scholarship in research.Methods: A cross-sectional survey of pharmacy practice-based faculty at University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC completed via the web in November 2005.Results: Of 39 clinical track faculty respondents (48% response rate, 100% indicated they were interested in being co-investigator or 77% lead investigator on a research grant proposal. The majority of respondents expressed “a lot” or “extreme” interest in receiving methodological guidance and administrative support in order to pursue research interests. The greatest interest in research support services related to sample size calculations, selection of appropriate statistical tests, grant writing, and writing for journals. Barriers to research cited by faculty included lack of confidence in ability, the need for balancing responsibilities, and reward for efforts. Suggestions included the creation of specific research interest groups, research seminars, formal mentoring and statistical support services.Conclusions: Clinical-track faculty are interested in research-related scholarship but typically lack the confidence or skills to lead research. While this study was limited to UIC clinical faculty, UIC faculty are attracted from Colleges of Pharmacy across North America and it is notable that such barriers can be quickly identified using a brief web-based survey in order to inform a plan that provides resources and support for research by clinical pharmacy faculty.

  20. Attitudes and attitude change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohner, Gerd; Dickel, Nina

    2011-01-01

    Attitudes and attitude change remain core topics of contemporary social psychology. This selective review emphasizes work published from 2005 to 2009. It addresses constructionist and stable-entity conceptualizations of attitude, the distinction between implicit and explicit measures of attitude, and implications of the foregoing for attitude change. Associative and propositional processes in attitude change are considered at a general level and in relation to evaluative conditioning. The role of bodily states and physical perceptions in attitude change is reviewed. This is followed by an integrative perspective on processing models of persuasion and the consideration of meta-cognitions in persuasion. Finally, effects of attitudes on information processing, social memory, and behavior are highlighted. Core themes cutting across the areas reviewed are attempts at integrative theorizing bringing together formerly disparate phenomena and viewpoints.

  1. THE BARRIERS TO INCLUSIVE EDU­CA­TION: MAPPING 10 YEARS OF SERBI­AN TEACHERS’ ATTITUDES TO­WARD INCLUSIVE EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera RAJOVIC

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The study provides a comparative review of 15 independently written studies on teachers’ attitudes toward inclusion in Serbia between 2002 and 2012. It also attempted to describe teachers’ attitudes toward inclusive education depending on the type of special need, as well as the main obstacles and benefits of a successful inclusion from the in-service teachers’ pointof view. The findings show that shifts in teachers’ attitudes toward inclusion are slow despite numerous reform changes. The results are discussed in two stages, first before and then after the inclusion legislation was enacted. Furthermore, the overview showed that teachers in Serbia hold the most negative attitude toward inclusion of students with sensory impairments in mainstream schools. Despite resistance toward inclusion, teachers in Serbia realize its benefits, emphasizing the importance of developing social skills as well as reducing prejudice toward people with disabilities. The main obstacles to inclusion, as teachers perceive it, are insufficient education and inadequate professional development programs for teachers in Serbia, low peer status of children with disabilities in regular classrooms and lack of resources, which is in line with reform goals in Serbia.The implications for further reform implementation are discussed, as well as the need for further clarifications in future research.

  2. Attitudes and attitude change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scholderer, Joachim

    2010-01-01

    attitude theory. Why is this important? Attitudinal concepts can be found in every area of marketing. Concepts like ad liking, brand attitude, quality perception, product preference, perceived benefit, perceived risk, perceived value, and customer satisfaction can all be understood as particular types......, attitude objects are simply the things we like or dislike. Consumer researchers are mainly interested in attitude objects of two classes, products and services, including the attributes, issues, persons, communications, situations, and behaviours related to them. Research on consumer attitudes takes two...

  3. Open Educational Resources: Staff Attitudes and Awareness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolfe, Vivien

    2012-01-01

    Attitudes are changing in education globally to promote the open sharing of educational courses and resources. The aim of this study was to explore staff awareness and attitudes towards "open educational resources" (OER) as a benchmark for monitoring future progress. Faculty staff (n = 6) were invited to participate in semi-structured…

  4. Attitudes of College Graduates, Faculty, and Human Resource Managers Regarding the Importance of Skills Acquired in College and Needed for Job Performance and Career Advancement Potential in the Retail Sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimler, Ronald

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to empirically examine college graduate, faculty, and human resource manager descriptions of needed, received, and further training in eight employability dimensions of literacy and numeracy, critical thinking, management, leadership, interpersonal, information technology, systems thinking skills, and work ethic…

  5. Attitudes of College Graduates, Faculty, and Human Resource Managers Regarding the Importance of Skills Acquired in College and Needed for Job Performance and Career Advancement Potential in the Retail Sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimler, Ronald

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to empirically examine college graduate, faculty, and human resource manager descriptions of needed, received, and further training in eight employability dimensions of literacy and numeracy, critical thinking, management, leadership, interpersonal, information technology, systems thinking skills, and work ethic…

  6. Accounting Faculty Internships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill Christopher

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Accounting professionals, business college accrediting bodies, and even accounting academics themselves acknowledge that there is a disconnect between academe and the rigors and requirements of the accounting profession. Among the suggestions proposed in the literature to reduce this gap is the faculty internship, where accounting faculty members work within the field as accountants. Heretofore, individual case studies report benefits of such internships that accrue to a variety of stakeholder groups beyond just the faculty intern and include the academic institution, students, and accounting profession through faculty internships. This research seeks wider support for these benefits. This descriptive study involved surveying a sample of accounting faculty members to get their opinions about the benefits and drawbacks of faculty internships, and to determine the level of use of faculty internships in accounting. In all, 128 usable responses were obtained, representing a 14.6% response rate. The results of this study reveal that although most faculty members acknowledge the benefits cited in the literature, too few take advantage of faculty internships.

  7. Attitudes and attitude change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scholderer, Joachim

    2010-01-01

    attitude theory. Why is this important? Attitudinal concepts can be found in every area of marketing. Concepts like ad liking, brand attitude, quality perception, product preference, perceived benefit, perceived risk, perceived value, and customer satisfaction can all be understood as particular types...... of attitudes. This is the reason why a thorough understanding of attitudes is one of the most important skills a marketer can have. That same is true in related areas such as communications research: concepts like public opinion, corporate reputation, and corporate image are nothing more than particular types...

  8. Color-Blind Racial Beliefs Among Dental Students and Faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yu; Behar-Horenstein, Linda S

    2017-09-01

    Providing culturally competent patient care requires an awareness of racial and cultural norms as well as a recognition of racism. Yet, there is a paucity of research devoted to this problem. In dental education, increased attention has focused on eliminating oral health care disparities due to ethnicity and race. Further investigation to determine the relationship between color-blind attitudes (failing to recognize the impact of race and racism on social justice) and dental educators' cultural competence is needed. The aim of this study was to determine dental faculty and student baseline color-blind racial attitudes scale scores, using the color-blind racial attitudes scale (CoBRAS). This 20-item instrument that measures three subscales of color-blind racial attitudes (Unawareness of Racial Privilege, Institutional Discrimination, and Blatant Racial Issues) was administered to student and faculty groups at one U.S. dental school. Out of a total 245 students in three class years, 235 responded to all items, for a response rate of 96%; out of a total 77 faculty members invited to participate, 71 responded to all items, for a response rate of 92%. Underrepresented minority (URM) faculty scored significantly higher on the Institutional Discrimination subscale and lower on Unawareness of Racial Privilege compared to non-URM students. Males scored significantly higher on Institutional Discrimination and Blatant Racial Issues compared to females. Compared to white students, URM students scored lower on all three subscales. The findings were consistent with previous studies indicating that female and URM students were more sensitive to racism compared to male and majority students. The findings that white faculty had higher awareness of racial privilege than white students and that URM faculty were less aware of institutional discrimination than URM students provided new information. These findings suggest that dental faculty members need professional development

  9. Clarifying Evidence-Based Medicine in Educational and Therapeutic Experiences of Clinical Faculty Members: A Qualitative Study in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safari, Yahya

    2015-03-26

    Although evidence-based medicine has been a significant part of recent research efforts to reform the health care system, it requires an assessment of real life community and patient. The present study strives to clarify the concept of evidence-based medicine in educational and therapeutic experiences of clinical faculty members of Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences (2014). It was a qualitative study of phenomenology. The population consists of 12 clinical faculty members of Kermanshah University Medical Sciences. Sampling was carried out using a purposeful method. Sample volume was determined using adequacy of samples' law. Data gathering occurred through semi-structured interviews. Collaizzi pattern was employed for data interpretation concurrent with data gathering. interpreting the data, three main themes were extracted. They include: 1. Unawareness and disuse (unaware of the concept, disuse, referral to colleagues, experiment prescription) 2. Conscious or unconscious use (using journals and scientific websites, aware of the process). 3. Beliefs (belief or disbelief in necessity). It sounds essential to change the behavior of clinical faculty members from passive to active with respect to employing evidence-based medicine as well as to alter negative attitudes into positive ones. In so doing, systematic training program aiming at behavior changing is necessary. Also, providing dissent facilities and infrastructures and removing barriers to the use of EBM can be effective.

  10. Faculty Compensation Policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silander, Fred

    1983-01-01

    Faculty compensation policy is seen as one means by which an institution influences the faculty to work toward institutional goals. Among the broad criteria for compensation are worth, equity, need, and market measures. Benefits and issues in compensation including differentials in compensation, merit, part-time instruction, etc. are discussed.…

  11. Faculty Retirement Transitions Revitalized

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Ummersen, Claire; Duranleau, Lauren; McLaughlin, Jean

    2013-01-01

    It has been almost ten years since the American Council on Education (ACE) began to raise awareness of the importance of workplace flexibility in faculty careers and to encourage colleges and universities to support faculty in better integrating their professional and personal lives. With the generous support of the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, ACE…

  12. Faculty Growth Contracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seldin, Peter

    Growth contracts, described as faculty plans for personal and professional growth proposed by each member of the faculty, are examined. The rationale for growth contracts is explained and a list of some institutions using growth contracts or variations of the concept is provided. Growth contract advantages, the role of the evaluation committee or…

  13. Learner and Faculty Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Sharon; Stanford, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    This chapter identifies effective ways to address learner and faculty support. It introduces methods for building a successful learner support system by providing sufficient resources and proactively addressing learner motivation. It also addresses effective faculty support through institutional policies, resources, training, and course…

  14. THE ATTITUDES AND VIEWS OF TEACHERS AND PRE-SERVICE TEACHERS RELATED TO THE GENDER DISCRIMINATION IN SCHOOL LEADERSHIP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cemalettin İPEK

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Women are underrepresented in leadership positions in Turkish work life as well as in other countries. There are some social and personal barriers preventing women from managerial positions. One of the area in which women are underrepresented is school leadership. The main purpose of this study is to describe the attitudes and the views of the primary teachers and primary pre-service teachers related to the barriers preventing female teachers from attaining leadership positions in schools. In accordance with the main purpose of the study it was investigated whether there were any differences between the attitudes and the views of the primary teacher and the primary pre-service teachers. The attitudes and the views about the barriers facing female teachers in school leadership were also compared according to gender and the grades of the primary pre-service teachers. Data were collected from 114 primary teachers working in primary schools in Çayeli district and 192 primary pre-service teachers attending primary school teacher training program in the Faculty of Education in Rize University.The attitudes and the views of the primary teachers and primary pre-service teachers related to the barriers preventing female teachers from attaining leadership positions were described in two dimensions, personal attitudes and views, and social attitudes and views. Study results revealed that the attitudes and views differentiated significantly due to gender and position (teacher or pre-service teacher in both dimensions. Moreover, it was indicated that gender and the position of the primary teachers and the primary pre-service teachers have significant joint effects on the personal attitudes and views whereas joint effects of the gender and positions on the social attitudes and views were not observed at statistically significant level. As a conclusion, study results indicated that female primary teachers and female primary pre-service teachers have not

  15. Overcoming language barriers with foreign-language speaking patients: a survey to investigate intra-hospital variation in attitudes and practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vilpert Sarah

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Use of available interpreter services by hospital clincial staff is often suboptimal, despite evidence that trained interpreters contribute to quality of care and patient safety. Examination of intra-hospital variations in attitudes and practices regarding interpreter use can contribute to identifying factors that facilitate good practice. The purpose of this study was to describe attitudes, practices and preferences regarding communication with limited French proficiency (LFP patients, examine how these vary across professions and departments within the hospital, and identify factors associated with good practices. Methods A self-administered questionnaire was mailed to random samples of 700 doctors, 700 nurses and 93 social workers at the Geneva University Hospitals, Switzerland. Results Seventy percent of respondents encounter LFP patients at least once a month, but this varied by department. 66% of respondents said they preferred working with ad hoc interpreters (patient's family and bilingual staff, mainly because these were easier to access. During the 6 months preceding the study, ad hoc interpreters were used at least once by 71% of respondents, and professional interpreters were used at least once by 51%. Overall, only nine percent of respondents had received any training in how and why to work with a trained interpreter. Only 23.2% of respondents said the clinical service in which they currently worked encouraged them to use professional interpreters. Respondents working in services where use of professional interpreters was encouraged were more likely to be of the opinion that the hospital should systematically provide a professional interpreter to LFP patients (40.3% as compared with those working in a department that discouraged use of professional interpreters (15.5% and they used professional interpreters more often during the previous 6 months. Conclusion Attitudes and practices regarding communication with

  16. Successful Implementation of a Faculty Development Program in Geriatrics for Non-Primary Care Physician Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Brent C.; Schigelone, Amy R.; Fitzgerald, James T.; Halter, Jeffrey B.

    2008-01-01

    A four-year faculty development program to enhance geriatrics learning among house officers in seven surgical and related disciplines and five medical subspecialties at a large academic institution resulted in changes in attitudes and knowledge of faculty participants, expanded curricula and teaching activities in geriatrics, and enhanced and…

  17. International Comparisons of Inclusive Instruction among College Faculty in Spain, Canada, and the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, Allison; Vukovic, Boris; Sala-Bars, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    Across the globe, students with disabilities have been increasing in prevalence in higher education settings. Thus, it has become more urgent for college faculty to have a broad awareness of disability and inclusive teaching practices based on the tenets of Universal Design. In this study, we examined faculty attitudes toward disability-related…

  18. The Leadership Lens: Perspectives on Leadership from School District Personnel and University Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, Jennifer K.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the skills, knowledge, and attitudes necessary for aspiring school leaders from the perspective of university faculty in educational administration programs and acting school administrators and teacher leaders. Additionally, I sought to understand the congruence and/or dissonance between university faculty in educational…

  19. Technology Acceptance in an Academic Context: Faculty Acceptance of Online Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Shanan G.; Harris, Michael L.; Colaric, Susan M.

    2008-01-01

    The authors surveyed faculty from a college of business and a college of education regarding their attitudes toward online education. Results of the survey were examined to determine the degree to which the technology acceptance model was able to adequately explain faculty acceptance of online education. Results indicate that perceived usefulness…

  20. Using a Preflective Activity to Identify Faculty Beliefs Prior to an International Professional Development Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harder, Amy; Lamm, Alexa; Roberts, T. Grady; Navarro, Maria; Ricketts, John

    2012-01-01

    Today's college graduates in agricultural and life sciences must be prepared to work in a global society. Increasing the integration of international content into on-campus courses requires globally competent faculty members. This study reports faculty's initial attitudes and beliefs about Latin American culture prior to participating in a 12-day…

  1. Motivations, Costs and Results of AOL: Perceptions of Accounting and Economics Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eschenfelder, Mark J.; Bryan, Lois D.; Lee, Tanya M.

    2014-01-01

    The emphasis of the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) on improving student learning through Assurance of Learning (AOL) makes faculty involvement in the process at AACSB accredited schools important. This study examines the attitudes of accounting and economics faculty at AACSB accredited institutions toward the AOL…

  2. An analysis of key stakeholders' attitudes and beliefs about barriers and facilitating factors in the development of a cervical cancer prevention program in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Shelley A; Leser, Kendall A; Esmont, Emma E; Griffith, Fareeda M

    2013-03-01

    Cervical cancer is the leading cause of cancer related deaths among women. Each year there are approximately 250,000 deaths; most of which occurred in Sub-Saharan Africa, South Asia, and Latin America. The purpose of this report is to examine key stakeholders experience and knowledge of HPV and cervical cancer, examine their experiences with the current cervical cancer screening and treatment policy, and identify barriers and facilitating factors to vaccine implementation and uptake. Fifteen indepth interviews were conducted with key stakeholders in Cape Town and Johannesburg, South Africa. The interviews revealed several key findings including: 1) knowledge about HPV and cervical cancer varied across participants, 2) knowledge about cervical cancer was also mixed while knowledge about the relationship between HPV and cervical cancer was low among participants. Our findings indicate that key stakeholders are concerned about women's health and wellbeing. In addition, they believe that the government, families, and the media need to play a prominent role in prevention efforts.

  3. Barriers to integrating information technology content in doctor of nursing practice curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilly, Kezia; Fitzpatrick, Joyce; Madigan, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    To date, there is no benchmark data available on the measurement of program outcomes in doctor of nursing practice (DNP) programs. The purpose of this study was to identify barriers to integration of IT content in the curriculum in DNP programs, perceived IT competencies taught, and DNP faculty perception of competencies. The study location was DNP programs in the United States, and focus was on doctorate-prepared faculty with a DNP or PhD. A descriptive design using an Internet-based survey was done with 113 DNP programs administrators and faculty across the United States. Limitation of the study was that few DNP administrators forwarded the study to faculty, limiting the sample size. For the purpose of this study, the results were limited to responses from DNP administrators, and some comparative data of the faculty were used. Barriers measured included lack of qualified faculty, faculty's limited knowledge or skills in IT, lack of interest, age, lack of time to learn IT, lack of time to use IT, too many work demands, lack of administrative vision, unclear expectations of faculty, lack of technical support to faculty, or lack of resources. Leading barriers to IT implementation were lack of time of faculty, too many other work demands of faculty, lack of resources dedicated to IT, and lack of qualified faculty to teach IT. Further research is necessary on doctorate-prepared faculty and on interventions to overcome these barriers is needed. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Teaching for Inclusion: A Resource Book for NU Faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prenger, Suzanne M., Ed.

    This teaching manual helps college faculty understand how to work with diverse students in the classroom. An introductory section defines diversity, discusses teacher attitudes, and suggests where to begin. The 14 chapters are: (1) "Creating Inclusive Classrooms"; (2) "Selected Strategies for Teaching for Inclusion"; (3) "Gender"; (4) "Class in…

  5. Faculty Perceptions of Plagiarism at Queensborough Community College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Sara; Beck, Sheila

    2011-01-01

    The researchers surveyed English and Speech & Theater faculty members at Queensborough Community College on their perceptions of and attitudes toward plagiarism. The researchers used the Queensborough Community College Academic Integrity Policy as the basis for their analysis. Based on the responses received, it was determined that 50% of the…

  6. Faculty Perceptions of Plagiarism at Queensborough Community College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Sara; Beck, Sheila

    2011-01-01

    The researchers surveyed English and Speech & Theater faculty members at Queensborough Community College on their perceptions of and attitudes toward plagiarism. The researchers used the Queensborough Community College Academic Integrity Policy as the basis for their analysis. Based on the responses received, it was determined that 50% of the…

  7. 幼儿园保教人员的儿童忽视相关知识、态度及行为现况调查研究%A Cross-sectional Survey on the Knowledge,Attitude and Behavior towards Child Neglect among Kindergarten Faculty Members

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王宏; 符勤怀; 静进; 侯丹红; 冼少龙; 刘婷婷

    2012-01-01

    目的 了解幼儿园保教人员的儿童忽视相关知识、态度及行为现况,为开展适宜的防治儿童忽视的健康教育提供科学依据.方法 采用自行设计的调查问卷,对东莞、惠州、中山、佛山市的15所幼儿园的198名保教人员进行儿童忽视相关知识、态度及行为现况调查.结果 仅21.4%的保教人员听说过儿童忽视也知道内容;36.5%的保教人员以前从来没有获得过防治儿童忽视的知识;90.9%~98.4%的保教人员需要、也愿意接受并认为应该进行防治儿童忽视的教育和宣传;保教人员对孩子经常的行为:80.8%温情/理解、40.4%严厉、27.8%过度保护、18.2%过分干涉;保教人员对孩子从来没有的行为:75.3%从未恐吓过、52.5%从未过分干涉过、52.0%从未惩罚过、37.4%从未否认过;92.2%的保教人员愿意为防治儿童忽视做力所能及的事情;保教人员认为儿童忽视的主要发生地点:86.8%家庭、59.5%幼儿园、32.6%公共场合;保教人员认为保护3~6岁儿童的责任应是:87.9%家长、84.3%幼儿园保教人员、46.9%政府;保教人员认为目前防治儿童忽视的教育未普及的可能原因:56.8%政府及社会不重视、53.6%没有成立相应的专业机构、59.8%家长或保教人员本身缺乏相应知识、36.4%社会/医疗和教育机构宣传不力;93.2%的保教人员呼吁应该成立相应的防治儿童忽视的机构、法律援助机构或立法保护儿童.结论 幼儿园保教人员的儿童忽视相关知识匮乏,相关健康教育远远不够,但他们对其态度是肯定的,且迫切需求关于儿童忽视的健康教育.应加强对幼儿园保教人员的儿童忽视的健康教育,同时呼吁政府、社会对儿童忽视加以关注,建立儿童忽视培训和报告体系,并成立相应的防治儿童忽视的机构.%To investigate the knowledge, attitude and behavior of child neglect among the kindergarten faculty members in Guangdong Province

  8. Plagiarism Among Faculty Applicants

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Beuy Joob; Viroj Wiwanitkit

    2012-01-01

    ....5 Re-education and re-emphasizing the importance of "no plagiarism" in academic work, as well as establishing standards for all present academic faculty members, including senior and administrative...

  9. Faculty Trends and Projected Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Barbara A.

    1983-01-01

    Matching faculty with projected staffing needs requires creation of a broad-based inventory of faculty talents and interests, but such a database also suggests a number of faculty placement alternatives, including more productive faculty use, increased industry outplacement, and combining academic and nonacademic employment or administrative…

  10. Faculty Trends and Projected Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Barbara A.

    1983-01-01

    Matching faculty with projected staffing needs requires creation of a broad-based inventory of faculty talents and interests, but such a database also suggests a number of faculty placement alternatives, including more productive faculty use, increased industry outplacement, and combining academic and nonacademic employment or administrative…

  11. The Opinion of Students and Faculty Members about the Effect of the Faculty Performance Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghahrani, Nassim; Siamian, Hasan; Balaghafari, Azita; Aligolbandi, Kobra; Vahedi, Mohammad

    2015-08-01

    One of the most common ways that in most countries and Iran in determining the status of teacher training is the evaluation by students. The most common method of evaluation is the survey questionnaire provided to the study subjects, comprised of questions about educational activities. The researchers plan to evaluate the opinion of students and faculty members about the effect of the faculty performance evaluation at Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences in 2014-15. In this descriptive cross-sectional survey of attitudes of students and professors base their evaluation on the impact on their academic performance, have been studied. The populations were 3904 students and 149 faculty members of basic sciences Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences. Sample of 350 students and 107 students using Cochran formula faculty members through proportional stratified random sampling was performed. The data of the questionnaire with 28 questions on a Likert Spectrum, respectively. Statistical Analysis Data are descriptive and inferential statistics using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U test is done. Based on the results obtained from total of 350 students, 309 students and from total of 107 faculty members, 76 faculty of basic sciences, participated in this study. The most of the students, 80 (25.9%) of the Faculty of Allied Medical Sciences and most of the faculty of basic sciences, 33 (4.43) of the medicine science faculty. Comments Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences in comparison to the scope of the evaluation should test using Binominal test; we can conclude that in the field of regulatory, scientific, educational, and communications arena, there were no significant differences between the views of students. The greatest supporter of the education of 193 (62%) and most challengers of exam 147 (48%), respectively. Regarding the viewpoints of the faculty members at Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences towards the evaluation domains, using binomial test

  12. dental services and attitudes towards its regular utilization among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    responsible for 6.1million days of admission related ill health ... 2Department of Preventive Medicine and Primary Care, Faculty of the Clinical Sciences, University of Ibadan ... among civil servants and their attitudes towards its regular use.

  13. Latino Faculty in STEM Disciplines: Motivation to Engage in Research Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechuga, Vicente M.

    2012-01-01

    The scarcity of underrepresented faculty members in the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) disciplines is an issue of great concern to education researchers and scholars alike. Despite their low representation, many minority faculty are able to remain motivated, even when facing barriers due to their ethnicity. I present…

  14. Identifying Barriers in Implementing Outcomes-Based Assessment Program Review: A Grounded Theory Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bresciani, Marilee J.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this grounded theory study was to identify the typical barriers encountered by faculty and administrators when implementing outcomes-based assessment program review. An analysis of interviews with faculty and administrators at nine institutions revealed a theory that faculty and administrators' promotion, tenure (if applicable),…

  15. The Family Medicine Curriculum Resource Project: implications for faculty development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheets, Kent J; Quirk, Mark E; Davis, Ardis K

    2007-01-01

    Faculty development implications related to implementing the Family Medicine Curriculum Resource (FMCR) Project provide an opportunity to look at the recommendations of the Society of Teachers of Family Medicine's federally funded Faculty Futures Initiative (FFI) and the recent Future of Family Medicine (FFM) project. Implications for faculty development include the importance of the clerkship setting, originally defined in 1991, with new features added in today's practice environment as outlined by the FFM and the changing assumptions in approaching faculty development. Previously, faculty development focused on teaching learners to master current knowledge. Now, faculty must teach learners how to master new competencies throughout their lives; learners need to learn how they and others learn now. Teaching must focus on how to learn in the future as well as what to learn for the present. Competence ("what individuals know or are able to do in terms of knowledge, skills, and attitudes") has become the focus of curriculum development efforts over the last few years and most appropriately serves as the focus of curriculum development in the FMCR Project. Implications for developing teachers and preceptors focus on the skills and circumstances required to teach and evaluate all types (cognitive, metacognitive, and affective) of competence. In the new culture, novel teaching methods will serve as the focus of faculty development in teaching and of educational ("best practices") research.

  16. Beyond the Sound Barrier. Booklet No. 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George Washington Univ., Washignton, DC. Regional Rehabilitation Research Inst. on Attitudinal, Legal and Leisure Barriers.

    The second of five booklets designed to change the attitudes of the general public toward disabled people examines attitudes toward deaf and hearing impaired people. Six myths (including that deaf persons cannot appreciate the arts) are contradicted, and five situations demonstrating attitudinal barriers are described. Suggested actions when…

  17. A Comparison of the mechanical engineering and safety engineering student’s ICT attitudes at the Obuda University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiss Gabor

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Communication and technology are critical to education. However, using technology in education is not an easy task as communication barriers emerge. The aim of this research is to analyze the ICT attitudes from different faculties at the Obuda University that is between the mechanical engineering students and safety engineering students from the Donát Bánki Mechanical Safety Engineer Faculty. The students from these two groups will use different ICT tool at work after their graduation; the mechanical engineering students will work mostly with designer ICT tools, the safety engineering students will use security systems. It would be important to know whether instructors, when using ICT, have to follow different teaching methods and approaches in these two different groups or not. We measured the ICT attitude with a tool consisting of 23 items (Likert scaled. We worked with 361 students. The data analysis was performed with SPSS software using descriptive statistics and Mann-Whitney test. The results show both groups having the same positive ICT attitude however with one difference.

  18. Faculty-Student Perceptions about Entrepreneurship in Six Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruett, Mark; Sesen, Harun

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: In what may be the first study of its kind in business and entrepreneurship, the purpose of this paper is to compare faculty and student perceptions and beliefs about entrepreneurship motives and barriers and student aspirations in order to explore implications for entrepreneurship education (EE). Design/Methodology/Approach: The authors…

  19. Faculty-Student Perceptions about Entrepreneurship in Six Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruett, Mark; Sesen, Harun

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: In what may be the first study of its kind in business and entrepreneurship, the purpose of this paper is to compare faculty and student perceptions and beliefs about entrepreneurship motives and barriers and student aspirations in order to explore implications for entrepreneurship education (EE). Design/Methodology/Approach: The authors…

  20. Recognition of Core Elements of Medical Professionalism among Medical Students and Faculty Members

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    irdous Jahan

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Medical students and future physicians have chosen to pursue a profession that requires personal integrity, compassion and a constant awareness of the commitment made by them. Professionalism includes personal behaviors, knowledge, and competency. It includes the attitudes and values one holds and that run through the profession as a whole. Medical students learn professionalism during the course by either direct teaching or experiential learning. We conducted this study to estimate the self-reported level of practice of the core elements of professionalism by medical students and medical faculty and compared the two groups. Methods: One-hundred and nine students and 83 faculty members of Oman Medical College completed a professionalism questionnaire. The survey questions related to core elements of professionalism and were grouped under professional knowledge, professional skills, professional attitude, and qualities essential for professionalism. Results: The response rate was 65.6% (109 of 166 among students and 75.5% (83 of 110 from faculty members. Response to the questions on professional skills between the student and faculty group was significantly different (p < 0.001. Similarly, there was a significant difference in the responses related to professional attitude between the student and faculty group (p < 0.001. Students and faculty members have a significant difference in opinion regarding up to date knowledge of basic and clinical sciences and clinical competency (p = 0.024. Similarly, significant differences in opinion regarding up to date knowledge of basic and clinical sciences and clinical competency in clinical and basic sciences faculty members (p = 0.001. Students identified good communication skills (82.6%, and faculty staff identified up to date professional knowledge (62.7% as the most important aspect of professionalism. Conclusions: Both students and teaching faculty agreed that the top most professional

  1. A comparative study on students' attitudes towards bilingualism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Furlan

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the research was to assess the existence of differences between attitudes towards bilingualism held by students of the Faculty of Humanities Koper and those held by students of Italian language and literacy from the Faculty of Philosophy in Split (Croatia. We investigated whether there are differences between attitudes towards bilingualism of both groups and if attitudes towards bilingualism held by students from Split are more favorable than those held by students from the Faculty of Humanities Koper. The results confirmed the first hypothesis partially, and the second one completely. 11 items out of 20 have shown to conduct to statistically different attitudes, whereas in one case a tendency towards statistically significant difference is to be found. In all cases, where statistically significant differences are to be found, attitudes held by students from Split are more positive, if compared to those held by students from Koper.

  2. Attitudes and anxiety levels of medical students towards the acquisition of competencies in communication skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loureiro, Elizabete M; Severo, Milton; Bettencourt, Paulo; Ferreira, Maria A

    2011-12-01

    Results of third year medical students' attitudes and stress levels towards the acquisition of communication skills before and after a Communication and Clinical Skills Course (CCSC) at the Faculty of Medicine of the University of Porto (FMUP), Portugal, are presented. 115 students attending third-year CCSC completed a demographic questionnaire, State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, Communication Skills Attitudes Scale and Interpersonal Behavior Survey. Significant negative correlation was found between anxiety levels and attitudes towards learning communication skills in general as well as the teaching and learning process. At the end of the Course students reported that when compared to the start, their communication skills are less sufficient. At the end of this CCSC at FMUP, students recognized its major importance and how they need to invest and improve communication skills. However, it seems important to monitor the attitudes and anxiety levels of students towards patient care and communication during the medical course and to identify ways of overcoming barriers towards learning communication skills. It is recommended that there should be a complete (transversal and vertical) integration of communication skills, including effective teaching methods, assessments, and examinations in order to be valued by the students. This would necessitate curricular changes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Students' attitudes towards learning statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghulami, Hassan Rahnaward; Hamid, Mohd Rashid Ab; Zakaria, Roslinazairimah

    2015-05-01

    Positive attitude towards learning is vital in order to master the core content of the subject matters under study. This is unexceptional in learning statistics course especially at the university level. Therefore, this study investigates the students' attitude towards learning statistics. Six variables or constructs have been identified such as affect, cognitive competence, value, difficulty, interest, and effort. The instrument used for the study is questionnaire that was adopted and adapted from the reliable instrument of Survey of Attitudes towards Statistics(SATS©). This study is conducted to engineering undergraduate students in one of the university in the East Coast of Malaysia. The respondents consist of students who were taking the applied statistics course from different faculties. The results are analysed in terms of descriptive analysis and it contributes to the descriptive understanding of students' attitude towards the teaching and learning process of statistics.

  4. 组织公平、心理契约违背与工作态度——基于“绩效工资”政策背景下高校教师的实证分析%Organizational Justice, Psychological Contract Violation and Working Attitude: An Empirical Analysis on Faculty under the "Performance Pay" Policy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王永刚

    2012-01-01

    Based on discriminating dimensions of organizational justice and working attitude, this study empirically analyzes the relationships among organizational justice, psychological contract violation and working attitude, with a special reference to the data from faculty members under the "Performance Pay" policy in our country. Results reveal that, distribuutive justice and procedural justice have significantly negative impacts on psychological contract violation, which in turn has a negative impact on job satisfaction. Job satisfaction has significantly positive impacts on organizational commitment and job engagement, while the positive impact of organizational commitment on job engagement is not statistically significant. The final part of this paper illustrates conclusions, implications and limitations of this study.%在对组织公平和工作态度进行维度划分的基础上,本文以我国“绩效工资”政策实施背景下的高校教师为研究对象,对组织公平、心理契约违背及工作态度间的关系进行了实证分析。结果发现,分配公平和程序公平对心理契约违背的消极影响显著;心理契约违背对工作满意度有着消极影响;工作满意度对组织承诺和工作投入有着积极影响;组织承诺对工作投入的积极影响不显著。最后,对本文的研究结论、启示与不足进行了阐述。

  5. 北京高校青年创业态度调查及其创业障碍研究%Investigation on Attitudes toward Entrepreneurship among University Students in Beijing and the Study of Barriers to Entrepreneurship

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    龚秀敏

    2011-01-01

    Entrepreneurship is the engine of national and regional economic development. The entrepreneurial group is a nascent force to promote the transformation from traditional economy to modern economy. To know whether Beijing has a potential to foster a large number of young entrepreneurs, we conducted a survey on attitudes toward entrepreneurship among students from 29 universities in Beijing in May, 2010. The survey revealed that many students' entrepreneurial behaviors in future tend to be conservative and uncertain. This means that a few factors impede young people from starting and running a business. Therefore, based on the statistic results of survey, this paper will try to find out the key barriers that young people face when starting and running a business, and will rethink about entrepreneurial policies and re -orient it, so as to provide a basis for government decision makers.%创业是一个国家和地区经济发展的引擎,创业者是推动传统经济向现代经济转型的新生力量.北京是否具备孕育大批年轻创业力量的潜能?针对这个问题,对北京地区29所高校学生的创业态度进行了问卷调查,结果显示,多数学生在创业行动上趋于保守和不确定.这意味着某些因素对北京高校学生的创业选择构成障碍.论文将在调查数据的基础上去分析妨碍年轻人创业的关键性障碍因素,并对创业政策进行重新思考和定位,以期为政府决策提供依据.

  6. Barriers to Career Flexibility in Academic Medicine: A Qualitative Analysis of Reasons for the Underutilization of Family-Friendly Policies, and Implications for Institutional Change and Department Chair Leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shauman, Kimberlee; Howell, Lydia P; Paterniti, Debora A; Beckett, Laurel A; Villablanca, Amparo C

    2017-08-22

    Academic medical and biomedical professionals need workplace flexibility to manage the demands of work and family roles and meet their commitments to both, but often fail to use the very programs and benefits that provide flexibility. This study investigated the reasons for faculty underutilization of work-life programs. As part of a National Institutes of Health-funded study, in 2010 the authors investigated attitudes of clinical and/or research biomedical faculty at the University of California, Davis, toward work-life policies, and the rationale behind their individual decisions regarding use of flexibility policies. The analysis used verbatim responses from 213 of 472 faculty (448 unstructured comments) to a series of open-ended survey questions. Questions elicited faculty members' self-reports of policy use, attitudes, and evaluations of the policies, and their perceptions of barriers that limited full benefit utilization. Data were coded and analyzed using a grounded theory approach. Faculty described how their utilization of workplace flexibility benefits was inhibited by organizational influences: the absence of reliable information about program eligibility and benefits, workplace norms and cultures that stigmatized program participation, influence of uninformed/unsupportive department heads, and concerns about how participation might burden coworkers, damage collegial relationships, or adversely affect workflow and grant funding. Understanding underuse of work-life programs is essential to maximize employee productivity and satisfaction, minimize turnover, and provide equal opportunities for career advancement to all faculty. The findings are discussed in relation to specific policy recommendations, implications for institutional change, and department chair leadership.

  7. Attitudes and barriers in implementing the environmental management system in a primary health care center Actitudes y barreras en la implantación del Sistema de Gestión Medioambiental en un centro de salud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Ángel Gata Díaz

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Identify attitudes and analyze the barriers perceived by those responsible for the implementation of SIGA-SAS in the primary health care centers of Distrito Sanitario Jaén.Methods: Between the nine primary health care centers that assisted a population more than 6000 users, were selected four professional with management tasks. We carried out an interview using a standardized questionnaire with 18 open questions, before conducting the interview, a small talk was given training and or delivered an informative documentation about SIGA-SAS. The interviews were recorded and transcribed in order to further analyze the speech in front of each professional to implement the SIGA-SAS.Results: Among the key findings on attitudes stressing the importance of the Managing Director of SAS to succeed in implementing the SIGA-SAS, and must rely on the actions of continuous improvement and active listening to the professionals. In addition there was also a clear consensus on the importance of the Distrito Sanitario Jaén and the ZBS management team to lead the implementation, defining objectives, setting tasks and delegating res- ponsibilities.Conclusions: The success of SIGA-SAS implementing should be based on three pillars, reinforcing the positive attitudes of the health professionals team working in the primary health care centers, the training of individuals with regard to the SIGA-SAS and the careful scheduling of the sequence of tasks to carry at all times.Objetivo: Identificar las actitudes y analizar las barreras percibidas por los responsables de la implantación del Sistema Integral de Gestión Ambiental, del Servicio Andaluz de Salud (SIGA-SAS, en los centros de salud del Distrito Sanitario Jaén.Material y métodos: De los nueve centros de salud, del Distrito Sanitario Jaén, con una población asistida superior a 6.000 habitantes, fueron seleccionados cuatro profesionales con funciones de gestión. Se llevó a cabo una entrevista

  8. Learner-Centered Faculty Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    To maximize their effectiveness, faculty developers should not merely advocate for an active learning approach but also enact it in their own workshops and service-oriented interactions with faculty, even extending to their use of outreach and social media.

  9. Contingent Faculty as Nonideal Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kezar, Adrianna; Bernstein-Sierra, Samantha

    2016-01-01

    This chapter explores how contingent faculty address the issue of work and family and demonstrates the importance of understanding the diversity of contingent faculty experiences and of underemployment rather than notions of the ideal worker to explain their work lives.

  10. Learner-Centered Faculty Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    To maximize their effectiveness, faculty developers should not merely advocate for an active learning approach but also enact it in their own workshops and service-oriented interactions with faculty, even extending to their use of outreach and social media.

  11. The Paradox of Faculty Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minter, Robert L.

    2009-01-01

    This paper explores the weaknesses in university faculty development efforts when compared with corporate professional development practices. Suggestions are offered to think of faculty development as a process rather than as isolated development activities.

  12. Faculty Motivations: An Exploratory Study of Motivational Factors of Faculty to Assist with Students’ Research Skills Development

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    Laurie Morrison

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Based on the premise that collaboration with faculty is a core element for the success of an IL program, this study sought to investigate the intrinsic motivations of faculty to assist their students’ development of information literacy skills. Research into the relationship between faculty and the library and librarians has left many unanswered questions about why faculty value research skills yet appear to be resistant to opportunities to collaborate with a librarian. The question arises: does attitude sufficiently predict the behaviour of faculty? Motivation (the underlying energy and direction of behaviour may be a more likely predictor of behaviour. This article reports findings from qualitative study which sought to uncover the motivational factors of faculty to address the library research skills of students. In-depth, semi-structured interviews were conducted in the fall semester 2004 with teaching faculty at the University of Guelph. Participants were asked to discuss their use of course-integrated library/research instruction. In its absence, faculty were asked how (if at all did they assist students to learn to do research. Transcripts were analyzed using grounded theory methodology. Findings suggest that faculty are motivated by their desire to produce independent learners with transferable skills. Scholars look for potential students for the next generation of scholars – graduate students. They see a link between the development of research skills and readers –an audience for their work. Some participants who had not previously collaborated with a librarian described their own methods of integrating research skills development in the curriculum. Findings are encouraging and support librarians in their efforts to promote information literacy instruction as a critical skill in undergraduate education.

  13. Faculty-Librarian Partnerships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesbitt, Renee

    1997-01-01

    A survey was designed to foster collaborative development of instructional strategies between education faculty and librarians at a state institution in California. Strategies from the survey results were utilized in developing instructional programs to teach education students information retrieval skills needed to access information from…

  14. Where Are the Faculty?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoskins, Barbara J.

    2010-01-01

    This article discusses how faculty members feel about the growth and quality of distance, distributed, and online higher education. The twenty-first century university must innovate to survive as the Internet becomes the dominant source of knowledge and learning. The twenty-first century student connects with information differently than earlier…

  15. Academic Achievement and Personality Traits of Faculty Members of Indian Agricultural Universities: Their Effect on Teaching and Research Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh, P.; Reddy, K. M.; Rao, R. V. S.; Dhandapani, A.; Siva, G. Samba; Ramakrishna, A.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The present study was undertaken to assess academic achievement, teaching aptitude and research attitude of Indian agricultural universities' faculty, to predict indicators for successful teachers and researchers, and thereby enhancing the quality of higher agricultural education. Methodology: Five hundred faculty members were selected to…

  16. Faculty Perceptions of the Benefits and Costs of Participation in Opencourseware and Their Sense of Institutional Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilges, Dolores C.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine college faculty attitudes towards benefits and costs of participation in OpenCourseWare (OCW), and level of content sharing. In addition, relationships among faculty participation in OCW, their assessments of costs and benefits to its use, content feedback, content protection, and their sense of OCW's…

  17. Campus Survey on the Status of the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SOTL) by Health Sciences Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Shari; Merchant, Christine; Appelt, Erin

    2013-01-01

    The Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL) provides an opportunity for clinician faculty to learn, share, and execute research studies aimed at improving teaching and learning. Knowledge of faculty knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs regarding SoTL provide a framework to advance SoTL on health science campuses. However, clinicians generally…

  18. Nursing Faculty Members' Perspectives of Faculty-to-Faculty Workplace Incivility among Nursing Faculty Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amos, Kimberly S.

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, nursing faculty incivility has been a searing topic of research. Nursing research included studies on incivility among nursing students, incivility between nursing students and nursing faculty, and incivility in the clinical setting. However, literature specifically on nursing faculty incivility was limited. This descriptive,…

  19. Faculty Demand in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Danielle

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study is to identify the factors that shift the demand curve for faculty at not-for-profit private institutions. It is unique in that to the author's knowledge no other study has directly addressed the question of how the positive correlation between average faculty salaries and faculty-student ratios can be reconciled with…

  20. Faculty Internships for Hospitality Instructors

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    Lynn, Christine; Hales, Jonathan A; Wiener, Paul

    2007-01-01

    Internships can help hospitality faculty build industry relationships while also ensuring the best and most current training for their students. Many hospitality organizations have structured faculty internships available or are willing to work with faculty to provide individualized internship opportunities. Career and technical educators in…

  1. Colgate University Faculty Handbook, 1970.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colgate Univ., Hamilton, NY.

    Designed to supplement the university catalog and handbook, this 1970 faculty handbook is primarily for the information and guidance of new members of the faculty. The community is described, and university organization and campus governance outlined. Specific details are reported on various topics, including: faculty use of college facilities,…

  2. Mentoring and Pretenure Faculty Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, Alan A.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    The University of British Columbia (Canada) Dental School uses teaching and research mentors for new faculty, together with a structured semiannual review process, to clearly identify faculty expectations for tenure. Pretenure faculty have appreciated the clear and regular input concerning their progress, and mentors enjoy the interaction with…

  3. Faculty Perspectives on Administrator Effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bess, James L.

    The sources of faculty perspectives on the personal effectiveness of administrators are analyzed. It is proposed that faculty will be predisposed to see administrators in different lights, depending on structural elements in decision making and the orientation of the faculty members. Attention is directed to Talcott Parson's theory for classifying…

  4. Attitude Strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Lauren C; Krosnick, Jon A

    2017-01-03

    Attitude strength has been the focus of a huge volume of research in psychology and related sciences for decades. The insights offered by this literature have tremendous value for understanding attitude functioning and structure and for the effective application of the attitude concept in applied settings. This is the first Annual Review of Psychology article on the topic, and it offers a review of theory and evidence regarding one of the most researched strength-related attitude features: attitude importance. Personal importance is attached to an attitude when the attitude is perceived to be relevant to self-interest, social identification with reference groups or reference individuals, and values. Attaching personal importance to an attitude causes crystallizing of attitudes (via enhanced resistance to change), effortful gathering and processing of relevant information, accumulation of a large store of well-organized relevant information in long-term memory, enhanced attitude extremity and accessibility, enhanced attitude impact on the regulation of interpersonal attraction, energizing of emotional reactions, and enhanced impact of attitudes on behavioral intentions and action. Thus, important attitudes are real and consequential psychological forces, and their study offers opportunities for addressing behavioral change.

  5. Barriers to medication taking among Kuwaiti patients with type 2 diabetes: a qualitative study

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    Jeragh-Alhaddad FB

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Fatima B Jeragh-Alhaddad,1,2 Mohammad Waheedi,2 Nick D Barber,1 Tina Penick Brock3 1Department of Practice and Policy, University College London School of Pharmacy, London, UK; 2Department of Pharmacy Practice, Faculty of Pharmacy, Kuwait University, Kuwait City, Kuwait; 3Department of Clinical Pharmacy, School of Pharmacy, University of California, San Francisco, CA, USA Background: Nonadherence to medications among Kuwaitis with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM is believed to be a major barrier to appropriate management of the disease. Published studies of barriers to medication adherence in T2DM suggest a Western bias, which may not adequately describe the Kuwaiti experience. Aim: The purpose of this study was to explore barriers to medication adherence among Kuwaiti adults with T2DM. Methods: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 20 Kuwaiti patients with type 2 diabetes. The interviews were digitally recorded, transcribed, and analyzed using thematic analysis. Results: Barriers to medication adherence were identified. Emerging themes were: 1 lack of education/awareness about diabetes/medications, 2 beliefs about medicines/diabetes, 3 spirituality and God-centered locus of control, 4 attitudes toward diabetes 5 perceptions of self-expertise with the disease and body awareness, 6 social stigma, 7 perceptions of social support, 8 impact of illness on patient’s life, 9 perceptions of health care providers’ attitudes toward patients, and 10 health system-related factors, such as access difficulties and inequalities of medication supply and services. Conclusion: Personal, sociocultural, religious, health care provider, and health care system-related factors may impede medication adherence among Kuwaitis with type 2 diabetes. Interventions to improve care and therapeutic outcomes in this particular population must recognize and attempt to resolve these factors. Keywords: medication adherence, type 2 diabetes mellitus, Kuwait

  6. Barriers to obesity treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauro, Marina; Taylor, Valerie; Wharton, Sean; Sharma, Arya M

    2008-05-01

    Obesity, one of the most prevalent health problems in the Western world, is a chronic and progressive condition. Therefore, as with other chronic diseases, patients with obesity require lifelong treatment. Long-term efficacy and effectiveness of obesity treatments is notoriously poor. This may in part be attributable to the substantial barriers that undermine long-term obesity management strategies. These can include lack of recognition of obesity as a chronic condition, low socioeconomic status, time constraints, intimate saboteurs, and a wide range of comorbidities including mental health, sleep, chronic pain, musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive and endocrine disorders. Furthermore, medications used to treat some of these disorders may further undermine weight-loss efforts. Lack of specific obesity training of health professionals, attitudes and beliefs as well as coverage and availability of obesity treatments can likewise pose important barriers. Health professionals need to take care to identify, acknowledge and address these barriers where possible to increase patient success as well as compliance and adherence with treatments. Failure to do so may further undermine the sense of failure, low self esteem and self efficacy already common among obese individuals. Addressing treatment barriers can save resources and increase the prospect of long-term success.

  7. Attrition of full-time faculty from schools of nursing with baccalaureate and graduate programs, 2010 to 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Di; Bednash, Geraldine D

    2014-01-01

    The shortage of qualified faculty has been consistently reported as a major barrier impeding acceptance of all qualified applicants into nursing programs. In addition to faculty recruitment, the attrition of faculty is also a concern for schools of nursing. In this study, we found that nationally 11.8% of full-time faculty who worked in 2010 left their full-time jobs by 2011. Nearly half of total attrition, or 5.7% of full-time faculty members, were related to leaving for nonacademic nursing positions, whereas another 20% of attrition, or 2.4% of full-time faculty, resulted from retirement. Nearly 20% of faculty egressions, or 2.2% of full-time faculty, was due to leaving for nursing administrative positions or full-time faculty positions in an academic setting. Leaving for part-time faculty positions made up slightly more than 10% of faculty attrition or 1.3% of full-time faculty. Our bivariate analysis identifies distinctive academic and demographic profiles of faculty who left full-time positions for different reasons, and our multivariate analysis further shows that different individual and institutional attributes are significantly associated with different types of attrition.

  8. Faculty development needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houston, Thomas K; Ferenchick, Gary S; Clark, Jeanne M; Bowen, Judith L; Branch, William T; Alguire, Patrick; Esham, Richard H; Clayton, Charles P; Kern, David E

    2004-04-01

    We compared prior training in 4 areas (general teaching skills, teaching specific content areas, teaching by specific methods and in specific settings, and general professional skills) among community-based teachers based in private practices (N = 61) compared with those in community sites operated by teaching institutions (N = 64) and hospital-based faculty (N = 291), all of whom attended one of three national faculty development conferences. The prevalence of prior training was low. Hospital-based faculty reported the most prior training in all 4 categories, teaching hospital affiliated community-based teachers an intermediate amount, and private practice community-based teachers the least (all P <.05). This association remained after multivariable adjustment for age, gender, and amount of time spent in teaching and clinical activities. Preferences for future training reported frequently by the private practice community-based teachers included: time management (48%); teaching evidence-based medicine (46%); evaluation of learners (38%); giving feedback (39%); outpatient precepting (38%); and "teaching in the presence of the patient" (39%).

  9. Measures of homophobia among nursing students and faculty: a Midwestern perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinkel, Shirley; Patzel, Brenda; McGuire, Michael J; Rolfs, Elaine; Purcell, Kelly

    2007-01-01

    It is well documented that homophobia exists among healthcare providers including nurses. However, little research is available on the level of homophobia among nursing students and nursing faculty. Using the Index of Attitudes Toward Homosexuals (IAH) and the Homophobic Behavior of Students Scale (HBSS) 241 nursing students and 32 faculty in a Midwest university were invited to participate. One hundred twenty six students completed the survey resulting in a 51% return rate. Fifteen faculty completed the survey. Results reveal that there is a low level of homophobia among students and faculty at this university. Religion and LGBT acquaintances or family members accounted for most of the variance within the homophobia scores. While scores reflect low levels of homophobia, it is the belief of these researchers that they actually may reflect ambivalent or heterosexist attitudes toward LGBT people which may impact healthcare delivered by these future nurses.

  10. Survey of outcomes in a faculty development program on simulation pedagogy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Young Sook; Kim, Mi Kang; Tangkawanich, Thitiarpha

    2016-06-01

    Although many nursing programs use simulation as a teaching-learning modality, there are few systematic approaches to help nursing educators learn this pedagogy. This study evaluates the effects of a simulation pedagogy nursing faculty development program on participants' learning perceptions using a retrospective pre-course and post-course design. Sixteen Thai participants completed a two-day nursing faculty development program on simulation pedagogy. Thirteen questionnaires were used in the final analysis. The participants' self-perceived learning about simulation teaching showed significant post-course improvement. On a five-point Likert scale, the composite mean attitude, subjective norm, and perceived behavioral control scores, as well as intention to use a simulator, showed a significant post-course increase. A faculty development program on simulation pedagogy induced favorable learning and attitudes. Further studies must test how faculty performance affects the cognitive, emotional, and social dimensions of learning in a simulation-based learning domain.

  11. Faculty Perceptions of Challenges and Enablers of Effective Teaching in a Large Research-Intensive University: Preliminary Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briseño-Garzón, Adriana; Han, Andrea; Birol, Gülnur; Bates, Simon; Whitehead, Lorne

    2016-01-01

    In October 2014, the University of British Columbia Vancouver campus (UBCV) ran a campus-wide survey to establish baseline information on teaching practices and attitudes among faculty, to measure the impact of existing teaching and learning initiatives and to identify the conditions leading to change in practices and attitudes around teaching.…

  12. Perceived Benefits and Barriers to Family Planning Education among Third Year Medical Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly G. Smith, MD, MS

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of the current study is to explore third- year medical students’ interest in learning about family planning, exposure to family planning (contraception and abortion and perceived barriers and benefits to family planning education in their obstetrics and gynecology rotation.Method: We conducted four focus groups with 27 third-year medical students near the end of their rotation in obstetrics and gynecology.Results: Students desired education in family planning but perceived limited exposure during their rotation. Most students were aware of abortion but lacked factual information and abortion procedural skills. They felt systemic and faculty-related barriers contributed to limited exposure. Students discussed issues such as lack of time for coverage of contraception and abortion in the curricula and rotation itself. Perceived benefits of clinical instruction in family planning included increased knowledge of contraceptive management and abortion the ability to care for and relate to patients, opportunity for values clarification, and positive changes in attitudes towards family planning.Conclusions: Medical students who desire full education in family planning during their obstetrics and gynecology rotation may face barriers to obtaining that education. Given that many medical students will eventually care for reproductive-age women, greater promotion of opportunities for exposure to family planning within obstetrics and gynecology rotations is warranted.

  13. Passing the Baton: Mentoring for Adoption of Active-Learning Pedagogies by Research-Active Junior Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimes, Catherine Leimkuhler; White, Harold B., III

    2015-01-01

    There are barriers to adoption of research-based teaching methods. Professional development workshops may inform faculty of these methods, but effective adoption often does not follow. In addition, newly-minted research-active faculty are often overwhelmed by the many new responsibilities (grant writing, group management, laboratory setup,…

  14. International Medical School Faculty Development: The Results of a Needs Assessment Survey among Medical Educators in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yan; Sippola, Emily; Feng, Xinglin; Dong, Zhe; Wang, Debing; Moyer, Cheryl A.; Stern, David T.

    2009-01-01

    To explore the need for faculty development among Chinese medical educators. Leaders at each medical school in China were asked to complete a 123-item survey to identify interest in various topics and barriers and perceived benefits of participating in faculty development programs. Interest levels were high for all topics. Experience with Hospital…

  15. Evolución de Motivaciones, Actitudes y Hábitos de los Estudiantes de la Facultad de Ciencias de la Actividad Física y del Deporte de la Universidad de León Motivations, Attitudes and Habits of the students in the Sport Sciences Faculty of the Universit y of Leon (Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Pérez

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available

     

    Conociendo el descenso que se produce en la práctica deportiva al entrar en la Universidad, y la relación existente entre el consumo de sustancias nocivas y la falta de ejercicio físico, hemos querido estudiar si esto también ocurre en los estudiantes de Ciencias de la Actividad Física y el Deporte. Con este objetivo pasamos un cuestionario elaborado por nosotras a estudiantes de nuestra Facultad dónde  analizamos: 1º, motivaciones y actitudes de los alumnos de los diversos cursos hacia la carrera, así como sus preferencias profesionales; 2º, si se ha producido un descenso en la práctica física al estudiar la carrera; y 3º, qué hábitos de consumo de tabaco y alcohol tenían nuestros estudiantes antes de entrar en la Facultad y cómo evolucionan durante la carrera. Entre los resultados más relevantes cabe destacar la marcada disminución de la práctica deportiva al iniciar la carrera; la caída de la motivación hacia estos estudios según avanzan los cursos, y finalmente, que el porcentaje de alumnos que consumen alcohol es alto y aumenta a lo largo de la carrera, ocurriendo lo contrario con el tabaco.
    PALABRAS CLAVE: Práctica deportiva, actitudes, motivación, alcohol y tabaco.

    The aim of this research study is to examine the reduction in sports activity of the students of Sciences of the Physical Activity and Sport of the University of Leon at the beginning of their studies, and the relationship between the consumption of injurious substances and their poor physical exercise. We passed a self elaborated questionnaire to students of our Faculty to analyze: 1st, motivations and attitudes of the students towards their degreeand their professional preferences; 2nd, if the reduction in sports practice had occurred at the beginning of their studies; and 3rd, which habits of consumption of tobacco and alcohol

  16. RN-to-MSN students' attitudes toward women experiencing homelessness: A focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung-Park, Min; Hatton, Diane; Robinson, Linda; Kleffel, Dorothy

    2006-08-01

    When health professionals, including RNs, have negative attitudes toward women experiencing homelessness, they create barriers to services. It is incumbent on nursing faculty to develop curricula that address homelessness and associated stereotypes, as well as to prepare students to provide safe and appropriate care to the homeless population. The aim of this qualitative study was to examine the attitudes of RN-to-MSN students toward mothers living with their children in a transitional shelter. A convenience sample of 10 students enrolled in a community health nursing course at a university in southern California participated in the study. Two focus groups were conducted: one before and one after a 15-week clinical experience. Data analysis revealed that during the clinical experience, students discovered that they, or perhaps an individual like them, could become homeless. Their attitudes and views changed to include a bigger picture of homelessness, described by public health nursing researchers as "moving upstream." This article suggests strategies for integrating clinical experiences with socioeconomically vulnerable individuals into undergraduate nursing curricula.

  17. Assessment of medical students' attitudes on social media use in medicine: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avcı, Kadriye; Çelikden, Sevda Gerek; Eren, Semih; Aydenizöz, Doğukan

    2015-02-15

    Social media has created a revolution in health services. Information available on the Internet and via social media is now being used as reference guides for sensitive health issues by nonprofessionals, physicians, and medical students. When used by physicians and medical students, social media has the potential to raise issues such as the blurring of the line between professional and private lives, patient relations, and medical ethics. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to evaluate the use of social media and attitudes toward its use in medicine among medical students. Medical students from Afyon Kocatepe University, Faculty of Medicine (Afyonkarahisar, Turkey) were asked to participate in a survey consisting of two sections, the first containing questions assessing the frequency of social media use and the second regarding attitudes toward the use of social media in medicine. Survey responses indicated that 93.4% of medical students used social media and 89.3% used social media for professional purposes. Factor analysis showed that attitudes toward social media are based on five factors: professional usefulness, popularity, ethics, barriers, and innovativeness. A structural equation model revealed the highest positive correlation between usefulness and innovativeness; ethics had a low but positive correlation with other factors. Although social media is being used extensively by medical students, they appear unaware of possible ethical issues. Therefore, social media guidelines should be developed.

  18. Perceptions and practices of dental school faculty regarding evidence-based dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Teresa A; Straub-Morarend, Cheryl L; Qian, Fang; Finkelstein, Michael W

    2013-02-01

    Successful integration of critical thinking and evidence-based dentistry (EBD) concepts throughout didactic and clinical dental curricula require faculty support. Critical thinking and EBD definitions and practice continue to evolve, and not all dental faculty members were exposed to such concepts during their education. The objective of this study was to understand faculty members' perspectives on both critical thinking and EBD. An online survey was designed to assess full- and part-time faculty members' understanding, practice and teaching of critical thinking and EBD, interest in and perceived significance of EBD, and perceived barriers to teaching critical thinking and EBD at one U.S. dental school. Forty-three faculty members completed the survey for a 41 percent response rate. Most respondents (46 percent) defined critical thinking as the use of evidence or the scientific method in decision making and EBD as clinical practice based on "science only" (39 percent) or "quality science only" (34 percent). Based on their individual definitions, over 75 percent of the respondents reported incorporating critical thinking into didactic and clinical teaching; 79 percent and 47 percent, respectively, reported incorporating EBD into their didactic and clinical teaching. While these faculty members confirmed the importance of teaching students EBD, they identified barriers to teaching as time, knowledge, and resources. These results, which reflect one school's efforts to understand faculty perceptions and practices of EBD, suggest that faculty training and resource support are necessary for successful curricular integration of critical thinking and EBD.

  19. Lack of chart reminder effectiveness on family medicine resident JNC-VI and NCEP III guideline knowledge and attitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Upshur Ross EG

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The literature demonstrates that medical residents and practicing physicians have an attitudinal-behavioral discordance concerning their positive attitudes towards clinical practice guidelines (CPG, and the implementation of these guidelines into clinical practice patterns. Methods A pilot study was performed to determine if change in a previously identified CPG compliance factor (accessibility would produce a significant increase in family medicine resident knowledge and attitude toward the guidelines. The primary study intervention involved placing a summary of the Sixth Report of the Joint National Committee on Prevention, Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure (JNC VI and the National Cholesterol Education Program Expert Panel on Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Cholesterol in Adults (NCEP III CPGs in all patient (>18 yr. charts for a period of three months. The JNC VI and NCEP III CPGs were also distributed to each Wayne State family medicine resident, and a copy of each CPG was placed in the preceptor's area of the involved clinics. Identical pre- and post- intervention questionnaires were administered to all residents concerning CPG knowledge and attitude. Results Post-intervention analysis failed to demonstrate a significant difference in CPG knowledge. A stastically significant post-intervention difference was found in only on attitude question. The barriers to CPG compliance were identified as 1 lack of CPG instruction; 2 lack of critical appraisal ability; 3 insufficient time; 4 lack of CPG accessibility; and 5 lack of faculty modeling. Conclusion This study demonstrated no significant post intervention changes in CPG knowledge, and only one question that reflected attitude change. Wider resident access to dedicated clinic time, increased faculty modeling, and the implementation of an electronic record/reminder system that uses a team-based approach are compliance factors that

  20. Barriers to cancer screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Womeodu, R J; Bailey, J E

    1996-01-01

    Many barriers to cancer screening have been summarized and discussed. Barriers have been documented in all patient populations, but some groups such as ethnic minorities and the elderly face unique barriers. The barriers to cancer screening, are multifactorial, but much of the responsibility for change must lie with health care providers and the health care delivery industry. This is not to free the patient of all responsibility, but some significant barriers are beyond their direct control. Take, for example, socioeconomic status, disease knowledge, and culturally related perceptions and myths about cancer detection and treatment. The health care industry must do a better job identifying and overcoming these barriers. The significant effects of provider counseling and advice must not be underestimated. Patients must first be advised, and then further actions must be taken if they reject the screening advice. Did they refuse adherence to recommendations because they do not view themselves as susceptible, because of overwhelming personal barriers, or because of a fatalistic attitude toward cancer detection and treatment? If that is the case, physicians and health care institutions must attempt to change perceptions, educate, and personalize the message so that patients accept their disease susceptibility [table: see text]. Multiple patient and provider risk factors have been identified that can be used to target patients particularly at high risk for inadequate cancer screening and providers at high risk for performing inadequate screening. Research has clearly demonstrated the effectiveness of interventions to improve tracking of patient and physician compliance with screening recommendations. Further research is needed to show the impact of managed-care penetration and payer status on screening efforts, and incentive schemes need to be tested that reward institutions and third-party payers who develop uniform standards and procedures for cancer screening. The

  1. Needs assessment of Wisconsin primary care residents and faculty regarding interest in global health training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanders James

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The primary objectives of this study were to assess Wisconsin's primary care residents' attitudes toward international health training, the interest among faculty to provide IH training, and the preferred modality of IH training. Methods Surveys were administered using 505 residents and 413 medical faculty in primary care residencies in Wisconsin. Results from 128 residents and 118 medical school faculty members were collected during the spring of 2007 and analyzed. Results In total, 25% of residents (128/505 and 28% of faculty (118/413 responded to the survey. A majority of residents (58% and faculty (63% were interested in global health issues. Among residents, 63% planned on spending professional time working abroad. Few residents (9% and faculty (11% assess their residencies as preparing residents well to address topics relating to international health. The survey indicates that adequate faculty in Wisconsin could provide mentorship in international health as 47% (55 of faculty had experience working as a physician internationally, 49% (58 of faculty spend more than 25% clinical time caring for patient from underserved communities and 39% (46 would be willing to be involved with developing curriculum, lecturing and/or mentoring residents in international health. Conclusion Overall, the majority of the respondents expressed high interest in IH and few felt prepared to address IH issues indicating a need for increased training in this area. The findings of this survey are likely relevant as a prototype for other primary care residencies.

  2. Outcomes of a faculty development conference in Mongolia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah A Kroeker

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Medical Education International (MEI, an organization that provides faculty development to medical educators in developing countries, wanted information on the program effectiveness of its faculty development conferences. Objectives: To assess the outcomes of an MEI faculty development conference in Mongolia on the knowledge, confidence in applying new skills, and attitudes of participants. Methods: A retrospective pretest survey of participants was used to assess the outcomes of a 3-day faculty development conference given twice at the Mongolian National University of Medical Sciences. The survey assessed participant views on their ability to meet the objectives of the conference, the perceived overall value of the conference, and their suggestions for improvements in future MEI conferences. Results: Twenty participants (65% completed surveys. Participants reported significant changes in agreement with their ability to meet the objectives of the conference in all of the pre-post measures (pre-post p<0.001. The value of attending the conference was ranked at a mean score of 4.05 on a Likert scale from 1 to 5, with 1 indicating “Strongly Disagree” and 5 “Strongly Agree.” Conference attendees indicated interest in additional training on more advanced topics. Conclusion: Overall, the findings indicate that conference attendees gained knowledge and confidence in applying new skills and valued the training received from a faculty development conference led by physicians from the USA. Further research is needed to determine long-term impact on residency education in Mongolia.

  3. Junior faculty core curriculum to enhance faculty development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillet, Ronnie; Holloway, Robert G; Gross, Robert A; Libby, Katie; Shapiro, Janine R

    2017-04-01

    Senior Instructors and Assistant Professors in their first academic appointment may not have all the tools for an efficient start to their careers. Although many institutions provide access to mentoring programs and seminars on faculty development, the timing and format of the offerings often conflict with ongoing responsibilities of the faculty, particularly clinical faculty. We established a collaboration between the Clinical and Translational Science Institute (CTSI) and the University of Rochester Medical Center Office for Faculty Development with the goal of developing a week-long Junior Faculty Core Curriculum that would better suit faculty schedules. We convened focus groups and with their help, identified themes for inclusion in the course. Speakers were identified from among local senior faculty. University leadership was enlisted in promoting the course. Individual speakers and course content were evaluated daily, at the end of the week-long course, and 6 months later. Planning for subsequent years incorporated the feedback. Yearly evaluations and subsequent course modification continued. Junior faculty from nearly every department in the Medical Center were represented. There was high learner satisfaction and participation however several limitations were identified and addressed in subsequent years. The focus on principles and available resources, not specific skills or content was appropriate. Daily interactions among participants from a wide variety of departments fostered networking among faculty who may not otherwise have met and discussed common interests. The ultimate value of such an early, intensive faculty development program will depend on whether it equips junior faculty to organize, develop, and achieve their academic goals better than alternative formats. This will require further study.

  4. Effects of a research-infused botanical curriculum on undergraduates' content knowledge, STEM competencies, and attitudes toward plant sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Jennifer Rhode; Clarke, H David; Horton, Jonathan L

    2014-01-01

    In response to the American Association for the Advancement of Science's Vision and Change in Undergraduate Biology Education initiative, we infused authentic, plant-based research into majors' courses at a public liberal arts university. Faculty members designed a financially sustainable pedagogical approach, utilizing vertically integrated curricular modules based on undergraduate researchers' field and laboratory projects. Our goals were to 1) teach botanical concepts, from cells to ecosystems; 2) strengthen competencies in statistical analysis and scientific writing; 3) pique plant science interest; and 4) allow all undergraduates to contribute to genuine research. Our series of inquiry-centered exercises mitigated potential faculty barriers to adopting research-rich curricula, facilitating teaching/research balance by gathering publishable scholarly data during laboratory class periods. Student competencies were assessed with pre- and postcourse quizzes and rubric-graded papers, and attitudes were evaluated with pre- and postcourse surveys. Our revised curriculum increased students' knowledge and awareness of plant science topics, improved scientific writing, enhanced statistical knowledge, and boosted interest in conducting research. More than 300 classroom students have participated in our program, and data generated from these modules' assessment allowed faculty and students to present 28 contributed talks or posters and publish three papers in 4 yr. Future steps include analyzing the effects of repeated module exposure on student learning and creating a regional consortium to increase our project's pedagogical impact.

  5. Ageism among social work faculty: impact of personal factors and other "isms".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chonody, Jill M; Wang, Donna

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this article was (a) to determine the extent to which ageist attitudes are evident among social work faculty and how educational factors may contribute to ageism, (b) to determine if terror management theory (in terms of aging anxiety) offers a further explanation for ageist attitudes beyond known correlates, and (c) to understand how intersecting prejudices (attitudes toward women, gay men, and lesbians) may be associated with ageist attitudes. Results indicated a low bias toward older adults, with two variables, psychological anxiety about aging and paid experience with older adults, accounting for 29.7% of the variance. Further, no association was found between ageism and sexism and sexual prejudice in the multivariate analyses. These results indicate promising advances for terror management theory in explaining ageism. Social work faculty's low bias and perceived need for gerontological content in curricula is an encouraging finding for gerontological social work education.

  6. Determinanten für eine hausärztliche Berufswahl unter Studierenden der Medizin: Eine Umfrage an drei bayerischen Medizinischen Fakultäten [Predictors of a positive attitude of medical students towards general practice – a survey of three Bavarian medical faculties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schelling, Jörg

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available [english] Objective: Germany is witnessing an increasing shortage of general practitioners (GPs. The aim was to determine predictors of the job-related motivation of medical students of three medical faculties with different institutionalisation of general practice as an academic discipline.Methods: Medical students were surveyed with a standardised questionnaire about their attitudes towards general practice and their motivation to work as a GP in different working conditions. Predictors for positive attitudes and motivation were calculated using logistic regression models.Results: 940 (15.2% out of 6182 medical students from three Bavarian medical faculties participated in an online survey. 585 (62.7% were female, and the average age was 25.0 (standard deviation 3.7. The average grade of a university-entrance diploma was 1.6 (standard deviation 0.5. 718 (76.4% could imagine working as a GP. However, they favoured being employed within another organisation and not having their own private practice (65.5% vs. 35.1%. “Presence of a professorship of general practice” was associated with a positive attitude towards general practice (OR 1.57; 95%CI 1.13-2.417. Motivation for working as a GP was associated with “being female” (OR 2.56; 95%CI 1.80-3.56 and “presence of a professorship of general practice” (OR 1.68; 95%CI 1.14-2.46. Having a lower grade for one’s university-entrance diploma was associated with a higher preference to work in one’s own practice (OR 1.39; 95%CI 1.02-1.90.Conclusion: A high amount of medical students were open-minded towards general practice. However, they favoured employment within an organization over working in their own practice. Institutionalisation of general practice as an academic discipline might be of importance to gain positive attitudes towards general practice and motivate medical students to work as a GP.[german] Zielsetzung: Der zunehmende Hausärztemangel wird immer mehr zu einem realen

  7. Faculty Agency: Departmental Contexts That Matter in Faculty Careers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Corbin M.; O'Meara, KerryAnn

    2014-01-01

    In a modern context of constrained resources and high demands, faculty exert agency to strategically navigate their careers (Baez 2000a; Neumann et al. 2006). Guided by the O'Meara et al. (2011) framework on agency in faculty professional lives, this study used Structural Equation Modeling to investigate which departmental factors…

  8. Measuring Pharmacy Student Attitudes toward Prayer: The Student Prayer Attitude Scale (SPAS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pace, Adam C.; Greene, Joy; Deweese, Joseph E.; Brown, Dana A.; Cameron, Ginger; Nesbit, James M.; Wensel, Terri

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop and validate an instrument to assess the attitude of student pharmacists toward prayer in general and in particular as it relates to their academic performance. To fulfill the study objective, faculty from seven colleges of pharmacy located at Christian universities collaboratively developed the Student…

  9. Effects of an educational intervention on residents' knowledge and attitudes toward interactions with pharmaceutical representatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopper, J A; Speece, M W; Musial, J L

    1997-10-01

    To assess primary care resident and faculty knowledge and attitudes concerning interactions between physicians and pharmaceutical representatives (PRs) and to measure changes in residents' knowledge and attitudes after an educational intervention, we conducted preintervention and postintervention surveys with a causal-comparative group in a university-based primary care residency program. All primary care internal medicine and internal medicine-pediatrics residents and faculty were given the voluntary survey. In general, residents and faculty demonstrated similar responses for the preintervention survey. Differences between faculty and resident opinions were seen in two areas. Faculty were more likely than residents to believe that PRs sometimes use unethical marketing practices (p unethical marketing practices (p marketing gifts with no patient benefit may be inappropriate (p = .05), and that other physicians' prescribing patterns could be negatively influenced through the acceptance of gifts (p < .05). A brief educational intervention can change resident attitudes concerning physician interactions with PRs.

  10. University Faculty Gender Roles Perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Street, Sue; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Surveyed 400 college faculty men and women to determine gender role preferences and perceptions. Perceptions of the ideal woman, ideal man, most women, most men, and self were measured. Results from the Sex Role Trait Inventory show that both men and women faculty preferences and perceptions were generally very similar. Implications are discussed.…

  11. Faculty Meetings: Hidden Conversational Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Richard F.

    2015-01-01

    In the everydayness of faculty meetings, collegial conversations mirror distinctive dynamics and practices, which either enhance or undercut organizational effectiveness. A cluster of conversational practices affect how colleagues connect, engage, interact, and influence others during faculty meetings in diverse educational settings. The…

  12. Reframing research on faculty development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, Patricia S; Irby, David M

    2011-04-01

    Research on faculty development has focused primarily on individual participants and has produced relatively little generalizable knowledge that can guide faculty development programs. In this article, the authors examine how current research on faculty development in medical education can be enriched by research in related fields such as teacher education, quality improvement, continuing medical education, and workplace learning. As a result of this analysis, the authors revise the old model for conceptualizing faculty development (preferably called professional development). This expanded model calls for research on educational process and outcomes focused on two communities of practice: the community created among participants in faculty development programs and the communities of teaching practice in the workplace (classroom or clinic) where teaching actually occurs. For the faculty development community, the key components are the participants, program, content, facilitator, and context in which the program occurs and in which the faculty teach. For the workplace community, associated components include relationships and networks of association in that environment, the organization and culture of the setting, the teaching tasks and activities, and the mentoring available to the members of that academic and/or clinical community of teaching practice. This expanded model of faculty development generates a new set of research questions, which are described along with six recommendations for enhancing research, including establishment of a national center for research in health professions education.

  13. Perspectives on nordic faculty developmet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolmos, Anette; Vinther, Ole; Andersson, Pernille;

    2004-01-01

    The chapter gives an introduction to the book "Faculty development in nordic engineering" education and describes todays challenges in developing engineering education.......The chapter gives an introduction to the book "Faculty development in nordic engineering" education and describes todays challenges in developing engineering education....

  14. Changing Practices in Faculty Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seldin, Peter

    A guide to understanding and improving faculty evaluation procedures at all types of colleges and universities is presented. The causes of today's crisis in higher education and survival strategies are reviewed, and the search for solvency is related to major changes in assessing faculty performance. The proliferation of court challenges to…

  15. Professorship: A Faculty Development Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Todd M.; Davis, Jane F.

    1987-01-01

    A faculty development program at a traditionally black college was designed to enhance the ability of graduate faculty to supervise research activities of graduate students. Focus was on interpersonal problem solving in advisement and professional issues; classroom techniques of discussion teaching, case methods, and psychodrama encouraged the…

  16. Accreditation: Impact on Faculty Roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costello, Daniel E.

    1994-01-01

    The new mission-linked accreditation standards of the American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business represent a fundamental change in how business schools operate. Emphases on strategic planning, stakeholder participation, faculty teams, and continuous improvement will encourage institutional cultural change and help faculty respond with…

  17. Faculty Research and Publication Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoellner, Kate; Hines, Samantha; Keenan, Teressa; Samson, Sue

    2015-01-01

    Understanding faculty work practices can translate into improved library services. This study documents how education and behavioral science faculty locate, retrieve, and use information resources for research and writing and how they publish and store their research materials. The authors interviewed twelve professors using a structured interview…

  18. Faculty Retention in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soomro, Tariq Rahim; Ahmad, Reyaz

    2013-01-01

    Criteria for retaining or firing a highly qualified faculty in higher education in many cases are vague and unclear. This situation is neither a comfortable, nor a healthy, both for the faculty and the administration. Stakeholders have enough reason to blame each other in the absence of transparent mechanism. This paper proposes a transparent…

  19. The impact of a psychiatry clinical rotation on the attitude of Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    person with mental illness, medical school experiences, including influence of faculty .... sample size with attendant loss in statistical power.There were no significant ... attitude to psychiatry at the end of the rotation compared with students who ...

  20. Arkansas State University Beebe Branch Faculty Handbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkansas State Univ., Beebe.

    Arkansas State University Beebe Branch provides a liberal arts oriented program for traditional and nontraditional students. Its faculty handbook contains institutional goals, description of responsibilities of administrative officers and faculty committees, faculty employment policies, and administrative and instructional policies. The…

  1. Unpacking attitude certainty: attitude clarity and attitude correctness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrocelli, John V; Tormala, Zakary L; Rucker, Derek D

    2007-01-01

    Attitude certainty has been the subject of considerable attention in the attitudes and persuasion literature. The present research identifies 2 aspects of attitude certainty and provides evidence for the distinctness of the constructs. Specifically, it is proposed that attitude certainty can be conceptualized, and empirically separated, in terms of attitude clarity (the subjective sense that one knows what one's attitude is) and attitude correctness (the subjective sense that one's attitude is correct or valid). Experiment 1 uses factor analysis and correlational data to provide evidence for viewing attitude clarity and attitude correctness as separate constructs. Experiments 2 and 3 demonstrate that attitude clarity and attitude correctness can have distinct antecedents (repeated expression and consensus feedback, respectively). Experiment 4 reveals that these constructs each play an independent role in persuasion and resistance situations. As clarity and correctness increase, attitudes become more resistant to counterattitudinal persuasive messages. These findings are discussed in relation to the existing attitude strength literature. 2007 APA, all rights reserved

  2. Barriers in the Physics Pipeline from K-12 to Tenure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilburn, Micha

    2016-09-01

    The lack of diversity in physics is a known problem, and yet efforts to change our demographics have only had minor effects during the last decade. I will explain some of the hidden barriers that dissuade underrepresented minorities in becoming physicists using a framework borrowed from sociology, Maslow's hierarchy of needs. I will draw from current research at the undergraduate to faculty levels over a variety of STEM fields that are also addressing a lack of diversity. I will also provide analysis from the Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics Center for the Evolution of Elements (JINA-CEE) outreach programs to understand the likelihood of current K-12 students in becoming physicists. Specifically, I will present results from the pre-surveys from our Art 2 Science Camps (ages 8-14) about their attitudes towards science as well as results from analysis of teacher recommendations for our high school summer program. I will conclude with a positive outlook describing the pipeline created by JINA-CEE to retain students from middle school through college. This work was supported in part by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. PHY-1430152 (JINA Center for the Evolution of the Elements).

  3. Faculty development for community practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWitt, T G

    1996-12-01

    Developing the academic skills of the individuals who will serve as educators and role models in the community is critical to pediatric resident education in community settings. The main focus of any faculty development program must be on teaching, although for a subset of individuals, the development of research skills should also be a consideration. The three key elements that must be considered for an effective faculty development program include: (1) creating a culture of mutual respect between full-time and community faculty; (2) basing the program on sound principles of education theory, especially adult learning theory, using appropriately trained faculty; and (3) establishing ongoing institutional financial and philosophical support. Effectively addressing these elements should create a faculty development program that will help the community practitioner become an effective role model and practitioner- preceptor-educator.

  4. Effects of an Educational Intervention on Residents' Knowledge and Attitudes Toward Interactions with Pharmaceutical Representatives

    OpenAIRE

    Hopper, John A.; Speece, Mark W; Musial, Joseph L

    1997-01-01

    To assess primary care resident and faculty knowledge and attitudes concerning interactions between physicians and pharmaceutical representatives (PRs) and to measure changes in residents' knowledge and attitudes after an educational intervention, we conducted preintervention and postintervention surveys with a causal-comparative group in a university-based primary care residency program. All primary care internal medicine and internal medicine-pediatrics residents and faculty were given the ...

  5. Psychometric properties of the Farsi version of Attitudes to Aging Questionnaire in Iranian older adults

    OpenAIRE

    Rejeh N; Heravi-Karimooi M; Vaismoradi M; Griffiths P; Nikkhah M.; Bahrami T

    2017-01-01

    Nahid Rejeh,1 Majideh Heravi-Karimooi,1 Mojtaba Vaismoradi,2 Pauline Griffiths,3 Maryam Nikkhah,4 Tahereh Bahrami4 1Elderly Care Research Centre, Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery, Shahed University, Tehran, Iran; 2Faculty of Nursing and Health Sciences, Nord University, Bodø, Norway; 3College of Human and Health Sciences, Swansea University, Swansea, UK; 4Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery, Shahed University, Tehran, Iran Background: Attitudes to the aging process are affected by t...

  6. Teacher Candidates' Attitudes towards Inclusion Education and Comparison of Self-Compassion Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Aydan; Kuzu, Seher

    2013-01-01

    This study has been figured for the purpose of comparing attitudes of teacher candidates toward inclusion education in terms of several variables and self-compassion levels. Sampling of the study consists of Grade 4 students of (547) Marmara University Ataturk, Faculty of Education and Faculty of Science and Letters. In this study, a personnel…

  7. A Survey of Attitudes on the Use of Calculators in the College Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukowski, Joseph E.

    This study focused on faculty and student attitudes toward the use of calculators in college accounting and business mathematics courses. Two different surveys were used; one was administered to thirty-five full-time and part-time faculty in the accounting and business mathematics areas at one college, while a second survey was administered to a…

  8. Race, Gender, and Affirmative Action Attitudes in American and Canadian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katchanovski, Ivan; Nevitte, Neil; Rothman, Stanley

    2015-01-01

    Direct comparisons of American and Canadian faculty and students' views concerning issues of race, gender, and affirmative action in higher education are rare. The 1999 North American Academic Study Survey provides a unique opportunity to analyze the role of national and positional factors in faculty and student attitudes towards race, gender, and…

  9. A Ten Year Follow-up of Attitudes toward Evaluation in Behavioral Aspects of Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grace, Edward G.; Cohen, Leonard A.

    1991-01-01

    Repetition of a 1979 survey of University of Maryland at Baltimore dental school students (n=258) and faculty (n=120) concerning student evaluation in behavioral science content found more favorable student responses, little change in faculty attitudes toward the importance of behavioral sciences, and more interest in evaluating students on…

  10. Professional Development Opportunities for Two-Year College Geoscience Faculty: Issues, Opportunities, and Successes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baer, E. M.; Macdonald, H.; McDaris, J. R.; Granshaw, F. D.; Wenner, J. M.; Hodder, J.; van der Hoeven Kraft, K.; Filson, R. H.; Guertin, L. A.; Wiese, K.

    2011-12-01

    Two-year colleges (2YCs) play a critical role in geoscience education in the United States. Nearly half of the undergraduate students who take introductory geoscience do so at a 2YC. With awide reach and diverse student populations, 2YCs may be key to producing a well-trained, diverse and sufficiently large geoscience workforce. However, faculty at 2YCs often face many barriers to professional development including lack of financial resources, heavy and inflexible teaching loads, lack of awareness of opportunities, and few professional development resources/events targeted at their needs. As an example, at the 2009 GSA meeting in Portland, fewer than 80 of the 6500 attendees were from community colleges, although this was more than twice the 2YC faculty attendance the previous year. Other issues include the isolation described by many 2YC geoscience faculty who may be the only full time geoscientist on a campus and challenges faced by adjunct faculty who may have even fewer opportunities for professional development and networking with other geoscience faculty. Over the past three years we have convened several workshops and events for 2YC geoscience faculty including technical sessions and a workshop on funding opportunities for 2YC faculty at GSA annual meetings, a field trip and networking event at the fall AGU meeting, a planning workshop that examined the role of 2YCs in geoscience education and in broadening participation in the geosciences, two workshops supporting use of the 'Math You Need, When You Need It' educational materials that included a majority of 2YC faculty, and marine science summer institutes offered by COSEE-Pacific Partnerships for 2YC faculty. Our experience indicates that 2YC faculty desire professional development opportunities when the experience is tailored to the needs and character of their students, programs, and institutions. The content of the professional development opportunity must be useful to 2YC faculty -workshops and

  11. Understanding Faculty and Trainee Needs Related to Scholarly Activity in a Large, Nonuniversity Graduate Medical Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Davida; Garth, Hanna; Hollander, Rachel; Klein, Felice; Klau, Marc

    2017-01-01

    Context: Graduate medical education (GME) programs must develop curriculum to ensure scholarly activity among trainees and faculty to meet accreditation requirements and to support evidence-based medicine. Objective: Test whether research-related needs and interests varied across four groups: primary care trainees, specialty trainees, primary care faculty, and specialty faculty. Design: We surveyed a random sample of trainees and faculty in Kaiser Permanente Southern California’s GME programs. We investigated group differences in outcomes using Fisher exact and Kruskal-Wallis tests. Main Outcome Measures: Research experiences, skills, barriers, motivators, and interests in specific research skills development. Results: Participants included 47 trainees and 26 faculty (response rate = 30%). Among primary care faculty, 12 (71%) reported little or no research experience vs 1 (11%) for specialty faculty, 14 (41%) for primary care trainees, and 1 (8%) for specialty trainees (p skills also differed across groups (p skill level. Research barriers that differed across groups included other work roles taking priority; desire for work-life balance; and lack of managerial support, research equipment, administrative support, and funding. Conclusion: Faculty and trainees in primary care and specialties have differing research-related needs that GME programs should consider when designing curricula to support scholarly activity. Developing research skills of primary care faculty is a priority to support trainees’ scholarly activity. PMID:28333607

  12. Exploring faculty perceptions towards electronic health records for nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowitlawakul, Y; Chan, S W C; Wang, L; Wang, W

    2014-12-01

    The use of electronic health records in nursing education is rapidly increasing worldwide. The successful implementation of electronic health records for nursing education software program relies on students as well as nursing faculty members. This study aimed to explore the experiences and perceptions of nursing faculty members using electronic health records for nursing education software program, and to identify the influential factors for successful implementation of this technology. This exploratory qualitative study was conducted using in-depth individual interviews at a university in Singapore. Seven faculty members participated in the study. The data were gathered and analysed at the end of the semester in the 2012/2013 academic year. The participants' perceptions of the software program were organized into three main categories: innovation, transition and integration. The participants perceived this technology as innovative, with both values and challenges for the users. In addition, using the new software program was perceived as transitional process. The integration of this technology required time from faculty members and students, as well as support from administrators. The software program had only been implemented for 2-3 months at the time of the interviews. Consequently, the participants might have lacked the necessary skill and competence and confidence to implement it successfully. In addition, the unequal exposure to the software program might have had an impact on participants' perceptions. The findings show that the integration of electronic health records into nursing education curricula is dependent on the faculty members' experiences with the new technology, as well as their perceptions of it. Hence, cultivating a positive attitude towards the use of new technologies is important. Electronic health records are significant applications of health information technology. Health informatics competency should be included as a required competency

  13. An Integrated Health Care Model in Medical Education: Interviews with Faculty and Administrators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tresolini, Carol P.; Shugars, Daniel A.

    1994-01-01

    Faculty and administrators of 22 medical schools were interviewed for their insights into development of an approach to health care and medical education that integrates psychosocial and biomedical perspectives. Results suggest medical curricula should address development of physicians' knowledge, attitudes, and skills in relationships with both…

  14. Faculty Perceptions Regarding Authentication of Online Students' Identities and Academic Dishonesty

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, Stephanie Renee

    2012-01-01

    This study explored undergraduate teaching faculty's perceptions regarding using biometric-based technologies to reduce academic dishonesty in online classes. The first objective was to develop a baseline of the respondents' concerns toward and experience with using biometrics; attitudes, experience, and mitigation strategies used to…

  15. Obesity and Food Choices among Faculty and Staff at a Large Urban University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, Marjorie R.; Rubinstein, Rebecca J.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: In order to address increasing health care costs associated with obesity, this study sought to determine prevalence of overweight and obesity and examine eating behaviors, food choices, health beliefs, and attitudes of university employees. Participants and Methods: An online survey was distributed to greater than 3,800 faculty and…

  16. Faculty Perceptions Regarding Authentication of Online Students' Identities and Academic Dishonesty

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, Stephanie Renee

    2012-01-01

    This study explored undergraduate teaching faculty's perceptions regarding using biometric-based technologies to reduce academic dishonesty in online classes. The first objective was to develop a baseline of the respondents' concerns toward and experience with using biometrics; attitudes, experience, and mitigation strategies used to…

  17. Obesity and Food Choices among Faculty and Staff at a Large Urban University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, Marjorie R.; Rubinstein, Rebecca J.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: In order to address increasing health care costs associated with obesity, this study sought to determine prevalence of overweight and obesity and examine eating behaviors, food choices, health beliefs, and attitudes of university employees. Participants and Methods: An online survey was distributed to greater than 3,800 faculty and…

  18. Technology and Teaching: A Conversation among Faculty Regarding the Pros and Cons of Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Andrew T.; Preston, John; Page, C. Steven; Harper, Rebecca; Dillard, Benita; Flynn, Joseph; Yamaguchi, Misato

    2014-01-01

    Technology is often touted as the savior of education (Collins & Haverson, 2009). However, is technology the panacea that it is made out to be? This paper is an extended conversation among a group of faculty members at three different universities and their attitudes and beliefs about technology and education. Three professors shared their…

  19. An Examination of Adjunct Faculty Job Satisfaction and Loyalty in Christian Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couch, Jeremy J.

    2014-01-01

    In order to address the deficiency of research regarding the job attitudes of adjunct faculty members in Christian higher education, a quantitative causal-comparative study was conducted for the purpose of examining the influence of six extrinsic and three intrinsic variables on the job satisfaction and loyalty of 388 adjuncts teaching at seven…

  20. The Impact of Faculty and Staff on High-Risk College Student Persistence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiner, Laurie A.; Noel, Patrice; Anderson, Edward; Cantwell, Linda

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the attitudes and behaviors of faculty and staff that impact the success and persistence of highrisk students. Using an exploratory qualitative approach, 62 successful high-risk students from nine different colleges and universities were interviewed and asked to identify and describe someone on campus who…

  1. Faculty as Border Crossers: A Study of Fulbright Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddy, Pamela L.

    2014-01-01

    As adult learners, faculty members approach new experiences based on events of the past, but this underlying framework of understanding is challenged when they work abroad for an extended period of time.

  2. Faculty and Student Attitudes about Transfer of Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lightner, Robin; Benander, Ruth; Kramer, Eugene F.

    2008-01-01

    Transfer of learning is using previous knowledge in novel contexts. While this is a basic assumption of the educational process, students may not always perceive all the options for using what they have learned in different, novel situations. Within the framework of transfer of learning, this study outlines an attitudinal survey concerning faculty…

  3. Faculty Attitudes Toward Leadership in Post-Secondary Institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Roberto; Ramey, Gerald W.

    Using the existing body of knowledge about both management and higher education, it is argued that the managerial climate surrounding professional level people should lean toward Douglas McGregor's Theory Y, a nonauthoritarian, nonautocratic style of leadership. A number of theories of leadership in organizations are brought into the discussion,…

  4. Keeping Faculty [Happy]: The Critical Role of a Faculty Center in Developing and Retaining Quality, Collegial Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargis, Jace; Gilbertson, Phil

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes an innovative approach to retaining happy and healthy faculty members in a collegial, productive teaching and learning environment. A major portion of the paper shares how the Faculty Center for Teaching and Learning plays a significant role in the faculty interview process, new faculty orientation, and subsequent mentoring of…

  5. Deconstructing barriers: perceptions of students labeled with learning disabilities in higher education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denhart, Hazel

    2008-01-01

    This phenomenological study investigated barriers to higher education faced by 11 college students labeled with learning disabilities (LD) using their voice as the primary data. Data were analyzed and interpreted through a disability theory perspective revealing barriers stemmed largely from external social causes rather than individual pathology. Barriers included being misunderstood by faculty, being reluctant to request accommodations for fear of invoking stigma, and having to work considerably longer hours than nonlabeled peers. Findings indicated barriers could be overcome through raising faculty awareness about LD issues, engaging the assistance of the college LD specialist, and participation in a LD democratic empowerment community on campus.

  6. Perceived Sodium Reduction Barriers Among Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease: Which Barriers Are Important and Which Patients Experience Barriers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meuleman, Yvette; Hoekstra, Tiny; Dekker, Friedo W; van der Boog, Paul J M; van Dijk, Sandra

    2017-09-08

    The purposes of this study were to assess the importance of perceived sodium reduction barriers among patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and identify associated sociodemographic, clinical, and psychosocial factors. A total of 156 patients with CKD completed a questionnaire assessing sodium reduction barriers (18 self-formulated items), depressive symptoms (Beck Depression Inventory), perceived autonomy support (Modified Health Care Climate Questionnaire), and self-efficacy (Partners in Health Questionnaire). Factor analysis was used to identify barrier domains. Correlation coefficients were computed to examine relationships between barrier domains and patient characteristics. Nine barrier domains were identified. Barriers perceived as important were as follows: high sodium content in products, lack of sodium feedback, lack of goal setting and discussing strategies for sodium reduction, and not experiencing CKD-related symptoms (mean scores > 3.0 on 5-point scales, ranging from 1 'no barrier' to 5 'very important barrier'). Other barriers (knowledge, attitude, coping skills when eating out, and professional support) were rated as moderately important (rated around midpoint), and the barrier 'intrinsic motivation' was rated as somewhat important (mean score = 1.9). Sodium reduction barrier domains were not associated with gender and kidney function, but were associated with age, level of education, number of comorbidities, perceived autonomy support, depressive symptoms, and self-efficacy (range r = 0.17-0.35). Patients with lower self-efficacy and perceived autonomy support scores experienced most sodium reduction barriers. Patients with CKD experience multiple important sodium reduction barriers and could benefit from support strategies that target various sodium reduction barriers and strengthen beliefs regarding self-efficacy and autonomy support. Additionally, environmental interventions should be implemented to reduce sodium levels in processed

  7. Gender Differences in Business Faculty's Research Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yining; Zhao, Qin

    2013-01-01

    The authors use expectancy theory to evaluate gender differences in key factors that motivate faculty to conduct research. Using faculty survey data collected from 320 faculty members at 10 business schools, they found that faculty members, both men and women, who displayed higher motivation were more productive in research. Among them, pretenured…

  8. Academic Incivility among Health Sciences Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Melissa; Hill, Lilian H.

    2015-01-01

    Academic health centers are under pressure to graduate more health professionals and, therefore, must retain talented faculty members who can educate students in respective disciplines. Faculty-to-faculty incivility is especially relevant to academic medical centers because faculty in the health professions must not only meet university tenure and…

  9. Resources for Developing Senior Faculty as Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seal, Robert K.

    1993-01-01

    An annotated list of 38 resources is provided to help administrators, faculty developers, and faculty in designing effective renewal interventions for senior faculty. Topics include research on senior faculty, personnel policies (tenure, growth contracting), program strategies (mentoring, team teaching, motivation), and assessment of institutional…

  10. Faculty Internationalization: Experiences, Attitudes, and Involvement of Faculty at Public Universities in South Dakota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Internationalization in higher education is an issue of growing importance as the forces of globalism continue to push both social and economic connections from local to global. While this topic is becoming increasingly vital to the health and influence of educational institutions, many, including those within South Dakota, are unaware of the…

  11. Faculty Internationalization: Experiences, Attitudes, and Involvement of Faculty at Public Universities in South Dakota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Internationalization in higher education is an issue of growing importance as the forces of globalism continue to push both social and economic connections from local to global. While this topic is becoming increasingly vital to the health and influence of educational institutions, many, including those within South Dakota, are unaware of the…

  12. The negotiation of writer identity in engineering faculty - writing consultant collaborations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Read

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Negotiating faculty-writing consultant collaborations in engineering contexts can be challenging when the writing consultant originates in the humanities. The author found that one of the sites of negotiation in the formation of working relationships is that of writer identity, and disciplinary writer identity in particular. In order to confirm her experiential knowledge, the author interviewed her faculty collaborators to further investigate their attitudes and experiences about writing. Analysis of two excerpts of these interviews makes visible "clashes" between the faculty engineers' and the writing consultant's autobiographical and disciplinary writer identities. Implications of the role of writer identity in faculty-writing consultant collaborations include considering the value of extending this negotiation explicitly to students and the question of how writing curriculum can explicitly engage students in the formation of positive disciplinary writer identities

  13. The experiences of faculty teaching in an innovative clinical immersion nursing curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulson, Carole

    2011-01-01

    A lack of research exists regarding the impact of substantive curriculum reform on faculty teaching and attitudes. This report of an interpretive phenomenological study of one group of baccalaureate nursing faculty undergoing implementation of an innovative curriculum revealed that the curricular structure and program philosophy offered multiple new challenges. These included the integration of multiple concurrent learning activities, expansion of simulation, and a renewed focus on student assessment. The study design used Heideggerian hermeneutics, a reflexive approach to text analysis of interviews of seven full-time faculty who had worked in the school's traditional curriculum prior to the implementation of the clinical immersion model. The research offers insights into faculty adaptation to curriculum change and its effect on teaching and instruction. The results of this study may assist other schools contemplating or in the process of similar overarching program reforms.

  14. Nurse Faculty Enrichment and Competency Development in Oral-Systemic Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria C. Dolce

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nurses are positioned to play a significant role in oral health promotion and disease prevention across the life cycle. Oral health has not been a high priority in nursing practice, and educating nurses about oral health has been inadequate particularly regarding the interrelationship between oral health and overall health. The first step for developing a nursing workforce with core competencies in oral health promotion and disease prevention is to prepare nurse faculty with the requisite knowledge, skills, attitudes, and best practices in oral-systemic health. The purpose of this paper is to present Smiles for Life: A National Oral Health Curriculum as a knowledge framework that nurse faculty can use for faculty enrichment and competency development in oral health across the life cycle. A variety of teaching-learning strategies and resources are provided to assist nurse faculty with integrating oral-systemic health into existing nursing curricula.

  15. The role of cultural diversity climate in recruitment, promotion, and retention of faculty in academic medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Eboni G; Gozu, Aysegul; Kern, David E; Powe, Neil R; Wand, Gary S; Golden, Sherita; Cooper, Lisa A

    2005-07-01

    Ethnic diversity among physicians may be linked to improved access and quality of care for minorities. Academic medical institutions are challenged to increase representation of ethnic minorities among health professionals. To explore the perceptions of physician faculty regarding the following: (1) the institution's cultural diversity climate and (2) facilitators and barriers to success and professional satisfaction in academic medicine within this context. Qualitative study using focus groups and semi-structured interviews. Nontenured physicians in the tenure track at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Focus groups and interviews were audio-taped, transcribed verbatim, and reviewed for thematic content in a 3-stage independent review/adjudication process. Study participants included 29 faculty representing 9 clinical departments, 4 career tracks, and 4 ethnic groups. In defining cultural diversity, faculty noted visible (race/ethnicity, foreign-born status, gender) and invisible (religion, sexual orientation) dimensions. They believe visible dimensions provoke bias and cumulative advantages or disadvantages in the workplace. Minority and foreign-born faculty report ethnicity-based disparities in recruitment and subtle manifestations of bias in the promotion process. Minority and majority faculty agree that ethnic differences in prior educational opportunities lead to disparities in exposure to career options, and qualifications for and subsequent recruitment to training programs and faculty positions. Minority faculty also describe structural barriers (poor retention efforts, lack of mentorship) that hinder their success and professional satisfaction after recruitment. To effectively manage the diversity climate, our faculty recommended 4 strategies for improving the psychological climate and structural diversity of the institution. Soliciting input from faculty provides tangible ideas regarding interventions to improve an institution's diversity

  16. Attitudes and practices of health science students regarding blood donation

    OpenAIRE

    Abdul-Monim Batiha; Mohammed ALBashtawy

    2016-01-01

    Background: Blood is fundamental to saving lives and is considered to be the force that sustains our bodies. Objective: To assess the attitudes and practices of health science students regarding blood donation. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was employed to assess the attitudes and practices of health science students regarding blood donation. 453 students (56.7% male) from the four health faculties (Pharmacy, Genetic engineering, Nursing, and Hospital administration) were surveyed...

  17. Classroom Discipline as Manifestation of Adolscents Attitude to Learning

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Classroom Discipline as Manifestation of Adolescents’ Attitude to Learning The promotion paper was worked out at the Pedagogy Department of the Faculty of Education and Psychology of the University of Latvia from September, 2003 till August, 2008. Problem Nowadays the main stress in the teacher’s work for the prevention of inadmissible activities should be put on the promotion of adolescents’ positive attitude to learning, the encouragement of their self-regulated learnin...

  18. Barriers to Teaching Introductory Physical Geography Online

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael E. RITTER

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Learning geography online is becoming an option for more students but not without controversy. Issues of faculty resources, logistics, professional recognition, and pedagogical concerns are cited as barriers to teaching online. Offering introductory physical geography online presents special challenges. As a general education course, an introductory physical geography course has a diverse population of students with disparate educational needs and goals that impacts its ability to be delivered online. Online learning is further complicated when lab courses require specialized laboratory equipment and fieldwork. A survey of geography departments in the United States was conducted to determine barriers to the deployment of introductory physical geography lab courses. Lack of faculty interest, faculty resources, and pedagogical concerns were found to be the most important barriers to deploying online physical geography lab courses. Knowing the challenges faced by geography departments offering online courses provides insight into where valuable support services and resources can best be used to address them. Recent advances in blogging, podcasting, lecture capture, web conferencing, and augmented reality are offered as solutions to the concerns expressed by survey respondents.

  19. The teacher, the physician and the person: how faculty's teaching performance influences their role modelling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin C M Boerebach

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Previous studies identified different typologies of role models (as teacher/supervisor, physician and person and explored which of faculty's characteristics could distinguish good role models. The aim of this study was to explore how and to which extent clinical faculty's teaching performance influences residents' evaluations of faculty's different role modelling statuses, especially across different specialties. METHODS: In a prospective multicenter multispecialty study of faculty's teaching performance, we used web-based questionnaires to gather empirical data from residents. The main outcome measures were the different typologies of role modelling. The predictors were faculty's overall teaching performance and faculty's teaching performance on specific domains of teaching. The data were analyzed using multilevel regression equations. RESULTS: In total 219 (69% response rate residents filled out 2111 questionnaires about 423 (96% response rate faculty. Faculty's overall teaching performance influenced all role model typologies (OR: from 8.0 to 166.2. For the specific domains of teaching, overall, all three role model typologies were strongly associated with "professional attitude towards residents" (OR: 3.28 for teacher/supervisor, 2.72 for physician and 7.20 for the person role. Further, the teacher/supervisor role was strongly associated with "feedback" and "learning climate" (OR: 3.23 and 2.70. However, the associations of the specific domains of teaching with faculty's role modelling varied widely across specialties. CONCLUSION: This study suggests that faculty can substantially enhance their role modelling by improving their teaching performance. The amount of influence that the specific domains of teaching have on role modelling differs across specialties.

  20. Exploring Job Satisfaction of Nursing Faculty: Theoretical Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yingchen; Liesveld, Judy

    2015-01-01

    The Future of Nursing report identified the shortage of nursing faculty as 1 of the barriers to nursing education. In light of this, it is becoming increasingly important to understand the work-life of nursing faculty. The current research focused on job satisfaction of nursing faculty from 4 theoretical perspectives: human capital theory, which emphasizes the expected monetary and nonmonetary returns for any career choices; structural theory, which emphasizes the impact of institutional features on job satisfaction; positive extrinsic environment by self-determination theory, which asserts that a positive extrinsic environment promotes competency and effective outcomes at work; and psychological theory, which emphasizes the proposed relationship between job performance and satisfaction. In addition to the measures for human capital theory, institutional variables (from structural theory and self-determination theory), and productivity measures (from psychological theory), the authors also selected sets of variables for personal characteristics to investigate their effects on job satisfaction. The results indicated that variables related to human capital theory, especially salary, contributed the most to job satisfaction, followed by those related to institutional variables. Personal variables and productivity variables as a whole contributed as well. The only other variable with marginal significance was faculty's perception of institutional support for teaching.

  1. Psychiatry and Emergency Medicine: Medical Student and Physician Attitudes toward Homeless Persons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Ann; Roman, Brenda; Borges, Nicole

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of the study was to explore changes in medical students' attitudes toward homeless persons during the Psychiatry and Emergency Medicine clerkships. Simultaneously, this study explored attitudes toward homeless persons held by Psychiatry and Emergency Medicine residents and faculty in an attempt to uncover the "hidden…

  2. Psychiatry and Emergency Medicine: Medical Student and Physician Attitudes toward Homeless Persons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Ann; Roman, Brenda; Borges, Nicole

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of the study was to explore changes in medical students' attitudes toward homeless persons during the Psychiatry and Emergency Medicine clerkships. Simultaneously, this study explored attitudes toward homeless persons held by Psychiatry and Emergency Medicine residents and faculty in an attempt to uncover the "hidden…

  3. Prospective Teachers' Conceptions of Teaching and Learning and Their Attitudes towards Multicultural Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koç, Canan; Köybasi, Fatma

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to analyze the conceptions of the senior students at the faculty of education along with their attitudes towards multicultural education according to gender and department variables, and to identify the degree to which their conception of teaching and learning predicts their attitudes towards multicultural education. A total of 278…

  4. An investigation of the challenges of e-Learning in medical sciences from the faculty members’ viewpoints of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Asghari

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : Regarding the numerous benefits of e-learning, an investigation of its barrier and potential solutions to resolve them will be helpful. This will enable universities to implement this method and convert their traditional teaching-learning methods and approaches to e-learning. Methods: In this descriptive study a total of 242 faculty members at Tabriz University of Medical Sciences were selected randomly. A questionnaire was used to collect data on their attitudes towards barriers of e-Learning. The data were analyzed using SPSS15. Results: The barriers were classified into six categories and twenty-four cases. The average score of the administrative category was 13.18±1.96, electronic categories was 11.66±2.32, educational category was 13.39±2.22, economical category was 9.62±2.09, cultural and psychological categories was 20.43±2.53, and finally, social and cooperative category was 10.09±1.97. The cultural and psychological categories were found as the most important barrier and the electronic category the least important one. Conclusion: The academics believed that they did not have enough time or skills for compiling and evaluating e-learning materials and that there was no proper culture for this. Not only the academics should learn how to compile, use and to take rapid feedback, but also it is essential that they recognize their new roles (as learning facilitators in realizing and expanding their mode of education by their innovations.

  5. Junior faculty satisfaction in a large academic radiology department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Aine M; Cronin, Paul; Dunnick, N Reed

    2007-04-01

    Retention of academic faculty is a pressing issue for many radiology departments. The departure of junior faculty members to private practice may be driven in part by economics; however, the choice may be influenced by many other elements of faculty satisfaction. The purpose of this study was to evaluate how satisfied junior (assistant professors and instructors) and senior (associate professors and professors) faculty in an academic radiology department are with respect to their work and to determine which factors most affected the decision to stay in academics. We conducted a survey of junior and senior faculty in the department of radiology. Questions included attitudes regarding work, home, and family issues. Among the 27 junior faculty (73%) who responded to the survey, 14 were instructors and 13 were assistant professors. Among the 11 senior faculty (21%) who responded to the survey, 3 were associate professors and 8 were professors. Academic radiology faculty are very happy with work and derive enjoyment and fulfillment from their work. The working week excluding call (average 52 hours) and including call (average 61 hours) was not regarded as too long. The average academic faculty works 72% clinical time (range 15% to 100%) and gets 0.96 day a week of professional development. Fifty-nine percent are funded at an average of 0.91 day a week. Forty-one percent are on tenure track, and of the remainder, 40% expressed a desire for tenure track. Fifty-five percent of faculty have mentors and 57% receive adequate mentoring. When it comes to teaching, 50% have enough time to teach juniors. Of the remainder, all but one cited high clinical workload as an impediment to teaching juniors. Forty-one percent of faculty reported not getting enough academic time. Fifty-nine percent felt pressure to publish and 34% felt pressure to obtain external funding. Seventy-six percent surveyed felt it has become more difficult to publish. The main reasons cited were increasing

  6. A Qualitative Study of Faculty Members' Views of Women Chairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaac, Carol; Griffin, Lindsay

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Concurrent with the evolving role of the department chair in academic medicine is the entry of women physicians into chair positions. Because implicit biases that stereotypically masculine behaviors are required for effective leadership remain strong, examining faculty members' perceptions of their chair's leadership in medical school departments with women chairs can provide insight into the views of women leaders in academic medicine and the complex ways in which gender may impact these chairs' leadership style and actions. Methods We conducted semistructured interviews with 13 male and 15 female faculty members representing all faculty tracks in three clinical departments chaired by women. Inductive, qualitative analysis of the subsequent text allowed themes to emerge across interviews. Results Four themes emerged regarding departmental leadership. One dealt with the leadership of the previous chair. The other three described the current chair's characteristics (tough, direct, and transparent), her use of communal actions to help support and mentor her faculty, and her ability to build power through consensus. Because all three chairs were early in their tenure, a wait and see attitude was frequently expressed. Faculty generally viewed having a woman chair as an indication of positive change, with potential individual and institutional advantages. Conclusions This exploratory study suggests that the culture of academic medicine has moved beyond questioning women physicians' competence to lead once they are in top organizational leadership positions. The findings are also consonant with experimental research indicating that women leaders are most successful when they pair stereotypic male (agentic) behaviors with stereotypic female (communal) behaviors. All three chairs exhibited features of a transformational leadership style and characteristics deemed essential for effective leadership in academic medicine. PMID:20156081

  7. A locally created EBM course for faculty development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crites, Gerald E; Chrisagis, Ximena; Patel, Vipul; Little, David; Drehmer, Timothy

    2004-02-01

    International EBM workshops have significant barriers and lack focus on institutional needs. The authors describe a local EBM curriculum and report its effectiveness and participant satisfaction. Local EBM experts devised an EBM course designed to improve faculty understanding of EBM skills and concepts. Retention of EBM concepts was assessed with a 10-item EBM knowledge test administered before and after the course. Participants were also asked to self-assess five EBM skills immediately after and nine months after the course. They also filled out a satisfaction survey. In total, 61% of the participants completed the course. The EBM knowledge test showed a significant change in scores for EBM concepts. The participants' self-assessed EBM skills remained high at nine months. Participants rated most course variables highly. It is concluded that a locally developed EBM faculty curriculum can succeed if scholars define institutional needs, receive broad institutional support, use proven educational methodologies and avoid scheduling conflicts.

  8. Faculty development: principles and practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinert, Yvonne; Mann, Karen V

    2006-01-01

    Instructors in the health professions today must acquire knowledge and competencies that go beyond disciplinary expertise. It is now generally accepted that educational training as a teacher is essential to a faculty member's effectiveness as an educator. The educational challenges across the health professions share many similarities. In this article, we draw on the medical education literature and focus on faculty development designed to enhance teaching effectiveness. We first address commonly included faculty development topics, including instructional improvement, organizational development, the development of professional academic skills, and the teaching of specific content areas. We then review a variety of educational approaches and formats that are described in the literature. Included in this discussion are commonly used workshops, seminars, short courses, and fellowships, as well as longitudinal programs, peer coaching, mentorship, self-directed learning, and computer-aided instruction. We also briefly explore learning at work and in communities of practice, and we discuss several frequently encountered challenges in designing and implementing faculty development activities, including motivating colleagues and assessing program effectiveness. We conclude the discussion by presenting a set of guidelines for the design of effective faculty development programs.

  9. Czech medical faculties and smoking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Králíková, E; Kozák, J; Rames, J; Zámecník, L; Wallenfels, I

    1995-05-01

    At the 1st Medical Faculty of Charles University in Prague the prevalence of smoking was investigated among the faculty, staff, students and among health professionals in the country. We found 38.1% smokers (current and occasional) among malephysicians (N = 625), 25.6% smokers among women physicians (N = 394), 48.7% smoking nurses (N = 729) and 42.3% smokers among paramedical staff (N = 298). We have also followed up smoking habits among our students since 1989 (N = 1235). The number of smokers among them rose from 7% in 1989 to 18% in 1994. Students were also asked about their opinion on smoking as a risk factor for coronary heart disease which has a rising trend. Trying to coordinate the anti-smoking activity at all seven medical faculties in the Czech Republic, in collaboration with the Faculty of Medicine of Masaryk University in Brno, the National Centre for Health Promotion and the Czech Commission of EMASH, present the main points of the anti-smoking strategy at Czech medical faculties.

  10. Exploring the Ambiguity: What Faculty Leaders Really Think of Sustainability in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Tarah; Horst, Naomi

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine how a cohort of university faculty leaders in Canadian universities conceptualize sustainable development, sustainable universities, the role universities play in achieving a sustainable future, key issues facing the university, and the barriers to implementing sustainability initiatives on campus.…

  11. Stereotype Threat-Based Diversity Programming: Helping Students While Empowering and Respecting Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artze-Vega, Isis; Richardson, Leslie; Traxler, Adrienne

    2014-01-01

    As college student populations grow increasingly diverse, centers for teaching and learning are often charged with promoting inclusive teaching practices. Yet faculty cite many affective barriers to diversity training, and we often preach to the choir. These challenges led us to seek alternate routes for diversity programming, and stereotype…

  12. Best Practices: A Triangulated Support Approach in Transitioning Faculty to Online Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covington, David; Petherbridge, Donna; Warren, Sarah Egan

    2005-01-01

    The English department at North Carolina State University faced a rapid, large-scale transition of a number of its professional writing courses from traditional classes to online courses. Recognizing that numerous barriers, including unresolved administrative issues, faculty resistance, and lack of training could impede this process,…

  13. Stereotype Threat-Based Diversity Programming: Helping Students While Empowering and Respecting Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artze-Vega, Isis; Richardson, Leslie; Traxler, Adrienne

    2014-01-01

    As college student populations grow increasingly diverse, centers for teaching and learning are often charged with promoting inclusive teaching practices. Yet faculty cite many affective barriers to diversity training, and we often preach to the choir. These challenges led us to seek alternate routes for diversity programming, and stereotype…

  14. How Faculty Learn about and Implement Research-Based Instructional Strategies: The Case of Peer Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dancy, Melissa; Henderson, Charles; Turpen, Chandra

    2016-01-01

    The lack of knowledge about how to effectively spread and sustain the use of research-based instructional strategies is currently a significant barrier to the improvement of undergraduate physics education. In this paper we address this lack of knowledge by reporting on an interview study of 35 physics faculty, of varying institution types, who…

  15. Exploring the Ambiguity: What Faculty Leaders Really Think of Sustainability in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Tarah; Horst, Naomi

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine how a cohort of university faculty leaders in Canadian universities conceptualize sustainable development, sustainable universities, the role universities play in achieving a sustainable future, key issues facing the university, and the barriers to implementing sustainability initiatives on campus.…

  16. Implementing Pedagogical Change in Introductory Biology Courses through the Use of Faculty Learning Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addis, Elizabeth A.; Quardokus, Kathleen M.; Bassham, Diane C.; Becraft, Philip W.; Boury, Nancy; Coffman, Clark R.; Colbert, James T.; Powell-Coffman, Jo Anne

    2013-01-01

    Recent national reports have indicated a need for significant changes in science higher education, with the inclusion of more student centered learning. However, substantial barriers to change exist. These include a lack of faculty awareness and understanding of appropriate pedagogical approaches, large class sizes, the time commitment needed to…

  17. [Barrier methods of contraception].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, A; Edelman, D A

    1982-01-01

    Vaginal methods of contraception were the earliest types used and some references to them date back to antiquity. Most of the vaginal contraceptive agents identified by the ancient Greeks, Indians, Japanese, and Chinese have been found in modern laboratory tests to have spermicidal properties, but it is doubtful that the methods were fully reliable or were used by many people. During the 19th century the condom, vaginal spermicides, and diaphragm became available. The development of nonoxynol-9 and other nonirritating but effective spermicidal agents improved vaginal contraceptives greatly by the 1950s, but starting in the 1960s newer methods began to replace the vaginal methods. Interest in barrier methods has been reawakened somewhat by concern about the health effects of hormonal methods. At present all barrier methods leave something to be desired. Failure rates of 3-30% for barrier methods in general have been estimated, but the higher rates are believed due to incorrect or inconsistent use. Theoretical failure rates of condoms and diaphragms have been estimated at 3/100 women-years, but in actual use failure rates may reach 15 for condoms and 13 for diaphragms used with spermicides. Use-effectiveness rates are greatly influenced by motivation. For a variety of reasons, the acceptability of barrier methods is low, especially in developing countries. New developments in spermicidal agents include sperm inhibitors, which impede the fertilizing capacity of sperm rather than attempting a spermicidal effect; a number of such agents have been studied and have proven more effective in animal tests than conventional spermicides. Neosampoon, a new spermicidal foam, has attracted an increasing number of users, especially in developing countries. A new condom, made of thin polymers and containing a standard dose of nonoxynol-9, has been designed to dissolve in the vaginal fluid. Further studies are needed of its acceptability, efficacy, and side effects before it becomes

  18. Ambiguity attitudes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trautmann, Stefan; van de Kuilen, Gijs; Keren, Gideon; Wu, George

    2015-01-01

    This chapter reviews the experimental literature on ambiguity attitudes, focusing on three topics. First, it considers various approaches to operationalize ambiguity in experiments. Second, the chapter reviews basic findings in the field regarding the prevalence of ambiguity aversion and ambiguity s

  19. Barriers to use of modern contraceptives among women in an inner city area of Osogbo metropolis, Osun State, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asekun–Olarinmoye EO

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available EO Asekun-Olarinmoye,1 WO Adebimpe,1 JO Bamidele,2 OO Odu,2 IO Asekun-Olarinmoye,3 EO Ojofeitimi41Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Clinical Sciences, Osun State University, Osogbo, Osun State, Nigeria; 2Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Clinical Sciences, Ekiti State University, Ado-Ekiti, Ekiti State, Nigeria; 3Department of Community Health, School of Public and Allied Health, Babcock University, Ilishan-Remo, Ogun State, Nigeria; 4Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Clinical Sciences, Ladoke Akintola University of Technology, Osogbo, Osun State, NigeriaObjectives: To determine the knowledge and attitudes on modern contraceptive use of women living in an inner city area of Osogbo.Materials and methods: Three hundred and fifty nine women of childbearing age were studied utilizing a community-based, descriptive, cross-sectional study design. A multistage random sampling technique was used in recruiting respondents to the study. A four-part questionnaire was applied dually, by interviewers and by respondents' self administration, and the data was analyzed using the SPSS software version 17.0.Results: The mean age of respondents was 28.6 ± 6.65 years. The majority (90.3% of respondents were aware of modern methods of family planning (FP, 76.0% claimed awareness of where to obtain FP services, and 74.9% knew of at least five methods. However, only 30.6% had ever used contraceptives, while only 13.1% were current users. The most frequently used method was the male condom. The commonly perceived barriers accounting for low use of FP methods were fear of perceived side effects (44.0%, ignorance (32.6%, misinformation (25.1%, superstition (22.0%, and culture (20.3%. Some reasons were proffered for respondents' nonuse of modern contraception. Predictors of use of modern contraceptives include the awareness of a place of FP service provision, respondents' approval of the use of contraceptives, higher education status, and

  20. Student narratives of faculty incivility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasiter, Sue; Marchiondo, Lisa; Marchiondo, Kathleen

    2012-01-01

    Academic incivility remains a problem on college campuses. Nursing research has refocused from student impropriety to aberrant faculty behaviors. Our original study using the Nursing Education Environment Survey showed that 133 of 152 student participants experienced uncivil treatment. Latent, inductive content analysis was undertaken to analyze narratives about their "worst experience" of negative faculty behavior. Four categories were identified: "In front of someone," "Talked to others about me," "Made me feel stupid," and "I felt belittled." Incivility had a profound effect on students and is problematic because it increases already significant academic pressure; it interferes with learning and safe clinical performance; it is contrary to caring, a central nursing concept; and it decreases program satisfaction and retention. Few nursing schools have civility policies for faculty behavior. Formal procedures that promote professional interaction should be crafted and implemented. Equally important is creating ways for nursing students to document incivility without fear of retaliation.

  1. Transnational collaboration for faculty development in health professions education in Mongolia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Minsun; Amgalan, Nomin; Chinzorig, Tselmuun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The Mongolian National University of Medical Sciences is the only national university in Mongolia and has produced more than 90% of health professionals in the country. Experts from Mongolia and Korea embarked on a collaborative effort to develop educational programs for faculty development based on the personal and professional needs of faculty members. This study aimed to evaluate the outcomes of those educational programs to determine whether this transnational collaboration was successful. Methods A needs assessment survey was conducted among 325 faculty members. Based on the results of this survey, the joint expert team developed educational programs on seven core topics: clinical teaching, curriculum development, e-learning, item writing, medical research, organizational culture, and resident selection. Surveys evaluating the satisfaction and the attitudes of the participants were conducted for each program. Results Throughout the 17-day program, 16 experts from Korea and 14 faculty members from Mongolia participated as instructors, and a total of 309 participants attended the program. The average satisfaction score was 7.15 out of 8.0, and the attitudes of the participants towards relevant competencies significantly improved after each educational program. Conclusion The faculty development programs that were developed and implemented as part of this transnational collaboration between Mongolia and Korea are expected to contribute to the further improvement of health professions education in Mongolia. Future studies are needed to evaluate the long-term outcomes of these educational programs. PMID:27907984

  2. The Relationship between Personal Values and Attitude towards Teaching Profession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bektas, Fatih; Nalcaci, Ahmet

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to determine to what extent the personal values of class teacher candidates predict their attitude towards teaching. The universe of the research is teacher candidates from the Kazim Karabekir Faculty of Education, Ankara University in the 2010-2011 academic year. 305 teacher candidates from 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th year class were…

  3. Attitudes about Addiction: A National Study of Addiction Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadus, Angela D.; Hartje, Joyce A.; Roget, Nancy A.; Cahoon, Kristy L.; Clinkinbeard, Samantha S.

    2010-01-01

    The following study, funded by the National Institute of Drug Abuse (NIDA), utilized the "Addiction Belief Inventory" (ABI; Luke, Ribisl, Walton, & Davidson, 2002) to examine addiction attitudes in a national sample of U.S. college/university faculty teaching addiction-specific courses (n = 215). Results suggest that addiction educators view…

  4. Do Family Responsibilities and a Clinical Versus Research Faculty Position Affect Satisfaction with Career and Work-Life Balance for Medical School Faculty?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckett, Laurel; Nettiksimmons, Jasmine; Howell, Lydia Pleotis; Villablanca, Amparo C

    2015-06-01

    Balancing career and family obligations poses challenges to medical school faculty and contributes to dissatisfaction and attrition from academics. We examined the relationship between family setting and responsibilities, rank, and career and work-life satisfaction for faculty in a large U.S. medical school. Baseline faculty surveys were analyzed from the first year of a 4-year National Institutes of Health-funded study to evaluate awareness, knowledge, attitudes, and use of family friendly policies and career satisfaction. The study focus was on the impact of family responsibilities and characteristics of the faculty position (rank, clinical vs. nonclinical, and academic series) in multivariate comparisons between primary predictors and outcomes of interest. Both clinical and family responsibilities for children under 18 play a major and interacting role in satisfaction with career and work-life balance. Clinical faculty respondents without children at home reported significantly greater career satisfaction and better work-life balance than their nonclinical counterparts. Nonclinical faculty respondents with children reported greater satisfaction and better balance than counterparts without family responsibilities. However, the advantage in career satisfaction and work-life balance for clinical faculty respondents disappeared for those with responsibility for young children. No gender-based differences were noted in the results or across faculty rank for respondents; however, for women, reaching associate professor resulted in greater career satisfaction. This study suggests that both work-related factors and family responsibilities influence satisfaction with career and work-life balance, but the predictors appear to interact in complex and nuanced ways. Further research is needed to delineate more clearly these interactions and to explore other factors that may play important additional roles.

  5. Do Family Responsibilities and a Clinical Versus Research Faculty Position Affect Satisfaction with Career and Work–Life Balance for Medical School Faculty?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckett, Laurel; Nettiksimmons, Jasmine; Howell, Lydia Pleotis

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Balancing career and family obligations poses challenges to medical school faculty and contributes to dissatisfaction and attrition from academics. We examined the relationship between family setting and responsibilities, rank, and career and work–life satisfaction for faculty in a large U.S. medical school. Methods: Baseline faculty surveys were analyzed from the first year of a 4-year National Institutes of Health–funded study to evaluate awareness, knowledge, attitudes, and use of family friendly policies and career satisfaction. The study focus was on the impact of family responsibilities and characteristics of the faculty position (rank, clinical vs. nonclinical, and academic series) in multivariate comparisons between primary predictors and outcomes of interest. Results: Both clinical and family responsibilities for children under 18 play a major and interacting role in satisfaction with career and work–life balance. Clinical faculty respondents without children at home reported significantly greater career satisfaction and better work–life balance than their nonclinical counterparts. Nonclinical faculty respondents with children reported greater satisfaction and better balance than counterparts without family responsibilities. However, the advantage in career satisfaction and work–life balance for clinical faculty respondents disappeared for those with responsibility for young children. No gender-based differences were noted in the results or across faculty rank for respondents; however, for women, reaching associate professor resulted in greater career satisfaction. Conclusion: This study suggests that both work-related factors and family responsibilities influence satisfaction with career and work–life balance, but the predictors appear to interact in complex and nuanced ways. Further research is needed to delineate more clearly these interactions and to explore other factors that may play important additional roles. PMID

  6. Dental students' and faculty members' concepts and emotions associated with a caries risk assessment program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maupome, Gerardo; Isyutina, Olga

    2013-11-01

    The objective of this study was to identify concepts and emotions associated with using an established Caries Risk Assessment (CRA) and Caries Risk Management (CRM) program in a dental school. Five focus groups with students and faculty members were conducted. Transcripts of the focus group discussions were qualitatively analyzed for emotions, using Plutchik's wheel of emotions, and were inductively evaluated for concepts (stability coefficients, Scott's π, 0.65-0.71). A total of twenty-five students took part in three focus groups (D2, D3, and D4 separately), and fifteen faculty members participated in two groups. Few frequency differences existed across students and faculty in terms of emotions (278 in faculty members' discourse; 276 in students'). From these, 535 concepts were assembled in seven groups of semantically distinct concepts. Faculty members verbalized more numerous concepts than students (300 vs. 235). Skepticism about the effectiveness of the CRA/CRM program represented the most significant barrier to comprehensive student and faculty support. The findings also suggested that, in order to dispel misconceptions, clearer messages, simpler forms and systems, and better tailored foci of the program for diverse patient, student, and faculty subgroups are needed. Ultimately, buy-in from users depends on CRA forms and programs that are seen as relevant, useful, and simple, offering tangible outcomes for patients and clinicians.

  7. Faculty and second-year medical student perceptions of active learning in an integrated curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Alexander; Harris, David M

    2016-12-01

    Patients expect physicians to be lifelong learners who are able to interpret and evaluate diagnostic tests, and most medical schools list the development of lifelong learning in their program objectives. However, lecture is the most often utilized form of teaching in the first two years and is considered passive learning. The current generation of medical students has many characteristics that should support active learning pedagogies. The purpose of this study was to analyze student and faculty perceptions of active learning in an integrated medical curriculum at the second-year mark, where students have been exposed to multiple educational pedagogies. The first hypothesis of the study was that faculty would favor active learning methods. The second hypothesis was that Millennial medical students would favor active learning due to their characteristics. Primary faculty for years 1 and 2 and second-year medical students were recruited for an e-mail survey consisting of 12 questions about active learning and lecture. Students perceived that lecture and passive pedagogies were more effective for learning, whereas faculty felt active and collaborative learning was more effective. Students believed that more content should be covered by lecture than faculty. There were also significant differences in perceptions of what makes a good teacher. Students and faculty both felt that lack of time in the curriculum and preparation time were barriers for faculty. The data suggest that students are not familiar with the process of learning and that more time may be needed to help students develop lifelong learning skills.

  8. Enhancing Faculty Engagement and Student Learning in Foundational STEM Courses at a Large Public University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Howard; Koenig, Kathleen

    2015-03-01

    Enhancing student learning requires both the strong involvement of the faculty member and the student. We present preliminary efforts of an NSF-supported multi-disciplinary program to enhance learning in foundational STEM courses. A central theme, supported by evidenced-based research across the STEM disciplines, is that active leaning engages students in ways that enhance student learning. A secondary theme is that sustained use of active learning techniques by faculty needs a supportive local culture. We describe our initial efforts with the use of Teaching and Learning Liaisons, faculty members trained in research-based instructional strategies in order to lower the barriers for faculty to try new (to them) active learning strategies, and to increase the probability that these faculty carry out the strategies with fidelity. We have assembled a collection of faculty across the STEM disciplines of Biology, Chemistry, and Physics to participate and will compare initial activities by these departments. Efforts to create a supportive culture for these faculty was also provided by tangible department head efforts We acknowledge support from the National Science Foundation (DUE-1022563).

  9. Barriers to Adopting Technology for Teaching and Learning in Oman

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Senaidi, Said; Lin, Lin; Poirot, Jim

    2009-01-01

    This study investigates the perceived barriers to adopting information and communication technologies (ICT) in Omani higher education. One hundred faculty members from four different departments at the College of Applied Sciences in Oman participated in the study. The participants took a survey, which was developed based on the Western literature.…

  10. Collaboration in Delivering Higher Education Programs: Barriers and Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Robert B.; Short, Paula M.

    2001-01-01

    Explored perceptions of faculty, administrators, students, and state policy makers concerning barriers and challenges in implementing collaborative degree programs. Created a typology of collaboration based on data analysis: the builder, broker, ballerina, and baker types of collaborative. Found that setting the pace, acknowledging differences,…

  11. Exploring the Relationship between Faculty Concerns and Faculty Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myoungsook; Cho, YoonJung; Svinicki, Marilla D.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore how college faculty characteristics are related to their teaching concerns based on Fuller's model of teacher concern (self, task, and impact concern). Fuller's model was supported by self and task concerns, though impact concern did not follow the model. Impact concern was the highest among the three…

  12. Faculty and Technology: Implications for Faculty Training and Technology Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keengwe, Jared; Kidd, Terry; Kyei-Blankson, Lydia

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the factors affecting ICT adoption process and the implications for faculty training and technology leadership. Respondents represented a wide range of academic and professional positions. They identified themselves as Assistant, Associate, and Professor as well as Instructional Designer, Director of…

  13. Faculty-Curriculum Development. Curriculum Design by Nursing Faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yura, Helen; And Others

    Faculty curriculum development, and specific applications to nursing education, are addressed in 37 papers and 6 discussion summaries from 1973 and 1974 workshops sponsored by the National League for Nursing. Attention is directed to: the curriculum development process, curriculum evaluation, the conceptual framework as a part of curriculum…

  14. New England Faculty and College Students Differ in Their Views About Evolution, Creationism, Intelligent Design, and Religiosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paz-Y-Miño C, Guillermo; Espinosa, Avelina

    2011-06-01

    students=1.60) and evolution (Evolution Index faculty=2.48 and students=1.65) than the students. Because attitudes toward evolution correlate (1) positively with understanding of science/evolution and (2) negatively with religiosity/political ideology, we conclude that science education combined with vigorous public debate should suffice to increase acceptance of naturalistic rationalism and decrease the negative impact of creationism and ID on society's evolution literacy.

  15. Education: Chemistry Faculty Job Mobility Surveyed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1981

    1981-01-01

    Summarizes results of a survey undertaking to describe the extent of movement of chemistry faculty members (N=1207) from academic to industrial positions. Numbers of male and female faculty within categories of reasons for leaving are also reported. (CS)

  16. Faculty Changing Departments: Why, Who, and When?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallerstein, George

    1976-01-01

    Departmental changes by faculty staff are suggested to be one solution to the budgetary problems of some institutions, rather than the more prevalent practice of nonreappointment of untenured faculty. (LBH)

  17. Nursing faculty preparedness for clinical teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suplee, Patricia Dunphy; Gardner, Marcia; Jerome-D'Emilia, Bonnie

    2014-03-01

    Nursing faculty who teach in clinical settings face complex situations requiring evidence-based educational and evaluative strategies, yet many have had limited preparation for these tasks. A convenience sample of 74 nursing faculty participated in a survey about clinical teaching in prelicensure nursing programs. Most faculty developed teaching skills through conferences (57%), orientation at their educational institution (53%), or exposure in graduate school (38%). Thirty-one percent reported having no preparation for clinical teaching. Faculty felt least prepared to manage students with learning, physical, or emotional disabilities and incivility. Twenty-six percent had no preparation for evaluating students in the clinical setting, and only 17% had worked with a faculty mentor. Few evidence-based teaching strategies were used by the faculty. These findings indicate gaps exist in the preparation of clinical faculty. Graduate education, comprehensive orientation programs, and continuing professional development may help to ensure faculty are effective in managing and evaluating student learning. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  18. Faculty Satisfaction in Academic Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyquist, Julie G.; Hitchcock, Maurice A.; Teherani, Arianne

    2000-01-01

    Describes the challenges and elements of satisfaction in academic medicine. Proposes a model of academic faculty satisfaction which postulates that organizational, job-related, and personal factors combine to develop self-knowledge, social knowledge, and satisfaction with outcomes of productivity, retention, and learner-patient satisfaction. (DB)

  19. Faculty Organizational Commitment and Citizenship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Janet; Ott, Molly; Bell, Alli

    2012-01-01

    Building on a theoretical framework that links characteristics of individuals and their work settings to organizational commitment (OC) and citizenship behavior, this study considers why faculty may be disengaging from institutional service. Analyses of survey data collected from a state system of higher education suggest that job characteristics,…

  20. Faculty Adoption of Educational Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Franziska Zellweger

    2007-01-01

    Although faculty support has been identified as a critical factor in the success of educational-technology programs, many people involved in such efforts underestimate the complexities of integrating technology into teaching. In this article, the author proposes an adoption cycle to help tackle the complex issue of technology adoption for…

  1. Faculty Preceptions of Learning Spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friskney, Doyle

    2014-01-01

    The project researched faculty perceptions of learning spaces and their possible impact on student persistence at two community colleges in Kentucky. The researchers found through literature review, surveys, and interviews that learning spaces that enhanced student engagement and collaboration could positively impact student persistence. The…

  2. Faculty Perceptions of Learning Spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarapata, Paul B.

    2014-01-01

    This project researched faculty perceptions of learning spaces and their possible impact on student persistence at two community colleges in Kentucky. The researchers found through literature review, surveys, and interviews that learning spaces that enhanced student engagement and collaboration could positively impact student persistence. The…

  3. Teaching portfolios for faculty evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melland, H I; Volden, C M

    1996-01-01

    Teaching portfolios are stimulating much discussion as more comprehensive approaches to evaluating teaching are sought. Portfolios can be used effectively for both formative and summative evaluative purposes. The content of a portfolio may vary greatly, but commonly includes material that reflects student learning, evaluative materials, and a personal statement on the faculty's philosophy of education. Professional growth often accompanies developing a personal teaching portfolio.

  4. Electronic Portfolios for Faculty Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, Marilyn; Cockerham, Steve

    This paper examines the conceptual process of creating an electronic professional portfolio for faculty development. The characteristics of electronic professional portfolios and the benefits of electronic portfolio development are discussed. Additional topics covered include: collection and selection of portfolio contents; reflection on portfolio…

  5. Faculty Rights to Scholarly Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinman, Molly

    2017-01-01

    This chapter provides a history of the scholarly publishing system, and explains how it has evolved to benefit corporate publishers to the detriment of faculty, universities, and the public. It offers the open access movement as a potential remedy for the publishing crisis, and the policy environment surrounding these new forms of communication.

  6. Paperless Grades and Faculty Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, James C.; Jones, Dennis; Turner, Sandy

    2003-01-01

    Provides overview of process of switching from paper-based grade reporting to computer-based grading. Authors found that paperless grading decreased number of errors, made student access more immediate, and reduced costs incurred by purchasing and storing grade-scanning sheets. Authors also argue that direct entry grading encourages faculty to…

  7. Faculty Workload: An Analytical Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennison, George M.

    2012-01-01

    Recent discussions of practices in higher education have tended toward muck-raking and self-styled exposure of cynical self-indulgence by faculty and administrators at the expense of students and their families, as usually occurs during periods of economic duress, rather than toward analytical studies designed to foster understanding This article…

  8. Faculty Perceptions of Learning Spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarapata, Paul B.

    2014-01-01

    This project researched faculty perceptions of learning spaces and their possible impact on student persistence at two community colleges in Kentucky. The researchers found through literature review, surveys, and interviews that learning spaces that enhanced student engagement and collaboration could positively impact student persistence. The…

  9. Faculty Preceptions of Learning Spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friskney, Doyle

    2014-01-01

    The project researched faculty perceptions of learning spaces and their possible impact on student persistence at two community colleges in Kentucky. The researchers found through literature review, surveys, and interviews that learning spaces that enhanced student engagement and collaboration could positively impact student persistence. The…

  10. Faculty Development: Assessing Learner Achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Barbara A.; Overfield, Karen

    This study addressed the challenges of developing a faculty professional development workshop on assessment, measurement, and evaluation of achievement in adult learners. The setting for the workshop was a system of postsecondary career colleges throughout the United States. The curriculum development model of D. Kirkpatrick (1994) was used as a…

  11. Embedded Neoliberalism within Faculty Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, John S.; Aliyeva, Aida

    2015-01-01

    Although there are claims that neoliberalism has not only commandeered the agenda and actions of universities and colleges but also become identified with the work of academic professionals, there is little empirical evidence to show that neoliberalism has infiltrated the work of faculty. This qualitative field work investigation of three…

  12. Attitudes of psychology freshmen to mathematics

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    Tenjović Lazar R.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Two components of the attitude towards mathematics were examined on the groups of psychology and ethnology freshmen using the Attitude to Mathematics Questionnaire by L. Aiken: Enjoyments in mathematics and Value of Mathematics. The means of the psychology students on the two components of the attitude towards mathematics were almost in the middle between those of the civil engineering students on the one side, and those of the ethnology students on the other side. However, considering the markedly asymmetric result distributions on specific components of the attitude towards mathematics, with a view of more real positioning of the psychology students compared with the remaining two groups according to their relation to mathematics, all the subjects were clustered pursuant to their answers to the respective Questionnaire items. The cluster analysis results lead to the conclusion that in their attitude towards mathematics most of the psychology freshmen are closer to the students of those faculties who use mathematics as basic ''tools'' than to the students freshly enrolled in other fields traditionally not employing mathematical ''tools'' in their work. Likewise, a positive attitude towards mathematics prevails in the psychology freshmen.

  13. Relationships between teaching faculty and teaching librarians

    CERN Document Server

    Katz, Linda S

    2014-01-01

    Every librarian who teaches in an academic library setting understands the complexities involved in partnering with teaching faculty. Relationships Between Teaching Faculty and Teaching Librarians recounts the efforts of librarians and faculty working together in disciplines across the board to create and sustain connections crucial to the success of library instruction. This unique collection of essays examines various types of partnerships between librarians and faculty (networking, coordination, and collaboration) and addresses the big issues involved, including teaching within an academic

  14. Faculty Learning Matters: Organizational Conditions and Contexts That Shape Faculty Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Meara, KerryAnn; Rivera, Mark; Kuvaeva, Alexandra; Corrigan, Kristen

    2017-01-01

    This study explored the relationships between faculty scholarly learning, faculty teaching learning, institutional support, faculty demographics, disciplinary groups, working conditions, and career outcomes such as retention, productivity, satisfaction, and career agency. We found that the stronger the scholarly learning faculty members reported,…

  15. Surveying Graduate Students' Attitudes and Approaches to Problem Solving

    CERN Document Server

    Mason, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Students' attitudes and approaches to problem solving in physics can profoundly influence their motivation to learn and development of expertise. We developed and validated an Attitudes and Approaches to Problem Solving survey by expanding the Attitudes towards Problem Solving survey of Marx and Cummings and administered it to physics graduate students. Comparison of their responses to the survey questions about problem solving in their own graduate level courses vs. problem solving in the introductory physics courses provides insight into their expertise in introductory and graduate level physics. The physics graduate students' responses to the survey questions were also compared with those of introductory physics and astronomy students and physics faculty. We find that, even for problem solving in introductory physics, graduate students' responses to some survey questions are less expert-like than those of the physics faculty. Comparison of survey responses of graduate students and introductory students for...

  16. Faculty Recruitment in an Era of Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Marilyn; Schimpf, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Faculty recruitment is a challenge for administration and departments, especially in an era of change in the academy. This article builds on information from an interactive conference panel session that focused on faculty recruitment best practices. The article addresses faculty recruitment strategies that focus on the optimization of search…

  17. Retrenchment Clauses in Faculty Union Contracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhoades, Gary

    1993-01-01

    Examination of retrenchment clauses in the faculty union contracts at 42 colleges and universities focused on implications for tenure rights and the roles prescribed for faculty and administrators. Concepts of financial exigency and shared governance are highlighted. Contracts were found to provide faculty with a limited and reactive role during…

  18. A Faculty Code is not a Coda

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neil, Robert M.

    1974-01-01

    Many college and university faculties have adopted codes of faculty responsibilities and self-regulation. Firsthand advice on creating a code precedes an example of one: the new University of California Policy on Faculty Conduct and the Administration of Discipline. (Editor/PG)

  19. Development of New Faculty in Higher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyden, Kathleen M.

    2000-01-01

    Nursing faculty are challenged by changing expectations of undergraduate education, decreasing resources, and widespread technology use. Stressors on new faculty include time, lack of peer support, inadequate feedback, and family-work imbalance. Suggestions for new faculty development include orientation, mentoring, and strategic planning for…

  20. Perceptions of Faculty Status among Academic Librarians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galbraith, Quinn; Garrison, Melissa; Hales, Whitney

    2016-01-01

    This study measures the opinions of ARL librarians concerning the benefits and disadvantages of faculty status in academic librarianship. Average responses from faculty and nonfaculty librarians, as well as from tenured and tenure-track librarians, are analyzed to determine the general perceptions of each group. Overall, faculty librarians…

  1. Faculty Senates and the Fiscal Crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridgely, Julia

    1993-01-01

    A 1993 conference of college faculty senate members is discussed, focusing on common difficulties in governance during a period of retrenchment and due to the faculty culture. Some recent research into the relationship of finances to academic freedom and tenure is examined. Strategies for enhancing faculty senate effectiveness are suggested. (MSE)

  2. Faculty Members on Boards of Trustees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrenberg, Ronald G.; Patterson, Richard W.; Key, Andrew V.

    2013-01-01

    During the 2011-12 academic year, a group of faculty and student researchers at the Cornell Higher Education Research Institute (CHERI) gathered information on which public and private institutions had faculty members on boards of trustees and obtained the names of the faculty members serving in these roles. In April and May 2012, the authors…

  3. Undergraduate Nursing Student Experiences with Faculty Bullying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mott, Jason D.

    2013-01-01

    Incivility and bullying in nursing education has become an area of increased interest. Incivility literature has focused primarily on student-to-faculty incivility. Less focus has been placed on faculty-to-student bullying. This study examined the lived experiences of undergraduate nursing students with faculty bullying. Using descriptive…

  4. Special Education Faculty Needs Assessment Study Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, D.D.; Tyler, N.; Montrosse, B.E.; Young, C.; Robb, S.M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the highlights of the Special Education Faculty Needs Assessment Study (SEFNA). Actions taken after the release of The 2001 Faculty Shortage Study demonstrate that supply-and-demand imbalances can be improved. The projected shortage of special education faculty will directly and negatively affect students with disabilities and…

  5. Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practice of Infection Control among Dental Students at Sana’a University, Yemen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halboub, Esam Saleh; Al-Maweri, Sadeq Ali; Al-Jamaei, Aisha Ahmed; Tarakji, Bassel; Al-Soneidar, Walid Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate knowledge, attitudes, and practices regarding infection control procedures among senior dental students. Materials and Methods: A questionnaire-based cross-sectional survey was conducted among 145 4th- and 5th-year dental students at the Faculty of Dentistry, Sana’a University, Yemen. The self-administered questionnaire was comprised of 20 open- and close-ended items regarding barrier techniques, vaccination status, infection control practices, and awareness. Data were analyzed with a Chi-square test. A P ≤ 0.05 was considered significant. Results: The response rate was 72% (145 out of 204 potential respondents). Overall, 71.7% of the students had been vaccinated for hepatitis B and only 9.5% were tested for post-hepatitis B virus immunization serology. While the vast majority (96.6%) reported always wearing gloves for all dental procedures, the use of face masks and eyewear were reported by only 53.8% and 14.0% of students, respectively, with no significant difference between genders and year of study (P > 0.05). A significantly higher percentage of 5th-year students (58.9%) showed positive attitudes toward the treatment of patients with infectious diseases, as compared to only 31.0% of 4th year students (P < 0.01). A great number of students (62%) reported non-sterile occupational percutaneous and mucous injuries while treating their patients. Conclusions: These unsatisfactory findings highlight the necessity of continued infection control education in order to improve knowledge, attitudes, and practices regarding infection control among dental students at Sana’a University. PMID:26028896

  6. The Development of Attitude ScaleFor Physics Laboratory and The Assesment of Pre-Service Teachers’ Attitudes Towards Physics Laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasret NUHOĞLU

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to develop a reliable and valid attitude scale in order to assess primary science preservice teachers’ attitudes towards physics laboratory. The attitude factors were developed by comparing existing attitudes scales and discussing with experts on the field. The sample related to the development phase of the scale consists of 318 science pre-service teachers studying in the Department of primary science education at the Faculty of education, Kırsehir at Gazi University. There are 19 positive and 17 negative attitude factors in the scale. The Cronbach-Alpha internal integrity coefficient of the final version of the scale was found to be 0.8930 after factor analysis was carried out. Science pre- service teachers’ attitudes towards physics laboratory were explored by a five point Likert scale. The data were analyzed by SPSS software and were evaluated at their attitudes towards physicslaboratory.

  7. Faculty and Technology: Implications for Faculty Training and Technology Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keengwe, Jared; Kidd, Terry; Kyei-Blankson, Lydia

    2009-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the factors affecting ICT adoption process and the implications for faculty training and technology leadership. Respondents represented a wide range of academic and professional positions. They identified themselves as Assistant, Associate, and Professor as well as Instructional Designer, Director of Technology, Information Manager, eLearning Manager, Assistant Department Chair, Associate Vice President of Academic Affairs and Consultant. The respondents identified Organizational Support, Leadership, Training and Development, and Resources as the predominate themes affecting Information and Communication Technology (ICT) adoption process in higher education. Evidence from this study offers insights on how higher education administrators and technology leaders could help their faculty and staff to implement appropriate ICT tools and practices to improve student learning.

  8. Education About Dental Hygienists' Roles in Public Dental Prevention Programs: Dental and Dental Hygiene Students' and Faculty Members' and Dental Hygienists' Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pervez, Anushey; Kinney, Janet S; Gwozdek, Anne; Farrell, Christine M; Inglehart, Marita R

    2016-09-01

    In 2005, Public Act No. 161 (PA 161) was passed in Michigan, allowing dental hygienists to practice in approved public dental prevention programs to provide services for underserved populations while utilizing a collaborative agreement with a supervising dentist. The aims of this study were to assess how well dental and dental hygiene students and faculty members and practicing dental hygienists have been educated about PA 161, what attitudes and knowledge about the act they have, and how interested they are in additional education about it. University of Michigan dental and dental hygiene students and faculty members, students in other Michigan dental hygiene programs, and dental hygienists in the state were surveyed. Respondents (response rate) were 160 dental students (50%), 63 dental hygiene students (82%), 30 dental faculty members (26%), and 12 dental hygiene faculty members (52%) at the University of Michigan; 143 dental hygiene students in other programs (20%); and 95 members of the Michigan Dental Hygienists' Association (10%). The results showed that the dental students were less educated about PA 161 than the dental hygiene students, and the dental faculty members were less informed than the dental hygiene faculty members and dental hygienists. Responding dental hygiene faculty members and dental hygienists had more positive attitudes about PA 161 than did the students and dental faculty members. Most of the dental hygiene faculty members and dental hygienists knew a person providing services in a PA 161 program. Most dental hygiene students, faculty members, and dental hygienists wanted more education about PA 161. Overall, the better educated about the program the respondents were, the more positive their attitudes, and the more interested they were in learning more.

  9. Understanding the challenges to facilitating active learning in the resident conferences: a qualitative study of internal medicine faculty and resident perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam P. Sawatsky

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: In the Next Accreditation System, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education outlines milestones for medical knowledge and requires regular didactic sessions in residency training. There are many challenges to facilitating active learning in resident conferences, and we need to better understand resident learning preferences and faculty perspectives on facilitating active learning. The goal of this study was to identify challenges to facilitating active learning in resident conferences, both through identifying specific implementation barriers and identifying differences in perspective between faculty and residents on effective teaching and learning strategies. Methods: The investigators invited core residency faculty to participate in focus groups. The investigators used a semistructured guide to facilitate discussion about learning preferences and teaching perspectives in the conference setting and used an ‘editing approach’ within a grounded theory framework to qualitative analysis to code the transcripts and analyze the results. Data were compared to previously collected data from seven resident focus groups. Results: Three focus groups with 20 core faculty were conducted. We identified three domains pertaining to facilitating active learning in resident conferences: barriers to facilitating active learning formats, similarities and differences in faculty and resident learning preferences, and divergence between faculty and resident opinions about effective teaching strategies. Faculty identified several setting, faculty, and resident barriers to facilitating active learning in resident conferences. When compared to residents, faculty expressed similar learning preferences; the main differences were in motivations for conference attendance and type of content. Resident preferences and faculty perspectives differed on the amount of information appropriate for lecture and the role of active participation in

  10. An Investigation into Prospective Science Teachers' Attitudes towards Laboratory Course and Self-Efficacy Beliefs in Laboratory Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aka, Elvan Ince

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the current study is to identify the attitudes towards the laboratory course and self-efficacy beliefs in the laboratory use of prospective teachers who are attending Gazi University Gazi Education Faculty Primary Education Science Teaching program, and to investigate the relationship between the attitudes and self-efficacy beliefs.…

  11. Atitudes e barreiras à prática de enfermagem baseada na evidência em contexto comunitário Actitudes y barreras para la práctica de enfermería basada en la evidencia en un contexto comunitário Attitudes and barriers to evidence-based nursing practice in a community context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Pedro Gomes Pereira

    2012-07-01

    adopción de una práctica de enfermería basada en la evidencia en un contexto comunitario, b describir las actitudes de las enfermeras en relación con la práctica basada en la evidencia. Metodología: se desarrolló un estudio transversal, exploratorio y descriptivo que tuvo lugar en una unidad local de salud en el norte de Portugal, recurriendo a la versión de prueba del “Cuestionario de Actitudes Práctica Basada en Evidencias” (McKenna, Ashton y Keeney, 2004. Los resultados coinciden con los de estudios internacionales, aunque tengan en cuenta las especificidades nacionales. En general, las barreras identificadas son de diversas etiologías: personal, organizacional, cultural y científica. En conclusión, una PBE cumple con la obligación social de la enfermería, funda su credibilidad entre las ciencias de la salud y es sostiene eventuales cambios a nivel político. Es fundamental identificar las barreras y actitudes, independientemente de sus orígenes de modo a estructurar futuras estrategias de intervención.Background: Several studies have identified barriers to evidence-based practice (EBP. Most of these investigations were carried out in different contexts. Therefore research is needed to identify barriers and attitudes to EBP in a community context, given the importance and reorganization of primary health care. The research objectives were: a to identify perceived barriers to the adoption of evidence-based nursing practice in a community setting; b to describe nurses’ attitudes related to evidence-based practice. Methodology: we developed an exploratory and descriptive cross-sectional study, which took place in local health unit in northern Portugal, using the test version of the “Questionnaire Attitudes to Evidence Based Practice” (McKenna, Ashton and Keeney, 2004. The results were considered in relation to those of international studies but taking into account national specificities. Overall, the barriers identified have various etiologies

  12. Opinion & special articles: a guide from fellowship to faculty: Nietzsche and the academic neurologist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmichael, S Thomas

    2012-10-02

    The role of the physician scientist in biomedical research is increasingly threatened. Despite a clear role in clinical advances in translational medicine, the percentage of physicians engaged in research has steadily declined. Several programmatic efforts have been initiated to address this problem by providing time and financial resources to the motivated resident or fellow. However, this decline in physician scientists is due not only to a lack of time and resources but also a reflection of the uncertain path in moving from residency or postdoctoral training toward junior faculty. This article is a practical guide to the milestones and barriers to successful faculty achievement after residency or fellowship training.

  13. ASSESSMENT OF ATTITUDE AND BEHAVIOR OF HEALTH PROFESSIONALS TOWARDS PROVISION OF DRUG INFORMATION SERVICES IN ENUGU STATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pharm. Adibe M.O

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Access to authoritative and independent information is fundamental for the rational and effective use of drugs. In Nigeria, there is currently very few drug information centres or other source for problem oriented drug information. Purpose: To assess the attitude and behaviour of health professionals (physicians and pharmacists in Enugu State, Nigeria towards provision of drug information services in the state. Methods: A self-completion questionnaire was administered to 37 doctors and 41 pharmacists in the included hospitals and faculty of pharmacy. A twenty-item question was added to assess the attitude and behaviour of the respondents towards provision of drug information services. Respondents were requested to rate necessity of each item by selecting among ??Not Important at all?? to ??Very Important?? (lowest to highest. The instrument was prefaced: ??Very important??, ??Important??, ??Less important??, and ??Not important at all??. Their attitude and behaviour were expressed in term of item-performance. The percentage item-performance was calculated to reflect the level of necessity of each items; high percentage item-performance of an item correlates with high level of necessity of the item in provision of drug information services and vice versa. Results: Out of 78 questionnaires administered, 67 were retrieved given a response rate of 85.90%. The major sources of drug information currently in use were medical journals (79.1%, medical representatives of drug manufacturers and marketers (71.6%. The drug information areas mostly sought for by the respondent were indication (86.6%, use of drug in special group (77.6%. The attitude and behaviour of health professionals towards provision of drug information services in Enugu state were positive. This study identified three barriers and five facilitators as the major factors affecting provision of efficient and effective drug information services in Enugu state. The major

  14. A Study of Faculty Approaches to Teaching Undergraduate Physical Chemistry Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mack, Michael Ryan

    Chemistry education researchers have not adequately studied teaching and learning experiences at all levels in the undergraduate chemistry curriculum leaving gaps in discipline-based STEM education communities understanding about how the upper- division curricula works (National Research Council, 2012b; Towns, 2013). This study explored faculty approaches to teaching in upper-division physical chemistry course settings using an interview-based methodology. Two conceptualizations of approaches to teaching emerged from a phenomenographic analysis of interview transcripts: (1) faculty beliefs about the purposes for teaching physical chemistry and (2) their conceptions of their role as an instructor in these course settings. Faculty who reported beliefs predominantly centered on helping students develop conceptual knowledge and problem-solving skills in physical chemistry often worked with didactic models of teaching, which emphasized the transfer of expert knowledge to students. When faculty expressed beliefs that were more inclusive of conceptual, epistemic, and social learning goals in science education they often described more student-centered models of teaching and learning, which put more responsibilities on them to facilitate students' interactive engagement with the material and peers during regularly scheduled class time. Knowledge of faculty thinking, as evinced in a rich description of their accounts of their experience, provides researchers and professional developers with useful information about the potential opportunities or barriers that exist for helping faculty align their beliefs and goals for teaching with research-based instructional strategies.

  15. Attitudes, social representations and social attitudes

    OpenAIRE

    Farr, Robert, M.

    1994-01-01

    This paper plays the role of the devil's advocate in relation to Colin Fraser's paper "attitudes, social representations and widespread beliefs". It argues for the alternative perspective which Colin identifies that social representations and social attitudes are epistemologically incompatible theories.

  16. Targeting change: Assessing a faculty learning community focused on increasing statistics content in life science curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Loran Carleton; Gleichsner, Alyssa M; Adedokun, Omolola A; Forney, James

    2016-11-12

    Transformation of research in all biological fields necessitates the design, analysis and, interpretation of large data sets. Preparing students with the requisite skills in experimental design, statistical analysis, and interpretation, and mathematical reasoning will require both curricular reform and faculty who are willing and able to integrate mathematical and statistical concepts into their life science courses. A new Faculty Learning Community (FLC) was constituted each year for four years to assist in the transformation of the life sciences curriculum and faculty at a large, Midwestern research university. Participants were interviewed after participation and surveyed before and after participation to assess the impact of the FLC on their attitudes toward teaching, perceived pedagogical skills, and planned teaching practice. Overall, the FLC had a meaningful positive impact on participants' attitudes toward teaching, knowledge about teaching, and perceived pedagogical skills. Interestingly, confidence for viewing the classroom as a site for research about teaching declined. Implications for the creation and development of FLCs for science faculty are discussed. © 2016 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 44(6):517-525, 2016. © 2016 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  17. Attitudes of Health Professional Educators Toward the Use of Social Media as a Teaching Tool: Global Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Souza, Karan; Henningham, Lucy; Zou, Runyu; Huang, Jessica; O'Sullivan, Elizabeth; Last, Jason; Ho, Kendall

    2017-08-04

    The use of social media in health education has witnessed a revolution within the past decade. Students have already adopted social media informally to share information and supplement their lecture-based learning. Although studies show comparable efficacy and improved engagement when social media is used as a teaching tool, broad-based adoption has been slow and the data on barriers to uptake have not been well documented. The objective of this study was to assess attitudes of health educators toward social media use in education, examine differences between faculty members who do and do not use social media in teaching practice, and determine contributing factors for an increase in the uptake of social media. A cross-sectional Web-based survey was disseminated to the faculty of health professional education departments at 8 global institutions. Respondents were categorized based on the frequency of social media use in teaching as "users" and "nonusers." Users sometimes, often, or always used social media, whereas nonusers never or rarely used social media. A total of 270 health educators (52.9%, n=143 users and 47.0%, n=127 nonusers) were included in the survey. Users and nonusers demonstrated significant differences on perceived barriers and potential benefits to the use of social media. Users were more motivated by learner satisfaction and deterred by lack of technology compatibility, whereas nonusers reported the need for departmental and skill development support. Both shared concerns of professionalism and lack of evidence showing enhanced learning. The majority of educators are open-minded to incorporating social media into their teaching practice. However, both users and nonusers have unique perceived challenges and needs, and engaging them to adapt social media into their educational practice will require previously unreported approaches. Identification of these differences and areas of overlap presents opportunities to determine a strategy to increase

  18. ESMD Space Grant Faculty Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jiang; Whitmore, Stephen; Radcliff, Roger; Misra, Prabhakar; Prasad, Nadipuram; Conrad, James; Lackey, Ellen; Selby, Gregory; Wersinger, Jean-Marie; Lambright, Jonathan

    2008-01-01

    The strength of the Exploration Systems Mission Directorate ESMD Faculty Project lies in its ability to meet National Aeronautics Space Administration NASA's Strategic Educational Outcome 1 by developing a sustainable and long-term integration of student involvement at academic institutions with all NASA Centers. This outcome is achieved by a three-fold approach: 1) by collecting Senior Design projects pertaining to Constellation work performed at each of the ten NASA Centers, 2) by engaging students at Minority Serving Institutions in the art of systems engineering and systems design of technologies required for space exploration, and 3) by identifying potential internships at each Center relative to exploration that provide students who are supported by their institutional Space Grant to engage in on-going mission-level and explorative systems designs. The objectives of the ESMD Faculty Project are to: 1. Aid the Centers (both Education Offices and associated technical organizations) in providing relevant opportunities for the ESMD Space Grant Program to support student and faculty in Senior Design projects 2. Enable better matches between the ESMD work required and what the Space Grant Consortia can do to effectively contribute to NASA programs 3. Provide the Space Grant Consortia an opportunity to strengthen relations with the NASA Centers 4. Develop better collective understanding of the U.S. Space Exploration Policy by the Center, Space Grant, faculty, Education Office, and students 5. Enable Space Grant institution faculty to better prepare their students to meet current and future NASA needs 6. Enable the Center Education Offices to strengthen their ties to their technical organizations and Space Grant Consortia 7. Aid KSC in gaining a greater and more detailed understanding of each of the Center activities Senior Design projects are intended to stimulate undergraduate students on current NASA activities related to lunar, Mars, and other planetary missions

  19. Cultivating adjunct faculty: strategies beyond orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santisteban, Lisette; Egues, Aida L

    2014-01-01

    Schools of nursing across the country are using adjunct faculty to meet clinical, didactic, and online instructional needs of their nursing programs. While adjunct faculty are vital to the alleviation of the nursing shortage and the shortage of nursing faculty, and to the preparation of the current and future nursing workforce, little is known about cultivating adjunct faculty as nurse educators. To investigate the cultivation of adjunct nursing faculty, the authors engaged in a comprehensive review of the extant literature of primary databases and reports from accredited nursing programs and professional nursing organizations. Scant literature exists that seeks to identify issues associated with developing adjunct nursing faculty as educators, including role transition needs, and useful approaches to orientation, mentorship, or retention. Working toward cultivation of adjunct faculty includes innovative support measures beyond simple orientation. Orientation should be comprehensive, and move to mentorship as a key component that helps establish a sustainable nurse educator career for adjunct nursing faculty. It is incumbent upon schools of nursing to cultivate their adjunct faculty, and this article includes creative approaches to doing so, with recommendations for nursing education, nursing practice, and nursing research settings. While adjunct faculty may successfully meet some of the challenges faced by nursing programs, they themselves face many challenges that may hinder their success as nurse educators. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. The research impact of school psychology faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Marley W; Chan-Park, Christina Y

    2015-06-01

    Hirsch's (2005) h index has become one of the most popular indicators of research productivity for higher education faculty. However, the h index varies across academic disciplines so empirically established norms for each discipline are necessary. To that end, the current study collected h index values from Scopus and Google Scholar databases for 401 tenure-track faculty members from 109 school psychology training programs. Male faculty tended to be more senior than female faculty and a greater proportion of the male faculty held professorial rank. However, female faculty members outnumbered males at the assistant and associate professor ranks. Although strongly correlated (rho=.84), h index values from Google Scholar were higher than those from Scopus. h index distributions were positively skewed with many faculty having low values and a few faculty having high values. Faculty in doctoral training programs exhibited significantly larger h index values than faculty in specialist training programs and there were univariate differences in h index values across academic rank and sex, but sex differences were not significant after taking seniority into account. It was recommended that the h index be integrated with peer review and diverse other indicators when considering individual merit. Copyright © 2015 Society for the Study of School Psychology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Group Supervision Attitudes: Supervisory Practices Fostering Resistance to Adoption of Evidence-Based Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Charles T; Patterson, David A; McKiernan, Patrick M

    2012-01-01

    The focus of this study was to qualitatively evaluate worker's attitudes about clinical supervision. It is believed that poor attitudes toward clinical supervision can create barriers during supervision sessions. Fifty-one participants within a social services organization completed an open-ended questionnaire regarding their clinical supervision experiences. Results suggest four key areas which appear to be strong factors in workers' experiences and attitudes regarding group supervision: a. facilitator's skill level; b. creativity; c. utilization of technology; and d. applicability. For organizations interested in overcoming potential barriers to adopting best practices, effectively addressing workers' negative attitudes toward group supervision would be a worthy endeavor.

  2. Faculty development on professionalism and medical ethics: the design, development and implementation of Objective Structured Teaching Exercises (OSTEs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wei-Hsin; Mylona, Elza; Lane, Susan; Wertheim, William A; Baldelli, Perrilynn; Williams, Peter C

    2014-10-01

    As students are expected to develop competency in professionalism and medical ethics, faculty are also expected to facilitate medical students' learning and understanding of these areas. One of the main challenges to success in this domain has been uncertainty of whether or not faculty know the content and the methods to teach and assess these competencies. We used the Objective Structured Teaching Exercise (OSTE) format as a faculty development tool to train and evaluate faculty on how to teach professionalism and medical ethics to students in clinical settings. The process for the design, development and implementation of OSTEs consisted of five phases: (1) performing a literature review and student needs assessment, (2) developing the OSTE cases and performance checklists, (3) recruiting and training of standardized students, (4) conducting a mock training session and (5) organizing faculty development workshops using OSTEs. Twenty clinical faculty members participated in one of three half-day OSTE workshops offered. Faculty confidence and attitudes about teaching professionalism increased significantly (p teaching medical students, the information and skills they learned from the workshop are important to them as clinical educators, and that the information and skills will likely have an impact on the way they teach professionalism and ethics in the future.

  3. Barriers Non-Traditional Age Freshmen Women Encounter as They Seek Entrance to Four-Year Colleges and Universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Wanda Young Cadman

    Barriers faced by 42 nontraditional age women (age 35 or above) enrolled as freshman in four state institutions in Oregon were studied, based on a demographic survey and interviews. The following types of barriers were identified: (1) social barriers, constraints brought about through economics, age, family or community attitudes, or sex-role…

  4. Participation of nursing faculty in university governance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrawy, A A

    1992-03-01

    It has been suggested that faculty participation in governance in American colleges is low, and that faculty in schools of nursing are particularly unlikely to be involved in governance activities. This study was designed to determine actual and ideal levels of nursing faculty participation in five areas of governance: academic, student, personnel, public, and financial affairs. A survey of nursing faculty suggested that they were involved substantially in academic affairs, but less involved in the other areas of governance. Generally, the faculty indicated satisfaction with their high level of participation in academic affairs, and with their lower level of participation in student affairs, personnel affairs, and public affairs; the faculty did indicate dissatisfaction with their low level of participation in financial affairs.

  5. Smart parking barrier

    KAUST Repository

    Alharbi, Abdulrazaq M.

    2016-05-06

    Various methods and systems are provided for smart parking barriers. In one example, among others, a smart parking barrier system includes a movable parking barrier located at one end of a parking space, a barrier drive configured to control positioning of the movable parking barrier, and a parking controller configured to initiate movement of the parking barrier, via the barrier drive. The movable parking barrier can be positioned between a first position that restricts access to the parking space and a second position that allows access to the parking space. The parking controller can initiate movement of the movable parking barrier in response to a positive identification of an individual allowed to use the parking space. The parking controller can identify the individual through, e.g., a RFID tag, a mobile device (e.g., a remote control, smartphone, tablet, etc.), an access card, biometric information, or other appropriate identifier.

  6. faculties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mardanov Rustam Sh.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyzes some of the psychological problems of the economic faculties’ students arising in the course of study of mathematical disciplines. These problems are primarily related with the lack of students’ awareness, misconception about the calculation methods in their future profession, low motivation and performance, math anxiety, etc. They makeadditional difficulties which impede successful mastering of sophisticated material. Based on the experience of mathematical disciplines teaching, the paper provides some possible solutions to these problems with the lecturer who has to play an important role. The lecturer should orientate students towards serious and profound knowledge of economic and mathematical methods, create conditions for students’ active participation in the educational process and provide them with comprehensive assistance in overcoming difficulties.

  7. Presentation rubric: improving faculty professional presentations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayne, Arlene N; McDaniel, Gretchen S

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the content of a presentation evaluation rubric for use in the development and improvement in faculty performance to enhance learning. Lectures or professional presentations require skills that can be learned through the use of evidence-based practices for all forms of public speaking. A core competency of nursing faculty is to serve as a role model in skilled oral communication. The use of an evaluation presentation rubric can increase faculty competency in this area. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Faculty development in medical education research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaMantia, Joseph; Hamstra, Stanley J; Martin, Daniel R; Searle, Nancy; Love, Jeffrey; Castaneda, Jill; Aziz-Bose, Rahela; Smith, Michael; Griswold-Therodorson, Sharon; Leuck, JoAnna

    2012-12-01

    This 2012 Academic Emergency Medicine consensus conference breakout session was devoted to the task of identifying the history and current state of faculty development in education research in emergency medicine (EM). The participants set a future agenda for successful faculty development in education research. A number of education research and content experts collaborated during the session. This article summarizes existing academic and medical literature, expert opinions, and audience consensus to report our agreement and findings related to the promotion of faculty development.

  9. Performance Measurement and Faculty Pay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Pin-liang; RUI Ming-jie

    2002-01-01

    In classic agency models, first best efficiency can't be achieved due to the trade-off between risk and incentives except that agency is risk neutral. Whereas if the principal's objective is not contractible,an alternative objective performance measurement which is contractible is always proposed. However, if the reaction of this objective performance measurement to agency's effort differs from that of the principal's objective, the agent would game performance measures, which leads to loss of efficiency, even if agency is risk neutral. By adding subjective weights on objective measures, or combination of subjective performance measurement with objective performance measurement, efficiency can be regained. Implications for faculty pay are also discussed.

  10. Faculty perspectives on rewards and incentives for community-engaged work: A multinational exploratory study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trang Vuong

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Universities around the world are grappling with the challenge of how to best recognise and support community-engaged teaching, research and scholarship. The status quo reveals two major problems: many faculty members express the sentiment that such work is often discounted, and there is a dearth of available information on faculty perspectives at non-US, especially non-Western, institutions. Understanding faculty needs and perceptions may help institutions improve reward systems and community research and engagement. Also, filling the information gap between the Global North and Global South may help policy-makers and educators make higher education more civically engaged and socially responsible. As a global coalition of universities moving beyond the ivory tower, the Talloires Network (TN is uniquely positioned to provide support for and conduct research on community-engaged work. To better understand engaged faculty attitudes about rewards and incentives, TN launched a pilot survey involving 14 institutions in 11 countries. All of these institutions are members of TN, an international association of 368 institutions in 77 countries committed to strengthening civic engagement. Thirty-eight respondents were chosen based on diverse recruiting requirements. This exploratory study highlights some common opinions about what kind of faculty work is encouraged; whether institutional policies regarding engaged work exist; and how community-engaged work is perceived by colleagues. More importantly, this study contributes to the design and administration of larger surveys on community-engaged work.

  11. A conceptual model for faculty development in academic medicine: the underrepresented minority faculty experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daley, Sandra P; Broyles, Shelia L; Rivera, Lourdes M; Brennan, Jesse J; Lu, Ethel Regis; Reznik, Vivian

    2011-01-01

    In May 2010, the Association of American Medical Colleges reported that nonwhite professors have a lower promotion rate than white professors. A cohort of 30 underrepresented minority (URM) junior faculty who participated in a structured faculty development program at a public, research-intensive, academic medical center were followed in a 10-year longitudinal study. This paper reports on the career status of 12 of the 30 URM faculty who were eligible for promotion during this period. Ninety-two percent (11/12) of URM faculty eligible for promotion were promoted to associate professor. When asked what factors contributed to their success, these URM faculty identified access and support of senior faculty mentors, peer networking, professional skill development, and knowledge of institutional culture. A faculty development program that addresses these components can promote the success of URM faculty in academic medicine.

  12. Faculty-Student Collaboration: Issues and Recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angeline L. Barretta-Herman

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available This exploratory qualitative study of 11 social work faculty identified the benefits and risks of faculty-student collaboration. Benefits articulated include helping students learn to write for publication, learning the publication process, getting innovative student material published, and enriching the project through shared problem-solving. The benefits, however, must be weighed against the risks of exploitation of the student collaborator. Successful faculty-student collaboration in this dual relationship demands that faculty take responsibility for safeguarding boundaries, following the NASW Code of Ethics, and openly negotiating roles, tasks, workload, and order of authorship with the student.

  13. Survey of Attitudes towards Curriculum Reforms among Medical Teachersin Different Socio-economic and Cultural Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Mads Ronald

    2007-01-01

    towards medical curriculum reform in post-communist transition countries, but not in Western European schools, was younger age, as well as female gender in Bosnia and Herzegovina,. Factors influencing faculty attitudes may not be easy to identify and may be specific for different settings......Curriculum reforms in medical schools require cultural and conceptual changes from the faculty. We assessed attitudes towards curriculum reforms in different academic, economic, and social environments among 776 teachers from 2 Western European medical schools (Belgium and Denmark) and 7 medical...

  14. Attitude of Management Students towards Whistleblowing: Evidence from Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Bogdanovic

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the attitude of management students towards whistleblowing in a sample of 121 master students of business ethics at the Faculty of Economics University in Split, Croatia. The three measurement instruments include whistleblowers´ attitudes (3 items, whistleblowing attitudes (2 items and potential types of whistleblowing reactions (8 items, i.e. external reactions (4 items and internal reactions (4 items. The results of the study indicated a positive attitude toward whistleblowing and whistleblowers. The authors also found that female students exhibited more confidence in management and were more prone to whistleblowing than male students. Also, students with professional experience considered whistleblowing to be in the public interest more than students with no professional experience. The results may be of practical use to managers who can benefit from whistleblowing while keeping in mind that whistleblowing can't be avoided and that punishing whistleblowers seems to be a bad managerial practice.

  15. Formation of self-regulation culture of physical education faculty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kudin S.F.

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to experimentally substantiate effectiveness of pedagogic conditions of self-regulation culture formation of future physical culture teachers. Material: in the research 110 3rd year students of physical education faculty participated. The students were questioned. The level of students’ anxiety was assessed. Results: Implementation of the author’s course in educational process facilitated formation of students’ self-regulation skills and abilities; raises confidence and self estimation; influences positively on functional state. It was found that students acquire ability to consciously observe their own verbal constructs of negative thinking and create positive alternatives. Conclusions: preparing of future physical culture teachers stipulates his (her ability to effectively fulfill professional functioning in the aspect of health preservation. The necessary conditions of self-regulation culture formation are formation of students’ holistic value-meaningful attitude to individual health and health of surrounding people.

  16. [Attitudes of pharmacy and dentistry students of Poznan Medical University towards smoking].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korzeniowska, Katarzyna; Cieślewicz, Artur; Szałek, Edyta; Jabłecka, Anna

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the attitude of students of the Faculty of Pharmacy and Division of Dentistry (Poznan University of Medical Sciences) towards smoking. Information was collected using a self-completion questionnaire for students. 114 students of the 5th year of Faculty of Pharmacy and 60 students of 4th year of Division of Dentistry took part in the survey. Most of the students were non-smokers (77% in the Faculty of Pharmacy and 72% in the Division of Dentistry). The main reason for abandoning smoking in both groups was knowledge on the dangers of addiction obtained in medical studies.

  17. Hardin-Simmons University Faculty Handbook, 1975-1976.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardin-Simmons Univ., Abilene, TX.

    The 1975 edition of the faculty handbook is divided into major sections covering administrative structure, faculty-administration relationships, faculty compensation and fringe benefits, faculty services, faculty-student responsibilities and relationships, and summer school employment. The university administration is described with regard to the…

  18. Faculty Rank System, Research Motivation, and Faculty Research Productivity: Measure Refinement and Theory Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tien, Flora F.; Blackburn, Robert T.

    1996-01-01

    A study explored the relationship between the traditional system of college faculty rank and faculty research productivity from the perspectives of behavioral reinforcement theory and selection function. Six hypotheses were generated and tested, using data from a 1989 national faculty survey. Results failed to support completely either the…

  19. Expanding the Discussion of Faculty Vitality to Include Productive but Disengaged Senior Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huston, Therese A.; Norman, Marie; Ambrose, Susan A.

    2007-01-01

    In this essay, the authors begin by examining and challenging the way in which faculty vitality has been operationalized in the past, arguing for the value of institution-specific analysis of the faculty vitality issue. They then propose alternative models for understanding previously unexplored aspects of faculty vitality, drawing on research in…

  20. Service user and carer involvement in learning and teaching: a faculty of health staff perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutteridge, Robin; Dobbins, Kerry

    2010-08-01

    As part of a larger evaluation study, 20 members of staff in a Faculty of Health were interviewed about the impact of service user and carer involvement on learning and teaching. A qualitative approach was adopted and semi-structured interviews were used to explore current levels of involvement, barriers and solutions. The data generated was analysed using the principles of grounded theory. Findings suggest respondents recognised the requirement to involve service users and carers in their learning activities. Most wanted to develop this aspect of their educational provision but a number of barriers were described. Strategic and operational solutions were proposed to overcome these and respondents were positive about achieving meaningful involvement.

  1. Comparison of attitudes toward disability and people with disability among caregivers, the public, and people with disability: findings from a cross-sectional survey

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Background A negative attitude toward disability is one of the potential barriers for people with disability (PWD) to achieve social equality. Although numerous studies have investigated attitudes toward disability, few have evaluated personal attitudes toward disability among PWD, and made comparisons with attitudes of healthy respondents. This study was to investigate and compare the attitudes of PWD, caregivers, and the public toward disability and PWD in China, to identify discrepancies i...

  2. Attitude towards statistics and performance among post-graduate students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosli, Mira Khalisa; Maat, Siti Mistima

    2017-05-01

    For student to master Statistics is a necessity, especially for those post-graduates that are involved in the research field. The purpose of this research was to identify the attitude towards Statistics among the post-graduates and to determine the relationship between the attitude towards Statistics and post-graduates' of Faculty of Education, UKM, Bangi performance. 173 post-graduate students were chosen randomly to participate in the study. These students registered in Research Methodology II course that was introduced by faculty. A survey of attitude toward Statistics using 5-points Likert scale was used for data collection purposes. The instrument consists of four components such as affective, cognitive competency, value and difficulty. The data was analyzed using the SPSS version 22 in producing the descriptive and inferential Statistics output. The result of this research showed that there is a medium and positive relation between attitude towards statistics and students' performance. As a conclusion, educators need to access students' attitude towards the course to accomplish the learning outcomes.

  3. Factors Associated with Veterinary Clinical Faculty Attrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furr, Martin

    2017-06-28

    Faculty attrition and recruitment for veterinary clinical faculty positions have been reported as significant problems in veterinary medical education. To investigate the factors that may be important in veterinary clinical faculty retention, the perceptions and views of veterinary clinical academic faculty were determined using a web-distributed electronic survey. Responses were dichotomized by whether the respondent had or had not left an academic position and were analyzed for their association with faculty attrition. A total of 1,226 responses were recorded and results demonstrated that factors other than compensation were associated with veterinary clinical faculty attrition, including departmental culture, work-life balance, and recognition and support of clinical medicine by the administration. Forty-four percent of respondents who had held a faculty appointment reported leaving academia either voluntarily or for non-voluntary reasons such as failure to achieve tenure, retirement, or having their position closed. Attention to correcting deficiencies in workplace culture and professional rewards could be a beneficial means by which to decrease the faculty attrition rates currently observed in clinical academic veterinary medicine.

  4. Teaching Evaluations: Perceptions of Students and Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherji, Sandip; Rustagi, Narendra

    2008-01-01

    This study conducts a survey of students and faculty at a business school on critical issues regarding student evaluations of teaching and identifies several significant differences between their perceptions. Students agreed more strongly than faculty that evaluations are higher in courses where the instructor teaches effectively and students…

  5. Motivational Issues of Faculty in Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul Cader, Akram

    2012-01-01

    Researchers have suggested that faculty motivation influences profitability of academic programs. The problem researched in this mixed method study was the motivational factors that reduce faculty member effectiveness in improving the profitability of their universities' academic programs. Based on Maslow's theory of needs, the purpose of the…

  6. Aging in the Undergraduate Curriculum: Faculty Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyman, Janna C.; Gutheil, Irene A.; White-Ryan, Linda; Phipps, Colette; Guishard, Dozene

    2008-01-01

    This descriptive study of undergraduate faculty (N = 177) ascertained the extent to which aging content is taught and faculty are interested in aging. The research was the result of a collaboration among an area agency on aging, an alliance of academic and community leaders, and a university-based research center. While approximately 43% of the…

  7. Enhancing Sustainability Curricula through Faculty Learning Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natkin, L. W.; Kolbe, Tammy

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Although the number of higher education institutions adopting sustainability-focused faculty learning communities (FLCs) has grown, very few of these programs have published evaluation research. This paper aims to report findings from an evaluation of the University of Vermont's (UVM's) sustainability faculty fellows (SFF) program. It…

  8. The organisational aspect of faculty development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolmos, Anette; Gynnild, Vidar; Roxå, Torgny

    2004-01-01

    The article points out the faculty centres ought to be more conscious in their organisational strategies and get to managements support when working on pedagogical changes.......The article points out the faculty centres ought to be more conscious in their organisational strategies and get to managements support when working on pedagogical changes....

  9. A Service-Learning Curriculum for Faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bringle, Robert G.; Hatcher, Julie A.

    1995-01-01

    Suggests that higher education institutions should provide faculty development opportunities for service-learning that develop a common understanding on campus concerning the nature of service-learning, establish and maintain academic integrity of service-learning; increase faculty confidence in implementing a new pedagogy, and increase the…

  10. Harvard Law School's War over Faculty Diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromberg, Matthew S.

    1993-01-01

    Examines the controversy over the lack of faculty diversity at Harvard Law School and highlights the school's past practices regarding hiring and promotion of minority teaching staff. The pool problem issue is discussed, and the current status of faculty diversity is presented. (GLR)

  11. Faith and Faculty Autonomy at Calvin College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monsma, George N., Jr.

    2001-01-01

    Asserts that to prevent incursions on academic freedom, faculty members must make a strong commitment of time and expertise to institutional governance, and they must promote regulations and behavior that support academic freedom. Describes how the administration, faculty, and board of Calvin College, affiliated with the Christian Reformed Church,…

  12. Nursing Faculty: One Generation away from Extinction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brendtro, Mary; Hegge, Marge

    2000-01-01

    A statewide survey of 288 nurses with graduate degrees found that those were nursing faculty (n=79) were older than other nurses in the sample. There were no differences in job satisfaction between faculty and other nurses. Noncompetitive salaries, desire for clinical practice, and rising expectations in higher education were deterrents to…

  13. College Presidents' Role Performance and Faculty Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paxton, Dan R.; Thomas, Darwin L.

    1977-01-01

    Data gathered from 896 faculty members from two technical colleges, three community colleges, two private universities, and three public universities revealed three dimensions of the presidential role: personal-public image, faculty and student interaction with presidents, and absence of autocratic leadership style. (Author/LBH)

  14. Factors Explaining Faculty Technology Use and Productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yonghong; Meyer, Katrina A.

    2007-01-01

    This study examines factors related to technology use in teaching by university faculty. An EFA analysis of multiple questions of technology use in the classroom found two factors: one loaded with Web use and the second with email use. Therefore, three research questions were asked: What factors explain faculty use of the Web or email? Are these…

  15. Bullying and Inappropriate Behaviour among Faculty Personnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meriläinen, Matti; Sinkkonen, Hanna-Maija; Puhakka, Helena; Käyhkö, Katinka

    2016-01-01

    This study focuses on the degree, nature and consequences of bullying or inappropriate behaviour among faculty personnel (n = 303) in a Finnish university. A total of 114 (38%) faculty members answered the email questionnaire. According to the results, 15% of the respondents had experienced bullying; in addition, 45% had experienced inappropriate…

  16. The Madness of Weighted Mean Faculty Salaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micceri, Theodore

    2009-01-01

    Higher education frequently uses weighted mean faculty salaries to compare either across institutions, or to evaluate an institution's salary growth over time. Unfortunately, faculty salaries are an extraordinarily complex phenomenon that cannot be legitimately reduced to a single number any more than the academic construct of skills, knowledge,…

  17. Faculty Development: An Imperative for the Nineties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nies, Joyce I.

    1990-01-01

    Budget constraints and changing enrollment patterns have expanded the concept of faculty development to include retraining. In home economics, retraining faculty for high demand areas such as hotel/restaurant management and fashion merchandising can be an efficient use of resources and an effective way to meet demand. (SK)

  18. Information-Seeking Habits of Education Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupp-Serrano, Karen; Robbins, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    This study explores the information-seeking behavior of academic education faculty from twenty large public research universities. The investigation includes an examination of how frequently education faculty seek or access information, how they stay up-to-date on current developments in the field and identify less recent journal literature, how…

  19. Rising Tides: Faculty Expectations of Library Websites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicol, Erica Carlson; O'English, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Looking at 2003-2009 LibQUAL+ responses at research-oriented universities in the United States, faculty library users report a significant and consistent rise in desires and expectations for library-provided online tools and websites, even as student user groups show declining or leveling expectations. While faculty, like students, also report…

  20. Social Work Faculty and Undergraduate Research Mentorships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horner, Pilar S.; Hughes, Anne K.; Vélez Ortiz, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Social work faculty scholars lead the field as generators of knowledge that integrates investigative studies with practical social welfare outcomes. As such, the faculty potentially offers undergraduate researchers a different way of envisioning research that extends beyond traditional undergraduate research models. To date, however, no research…

  1. How to Evaluate a Faculty Governance Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordes, John W.; Dunbar, David; Gingerich, Jeff

    2013-01-01

    During the 2010-11 academic year, Cabrini College began an evaluation of a faculty governance structure that had been implemented in fall 2007. The processes involved might serve as a roadmap for faculty members and administrators at other institutions who seek to understand the strengths and weaknesses of their governance model and improve shared…

  2. Business Students' Ethical Evaluations of Faculty Misconduct

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentine, Sean; Kidwell, Roland E.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to gauge business school student perceptions of the academic conduct of college professors, to determine students' ethical evaluations of certain potential faculty behaviors. The relationships between perceived faculty misconduct and several student demographic characteristics including sex and academic classification were…

  3. Study of Faculty and Information Technology, 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlstrom, Eden; Brooks, D. Christopher

    2014-01-01

    In this inaugural year of the faculty technology study, EDUCAUSE Center for Analysis and Research (ECAR) partnered with 151 college/university sites yielding responses from 17,451 faculty respondents across 13 countries. The findings are exploratory in nature, as they cover new ground to help us tell a more comprehensive story about technology…

  4. AACSB Standards and Accounting Faculty's Intellectual Contributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, B. Brian; Quddus, Munir

    2008-01-01

    The authors performed a content analysis of intellectual contribution portfolios of accounting faculty at various business schools that Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business International recently accredited. The results showed a significant divergence in faculty research (e.g., areas, topics) and their teaching assignments. This…

  5. Confidentiality and Faculty Representation in Academic Governance

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Association of University Professors, 2013

    2013-01-01

    This report argues that requiring faculty members to sign confidentiality agreements as a requirement to serve on university committees is in most cases inconsistent with widely accepted standards of shared governance and with the concept of serving as a representative. This argument does not apply to faculty serving on promotion and tenure…

  6. Ethical Perspectives on Evaluating Community College Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stumpf, Dan; King, Stephanie; Blendinger, Jack; Davis, Ed

    2013-01-01

    Because the process of faculty evaluation in the community college gives rise to ethical concerns about what is evaluated, who is involved in the process, and how data are collected and used, the purpose of this paper is to provide a meaningful ethical perspective for conducting faculty evaluation. The authors discuss ethical issues that arise in…

  7. Engaging Faculty across the Community Engagement Continuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorski, Irena; Mehta, Khanjan

    2016-01-01

    There currently exists an incompatibility between the demands of university administrators for increased community engagement and the realities facing faculty who want to integrate it into their academic coursework, research, and professional service. This article provides insight on the complex challenges preventing faculty from becoming involved…

  8. Predicting Seminary Faculty Engagement with Multicultural Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gin, Deborah Hearn-Chung

    2012-01-01

    Most multicultural theological education research has focused on theoretical or historical pieces and only on a few institutions. This study explored the personal, professional, institutional, and interactional predictors of seminary faculty engagement with multicultural education. Three hundred full-time faculty in U.S. seminaries affiliated with…

  9. Student and Faculty Ethnic Diversity Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greiner, Keith; Girardi, Anthony G.

    2007-01-01

    The annual Ethnic Diversity Report provides information about minority student enrollment and minority faculty at Iowa colleges and universities. The "Student and Faculty Ethnic Diversity Report" has been prepared annually since 1992 and is provided to the Governor and General Assembly leadership. This summary is based on a Fall 2006…

  10. Senior Faculty Perceptions of Social Work Journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cnaan, Ram A.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    A survey of 421 senior faculty in graduate social work education investigated the familiarity and perceived quality of 120 professional journals in the field. Resulting ratings are presented for use by faculty seeking to publish their work in appropriate journals and those assessing the scholarly contribution of social work educators. (Author/MSE)

  11. Faculty on Facebook: Confirm or Deny?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturgeon, C. Michael; Walker, Christin

    2009-01-01

    Since its creation in 2004, Facebook has become one of the most frequently visited websites on college campuses. Because of this rise in popularity, the subject of social networking has grown as an idea and concern for both faculty members and students. At Lee University, it has been observed that a growing number of faculty members have indeed…

  12. Enhancing Sustainability Curricula through Faculty Learning Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natkin, L. W.; Kolbe, Tammy

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Although the number of higher education institutions adopting sustainability-focused faculty learning communities (FLCs) has grown, very few of these programs have published evaluation research. This paper aims to report findings from an evaluation of the University of Vermont's (UVM's) sustainability faculty fellows (SFF) program. It…

  13. Aging in the Undergraduate Curriculum: Faculty Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyman, Janna C.; Gutheil, Irene A.; White-Ryan, Linda; Phipps, Colette; Guishard, Dozene

    2008-01-01

    This descriptive study of undergraduate faculty (N = 177) ascertained the extent to which aging content is taught and faculty are interested in aging. The research was the result of a collaboration among an area agency on aging, an alliance of academic and community leaders, and a university-based research center. While approximately 43% of the…

  14. Faculty Development: An Imperative for the Nineties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nies, Joyce I.

    1990-01-01

    Budget constraints and changing enrollment patterns have expanded the concept of faculty development to include retraining. In home economics, retraining faculty for high demand areas such as hotel/restaurant management and fashion merchandising can be an efficient use of resources and an effective way to meet demand. (SK)

  15. Predicting Faculty Integration of Faith and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaul, Corina R.; Hardin, Kimberly A.; Beaujean, A. Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Concern regarding the secularization of Christian higher education has prompted researchers to investigate the extent that faith and learning is integrated at a faculty level and what factors might predict faculty integration (Lyon, Beaty, Parker, & Mencken, 2005). This research attempted to replicate Lyon et al.'s (2005) logistic regression…

  16. AACSB Standards and Accounting Faculty's Intellectual Contributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, B. Brian; Quddus, Munir

    2008-01-01

    The authors performed a content analysis of intellectual contribution portfolios of accounting faculty at various business schools that Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business International recently accredited. The results showed a significant divergence in faculty research (e.g., areas, topics) and their teaching assignments. This…

  17. Nursing Faculty Perceptions on Teaching Critical Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Doris A.

    2010-01-01

    The perceptions of nursing faculty teaching critical thinking (CT) affective attributes and cognitive skills are described in this quantitative, descriptive study. The study sample consisted of nurse educators from the National League of Nursing database. The purpose of the study was to gain nursing faculty perception of which teaching strategies…

  18. How to Evaluate a Faculty Governance Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordes, John W.; Dunbar, David; Gingerich, Jeff

    2013-01-01

    During the 2010-11 academic year, Cabrini College began an evaluation of a faculty governance structure that had been implemented in fall 2007. The processes involved might serve as a roadmap for faculty members and administrators at other institutions who seek to understand the strengths and weaknesses of their governance model and improve shared…

  19. Information-Seeking Habits of Education Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupp-Serrano, Karen; Robbins, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    This study explores the information-seeking behavior of academic education faculty from twenty large public research universities. The investigation includes an examination of how frequently education faculty seek or access information, how they stay up-to-date on current developments in the field and identify less recent journal literature, how…

  20. Faculty ethics: ideal principles with practical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reybold, L Earle

    2009-01-01

    Ethics in higher education is the subject of intense public attention, with considerable focus on faculty roles and responsibilities. Media reports and scholarly research have documented egregious misconduct that includes plagiarism, falsification of data, illicit teacher-student relationships, and grading bias. These accounts of wrongdoing often portray faculty ethicality as only a legal issue of obeying rules and regulations, especially in the teaching and research roles. My discussion challenges this narrow perspective and argues that characterizations of faculty ethicality should take into account broader expectations for professionalism such as collegiality, respect, and freedom of inquiry. First, I review the general principles of faculty ethics developed by the American Association of University Professors, as well as professional codes of ethics in specific professional fields. Second, I juxtapose the experiences of women and minority faculty members in relation to these general codes of ethics. This section examines three issues that particularly affect women and minority faculty experiences of ethicality: "chilly and alienating" academic climates, "cultural taxation" of minority identity, and the snare of conventional reward systems. Third, I suggest practical strategies to reconcile faculty practice with codes of ethics. My challenge is to the faculty as a community of practice to engage professional ethics as social and political events, not just legal and moral failures.