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Sample records for factors underlying complex

  1. L2 Speaking Development during Study Abroad: Fluency, Accuracy, Complexity, and Underlying Cognitive Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Karen Ruth; Shea, Christine E.

    2017-01-01

    We take a multidimensional perspective on the development of second language (L2) speaking ability and examine how changes in the underlying cognitive variables of linguistic knowledge and processing speed interact with complexity, fluency, and accuracy over the course of a 3-month Spanish study abroad session. Study abroad provides a unique…

  2. Biological factors underlying regularity and chaos in aquatic ecosystems: Simple models of complex dynamics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A B Medvinsky; S V Petrovskii; D A Tikhonov; I A Tikhonova; G R Ivanitsky; E Venturino; H Malchow

    2001-03-01

    This work is focused on the processes underlying the dynamics of spatially inhomogeneous plankton communities. We demonstrate that reaction—diffusion mathematical models are an appropriate tool for searching and understanding basic mechanisms of complex spatio-temporal plankton dynamics and fractal properties of planktivorous fish school walks.

  3. EEG disorder in patients with complex febrile convulsion and underlying risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitra Hemmati

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Febrile seizures are the most common convulsion disorder in childhood. The possible risk of developing epilepsy in febrile seizures is about 2-10%. EEG is helpful to diagnose epilepsy; however, there are controversies about the abnormal EEG and associated risk factors .The aim of this study was to determine EEG abnormality and effective risk factors in patients with complex febrile seizures. Methods: This study was conducted on the patients with complex febrile seizures in 2009-2010.EEG was performed on all children 6 to 10 days after seizure and reported by a neurologist. Demographic data and risk factors, including age, sex, family history of epilepsy and febrile convulsions, presentation of seizure, postictal neurological disorder were documented by a checklist and their association with EEG was analyzed. Results: 111 patients with complex febrile seizure, 70 girls and 41 boys, with the mean age of 3.4±20 months were studied. EEG was abnormal in 37.8% of patients, 9% were epileptic form abnormality and 28.8% were nonspecific abnormal. There was a statistically significant association between EEG abnormality in patients with focal seizures, family history of febrile seizures and postictal neurologic disorder (p<0.05. Conclusion: The results of this study showed abnormality of EEG in complex febrile convulsions in 37.8% of patients, which was significantly higher in patients with postictal neurological disorder, focal seizures and family history of febrile seizure.

  4. Complex Interactions of Factors Underlying Thai EFL Learners' Willingness to Communicate in English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattapong, Kamlaitip

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores factors contributing to the willingness to communicate (WTC) in English as a foreign language (L2) in a Thai university setting. The study uses multiple methods within a qualitative research approach. Data were collected through interviews, stimulated recall, and classroom observations. Relevant contextually-related variables…

  5. Complex Interfaces Under Change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosbjerg, Dan

    and mechanical processes that develop within this structure. Water-related processes at the interfaces between the compartments are complex, depending both on the interface itself, and on the characteristics of the interfaced compartments. Various aspects of global change directly or indirectly impact...

  6. Neural mechanisms underlying breathing complexity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agathe Hess

    Full Text Available Breathing is maintained and controlled by a network of automatic neurons in the brainstem that generate respiratory rhythm and receive regulatory inputs. Breathing complexity therefore arises from respiratory central pattern generators modulated by peripheral and supra-spinal inputs. Very little is known on the brainstem neural substrates underlying breathing complexity in humans. We used both experimental and theoretical approaches to decipher these mechanisms in healthy humans and patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. COPD is the most frequent chronic lung disease in the general population mainly due to tobacco smoke. In patients, airflow obstruction associated with hyperinflation and respiratory muscles weakness are key factors contributing to load-capacity imbalance and hence increased respiratory drive. Unexpectedly, we found that the patients breathed with a higher level of complexity during inspiration and expiration than controls. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI, we scanned the brain of the participants to analyze the activity of two small regions involved in respiratory rhythmogenesis, the rostral ventro-lateral (VL medulla (pre-Bötzinger complex and the caudal VL pons (parafacial group. fMRI revealed in controls higher activity of the VL medulla suggesting active inspiration, while in patients higher activity of the VL pons suggesting active expiration. COPD patients reactivate the parafacial to sustain ventilation. These findings may be involved in the onset of respiratory failure when the neural network becomes overwhelmed by respiratory overload We show that central neural activity correlates with airflow complexity in healthy subjects and COPD patients, at rest and during inspiratory loading. We finally used a theoretical approach of respiratory rhythmogenesis that reproduces the kernel activity of neurons involved in the automatic breathing. The model reveals how a chaotic activity in

  7. Identification of complexity cost factors in manufacturing companies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Myrodia, Anna; Hvam, Lars

    2015-01-01

    . This research focuses on the relation between product and process complexity. Complexity cost factors are identified and categorized under the industrial standard APQC for process classification. Then, this categorization is used as a tool for identification of complexity cost factors in seven companies......Complexity tends to be arguably the biggest challenge of manufacturing companies. As the demand from the customers increases in volume and diversity, the number of finished products and components increases as well. This increasing product complexity has a direct effect on the production processes...

  8. Barrier experiment: Shock initiation under complex loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menikoff, Ralph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-01-12

    The barrier experiments are a variant of the gap test; a detonation wave in a donor HE impacts a barrier and drives a shock wave into an acceptor HE. The question we ask is: What is the trade-off between the barrier material and threshold barrier thickness to prevent the acceptor from detonating. This can be viewed from the perspective of shock initiation of the acceptor subject to a complex pressure drive condition. Here we consider key factors which affect whether or not the acceptor undergoes a shock-to-detonation transition. These include the following: shock impedance matches for the donor detonation wave into the barrier and then the barrier shock into the acceptor, the pressure gradient behind the donor detonation wave, and the curvature of detonation front in the donor. Numerical simulations are used to illustrate how these factors affect the reaction in the acceptor.

  9. Face Detection under Complex Background and Illumination

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shao-Dong Lv; Yong-Duan Song; Mei Xu; Cong-Ying Huang

    2015-01-01

    Abstract⎯For face detection under complex background and illumination, a detection method that combines the skin color segmentation and cost-sensitive Adaboost algorithm is proposed in this paper. First, by using the characteristic of human skin color clustering in the color space, the skin color area inYCbCr color space is extracted and a large number of irrelevant backgrounds are excluded; then for remedyingthe deficiencies of Adaboost algorithm, the cost-sensitive function is introduced into the Adaboost algorithm; finally the skin color segmentation and cost-sensitive Adaboost algorithm are combined for the face detection. Experimental results show that the proposed detection method has a higher detection rate and detection speed, which can more adapt to the actual field environment.

  10. Psychosocial factors underlying physical activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Cheng-Ye

    2007-09-01

    of physical activity on academic achievement and other factors beyond physical health; barriers of not having enough time and having too many assignments perceived to hinder frequent physical activity; and parental approval. More rigorous research on psychosocial determinants with close-ended items developed from these open-ended data and with larger sample sizes of students is necessary. Research with parents and school staff will be needed to understand the perceptions of these stakeholder groups key to creating the students' social environment.

  11. Stability of extremal metrics under complex deformations

    CERN Document Server

    Rollin, Yann; Tipler, Carl

    2011-01-01

    Let $(\\mathcal {X},\\Omega)$ be a closed polarized complex manifold, $g$ be an extremal metric on $\\mathcal X$ that represents the K\\"ahler class $\\Omega$, and $G$ be a compact connected subgroup of the isometry group $Isom(\\mathcal{X},g)$. Assume that the Futaki invariant relative to $G$ is nondegenerate at $g$. Consider a smooth family $(\\mathcal{M}\\to B)$ of polarized complex deformations of $(\\mathcal{X},\\Omega)\\simeq (\\mathcal{M}_0,\\Theta_0)$ provided with a holomorphic action of $G$. Then for every $t\\in B$ sufficiently small, there exists an $h^{1,1}(\\cX)$-dimensional family of extremal K\\"ahler metrics on $\\mathcal{M}_t$ whose K\\"ahler classes are arbitrarily close to $\\Theta_t$. We apply this deformation theory to analyze the Mukai-Umemura 3-fold and its complex deformations. In particular, we prove that there are certain complex deformation of the Mukai-Umemura 3-folds which have extremal metric of non constant scalar curvature with Kaehler class $c_1$.

  12. Traffic Control Under Complex Weather Conditions in Suining Airport

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕维峰

    2014-01-01

    Complex weather conditions is meaning thunderstorm freezing turbulence wind-shear low visibility weather affect the flight safety. When confronted with complex weather conditions,the controllers should know the weather condition and trend weather,and notify the aircraft under your control zone.The controllers provide the required services to the pilots,help the pilots to avoid the complex weather.In this paper, through different complex weathers under different control command,get the different methods of control.

  13. Dissecting the genomic complexity underlying medulloblastoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jones, David T W; Jäger, Natalie; Kool, Marcel

    2012-01-01

    a favourable prognosis under current treatment regimens. SHH tumours show hedgehog pathway activation, and have an intermediate prognosis. Group 3 and 4 tumours are molecularly less well characterized, and also present the greatest clinical challenges. The full repertoire of genetic events driving...

  14. Enhancement of FSO communications links under complex environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alnajjar, Satea H.; Noori, Ammar A.; Moosa, Arwa A.

    2017-06-01

    Free space optical communication is a line-of-sight (LOS) technology that uses lasers to provide optical bandwidth connections. Potential disturbance arising from the weather condition is one of the most effective factors that influence the bi-directional free space optics (FSO) performance. The complex weather condition in the Middle East region and Arabian Gulf has been dominated by dust storms activities. Dust storms directly affect the characteristics of FSO and consequently lead to an increase in the bit error rate (BER) and deterioration Q-factor to bad levels due to the high attenuation factor. In this research, the authors compare the differences between two bi-directional FSOs. One is the traditional link, and the other has been developed to enhance the system performance under the dust storms condition. The proposed design consists of dual FSO channels, and each one includes erbium-doped fiber amplifier (EDFA) optical amplifiers. This design has demonstrated the proficiency in addressing the attenuation that occurs due to weather stickers. The results prove there is an improvement in performance by measuring the Q-factor. In addition, BER can be significantly improved, and further communicating distance can be achieved by utilizing 1550 nm with multiple channels and EDFA.

  15. Enhancement of FSO communications links under complex environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alnajjar, Satea H.; Noori, Ammar A.; Moosa, Arwa A.

    2017-03-01

    Free space optical communication is a line-of-sight (LOS) technology that uses lasers to provide optical bandwidth connections. Potential disturbance arising from the weather condition is one of the most effective factors that influence the bi-directional free space optics (FSO) performance. The complex weather condition in the Middle East region and Arabian Gulf has been dominated by dust storms activities. Dust storms directly affect the characteristics of FSO and consequently lead to an increase in the bit error rate (BER) and deterioration Q-factor to bad levels due to the high attenuation factor. In this research, the authors compare the differences between two bi-directional FSOs. One is the traditional link, and the other has been developed to enhance the system performance under the dust storms condition. The proposed design consists of dual FSO channels, and each one includes erbium-doped fiber amplifier (EDFA) optical amplifiers. This design has demonstrated the proficiency in addressing the attenuation that occurs due to weather stickers. The results prove there is an improvement in performance by measuring the Q-factor. In addition, BER can be significantly improved, and further communicating distance can be achieved by utilizing 1550 nm with multiple channels and EDFA.

  16. Factor structure underlying components of allostatic load.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanne M McCaffery

    Full Text Available Allostatic load is a commonly used metric of health risk based on the hypothesis that recurrent exposure to environmental demands (e.g., stress engenders a progressive dysregulation of multiple physiological systems. Prominent indicators of response to environmental challenges, such as stress-related hormones, sympatho-vagal balance, or inflammatory cytokines, comprise primary allostatic mediators. Secondary mediators reflect ensuing biological alterations that accumulate over time and confer risk for clinical disease but overlap substantially with a second metric of health risk, the metabolic syndrome. Whether allostatic load mediators covary and thus warrant treatment as a unitary construct remains to be established and, in particular, the relation of allostatic load parameters to the metabolic syndrome requires elucidation. Here, we employ confirmatory factor analysis to test: 1 whether a single common factor underlies variation in physiological systems associated with allostatic load; and 2 whether allostatic load parameters continue to load on a single common factor if a second factor representing the metabolic syndrome is also modeled. Participants were 645 adults from Allegheny County, PA (30-54 years old, 82% non-Hispanic white, 52% female who were free of confounding medications. Model fitting supported a single, second-order factor underlying variance in the allostatic load components available in this study (metabolic, inflammatory and vagal measures. Further, this common factor reflecting covariation among allostatic load components persisted when a latent factor representing metabolic syndrome facets was conjointly modeled. Overall, this study provides novel evidence that the modeled allostatic load components do share common variance as hypothesized. Moreover, the common variance suggests the existence of statistical coherence above and beyond that attributable to the metabolic syndrome.

  17. Revisiting the Factors Underlying Maxillary Midline Diastema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah M. Zakria Jaija

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The aim of this study is to analyze the etiological factors underlying the presence of maxillary midline diastema in a sample of orthodontic patients. Materials and Methods. One hundred patients who fulfill the inclusion criteria were selected from 1355 patients seeking orthodontic treatment. The pretreatment orthodontic records were analyzed. The width of the maxillary midline diastema was measured clinically with a digital caliper at two levels: the mesioincisal angles of the central incisors and five millimeters from the incisal edge. The two measurements were averaged, and patients with diastema of more than 0.5 millimeter in width were enrolled. Results. Diastema is a multifactorial clinical finding with more than one underlying etiological cause. The interrelationship between the familial pattern of midline diastema and the microdontia, macroglossia, labial frenum, and alveolar cleft conforms was clear. The effect of a mesiodens and the upper lateral incisor whether bilaterally missing, unerupted, or peg shaped was minimal. Conclusion. Etiological factors underlying maxillary midline diastema are interconnected. Using a checklist as a guide during handling maxillary midline diastema is important in the different stages of treatment.

  18. Revisiting the Factors Underlying Maxillary Midline Diastema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaija, Abdullah M Zakria; El-Beialy, Amr Ragab; Mostafa, Yehya A

    2016-01-01

    Aim. The aim of this study is to analyze the etiological factors underlying the presence of maxillary midline diastema in a sample of orthodontic patients. Materials and Methods. One hundred patients who fulfill the inclusion criteria were selected from 1355 patients seeking orthodontic treatment. The pretreatment orthodontic records were analyzed. The width of the maxillary midline diastema was measured clinically with a digital caliper at two levels: the mesioincisal angles of the central incisors and five millimeters from the incisal edge. The two measurements were averaged, and patients with diastema of more than 0.5 millimeter in width were enrolled. Results. Diastema is a multifactorial clinical finding with more than one underlying etiological cause. The interrelationship between the familial pattern of midline diastema and the microdontia, macroglossia, labial frenum, and alveolar cleft conforms was clear. The effect of a mesiodens and the upper lateral incisor whether bilaterally missing, unerupted, or peg shaped was minimal. Conclusion. Etiological factors underlying maxillary midline diastema are interconnected. Using a checklist as a guide during handling maxillary midline diastema is important in the different stages of treatment.

  19. Scope Complexity Options Risks Excursions (SCORE) Factor Mathematical Description.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gearhart, Jared Lee [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Samberson, Jonell Nicole [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Shettigar, Subhasini [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jungels, John [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Welch, Kimberly M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jones, Dean A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of the Scope, Complexity, Options, Risks, Excursions (SCORE) model is to estimate the relative complexity of design variants of future warhead options, resulting in scores. SCORE factors extend this capability by providing estimates of complexity relative to a base system (i.e., all design options are normalized to one weapon system). First, a clearly defined set of scope elements for a warhead option is established. The complexity of each scope element is estimated by Subject Matter Experts (SMEs), including a level of uncertainty, relative to a specific reference system. When determining factors, complexity estimates for a scope element can be directly tied to the base system or chained together via comparable scope elements in a string of reference systems that ends with the base system. The SCORE analysis process is a growing multi-organizational Nuclear Security Enterprise (NSE) effort, under the management of the NA-12 led Enterprise Modeling and Analysis Consortium (EMAC). Historically, it has provided the data elicitation, integration, and computation needed to support the out-year Life Extension Program (LEP) cost estimates included in the Stockpile Stewardship Management Plan (SSMP).

  20. Factors Determining Nestedness in Complex Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonhson, Samuel; Domínguez-García, Virginia; Muñoz, Miguel A.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the causes and effects of network structural features is a key task in deciphering complex systems. In this context, the property of network nestedness has aroused a fair amount of interest as regards ecological networks. Indeed, Bastolla et al. introduced a simple measure of network nestedness which opened the door to analytical understanding, allowing them to conclude that biodiversity is strongly enhanced in highly nested mutualistic networks. Here, we suggest a slightly refined version of such a measure of nestedness and study how it is influenced by the most basic structural properties of networks, such as degree distribution and degree-degree correlations (i.e. assortativity). We find that most of the empirically found nestedness stems from heterogeneity in the degree distribution. Once such an influence has been discounted – as a second factor – we find that nestedness is strongly correlated with disassortativity and hence – as random networks have been recently found to be naturally disassortative – they also tend to be naturally nested just as the result of chance. PMID:24069264

  1. Molecular mechanism underlying RAG1/RAG2 synaptic complex formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shlyakhtenko, Luda S; Gilmore, Jamie; Kriatchko, Aleksei N; Kumar, Sushil; Swanson, Patrick C; Lyubchenko, Yuri L

    2009-07-31

    Two lymphoid cell-specific proteins, RAG1 and RAG2 (RAG), initiate V(D)J recombination by assembling a synaptic complex with recombination signal sequences (RSSs) abutting two different antigen receptor gene coding segments, and then introducing a DNA double strand break at the end of each RSS. Despite the biological importance of this system, the structure of the synaptic complex, and the RAG protein stoichiometry and arrangement of DNA within the synaptosome, remains poorly understood. Here we applied atomic force microscopy to directly visualize and characterize RAG synaptic complexes. We report that the pre-cleavage RAG synaptic complex contains about twice the protein content as a RAG complex bound to a single RSS, with a calculated mass consistent with a pair of RAG heterotetramers. In the synaptic complex, the RSSs are predominantly oriented in a side-by-side configuration with no DNA strand crossover. The mass of the synaptic complex, and the conditions under which it is formed in vitro, favors an association model of assembly in which isolated RAG-RSS complexes undergo synapsis mediated by RAG protein-protein interactions. The replacement of Mg2+ cations with Ca2+ leads to a dramatic change in protein stoichiometry for all RAG-RSS complexes, suggesting that the cation composition profoundly influences the type of complex assembled.

  2. Molecular Mechanism Underlying RAG1/RAG2 Synaptic Complex Formation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shlyakhtenko, Luda S.; Gilmore, Jamie; Kriatchko, Aleksei N.; Kumar, Sushil; Swanson, Patrick C.; Lyubchenko, Yuri L.

    2009-01-01

    Two lymphoid cell-specific proteins, RAG1 and RAG2 (RAG), initiate V(D)J recombination by assembling a synaptic complex with recombination signal sequences (RSSs) abutting two different antigen receptor gene coding segments, and then introducing a DNA double strand break at the end of each RSS. Despite the biological importance of this system, the structure of the synaptic complex, and the RAG protein stoichiometry and arrangement of DNA within the synaptosome, remains poorly understood. Here we applied atomic force microscopy to directly visualize and characterize RAG synaptic complexes. We report that the pre-cleavage RAG synaptic complex contains about twice the protein content as a RAG complex bound to a single RSS, with a calculated mass consistent with a pair of RAG heterotetramers. In the synaptic complex, the RSSs are predominantly oriented in a side-by-side configuration with no DNA strand crossover. The mass of the synaptic complex, and the conditions under which it is formed in vitro, favors an association model of assembly in which isolated RAG-RSS complexes undergo synapsis mediated by RAG protein-protein interactions. The replacement of Mg2+ cations with Ca2+ leads to a dramatic change in protein stoichiometry for all RAG-RSS complexes, suggesting that the cation composition profoundly influences the type of complex assembled. PMID:19502597

  3. Robustness of Complex Networks under Attack and Repair

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Bin; LI Fang; ZHOU Hou-Shun

    2009-01-01

    To study the robustness of complex networks under attack and repair,we introduce a repair model of complex networks.Based on the model,we introduce two new quantities,i.e.attack fraction f_a and the maximum degree of the nodes that have never been attacked K_a,to study analytically the critical attack fraction and the relati ve size of the giant component of complex networks under attack and repair,using the method of generating function.We show analytically and numerically that the repair strategy significantly enhances the robustness of the scale-free network and the effect of robustness improvement is better for the scale-free networks with a smaller degree exponent.We discuss the application of our theory in relation to the understanding of robustness of complex networks with reparability.

  4. Optimal restructuring strategies under various dynamic factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MENG Qing-xuan

    2007-01-01

    Corporate restructuring was identified as a new industrial force that has great impact on economic values and that therefore has become central in daily financial decision making. This article investigates the optimal restructuring strategies under different dynamic factors and their numerous impacts on firm value. The concept of quasi-leverage is introduced and valuation models are built for corporate debt and equity under imperfect market conditions. The model's input variables include the quasi-leverage and other firm-specific parameters, the output variables include multiple corporate security values. The restructuring cost is formulated in the form of exponential function, which allows us to observe the sensitivity of the variation in security values. The unified model and its analytical solution developed in this research allow us to examine the continuous changes of security values by dynamically changing the coupon rates, riskless interest rate, bankruptcy cost, quasi-leverage, personal tax rate, corporate taxes rate, transaction cost, firm risk, etc., so that the solutions provide useful guidance for financing and restructuring decisions.

  5. Modeling the propagation of mobile phone virus under complex network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wei; Wei, Xi-liang; Guo, Hao; An, Gang; Guo, Lei; Yao, Yu

    2014-01-01

    Mobile phone virus is a rogue program written to propagate from one phone to another, which can take control of a mobile device by exploiting its vulnerabilities. In this paper the propagation model of mobile phone virus is tackled to understand how particular factors can affect its propagation and design effective containment strategies to suppress mobile phone virus. Two different propagation models of mobile phone viruses under the complex network are proposed in this paper. One is intended to describe the propagation of user-tricking virus, and the other is to describe the propagation of the vulnerability-exploiting virus. Based on the traditional epidemic models, the characteristics of mobile phone viruses and the network topology structure are incorporated into our models. A detailed analysis is conducted to analyze the propagation models. Through analysis, the stable infection-free equilibrium point and the stability condition are derived. Finally, considering the network topology, the numerical and simulation experiments are carried out. Results indicate that both models are correct and suitable for describing the spread of two different mobile phone viruses, respectively.

  6. Probabilistic Multi-Factor Interaction Model for Complex Material Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abumeri, Galib H.; Chamis, Christos C.

    2010-01-01

    Complex material behavior is represented by a single equation of product form to account for interaction among the various factors. The factors are selected by the physics of the problem and the environment that the model is to represent. For example, different factors will be required for each to represent temperature, moisture, erosion, corrosion, etc. It is important that the equation represent the physics of the behavior in its entirety accurately. The Multi-Factor Interaction Model (MFIM) is used to evaluate the divot weight (foam weight ejected) from the external launch tanks. The multi-factor has sufficient degrees of freedom to evaluate a large number of factors that may contribute to the divot ejection. It also accommodates all interactions by its product form. Each factor has an exponent that satisfies only two points - the initial and final points. The exponent describes a monotonic path from the initial condition to the final. The exponent values are selected so that the described path makes sense in the absence of experimental data. In the present investigation, the data used were obtained by testing simulated specimens in launching conditions. Results show that the MFIM is an effective method of describing the divot weight ejected under the conditions investigated. The problem lies in how to represent the divot weight with a single equation. A unique solution to this problem is a multi-factor equation of product form. Each factor is of the following form (1 xi/xf)ei, where xi is the initial value, usually at ambient conditions, xf the final value, and ei the exponent that makes the curve represented unimodal that meets the initial and final values. The exponents are either evaluated by test data or by technical judgment. A minor disadvantage may be the selection of exponents in the absence of any empirical data. This form has been used successfully in describing the foam ejected in simulated space environmental conditions. Seven factors were required

  7. Structure Under the Bushveld Complex, South Africa from Receiver Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, B. A.

    2015-12-01

    The Bushveld Igneous Complex (BIC) is the largest layered mafic intrusion on Earth and formed within Transvaal Basin in South Africa. The hypothesis that the limbs of the Rustenburg layer of the BIC are connected at depth is tested using teleseimic events of Mw > 5.5 to provide data under a seismic station (receiver) in the western limb of the BIC. Receiver functions have been computed from the data in order to image the layering under the Bushveld Complex. The receiver functions show discrete arrivals from the mafic layers, the Transvaal sediments under the BIC, and the Mohorovicic discontinuity at the base of the crust.. An interactive forward modeling method has been used to model the receiver functions in order to estimate the thickness of the BIC and the crust. Results show a BIC that is about 5-8 km thick and a Moho at ~40 km depth.

  8. Underlying Factors for Practicality of the Production Control Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arica, Emrah; Strandhagen, Jan Ola; Hvolby, Hans-Henrik

    2012-01-01

    This paper gives indications to important factors that must be considered for effectiveness of the production control systems under uncertainty. Five key factors have been identified by the literature study. Production schedule generation and execution approach under uncertainty, information...

  9. Fundamental Complex Plasma Research on Ground and under Microgravity Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Hubertus; Fortov, Vladimir; Thoma, Markus; Pustylnik, Mikhail; Lipaev, Andrey; Morfill, Gregor; Molotkov, Vladimir; Usachev, Alexander; Nosenko, Vladimir; Fink, Martin; Petrov, Oleg; Rubin-Zuzic, Milenko

    2016-07-01

    Complex (dusty) plasma is plasma containing small solid particles in the sub-mm range. Those "dust" particles are highly charged due to the collection of electrons and ions and they interact electrostatically. Depending on the charge, density, and kinetic temperature of the particles, the interaction may be strong leading to collective effects and the emergence of liquid or solid behavior. In that sense complex plasmas are perfect model systems for the investigation of fundamental processes in classical condensed matter physics since their constituent mesoscopic particles are individually observable and can be regarded as classically interacting "proxy atoms". The term "complex plasmas" is widely used in the literature to distinguish dusty plasmas composed of a weakly ionized gas and charged microparticles specially "designed" for investigations in classical condensed matter, from naturally occurring systems. Gravity influences the complex plasma, the microparticles sediment and stable systems can only be achieved through counteracting gravity with other volume forces, e.g. electric or thermophoretic force. This allows producing two-dimensional - monolayer - systems, or three-dimensional systems under stress. Only under weightlessness conditions, large and homogeneous 3D systems can be formed. Although phenomena in classical condensed matter physics are in the forefront of complex plasma research the basic know-how gained from experiments, theory and numerical simulations can be of importance for the understanding of naturally occurring dusty plasmas in space. Thus, in this presentation I will show recent work on complex plasmas from the ground and first results from the PK-4 facility onboard the International Space Station ISS. Acknowledgements: We would like to acknowledge the joint ESA-ROSCOSMOS Experiment «Plasma Kristall-4» onboard the International Space Station ISS. This work is partly supported by DLR grant 50WM1441/ 50WM1442 and by the Russian Science

  10. Metabolic Factors and Chronic Hepatitis C: A Complex Interplay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Salvatore Macaluso

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last years, several lines of evidence showed how metabolic factors may influence the natural history of patients with chronic hepatitis C. Chronic HCV infection is able to perturb the metabolic homeostasis of the host, in a context of complex interactions where pre-existent metabolic status and genetic background play an important role, allowing us to state that HCV infection is a systemic disease. In this review, we discuss the most recent lines of evidence on the main metabolic factors that are known to be associated with CHC, namely, insulin resistance/type 2 diabetes, steatosis, visceral obesity, atherosclerosis, vitamin D, menopause, fructose and coffee intake, lipoproteins, methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase status, and hyperuricaemia. In particular, we focus on the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the correlation between HCV infection and metabolic disorders, the impact of metabolic factors on the progression of liver and non-liver-related diseases, and, on the contrary, the possible influence of chronic HCV infection on metabolic features. In this setting, the importance of a multifaceted evaluation of CHC patients and a prompt correction of modifiable metabolic risk factors should be emphasized.

  11. Factors determining nestedness in complex networks

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, Samuel; Munoz, Miguel A

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the causes and effects of network structural features is a key task in deciphering complex systems. In this context, the property of network nestedness has aroused a fair amount of interest as regards ecological networks. Indeed, Bastolla et al. introduced a simple measure of network nestedness which opened the door to analytical understanding, allowing them to conclude that biodiversity is strongly enhanced in highly nested mutualistic networks. Here, we suggest a slightly refined version of such a measure and go on to study how it is influenced by the most basic structural properties of networks, such as degree distribution and degree-degree correlations (i.e. assortativity). We find that heterogeneity in the degree has a very strong influence on nestedness. Once such an influence has been discounted, we find that nestedness is strongly correlated with disassortativity and hence, as random (neutral) networks have been recently found to be naturally disassortative, they tend to be naturally nes...

  12. Personality factors underlying suicidal behavior among military youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltaninejad, Abdollah; Fathi-Ashtiani, Ali; Ahmadi, Khodabakhsh; Mirsharafoddini, Hediye Sadat; Nikmorad, Alireza; Pilevarzadeh, Motahare

    2014-04-01

    Suicidal behavior is one the most significant mental health problems in the military. Militaries are closed systems that operate in particular situations. Military service is associated with certain stressful conditions. On this basis, there is likely of trauma in the military environment. Measures of suicidal behavior are pathologically complex. A range of biological, psychological, social, and institutional factors are involved in the incidence and prevalence of these behaviors. One of the underlying factors in suicidal behavior is individuals' personality. The study population comprised of the Iranian Armed Forces. To recruit the sample of the research, 1659 soldiers were selected by multistage sampling. Data were collected using the Beck Scale for Suicide Ideation (BSSI) and NEO-Five Factor Inventory. There was a significant positive correlation (r = 0.323) between neuroticism and suicide ideation; however, significant negative correlations existed between three other personality traits --extraversion [r = -0.306], agreeableness [r = -0.227], and conscientiousness [r = -0.271] and suicidal ideation. Unlike neuroticism, extraversion and conscientiousness personality factors could reduce significantly (as much 14% as are predicted) levels of suicidal ideation. Based on these results, neuroticism might increase suicide, but extraversion and conscientiousness personality traits are associated with a reduced risk of suicide.

  13. Personality Factors Underlying Suicidal Behavior Among Military Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltaninejad, Abdollah; Fathi-Ashtiani, Ali; Ahmadi, Khodabakhsh; Mirsharafoddini, Hediye Sadat; Nikmorad, Alireza; Pilevarzadeh, Motahare

    2014-01-01

    Background: Suicidal behavior is one the most significant mental health problems in the military. Militaries are closed systems that operate in particular situations. Military service is associated with certain stressful conditions. On this basis, there is likely of trauma in the military environment. Measures of suicidal behavior are pathologically complex. A range of biological, psychological, social, and institutional factors are involved in the incidence and prevalence of these behaviors. Objectives: One of the underlying factors in suicidal behavior is individuals' personality. Patients and Methods: The study population comprised of the Iranian Armed Forces. To recruit the sample of the research, 1659 soldiers were selected by multistage sampling. Data were collected using the Beck Scale for Suicide Ideation (BSSI) and NEO-Five Factor Inventory. Results: There was a significant positive correlation (r = 0.323) between neuroticism and suicide ideation; however, significant negative correlations existed between three other personality traits --extraversion [r = -0.306], agreeableness [r = -0.227], and conscientiousness [r = -0.271] and suicidal ideation. Unlike neuroticism, extraversion and conscientiousness personality factors could reduce significantly (as much 14% as are predicted) levels of suicidal ideation. Conclusions: Based on these results, neuroticism might increase suicide, but extraversion and conscientiousness personality traits are associated with a reduced risk of suicide. PMID:24910793

  14. Patient complexity and GPs' income under mixed remuneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, K R

    2012-06-01

    Because of problems with recruiting GPs to deprived areas in Denmark, it has been discussed whether the mixed remuneration scheme is flexible enough to compensate GPs serving patients with high need for services. The objective is to assess how patient heterogeneity affects list size, income and total utility of GPs operating under a mixed remuneration scheme. We adapt the model by Iversen (2004) as a theoretical framework for analysing the consequences of patient heterogeneity in a mixed remuneration system. We use a data set of Danish solo practitioners to analyse the effect of patient complexity on list size and income. From the theoretical model we find that higher levels of patient complexity lead GPs to choose a lower list size, whereas the effect on income is ambiguous. The effect on total utility (income and leisure) is, however, shown to be negative. Using empirical data from 1039 solo practices we find that patient complexity reduces both list size and income and conclude that a mixed per capita and fee for service remuneration system does not fully compensate practices with more complex patients. Differentiated per capita payment may represent a means of ensuring fair and equal income of GPs.

  15. Molecular Signatures of Membrane Protein Complexes Underlying Muscular Dystrophy*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turk, Rolf; Hsiao, Jordy J.; Smits, Melinda M.; Ng, Brandon H.; Pospisil, Tyler C.; Jones, Kayla S.; Campbell, Kevin P.; Wright, Michael E.

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in genes encoding components of the sarcolemmal dystrophin-glycoprotein complex (DGC) are responsible for a large number of muscular dystrophies. As such, molecular dissection of the DGC is expected to both reveal pathological mechanisms, and provides a biological framework for validating new DGC components. Establishment of the molecular composition of plasma-membrane protein complexes has been hampered by a lack of suitable biochemical approaches. Here we present an analytical workflow based upon the principles of protein correlation profiling that has enabled us to model the molecular composition of the DGC in mouse skeletal muscle. We also report our analysis of protein complexes in mice harboring mutations in DGC components. Bioinformatic analyses suggested that cell-adhesion pathways were under the transcriptional control of NFκB in DGC mutant mice, which is a finding that is supported by previous studies that showed NFκB-regulated pathways underlie the pathophysiology of DGC-related muscular dystrophies. Moreover, the bioinformatic analyses suggested that inflammatory and compensatory mechanisms were activated in skeletal muscle of DGC mutant mice. Additionally, this proteomic study provides a molecular framework to refine our understanding of the DGC, identification of protein biomarkers of neuromuscular disease, and pharmacological interrogation of the DGC in adult skeletal muscle https://www.mda.org/disease/congenital-muscular-dystrophy/research. PMID:27099343

  16. Sensitivity to Factors Underlying the Hiatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marvel, Kate; Schmidt, Gavin A.; Tsigaridis, Kostas; Cook, Benjamin I.

    2015-01-01

    Recent trends in global mean surface air temperature fall outside the 90 range predicted by models using the CMIP5 forcings and scenarios; this recent period of muted warming is dubbed the hiatus. The hiatus has attracted broad attention in both the popular press and the scientific literature, primarily because of its perceived implications for understanding long-term trends. Many hypotheses have been offered to explain the warming slowdown during the hiatus, and comprehensive studies of this period across multiple variables and spatial scales will likely improve our understanding of the physical mechanisms driving global temperature change and variability.We argue, however, that decadal temperature trends by themselves are unlikely to constrain future trajectories of global mean temperature and that the hiatus does not significantly revise our understanding of overall climate sensitivity. Instead, we demonstrate that, because of the poorly constrained nature of the hiatus, model-observation disagreements over this period may be resolvable via uncertainties in the observations, modeled internal variability, forcing estimates, or (more likely) some combination of all three factors. We define the hiatus interval as 1998-2012, endpoints judiciously chosen to minimize observed warming by including the large 1998 El Nio event and excluding 2014, an exceptionally warm year. Such choices are fundamentally subjective and cannot be considered random, so any probabilistic statements regarding the likelihood of this occurring need to be made carefully. Using this definition, the observed global temperature trend estimates from four datasets fall outside the 5-95 interval predicted by the CMIP5 models. Here we explore some of the plausible explanations for this discrepancy, and show that no unique explanation is likely to fully account for the hiatus.

  17. On the Complexity of Rearrangement Problems under the Breakpoint Distance

    CERN Document Server

    Kovac, Jakub

    2011-01-01

    Tannier et al. introduced a generalization of breakpoint distance for multichromosomal genomes. They showed that the median problem under the breakpoint distance is solvable in polynomial time in the multichromosomal circular and mixed models. This is intriguing, since in all other rearrangement models (DCJ, reversal, unichromosomal or multilinear breakpoint models), the problem is NP-hard. The complexity of the small or even the large phylogeny problem under the breakpoint distance remained an open problem. We improve the algorithm for the median problem and show that it is equivalent to the problem of finding maximum cardinality non-bipartite matching (under linear reduction). On the other hand, we prove that the more general small phylogeny problem is NP-hard. Surprisingly, we show that it is already NP-hard (or even APX-hard) for 4 species (a quartet phylogeny). In other words, while finding an ancestor for 3 species is easy, already finding two ancestors for 4 species is hard. We also show that, in the u...

  18. Analysis and Reduction of Complex Networks Under Uncertainty.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghanem, Roger G [University of Southern California

    2014-07-31

    This effort was a collaboration with Youssef Marzouk of MIT, Omar Knio of Duke University (at the time at Johns Hopkins University) and Habib Najm of Sandia National Laboratories. The objective of this effort was to develop the mathematical and algorithmic capacity to analyze complex networks under uncertainty. Of interest were chemical reaction networks and smart grid networks. The statements of work for USC focused on the development of stochastic reduced models for uncertain networks. The USC team was led by Professor Roger Ghanem and consisted of one graduate student and a postdoc. The contributions completed by the USC team consisted of 1) methodology and algorithms to address the eigenvalue problem, a problem of significance in the stability of networks under stochastic perturbations, 2) methodology and algorithms to characterize probability measures on graph structures with random flows. This is an important problem in characterizing random demand (encountered in smart grid) and random degradation (encountered in infrastructure systems), as well as modeling errors in Markov Chains (with ubiquitous relevance !). 3) methodology and algorithms for treating inequalities in uncertain systems. This is an important problem in the context of models for material failure and network flows under uncertainty where conditions of failure or flow are described in the form of inequalities between the state variables.

  19. Coi1 is a novel assembly factor of the yeast complex III-complex IV supercomplex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhal, Ravi K; Kruse, Christine; Heidler, Juliana; Strecker, Valentina; Zwicker, Klaus; Düsterwald, Lea; Westermann, Benedikt; Herrmann, Johannes M; Wittig, Ilka; Rapaport, Doron

    2017-08-09

    The yeast bc1 complex (complex III) and cytochrome oxidase (complex IV) are mosaics of core subunits encoded by the mitochondrial genome and additional nuclear-encoded proteins imported from the cytosol. Both complexes build in the mitochondrial inner membrane various supramolecular assemblies. The formation of the individual complexes and their supercomplexes depends on the activity of dedicated assembly factors. We identified a so far uncharacterized mitochondrial protein (open reading frame YDR381C-A) as an important assembly factor for complex III, complex IV, and their supercomplexes. Therefore, we named this protein Cox interacting (Coi) 1. Deletion of COI1 results in decreased respiratory growth, reduced membrane potential, and hampered respiration, as well as slow fermentative growth at low temperature. In addition, coi1Δ cells harbour reduced steady-state levels of subunits of complexes III and IV as well as of the assembled complexes and supercomplexes. Interaction of Coi1 with respiratory chain subunits seems transient, as it appears to be a stoichiometric subunit neither of complex III nor of complex IV. Collectively, this work identifies a novel protein that plays a role in the assembly of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. © 2017 by The American Society for Cell Biology.

  20. Analysis and Reduction of Complex Networks Under Uncertainty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knio, Omar M

    2014-04-09

    This is a collaborative proposal that aims at developing new methods for the analysis and reduction of complex multiscale networks under uncertainty. The approach is based on combining methods of computational singular perturbation (CSP) and probabilistic uncertainty quantification. In deterministic settings, CSP yields asymptotic approximations of reduced-dimensionality “slow manifolds” on which a multiscale dynamical system evolves. Introducing uncertainty raises fundamentally new issues, particularly concerning its impact on the topology of slow manifolds, and means to represent and quantify associated variability. To address these challenges, this project uses polynomial chaos (PC) methods to reformulate uncertain network models, and to analyze them using CSP in probabilistic terms. Specific objectives include (1) developing effective algorithms that can be used to illuminate fundamental and unexplored connections among model reduction, multiscale behavior, and uncertainty, and (2) demonstrating the performance of these algorithms through applications to model problems.

  1. Dynamic Coherence in Excitonic Molecular Complexes under Various Excitation Conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Chenu, Aurélia; Mancal, Tomáš

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the relevance of dynamic electronic coherence under conditions natural to light-harvesting systems. We formulate the results of a quantum mechanical treatment of a weak light-matter interaction in terms of experimental observable, such as the incident light spectrum and the absorption spectrum of the material, and we derive the description of the incoherent F\\"orster type energy transfer fully from the wave function formalism. We demonstrate that excitation of a coherent superposition of electronic eigenstates of natural light-harvesting complexes by sunlight or by excitation transfer from a neighboring antenna is unlikely and that dynamical coherence therefore cannot play any significant role in natural photosynthesis, regardless of their life time. Dynamical coherence as a transient phenomenon must be strictly distinguished from the effect of excited state delocalization (also termed quantum coherence in the literature) which is established by interaction between the pigments a...

  2. Conserved Molecular Mechanisms Underlying Homeostasis of the Golgi Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cathal Wilson

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The Golgi complex performs a central function in the secretory pathway in the sorting and sequential processing of a large number of proteins destined for other endomembrane organelles, the plasma membrane, or secretion from the cell, in addition to lipid metabolism and signaling. The Golgi apparatus can be regarded as a self-organizing system that maintains a relatively stable morphofunctional organization in the face of an enormous flux of lipids and proteins. A large number of the molecular players that operate in these processes have been identified, their functions and interactions defined, but there is still debate about many aspects that regulate protein trafficking and, in particular, the maintenance of these highly dynamic structures and processes. Here, we consider how an evolutionarily conserved underlying mechanism based on retrograde trafficking that uses lipids, COPI, SNAREs, and tethers could maintain such a homeodynamic system.

  3. Final Report. Analysis and Reduction of Complex Networks Under Uncertainty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marzouk, Youssef M. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Coles, T. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Spantini, A. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Tosatto, L. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2013-09-30

    The project was a collaborative effort among MIT, Sandia National Laboratories (local PI Dr. Habib Najm), the University of Southern California (local PI Prof. Roger Ghanem), and The Johns Hopkins University (local PI Prof. Omar Knio, now at Duke University). Our focus was the analysis and reduction of large-scale dynamical systems emerging from networks of interacting components. Such networks underlie myriad natural and engineered systems. Examples important to DOE include chemical models of energy conversion processes, and elements of national infrastructure—e.g., electric power grids. Time scales in chemical systems span orders of magnitude, while infrastructure networks feature both local and long-distance connectivity, with associated clusters of time scales. These systems also blend continuous and discrete behavior; examples include saturation phenomena in surface chemistry and catalysis, and switching in electrical networks. Reducing size and stiffness is essential to tractable and predictive simulation of these systems. Computational singular perturbation (CSP) has been effectively used to identify and decouple dynamics at disparate time scales in chemical systems, allowing reduction of model complexity and stiffness. In realistic settings, however, model reduction must contend with uncertainties, which are often greatest in large-scale systems most in need of reduction. Uncertainty is not limited to parameters; one must also address structural uncertainties—e.g., whether a link is present in a network—and the impact of random perturbations, e.g., fluctuating loads or sources. Research under this project developed new methods for the analysis and reduction of complex multiscale networks under uncertainty, by combining computational singular perturbation (CSP) with probabilistic uncertainty quantification. CSP yields asymptotic approximations of reduceddimensionality “slow manifolds” on which a multiscale dynamical system evolves. Introducing

  4. Water allocation for agriculture complex terrain under changing climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putu Santikayasa, I.; Perdinan; Basit, Rizki Abdul

    2017-01-01

    The current water resources management in Indonesia requires the government to pay more attention on sustainable water management. Agriculture as the highest water demand in the country need better water management as the impact of future changing climate. Furthermore, the water managers as well as policy makers may require integrating the climate change assessment into water resources allocation policy and management. Agropolitan in Malang district, East java - Indonesia is an agriculture which is characterized by complex agricultural system and was assigned as a case study. The supply-demand water allocation approach was applied on allocating water to different water users under current and future climatic condition. Both climate and the changing nature of water demand have affected the development and evolution of water allocation. The result shows that the water supply is expected to decrease under future climate comparing with the current condition. Furthermore, it is required to incorporate the future climate information on design the future water policy and management to reduce the adverse impact of changing climate. This study also suggested policy actions as recommendation to better manage current climate variability as well as future uncertainty from climate change impacts on water allocation and resources management.

  5. ICGC PedBrain: Dissecting the genomic complexity underlying medulloblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, David TW; Jäger, Natalie; Kool, Marcel; Zichner, Thomas; Hutter, Barbara; Sultan, Marc; Cho, Yoon-Jae; Pugh, Trevor J; Hovestadt, Volker; Stütz, Adrian M; Rausch, Tobias; Warnatz, Hans-Jörg; Ryzhova, Marina; Bender, Sebastian; Sturm, Dominik; Pleier, Sabrina; Cin, Huriye; Pfaff, Elke; Sieber, Laura; Wittmann, Andrea; Remke, Marc; Witt, Hendrik; Hutter, Sonja; Tzaridis, Theophilos; Weischenfeldt, Joachim; Raeder, Benjamin; Avci, Meryem; Amstislavskiy, Vyacheslav; Zapatka, Marc; Weber, Ursula D; Wang, Qi; Lasitschka, Bärbel; Bartholomae, Cynthia C; Schmidt, Manfred; von Kalle, Christof; Ast, Volker; Lawerenz, Chris; Eils, Jürgen; Kabbe, Rolf; Benes, Vladimir; van Sluis, Peter; Koster, Jan; Volckmann, Richard; Shih, David; Betts, Matthew J; Russell, Robert B; Coco, Simona; Tonini, Gian Paolo; Schüller, Ulrich; Hans, Volkmar; Graf, Norbert; Kim, Yoo-Jin; Monoranu, Camelia; Roggendorf, Wolfgang; Unterberg, Andreas; Herold-Mende, Christel; Milde, Till; Kulozik, Andreas E; von Deimling, Andreas; Witt, Olaf; Maass, Eberhard; Rössler, Jochen; Ebinger, Martin; Schuhmann, Martin U; Frühwald, Michael C; Hasselblatt, Martin; Jabado, Nada; Rutkowski, Stefan; von Bueren, André O; Williamson, Dan; Clifford, Steven C; McCabe, Martin G; Collins, V. Peter; Wolf, Stephan; Wiemann, Stefan; Lehrach, Hans; Brors, Benedikt; Scheurlen, Wolfram; Felsberg, Jörg; Reifenberger, Guido; Northcott, Paul A; Taylor, Michael D; Meyerson, Matthew; Pomeroy, Scott L; Yaspo, Marie-Laure; Korbel, Jan O; Korshunov, Andrey; Eils, Roland; Pfister, Stefan M; Lichter, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Summary Medulloblastoma is an aggressively-growing tumour, arising in the cerebellum or medulla/brain stem. It is the most common malignant brain tumour in children, and displays tremendous biological and clinical heterogeneity1. Despite recent treatment advances, approximately 40% of children experience tumour recurrence, and 30% will die from their disease. Those who survive often have a significantly reduced quality of life. Four tumour subgroups with distinct clinical, biological and genetic profiles are currently discriminated2,3. WNT tumours, displaying activated wingless pathway signalling, carry a favourable prognosis under current treatment regimens4. SHH tumours show hedgehog pathway activation, and have an intermediate prognosis2. Group 3 & 4 tumours are molecularly less well-characterised, and also present the greatest clinical challenges2,3,5. The full repertoire of genetic events driving this distinction, however, remains unclear. Here we describe an integrative deep-sequencing analysis of 125 tumour-normal pairs. Tetraploidy was identified as a frequent early event in Group 3 & 4 tumours, and a positive correlation between patient age and mutation rate was observed. Several recurrent mutations were identified, both in known medulloblastoma-related genes (CTNNB1, PTCH1, MLL2, SMARCA4) and in genes not previously linked to this tumour (DDX3X, CTDNEP1, KDM6A, TBR1), often in subgroup-specific patterns. RNA-sequencing confirmed these alterations, and revealed the expression of the first medulloblastoma fusion genes. Chromatin modifiers were frequently altered across all subgroups. These findings enhance our understanding of the genomic complexity and heterogeneity underlying medulloblastoma, and provide several potential targets for new therapeutics, especially for Group 3 & 4 patients. PMID:22832583

  6. socio-demographic factors in under five children with acute ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-09-01

    Sep 1, 2013 ... Their socio-demographic factors such as age, sex, breastfeeding status, parents ... acute diarrhoea among under five children in Enugu, Nigeria. ... Malnutrition predisposes .... Determinants of the utilization of children's Health.

  7. nutritional status of children under five years and associated factors ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACSS

    Identification of core factors influencing nutrition of this population supports plans to alleviate child ... This study sought to determine the nutritional status of children under five years and associated ... The primary determinants of malnutrition as.

  8. Emergent Phototactic Responses of Cyanobacteria under Complex Light Regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chau, Rosanna Man Wah

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Environmental cues can stimulate a variety of single-cell responses, as well as collective behaviors that emerge within a bacterial community. These responses require signal integration and transduction, which can occur on a variety of time scales and often involve feedback between processes, for example, between growth and motility. Here, we investigate the dynamics of responses of the phototactic, unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 to complex light inputs that simulate the natural environments that cells typically encounter. We quantified single-cell motility characteristics in response to light of different wavelengths and intensities. We found that red and green light primarily affected motility bias rather than speed, while blue light inhibited motility altogether. When light signals were simultaneously presented from different directions, cells exhibited phototaxis along the vector sum of the light directions, indicating that cells can sense and combine multiple signals into an integrated motility response. Under a combination of antagonistic light signal regimes (phototaxis-promoting green light and phototaxis-inhibiting blue light), the ensuing bias was continuously tuned by competition between the wavelengths, and the community response was dependent on both bias and cell growth. The phototactic dynamics upon a rapid light shift revealed a wavelength dependence on the time scales of photoreceptor activation/deactivation. Thus, Synechocystis cells achieve exquisite integration of light inputs at the cellular scale through continuous tuning of motility, and the pattern of collective behavior depends on single-cell motility and population growth. PMID:28270586

  9. Emergent Phototactic Responses of Cyanobacteria under Complex Light Regimes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosanna Man Wah Chau

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Environmental cues can stimulate a variety of single-cell responses, as well as collective behaviors that emerge within a bacterial community. These responses require signal integration and transduction, which can occur on a variety of time scales and often involve feedback between processes, for example, between growth and motility. Here, we investigate the dynamics of responses of the phototactic, unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 to complex light inputs that simulate the natural environments that cells typically encounter. We quantified single-cell motility characteristics in response to light of different wavelengths and intensities. We found that red and green light primarily affected motility bias rather than speed, while blue light inhibited motility altogether. When light signals were simultaneously presented from different directions, cells exhibited phototaxis along the vector sum of the light directions, indicating that cells can sense and combine multiple signals into an integrated motility response. Under a combination of antagonistic light signal regimes (phototaxis-promoting green light and phototaxis-inhibiting blue light, the ensuing bias was continuously tuned by competition between the wavelengths, and the community response was dependent on both bias and cell growth. The phototactic dynamics upon a rapid light shift revealed a wavelength dependence on the time scales of photoreceptor activation/deactivation. Thus, Synechocystis cells achieve exquisite integration of light inputs at the cellular scale through continuous tuning of motility, and the pattern of collective behavior depends on single-cell motility and population growth.

  10. Robustness of Dengue Complex Network under Targeted versus Random Attack

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hafiz Abid Mahmood Malik

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Dengue virus infection is one of those epidemic diseases that require much consideration in order to save the humankind from its unsafe impacts. According to the World Health Organization (WHO, 3.6 billion individuals are at risk because of the dengue virus sickness. Researchers are striving to comprehend the dengue threat. This study is a little commitment to those endeavors. To observe the robustness of the dengue network, we uprooted the links between nodes randomly and targeted by utilizing different centrality measures. The outcomes demonstrated that 5% targeted attack is equivalent to the result of 65% random assault, which showed the topology of this complex network validated a scale-free network instead of random network. Four centrality measures (Degree, Closeness, Betweenness, and Eigenvector have been ascertained to look for focal hubs. It has been observed through the results in this study that robustness of a node and links depends on topology of the network. The dengue epidemic network presented robust behaviour under random attack, and this network turned out to be more vulnerable when the hubs of higher degree have higher probability to fail. Moreover, representation of this network has been projected, and hub removal impact has been shown on the real map of Gombak (Malaysia.

  11. Investigating the Effect of Complexity Factors in Gas Law Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuttlefield, Jennifer D.; Kirk, John; Pienta, Norbert J.; Tang, Hui

    2012-01-01

    Undergraduate students were asked to complete gas law questions using a Web-based tool as a first step in our understanding of the role of cognitive load in chemistry word questions and in helping us assess student problem-solving. Each question contained five different complexity factors, which were randomly assigned by the tool so that a…

  12. Factors Underlying the Development of Orofacial Pathology in Athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitry I. Karpovich

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This work addresses the factors underlying the development of orofacial pathology in athletes. The author has assessed the significance and practical value of these factors and has made an attempt to establish a link between it and somatic pathology in athletes.

  13. Emergent Phototactic Responses of Cyanobacteria under Complex Light Regimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chau, Rosanna Man Wah; Bhaya, Devaki; Huang, Kerwyn Casey

    2017-03-07

    Environmental cues can stimulate a variety of single-cell responses, as well as collective behaviors that emerge within a bacterial community. These responses require signal integration and transduction, which can occur on a variety of time scales and often involve feedback between processes, for example, between growth and motility. Here, we investigate the dynamics of responses of the phototactic, unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 to complex light inputs that simulate the natural environments that cells typically encounter. We quantified single-cell motility characteristics in response to light of different wavelengths and intensities. We found that red and green light primarily affected motility bias rather than speed, while blue light inhibited motility altogether. When light signals were simultaneously presented from different directions, cells exhibited phototaxis along the vector sum of the light directions, indicating that cells can sense and combine multiple signals into an integrated motility response. Under a combination of antagonistic light signal regimes (phototaxis-promoting green light and phototaxis-inhibiting blue light), the ensuing bias was continuously tuned by competition between the wavelengths, and the community response was dependent on both bias and cell growth. The phototactic dynamics upon a rapid light shift revealed a wavelength dependence on the time scales of photoreceptor activation/deactivation. Thus, Synechocystis cells achieve exquisite integration of light inputs at the cellular scale through continuous tuning of motility, and the pattern of collective behavior depends on single-cell motility and population growth.IMPORTANCE The photosynthetic cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. exhibits phototaxis that is dependent on the incident light wavelength through the action of various photoreceptors. In natural environments, cells experience a set of highly dynamic and complex light inputs, yet how cells transduce

  14. Research on gastropylor complex capsules in the treatment of childhood diarrhea of children under 5 years old and the influence factors%复合凝乳酶胶囊治疗5岁以下儿童腹泻及影响因素研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    葛丽萍

    2014-01-01

    目的:研究复合凝乳酶胶囊对治疗5岁以下儿童腹泻和影响因素。方法:选取儿童腹泻患儿100例,均在5岁以下,按年龄比例分为观察组和对照组,观察组在服用复合凝乳酶胶囊的基础上同时进行常规抗炎治疗,对照组只进行常规抗炎治疗。比较两组疗效。结果:观察组总有效率(94.8%)高于对照组(83.3%),差异有统计学意义(P<0.05)。影响腹泻治疗效果的因素主要有药的用量、腹泻程度、小儿的年龄等多种因素有关。结论:复合凝乳酶胶囊对治疗5岁以下儿童腹泻症状有着显著的疗效,并且无明显的不良反应,在临床应用上值得推广。%Objective:To research gastropylor complex capsules in the treatment of childhood diarrhea of children under 5 years old and the influence factors.Methods:100 children with childhood diarrhea were selected.They were all under 5 years old. According to the ratio of age,they were divided into the observation group and the control group.The observation group were also given conventional anti-inflammatory treatment on the basis of taking gastropylor complex capsules.The control group were only given conventional anti-inflammatory treatment.Results:The total effective rate of the observation group(94.8%) was higher than 83.3% of the control group,and the difference was statistically significant(P<0.05).The factors affecting the treatment of diarrhea effect were drug dosage,the severity of diarrhea,the age of the children and other factors.Conclusion:Gastropylor complex capsules in the treatment of childhood diarrhea symptoms of children under 5 years old has a significant effect, and no significant adverse reactions.It is worthy to be popularized in clinical application.

  15. Ecotoxicology of waters under the influence of a petrochemical complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noll, R.; Zandonai, V.; Ries, M.A. [CORSAN-SITEL, Triunfo, RS (Brazil). Polo Petrquimico do Sul

    1993-12-31

    This work summarizes the regular monitoring and studies conducted by SITEL - The Integrated Wastewater Treatment System of South Petrochemical Complex (South Brazil) - in order to evaluate the full environmental impact on waters in the area of influence of the effluents of the above mentioned Complex. 8 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  16. Autocatalysis as the Natural Philosophy Underlying Complexity and Biological Evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Güngör Gündüz

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The importance and different aspects of autocatalysis in evolution was analyzed. The behaviour of autocatalytic reactions mainly the Lotka-Volterra and the Schlögl equations were discussed in terms of phase change, entropy, and their oscillation frequency. The increase of complexity as the general direction of evolution was examined on some patterns in terms of both their entropy and information content. In addition, the relation between stability and functionality, stability and cohesion were discussed. It was concluded that evolution drifts in the direction of increasing complexity as a kind of natural philosophy to counteract the increase of entropy in the universe.

  17. Enhanced retinal modeling for face recognition and facial feature point detection under complex illumination conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yong; Li, Zuoyong; Jiao, Liangbao; Lu, Hong; Cao, Xuehong

    2016-07-01

    We improved classic retinal modeling to alleviate the adverse effect of complex illumination on face recognition and extracted robust image features. Our improvements on classic retinal modeling included three aspects. First, a combined filtering scheme was applied to simulate functions of horizontal and amacrine cells for accurate local illumination estimation. Second, we developed an optimal threshold method for illumination classification. Finally, we proposed an adaptive factor acquisition model based on the arctangent function. Experimental results on the combined Yale B; the Carnegie Mellon University poses, illumination, and expression; and the Labeled Face Parts in the Wild databases show that the proposed method can effectively alleviate illumination difference of images under complex illumination conditions, which is helpful for improving the accuracy of face recognition and that of facial feature point detection.

  18. Personality Factors Underlying Suicidal Behavior Among Military Youth

    OpenAIRE

    Soltaninejad, Abdollah; Fathi-Ashtiani, Ali; Ahmadi, Khodabakhsh; Mirsharafoddini, Hediye Sadat; Nikmorad, Alireza; Pilevarzadeh, Motahare

    2014-01-01

    Background: Suicidal behavior is one the most significant mental health problems in the military. Militaries are closed systems that operate in particular situations. Military service is associated with certain stressful conditions. On this basis, there is likely of trauma in the military environment. Measures of suicidal behavior are pathologically complex. A range of biological, psychological, social, and institutional factors are involved in the incidence and prevalence of these behaviors....

  19. Personality Factors Underlying Suicidal Behavior Among Military Youth

    OpenAIRE

    Soltaninejad, Abdollah; Fathi-Ashtiani, Ali; Ahmadi, Khodabakhsh; Mirsharafoddini, Hediye Sadat; Nikmorad, Alireza; Pilevarzadeh, Motahare

    2014-01-01

    Background: Suicidal behavior is one the most significant mental health problems in the military. Militaries are closed systems that operate in particular situations. Military service is associated with certain stressful conditions. On this basis, there is likely of trauma in the military environment. Measures of suicidal behavior are pathologically complex. A range of biological, psychological, social, and institutional factors are involved in the incidence and prevalence of these behaviors....

  20. Affinity purification strategies for proteomic analysis of transcription factor complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giambruno, Roberto; Grebien, Florian; Stukalov, Alexey; Knoll, Christian; Planyavsky, Melanie; Rudashevskaya, Elena L; Colinge, Jacques; Superti-Furga, Giulio; Bennett, Keiryn L

    2013-09-06

    Affinity purification (AP) coupled to mass spectrometry (MS) has been successful in elucidating protein molecular networks of mammalian cells. These approaches have dramatically increased the knowledge of the interconnectivity present among proteins and highlighted biological functions within different protein complexes. Despite significant technical improvements reached in the past years, it is still challenging to identify the interaction networks and the subsequent associated functions of nuclear proteins such as transcription factors (TFs). A straightforward and robust methodology is therefore required to obtain unbiased and reproducible interaction data. Here we present a new approach for TF AP-MS, exemplified with the CCAAT/enhancer binding protein alpha (C/EBPalpha). Utilizing the advantages of a double tag and three different MS strategies, we conducted a total of six independent AP-MS strategies to analyze the protein-protein interactions of C/EBPalpha. The resultant data were combined to produce a cohesive C/EBPalpha interactome. Our study describes a new methodology that robustly identifies specific molecular complexes associated with transcription factors. Moreover, it emphasizes the existence of TFs as protein complexes essential for cellular biological functions and not as single, static entities.

  1. Donation to disaster relief campaigns: underlying social cognitive factors exposed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterhof, Liesbeth; Heuvelman, Ard; Peters, Oscar

    2009-01-01

    number of very serious natural disasters have put an enormous pressure on relief organizations in the last few years. The present study exposes underlying social cognitive factors for donation to relief campaigns. A causal model was constructed, based on social cognitive theory, research on attitude

  2. Factors Underlying Second Language Reading Motivation of Adult EAP Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komiyama, Reiko

    2013-01-01

    Characteristics of English for Academic Purposes students' second language (L2) motivation were examined by identifying underlying motivational factors. Using the motivation constructs created by first language reading researchers, a survey was developed and administered to 2,018 students from 53 English language programs in the U.S. Survey…

  3. Factors Underlying Second Language Reading Motivation of Adult EAP Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komiyama, Reiko

    2013-01-01

    Characteristics of English for Academic Purposes students' second language (L2) motivation were examined by identifying underlying motivational factors. Using the motivation constructs created by first language reading researchers, a survey was developed and administered to 2,018 students from 53 English language programs in the U.S. Survey…

  4. Factors underlying male and female use of violent video games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartmann, T.; Möller, I.; Krause, C.

    2015-01-01

    Research has consistently shown that males play violent video games more frequently than females, but factors underlying this gender gap have not been examined to date. This approach examines the assumption that males play violent video games more because they anticipate more enjoyment and less

  5. Factors underlying male and female use of violent video games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartmann, T.; Möller, I.; Krause, C.

    2015-01-01

    Research has consistently shown that males play violent video games more frequently than females, but factors underlying this gender gap have not been examined to date. This approach examines the assumption that males play violent video games more because they anticipate more enjoyment and less guil

  6. Factors Underlying Second Language Reading Motivation of Adult EAP Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komiyama, Reiko

    2013-01-01

    Characteristics of English for Academic Purposes students' second language (L2) motivation were examined by identifying underlying motivational factors. Using the motivation constructs created by first language reading researchers, a survey was developed and administered to 2,018 students from 53 English language programs in the U.S. Survey…

  7. Donation to disaster relief campaigns: underlying social cognitive factors exposed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterhof, Liesbeth; Heuvelman, A.; Peters, O.

    2009-01-01

    number of very serious natural disasters have put an enormous pressure on relief organizations in the last few years. The present study exposes underlying social cognitive factors for donation to relief campaigns. A causal model was constructed, based on social cognitive theory, research on attitude

  8. Worms under stress: unravelling genetic complex traits through perturbation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodriguez Sanchez, M.

    2014-01-01

    The genetic architecture of an organism could be considered ‘the most amazing piece of engineering’ existing in nature. Looking from a certain distance, the genetic complexity of an organism could be described as an immense jigsaw puzzle. As in a real jigsaw, the connection between two p

  9. Performance of Random Effects Model Estimators under Complex Sampling Designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yue; Stokes, Lynne; Harris, Ian; Wang, Yan

    2011-01-01

    In this article, we consider estimation of parameters of random effects models from samples collected via complex multistage designs. Incorporation of sampling weights is one way to reduce estimation bias due to unequal probabilities of selection. Several weighting methods have been proposed in the literature for estimating the parameters of…

  10. Worms under stress: unravelling genetic complex traits through perturbation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodriguez Sanchez, M.

    2014-01-01

    The genetic architecture of an organism could be considered ‘the most amazing piece of engineering’ existing in nature. Looking from a certain distance, the genetic complexity of an organism could be described as an immense jigsaw puzzle. As in a real jigsaw, the connection between two p

  11. Binding of the Covalent Flavin Assembly Factor to the Flavoprotein Subunit of Complex II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maklashina, Elena; Rajagukguk, Sany; Starbird, Chrystal A; McDonald, W Hayes; Koganitsky, Anna; Eisenbach, Michael; Iverson, Tina M; Cecchini, Gary

    2016-02-05

    Escherichia coli harbors two highly conserved homologs of the essential mitochondrial respiratory complex II (succinate:ubiquinone oxidoreductase). Aerobically the bacterium synthesizes succinate:quinone reductase as part of its respiratory chain, whereas under microaerophilic conditions, the quinol:fumarate reductase can be utilized. All complex II enzymes harbor a covalently bound FAD co-factor that is essential for their ability to oxidize succinate. In eukaryotes and many bacteria, assembly of the covalent flavin linkage is facilitated by a small protein assembly factor, termed SdhE in E. coli. How SdhE assists with formation of the covalent flavin bond and how it binds the flavoprotein subunit of complex II remain unknown. Using photo-cross-linking, we report the interaction site between the flavoprotein of complex II and the SdhE assembly factor. These data indicate that SdhE binds to the flavoprotein between two independently folded domains and that this binding mode likely influences the interdomain orientation. In so doing, SdhE likely orients amino acid residues near the dicarboxylate and FAD binding site, which facilitates formation of the covalent flavin linkage. These studies identify how the conserved SdhE assembly factor and its homologs participate in complex II maturation.

  12. Quantum Sensing of Noisy and Complex Systems under Dynamical Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gershon Kurizki

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We review our unified optimized approach to the dynamical control of quantum-probe interactions with noisy and complex systems viewed as thermal baths. We show that this control, in conjunction with tools of quantum estimation theory, may be used for inferring the spectral and spatial characteristics of such baths with high precision. This approach constitutes a new avenue in quantum sensing, dubbed quantum noise spectroscopy.

  13. Genetic complexity underlying hybrid male sterility in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawamura, Kyoichi; Roote, John; Wu, Chung-I; Yamamoto, Masa-Toshi

    2004-02-01

    Recent genetic analyses of closely related species of Drosophila have indicated that hybrid male sterility is the consequence of highly complex synergistic effects among multiple genes, both conspecific and heterospecific. On the contrary, much evidence suggests the presence of major genes causing hybrid female sterility and inviability in the less-related species, D. melanogaster and D. simulans. Does this contrast reflect the genetic distance between species? Or, generally, is the genetic basis of hybrid male sterility more complex than that of hybrid female sterility and inviability? To clarify this point, the D. simulans introgression of the cytological region 34D-36A to the D. melanogaster genome, which causes recessive male sterility, was dissected by recombination, deficiency, and complementation mapping. The 450-kb region between two genes, Suppressor of Hairless and snail, exhibited a strong effect on the sterility. Males are (semi-)sterile if this region of the introgression is made homozygous or hemizygous. But no genes in the region singly cause the sterility; this region has at least two genes, which in combination result in male sterility. Further, the males are less fertile when heterozygous with a larger introgression, which suggests that dominant modifiers enhance the effects of recessive genes of male sterility. Such an epistatic view, even in the less-related species, suggests that the genetic complexity is special to hybrid male sterility.

  14. Effect of environmental factors on the complexation of iron and humic acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kai Fang; Dongxing Yuan; Lei Zhang; Lifeng Feng; Yaojin Chen; Yuzhou Wang

    2015-01-01

    A method of size exclusion chromatography coupled with ultraviolet spectrophotometry and off-line graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry was developed to assess the complexation properties of iron (Fe) and humic acid (HA) in a water environment.The factors affecting the complexation of Fe and HA,such as ionic strength,pH,temperature and UV radiation,were investigated.The Fe-HA complex residence time was also studied.Experimental results showed that pH could influence the deprotonation of HA and hydrolysis of Fe,and thus affected the complexation of Fe and HA.The complexation was greatly disrupted by the presence of NaCl.Temperature had some influence on the complexation.The yield of Fe-HA complexes showed a small decrease at high levels of UV radiation,but the effect of UV radiation on Fe-HA complex formation at natural levels could be neglected.It took about 10 hr for the complexation to reach equilibrium,and the Fe-HA complex residence time was about 20 hr.Complexation of Fe and HA reached a maximum level under the conditions of pH 6,very low ionic strength,in the dark and at a water temperature of about 25℃,for 10 hr.It was suggested that the Fe-HA complex could form mainly in freshwater bodies and reach high levels in the warm season with mild sunlight radiation.With changing environmental parameters,such as at lower temperature in winter or higher pH and ionic strength in an estuary,the concentration of the Fe-HA complex would decrease.

  15. Aircraft passenger comfort experience: underlying factors and differentiation from discomfort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadpour, Naseem; Robert, Jean-Marc; Lindgaard, Gitte

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies defined passengers' comfort based on their concerns during the flight and a set of eight experiential factors such as 'peace of mind', 'physical wellbeing', 'pleasure', etc. One Objective of this paper was to determine whether the factors underlying the passengers' experience of comfort differ from those of discomfort. Another objective was to cross-validate those factors. In the first study, respondents provided written reports of flight comfort and discomfort experiences separately and gave ratings on the impact of the eight factors on each experience. Follow up interviews were also conducted. Significant difference was found between comfort and discomfort ratings for two factors of 'pleasure', denoted by one's concern for stimulation, ambience and exceeded expectations, and 'physical wellbeing' characterized in terms of bodily support and energy. However, there were no significant differences between the comfort and discomfort ratings on the other six factors. The evidence does not support the proposition that passenger comfort and discomfort are underline by different sets of factors. It is therefore suggested that the evaluation of overall passenger comfort experience, as a whole, employ one spectrum ranging from extreme comfort to discomfort. In study two, a pool of comfort descriptors was collected. Those that were less relevant to passenger comfort were eliminated in a number of steps. Factor analysis was used to classify the remaining descriptors, using respondents' ratings on their potential impact on passenger comfort. Seven factors corresponded to the pre-determined passenger comfort factors from previous research, validating those with an exception of 'proxemics' (concerning one's privacy and control over their situation) but it was argued that this is due to the nature of the factor itself, which is context dependent and generally perceived unconsciously.

  16. Effect of Surcharge on the Stability of Rock Slope under Complex Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiewen Tu

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a general analytical expression for the factor of safety of the rock slope against plane failure is proposed, incorporating most of the practically occurring under complex conditions such as depth of tension crack, depth of water in tension crack, seismic loads and surcharge. Several special cases of this expression are established, which can be found similarly to those reported in the literature. A detailed parametric analysis is presented to study the effect of surcharge on the stability of the rock slope for practical ranges of main parameters such as depth of tension crack, depth of water in tension crack, the horizontal seismic coefficient and the vertical seismic coefficient. The parametric analysis has shown that the factor of safety of the rock slope decreases with increase in surcharge for the range of those parameters in this paper. It is also shown that the horizontal seismic coefficient is the most important factor which effects on the factor of safety in the above four influence factors. The general analytical expression proposed in this paper and the results of the parametric analysis can be used to carry out a quantitative assessment of the stability of the rock slopes by engineers and researchers.

  17. Vulnerability of complex networks under three-level-tree attacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Yao-hui; Han, Ji-hong; Lin, Yi; Liu, Lin

    2016-11-01

    We investigate vulnerability of complex networks including model networks and real world networks subject to three-level-tree attack. Specifically, we remove three different three-level-tree structures: RRN (Random Root Node), MaxDRN (Max Degree Root Node) and MinDRN (Min Degree Root Node) from a network iteratively until there is no three-level-tree left. Results demonstrate that random network is more robust than scale-free network against three tree attacks, and the robustness of random network decreases as the increases. And scale-free network shows different characteristics in different tree attack modes. The robustness of scale-free is not affected by the parameters for RRN, but increases as the increases for MinDRN. The important thing is that MaxDRN is the most effective in the three tree attack modes, especially for scale-free network. These findings supplement and extend the previous attack results on nodes and edges, and can thus help us better explain the vulnerability of different networks, and provide an insight into more tolerant real complex systems design.

  18. The asymptotic convergence factor for a polygon under a perturbation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, X. [Georgia Southern Univ., Statesboro, GA (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Let Ax = b be a large system of linear equations, where A {element_of} C{sup NxN}, nonsingular and b {element_of} C{sup N}. A few iterative methods for solving have recently been presented in the case where A is nonsymmetric. Many of their algorithms consist of two phases: Phase I: estimate the extreme eigenvalues of A; Phase II: construct and apply an iterative method based on the estimates. For convenience, it is rewritten as an equivalent fixed-point form, x = Tx + c. Let {Omega} be a compact set excluding 1 in the complex plane, and let its complement in the extended complex plane be simply connected. The asymptotic convergence factor (ACF) for {Omega}, denoted by {kappa}({Omega}), measures the rate of convergence for the asymptotically optimal semiiterative methods for solving, where {sigma}(T) {contained_in} {Omega}.

  19. Nye Lecture: Water Under Ice: Curiosities, Complexities, and Catastrophes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, G. K.

    2006-12-01

    flood occurring 4 km below the surface of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet has reignited interest in this important question. Complexity is the hallmark of nonlinear systems and the coupled subglacial interactions of ice, water, and sediment systems are certain to be nonlinear and complex. This complexity may account for the lack of agreement concerning the processes that govern subglacial landform genesis and which, for the most part, remain challenging and mysterious.

  20. On the Complexity of Spill Everywhere under SSA Form

    CERN Document Server

    Bouchez, Florent; Rastello, Fabrice

    2007-01-01

    Compilation for embedded processors can be either aggressive (time consuming cross-compilation) or just in time (embedded and usually dynamic). The heuristics used in dynamic compilation are highly constrained by limited resources, time and memory in particular. Recent results on the SSA form open promising directions for the design of new register allocation heuristics for embedded systems and especially for embedded compilation. In particular, heuristics based on tree scan with two separated phases -- one for spilling, then one for coloring/coalescing -- seem good candidates for designing memory-friendly, fast, and competitive register allocators. Still, also because of the side effect on power consumption, the minimization of loads and stores overhead (spilling problem) is an important issue. This paper provides an exhaustive study of the complexity of the ``spill everywhere'' problem in the context of the SSA form. Unfortunately, conversely to our initial hopes, many of the questions we raised lead to NP-...

  1. The complexity of silk under the spotlight of synthetic biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollrath, Fritz

    2016-08-15

    For centuries silkworm filaments have been the focus of R&D innovation centred on textile manufacture with high added value. Most recently, silk research has focused on more fundamental issues concerning bio-polymer structure-property-function relationships. This essay outlines the complexity and fundamentals of silk spinning, and presents arguments for establishing this substance as an interesting and important subject at the interface of systems biology (discovery) and synthetic biology (translation). It is argued that silk is a generic class of materials where each type of silk presents a different embodiment of emergent properties that combine genetically determined (anticipatory) and environmentally responsive components. In spiders' webs the various silks have evolved to form the interactive components of an intricate fabric that provides an extended phenotype to the spider's body morphology. © 2016 The Author(s). published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  2. Factors underlying male and female use of violent video games

    OpenAIRE

    Hartmann, T.; Möller, I.; Krause, C.

    2015-01-01

    Research has consistently shown that males play violent video games more frequently than females, but factors underlying this gender gap have not been examined to date. This approach examines the assumption that males play violent video games more because they anticipate more enjoyment and less guilt from engaging in virtual violence than females. This may be because males are less empathetic, tend to morally justify physical violence more and have a greater need for sensation and aggression ...

  3. A common genetic factor underlies hypertension and other cardiovascular disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spector Tim D

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Certain conditions characterised by blood vessel occlusion or vascular spasm have been found to cluster together in epidemiological studies. However the biological causes for these associations remain controversial. This study used a classical twin design to examine whether these conditions are linked through shared environmental exposures or by a common underlying genetic propensity to vasospasm. Methods We investigated the association between hypertension, migraine, Raynaud's phenomenon and coronary artery disease in twins from a national register. Phenotype status was determined using a questionnaire and the genetic and environmental association between phenotypes was estimated through variance components analysis. Results Responses were obtained from 2,204 individuals comprising 525 monozygotic and 577 dizygotic pairs. There was a significant genetic contribution to all four traits with heritabilities ranging from 0.34 to 0.64. Multivariate model-fitting demonstrated that a single common genetic factor underlies the four conditions. Conclusions We have confirmed an association between hypertension, migraine, Raynaud's phenomenon and coronary artery disease, and shown that a single genetic factor underlies them. The demonstration of a shared genetic factor explains the association between them and adds weight to the theory of an inherited predisposition to vasospasm.

  4. Donation to disaster relief campaigns: underlying social cognitive factors exposed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oosterhof, Liesbeth; Heuvelman, Ard; Peters, Oscar

    2009-05-01

    A number of very serious natural disasters have put an enormous pressure on relief organizations in the last few years. The present study exposes underlying social cognitive factors for donation to relief campaigns. A causal model was constructed, based on social cognitive theory, research on attitudes, and the impact of media exposure. The aim was to expand and improve an already existing model by Cheung and Chan [Cheung, C. K., & Chan, C. M. (2000). Social-cognitive factors of donating money to charity, with special attention to an international relief organisation. Evaluation and Program Planning, 23, 241-253]. The expanded model showed a better fit. Furthermore, the expanded model explained two-thirds of the variance of the intention to donate to a disaster relief campaign. The greatest predictor of the intention to donate proved to be "Past donation to disaster relief campaigns." The factor "News exposure" was indicated to be a valuable additional factor, as it had a significant direct effect on "Awareness of a disaster relief campaign" and was the only factor that had a total effect on all other factors, including "Intention to donate to a disaster relief campaign."

  5. Node vulnerability under finite perturbations in complex networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Gutiérrez

    Full Text Available A measure to quantify vulnerability under perturbations (attacks, failures, large fluctuations in ensembles (networks of coupled dynamical systems is proposed. Rather than addressing the issue of how the network properties change upon removal of elements of the graph (the strategy followed by most of the existing methods for studying the vulnerability of a network based on its topology, here a dynamical definition of vulnerability is introduced, referring to the robustness of a collective dynamical state to perturbing events occurring over a fixed topology. In particular, we study how the collective (synchronized dynamics of a network of chaotic units is disrupted under the action of a finite size perturbation on one of its nodes. Illustrative examples are provided for three systems of identical chaotic oscillators coupled according to three distinct well-known network topologies. A quantitative comparison between the obtained vulnerability rankings and the classical connectivity/centrality rankings is made that yields conclusive results. Possible applications of the proposed strategy and conclusions are also discussed.

  6. Node vulnerability under finite perturbations in complex networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, Ricardo; Del-Pozo, Francisco; Boccaletti, Stefano

    2011-01-01

    A measure to quantify vulnerability under perturbations (attacks, failures, large fluctuations) in ensembles (networks) of coupled dynamical systems is proposed. Rather than addressing the issue of how the network properties change upon removal of elements of the graph (the strategy followed by most of the existing methods for studying the vulnerability of a network based on its topology), here a dynamical definition of vulnerability is introduced, referring to the robustness of a collective dynamical state to perturbing events occurring over a fixed topology. In particular, we study how the collective (synchronized) dynamics of a network of chaotic units is disrupted under the action of a finite size perturbation on one of its nodes. Illustrative examples are provided for three systems of identical chaotic oscillators coupled according to three distinct well-known network topologies. A quantitative comparison between the obtained vulnerability rankings and the classical connectivity/centrality rankings is made that yields conclusive results. Possible applications of the proposed strategy and conclusions are also discussed.

  7. On the Complexity of the Metric TSP under Stability Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihalák, Matúš; Schöngens, Marcel; Šrámek, Rastislav; Widmayer, Peter

    We consider the metric Traveling Salesman Problem (Δ-TSP for short) and study how stability (as defined by Bilu and Linial [3]) influences the complexity of the problem. On an intuitive level, an instance of Δ-TSP is γ-stable (γ> 1), if there is a unique optimum Hamiltonian tour and any perturbation of arbitrary edge weights by at most γ does not change the edge set of the optimal solution (i.e., there is a significant gap between the optimum tour and all other tours). We show that for γ ≥ 1.8 a simple greedy algorithm (resembling Prim's algorithm for constructing a minimum spanning tree) computes the optimum Hamiltonian tour for every γ-stable instance of the Δ-TSP, whereas a simple local search algorithm can fail to find the optimum even if γ is arbitrary. We further show that there are γ-stable instances of Δ-TSP for every 1 problem instances which are substantially easier to solve than instances of the general Δ-TSP.

  8. Experimental Study of Sediment Incipience Under Complex Flows

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Chunrong; DENG Liying; HUANG Zhenhua; HUHE Aode

    2008-01-01

    Sediment incipience under flows passing a backward-facing step was studied. A series of experiments were conducted to measure scouring depth, probability of sediment incipience, and instantaneous flow velocity field downstream of a backward-facing step. Instantaneous flow velocity fields were measured by using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV), and an image processing method for determining probability of sediment incipience was employed to analyze the experimental data.The experimental results showed that the probability of sediment incipience was the highest near the reattachment point, even though the near-wall instantaneous flow velocity and the Reynolds stress were both much higher further downstream of the backward-facing step. The possible mechanisms are discussed for the sediment incipience near the reattachment point.

  9. Evidence for a heritable unidimensional symptom factor underlying obsessionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, Carol A; Greenwood, Tiffany; Wessel, Jennifer; Azzam, Amin; Garrido, Helena; Chavira, Denise A; Chandavarkar, Uma; Bagnarello, Monica; Stein, Murray; Schork, Nicholas J

    2008-09-05

    The division of obsessive-compulsive symptoms (OCS) into specific factors is now widely accepted. However, the utility of these categories for genetic studies remains unclear, as studies examining their heritability have been inconsistent. Less attention has been paid to the possibility that clinically significant obsessionality is primarily determined by a "core" group of OCS that crosses the boundaries between symptom subgroups. The aim of this study is to determine whether such a core group exists, and to compare its heritability to that of the more traditionally derived symptom factors. We examined the properties and heritability of obsessive-compulsive symptoms in college students, medical students, and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) families using the Leyton Obsessional Inventory. In each of the three samples, we identified a core group of symptoms that comprised a single unique construct and accounted for over 90% of the variation of the four more traditional symptom factors. This core construct was highly correlated with OCD in our families and had a heritability estimate of 0.19 when OCD was not included as a covariate and 0.49 when OCD was included as a covariate. In contrast, the four symptom factors were not heritable. There appears to be an underlying unidimensional component to obsessionality, both in non-clinical and clinical samples. This component, which is heritable, accounts for the majority of the variation of the more traditionally derived symptom factors in our sample, and is composed of OCS that are not specific to any of the symptom subgroups.

  10. Influence of dissolved organic matter on the complexation of mercury under sulfidic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Carrie L; Mason, Robert P; Gilmour, Cynthia C; Heyes, Andrew

    2007-04-01

    The complexation of Hg under sulfidic conditions influences its bioavailability for microbial methylation. Neutral dissolved Hg-sulfide complexes are readily available to Hg-methylating bacteria in culture, and thermodynamic models predict that inorganic Hg-sulfide complexes dominate dissolved Hg speciation under natural sulfidic conditions. However, these models have not been validated in the field. To examine the complexation of Hg in natural sulfidic waters, octanol/water partitioning methods were modified for use under environmentally relevant conditions, and a centrifuge ultrafiltration technique was developed. These techniques demonstrated much lower concentrations of dissolved Hg-sulfide complexes than predicted. Furthermore, the study revealed an interaction between Hg, dissolved organic matter (DOM), and sulfide that is not captured by current thermodynamic models. Whereas Hg forms strong complexes with DOM under oxic conditions, these complexes had not been expected to form in the presence of sulfide because of the stronger affinity of Hg for sulfide relative to its affinity for DOM. The observed interaction between Hg and DOM in the presence of sulfide likely involves the formation of a DOM-Hg-sulfide complex or results from the hydrophobic partitioning of neutral Hg-sulfide complexes into the higher-molecular-weight DOM. An understanding of the mechanism of this interaction and determination of complexation coefficients for the Hg-sulfide-DOM complex are needed to adequately assess how our new finding affects Hg bioavailability, sorption, and flux.

  11. Beyond membrane channelopathies: alternative mechanisms underlying complex human disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Konstantinos Dean BOUDOULAS; Peter J MOHLER

    2011-01-01

    Over the past fifteen years, our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying human disease has flourished in large part due to the discovery of gene mutations linked with membrane ion channels and transporters. In fact, ion channel defects ("channelopathies" - the focus of this review series) have been associated with a spectrum of serious human disease phenotypes including cystic fibrosis, cardiac arrhythmia, diabetes, skeletal muscle defects, and neurological disorders. However, we now know that human disease, particularly excitable cell disease, may be caused by defects in non-ion channel polypeptides including in cellular components residing well beneath the plasma membrane. For example, over the past few years, a new class of potentially fatal cardiac arrhythmias has been linked with cytoplasmic proteins that include sub-membrane adapters such as ankyrin-B (ANK2),ankyrin-G (ANK3), and alpha-1 syntrophin, membrane coat proteins including caveolin-3 (CAV3), signaling platforms including yotiao (AKAPg), and cardiac enzymes (GPD1L). The focus of this review is to detail the exciting role of lamins, yet another class of gene products that have provided elegant new insight into human disease.

  12. On Impact Dynamics under Complex or Extreme Conditions

    KAUST Repository

    Kouraytem, Nadia

    2016-11-01

    The impact of a spherical object onto a surface of a liquid, solid or granular material, is a configuration which occurs in numerous industrial and natural phenomena. The resulting dynamics can produce complex outcomes and often occur on very short time-scales. Their study thereby requires high-speed video imaging, as is done herein. This three-part dissertation investigates widely disparate but kindred impact configurations, where the impacting object is a solid steel sphere, or a molten metal droplet. The substrate, on the other hand, is either granular material, a liquid, or solid ice. Therefore both fluid mechanics and thermodynamics play a key role in some of these dynamics. Part I, investigates the penetration depth of a steel sphere which impacts onto a granular bed containing a mixture of grains of two different sizes. The addition of smaller grains within a bed of larger grains can promote a “lubrication” effect and deeper penetration of the sphere. However, there needs to be enough mass fraction of the smaller grains so that they get lodged between the larger grains and are not simply like isolated rattlers inside the voids between the larger grains. This lubrication occurs even though the addition of the small grains increases the overall packing fraction of the bed. We compare the enhanced penetration for the mixtures to a simple interpolative model based on the results for monodispersed media of the constitutive sizes. The strongest lubrication is observed for large irregular shaped Ottawa sand grains, which are seeded with small spherical glass beads. Part II, tackles the topic of a molten metal drop impacting onto a pool of water. When the drop temperature is far above the boiling temperature of water, a continuous vapor layer can form at the interface between the metal and water, in what is called the Leidenfrost phenomenon. This vapor layer can become unstable forming what is called a vapor explosion, which can break up the molten metal drop

  13. Transcription factors expressed in soybean roots under drought stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, S S; Guimarães, F C M; Carvalho, J F C; Stolf-Moreira, R; Oliveira, M C N; Rolla, A A P; Farias, J R B; Neumaier, N; Nepomuceno, A L

    2011-10-21

    To gain insight into stress-responsive gene regulation in soybean plants, we identified consensus sequences that could categorize the transcription factors MYBJ7, BZIP50, C2H2, and NAC2 as members of the gene families myb, bzip, c2h2, and nac, respectively. We also investigated the evolutionary relationship of these transcription factors and analyzed their expression levels under drought stress. The NCBI software was used to find the predicted amino acid sequences of the transcription factors, and the Clustal X software was used to align soybean and other plant species sequences. Phylogenetic trees were built using the Mega 4.1 software by neighbor joining and the degree of confidence test by Bootstrap. Expression level studies were carried out using hydroponic culture; the experiments were designed in completely randomized blocks with three repetitions. The blocks consisted of two genotypes, MG/BR46 Conquista (drought-tolerant) and BR16 (drought-sensitive) and the treatments consisted of increasingly long dehydration periods (0, 25, 50, 75, and 100 min). The transcription factors presented domains and/or conserved regions that characterized them as belonging to the bzip, c2h2, myb, and nac families. Based on the phylogenetic trees, it was found that the myb, bzip and nac genes are closely related to myb78, bzip48 and nac2 of soybean and that c2h2 is closely related to c2h2 of Brassica napus. Expression of all genes was in general increased under drought stress in both genotypes. Major differences between genotypes were due to the lowering of the expression of the mybj7 and c2h2 genes in the drought-tolerant variety at some times. Over-expression or silencing of some of these genes has the potential to increase stress tolerance.

  14. Isolation of transcription factor complexes from Arabidopsis cell suspension cultures by tandem affinity purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Leene, Jelle; Eeckhout, Dominique; Persiau, Geert; Van De Slijke, Eveline; Geerinck, Jan; Van Isterdael, Gert; Witters, Erwin; De Jaeger, Geert

    2011-01-01

    Defining protein complexes is critical to virtually all aspects of cell biology because most cellular processes are regulated by stable or more dynamic protein interactions. Elucidation of the protein-protein interaction network around transcription factors is essential to fully understand their function and regulation. In the last decade, new technologies have emerged to study protein-protein interactions under near-physiological conditions. We have developed a high-throughput tandem affinity purification (TAP)/mass spectrometry (MS) platform for cell suspension cultures to analyze protein complexes in Arabidopsis thaliana. This streamlined platform follows an integrated approach comprising generic Gateway-based vectors with high cloning flexibility, the fast generation of transgenic suspension cultures, TAP adapted for plant cells, and tandem matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization MS for the identification of purified proteins. Recently, we evaluated the GS tag, originally developed to study mammalian protein complexes, that combines two IgG-binding domains of protein G with a streptavidin-binding peptide, separated by two tobacco etch virus cleavage sites. We found that this GS tag outperforms the traditional TAP tag in plant cells, regarding both specificity and complex yield. Here, we provide detailed protocols of the GS-based TAP platform that allowed us to characterize transcription factor complexes involved in signaling in response to the plant phytohormone jasmonate.

  15. MCUR1 Is a Scaffold Factor for the MCU Complex Function and Promotes Mitochondrial Bioenergetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomar, Dhanendra; Dong, Zhiwei; Shanmughapriya, Santhanam; Koch, Diana A; Thomas, Toby; Hoffman, Nicholas E; Timbalia, Shrishiv A; Goldman, Samuel J; Breves, Sarah L; Corbally, Daniel P; Nemani, Neeharika; Fairweather, Joseph P; Cutri, Allison R; Zhang, Xueqian; Song, Jianliang; Jaña, Fabián; Huang, Jianhe; Barrero, Carlos; Rabinowitz, Joseph E; Luongo, Timothy S; Schumacher, Sarah M; Rockman, Michael E; Dietrich, Alexander; Merali, Salim; Caplan, Jeffrey; Stathopulos, Peter; Ahima, Rexford S; Cheung, Joseph Y; Houser, Steven R; Koch, Walter J; Patel, Vickas; Gohil, Vishal M; Elrod, John W; Rajan, Sudarsan; Madesh, Muniswamy

    2016-05-24

    Mitochondrial Ca(2+) Uniporter (MCU)-dependent mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake is the primary mechanism for increasing matrix Ca(2+) in most cell types. However, a limited understanding of the MCU complex assembly impedes the comprehension of the precise mechanisms underlying MCU activity. Here, we report that mouse cardiomyocytes and endothelial cells lacking MCU regulator 1 (MCUR1) have severely impaired [Ca(2+)]m uptake and IMCU current. MCUR1 binds to MCU and EMRE and function as a scaffold factor. Our protein binding analyses identified the minimal, highly conserved regions of coiled-coil domain of both MCU and MCUR1 that are necessary for heterooligomeric complex formation. Loss of MCUR1 perturbed MCU heterooligomeric complex and functions as a scaffold factor for the assembly of MCU complex. Vascular endothelial deletion of MCU and MCUR1 impaired mitochondrial bioenergetics, cell proliferation, and migration but elicited autophagy. These studies establish the existence of a MCU complex that assembles at the mitochondrial integral membrane and regulates Ca(2+)-dependent mitochondrial metabolism.

  16. MCUR1 Is a Scaffold Factor for the MCU Complex Function and Promotes Mitochondrial Bioenergetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhanendra Tomar

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial Ca2+ Uniporter (MCU-dependent mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake is the primary mechanism for increasing matrix Ca2+ in most cell types. However, a limited understanding of the MCU complex assembly impedes the comprehension of the precise mechanisms underlying MCU activity. Here, we report that mouse cardiomyocytes and endothelial cells lacking MCU regulator 1 (MCUR1 have severely impaired [Ca2+]m uptake and IMCU current. MCUR1 binds to MCU and EMRE and function as a scaffold factor. Our protein binding analyses identified the minimal, highly conserved regions of coiled-coil domain of both MCU and MCUR1 that are necessary for heterooligomeric complex formation. Loss of MCUR1 perturbed MCU heterooligomeric complex and functions as a scaffold factor for the assembly of MCU complex. Vascular endothelial deletion of MCU and MCUR1 impaired mitochondrial bioenergetics, cell proliferation, and migration but elicited autophagy. These studies establish the existence of a MCU complex that assembles at the mitochondrial integral membrane and regulates Ca2+-dependent mitochondrial metabolism.

  17. Protein anticoagulants targeting factor VIIa-tissue factor complex: a comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Karna; Bayoumi, Riad; Banerjee, Yajnavalka

    2013-01-01

    Anticoagulants are pivotal for the treatment of debilitating thromboembolic and associated disorders. Current anticoagulants such as heparin and warfarin are non-specific and have a narrow therapeutic window. These limitations have provided the impetus to develop new anticoagulant therapies/strategies that target specific factors in the blood coagulation cascade, ideally those located upstream in the clotting process. Factor VIIa (FVIIa) presents an attractive target as it, in complex with tissue factor (TF), acts as the prima ballerina for the formation of blood clot. A comprehensive review delineating the structure-activity relationship of protein/peptide anticoagulants targeting FVIIa or TF-FVIIa complex is absent in the literature. In this article, we have addressed this deficit by appraising the peptide/protein anticoagulants that target FVIIa/TF-FVIIa complex. Further, the current status of these anticoagulants, with regard to their performance in different clinical trials has also been presented. Lastly, the unexplored domains of these unique proteins have also been highlighted, which will facilitate further translational research in this paradigm, to improve strategies to counter and treat thromboembolic disorders.

  18. Crystal Structure of Human Factor VIII: Implications for the Formation of the Factor IXa-Factor VIIIa Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ngo, J.C.; Huang, M.; Roth, D.A.; Furie, B.C.; Furie, B. (Wyeth); (MBL)

    2008-06-03

    Factor VIII is a procofactor that plays a critical role in blood coagulation, and is missing or defective in hemophilia A. We determined the X-ray crystal structure of B domain-deleted human factor VIII. This protein is composed of five globular domains and contains one Ca{sup 2+} and two Cu{sup 2+} ions. The three homologous A domains form a triangular heterotrimer where the A1 and A3 domains serve as the base and interact with the C2 and C1 domains, respectively. The structurally homologous C1 and C2 domains reveal membrane binding features. Based on biochemical studies, a model of the factor IXa-factor VIIIa complex was constructed by in silico docking. Factor IXa wraps across the side of factor VIII, and an extended interface spans the factor VIII heavy and light chains. This model provides insight into the activation of factor VIII and the interaction of factor VIIIa with factor IXa on the membrane surface.

  19. Crystal Structure of Human Factor VIII: Implications for the Formation of the Factor IXa-Factor VIIIa Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chi Ki Ngo,J.; Huang, M.; Roth, D.; Furie, B.; Furie, B.

    2008-01-01

    Factor VIII is a procofactor that plays a critical role in blood coagulation, and is missing or defective in hemophilia A. We determined the X-ray crystal structure of B domain-deleted human factor VIII. This protein is composed of five globular domains and contains one Ca(2+) and two Cu(2+) ions. The three homologous A domains form a triangular heterotrimer where the A1 and A3 domains serve as the base and interact with the C2 and C1 domains, respectively. The structurally homologous C1 and C2 domains reveal membrane binding features. Based on biochemical studies, a model of the factor IXa-factor VIIIa complex was constructed by in silico docking. Factor IXa wraps across the side of factor VIII, and an extended interface spans the factor VIII heavy and light chains. This model provides insight into the activation of factor VIII and the interaction of factor VIIIa with factor IXa on the membrane surface.

  20. Characterization of Novel Components of the Baculovirus Per Os Infectivity Factor Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Ke; van Lent, Jan W. M.; Boeren, Sjef; Fang, Minggang; Theilmann, David A.; Erlandson, Martin A.; Vlak, Just M.

    2012-01-01

    Baculovirus occlusion-derived virus (ODV) infects insect midgut cells under alkaline conditions, a process mediated by highly conserved per os infectivity factors (PIFs), P74 (PIF0), PIF1, PIF2, PIF3, PIF4, and PIF5 (ODV-E56). Previously, a multimolecular complex composed of PIF1, PIF2, PIF3, and P74 was identified which was proposed to play an essential role during ODV entry. Recently, more proteins have been identified that play important roles in ODV oral infectivity, including PIF4, PIF5, and SF58, which might work in concert with previously known PIFs to facilitate ODV infection. In order to understand the ODV entry mechanism, the identification of all components of the PIF complex is crucial. Hence, the aim of this study was to identify additional components of the PIF complex. Coimmunoprecipitation (CoIP) combined with proteomic analysis was used to identify the components of the Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) PIF complex. PIF4 and P95 (AC83) were identified as components of the PIF complex while PIF5 was not, and this was confirmed with blue native PAGE and a second CoIP. Deletion of the pif4 gene impaired complex formation, but deletion of pif5 did not. Differentially denaturing SDS-PAGE further revealed that PIF4 forms a stable complex with PIF1, PIF2, and PIF3. P95 and P74 are more loosely associated with this complex. Three other proteins, AC5, AC68, and AC108 (homologue of SF58), were also found by the proteomic analysis to be associated with the PIF complex. Finally the functional significance of the PIF protein interactions is discussed. PMID:22379094

  1. Microwave Synthesis Under Solvent-Free Conditions and Spectral Studies of Some Mesoporphyrinic Complexes

    OpenAIRE

    Rica Boscencu

    2012-01-01

    A series of A3B and A4 type mesoporphyrinic complexes were synthesized with superior yields using microwave irradiation under solvent-free conditions. The structures of the complexes were confirmed using elemental analysis, FT-IR, UV-Vis, EPR and NMR spectral data. The influence of environmental polarity on spectral properties of the mesoporphyrinic complexes was investigated. The obtained results indicate that the shape of absorption and fluoresc...

  2. Worms under stress: C. elegans stress response and its relevance to complex human disease and aging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodriguez Sanchez, M.; Snoek, L.B.; Bono, de M.; Kammenga, J.E.

    2013-01-01

    Many organisms have stress response pathways, components of which share homology with players in complex human disease pathways. Research on stress response in the nematode worm Caenorhabditis elegans has provided detailed insights into the genetic and molecular mechanisms underlying complex human d

  3. A Low Complexity Decoding Algorithm for STBC under Non-Constant Module Modulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ke; TANG Bin; YANG Jian-yu

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a low complexity algorithm for the decoding of space-time block codes (STBC) under non-constant module modulation. Simulation results show that in most cases of non-constant module modulation the new algorithm results in more than 50% reduction in computation complexity comparing to the original maximum likelihood algorithm without any loss of BER performance.

  4. A study on the interaction between two rumors in homogeneous complex networks under symmetric conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jie, Renlong; Qiao, Jian; Xu, Genjiu; Meng, Yingying

    2016-07-01

    The propagating dynamics of more than one rumor has received a substantial amount of attention in recent years. To investigate the effects of interactions between two rumors under symmetric conditions, we built a model based on an ordinary differential equation system while assuming that each individual's spreading rate after receiving one rumor depends on whether he/she knows the other rumor. In certain cases, two rumors accelerate the spread of each other, while in a portion of the other cases they impede or decelerate the spread of each other. We discuss these effects by dividing the total population into nine groups that correspond to nine states, and we subsequently build the mean-field equations for the two-rumor interaction based on the SIR model in a homogeneous complex network, and we find their numerical solution with varying interaction factors for the rates of spreading and becoming disinterested. The results show that when we change these interaction factors, the density curves of the nine states and their maximum values will change accordingly by a series of rules, which demonstrates the corresponding effects when there is a positive or negative interaction between the two rumors. Our work could establish a foundation for further study of this issue.

  5. Fibroblast Growth Factors and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Promote Cardiac Reprogramming under Defined Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Yamakawa

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Fibroblasts can be directly reprogrammed into cardiomyocyte-like cells (iCMs by overexpression of cardiac transcription factors, including Gata4, Mef2c, and Tbx5; however, this process is inefficient under serum-based culture conditions, in which conversion of partially reprogrammed cells into fully reprogrammed functional iCMs has been a major hurdle. Here, we report that a combination of fibroblast growth factor (FGF 2, FGF10, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, termed FFV, promoted cardiac reprogramming under defined serum-free conditions, increasing spontaneously beating iCMs by 100-fold compared with those under conventional serum-based conditions. Mechanistically, FFV activated multiple cardiac transcriptional regulators and converted partially reprogrammed cells into functional iCMs through the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and phosphoinositol 3-kinase/AKT pathways. Moreover, FFV enabled cardiac reprogramming with only Mef2c and Tbx5 through the induction of cardiac reprogramming factors, including Gata4. Thus, defined culture conditions promoted the quality of cardiac reprogramming, and this finding provides new insight into the mechanism of cardiac reprogramming.

  6. Characterization of Novel Components of the Baculovirus Per Os Infectivity Factor Complex

    OpenAIRE

    Peng, K; Lent, van, J.W.M.; Boeren, J.A.; Fang, M.; Theilmann, D A; Erlandson, M.; Vlak, J M; Oers, van, B.

    2012-01-01

    Baculovirus occlusion-derived virus (ODV) infects insect midgut cells under alkaline conditions, a process mediated by highly conserved per os infectivity factors (PIFs), P74 (PIF0), PIF1, PIF2, PIF3, PIF4, and PIF5 (ODV-E56). Previously, a multimolecular complex composed of PIF1, PIF2, PIF3, and P74 was identified which was proposed to play an essential role during ODV entry. Recently, more proteins have been identified that play important roles in ODV oral infectivity, including PIF4, PIF5,...

  7. Microwave synthesis under solvent-free conditions and spectral studies of some mesoporphyrinic complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boscencu, Rica

    2012-05-10

    A series of A₃B and A₄ type mesoporphyrinic complexes were synthesized with superior yields using microwave irradiation under solvent-free conditions. The structures of the complexes were confirmed using elemental analysis, FT-IR, UV-Vis, EPR and NMR spectral data. The influence of environmental polarity on spectral properties of the mesoporphyrinic complexes was investigated. The obtained results indicate that the shape of absorption and fluorescence spectra does not depend on the solvent polarity under the experimental conditions used. The small shifts of the absorption and emission maximums that occur by increasing of solvent polarity reflects the physical interaction between the porphyrinic substituents and the solvent molecules.

  8. Characterization of Hematopoietic Transcription Factor Complexes in Erythroid Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.J.F. Rodriguez

    2006-01-01

    textabstractEfficient tagging methodologies are an integral aspect of protein complex characterization by proteomic approaches. Due to biotin’s very high affinity for avidin and streptavidin, biotinylation tagging offers an attractive approach for the efficient purification of protein complexe

  9. Influence of an AGN complex photon field on the jet bulk Lorentz factor through Compton rocket effect

    CERN Document Server

    Vuillaume, Thomas; Henri, Gilles

    2014-01-01

    AGNs jets are known to display relativistic motion on parsec scales but the accelerating mechanism as well as the exact bulk Lorentz factor of the flow are still a matter of discussion. Under certain assumptions, a plasma can be accelerated to relativistic speeds through the Compton rocket effect. Here, we study this effect and the resulting bulk Lorentz factor in the complex environment of an AGN including various external sources. This is the proceedings to the IAU Symposium 313.

  10. Interferon-gamma and tumour necrosis factor induce expression of major histocompatibility complex antigen on rat retinal astrocytes.

    OpenAIRE

    el-Asrar, A M; Maimone, D.; Morse, P H; Lascola, C; Reder, A T

    1991-01-01

    Cultured rat retinal astrocytes were tested by indirect immunofluorescence staining for their ability to express class I and II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) antigens under basal culture conditions and after three days of stimulation with two recombinant cytokines, rat interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and human tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha). Under basal culture conditions low levels of class I antigens were detected on a small percentage of cells, but there was no visible clas...

  11. Complexity of OM factorizations of polynomials over local fields

    CERN Document Server

    Bauch, Jens-Dietrich; Stainsby, Hayden D

    2012-01-01

    Let $k$ be a locally compact complete field with respect to a discrete valuation $v$. Let $\\oo$ be the valuation ring, $\\m$ the maximal ideal and $F(x)\\in\\oo[x]$ a monic separable polynomial of degree $n$. Let $\\delta=v(\\dsc(F))$. The Montes algorithm computes an OM factorization of $F$. The single-factor lifting algorithm derives from this data a factorization of $F \\md{\\m^\

  12. Simplified reactive power management strategy for complex power grids under stochastic operation and incomplete information

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vlachogiannis, Ioannis (John)

    2009-01-01

    In the current released energy market, the large-scale complex transmission networks and the distribution ones with dispersed energy sources and "intelligent" components operate under uncertainties, stochastic and prior incomplete information. A safe and reliable operation of such complex power...... consider more stochastic aspects such as variable grid's topology. Results of the proposed strategy obtained on the networks of IEEE 30-bus and IEEE 118-bus systems demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed strategy....

  13. A note on sample complexity of learning binary output neural networks under fixed input distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Pestov, Vladimir

    2010-01-01

    We show that the learning sample complexity of a sigmoidal neural network constructed by Sontag (1992) required to achieve a given misclassification error under a fixed purely atomic distribution can grow arbitrarily fast: for any prescribed rate of growth there is an input distribution having this rate as the sample complexity, and the bound is asymptotically tight. The rate can be superexponential, a non-recursive function, etc. We further observe that Sontag's ANN is not Glivenko-Cantelli under any input distribution having a non-atomic part.

  14. Formation of transcription factor complexes during embryonic erythroid development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    X. Yu (Xiao)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractHematopoiesis is a classic model for the study of embryonic and adult stem cell differentiation. Erythropoiesis is the process of generating erythrocytes from hematopoietic stem cells (HSC). In Chapter1, we introduce the process of erythropoiesis and discuss proteins and protein complexe

  15. Algebraic approach to form factors in the complex sinh-Gordon theory

    CERN Document Server

    Lashkevich, Michael

    2016-01-01

    We study form factors of the quantum complex sinh-Gordon theory in the algebraic approach. In the case of exponential fields the form factors can be obtained from the known form factors of the $Z_N$-symmetric Ising model. The algebraic construction also provides an Ansatz for form factors of descendant operators. We obtain generating functions of such form factors and establish their main properties: the cluster factorization and reflection equations.

  16. Algebraic approach to form factors in the complex sinh-Gordon theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lashkevich, Michael; Pugai, Yaroslav

    2017-01-01

    We study form factors of the quantum complex sinh-Gordon theory in the algebraic approach. In the case of exponential fields the form factors can be obtained from the known form factors of the ZN-symmetric Ising model. The algebraic construction also provides an Ansatz for form factors of descendant operators. We obtain generating functions of such form factors and establish their main properties: the cluster factorization and reflection equations.

  17. Tumour necrosis factor gene complex polymorphisms in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruse, Charlotte E; Hill, Maureen C; Tobin, Martin; Neale, Natalie; Connolly, Martin J; Parker, Stuart G; Wardlaw, Andrew J

    2007-02-01

    We aimed to examine the role of tumour necrosis factor gene complex polymorphisms in subjects with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We hypothesized that individuals possessing polymorphic variants associated with higher tumour necrosis factor (TNF) secretion would be more susceptible to and/or have more severe disease. Patients with COPD and population controls underwent detailed clinical phenotyping. Genotyping for the tumour necrosis factor-308 and the lymphotoxin alpha NcoI (LTalpha polymorphisms was carried out by 'blinded' laboratory staff. Three hundred and sixty one individuals (220 cases and 141 controls) were recruited. We showed an association between the LTalphaNcol polymorphism and forced vital capacity (FVC) in a population of older adults with and without COPD. The LTalphaNcol*2 allele was associated with poorer lung function, under a codominant model, with a fall in FVC (expressed as a percentage of its predicted value) of 3.7% for each copy of the LTalphaNcol*2 allele possessed (for FVC, regression coefficient (95% CI)=-3.73(-7.01 to -0.44), P=0.026; for FEV(1) regression coefficient=-3.56(-7.80 to 0.70), P=0.101. However, there was no difference in genotype distribution between the case and control populations. This study adds weight to the suggestion that the TNF gene complex is involved in physiological alterations (FVC) that may affect the development and severity of COPD. The absence of a significant association between the TNF gene-complex polymorphisms in this study does not rule out a modest effect of these polymorphisms on the risk of COPD, as much larger studies are needed to detect modest gene effects on binary disease endpoints.

  18. Investigating the Effect of Complexity Factors in Stoichiometry Problems Using Logistic Regression and Eye Tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Hui; Kirk, John; Pienta, Norbert J.

    2014-01-01

    This paper includes two experiments, one investigating complexity factors in stoichiometry word problems, and the other identifying students' problem-solving protocols by using eye-tracking technology. The word problems used in this study had five different complexity factors, which were randomly assigned by a Web-based tool that we developed. The…

  19. Investigating the Effect of Complexity Factors in Stoichiometry Problems Using Logistic Regression and Eye Tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Hui; Kirk, John; Pienta, Norbert J.

    2014-01-01

    This paper includes two experiments, one investigating complexity factors in stoichiometry word problems, and the other identifying students' problem-solving protocols by using eye-tracking technology. The word problems used in this study had five different complexity factors, which were randomly assigned by a Web-based tool that we developed. The…

  20. A combined model of human erythropoiesis and granulopoiesis under growth factor and chemotherapy treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schirm, Sibylle; Engel, Christoph; Loeffler, Markus; Scholz, Markus

    2014-05-26

    Haematotoxicity of conventional chemotherapies often results in delays of treatment or reduction of chemotherapy dose. To ameliorate these side-effects, patients are routinely treated with blood transfusions or haematopoietic growth factors such as erythropoietin (EPO) or granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). For the latter ones, pharmaceutical derivatives are available, which differ in absorption kinetics, pharmacokinetic and -dynamic properties. Due to the complex interaction of cytotoxic effects of chemotherapy and the stimulating effects of different growth factor derivatives, optimal treatment is a non-trivial task. In the past, we developed mathematical models of thrombopoiesis, granulopoiesis and erythropoiesis under chemotherapy and growth-factor applications which can be used to perform clinically relevant predictions regarding the feasibility of chemotherapy schedules and cytopenia prophylaxis with haematopoietic growth factors. However, interactions of lineages and growth-factors were ignored so far. To close this gap, we constructed a hybrid model of human granulopoiesis and erythropoiesis under conventional chemotherapy, G-CSF and EPO applications. This was achieved by combining our single lineage models of human erythropoiesis and granulopoiesis with a common stem cell model. G-CSF effects on erythropoiesis were also implemented. Pharmacodynamic models are based on ordinary differential equations describing proliferation and maturation of haematopoietic cells. The system is regulated by feedback loops partly mediated by endogenous and exogenous EPO and G-CSF. Chemotherapy is modelled by depletion of cells. Unknown model parameters were determined by fitting the model predictions to time series data of blood counts and cytokine profiles. Data were extracted from literature or received from cooperating clinical study groups. Our model explains dynamics of mature blood cells and cytokines after growth-factor applications in healthy volunteers

  1. Diversity and Complexity in DNA Recognition by Transcription Factors**

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badis, Gwenael; Berger, Michael F.; Philippakis, Anthony A.; Talukder, Shaheynoor; Gehrke, Andrew R.; Jaeger, Savina A.; Chan, Esther T.; Metzler, Genita; Vedenko, Anastasia; Chen, Xiaoyu; Kuznetsov, Hanna; Wang, Chi-Fong; Coburn, David; Newburger, Daniel E.; Morris, Quaid; Hughes, Timothy R.; Bulyk, Martha L.

    2010-01-01

    Sequence preferences of DNA-binding proteins are a primary mechanism by which cells interpret the genome. Despite these proteins’ central importance in physiology, development, and evolution, comprehensive DNA-binding specificities have been determined experimentally for few proteins. Here, we used microarrays containing all 10-base-pair sequences to examine the binding specificities of 104 distinct mouse DNA-binding proteins representing 22 structural classes. Our results reveal a complex landscape of binding, with virtually every protein analyzed possessing unique preferences. Roughly half of the proteins each recognized multiple distinctly different sequence motifs, challenging our molecular understanding of how proteins interact with their DNA binding sites. This complexity in DNA recognition may be important in gene regulation and in evolution of transcriptional regulatory networks. PMID:19443739

  2. Microwave Synthesis Under Solvent-Free Conditions and Spectral Studies of Some Mesoporphyrinic Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rica Boscencu

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available A series of A3B and A4 type mesoporphyrinic complexes were synthesized with superior yields using microwave irradiation under solvent-free conditions. The structures of the complexes were confirmed using elemental analysis, FT-IR, UV-Vis, EPR and NMR spectral data. The influence of environmental polarity on spectral properties of the mesoporphyrinic complexes was investigated. The obtained results indicate that the shape of absorption and fluorescence spectra does not depend on the solvent polarity under the experimental conditions used. The small shifts of the absorption and emission maximums that occur by increasing of solvent polarity reflects the physical interaction between the porphyrinic substituents and the solvent molecules.

  3. Architectures of archaeal GINS complexes, essential DNA replication initiation factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saito Mihoko

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the early stage of eukaryotic DNA replication, the template DNA is unwound by the MCM helicase, which is activated by forming a complex with the Cdc45 and GINS proteins. The eukaryotic GINS forms a heterotetramer, comprising four types of subunits. On the other hand, the archaeal GINS appears to be either a tetramer formed by two types of subunits in a 2:2 ratio (α2β2 or a homotetramer of a single subunit (α4. Due to the low sequence similarity between the archaeal and eukaryotic GINS subunits, the atomic structures of the archaeal GINS complexes are attracting interest for comparisons of their subunit architectures and organization. Results We determined the crystal structure of the α2β2 GINS tetramer from Thermococcus kodakaraensis (TkoGINS, comprising Gins51 and Gins23, and compared it with the reported human GINS structures. The backbone structure of each subunit and the tetrameric assembly are similar to those of human GINS. However, the location of the C-terminal small domain of Gins51 is remarkably different between the archaeal and human GINS structures. In addition, TkoGINS exhibits different subunit contacts from those in human GINS, as a consequence of the different relative locations and orientations between the domains. Based on the GINS crystal structures, we built a homology model of the putative homotetrameric GINS from Thermoplasma acidophilum (TacGINS. Importantly, we propose that a long insertion loop allows the differential positioning of the C-terminal domains and, as a consequence, exclusively leads to the formation of an asymmetric homotetramer rather than a symmetrical one. Conclusions The DNA metabolizing proteins from archaea are similar to those from eukaryotes, and the archaeal multi-subunit complexes are occasionally simplified versions of the eukaryotic ones. The overall similarity in the architectures between the archaeal and eukaryotic GINS complexes suggests that the GINS function

  4. Dynamic Trade Policy Game under Imperfect Factor Mobility

    OpenAIRE

    Kwan-Ho Kim

    2003-01-01

    This paper considers a dynamic strategic trade policy game when the sectoral movement of production factors is sluggish. A differential game between a domestic and foreign government is presented. The result of this dynamic game singles out two factors to determine the relative positions of the domestic firm and foreign firm at the steady state.

  5. ELECTRIC FACTORS INFLUENCING THE COMPLEX EROSION PROCESSING BY INTRODUCING THE ELECTROLYTE THROUGH THE TRANSFER OBJECT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alin Nioata

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The electric and electrochemical complex erosion processing is influenced by a great number of factors acting in tight interdependence and mutually influencing one another for achieving the stability of the processing process and achieving the final technological characteristics.The values taking part in developing the fundamental phenomena of the mechanism of complex erosion prevailing and contributes to the definition of technological characteristics, are factors.The paper presents the U potential difference and electric strength I as determining factors of the complex erosion process as well as other factors deriving from them: the current density, the power of the supply source.

  6. Two cross-linguistic factors underlying tongue shapes for vowels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nix, D.A.; Papcun, G.; Hogden, J.; Zlokarnik, I. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1996-06-01

    Desirable characteristics of a vocal-tract parametrization include accuracy, low dimensionality, and generalizability across speakers and languages. A low-dimensional, speaker-independent linear parametrization of vowel tongue shapes can be obtained using the PARAFAC three-mode factor analysis procedure. Harshman et al. applied PARAFAC to midsagittal x-ray vowel data from five English speakers, reporting that two speaker-independent factors are required to accurately represent the tongue shape measured along anatomically normalized vocal-tract diameter grid lines. Subsequently, the cross-linguistic generality of this parametrization was brought into question by the application of PARAFAC to Icelandic vowel data, where three nonorthogonal factors were reported. This solution is shown to be degenerate; a reanalysis of Jackson`s Icelandic data produces two factors that match Harshman et al.`s factors for English vowels, contradicting Jackson`s distinction between English and Icelandic language-specific `articulatory primes.` To obtain vowel factors not constrained by artificial measurement grid lines, x-ray tongue shape traces of six English speakers were marked with 13 equally spaced points. PARAFAC analysis of this unconstranied (x,y) coordinate data results in two factors that are clearly interpretable in terms of the traditional vowel quality dimensions front/back, high/low. 14 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Information-theoretic equilibration: the appearance of irreversibility under complex quantum dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ududec, Cozmin; Wiebe, Nathan; Emerson, Joseph

    2013-08-23

    The question of how irreversibility can emerge as a generic phenomenon when the underlying mechanical theory is reversible has been a long-standing fundamental problem for both classical and quantum mechanics. We describe a mechanism for the appearance of irreversibility that applies to coherent, isolated systems in a pure quantum state. This equilibration mechanism requires only an assumption of sufficiently complex internal dynamics and natural information-theoretic constraints arising from the infeasibility of collecting an astronomical amount of measurement data. Remarkably, we are able to prove that irreversibility can be understood as typical without assuming decoherence or restricting to coarse-grained observables, and hence occurs under distinct conditions and time scales from those implied by the usual decoherence point of view. We illustrate the effect numerically in several model systems and prove that the effect is typical under the standard random-matrix conjecture for complex quantum systems.

  8. Thermodynamics of Np(IV) complexes with gluconic acid under alkaline conditions. Sorption studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rojo, H.; Garcia-Gutierrez, M.; Missana, T. [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain). Sorption, Migration and Colloids Lab.; Tits, J.; Wieland, E. [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen (Switzerland). Lab. for Waste Management; Gaona, X. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe (Germany). Inst. fuer Nukleare Entsorgung

    2013-05-01

    The complexation of Np(IV) with gluconic acid (GLU) under alkaline conditions was investigated in the absence of Ca by carrying out a series of sorption experiments. The decrease of Np(IV) sorption on the sorbing material at increasing concentrations of GLU was interpreted as the formation of Np(IV)-GLU aqueous complexes. The modelling of experimental data according to the Schubert method [1] confirmed the formation of a complex with a Np:GLU ratio 1: 1. The stoichiometry of the complex Np(OH){sub 4}GLU{sup -} was proposed based on the experimental observation that no proton exchange occurred during the course of the complexation reaction and that Np(OH){sub 4}(aq) was the predominant hydrolysis product in the absence of GLU. A log *{beta}{sup 0}{sub 1,4,1} = -2.92 {+-} 0.30 for the formation reaction Np{sup 4+} + 4H{sub 2}O + GLU{sup -} <=> Np(OH){sub 4}GLU{sup -} + 4H{sup +} was calculated based on the conditional stability constants determined from sorption experiments and using the Np(IV) thermodynamic data selected in the NEA reviews [2]. Linear free energy relationships (LFER) confirmed that the stoichiometry and stability of the Np(IV)-GLU complex characterized in this work are consistent with data available for Th(IV)-, U(IV)- and Pu(IV)-GLU complexes. (orig.)

  9. Coeliac disease : investigation of the genetic factors underlying coeliac disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belzen, M.J. (Martine Juliana) van

    2003-01-01

    Coeliac disease is a common food intolerance with a complex genetic aetiology. It is caused by ingestion of gluten peptides from wheat and related proteins from barley and rye in genetically susceptible individuals. The disease affects the small intestine and leads to abnormalities ranging from the

  10. Coeliac disease : investigation of the genetic factors underlying coeliac disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belzen, M.J. (Martine Juliana) van

    2004-01-01

    Coeliac disease is a common food intolerance with a complex genetic aetiology. It is caused by ingestion of gluten peptides from wheat and related proteins from barley and rye in genetically susceptible individuals. The disease affects the small intestine and leads to abnormalities ranging from the

  11. Cooperation under Incomplete Information on the Discount Factors

    CERN Document Server

    Maor, C

    2010-01-01

    In the repeated Prisoner's Dilemma, when every player has a different discount factor, the grim-trigger strategy is an equilibrium if and only if the discount factor of each player is higher than some threshold. What happens if the players have incomplete information regarding the discount factors? In this work we look at repeated games in which each player has incomplete information regarding the other player's discount factor, and ask when a pair of grim-trigger strategies is an equilibrium. We provide necessary and sufficient conditions for such strategies to be an equilibrium. We characterize the states of the world in which the strategies are not triggered, i.e., the players cooperate, in such equilibria (or $\\epsilon$-equilibria), and ask whether these "cooperation events" are close to those in the complete information case, when the information is "almost" complete, in several senses.

  12. Numerical Modeling and Simulation of Wind Blown Sand Morphology under Complex Wind-Flow Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xamxinur Abdikerem

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The flow field and the sand flow field constitutive equations are analyzed at first, then the different desert highway numerical models are established by considering the crossroad and by changing the road surface height and air stream flow field, then three kinds of different models with different complex air flow fields are made for simulating the sand ripple formation process by weak coupling of air and sand flow field, and finally the numerical simulations of these models are conducted and the affect process of sand morphology under complex air flow fields are discussed. The results show that under the uniform airflow field, the straight parallel ripple formed and the flared ripple formed in the middle region of the crossroad, and the wavelength of the ripples on the desert highway is bigger than that of the ripples around the road when the road height is higher than that of the sand surface height. Under the nonuniform complex airflow field, the complex curved ripples are formed, and some of the local area, where the whirlwind exits, no ripples are formed.

  13. Amputation effects on the underlying complexity within transtibial amputee ankle motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wurdeman, Shane R., E-mail: shanewurdeman@gmail.com [Nebraska Biomechanics Core Facility, University of Nebraska at Omaha, Omaha, Nebraska 68182 (United States); Advanced Prosthetics Center, Omaha, Nebraska 68134 (United States); Myers, Sara A. [Nebraska Biomechanics Core Facility, University of Nebraska at Omaha, Omaha, Nebraska 68182 (United States); Stergiou, Nicholas [Nebraska Biomechanics Core Facility, University of Nebraska at Omaha, Omaha, Nebraska 68182 (United States); College of Public Health, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska 68198 (United States)

    2014-03-15

    The presence of chaos in walking is considered to provide a stable, yet adaptable means for locomotion. This study examined whether lower limb amputation and subsequent prosthetic rehabilitation resulted in a loss of complexity in amputee gait. Twenty-eight individuals with transtibial amputation participated in a 6 week, randomized cross-over design study in which they underwent a 3 week adaptation period to two separate prostheses. One prosthesis was deemed “more appropriate” and the other “less appropriate” based on matching/mismatching activity levels of the person and the prosthesis. Subjects performed a treadmill walking trial at self-selected walking speed at multiple points of the adaptation period, while kinematics of the ankle were recorded. Bilateral sagittal plane ankle motion was analyzed for underlying complexity through the pseudoperiodic surrogation analysis technique. Results revealed the presence of underlying deterministic structure in both prostheses and both the prosthetic and sound leg ankle (discriminant measure largest Lyapunov exponent). Results also revealed that the prosthetic ankle may be more likely to suffer loss of complexity than the sound ankle, and a “more appropriate” prosthesis may be better suited to help restore a healthy complexity of movement within the prosthetic ankle motion compared to a “less appropriate” prosthesis (discriminant measure sample entropy). Results from sample entropy results are less likely to be affected by the intracycle periodic dynamics as compared to the largest Lyapunov exponent. Adaptation does not seem to influence complexity in the system for experienced prosthesis users.

  14. Amputation effects on the underlying complexity within transtibial amputee ankle motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurdeman, Shane R.; Myers, Sara A.; Stergiou, Nicholas

    2014-03-01

    The presence of chaos in walking is considered to provide a stable, yet adaptable means for locomotion. This study examined whether lower limb amputation and subsequent prosthetic rehabilitation resulted in a loss of complexity in amputee gait. Twenty-eight individuals with transtibial amputation participated in a 6 week, randomized cross-over design study in which they underwent a 3 week adaptation period to two separate prostheses. One prosthesis was deemed "more appropriate" and the other "less appropriate" based on matching/mismatching activity levels of the person and the prosthesis. Subjects performed a treadmill walking trial at self-selected walking speed at multiple points of the adaptation period, while kinematics of the ankle were recorded. Bilateral sagittal plane ankle motion was analyzed for underlying complexity through the pseudoperiodic surrogation analysis technique. Results revealed the presence of underlying deterministic structure in both prostheses and both the prosthetic and sound leg ankle (discriminant measure largest Lyapunov exponent). Results also revealed that the prosthetic ankle may be more likely to suffer loss of complexity than the sound ankle, and a "more appropriate" prosthesis may be better suited to help restore a healthy complexity of movement within the prosthetic ankle motion compared to a "less appropriate" prosthesis (discriminant measure sample entropy). Results from sample entropy results are less likely to be affected by the intracycle periodic dynamics as compared to the largest Lyapunov exponent. Adaptation does not seem to influence complexity in the system for experienced prosthesis users.

  15. Technological Developments and Factor Substitution in a Complex and Dynamic System

    CERN Document Server

    Leydesdorff, Loet

    2010-01-01

    Schumpeter's (1939) distinction between changes in the form of the production function corresponding to innovation, and shifts along the production function corresponding to factor substitution, does not preclude that the underlying dynamics interact. In an evolutionarily complex system, such interactions are expected: they lead to non-linear terms in the model, and therefore to stabilization and self-organization in addition to selection and variation. Relatively simple simulations enable us to specify various concepts used in 'evolutionary economics' in terms of non-linear dynamics. While a technological trajectory can be considered as a stabilization in a (distributed) environment, a technological regime can be defined as a next-higher-order globalization in a hyper-space. A regime is able to restore its order despite local disturbances, for example by the political system. Technology policies may be effective at the level of the (sub-)systems if they provide the relevant agents with room for 'creative des...

  16. Water oxidation catalysis with nonheme iron complexes under acidic and basic conditions: homogeneous or heterogeneous?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Dachao; Mandal, Sukanta; Yamada, Yusuke; Lee, Yong-Min; Nam, Wonwoo; Llobet, Antoni; Fukuzumi, Shunichi

    2013-08-19

    Thermal water oxidation by cerium(IV) ammonium nitrate (CAN) was catalyzed by nonheme iron complexes, such as Fe(BQEN)(OTf)2 (1) and Fe(BQCN)(OTf)2 (2) (BQEN = N,N'-dimethyl-N,N'-bis(8-quinolyl)ethane-1,2-diamine, BQCN = N,N'-dimethyl-N,N'-bis(8-quinolyl)cyclohexanediamine, OTf = CF3SO3(-)) in a nonbuffered aqueous solution; turnover numbers of 80 ± 10 and 20 ± 5 were obtained in the O2 evolution reaction by 1 and 2, respectively. The ligand dissociation of the iron complexes was observed under acidic conditions, and the dissociated ligands were oxidized by CAN to yield CO2. We also observed that 1 was converted to an iron(IV)-oxo complex during the water oxidation in competition with the ligand oxidation. In addition, oxygen exchange between the iron(IV)-oxo complex and H2(18)O was found to occur at a much faster rate than the oxygen evolution. These results indicate that the iron complexes act as the true homogeneous catalyst for water oxidation by CAN at low pHs. In contrast, light-driven water oxidation using [Ru(bpy)3](2+) (bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine) as a photosensitizer and S2O8(2-) as a sacrificial electron acceptor was catalyzed by iron hydroxide nanoparticles derived from the iron complexes under basic conditions as the result of the ligand dissociation. In a buffer solution (initial pH 9.0) formation of the iron hydroxide nanoparticles with a size of around 100 nm at the end of the reaction was monitored by dynamic light scattering (DLS) in situ and characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) measurements. We thus conclude that the water oxidation by CAN was catalyzed by short-lived homogeneous iron complexes under acidic conditions, whereas iron hydroxide nanoparticles derived from iron complexes act as a heterogeneous catalyst in the light-driven water oxidation reaction under basic conditions.

  17. Factors Affecting Timely Completion of a PhD: A Complex Systems Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitchforth, Jegar; Beames, Stephanie; Thomas, Aleysha; Falk, Matthew; Farr, Charisse; Gasson, Susan; Thamrin, Sri Astuti; Mengersen, Kerrie

    2012-01-01

    Completing a PhD on time is a complex process, influenced by many interacting factors. In this paper we take a Bayesian Network approach to analyzing the factors perceived to be important in achieving this aim. Focusing on a single research group in Mathematical Sciences, we develop a conceptual model to describe the factors considered to be…

  18. Factors Affecting Grammatical and Lexical Complexity of Long-Term L2 Speakers' Oral Proficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahmann, Cornelia; Steinkrauss, Rasmus; Schmid, Monika S.

    2016-01-01

    There remains considerable disagreement about which factors drive second language (L2) ultimate attainment. Age of onset (AO) appears to be a robust factor, lending support to theories of maturational constraints on L2 acquisition. The present study is an investigation of factors that influence grammatical and lexical complexity at the stage of L2…

  19. Identifying the most critical project complexity factors using Delphi method: the Iranian construction industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Mehdi Mozaffari

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Complexity is one of the most important issues influencing success of any construction project and there are literally different studies devoted to detect important factors increasing complexity of projects. During the past few years, there have been growing interests in developing mass construction projects in Iran. The proposed study of this paper uses Delphi technique to find out about important factors as barriers of construction projects in Iran. The results show that among 47 project complexity factors, 19 factors are more important than others are. The study groups different factors into seven categories including environmental, organizational, objectives, tasks, stakeholders, technological, information systems and determines the relative importance of each. In each group, many other sub group activities are determined and they are carefully investigated. The study provides some detailed suggestions on each category to reduce the complexity of construction project.

  20. Hypoxia-inducible factor 3 biology: complexities and emerging themes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Cunming

    2016-02-15

    The hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) family has three distinct members in most vertebrates. All three HIFs consist of a unique and oxygen-labile α-subunit and a common and stable β-subunit. While HIF-1 and HIF-2 function as master regulators of the transcriptional response to hypoxia, much less is known about HIF-3. The HIF-3α gene gives rise to multiple HIF-3α variants due to the utilization of different promoters, different transcription initiation sites, and alternative splicing. These HIF-3α variants are expressed in different tissues, at different developmental stages, and are differentially regulated by hypoxia and other factors. Recent studies suggest that different HIF-3α variants have different and even opposite functions. There is strong evidence that full-length HIF-3α protein functions as an oxygen-regulated transcription activator and that it activates a unique transcriptional program in response to hypoxia. Many HIF-3α target genes have been identified. While some short HIF-3α variants act as dominant-negative regulators of HIF-1/2α actions, other HIF-3α variants can inhibit HIF-1/2α actions by competing for the common HIF-β. There are also a number of HIF-3α variants yet to be explored. Future studies of these naturally occurring HIF-3α variants will provide new and important insights into HIF biology and may lead to the development of new therapeutic strategies.

  1. Activity of recombinant factor VIIa under different conditions in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bladbjerg, Else-Marie; Jespersen, Jørgen

    2008-01-01

    , but no effects on clotting time indicating that haemodilution does not affect clot formation, but the clot formed at high haemodilution may not be so firm. In conclusion, the activity of recombinant activated factor VII was affected in vitro by pH, temperature, and haemodilution. Additional studies are necessary...... investigated the in-vitro effects of pH, temperature, and haemodilution on the activity of recombinant activated factor VII. Samples from eight healthy volunteers were spiked with recombinant activated factor VII (final concentration 1.7 microg/ml) and adjusted to pH 6.0, 6.5, 7.0, and 7.4 or analysed at 30...... activity in plasma. Significant effects of pH were observed for clotting time, clot formation time, maximum clot firmness, and factor VII coagulant activity in the direction of longer clot formation times and less firm clots with decreasing pH. Temperature had significant effects on clotting time, clot...

  2. Factors Underlying the Public's Credibility Perceptions in Educational Evaluations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Miriam R.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how evaluation audiences perceive credibility can help evaluators design evaluations and reports that support appropriate use. While researchers have studied credibility assessment among various educational stakeholders, little research has been conducted with the broader public. This study explored potential factors affecting the…

  3. Factors Underlying the Public's Credibility Perceptions in Educational Evaluations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Miriam R.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how evaluation audiences perceive credibility can help evaluators design evaluations and reports that support appropriate use. While researchers have studied credibility assessment among various educational stakeholders, little research has been conducted with the broader public. This study explored potential factors affecting the…

  4. Risk Factors for Mortality of Pediatric Patients Without Underlying Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling-Sai Chang

    2011-02-01

    Conclusion: Results from this study suggest that mortality in pediatric patients without underlying diseases is most frequently found in younger children with CNS and cardiovascular infections, consciousness change, and high liver enzyme levels at admission. Results from this analysis will provide information for the awareness of fatal outcomes in previously healthy children.

  5. A computational method for planning complex compound distributions under container, liquid handler, and assay constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Mark F; Wild, Daniel; Hoffman, Steve; Paulson, James; Neil, William; Nirschl, David S

    2013-10-01

    A systematic method for assembling and solving complex compound distribution problems is presented in detail. The method is based on a model problem that enumerates the mathematical equations and constraints describing a source container, liquid handler, and three types of destination containers involved in a set of compound distributions. One source container and one liquid handler are permitted in any given problem formulation, although any number of compound distributions may be specified. The relative importance of all distributions is expressed by assigning weights, which are factored into the final mathematical problem specification. A computer program was created that automatically assembles and solves a complete compound distribution problem given the parameters that describe the source container, liquid handler, and any number and type of compound distributions. Business rules are accommodated by adjusting weighting factors assigned to each distribution. An example problem, presented and explored in detail, demonstrates complex and nonintuitive solution behavior.

  6. The Crystal Structure and Behavior of Fenamic Acid-Acridine Complex Under High Pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerzykiewicz, Lucjan; Sroka, Adam; Majerz, Irena

    2016-12-01

    The crystal structure of fenamic acid-acridine complex is determined by X-ray diffraction. The strong OHN hydrogen bond linking the complex components and other interactions responsible for packing of the molecules into a crystal are investigated within the Quantum Theory of Atom in Molecule theory. The crystal structure is compared with the structure optimized at B3LYP/6-311++G** level and with the theoretical structures optimized under systematically changed pressure. Analysis of the lattice constants, hydrogen bond lengths, and angles of the inter- and intramolecular hydrogen bond under compression is performed. The structural transformation observed at 5 GPa is connected with a change in the intermolecular OHN hydrogen bond. The proton shifts to acceptor and a new interaction in the crystal appears.

  7. Information-theoretic equilibration: the appearance of irreversibility under complex quantum dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    The question of how irreversibility can emerge as a generic phenomena when the underlying mechanical theory is reversible has been a long-standing fundamental problem for both classical and quantum mechanics. We describe a mechanism for the appearance of irreversibility that applies to coherent, isolated systems in a pure quantum state. This equilibration mechanism requires only an assumption of sufficiently complex internal dynamics and natural information-theoretic constraints arising from ...

  8. Highly efficient photocatalytic hydrogen evolution from nickel quinolinethiolate complexes under visible light irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Heng; Yu, Wen-Qian; Zheng, Hui-Qin; Bonin, Julien; Fan, Yao-Ting; Hou, Hong-Wei

    2016-08-01

    Earth-abundant metal complexes have emerged as promising surrogates of platinum for catalyzing the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). In this study, we report the design and synthesis of two novel nickel quinolinethiolate complexes, namely [Ni(Hqt)2(4, 4‧-Z-2, 2‧-bpy)] (Hqt = 8-quinolinethiol, Z = sbnd H [1] or sbnd CH3 [2], bpy = bipyridine). An efficient three-component photocatalytic homogeneous system for hydrogen generation working under visible light irradiation was constructed by using the target complexes as catalysts, triethylamine (TEA) as sacrificial electron donor and xanthene dyes as photosensitizer. We obtain turnover numbers (TON, vs. catalyst) for H2 evolution of 5923/7634 under the optimal conditions with 5.0 × 10-6 M complex 1/2 respectively, 1.0 × 10-3 M fluorescein and 5% (v/v) TEA at pH 12.3 in EtOH/H2O (1:1, v/v) mixture after 8 h irradiation (λ > 420 nm). We discuss the mechanism of H2 evolution in the homogeneous photocatalytic system based on fluorescence spectrum and cyclic voltammetry data.

  9. Correction factors for assessing immersion suits under harsh conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, Jonathan; Tikuisis, Peter; Ré, António Simões; Barwood, Martin; Tipton, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Many immersion suit standards require testing of thermal protective properties in calm, circulating water while these suits are typically used in harsher environments where they often underperform. Yet it can be expensive and logistically challenging to test immersion suits in realistic conditions. The goal of this work was to develop a set of correction factors that would allow suits to be tested in calm water yet ensure they will offer sufficient protection in harsher conditions. Two immersion studies, one dry and the other with 500 mL of water within the suit, were conducted in wind and waves to measure the change in suit insulation. In both studies, wind and waves resulted in a significantly lower immersed insulation value compared to calm water. The minimum required thermal insulation for maintaining heat balance can be calculated for a given mean skin temperature, metabolic heat production, and water temperature. Combining the physiological limits of sustainable cold water immersion and actual suit insulation, correction factors can be deduced for harsh conditions compared to calm. The minimum in-situ suit insulation to maintain thermal balance is 1.553-0.0624·TW + 0.00018·TW(2) for a dry calm condition. Multiplicative correction factors to the above equation are 1.37, 1.25, and 1.72 for wind + waves, 500 mL suit wetness, and both combined, respectively. Calm water certification tests of suit insulation should meet or exceed the minimum in-situ requirements to maintain thermal balance, and correction factors should be applied for a more realistic determination of minimum insulation for harsh conditions. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. RISK FACTORS FOR PANCREATIC CANCER: UNDERLYING MECHANISMS AND POTENTIAL TARGETS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas eKolodecik

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose of the review:Pancreatic cancer is extremely aggressive, forming highly chemo-resistant tumors, and has one of the worst prognoses. The evolution of this cancer is multi-factorial. Repeated acute pancreatic injury and inflammation are important contributing factors in the development of pancreatic cancer. This article attempts to understand the common pathways linking pancreatitis to pancreatic cancer.Recent Findings:Intracellular activation of both pancreatic enzymes and the transcription factor NF-kB are important mechanisms that induce acute pancreatitis. Recurrent pancreatic injury due to genetic susceptibility, environmental factors such as smoking, alcohol intake, and conditions such as obesity lead to increases in oxidative stress, impaired autophagy and constitutive activation of inflammatory pathways. These processes can stimulate pancreatic stellate cells, thereby increasing fibrosis and encouraging chronic disease development. Activation of oncogneic Kras mutations through inflammation, coupled with altered levels of tumor suppressor proteins (p53 and p16 can ultimately lead to development of pancreatic cancer. Summary:Although our understanding of pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer has tremendously increased over many years, much remains to be elucidated in terms of common pathways linking these conditions.

  11. Risk factors for pancreatic cancer: underlying mechanisms and potential targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolodecik, Thomas; Shugrue, Christine; Ashat, Munish; Thrower, Edwin C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of the review: Pancreatic cancer is extremely aggressive, forming highly chemo-resistant tumors, and has one of the worst prognoses. The evolution of this cancer is multi-factorial. Repeated acute pancreatic injury and inflammation are important contributing factors in the development of pancreatic cancer. This article attempts to understand the common pathways linking pancreatitis to pancreatic cancer. Recent findings: Intracellular activation of both pancreatic enzymes and the transcription factor NF-κB are important mechanisms that induce acute pancreatitis (AP). Recurrent pancreatic injury due to genetic susceptibility, environmental factors such as smoking, alcohol intake, and conditions such as obesity lead to increases in oxidative stress, impaired autophagy and constitutive activation of inflammatory pathways. These processes can stimulate pancreatic stellate cells, thereby increasing fibrosis and encouraging chronic disease development. Activation of oncogenic Kras mutations through inflammation, coupled with altered levels of tumor suppressor proteins (p53 and p16) can ultimately lead to development of pancreatic cancer. Summary: Although our understanding of pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer has tremendously increased over many years, much remains to be elucidated in terms of common pathways linking these conditions. PMID:24474939

  12. Development and Validation of a Method to Identify Children With Social Complexity Risk Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrager, Sheree M; Arthur, Kimberly C; Nelson, Justine; Edwards, Anne R; Murphy, J Michael; Mangione-Smith, Rita; Chen, Alex Y

    2016-09-01

    We sought to develop and validate a method to identify social complexity risk factors (eg, limited English proficiency) using Minnesota state administrative data. A secondary objective was to examine the relationship between social complexity and caregiver-reported need for care coordination. A total of 460 caregivers of children with noncomplex chronic conditions enrolled in a Minnesota public health care program were surveyed and administrative data on these caregivers and children were obtained. We validated the administrative measures by examining their concordance with caregiver-reported indicators of social complexity risk factors using tetrachoric correlations. Logistic regression analyses subsequently assessed the association between social complexity risk factors identified using Minnesota's state administrative data and caregiver-reported need for care coordination, adjusting for child demographics. Concordance between administrative and caregiver-reported data was moderate to high (correlation range 0.31-0.94, all P values risk factor was significantly associated with need for care coordination before (unadjusted odds ratio = 1.65; 95% confidence interval, 1.07-2.53) but not after adjusting for child demographic factors (adjusted odds ratio = 1.53; 95% confidence interval, 0.98-2.37). Social complexity risk factors may be accurately obtained from state administrative data. The presence of these risk factors may heighten a family's need for care coordination and/or other services for children with chronic illness, even those not considered medically complex. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  13. The effect of humic acids and their complexes with iron on the functional status of plants grown under iron deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abros'kin, D. P.; Fuentes, M.; Garcia-Mina, J. M.; Klyain, O. I.; Senik, S. V.; Volkov, D. S.; Perminova, I. V.; Kulikova, N. A.

    2016-10-01

    The effect of humic acids (HAs) and their iron complexes (Fe-HAs) on the input of the main mineral elements into wheat seedlings, as well as on the efficiency of photosynthesis and the lipid profile of plants, under iron deficiency has been studied. The input of iron from Fe-HA complexes and its predominant accumulation in roots are demonstrated. It is found that HAs increase the efficiency of photosynthesis due to enhanced electron transport in photosystem II. It is shown that the application of HAs and Fe-HAs is accompanied by an enhanced input of Zn into plants, which could increase the antioxidant status of plants under iron deficiency conditions. In addition, a pronounced increase in the content of lipids in plants is revealed, which is indicative of the effect of HAs on plant metabolism. The obtained results suggest that the positive effect of Fe-HAs and HAs on plants under iron deficiency conditions is due to a combination of factors, among which the effect of HAs on the antioxidant status of plants and the plant lipid metabolism predominates.

  14. [Structure and function of the factor VIII/von Willebrand factor complex].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, G

    1990-03-01

    In the blood plasma factor VIII is bound to the von Willebrand factor. The primary structure of the two proteins were clarified by gene clonation. Factor VIII descends from a precursor protein with 2,351 amino acids by splitting of 19 amino acid residues and is activated by partial proteolysis. In the blood coagulation factor VIII acts as co-factor for the activation of factor X by factor IX in the presence of phospholipids and Ca++ within the intrinsic coagulation system. The formation of the von Willebrand factor takes place by splitting of 22 and 741 amino acid residues, respectively, from pre-pro-von Willebrand factor via pro-von Willebrand factor. The subunits of the von Willebrand factor consist od 2,050 amino acid residues. In the blood plasma the von Willebrand factor is existing as a mixture of multimeres. Receptors of the von Willebrand factor on the thrombocytic membrane are the glycoproteins GPIb and GPIIb/GPIIIa, by means of which the adhesion of thrombocytes at the subendoethelium of the vascular wall and the aggregation of thrombocytes are mediated.

  15. An Intelligent Complex Event Processing with D Numbers under Fuzzy Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuyuan Xiao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Efficient matching of incoming mass events to persistent queries is fundamental to complex event processing systems. Event matching based on pattern rule is an important feature of complex event processing engine. However, the intrinsic uncertainty in pattern rules which are predecided by experts increases the difficulties of effective complex event processing. It inevitably involves various types of the intrinsic uncertainty, such as imprecision, fuzziness, and incompleteness, due to the inability of human beings subjective judgment. Nevertheless, D numbers is a new mathematic tool to model uncertainty, since it ignores the condition that elements on the frame must be mutually exclusive. To address the above issues, an intelligent complex event processing method with D numbers under fuzzy environment is proposed based on the Technique for Order Preferences by Similarity to an Ideal Solution (TOPSIS method. The novel method can fully support decision making in complex event processing systems. Finally, a numerical example is provided to evaluate the efficiency of the proposed method.

  16. Swimming and asthma: factors underlying respiratory symptoms in competitive swimmers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Päivinen, Marja Kristiina; Keskinen, Kari Lasse; Tikkanen, Heikki Olavi

    2010-04-01

    Swimming is recommended for asthmatics. However, many competitive swimmers report asthmatic symptoms. While some studies identify the swimming environment as a trigger for allergy and asthmatic symptoms, even more studies suggest swimming to be suitable for people with allergies and asthma. The factors behind the symptoms were studied first by determining the prevalence of asthma, allergy and self-reported asthmatic symptoms in experienced Finnish swimmers and then by examining the relationships between the reported symptoms and the main triggering factors: medical history, environment and exercise intensity. Top swimmers (n = 332) of the Finnish Swimming Association registry (N = 4578) were asked to complete a structured questionnaire on their medical history, swimming background, swimming environment and symptoms in different swimming intensities. Two hundred experienced swimmers, 107 females and 93 males, with an average age of 18.5 [standard deviation (SD) = 3.0] years and a swimming training history of 9 (SD = 3.8) years completed the questionnaire. Physician-diagnosed asthma was reported by 32 swimmers (16%), including 24 (12%) with exercise-induced asthma. Physician-diagnosed allergy was reported by 81 (41%) swimmers. Asthmatic symptoms during swimming were described by 84 subjects (42%). Most symptoms occurred when swimming exceeded speeds corresponding to the lactic/anaerobic threshold. Family history of asthma was significant and the most important risk factor for asthmatic symptoms. The prevalence of asthma in swimmers was higher than in the general population but not different from that in other endurance athletes. Family history of asthma and increased swimming intensity had the strongest associations with the reported asthmatic symptoms.

  17. Equivalent circuit with complex physical constants and equivalent-parameters-expressed dissipation factors of piezoelectric materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Yu; Wen Yu-Mei; Li Ping

    2006-01-01

    The equivalent circuit with complex physical constants for a piezoelectric ceramic in thickness mode is established.In the equivalent circuit, electric components (equivalent circuit parameters) are connected to real and imaginary parts of complex physical coefficients of piezoelectric materials. Based on definitions of dissipation factors, three of them (dielectric, elastic and piezoelectric dissipation factors) are represented by equivalent circuit parameters. Since the equivalent circuit parameters are detectable, the dissipation factors can be easily obtained. In the experiments, the temperature and the stress responses of the three dissipation factors are measured.

  18. Local zeta factors and geometries under Spec Z

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manin, Yu I.

    2016-08-01

    The first part of this note shows that the odd-period polynomial of each Hecke cusp eigenform for the full modular group produces via the Rodriguez-Villegas transform ([1]) a polynomial satisfying the functional equation of zeta type and having non-trivial zeros only in the middle line of its critical strip. The second part discusses the Chebyshev lambda-structure of the polynomial ring as Borger's descent data to \\mathbf{F}_1 and suggests its role in a possible relation of the Γ\\mathbf{R}-factor to 'real geometry over \\mathbf{F}_1' (cf. [2]).

  19. Biology, Genetics, and Environment: Underlying Factors Influencing Alcohol Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Tamara L; Luczak, Susan E; Hiller-Sturmhöfel, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    Gene variants encoding several of the alcohol-metabolizing enzymes, alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH), are among the largest genetic associations with risk for alcohol dependence. Certain genetic variants (i.e., alleles)--particularly the ADH1B*2, ADH1B*3, ADH1C*1, and ALDH2*2 alleles--have been associated with lower rates of alcohol dependence. These alleles may lead to an accumulation of acetaldehyde during alcohol metabolism, which can result in heightened subjective and objective effects. The prevalence of these alleles differs among ethnic groups; ADH1B*2 is found frequently in northeast Asians and occasionally Caucasians, ADH1B*3 is found predominantly in people of African ancestry, ADH1C*1 varies substantially across populations, and ALDH2*2 is found almost exclusively in northeast Asians. Differences in the prevalence of these alleles may account at least in part for ethnic differences in alcohol consumption and alcohol use disorder (AUD). However, these alleles do not act in isolation to influence the risk of AUD. For example, the gene effects of ALDH2*2 and ADH1B*2 seem to interact. Moreover, other factors have been found to influence the extent to which these alleles affect a person's alcohol involvement, including developmental stage, individual characteristics (e.g., ethnicity, antisocial behavior, and behavioral undercontrol), and environmental factors (e.g., culture, religion, family environment, and childhood adversity).

  20. COP1/SPA ubiquitin ligase complexes repress anthocyanin accumulation under low light and high light conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Alexander; Hoecker, Ute

    2015-01-01

    In Arabidopsis and many other plant species, anthocyanin pigments accumulate only after light exposure and not in darkness. Excess light of very high fluence rates leads to a further, very strong increase in anthocyanin levels. How excess light is sensed is not well understood. Here, we show that mutations in the key repressor of light signaling, the COP1/SPA complex, cause a strong hyperaccumulation of anthocyanins not only under normal light but also under excess, high light conditions. Hence, normal light signaling via COP1/SPA is required to prevent hyperaccumulation of anthocyanins under these high light conditions. However, since cop1 and spa mutants show a similar high-light responsiveness of anthocyanin accumulation as the wild type it remains to be resolved whether COP1/SPA is directly involved in the high-light response itself.

  1. Factors affecting survivability of local Rohilkhand goats under organized farm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Upadhyay

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To study the pattern of mortality as affected by age, season and various diseases in local goats of Rohilkhand region maintained at the Indian Veterinary Research Institute, Bareilly. Materials and Methods: Post-mortem records of 12 years (2000-01 to 2011-12 were used, and total 243 mortality data were collected and analyzed. The causes of mortality were classified into seven major classes viz. digestive disorders, respiratory disorders, cardiovascular disorders, musculoskeletal disorder, parasitic disorders, mixed disorders (combination of digestive, respiratory, parasitic, and cardiovascular disorders and miscellaneous disorders (cold, hypoglycemia, emaciation, endometritis, traumatic injury, etc.. Results: The average mortality was 10.93%. The overall mortality was more during rainy season followed by winter and summer season. The mortality in 4-6 months of age was high (2.52% followed by 0-1 month (2.34% and 2-3 months (1.35%. The average mortality among adult age groups (>12 months was 3.42%. The mortality showed declining trend with the advancement of age up to 3 months and then again increased in 4-6 months age group. The digestive diseases (3.51% followed by respiratory diseases (1.89% and parasitic diseases (1.48% contributed major share to the total mortality occurred and the remaining disorders were of lesser significance in causing death in goats. There is significant (p<0.01; χ2=55.62 association between year with season and age with the season (p<0.05, χ2=16.083 found in the present study. Conclusion: This study confirms that overall mortality rate averaged 10.93% (ranged between 1.10% and 25.56% over 12 years under semi-intensive farm condition. It was generally higher in rainy season. The mortality remains higher in kids particularly under 1 month of age. The digestive diseases contributed major share to overall mortality.

  2. Review of the complexation of tetravalent actinides by ISA and gluconate under alkaline to hyperalkaline conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaona, X.; Montoya, V.; Colàs, E.; Grivé, M.; Duro, L.

    2008-12-01

    Isosaccharinic (ISA) and gluconic acids (GLU) are polyhydroxy carboxylic compounds showing a high affinity to metal complexation. Both organic ligands are expected in the cementitious environments usually considered for the disposal of low- and intermediate-level radioactive wastes. The hyperalkaline conditions imposed by cementitious materials contribute to the formation of ISA through cellulose degradation, whereas GLU is commonly used as a concrete additive. Despite the high stability attributed to ISA/GLU complexes of tetravalent actinides, the number and reliability of available experimental studies is still limited. This work aims at providing a general and comprehensive overview of the state of the art regarding Th, U(IV), Np(IV), and Pu(IV) complexes with ISA and GLU. In the presence of ISA/GLU concentrations in the range 10 - 5 -10 - 2 M and absence of calcium, An(IV)(OH) x(L) y complexes (An(IV) = Th, U(IV), Np(IV), Pu(IV); L = ISA, GLU) are expected to dominate the aqueous speciation of tetravalent actinides in the alkaline pH range. There is a moderate agreement among their stability, although the stoichiometry of certain An(IV)-GLU complexes is still ill-defined. Under hyperalkaline conditions and presence of calcium, the species CaTh(OH) 4(L) 2(aq) has been described for both ISA and GLU, and similar complexes may be expected to form with other tetravalent actinides. In the present work, the available thermodynamic data for An(IV)-ISA/GLU complexes have been reviewed and re-calculated to ensure the internal consistency of the stability constants assessed. Further modelling exercises, estimations based on Linear Free-Energy Relationships (LFER) among tetravalent actinides, as well as direct analogies between ISA and GLU complexes have also been performed. This approach has led to the definition of a speciation scheme for the complexes of Th, U(IV), Np(IV) and Pu(IV) with ISA and GLU forming in alkaline to hyperalkaline pH conditions, both in the

  3. Pectoral fins aid in navigation of a complex environment by bluegill sunfish under sensory deprivation conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flammang, Brooke E; Lauder, George V

    2013-08-15

    Complex structured environments offer fish advantages as places of refuge and areas of greater potential prey densities, but maneuvering through these environments is a navigational challenge. To successfully navigate complex habitats, fish must have sensory input relaying information about the proximity and size of obstacles. We investigated the role of the pectoral fins as mechanosensors in bluegill sunfish swimming through obstacle courses under different sensory deprivation and flow speed conditions. Sensory deprivation was accomplished by filming in the dark to remove visual input and/or temporarily blocking lateral line input via immersion in cobalt chloride. Fish used their pectoral fins to touch obstacles as they swam slowly past them under all conditions. Loss of visual and/or lateral line sensory input resulted in an increased number of fin taps and shorter tap durations while traversing the course. Propulsive pectoral fin strokes were made in open areas between obstacle posts and fish did not use the pectoral fins to push off or change heading. Bending of the flexible pectoral fin rays may initiate an afferent sensory input, which could be an important part of the proprioceptive feedback system needed to navigate complex environments. This behavioral evidence suggests that it is possible for unspecialized pectoral fins to act in both a sensory and a propulsive capacity.

  4. Cognitive and Ocular Factors Jointly Determine Pupil Responses under Equiluminance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomas Knapen

    Full Text Available Changes in pupil diameter can reflect high-level cognitive signals that depend on central neuromodulatory mechanisms. However, brain mechanisms that adjust pupil size are also exquisitely sensitive to changes in luminance and other events that would be considered a nuisance in cognitive experiments recording pupil size. We implemented a simple auditory experiment involving no changes in visual stimulation. Using finite impulse-response fitting we found pupil responses triggered by different types of events. Among these are pupil responses to auditory events and associated surprise: cognitive effects. However, these cognitive responses were overshadowed by pupil responses associated with blinks and eye movements, both inevitable nuisance factors that lead to changes in effective luminance. Of note, these latter pupil responses were not recording artifacts caused by blinks and eye movements, but endogenous pupil responses that occurred in the wake of these events. Furthermore, we identified slow (tonic changes in pupil size that differentially influenced faster (phasic pupil responses. Fitting all pupil responses using gamma functions, we provide accurate characterisations of cognitive and non-cognitive response shapes, and quantify each response's dependence on tonic pupil size. These results allow us to create a set of recommendations for pupil size analysis in cognitive neuroscience, which we have implemented in freely available software.

  5. Generating functions for Wilf equivalence under generalized factor order

    CERN Document Server

    Langley, Thomas; Remmel, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    Kitaev, Liese, Remmel, and Sagan recently defined generalized factor order on words comprised of letters from a partially ordered set $(P, \\leq_P)$ by setting $u \\leq_P w$ if there is a subword $v$ of $w$ of the same length as $u$ such that the $i$-th character of $v$ is greater than or equal to the $i$-th character of $u$ for all $i$. This subword $v$ is called an embedding of $u$ into $w$. For the case where $P$ is the positive integers with the usual ordering, they defined the weight of a word $w = w_1\\ldots w_n$ to be $\\text{wt}(w) = x^{\\sum_{i=1}^n w_i} t^{n}$, and the corresponding weight generating function $F(u;t,x) = \\sum_{w \\geq_P u} \\text{wt}(w)$. They then defined two words $u$ and $v$ to be Wilf equivalent, denoted $u \\backsim v$, if and only if $F(u;t,x) = F(v;t,x)$. They also defined the related generating function $S(u;t,x) = \\sum_{w \\in \\mathcal{S}(u)} \\text{wt}(w)$ where $\\mathcal{S}(u)$ is the set of all words $w$ such that the only embedding of $u$ into $w$ is a suffix of $w$, and showed t...

  6. Underlying causal factors associated with construction worker fatalities involving stepladders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aneurin Thomas James Grant

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Stepladders are frequently utilized on construction projects as a means of access to elevation. Stepladder heights commonly range from 4 feet (1.2 m to 14 feet (4.3 m. Since these heights are not extreme, there is a common misperception that stepladder use presents a low risk. On the contrary, extreme care must be exercised to ensure that work on stepladders is performed safely, as described in the conspicuously located recommendations and brightly-colored warnings that adorn virtually all newly-purchased equipment. Despite this, accidents involving stepladders occur on a regular basis.  This study was conducted to better understand the underlying causes of these accidents. The narrative descriptions of 180 stepladder-related fatalities were obtained from the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration and were analyzed to identify the at-risk behaviors that preceded the fatality incidents. The results showed that most of the incidents should have been anticipated and could have been avoided. Unsafe practices such as improper lockout-tagout of electrical equipment, loss of balance, working on a folded stepladder, over-reaching, straddling the ladder, “walking” the ladder, poor footing, and unstable/shifting ladders, among others were identified. Virtually all of these fatalities could have been avoided by adhering to the guidelines posted on the stepladders and by complying with basic safe construction practices.

  7. Underlying causal factors associated with construction worker fatalities involving stepladders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aneurin Thomas James Grant

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Stepladders are frequently utilized on construction projects as a means of access to elevation. Stepladder heights commonly range from 4 feet (1.2 m to 14 feet (4.3 m. Since these heights are not extreme, there is a common misperception that stepladder use presents a low risk. On the contrary, extreme care must be exercised to ensure that work on stepladders is performed safely, as described in the conspicuously located recommendations and brightly-colored warnings that adorn virtually all newly-purchased equipment. Despite this, accidents involving stepladders occur on a regular basis.  This study was conducted to better understand the underlying causes of these accidents. The narrative descriptions of 180 stepladder-related fatalities were obtained from the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration and were analyzed to identify the at-risk behaviors that preceded the fatality incidents. The results showed that most of the incidents should have been anticipated and could have been avoided. Unsafe practices such as improper lockout-tagout of electrical equipment, loss of balance, working on a folded stepladder, over-reaching, straddling the ladder, “walking” the ladder, poor footing, and unstable/shifting ladders, among others were identified. Virtually all of these fatalities could have been avoided by adhering to the guidelines posted on the stepladders and by complying with basic safe construction practices. 

  8. Genetic deletion of fibroblast growth factor 14 recapitulates phenotypic alterations underlying cognitive impairment associated with schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshammari, T K; Alshammari, M A; Nenov, M N; Hoxha, E; Cambiaghi, M; Marcinno, A; James, T F; Singh, P; Labate, D; Li, J; Meltzer, H Y; Sacchetti, B; Tempia, F; Laezza, F

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive processing is highly dependent on the functional integrity of gamma-amino-butyric acid (GABA) interneurons in the brain. These cells regulate excitability and synaptic plasticity of principal neurons balancing the excitatory/inhibitory tone of cortical networks. Reduced function of parvalbumin (PV) interneurons and disruption of GABAergic synapses in the cortical circuitry result in desynchronized network activity associated with cognitive impairment across many psychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia. However, the mechanisms underlying these complex phenotypes are still poorly understood. Here we show that in animal models, genetic deletion of fibroblast growth factor 14 (Fgf14), a regulator of neuronal excitability and synaptic transmission, leads to loss of PV interneurons in the CA1 hippocampal region, a critical area for cognitive function. Strikingly, this cellular phenotype associates with decreased expression of glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 (GAD67) and vesicular GABA transporter (VGAT) and also coincides with disrupted CA1 inhibitory circuitry, reduced in vivo gamma frequency oscillations and impaired working memory. Bioinformatics analysis of schizophrenia transcriptomics revealed functional co-clustering of FGF14 and genes enriched within the GABAergic pathway along with correlatively decreased expression of FGF14, PVALB, GAD67 and VGAT in the disease context. These results indicate that Fgf14−/− mice recapitulate salient molecular, cellular, functional and behavioral features associated with human cognitive impairment, and FGF14 loss of function might be associated with the biology of complex brain disorders such as schizophrenia. PMID:27163207

  9. NONINVASIVE DETECTION OF BRAIN ACTIVITY VARIATION UNDER DIFFERENT DEPTH OF ANESTHESIA BY EEG COMPLEXITY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Jin; Li Wenwen; Zheng Chongxun; Jing Guixia; Liu Xueliang

    2006-01-01

    Objective To detect the change of brain activity under different depth of anesthesia (DOA)noninvasively. Methods The Lempel-Ziv complexity C(n) was used to analyze EEG and its four components (delta,theta, alpha, beta), which was recorded from SD rats under different DOA. The relationship between C(n) and DOA was studied. Results The C(n) of EEG will decrease while the depth of anesthesia increasing and vice versa. It can be used to detect the change of DOA sensitively. Compared with power spectrum, the change of C(n) is opposite to that of power spectru,. Only the C(n) of delta rhythm has obvious variations induced by the change of DOA, and the variations of delta is as similar as the EEG's. Conclusion The study shows that the desynchronized EEG is replaced by the synchronized EEG when rat goes into anesthesia state from awake, that is just the reason why complexity and power spectrum appear corresponding changes under different DOA. C(n) of delta rhythm dynamic change leads to the change of EEG, and the delta rhythm is the dominant rhythm during anesthesia for rats.

  10. Complex Nonlinear Dynamic System of Oligopolies Price Game with Heterogeneous Players Under Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Feng; Li, Yaguang

    A nonlinear four oligopolies price game with heterogeneous players, that are boundedly rational and adaptive, is built using two different special demand costs. Based on the theory of complex discrete dynamical system, the stability and the existing equilibrium point are investigated. The complex dynamic behavior is presented via bifurcation diagrams, the Lyapunov exponents to show equilibrium state, bifurcation and chaos with the variation in parameters. As disturbance is ubiquitous in economic systems, this paper focuses on the analysis of delay feedback control method under noise circumstances. Stable dynamics is confirmed to depend mainly on the low price adjustment speed, and if all four players have limited opportunities to stabilize the market, the new adaptive player facing profits of scale are found to be higher than the incumbents of bounded rational.

  11. On the origin of dust vortices in complex plasmas under microgravity conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bockwoldt, Tim, E-mail: bockwoldt@physik.uni-kiel.de; Arp, Oliver; Piel, Alexander [IEAP, Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel, D–24098 Kiel (Germany); Menzel, Kristoffer Ole [ABB Switzerland Ltd., Corporate Research Center, 5405 Dättwil (Switzerland)

    2014-10-15

    Under microgravity conditions, microparticles in a radio-frequency plasma form an extended dust cloud. In such clouds, self-excited large-scale vortices are observed. New experimental observations are reported, which exhibit a simple double vortex structure or a more complex quadrupole-like topology. Modeling the fields of the main acting forces, namely, the electric field force and the ion drag force, and calculating the curl of these forces reveal their non-conservative character and the possible driving mechanism of the vortices. It is shown that the curl of the ion drag force and of the electric field force has opposite sign and the combination could thus lead to the complex structures, also found in the observations.

  12. Detection of Micro-Leaks Through Complex Geometries Under Mechanical Load and at Cryogenic Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivers, H. Kevin; Sikora, J. G.; Sankaran, S. N.

    2001-01-01

    Polymer Matrix Composite (PMC) hydrogen tanks have been proposed as an enabling technology for reducing the weight of Single-Stage-to-Orbit reusable launch vehicles where structural mass has a large impact on vehicle performance. A key development issue of these lightweight structures is the leakage of hydrogen through the composite material. The rate of hydrogen leakage can be a function of the material used, method of 6 fabrication used to manufacture the tank, mechanical load the tank must react, internal damage-state of the material, and the temperatures at which the tank must operate. A method for measuring leakage through a geometrically complex structure at cryogenic temperature and under mechanical load was developed, calibrated and used to measure hydrogen leakage through complex X-33 liquid-hydrogen tank structure sections.

  13. Can simple interactions capture complex features of neural activity underlying behavior in a virtual reality environment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meshulam, Leenoy; Gauthier, Jeffrey; Brody, Carlos; Tank, David; Bialek, William

    The complex neural interactions which are abundant in most recordings of neural activity are relatively poorly understood. A prime example of such interactions can be found in the in vivo neural activity which underlies complex behaviors of mice, imaged in brain regions such as hippocampus and parietal cortex. Experimental techniques now allow us to accurately follow these neural interactions in the simultaneous activity of large neuronal populations of awake behaving animals. Here, we demonstrate that pairwise maximum entropy models can predict a surprising number of properties of the neural activity. The models, that are constrained with activity rates and interactions between pairs of neurons, are well fit to the activity `states' in the hippocampus and cortex of mice performing cognitive tasks while navigating in a virtual reality environment.

  14. The dynamics of architectural complexity on coral reefs under climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozec, Yves-Marie; Alvarez-Filip, Lorenzo; Mumby, Peter J

    2015-01-01

    One striking feature of coral reef ecosystems is the complex benthic architecture which supports diverse and abundant fauna, particularly of reef fish. Reef-building corals are in decline worldwide, with a corresponding loss of live coral cover resulting in a loss of architectural complexity. Understanding the dynamics of the reef architecture is therefore important to envision the ability of corals to maintain functional habitats in an era of climate change. Here, we develop a mechanistic model of reef topographical complexity for contemporary Caribbean reefs. The model describes the dynamics of corals and other benthic taxa under climate-driven disturbances (hurricanes and coral bleaching). Corals have a simplified shape with explicit diameter and height, allowing species-specific calculation of their colony surface and volume. Growth and the mechanical (hurricanes) and biological erosion (parrotfish) of carbonate skeletons are important in driving the pace of extension/reduction in the upper reef surface, the net outcome being quantified by a simple surface roughness index (reef rugosity). The model accurately simulated the decadal changes of coral cover observed in Cozumel (Mexico) between 1984 and 2008, and provided a realistic hindcast of coral colony-scale (1-10 m) changing rugosity over the same period. We then projected future changes of Caribbean reef rugosity in response to global warming. Under severe and frequent thermal stress, the model predicted a dramatic loss of rugosity over the next two or three decades. Critically, reefs with managed parrotfish populations were able to delay the general loss of architectural complexity, as the benefits of grazing in maintaining living coral outweighed the bioerosion of dead coral skeletons. Overall, this model provides the first explicit projections of reef rugosity in a warming climate, and highlights the need of combining local (protecting and restoring high grazing) to global (mitigation of greenhouse gas

  15. Risk factors for ischemic stroke and transient ischemic attack in patients under age 50

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, A.W.M.; Leeuw, F.E. de; Janssen, M.C.H.

    2011-01-01

    To analyze risk factors for ischemic stroke and transient ischemic attack (TIA) in young adults under the age of 50. To make recommendations for additional research and practical consequences. From 97 patients with ischemic stroke or TIA under the age of 50, classical cardiovascular risk factors, co

  16. πBUSS: a parallel BEAST/BEAGLE utility for sequence simulation under complex evolutionary scenarios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielejec, Filip; Lemey, Philippe; Carvalho, Luiz Max; Baele, Guy; Rambaut, Andrew; Suchard, Marc A

    2014-05-07

    Simulated nucleotide or amino acid sequences are frequently used to assess the performance of phylogenetic reconstruction methods. BEAST, a Bayesian statistical framework that focuses on reconstructing time-calibrated molecular evolutionary processes, supports a wide array of evolutionary models, but lacked matching machinery for simulation of character evolution along phylogenies. We present a flexible Monte Carlo simulation tool, called πBUSS, that employs the BEAGLE high performance library for phylogenetic computations to rapidly generate large sequence alignments under complex evolutionary models. πBUSS sports a user-friendly graphical user interface (GUI) that allows combining a rich array of models across an arbitrary number of partitions. A command-line interface mirrors the options available through the GUI and facilitates scripting in large-scale simulation studies. πBUSS may serve as an easy-to-use, standard sequence simulation tool, but the available models and data types are particularly useful to assess the performance of complex BEAST inferences. The connection with BEAST is further strengthened through the use of a common extensible markup language (XML), allowing to specify also more advanced evolutionary models. To support simulation under the latter, as well as to support simulation and analysis in a single run, we also add the πBUSS core simulation routine to the list of BEAST XML parsers. πBUSS offers a unique combination of flexibility and ease-of-use for sequence simulation under realistic evolutionary scenarios. Through different interfaces, πBUSS supports simulation studies ranging from modest endeavors for illustrative purposes to complex and large-scale assessments of evolutionary inference procedures. Applications are not restricted to the BEAST framework, or even time-measured evolutionary histories, and πBUSS can be connected to various other programs using standard input and output format.

  17. Efficient and robust analysis of complex scattering data under noise in microwave resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Probst, S.; Song, F. B.; Bushev, P. A.; Ustinov, A. V.; Weides, M.

    2015-02-01

    Superconducting microwave resonators are reliable circuits widely used for detection and as test devices for material research. A reliable determination of their external and internal quality factors is crucial for many modern applications, which either require fast measurements or operate in the single photon regime with small signal to noise ratios. Here, we use the circle fit technique with diameter correction and provide a step by step guide for implementing an algorithm for robust fitting and calibration of complex resonator scattering data in the presence of noise. The speedup and robustness of the analysis are achieved by employing an algebraic rather than an iterative fit technique for the resonance circle.

  18. Efficient and robust analysis of complex scattering data under noise in microwave resonators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Probst, S., E-mail: sebastian.probst@kit.edu [Physikalisches Institut, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, D-76128 Karlsruhe (Germany); Song, F. B. [Physikalisches Institut, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, D-76128 Karlsruhe (Germany); The 10th Institute of Chinese Electronic Technology Corporation, Chengdu 610036 (China); Bushev, P. A. [Experimentalphysik, Universität des Saarlandes, D-66123 Saarbrücken (Germany); Ustinov, A. V. [Physikalisches Institut, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, D-76128 Karlsruhe (Germany); Laboratory of Superconducting Metamaterials, National University of Science and Technology “MISIS,” Moscow 119049 (Russian Federation); Weides, M. [Physikalisches Institut, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, D-76128 Karlsruhe (Germany); Institut für Physik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz, D-55099 Mainz (Germany)

    2015-02-15

    Superconducting microwave resonators are reliable circuits widely used for detection and as test devices for material research. A reliable determination of their external and internal quality factors is crucial for many modern applications, which either require fast measurements or operate in the single photon regime with small signal to noise ratios. Here, we use the circle fit technique with diameter correction and provide a step by step guide for implementing an algorithm for robust fitting and calibration of complex resonator scattering data in the presence of noise. The speedup and robustness of the analysis are achieved by employing an algebraic rather than an iterative fit technique for the resonance circle.

  19. An archaeal tRNA-synthetase complex that enhances aminoacylation under extreme conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Godinic-Mikulcic, Vlatka; Jaric, Jelena; Hausmann, Corinne D;

    2011-01-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) play an integral role in protein synthesis, functioning to attach the correct amino acid with its cognate tRNA molecule. AaRSs are known to associate into higher-order multi-aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase complexes (MSC) involved in archaeal and eukaryotic translation...... in the catalytic efficiency of serine attachment to tRNA, but had no effect on the activity of MtArgRS. Further, the most pronounced improvements in the aminoacylation activity of MtSerRS induced by MtArgRS were observed under conditions of elevated temperature and osmolarity. These data indicate that formation...

  20. Median and quantile tests under complex survey design using SAS and R.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yi; Caudill, Samuel P; Li, Ruosha; Caldwell, Kathleen L

    2014-11-01

    Techniques for conducting hypothesis testing on the median and other quantiles of two or more subgroups under complex survey design are limited. In this paper, we introduce programs in both SAS and R to perform such a test. A detailed illustration of the computations, macro variable definitions, input and output for the SAS and R programs are also included in the text. Urinary iodine data from National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) are used as examples for comparing medians between females and males as well as comparing the 75th percentiles among three salt consumption groups.

  1. Interrelationships of metal transfer factor under wastewater reuse and soil pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papaioannou, D; Kalavrouziotis, I K; Koukoulakis, P H; Papadopoulos, F; Psoma, P

    2017-04-20

    The transfer of heavy metals under soil pollution wastewater reuse was studied in a Greenhouse experiment using a randomized block design, including 6 treatments of heavy metals mixtures composed of Zn, Mn, Cd, Co, Cu, Cr, Ni, and Pb, where each metal was taking part in the mixture with 0, 10, 20, 30, 40, 50 mg/kg respectively, in four replications. The Beta vulgaris L (beet) was used as a test plant. It was found that the metal transfer factors were statistically significantly related to the: (i) DTPA extractable soil metals, (ii) the soil pollution level as assessed by the pollution indices, (iii) the soil pH, (iv) the beet dry matter yield and (v) the interactions between the heavy metals in the soil. It was concluded that the Transfer Factor is subjected to multifactor effects and its real nature is complex, and there is a strong need for further study for the understanding of its role in metal-plant relationships. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Transitional dispersive scenarios driven by mesoscale flows on complex terrain under strong dry convective conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. L. Palau

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available By experimentation and modelling, this paper analyses the atmospheric dispersion of the SO2 emissions from a power plant on complex terrain under strong convective conditions, describing the main dispersion features as an ensemble of "stationary dispersive scenarios" and reformulating some "classical" dispersive concepts to deal with the systematically monitored summer dispersive scenarios in inland Spain. The results and discussions presented arise from a statistically representative study of the physical processes associated with the multimodal distribution of pollutants aloft and around a 343-m-tall chimney under strong dry convective conditions in the Iberian Peninsula. This paper analyses the importance of the identification and physical implications of transitional periods for air quality applications. The indetermination of a transversal plume to the preferred transport direction during these transitional periods implies a small (or null physical significance of the classical definition of horizontal standard deviation of the concentration distribution.

  3. A simple method to determine electrospray response factors of noncovalent complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabelica, Valérie; Rosu, Frédéric; De Pauw, Edwin

    2009-08-15

    The quantitative study of noncovalent complexes by electrospray mass spectrometry requires the determination of the relative response of each species. The method proposed here to determine the electrospray response factors is based on the use of (1) an internal standard and (2) the mass balance equation applied to one binding partner M, for which different complexes M(x)L(y) are detected in the electrospray mass spectra. A set of experiments providing various ratios between the complexes (e.g., different ligand concentrations in a titration experiment or different time points in a kinetics experiment) is used to generate a set of independent linear equations that can be solved using simple matrix algebra to find the response factors of each M(x)L(y) complex relative to that of the internal standard. The response factors can then be used to determine equilibrium dissociation constants or for the quantitative monitoring of reaction kinetics. The first is illustrated with a study of DNA-ligand complexes, where we show that neither minor groove binding nor intercalation dramatically affects the DNA response factor. The second is illustrated with a study of the association kinetics of the telomeric G-quadruplex dGGG(TTAGGG)(3) with its complementary strand, where the response factors allow correcting for the relative response of the quadruplex and the long duplex and obtaining reproducible association rate constants independently of the source tuning potentials.

  4. C sub 6 sub 0 fullerene and its molecular complexes under axial and shear deformation

    CERN Document Server

    Spitsina, N G; Bashkin, I V; Meletov, K P

    2002-01-01

    We have studied the pristine C sub 6 sub 0 and its molecular complexes with the organic donors bis(ethylenedithio) tetrathiafulvalene (BEDT-TTF or ET) and tetramethyltetraselenafulvalene (TMTSF) by means of ESR and Raman spectroscopy at high pressure. The important changes in the ESR signal of C sub 6 sub 0 were observed under axial pressure combined with shear deformation. It is shown that the treatment at a anisotropic pressure of 4 GPa results in a reduction in the symmetry of the C sub 6 sub 0 molecule and the formation of radicals. Treatment of the molecular complex of (ET) sub 2 centre dot C sub 6 sub 0 at a pressure of approx 4.5 GPa and a temperature of 150 deg. C leads to the formation of C sub 6 sub 0 dimers. The Raman spectra of the molecular complex C sub 6 sub 0 centre dot TMTSF centre dot 2(CS sub 2) were measured in situ at ambient temperature and pressures up to 9.5 GPa. The pressure behaviour of the Raman peaks reveals singularity at 5.0 +- 0.5 GPa related to the softening and splitting of so...

  5. [Justifying genetic and immune markers of efficiency and sensitivity under combined exposure to risk factors in mining industry workers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolgikh, O V; Zaitseva, N V; Krivtsov, A V; Gorshkova, K G; Lanin, D V; Bubnova, O A; Dianova, D G; Lykhina, T S; Vdovina, N A

    2014-01-01

    The authors evaluated and justified immunologic and genetic markers under combined exposure to risk factors in mining industry workers. Analysis covered polymorphism features of 29 genes with variant alleles possibly participating in occupationally conditioned diseases formation and serving as sensitivity markers of these diseases risk. The genes association selected demonstrates reliably changed polymorphism vs. the reference group (SOD2 superoxidedismutase gene, ANKK1 dophamine receptor gene, SULT1A1 sulphtransaminase gene, MTHFR methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase gene, VEGF endothelial growth factor gene, TNF-alpha tumor necrosis factor gene). Under combined exposure to occupational hazards (sylvinite dust, noise) in mining industry, this association can serve as adequate marking complex of sensitivity to development of occupationally conditioned diseases. Increased-production of immune cytokine regulation markers: tumor necrosis factor and vascular endothelial growth factor. Genes SOD2, ANKK1, SULT1A1, VEGF, TNFalpha are recommended as sensitivity markers, and the coded cytokines (tumor necrosis factor and endothelial growth factor) are proposed as effect markers in evaluation of health risk for workers in mining industry.

  6. Nonlinear dynamics of initially imperfect functionally graded circular cylindrical shell under complex loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y. Z.; Hao, Y. X.; Zhang, W.; Chen, J.; Li, S. B.

    2015-07-01

    The nonlinear vibration of a simply supported FGM cylindrical shell with small initial geometric imperfection under complex loads is studied. The effects of radial harmonic excitation, compressive in-plane force combined with supersonic aerodynamic and thermal loads are considered. The small initial geometric imperfection of the cylindrical shell is characterized in the form of the sine-type trigonometric functions. The effective material properties of this FGM cylindrical shell are graded in the radial direction according to a simple power law in terms of the volume fractions. Based on Reddy's third-order shear deformation theory, von Karman-type nonlinear kinematics and Hamilton's principle, the nonlinear partial differential equation that controls the shell dynamics is derived. Both axial symmetric and driven modes of the cylindrical shell deflection pattern are included. Furthermore, the equations of motion can be reduced into a set of coupled nonlinear ordinary differential equations by applying Galerkin's method. In the study of the nonlinear dynamics responses of small initial geometric imperfect FGM cylindrical shell under complex loads, the 4th order Runge-Kutta method is used to obtain time history, phase portraits, bifurcation diagrams and Poincare maps with different parameters. The effects of external loads, geometric imperfections and volume fractions on the nonlinear dynamics of the system are discussed.

  7. Applying nonlinear MODM model to supply chain management with quantity discount policy under complex fuzzy environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhe Zhang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this paper is to deal with the supply chain management (SCM with quantity discount policy under the complex fuzzy environment, which is characterized as the bi-fuzzy variables. By taking into account the strategy and the process of decision making, a bi-fuzzy nonlinear multiple objective decision making (MODM model is presented to solve the proposed problem.Design/methodology/approach: The bi-fuzzy variables in the MODM model are transformed into the trapezoidal fuzzy variables by the DMs's degree of optimism ?1 and ?2, which are de-fuzzified by the expected value index subsequently. For solving the complex nonlinear model, a multi-objective adaptive particle swarm optimization algorithm (MO-APSO is designed as the solution method.Findings: The proposed model and algorithm are applied to a typical example of SCM problem to illustrate the effectiveness. Based on the sensitivity analysis of the results, the bi-fuzzy nonlinear MODM SCM model is proved to be sensitive to the possibility level ?1.Practical implications: The study focuses on the SCM under complex fuzzy environment in SCM, which has a great practical significance. Therefore, the bi-fuzzy MODM model and MO-APSO can be further applied in SCM problem with quantity discount policy.Originality/value: The bi-fuzzy variable is employed in the nonlinear MODM model of SCM to characterize the hybrid uncertain environment, and this work is original. In addition, the hybrid crisp approach is proposed to transferred to model to an equivalent crisp one by the DMs's degree of optimism and the expected value index. Since the MODM model consider the bi-fuzzy environment and quantity discount policy, so this paper has a great practical significance.

  8. Biophysical and sociocultural factors underlying spatial trade-offs of ecosystem services in semiarid watersheds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina García-Llorente

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Biophysical and social systems are linked to form social-ecological systems whose sustainability depends on their capacity to absorb uncertainty and cope with disturbances. In this study, we explored the key biophysical and socio-cultural factors underlying ecosystem service supply in two semiarid watersheds of southern Spain. These included variables associated with the role that freshwater flows and biodiversity play in securing the system's capacity to sustain essential ecosystem services and their relationship with social demand for services, local water governance, and land-use intensification. Our results reveal the importance of considering the invisible dimensions of water and biodiversity, i.e. green freshwater flows and trait-based indicators, because of their relevance to the supply of ecosystem services. Furthermore, they uncover the importance of traditional irrigation canals, a local water governance system, in maintaining the ecosystems' capacity to supply services. The study also highlights the complex trade-offs that occur because of the spatial mismatch between ecosystem service supply (upstream and ecosystem service demand (downstream in watersheds. Finally, we found that land-use intensification generally resulted in losses of the biophysical factors that underpin the supply of some ecosystem services, increases in social demand for less diversified services, and the abandonment of local governance practices. Attempts to manage social-ecological systems toward sustainability at the local scale should identify the key biophysical and socio-cultural factors that are essential for maintaining ecosystem services and should recognize existing interrelationships between them. Land-use management should also take into account ecosystem service trade-offs and the consequences resulting from land-use intensification.

  9. Evidence that the modulator of the glucocorticoid-receptor complex is the endogenous molybdate factor.

    OpenAIRE

    Bodine, P V; Litwack, G

    1988-01-01

    We have recently purified the modulator of the glucocorticoid-receptor complex from rat liver. Purified modulator inhibits glucocorticoid-receptor complex activation and stabilizes the steroid-binding ability of the unoccupied glucocorticoid receptor. Since these activities are shared by exogenous sodium molybdate, modulator appears to be the endogenous factor that sodium molybdate mimics. In this report, we present additional evidence for the mechanism of action of purified modulator. (i) Mo...

  10. Substrate recognition by complement convertases revealed in the C5-cobra venom factor complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Nick Stub; Andersen, Kasper Røjkjær; Braren, Ingke

    2011-01-01

    with a protease subunit (Bb or C2a). We determined the crystal structures of the C3b homologue cobra venom factor (CVF) in complex with C5, and in complex with C5 and the inhibitor SSL7 at 4.3 Å resolution. The structures reveal a parallel two-point attachment between C5 and CVF, where the presence of SSL7 only...

  11. Bovine babesiosis and anaplasmosis complex: diagnosis and evaluation of the risk factors from Bahia, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucimar Souza Amorim

    Full Text Available Direct diagnoses were made by using - blood smears and nested PCR (nPCR tests on 309 blood samples from crossbred dairy cattle in the municipality of Ibicaraí, Bahia. From diagnostic blood smear slides, the observed parasitic frequencies were 31.1% for Anaplasma marginale and 20.4% for Babesia sp. From nPCR diagnoses, they were 63% for A. marginale, 34% for Babesia bigemina and 20.4% for Babesia bovis. There were significant differences (P <0.01 between the two diagnostic methods (nPCR and blood smear slides. The compliance obtained from the kappa test was 0.41 and 0.48 for A. marginale and Babesia sp., respectively. The tick samples from the six farms analyzed using nPCR were only positive for A. marginale. Evaluation of the risk factors relating to the presence of ticks and the age of the animals showed that there was a significant association (P <0.01 with the frequency of animals infected with both pathogens. Therefore, under the conditions studied, nPCR proved to be a good tool for diagnosing the agents of the bovine babesiosis and anaplasmosis complex because of its sensitivity and specificity in comparison with blood smears. The municipality of Ibicaraí is an area with endemic prevalence of bovine babesiosis and anaplasmosis confirmed by nPCR and A. marginale is the main agent of the disease.

  12. Modification of the protein corona-nanoparticle complex by physiological factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Nicholas J; DeBrosse, Madeleine C; Hussain, Saber M; Comfort, Kristen K

    2016-07-01

    Nanoparticle (NP) effects in a biological system are driven through the formation and structure of the protein corona-NP complex, which is dynamic by nature and dependent upon factors from both the local environment and NP physicochemical parameters. To date, considerable data has been gathered regarding the structure and behavior of the protein corona in blood, plasma, and traditional cell culture medium. However, there exists a knowledge gap pertaining to the protein corona in additional biological fluids and following incubation in a dynamic environment. Using 13nm gold NPs (AuNPs), functionalized with either polyethylene glycol or tannic acid, we demonstrated that both particle characteristics and the associated protein corona were altered when exposed to artificial physiological fluids and under dynamic flow. Furthermore, the magnitude of observed behavioral shifts were dependent upon AuNP surface chemistry. Lastly, we revealed that exposure to interstitial fluid produced protein corona modifications, reshaping of the nano-cellular interface, modified AuNP dosimetry, and induction of previously unseen cytotoxicity. This study highlights the need to elucidate both NP and protein corona behavior in biologically representative environments in an effort to increase accurate interpretation of data and transfer of this knowledge to efficacy, behavior, and safety of nano-based applications.

  13. Structure-aided prediction of mammalian transcription factor complexes in conserved non-coding elements

    KAUST Repository

    Guturu, H.

    2013-11-11

    Mapping the DNA-binding preferences of transcription factor (TF) complexes is critical for deciphering the functions of cis-regulatory elements. Here, we developed a computational method that compares co-occurring motif spacings in conserved versus unconserved regions of the human genome to detect evolutionarily constrained binding sites of rigid TF complexes. Structural data were used to estimate TF complex physical plausibility, explore overlapping motif arrangements seldom tackled by non-structure-aware methods, and generate and analyse three-dimensional models of the predicted complexes bound to DNA. Using this approach, we predicted 422 physically realistic TF complex motifs at 18% false discovery rate, the majority of which (326, 77%) contain some sequence overlap between binding sites. The set of mostly novel complexes is enriched in known composite motifs, predictive of binding site configurations in TF-TF-DNA crystal structures, and supported by ChIP-seq datasets. Structural modelling revealed three cooperativity mechanisms: direct protein-protein interactions, potentially indirect interactions and \\'through-DNA\\' interactions. Indeed, 38% of the predicted complexes were found to contain four or more bases in which TF pairs appear to synergize through overlapping binding to the same DNA base pairs in opposite grooves or strands. Our TF complex and associated binding site predictions are available as a web resource at http://bejerano.stanford.edu/complex.

  14. Plant polyadenylation factors: conservation and variety in the polyadenylation complex in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Arthur G; Xing, Denghui; Li, Qingshun Q

    2012-11-20

    Polyadenylation, an essential step in eukaryotic gene expression, requires both cis-elements and a plethora of trans-acting polyadenylation factors. The polyadenylation factors are largely conserved across mammals and fungi. The conservation seems also extended to plants based on the analyses of Arabidopsis polyadenylation factors. To extend this observation, we systemically identified the orthologs of yeast and human polyadenylation factors from 10 plant species chosen based on both the availability of their genome sequences and their positions in the evolutionary tree, which render them representatives of different plant lineages. The evolutionary trajectories revealed several interesting features of plant polyadenylation factors. First, the number of genes encoding plant polyadenylation factors was clearly increased from "lower" to "higher" plants. Second, the gene expansion in higher plants was biased to some polyadenylation factors, particularly those involved in RNA binding. Finally, while there are clear commonalities, the differences in the polyadenylation apparatus were obvious across different species, suggesting an ongoing process of evolutionary change. These features lead to a model in which the plant polyadenylation complex consists of a conserved core, which is rather rigid in terms of evolutionary conservation, and a panoply of peripheral subunits, which are less conserved and associated with the core in various combinations, forming a collection of somewhat distinct complex assemblies. The multiple forms of plant polyadenylation complex, together with the diversified polyA signals may explain the intensive alternative polyadenylation (APA) and its regulatory role in biological functions of higher plants.

  15. [Epidermal growth factor receptor expression and epidermal growth factor blood plasma content in simple and complex endometrial hyperplasia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dznelashvili, N; Kasradze, D; Tavartkiladze, A; Mariamidze, A

    2014-01-01

    The goal of our study was to concurrently determine the prognostic significance of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) expression in endometrium and Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF) blood content in simple and complex hyperplasia. In order to detect EGFR expression, immunohistochemical examination of endometrial scarp from 35 patients was done along with HPLC (High performance liquid chromatography) method, for measuring EGF blood plasma content. The numerical data obtained were processed statistically using computer program SPSS-12. According to the results: 1. A significant/marked increase in EGF blood plasma level together with pronounced EGFR expression in simple endometrial hyperplasia (without atypia) suggests that simple hyperplasia is likely to transform into complex form, while unchanged level of EGF against the background of mild EGFR expression is probably indicative of not very bad prognosis. 2. Normal indices of EGF blood plasma level in simple endometrial hyperplasia (without atypia), accompanied by mild EGFR expression is suggestive of good prognosis. 3. A sharp or extremely sharp increase in EGF blood plasma level with pronounced EGFR expression in complex endometrial hyperplasia (without atypia) is likely to indicate poor prognosis that may lead to the transformation into atypical form. However, unchanged EGF blood plasma level against the background of mild EGFR expression in complex endometrial hyperplasia (without atypia) is likely to point to not very bad prognosis. 4. A marked increase in EGF blood plasma level with a pronounced EGFR expression in complex endometrial hyperplasia (without atypia) is likely to indicate poor prognosis that may lead to the transformation into atypical form. Because it is evident that drastic increase in EGF blood plasma level is not necessary, other factor should be suspected to play the major role, i.e the substance that will (or will not) withstand neoplasia.

  16. Sphingosine kinase 2 is a chikungunya virus host factor co-localized with the viral replication complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, St Patrick; Tritsch, Sarah R; Kota, Krishna; Chiang, Chih-Yuan; Dong, Lian; Kenny, Tara; Brueggemann, Ernest E; Ward, Michael D; Cazares, Lisa H; Bavari, Sina

    2015-10-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a re-emerging alphavirus which causes severe and prolonged arthralgic febrile illness. The recent global spread of the virus and lack of approved therapeutic options makes it imperative to gain greater insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying CHIKV pathogenesis, in particular host factors recruited by the virus. In the current study, we identify sphingosine kinase 2 (SK2) as a CHIKV host factor co-localized with the viral replication complex (VRC) during infection. SK2 was demonstrated to co-localize with viral RNA and nonstructural proteins. Targeted impairment of SK2 expression or function significantly inhibited CHIKV infection. Furthermore, affinity purification-mass spectrometry studies revealed that SK2 associates with a number of proteins involved in cellular gene expression specifically during viral infection, suggesting a role in replication. Collectively these results identify SK2 as a novel CHIKV host factor.

  17. Structures of a platelet-derived growth factor/propeptide complex and a platelet-derived growth factor/receptor complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shim, Ann Hye-Ryong; Liu, Heli; Focia, Pamela J.; Chen, Xiaoyan; Lin, P. Charles; He, Xiaolin (Vanderbilt); (NWU)

    2010-07-13

    Platelet-derived growth factors (PDGFs) and their receptors (PDGFRs) are prototypic growth factors and receptor tyrosine kinases which have critical functions in development. We show that PDGFs share a conserved region in their prodomain sequences which can remain noncovalently associated with the mature cystine-knot growth factor domain after processing. The structure of the PDGF-A/propeptide complex reveals this conserved, hydrophobic association mode. We also present the structure of the complex between PDGF-B and the first three Ig domains of PDGFR{beta}, showing that two PDGF-B protomers clamp PDGFR{beta} at their dimerization seam. The PDGF-B:PDGFR{beta} interface is predominantly hydrophobic, and PDGFRs and the PDGF propeptides occupy overlapping positions on mature PDGFs, rationalizing the need of propeptides by PDGFs to cover functionally important hydrophobic surfaces during secretion. A large-scale structural organization and rearrangement is observed for PDGF-B upon receptor binding, in which the PDGF-B L1 loop, disordered in the structure of the free form, adopts a highly specific conformation to form hydrophobic interactions with the third Ig domain of PDGFR{beta}. Calorimetric data also shows that the membrane-proximal homotypic PDGFR{alpha} interaction, albeit required for activation, contributes negatively to ligand binding. The structural and biochemical data together offer insights into PDGF-PDGFR signaling, as well as strategies for PDGF-antagonism.

  18. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic data for a ternary complex between tissue factor, factor VIIa and a BPTI-derived inhibitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stura, Enrico A.; Ruf, Wolfram; Wilson, Ian A.

    1996-10-01

    The binding of tissue factor (TF) with the serine protease coagulation factor VIIa (VIIa) is the initial trigger for activation of the coagulation protease cascades. In complex with TF, VIIa has profoundly enhanced function in the limited proteolytic activation of the natural substrate factors X and IX. Here we report the screening and identification of crystallization conditions to produce diffraction quality crystals of the complex between TF · VIIa and a potent inhibitor (5L 15) derived from mutagenesis of the bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI) sequence. The complex crystals were obtained from the soluble extracellular domain of tissue factor, expressed in Escherichia coli as a fusion protein, VIIa expressed in mammalian cells and recombinant 5L15. Because only 1.5 mg of complex were available for this work, a reverse screening based strategy was used in the search and optimization of the crystallization conditions. Two different crystal forms were obtained from polyethylene glycol 4000 and monomethyl polyethylene glycol 2000 with cacodylate buffer at pH 6.5 in the presence of sodium and calcium ions. The addition of magnesium and zinc have profound effects on the crystallization. Both crystal forms are trigonal with cell parameters a = b = 129.3 Å, c = 110.8 Å and a = b = 67.2 Å, c = 314.8 Å diffracting to 7 and 3.2 Å resolution, respectively, each with one molecule in the asymmetric unit. Complete data sets have been collected from each of these forms to the resolution to which the crystals diffract. A structural understanding of the interaction of VIIa with its cofactor TF to form a binary enzyme, and its inhibition by 5L15 will provide a basis for the development of antithrombotic strategies.

  19. The impact of nutrients on the aging rate: A complex interaction of demographic, environmental and genetic factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dato, Serena; Bellizzi, Dina; Rose, Giuseppina; Passarino, Giuseppe

    2016-03-01

    Nutrition has a strong influence on the health status of the elderly, with many dietary components associated to either an increased risk of disease or to an improvement of the quality of life and to a delay of age-related pathologies. A direct effect of a reduced caloric intake on the delay of aging phenotypes is documented in several organisms. The role of nutrients in the regulation of human lifespan is not easy to disentangle, influenced by a complex interaction of nutrition with environmental and genetic factors. The individual genetic background is fundamental for mediating the effects of nutritional components on aging. Classical genetic factors able to influence nutrient metabolism are considered those belonging to insulin/insulin growth factor (INS/IGF-1) signaling, TOR signaling and Sirtuins, but also genes involved in inflammatory/immune response and antioxidant activity can have a major role. Considering the worldwide increasing interest in nutrition to prevent age related diseases and achieve a healthy aging, in this review we will discuss this complex interaction, in the light of metabolic changes occurring with aging, with the aim of shedding a light on the enormous complexity of the metabolic scenario underlying longevity phenotype.

  20. High efficiency light harvesting by carotenoids in the LH2 complex from photosynthetic bacteria: unique adaptation to growth under low-light conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magdaong, Nikki M; LaFountain, Amy M; Greco, Jordan A; Gardiner, Alastair T; Carey, Anne-Marie; Cogdell, Richard J; Gibson, George N; Birge, Robert R; Frank, Harry A

    2014-09-25

    Rhodopin, rhodopinal, and their glucoside derivatives are carotenoids that accumulate in different amounts in the photosynthetic bacterium, Rhodoblastus (Rbl.) acidophilus strain 7050, depending on the intensity of the light under which the organism is grown. The different growth conditions also have a profound effect on the spectra of the bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) pigments that assemble in the major LH2 light-harvesting pigment-protein complex. Under high-light conditions the well-characterized B800-850 LH2 complex is formed and accumulates rhodopin and rhodopin glucoside as the primary carotenoids. Under low-light conditions, a variant LH2, denoted B800-820, is formed, and rhodopinal and rhodopinal glucoside are the most abundant carotenoids. The present investigation compares and contrasts the spectral properties and dynamics of the excited states of rhodopin and rhodopinal in solution. In addition, the systematic differences in pigment composition and structure of the chromophores in the LH2 complexes provide an opportunity to explore the effect of these factors on the rate and efficiency of carotenoid-to-BChl energy transfer. It is found that the enzymatic conversion of rhodopin to rhodopinal by Rbl. acidophilus 7050 grown under low-light conditions results in nearly 100% carotenoid-to-BChl energy transfer efficiency in the LH2 complex. This comparative analysis provides insight into how photosynthetic systems are able to adapt and survive under challenging environmental conditions.

  1. Safety and coping strategy for high dam under complex natural conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Niu Xinqiang

    2012-01-01

    In respect to current situation and new challenges for high dam construction in China, safety problems are an- alyzed for high dam construction under complex natural conditions such as high elevation, cold area, high seismic inten- sity, large-seale landslide and high dam and huge reservoirs with dam types such as concrete surface rock-fill, asphalt concrete core, roller compacted concrete (RCC) arch dam and so on. From several aspects, including risk response measures for high dam, strengthening safety awareness for high dam design and construction, improving high dam con- struetion technique, intelligent dam safety management system based on IT, developing dam rehabilitation and mainte- nance technologies, useful dam safety and coping strategy is proposed.

  2. Nonlinear Channel Estimation for OFDM System by Complex LS-SVM under High Mobility Conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Charrada, Anis; 10.5121/ijwmn.2011.3412

    2011-01-01

    A nonlinear channel estimator using complex Least Square Support Vector Machines (LS-SVM) is proposed for pilot-aided OFDM system and applied to Long Term Evolution (LTE) downlink under high mobility conditions. The estimation algorithm makes use of the reference signals to estimate the total frequency response of the highly selective multipath channel in the presence of non-Gaussian impulse noise interfering with pilot signals. Thus, the algorithm maps trained data into a high dimensional feature space and uses the structural risk minimization (SRM) principle to carry out the regression estimation for the frequency response function of the highly selective channel. The simulations show the effectiveness of the proposed method which has good performance and high precision to track the variations of the fading channels compared to the conventional LS method and it is robust at high speed mobility.

  3. An effective electron mass in heavily doped gallium arsenide under ordering impurity complexes

    CERN Document Server

    Bogdanova, V A; Semikolenova, N A; Sidorov, E N

    2002-01-01

    The results of an investigation of edge photoluminescence spectra at 300 K for series of Czochralski grown tellurium doped gallium arsenide monocrystals with free carriers concentration n sub 0 = 10 sup 1 sup 7 -10 sup 1 sup 9 cm sup - sup 3 are presented. On the basis of photoluminescence spectra contour analysis the concentration dependences of chemical potential and value of band gap narrowing are obtained. The concentration dependence of electron effective mass m* sub 0 (n sub 0) at the bottom of the conduction band is calculated. It is shown, that the nonmonotonous dependence m* sub 0 (n sub 0) is an accordance with electron scattering data in the material under study and is conditioned by ordering of impurity complexes

  4. Changes in the properties of solonetzic soil complexes in the dry steppe zone under anthropogenic impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyubimova, I. N.; Novikova, A. F.

    2016-05-01

    Long-term studies of changes in the properties of solonetzic soil complexes of the dry steppe zone under anthropogenic impacts (deep plowing, surface leveling, irrigation, and post-irrigation use) have been performed on the Privolzhskaya sand ridge and the Khvalyn and Ergeni plains. The natural morphology of solonetzic soils was strongly disturbed during their deep ameliorative plowing. At present, the soil cover consists of solonetzic agrozems (Sodic Protosalic Cambisols (Loamic, Aric, Protocalcic)), textural (clay-illuvial) calcareous agrozems (Eutric Cambisols (Loamic, Aric, Protocalcic)), agrosolonetzes (Endocalcaric Luvisols (Loamic, Aric, Cutanic, Protosodic), agrochestnut soils (Eutric Cambisols (Siltic, Aric)), and meadowchestnut soils (Haplic Kastanozems). No features attesting to the restoration of the initial profile of solonetzes have been found. The dynamics of soluble salts and exchangeable sodium differ in the agrosolonetzes and solonetzic agrozems. A rise in pH values takes place in the middle part of the soil profiles on the Khvalyn and Ergeni plains.

  5. Wear Behavior of Uncoated and Coated Tools under Complex Loading Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Wieland

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In automotive industry crash relevant structures of the body in white are manufactured using the direct hot stamping process. Due to the high temperature difference between the hot blank and the cold tool surfaces and the relative movement between the blank and the tool surfaces during the forming operation, high thermal and mechanical loads are applied on the tool leading to excessive wear in terms of adhesion on the tool surfaces. One possibility to reduce wear of hot stamping tools is the application of tool coating systems. In the scope of this work uncoated and coated tools are characterized under complex loading conditions with respect to adhesive layer build-up.

  6. Tumour necrosis factor-α polymorphism as one of the complex inherited factors in pemphigus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolanta Dorota Torzecka

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our study was to analyse a significance of tumour necrosis factor (TNF-α promoter gene polymorphisms in relation to the HLA-DR locus in genetic predisposition to pemphigus. TNF-α gene polymorphisms in position -238 and -308 were identified using a modified polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism method in 53 patients with pemphigus (38 with pemphigus vulgaris, 15 with pemphigus foliaceus and 87 healthy controls. The HLA-DRB1 locus was typed using the polymerase chain reaction SSO method in all the patients and 152 population controls.

  7. Core regulatory network motif underlies the ocellar complex patterning in Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar-Hidalgo, D.; Lemos, M. C.; Córdoba, A.

    2015-03-01

    During organogenesis, developmental programs governed by Gene Regulatory Networks (GRN) define the functionality, size and shape of the different constituents of living organisms. Robustness, thus, is an essential characteristic that GRNs need to fulfill in order to maintain viability and reproducibility in a species. In the present work we analyze the robustness of the patterning for the ocellar complex formation in Drosophila melanogaster fly. We have systematically pruned the GRN that drives the development of this visual system to obtain the minimum pathway able to satisfy this pattern. We found that the mechanism underlying the patterning obeys to the dynamics of a 3-nodes network motif with a double negative feedback loop fed by a morphogenetic gradient that triggers the inhibition in a French flag problem fashion. A Boolean modeling of the GRN confirms robustness in the patterning mechanism showing the same result for different network complexity levels. Interestingly, the network provides a steady state solution in the interocellar part of the patterning and an oscillatory regime in the ocelli. This theoretical result predicts that the ocellar pattern may underlie oscillatory dynamics in its genetic regulation.

  8. Studies of Aqueous U(IV) Complexation under Thiol-rich Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Wansik; Cho, Hyeryun; Jung, Euo Chang [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    Organic thiol compounds and hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) are electron donors and metabolic products of sulfate reducing bacteria. In addition, they are among redox potential (Eh) determinants of groundwater systems due to their redox characteristics. The low values of acid dissociation constants for .SH (pK{sub a}, 7-9) compared to those of aliphatic or phenolic .OH, impart greater anionic and metal-binding properties to the molecules. Recently, we demonstrated that a thiol compound (i. e., thiosalicylate) enhances the solubility of U(VI) at higher pH levels (< ∼9). In this study, to have a better knowledge of the behaviors of U(IV) species under anaerobic conditions, the U(IV)-OH complex formation in the presence of thiol was examined using UV-Vis spectrophotometry and TRLFS (time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy). A TRLFS-based U(IV) quantification methodology developed earlier was applied to examine the effects of thiol species on the dissolution behaviors. Based on UV-Vis absorption monitoring, the presence of thiol does not result in a significant changes in the low-pH hydrolysis behaviors of U(IV). However, the concentration of U(IV) dissolved in bulk phase of aqueous solutions increased with the increase of thiol concentration. The formation of soluble thiol complexes or the stabilization of UO{sub 2} nanoparticles may explain the observed solubility increase.

  9. FUNCTION OF MALATDEHYDROGENASE COMPLEX OF MAIZE MESOPHYLL AND BUNDLE SHEATH CELLS UNDER SALT STRESS CONDITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Еprintsev А.Т.

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Salt-induced changes in malatdehydrogenase system activity make the essential contribution to cell adaptation to stress condition. The enzyme systems of C4-plants are most interesting due to their ability for adaptation to environment conditions. The role of separate components of malatdehydrogenase complex of mesophyll and bundle sheath cells of corn in formation of adaptive reaction in stressful conditions is investigated in presented work.The activation of all enzymes of malatdehydrogenase system and the subsequent decrease in their activity was observed in mesophyll durring the first stage of adaptation to salt influence. In bundle sheath cells such parameters are differed from control less essentially. Fast accumulation of piruvate in cells and malate in both investigated tissues was induced. The further salinity led to falling of concentration this intermediate. The concentration of piruvate was below control level, and it was raised by the end of an exposition.The results show that sodium chloride causes induction of Krebs-cycle in mesophyll and bundle sheath cells of corn and intensification of Hatch-Slack cycle. The described differences in function malatdehydrogenase systems of mesophyll and bundle sheath cells of leaves of corn under salinity mainly consist of the activity of enzymes of a studied complex in bundle sheath cells is subject to the minimal changes in comparison with mesophyll. Role of this enzymesystem in mechanisms of adaptive reaction of various tissues of corn to salt stress is discussed.

  10. Complex fluids under microflow probed by SAXS: rapid microfabrication and analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Hazel P; Luckham, Paul F; Cabral, Joao T [Department of Chemical Engineering, Imperial College London, Exhibition Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Brooks, Nicholas J; Seddon, John M [Department of Chemistry, Imperial College London, Exhibition Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Terrill, Nick J [Diamond Light Source Ltd., Diamond House, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire, OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Kowalski, Adam J, E-mail: j.cabral@imperial.ac.u [Unilever Research and Development, Port Sunlight Laboratory, Bebington, Wirral, CH63 3JW (United Kingdom)

    2010-10-01

    We report a combined microfluidic and online synchrotron small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) study of complex surfactant mixtures under flow. We investigate the influence of a series of flow constrictions, generating well-defined, periodic extensional flow fields, on the microstructure of two model surfactant mixtures containing SDS and CTAC. Specifically, the lamella spacing, orientation and structural order are reported and correlated with the imposed flow field: geometry, flow velocity and residence time. The design, fabrication and operation of a microfluidic system using rapid prototyping is described in detail. We show that polydimethyl siloxane (PDMS), ubiquitous in microfabrication, provides a suitable matrix for SAXS microdevices provided that: (i) PDMS thickness are kept to a minimum while retaining structural integrity ({approx}1000{mu}m) and (ii) scattering from the structure of interest is sufficiently decoupled from the amorphous background scattering. The combination SAXS-microfluidics provides unprecedented opportunities to elucidate the non-equilibrium structure formation and relaxation of complex fluids, demonstrated here for concentrated surfactant mixtures.

  11. A New Insight of Graphene oxide-Fe(III) Complex Photochemical Behaviors under Visible Light Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Renlan; Zhu, Xiaoying; Chen, Baoliang

    2017-01-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) contains not only aromatic carbon lattice but also carboxyl groups which enhanced the aqueous solubility of GO. To study the transformation of GO nanosheets in natural environments, GO aqueous dispersion was mixed with Fe3+ ions to form photoactive complex. Under visible light irradiation, Fe(III) of the complex would be reduced to Fe(II) which could subsequently reduce highly toxic Cr(VI) to Cr3+. The electron of the reduction was contributed by the decarboxylation of carboxyl groups on GO and iron was acting as a catalyst during the photoreduction. On the other hand, the consumption of carboxyl groups may convert GO to rGO which are tend to aggregate since the decreased electrostatic repulsion and the increased π-π attraction. The formed Cr3+ may be electrostatically adsorbed by the rGO sheets and simultaneously precipitated with the aggregated rGO sheets, resulting the effective removal of chromium and GO nanosheets from the aqueous environment. This study may shed a light on understanding the environmental transformation of GO and guide the treatment of Cr(VI). PMID:28084446

  12. Dielectric and Ferroelectric Properties of Complex Perovskite Ceramics Under Compressive Stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Dielectric and ferroelectric properties of complex perovskite PZT-PZN ceramic system were investigated under the influence of the compressive stress. The results showed that the dielectric properties, i.e. dielectric constant ( εr ) and dielectric loss ( tan δ), and the ferroelectric characteristics, i.e. the area of the ferroelectric hysteresis loops, the saturation polarization ( P(sat) ), and the remnant polarization (Pr) changed significantly with increasing compressive stress. These changes depended strongly on the ceramic compositions. The experimental results on the dielectric properties could be explained by both intrinsic and extrinsic domain-related mechanisms involving domain wall motions, as well as the de-aging phenomenon. The stress-induced domain wall motion suppression and non-180° ferroelectric domain switching processes were responsible for the changes observed in the ferroelectric parameters. In addition,a significant decrease in those parameters after a cycle of stress was observed and attributed to the stress induced decrease in switchable part of spontaneous polarization. This study clearly show that the applied stress had significant influence on the electrical properties of complex perovskite ceramics.

  13. Genetic interactions underlying hybrid male sterility in the Drosophila bipectinata species complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Paras Kumar; Singh, Bashisth Narayan

    2006-06-01

    Understanding genetic mechanisms underlying hybrid male sterility is one of the most challenging problems in evolutionary biology especially speciation. By using the interspecific hybridization method roles of Y chromosome, Major Hybrid Sterility (MHS) genes and cytoplasm in sterility of hybrid males have been investigated in a promising group, the Drosophila bipectinata species complex that consists of four closely related species: D. pseudoananassae, D. bipectinata, D. parabipectinata and D. malerkotliana. The interspecific introgression analyses show that neither cytoplasm nor MHS genes are involved but X-Y interactions may be playing major role in hybrid male sterility between D. pseudoananassae and the other three species. The results of interspecific introgression analyses also show considerable decrease in the number of males in the backcross offspring and all males have atrophied testes. There is a significant positive correlation between sex - ratio distortion and severity of sterility in backcross males. These findings provide evidence that D. pseudoananassae is remotely related with other three species of the D. bipectinata species complex.

  14. Analytical Solution for Stress Field and Intensity Factor in CSTBD under Mixed Mode Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najaf Ali Ghavidel

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Considering the fact that rocks fail faster under tensile stress, rock tensile strength is of greatimportance in applications such as blasting, rock fragmentation, slope stability, hydraulic fracturing,caprock integrity, and geothermal energy extraction. There are two direct and indirect methods tomeasure tensile strength. Since direct methods always encompass difficulties in test setup, indirectmethods, specifically the Brazilian test, have often been employed for tensile strength measurement.Tensile failure is technically attributed to crack propagation in rock. Fracture mechanics hassignificant potential for the determination of crack behaviour as well as propagation pattern. To applyBrazilian tests, cracked disc geometry has been suggested by the International Society for RockMechanics ISRM. Accordingly, a comprehensive study is necessary to evaluate stress field and stressintensity factor (SIF around the crack in the centre of the specimen. In this paper, superpositionprinciple is employed to solve the problem of cracked straight-through Brazilian disc (CSTBD, usingtwo methods of dislocation and complex stress function. Stress field and SIF in the vicinity of thecrack tip are then calculated. With the proposed method, the magnitude of critical load for crackinitiation in structures can be predicted. This method is valid for any crack of any arbitrary length andangle. In addition, numerical modelling has been carried out for the Brazilian disc. Finally, theanalytical solution has been compared with numerical modelling results showing the same outcomefor both methods.

  15. Application of bisphosphomide-palladium(II) pincer complex in Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling reaction under microwave irradiation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Maruthai Kumaravel; Pawan Kumar; Maravanji S Balakrishna

    2014-05-01

    The bisphosphomide-based pincer complex [PdBr{2,6-{Ph2PC(O)}2(C6H3)}] (2) has shown very high catalytic activity in Suzuki-Miyaura cross coupling reaction under microwave irradiation for a variety of aryl bromides and aryl boronic acids. The complex showed the same efficiency for gram scale reactions.

  16. Hemolysin as a Virulence Factor for Systemic Infection with Isolates of Mycobacterium avium Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslow, Joel N.; Dawson, David; Carlin, Elizabeth A.; Holland, Steven M.

    1999-01-01

    Isolates of the Mycobacterium avium complex were examined for hemolysin expression. Only invasive isolates of M. avium were observed to be hemolytic (P < 0.001), with activity the greatest for isolates of serovars 4 and 8. Thus, M. avium hemolysin appears to represent a virulence factor necessary for invasive disease. PMID:9889239

  17. Environmental Factors Affecting Computer Assisted Language Learning Success: A Complex Dynamic Systems Conceptual Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marek, Michael W.; Wu, Wen-Chi Vivian

    2014-01-01

    This conceptual, interdisciplinary inquiry explores Complex Dynamic Systems as the concept relates to the internal and external environmental factors affecting computer assisted language learning (CALL). Based on the results obtained by de Rosnay ["World Futures: The Journal of General Evolution", 67(4/5), 304-315 (2011)], who observed…

  18. The Journal Impact Factor is under attack - use the CAPCI factor instead.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamandis, Eleftherios P

    2017-01-16

    The uses and misuses of the Journal Impact Factor (JIF) have been thoroughly discussed in the literature. A few years ago, I predicted that JIF would soon be replaced, while another colleague argued the opposite. Over the past few months, attacks on JIF have intensified, with some publishing organizations gradually removing the indicator from their journals' websites. Here, I argue that most, if not all of the misuses of JIF are related to its name. The word "impact" should be removed, since it implies an influential attribute, either for the journals, their published papers, or their authors. I propose instead the use of a new name, the "CAPCI factor", standing for Citation Average Per Citable Item, which accurately describes what is represented by this measure.

  19. Sustainable Water Resources Management in a Complex Watershed Under Climate Change Scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, J. P.; McPhee, J.

    2007-05-01

    The Aconcagua River Basin in central Chile supplies water for over one million people, high-return agriculture, mining and hydropower industries. The Aconcagua river basin has Mediterranean/semi-arid climate, its hydrologic regime varies along its path from snow- to a rainfall-dominated, and significant stream-aquifer interaction is observed throughout the river path. A complex water market operates in the Aconcagua River Basin, where private owners hold surface and subsurface water rights independently of land ownership and/or intended use. The above yield integrated watershed management critical for the sustainability of basin operations, moreover under conditions of significant precipitation interannual variability and uncertain future climatic scenarios. In this work we propose an integrated hydrologic-operational model for the Aconcagua River in order to evaluate sustainable management scenarios under conditions of climatic uncertainty. The modeling software WEAP (Water Evaluation and Planning System) serves as the platform for decision support, allowing the assessment of diverse scenarios of water use development and hydrologic conditions. The hydrologic component of the adopted model utilizes conceptual functions for describing the relations between different hydrologic variables. The management component relies on economic valuation for characterizing the space of efficient operational policies.

  20. Complex Dynamics in Models of Peat Accumulation lead to Dramatic Regime Shifts under a Steady Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, P. J.; Baird, A. J.; Belyea, L. R.

    2009-12-01

    Peatlands are highly concentrated and potentially fragile stores of organic carbon (C), and the accumulation of deep peat deposits during the Holocene represents a globally-significant terrestrial C sink. Several existing models predict the 1-D (vertical) accumulation of peat based on representations of peatland ecohydrological feedbacks. However, many such models make oversimplifying assumptions. In particular, hydraulic conductivity, the rate of formation of fresh peat, and peatland lateral (drainage) extent are often assumed to be constants. The available evidence suggests that complex feedbacks between these quantities and other neglected elements of peatland systems may play an important role in determining long-term rates of peat accumulation and trends in peatland surface-wetness. We observed the response of a 1-D model of peat accumulation to assumed long-term net rainfall rates and peat decay rates over 5,000 simulated years. We increased model complexity incrementally so as to represent: rate of formation of fresh peat as a humpback function of surface wetness; hydraulic conductivity as a logarithmic function of peat decay; and peatland lateral extent as various functions of time. Each incremental increase in model complexity caused qualitative and quantitative alterations to model behaviour, suggesting that the accurate understanding of peat accumulation may require the consideration of complex, interacting feedbacks not previously considered in modelling studies. Importantly, maximum long-term rates of peat accumulation occurred under intermediate peat decay rates and intermediate rainfall rates. This is a novel finding which challenges the assumptions of traditional, static models commonly used to estimate rates of carbon accumulation from dated peat profiles. Also, the assumed rate and mode of peatland lateral expansion are identifiable in model peat profiles, suggesting that they may also have to be taken into account when analysing peat records

  1. The factor structure underlying three self-report multicultural counseling competence scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantine, Madonna G; Gloria, Alberta M; Ladany, Nicholas

    2002-11-01

    This study examined the extent to which 3 self-report multicultural scales were measuring the predominant 3-factor conceptualization of multicultural counseling competence as consisting of multicultural attitudes/beliefs, knowledge, and skills. Results of a confirmatory factor analysis revealed that the 3-factor model was not fully supported. An exploratory factor analysis identified a 2-factor structure (i.e., self-perceived multicultural counseling skills and multicultural counseling attitudes/beliefs) underlying these instruments. Implications of the findings for clinical practice, training, and research are discussed.

  2. Factors associated with asthma among under-fives in Mulago hospital, Kampala Uganda

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nantanda, Rebecca; Ostergaard, Marianne S; Ndeezi, Grace

    2013-01-01

    Asthma is the most common chronic childhood illness, with rapidly increasing prevalence in low-income countries. Among young children, asthma is often under-diagnosed.We investigated the factors associated with asthma among under-fives presenting with acute respiratory symptoms at Mulago hospital...

  3. Gradual sub-lattice reduction and a new complexity for factoring polynomials

    CERN Document Server

    Van Hoeij, Mark

    2010-01-01

    We present a lattice algorithm specifically designed for some classical applications of lattice reduction. The applications are for lattice bases with a generalized knapsack-type structure, where the target vectors are boundably short. For such applications, the complexity of the algorithm improves traditional lattice reduction by replacing some dependence on the bit-length of the input vectors by some dependence on the bound for the output vectors. If the bit-length of the target vectors is unrelated to the bit-length of the input, then our algorithm is only linear in the bit-length of the input entries, which is an improvement over the quadratic complexity floating-point LLL algorithms. To illustrate the usefulness of this algorithm we show that a direct application to factoring univariate polynomials over the integers leads to the first complexity bound improvement since 1984. A second application is algebraic number reconstruction, where a new complexity bound is obtained as well.

  4. Interaction between Fibrinogen and Insulin-Like Growth Factor-Binding Protein-1 in Human Plasma under Physiological Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gligorijević, N; Nedić, O

    2016-02-01

    Fibrinogen is a plasma glycoprotein and one of the principle participants in blood coagulation. It interacts with many proteins during formation of a blood clot, including insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) and their binding proteins (IGFBP). Fibrinogen complexes were found as minor fractions in fibrinogen preparations independently of the coagulation process, and their presence influences the kinetics of polymerization. The idea of this work was to investigate whether fibrinogen in human plasma interacts with IGFBPs independently of the tissue injury or coagulation process. The results have shown that fibrinogen forms complexes with IGFBP-1 under physiological conditions. Several experimental approaches have confirmed that complexes are co-isolated with fibrinogen from plasma, they are relatively stable, and they appear as a general feature of human plasma. Several other experiments excluded the possibility that alpha-2 macroglobulin/IGFBP-1 complexes or IGFBP-1 oligomers contributed to IGFBP-1 immunoreactivity. The role of fibrinogen/IGFBP-1 complexes is still unknown. Further investigation in individuals expressing both impaired glucose control and coagulopathy could contribute to identification and understanding of their possible physiological role.

  5. Complex karyotype newly defined: the strongest prognostic factor in advanced childhood myelodysplastic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göhring, Gudrun; Michalova, Kyra; Beverloo, H Berna; Betts, David; Harbott, Jochen; Haas, Oskar A; Kerndrup, Gitte; Sainati, Laura; Bergstraesser, Eva; Hasle, Henrik; Stary, Jan; Trebo, Monika; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M; Zecca, Marco; van Wering, Elisabeth R; Fischer, Alexandra; Noellke, Peter; Strahm, Brigitte; Locatelli, Franco; Niemeyer, Charlotte M; Schlegelberger, Brigitte

    2010-11-11

    To identify cytogenetic risk factors predicting outcome in children with advanced myelodysplastic syndrome, overall survival of 192 children prospectively enrolled in European Working Group of Myelodysplastic Syndrome in Childhood studies was evaluated with regard to karyotypic complexity. Structurally complex constitutes a new definition of complex karyotype characterized by more than or equal to 3 chromosomal aberrations, including at least one structural aberration. Five-year overall survival in patients with more than or equal to 3 clonal aberrations, which were not structurally complex, did not differ from that observed in patients with normal karyotype. Cox regression analysis revealed the presence of a monosomal and structurally complex karyotype to be strongly associated with poor prognosis (hazard ratio = 4.6, P < .01). Notably, a structurally complex karyotype without a monosomy was associated with a very short 2-year overall survival probability of only 14% (hazard ratio = 14.5; P < .01). The presence of a structurally complex karyotype was the strongest independent prognostic marker predicting poor outcome in children with advanced myelodysplastic syndrome.

  6. Yeast silencing factor Sir4 and a subset of nucleoporins form a complex distinct from nuclear pore complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapetina, Diego L; Ptak, Christopher; Roesner, Ulyss K; Wozniak, Richard W

    2017-09-07

    Interactions occurring at the nuclear envelope (NE)-chromatin interface influence both NE structure and chromatin organization. Insights into the functions of NE-chromatin interactions have come from the study of yeast subtelomeric chromatin and its association with the NE, including the identification of various proteins necessary for tethering subtelomeric chromatin to the NE and the silencing of resident genes. Here we show that four of these proteins-the silencing factor Sir4, NE-associated Esc1, the SUMO E3 ligase Siz2, and the nuclear pore complex (NPC) protein Nup170-physically and functionally interact with one another and a subset of NPC components (nucleoporins or Nups). Importantly, this group of Nups is largely restricted to members of the inner and outer NPC rings, but it lacks numerous others including cytoplasmically and nucleoplasmically positioned Nups. We propose that this Sir4-associated Nup complex is distinct from holo-NPCs and that it plays a role in subtelomeric chromatin organization and NE tethering. © 2017 Lapetina et al.

  7. A stable transcription factor complex nucleated by oligomeric AML1–ETO controls leukaemogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Xiao-Jian; Wang, Zhanxin; Wang, Lan; Jiang, Yanwen; Kost, Nils; Soong, T. David; Chen, Wei-Yi; Tang, Zhanyun; Nakadai, Tomoyoshi; Elemento, Olivier; Fischle, Wolfgang; Melnick, Ari; Patel, Dinshaw J.; Nimer, Stephen D.; Roeder, Robert G.

    2013-06-30

    Transcription factors are frequently altered in leukaemia through chromosomal translocation, mutation or aberrant expression. AML1–ETO, a fusion protein generated by the t(8;21) translocation in acute myeloid leukaemia, is a transcription factor implicated in both gene repression and activation. AML1–ETO oligomerization, mediated by the NHR2 domain, is critical for leukaemogenesis, making it important to identify co-regulatory factors that ‘read’ the NHR2 oligomerization and contribute to leukaemogenesis. Here we show that, in human leukaemic cells, AML1–ETO resides in and functions through a stable AML1–ETO-containing transcription factor complex (AETFC) that contains several haematopoietic transcription (co)factors. These AETFC components stabilize the complex through multivalent interactions, provide multiple DNA-binding domains for diverse target genes, co-localize genome wide, cooperatively regulate gene expression, and contribute to leukaemogenesis. Within the AETFC complex, AML1–ETO oligomerization is required for a specific interaction between the oligomerized NHR2 domain and a novel NHR2-binding (N2B) motif in E proteins. Crystallographic analysis of the NHR2–N2B complex reveals a unique interaction pattern in which an N2B peptide makes direct contact with side chains of two NHR2 domains as a dimer, providing a novel model of how dimeric/oligomeric transcription factors create a new protein-binding interface through dimerization/oligomerization. Intriguingly, disruption of this interaction by point mutations abrogates AML1–ETO-induced haematopoietic stem/progenitor cell self-renewal and leukaemogenesis. These results reveal new mechanisms of action of AML1–ETO, and provide a potential therapeutic target in t(8;21)-positive acute myeloid leukaemia.

  8. UGMDR: a unified conceptual framework for detection of multifactor interactions underlying complex traits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, X-Y

    2015-01-01

    Biological outcomes are governed by multiple genetic and environmental factors that act in concert. Determining multifactor interactions is the primary topic of interest in recent genetics studies but presents enormous statistical and mathematical challenges. The computationally efficient multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR) approach has emerged as a promising tool for meeting these challenges. On the other hand, complex traits are expressed in various forms and have different data generation mechanisms that cannot be appropriately modeled by a dichotomous model; the subjects in a study may be recruited according to its own analytical goals, research strategies and resources available, not only consisting of homogeneous unrelated individuals. Although several modifications and extensions of MDR have in part addressed the practical problems, they are still limited in statistical analyses of diverse phenotypes, multivariate phenotypes and correlated observations, correcting for potential population stratification and unifying both unrelated and family samples into a more powerful analysis. I propose a comprehensive statistical framework, referred as to unified generalized MDR (UGMDR), for systematic extension of MDR. The proposed approach is quite versatile, not only allowing for covariate adjustment, being suitable for analyzing almost any trait type, for example, binary, count, continuous, polytomous, ordinal, time-to-onset, multivariate and others, as well as combinations of those, but also being applicable to various study designs, including homogeneous and admixed unrelated-subject and family as well as mixtures of them. The proposed UGMDR offers an important addition to the arsenal of analytical tools for identifying nonlinear multifactor interactions and unraveling the genetic architecture of complex traits. PMID:25335557

  9. Robust Satisficing Decision Making for Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Complex Missions under Severe Uncertainty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Xiaoting; Niu, Yifeng; Shen, Lincheng

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a robust satisficing decision-making method for Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) executing complex missions in an uncertain environment. Motivated by the info-gap decision theory, we formulate this problem as a novel robust satisficing optimization problem, of which the objective is to maximize the robustness while satisfying some desired mission requirements. Specifically, a new info-gap based Markov Decision Process (IMDP) is constructed to abstract the uncertain UAV system and specify the complex mission requirements with the Linear Temporal Logic (LTL). A robust satisficing policy is obtained to maximize the robustness to the uncertain IMDP while ensuring a desired probability of satisfying the LTL specifications. To this end, we propose a two-stage robust satisficing solution strategy which consists of the construction of a product IMDP and the generation of a robust satisficing policy. In the first stage, a product IMDP is constructed by combining the IMDP with an automaton representing the LTL specifications. In the second, an algorithm based on robust dynamic programming is proposed to generate a robust satisficing policy, while an associated robustness evaluation algorithm is presented to evaluate the robustness. Finally, through Monte Carlo simulation, the effectiveness of our algorithms is demonstrated on an UAV search mission under severe uncertainty so that the resulting policy can maximize the robustness while reaching the desired performance level. Furthermore, by comparing the proposed method with other robust decision-making methods, it can be concluded that our policy can tolerate higher uncertainty so that the desired performance level can be guaranteed, which indicates that the proposed method is much more effective in real applications.

  10. Binge eating under a complex reading: Subsidies for the praxis of food and nutrition education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Lúcia Magalhães BOSI

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Binge eating disorder is characterized by the consumption of large amounts of food in a short time, accompanied by the feeling of lack of control, remorse and guilt. binge eating disorder has a close interface with the obesity problem, a matter of great dimensions for health services, especially for the high comorbidity. Although this disorder is closely linked to obesity, a matter of great dimensions for healthcare, especially due to it high comorbidity, this disorder is still poorly known in its symbolic dimension, compromising actions directed to this dimension, among them those included in the scope of food and nutrition education. The purpose of this article is to delimitate the issue of binge eating disorder, under a lens based on complex thinking, in order to discuss and support the scope of the nutritional eating education, illustrating, with life experiences, the multidimensionality inherent to eating disorders. The analysis aims to highlight the challenge of working in educational practices focused on these complex disorders. Therefore, we articulated the theoretical with the empirical levels, revisiting, through a reflexive exercise, the discursive material obtained in a broad research carried out by the authors, guided by phenomenological-hermeneutics approach focusing on the understanding of binge eating disorder, with obese women who have also received this diagnosis. The analysis highlights binge eating disorder as an intense experience of suffering, which compromises the ability to innovate and reinvent behavior, in which food operates as an emotional cushion. In this context, healing requires taking an active and engaged place, feeling an active part in the self-transformation process. Thus, food and nutritional education should be conceived in the scope of a comprehensive care, as a fundamental and strategic space due to the specific nature of the practice, in potential terms.

  11. Finite Difference Methods for Option Pricing under Lévy Processes: Wiener-Hopf Factorization Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg Kudryavtsev

    2013-01-01

    factorization identity. Notice that our algorithm has the same complexity as the ones which use the explicit-implicit scheme, with a tridiagonal matrix. However, our method is more accurate. We support the advantage of the new method in terms of accuracy and convergence by using numerical experiments.

  12. A transcription factor network controls cell migration and fate decisions in the developing zebrafish pineal complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clanton, Joshua A.; Dean, Benjamin J.; Gamse, Joshua T.

    2016-01-01

    The zebrafish pineal complex consists of four cell types (rod and cone photoreceptors, projection neurons and parapineal neurons) that are derived from a single pineal complex anlage. After specification, parapineal neurons migrate unilaterally away from the rest of the pineal complex whereas rods, cones and projection neurons are non-migratory. The transcription factor Tbx2b is important for both the correct number and migration of parapineal neurons. We find that two additional transcription factors, Flh and Nr2e3, negatively regulate parapineal formation. Flh induces non-migratory neuron fates and limits the extent of parapineal specification, in part by activation of Nr2e3 expression. Tbx2b is positively regulated by Flh, but opposes Flh action during specification of parapineal neurons. Loss of parapineal neuron specification in Tbx2b-deficient embryos can be partially rescued by loss of Nr2e3 or Flh function; however, parapineal migration absolutely requires Tbx2b activity. We conclude that cell specification and migration in the pineal complex are regulated by a network of at least three transcription factors. PMID:27317804

  13. Modification of the protein corona–nanoparticle complex by physiological factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braun, Nicholas J.; DeBrosse, Madeleine C.; Hussain, Saber M. [Molecular Bioeffects Branch, Bioeffects Division, Human Effectiveness Directorate, 711 Human Performance Wing, Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright Patterson AFB, 2729 R. St, Bldg 837, Dayton, OH, 45433 (United States); Comfort, Kristen K., E-mail: kcomfort1@udayton.edu [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Dayton, 524 Kettering Laboratories, 300 College Park, Dayton, OH 45469 (United States)

    2016-07-01

    Nanoparticle (NP) effects in a biological system are driven through the formation and structure of the protein corona–NP complex, which is dynamic by nature and dependent upon factors from both the local environment and NP physicochemical parameters. To date, considerable data has been gathered regarding the structure and behavior of the protein corona in blood, plasma, and traditional cell culture medium. However, there exists a knowledge gap pertaining to the protein corona in additional biological fluids and following incubation in a dynamic environment. Using 13 nm gold NPs (AuNPs), functionalized with either polyethylene glycol or tannic acid, we demonstrated that both particle characteristics and the associated protein corona were altered when exposed to artificial physiological fluids and under dynamic flow. Furthermore, the magnitude of observed behavioral shifts were dependent upon AuNP surface chemistry. Lastly, we revealed that exposure to interstitial fluid produced protein corona modifications, reshaping of the nano-cellular interface, modified AuNP dosimetry, and induction of previously unseen cytotoxicity. This study highlights the need to elucidate both NP and protein corona behavior in biologically representative environments in an effort to increase accurate interpretation of data and transfer of this knowledge to efficacy, behavior, and safety of nano-based applications. - Highlights: • Dynamic flow increased the size of the gold nanoparticle protein corona. • Exposure to biological fluids altered protein corona size and composition. • Interstitial fluid modified the nano-cellular interface and deposition efficiency. • Tannic acid coated nanoparticles induced toxicity in an interstitial environment.

  14. [The Stigma-discrimination Complex Associated With Mental Disorder as a Risk Factor for Suicide].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campo-Arias, Adalberto; Herazo, Edwin

    2015-01-01

    The concept stigma-discrimination complex associated with mental disorder (SDCAMD) is proposed to encompass the terms used in the attribution theory: stigma, stereotype, prejudice and discrimination. SDCAMD is one of the most frequent disorders worldwide. Internalized and perceived SDCAMD may explain a number of suicide cases. To update the factors that may explain the association between SDCAMD and suicide, and postulate possible underlying mechanisms. Articles were identified in MEDLINE using the descriptors for "stigma", "mental disorders" and "suicide" or "suicide rate". Articles published between January 2000 and June 2014 were included. Reviews and case studies were not considered. The two included studies showed that stigma increased the risk of suicidal behaviors. It was evident that people who meet criteria for mental disorder and reported high self-stigma made a greater number of suicide attempts, and countries with high stigma in the general population have a higher suicide rate. It was considered that the relationship between SDCAMD and suicide is established by a set of interrelated mechanisms. A "direct" mechanism involving perceived stigma and is configured as a barrier to access mental health services, and an "indirect" mechanism involving the self-stigma, which increases the vulnerability to depressive episodes and repeated self-injurious behaviors that ultimately end in suicide. The SDCAMD impacts negatively on the quality of life of people who meet criteria for mental disorders, and accounts for a significant number of suicides. One way is related to the perceived stigma that is configured as a barrier to access mental health services and, the second one includes repeated self-injurious behaviors that reduce self-esteem and increases perceived stress. Further research is required to increase the knowledge of this association. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  15. Evolutionary factors affecting Lactate dehydrogenase A and B variation in the Daphnia pulex species complex

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    Cristescu Melania E

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evidence for historical, demographic and selective factors affecting enzyme evolution can be obtained by examining nucleotide sequence variation in candidate genes such as Lactate dehydrogenase (Ldh. Two closely related Daphnia species can be distinguished by their electrophoretic Ldh genotype and habitat. Daphnia pulex populations are fixed for the S allele and inhabit temporary ponds, while D. pulicaria populations are fixed for the F allele and inhabit large stratified lakes. One locus is detected in most allozyme surveys, but genome sequencing has revealed two genes, LdhA and LdhB. Results We sequenced both Ldh genes from 70 isolates of these two species from North America to determine if the association between Ldh genotype and habitat shows evidence for selection, and to elucidate the evolutionary history of the two genes. We found that alleles in the pond-dwelling D. pulex and in the lake-dwelling D. pulicaria form distinct groups at both loci, and the substitution of Glutamine (S for Glutamic acid (F at amino acid 229 likely causes the electrophoretic mobility shift in the LDHA protein. Nucleotide diversity in both Ldh genes is much lower in D. pulicaria than in D. pulex. Moreover, the lack of spatial structuring of the variation in both genes over a wide geographic area is consistent with a recent demographic expansion of lake populations. Neutrality tests indicate that both genes are under purifying selection, but the intensity is much stronger on LdhA. Conclusions Although lake-dwelling D. pulicaria hybridizes with the other lineages in the pulex species complex, it remains distinct ecologically and genetically. This ecological divergence, coupled with the intensity of purifying selection on LdhA and the strong association between its genotype and habitat, suggests that experimental studies would be useful to determine if variation in molecular function provides evidence that LDHA variants are adaptive.

  16. Interferon-gamma and tumour necrosis factor induce expression of major histocompatibility complex antigen on rat retinal astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    el-Asrar, A M; Maimone, D; Morse, P H; Lascola, C; Reder, A T

    1991-08-01

    Cultured rat retinal astrocytes were tested by indirect immunofluorescence staining for their ability to express class I and II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) antigens under basal culture conditions and after three days of stimulation with two recombinant cytokines, rat interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and human tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha). Under basal culture conditions low levels of class I antigens were detected on a small percentage of cells, but there was no visible class II. IFN-gamma and TNF alpha stimulation enhanced class I expression. TNF alpha had no effect on class II expression, whereas IFN-gamma induced the expression of class II in a dose dependent manner. These findings suggest that retinal astrocytes might play a part in immunological events occurring in the retina.

  17. Interactions among Ecological Factors That Explain the Psychosocial Quality of Life of Children with Complex Needs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandy Thurston

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To explore the associations and interactions among ecological factors and explain the psychosocial quality of life of children with complex needs. Methods. In this cross-sectional survey consenting parents were identified by the Children's Treatment Network. Families were eligible if the child from 0 to 19 years, resided in Simcoe/York, and there were multiple family needs. Regression analysis was used to explore associations and interactions. n=429. Results. Younger children, without conduct disorder, without hostile and punitive parenting and with low adverse family impact demonstrated the highest levels of psychosocial quality of life. Statistically significant interactions between processes of care and parent variables highlight the complexity of real life situations. Conclusions. It is not possible to fully understand the child's psychosocial quality of life in complex needs families by considering only simple associations between ecological factors. A multitude of factors and interactions between these factors are simultaneously present and the care of these families requires a holistic approach.

  18. Nasal bone shape is under complex epistatic genetic control in mouse interspecific recombinant congenic strains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaétan Burgio

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Genetic determinism of cranial morphology in the mouse is still largely unknown, despite the localization of putative QTLs and the identification of genes associated with Mendelian skull malformations. To approach the dissection of this multigenic control, we have used a set of interspecific recombinant congenic strains (IRCS produced between C57BL/6 and mice of the distant species Mus spretus (SEG/Pas. Each strain has inherited 1.3% of its genome from SEG/Pas under the form of few, small-sized, chromosomal segments. RESULTS: The shape of the nasal bone was studied using outline analysis combined with Fourier descriptors, and differential features were identified between IRCS BcG-66H and C57BL/6. An F2 cross between BcG-66H and C57BL/6 revealed that, out of the three SEG/Pas-derived chromosomal regions present in BcG-66H, two were involved. Segments on chromosomes 1 (∼32 Mb and 18 (∼13 Mb showed additive effect on nasal bone shape. The three chromosomal regions present in BcG-66H were isolated in congenic strains to study their individual effect. Epistatic interactions were assessed in bicongenic strains. CONCLUSIONS: Our results show that, besides a strong individual effect, the QTL on chromosome 1 interacts with genes on chromosomes 13 and 18. This study demonstrates that nasal bone shape is under complex genetic control but can be efficiently dissected in the mouse using appropriate genetic tools and shape descriptors.

  19. Impacts on Power Factor of AC Voltage Controllers Under Non-Sinusoidal Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukhtiar Ahmed Mahar

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available AC-AC conversion is obtained with the help of Cyclo-converters, DC Link converters and AC Voltage Controllers. AC voltage controllers are also referred to as voltage regulators. Main issue concerned to these converters is that they generate harmonics due to periodic variable structure system. The generated harmonics create disturbances and degrade the performance of converter. The power factor of supply side is affected due to these harmonics. This paper focuses on source side power factor of ac voltage controllers under nonsinusoidal conditions. In order to observe the power factor, measurement tool of power factor and simulation model of ac voltage controller is also developed in MATLAB software.

  20. Genetic Association Analysis under Complex Survey Sampling: The Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Dan-Yu; Tao, Ran; Kalsbeek, William D.; Zeng, Donglin; Gonzalez, Franklyn; Fernández-Rhodes, Lindsay; Graff, Mariaelisa; Koch, Gary G.; North, Kari E.; Heiss, Gerardo

    2014-01-01

    The cohort design allows investigators to explore the genetic basis of a variety of diseases and traits in a single study while avoiding major weaknesses of the case-control design. Most cohort studies employ multistage cluster sampling with unequal probabilities to conveniently select participants with desired characteristics, and participants from different clusters might be genetically related. Analysis that ignores the complex sampling design can yield biased estimation of the genetic association and inflation of the type I error. Herein, we develop weighted estimators that reflect unequal selection probabilities and differential nonresponse rates, and we derive variance estimators that properly account for the sampling design and the potential relatedness of participants in different sampling units. We compare, both analytically and numerically, the performance of the proposed weighted estimators with unweighted estimators that disregard the sampling design. We demonstrate the usefulness of the proposed methods through analysis of MetaboChip data in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos, which is the largest health study of the Hispanic/Latino population in the United States aimed at identifying risk factors for various diseases and determining the role of genes and environment in the occurrence of diseases. We provide guidelines on the use of weighted and unweighted estimators, as well as the relevant software. PMID:25480034

  1. Reproduction experiment on Austropotamobius pallipes complex under controlled conditions: Can hybrids be hatched?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghia D.

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The Austropotamobius pallipes complex is formed by the two species A. pallipes and A. italicus, recently defined only on genetic basis, without obvious morphological features for their differentiation. Dealing with this problem, we have conducted a breeding experiment between these two presumed species under controlled conditions, in order to investigate the possible existence of reproductive barriers. Using 80 breeders (56 females and 24 males collected from populations where their species identity was genetically well established, we performed four series of trials: Fita × Mpal and Fpal × Mita interspecific mating; Fita × Mita and Fpal × Mpal intraspecific mating as a control. We have monitored only the main phases of the reproduction in order to avoid excessive interference for the crayfish. In November 2009 the 91.7% of females having intraspecific mating, as well as the 100% of females having interspecific mating, produced eggs. In June 2010 the eggs from the 36.4% of females having intraspecific mating, and those from the 42.3% of females having interspecific mating did hatch. We emphasize the hatching of hybrids and their vitality.

  2. Bacterial degradation of cyanide and its metal complexes under alkaline conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luque-Almagro, Víctor M; Huertas, María-J; Martínez-Luque, Manuel; Moreno-Vivián, Conrado; Roldán, M Dolores; García-Gil, L Jesús; Castillo, Francisco; Blasco, Rafael

    2005-02-01

    A bacterial strain able to use cyanide as the sole nitrogen source under alkaline conditions has been isolated. The bacterium was classified as Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes by comparison of its 16S RNA gene sequence to those of existing strains and deposited in the Coleccion Espanola de Cultivos Tipo (Spanish Type Culture Collection) as strain CECT5344. Cyanide consumption is an assimilative process, since (i) bacterial growth was concomitant and proportional to cyanide degradation and (ii) the bacterium stoichiometrically converted cyanide into ammonium in the presence of l-methionine-d,l-sulfoximine, a glutamine synthetase inhibitor. The bacterium was able to grow in alkaline media, up to an initial pH of 11.5, and tolerated free cyanide in concentrations of up to 30 mM, which makes it a good candidate for the biological treatment of cyanide-contaminated residues. Both acetate and d,l-malate were suitable carbon sources for cyanotrophic growth, but no growth was detected in media with cyanide as the sole carbon source. In addition to cyanide, P. pseudoalcaligenes CECT5344 used other nitrogen sources, namely ammonium, nitrate, cyanate, cyanoacetamide, nitroferricyanide (nitroprusside), and a variety of cyanide-metal complexes. Cyanide and ammonium were assimilated simultaneously, whereas cyanide strongly inhibited nitrate and nitrite assimilation. Cyanase activity was induced during growth with cyanide or cyanate, but not with ammonium or nitrate as the nitrogen source. This result suggests that cyanate could be an intermediate in the cyanide degradation pathway, but alternative routes cannot be excluded.

  3. Complex network analysis of brain functional connectivity under a multi-step cognitive task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Shi-Min; Chen, Wei; Liu, Dong-Bai; Tang, Ming; Chen, Xun

    2017-01-01

    Functional brain network has been widely studied to understand the relationship between brain organization and behavior. In this paper, we aim to explore the functional connectivity of brain network under a multi-step cognitive task involving consecutive behaviors, and further understand the effect of behaviors on the brain organization. The functional brain networks are constructed based on a high spatial and temporal resolution fMRI dataset and analyzed via complex network based approach. We find that at voxel level the functional brain network shows robust small-worldness and scale-free characteristics, while its assortativity and rich-club organization are slightly restricted to the order of behaviors performed. More interestingly, the functional connectivity of brain network in activated ROIs strongly correlates with behaviors and is obviously restricted to the order of behaviors performed. These empirical results suggest that the brain organization has the generic properties of small-worldness and scale-free characteristics, and its diverse functional connectivity emerging from activated ROIs is strongly driven by these behavioral activities via the plasticity of brain.

  4. Deconvolution of complex differential scanning calorimetry profiles for protein transitions under kinetic control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledo-Núñez, Citlali; Vera-Robles, L Iraís; Arroyo-Maya, Izlia J; Hernández-Arana, Andrés

    2016-09-15

    A frequent outcome in differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) experiments carried out with large proteins is the irreversibility of the observed endothermic effects. In these cases, DSC profiles are analyzed according to methods developed for temperature-induced denaturation transitions occurring under kinetic control. In the one-step irreversible model (native → denatured) the characteristics of the observed single-peaked endotherm depend on the denaturation enthalpy and the temperature dependence of the reaction rate constant, k. Several procedures have been devised to obtain the parameters that determine the variation of k with temperature. Here, we have elaborated on one of these procedures in order to analyze more complex DSC profiles. Synthetic data for a heat capacity curve were generated according to a model with two sequential reactions; the temperature dependence of each of the two rate constants involved was determined, according to the Eyring's equation, by two fixed parameters. It was then shown that our deconvolution procedure, by making use of heat capacity data alone, permits to extract the parameter values that were initially used. Finally, experimental DSC traces showing two and three maxima were analyzed and reproduced with relative success according to two- and four-step sequential models. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. A bioactive molecule in a complex wound healing process: platelet-derived growth factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaltalioglu, Kaan; Coskun-Cevher, Sule

    2015-08-01

    Wound healing is considered to be particularly important after surgical procedures, and the most important wounds related to surgical procedures are incisional, excisional, and punch wounds. Research is ongoing to identify methods to heal non-closed wounds or to accelerate wound healing; however, wound healing is a complex process that includes many biological and physiological events, and it is affected by various local and systemic factors, including diabetes mellitus, infection, ischemia, and aging. Different cell types (such as platelets, macrophages, and neutrophils) release growth factors during the healing process, and platelet-derived growth factor is a particularly important mediator in most stages of wound healing. This review explores the relationship between platelet-derived growth factor and wound healing.

  6. Complexity

    CERN Document Server

    Gershenson, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    The term complexity derives etymologically from the Latin plexus, which means interwoven. Intuitively, this implies that something complex is composed by elements that are difficult to separate. This difficulty arises from the relevant interactions that take place between components. This lack of separability is at odds with the classical scientific method - which has been used since the times of Galileo, Newton, Descartes, and Laplace - and has also influenced philosophy and engineering. In recent decades, the scientific study of complexity and complex systems has proposed a paradigm shift in science and philosophy, proposing novel methods that take into account relevant interactions.

  7. Heterogeneous intracellular trafficking dynamics of brain-derived neurotrophic factor complexes in the neuronal soma revealed by single quantum dot tracking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anke Vermehren-Schmaedick

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence underscores the importance of ligand-receptor dynamics in shaping cellular signaling. In the nervous system, growth factor-activated Trk receptor trafficking serves to convey biochemical signaling that underlies fundamental neural functions. Focus has been placed on axonal trafficking but little is known about growth factor-activated Trk dynamics in the neuronal soma, particularly at the molecular scale, due in large part to technical hurdles in observing individual growth factor-Trk complexes for long periods of time inside live cells. Quantum dots (QDs are intensely fluorescent nanoparticles that have been used to study the dynamics of ligand-receptor complexes at the plasma membrane but the value of QDs for investigating ligand-receptor intracellular dynamics has not been well exploited. The current study establishes that QD conjugated brain-derived neurotrophic factor (QD-BDNF binds to TrkB receptors with high specificity, activates TrkB downstream signaling, and allows single QD tracking capability for long recording durations deep within the soma of live neurons. QD-BDNF complexes undergo internalization, recycling, and intracellular trafficking in the neuronal soma. These trafficking events exhibit little time-synchrony and diverse heterogeneity in underlying dynamics that include phases of sustained rapid motor transport without pause as well as immobility of surprisingly long-lasting duration (several minutes. Moreover, the trajectories formed by dynamic individual BDNF complexes show no apparent end destination; BDNF complexes can be found meandering over long distances of several microns throughout the expanse of the neuronal soma in a circuitous fashion. The complex, heterogeneous nature of neuronal soma trafficking dynamics contrasts the reported linear nature of axonal transport data and calls for models that surpass our generally limited notions of nuclear-directed transport in the soma. QD-ligand probes are

  8. pipsqueak Encodes a Factor Essential for Sequence-Specific Targeting of a Polycomb Group Protein Complex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Der-HwaHuang; Yuh-LongChang; Chih-ChaoYang; I-ChingPan; BalasKing

    2005-01-01

    The Polycomb (Pc) group (Pc-G) of repressors is essential for transcriptional silencing of homeotic genes that determine the axial development of metazoan animals. It is generally believed that the multimeric complexes formed by these proteins nucleate certain chromatin structures to silence promoter activity upon binding to Pc-G response elements (PRE). Little is known, however, about the molecular mechanism involved in sequence-specific binding of these complexes. Here, we show that an immunoa ffinity-purified Pc protein complex contains a DNA binding activity specific to the (GA), motif in a PRE from the bithoraxoid region. We found that this activity can be attributed primarily to the large protein isoform encoded by pipsqueak (psq) instead of to the well-characterized GAGA factor. The functional relevance ofpsq to the silencing mechanismis strongly supported by its synergistic interactions with a subset of Pc-G that cause misexpression of homeotic genes.

  9. Computational Experiment Study on Selection Mechanism of Project Delivery Method Based on Complex Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Ding

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Project delivery planning is a key stage used by the project owner (or project investor for organizing design, construction, and other operations in a construction project. The main task in this stage is to select an appropriate project delivery method. In order to analyze different factors affecting the PDM selection, this paper establishes a multiagent model mainly to show how project complexity, governance strength, and market environment affect the project owner’s decision on PDM. Experiment results show that project owner usually choose Design-Build method when the project is very complex within a certain range. Besides, this paper points out that Design-Build method will be the prior choice when the potential contractors develop quickly. This paper provides the owners with methods and suggestions in terms of showing how the factors affect PDM selection, and it may improve the project performance.

  10. Energetic Mechanism of Cytochrome c-Cytochrome c Oxidase Electron Transfer Complex Formation under Turnover Conditions Revealed by Mutational Effects and Docking Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Wataru; Hitaoka, Seiji; Inoue, Kaoru; Imai, Mizue; Saio, Tomohide; Uchida, Takeshi; Shinzawa-Itoh, Kyoko; Yoshikawa, Shinya; Yoshizawa, Kazunari; Ishimori, Koichiro

    2016-07-15

    Based on the mutational effects on the steady-state kinetics of the electron transfer reaction and our NMR analysis of the interaction site (Sakamoto, K., Kamiya, M., Imai, M., Shinzawa-Itoh, K., Uchida, T., Kawano, K., Yoshikawa, S., and Ishimori, K. (2011) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 108, 12271-12276), we determined the structure of the electron transfer complex between cytochrome c (Cyt c) and cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) under turnover conditions and energetically characterized the interactions essential for complex formation. The complex structures predicted by the protein docking simulation were computationally selected and validated by the experimental kinetic data for mutant Cyt c in the electron transfer reaction to CcO. The interaction analysis using the selected Cyt c-CcO complex structure revealed the electrostatic and hydrophobic contributions of each amino acid residue to the free energy required for complex formation. Several charged residues showed large unfavorable (desolvation) electrostatic interactions that were almost cancelled out by large favorable (Columbic) electrostatic interactions but resulted in the destabilization of the complex. The residual destabilizing free energy is compensated by the van der Waals interactions mediated by hydrophobic amino acid residues to give the stabilized complex. Thus, hydrophobic interactions are the primary factors that promote complex formation between Cyt c and CcO under turnover conditions, whereas the change in the electrostatic destabilization free energy provides the variance of the binding free energy in the mutants. The distribution of favorable and unfavorable electrostatic interactions in the interaction site determines the orientation of the binding of Cyt c on CcO.

  11. Functional Factor Analysis In Sesame Under Water - Limiting Stress: New Concept On An Old Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansouri Sadollah

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Multivariate statistical analysis, through their ability to extract hidden relationship between various traits, has a wide application in breeding programs. Having physiological concept on the multivariate analysis, factor analysis was used to extract differential relationships between different components involving in assimilate partitioning in sesame under regular irrigation regime and limited irrigation. The analysis revealed that under regular irrigation regime, the stored and/or currently produced assimilates are allocated to the filling seeds. However, incidence of water shortage in the beginning of flowering time make shifts in assimilate partitioning from formation of new seeds or capsules to the not-matured pre-formed seeds, which results in seeds with more nutrient storage. This indicates the requirement for change in breeding strategies under sub-optimal condition. The possible common language between factor concept in multivariate analysis, QTLs in genetics, and transcription factors in molecular biology is indicated.

  12. Why are you draining your brain? Factors underlying decisions of graduating Lebanese medical students to migrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akl, Elie A; Maroun, Nancy; Major, Stella; Afif, Claude; Chahoud, Bechara; Choucair, Jacques; Sakr, Mazen; Schünemann, Holger J

    2007-03-01

    In the context of a worldwide physician brain drain phenomenon, Lebanon has the highest emigration factor in the Middle East and North Africa. In this manuscript we aim to identify and develop a conceptual framework for the factors underlying the decisions of graduating Lebanese medical students to train abroad. We conducted two focus groups and seven semi-structured individual interviews with 23 students. In the deductive analysis (based on the push-pull theory), students reported push factors in Lebanon and pull factors abroad related to five dimensions. They focused predominantly on how training abroad provides them with a competitive advantage in an oversaturated Lebanese job market. An inductive analysis revealed the following emerging concepts: repel factors abroad and retain factors locally; societal expectations that students should train abroad; marketing of abroad training; and an established culture of migration. The marketing of abroad training and the culture of migration are prevalent in the academic institutions.

  13. Studies decode crystal structure of a neurotrophic factor and the p75 neurotrophin receptor complex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ CAS biophysicists have made new discoveries about the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR).Under the guidance of Prof.JIANG Tao of the CAS Institute of Biophysics (IBP),Dr.GONG Yong and Dr.CAO Peng revealed crystal structure of a symmetrical complex of the neurotrophin-3 and p75NTR,bringing to light the mode of their interaction and their structural basis.The work was published by the ioumal Nature on 7 August.

  14. Steady-State Configuration and Tension Calculations of Marine Cables Under Complex Currents via Separated Particle Swarm Optimization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐雪松

    2014-01-01

    Under complex currents, the motion governing equations of marine cables are complex and nonlinear, and the calculations of cable configuration and tension become difficult compared with those under the uniform or simple currents. To obtain the numerical results, the usual Newton−Raphson iteration is often adopted, but its stability depends on the initial guessed solution to the governing equations. To improve the stability of numerical calculation, this paper proposed separated the particle swarm optimization, in which the variables are separated into several groups, and the dimension of search space is reduced to facilitate the particle swarm optimization. Via the separated particle swarm optimization, these governing nonlinear equations can be solved successfully with any initial solution, and the process of numerical calculation is very stable. For the calculations of cable configuration and tension of marine cables under complex currents, the proposed separated swarm particle optimization is more effective than the other particle swarm optimizations.

  15. The apical complex provides a regulated gateway for secretion of invasion factors in Toxoplasma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas J Katris

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The apical complex is the definitive cell structure of phylum Apicomplexa, and is the focus of the events of host cell penetration and the establishment of intracellular parasitism. Despite the importance of this structure, its molecular composition is relatively poorly known and few studies have experimentally tested its functions. We have characterized a novel Toxoplasma gondii protein, RNG2, that is located at the apical polar ring--the common structural element of apical complexes. During cell division, RNG2 is first recruited to centrosomes immediately after their duplication, confirming that assembly of the new apical complex commences as one of the earliest events of cell replication. RNG2 subsequently forms a ring, with the carboxy- and amino-termini anchored to the apical polar ring and mobile conoid, respectively, linking these two structures. Super-resolution microscopy resolves these two termini, and reveals that RNG2 orientation flips during invasion when the conoid is extruded. Inducible knockdown of RNG2 strongly inhibits host cell invasion. Consistent with this, secretion of micronemes is prevented in the absence of RNG2. This block, however, can be fully or partially overcome by exogenous stimulation of calcium or cGMP signaling pathways, respectively, implicating the apical complex directly in these signaling events. RNG2 demonstrates for the first time a role for the apical complex in controlling secretion of invasion factors in this important group of parasites.

  16. Psychologic factors in the development of complex regional pain syndrome: history, myth, and evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feliu, Miriam H; Edwards, Christopher L

    2010-01-01

    The present paper examines the literature that addresses psychologic aspects involved in complex regional pain syndrome from a historic perspective to provide a rationale for the emergence of psychologic theories to explain its pathogenesis. The support of such perspective is then analyzed through the review of evidence-based studies. A review of the literature from a historic perspective was presented since its first description to the present time, including the clinical presentation and associated symptoms. An evidence-based approach was used to review the literature on complex regional pain syndrome and psychologic factors associated with the etiology or as predictors in the development of the disorder. After reviewing the literature on the history and the myths associated with complex regional pain syndrome, a hypothesis is provided based on an analysis of the Zeitgeist in the development of the psychologic theory associated with the disorder. We also concluded there is no evidence to support a linear relationship that establishes a psychologic predisposition to develop the disorder. An analysis of the Zeitgeist when complex regional pain syndrome was first described helps to understand the long-standing theories associated with a psychological theory of its etiology. This understanding should help to undermine the perpetuation of such claims which may contribute to undertreatment and misdiagnosis. To be consistent with todays Zeitgeist we must incorporate psychologic aspects, which while not causal in nature or exclusive of complex regional pain syndrome, are strongly associated with a wide spectrum of chronic pain disorders.

  17. Computational modeling of optogenetic neuronal excitation under complex illumination conditions using a Matlab-Neuron interface (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yona, Guy; Weissler, Yonatan; Meitav, Nizan; Guzi, Eliran; Rifold, Dafna D.; Kahn, Itamar; Shoham, Shy

    2016-03-01

    Optogenetics has in recent years become a central tool in neuroscience research. Creating a realistic model of optogenetic neuronal excitation is of crucial importance for controlling the activation levels of various neuronal populations in different depths, predicting experimental results and designing the optical systems. However, current approaches to modeling light propagation through rodents' brain tissue suffer from major shortcomings and comprehensive modeling of local illumination levels together with other important factors governing excitation (i.e., cellular morphology, channel dynamics and expression), are still lacking. To address this challenge we introduce a new simulation tool for optogenetic neuronal excitation under complex and realistic illumination conditions that implements a detailed physical model for light scattering (in MATLAB) together with neuron morphology and channelrhodopsin-2 model (in NEURON). These two disparate simulation environments were interconnected using a newly developed generic interface termed 'NeuroLab'. Applying this method, we show that in a layer-V cortical neuron, the relative contribution of the apical dendrites to neuronal excitation is considerably greater than that of the soma or basal dendrites, when illuminated from the surface.

  18. Computational identification of diverse mechanisms underlying transcription factor-DNA occupancy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiong Cheng

    Full Text Available ChIP-based genome-wide assays of transcription factor (TF occupancy have emerged as a powerful, high-throughput method to understand transcriptional regulation, especially on a global scale. This has led to great interest in the underlying biochemical mechanisms that direct TF-DNA binding, with the ultimate goal of computationally predicting a TF's occupancy profile in any cellular condition. In this study, we examined the influence of various potential determinants of TF-DNA binding on a much larger scale than previously undertaken. We used a thermodynamics-based model of TF-DNA binding, called "STAP," to analyze 45 TF-ChIP data sets from Drosophila embryonic development. We built a cross-validation framework that compares a baseline model, based on the ChIP'ed ("primary" TF's motif, to more complex models where binding by secondary TFs is hypothesized to influence the primary TF's occupancy. Candidates interacting TFs were chosen based on RNA-SEQ expression data from the time point of the ChIP experiment. We found widespread evidence of both cooperative and antagonistic effects by secondary TFs, and explicitly quantified these effects. We were able to identify multiple classes of interactions, including (1 long-range interactions between primary and secondary motifs (separated by ≤150 bp, suggestive of indirect effects such as chromatin remodeling, (2 short-range interactions with specific inter-site spacing biases, suggestive of direct physical interactions, and (3 overlapping binding sites suggesting competitive binding. Furthermore, by factoring out the previously reported strong correlation between TF occupancy and DNA accessibility, we were able to categorize the effects into those that are likely to be mediated by the secondary TF's effect on local accessibility and those that utilize accessibility-independent mechanisms. Finally, we conducted in vitro pull-down assays to test model-based predictions of short-range cooperative

  19. Estimating the total number of susceptibility variants underlying complex diseases from genome-wide association studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hon-Cheong So

    Full Text Available Recently genome-wide association studies (GWAS have identified numerous susceptibility variants for complex diseases. In this study we proposed several approaches to estimate the total number of variants underlying these diseases. We assume that the variance explained by genetic markers (Vg follow an exponential distribution, which is justified by previous studies on theories of adaptation. Our aim is to fit the observed distribution of Vg from GWAS to its theoretical distribution. The number of variants is obtained by the heritability divided by the estimated mean of the exponential distribution. In practice, due to limited sample sizes, there is insufficient power to detect variants with small effects. Therefore the power was taken into account in fitting. Besides considering the most significant variants, we also tried to relax the significance threshold, allowing more markers to be fitted. The effects of false positive variants were removed by considering the local false discovery rates. In addition, we developed an alternative approach by directly fitting the z-statistics from GWAS to its theoretical distribution. In all cases, the "winner's curse" effect was corrected analytically. Confidence intervals were also derived. Simulations were performed to compare and verify the performance of different estimators (which incorporates various means of winner's curse correction and the coverage of the proposed analytic confidence intervals. Our methodology only requires summary statistics and is able to handle both binary and continuous traits. Finally we applied the methods to a few real disease examples (lipid traits, type 2 diabetes and Crohn's disease and estimated that hundreds to nearly a thousand variants underlie these traits.

  20. Influence of topology in the evolution of coordination in complex networks under information diffusion constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasthurirathna, Dharshana; Piraveenan, Mahendra; Harré, Michael

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we study the influence of the topological structure of social systems on the evolution of coordination in them. We simulate a coordination game ("Stag-hunt") on four well-known classes of complex networks commonly used to model social systems, namely scale-free, small-world, random and hierarchical-modular, as well as on the well-mixed model. Our particular focus is on understanding the impact of information diffusion on coordination, and how this impact varies according to the topology of the social system. We demonstrate that while time-lags and noise in the information about relative payoffs affect the emergence of coordination in all social systems, some topologies are markedly more resilient than others to these effects. We also show that, while non-coordination may be a better strategy in a society where people do not have information about the payoffs of others, coordination will quickly emerge as the better strategy when people get this information about others, even with noise and time lags. Societies with the so-called small-world structure are most conducive to the emergence of coordination, despite limitations in information propagation, while societies with scale-free topologies are most sensitive to noise and time-lags in information diffusion. Surprisingly, in all topologies, it is not the highest connected people (hubs), but the slightly less connected people (provincial hubs) who first adopt coordination. Our findings confirm that the evolution of coordination in social systems depends heavily on the underlying social network structure.

  1. New Laboratory Technique to Determine Thermal Conductivity of Complex Regolith Simulants Under High Vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, A. J.; Christensen, P. R.

    2016-12-01

    Laboratory measurements have been necessary to interpret thermal data of planetary surfaces for decades. We present a novel radiometric laboratory method to determine temperature-dependent thermal conductivity of complex regolith simulants under high vacuum and across a wide range of temperatures. Here, we present our laboratory method, strategy, and initial results. This method relies on radiometric temperature measurements instead of contact measurements, eliminating the need to disturb the sample with thermal probes. We intend to determine the conductivity of grains that are up to 2 cm in diameter and to parameterize the effects of angularity, sorting, layering, composition, and cementation. These results will support the efforts of the OSIRIS-REx team in selecting a site on asteroid Bennu that is safe and meets grain size requirements for sampling. Our system consists of a cryostat vacuum chamber with an internal liquid nitrogen dewar. A granular sample is contained in a cylindrical cup that is 4 cm in diameter and 1 to 6 cm deep. The surface of the sample is exposed to vacuum and is surrounded by a black liquid nitrogen cold shroud. Once the system has equilibrated at 80 K, the base of the sample cup is rapidly heated to 450 K. An infrared camera observes the sample from above to monitor its temperature change over time. We have built a time-dependent finite element model of the experiment in COMSOL Multiphysics. Boundary temperature conditions and all known material properties (including surface emissivities) are included to replicate the experiment as closely as possible. The Optimization module in COMSOL is specifically designed for parameter estimation. Sample thermal conductivity is assumed to be a quadratic or cubic polynomial function of temperature. We thus use gradient-based optimization methods in COMSOL to vary the polynomial coefficients in an effort to reduce the least squares error between the measured and modeled sample surface temperature.

  2. Photodegradation of orange I in the heterogeneous iron oxide-oxalate complex system under UVA irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lei, Jing [Faculty of Agriculture, Guangxi University, Nanning 630005 (China); Guangdong Key Laboratory of Agricultural Environment Pollution Integrated Control, Guangdong Institute of Eco-Environment and Soil Sciences, Guangzhou 510650 (China); Liu Chengshuai [Guangdong Key Laboratory of Agricultural Environment Pollution Integrated Control, Guangdong Institute of Eco-Environment and Soil Sciences, Guangzhou 510650 (China); Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Li Fangbai [Guangdong Key Laboratory of Agricultural Environment Pollution Integrated Control, Guangdong Institute of Eco-Environment and Soil Sciences, Guangzhou 510650 (China)]. E-mail: cefbli@soil.gd.cn; Li Xiaomin [Guangdong Key Laboratory of Agricultural Environment Pollution Integrated Control, Guangdong Institute of Eco-Environment and Soil Sciences, Guangzhou 510650 (China); Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Zhou Shungui [Guangdong Key Laboratory of Agricultural Environment Pollution Integrated Control, Guangdong Institute of Eco-Environment and Soil Sciences, Guangzhou 510650 (China); Liu Tongxu [Guangdong Key Laboratory of Agricultural Environment Pollution Integrated Control, Guangdong Institute of Eco-Environment and Soil Sciences, Guangzhou 510650 (China); Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Gu Minghua [Faculty of Agriculture, Guangxi University, Nanning 630005 (China); Wu Qitang [College of Natural Resources and Environment, South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou 510642 (China)

    2006-09-21

    To understand the photodegradation of azo dyes in natural aquatic environment, a novel photo-Fenton-like system, the heterogeneous iron oxide-oxalate complex system was set up with the existence of iron oxides and oxalate. Five iron oxides, including {gamma}-FeOOH, IO-250, IO-320, IO-420 and IO-520, were prepared and their adsorption capacity was investigated in the dark. The results showed that the saturated adsorption amount ({gamma}{sub max}) was ranked the order of IO-250>IO-320>{gamma}-FeOOH>IO-420>IO-520 and the adsorption equilibrium constant (K{sub a}) followed the order of IO-250>IO-520>{gamma}-FeOOH>IO-420>IO-320. The effect of initial pH value, the initial concentrations of oxalate and orange I on the photodegradation of orange I were also investigated in different iron oxide-oxalate systems. The results showed that the photodegradation of orange I under UVA irradiation could be enhanced greatly in the presence of oxalate. And the optimal oxalate concentrations (C{sub ox}{sup 0}) for {gamma}-FeOOH, IO-250, IO-320, IO-420 and IO-520 were 1.8, 1.6, 3.5, 3.0 and 0.8mM, respectively. The photodegradation of orange I in the presence of optimal C{sub ox}{sup 0} was ranked as the order of {gamma}-FeOOH>IO-250>IO-320>IO-420>IO-520. The optimal range of initial pH was at about 3-4. The first-order kinetic constant for the degradation of orange I decreased with the increase in the initial concentration of orange I. Furthermore, the variation of pH, the concentrations of Fe{sup 3+} and Fe{sup 2+} during the photoreaction were also strongly dependent on the C{sub ox}{sup 0} and iron oxides.

  3. Photodegradation of orange I in the heterogeneous iron oxide-oxalate complex system under UVA irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Jing; Liu, Chengshuai; Li, Fangbai; Li, Xiaomin; Zhou, Shungui; Liu, Tongxu; Gu, Minghua; Wu, Qitang

    2006-09-21

    To understand the photodegradation of azo dyes in natural aquatic environment, a novel photo-Fenton-like system, the heterogeneous iron oxide-oxalate complex system was set up with the existence of iron oxides and oxalate. Five iron oxides, including gamma-FeOOH, IO-250, IO-320, IO-420 and IO-520, were prepared and their adsorption capacity was investigated in the dark. The results showed that the saturated adsorption amount (gamma(max)) was ranked the order of IO-250 > IO-320 > gamma-FeOOH > IO-420 > IO-520 and the adsorption equilibrium constant (Ka) followed the order of IO-250 > IO-520 > gamma-FeOOH > IO-420 > IO-320. The effect of initial pH value, the initial concentrations of oxalate and orange I on the photodegradation of orange I were also investigated in different iron oxide-oxalate systems. The results showed that the photodegradation of orange I under UVA irradiation could be enhanced greatly in the presence of oxalate. And the optimal oxalate concentrations (C(ox)0) for gamma-FeOOH, IO-250, IO-320, IO-420 and IO-520 were 1.8, 1.6, 3.5, 3.0 and 0.8 mM, respectively. The photodegradation of orange I in the presence of optimal C(ox)0 was ranked as the order of gamma-FeOOH > IO-250 > IO-320 > IO-420 > IO-520. The optimal range of initial pH was at about 3-4. The first-order kinetic constant for the degradation of orange I decreased with the increase in the initial concentration of orange I. Furthermore, the variation of pH, the concentrations of Fe3+ and Fe2+ during the photoreaction were also strongly dependent on the C(ox)0 and iron oxides.

  4. The statistical mechanics of complex signaling networks: nerve growth factor signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, K S; Hill, C C; Calero, G A; Myers, C R; Lee, K H; Sethna, J P; Cerione, R A

    2004-12-01

    The inherent complexity of cellular signaling networks and their importance to a wide range of cellular functions necessitates the development of modeling methods that can be applied toward making predictions and highlighting the appropriate experiments to test our understanding of how these systems are designed and function. We use methods of statistical mechanics to extract useful predictions for complex cellular signaling networks. A key difficulty with signaling models is that, while significant effort is being made to experimentally measure the rate constants for individual steps in these networks, many of the parameters required to describe their behavior remain unknown or at best represent estimates. To establish the usefulness of our approach, we have applied our methods toward modeling the nerve growth factor (NGF)-induced differentiation of neuronal cells. In particular, we study the actions of NGF and mitogenic epidermal growth factor (EGF) in rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells. Through a network of intermediate signaling proteins, each of these growth factors stimulates extracellular regulated kinase (Erk) phosphorylation with distinct dynamical profiles. Using our modeling approach, we are able to predict the influence of specific signaling modules in determining the integrated cellular response to the two growth factors. Our methods also raise some interesting insights into the design and possible evolution of cellular systems, highlighting an inherent property of these systems that we call 'sloppiness.'

  5. [Humus composition of black soil and its organo-mineral complexes under different fertility level].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lanpo; Wang, Jie; Liu, Jingshuan; Liu, Shuxia; Wang, Yanling; Wang, Hongbin; Zhang, Zhidan

    2005-01-01

    Determinations by Kumada method showed that with the improvement of black soil fertility, the free and combined humus contents in soil and its different size organo-mineral complexes increased, but the humification degree of free humus decreased, which was more obvious in silt and fine sand size complexes. The organic carbon content in complexes, humus extraction rate, free humus content, and humification degree of free humic acid decreased with the increasing particle size of complexes. All free humic acids in fertile soil were Rp type, while in unfertile soil, they were Rp and B type. With the increasing particle size of complexes, the type of free humic acids changed in the sequence A type (clay)-->B type (silt)-->Rp type (fine sand). Combined form humic acid mainly belonged to A type, no matter what particle size the complex was. The improvement of soil fertility could make the humification degree of free humus in soil and its complexes decrease, and furthermore, result in type change. In black soil, the type change of free humic acid mainly occurred in silt size complex, and that of combined form humic acid mainly occurred in fine sand size complex.

  6. [Factors influencing the spatial variability in soil respiration under different land use regimes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shu-Tao; Liu, Qiao-Hui; Hu, Zheng-Hua; Liu, Yan; Ren, Jing-Quan; Xie, Wei

    2013-03-01

    In order to investigate the factors influencing the spatial variability in soil respiration under different land use regimes, field experiments were performed. Soil respiration and relevant environment, vegetation and soil factors were measured. The spatial variability in soil respiration and the relationship between soil respiration and these measured factors were investigated. Results indicated that land use regimes had significant effects on soil respiration. Soil respiration varied significantly (P DBH) of trees can be explained by a natural logarithmic function. A model composed of soil organic carbon (C, %), available phosphorous (AP, g x kg(-1)) and diameter at breast height (DBH, cm) explained 92.8% spatial variability in soil respiration for forest ecosystems.

  7. The role of Glu259 in Escherichia coli elongation factor Tu in ternary complex formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nautrup Pedersen, Gitte; Rattenborg, Thomas; Knudsen, Charlotte Rohde;

    1998-01-01

    Determination of the crystal structure of the ternary complex formed between elongation factor Tu:GTP and aminoacylated tRNA revealed three regions of interaction between elongation factor Tu and tRNA. The structure indicates that the conserved glutamic acid at position 271 in Thermus aquaticus EF......-Tu could be involved in the binding of the 3' CCA-Phe end of the aminoacylated tRNA. Therefore, the corresponding residue, Glu259, of Escherichia coli EF-Tu was mutated into alanine, aspartic acid, glutamine and tyrosine, in order to substantiate the crystallographic structural evidence and to obtain...... of interaction with tRNA, while mutation to tyrosine abolished completely the interaction with tRNA. Finally, mutation to glutamine resulted in an elongation factor Tu variant behaving like the wild type. In conclusion, the environment around the site binding the CCA-Phe end of the tRNA is very restricted...

  8. Pathophysiological domains underlying the metabolic syndrome: an alternative factor analytic strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeters, Carel F W; Dziura, James; van Wesel, Floryt

    2014-10-01

    Factor analysis (FA) has become part and parcel in metabolic syndrome (MBS) research. Both exploration- and confirmation-driven factor analyzes are rampant. However, factor analytic results on MBS differ widely. A situation that is at least in part attributable to misapplication of FA. Here, our purpose was (i) to review factor analytic efforts in the study of MBS with emphasis on misusage of the FA model and (ii) to propose an alternative factor analytic strategy. The proposed factor analytic strategy consists of four steps and confronts weaknesses in application of the FA model. At its heart lies the explicit separation of dimensionality and pattern selection and the direct evaluation of competing inequality-constrained loading patterns. A high-profile MBS data set with anthropometric measurements on overweight children and adolescents is reanalyzed using this strategy. The reanalysis implied a more parsimonious constellation of pathophysiological domains underlying phenotypic expressions of MBS than the original analysis (and many other analyses). The results emphasize correlated factors of impaired glucose metabolism and impaired lipid metabolism. Pathophysiological domains underlying phenotypic expressions of MBS included in the analysis are driven by multiple interrelated metabolic impairments. These findings indirectly point to the possible existence of a multifactorial etiology. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. SELEX-seq, a method for characterizing the complete repertoire of binding site preferences for transcription factor complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Todd R.; Slattery, Matthew; Abe, Namiko; Rastogi, Chaitanya; Mann, Richard; Bussemaker, Harmen

    2014-01-01

    Summary The closely related members of the Hox family of homeodomain transcription factors have similar DNA-binding preferences as monomers, yet carry out distinct functions in vivo. Transcription factors often bind DNA as multiprotein complexes, raising the possibility that complex formation might modify their DNA binding specificities. To test this hypothesis we developed a new experimental and computational platform, termed SELEX-seq, to characterize DNA binding specificities of Hox-based multiprotein complexes. We found that complex formation with the same cofactor reveals latent specificities that are not observed for monomeric Hox factors. The findings from this in vitro platform are consistent with in vivo data, and the ‘latent specificity’ concept serves as a precedent for how the specificities of similar transcription factors might be distinguished in vivo. Importantly, the SELEX-seq platform is flexible and can be used to determine the relative affinities to any DNA sequence for any transcription factor or multiprotein complex. PMID:25151169

  10. Complex

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    CLEMENT O BEWAJI

    Schiff bases and their complex compounds have been studied for their .... establishing coordination of the N–(2 – hydroxybenzyl) - L - α - valine Schiff base ..... (1967); “Spectrophotometric Identification of Organic Compounds”, Willey, New.

  11. A Unique Computational Algorithm to Simulate Probabilistic Multi-Factor Interaction Model Complex Material Point Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamis, Christos C.; Abumeri, Galib H.

    2010-01-01

    The Multi-Factor Interaction Model (MFIM) is used to evaluate the divot weight (foam weight ejected) from the launch external tanks. The multi-factor has sufficient degrees of freedom to evaluate a large number of factors that may contribute to the divot ejection. It also accommodates all interactions by its product form. Each factor has an exponent that satisfies only two points--the initial and final points. The exponent describes a monotonic path from the initial condition to the final. The exponent values are selected so that the described path makes sense in the absence of experimental data. In the present investigation, the data used was obtained by testing simulated specimens in launching conditions. Results show that the MFIM is an effective method of describing the divot weight ejected under the conditions investigated.

  12. Structural Study of Inclusion Complex of Andrographolide with β-Cyclodextrin Prepared under Microwave Irradiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    An inclusion complex of β-cyclodextrin with andrographolide (Andro) was prepared by using a convenient method of microwave irradiation. The structure of the inclusion complex was determined by the 1H NMR, 2D NMR spectroscopy as well as the elemental analysis.

  13. A Cyclodissipativity Condition for Power Factor Improvement under Nonsinusoidal Source with Significant Impedance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Puerto-Flores, Dunstano del; Ortega, Romeo; Scherpen, Jacquelien M.A.

    2010-01-01

    The main contribution of this paper is an extension of a recent result that reformulates and solves the power factor compensation for nonlinear loads under nonsinusoidal regime in terms of cyclodissipativity. In the aforementioned result the generator was assumed to be ideal, that is, with negligibl

  14. Relative Damage Stress: Dominant Mechanical Factor for the Failure of Soldered Joints under Temperature Cycling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    By temperature normalization of the concept of equivalent damage stress proposed by Lemaitre,a new concept of relative damage stress has been put forward as the dominant mechanical factor for the failure of soldered joints under temperature cycling. Finite element numerical simulation results showed that the highest value of relative damage stress occurred at the high temperaturehold time during temperature cycling history.

  15. Overland flow under rainfall: some aspects related to modelling and conditioning factors.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lima, de J.L.M.P.

    1989-01-01

    This study concerns the theory and some practical aspects of overland flow under rainfall. Of the conditioning factors and processes which govern the generation of overland flow, the following were studied: depression storage, infiltration, morphology and wind. Special attention was paid to wind-dri

  16. Demographic factors and genetic variation influence population persistence under environmental change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willi, Yvonne; Hoffmann, Ary A

    2009-01-01

    Population persistence has been studied in a conservation context to predict the fate of small or declining populations. Persistence models have explored effects on extinction of random demographic and environmental fluctuations, but in the face of directional environmental change they should also integrate factors affecting whether a population can adapt. Here, we examine the population-size dependence of demographic and genetic factors and their likely contributions to extinction time under scenarios of environmental change. Parameter estimates were derived from experimental populations of the rainforest species, Drosophila birchii, held in the lab for 10 generations at census sizes of 20, 100 and 1000, and later exposed to five generations of heat-knockdown selection. Under a model of directional change in the thermal environment, rapid extinction of populations of size 20 was caused by a combination of low growth rate (r) and high stochasticity in r. Populations of 100 had significantly higher reproductive output, lower stochasticity in r and more additive genetic variance (V(A)) than populations of 20, but they were predicted to persist less well than the largest size class. Even populations of 1000 persisted only a few hundred generations under realistic estimates of environmental change because of low V(A) for heat-knockdown resistance. The experimental results document population-size dependence of demographic and adaptability factors. The simulations illustrate a threshold influence of demographic factors on population persistence, while genetic variance has a more elastic impact on persistence under environmental change.

  17. The Causal Factor Underlying the Correlation between Psychometric "g" and Scholastic Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Dasen; Thompson, Lee A.; Detterman, Douglas K.

    2003-01-01

    Fitted structural equation models to covariances among 9 cognitive abilities Test variables, 11 intelligence test variables, and 3 achievement test scaled scores of 532 primary school children in a twin studies project. Results suggest that individual differences in mental speed are a main causal factor underlying correlation between general…

  18. Eddy-correlation measurements of benthic fluxes under complex flow conditions: Effects of coordinate transformations and averaging time scales

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorke, Andreas; McGinnis, Daniel F.; Maeck, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    hours of continuous eddy-correlation measurements of sediment oxygen fluxes in an impounded river, we demonstrate that rotation of measured current velocities into streamline coordinates can be a crucial and necessary step in data processing under complex flow conditions in non-flat environments...... in the context of the theoretical concepts underlying eddy-correlation measurements and a set of recommendations for planning and analyses of flux measurements are derived....

  19. CPMD simulation of Cu2+ -- phenylalanine complex under micro-solvated environment

    CERN Document Server

    Ganesan, Aravindhan; Wang, Feng; Akola, Jaakko; Larrucea, Julen

    2013-01-01

    The study combines DFT calculations and CPMD simulations to investigate the structures of phenylalanine-copper (II) ([Phe-Cu]2+) complexes and the micro-solvation processes. ....It is found that the phenylalanine moiety appears to be in the neutral form in isolated and mono-hydrated complexes, but in the zwitterionic form in other hydrated complexes (with n no less than 2). .... The present CPMD simulations reveal that the maximum coordination of Cu2+ in the presence of the Phe ligand does not exceed four: the oxygen atoms from three water molecules and one carboxyl oxygen atom of Phe. Any excess water molecules will migrate to the second solvation shell. Moreover a unique structural motif is present in the lowest energy complexes, which is recognized to be significant in stabilizing the structures of the complexes. .....

  20. Hepatoma-derived growth factor and nucleolin exist in the same ribonucleoprotein complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bremer Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatoma-derived growth factor (HDGF is a protein which is highly expressed in a variety of tumours. HDGF has mitogenic, angiogenic, neurotrophic and antiapoptotic activity but the molecular mechanisms by which it exerts these activities are largely unknown nor has its biological function in tumours been elucidated. Mass spectrometry was performed to analyse the HDGFStrep-tag interactome. By Pull–down-experiments using different protein and nucleic acid constructs the interaction of HDGF and nucleolin was investigated further. Results A number of HDGFStrep-tag copurifying proteins were identified which interact with RNA or are involved in the cellular DNA repair machinery. The most abundant protein, however, copurifying with HDGF in this approach was nucleolin. Therefore we focus on the characterization of the interaction of HDGF and nucleolin in this study. We show that expression of a cytosolic variant of HDGF causes a redistribution of nucleolin into the cytoplasm. Furthermore, formation of HDGF/nucleolin complexes depends on bcl-2 mRNA. Overexpression of full length bcl-2 mRNA increases the number of HDGF/nucleolin complexes whereas expression of only the bcl-2 coding sequence abolishes interaction completely. Further examination reveals that the coding sequence of bcl-2 mRNA together with either the 5′ or 3′ UTR is sufficient for formation of HDGF/nucleolin complexes. When bcl-2 coding sequence within the full length cDNA is replaced by a sequence coding for secretory alkaline phosphatase complex formation is not enhanced. Conclusion The results provide evidence for the existence of HDGF and nucleolin containing nucleoprotein complexes which formation depends on the presence of specific mRNAs. The nature of these RNAs and other components of the complexes should be investigated in future.

  1. Molecular assembly of the ternary granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClure, Barbara J; Hercus, Timothy R; Cambareri, Bronwyn A; Woodcock, Joanna M; Bagley, Christopher J; Howlett, Geoff J; Lopez, Angel F

    2003-02-15

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a hematopoietic cytokine that stimulates the production and functional activity of granulocytes and macrophages, properties that have encouraged its clinical use in bone marrow transplantation and in certain infectious diseases. Despite the importance of GM-CSF in regulating myeloid cell numbers and function, little is known about the exact composition and mechanism of assembly of the GM-CSF receptor complex. We have now produced soluble forms of the GM-CSF receptor alpha chain (sGMRalpha) and beta chain (sbetac) and utilized GM-CSF, the GM-CSF antagonist E21R (Glu21Arg), and the betac-blocking monoclonal antibody BION-1 to define the molecular assembly of the GM-CSF receptor complex. We found that GM-CSF and E21R were able to form low-affinity, binary complexes with sGMRalpha, each having a stoichiometry of 1:1. Importantly, GM-CSF but not E21R formed a ternary complex with sGMRalpha and sbetac, and this complex could be disrupted by E21R. Significantly, size-exclusion chromatography, analytical ultracentrifugation, and radioactive tracer experiments indicated that the ternary complex is composed of one sbetac dimer with a single molecule each of sGMRalpha and of GM-CSF. In addition, a hitherto unrecognized direct interaction between betac and GM-CSF was detected that was absent with E21R and was abolished by BION-1. These results demonstrate a novel mechanism of cytokine receptor assembly likely to apply also to interleukin-3 (IL-3) and IL-5 and have implications for our molecular understanding and potential manipulation of GM-CSF activation of its receptor.

  2. Expression and subcellular localization of mechano-growth factor in osteoblasts under mechanical stretch

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG BingBing; XIAN ChengYu; LUO YanFeng; WANG YuanLiang

    2009-01-01

    Mechano-growth factor (MGF) is a stretch sensitive factor in myocytes, and it might also be produced by other mechanocytes under mechanical stimulation. In this study, both the mRNA and protein expression of MGF were detected in stretched osteoblasts. Quantitative analysis showed that a cyclic stretching stimulation caused a quick and sharp increase of MGF mRNA and protein expression from a low basal level under no stretch; the mRNA and protein levels respectively peaked in 6 and 12 h to 5 and 5.2 fold over the basal level and returned to normal by 24 h. The subcellular distribution of MGF protein was revealed by immunofluorescence analysis to be restricted to the nucleus. We concluded that cyclic stretching stimulation could induce MGF expression in osteoblasts in a pulsing fashion; and the nuclear distribution of MGF suggested that MGF might act in mechanocytes as an autocrine growth factor.

  3. Hypoxia inducible factor 1α promotes survival of mesenchymal stem cells under hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Bingke; Li, Feng; Fang, Jie; Xu, Limin; Sun, Chengmei; Han, Jianbang; Hua, Tian; Zhang, Zhongfei; Feng, Zhiming; Jiang, Xiaodan

    2017-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are ideal materials for cell therapy. Research has indicated that hypoxia benefits MSC survival, but little is known about the underlying mechanism. This study aims to uncover potential mechanisms involving hypoxia inducible factor 1α (HIF1A) to explain the promoted MSC survival under hypoxia. MSCs were obtained from Sprague-Dawley rats and cultured under normoxia or hypoxia condition. The overexpression vector or small interfering RNA of Hif1a gene was transfected to MSCs, after which cell viability, apoptosis and expression of HIF1A were analyzed by MTT assay, flow cytometry, qRT-PCR and Western blot. Factors in p53 pathway were detected to reveal the related mechanisms. Results showed that hypoxia elevated MSCs viability and up-regulated HIF1A (P cell CLL/lymphoma 2 (BCL2) expression had the opposite pattern (P cell therapy.

  4. The Transport Properties of Concrete under the Simultaneous Coupling of Fatigue Load and Environment Factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Caihui; SUN Wei; JING Jinyang; HAN Jiande; RONG Hui

    2012-01-01

    A set of coupling experimental instrument was designed to study the transport properties of chloride ion in concrete under simultaneous coupling action of fatigue load and environmental factors.Firstly the water-saturated performance of modern concrete was investigated,then diffusion performance of chloride ion under different stress levels and different temperature were studied respectively; meanwhile,the timedependent behavior of the chloride ion diffusion in concrete was also researched.The results showed that the saturation degree of concrete can reach as high as 99%.Besides,diffusion coefficient of chloride ion increased with increasing of the stress level and temperature,and when the stress level and temperature are at 0.6 and 60 ℃ respectively,the diffusion coefficient is 6.3 × 10 14 m2/s,moreover the diffusion coefficient of chloride ion in concrete decreased with time under the simultaneous coupling action of fatigue load and environment factors.

  5. Factors influencing Complexity in Financial Report preparation - Evidence from the Banking Sector in Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.Mutiso

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The current developments in the business environment as well as in the accountancy profession have significantly affected the way the financial reports are prepared. This study sought to assess the factors influencing complexity of preparing financial reports in the banking sector in Kenya. The objectives included assessing whether disclosures, adoption of International financial Reporting Standard, regulations and lack of competence by the preparers have contributed to the complexity of preparing financial statements. Using a descriptive study design, data was collected from ten banks registered in the Nairobi Capital Market. The study found out that the identified variables positively contributed to complications in the preparation of financial reports. Management interference, lack of guidance on interpretations and frequent updates of the standards were identified as the main challenges in preparing financial reports. Several recommendations were given to help simplify the process of preparing financial statements.

  6. Identification of the underlying factor structure of the Derriford Appearance Scale 24.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Timothy P; Lawson, Victoria; White, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Background. The Derriford Appearance Scale24 (DAS24) is a widely used measure of distress and dysfunction in relation to self-consciousness of appearance. It has been used in clinical and research settings, and translated into numerous European and Asian languages. Hitherto, no study has conducted an analysis to determine the underlying factor structure of the scale. Methods. A large (n = 1,265) sample of community and hospital patients with a visible difference were recruited face to face or by post, and completed the DAS24. Results. A two factor solution was generated. An evaluation of the congruence of the factor solutions on each of the the hospital and the community samples using Tucker's Coefficient of Congruence (rc = .979) and confirmatory factor analysis, which demonstrated a consistent factor structure. A main factor, general self consciousness (GSC), was represented by 18 items. Six items comprised a second factor, sexual and body self-consciousness (SBSC). The SBSC scale demonstrated greater sensitivity and specificity in identifying distress for sexually significant areas of the body. Discussion. The factor structure of the DAS24 facilitates a more nuanced interpretation of scores using this scale. Two conceptually and statistically coherent sub-scales were identified. The SBSC sub-scale offers a means of identifying distress and dysfunction around sexually significant areas of the body not previously possible with this scale.

  7. Identification of the underlying factor structure of the Derriford Appearance Scale 24

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy P. Moss

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background. The Derriford Appearance Scale24 (DAS24 is a widely used measure of distress and dysfunction in relation to self-consciousness of appearance. It has been used in clinical and research settings, and translated into numerous European and Asian languages. Hitherto, no study has conducted an analysis to determine the underlying factor structure of the scale.Methods. A large (n = 1,265 sample of community and hospital patients with a visible difference were recruited face to face or by post, and completed the DAS24.Results. A two factor solution was generated. An evaluation of the congruence of the factor solutions on each of the the hospital and the community samples using Tucker’s Coefficient of Congruence (rc = .979 and confirmatory factor analysis, which demonstrated a consistent factor structure. A main factor, general self consciousness (GSC, was represented by 18 items. Six items comprised a second factor, sexual and body self-consciousness (SBSC. The SBSC scale demonstrated greater sensitivity and specificity in identifying distress for sexually significant areas of the body.Discussion. The factor structure of the DAS24 facilitates a more nuanced interpretation of scores using this scale. Two conceptually and statistically coherent sub-scales were identified. The SBSC sub-scale offers a means of identifying distress and dysfunction around sexually significant areas of the body not previously possible with this scale.

  8. Microwave gallium-68 radiochemistry for kinetically stable bis(thiosemicarbazone) complexes: structural investigations and cellular uptake under hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Israt S; Arrowsmith, Rory L; Cortezon-Tamarit, Fernando; Twyman, Frazer; Kociok-Köhn, Gabriele; Botchway, Stanley W; Dilworth, Jonathan R; Carroll, Laurence; Aboagye, Eric O; Pascu, Sofia I

    2016-01-07

    We report the microwave synthesis of several bis(thiosemicarbazones) and the rapid gallium-68 incorporation to give the corresponding metal complexes. These proved kinetically stable under 'cold' and 'hot' biological assays and were investigated using laser scanning confocal microscopy, flow cytometry and radioactive cell retention studies under normoxia and hypoxia. (68)Ga complex retention was found to be 34% higher in hypoxic cells than in normoxic cells over 30 min, further increasing to 53% at 120 min. Our data suggests that this class of gallium complexes show hypoxia selectivity suitable for imaging in living cells and in vivo tests by microPET in nude athymic mice showed that they are excreted within 1 h of their administration.

  9. Role for mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 signaling in neuroadaptations underlying alcohol-related disorders.

    OpenAIRE

    Neasta, Jérémie; Ben Hamida, Sami; Yowell, Quinn; Carnicella, Sebastien; RON, DORIT

    2010-01-01

    Present adress of Sébastien Carnicella: Grenoble Institute of Neuroscience, Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale U836, 38100 Grenoble, France. Equipe 10, Dynamique des réseaux neuronaux du mouvement; International audience; Alcohol addiction is a chronically relapsing disorder that includes certain maladaptive learning and memory. The serine and threonine kinase complex, mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), has been implicated in synaptic plasticity, learning...

  10. Molecular Mechanisms Underlying the Epileptogenesis and Seizure Progression in Tuberous Sclerosis Complex 1 Deficient Mouse Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    mutations in the TSC1 or TSC2 genes, which form a regulatory complex responsible for limiting the activity of an important intracellular regulator of cell ...growth and metabolism known as mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1). The pathological hallmark of TSC brains are cortical tubers...characterized by disorganized cortical lamination, aberrant dendritic arbors and axonal projections, astrocyte gliosis and abnormal cell morphology (ie

  11. Study on the Characteristic Energy Factor of the Deep Rock Mass Under Weak Disturbance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mingyang; Li, Jie; Ma, Linjian; Huang, Houxu

    2016-08-01

    This study aims to investigate the characteristic energy factor of the deep rock mass deformation subjected to the disturbance induced by excavation or explosion. Based on the well-known rock hierarchical structure, the equivalent average kinetic energy of the deep rock mass under weak disturbance is first introduced. The characteristic energy factor that reflects the instable deformation of the deep rock mass is derived using the principle of variation. The relationship between the characteristic energy factor and the energy hierarchical sequence of the deep rock mass deformation and failure has also been illustrated. We believe that the characteristic energy factor is closely related to the characteristic scientific phenomena of deep rock mass in essence, which can provide a new approach for the study of deep rock mass in the fields of nonlinear mechanics, statistic physical mechanics, and mechanics of explosion and geophysics.

  12. The acid-labile subunit of the ternary insulin-like growth factor complex in cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, S; Juul, A; Becker, U;

    2000-01-01

    In the circulation, insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) is bound in a trimeric complex of 150 kDa with IGF binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) and the acid-labile subunit (ALS). Whereas circulating IGF-I and IGFBP-3 are reported to be low in patients with chronic liver failure, the level of ALS has...... not been described in relation to hepatic dysfunction. The aim of the present study was therefore to measure circulating and hepatic venous concentrations of ALS in relation to hepatic function and the IGF axis....

  13. Neutrophil Recruitment by Tumor Necrosis Factor from Mast Cells in Immune Complex Peritonitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Ramos, Bernard F.; Jakschik, Barbara A.

    1992-12-01

    During generalized immune complex-induced inflammation of the peritoneal cavity, two peaks of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) were observed in the peritoneal exudate of normal mice. In mast cell-deficient mice, the first peak was undetected, and the second peak of TNF and neutrophil influx were significantly reduced. Antibody to TNF significantly inhibited neutrophil infiltration in normal but not in mast cell-deficient mice. Mast cell repletion of the latter normalized TNF, neutrophil mobilization, and the effect of the antibody to TNF. Thus, in vivo, mast cells produce the TNF that augments neutrophil emigration.

  14. Molecular Processes Underlying the Structure and Assembly of Thin Films and Nanoparticles at Complex interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richmond, Geraldine [Univ. of Oregon, Eugene, OR (United States)

    2016-06-03

    carboxylic acid-containing polyelectrolytes at the carbon tetrachloride–water interface, a model system for an oil–water interface. Using VSFS and interfacial tension techniques, these unique set of studies identify the factors that dictate whether or not polyelectrolytes will adsorb to the oil–water interface and also describe the specifics of the adsorption process that depend upon factors such as polymer size, charge density, hydrophobicity, conformation, and the effect of metal ion electrostatics and bonding. The systems studied include polyelectrolytes polyacrylic acid (PAA) and polymethylacrylic acid (PMA) of different polymer sizes and under different aqueous solution conditions. The studies are the first to show the highly ordered nature of the adsorption of the first monolayer with subsequent monolayers disordered. The second set of studies have examined how peptoid nanosheets assemble at the oil/water interface. Peptoid nanosheets are a recently discovered class of two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterial, which form from the self-assembly of a sequence-specific peptoid polymer at an air-water interface. Nanosheet formation occurs first through the assembly of a peptoid monolayer and subsequent compression into a bilayer structure. In these highly successful studies we have shown that the oil-water interface provides another opportunity for growth of these unique and highly ordered peptoid sheets. The monolayer formed at this interface are found through surface spectroscopic measurements to be highly ordered and electrostatic interactions between the charged moieties, namely carboxylate and ammonium residues, of the peptoid are essential in the ability of these peptoids to form ordered nanosheets at the oil-water interface.

  15. REGULARITIES OF THE INFLUENCE OF ORGANIZATIONAL AND TECHNOLOGICAL FACTORS ON THE DURATION OF CONSTRUCTION OF HIGH-RISE MULTIFUNCTIONAL COMPLEXES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZAIATS Yi. I.

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement. Technical and economic indexes of projects of construction of high-rise multifunctional complexes, namely: the duration of construction works and the cost of building products depends on the technology of construction works and method of construction organization, and on their choice influence the architectural and design, constructional and engineering made decisions. Purpose. To reveal the regularity of influence of organizational and technological factors on the duration of construction of high-rise multifunctional complexes in the conditions of dense city building. Conclusion. To reveal the regularity of the influence of organizational and technological factors (the height, the factor complexity of design of project and and estimate documentation, factor of complexity of construction works, the factor of complexity of control of investment and construction project, economy factor, comfort factor, factor of technology of projected solutions for the duration of the construction of high-rise multifunctional complexes (depending on their height: from 73,5 m to 100 m inclusively; from 100 m to 200 m inclusively allow us to quantitatively assess their influence and can be used in the development of the methodology of substantiation of the expediency and effectiveness of the realization of projects of high-rise construction in condition of compacted urban development, based on the consideration of the influence of organizational and technological aspects.

  16. Relationships between psychological factors, pain, and disability in complex regional pain syndrome and low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bean, Debbie J; Johnson, Malcolm H; Kydd, Robert R

    2014-08-01

    Cognitive and emotional factors are known to influence peoples' pain experiences in many conditions, including low back pain. However, in complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS), their role is unclear. This study aimed to assess the relationships between psychological factors, pain, and disability in CRPS, compared with low back pain. This could help to identify target variables for psychological treatment. A total of 88 CRPS patients and 88 low back pain patients completed measures of pain, disability, depression, anxiety, and fear of movement and reinjury (kinesiophobia). Mean scores between the 2 groups were compared, and correlations between psychological factors, pain, and disability were compared between the 2 groups. Predictors of pain and disability were assessed using multiple regression analyses. The 2 groups had remarkably similar scores on measures of pain, disability, depression, anxiety, and kinesiophobia. In both groups, those who were more depressed, anxious, and kinesiophobic were more disabled. For the CRPS group (but not the low back pain group), pain intensity significantly correlated with distress. Multivariate analyses showed that the unique predictors of disability for the 2 groups were pain and depression, and that depression had a stronger relationship with disability for the CRPS group. For both groups, pain intensity was predicted by kinesiophobia, and anxiety was a unique predictor in the CRPS group only. In CRPS, disability and pain severity were more strongly associated with psychological factors than they were in low back pain. Cause and effect relationships could not be established by this cross-sectional study.

  17. The synergy factor: a statistic to measure interactions in complex diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Combarros Onofre

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One challenge in understanding complex diseases lies in revealing the interactions between susceptibility factors, such as genetic polymorphisms and environmental exposures. There is thus a need to examine such interactions explicitly. A corollary is the need for an accessible method of measuring both the size and the significance of interactions, which can be used by non-statisticians and with summarised, e.g. published data. The lack of such a readily available method has contributed to confusion in the field. Findings The synergy factor (SF allows assessment of binary interactions in case-control studies. In this paper we describe its properties and its novel characteristics, e.g. in calculating the power to detect a synergistic effect and in its application to meta-analyses. We illustrate these functions with real examples in Alzheimer's disease, e.g. a meta-analysis of the potential interaction between a BACE1 polymorphism and APOE4: SF = 2.5, 95% confidence interval: 1.5–4.2; p = 0.0001. Conclusion Synergy factors are easy to use and clear to interpret. Calculations may be performed through the Excel programmes provided within this article. Unlike logistic regression analysis, the method can be applied to datasets of any size, however small. It can be applied to primary or summarised data, e.g. published data. It can be used with any type of susceptibility factor, provided the data are dichotomised. Novel features include power estimation and meta-analysis.

  18. Three versus four-factor prothrombin complex concentrates for "factor-based" resuscitation in a porcine hemorrhagic shock model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moe, Donald Michael; Lallemand, Michael Scott; McClellan, John Mason; Smith, Joshua Porter; Marko, Shannon T; Eckert, Matthew J; Martin, Matthew J

    2017-07-12

    Bleeding is a leading cause of preventable death following severe injury. Prothrombin complex concentrates (PCC) treat inborn coagulation disorders and reverse oral anticoagulants, but are proposed for use in "factor-based" resuscitation strategies. Few studies exist for this indication in acidosis, or that compare 3-factor (3PCC) versus 4-factor (4PCC) products. We aimed to assess and compare their safety and efficacy in a porcine model of severe hemorrhagic shock and coagulopathy. Twenty-five adult Yorkshire swine underwent 35% volume hemorrhage, ischemia-reperfusion injury, and protocolized crystalloid resuscitation. Seventeen animals were randomized at 4 hours following model creation to receive a 45-IU/kg dose of either 3PCC or 4PCC. An additional 8 animals received autologous plasma transfusion prior to 4PCC to better characterize response to PCC. Individual factor levels were drawn at 4 and 6 hours. The model created significant acidosis with mean pH 7.21 and lactate of 9.6 mmol/L. Following PCC, 66.7% of 3PCC animals and 25% of 4PCC animals (regardless of plasma administration) developed consumptive coagulopathy. The animals that developed consumptive coagulopathy had manifested the "lethal triad" with lower temperatures (36.3 vs. 37.8°C), increased acidosis (pH 7.14 vs. 7.27, base excess -12.1 vs. -6.5 mEq/L), and worse coagulopathy (prothrombin time 17.1 vs. 14.6 seconds, fibrinogen 87.9 vs. 124.1 mg/dL) (all pfactors with transient improvement of prothrombin time, but there was significant depletion of fibrinogen and platelets with no lasting improvement of coagulopathy. PCC failed to correct coagulopathy and was associated with fibrinogen and platelet depletion. Of greater concern, PCC administration resulted in consumptive coagulopathy in the more severely ill animals. The incidence of consumptive coagulopathy was markedly increased with 3PCC versus 4PCC, and these products should be used with caution in this setting. II, therapeutic.

  19. Tracking energy transfer between light harvesting complex 2 and 1 in photosynthetic membranes grown under high and low illumination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lüer, Larry; Moulisová, Vladimíra; Henry, Sarah; Polli, Dario; Brotosudarmo, Tatas H P; Hoseinkhani, Sajjad; Brida, Daniele; Lanzani, Guglielmo; Cerullo, Giulio; Cogdell, Richard J

    2012-01-31

    Energy transfer (ET) between B850 and B875 molecules in light harvesting complexes LH2 and LH1/RC (reaction center) complexes has been investigated in membranes of Rhodopseudomonas palustris grown under high- and low-light conditions. In these bacteria, illumination intensity during growth strongly affects the type of LH2 complexes synthesized, their optical spectra, and their amount of energetic disorder. We used a specially built femtosecond spectrometer, combining tunable narrowband pump with broadband white-light probe pulses, together with an analytical method based on derivative spectroscopy for disentangling the congested transient absorption spectra of LH1 and LH2 complexes. This procedure allows real-time tracking of the forward (LH2 → LH1) and backward (LH2←LH1) ET processes and unambiguous determination of the corresponding rate constants. In low-light grown samples, we measured lower ET rates in both directions with respect to high-light ones, which is explained by reduced spectral overlap between B850 and B875 due to partial redistribution of oscillator strength into a higher energetic exciton transition. We find that the low-light adaptation in R. palustris leads to a reduced elementary backward ET rate, in accordance with the low probability of two simultaneous excitations reaching the same LH1/RC complex under weak illumination. Our study suggests that backward ET is not just an inevitable consequence of vectorial ET with small energetic offsets, but is in fact actively managed by photosynthetic bacteria.

  20. Cyclopentadienyl molybdenum(II/VI) N-heterocyclic carbene complexes: Synthesis, structure, and reactivity under oxidative conditions

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Shenyu

    2010-04-26

    A series of N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) complexes CpMo(CO) 2(NHC)X (NHC = IMe = 1,3-dimethylimidazol-2-ylidene, X = Br, 1; NHC = 1,3-dipropylimidazol-2-ylidene, X = Br, 2; NHC = IMes = 1,3-bis(2,4,6- trimethylphenyl)imidazol-2-ylidene, X = Br, 3; NHC = IBz = 1,3-dibenzylimidazol- 2-ylidene, X = Br, 4a, and X = Cl, 4b; NHC = 1-methyl-3-propylimidazol-2- ylidene, X = Br, 5) and [CpMo(CO)2(IMes)(CH3CN)][BF 4] (6) have been synthesized and fully characterized. The stability of metal-NHC ligand bonds in these compounds under oxidative conditions has been investigated. The thermally stable Mo(VI) dioxo NHC complex [CpMoO 2(IMes)][BF4] (9) has been isolated by the oxidation of the ionic complex 6 by TBHP (tert-butyl hydrogen peroxide). Complex 6 can be applied as a very active (TOFs up to 3400 h-1) and selective olefin epoxidation catalyst. While under oxidative conditions (in the presence of TBHP), compounds 1-5 decompose into imidazolium bromide and imidazolium polyoxomolybdate. The formation of polyoxomolybdate as oxidation products had not been observed in a similar epoxidation catalyzed by Mo(II) and Mo(VI) complexes. DFT studies suggest that the presence of Br- destabilizes the CpMo(VI) oxo NHC carbene species, consistent with the experimental observations. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  1. Analysis on complex structure stability under different bar angle with BIM technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Xiongjue

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Sun Valley, the landmark building of World Expo in Shanghai, which has free surface with single-layer reticulated shell structure, is a typical complex structure. CAD/CAM integrated information system to design is used for the complex structure; however, it is a very rigorous process to be used widely. The relevant technology of the Sun Valley is not open to the public at present, so we try to use BIM technology to model the Sun Valley, including architecture modelling and structure analysis. By analysis of the Sun Valley structure using this method, it is proved that the problems in modelling may be solved by writing some script codes in Rhino software and the stability of the model can also be analyzed. The new approach is viable and effective in combination with different softwares such as Rhino, Revit, and Midas in solution of the complex shaped surfaces’ structure for modelling and calculation.

  2. Negative Mood and Obsessive-Compulsive Related Clinical Constructs: An Examination of Underlying Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary I. Britton

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Emerging evidence suggests that many of the clinical constructs used to help understand and explain obsessive-compulsive (OC symptoms, and negative mood, may be causally interrelated. One approach to understanding this interrelatedness is a motivational systems approach. This approach suggests that rather than considering clinical constructs and negative affect as separable entities, they are all features of an integrated threat management system, and as such are highly coordinated and interdependent. The aim of the present study was to examine if clinical constructs related to OC symptoms and negative mood are best treated as separable or, alternatively, if these clinical constructs and negative mood are best seen as indicators of an underlying superordinate variable, as would be predicted by a motivational systems approach. A sample of 370 student participants completed measures of mood and the clinical constructs of inflated responsibility, intolerance of uncertainty, not just right experiences, and checking stop rules. An exploratory factor analysis suggested two plausible factor structures, one where all construct items and negative mood items loaded onto one underlying superordinate variable, and a second structure comprising of five factors, where each item loaded onto a factor representative of what the item was originally intended to measure. A confirmatory factor analysis showed that the five factor model was preferential to the one factor model, suggesting the four constructs and negative mood are best conceptualized as separate variables. Given the predictions of a motivational systems approach were not supported in the current study, other possible explanations for the causal interrelatedness between clinical constructs and negative mood are discussed.

  3. Methylenedioxymethamphetamine inhibits mitochondrial complex I activity in mice: a possible mechanism underlying neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puerta, Elena; Hervias, Isabel; Goñi-Allo, Beatriz; Zhang, Steven F; Jordán, Joaquín; Starkov, Anatoly A; Aguirre, Norberto

    2010-05-01

    3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) causes a persistent loss of dopaminergic cell bodies in the substantia nigra of mice. Current evidence indicates that such neurotoxicity is due to oxidative stress but the source of free radicals remains unknown. Inhibition of mitochondrial electron transport chain complexes by MDMA was assessed as a possible source. Activities of mitochondrial complexes after MDMA were evaluated spectrophotometrically. In situ visualization of superoxide production in the striatum was assessed by ethidium fluorescence and striatal dopamine levels were determined by HPLC as an index of dopaminergic toxicity. 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine decreased mitochondrial complex I activity in the striatum of mice, an effect accompanied by an increased production of superoxide radicals and the inhibition of endogenous aconitase. alpha-Lipoic acid prevented superoxide generation and long-term toxicity independent of any effect on complex I inhibition. These effects of alpha-lipoic acid were also associated with a significant increase of striatal glutathione levels. The relevance of glutathione was supported by reducing striatal glutathione content with L-buthionine-(S,R)-sulfoximine, which exacerbated MDMA-induced dopamine deficits, effects suppressed by alpha-lipoic acid. The nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, N(G)-nitro-L-arginine, partially prevented MDMA-induced dopamine depletions, an effect reversed by L-arginine but not D-arginine. Finally, a direct relationship between mitochondrial complex I inhibition and long-term dopamine depletions was found in animals treated with MDMA in combination with 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine. Inhibition of mitochondrial complex I following MDMA could be the source of free radicals responsible for oxidative stress and the consequent neurotoxicity of this drug in mice.

  4. Proteomic analyses reveal distinct chromatin-associated and soluble transcription factor complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xu; Wang, Wenqi; Wang, Jiadong; Malovannaya, Anna; Xi, Yuanxin; Li, Wei; Guerra, Rudy; Hawke, David H; Qin, Jun; Chen, Junjie

    2015-01-21

    The current knowledge on how transcription factors (TFs), the ultimate targets and executors of cellular signalling pathways, are regulated by protein-protein interactions remains limited. Here, we performed proteomics analyses of soluble and chromatin-associated complexes of 56 TFs, including the targets of many signalling pathways involved in development and cancer, and 37 members of the Forkhead box (FOX) TF family. Using tandem affinity purification followed by mass spectrometry (TAP/MS), we performed 214 purifications and identified 2,156 high-confident protein-protein interactions. We found that most TFs form very distinct protein complexes on and off chromatin. Using this data set, we categorized the transcription-related or unrelated regulators for general or specific TFs. Our study offers a valuable resource of protein-protein interaction networks for a large number of TFs and underscores the general principle that TFs form distinct location-specific protein complexes that are associated with the different regulation and diverse functions of these TFs.

  5. Low-Complexity Adaptive Channel Estimation over Multipath Rayleigh Fading Non-Stationary Channels Under CFO

    CERN Document Server

    Hadei, Sayed A

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we propose novel low-complexity adaptive channel estimation techniques for mob ile wireless chan- n els in presence of Rayleigh fading, carrier frequency offsets (CFO) and random channel variations. We show that the selective p artial update of the estimated channel tap-weight vector offers a better trade-off between the performance and computational complexity, compared to the full update of the estimated channel tap-weight vector. We evaluate the mean-square weight error of th e proposed methods and demonstrate the usefulness of its via simulation studies.

  6. Investigating the Underlying Factors of Corruption in the Public Construction Sector: Evidence from China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Ming; Le, Yun; Yiu, Kenneth T W; Chan, Albert P C; Hu, Yi

    2016-12-30

    Over recent years, the issue of corruption in the public construction sector has attracted increasing attention from both practitioners and researchers worldwide. However, limited efforts are available for investigating the underlying factors of corruption in this sector. Thus, this study attempted to bridge this knowledge gap by exploring the underlying factors of corruption in the public construction sector of China. To achieve this goal, a total of 14 structured interviews were first carried out, and a questionnaire survey was then administered to 188 professionals in China. Two iterations of multivariate analysis approaches, namely, stepwise multiple regression analysis and partial least squares structural equation modeling were successively utilized to analyze the collected data. In addition, a case study was also conducted to triangulate the findings obtained from the statistical analysis. The results generated from these three research methods achieve the same conclusion: the most influential underlying factor leading to corruption was immorality, followed by opacity, unfairness, procedural violation, and contractual violation. This study has contributed to the body of knowledge by exploring the properties of corruption in the public construction sector. The findings from this study are also valuable to the construction authorities as they can assist in developing more effective anti-corruption strategies.

  7. The calcium-paracaseinate-phosphate-complex under conditions similar to those in cheese

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Monib, A.M.M.F.

    1962-01-01

    The complex of calcium-paracaseinate-phosphate is the matrix substance of cheese. The changes it undergoes during maturing determines many characteristics of the finished product.

    The preliminary studies of the effect of pH and sodium chloride on the swelling and solubility of the

  8. Identification of chromatophore membrane protein complexes formed under different nitrogen availability conditions in Rhodospirillum rubrum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selao, Tiago Toscano; Branca, Rui; Chae, Pil Seok

    2011-01-01

    expressed proteins, such as subunits of the succinate dehydrogenase complex and other TCA cycle enzymes that are usually found in the cytosol, thus hinting at a possible association to the membrane in response to nitrogen deficiency. We propose a redox sensing mechanism that can influence the membrane...

  9. Looking under the Bonnet: Factors Affecting Student Adoption of E-Learning Systems in Jordan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muneer Mahmood Abbad, David Morris, Carmel de Nahlik

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The primary questions addressed in this paper are the following: what are the factors that affect students’ adoption of an e-learning system and what are the relationships among these factors?This paper investigates and identifies some of the major factors affecting students’ adoption of an e-learning system in a university in Jordan. E-learning adoption is approached from the information systems acceptance point of view. This suggests that a prior condition for learning effectively using e-learning systems is that students must actually use them. Thus, a greater knowledge of the factors that affect IT adoption and their interrelationships is a pre-cursor to a better understanding of student acceptance of e-learning systems. In turn, this will help and guide those who develop, implement, and deliver e-learning systems.In this study, an extended version of the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM was developed to investigate the underlying factors that influence students’ decisions to use an e-learning system. The TAM was populated using data gathered from a survey of 486 undergraduate students using the Moodle based e-learning system at the Arab Open University. The model was estimated using Structural Equation Modelling (SEM. A path model was developed to analyze the relationships between the factors to explain students’ adoption of the e-learning system. Whilst findings support existing literature about prior experience affecting perceptions, they also point to surprising group effects, which may merit future exploration.

  10. Are familial factors underlying the association between socioeconomic position and prescription medicine?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Mia; Andersen, Per Kragh; Gerster, Mette;

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Although well established, the association between socioeconomic position and health and health behaviour is not clearly understood, and it has been speculated that familial factors, for example, dispositional factors or exposures in the rearing environment, may be underlying...... analyses were compared. RESULTS: An inverse social gradient in filling of prescriptions for all-purpose and system-specific drugs was observed in the unpaired analyses. In the intrapair analyses, associations were attenuated some in DZSS and more in MZ twins. Filling of drugs targeting the nervous system...... was still strongly associated with income in the intrapair analyses. CONCLUSIONS: Familial factors seem to account for part of the observed social inequality in filling of prescription medicine....

  11. Are the educational differences in incidence of cardiovascular disease explained by underlying familial factors?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Mia; Andersen, Per Kragh; Gerster, Mette;

    2014-01-01

    To isolate the effect of education from the influence of potential underlying factors, we investigated the association of education with the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and ischemic heart disease (IHD) using twin data to adjust for familial factors shared within twins, including genetic...... make-up and childhood environment. The study was based on data from the Danish Twin Registry linked to administrative and heath registers in Statistics Denmark. A total of 11,968 monozygotic and 20,464 dizygotic same sexed twins were followed from 1980 to 2009, including more than 8000 events of CVD....... Unpaired and intra-pair analyses were compared. In the unpaired analyses, an inverse educational gradient in CVD- and IHD risk was observed. This association was not replicated in the intra-pair analyses that control for shared familial factors exploiting that twins share their intrauterine- and childhood...

  12. [Dynamic changes of soil ecological factors in Ziwuling secondary forest area under human disturbance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhengchao; Shangguan, Zhouping

    2005-09-01

    As a widespread natural phenomenon, disturbance is considered as a discrete event occurred in natural ecosystems at various spatial and temporal scales. The occurrence of disturbance directly affects the structure, function and dynamics of ecosystems. Forest logging and forestland assart, the common human disturbances in forest area, have caused the dynamic changes of forest soil ecological factors in a relatively consistent environment. A study on the dynamics of soil bulk density, soil organic matter, soil microbes and other soil ecological factors under different human disturbance (logging and assart, logging but without assart, control) were conducted in the Ziwuling secondary forest area. The results indicated that human disturbance had a deep impact on the soil ecological factors, with soil physical and chemical properties become bad, soil organic matter decreased from 2.2% to 0.8%, and soil stable aggregates dropped more than 30%. The quantity of soil microbes decreased sharply with enhanced human disturbance. Soil organic matter and soil microbes decreased more than 50% and 90%, respectively, and soil bulk density increased from 0.9 to 1.21 g x cm(-3) with increasing soil depth. Ditch edge level also affected the dynamics of soil factors under the same disturbance, with a better soil ecological condition at low-than at high ditch edge level.

  13. [Dietary factors and their relation to appetite in children under two years with mild malnutrition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quijada, Mariana Martínez; Gutiérrez, María Luisa Alvarez

    2012-06-01

    Malnutrition is conditioned by a series of factors, among them the dietary factors, which include appetite, eating behaviors and habits. In order to assess these factors, the following objective was pursued: describe the dietary factors and their relation to appetite in children under two years of age with mild malnutrition. A correlational study was conducted. The sample consisted of all children under two years of age (n = 168) diagnosed with primary (mild) malnutrition, who attended consultation at the Centro de Atención Nutricional Infantil Antímano, CANIA, during the period 2000-2008. The results showed intake of energy and macronutrients was lower than the individual requirement; iron intake children showed rebellious behavior and caregivers were permissive. Protein adequacy, vegetable and whole milk consumption frequency, preparation type, identification of refusals and preferences, place and duration of meals, and child-caregiver interaction at mealtimes were significantly associated with appetite; if we consider this last one as a guide and we try to modify inadequate eating behaviors and habits, we will generate an impact over the child appetite that could improve the food consumption and prevent malnutrition.

  14. [Analysis of factors associated with multiple pregnancies in assisted reproduction treatment complex].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Nieto, C A; Méndez-Lozano, D H; Fraustro-Ávila, M E; García-Martínez, M R; Soto-Cossio, L E; Basurto-Díaz, D; Flores-Mendoza, H

    2016-01-01

    Today, advances in technology provide the best success rates in the reproductive medicine field. One of the biggest concerns about it, is the high risk of achieving multiple pregnancies, which may carry greater health risks for both; the mother and fetuses. Besides that, multiple pregnancies are considered a complication or an adverse effect of assisted reproduction treatments. To compare the factors associated with multiple pregnancy in patients who underwent complex assisted reproduction techniques. A retrospective and transversal case control study was rolled to compare the factors associated with multiple pregnancy rates, these results were correlated using a logistic regression model. a total of 1063 cases were reviewed, we obtained a pregnancy rate of 35.9%, and a multiple pregnancy rate of 31.5%. We found positive statistical association between patient age, total number of oocytes obtained, total embryos transferred, total vitrified embryos per cycle, total serum cuantitative B-GCH level, endometrial thickness in milimeters, and the Honest of a multiple pregnancy. In the logistic regression model, we found statistical association between the number of embryos transferred, number of embryos obtained, embryo quality, total vitrified embryos and the risk for multiple pregnancies. The total number of embryos transferred in a cycle of a complex assisted reproduction, is the most important factor for the onset of multiple pregnancies. The age of patients, the number of oocytes, total number of embryos obtained, the number of embryos transferred, the quality of embryos transferred and the number of frozen embryos per cycle, correlate significantly with more risk for multiple pregnancies.

  15. Can transcriptomics provide insight into the underlying chemopreventive mechanisms of complex mixtures of phytochemicals in humans?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breda, van S.G.; Wilms, L.C.; Gaj, S.; Briedé, J.J.; Helsper, J.P.F.G.; Kleinjans, J.C.; Kok, de T.M.

    2014-01-01

    Blueberries contain relatively large amounts of different phytochemicals which are suggested to have chemopreventive properties, but little information is available on the underlying molecular modes of action. This study investigates whole genome gene expression changes in lymphocytes of 143 humans

  16. Can transcriptomics provide insight into the underlying chemopreventive mechanisms of complex mixtures of phytochemicals in humans?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breda, van S.G.; Wilms, L.C.; Gaj, S.; Briedé, J.J.; Helsper, J.P.F.G.; Kleinjans, J.C.; Kok, de T.M.

    2014-01-01

    Blueberries contain relatively large amounts of different phytochemicals which are suggested to have chemopreventive properties, but little information is available on the underlying molecular modes of action. This study investigates whole genome gene expression changes in lymphocytes of 143 humans

  17. Using Estimations of Entropy to Optimize Complex Human Dynamic Networks under Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-30

    blood components , during various physically and mentally stressful exercises, we will be able to determine the factors that drive overall team success and assemble more effective teams using these factors. Sixteen WVU Air Force ROTC participants were selected, divided into four different teams of four individuals, their biological responses were monitored (some in real-time and some prior to and immediately following) in response to stressful teamwork exercises (mock hostage rescue). Individuals were outfitted with EEG, heart rate, breathing rate, estimated core

  18. Providing stability of properties of filled polymers under the joint effect of exploitation factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minakova, N. N.; Ushakov, V. Ya.

    2016-11-01

    The present work is devoted to a search for the structural parameter that can be used to adjust the structure of a resistive polymer composite material stable against the action of exploitation factors. The objects of research are polymers filled with technical carbon. Various approaches have been developed for them to control the stability of their properties: application of polymers of different chemical compositions and electroconductive filler with different concentrations, grades, and surface modifications. The following main problems have been formulated: based on an analysis of physical structurization processes, to reveal geometrical parameters determining the stability of properties under the joint effect of the exploitation factors; to adjust the structural parameter that responds to these factors; to check its efficiency; to estimate the importance of factors that influence the stability of the properties; and to propose an approach to the adjustment of the main material components to provide the stability of properties under the effect of the exploitation factors. The structural parameter was adjusted based on the physical principles developed earlier by the authors of the present report and other authors, whose publications are given in the References. It has been established that the stability of properties to the joint influence of the exploitation factors can be determined by the structural parameter that responds to branching of the electroconductive grid in a comparative analysis of the known material and the material being synthesized. Its application allows the problem of adjusting the material components to be also solved in the case in which identical values of the specific volume electrical resistances are formed for different elemental compositions.

  19. Infirmity and injury complexity are risk factors for surgical-site infection after operative fracture care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachoura, Abdo; Guitton, Thierry G; Smith, R Malcolm; Vrahas, Mark S; Zurakowski, David; Ring, David

    2011-09-01

    Orthopaedic surgical-site infections prolong hospital stays, double rehospitalization rates, and increase healthcare costs. Additionally, patients with orthopaedic surgical-site infections (SSI) have substantially greater physical limitations and reductions in their health-related quality of life. However, the risk factors for SSI after operative fracture care are unclear. We determined the incidence and quantified modifiable and nonmodifiable risk factors for SSIs in patients with orthopaedic trauma undergoing surgery. We retrospectively indentified, from our prospective trauma database and billing records, 1611 patients who underwent 1783 trauma-related procedures between 2006 and 2008. Medical records were reviewed and demographics, surgery-specific data, and whether the patients had an SSI were recorded. We determined which if any variables predicted SSI. Six factors independently predicted SSI: (1) the use of a drain, OR 2.3, 95% CI (1.3-3.8); (2) number of operations OR 3.4, 95% CI (2.0-6.0); (3) diabetes, OR 2.1, 95% CI (1.2-3.8); (4) congestive heart failure (CHF), OR 2.8, 95% CI (1.3-6.5); (5) site of injury tibial shaft/plateau, OR 2.3, 95% CI (1.3-4.2); and (6) site of injury, elbow, OR 2.2, 95% CI (1.1-4.7). The risk factors for SSIs after skeletal trauma are most strongly determined by nonmodifiable factors: patient infirmity (diabetes and heart failure) and injury complexity (site of injury, number of operations, use of a drain). Level II, prognostic study. See the Guideline for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  20. The factor structure of complex posttraumatic stress disorder in traumatized refugees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Nickerson

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The construct of complex posttraumatic stress disorder (CPTSD has attracted much research attention in previous years, however it has not been systematically evaluated in individuals exposed to persecution and displacement. Given that CPTSD has been proposed as a diagnostic category in the ICD-11, it is important that it be examined in refugee groups. Objective: In the current study, we proposed to test, for the first time, the factor structure of CPTSD proposed for the ICD-11 in a sample of resettled treatment-seeking refugees. Method: The study sample consisted of 134 traumatized refugees from a variety of countries of origin, with approximately 93% of the sample having been exposed to torture. We used confirmatory factor analysis to examine the factor structure of CPTSD in this sample and examined the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive power and negative predictive power of individual items in relation to the CPTSD diagnosis. Results: Findings revealed that a two-factor higher-order model of CPTSD comprising PTSD and Difficulties in Self-Organization (χ2 (47=57.322, p=0.144, RMSEA=0.041, CFI=0.981, TLI=0.974 evidenced superior fit compared to a one-factor higher-order model of CPTSD (χ2 (48=65.745, p=0.045, RMSEA=0.053, CFI=0.968, TLI=0.956. Overall, items evidenced strong sensitivity and negative predictive power, moderate positive predictive power, and poor specificity. Conclusions: Findings provide preliminary evidence for the validity of the CPTSD construct with highly traumatized treatment-seeking refugees. Highlights of the article:

  1. Hypothalamic corticotropin-releasing factor is centrally involved in learning under moderate stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Morgan; Chen, Alon; Richter-Levin, Gal

    2013-08-01

    The corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) neuropeptide is found to have a pivotal role in the regulation of the behavioral and neuroendocrine responses to stressful challenges. Here, we studied the involvement of the hypothalamic CRF in learning under stressful conditions. We have used a site-specific viral approach to knockdown (KD) CRF expression in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN). The two-way shuttle avoidance (TWSA) task was chosen to assess learning and memory under stressful conditions. Control animals learned to shuttle from one side to the other to avoid electrical foot shock by responding to a tone. Novel object and social recognition tasks were used to assess memory under less stressful conditions. KD of PVN-CRF expression decreased the number of avoidance responses in a TWSA session under moderate (0.8 mA), but not strong (1.5 mA), stimulus intensity compared to control rats. On the other hand, KD of PVN-CRF had no effect on memory performance in the less stressful novel object or social recognition tasks. Interestingly, basal or stress-induced corticosterone levels in CRF KD rats were not significantly different from controls. Taken together, the data suggest that the observed impairment was not a result of alteration in HPA axis activity, but rather due to reduced PVN-CRF activity on other brain areas. We propose that hypothalamic CRF is centrally involved in learning under moderate stressful challenge. Under 'basal' (less stressful) conditions or when the intensity of the stress is more demanding, central CRF ceases to be the determinant factor, as was indicated by performances in the TWSA with higher stimulus intensity or in the less stressful tasks of object and social recognition.

  2. Crystallization of hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α (HNF4α) in complex with the HNF1α promoter element

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Peng; Liu, Jianguo; Melikishvili, Manana; Fried, Michael G.; Chi, Young-In, E-mail: ychi@uky.edu [Department of Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry and Center for Structural Biology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States)

    2008-04-01

    Sample preparation, characterization, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis are reported for the HNF4α–DNA binary complex. Hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α (HNF4α) is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily that plays a central role in organ development and metabolic functions. Mutations on HNF4α cause maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY), a dominant monogenic cause of diabetes. In order to understand the molecular mechanism of promoter recognition and the molecular basis of disease-causing mutations, the recombinant HNF4α DNA-binding domain was prepared and used in a study of its binding properties and in crystallization with a 21-mer DNA fragment that contains the promoter element of another MODY gene, HNF1α. The HNF4α protein displays a cooperative and specific DNA-binding activity towards its target gene-recognition elements. Crystals of the complex diffract to 2.0 Å using a synchrotron-radiation source under cryogenic (100 K) conditions and belong to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 121.63, b = 35.43, c = 70.99 Å, β = 119.36°. A molecular-replacement solution has been obtained and structure refinement is in progress. This structure and the binding studies will provide the groundwork for detailed functional and biochemical studies of the MODY mutants.

  3. Measurement of the speed of sound by observation of the Mach cones in a complex plasma under microgravity conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhukhovitskii, D. I., E-mail: dmr@ihed.ras.ru; Fortov, V. E.; Molotkov, V. I.; Lipaev, A. M.; Naumkin, V. N. [Joint Institute of High Temperatures, Russian Academy of Sciences, Izhorskaya 13, Bd. 2, 125412 Moscow (Russian Federation); Thomas, H. M. [Research Group Complex Plasma, DLR, Oberpfaffenhofen, 82234 Wessling (Germany); Ivlev, A. V.; Morfill, G. E. [Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse, 85748 Garching (Germany); Schwabe, M. [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Graves Lab, D75 Tan Hall, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    We report the first observation of the Mach cones excited by a larger microparticle (projectile) moving through a cloud of smaller microparticles (dust) in a complex plasma with neon as a buffer gas under microgravity conditions. A collective motion of the dust particles occurs as propagation of the contact discontinuity. The corresponding speed of sound was measured by a special method of the Mach cone visualization. The measurement results are incompatible with the theory of ion acoustic waves. The estimate for the pressure in a strongly coupled Coulomb system and a scaling law for the complex plasma make it possible to derive an evaluation for the speed of sound, which is in a reasonable agreement with the experiments in complex plasmas.

  4. Measurement of the speed of sound by observation of the Mach cones in a complex plasma under microgravity conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Zhukhovitskii, D I; Molotkov, V I; Lipaev, A M; Naumkin, V N; Thomas, H M; Ivlev, A V; Schwabe, M; Morfill, G E

    2014-01-01

    We report the first observation of the Mach cones excited by a larger microparticle (projectile) moving through a cloud of smaller microparticles (dust) in a complex plasma with neon as a buffer gas under microgravity conditions. A collective motion of the dust particles occurs as propagation of the contact discontinuity. The corresponding speed of sound was measured by a special method of the Mach cone visualization. The measurement results are fully incompatible with the theory of ion acoustic waves. We explore the analogy between a strongly coupled Coulomb system and a solid. A scaling law for the complex plasma makes it possible to derive a theoretical estimate for the speed of sound, which is in a reasonable agreement with the experiments in strongly coupled complex plasmas.

  5. A new method for predicting response in complex linear systems. II. [under random or deterministic steady state excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanoff, J. L.; Kayser, K.; Krieger, W.

    1977-01-01

    The paper describes convergence and response studies in the low frequency range of complex systems, particularly with low values of damping of different distributions, and reports on the modification of the relaxation procedure required under these conditions. A new method is presented for response estimation in complex lumped parameter linear systems under random or deterministic steady state excitation. The essence of the method is the use of relaxation procedures with a suitable error function to find the estimated response; natural frequencies and normal modes are not computed. For a 45 degree of freedom system, and two relaxation procedures, convergence studies and frequency response estimates were performed. The low frequency studies are considered in the framework of earlier studies (Kayser and Bogdanoff, 1975) involving the mid to high frequency range.

  6. Manifestation of Coupled Geometric Complexity in Urban Road Networks under Mono-Centric Assumption

    CERN Document Server

    Peiravian, Farideddin

    2015-01-01

    This article analyzes the complex geometry of urban transportation networks as a gateway to understanding their encompassing urban systems. Using a proposed ring-buffer approach and applying it to 50 urban areas in the United States, we measure road lengths in concentric rings from carefully-selected urban centers and study how the trends evolve as we move away from these centers. Overall, we find that the complexity of urban transportation networks is naturally coupled, consisting of two distinct patterns: (1) a fractal component (i.e., power law) that represent a uniform grid, and (2) a second component that can be exponential, power law, or logarithmic that captures changes in road density. From this second component, we introduce two new indices, density index and decay index, which jointly capture essential characteristics of urban systems and therefore can help us gain new insights into how cities evolve.

  7. Functionality, Complexity, and Approaches to Assessment of Resilience Under Constrained Energy and Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-26

    budget economics, geological constraints on fossil fuel production, or foreign suppliers collaborating to withhold energy sources. While the energy...out by Corning , such definitions “exclude the extremes associated with highly ordered or strictly random phenomena, even though there can be more or...pilot who changed the art of war. Back Bay Books, New York, 2004. [20] Corning , P.A. “Complexity is just a word!” Technological Forecasting and Social

  8. Integral Light-Harvesting Complex Expression In Symbiodinium Within The Coral Acropora aspera Under Thermal Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gierz, Sarah L.; Gordon, Benjamin R.; Leggat, William

    2016-04-01

    Coral reef success is largely dependent on the symbiosis between coral hosts and dinoflagellate symbionts belonging to the genus Symbiodinium. Elevated temperatures can result in the expulsion of Symbiodinium or loss of their photosynthetic pigments and is known as coral bleaching. It has been postulated that the expression of light-harvesting protein complexes (LHCs), which bind chlorophylls (chl) and carotenoids, are important in photobleaching. This study explored the effect a sixteen-day thermal stress (increasing daily from 25-34 °C) on integral LHC (chlorophyll a-chlorophyll c2-peridinin protein complex (acpPC)) gene expression in Symbiodinium within the coral Acropora aspera. Thermal stress leads to a decrease in Symbiodinium photosynthetic efficiency by day eight, while symbiont density was significantly lower on day sixteen. Over this time period, the gene expression of five Symbiodinium acpPC genes was quantified. Three acpPC genes exhibited up-regulated expression when corals were exposed to temperatures above 31.5 °C (acpPCSym_1:1, day sixteen; acpPCSym_15, day twelve; and acpPCSym_18, day ten and day sixteen). In contrast, the expression of acpPCSym_5:1 and acpPCSym_10:1 was unchanged throughout the experiment. Interestingly, the three acpPC genes with increased expression cluster together in a phylogenetic analysis of light-harvesting complexes.

  9. Mobility of Iron-Cyanide Complexes in a Humic Topsoil under Varying Redox Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thilo Rennert

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The potentially toxic Fe-CN complexes ferricyanide, [FeIII(CN6]3−, and ferrocyanide, [FeII(CN6]4−, undergo a variety of redox processes in soil, which affect their mobility. We carried out microcosm experiments with suspensions of a humic topsoil (pH 5.3; Corg 107 g kg-1 to which we added ferricyanide (20 mg l-1. We varied the redox potential (EH from −280 to 580 mV by using O2, N2 and glucose. The decrease of EH led to decreasing concentrations of Fe-CN complexes and partial reductive dissolution of (hydrous Fe and Mn oxides. The dynamics of aqueous Fe-CN concentrations was characterized by decreasing concentrations when the pH rose and the EH dropped. We attribute these dependencies to adsorption on organic surfaces, for which such a pH/EH behavior has been shown previously. Adsorption was reversible, because when the pH and EH changed into the opposite direction, desorption occurred. This study demonstrates the possible impact of soil organic matter on the fate of Fe-CN complexes in soil.

  10. [Analysis on risk factors of endotracheal cuff under inflation in mechanically ventilated patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, You; Xi, Xiuming

    2014-12-01

    To investigate the prevalent condition of endotracheal cuff pressure and risk factors for under inflation. A prospective cohort study was conducted. Patients admitted to the Department of Critical Care Medicine of Fuxing Hospital Affiliated to Capital Medical University, who were intubated with a high-volume low-pressure endotracheal tube, and had undergone mechanical ventilation for at least 48 hours, were enrolled. The endotracheal cuff pressure was determined every 8 hours by a manual manometer connected to the distal edge of the valve cuff at 07 : 00, 15 : 00, and 23 : 00. Measurement of the endotracheal cuff pressure was continued until the extubation of endotracheal or tracheostomy tube, or death of the patient. According to the incidence of under inflation of endotracheal cuff, patients were divided into the incidence of under inflation lower than 25% group (lower low cuff pressure group) and higher than 25% group (higher low cuff pressure group). The possible influencing factors were evaluated in the two groups, including body mass index (BMI), size of endotracheal tube, duration of intubation, use of sedative or analgesic, number of leaving from intensive care unit (ICU), the number of turning over the patients, and aspiration of sputum. Logistic regression analysis was used to determine risk factors for under-inflation of the endotracheal cuff. During the study period, 53 patients were enrolled. There were 812 measurements, and 46.3% of them was abnormal, and 204 times (25.1%) of under inflation of endotracheal cuff were found. There were 24 patients (45.3%) in whom the incidence of under inflation rate was higher than 25%. The average of under inflation was 7 (4, 10) times. Compared with the group with lower rate of low cuff pressure, a longer time for intubation was found in group with higher rate of low cuff pressure [hours: 162 (113, 225) vs. 118 (97, 168), Z=-2.034, P=0.042]. There were no differences between the two groups in other factors

  11. Risk Factors of Diarrhea in Children Under Five Years in Urban Slums

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balakrishna Kalakheti

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Diarrhea is a leading cause of mortality in children in developing countries and the condition is worse in slums. In order to provide effective preventive and management strategies, it is important to identify factors associated with the disease. This study was carried out to investigate the risk factors of diarrhea in  children under five years of age in urban slums.   Methods: Parents of all children under five years from the urban slums of Tansen municipality, Palpa, Nepal were interviewed using a standardized pretested questionnaire and proforma. Parental variables, environmental factors, and presence of diarrhea in those children in past three months were collected by trained enumerators and the data were analyzed with statistical software SPSS-10.   Results: A total of 450 under five years children were enrolled in the study. There were 216 (48% male and 234 (52% female children with F:M ratio of 1.08:1. Occurrence of diarrhea was lower if the children were breast-fed for more than six months, well-nourished, used fountain water for drinking, or used boiled or treated water. Similarly, diarrhea prevalence was lower if father had a regular job, daily income in the family was more than one US dollar, there was a toilet in the house, practice of hand washing was followed before feeding or preparing food, or there was no child suffering from diarrhea in the neighborhood.   Conclusion: There are a few variables that are significantly related to diarrhea in children under five years of age. In order to decrease the diarrheal episodes in children in the slums of the developing countries, priority could be given in the improvement of those variables.

  12. Evidence for positive selection in putative virulence factors within the Paracoccidioides brasiliensis species complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel R Matute

    Full Text Available Paracoccidioides brasiliensis is a dimorphic fungus that is the causative agent of paracoccidioidomycosis, the most important prevalent systemic mycosis in Latin America. Recently, the existence of three genetically isolated groups in P. brasiliensis was demonstrated, enabling comparative studies of molecular evolution among P. brasiliensis lineages. Thirty-two gene sequences coding for putative virulence factors were analyzed to determine whether they were under positive selection. Our maximum likelihood-based approach yielded evidence for selection in 12 genes that are involved in different cellular processes. An in-depth analysis of four of these genes showed them to be either antigenic or involved in pathogenesis. Here, we present evidence indicating that several replacement mutations in gp43 are under positive balancing selection. The other three genes (fks, cdc42 and p27 show very little variation among the P. brasiliensis lineages and appear to be under positive directional selection. Our results are consistent with the more general observations that selective constraints are variable across the genome, and that even in the genes under positive selection, only a few sites are altered. We present our results within an evolutionary framework that may be applicable for studying adaptation and pathogenesis in P. brasiliensis and other pathogenic fungi.

  13. Driver’s Cognitive Workload and Driving Performance under Traffic Sign Information Exposure in Complex Environments: A Case Study of the Highways in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, Nengchao; Xie, Lian; Wu, Chaozhong; Fu, Qiang; Deng, Chao

    2017-01-01

    Complex traffic situations and high driving workload are the leading contributing factors to traffic crashes. There is a strong correlation between driving performance and driving workload, such as visual workload from traffic signs on highway off-ramps. This study aimed to evaluate traffic safety by analyzing drivers’ behavior and performance under the cognitive workload in complex environment areas. First, the driving workload of drivers was tested based on traffic signs with different quantities of information. Forty-four drivers were recruited to conduct a traffic sign cognition experiment under static controlled environment conditions. Different complex traffic signs were used for applying the cognitive workload. The static experiment results reveal that workload is highly related to the amount of information on traffic signs and reaction time increases with the information grade, while driving experience and gender effect are not significant. This shows that the cognitive workload of subsequent driving experiments can be controlled by the amount of information on traffic signs; Second, driving characteristics and driving performance were analyzed under different secondary task driving workload levels using a driving simulator. Drivers were required to drive at the required speed on a designed highway off-ramp scene. The cognitive workload was controlled by reading traffic signs with different information, which were divided into four levels. Drivers had to make choices by pushing buttons after reading traffic signs. Meanwhile, the driving performance information was recorded. Questionnaires on objective workload were collected right after each driving task. The results show that speed maintenance and lane deviations are significantly different under different levels of cognitive workload, and the effects of driving experience and gender groups are significant. The research results can be used to analyze traffic safety in highway environments, while

  14. Driver's Cognitive Workload and Driving Performance under Traffic Sign Information Exposure in Complex Environments: A Case Study of the Highways in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, Nengchao; Xie, Lian; Wu, Chaozhong; Fu, Qiang; Deng, Chao

    2017-02-17

    Complex traffic situations and high driving workload are the leading contributing factors to traffic crashes. There is a strong correlation between driving performance and driving workload, such as visual workload from traffic signs on highway off-ramps. This study aimed to evaluate traffic safety by analyzing drivers' behavior and performance under the cognitive workload in complex environment areas. First, the driving workload of drivers was tested based on traffic signs with different quantities of information. Forty-four drivers were recruited to conduct a traffic sign cognition experiment under static controlled environment conditions. Different complex traffic signs were used for applying the cognitive workload. The static experiment results reveal that workload is highly related to the amount of information on traffic signs and reaction time increases with the information grade, while driving experience and gender effect are not significant. This shows that the cognitive workload of subsequent driving experiments can be controlled by the amount of information on traffic signs. Second, driving characteristics and driving performance were analyzed under different secondary task driving workload levels using a driving simulator. Drivers were required to drive at the required speed on a designed highway off-ramp scene. The cognitive workload was controlled by reading traffic signs with different information, which were divided into four levels. Drivers had to make choices by pushing buttons after reading traffic signs. Meanwhile, the driving performance information was recorded. Questionnaires on objective workload were collected right after each driving task. The results show that speed maintenance and lane deviations are significantly different under different levels of cognitive workload, and the effects of driving experience and gender groups are significant. The research results can be used to analyze traffic safety in highway environments, while

  15. Rab-GDI complex dissociation factor expressed through translational frameshifting in filamentous ascomycetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabienne Malagnac

    Full Text Available In the model fungus Podospora anserina, the PaYIP3 gene encoding the orthologue of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae YIP3 Rab-GDI complex dissociation factor expresses two polypeptides, one of which, the long form, is produced through a programmed translation frameshift. Inactivation of PaYIP3 results in slightly delayed growth associated with modification in repartition of fruiting body on the thallus, along with reduced ascospore production on wood. Long and short forms of PaYIP3 are expressed in the mycelium, while only the short form appears expressed in the maturing fruiting body (perithecium. The frameshift has been conserved over the evolution of the Pezizomycotina, lasting for over 400 million years, suggesting that it has an important role in the wild.

  16. Rab-GDI complex dissociation factor expressed through translational frameshifting in filamentous ascomycetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malagnac, Fabienne; Fabret, Céline; Prigent, Magali; Rousset, Jean-Pierre; Namy, Olivier; Silar, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    In the model fungus Podospora anserina, the PaYIP3 gene encoding the orthologue of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae YIP3 Rab-GDI complex dissociation factor expresses two polypeptides, one of which, the long form, is produced through a programmed translation frameshift. Inactivation of PaYIP3 results in slightly delayed growth associated with modification in repartition of fruiting body on the thallus, along with reduced ascospore production on wood. Long and short forms of PaYIP3 are expressed in the mycelium, while only the short form appears expressed in the maturing fruiting body (perithecium). The frameshift has been conserved over the evolution of the Pezizomycotina, lasting for over 400 million years, suggesting that it has an important role in the wild.

  17. Fast ranking influential nodes in complex networks using a k-shell iteration factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhixiao; Zhao, Ya; Xi, Jingke; Du, Changjiang

    2016-11-01

    Identifying the influential nodes of complex networks is important for optimizing the network structure or efficiently disseminating information through networks. The k-shell method is a widely used node ranking method that has inherent advantages in performance and efficiency. However, the iteration information produced in k-shell decomposition has been neglected in node ranking. This paper presents a fast ranking method to evaluate the influence capability of nodes using a k-shell iteration factor. The experimental results with respect to monotonicity, correctness and efficiency have demonstrated that the proposed method can yield excellent performance on artificial and real world networks. It discriminates the influence capability of nodes more accurately and provides a more reasonable ranking list than previous methods.

  18. Insulin-like growth factor II: complexity of biosynthesis and receptor binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammeltoft, S; Christiansen, Jan; Nielsen, F C

    1991-01-01

    , Man-6-P induces cellular responses. We have studied rat brain neuronal precursor cells where Man-6-P acted as a mitogen suggesting that phosphomannosylated proteins may act as growth factors via the Man-6-P/IGF-II receptor. In conclusion, the gene expression and mechanism of action of IGF-II is very...... and the mannose-6-phosphate (Man-6-P)/IGF-II receptor. There is consensus that the cellular effects of IGF-II are mediated by the IGF-I receptor via activation of its intrinsic tyrosine kinase. The Man-6-P/IGF-II receptor is involved in endocytosis of lysosomal enzymes and IGF-II. In selected cell types, however...... complex suggesting that its biological actions can be regulated at different levels including the transcription, translation, posttranslational processing, receptor binding and intracellular signalling....

  19. The role of psychological and physiological factors in decision making under risk and in a dilemma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas eFooken

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Different methods to elicit risk attitudes of individuals often provide differing results despite a common theory. Reasons for such inconsistencies may be the different influence of underlying factors in risk-taking decisions. In order to evaluate this conjecture, a better understanding of underlying factors across methods and decision contexts is desirable. In this paper we study the difference in result of two different risk elicitation methods by linking estimates of risk attitudes to gender, age and personality traits, which have been shown to be related. We also investigate the role of these factors during decision-making in a dilemma situation. For these two decision contexts we also investigate the decision-maker's physiological state during the decision, measured by heart rate variability (HRV, which we use as an indicator of emotional involvement. We found that the two elicitation methods provide different individual risk attitude measures which is partly reflected in a different gender effect between the methods. Personality traits explain only relatively little in terms of driving risk attitudes and the difference between methods. We also found that risk taking and the physiological state are related for one of the methods, suggesting that more emotionally involved individuals are more risk averse in the experiment. Finally, we found evidence that personality traits are connected to whether individuals made a decision in the dilemma situation, but risk attitudes and the physiological state were not indicative for the ability to decide in this decision context.

  20. Complex landscapes in the American Southwest: Under what conditions does desetification lead to novel ecosystems?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novel ecosystems are often defined as no-analog communities consisting of new combinations of species that assemble under new abiotic conditions. In the Anthropocene, novel systems differ from the historical state as a result of human influences where self-organizational processes prevail to make th...

  1. Repeating a Monologue under Increasing Time Pressure: Effects on Fluency, Complexity, and Accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thai, Chau; Boers, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Studies have shown that learners' task performance improves when they have the opportunity to repeat the task. Conditions for task repetition vary, however. In the 4/3/2 activity, learners repeat a monologue under increasing time pressure. The purpose is to foster fluency, but it has been suggested in the literature that it also benefits other…

  2. Repeating a Monologue under Increasing Time Pressure: Effects on Fluency, Complexity, and Accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thai, Chau; Boers, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Studies have shown that learners' task performance improves when they have the opportunity to repeat the task. Conditions for task repetition vary, however. In the 4/3/2 activity, learners repeat a monologue under increasing time pressure. The purpose is to foster fluency, but it has been suggested in the literature that it also benefits other…

  3. Comparative analyses of developmental transcription factor repertoires in sponges reveal unexpected complexity of the earliest animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortunato, Sofia A V; Adamski, Marcin; Adamska, Maja

    2015-12-01

    Developmental transcription factors (DTFs) control development of animals by affecting expression of target genes, some of which are transcription factors themselves. In bilaterians and cnidarians, conserved DTFs are involved in homologous processes such as gastrulation or specification of neurons. The genome of Amphimedon queenslandica, the first sponge to be sequenced, revealed that only a fraction of these conserved DTF families are present in demosponges. This finding was in line with the view that morphological complexity in the animal lineage correlates with developmental toolkit complexity. However, as the phylum Porifera is very diverse, Amphimedon's genome may not be representative of all sponges. The recently sequenced genomes of calcareous sponges Sycon ciliatum and Leucosolenia complicata allowed investigations of DTFs in a sponge lineage evolutionarily distant from demosponges. Surprisingly, the phylogenetic analyses of identified DTFs revealed striking differences between the calcareous sponges and Amphimedon. As these differences appear to be a result of independent gene loss events in the two sponge lineages, the last common ancestor of sponges had to possess a much more diverse repertoire of DTFs than extant sponges. Developmental expression of sponge homologs of genes involved in specification of the Bilaterian endomesoderm and the neurosensory cells suggests that roles of many DTFs date back to the last common ancestor of all animals. Strikingly, even DTFs displaying apparent pan-metazoan conservation of sequence and function are not immune to being lost from individual species genomes. The quest for a comprehensive picture of the developmental toolkit in the last common metazoan ancestor is thus greatly benefitting from the increasing accessibility of sequencing, allowing comparisons of multiple genomes within each phylum.

  4. Studying the Laws of the Thermoviscoplastic Deformation of a Solid Under Nonisothermal Complex Loading. Part 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevchenko, Yu. N.; Terekhov, R. G.

    2001-06-01

    The studies made at the thermoplasticity department of the S. P. Timoshenko Institute of Mechanics are analyzed. These studies involve experimental validations of the kinematic equation of creep damage and the constitutive equations describing simple thermoviscoelastoplastic loading, with history, of isotropic and transversally isotropic bodies, for elastoviscoplastic deformation of bodies along slightly curved paths, for complex loading along arbitrary paths lying either in a plane arbitrarily oriented in the five-dimensional space of stresses or in one coordinate plane, and for elastoplastic deformation of a body's elements along paths of moderate curvature and small torsion

  5. Modelling agricultural suitability along soil transects under current conditions and improved scenario of soil factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd-Elmabod, Sameh K.; Jordán, Antonio; Fleskens, Luuk; van der Ploeg, Martine; Muñoz-Rojas, Miriam; Anaya-Romero, María; van der Salm, Renée J.; De la Rosa, Diego

    2015-04-01

    limiting factor in lowlands. The decrease in the severity of soil limiting factors in the improved scenario leads to an increase of soil suitability for the twelve crops along TA and TB transects, except in segments with shallow soils and very coarse texture. In the hypothetical scenario with no limiting factors, the highest improvement on suitability is observed under perennial crops in the TA transect. Land evaluation has proved to be a good way to distinguish the best soil suitability by addressing limitations and is an essential tool for land use and climate-change adaptation planning. Keywords: Digital Elevation Model, Toposequence, MicroLEIS DSS, Almagra model, Soil quality.

  6. Complex SUMO-1 regulation of cardiac transcription factor Nkx2-5.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro W Costa

    Full Text Available Reversible post-translational protein modifications such as SUMOylation add complexity to cardiac transcriptional regulation. The homeodomain transcription factor Nkx2-5/Csx is essential for heart specification and morphogenesis. It has been previously suggested that SUMOylation of lysine 51 (K51 of Nkx2-5 is essential for its DNA binding and transcriptional activation. Here, we confirm that SUMOylation strongly enhances Nkx2-5 transcriptional activity and that residue K51 of Nkx2-5 is a SUMOylation target. However, in a range of cultured cell lines we find that a point mutation of K51 to arginine (K51R does not affect Nkx2-5 activity or DNA binding, suggesting the existence of additional Nkx2-5 SUMOylated residues. Using biochemical assays, we demonstrate that Nkx2-5 is SUMOylated on at least one additional site, and this is the predominant site in cardiac cells. The second site is either non-canonical or a "shifting" site, as mutation of predicted consensus sites and indeed every individual lysine in the context of the K51R mutation failed to impair Nkx2-5 transcriptional synergism with SUMO, or its nuclear localization and DNA binding. We also observe SUMOylation of Nkx2-5 cofactors, which may be critical to Nkx2-5 regulation. Our data reveal highly complex regulatory mechanisms driven by SUMOylation to modulate Nkx2-5 activity.

  7. Structure of a bacterial quorum-sensing transcription factor complexed with pheromone and DNA.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, R.; Pappas, T.; Brace, J.; Miller, P.; Oulmassov, T.; Molyneaux, J.; Anderson, J.; Bashkin, J.; Winans, S.; Joachimiak, A.; Biosciences Division; Cornell Univ.; Monsanto Co.

    2002-06-27

    Many proteobacteria are able to monitor their population densities through the release of pheromones known as N-acylhomoserine lactones. At high population densities, these pheromones elicit diverse responses that include bioluminescence, biofilm formation, production of antimicrobials, DNA exchange, pathogenesis and symbiosis1. Many of these regulatory systems require a pheromone-dependent transcription factor similar to the LuxR protein of Vibrio fischeri. Here we present the structure of a LuxR-type protein. TraR of Agrobacterium tumefaciens was solved at 1.66 A as a complex with the pheromone N-3-oxooctanoyl-l-homoserine lactone (OOHL) and its TraR DNA-binding site. The amino-terminal domain of TraR is an {alpha}/{beta}/{alpha} sandwich that binds OOHL, whereas the carboxy-terminal domain contains a helix-turn-helix DNA-binding motif. The TraR dimer displays a two-fold symmetry axis in each domain; however, these two axes of symmetry are at an approximately 90 degree angle, resulting in a pronounced overall asymmetry of the complex. The pheromone lies fully embedded within the protein with virtually no solvent contact, and makes numerous hydrophobic contacts with the protein as well as four hydrogen bonds: three direct and one water-mediated.

  8. Species Distribution, Virulence Factors, and Antifungal Susceptibility Among Candida parapsilosis Complex Isolates Recovered from Clinical Specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Beatriz Virgínia; Silva, Larissa Beatriz; de Oliveira, Diego Batista Carneiro; da Silva, Paulo Roberto; Ferreira-Paim, Kennio; Andrade-Silva, Leonardo Euripides; Silva-Vergara, Mario León; Andrade, Anderson Assunção

    2015-12-01

    The Candida parapsilosis complex has emerged as an important fungal pathogen. In spite of this, relatively little is known about its characteristics. Thus, the purposes of this study were (1) to determine by BanI-RFLP-assay the occurrence of C. parapsilosis complex species among 81 clinical isolates primarily identified as C. parapsilosis; (2) to evaluate their in vitro production of virulence factors; and (3) to compare their susceptibility profiles, grown as planktonic cells and biofilms, against amphotericin B, fluconazole, voriconazole, and caspofungin by following the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) guidelines. Seventy-seven isolates (95%) were identified as C. parapsilosis sensu stricto, 2 (2.5%) as C. orthopsilosis, and 2 (2.5%) as C. metapsilosis. Protease activity was detected in 29 (37.7%) isolates of C. parapsilosis sensu stricto, whereas only 7 (9.1%) exhibited phospholipase activity. None of the C. metapsilosis or C. orthopsilosis was able to produce protease or phospholipase. Biofilm production was detected in 35 (43.2%) isolates, among which 33 were C. parapsilosis sensu stricto and 2 were C. orthopsilosis. Antifungal resistance was uncommon; only one C. metapsilosis was fluconazole resistant. However, biofilm-producing isolates showed a marked resistance to all antifungal agents tested, particularly to voriconazole. This knowledge could be of clinical relevance for guiding therapeutic decisions.

  9. Complex factors in the etiology of Gulf War illness: wartime exposures and risk factors in veteran subgroups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Lea; Sastre, Antonio; Gerkovich, Mary M; Cook, Mary R

    2012-01-01

    At least one-fourth of U.S. veterans who served in the 1990-1991 Gulf War are affected by the chronic symptomatic illness known as Gulf War illness (GWI). Clear determination of the causes of GWI has been hindered by many factors, including limitations in how epidemiologic studies have assessed the impact of the complex deployment environment on veterans' health. We sought to address GWI etiologic questions by evaluating the association of symptomatic illness with characteristics of veterans' deployment. We compared veteran-reported wartime experiences in a population-based sample of 304 Gulf War veterans: 144 cases who met preestablished criteria for GWI and 160 controls. Veteran subgroups and confounding among deployment variables were considered in the analyses. Deployment experiences and the prevalence of GWI differed significantly by veterans' location in theater. Among personnel who were in Iraq or Kuwait, where all battles took place, GWI was most strongly associated with using pyridostigmine bromide pills [odds ratio (OR) = 3.5; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.7, 7.4] and being within 1 mile of an exploding SCUD missile (OR = 3.1; 95% CI: 1.5, 6.1). For veterans who remained in support areas, GWI was significantly associated only with personal pesticide use, with increased prevalence (OR = 12.7; 95% CI: 2.6, 61.5) in the relatively small subgroup that wore pesticide-treated uniforms, nearly all of whom also used skin pesticides. Combat service was not significantly associated with GWI. Findings support a role for a limited number of wartime exposures in the etiology of GWI, which differed in importance with the deployment milieu in which veterans served.

  10. Nonlinear Dynamic Behavior of Functionally Graded Truncated Conical Shell Under Complex Loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, S. W.; Hao, Y. X.; Zhang, W.; Li, S. B.

    Nonlinear dynamic behaviors of ceramic-metal graded truncated conical shell subjected to complex loads are investigated. The shell is modeled by first-order shear deformation theory. The nonlinear partial differential governing equation in terms of transverse displacements of the FGM truncated conical shell is derived from the Hamilton's principle. Galerkin's method is then utilized to discretize the partial governing equations to a two-degree-of-freedom nonlinear ordinary differential equation. The temperature-dependent materials properties of the constituents are graded in the radial direction in accordance with a power-law distribution. The aerodynamic pressure can be calculated by using the first-order piston theory. The temperature field is assumed to be a steady-state constant-temperature distribution. Bifurcation diagrams, the maximum Lyapunov exponents, wave forms and phase portraits are obtained by numerical simulation to demonstrate the complex nonlinear dynamics response of the FGM truncated conical shell. The influences of the semi-vertex angle, the material gradient index, in-plane and aerodynamic load on the nonlinear dynamics are studied.

  11. The diversity effect of inductive reasoning under segment manipulation of complex cognition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN; Antao; LI; Hong; FENG; Tingyong; GAO; Xuemei; ZHANG

    2005-01-01

    The present study proposed the idea of segment manipulation of complex cognition (SMCC), and technically made it possible the quantitative treatment and systematical manipulation on the premise diversity. The segment manipulation of complex cognition divides the previous inductive strengths judgment task into three distinct steps, attempting to particularly distinguish the psychological processes and their rules. The results in Experiment 1 showed that compared with the traditional method, the quantitative treatment and systematical manipulation of SMCC on the diversity did not change the task's nature, and remain rational and a good measurement of inductive strength judgment. The results in Experiment 2 showed that the participants' response rules in the triple-step task were expected from our proposal, and that in Step 2 the "feeling of surprise" (FOS), which seems implausible but predicted from the diversity premises, was measured, and its component might be the critical part that produced the diversity effect. The "feeling of surprise" may reflect the impact of emotion on cognition, representing a strong revision to premise probability principle of pure rational hypothesis proposed by Lo et al., and its roles in the diversity effect are worthy of further research. In this regards were discussed the mistakes that the premise probability principle makes when it takes posterity probability as prior probability.

  12. The diversity effect of inductive reasoning under segment manipulation of complex cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Antao; Li, Hong; Feng, Tingyong; Gao, Xuemei; Zhang, Zhongming; Li, Fuhong; Yang, Dong

    2005-12-01

    The present study proposed the idea of segment manipulation of complex cognition (SMCC), and technically made it possible the quantitative treatment and systematical manipulation on the premise diversity. The segment manipulation of complex cognition divides the previous inductive strengths judgment task into three distinct steps, attempting to particularly distinguish the psychological processes and their rules. The results in Experiment 1 showed that compared with the traditional method, the quantitative treatment and systematical manipulation of SMCC on the diversity did not change the task's nature, and remain rational and a good measurement of inductive strength judgment. The results in Experiment 2 showed that the participants' response rules in the triple-step task were expected from our proposal, and that in Step 2 the "feeling of surprise" (FOS), which seems implausible but predicted from the diversity premises, was measured, and its component might be the critical part that produced the diversity effect. The "feeling of surprise" may reflect the impact of emotion on cognition, representing a strong revision to premise probability principle of pure rational hypothesis proposed by Lo et al., and its roles in the diversity effect are worthy of further research. In this regards were discussed the mistakes that the premise probability principle makes when it takes posterity probability as prior probability.

  13. Bacteria of the Burkholderia cepacia complex are cyanogenic under biofilm and colonial growth conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoshino Saiko

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc is a collection of nine genotypically distinct but phenotypically similar species. They show wide ecological diversity and include species that are used for promoting plant growth and bio-control as well species that are opportunistic pathogens of vulnerable patients. Over recent years the Bcc have emerged as problematic pathogens of the CF lung. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is another important CF pathogen. It is able to synthesise hydrogen cyanide (HCN, a potent inhibitor of cellular respiration. We have recently shown that HCN production by P. aeruginosa may have a role in CF pathogenesis. This paper describes an investigation of the ability of bacteria of the Bcc to make HCN. Results The genome of Burkholderia cenocepacia has 3 putative HCN synthase encoding (hcnABC gene clusters. B. cenocepacia and all 9 species of the Bcc complex tested were able to make cyanide at comparable levels to P. aeruginosa, but only when grown surface attached as colonies or during biofilm growth on glass beads. In contrast to P. aeruginosa and other cyanogenic bacteria, cyanide was not detected during planktonic growth of Bcc strains. Conclusion All species in the Bcc are cyanogenic when grown as surface attached colonies or as biofilms.

  14. A combined complex electrical impedance and acoustic emission study in limestone samples under uniaxial loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saltas, V.; Fitilis, I.; Vallianatos, F.

    2014-12-01

    In the present work, complex electrical impedance measurements in the frequency range of 10 mHz to 1 MHz were carried out in conjunction with acoustic emission monitoring in limestone samples subjected to linear and stepped-like uniaxial loading, up to ultimate failure. Cole-Cole plots of the complex impedance during the stepped loading of limestone have been used to discriminate the contributions of grains interior, grain boundaries and electrode polarization effects to the overall electrical behavior. The latter is well-described with an equivalent-circuit model which comprises components of constant phase elements and resistances in parallel connection. Electrical conductivity increases upon uniaxial loading giving rise to negative values of effective activation volume. This is a strong experimental evidence for the generation of transient electric signals recorded prior to seismic events and may be attributed to charge transfer (proton conduction) due to cracks generation and propagation as a result of the applied stress. The time-series of ac-conductivity at two distinct frequencies (10 kHz, 200 kHz) during linear loading of limestone samples exhibits a strong correlation with the acoustic emission activity obeying the same general self-similar law for critical phenomena that has been reported for the energy release before materials fracture.

  15. A Socio-Institutional Approach to Brighten Complexity under Agricultural Pest Invasion Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Romero Manrique de Lara

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This study illustrates the inherent complexity and uncertainties surrounding the Guatemalan potato moth pest on Tenerife that has affected potato crops for several decades using a Socio-Institutional methodology and a farmers’ focus group. It focuses on detecting major socioeconomic and environmental impacts caused by the pest. It identifies the stakeholders and historical decisions involved as well as systemic uncertainties. This methodology generates socially robust knowledge and introduces new variables into future decision-making processes. The results show that the efforts made so far to control the pest, based on technical and scientific knowledge, have not been commensurate with the enormous complexity of the issue. Novel alternatives to eliminate the plague and new recommendations have emerged after the application of the methodology. These alternatives and recommendations are related to breaking the reproduction cycle of the moth; promoting agro-ecological strategies and participatory processes; and dealing with uncertainties such as climate change or loss of agro-biodiversity on the island.

  16. Finite difference methods for option pricing under Lévy processes: Wiener-Hopf factorization approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudryavtsev, Oleg

    2013-01-01

    In the paper, we consider the problem of pricing options in wide classes of Lévy processes. We propose a general approach to the numerical methods based on a finite difference approximation for the generalized Black-Scholes equation. The goal of the paper is to incorporate the Wiener-Hopf factorization into finite difference methods for pricing options in Lévy models with jumps. The method is applicable for pricing barrier and American options. The pricing problem is reduced to the sequence of linear algebraic systems with a dense Toeplitz matrix; then the Wiener-Hopf factorization method is applied. We give an important probabilistic interpretation based on the infinitely divisible distributions theory to the Laurent operators in the correspondent factorization identity. Notice that our algorithm has the same complexity as the ones which use the explicit-implicit scheme, with a tridiagonal matrix. However, our method is more accurate. We support the advantage of the new method in terms of accuracy and convergence by using numerical experiments.

  17. Factors related to outcome of bloodstream infections due to Candida parapsilosis complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barchiesi, Francesco; Orsetti, Elena; Osimani, Patrizia; Catassi, Carlo; Santelli, Fabio; Manso, Esther

    2016-08-09

    Although Candida albicans is the most common cause of fungal blood stream infections (BSIs), infections due to Candida species other than C. albicans are rising. Candida parapsilosis complex has emerged as an important fungal pathogen and became one of the main causes of fungemia in specific geographical areas. We analyzed the factors related to outcome of candidemia due to C. parapsilosis in a single tertiary referral hospital over a five-year period. A retrospective observational study of all cases of candidemia was carried out at a 980-bedded University Hospital in Italy. Data regarding demographic characteristics and clinical risk factors were collected from the patient's medical records. Antifungal susceptibility testing was performed and MIC results were interpreted according to CLSI species-specific clinical breakpoints. Of 270 patients diagnosed with Candida BSIs during the study period, 63 (23 %) were infected with isolates of C. parapsilosis complex which represented the second most frequently isolated yeast after C. albicans. The overall incidence rate was 0.4 episodes/1000 hospital admissions. All the strains were in vitro susceptible to all antifungal agents. The overall crude mortality at 30 days was 27 % (17/63), which was significantly lower than that reported for C. albicans BSIs (42 % [61/146], p = 0.042). Being hospitalized in ICU resulted independently associated with a significant higher risk of mortality (HR 4.625 [CI95% 1.015-21.080], p = 0.048). Conversely, early CVC removal was confirmed to be significantly associated with a lower risk of mortality (HR 0.299 [CI95% 0.102-0.874], p = 0.027). Finally, the type of primary antifungal therapy did not influence the outcome of infection. Candidemia due to C. parapsilosis complex, the second most commonly causative agent of yeast BSIs in our center, is characterized by a non-negligible mortality at 30 days. An early CVC removal is associated with a significant reduced mortality.

  18. From simple to complex and backwards. Chemical reactions under very high pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bini, Roberto [Department of Chemistry, University of Florence, Via della Lastruccia 3, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); LENS - European Laboratory of Non linear Spectroscopy, University of Florence, Via Nello Carrara 1, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Ceppatelli, Matteo; Citroni, Margherita [LENS - European Laboratory of Non linear Spectroscopy, University of Florence, Via Nello Carrara 1, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Schettino, Vincenzo, E-mail: vincenzo.schettino@unifi.it [LENS - European Laboratory of Non linear Spectroscopy, University of Florence, Via Nello Carrara 1, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy)

    2012-04-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High pressure reactivity of several molecular systems. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Reaction kinetics and dynamics in high density conditions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Key role of optical pumping and electronic excitation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Perspectives for the synthesis of hydrogen. - Abstract: High pressure chemical reactions of molecular systems are discussed considering the various factors that can affect the reactivity. These include steric hindrance and geometrical constraints in the confined environment of crystals at high pressure, changes of the free energy landscape with pressure, photoactivation by two-photon absorption, local and collective effects. A classification of the chemical reactions at high pressure is attempted on the basis of the prevailing factors.

  19. Detrended Fluctuation Analysis on Correlations of Complex Networks Under Attack and Repair Strategy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    We analyze the correlation properties of the Erdos-Rényi random graph (RG) and the Barabási-Albert scale-free network (SF) under the attack and repair strategy with detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA). The maximum degree k representing the local property of the system, shows similar scaling behaviors for random graphs and scale-free networks. The fluctuations are quite random at short time scales but display strong anticorrelation at longer time scales under the same system size N and different repair probability pre. The average degree , revealing the statistical property of the system, exhibits completely different scaling behaviors for random graphs and scale-free networks. Random graphs display long-range power-law correlations. Scale-free networks are uncorrelated at short time scales; while anticorrelated at longer time scales and the anticorrelation becoming stronger with the increase of pre.

  20. Modeling of agent-based complex network under cyber-violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chuanchao; Hu, Bin; Jiang, Guoyin; Yang, Ruixian

    2016-09-01

    Public opinion reversal arises frequently in modern society, due to the continual interactions between individuals and their surroundings. To explore the underlying mechanism of the interesting social phenomenon, we introduce here a new model which takes the relationship between the individual cognitive bias and their corresponding choice behavior into account. Experimental results show that the proposed model can provide an accurate description of the entire process of public opinion reversal under the internet environment and the distribution of cognitive bias plays the role of a measure for the reversal probability. In particular, the application to cyber violence, a typical example of public opinion reversal, suggests that public opinion is prone to be seriously affected by the spread of misleading and harmful information. Furthermore, our model is very robust and thus can be employed to other empirical studies that concern the sudden change of public and personal opinion on internet.

  1. Solution study under physiological conditions and cytotoxic activity of the gold(III complexes with L-histidine-containing peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glišić Biljana Đ.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Proton NMR spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry have been applied to study the stability of three gold(III complexes with L-histidine-containing peptides, [Au(Gly-L-His-N,N’,N’’Cl]NO3.1.25H2O (Au1, [Au(L-Ala-L-His-N,N’,N’’Cl]NO3.2.5H2O (Au2 and [Au(Gly-Gly-L-His-N,N’,N’’,N’’’]Cl.H2O (Au3 under physiologically relevant conditions. It was found that tridentate coordination of Gly-L-His and L-Ala-L-His dipeptides, as well as tetradentate coordination of Gly-Gly-L-His tripeptide in Au1, Au2 and Au3 complexes, respectively, stabilized +3 oxidation state of gold and prevented its reduction to Au(I and Au(0. No release of the coordinated peptides from Au(III was observed under these experimental conditions. Considering remarkable stability of Au1, Au2 and Au3 complexes, their cytotoxic activity was evaluated by MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay toward five human tumor cell lines, MCF-7 (human breast adenocarcinoma, HT-29 (human colon adenocarcinoma, HeLa (human cervix carcinoma, HL-60 (human promyelocytic leukemia, Raji (human Burkitt’s lymphoma and one human normal cell line MRC-5 (human fetal lung fibroblasts. While the cytotoxic activity of Au1, Au2 and Au3 against investigated human malignant cell lines was strongly cell line dependent, none of these complexes was cytotoxic against normal MRC-5 cell line. This study can contribute to the future development of gold(III-peptide complexes as potential antitumor agents.

  2. Experimental Adiabatic Quantum Factorization under Ambient Conditions Based on a Solid-State Single Spin System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kebiao; Xie, Tianyu; Li, Zhaokai; Xu, Xiangkun; Wang, Mengqi; Ye, Xiangyu; Kong, Fei; Geng, Jianpei; Duan, Changkui; Shi, Fazhan; Du, Jiangfeng

    2017-03-31

    The adiabatic quantum computation is a universal and robust method of quantum computing. In this architecture, the problem can be solved by adiabatically evolving the quantum processor from the ground state of a simple initial Hamiltonian to that of a final one, which encodes the solution of the problem. Adiabatic quantum computation has been proved to be a compatible candidate for scalable quantum computation. In this Letter, we report on the experimental realization of an adiabatic quantum algorithm on a single solid spin system under ambient conditions. All elements of adiabatic quantum computation, including initial state preparation, adiabatic evolution (simulated by optimal control), and final state read-out, are realized experimentally. As an example, we found the ground state of the problem Hamiltonian S_{z}I_{z} on our adiabatic quantum processor, which can be mapped to the factorization of 35 into its prime factors 5 and 7.

  3. Notch Sensitivity Factor Determination With Artificial Neural Network For Shafts Under The Bending Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Tolga Özkan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Notch, hole, tap and a variety of geometric shapes such as curves or discontinuities can be found with various reasons in the design of Machine Element. Stress is caused by sudden changes in section aggregating. Stress concentration can occur with the reason of material features of size or direction of forces application. This type of stress concentration in the material brings out the effect of notch. Notch impact can lead to distortions and breakage of materials. In this study, the notch sensitivity factor values have been modelled Artificial Neural Networks (ANN for shafts that is under the influence of bending stress, and the accuracy of the model has been verified by using Statistica software. The model has been developed using Pythia. With this software, the user can be obtained the accurate value by inputing shaft dimension and the applied force without the need for notch sensitivity factor tables and any calculations.

  4. Assessment of Available Transfer Capability (ATC Using Linear Sensitivity Factors under Deregulated Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Indhumathy

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Electric supply industry throughout the world have been restructured to introduce competition among the market participants and bring several competitive opportunities. The structure of power industry is moving towards deregulatory environment from the regulatory environment. Under this deregulatory, there are many technical issues need to be addressed. In this paper, one such technical issue handled carefully is the Available Transfer Capability (ATC. ATC is the amount of maximum additional power transfer between two control areas (source and sink that is available without violating thermal overloads. Here ATC is estimated for normal and contingency modes using linear sensitivity factors according to the security and reliability requirements. Simultaneous bilateral transactions havebeen done on IEEE-30 bus standard system for the assessment of ATC under MATLAB environment. From the results, it is computed that ATC is determined with less computation burden and this study willbe useful for the present open access electricity market.

  5. Rice Breeding for High Grain Yield under Drought: A Strategic Solution to a Complex Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shalabh Dixit

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Drought is one of the major abiotic stresses that affect rice production in rainfed areas. Recent trends in climate change have predicted a further increase in drought intensity, making the development of new drought-tolerant rice cultivars critical to sustain rice production in this ecosystem. The use of grain yield as a selection criterion at the International Rice Research Institute (IRRI, through proper population development and precise phenotyping techniques, has allowed the development of several high-yielding rice cultivars that have been released in major rainfed rice-growing areas. This strategy has also allowed the identification of several major quantitative trait loci (QTLs that show large effects under drought across environments and genetic backgrounds. These QTLs are being pyramided together to develop drought-tolerant versions of popular drought-susceptible varieties. The near-isogenic lines (NILs developed can replace the popular, high-yielding but drought-susceptible varieties in rainfed areas prone to drought. Additionally, these NILs serve as suitable genetic material for the study of molecular and physiological mechanisms underlying these QTLs. This may provide a better understanding of plant functions responsible for high grain yield under drought and lead to the identification of new traits and genes.

  6. Designing automation for complex work environments under different levels of stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, Juergen; Nickel, Peter; Wastell, David

    2013-01-01

    This article examines the effectiveness of different forms of static and adaptable automation under low- and high-stress conditions. Forty participants were randomly assigned to one of four experimental conditions, comparing three levels of static automation (low, medium and high) and one level of adaptable automation, with the environmental stressor (noise) being varied as a within-subjects variable. Participants were trained for 4 h on a simulation of a process control environment, called AutoCAMS, followed by a 2.5-h testing session. Measures of performance, psychophysiology and subjective reactions were taken. The results showed that operators preferred higher levels of automation under noise than under quiet conditions. A number of parameters indicated negative effects of noise exposure, such as performance impairments, physiological stress reactions and higher mental workload. It also emerged that adaptable automation provided advantages over low and intermediate static automation, with regard to mental workload, effort expenditure and diagnostic performance. The article concludes that for the design of automation a wider range of operational scenarios reflecting adverse as well as ideal working conditions needs to be considered.

  7. Assessing adherence factors in patients under topical treatment: development of the Topical Therapy Adherence Questionnaire (TTAQ).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zschocke, Ina; Mrowietz, Ulrich; Lotzin, Annett; Karakasili, Eleni; Reich, Kristian

    2014-04-01

    Medication adherence rates strongly depend on favorable disease outcomes. It is known that medication adherence rates are lower for topical treatment than for systemic treatment. However, to date no validated instrument for the assessment of adherence factors in topical treatment is available. The aim of this study was to develop a new questionnaire to assess adherence risk factors in topical treatment. The development of the Topical Therapy Adherence Questionnaire (TTAQ) and Patient Preference Questionnaire (PPQ) was based on a systematic literature review, and qualitative patient focus interviews and expert focus groups' input. The psychometric properties and comprehensibility of the TTAQ and PPQ were assessed in a feasibility study with 59 psoriasis patients. Our first preliminary results indicate that the TTAQ and PPQ are psychometrically sound and reliable measures for the assessment of factors influencing topical treatment adherence. The questionnaires are currently being further developed and various parameters (e.g., time point of assessment) are currently being tested in an exploratory pilot study with ca. 2,000 psoriasis patients receiving topical treatment in a European clinical trial. The use of the final versions of TTAQ and PPQ in clinical practice may facilitate the early identification of specific non-adherence factors in patients under topical treatment, which could enable designing and applying adherence-enhancing interventions according to the patient's individual needs.

  8. SM-TF: A structural database of small molecule-transcription factor complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xianjin; Ma, Zhiwei; Sun, Hongmin; Zou, Xiaoqin

    2016-06-30

    Transcription factors (TFs) are the proteins involved in the transcription process, ensuring the correct expression of specific genes. Numerous diseases arise from the dysfunction of specific TFs. In fact, over 30 TFs have been identified as therapeutic targets of about 9% of the approved drugs. In this study, we created a structural database of small molecule-transcription factor (SM-TF) complexes, available online at http://zoulab.dalton.missouri.edu/SM-TF. The 3D structures of the co-bound small molecule and the corresponding binding sites on TFs are provided in the database, serving as a valuable resource to assist structure-based drug design related to TFs. Currently, the SM-TF database contains 934 entries covering 176 TFs from a variety of species. The database is further classified into several subsets by species and organisms. The entries in the SM-TF database are linked to the UniProt database and other sequence-based TF databases. Furthermore, the druggable TFs from human and the corresponding approved drugs are linked to the DrugBank. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Noncovalent PEGylation by polyanion complexation as a means to stabilize keratinocyte growth factor-2 (KGF-2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khondee, Supang; Olsen, Christopher M; Zeng, Yuhong; Middaugh, C Russell; Berkland, Cory

    2011-11-14

    Repifermin, a truncated form of fibroblast growth factor-10 (FGF-10) also known as keratinocyte growth factor-2 (KGF-2), is a heparin-binding protein with potent regenerative properties. The protein unfolds and aggregates at relatively low temperature (~37 °C). Electrostatic interactions between polyanions and several FGFs have been reported to enhance the thermal stability of these proteins. Polyethylene glycol (PEG) was grafted to the polyanions pentosan polysulfate (PPS) and dextran sulfate (DS) as an alternative means to stabilize and noncovalently PEGylate KGF-2. Physical characteristics of KGF-2:polyanion-PEG complexes were examined using a variety of methods including circular dichroism (CD), intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence, differential scanning calorimetry, and dynamic light scattering. When compared to KGF-2 alone, subtle changes in CD spectra and fluorescence emission maxima were found when KGF-2 was formulated with the synthetic PEG-polyanions. Highly PEGylated polyanions (DS-PEG5) did not bind KGF-2 as well as conjugates with fewer PEG chains. The molecular weight of PEG did not have a noticeable effect on KGF-2 binding to the various PEG-polyanion conjugates. At optimal molar ratios, PPS-PEG and DS-PEG conjugates were able to stabilize KGF-2 by increasing the melting temperature by approximately 9-17 °C. Thus, polyanion-PEG conjugates improved the stability of KGF-2 and also offered a new electrostatic PEGylation scheme that may be extrapolated to other heparin-binding proteins.

  10. Clinical heterogeneity of human neurocysticercosis results from complex interactions among parasite, host and environmental factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleury, Agnès; Escobar, Alfonso; Fragoso, Gladis; Sciutto, Edda; Larralde, Carlos

    2010-04-01

    Human neurocysticercosis (NC) is endemic in most countries of Latin America, Asia and Africa and is re-emerging in some industrialized nations. Both within and among endemic countries, NC is very variable in its clinical and radiological features, as well as in the intensity of the immuno-inflammatory reactions of the hosts. This review, focusing on the Mexican experience, describes and interprets the heterogeneity of NC as the result of different combinations among factors associated with the parasite, host and environment. The review may serve to foster similar descriptive efforts in other endemic areas of the world in order to facilitate the identification of the distinct factors that participate in the complex pathogenesis and diverse clinical outcomes of NC. In particular, it is necessary to understand the precise physiopathology of the inflammatory reaction associated with NC, as inflammation is one of the characteristics of those NC cases that are clinically more severe and less responsive to current treatments. Devising new medical interventions through the use of molecular regulators of the innate and adaptive immune responses of the host is a largely unexplored approach that could improve the existing forms of treatment. Copyright 2010 Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Factors impacting same-day cancellation of outpatient pediatric magnetic resonance imaging under anesthesia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, Andrea S. [University of Toronto, Department of Paediatrics, Division of Developmental Paediatrics, Holland Bloorview Kids Rehabilitation Hospital, Toronto (Canada); Matlow, Anne [University of Toronto, Strategic Initiatives, Postgraduate Medical Education, Toronto (Canada); Shroff, Manohar [University of Toronto, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Division of Neuroradiology, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto (Canada); Cohen, Eyal [University of Toronto, Division of Paediatric Medicine and Child Health Evaluative Sciences, Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Paediatrics and Institute of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation, Toronto (Canada)

    2014-07-24

    Studies of elective surgical procedures indicate that cancellation is common and preventable. Little is known about cancellation of anesthesia-supported elective diagnostic imaging. To describe the reasons for same-day cancellation of MRI studies performed under sedation or anesthesia and identify patient characteristics associated with cancellations. This case-control study was carried out in a university-affiliated tertiary care children's hospital. Cases were defined as elective outpatient MRI studies booked under anesthesia that were cancelled after the patient had arrived in the radiology department in 2009. Matched controls were identified by selecting the same day and time 1 week before or after the cancelled case. Main outcome measures included demographics, MRI study characteristics, and social and medical factors. There were 111 outpatient anesthesia-supported MRI studies cancelled on the same day as the assessment (cancellation rate: 4.5%), of which 74.6% were related to family and patient factors, while 22% were related to system factors. Cancelled cases involved patients who lived in lower median income quintile neighborhoods compared to controls (2 vs. 3; P = 0.0007; odds ratio [OR] 3.81; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.18-12.34). Those who traveled a greater median distance (in kilometers) were less likely to be cancelled (18.8 vs. 27.1, P = 0.0035). Although cancelled patients had a lower mean number of total medical services (2.5 vs. 3.0; P = 0.03; OR = 0.78; 95% CI 0.62-0.98), current medical factors (past 12 months) did not impact cancellations. Same-day cancellations of anesthesia-supported MRI studies are not uncommon, and the main predictor of cancellation seems to be socioeconomic rather than medical. (orig.)

  12. Using advanced surface complexation models for modelling soil chemistry under forests: Solling forest, Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonten, Luc T C; Groenenberg, Jan E; Meesenburg, Henning; de Vries, Wim

    2011-10-01

    Various dynamic soil chemistry models have been developed to gain insight into impacts of atmospheric deposition of sulphur, nitrogen and other elements on soil and soil solution chemistry. Sorption parameters for anions and cations are generally calibrated for each site, which hampers extrapolation in space and time. On the other hand, recently developed surface complexation models (SCMs) have been successful in predicting ion sorption for static systems using generic parameter sets. This study reports the inclusion of an assemblage of these SCMs in the dynamic soil chemistry model SMARTml and applies this model to a spruce forest site in Solling Germany. Parameters for SCMs were taken from generic datasets and not calibrated. Nevertheless, modelling results for major elements matched observations well. Further, trace metals were included in the model, also using the existing framework of SCMs. The model predicted sorption for most trace elements well.

  13. Localized Model and Arithmetic System Based on Two Image Sensors Under Complex Circumstance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Guang-lin; YUAN Ben-sheng

    2009-01-01

    Two image sensors simulate directly the way of disposing images with the human's two eyes,so it has important value to apply in many domains,such as object identification,small unmaned aerial vehicle (UAV),workpiece localization,robot navigation and so on.The object localization based on two image sensors is studied in this paper.It concentrates on how to apply two charge coupled device (CCD) image sensors to object localization of sphere in complex environments.At first a space model of the two image sensors is set up,then Hough transformation is adopted to get localizated model and arithmetic system.An experiment platform is built in order to prove the correctness and feasibility of that localization algorithm.

  14. 3D graphical visualization of the genetic architectures underlying complex traits in multiple environments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Cheng-cheng; YE Xiu-zi; ZHANG Yin; YU Rong-dong; YANG Jian; ZHU Jun

    2007-01-01

    An approach for generating interactive 3D graphical visualization of the genetic architectures of complex traits in multiple environments is described. 3D graphical visualization is utilized for making improvements on traditional plots in quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping analysis. Interactive 3D graphical visualization for abstract expression of QTL, epistasis and their environmental interactions for experimental populations was developed in framework of user-friendly software QTLNetwork (http://ibi.zju.edu.cn/software/qtlnetwork). Novel definition of graphical meta system and computation of virtual coordinates are used to achieve explicit but meaningful visualization. Interactive 3D graphical visualization for QTL analysis provides geneticists and breeders a powerful and easy-to-use tool to analyze and publish their research results.

  15. Risk factors and outcomes for patients with bloodstream infection due to Acinetobacter baumannii-calcoaceticus complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopra, Teena; Marchaim, Dror; Johnson, Paul C; Awali, Reda A; Doshi, Hardik; Chalana, Indu; Davis, Naomi; Zhao, Jing J; Pogue, Jason M; Parmar, Sapna; Kaye, Keith S

    2014-08-01

    Identifying patients at risk for bloodstream infection (BSI) due to Acinetobacter baumannii-Acinetobacter calcoaceticus complex (ABC) and providing early appropriate therapy are critical for improving patient outcomes. A retrospective matched case-control study was conducted to investigate the risk factors for BSI due to ABC in patients admitted to the Detroit Medical Center (DMC) between January 2006 and April 2009. The cases were patients with BSI due to ABC; the controls were patients not infected with ABC. Potential risk factors were collected 30 days prior to the ABC-positive culture date for the cases and 30 days prior to admission for the controls. A total of 245 case patients were matched with 245 control patients. Independent risk factors associated with BSI due to ABC included a Charlson's comorbidity score of ≥ 3 (odds ratio [OR], 2.34; P = 0.001), a direct admission from another health care facility (OR, 4.63; P < 0.0001), a prior hospitalization (OR, 3.11; P < 0.0001), the presence of an indwelling central venous line (OR, 2.75; P = 0.011), the receipt of total parenteral nutrition (OR, 21.2; P < 0.0001), the prior receipt of β-lactams (OR, 3.58; P < 0.0001), the prior receipt of carbapenems (OR, 3.18; P = 0.006), and the prior receipt of chemotherapy (OR, 15.42; P < 0.0001). The median time from the ABC-positive culture date to the initiation of the appropriate antimicrobial therapy was 2 days (interquartile range [IQR], 1 to 3 days). The in-hospital mortality rate was significantly higher among case patients than among control patients (OR, 3.40; P < 0.0001). BSIs due to ABC are more common among critically ill and debilitated institutionalized patients, who are heavily exposed to health care settings and invasive devices.

  16. Factors Associated With Disability and Sick Leave in Early Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Type-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bean, Debbie J; Johnson, Malcolm H; Heiss-Dunlop, Wolfgang; Kydd, Robert R

    2016-02-01

    Factors influencing disability and work absence in complex regional pain syndrome type-1 (CRPS)-1 have not been thoroughly described in the literature. We sought to determine whether demographic variables, work-related factors, CRPS clinical severity ratings, pain scores, or psychological variables were associated with disability and sick leave in early CRPS-1. A total of 66 CRPS-1 patients were recruited within 12 weeks of CRPS onset. Patients completed measures of pain, depression, anxiety, stress, pain catastrophizing, and pain-related fear. A physical examination was conducted to assess signs and symptoms of CRPS and to calculate a CRPS severity score. Demographic details, clinical details, treatments, work type, and work status were recorded. In multivariate analyses, the following factors were associated with greater disability: higher pain scores, more restricted ankle or wrist extension, and higher levels of depression. Among the 49 who were either working or studying before developing CRPS, 28 had stopped work or study at the time of assessment. Multivariate analyses showed that sick leave was more likely among those whose CRPS was triggered by more severe injuries, whose work was more physically demanding, among those with higher disability scores, and there was also a significant effect of depression on sick leave, which was mediated by disability. Although the study was cross-sectional and so cannot differentiate cause from effect, results suggest that even in the early stages of CRPS, a cycle of pain, disability, depression, and work absence can emerge. Treatments aimed to prevent this cycle may help prevent adverse long-term outcomes.

  17. Building a Complex Scorecard on the Basis of Assessment of Influence of Socio-economic Factors of Enterprise Development

    OpenAIRE

    Verbitska Tetiana V.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of the article lies in building a complex scorecard used for assessment of influence of socio-economic factors of enterprise development. The article specifies such groups of socio-economic factors as factors of organisational and managerial impact; workers potential and their professional development; social protection of workers; labour protection and healthcare; and social infrastructure. Having analysed and compared concepts and approaches to assessment of enterprise activity, th...

  18. On the formation and structure of rare-earth element complexes in aqueous solutions under hydrothermal conditions with new data on gadolinium aqua and chloro complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayanovic, Robert A.; Anderson, Alan J.; Bassett, William A.; Chou, I.-Ming

    2007-01-01

    (III) chloro complexes increases steadily with temperature from 0.4 ?? 0.2 to 1.7 ?? 0.3 in the 0.006m chloride solution and from 0.9 ?? 0.7 to 1.8 ?? 0.7 in the 0.1m GdCl3 aqueous solution in the 300-500????C range. Conversely, the number of H2O ligands of Gd(H2O)??-nCln+3-n complexes decreases steadily from 8.9 ?? 0.4 to 5.8 ?? 0.7 in the 0.006m GdCl3 aqueous solution and from 9.0 ?? 0.5 to 5.3 ?? 1.0 in the 0.1m GdCl3 aqueous solution at temperatures from 25 to 500????C. Analysis of our results shows that the chloride ions partially displace the inner-shell water molecules during Gd(III) complex formation under hydrothermal conditions. The Gd-OH2 bond of the partially-hydrated Gd(III) chloro complexes exhibits slightly smaller rates of length contraction (??? 0.005??A??/100????C) for both solutions. The structural aspects of chloride speciation of Gd(III) as measured from this study and of Yb(III) as measured from our previous experiments are consistent with the solubility of these and other REE in deep-sea hydrothermal fluids. ?? 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Lipids and pigment-protein complexes of photosynthetic apparatus of Deschampsia antarctica Desv. plants under UV-B radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svietlova N. B.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To investigate structural and functional modifications of major components of photosynthetic membranes of endemic antarctic species D. antarctica under UV-B radiation. Methods. For quantitative determination of photosynthetic membrane components we used Arnon’s method (for chlorophylls and carotenoids; separation of carotenoids was carried out by Merzlyak’s method; polar lipids were isolated by Zill and Harmon method in modification of Yakovenko and Mihno; glycolipids separation and identification we carried out by Yamamoto method; and sulfoquinovosyl diacylglycerol content was determined by Kean method. The separation, disintegration and determination of pigment-protein complexes of chloroplasts were carried out by Anderson method. Authenticity of differences between the mean arithmetic values of indices was set after the Student criterion. Differences were considered as reliable at p 0.05. Results. We determined structural and functional changes in lipids, carotenoids and pigment-protein complexes at the photosyntetic apparatus level in D. antarctica plants under UV-B radiation. Conclusions. Adaptation of D. antarctica plants to UV-B radiation is accompanied by a cascade of physiological and biochemical rearrangements at the level of photosynthetic apparatus, manifested as the changes in pigment, lipid and pigment-protein complexes content

  20. Risk factors for hearing loss in infants under universal hearing screening program in Northern Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poonual W

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Watcharapol Poonual,1 Niramon Navacharoen,2 Jaran Kangsanarak,2 Sirianong Namwongprom3 1Clinical Epidemiology Program, 2Department of Otolaryngology, 3Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand Objective: To define the risk factors for hearing loss in infants (aged 3 months under universal hearing screening program. Materials and methods: A total of 3,120 infants (aged 3 months who underwent hearing screening using a universal hearing screening program using automated otoacoustic emission test between November 1, 2010 and May 31, 2012 in Uttaradit Hospital, Buddhachinaraj Hospital, and Sawanpracharuk Hospital (tertiary hospitals located in Northern Thailand were included in this prospective cohort study. Results: Of the 3,120 infants, 135 (4.3% were confirmed to have hearing loss with the conventional otoacoustic emission test. Five of these 135 infants (3.7% with hearing loss showed test results consistent with auditory brainstem responses. From the univariable analysis, there were eleven potential risk factors associated with hearing deterioration. On multivariable analysis, the risk factors independently associated with hearing loss at 3 months were birth weight 1,500–2,500 g (risk ratio [RR] 1.6, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.1–2.6, APGAR score <6 at 5 minutes (RR 2.2, 95% CI 1.1–4.4, craniofacial anomalies (RR 2.5, 95% CI 1.6–4.2, sepsis (RR 1.8, 95% CI 1.0–3.2, and ototoxic exposure (RR 4.1, 95% CI 1.9–8.6. Conclusion: This study concluded that low birth weight, APGAR score <6 at 5 minutes, craniofacial anomalies, sepsis, and ototoxic exposure are the risk factors for bilateral hearing loss in infants (aged 3 months and proper tests should be performed to identify these risk factors. As an outcome, under the present circumstances, it is suggested that infirmary/physicians/general practitioners/health action centers/polyclinics should carry out universal hearing screening in all

  1. Risk factors for under-5 mortality: evidence from Bangladesh Demographic and Health Survey, 2004-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abir, Tanvir; Agho, Kingsley Emwinyore; Page, Andrew Nicolas; Milton, Abul Hasnat; Dibley, Michael John

    2015-08-21

    The aim of this study was to identify factors associated with mortality in children under 5 years of age using a nationally representative sample of singleton births for the period of 2004-2011. Pooled 2004, 2007 and 2011 cross-sectional data sets of the Bangladesh Demographic and Health Surveys were analysed. The surveys used a stratified two-stage cluster sample of 16,722 singleton live-born infants of the most recent birth of a mother within a 3-year period. Outcome measures were neonatal mortality (0-30 days), postneonatal mortality (1-11 months), infant mortality (0-11 months), child mortality (1-4 years) and under-5 mortality (0-4 years). Survival information for 16,722 singleton live-born infants and 522 deaths of children child deaths and 522 under-5 deaths. Multiple variable analysis showed that, over a 7-year period, mortality reduced significantly by 48% for postneonatal deaths, 33% for infant deaths and 29% for under-5 deaths, but there was no significant reduction in neonatal deaths (adjusted OR (AOR) = 0.79, 95% CI 0.59 to 1.06) or child deaths (AOR = 1.00, 95% CI 0.51 to 1.94). The odds of neonatal, postneonatal, infant, child and under-5 deaths decreased significantly among mothers who used contraceptive and mothers who had other children aged 3 years or older. The risk of neonatal, postneonatal, infant, child and under-5 deaths was significantly higher in mothers who reported a previous death of a sibling. Our study suggests that family planning is needed to further reduce the overall rate of under-5 deaths in Bangladesh. To reduce childhood mortality, public health interventions that focus on child spacing and contraceptive use by mothers may be most effective. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  2. On Advice Complexity of the k-server Problem under Sparse Metrics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gupta, S.; Kamali, S.; López-Ortiz, A.

    2013-01-01

    We consider the k-Server problem under the advice model of computation when the underlying metric space is sparse. On one side, we introduce Θ (1)-competitive algorithms for a wide range of sparse graphs, which require advice of (almost) linear size. Namely, we show that for graphs of size N...... and treewidth α, there is an online algorithm which receives O (n(log α +log log N))1 bits of advice and optimally serves a sequence of length n. With a different argument, we show that if a graph admits a system of μ collective tree (q, r)- spanners, then there is a (q + r)-competitive algorithm which receives...... O (n(log μ +log logN)) bits of advice. Among other results, this gives a 3-competitive algorithm for planar graphs, provided with O (n log log N) bits of advice. On the other side, we show that an advice of size Ω (n) is required to obtain a 1-competitive algorithm for sequences of size n even...

  3. Factors limiting endurance of armor, artillery, and infantry units under simulated NBC conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rauch, T.M.; Tharion, W.J.; Banderet, L.E.; Lussier, A.R.

    1986-03-13

    The war of the future will require 72-hour operations in environments contaminated with nuclear/biological/chemical (NBC) agents. The 1985 P2NBC2 (Physiological and Psychological Effects of NBC and Extended Operations on Combined Arms Crews) Program assessed soldier endurance and performance under simulated NBC conditions. A total of 175 soldiers were observed during four tests differing in design, site, climatic conditions, and performance demands. In all but one of the iterations where the full chemical-protective ensemble (MOPP 4) was used without cooling, soldier endurance fell far short of the projected requirement. Psychological data were analyzed to determine which factors were associated with the incidence of casualties. The findings showed that perceived intensity of symptoms resembling the hyperventilation syndrome was significantly greater in soldiers classified as Casualties. Five of these symptoms (painful breathing, difficulty breathing, shortness of breath, headache, and nausea) showed Casualty-Survivor differences in all tests. Symptom intensity was attributed to two factors. (1) External conditions. Thermal stress exacerbated the five basic symptoms, induced others (tetany and paresthesia), and decreased endurance. Periodic relief from respirator use attenuated these symptoms and enhanced endurance. (2) Individual differences. Significant Casualty-Survivor differences in anxiety, depression, and cognitive strategy scores indicated that perception of hyperventilation symptoms and endurance were related to personality variables. Hyperventilation symptoms could incapacitate the soldier or induce removal of the protective mask under actual chemical attack.

  4. Oxygen Consumption by Postfermentation Wine Yeast Lees: Factors Affecting Its Rate and Extent under Oenological Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas Müller

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Postfermentation wine yeast lees show antioxidant properties based on their ability to consume dissolved oxygen. The oxygen consumption capacity of suspended yeast lees obtained after fermentations with six commercial active dry yeast strains was investigated in model, white and red wines using fluorescence-based oxygen sensors operating in a nondestructive way. In model solution, the oxygen consumption rate of yeast lees was shown to depend on their amount, yeast strain, sulfur dioxide and temperature. It is slightly lower in red than in white wines. It is strongly decreased by current levels of free sulfur dioxide, thus excluding the complementary use of both as antioxidants in wine. However, in 25 randomly sampled white wines produced under commercial conditions, the rate and extent of oxygen consumption during the first six months of postfermentation had no significant correlation with any of these interacting factors, making it difficult to predict the actual antioxidant effect of yeast lees. In these wines, yeast lees consumed 0 to 47 % of the dissolved oxygen. Although total oxygen consumption capacity of yeast lees is not a limiting factor under commercial winemaking conditions, their oxygen consumption proceeds at a limited rate that reduces but cannot totally prevent concomitant chemical oxidation of the wine.

  5. Oxygen Consumption by Postfermentation Wine Yeast Lees: Factors Affecting Its Rate and Extent under Oenological Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Jonas; Schmidt, Dominik

    2016-01-01

    Summary Postfermentation wine yeast lees show antioxidant properties based on their ability to consume dissolved oxygen. The oxygen consumption capacity of suspended yeast lees obtained after fermentations with six commercial active dry yeast strains was investigated in model, white and red wines using fluorescence-based oxygen sensors operating in a nondestructive way. In model solution, the oxygen consumption rate of yeast lees was shown to depend on their amount, yeast strain, sulfur dioxide and temperature. It is slightly lower in red than in white wines. It is strongly decreased by current levels of free sulfur dioxide, thus excluding the complementary use of both as antioxidants in wine. However, in 25 randomly sampled white wines produced under commercial conditions, the rate and extent of oxygen consumption during the first six months of postfermentation had no significant correlation with any of these interacting factors, making it difficult to predict the actual antioxidant effect of yeast lees. In these wines, yeast lees consumed 0 to 47% of the dissolved oxygen. Although total oxygen consumption capacity of yeast lees is not a limiting factor under commercial winemaking conditions, their oxygen consumption proceeds at a limited rate that reduces but cannot totally prevent concomitant chemical oxidation of the wine. PMID:28115896

  6. Dimensions Underlying Measures of Disability, Personal Factors, and Health Status in Cervical Radiculopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halvorsen, Marie; Kierkegaard, Marie; Harms-Ringdahl, Karin; Peolsson, Anneli; Dedering, Åsa

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This cross-sectional study sought to identify dimensions underlying measures of impairment, disability, personal factors, and health status in patients with cervical radiculopathy. One hundred twenty-four patients with magnetic resonance imaging-verified cervical radiculopathy, attending a neurosurgery clinic in Sweden, participated. Data from clinical tests and questionnaires on disability, personal factors, and health status were used in a principal-component analysis (PCA) with oblique rotation. The PCA supported a 3-component model including 14 variables from clinical tests and questionnaires, accounting for 73% of the cumulative percentage. The first component, pain and disability, explained 56%. The second component, health, fear-avoidance beliefs, kinesiophobia, and self-efficacy, explained 9.2%. The third component including anxiety, depression, and catastrophizing explained 7.6%. The strongest-loading variables of each dimension were “present neck pain intensity,” “fear avoidance,” and “anxiety.” The three underlying dimensions identified and labeled Pain and functioning, Health, beliefs, and kinesiophobia, and Mood state and catastrophizing captured aspects of importance for cervical radiculopathy. Since the variables “present neck pain intensity,” “fear avoidance,” and “anxiety” had the strongest loading in each of the three dimensions; it may be important to include them in a reduced multidimensional measurement set in cervical radiculopathy. PMID:26091482

  7. Factors influencing mothers' role in convulsion treatment among under-five children in Ibadan, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwokocha, Ezenwa E; Awomoyi, Aanuoluwayomi O

    2009-01-01

    Convulsion among children between six months and five years is a major contributor to childhood mortality in less-developed societies, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. Most studies on under-five deaths have ignored the influence of socio-demographic and environmental factors as they relate to causes of the thematic health condition and available therapies. This study investigated mothers' perception of convulsion causation, relevant signs and symptoms, and the influence of socio-economic status on mothers' choice of remedies. The research was conducted in Ibadan, southwest Nigeria, which is densely populated with mainly Yoruba-speaking people. The study population comprised mothers who, at the time of fieldwork for the present analysis, had at least one under-five child. Five hundred questionnaire respondents were selected through a multistage sampling technique, and 14 in-depth interviews (IDIs) were conducted among different categories of women identified through the snowball technique. Voluntary Social Action Theory and the Health Belief Model were used in explaining the relationship between the dependent and independent variables. The findings show that the remedies mothers chose were strongly influenced by socio-demographic factors such as marriage type, religion, level of education, occupation and place of residence. It is strongly suggested that interventions, health policies and programs should focus on how best to empower women to effectively utilize medical information that will enable them recognize symptoms of this common health condition and/or undertake preliminary therapies that contribute positively to convulsion prevention or treatment.

  8. Complexities in using sentinel pigs to study Taenia solium transmission dynamics under field conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devleesschauwer, Brecht; Aryal, Arjun; Tharmalingam, Jayaraman; Joshi, Durga Datt; Rijal, Suman; Speybroeck, Niko; Gabriël, Sarah; Victor, Bjorn; Dorny, Pierre

    2013-03-31

    The transmission dynamics of the pork tapeworm, Taenia solium, remain a matter of research and debate. In a longitudinal field study performed in southeastern Nepal, 18 sentinel pigs were serologically monitored to study the field kinetics of Taenia antigens and anti-T. solium antibodies. At the end of the twelve months' study period, necropsy was performed and suspected lesions were subjected to molecular identification of the Taenia species. The study generated new hypotheses on the transmission dynamics of Taenia spp. and exposed crucial complexities in the use of sentinel pigs in longitudinal field studies. Sentinel pigs can be useful epidemiological tools, but their use should be thoroughly planned before initiating a study and carefully monitored throughout the course of the study. Important aspects to be considered are those affecting the pig's susceptibility to infection, such as passive immunity, age, hormonal levels, and infection with competing Taenia species. In addition, serological test results should be interpreted considering possible cross-reactions and with proper understanding of the significance of a positive test result.

  9. "Incest--see under Oedipus complex": the history of an error in psychoanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, B

    1992-01-01

    This paper is intended as a contribution to the understanding of errors in our field. The title refers to the index entries "incest" in several classic psychoanalytic texts. In a way that is analogous to the defenses utilized by survivors of incest, psychoanalysis has both known and not known, avowed and disavowed, the traumatic impact of actual incest. It is argued that psychoanalysis erred in (a) focusing too heavily on the implications of incest for the Oedipus complex instead of its implications for every stage of development, and (b) missing out on the full and detailed description of the clinical pictures of incest victims and of treatment issues, including transference and countertransference. The author presents an overview of the history prompted by Masson's original attack on Freud for abandoning the "seduction hypothesis." Topics covered are: Freud's early papers, the Freud-Ferenczi controversy (1932), and the state of psychoanalytic awareness in the 1960's of the importance of actual incest. Certain features of our field make it all too likely that new errors can be generated that may similarly take decades to recognize and undo. These include the politics of our discipline, and negative attitudes toward systematic gathering and assessment of evidence.

  10. Difficult Geotechnical Conditions Under the Palace Complex, Case Study from Cianowice, Near Krakow, Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Mastalerczyk, Joanna; Gil, Regina

    2016-10-01

    The palace complex in Cianowice near Krakow (Lesser Poland, Poland) built around 1890, after 1945 ceased to function as a residential, so the whole building underwent successive devastation. Military activities, ad hoc repairs and long-term shortage of funds in Poland, led to the destruction of the magnificent assumptions. Since 2006. Palace remained completely unsecured and unattended. Performed in 2012-2015 modernization of the historic palace with the expansion of the basement (for residential building multigenerational) has become the occasion for a thorough diagnosis of the prevailing geotechnical conditions and the state of preservation of threads stone and brick walls and vaults chambers basement. Difficult ground conditions, water penetration, lack of insulation of horizontal and vertical has become one of the main causes of the destruction of the foundations and walls of basements. Moisture from the ground, rising damp in the walls (with dissolved salts in it), evaporate causing erosion of the walls. The result it led to the weakening of the structural and breakout layers of walls. The phenomenon has become particularly clear after the geotechnical surveys, excavations and complete discovery of the basement walls. The conducted works related to general technical renovation and restoration, included foundations (lining and insulation), walls, floors and roof. The assumption palace in Cianowice, through appropriate interference with the use of modern and introduction of a new substance, in any manner that emphasizes value and historical monument became possible to restore the important significance of the object and place.

  11. IMMUNOMODULATORY ACTION OF MYELOPIDUM UNDER ITS INCLUSION IN COMPLEX THERAPY OF PATIENTS WITH PENETRATING OCULAR INJURIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. V. Gavrilova

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Examination of immunomodulatory actions and clinical efficiency of myelopidum when included into complex therapy that was carried out in 24 male patients with severe (stage 3 penetrating eye injury in the course of trauma treatment. The levels of C-reactive protein, lactoferrin, interleukin (IL-1β, IL-6, and activity of complement system were measured in peripheral blood, and concentrations of lactoferrin and IL-8 were determined in tears. An increase in lactoferrin, C-reactive protein, IL-1β, IL-8, and C5 complement component levels was detected during early post-traumatic period, as compared with data from the control group. As compared to effects of steroid and non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs included into standard therapy, treatment with myelopidum has led to a more favorable clinical course of traumatic process, and resulted into more pronounced anti-inflammatory effect that was manifested by decrease in lactoferrin and C-reactive protein levels, reduction of IL-1β concentration, and C5 complement component activity. (Med. Immunol., 2008, vol. 10, N 2-3, pp 239-244.

  12. Molecular epidemiology is becoming complex under the dynamic HIV prevalence: The perspective from Harbin, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Bing; Song, Bo; Cao, Lijun; Du, Juan; Sun, Dongying; Lin, Yuanlong; Wang, Binyou; Wang, Fuxiang; Wang, Sunran

    2016-05-01

    Unlike most areas of China, HIV transmission via men who have sex with men (MSM) is increasing rapidly, and has become the main route of HIV transmission in Harbin city. The purpose of the current study was to elaborate the molecular epidemiologic characteristics of the new HIV epidemic. Eighty-one HIV-1 gag gene sequences (HXB2:806-1861) from local HIV infections were isolated; CRF01_AE predominated among HIV infections (71.6%), followed by subtype B (16.5%), CRF07_BC (6.2%), and unique recombinant strains (URFs; 6.2%). URFs were most often identified in the MSM population, which consisted of a recombination of CRF01_AE with subtype B or CRF07_BC. Six clusters were formed in this analysis; clusters I and II mainly circulated in southwest China. Clusters III and IV mainly circulated in southwest, southeast, and central China. Clusters V and VI mainly circulated in north and northeast China. Clusters III and IV may facilitate the transmission of the CRF01_AE strain from the southwest to the north and northeast regions of China. HIV subtypes are becoming diverse with the persistent epidemic in this geographic region. In brief, our results indicate that the molecular epidemiology of HIV is trending to be more complex. Thus, timely molecular epidemiologic supervision of HIV is necessary, especially for the MSM population.

  13. 28-Homobrassinolide Modulate Antenna Complexes and Carbon Skeleton of Brassica juncea L. under Temperature Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harpreet Kaur

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of present study was to explore the ameliorative impact of 28-homoBL on morpho-physiological attributes, photosynthetic pigments and sugars of Brassica juncea L. exposed to oxidative stress caused by extreme temperatures (4 and 44 °C. For this, experiments were carried out at the Plant Physiology Laboratory, Department of Botany, Punjabi University, Patiala. Effect of different degrees of temperature (4 and 44 °C taking 24 °C as control was studied. 28-homoBL (10-6, 10-9 and 10-12M primed and unprimed seeds of B. juncea L. in terms of antenna complexes and end products of photosynthesis that is total carbohydrates and total soluble sugars was investigated. All concentrations of 28-homoBL used in present study showed different effects on morphology and light quenching pigments. All concentrations of 28-homoBL showed promoting effect on growth and light quenching pigments. The carbon makeup ameliorated positively in stressed and non-stressed components of photosynthetic machinery and 10-9 M 28-homoBL showed best results. In conclusion 28-homoBL showed great potential in protecting the reaction centre of photosynthetic machinery from oxidative stress caused by extreme low and high temperatures but in very dose dependent manner and thus modulate the carbon skeleton of the plant.

  14. Changing Interdigestive Migrating Motor Complex in Rats under Acute Liver Injury

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    Mei Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal motility disorder is a major clinical manifestation of acute liver injury, and interdigestive migrating motor complex (MMC is an important indicator. We investigated the changes and characteristics of MMC in rats with acute liver injury. Acute liver injury was created by D-galactosamine, and we recorded the interdigestive MMC using a multichannel physiological recorder and compared the indexes of interdigestive MMC. Compared with normal controls, antral MMC Phase I duration was significantly prolonged and MMC Phase III duration was significantly shortened in the rats with acute liver injury. The duodenal MMC cycle and MMC Phases I and IV duration were significantly prolonged and MMC Phase III duration was significantly shortened in the rats with acute liver injury. The jejunal MMC cycle and MMC Phases I and IV duration were significantly prolonged and MMC Phase III duration was significantly shortened in the rats with acute liver injury compared with normal controls. Compared with the normal controls, rats with acute liver injury had a significantly prolonged interdigestive MMC cycle, related mainly to longer MMC Phases I and IV, shortened MMC Phase III, and MMC Phase II characterized by increased migrating clustered contractions, which were probably major contributors to the gastrointestinal motility disorders.

  15. Ethylene Response Factor6 acts as a central regulator of leaf growth under water-limiting conditions in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, Marieke; Skirycz, Aleksandra; Claeys, Hannes; Maleux, Katrien; Dhondt, Stijn; De Bodt, Stefanie; Vanden Bossche, Robin; De Milde, Liesbeth; Yoshizumi, Takeshi; Matsui, Minami; Inzé, Dirk

    2013-05-01

    Leaf growth is a complex developmental process that is continuously fine-tuned by the environment. Various abiotic stresses, including mild drought stress, have been shown to inhibit leaf growth in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), but the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. Here, we identify the redundant Arabidopsis transcription factors ETHYLENE RESPONSE FACTOR5 (ERF5) and ERF6 as master regulators that adapt leaf growth to environmental changes. ERF5 and ERF6 gene expression is induced very rapidly and specifically in actively growing leaves after sudden exposure to osmotic stress that mimics mild drought. Subsequently, enhanced ERF6 expression inhibits cell proliferation and leaf growth by a process involving gibberellin and DELLA signaling. Using an ERF6-inducible overexpression line, we demonstrate that the gibberellin-degrading enzyme GIBBERELLIN 2-OXIDASE6 is transcriptionally induced by ERF6 and that, consequently, DELLA proteins are stabilized. As a result, ERF6 gain-of-function lines are dwarfed and hypersensitive to osmotic stress, while the growth of erf5erf6 loss-of-function mutants is less affected by stress. Besides its role in plant growth under stress, ERF6 also activates the expression of a plethora of osmotic stress-responsive genes, including the well-known stress tolerance genes STZ, MYB51, and WRKY33. Interestingly, activation of the stress tolerance genes by ERF6 occurs independently from the ERF6-mediated growth inhibition. Together, these data fit into a leaf growth regulatory model in which ERF5 and ERF6 form a missing link between the previously observed stress-induced 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid accumulation and DELLA-mediated cell cycle exit and execute a dual role by regulating both stress tolerance and growth inhibition.

  16. Nonlinear vibration and buckling of circular sandwich plate under complex load

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The nonlinear vibration fundamental equation of circular sandwich plate under uniformed load and circumjacent load and the loosely clamped boundary condition were established by von Karman plate theory, and then accordingly exact solution of static load and its numerical results were given. Based on time mode hypothesis and the variational method, the control equation of the space mode was derived, and then the amplitude frequency-load character relation of circular sandwich plate was obtained by the modified iteration method. Consequently the rule of the effect of the two kinds of load on the vibration character of the circular sandwich plate was investigated. When circumjacent load makes the lowest natural frequency zero, critical load is obtained.

  17. Computational Complexity of Traffic Hijacking under BGP and S-BGP

    CERN Document Server

    Chiesa, Marco; Erlebach, Thomas; Patrignani, Maurizio

    2012-01-01

    Harmful Internet hijacking incidents put in evidence how fragile the Border Gateway Protocol (BGP) is, which is used to exchange routing information between Autonomous Systems (ASes). As proved by recent research contributions, even S-BGP, the secure variant of BGP that is being deployed, is not fully able to blunt traffic attraction attacks. Given a traffic flow between two ASes, we study how difficult it is for a malicious AS to devise a strategy for hijacking or intercepting that flow. We show that this problem marks a sharp difference between BGP and S-BGP. Namely, while it is solvable, under reasonable assumptions, in polynomial time for the type of attacks that are usually performed in BGP, it is NP-hard for S-BGP. Our study has several by-products. E.g., we solve a problem left open in the literature, stating when performing a hijacking in S-BGP is equivalent to performing an interception.

  18. Further evidence of psychological factors underlying choice of elective cesarean delivery (ECD) by primigravidae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matinnia, Nasrin; Haghighi, Mohammad; Jahangard, Leila; Ibrahim, Faisal B; Rahman, Hejar A; Ghaleiha, Ali; Holsboer-Trachsler, Edith; Brand, Serge

    2017-06-12

    Requests for elective cesarean delivery (ECD) have increased in Iran. While some sociodemographic and fear-related factors have been linked with this choice, psychological factors such as self-esteem, stress, and health beliefs are under-researched. A total of 342 primigravidae (mean age = 25 years) completed questionnaires covering psychological dimensions such as self-esteem, perceived stress, marital relationship quality, perceived social support, and relevant health-related beliefs. Of the sample, 214 (62.6%) chose to undergo ECD rather than vaginal delivery (VD). This choice was associated with lower self-esteem, greater perceived stress, belief in higher susceptibility to problematic birth and barriers to an easy birth, along with lower perceived severity of ECD, fewer perceived benefits from VD, lower self-efficacy and a lower feeling of preparedness. No differences were found for marital relationship quality or perceived social support. The pattern suggests that various psychological factors such as self-esteem, self-efficacy, and perceived stress underpin the decision by primigravidae to have an ECD.

  19. You Want Me to Use THAT Robot? Identifying Underlying Factors Affecting Robot Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagoda, Rosemarie Elaine

    Building on traditional technology acceptance and human-robot interaction (HRI) research, this research sought to investigate operational HRI factors affecting robot use within the context of a high-risk environment. Technology acceptance models have previously focused on perceived usefulness and ease of use, but have tended to ignore barriers or external factors associated with technology adoption. The present studies investigate the role of barriers such as operational risk and lack of HRI trust in determining acceptance of robots. Experiment 1 empirically refined the experimental methodology used in Experiment 2 to investigate factors affecting robot use. Overall, the results highlighted the influence of HRI trust and operational risk on the likelihood of robot use; in addition, they shed light on the importance of the configuration of the robot capabilities needed for task completion. With the proposition that these relationships were moderated by the robot configuration, HRI trust was shown to increase the overall likelihood of robot use and only slight variations were attributed to increased operational risk. HRI trust was shown to have both a positive and negative influence in terms of the operational risks associated with on robot use. In fact, instances when HRI trust is high may lead to using a robot that is not even properly configured for the high-risk task. Therefore, it is beneficial to understand the underlying mechanisms that influence the perception (right or wrong) surrounding unmanned systems. The findings from this research can be used to enhance the utility and acceptance of new or existing unmanned systems.

  20. Localising loci underlying complex trait variation using Regional Genomic Relationship Mapping.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshitaka Nagamine

    Full Text Available The limited proportion of complex trait variance identified in genome-wide association studies may reflect the limited power of single SNP analyses to detect either rare causative alleles or those of small effect. Motivated by studies that demonstrate that loci contributing to trait variation may contain a number of different alleles, we have developed an analytical approach termed Regional Genomic Relationship Mapping that, like linkage-based family methods, integrates variance contributed by founder gametes within a pedigree. This approach takes advantage of very distant (and unrecorded relationships, and this greatly increases the power of the method, compared with traditional pedigree-based linkage analyses. By integrating variance contributed by founder gametes in the population, our approach provides an estimate of the Regional Heritability attributable to a small genomic region (e.g. 100 SNP window covering ca. 1 Mb of DNA in a 300000 SNP GWAS and has the power to detect regions containing multiple alleles that individually contribute too little variance to be detectable by GWAS as well as regions with single common GWAS-detectable SNPs. We use genome-wide SNP array data to obtain both a genome-wide relationship matrix and regional relationship ("identity by state" or IBS matrices for sequential regions across the genome. We then estimate a heritability for each region sequentially in our genome-wide scan. We demonstrate by simulation and with real data that, when compared to traditional ("individual SNP" GWAS, our method uncovers new loci that explain additional trait variation. We analysed data from three Southern European populations and from Orkney for exemplar traits - serum uric acid concentration and height. We show that regional heritability estimates are correlated with results from genome-wide association analysis but can capture more of the genetic variance segregating in the population and identify additional trait loci.

  1. Evolution of a single gene highlights the complexity underlying molecular descriptions of fitness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña, Matthew I.; Van Itallie, Elizabeth; Bennett, Matthew R.; Shamoo, Yousif

    2010-06-01

    Evolution by natural selection is the driving force behind the endless variation we see in nature, yet our understanding of how changes at the molecular level give rise to different phenotypes and altered fitness at the population level remains inadequate. The reproductive fitness of an organism is the most basic metric that describes the chance that an organism will succeed or fail in its environment and it depends upon a complex network of inter- and intramolecular interactions. A deeper understanding of the quantitative relationships relating molecular evolution to adaptation, and consequently fitness, can guide our understanding of important issues in biomedicine such as drug resistance and the engineering of new organisms with applications to biotechnology. We have developed the "weak link" approach to determine how changes in molecular structure and function can relate to fitness and evolutionary outcomes. By replacing adenylate kinase (AK), an essential gene, in a thermophile with a homologous AK from a mesophile we have created a maladapted weak link that produces a temperature-sensitive phenotype. The recombinant strain adapts to nonpermissive temperatures through point mutations to the weak link that increase both stability and activity of the enzyme AK at higher temperatures. Here, we propose a fitness function relating enzyme activity to growth rate and use it to create a dynamic model of a population of bacterial cells. Using metabolic control analysis we show that the growth rate exhibits thresholdlike behavior, saturating at high enzyme activity as other reactions in the energy metabolism pathway become rate limiting. The dynamic model accurately recapitulates observed evolutionary outcomes. These findings suggest that in vitro enzyme kinetic data, in combination with metabolic network analysis, can be used to create fitness functions and dynamic models of evolution within simple metabolic systems.

  2. A novel non-lens betagamma-crystallin and trefoil factor complex from amphibian skin and its functional implications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Bai Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In vertebrates, non-lens betagamma-crystallins are widely expressed in various tissues, but their functions are unknown. The molecular mechanisms of trefoil factors, initiators of mucosal healing and being greatly involved in tumorigenesis, have remained elusive. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A naturally existing 72-kDa complex of non-lens betagamma-crystallin (alpha-subunit and trefoil factor (beta-subunit, named betagamma-CAT, was identified from frog Bombina maxima skin secretions. Its alpha-subunit and beta-subunit (containing three trefoil factor domains, with a non-covalently linked form of alphabeta(2, show significant sequence homology to ep37 proteins, a group of non-lens betagamma-crystallins identified in newt Cynops pyrrhogaster and mammalian trefoil factors, respectively. betagamma-CAT showed potent hemolytic activity on mammalian erythrocytes. The specific antiserum against each subunit was able to neutralize its hemolytic activity, indicating that the two subunits are functionally associated. betagamma-CAT formed membrane pores with a functional diameter about 2.0 nm, leading to K(+ efflux and colloid-osmotic hemolysis. High molecular weight SDS-stable oligomers (>240-kDa were detected by antibodies against the alpha-subunit with Western blotting. Furthermore, betagamma-CAT showed multiple cellular effects on human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Low dosages of betagamma-CAT (25-50 pM were able to stimulate cell migration and wound healing. At high concentrations, it induced cell detachment (EC(50 10 nM and apoptosis. betagamma-CAT was rapidly endocytosed via intracellular vacuole formation. Under confocal microscope, some of the vacuoles were translocated to nucleus and partially fused with nuclear membrane. Bafilomycin A1 (a specific inhibitor of the vacuolar-type ATPase and nocodazole (an agent of microtuble depolymerizing, while inhibited betagamma-CAT induced vacuole formation, significantly inhibited betagamma

  3. Safety assessment of reactor components under complex multiaxial cyclic loading. Final report; Sicherheitsbewertung kerntechnischer Komponenten bei komplexer, mehrachsiger Schwingbeanspruchung. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fesich, Thomas M.; Herter, Karl-Heinz; Schuler, Xaver

    2012-12-15

    Objective of the project was the experimental assurance of investigations on the theoretical basis of multiaxial fatigue loading. The review of the applicability of existing hypotheses, as well as the extension of the corresponding data base was carried out by experimental studies in fatigue tests under complex multiaxial loading for a ferritic and austenitic material. To investigate the influence of complex multiaxial stress conditions on the fatigue behavior, in this project notched cylindrical specimens were examined under alternating tensile/pressure loading and alternating torsional loading. Through the notch in the notched section inhomogeneous, multiaxial stress states are generated. By uniaxial alternating tests on unnotched specimens and a further series of tests on unnotched specimens under alternating torsional loading an evaluation of the impact and influence of the notch of stress on fatigue behavior was possible. A series of experiments with superimposition of alternating torsional and alternating tensile/pressure loading permits verification of the effect of phase-shifted stress and rotating principal coordinate system. All experiments were performed at room temperature. As part of the research project, the experimental results with the ferritic and austenitic materials were evaluated in terms of material behavior (hardening or softening) under cyclic loading. These were to uniaxial alternating tensile/pressure tests, alternating torsional tests (unnotched cylindrical specimens), alternating tensile/pressure tests on notched cylindrical specimens, alternating torsional tests on notched cylindrical specimens, alternating tensiontorsion tests with complex proportional stresses on unnotched cylindrical specimens (superimposition of normal and shear stress components), as well as alternating tension-torsion tests with complex non-proportional strain on unnotched cylindrical specimens (superimposition of normal and shear stress components with 90 phase

  4. The interlanguage development in the spanish learning as foreign language in Teletandem under the View of the Complexity Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andressa Carvalho Silva Oyama

    Full Text Available This article presents, under the perspective of Complexity Theory, the characteristics of the learning process of Spanish as a foreign language in Teletandem. Data were collected from two pairs of Portuguese-Spanish interagents, who were engaged in a systematic and regular interaction, based on the tandem principles. It was found that the learning experience is developed with the peculiarities that arise from the context, agents, members and their nuances, which revealed the presence of a "shallow space" between the systems of native and foreign languages.

  5. NANOCOMPOSITE COMPLEX EMAP II INFLUENCE ON TUMOR NECROSIS FACTOR AND INTERFERON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. A. Kolomiets-Babenko

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The goal of the research was to determine the ability of new nanocomposite preparation EMAP II (endothelial monocyte activating poplypeptide II to affect the expression of the tumor-necrosis factor and interferon in vitro. In the experiments, the transformed cell line L929 cells was used. The induced interferon levels were determined in samples of culture medium by the microtitration method in the L929 cell culture against test virus vesicular stomatitus VSV. Toxicity of the substance was assessed by its maximum tolerated dose. The amount of endotoxins in nanocomposite preparation EMAP II was measured using gel-clot test. The range of concentrations of EMAP II causing the production of tumor necrosis factor was determined. The concentration of lipopolysaccharides in the tested nanocomposite preparation was less then 0.5 IEU/kg. New nanocomposite preparation EMAP II has the ability to induce TNF-α production at rather low concentration 1.56–25.00 μg/ml (82.49–1370.00 mol х 10–12. The interferon production under the influence of nanocomposite preparation EMAP II was not found. The results support the application of the target nanocomposite reparation EMAP II for cancer treatment.

  6. Expression and Function of Hypoxia Inducible Factor-1α and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor in Pulp Tissue of Teeth under Orthodontic Movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fulan Wei

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Orthodontic force may lead to cell damage, circulatory disturbances, and vascular changes of the dental pulp, which make a hypoxic environment in pulp. In order to maintain the homeostasis of dental pulp, hypoxia will inevitably induce the defensive reaction. However, this is a complex process and is regulated by numerous factors. In this study, we established an experimental animal model of orthodontic tooth movement to investigate the effects of mechanical force on the expression of VEGF and HIF-1α in dental pulp. Histological analysis of dental pulp and expressions of HIF-1α and VEGF proteins in dental pulp were examined. The results showed that inflammation and vascular changes happened in dental pulp tissue in different periods. Additionally, there were significant changes in the expression of HIF-1α and VEGF proteins under orthodontic force. After application of mechanical load, expression of HIF-1α and VEGF was markedly positive in 1, 3, 7 d, and 2 w groups, and then it weakened in 4 w group. These findings suggested that the expression of HIF-1α and VEGF was enhanced by mechanical force. HIF-1α and VEGF may play an important role in retaining the homeostasis of dental pulp during orthodontic tooth movement.

  7. Tissue-specific expression patterns of Arabidopsis NF-Y transcription factors suggest potential for extensive combinatorial complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siefers, Nicholas; Dang, Kristen K; Kumimoto, Roderick W; Bynum, William Edwards; Tayrose, Gregory; Holt, Ben F

    2009-02-01

    All aspects of plant and animal development are controlled by complex networks of transcription factors. Transcription factors are essential for converting signaling inputs, such as changes in daylength, into complex gene regulatory outputs. While some transcription factors control gene expression by binding to cis-regulatory elements as individual subunits, others function in a combinatorial fashion. How individual subunits of combinatorial transcription factors are spatially and temporally deployed (e.g. expression-level, posttranslational modifications and subcellular localization) has profound effects on their control of gene expression. In the model plant Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), we have identified 36 Nuclear Factor Y (NF-Y) transcription factor subunits (10 NF-YA, 13 NF-YB, and 13 NF-YC subunits) that can theoretically combine to form 1,690 unique complexes. Individual plant subunits have functions in flowering time, embryo maturation, and meristem development, but how they combine to control these processes is unknown. To assist in the process of defining unique NF-Y complexes, we have created promoter:beta-glucuronidase fusion lines for all 36 Arabidopsis genes. Here, we show NF-Y expression patterns inferred from these promoter:beta-glucuronidase lines for roots, light- versus dark-grown seedlings, rosettes, and flowers. Additionally, we review the phylogenetic relationships and examine protein alignments for each NF-Y subunit family. The results are discussed with a special emphasis on potential roles for NF-Y subunits in photoperiod-controlled flowering time.

  8. Simplified Method for Predicting a Functional Class of Proteins in Transcription Factor Complexes

    KAUST Repository

    Piatek, Marek J.

    2013-07-12

    Background:Initiation of transcription is essential for most of the cellular responses to environmental conditions and for cell and tissue specificity. This process is regulated through numerous proteins, their ligands and mutual interactions, as well as interactions with DNA. The key such regulatory proteins are transcription factors (TFs) and transcription co-factors (TcoFs). TcoFs are important since they modulate the transcription initiation process through interaction with TFs. In eukaryotes, transcription requires that TFs form different protein complexes with various nuclear proteins. To better understand transcription regulation, it is important to know the functional class of proteins interacting with TFs during transcription initiation. Such information is not fully available, since not all proteins that act as TFs or TcoFs are yet annotated as such, due to generally partial functional annotation of proteins. In this study we have developed a method to predict, using only sequence composition of the interacting proteins, the functional class of human TF binding partners to be (i) TF, (ii) TcoF, or (iii) other nuclear protein. This allows for complementing the annotation of the currently known pool of nuclear proteins. Since only the knowledge of protein sequences is required in addition to protein interaction, the method should be easily applicable to many species.Results:Based on experimentally validated interactions between human TFs with different TFs, TcoFs and other nuclear proteins, our two classification systems (implemented as a web-based application) achieve high accuracies in distinguishing TFs and TcoFs from other nuclear proteins, and TFs from TcoFs respectively.Conclusion:As demonstrated, given the fact that two proteins are capable of forming direct physical interactions and using only information about their sequence composition, we have developed a completely new method for predicting a functional class of TF interacting protein partners

  9. Factors associated with collaboration among agencies serving children with complex chronic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nageswaran, Savithri; Golden, Shannon L; Easterling, Douglas; O'Shea, T Michael; Hansen, William B; Ip, Edward H

    2013-11-01

    Our objective was to identify agency-level factors that increase collaborative relationships between agencies that serve children with complex chronic conditions (CCC). We hypothesized that an agency will collaborate with more partners in the network if the agency had a coordinator and participated in a community coalition. We surveyed representatives of 63 agencies that serve children with CCC in Forsyth County, North Carolina about their agencies' collaborations with other agencies. We used social network analytical methods and exponential random graph analysis to identify factors associated with collaboration among agencies. The unit of analysis was the collaborative tie (n = 3,658) between agencies in the network. Agencies participating in a community coalition were 1.5 times more likely to report collaboration than agencies that did not participate in a coalition. Presence of a coordinator in an agency was not associated with the number of collaborative relationships. Agencies in existence for a longer duration (≥11 vs. ≤10 years; adjusted odds ratio (aOR): 2.1) and those with a higher proportion of CCC clientele (aOR: 2.1 and 1.6 for 11-30 % and ≥31 % compared to ≤10 %) had greater collaboration. Care coordination agencies and pediatric practices reported more collaborative relationships than subspecialty clinics, home-health agencies, durable medical equipment companies, educational programs and family-support services. Collaborative relationships between agencies that serve children with CCC are increased by coalition participation, longer existence and higher CCC clientele. Future studies should evaluate whether interventions to improve collaborations among agencies will improve clinical outcomes of children with CCC.

  10. Sequential biodegradation of complex naphtha hydrocarbons under methanogenic conditions in two different oil sands tailings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamad Shahimin, Mohd Faidz; Siddique, Tariq

    2017-02-01

    Methane emissions in oil sands tailings ponds are sustained by anaerobic biodegradation of unrecovered hydrocarbons. Naphtha (primarily C6-C10; n- iso- and cycloalkanes) is commonly used as a solvent during bitumen extraction process and its residue escapes to tailings ponds during tailings deposition. To investigate biodegradability of hydrocarbons in naphtha, mature fine tailings (MFT) collected from Albian and CNRL tailings ponds were amended with CNRL naphtha at ∼0.2 wt% (∼2000 mg L(-1)) and incubated under methanogenic conditions for ∼1600 d. Microbial communities in both MFTs started metabolizing naphtha after a lag phase of ∼100 d. Complete biodegradation/biotransformation of all n-alkanes (except partial biodegradation of n-octane in CNRL MFT) followed by major iso-alkanes (2-methylpentane, 3-methylhexane, 2- and 4-methylheptane, iso-nonanes and 2-methylnonane) and a few cycloalkanes (derivatives of cyclopentane and cyclohexane) was observed during the incubation. 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing showed dominance of Peptococcaceae and Anaerolineaceae in Albian MFT and Anaerolineaceae and Syntrophaceae in CNRL MFT bacterial communities with co-domination of Methanosaetaceae and "Candidatus Methanoregula" in archaeal populations during active biodegradation of hydrocarbons. The findings extend the known range of hydrocarbons susceptible to methanogenic biodegradation in petroleum-impacted anaerobic environments and help refine existing kinetic model to predict greenhouse gas emissions from tailings ponds. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Driver behavior in use of guide and logo signs under distraction and complex roadway conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaber, David; Pankok, Carl; Corbett, Brendan; Ma, Wenqi; Hummer, Joseph; Rasdorf, William

    2015-03-01

    White-on-blue logo signs on the sides of highways are typically used to notify drivers of food, gas, and lodging at an upcoming interchange. The current research assessed driver performance and attention allocation in a simulated freeway driving task when exposed to six-panel logo signs, nine-panel logo signs, mileage guide signs, and roadway work zones both with and without an in-car navigation device. The objective was to identify the impact of signage types on driver behavior under realistic driving conditions. Results revealed glance durations and fixation frequencies to guide signs to be significantly lower than with six-panel and nine-panel logo signs, but no differences were found between six-panel and nine-panel logo signs. There were also statistical differences among the independent variables for speed deviation and lane deviation, but magnitudes were not large enough to be considered practically significant in terms of driving safety. Overall, there were minor differences in sign processing time between logo signs and mileage guide signs, but such differences did not translate to degradations in vehicle control.

  12. Dynamic self-consistent field theory of inhomogeneous complex fluids under shear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihajlovic, Maja Lazar

    Understanding and predicting the interplay between morphology and rheology of sheared, inhomogeneous, complex fluids is of great importance. Yet the modeling of such phenomena is in its infancy. We have developed a novel dynamic self-consistent field (DSCF) theory that makes possible a detailed computational study of such phenomena. Our DSCF theory couples the time evolution of chain conformation statistics with probabilistic transport equations for volume fractions and momenta, based on local conservation laws formulated on a segmental scale. To generate chain conformation statistics, we are using a modification of the lattice random walk formalism of Scheutjens and Fleer. Their static SCF theory is limited to equilibrium systems, since probability distributions are obtained by free energy minimization, assuming isotropic Gaussian chain conformations. In contrast, our DSCF approach accounts for explicit time evolution of the segmental and (anisotropic) conditional stepping probabilities used for generating chain conformations. We have applied the DSCF model to a variety of isothermal inhomogenous fluids containing homopolymers, block copolymers and colloidal particles. In all the simulations, the system is equilibrated before the onset of a steady shear at the walls. Our results suggest that, on short time scales, the velocity evolution resembles shock wave propagation. In the course of time, the amplitude of the shock waves is viscously damped, giving rise to a Couette-like steady state velocity profile. This is also reflected in the temporal evolution of the tensor of the second moment of the end-to-end vector and the dissipative stress tensor. The two- and three-component polymer blends (with a diblock copolymer as the third component) exhibit the interfacial velocity and viscosity slip. The addition of a diblock copolymer suppresses the velocity, and therefore the viscosity slip. Colloidal particles suspended in a simple fluid exhibit layering near the walls

  13. Effect of dye-metal complexation on photocatalytic decomposition of the dyes on TiO2 under visible irradiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MAHMOOD Tariq; CHEN Chuncheng; LIU Lili; ZHAO Dan; MA Wanghong; LIN Jun; ZHAO Jincai

    2009-01-01

    The photocatalytic degradation of dyes (Acid Chrome Blue K (ACBK) and Alizarin Red (AR)) with strong complexation ability was investigated in the presence of metal ions under visible light irradiation.It was found that, at low dye-metal ratio, the photodegradation of ACBK was markedly inhibited by the addition of high oxidative potential Cu2+.However, at high dye-metal ratio, the presence of Cu2+ enhanced the photodegradation of ACBK.The negtive effect of Cu2+ on the photodegradation of AR was observed for all dye-metal ratios.The relative chemical inert Zn2+ tended to enhance the photodegradation of both anionic dyes.The mechanism underlying the different effect of Cu2+ is discussed from the different roles of surface-adsorbed and dye-coordinated Cu2+ in the photodegradation of dyes.

  14. Reliability and construct validity of factors underlying the emotional intelligence of Iranian EFL teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebrahim Khodadady

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Home Journal Archive V1N3A8Reliability and construct validity of factors underlying the emotional intelligence of Iranian EFL teachers   Ebrahim Khodadady Ferdowsi University of Mashhad Saaber Andargani TabrizFerdowsi University of MashhadInternational Branch, Mashhad, Iran    ABSTRACT The 133-item Emotional Quotient Inventory (EQ-i designed by Bar-On (1997 and translated by Dehshiry (2003 was revised and modified by removing the response validity items, changing reverse indicators into positively worded statements and revising the remaining 117 Persian indicators on the basis of schema theory. It was administered to 669 instructors most of whom were teaching English as a foreign language (EFL in national branches of Iran Language Institute in 15 cities. The application of the Principal Axis Factoring to the data and rotating the extracted factors via Varimax with Kaiser Normalization yielded 15 latent variables (LVs called Humanistic, Self-Satisfying, Self-Confident, Self-Aware, Self-Controlled, Research-Oriented, Content, Sociable, Empathetic, Tolerant, Flexible, Realistic, Independent, Emotional and Happy in this study. Not only did the modified Persian EQ-I proved to be more reliable than its original version, but also its thirteen LVs reached very high and acceptable levels of reliability. With the exception of the last, all the LVs also correlated significantly with each other and thus established the EI as a multifactorial construct whose constituting LVs are closely related to each other. The findings question correlating the so-called competences of EI and offer employing the factorially valid LVs as the best factors to explore the relationship between EI and variables involved in teaching and learning EFL.

  15. Factors Affecting the Biomass and Lipid Production from Chlorella sp. TISTR 8990 under Mixotrophic Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ariful HAQUE

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Effects of media compositions on biomass and lipid accumulation of the isolate Chlorella sp. TISTR 8990 were investigated under a Plackett-Burman experimental design with mixotrophic cultivation conditions. Under this experimental design there were 15 different runs with ten factors-yeast extract, KH2PO4, MgSO4, FeSO4, MnCl2, CuSO4, Na2MoO4, H3BO3, ZnSO4 and pH. Cultures were grown mixotrophically under 16 h light and 8 h dark regime at 30 ºC for a period of 7 days. During the light regime, the light intensity at the surface of the vessels and agitation speed were set to 67.5 µmol photons m-2s-1 and 150 rpm, respectively. Initial cell concentration was set to an absorbance (A540 of 0.5. For high biomass production (2.2 g/L, run no. 6, the most effective and significant factors were yeast extract, KH2PO4, FeSO4 and ZnSO4 at concentrations 0.3 g/L, 0.3 g/L, 3 mg/L and 0.3 mg/L, respectively. Whereas for high lipid accumulation (19.59 %DCW, run no. 2, these were KH2PO4, pH and yeast extract, at a level of 1.7 g/L, 6.0 and 0.1 g/L, respectively. No significant factors were obtained for higher lipid content. The best treatment for biomass and lipid content was run no. 6, whose medium formula consisted of 0.3 g/L yeast extract, 1.7 g/L KH2PO4, 1.7 g/L MgSO4, 1 mg/L FeSO4, 0.9 mg/L MnCl2, and pH 7.0, together with fixed concentrations of glucose, NaHCO3 and KNO3 at 5 g/L, 0.05 g/L and 0.5 g/L, respectively.

  16. Molecular Processes Underlying the Structure and Assembly of Thin Films and Nanoparticles at Complex interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richmond, Geraldine [Univ. of Oregon, Eugene, OR (United States)

    2016-06-03

    Since 1995 we have pursued a number of different studies that are quite diverse in nature but with the common theme of using novel laser based methods to study important processes at buried interfaces. Studies of Corrosion, Passivation on n-GaAs(100)Methanol Photoelectrochemical Cell In these studies we have used picosecond photoluminescence and electrochemical studies to understand the GaAs/methanol interface. In our most extensive set of studies we conducted photo-illumination and XPS experiments to understand the chemistry occurring in the GaAs/methanol photoelectrochemical during photoexcitation. An important distinction between photocorrosion and photoetching of GaAs is elucidated by these studies. The dependence of GaAs photocorrosion on light intensity has been explored to better understand intrinsic differences between the lamplight studies and the picosecond photoluminescence studies. The effect of coating the GaAs with a sulfide layer prior to immersion in the cell has also been explored. This last result has led us to examine n-GaAs as a function of crystallographic orientation after exposure to aqueous Na2S containing solutions has been studied as a function of crystallographic orientation of the GaAs surface. The (100) and (110) surfaces are relatively similar, with significant amounts of As-S species present at the interface. The (111)B surface lacks this constituent, but shows significant amounts of metallic As. The XPS results have been correlated with the results of previous photocorrosion and passivation studies conducted in a photoelectrochemical cell. The studies indicate that the metallic As present at (111)B surface contributes strongly to the large surface recombination velocity found there, and to the inability of Na2S to passivate the (111)B surface. SAMS Under Water: Water Molecular Structure and Bonding at Hydrophobic Surfaces In these DOE sponsored studies we have been interested in learning the similarities and

  17. Tumour promotion by complex mixtures of polyhalogeneted aromatic hydrocarbons (PHAHs) an the applicability of the toxic equivalency factor (TEF) concept

    OpenAIRE

    Plas, van der, H.C.

    2000-01-01

    The aim of the project described in this thesis consisted of two main objectives, first, to examine the tumour promotion potential of complex, environmentally relevant mixtures of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polychlorinated dibenzo- p -dioxins (PCDDs) and polychlorinated dibenzo- p -furans (PCDFs) and secondly, to evaluate the applicability of the Toxic Equivalency Factor (TEF) concept for the tumour promotion potential of complex mixtures of PCBs, PCDDs and PCDFs. In addition, the effe...

  18. Polycomb complex 2 is required for E-cadherin repression by the Snail1 transcription factor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herranz, Nicolás; Pasini, Diego; Díaz, Víctor M

    2008-01-01

    The transcriptional factor Snail1 is a repressor of E-cadherin gene (CDH1) expression essential for triggering epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Snail1 represses CDH1 directly binding its promoter and inducing the synthesis of Zeb1 repressor. In this article we show that repression of CDH1...... by Snail1, but not by Zeb1, is dependent on the activity of the Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2). ES cells null for Suz12, one of the components of PRC2, show higher levels of Cdh1 mRNA than control ES cells. In tumour cells, interference of PRC2 activity prevents the ability of Snail1 to down......-regulate CDH1 and partially de-represses CDH1. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that Snail1 increases the binding of Suz12 to CDH1 promoter and the tri-methylation of lysine 27 in the histone 3. Moreover, Snail1 interacts with Suz12 and Ezh2 as shown by coimmunoprecipitation experiments...

  19. The Complex Role of the ZNF224 Transcription Factor in Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesaro, E; Sodaro, G; Montano, G; Grosso, M; Lupo, A; Costanzo, P

    2017-01-01

    ZNF224 is a member of the Kruppel-associated box zinc finger proteins (KRAB-ZFPs) family. It was originally identified as a transcriptional repressor involved in gene-specific silencing through the recruitment of the corepressor KAP1, chromatin-modifying activities, and the arginine methyltransferase PRMT5 on the promoter of its target genes. Recent findings indicate that ZNF224 can behave both as a tumor suppressor or an oncogene in different human cancers. The transcriptional regulatory properties of ZNF224 in these systems appear to be complex and influenced by specific sets of interactors. ZNF224 can also act as a transcription cofactor for other DNA-binding proteins. A role for ZNF224 in transcriptional activation has also emerged. Here, we review the state of the literature supporting both roles of ZNF224 in cancer. We also examine the functional activity of ZNF224 as a transcription factor and the influence of protein partners on its dual behavior. Increasing information on the mechanism through which ZNF224 can operate could lead to the identification of agents capable of modulating ZNF224 function, thus potentially paving the way to new therapeutic strategies for treatment of cancer.

  20. Isolation and Identification of Transforming Growth Factor β from In Vitro Matured Cumulus Oocyte Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AULANI’AM

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β is a two-chain polypeptide with molecular weight of 25 kDa which takes significant role in the steroidogenesis process. In the ovarian oocyte in particular, TGF-β has an important role in regulating reproductive function. TGF-β represents a key intrafollicular protein that regulates follicle development and aromatization process. The purpose of this research was to characterize and identify a protein fraction of TGF-β from the bovine isolated oocytes, which is synthesized during in vitro oocyte maturation process. Oocytes were collected from follicles with diameter of 3-8 mm. Oocytes were then matured in TCM 199 media supplemented with 5 μg/mg LH, 3% BSA, and 50 μg/ml gentamicin sulfate, and cultured in CO2 incubator (5%, 38.5 oC for 20 hours. TGF-β receptors were identified immunohistochemically. Characteristics of the TGF-β protein were determined using SDS PAGE and TGF-β specification was tested using Western Blotting. The results showed that TGF-β receptors were identified and found in cumulus oocyte complexes (COCs. TGF-β protein was isolated from bovine oocytes with molecular weight 25 kDa and it was identified by Western blotting methods in the same molecular weight.

  1. Detection of Factor XI Deficiency (FXID and Complex Vertebral Malformation (CVM in Bali Cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. W. Siswanti

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Factor XI Deficiency (FXID is caused by imperfect insertion of poly adenine which is resulted in introduction of premature stop codon in FXI gene. Substitution of guanine into thymine in SLC35A3 gene caused Complex Vertebral Malformation (CVM. The research was aimed to detect the presence or absence of a genetic defect mainly CVM using SLC35A3 gene and FXID using FXI gene in Indonesian Bali cattle. The presence of this genetic defect may have a significant economic impact on the breeding program. The research of genetic defect was done mostly in dairy cattle, but there was no report for screening of genetic defect in Bali cattle. In this study, 303 fresh blood samples and 22 semen samples which were collected from Indonesian Bali cattle breeding center (BPTU HMT Denpasar, BPT HMT Serading West Nusa Tenggara and district Barru South Sulawesi and artificial insemination centre (BBIB Singosari and BIBD Baturiti were used for screening of FXID and CVM. The amplicons of FXI gene were obtained by using PCR and that for SLC35A3 gene were obtained by using PCR-RFLP method with PstI restriction enzyme. These PCR products were analyzed by using 2% agarose gels electrophoresis. All genotypes were confirmed by DNA sequencing to determine an allele mutant. The allele mutant was not found in all of the samples. The result of this study showed that CVM and FXID were not detected in Bali cattle from Indonesian Bali cattle breeding and artificial insemination centres.

  2. Movement Complexity and Neuromechanical Factors Affect the Entropic Half-Life of Myoelectric Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma F. Hodson-Tole

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Appropriate neuromuscular functioning is essential for survival and features underpinning motor control are present in myoelectric signals recorded from skeletal muscles. One approach to quantify control processes related to function is to assess signal variability using measures such as Sample Entropy. Here we developed a theoretical framework to simulate the effect of variability in burst duration, activation duty cycle, and intensity on the Entropic Half-Life (EnHL in myoelectric signals. EnHLs were predicted to be <40 ms, and to vary with fluctuations in myoelectric signal amplitude and activation duty cycle. Comparison with myoelectic data from rats walking and running at a range of speeds and inclines confirmed the range of EnHLs, however, the direction of EnHL change in response to altered locomotor demand was not correctly predicted. The discrepancy reflected different associations between the ratio of the standard deviation and mean signal intensity (Ist:It¯ and duty factor in simulated and physiological data, likely reflecting additional information in the signals from the physiological data (e.g., quiescent phase content; variation in action potential shapes. EnHL could have significant value as a novel marker of neuromuscular responses to alterations in perceived locomotor task complexity and intensity.

  3. The Application of Modern Training Complexes for Persons with Risk Factors for Cardio-Vascular Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anatoly T. Bykov

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The study featured 236 males and 33 females with risk factors for cardio-vascular disorders, who underwent a 3-week-long sanatorium-resort treatment. The patients were divided into two groups: the primary group (n = 194 and the comparison group (n = 75. The comparison group patients received traditional treatment (diet, physiotherapy, climate-, phyto-, and balneotherapy. The primary group patients were prescribed an optimized therapeutic complex that included, in addition to traditional therapy, the application of the “Kardiomed” training system. All the patients, on admission to and before discharge from the sanatorium, had the anthropometric and hemodynamic parameters controlled and the indicators of lipid and carbohydrate metabolism examined. As a result of the therapy, the primary group patients demonstrated a considerable improvement in all the indicators: a 6% decrease in abdominal adiposity, a 7.5% decrease in average daily systolic arterial blood pressure, a 24.2% decrease in the atherogenic index, and a 16.4% decrease in glycated hemoglobin. In the comparison group patients, the above indicators improved to a lesser degree.

  4. An approach to detecting abnormal vehicle events in complex factors over highway surveillance video

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The detection of abnormal vehicle events is a research hotspot in the analysis of highway surveillance video.Because of the complex factors,which include different conditions of weather,illumination,noise and so on,vehicle’s feature extraction and abnormity detection become difficult.This paper proposes a Fast Constrained Delaunay Triangulation(FCDT) algorithm to replace complicated segmentation algorithms for multi-feature extraction.Based on the video frames segmented by FCDT,an improved algorithm is presented to estimate background self-adaptively.After the estimation,a multi-feature eigenvector is generated by Principal Component Analysis(PCA) in accordance with the static and motional features extracted through locating and tracking each vehicle.For abnormity detection,adaptive detection modeling of vehicle events(ADMVE) is presented,for which a semi-supervised Mixture of Gaussian Hidden Markov Model(MGHMM) is trained with the multi-feature eigenvectors from each video segment.The normal model is developed by supervised mode with manual labeling,and becomes more accurate via iterated adaptation.The abnormal models are trained through the adapted Bayesian learning with unsupervised mode.The paper also presents experiments using real video sequence to verify the proposed method.

  5. The E2F-DP1 Transcription Factor Complex Regulates Centriole Duplication in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jacqueline G; Liu, Yan; Williams, Christopher W; Smith, Harold E; O'Connell, Kevin F

    2016-01-15

    Centrioles play critical roles in the organization of microtubule-based structures, from the mitotic spindle to cilia and flagella. In order to properly execute their various functions, centrioles are subjected to stringent copy number control. Central to this control mechanism is a precise duplication event that takes place during S phase of the cell cycle and involves the assembly of a single daughter centriole in association with each mother centriole . Recent studies have revealed that posttranslational control of the master regulator Plk4/ZYG-1 kinase and its downstream effector SAS-6 is key to ensuring production of a single daughter centriole. In contrast, relatively little is known about how centriole duplication is regulated at a transcriptional level. Here we show that the transcription factor complex EFL-1-DPL-1 both positively and negatively controls centriole duplication in the Caenorhabditis elegans embryo. Specifically, we find that down regulation of EFL-1-DPL-1 can restore centriole duplication in a zyg-1 hypomorphic mutant and that suppression of the zyg-1 mutant phenotype is accompanied by an increase in SAS-6 protein levels. Further, we find evidence that EFL-1-DPL-1 promotes the transcription of zyg-1 and other centriole duplication genes. Our results provide evidence that in a single tissue type, EFL-1-DPL-1 sets the balance between positive and negative regulators of centriole assembly and thus may be part of a homeostatic mechanism that governs centriole assembly.

  6. Factors controlling spatial distribution patterns of biocrusts in a heterogeneous and topographically complex semiarid area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamizo, Sonia; Rodríguez-Caballero, Emilio; Roncero, Beatriz; Raúl Román, José; Cantón, Yolanda

    2016-04-01

    Biocrusts are widespread soil components in drylands all over the world. They are known to play key roles in the functioning of these regions by fixing carbon and nitrogen, regulating hydrological processes, and preventing from water and wind erosion, thus reducing the loss of soil resources and increasing soil fertility. The rate and magnitude of services provided by biocrusts greatly depend on their composition and developmental stage. Late-successional biocrusts such as lichens and mosses have higher carbon and nitrogen fixation rates, and confer greater protection against erosion and the loss of sediments and nutrients than early-successional algae and cyanobacteria biocrusts. Knowledge of spatial distribution patterns of different biocrust types and the factors that control their distribution is important to assess ecosystem services provided by biocrusts at large spatial scales and to improve modelling of biogeochemical processes and water and carbon balance in drylands. Some of the factors that condition biocrust cover and composition are incoming solar radiation, terrain attributes, vegetation distribution patterns, microclimatic variables and soil properties such as soil pH, texture, soil organic matter, soil nutrients and gypsum and CaCO3 content. However, the factors that govern biocrust distribution may vary from one site to another depending on site characteristics. In this study, we examined the influence of abiotic attributes on the spatial distribution of biocrust types in a complex heterogeneous badland system (Tabernas, SE Spain) where biocrust cover up to 50% of the soil surface. From the analysis of relationships between terrain attributes and proportional abundance of biocrust types, it was found that topography exerted a main control on the spatial distribution of biocrust types in this area. SW-facing slopes were dominated by physical soil crusts and were practically devoid of vegetation and biocrusts. Biocrusts mainly occupied the pediments

  7. Clinical factors associated with invasive testing and imaging in patients with complex febrile seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Deborah A; Sturm, Jesse J

    2013-04-01

    Complex febrile seizures (CFSs) are a common diagnosis in the pediatric emergency department (PED). Although multiple studies have shown a low likelihood of intracranial infections and abnormal neuroimaging findings among those who present with CFS, the absence of a consensus recommendation and the diversity of CFS presentations (ie, multiple seizures, prolonged seizure, focal seizure) often drive physicians to do a more extensive workup than needed. Few studies examine the factors that influence providers to pursue invasive testing and emergent neuroimaging. The objective of this study was to determine the clinical factors associated with a more extensive workup in a cohort of patients who present to the PED with CFSs. Patient visits to a tertiary care PED with an International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, diagnosis of CFS were reviewed from April 2009 to November 2011. Patients included were 6 months to 6 years of age. Complex febrile seizures were defined as febrile seizures lasting 15 minutes or longer, more than 1 seizure in 24 hours, and/or a focal seizure. Charts were reviewed for demographics, clinical parameters (duration of fever, history of febrile seizure, focality of seizure, antibiotic use before PED, and immunization status), PED management (antiepileptic drugs given in the PED or by Emergency Medical Services, empiric antibiotics given in the PED, laboratory testing, lumbar puncture, or computed tomography [CT] scan), and results (cultures, laboratories, or imaging). A logistic regression model was created to determine which clinical parameters were associated with diagnostic testing. One hundred ninety patients were diagnosed with CFS and met study criteria. Clinical management in the PED included a lumbar puncture in 37%, blood cultures in 88%, urine cultures in 47%, and a head CT scan in 28%. There were no positive cerebral spinal fluid or blood cultures in this cohort. Of the 90 patients, 4 (4.4%) with urine cultures had a urinary

  8. Factors that lessen the burden of treatment in complex patients with chronic conditions: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ridgeway JL

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Jennifer L Ridgeway,1,2 Jason S Egginton,1,2 Kristina Tiedje,3 Mark Linzer,4,5 Deborah Boehm,4 Sara Poplau,6 Djenane Ramalho de Oliveira,7 Laura Odell,8 Victor M Montori,2,9 David T Eton1,2 1The Mayo Clinic Robert D. and Patricia E. Kern Center for the Science of Health Care Delivery, 2Division of Health Care Policy and Research, Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA; 3Department of Anthropology, Université Lumière Lyon 2, Lyon, France; 4Division of General Internal Medicine, Hennepin County Medical Center, 5University of Minnesota Medical School, 6Minneapolis Medical Research Foundation, Minneapolis, MN, USA; 7Department of Social Pharmacy, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Brazil; 8Pharmacy Services, 9Knowledge and Evaluation Research Unit, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA Purpose: Patients with multiple chronic conditions (multimorbidity often require ongoing treatment and complex self-care. This workload and its impact on patient functioning and well-being are, together, known as treatment burden. This study reports on factors that patients with multimorbidity draw on to lessen perceptions of treatment burden. Patients and methods: Interviews (n=50 and focus groups (n=4 groups, five to eight participants per group were conducted with patients receiving care in a large academic medical center or an urban safety-net hospital. Interview data were analyzed using qualitative framework analysis methods, and themes and subthemes were used to identify factors that mitigate burden. Focus groups were held to confirm these findings and clarify any new issues. This study was part of a larger program to develop a patient-reported measure of treatment burden. Results: Five major themes emerged from the interview data. These included: 1 problem-focused strategies, like routinizing self-care, enlisting support of others, planning for the future, and using technology; 2 emotion-focused coping strategies, like

  9. Evaluation of Stress Intensity Factors for Multiple Cracked Circular Disks Under Crack Surface Tractions with SBFEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jun-yu; LIN Gao; LI Xiao-chuan; XU Feng-lin

    2013-01-01

    Stress intensity factors (SIFs) for the cracked circular disks under different distributing surface tractions are evaluated with the scaled boundary finite element method (SBFEM).In the SBFEM,the analytical advantage of the solution in the radial direction allows SIFs to be directly determined from its definition,therefore no special crack-tip treatment is necessary.Furthermore anisotropic material behavior can be treated easily.Different distributions of surface tractions are considered for the center and double-edge-cracked disks.The benchmark examples are modeled and an excellent agreement between the results in the present study and those in published literature is found.It shows that SBFEM is effective and possesses high accuracy.The SIFs of the cracked orthotropic material circular disks subjected to different surface tractions are also evaluated.The technique of substructure is applied to handle the multiple cracks problem.

  10. [Shifts in metabolism and its regulation under the effect of spaceflight factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larina, I M; Nichiporuk, I A; Veselova, O M; Vasilieva, G Yu; Popova, I A

    2013-01-01

    The review deals with the results of studying the adaptive changes in metabolism and its neuroendocrine regulation in humans and animals under the effect of spaceflight factors and ground-based simulation of the gravitational unloading. The majority of the investigations were concerned with the water-electrolyte and mineral turnover, as well as protein, lipid and carbohydrates metabolism. Biochemical measurements of the body liquids (blood, urine and saliva) before, in and after space flight or in ground simulation experiments were used as indictors of the status of sympathoadrenal, hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal and other systems involved in systemic regulation of metabolism, and also strength of stress-reaction to adversities. The authors generalized data on the interrelation and interaction of the neuroendocrine and psychophysiological status both in the real and simulated conditions of space flight.

  11. Change ΔS of the entropy in natural time under time reversal: Complexity measures upon change of scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarlis, N. V.; Christopoulos, S.-R. G.; Bemplidaki, M. M.

    2015-01-01

    The entropy S in natural time as well as the entropy in natural time under time reversal S- have already found useful applications in the physics of complex systems, e.g., in the analysis of electrocardiograms (ECGs). Here, we focus on the complexity measures Λl which result upon considering how the statistics of the time series Δ S≤ft[\\equiv S- S-\\right] changes upon varying the scale l. These scale-specific measures are ratios of the standard deviations σ(Δ S_l) and hence independent of the mean value and the standard deviation of the data. They focus on the different dynamics that appear on different scales. For this reason, they can be considered complementary to other standard measures of heart rate variability in ECG, like SDNN, as well as other complexity measures already defined in natural time. An application to the analysis of ECG —when solely using NN intervals— is presented: We show how Λl can be used to separate ECG of healthy individuals from those suffering from congestive heart failure and sudden cardiac death.

  12. In-frame and inter-frame information based infrared moving small target detection under complex cloud backgrounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Minjie; Gu, Guohua; Cao, Ercong; Hu, Xiaobo; Qian, Weixian; Ren, Kan

    2016-05-01

    Infrared moving small target detection under complex cloud backgrounds is one of the key techniques of infrared search and track (IRST) systems. This paper proposes a novel method based on in-frame inter-frame information to detect infrared moving small targets accurately. For a single frame, in the spatial domain, a directional max-median filter is developed to make a pre-processing and a background suppression filtering template is utilized on the denoised image to highlight target. Then, targets in cloud regions and non-cloud regions are extracted by different thresholds according to a cloud discrimination method so that a spatial domain map (SDM) is acquired. In the frequency domain, we design an α-DoB band-pass filter to conduct coarse saliency detection and make an amplitude transformation with smoothing processing which is the so-called elaborate saliency detection. Furthermore, a frequency domain map (FDM) is acquired by an adaptive binary segmentation method. Lastly, candidate targets in single frame are extracted by a discrimination based on intensity and spatial distance criteria. For consecutive frames, a false alarm suppression is conducted on account of differences of motion features between moving target and false alarms to improve detection accuracy again. Large numbers of experiments demonstrate that the proposed method has satisfying detection effectiveness and robustness for infrared moving small target detection under complex cloud backgrounds.

  13. Effect of a multienzyme complex in wheat-soybean meal diet on digestibility of broiler chickens under different rearing conditions

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    Fuensanta Hernández

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the effects of a multienzyme complex containing protease and carbohydrase enzymes on the performance and nutrient digestibility of broiler chickens under different rearing conditions from 1 to 42 d of age. Two experimental starter and finisher wheat-soybean meal based diets were used in a two-phase feeding programme, as follows: control diet (C; control diet plus 0.05% multienzyme complex of protease and carbohydrase enzymes (Allzyme Vegpro (VP. At location 1, broilers were raised in battery cages located in an experimental pen, without contact with litter. At location 2, broilers were raised in floor pens built in a commercial farm, and had contact with litter. At location 3, broilers were raised in commercial farms. In general, no differences in growth performance, feed intake or feed conversion ratio were observed in broiler chickens fed on the different diets at location 1. Only, the average daily feed intake from 22 to 42 d was significantly higher in the VP group compared with the C treatment (P<0.01. In addition, the final body weight of the VP group was numerically greater than that of the birds fed with the control diet, although the inclusion of the multienzyme complex did not cause significant effects. However, the ileal digestibilities of dry matter and crude protein were enhanced (P<0.05 by VP in the case of broilers in floor pens (+2.5% and +2.7% for DM and CP, respectively and in the commercial farm (+4.4% and +6% for the DM and CP, respectively at 42 d of age, as well as faecal digestibity of the VP diet in experimental pen. It seemed that the effectiveness of the multienzyme complex on digestibility was higher when conditions of hygiene were poorer and stress was frequent. Based on the results of this study it can be concluded that the multienzyme complex of protease and carbohydrase enzymes might be effective for improving nutrient digestibility in broilers fed with a wheat-soybean meal based diet under

  14. Specifics of heat and mass transfer in spherical dimples under the effect of external factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shchukin, A. V.; Il'inkov, A. V.; Takmovtsev, V. V.; Khabibullin, I. I.

    2017-06-01

    The specifics are examined of heat transfer enhancement with spherical dimples under the effect of factors important for practice and characteristic of cooling systems of gas-turbine engines and power units. This experimental investigation deals with the effect of the following factors on the flow in a channel with hemispherical dimples: continuous air swirl in an annulus with dimples on its concave wall, dimples on the convex or concave wall of a curved rectangular channel, imposition of regular velocity fluctuations on the external flow in a straight rectangular channel, and adverse or favorable pressure gradient along the flow direction. The flow is turbulent. Reynolds numbers based on the channel hydraulic diameter are on the order of 104. Results of the investigation of a model of a two-cavity diffuser dimple proposed by the authors are presented. It has been found that results for channels with spherical dimples and for smooth channels differ not only quantitatively but also qualitatively. Thus, if the effect of centrifugal mass forces on convex and concave surfaces with hemispherical dimples and in a smooth channel is almost the same (quantitative and qualitative indicators are identical), the pressure gradient in the flow direction brings about the drastically opposite results. At the same time, the quantitative contribution to a change in heat transfer in hemispherical dimples is different and depends on the impact type. The results are discussed with the use of physical models created on the basis of the results of flow visualization studies and data on the turbulence intensity, pressure coefficient, etc. Results of the investigations suggest that application of spherical dimples under nonstandard conditions requires the calculated heat transfer to be corrected to account for one or another effect.

  15. Nucleation promoting factors regulate the expression and localization of Arp2/3 complex during meiosis of mouse oocytes.

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    Jun Liu

    Full Text Available The actin nucleation factor Arp2/3 complex is a main regulator of actin assembly and is involved in multiple processes like cell migration and adhesion, endocytosis, and the establishment of cell polarity in mitosis. Our previous work showed that the Arp2/3 complex was involved in the actin-mediated mammalian oocyte asymmetric division. However, the regulatory mechanisms and signaling pathway of Arp2/3 complex in meiosis is still unclear. In the present work, we identified that the nucleation promoting factors (NPFs JMY and WAVE2 were necessary for the expression and localization of Arp2/3 complex in mouse oocytes. RNAi of both caused the degradation of actin cap intensity, indicating the roles of NPFs in the formation of actin cap. Moreover, JMY and WAVE2 RNAi decreased the expression of ARP2, a key component of Arp2/3 complex. However, knock down of Arp2/3 complex by Arpc2 and Arpc3 siRNA microinjection did not affect the expression and localization of JMY and WAVE2. Our results indicate that the NPFs, JMY and WAVE2, are upstream regulators of Arp2/3 complex in mammalian oocyte asymmetric division.

  16. Epidemiological characteristics and underlying risk factors for mortality during the autumn 2009 pandemic wave in Mexico.

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    Gerardo Chowell

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Elucidating the role of the underlying risk factors for severe outcomes of the 2009 A/H1N1 influenza pandemic could be crucial to define priority risk groups in resource-limited settings in future pandemics. METHODS: We use individual-level clinical data on a large series of ARI (acute respiratory infection hospitalizations from a prospective surveillance system of the Mexican Social Security medical system to analyze clinical features at presentation, admission delays, selected comorbidities and receipt of seasonal vaccine on the risk of A/H1N1-related death. We considered ARI hospitalizations and inpatient-deaths, and recorded demographic, geographic, and medical information on individual patients during August-December, 2009. RESULTS: Seasonal influenza vaccination was associated with a reduced risk of death among A/H1N1 inpatients (OR = 0.43 (95% CI: 0.25, 0.74 after adjustment for age, gender, geography, antiviral treatment, admission delays, comorbidities and medical conditions. However, this result should be interpreted with caution as it could have been affected by factors not directly measured in our study. Moreover, the effect of antiviral treatment against A/H1N1 inpatient death did not reach statistical significance (OR = 0.56 (95% CI: 0.29, 1.10 probably because only 8.9% of A/H1N1 inpatients received antiviral treatment. Moreover, diabetes (OR = 1.6 and immune suppression (OR = 2.3 were statistically significant risk factors for death whereas asthmatic persons (OR = 0.3 or pregnant women (OR = 0.4 experienced a reduced fatality rate among A/H1N1 inpatients. We also observed an increased risk of death among A/H1N1 inpatients with admission delays >2 days after symptom onset (OR = 2.7. Similar associations were also observed for A/H1N1-negative inpatients. CONCLUSIONS: Geographical variation in identified medical risk factors including prevalence of diabetes and immune suppression may in part

  17. CONCENTRATION OF CIRCULATING IMMUNE COMPLEXES IN EXPERIMENTAL GENERALIZED INFLAMMATORY PROCESS IN ANIMALS OF DIFFERENT AGE UNDER ACTION OF IMMUNOMODULATORS

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    Kovalenko T.I.

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Under physiological conditions a formation and a presence of the CEC in liquids is one of the manifestations of the immune response to receipt of antigens and an important factor, which provides immunity. Circulating immune complexes act as agents involved in the regulation of immune response and maintaining communication between the immune system and other regulatory systems of the body and direction to his defense. The intensity of the formation of the CEC may vary under the influence of infectious antigens and immune preparations. Material and methods. Material for the experiment were white male rats 3 months of age ("young" weighing 100 -140gr. (n = 40 and 22-month ("old" weighing 200 -240 g. (n = 40. And the first (n=10 and second (n=10 groups of rats served as controls. Third (n=15 and fourth (n=15 group of animals was injected intraperitoneal daily agar culture of Pseudomonas aeruginosa № 27835 ATCC (injected with 1.5 ml suspension of bacteria, which contained 109 CFU/ml. Fifth (n=15 and sixth (n=15 groups of animals were injected intraperitoneally daily agar culture of Escherichia coli number 25592, ATCC (injected with 1.5 ml of bacteria suspension which contain 109 CFU/ml. Control animals were taken from the experiment by decapitation 3rd day – n=20. Control and infected animals were taken from the experiment by decapitation at 3rd day - n=27, 5th day – n=27 and 7th day – n=26. In the second phase of the experiment Ia (n = 6 and IIa (n = 6 were the control group of rats following administration of the experimental composite preparation consisting amino acids, nucleotides, enzymes, vitamins (MF. In two age groups of animals with inflammation induced by E. coli suspension treated with MF 20 mсl 3- month rats (IIIa group n = 6 and 40 mсl 22-month rats (IVa group n = 6. Ib (n = 6 and IIb (n = 6 were the control group of rats after the injection of comparison, containing mannitol and natural antioxidant betakaroten (PO. In two age

  18. Association between maternal socioeconomic factors and nutritional outcomes in children under 5 years of age,

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    Tatiane Géa-Horta

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To estimate the association between maternal socioeconomic factors and the occurrence of nutritional outcomes in children under five years of age in a representative sample of the Brazilian population. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study that evaluated data from the latest National Survey of Children and Women's Demographics and Health, carried out in Brazil in 2006-2007. Maternal employment and maternal level of schooling were the main exposures. The following nutritional outcomes in children were considered: height/age 2SD for overweight. Generalized estimating equations (GEE were utilized as the regression method. Results: After adjustments, it was observed that children whose mothers had low level of schooling had a higher chance of having short stature (OR = 3.97, 95% CI, 1.23-12.80 and children whose mothers worked outside the home were more likely to have excess weight (OR = 1.57, 95% CI, 1.02-2.42. Maternal employment was not associated with short stature in children (OR = 1.09, 95% CI, 0.67-1.77. Conclusion: Maternal level of schooling was associated with short stature in children and maternal employment with overweight, indicating the need to take into account the socioeconomic factors when proposing programs and strategies aimed at health and nutrition improvement of children, considering inter-sectoral interventions.

  19. Hygiene and sanitation risk factors of diarrhoeal disease among under-five children in Ibadan, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oloruntoba, Elizabeth Omoladun; Folarin, Taiwo Bukola; Ayede, Adejumoke Idowu

    2014-12-01

    Diarrhoea diseases are among the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in under-five-children (U-5C) in Nigeria. Inadequate safe water, sanitation, and hygiene account for the disease burden. Cases of diarrhoea still occur in high proportion in the study area despite government-oriented interventions. To determine the hygiene and sanitation risk factors predisposing U-5C to diarrhoea in Ibadan, Nigeria. Two hundred and twenty pairs of children, matched on age, were recruited as cases and controls over a period of 5 months in Ibadan. Questionnaire and observation checklist were used to obtain information on hygiene practices from caregivers/mothers and sanitation conditions in the households of 30% of the consenting mothers/caregivers. Data were analysed using descriptive and inferential statistics. Caregivers/mothers' mean ages were 31.3 ±7.5 (cases) and 30.6 ±6.0(controls) years. The risk of diarrhoea was significantly higher among children whose mothers did not wash hands with soap before food preparation (OR=3.0, pHygiene and sanitation conditions within households were risk factors for diarrhoea. This study revealed the feasibility of developing and implementing an adequate model to establish intervention priorities in sanitation in Ibadan, Nigeria.

  20. Factors affecting potassium fixation in seven soils under 15-year long-term fertilization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG HuiMin; XU MingGang; ZHANG WenJu; HE XinHua

    2009-01-01

    Potassium (K) fixation by seven soils, including black soil, fluvo-aquic soil, grey desert soil, loess soil, paddy soil, red soil and purple soil, was determined by laboratory simulation under a fifteen-year-pe-riod of long-term fertilization. Factors affecting soil K fixation were then discussed by factor analysis and stepwise regression. Magnitude of soil K fixation rate was as follows: the black soil > the purple soil > the loess soil > the fluvo-aquic soil > the paddy soil > the grey desert soil > the red soil. Our re-sulta showed that soil K fixation capacity was significantly affected by the clay mineral types in the soils. Potassium fixation capacity of soils, whose 2:1 layer silicates were dominant minerals, was af-fected by two components extracted by the method of principal component analysis: the first including soil available K, slow available K and K+ saturation, and the second including cation exchange capacity (CEC), soil organic matter (SOM) and <0.002 mm clay contents. Potassium fixation rate was mainly af-fected by K+ saturation and CEC with lower added K concentration (from 0.4 to 1.6 g/L), and by K+ saturation and <0.002 mm clay content with higher added K concentration (from 2.4 to 4.0 g/L).

  1. Horse impoundments under Control of Horses legislation in the Munster region of Ireland: factors affecting euthanasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullinane, M; O'Sullivan, E; Collins, D M; Byrne, A W; More, S J

    2015-01-24

    Recently, considerable international attention has been paid to the problem of unwanted horses. In Ireland, stray horses, particularly in urban areas, are a further problem. The Control of Horses Act 1996 was enacted in response to an ongoing problem of uncontrolled horses in public places. As yet, no research work has been conducted focusing on stray horses in Ireland. This paper describes horses impounded under the Act in the Munster region of Ireland during 2005-2012 and the factors influencing decisions regarding their disposal. A logistic regression model was developed to investigate factors influencing the probability that a horse was euthanised during impoundment. In total, 3625 seizure events were recorded, most towards the end of the study period. Predictors for euthanasia during 2010-2012 included seizure location, sex, age, colour, body condition score and year. This study highlights the problem of stray horses in Ireland, particularly in urban areas. There is a need for rigorous enforcement of newly enacted horse identification legislation, allowing a fully integrated traceability system. More is required to manage the long-established societal problems of stray horses in urban settings, with a uniform approach by all Local Authorities being long overdue.

  2. Apoptosis: an underlying factor for accelerated periodontal disease associated with diabetes in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunalı, Mustafa; Ataoğlu, Tamer; Celik, Ilhami

    2014-09-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is well-established risk factor for periodontal disease. DM can also lead to changes in the number of apoptotic cells in periodontal tissues. The goal of this study was to evaluate apoptosis, depending on DM, in healthy and diseased periodontal soft tissues. A total of 43 adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were used in this study. Experimental periodontitis was created by placing silk ligatures around the cervices of the first mandibular molars. Experimental diabetes was induced by intraperitoneal injection of the diabetogenic agent streptozotocin (STZ). Following the induction of both experimental diseases, the animals were divided into four groups: (1) The healthy group (H) (n = 10); (2) The diabetes group (D) (n = 10); (3) The periodontitis group (P) (n = 11); and (4) The diabetes and periodontitis group (DP) (n = 12). Apoptotic cells were determined by immunohistochemistry, and the frequency of apoptotic cells was evaluated by apoptotic index score. It was observed that there was less apoptosis in both the epithelial and gingival connective tissue cells of healthy diabetic tissues than in healthy tissues without diabetes. When periodontal disease existed, apoptosis increased in both the epithelial and gingival connective tissues of diabetic and non-diabetic animals. There may be differences in the apoptotic mechanisms in the periodontal soft tissues of diabetic and non-diabetic animals. Apoptosis may be one of the underlying factors in increased risk for periodontal disease that is associated with diabetes.

  3. Association between maternal socioeconomic factors and nutritional outcomes in children under 5 years of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Géa-Horta, Tatiane; Felisbino-Mendes, Mariana Santos; Ortiz, Renzo Joel Flores; Velasquez-Melendez, Gustavo

    To estimate the association between maternal socioeconomic factors and the occurrence of nutritional outcomes in children under five years of age in a representative sample of the Brazilian population. This was a cross-sectional study that evaluated data from the latest National Survey of Children and Women's Demographics and Health, carried out in Brazil in 2006-2007. Maternal employment and maternal level of schooling were the main exposures. The following nutritional outcomes in children were considered: height/age 2SD for overweight. Generalized estimating equations (GEE) were utilized as the regression method. After adjustments, it was observed that children whose mothers had low level of schooling had a higher chance of having short stature (OR=3.97, 95% CI, 1.23-12.80) and children whose mothers worked outside the home were more likely to have excess weight (OR=1.57, 95% CI, 1.02-2.42). Maternal employment was not associated with short stature in children (OR=1.09, 95% CI, 0.67-1.77). Maternal level of schooling was associated with short stature in children and maternal employment with overweight, indicating the need to take into account the socioeconomic factors when proposing programs and strategies aimed at health and nutrition improvement of children, considering inter-sectoral interventions. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  4. Characterization of factors underlying the metabolic shifts in developing kernels of colored maize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chaoyang; Li, Quanlin; Shen, Xuefang; Quan, Sheng; Lin, Hong; Duan, Lei; Wang, Yifa; Luo, Qian; Qu, Guorun; Han, Qing; Lu, Yuan; Zhang, Dabing; Yuan, Zheng; Shi, Jianxin

    2016-01-01

    Elucidation of the metabolic pathways determining pigmentation and their underlying regulatory mechanisms in maize kernels is of high importance in attempts to improve the nutritional composition of our food. In this study, we compared dynamics in the transcriptome and metabolome between colored SW93 and white SW48 by integrating RNA-Seq and non-targeted metabolomics. Our data revealed that expression of enzyme coding genes and levels of primary metabolites decreased gradually from 11 to 21 DAP, corresponding well with the physiological change of developing maize kernels from differentiation through reserve accumulation to maturation, which was cultivar independent. A remarkable up-regulation of anthocyanin and phlobaphene pathway distinguished SW93 from SW48, in which anthocyanin regulating transcriptional factors (R1 and C1), enzyme encoding genes involved in both pathways and corresponding metabolic intermediates were up-regulated concurrently in SW93 but not in SW48. The shift from the shikimate pathway of primary metabolism to the flavonoid pathway of secondary metabolism, however, appears to be under posttranscriptional regulation. This study revealed the link between primary metabolism and kernel coloration, which facilitate further study to explore fundamental questions regarding the evolution of seed metabolic capabilities as well as their potential applications in maize improvement regarding both staple and functional foods. PMID:27739524

  5. [Mechanisms underlying physiological functions of food factors via non-specific interactions with biological proteins].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Akira

    2015-01-01

      We previously reported that zerumbone, a sesquiterpene found in Zingiber zerumbet SMITH, showed notable cancer preventive effects in various organs of experimental rodents. This agent up-regulated nuclear factor-E2-related factor (Nrf2)-dependent expressions of anti-oxidative and xenobiotics-metabolizing enzymes, leading to an increased self-defense capacity. On the other hand, zerumbone markedly suppressed the expression of cyclooxygenase-2, an inducible pro-inflammatory enzyme, by disrupting mRNA stabilizing processes. Binding experiments using a biotin derivative of zerumbone demonstrated that Keap1, an Nrf2 repressive protein, is one of its major binding proteins that promotes their dissociation for inducing Nrf2 transactivation. We then generated a specific antibody against zerumbone-modified proteins and found that zerumbone modified numerous cellular proteins in a non-specific manner, with global distribution of the modified proteins seen not only in cytoplasm but also the nucleus. Based on those observations, zerumbone was speculated to cause proteo-stress, a notion supported by previous findings that it increased the C-terminus of Hsc70 interacting protein-dependent protein ubiquitination and also promoted aggresome formation. Interestingly, zerumbone counteracted proteo-stress and heat stress via up-regulation of the protein quality control systems (PQCs), e.g., heat shock proteins (HSPs), ubiquitin-proteasome, and autophagy. Meanwhile, several phytochemicals, including ursolic acid and curcumin, were identified as marked HSP70 inducers, whereas most nutrients tested were scarcely active. Recent studies have revealed that PQCs play important roles in the prevention of many lifestyle related diseases, such as cancer, thus non-specific binding of phytochemicals to cellular proteins may be a novel and unique mechanism underlying their physiological activities.

  6. Factors affecting exposure level for medical staff during orthopedic procedures under fluoroscopic control

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    Maria A. Staniszewska

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Extended control of staff exposure in interventional radiology has been legally required over the last few years. This is determined by a number of factors, including the type of procedure, technical conditions and methodology. In orthopedic procedures fluoroscopy is used to control surgical reconstructions. An influence of particular factors on the registered values of doses received by the members of medical team performing osteosynthesis for limb fractures is presented in this paper. Material and Methods: Doses received by individual interventional team members performing specific functions, operator, assisting physicians and scrub nurse, during a series of the procedures were measured. Each person was equipped with 4 dosimetric tools, containing thermoluminescent dosimeters, to measure the equivalent doses for the eyes, hand skin and the neck (outside the shield and to evaluate effective doses. The investigations were performed in operational theatres of 3 hospitals in Łódź. Results: The equivalent doses per one procedure for the eyes and hand skin of the operator were 0.029–0.073 mSv and 0.366–1.604 mSv, respectively. Significantly higher doses were noted during the procedures of intramedullary osteosynthesis, especially for the operator. An average age and body mass index (BMI of patients treated in the monitored hospitals did not differ statistically. Conclusions: Based on the dosimetric measurements the following conclusions can be drawn: in orthopedic procedures of interventional radiology (IR the exposure of the staff is mostly determined by the type of procedure and more precisely by its complexity and by the optimized use of X-ray unit, including pulsed fluoroscopy. It is also revealed that the operator is the most exposed person in the interventional team. Med Pr 2017;68(1:75–83

  7. Variability of photosynthetic parameters of Pinus sibirica Du Tour needles under changing climatic factors

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    A.P. Zotikova

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The air temperature and relative humidity and the intensity of photosynthetically active radiation are the basic ecological factors determining geographical distribution of a species. Wood plant adaptation depends on the intensity of physiological and biochemicalprocesses of plants as a response to changing environmental factors. Investigations to reveal (detect the variability of modification andgenetic components of the photosynthetic parameters in needles of the Siberian cedar (Pinus sibirica Du Tour mountain ecotypes, distributed in central part of the Altai Mountains, were carried out. Also, the survey was extended to some experiments with these ecotypes introduced to mild climate and flat regions from south-western of Siberia. The length and thickness of needles, the size of chloroplasts, content of the photosynthetic pigments, and the functional activity of chloroplastsat the level of photo system II were the evaluated traits. Growing under mountainous conditions (at about 2000m elevation, the two-year-old needles were shorter and thicker and contained very large in size chloroplasts while the content of chlorophylls and carotinoids was twice lower than that in the local ecotype growing in the lowlands. On the other hand, more green and yellow pigments were found in needles of mountain ecotypes planted in the lowlands compared to the local lowland ectype trees. A decrease in pool of the photosynthetic pigments in the highlands ecotypes is probably due to decreased biosynthesis andincreased photo-destruction caused by severe light and temperature conditions. These parameters are likely to be associated withmodifications due to intense insolation, low temperature, ozone concentration, UV radiation, and other negative factors that are morepronounced at high elevation. Despite the large pool of accumulated photosynthetic pigments, the functional activity of chloroplasts in themountain ecotype at the level

  8. Variability of photosynthetic parameters of Pinus sibirica Du Tour needles under changing climatic factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.P. Zotikova

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The air temperature and relative humidity and the intensity of photosynthetically active radiation are the basic ecological factors determining geographical distribution of a species. Wood plant adaptation depends on the intensity of physiological and biochemicalprocesses of plants as a response to changing environmental factors. Investigations to reveal (detect the variability of modification andgenetic components of the photosynthetic parameters in needles of the Siberian cedar (Pinus sibirica Du Tour mountain ecotypes, distributed in central part of the Altai Mountains, were carried out. Also, the survey was extended to some experiments with these ecotypes introduced to mild climate and flat regions from south-western of Siberia. The length and thickness of needles, the size of chloroplasts, content of the photosynthetic pigments, and the functional activity of chloroplastsat the level of photo system II were the evaluated traits. Growing under mountainous conditions (at about 2000m elevation, the two-year-old needles were shorter and thicker and contained very large in size chloroplasts while the content of chlorophylls and carotinoids was twice lower than that in the local ecotype growing in the lowlands. On the other hand, more green and yellow pigments were found in needles of mountain ecotypes planted in the lowlands compared to the local lowland ectype trees. A decrease in pool of the photosynthetic pigments in the highlands ecotypes is probably due to decreased biosynthesis andincreased photo-destruction caused by severe light and temperature conditions. These parameters are likely to be associated withmodifications due to intense insolation, low temperature, ozone concentration, UV radiation, and other negative factors that are morepronounced at high elevation. Despite the large pool of accumulated photosynthetic pigments, the functional activity of chloroplasts in themountain ecotype at the level

  9. Factors affecting learning of vector math from computer-based practice: Feedback complexity and prior knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heckler, Andrew F.; Mikula, Brendon D.

    2016-06-01

    In experiments including over 450 university-level students, we studied the effectiveness and time efficiency of several levels of feedback complexity in simple, computer-based training utilizing static question sequences. The learning domain was simple vector math, an essential skill in introductory physics. In a unique full factorial design, we studied the relative effects of "knowledge of correct response" feedback and "elaborated feedback" (i.e., a general explanation) both separately and together. A number of other factors were analyzed, including training time, physics course grade, prior knowledge of vector math, and student beliefs about both their proficiency in and the importance of vector math. We hypothesize a simple model predicting how the effectiveness of feedback depends on prior knowledge, and the results confirm this knowledge-by-treatment interaction. Most notably, elaborated feedback is the most effective feedback, especially for students with low prior knowledge and low course grade. In contrast, knowledge of correct response feedback was less effective for low-performing students, and including both kinds of feedback did not significantly improve performance compared to elaborated feedback alone. Further, while elaborated feedback resulted in higher scores, the learning rate was at best only marginally higher because the training time was slightly longer. Training time data revealed that students spent significantly more time on the elaborated feedback after answering a training question incorrectly. Finally, we found that training improved student self-reported proficiency and that belief in the importance of the learned domain improved the effectiveness of training. Overall, we found that computer based training with static question sequences and immediate elaborated feedback in the form of simple and general explanations can be an effective way to improve student performance on a physics essential skill, especially for less prepared and low

  10. Functional diversification of FD transcription factors in rice, components of florigen activation complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Taoka, Ken-ichiro; Shimamoto, Ko

    2013-03-01

    Florigen, a protein encoded by the FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) in Arabidopsis and Heading date 3a (Hd3a) in rice, is the universal flowering hormone in plants. Florigen is transported from leaves to the shoot apical meristem and initiates floral evocation. In shoot apical cells, conserved cytoplasmic 14-3-3 proteins act as florigen receptors. A hexameric florigen activation complex (FAC) composed of Hd3a, 14-3-3 proteins, and OsFD1, a transcription factor, activates OsMADS15, a rice homolog of Arabidopsis APETALA1, leading to flowering. Because FD is a key component of the FAC, we characterized the FD gene family and their functions. Phylogenetic analysis of FD genes indicated that this family is divided into two groups: (i) canonical FD genes that are conserved among eudicots and non-Poaceae monocots; and (ii) Poaceae-specific FD genes that are organized into three subgroups: Poaceae FD1, FD2 and FD3. The Poaceae FD1 group shares a small sequence motif, T(A/V)LSLNS, with FDs of eudicots and non-Poaceae monocots. Overexpression of OsFD2, a member of the Poaceae FD2 group, produced smaller leaves with shorter plastochrons, suggesting that OsFD2 controls leaf development. In vivo subcellular localization of Hd3a, 14-3-3 and OsFD2 suggested that in contrast to OsFD1, OsFD2 is restricted to the cytoplasm through its interaction with the cytoplasmic 14-3-3 proteins, and interaction of Hd3a with 14-3-3 facilitates nuclear translocation of the FAC containing OsFD2. These results suggest that FD function has diverged between OsFD1 and OsFD2, but formation of a FAC is essential for their function.

  11. A numerical analysis of stress intensity factors for cracks emanating from an elliptical hole in a rectangular plate under biaxial loads

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Concerns with stress intensity factors for cracks emanating from an elliptical hole in a rectangular plate under biaxial loads by means of a boundary element method which consists of non-singular displacement discontinuity element presented by Crouch and Starfied[6] and crack-tip displacement discontinuity elements proposed by the author. In the boundary elenent implementation the left or the right crack-tip displacement discontinuity element is placed locally at the corresponding left or right crack tip on top of the constant displacement discontinuity elements that cover the entire crack surface and other boundaries. The present numerical results further illustrate that the present numerical approach is very effective and accurate for calculating stress intensity factors of complex cracks in a finite plate and can reveal the effect of the biaxial load and the cracked body geometry on stress intensity factors.

  12. The impact of vascular endothelial growth factor and basic fibroblast growth factor on cardiac fibroblasts grown under altered gravity conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulbrich, Claudia; Leder, Annekatrin; Pietsch, Jessica

    2010-01-01

    Myocardium is very sensitive to gravitational changes. During a spaceflight cardiovascular atrophy paired with rhythm problems and orthostatic intolerance can occur. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and vascular endothelial growth factor...

  13. THE AGGREGATION OF BACTERIA KLEBSIELLA OXYTOCA AND KLEBSIELLA PNEUMONIAE UNDER THE INFLUENCE OF CHEMICAL FACTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. R. Sadrtdinova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article acknowledges the formation of bacterial biofilms in strains of bacteria species Klebsiella oxytoca and Klebsiella pneumoniae when grown in liquid media under the influence of negative factors (chemical factor — containing agents. Biofilms, as a community of microorganisms cause many chronic infections (meningitis, inflammatory diseases of the oral cavity, urogenital infections and create problems in the industry (fouling of processing equipment, ship hulls, oil platforms, biocorrosion metal products. Ordinary disinfectants, such as chlorine and sodium chlorite, can not remove the biofilm, so finding an effective means of dealing with them is enough actual problem. Various antibacterial agents are ineffective in combating biofilms, since bacteria produce large amounts of polysaccharides — substances that help the colony stay without disintegration. Polysaccharide serves as a barrier layer for substances in water, including for biocides. This is the main reason for the survival of microorganisms even in the heavily chlorinated water. In the study the latest data took into account on the subject, especially concerning adverse effects of oxygen on the growth of bacterial cells and directs action as a factor in the formation of biofilms. In our study we analyzed the latest generation disinfectant as an influencing factor. Working concentrations were shown in three embodiments. The number of strains studied was 6 (3 strains of each species. All strains were obtained from the Department of Museum MVE and VSE Ulyanovsk State Agricultural Academy n.a. P.A. Stolypin. In our research the biofilm community formation phenomenon has been confirmed, marked differences in biofilm formation, depending on the intensity (in this case, concentration of the promoter and bacteria species. In vivo biofilm is easily destroyed by mechanical action (shaking test tubes with the medium. Biofilm recovery after this manipulation was not observed. The results

  14. Temporal dynamics of stomatal conductance of plants under water deficit: can homeostasis be improved by more complex dynamics?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Maia Souza

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study we hypothesized that chaotic or complex behavior of stomatal conductance could improve plant homeostasis after water deficit. Stomatal conductance of sunflower and sugar beet leaves was measured in plants grown either daily irrigation or under water deficit using an infrared gas analyzer. All measurements were performed under controlled environmental conditions. In order to measure a consistent time series, data were scored with time intervals of 20s during 6h. Lyapunov exponents, fractal dimensions, KS entropy and relative LZ complexity were calculated. Stomatal conductance in both irrigated and non-irrigated plants was chaotic-like. Plants under water deficit showed a trend to a more complex behaviour, mainly in sunflower that showed better homeostasis than in sugar beet. Some biological implications are discussed.Este estudo testou a hipótese de que a condutância estomática de uma população de estômatos em uma folha poderia apresentar um comportamento caótico ou complexo sob diferentes condições hídricas, o que poderia favorecer a capacidade homeostática das plantas. A condutância estomática em folhas de girassol e de beterraba cultivadas com irrigação diária e sob deficiência hídrica foi medida com um analisador de gás por infra-vermelho em condições controladas. Os dados foram registrados a cada 20s durante 6h. As séries temporais obtidas foram analisadas por meio dos coeficientes de Lyapunov, dimensão fractal, entropia KS e complexidade LZ relativa. A condutância estomática nas plantas cultivadas com e sem deficiência hídrica exibiu um comportamento provavelmente caótico. As plantas sob estresse hídrico mostraram uma tendência para um comportamento mais complexo, principalmente as plantas de girassol cuja capacidade homeostática foi superior. Algumas implicações biológicas destes comportamentos são discutidas no texto.

  15. Factors forming the BRCA1-A complex orchestrate BRCA1 recruitment to the sites of DNA damage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Joonyoung Her; Nam Soo Lee; Yonghwan Kim; Hongtae Kim

    2016-01-01

    Sustaining genomic integrity is essential for preventing onset of cancers.Therefore,human cells evolve to have refined biological pathways to defend genetic materials from various genomic insults.DNA damage response and DNA repair pathways essential for genome maintenance are accomplished by cooperative executions of multiple factors including breast cancer type 1 susceptibility protein (BRCA1).BRCAI is initially identified as an altered gene in the hereditary breast cancer patients.Since then,tremendous efforts to understand the functions of BRAC1 reveal that BRCA1 is found in distinct complexes,including BRCA1-A,BRCA1-B,BRCA1-C,and the BRCA1a PALB2aBRCA2 complex,and plays diverse roles in a context-dependent manner.Among the complexes,BRCA1-A is critical for BRCA1 recruitment to the sites of DNA damage.Factors comprising the BRCA1-A include RAP80,CCDC98aAbraxas,BRCC36,BRCC45,BARD1,BRCA1,and MERIT40,a RAP80-associated factor.In this review,we summarize recent findings of the factors that form the BRCA1-A complex.

  16. Complexities in understanding the role of compensation-related factors on recovery from whiplash-associated disorders : discussion paper 2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carroll, Linda J.; Connelly, Luke B.; Spearing, Natalie M.; Cote, Pierre; Buitenhuis, Jan; Kenardy, Justin

    2011-01-01

    Study Design. Focused discussion. Objective. To present some of the complexities in conducting research on the role of compensation and compensation-related factors in recovery from whiplash-associated disorders (WAD) and to suggest directions for future research. Summary of Background Data. There i

  17. Mortality in vitamin K antagonist-related intracerebral bleeding treated with plasma or 4-factor prothrombin complex concentrate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Majeed, Ammar; Meijer, Karina; Larrazabal, Ramiro; Arnberg, Fabian; Luijckx, Gert J.; Roberts, Robin S.; Schulman, Sam

    2014-01-01

    Prothrombin complex concentrates (PCC) can rapidly normalise prolonged prothrombin time, induced by vitamin K antagonists (VKA). We conducted a multicentre retrospective study to investigate whether reversal of VKA coagulopathy with 4-factor PCC improves the survival of patients with VKA-related int

  18. Abdominal Wall Hernia in Complex Patients incidences, risk factors and timing of repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Verhelst (Joost)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractThis thesis consists of two parts: __part 1__ describes a new prosthesis for the treatment of large and complex incisional hernia. Furthermore the natural course and consequences of conservative treatment are described; __part 2__ focusses on three complex groups of patients wit

  19. Neptunium (V) Adsorption to a Halophilic Bacterium Under High Ionic Strength Conditions: A Surface Complexation Modeling Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ams, David A [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-11

    Rationale for experimental design: Np(V) -- important as analog for Pu(V) and for HLW scenarios; High ionic strength -- relevant to salt-based repositories such as the WIPP; Halophilic microorganisms -- representative of high ionic strength environments. For the first time showed: Significant adsorbant to halophilic microorganisms over entire pH range under high ionic strength conditions; Strong influence of ionic strength with increasing adsorption with increasing ionic strength (in contrast to trends of previous low ionic strength studies); Effect of aqueous Np(V) and bacterial surface site speciation on adsorption; and Developed thermodynamic models that can be incorporated into geochemical speciation models to aid in the prediction of the fate and transport of Np(V) in more complex systems.

  20. Constitutive model for flake graphite cast iron automotive brake discs: induced anisotropic damage model under complex loadings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustins, L.; Billardon, R.; Hild, F.

    2016-09-01

    The present paper details an elasto-viscoplastic constitutive model for automotive brake discs made of flake graphite cast iron. In a companion paper (Augustins et al. in Contin Mech Thermodyn, 2015), the authors proposed a one-dimensional setting appropriate for representing the complex behavior of the material (i.e., asymmetry between tensile and compressive loadings) under anisothermal conditions. The generalization of this 1D model to 3D cases on a volume element and the associated challenges are addressed. A direct transposition is not possible, and an alternative solution without unilateral conditions is first proposed. Induced anisotropic damage and associated constitutive laws are then introduced. The transition from the volume element to the real structure and the numerical implementation require a specific basis change. Brake disc simulations with this constitutive model show that unilateral conditions are needed for the friction bands. A damage deactivation procedure is therefore defined.

  1. Thyroid functional disease: an under-recognized cardiovascular risk factor in kidney disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, Connie M; Brent, Gregory A; Kovesdy, Csaba P; Soldin, Offie P; Nguyen, Danh; Budoff, Matthew J; Brunelli, Steven M; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar

    2015-05-01

    Thyroid functional disease, and in particular hypothyroidism, is highly prevalent among chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients. In the general population, hypothyroidism is associated with impaired cardiac contractility, endothelial dysfunction, atherosclerosis and possibly higher cardiovascular mortality. It has been hypothesized that hypothyroidism is an under-recognized, modifiable risk factor for the enormous burden of cardiovascular disease and death in CKD and ESRD, but this has been difficult to test due to the challenge of accurate thyroid functional assessment in uremia. Low thyroid hormone levels (i.e. triiodothyronine) have been associated with adverse cardiovascular sequelae in CKD and ESRD patients, but these metrics are confounded by malnutrition, inflammation and comorbid states, and hence may signify nonthyroidal illness (i.e. thyroid functional test derangements associated with underlying ill health in the absence of thyroid pathology). Thyrotropin is considered a sensitive and specific thyroid function measure that may more accurately classify hypothyroidism, but few studies have examined the clinical significance of thyrotropin-defined hypothyroidism in CKD and ESRD. Of even greater uncertainty are the risks and benefits of thyroid hormone replacement, which bear a narrow therapeutic-to-toxic window and are frequently prescribed to CKD and ESRD patients. In this review, we discuss mechanisms by which hypothyroidism adversely affects cardiovascular health; examine the prognostic implications of hypothyroidism, thyroid hormone alterations and exogenous thyroid hormone replacement in CKD and ESRD; and identify areas of uncertainty related to the interplay between hypothyroidism, cardiovascular disease and kidney disease requiring further investigation. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA. All rights reserved.

  2. Mercury in edible mushrooms and underlying soil: bioconcentration factors and toxicological risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melgar, M J; Alonso, J; García, M A

    2009-10-01

    Wild growing mushrooms are a popular delicacy in many countries, but some species accumulate high levels of toxic heavy metals, e.g., mercury, both in unpolluted and mildly polluted areas. In this study, we examined the accumulation capacity of mercury in edible mushrooms in relation to certain factors and their possible toxicological implications. Total concentrations of mercury were determined by an anodic stripping voltammetric technique using a gold disc as the working electrode in 238 samples of the fruiting bodies of 28 wild growing edible mushrooms species and the underlying soil. The mushrooms were collected from different sites in the province of Lugo (NW Spain). The hymenophore (H) and the rest of the fruiting body (RFB) were analysed separately. The highest mean mercury concentrations (mg/kg dry weight) were found in Boletus pinophilus (6.9 in H and 4.5 in RFB), Agaricus macrosporus (5.1 in H and 3.7 in RFB), Lepista nuda (5.1 in H and 3.1 in RFB) and Boletus aereus (4.6 in H and 3.3 in RFB), while the lowest was found in Agrocybe cylindrica (0.34 in H and 0.26 in RFB) and Fistulina hepatica (0.30 in H and 0.22 in RFB). All mushroom species accumulated mercury (BCF>1) in relation to the underlying soils. There were no statistically significant differences between the mercury levels in the hymenophore and in the rest of the fruiting body. The total mercury concentrations were compared to data in the literature and to levels set by legislation. It was concluded that consumption of the majority of the studied mushrooms is not a toxicological risk as far as mercury content is concerned, although the species B.pinophilus, A.macrosporus, L.nuda and B.aereus should be consumed in low amounts.

  3. Robust binding between carbon nitride nanosheets and a binuclear ruthenium(II) complex enabling durable, selective CO{sub 2} reduction under visible light in aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuriki, Ryo; Ishitani, Osamu; Maeda, Kazuhiko [Department of Chemistry, School of Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology (Japan); Yamamoto, Muneaki; Yoshida, Tomoko [Advanced Research Institute for Natural Science and Technology, Osaka City University (Japan); Higuchi, Kimitaka; Yamamoto, Yuta; Akatsuka, Masato; Yagi, Shinya [Institute of Materials and Systems for Sustainability, Nagoya University (Japan); Lu, Daling [Suzukakedai Materials Analysis Division, Technical Department, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama (Japan)

    2017-04-18

    Carbon nitride nanosheets (NS-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}) were found to undergo robust binding with a binuclear ruthenium(II) complex (RuRu') even in basic aqueous solution. A hybrid material consisting of NS-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} (further modified with nanoparticulate Ag) and RuRu' promoted the photocatalytic reduction of CO{sub 2} to formate in aqueous media, in conjunction with high selectivity (approximately 98 %) and a good turnover number (>2000 with respect to the loaded Ru complex). These represent the highest values yet reported for a powder-based photocatalytic system during CO{sub 2} reduction under visible light in an aqueous environment. We also assessed the desorption of RuRu' from the Ag/C{sub 3}N{sub 4} surface, a factor that can contribute to a loss of activity. It was determined that desorption is not induced by salt additives, pH changes, or photoirradiation, which partly explains the high photocatalytic performance of this material. (copyright 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  4. A coupled remote sensing and the Surface Energy Balance with Topography Algorithm (SEBTA to estimate actual evapotranspiration under complex terrain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Q. Gao

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Evapotranspiration (ET may be used as an ecological indicator to address the ecosystem complexity. The accurate measurement of ET is of great significance for studying environmental sustainability, global climate changes, and biodiversity. Remote sensing technologies are capable of monitoring both energy and water fluxes on the surface of the Earth. With this advancement, existing models, such as SEBAL, S_SEBI and SEBS, enable us to estimate the regional ET with limited temporal and spatial scales. This paper extends the existing modeling efforts with the inclusion of new components for ET estimation at varying temporal and spatial scales under complex terrain. Following a coupled remote sensing and surface energy balance approach, this study emphasizes the structure and function of the Surface Energy Balance with Topography Algorithm (SEBTA. With the aid of the elevation and landscape information, such as slope and aspect parameters derived from the digital elevation model (DEM, and the vegetation cover derived from satellite images, the SEBTA can fully account for the dynamic impacts of complex terrain and changing land cover in concert with some varying kinetic parameters (i.e., roughness and zero-plane displacement over time. Besides, the dry and wet pixels can be recognized automatically and dynamically in image processing thereby making the SEBTA more sensitive to derive the sensible heat flux for ET estimation. To prove the application potential, the SEBTA was carried out to present the robust estimates of 24 h solar radiation over time, which leads to the smooth simulation of the ET over seasons in northern China where the regional climate and vegetation cover in different seasons compound the ET calculations. The SEBTA was validated by the measured data at the ground level. During validation, it shows that the consistency index reached 0.92 and the correlation coefficient was 0.87.

  5. A study of dispersion in complex terrain under winter conditions using high-resolution mesoscale and Lagrangian particle models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. L. Palau

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available A mesoscale model (MM5, a dispersive Langrangian particle model (FLEXPART, and intensive meteorological and COrrelation SPECtrometer (COSPEC measurements from a field campaign are used to examine the advection and turbulent diffusion patterns associated with interactions and forcings between topography, synoptic atmospheric flows and thermally-driven circulations. This study describes the atmospheric dispersion of emissions from a power plant with a 343-meter-tall chimney, situated on very complex terrain in the North-East of Spain, under winter conditions. During the field campaign, the plume was transported with low transversal dispersion and deformed essentially due to the effect of mechanical turbulence. The main surface impacts appeared at long distances from the emission source (more than 30 km. The results show that the coupled models (MM5 and FLEXPART are able to predict the plume integral advection from the power plant on very complex terrain. Integral advection and turbulent dispersion are derived from the dispersive Lagrangian model output for three consecutive days so that a direct quantitative comparison has been made between the temporal evolution of the predicted three-dimensional dispersive conditions and the COSPEC measurements. Comparison between experimental and simulated transversal dispersion shows an index of agreement between 80% and 90%, within distance ranges from 6 to 33 km from the stack. Linked to the orographic features, the simulated plume impacts on the ground more than 30 km away from the stack, because of the lee waves simulated by MM5.

  6. Cooperative binding of the outer arm-docking complex underlies the regular arrangement of outer arm dynein in the axoneme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owa, Mikito; Furuta, Akane; Usukura, Jiro; Arisaka, Fumio; King, Stephen M.; Witman, George B.; Kamiya, Ritsu; Wakabayashi, Ken-ichi

    2014-01-01

    Outer arm dynein (OAD) in cilia and flagella is bound to the outer doublet microtubules every 24 nm. Periodic binding of OADs at specific sites is important for efficient cilia/flagella beating; however, the molecular mechanism that specifies OAD arrangement remains elusive. Studies using the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii have shown that the OAD-docking complex (ODA-DC), a heterotrimeric complex present at the OAD base, functions as the OAD docking site on the doublet. We find that the ODA–DC has an ellipsoidal shape ∼24 nm in length. In mutant axonemes that lack OAD but retain the ODA-DC, ODA-DC molecules are aligned in an end-to-end manner along the outer doublets. When flagella of a mutant lacking ODA-DCs are supplied with ODA-DCs upon gamete fusion, ODA-DC molecules first bind to the mutant axonemes in the proximal region, and the occupied region gradually extends toward the tip, followed by binding of OADs. This and other results indicate that a cooperative association of the ODA-DC underlies its function as the OAD-docking site and is the determinant of the 24-nm periodicity. PMID:24979786

  7. Nod factor receptors form heteromeric complexes and are essential for intracellular infection in Medicago nodules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moling, S.; Pietraszewska-Bogiel, A.; Postma, M.; Fedorova, E.E.; Hink, M.A.; Limpens, E.H.M.; Gadella, T.W.J.; Bisseling, T.

    2014-01-01

    Rhizobial Nod factors are the key signaling molecules in the legume-rhizobium nodule symbiosis. In this study, the role of the Nod factor receptors NOD FACTOR PERCEPTION (NFP) and LYSIN MOTIF RECEPTOR-LIKE KINASE3 (LYK3) in establishing the symbiotic interface in root nodules was investigated. It wa

  8. Nod factor receptors form heteromeric complexes and are essential for intracellular infection in medicago nodules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moling, S.; Pietraszewska-Bogiel, A.; Postma, M.; Fedorova, E.; Hink, M.A.; Limpens, E.; Gadella, T.W.J.; Bisseling, T.

    2014-01-01

    Rhizobial Nod factors are the key signaling molecules in the legume-rhizobium nodule symbiosis. In this study, the role of the Nod factor receptors NOD FACTOR PERCEPTION (NFP) and LYSIN MOTIF RECEPTOR-LIKE KINASE3 (LYK3) in establishing the symbiotic interface in root nodules was investigated. It wa

  9. Factors Affecting Grammatical and Lexical Complexity of Long-Term L2 Speakers’ Oral Proficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lahmann, Cornelia; Steinkrauss, Rasmus; Schmid, Monika

    2016-01-01

    There remains considerable disagreement about which factors drive second language (L2) ultimate attainment. Age of onset (AO) appears to be a robust factor, lending support to theories of maturational constraints on L2 acquisition. The present study is an investigation of factors that influence gram

  10. Accuracy of Death Certificates and Assessment of Factors for Misclassification of Underlying Cause of Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makiko Naka Mieno

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cause of death (COD information taken from death certificates is often inaccurate and incomplete. However, the accuracy of Underlying CODs (UCODs recorded on death certificates has not been comprehensively described when multiple diseases are present. Methods: A total of 450 consecutive autopsies performed at a geriatric hospital in Japan between February 2000 and August 2002 were studied. We evaluated the concordance rate, sensitivity, and specificity of major UCODs (cancer, heart disease, and pneumonia reported on death certificates compared with a reference standard of pathologist assessment based on autopsy data and clinical records. Logistic regression analysis was performed to assess the effect of sex, age, comorbidity, and UCODs on misclassification. Results: The concordance rate was relatively high for cancer (81% but low for heart disease (55% and pneumonia (9%. The overall concordance rate was 48%. Sex and comorbidity did not affect UCOD misclassification rates, which tended to increase with patient age, although the association with age was also not significant. The strongest factor for misclassification was UCODs (P < 0.0001. Sensitivity and specificity for cancer were very high (80% and 96%, respectively, but sensitivity for heart disease and pneumonia was 60% and 46%, respectively. Specificity for each UCOD was more than 85%. Conclusions: Researchers should be aware of the accuracy of COD data from death certificates used as research resources, especially for cases of elderly patients with pneumonia.

  11. Diarrhea Prevalence, Care, and Risk Factors Among Poor Children Under 5 Years of Age in Mesoamerica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombara, Danny V; Hernández, Bernardo; McNellan, Claire R; Desai, Sima S; Gagnier, Marielle C; Haakenstad, Annie; Johanns, Casey; Palmisano, Erin B; Ríos-Zertuche, Diego; Schaefer, Alexandra; Zúñiga-Brenes, Paola; Zyznieuski, Nicholas; Iriarte, Emma; Mokdad, Ali H

    2016-03-01

    Care practices and risk factors for diarrhea among impoverished communities across Mesoamerica are unknown. Using Salud Mesoamérica Initiative baseline data, collected 2011-2013, we assessed the prevalence of diarrhea, adherence to evidence-based treatment guidelines, and potential diarrhea correlates in poor and indigenous communities across Mesoamerica. This study surveyed 14,500 children under 5 years of age in poor areas of El Salvador, Guatemala, Mexico (Chiapas State), Nicaragua, and Panama. We compared diarrhea prevalence and treatment modalities using χ(2) tests and used multivariable Poisson regression models to calculate adjusted risk ratios (aRRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for potential correlates of diarrhea. The 2-week point prevalence of diarrhea was 13% overall, with significant differences between countries (P risk for diarrhea (aRR = 1.49, 95% CI = 1.15, 1.95). Our results call for programs to examine and remedy low adherence to evidence-based treatment guidelines. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  12. Identification and Expression Profiling of the Auxin Response Factors in Dendrobium officinale under Abiotic Stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhehao; Yuan, Ye; Fu, Di; Shen, Chenjia; Yang, Yanjun

    2017-05-04

    Auxin response factor (ARF) proteins play roles in plant responses to diverse environmental stresses by binding specifically to the auxin response element in the promoters of target genes. Using our latest public Dendrobium transcriptomes, a comprehensive characterization and analysis of 14 DnARF genes were performed. Three selected DnARFs, including DnARF1, DnARF4, and DnARF6, were confirmed to be nuclear proteins according to their transient expression in epidermal cells of Nicotiana benthamiana leaves. Furthermore, the transcription activation abilities of DnARF1, DnARF4, and DnARF6 were tested in a yeast system. Our data showed that DnARF6 is a transcriptional activator in Dendrobium officinale. To uncover the basic information of DnARF gene responses to abiotic stresses, we analyzed their expression patterns under various hormones and abiotic treatments. Based on our data, several hormones and significant stress responsive DnARF genes have been identified. Since auxin and ARF genes have been identified in many plant species, our data is imperative to reveal the function of ARF mediated auxin signaling in the adaptation to the challenging Dendrobium environment.

  13. Factors affecting stress assisted corrosion cracking of carbon steel under industrial boiler conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dong

    Failure of carbon steel boiler tubes from waterside has been reported in the utility boilers and industrial boilers for a long time. In industrial boilers, most waterside tube cracks are found near heavy attachment welds on the outer surface and are typically blunt, with multiple bulbous features indicating a discontinuous growth. These types of tube failures are typically referred to as stress assisted corrosion (SAC). For recovery boilers in the pulp and paper industry, these failures are particularly important as any water leak inside the furnace can potentially lead to smelt-water explosion. Metal properties, environmental variables, and stress conditions are the major factors influencing SAC crack initation and propagation in carbon steel boiler tubes. Slow strain rate tests (SSRT) were conducted under boiler water conditions to study the effect of temperature, oxygen level, and stress conditions on crack initation and propagation on SA-210 carbon steel samples machined out of boiler tubes. Heat treatments were also performed to develop various grain size and carbon content on carbon steel samples, and SSRTs were conducted on these samples to examine the effect of microstructure features on SAC cracking. Mechanisms of SAC crack initation and propagation were proposed and validated based on interrupted slow strain tests (ISSRT). Water chemistry guidelines are provided to prevent SAC and fracture mechanics model is developed to predict SAC failure on industrial boiler tubes.

  14. Models and Strategies for Factor Mixture Analysis: An Example Concerning the Structure Underlying Psychological Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Shaunna L.; Muthén, Bengt; Kaprio, Jaakko; D’Onofrio, Brian M.; Viken, Richard; Rose, Richard J.

    2013-01-01

    The factor mixture model (FMM) uses a hybrid of both categorical and continuous latent variables. The FMM is a good model for the underlying structure of psychopathology because the use of both categorical and continuous latent variables allows the structure to be simultaneously categorical and dimensional. This is useful because both diagnostic class membership and the range of severity within and across diagnostic classes can be modeled concurrently. While the conceptualization of the FMM has been explained in the literature, the use of the FMM is still not prevalent. One reason is that there is little research about how such models should be applied in practice and, once a well fitting model is obtained, how it should be interpreted. In this paper, the FMM will be explored by studying a real data example on conduct disorder. By exploring this example, this paper aims to explain the different formulations of the FMM, the various steps in building a FMM, as well as how to decide between a FMM and alternative models. PMID:24302849

  15. [Physico-chemistry of dinitrosyl iron complexes with thiol-containing ligands underlying their beneficial treatment of endometriosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanin, A F; Adamian, L V; Burgova, E N; Tkachev, N A

    2014-01-01

    Exogenous dinitrosyl iron complexes (DNIC) with thiol-containing ligands as NO and NO+ donors are capable of exerting both regulatory and cytotoxic effects on diverse biological processes similarly to those characteristic of endogenous nitric oxide. Regulatory activity of DNIC (vasodilation, hypotension, trombosis suppression, red blood cell elasticity increasing, skin wound healing acceleration, penile erection inducing, etc) is determined by their capacity of NO and NO+ transfer to biological targets of the latter (hemo- and thiol-containing proteins, respectively) due to higher affinity of the proteins for NO and NO+ than that of DNIC. Cytotoxic activity of DNIC is endowed with rapid DNIC decomposition under action of iron-chelating compounds resulting in appearance of NO and NO+ in cells and tissues in high amount. The latter mechanism is suggested to cause the blocking effect of DNIC as cytotoxic effectors on the development of benign endometrial tumors in rats with experimental endometriosis. It is also proposed that. a similar mechanism can operate causing at least a delay of malignant tumor proliferation under action of DNIC.

  16. Production of Biomass-Degrading Multienzyme Complexes under Solid-State Fermentation of Soybean Meal Using a Bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitcosque, Gabriela L; Fonseca, Rafael F; Rodríguez-Zúñiga, Ursula Fabiola; Bertucci Neto, Victor; Couri, Sonia; Farinas, Cristiane S

    2012-01-01

    Biomass-degrading enzymes are one of the most costly inputs affecting the economic viability of the biochemical route for biomass conversion into biofuels. This work evaluates the effects of operational conditions on biomass-degrading multienzyme production by a selected strain of Aspergillus niger. The fungus was cultivated under solid-state fermentation (SSF) of soybean meal, using an instrumented lab-scale bioreactor equipped with an on-line automated monitoring and control system. The effects of air flow rate, inlet air relative humidity, and initial substrate moisture content on multienzyme (FPase, endoglucanase, and xylanase) production were evaluated using a statistical design methodology. Highest production of FPase (0.55 IU/g), endoglucanase (35.1 IU/g), and xylanase (47.7 IU/g) was achieved using an initial substrate moisture content of 84%, an inlet air humidity of 70%, and a flow rate of 24 mL/min. The enzymatic complex was then used to hydrolyze a lignocellulosic biomass, releasing 4.4 g/L of glucose after 36 hours of saccharification of 50 g/L pretreated sugar cane bagasse. These results demonstrate the potential application of enzymes produced under SSF, thus contributing to generate the necessary technological advances to increase the efficiency of the use of biomass as a renewable energy source.

  17. Features of transformation of impurity-defect complexes in СdTe:Сl under the influence of microwave radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Budzulyak S. I.

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available High-resistance cadmium telluride single crystals are promising material for production of ionizing radiation detectors. To increase crystal resistance, they are doped with chlorine. The detector quality depends on uniformity of chlorine impurity distribution over crystal. It is known that low-dose microwave irradiation can homogenize impurity distribution in a specimen. In the present work, we made an attempt to improve the detector material quality by using such post-technological treatment, as well as to study state variation for impurity-defect complexes. To this end, the effect of microwave irradiation on transformation of impurity-defect complexes in CdTe:Cl single crystals was investigated using low-temperature photoluminescence. It is shown that activation of ClTe donor centers by microwave irradiation for 10 s and presence of VCd acceptor centers in the specimens under investigation effectively facilitate formation of (VNd–ClTe defect centers at which excitons are bound. Detailed investigations of the band form for donor-acceptor pairs (DAPs in CdTe:Cl single crystals made it possible to determine the Huang—Rhys factor (that characterizes electron-phonon interaction in CdTe:Cl DAPs as a function of microwave treatment duration. It is shown for single crystals with NCl = 5·1017 cm–3 and 5·1019 cm–3 that the Huang—Rhys factor grows with microwave irradiation dose. This is related to both homogenization of donor and acceptor centers distribution and increase of donor—acceptor spacing. It is shown that microwave irradiation of CdTe:Cl single crystals results in concentration reduction for separate cadmium vacancies VCd because of formation of (VNd—ClTe defect centers at which excitons are bound.

  18. Kolmogorov complexity as a hidden factor of scientific discourse: from Newton's law to data mining

    CERN Document Server

    Manin, Yuri I

    2013-01-01

    The word "complexity" is most often used as a meta--linguistic expression referring to certain intuitive characteristics of a natural system and/or its scientific description. These characteristics may include: sheer amount of data that must be taken into account; visible "chaotic" character of these data and/or space distribution/time evolution of a system etc. This talk is centered around the precise mathematical notion of "Kolmogorov complexity", originated in the early theoretical computer science and measuring the degree to which an available information can be compressed. In the first part, I will argue that a characteristic feature of basic scientific theories, from Ptolemy's epicycles to the Standard Model of elementary particles, is their splitting into two very distinct parts: the part of relatively small Kolmogorov complexity ("laws", "basic equations", "periodic table", "natural selection, genotypes, mutations") and another part, of indefinitely large Kolmogorov complexity ("initial and boundary c...

  19. Different risk factors for candidemia occur for Candida species belonging to the C. parapsilosis complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constante, C C; Monteiro, A A; Alves, S H; Carneiro, L C; Machado, M M; Severo, L C; Park, S; Perlin, D S; Pasqualotto, A C

    2014-05-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated reduced virulence in the species that comprise the Candida parapsilosis complex. We investigated a cohort of 93 patients with candidemia caused by this complex. Most infections were caused by C. parapsilosis (80.6%), followed by C. orthopsilosis (18.3%) and C. metapsilosis (1.1%). Renal failure (P orthopsilosis group, suggesting an association with patients who had a greater state of immune suppression in comparison with infections caused by C. parapsilosis sensu stricto.

  20. Immunoaffinity purification of factor IX (Christmas factor) by using conformation-specific antibodies directed against the factor IX-metal complex.

    OpenAIRE

    1985-01-01

    Factor IX is a vitamin K-dependent blood clotting zymogen that is functionally defective or absent in patients with hemophilia B. A method of immunoaffinity chromatography has been developed for a one-step high yield purification of factor IX directly from plasma. The technique utilizes conformation-specific antibodies that bind solely to the metal-stabilized factor IX conformer, but not to the conformer of factor IX found in the absence of metal ions. Anti-factor IX-Ca(II) antibodies were im...

  1. The relationship between rheumatoid factor levels and coronary artery lesion complexity and severity in patients with stable coronary artery disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avcı, Anıl; Açar, Göksel; Fidan, Serdar; Öcal, Lütfi; Bulut, Mustafa; Tellice, Muhammed; Akçakoyun, Mustafa; Pala, Selçuk; Esen, Ali Metin

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The relation between serum rheumatoid factor levels and the extent, severity, and complexity of coronary artery disease has not been adequately studied. Aim Therefore, we assessed the relationship between the severity of coronary artery disease assessed by SYNTAX score and serum rheumatoid factor levels in patients with stable coronary artery disease. Material and methods We enrolled 268 consecutive patients who underwent coronary angiography. Patients with acute coronary syndrome and chronic immune disorders were excluded. Baseline serum rheumatoid factor levels were measured and the SYNTAX score was calculated from the study population. Results Patients were divided into two groups. Group 1 was defined as low SYNTAX score 22. Serum rheumatoid factor levels were significantly higher in the intermediate and high-SYNTAX score group than in the low-SYNTAX score group (16.4 ±9 IU/mlvs. 11.36 ±5 IU/ml, p < 0.001). Also, there was a significant correlation between rheumatoid factor and CRP levels with the SYNTAX score r = 0.411; p < 0.001 and r = 0.275; p < 0.001, respectively. On multivariate linear regression analysis, rheumatoid factor (β = 0.101, p < 0.001) was an independent risk factor for intermediate and high SYNTAX score in patients with stable coronary artery disease. In receiver operator characteristic curve analysis, optimal cut-off value of rheumatoid factor to predict high SYNTAX score was found to be 10.5 IU/ml, with 69% sensitivity and 61% specificity. Conclusions The rheumatoid factor level was independently associated with the extent, complexity, and severity of coronary artery disease assessed by SYNTAX score in patients with stable coronary artery diseases. PMID:25848367

  2. MiRNA-directed regulation of VEGF and other angiogenic factors under hypoxia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong Hua

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are a class of 20-24 nt non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression primarily through post-transcriptional repression or mRNA degradation in a sequence-specific manner. The roles of miRNAs are just beginning to be understood, but the study of miRNA function has been limited by poor understanding of the general principles of gene regulation by miRNAs. Here we used CNE cells from a human nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell line as a cellular system to investigate miRNA-directed regulation of VEGF and other angiogenic factors under hypoxia, and to explore the principles of gene regulation by miRNAs. Through computational analysis, 96 miRNAs were predicted as putative regulators of VEGF. But when we analyzed the miRNA expression profile of CNE and four other VEGF-expressing cell lines, we found that only some of these miRNAs could be involved in VEGF regulation, and that VEGF may be regulated by different miRNAs that were differentially chosen from 96 putative regulatory miRNAs of VEGF in different cells. Some of these miRNAs also co-regulate other angiogenic factors (differential regulation and co-regulation principle. We also found that VEGF was regulated by multiple miRNAs using different combinations, including both coordinate and competitive interactions. The coordinate principle states that miRNAs with independent binding sites in a gene can produce coordinate action to increase the repressive effect of miRNAs on this gene. By contrast, the competitive principle states when multiple miRNAs compete with each other for a common binding site, or when a functional miRNA competes with a false positive miRNA for the same binding site, the repressive effects of miRNAs may be decreased. Through the competitive principle, false positive miRNAs, which cannot directly repress gene expression, can sometimes play a role in miRNA-mediated gene regulation. The competitive principle, differential regulation, multi-miRNA binding sites, and false

  3. ATP Depletion Via Mitochondrial F1F0 Complex by Lethal Factor is an Early Event in B. Anthracis-Induced Sudden Cell Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitchell W. Woodberry

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Bacillus anthracis’ primary virulence factor is a tripartite anthrax toxin consisting of edema factor (EF, lethal factor (LF and protective antigen (PA. In complex with PA, EF and LF are internalized via receptor-mediated endocytosis. EF is a calmodulin- dependent adenylate cyclase that induces tissue edema. LF is a zinc-metalloprotease that cleaves members of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinases. Lethal toxin (LT: PA plus LF-induced death of macrophages is primarily attributed to expression of the sensitive Nalp1b allele, inflammasome formation and activation of caspase-1, but early events that initiate these processes are unknown. Here we provide evidence that an early essential event in pyroptosis of alveolar macrophages is LF-mediated depletion of cellular ATP. The underlying mechanism involves interaction of LF with F1F0-complex gamma and beta subunits leading to increased ATPase activity in mitochondria. In support, mitochondrial DNA-depleted MH-S cells have decreased F1F0 ATPase activity due to the lack of F06 and F08 polypeptides and show increased resistance to LT. We conclude that ATP depletion is an important early event in LT-induced sudden cell death and its prevention increases survival of toxin-sensitive cells.

  4. Urinary incontinence in bitches under primary veterinary care in England: prevalence and risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, D G; Riddell, A; Church, D B; Owen, L; Brodbelt, D C; Hall, J L

    2017-09-07

    To estimate prevalence and demographic risk factors for urinary incontinence in bitches under primary veterinary care in England. The study population included all bitches within the VetCompass database from September 1, 2009 to July 7, 2013. Electronic patient records were searched for urinary incontinence cases and additional demographic and clinical information was extracted. Of 100,397 bitches attending 119 clinics in England, an estimated 3108 were diagnosed with urinary incontinence. The prevalence of urinary incontinence was 3·14% (95% confidence intervals: 2·97 to 3·33). Medical therapy was prescribed to 45·6% cases. Predisposed breeds included the Irish setter (odds ratio: 8·09; 95% confidence intervals: 3·15 to 20·80; P< 0·001) and Dobermann (odds ratio: 7·98; 95% confidence intervals: 4·38 to 14·54; P< 0·001). Increased odds of a diagnosis of urinary incontinence were associated with: (1) weight at or above the mean adult bodyweight for the breed (odds ratio: 1·31; 95% confidence intervals: 1·12 to 1·54; P< 0·001), (2) age 9 to 12 years (odds ratio: 3·86; 95% confidence intervals: 2·86 to 5·20, P< 0·001), (3) neuter status (odds ratio: 2·23; 95% confidence intervals: 1·52 to 3·25, P< 0·001) and (4) being insured (odds ratio: 1·59; 95% confidence intervals: 1·34 to 1·88, P< 0·001). Clinical Impact: Urinary incontinence affects just over 3% of bitches overall but affects more than 15% of bitches in high-risk breeds including the Irish setter, Dobermann, bearded collie, rough collie and Dalmatian. These results provide an evidence base for clinicians to enhance clinical recommendations on neutering and weight control, especially in high-risk breeds. © 2017 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  5. The management of complex system innovations. A theoretic approach to network formation and critical success factor identification using the case of fuel cell vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venghaus, Sandra

    2011-07-01

    Given the economic, ecological and social importance of automotive transportation, the development of alternative fueling and propulsion technologies requires a wise and sustainable political course of action. Not least the public debate on the impact of transport emissions on climate change and the call for limits to automotive CO-2-emissions reflect the relevance of the topic. In the search for innovative alternatives to the conventional gasoline or diesel propulsion technology, electromobility and hydrogen-based fuel cell vehicles constitute the two most widely discussed long-term options. The market introduction of fuel cell vehicles serves as an expedient example of a highly complex system innovation (CSI), which requires the cooperation of a variety of actors from formerly independent economic sectors in order to overcome the significant barriers to market entry. As will be discussed, such CSI can only be successfully implemented in an environment, within which the complexity-induced knowledge gap is reduced by a systematic exchange of information with respect to both the critical success factors identified by each of the involved stakeholders as well as their cooperation needs and expectations. Given this challenge, a framework is developed, which serves as the basis for a structured dialogue among the multiple stakeholders involved in the development process of a complex system innovation. The framework can thus best be classified as a corporate moderation and decision-support tool to achieve transparency in and impose structure on complex contexts. Methodically, the presented thesis addresses the development of a holistic approach to the management of complex system innovations from two perspectives: (1) a theoretical perspective of analyzing underlying structures and processes of CSI management (i.e., the CSI Management Framework), as well as (2) the development of a strategic approach for the practical implementation of CSI management in complex networks

  6. Magnetic interactions as a stabilizing factor of semiquinone species of lawsone by metal complexation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valle-Bourrouet, Grettel [Universidad de Costa Rica, Escuela de Quimica, San Jose (Costa Rica); Ugalde-Saldivar, Victor M. [Facultad de Quimica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Ciudad Universitaria, C.P. 04510, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Gomez, Martin [Departamento de Sistemas Biologicos, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Xochimilco, C.P. 04960, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Ortiz-Frade, Luis A. [Centro de Investigacion y Desarrollo Tecnologico en Electroquimica, Parque Tecnologico Queretaro, Sanfandila, 76703, Pedro Escobedo, Queretaro (Mexico); Gonzalez, Ignacio [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana - Iztapalapa, Departamento de Quimica, Area de Electroquimica, Apartado postal 55-534, 09340, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Frontana, Carlos, E-mail: ultrabuho@yahoo.com.m [Departamento de Quimica, Centro de Investigacion y Estudios Avanzados, Av. Instituto Politecnico Nacional No. 2508 Col. San Pedro Zacatenco, C.P. 07360, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2010-12-01

    Changes in electrochemical reactivity for lawsone anions (lawsone, 2-hydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone, HLw) being coordinated to a series of metallic ions in dimethylsulfoxide solution were evaluated. Upon performing cyclic voltammetry experiments for metal complexes of this quinone with pyridine (Py) - structural formula M(II)(Lw{sup -}){sub 2}(Py){sub 2}; M: Co(II), Ni(II), Zn(II) - it was found that the reduction of coordinated Lw{sup -} units occurs during the first and second electron uptake in the analyzed compounds. The stability of the electrogenerated intermediates for each complex depends on the d electron configuration in each metal center and is determined by magnetic interactions with the available spins considering an octahedral conformation for all the compounds. This was evidenced by in situ spectroelectrochemical-ESR measurements in the Zn(II) complex in which due to the lack of magnetic interaction owing to its electron configuration, the structure of the coordinated anion radical species was determined. Successive reduction of the associated Lw{sup -} units leads to partial dissociation of the complex, determined by the identification of free radical dianion structures in solution. These results show some insights on how metal-lawsone complexation can modify the solution reactivity and stability of the electrogenerated radical species.

  7. Assessing the Role of Environmental Factors on Baltic Cod Recruitment, a Complex Adaptive System Emergent Property

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dionysis Krekoukiotis

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available For decades, fish recruitment has been a subject of intensive research with stock–recruitment models commonly used for recruitment prediction often only explaining a small fraction of the inter-annual recruitment variation. The use of environmental information to improve our ability to predict recruitment, could contribute considerably to fisheries management. However, the problem remains difficult because the mechanisms behind such complex relationships are often poorly understood; this in turn, makes it difficult to determine the forecast estimation robustness, leading to the failure of some relationships when new data become available. The utility of machine learning algorithms such as artificial neural networks (ANNs for solving complex problems has been demonstrated in aquatic studies and has led many researchers to advocate ANNs as an attractive, non-linear alternative to traditional statistical methods. The goal of this study is to design a Baltic cod recruitment model (FishANN that can account for complex ecosystem interactions. To this end, we (1 build a quantitative model representation of the conceptual understanding of the complex ecosystem interactions driving Baltic cod recruitment dynamics, and (2 apply the model to strengthen the current capability to project future changes in Baltic cod recruitment. FishANN is demonstrated to bring multiple stressors together into one model framework and estimate the relative importance of these stressors while interpreting the complex nonlinear interactions between them. Additional requirements to further improve the current study in the future are also proposed.

  8. Chlamydia trachomatis C-complex serovars are a risk factor for preterm birth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hollegaard, Stine; Vogel, Ida; Thorsen, Poul;

    2007-01-01

    , Chlamydia antigen, Chlamydia IgG, Chlamydia complex B, C and GF levels were measured. Spontaneous preterm birth (ectopic pregnancies. Crude and adjusted relative risks (RR......) and odds ratios (OR) were estimated by logistic regression. RESULTS: C. trachomatis C-complex positivity was associated with spontaneous PTB [RR 2.6 (1.1-6.29)] and additionally with a prior history of subfertility [OR 4.4 [2.5-7.7]), infertility treatment [OR 7.2 (4.0-12.8)] and ectopic pregnancy [5.2 (2.......2-12.4)]. CONCLUSION: A previous infection with C. trachomatis C-complex was associated with an increased risk for spontaneous PTB and may potentially contribute to subfertility, infertility and ectopic pregnancy....

  9. Unexpected complexity of the Reef-Building Coral Acropora millepora transcription factor network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravasi Timothy

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coral reefs are disturbed on a global scale by environmental changes including rising sea surface temperatures and ocean acidification. Little is known about how corals respond or adapt to these environmental changes especially at the molecular level. This is mostly because of the paucity of genome-wide studies on corals and the application of systems approaches that incorporate the latter. Like in any other organism, the response of corals to stress is tightly controlled by the coordinated interplay of many transcription factors. Results Here, we develop and apply a new system-wide approach in order to infer combinatorial transcription factor networks of the reef-building coral Acropora millepora. By integrating sequencing-derived transcriptome measurements, a network of physically interacting transcription factors, and phylogenetic network footprinting we were able to infer such a network. Analysis of the network across a phylogenetically broad sample of five species, including human, reveals that despite the apparent simplicity of corals, their transcription factors repertoire and interaction networks seem to be largely conserved. In addition, we were able to identify interactions among transcription factors that appear to be species-specific lending strength to the novel concept of "Taxonomically Restricted Interactions". Conclusions This study provides the first look at transcription factor networks in corals. We identified a transcription factor repertoire encoded by the coral genome and found consistencies of the domain architectures of transcription factors and conserved regulatory subnetworks across eumetazoan species, providing insight into how regulatory networks have evolved.

  10. [Osteological development of the vertebral column and caudal complex of Lujanus guttatus (Perciformes: Lutjanidae) larvae under rearing conditions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Ibarra, Luz Estela; Abdo-de la Parra, María Isabel; Aguilar-Zárate, Gabriela; Valasco-Blanco, Gabriela; Ibarra-Castro, Leonardo

    2015-03-01

    The spotted rose snapper (Lutjanus guttatus) is an important commercial species in Mexico with good culture potential. The osteological study at early stages in this species is an important tool to confirm normal bone structure and for the detection of malformations that may occur during early development. This study was carried out in order to evaluate and describe the normal osteological development of the vertebral column and caudal complex of this species grown under controlled conditions. For this, a total of 540 larvae of L. guttatus, between 2.1 and 17.5 mm of total length (TL), were cultured during 36 days; culture conditions were 28 degrees C, 5.74 mg/L oxygen and 32.2 ups salinity with standard feeding rates. To detect growth changes, a sample of 15 organisms was daily taken from day one until day 36 of post-hatch (DPH). Samples were processed following standard techniques of clearing, and cartilage (alcian blue) and bone staining (alizarin red). Results showed that the vertebral column is composed of ten vertebrae in the abdominal region, and 14 vertebrae including the urostyle in the caudal region. The development of the axial skeleton starts with the neural arches and haemal arches at 3.8 mm TL. Caudal elements such as the hypurals and parahypural began to develop at 4.1 mm TL. Pre-flexion and flexion of the notochord and the formation of all hypurals were observed between 5.3 and 5.8 mm TL. Ossification of the vertebrae in the abdominal region and in some neural arches initiated at 9.5mm TL. In the caudal region, all the neural and haemal arches ossified at 10.2 mm TL. All the abdominal vertebrae and their respective neural arches and parapophyses ossified at 11.2 mm TL, while the elements of the caudal complex that ossified were the hypurals, parahypurals and modified haemal spines. All caudal fm rays, 12 neural spines and 3 haemal arches were ossified by 15.5 mm. The complete ossification process of this specie under laboratory culture conditions

  11. Purification of FLAG-tagged eukaryotic initiation factor 2B complexes, subcomplexes, and fragments from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad-Qureshi, Sarah S; Haddad, Raphaël; Palmer, Karren S; Richardson, Jonathan P; Gomez, Edith; Pavitt, Graham D

    2007-01-01

    The eukaryotic initiation factor 2B (eIF2B) is a five-subunit guanine nucleotide exchange factor, that functions during translation initiation to catalyze the otherwise slow exchange of GDP for GTP on its substrate eIF2. Assays to measure substrate interaction and guanine nucleotide release ability of eIF2B require the complex to be purified free of interacting proteins. We have also found that a subcomplex of two subunits, gamma and epsilon or the largest one, epsilon alone, promotes this activity. Within eIF2Bepsilon, the catalytic center requires the C-terminal 200 residues only. Here, we describe our protocols for purifying the Saccharomyces cerevisiae eIF2B complexes and the catalytic subunit using FLAG-tagged proteins overexpressed in yeast cells. Using commercially available FLAG-affinity resin and high salt buffer, we are able to purify active eIF2B virtually free of contaminants.

  12. Is Mitral Annular Calcification Associated With Atherosclerotic Risk Factors and Severity and Complexity of Coronary Artery Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Hemal; Sanghani, Dharmesh; Julliard, Kell; Fernaine, George

    2015-08-01

    We assessed the association of mitral annular calcification (MAC) with atherosclerotic risk factors and severity and complexity of coronary artery disease (CAD). Cardiac catheterization reports and electronic medical records from 2010 to 2011 were retrospectively reviewed. A total of 481 patients were divided into 2 groups: MAC present (209) and MAC absent (272). All major cardiovascular risk factors, comorbidities, and coronary lesion characteristics were included. On linear regression analysis, age (P = .001, β 1.12) and female gender (P = .031, β 0.50) were the independent predictors of MAC. Mitral annular calcification was not independently associated with the presence of lesions with >70% stenosis (P = .283), number of obstructive vessels (P = .469), lesions with 50% to 70% stenosis (P = .458), and Synergy Between Percutaneous Coronary Intervention With Taxus and Cardiac Surgery score (P = .479). Mitral annular calcification is probably a benign marker of age-related degenerative changes in the heart independent of the severity and complexity of CAD.

  13. Field dependence as a limiting factor in solving a complex learning problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, R J; Alfano, P

    1985-08-01

    Subjects in a prior study of complex learning often experienced difficulty in mastering the task because of an apparent reluctance to release one perceptual field and reconstrue the task on a higher cognitive level. It was hypothesized that were this the correct explanation, the faster learners would be more field independent on a measure of field dependence, since independence has been defined in terms of ease in releasing one's attention from the immediate perceptual field. This hypothesis was tested with 22 undergraduate subjects for whom Group Embedded Figures Test scores were correlated with the number of trials to completion on the complex learning task. A moderate but significant correlation supported the hypothesis.

  14. Latent physiological factors of complex human diseases revealed by independent component analysis of clinarrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen David P

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diagnosis and treatment of patients in the clinical setting is often driven by known symptomatic factors that distinguish one particular condition from another. Treatment based on noticeable symptoms, however, is limited to the types of clinical biomarkers collected, and is prone to overlooking dysfunctions in physiological factors not easily evident to medical practitioners. We used a vector-based representation of patient clinical biomarkers, or clinarrays, to search for latent physiological factors that underlie human diseases directly from clinical laboratory data. Knowledge of these factors could be used to improve assessment of disease severity and help to refine strategies for diagnosis and monitoring disease progression. Results Applying Independent Component Analysis on clinarrays built from patient laboratory measurements revealed both known and novel concomitant physiological factors for asthma, types 1 and 2 diabetes, cystic fibrosis, and Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Serum sodium was found to be the most significant factor for both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, and was also significant in asthma. TSH3, a measure of thyroid function, and blood urea nitrogen, indicative of kidney function, were factors unique to type 1 diabetes respective to type 2 diabetes. Platelet count was significant across all the diseases analyzed. Conclusions The results demonstrate that large-scale analyses of clinical biomarkers using unsupervised methods can offer novel insights into the pathophysiological basis of human disease, and suggest novel clinical utility of established laboratory measurements.

  15. Factors associated with the healing of complex surgical wounds in the breast and abdomen: retrospective cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Eline Lima; Pires, José Ferreira; Abreu, Mery Natali Silva; Lima, Vera Lúcia de Araújo; Silva, Patrícia Aparecida Barbosa; Soares, Sônia Maria

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: to estimate the healing rate of complex surgical wounds and its associated factors. Method: retrospective cohort study from 2003 to 2014 with 160 outpatients of a Brazilian university hospital. Data were obtained through consultation of the medical records. Survival function was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox regression model to estimate the likelihood of the occurrence of healing. Results: the complex surgical wound healing rate was 67.8% (95% CI: 60.8-74.9). Factors associated with a higher likelihood of wound healing were segmentectomy/quadrantectomy surgery, consumption of more than 20 grams/day of alcohol, wound extent of less that 17.3 cm2 and the length of existence of the wound prior to outpatient treatment of less than 15 days, while the use of hydrocolloid covering and Marlex mesh were associated with a lower likelihood of healing. Conclusion: the wound healing rate was considered high and was associated with the type of surgical intervention, alcohol consumption, type of covering, extent and length of wound existence. Preventive measures can be implemented during the monitoring of the evolution of the complex surgical wound closure, with possibilities of intervention in the modifiable risk factors. PMID:27737379

  16. Relationship Between Diurnal Changes of Net Photosynthetic Rate and Influencing Factors in Rice under Saline Sodic Stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The net photosynthetic rate of flag leaves and influencing factors under saline sodic soil conditions were investigated at the full heading stage of rice.The net photosynthetic rate of rice leaves showed a double-peak curve in a day in both non-saline sodic and saline sodic soil treatments.The first peak of the net photosynthetic rate appeared at 9:00-10:00 and 9:00 in the saline sodic and non-saline sodic soil treatments,respectively,whereas the second peak both at 14:00.The midday depression of the net photosynthetic rate always appeared regardless of non-saline sodic or saline sodic soil conditions.In addition,the net photosynthetic rate significantly decreased in all day under saline sodic conditions compared with that under non-saline sodic conditions.Some differences were observed in correlation characters between the net photosynthetic rate and all influencing factors during 9:00-13:00.Under non-saline sodic conditions,the diurnal changes of the net photosynthetic rate in a day were mainly caused by stomatal conductance,and the limitation value and the stomatal factors served as determinants;whereas under saline soclic stress,the diurnal changes of the net photosynthetic rate in a day were mainly caused by non stomatal factors including light intensity and air temperature.

  17. Complement-mediated solubilization of immune complexes. Solubilization inhibition and complement factor levels in SLE patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baatrup, Gunnar; Petersen, Ivan; Kappelgaard, E;

    1984-01-01

    Thirty-two of 36 serum samples from 19 SLE patients showed reduced capacity to mediate complement-dependent solubilization of immune complexes (IC). SLE patients with nephritis exerted the lowest complement-mediated solubilization capacity (CMSC) whereas sera from patients with inactive disease g...

  18. Evaluation of recovering the "Tuvacobalt” Mining and Processing Complex: accounting the ecology factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David F. Dabiev

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the various options for recovery of the "Tuvacobalt” Mining and Processing Complex that worked on the mineral resources base of Khovu-Aksy nickel-cobalt deposit between 1970 and 1990’s. It shows that in case of revival combined with innovative technologies the project will have a relatively higher economic efficiency.

  19. Factors Affecting Learning of Vector Math from Computer-Based Practice: Feedback Complexity and Prior Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heckler, Andrew F.; Mikula, Brendon D.

    2016-01-01

    In experiments including over 450 university-level students, we studied the effectiveness and time efficiency of several levels of feedback complexity in simple, computer-based training utilizing static question sequences. The learning domain was simple vector math, an essential skill in introductory physics. In a unique full factorial design, we…

  20. Child and Symbol Factors in Learning to Read a Visually Complex Writing System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nag, Sonali; Snowling, Margaret; Quinlan, Philip; Hulme, Charles

    2014-01-01

    In Kannada, visual features are arranged in blocks called "akshara," making this a visually more complex writing system than typical alphabetic orthographies. Akshara knowledge was assessed concurrently and 8 months later in 113 children in the first years of reading instruction (aged 4-7 years). Mixed effects logistic regression models…