WorldWideScience

Sample records for factors including poverty

  1. Including health insurance in poverty measurement: The impact of Massachusetts health reform on poverty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korenman, Sanders D; Remler, Dahlia K

    2016-12-01

    We develop and implement what we believe is the first conceptually valid health-inclusive poverty measure (HIPM) - a measure that includes health care or insurance in the poverty needs threshold and health insurance benefits in family resources - and we discuss its limitations. Building on the Census Bureau's Supplemental Poverty Measure, we construct a pilot HIPM for the under-65 population under ACA-like health reform in Massachusetts. This pilot demonstrates the practicality, face validity and value of a HIPM. Results suggest that public health insurance benefits and premium subsidies accounted for a substantial, one-third reduction in the health inclusive poverty rate. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Assessing poverty and related factors in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saatci, Esra; Akpinar, Ersin

    2007-10-01

    Poverty, a complex, multidimensional, and universal problem, has been conceptualized as income and material deprivation. In this article, we discuss poverty and related factors in Turkey. The absolute poverty line for Turkey was US$ 4 per capita per day. Turkey was ranked 92nd out of 177 countries with moderate human development in the 2006 Human Development Report. The individual food poverty rate was 1.35% and the non-food poverty rate was 25.6%. The highest poverty rate was among primary school graduates (42.5%; 38.5% for women and 46.8% for men). The rate for this group was higher in urban than in rural areas. Among poor people, 57.2% were married. The highest poverty rate was among agricultural workers (46.6%) and in Eastern and Southeastern Anatolia. Factors related to poverty were crowded households, unemployment, immigration, working for a daily wage in the agricultural and construction sector, low educational status, female sex or married status, lacking social insurance, and living in rural areas or in Eastern and Southeastern Anatolia.

  3. Learner Factors in a High-Poverty Urban Middle School

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    Olivares-Cuhat, Gabriela

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this pilot study is to gain more insight into learner factors prominent in high-poverty urban schools and to suggest pedagogical approaches appropriate to this environment. To this end, three surveys were administered to students attending a high-poverty, urban middle school in order to measure their learning style preferences,…

  4. Income poverty, poverty co-factors, and the adjustment of children in elementary school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, Brian P; Brown, Eleanor D

    2006-01-01

    Since 1990, there have been great advances in how developmental researchers construct poverty. These advances are important because they may help inform social policy at many levels and help frame how American culture constructs poverty for children, both symbolically and in the opportunities children and families get to escape from poverty. Historically, developmental perspectives have embodied social address and main effects models, snapshot views of poverty effects at single points in time, and a rather narrow focus on income as the symbolic marker of the ecology of disadvantage. More recent views, in contrast, emphasize the diverse circumstances of disadvantaged families and diverse outcomes of disadvantaged children, the multiple sources of risk and the multiple determinants of poor outcomes for these children, dynamic aspects of that ecology, and change as well as continuity in outcome trajectories. The advances also consist of more powerful frames for understanding the ecology of disadvantage and the risk it poses for child outcomes. Most developmental researchers still tend to frame causal variables ultimately in terms of the dichotomy between social causation and social selection views, with a primary emphasis on the former. In part, this framing has reflected limitations of sample size and design, because the theoretical and empirical power of reciprocal selection models is clear (Kim et al., 2003). The conceptual advances that prompt such models include widespread acknowledgement of third variable problems in interpreting effects, of the clear need for multivariate approaches, and the need to pursue mechanisms and moderators of the relations between causal candidates and child outcomes. In the context of these advances, one of the core goals of our research program has been to construct robust representations of environmental adversity for disadvantaged families. Most of our research focuses on contextual co-factors at a family level (e.g., maternal

  5. The global distribution of risk factors by poverty level.

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    Blakely, Tony; Hales, Simon; Kieft, Charlotte; Wilson, Nick; Woodward, Alistair

    2005-02-01

    To estimate the individual-level association of income poverty with being underweight, using tobacco, drinking alcohol, having access only to unsafe water and sanitation, being exposed to indoor air pollution and being obese. Using survey data for as many countries as possible, we estimated the relative risk association between income or assets and risk factors at the individual level within 11 medium- and low-income subregions of WHO. WHO and The World Bank data on the prevalence of risk factors and income poverty (defined as living on US$ 2.00 per day) were analysed to impute the association between poverty and risk factors for each subregion. The possible effect of poverty reduction on the prevalence of risk factors was estimated using population-attributable risk percentages. There were strong associations between poverty and malnutrition among children, having access only to unsafe water and sanitation, and being exposed to indoor air pollution within each subregion (relative risks were twofold to threefold greater for those living on US$ 2.00 per day). Associations between poverty and obesity, tobacco use and alcohol use varied across subregions. If everyone living on US$ 2.00 per day, 51% of exposures to unimproved water and sanitation could be avoided as could 37% of malnutrition among children and 38% of exposure to indoor air pollution. The more realistic, but still challenging, Millennium Development Goal of halving the number of people living on poverty eradication and public health action. The methods used in this study may be useful for monitoring pro-equity progress towards Millennium Development Goals.

  6. Relationship between oral health in children and poverty related factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squassi, Aldo; Mauro, Silvia; Mauro, María José; Sánchez, Gabriel; Bordoni, Noemí

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to analyze the variables related to poverty and its influence on oral health in children living in a suburban area ofBuenos Aires, Argentina. The study population consisted of 1,049 children. 579 children at social risk (Group I) were recruited from five neighborhoods with critical lacks (Katzman, 1989) and divided into 2 subgroups according to age: (A) preschool children and (B) school children. 470 preschool and school children from the same district but living in homes without critical lacks served as controls (Group II). The following variables associated with poverty were analyzed: (a) parents' instructional level, (b) employment conditions, and (c) accessibilty to regular oral health care. Group I comprised children from five neighborhoods categorized according to the incidence rate of each variable. Clinical examinations were performed under similar conditions by three calibrated investigators. DMFS, dmfs, total DMFS + dmfs, DS + ds, Care Index and Loe & Silness plaque index were recorded and analyzed using Students t test, ANOVA and Chi square test (level of significance p poverty-related variables rose. The highest number of children with high cariogenic risk was observed in neighborhoods with the highest social risk (c2 = 30.48; p poverty-related variables seemed to be associated with factors that play a role in the dental caries development process in school and preschool children living in the Metropolitan area of Buenos Aires.

  7. The poverty factor: a special problem for women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feuerstein, M T

    1997-01-01

    Poverty may be inherited from poor parents, it may be temporarily caused by natural disasters or war, or it may be absolute. People living in absolute poverty lack basic necessities, are most likely to return to poverty despite improvements in society, are the poorest of the poor, and are the most vulnerable. The recent increase in the number of women heading poor households has led to an increasing feminization of poverty. Against this backdrop, women also have reproductive health needs exacerbated by early marriage, lack of access to family planning, malnutrition, a lack of clean water during delivery, female genital mutilation, a lack of prenatal care, failure to recognize obstetric emergencies, and inaccessible health care. Pregnancy-related morbidity can remain untreated or undiagnosed and cause untold misery, and women have less power than men to avoid acquiring HIV/AIDS or a sexually transmitted disease. Some women suffer from infertility or reproductive tract cancer. In fact, reproductive and sexual health problems account for more than 30% of the disease burden for women compared with about 10% for men. Realistic strategies to alleviate this situation include 1) developing profiles of poverty and women's reproductive health; 2) training individuals to conduct participatory research to identify and prioritize women's health needs and problems; 3) discovering the correct entry points for discussions on reproductive health priorities; 4) focusing on the household and work place; 5) using community-based monitoring tools; and 6) promoting provision of adequate health services. Employment of people-centered strategies will help the poor improve their reproductive health.

  8. Factors Influencing Poverty Alleviation amongst Microfinance Adopting Households in Zambia

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    Mavhungu Abel Mafukata

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this paper is to investigate the factors having the most influence on the alleviation of poverty amongst the households adopting microfinance in Zambia. Ninety nine (n=99 respondents were randomly and purposively selected from amongst 340 microfinance adopters of the so-called Micro Bankers Trust programme operating a microfinance business in the Makululu Compound of Kabwe, Zambia. Socio-demographic primary data were collected through face-to-face interviews based on a semi-structured questionnaire instrument. The data were entered into an excel spreadsheet for analysis. The descriptive data were thereafter exported and fitted to an empirical model. The descriptive results revealed that the majority of the respondents were married, unemployed, fairly educated younger women from larger-sized poor households who drew their household income mainly from microfinance activities. The majority of the respondents thought microfinance had improved their well-being in some crucial areas. The results of the empirical model found that some respondents were indeed alleviated from poverty through microfinance. Conclusion drawn in this paper is that microfinance does alleviate poverty of the poor.

  9. DETERMINANT FACTORS EFFECTING POVERTY AMONG NEW CONVERTS IN SELANGOR, MALAYSIA

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    Fuadah Johari

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The justice in Islam had attracted and opens the hearts of non-muslins to accept Islam. The justice and truthfulness of Islamic teaching attract the human to be part of its through conversion or reconciliation of hearts (Muallaf al-Qulub and it is one of the zakat recipients mentioned in Al-Qur’an. In Selangor, zakat assistance to the new converts begins from the first day they become Muslims. The new Muslim would be immediately helped with MYR 500.00 monthly allowance for five years until they manage to act in accordance with Allah’s orders and to perform worshipping (Mukallaf. This paper identifies the factors of new converts’ poverty in Selangor, Malaysia using a logistic regression method. A set of survey questionnaires has been used in this research and 80 respondents were randomly selected from Selangor Zakat Centre (SZC zakat recipient’s list from the New Converts category for nine districts of Selangor in 2013. We estimate the probability of households with specified characteristics to fall below Malaysia’s official poverty line. Results show that education, size, region, income and amount of zakat received significantly reduces the chance of being poor while gender, age, status were not a significant predictor. Thus, these statistical measures have proven the positive role of zakat in reducing poverty among the new converts. The findings have important policy implications for zakat institution and Malaysian government which has pledged to reduce overall poverty rate to 2.8 percent and eradicates hardcore poverty by 2010 under the Ninth Malaysian Plan. =========================================== Keadilan dalam Islam telah menarik perhatian dan membuka hati non-muslim untuk menerima Islam. Keadilan dan kejujuran dalam ajaran Islam menarik banyak untuk masuk dalam Islam (Muallaf al-Qulub dan mereka menjadi salah satu penerima zakat seperti disebutkan dalam Al Qur'an. Di Selangor, bantuan zakat kepada para muallaf dimulai pada

  10. Poverty and vulnerability: risk factors in the education of the borough

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    Liilian Inés Castro Durán

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we analyze the negative impact that poverty and vulnerability have on families and, therefore, in the educational process of students in the Municipality VIII region of Biobío (Chile. At the same time, we are interested to know and appreciate more deeply the most influential social institution in the development of human beings - the family as the primary social group and of greater importance and significance. Then we stop at the concept of poverty with the intent to treat it as a present reality and specific to Latin America, from this stage, go into the province of Punjab, and reflect on the most influential factors. Finally, we mention that we have applied the methodology for the development of this research from a quantitative perspective and cutting descriptive survey, and also the results obtained, through which we will realize how a series of social conditions including poverty and vulnerability, severely damaging to families living in this environment, socially deprived by unemployment, shortages of inputs, inadequate minimum wage, etc. This context, absolutely unfavourable significantly impairs the teaching that it is necessary to carry out education of children of this Commune.

  11. China urban poverty and its contributing factors, 1986 - 2000

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    Food price increases and the introduction of radical social welfare and enterprise reforms during the 1990s generated significant changes in the lives of urban households in China. During this period urban poverty increased considerably. This paper uses household level data from 1986 to 2000 to examine what determines whether households fall below the poverty line over this period and investigates how the impact of these determinants have changed through time. We find that large households an...

  12. Urban Poverty in Asia

    OpenAIRE

    Asian Development Bank

    2014-01-01

    This report provides an overview of important urban poverty questions. What defines urban poverty and how is urban poverty being measured? What other factors beyond consumption poverty need to be tackled? Who are the urban poor? What relations exist between urban poverty and city size? What linkages exist between urbanization, income, and urban poverty? What policy responses to urban poverty are implemented in selected Asian countries? The report served as a background study for the Internati...

  13. Poverty of pensioners: factors of formation and overcoming condition

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    A. K. Solovyev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most serious sociopolitical problems in Russia, as well as in all civilised world, now is steady strengthening of economic stratification of the population and, as consequence - growth of relative poverty of a considerable part of the population. Most the poverty acute problem costs for so-called socially vulnerable categories of the population - children and pensioners whom or (children of concrete sources at all cannot have, or its (pensioners in the size insufficient for worthy existence have, but are thus deprived (on the objective bases physical possibility independently to change / raise level of own material maintenance. Besides both vulnerable categories of the population concern demographic groups of the raised physiological risk.

  14. Growth, Distribution, and Poverty in Africa: Messages from the 1990s. Poverty Dynamics in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiaensen, Luc; Demery, Lionel; Paternostro, Stefano

    This book reviews trends in household well-being in Africa during the 1990s. Using the better data sets now available, the main factors behind observed poverty changes are examined in eight countries: Ethiopia, Ghana, Madagascar, Mauritania, Nigeria, Uganda, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. A broad view of poverty is taken, which includes income poverty and…

  15. Barriers to primary care responsiveness to poverty as a risk factor for health

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    Bloch Gary

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Poverty is widely recognized as a major determinant of poor health, and this link has been extensively studied and verified. Despite the strong evidentiary link, little work has been done to determine what primary care health providers can do to address their patients' income as a risk to their health. This qualitative study explores the barriers to primary care responsiveness to poverty as a health issue in a well-resourced jurisdiction with near-universal health care insurance coverage. Methods One to one interviews were conducted with twelve experts on poverty and health in primary care in Ontario, Canada. Participants included family physicians, specialist physicians, nurse practitioners, community workers, advocates, policy experts and researchers. The interviews were analysed for anticipated and emergent themes. Results This study reveals provider- and patient-centred structural, attitudinal, and knowledge-based barriers to addressing poverty as a risk to health. While many of its findings reinforce previous work in this area, this study's findings point to a number of areas front line primary care providers could target to address their patients' poverty. These include a lack of provider understanding of the lived reality of poverty, leading to a failure to collect adequate data about patients' social circumstances, and to the development of inappropriate care plans. Participants also pointed to prejudicial attitudes among providers, a failure of primary care disciplines to incorporate approaches to poverty as a standard of care, and a lack of knowledge of concrete steps providers can take to address patients' poverty. Conclusions While this study reinforces, in a well-resourced jurisdiction such as Ontario, the previously reported existence of significant barriers to addressing income as a health issue within primary care, the findings point to the possibility of front line primary care providers taking direct steps

  16. Poverty as a Historical Risk Factor for Disease Development in Slovenian Classic Literature

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    Grega Kragelj

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Our national history was not in favor of a leasure lifestyle. We spent six hundred years as part of the Austro-Hungarian empire and then were cast aside as consequence of the centralistic politics in former Yugoslavia. It is not surprising, knowing these facts, that a crimson trail of poverty, death and despair could be followed throughout our classic literature. In this paper, basing on Slovenian classic literature, we try to describe poverty as a historical risk factor but staying true to historical data.

  17. Analysis of the factors affecting the poverty in rural areas around gold mine areas in West Sumbawa Regency

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    Ibrahim

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available West Sumbawa Regencyis one of the regencies that are rich of natural resources managed by PT. Newmont Nusa Tenggara. However, local communities around the gold mine areas have generally to date been poor. This study was aimed to (1 examine the effect of material poverty, physical weakness, isolation, vulnerability, and powerlessness on poverty, and (2 describe the distribution of rural povertybased on land slope mapsin gold mine areas in West Sumbawa Regency.This study applied a survey technique, observation, and structured interviews to collect data. The processing and analysis of data was carried out by a quantitative method using a multiple regression analysis. The results of the study showed that the factors significantly affecting the poverty among rural communities around gold mine areas were material poverty, physical weakness, isolation, vulnerability and powerlessness (R2 = 0.715. However, the mostly dominant factor affecting the poverty was powerlessness (t = 19.715. Meanwhile, the distribution of poverty based on topographic sites showed that the poverty occurred in villages with plain topography (Goa Village, terrain topography (Maluk Village, wave topography (Belo Village, and hilly topography (Sekongkang Bawah Village. The poverties occurred in all the villages were mostly affected by powerlessness with t values of 3.489, 13.921, 11.828, and 6.504, respectively. This condition was due to minimum access and communication by local communities to local government and the gold mining company of PT. Newmont Nusa Tenggara

  18. Factors that influence emotional disturbance in adults living in extreme poverty.

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    Palomar-Lever, Joaquina; Victorio-Estrada, Amparo

    2012-04-01

    Living in poverty conditions implies exposure to severe circumstances of social disadvantage, associated with greater propensity to contract illnesses. A negative correlation has consistently been observed between health and poverty. The chronic exposure to stress affects people's well-being through the development of symptoms of anxiety and depression. The suffering of these symptoms for a long time period may be considered as part of a more general syndrome of emotional disturbance, in detriment to a person's mental health. The objective of this study is to identify psychological factors that influence emotional disturbance, measured as symptoms of anxiety and depression, in adults living in poverty conditions in Mexico's central region. A total of 913 adults, 65.2% female, were surveyed. The mean age of the participants was 43.71 (±12.58) years and the mean number of years of schooling was 4.04 (±3.36). Variables corresponding to personal characteristics were measured. The results indicate that the most important risk factor for depression is anxiety and vice versa. Additionally, gender, negative self-esteem, lack of adequate strategies for confronting and resolving difficulties, and lack of self-regulation predicted depression, whereas stress, lack of self-regulation, and coping style predicted anxiety. These variables were better predictors than optimism, locus of control, sense of humor or religiosity. © 2011 The Authors. Scandinavian Journal of Psychology © 2011 The Scandinavian Psychological Associations.

  19. IMPACT OF SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC FACTORS ON POVERTY, A CASE STUDY OF SINDH

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    Anwar Ali Shah G.Syed

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of this paper is examine social and economic factors that are responsible for the poverty in rural Sindh. Data were collected from 2500 households from four districts i.e. Shikarpur, Larkana, Sukkur, and Jacobabad of upper Sindh by using the simple random technique; a structural questionnaire was design as an instrument tool for measuring the poverty. It was revealed that the poverty position in Jacobabad and Shikarpur is worsening compare with Larkana and Sukkur. There are other factors like tribal disputes among various tribes and law and order situation most of the businesses people shift their business from Jacobabad and Shikarpur. Access to health and education facilities all districts have slight variation except Jacobabad where the literacy ratio is pretty low. It was further revealed that the lack of this makes this vulnerable to natural disasters and uncertainties thereby reduction the earning potential of poor families. This truly depicts the perception of the poor people they were not knowing the poverty in real sense. The vulnerability of the poor household becomes evident from a very significant percentage of households without any legal right in all surveyed districts. The main findings of this research seems to suggest that on average of the household income generated from the agriculture and most of the farmers are facing lot of problems regarding availability of water and inputs. By the criterion of derived demand the households from two districts Sukkur and Larkana engaged in productive activities to earn more compare with the Shikarpur and Jacobabad

  20. Dimensionality of the Chinese Perceived Causes of Poverty Scale: Findings Based on Confirmatory Factor Analyses

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    Shek, Daniel T. L.; Ma, Cecilia Man-Sze

    2009-01-01

    The Chinese Perceived Causes of Poverty Scale (CPCPS) was constructed to assess Chinese people's beliefs about poverty. Four categories of explanations of poverty are covered in this scale: personal problems of poor people, lack of opportunities to escape from poverty, exploitation of poor people, and bad fate. Based on the responses of 1,519…

  1. Dimensionality of the Chinese Perceived Causes of Poverty Scale: Findings Based on Confirmatory Factor Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shek, Daniel T. L.; Ma, Cecilia Man-Sze

    2009-01-01

    The Chinese Perceived Causes of Poverty Scale (CPCPS) was constructed to assess Chinese people's beliefs about poverty. Four categories of explanations of poverty are covered in this scale: personal problems of poor people, lack of opportunities to escape from poverty, exploitation of poor people, and bad fate. Based on the responses of 1,519…

  2. Child Poverty and Child Outcomes.

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    Bradshaw, Jonathan

    2002-01-01

    Reviews the evidence on the prevalence of child poverty in Britain including: (1) how child poverty has changed over the last 20 years; (2) how child poverty in Britain compares with that in other countries; (3) characteristics of poor children; (4) impact of poverty on child well-being; and (5) government attempts to abolish child poverty. (SD)

  3. Hookworm and poverty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotez, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Human hookworm infection is the leading cause of anemia and undernutrition and the second most important parasitic infection of humans. Hookworm occurs almost exclusively in the setting of rural poverty in the developing countries of the tropics. The rural dependency reflects the precise soil and temperature requirements of the environmental life history stages of the parasite, whereas the relationship between hookworm and poverty is based on multiple factors, including inadequate sanitation, the absence of concrete floors in home dwellings, and lack of access to essential medicines. Also, hookworm not only occurs in the setting of poverty but also promotes poverty because of its health and educational effects in children, its adverse effect on pregnancy outcome, and its effect on worker productivity. Since the middle of the 20th century, poverty reduction and urbanization have successfully reduced the prevalence of hookworm in the world's industrialized nations and some middle-income countries. However, the control of hookworm in low-income countries still relies heavily on the frequent and periodic use of anthelminthic drugs either through deworming programs targeting school-aged children or through integrated control programs that simultaneously target the seven neglected tropical diseases, including hookworm. However, the high rates of hookworm reinfection and the possible emergence of drug resistance will ultimately require the development of new control tools--including the Human Hookworm Vaccine, one of several so-called antipoverty vaccines that could undergo development and testing over the next decade.

  4. Pulmonary tuberculosis and associated factors in areas of high levels of poverty in Chiapas, Mexico.

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    Sánchez-Pérez, H; Flores-Hernández, J; Jansá, J; Caylá, J; Martín-Mateo, M

    2001-04-01

    To estimate the prevalence of pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) and factors associated with PTB in areas of high levels of poverty in Chiapas, Mexico. In 1998 active case-finding was carried out among those aged over 14 years who had a cough of > or =15 days duration, in a convenience sample of 1894 households in 32 communities selected at random based on the level of poverty and on the level of access to health services, measured by travelling time ( or =1 hour) from the community to the nearest health care unit. Of the 277 identified with a productive cough, we obtained sputum samples from 228 for the purposes of detecting PTB through acid-fast smears and cultures. Mycobacteria characterization was carried out using the BACTEC method. The identification of factors associated with PTB was performed using bivariate analysis and via logistic regression models. A PTB rate of 276.9 per 100 000 persons aged > or =15 years was found (95% CI : 161-443). Blood in sputum was the only factor associated with PTB (none of the demographic or socioeconomic characteristics were). Of 16 positive cultures, 14 became contaminated. The two cultures characterized were Mycobacterium tuberculosis (one being multiresistant). The high prevalence of PTB detected indicates the need, both in the area studied and in others with similar conditions, to develop PTB control programmes which give priority to early diagnosis and to the provision of adequate treatment.

  5. Poverty, social stress & mental health.

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    Kuruvilla, A; Jacob, K S

    2007-10-01

    While there is increasing evidence of an association between poor mental health and the experience of poverty and deprivation, the relationship is complex. We discuss the epidemiological data on mental illness among the different socio-economic groups, look at the cause -effect debate on poverty and mental illness and the nature of mental distress and disorders related to poverty. Issues related to individual versus area-based poverty, relative poverty and the impact of poverty on woman's and child mental health are presented. This review also addresses factors associated with poverty and the difficulties in the measurement of mental health and illness and levels/impact of poverty.

  6. Poverty-associated risk factors for wheezing in the first year of life in Honduras and El Salvador.

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    Bueso, A; Figueroa, M; Cousin, L; Hoyos, W; Martínez-Torres, A E; Mallol, J; Garcia-Marcos, L

    2010-01-01

    Risk factors for wheezing specifically during the first year of life have been studied in well-developed countries, but the information from developing countries is very scarce. There are no such studies focusing on factors derived from poverty. The aim of the present study was to determine if risk factors related to poverty are associated to wheezing during the first year of life in infants from Honduras and El Salvador. A survey, using a validated questionnaire, was carried out in the metropolitan area of San Pedro Sula (Honduras) and in La Libertad (El Salvador) in centres where infants attended for a scheduled vaccination shot or a healthy child visit at 12 months of age. Fieldworkers offered questionnaires to parents and helped the illiterate when necessary. The main outcome variable was wheezing during the first year of life, as reported by parents. A total of 1047 infants in El Salvador and 780 in Honduras were included in the analysis. The prevalence of wheeze in the first year was higher in El Salvador (41.2%) than in Honduras (27.7%), as was recurrent wheezing defined as three or more episodes (18.4% vs. 11.7%). Wheezing and recurrent wheezing was associated to unpaved floor in the household (summary odds ratios for both countries 1.55, p=0.036 and 1.72, p=0.054 for any wheeze and recurrent wheezing, respectively); dust entering from streets (1.30, p=0.052 and 1.67, p=0.008); living in a heavily polluted area (1.33, p=0.037 and 1.52, p=0.033); and having mould stains on the household walls (1.36, p=0.072 and 1.76, p=0.007). Furthermore, marginal associations were found for additional person at home and use of kerosene as cooking fuel. University studies in the mother (0.34, p=0.046 and 0.32, p=0.022) and a professional occupation in the father (0.34, p=0.046 and 0.26, p=0.047) were associated to a lower risk. The prevalence of wheezing and recurrent wheezing is notoriously high in El Salvador and Honduras. In those populations factors related to poverty

  7. Poor People in Poor Places: Local Opportunity Structures and Household Poverty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotter, David A.

    2002-01-01

    Individualist and structuralist perspectives on poverty were integrated by examining the relationship between "people poverty" and "place poverty" in nonmetropolitan and metropolitan areas, using a multilevel framework. Both household compositional factors (including education) and contextual factors contributed to the nonmetro-metro difference in…

  8. Poverty Reduction

    OpenAIRE

    Ortiz, Isabel

    2007-01-01

    The paper reviews poverty trends and measurements, poverty reduction in historical perspective, the poverty-inequality-growth debate, national poverty reduction strategies, criticisms of the agenda and the need for redistribution, international policies for poverty reduction, and ultimately understanding poverty at a global scale. It belongs to a series of backgrounders developed at Joseph Stiglitz's Initiative for Policy Dialogue.

  9. Individualization of poverty?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Carsten Kronborg

    2015-01-01

    that Beck’s thesis about the individualization and democratization of poverty is based on narrow income based definitions and that (possible) empirical verification depends on the definitions of poverty and approaches used to examine poverty. My analyses show that the dynamic perspective (using income......The German Sociologist Ulrich Beck is best known for his book “Risk Society” which has been discussed extensively; however Beck’s claims about modern poverty have not received the same attention among poverty researchers. The individualization perspective views poverty as a relatively transient...... phenomenon and the democratization perspective views the risk of poverty as spread equally in the population. Both perspectives challenge the mainstream tradition of class analysis, and therefore both view poverty as largely independent of traditional stratification factors. In this article, I argue...

  10. The influencing factors of energy poverty in rural Cameroon; Les determinants de la pauvrete energetique en milieu rural au Cameroun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamdem, Maxime; Edzengte, Joseph

    2010-09-15

    The objective of this study is to assess the influencing factors of energy poverty in rural Cameroon. The method used is in two stages: the first stage is a statistical analysis that has allowed to determine the level of energy poverty in rural areas, which is 7.5%. The second stage assesses the influencing factors of this poverty type. The results show that the revenue impacts on energy poverty, as well as the size of the household, in which the arrival of an additional person increases by 1.16% the chances that the household will suffer from energy poverty. [French] L'objectif de cette etude est d'evaluer les determinants de la pauvrete energetique en milieu rural au Cameroun. La methode mise en oeuvre procede en deux etapes : la premiere est une analyse statistique qui a permis de determiner le seuil de pauvrete energetique en milieu rural, qui se situe a 7,5%. La deuxieme etape evalue les determinants de ce type de pauvrete. Les resultats indiquent que le revenu explique la pauvrete energetique, de meme que la taille du menage dont l'arrivee d'une personne supplementaire accroit de 1,16% les chances de ce menage d'etre pauvre sur le plan energetique.

  11. Poverty linked with population says Chinese delegation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    In April 1996, at the senior officials' segment of the 52nd Session of the UN Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP), the Vice Foreign Minister from China told participants that excessive population growth along with many other adverse factors strongly hampers further sustained development of Asia-Pacific countries. Other adverse factors include environmental degradation, ecological imbalance, over-exploitation of resources, and an uncertain economic environment. Widespread poverty exists in the Asia-Pacific region. 730 million people, 25% of the region's population, live in poverty. This poor population makes up about 66% of the world's poor. Even though most poor people live in rural areas, urban poverty is expanding along with rapid urbanization. China has 65 million people living below the poverty line. The Chinese official endorsed ESCAP's work in poverty and population. The official backs the value of information activities.

  12. The psychology of poverty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan Janse van Rensburg

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This article investigates the psychological experience of poor people and the pastoral responsibility to guide them towards poverty transition. A qualitative analysis of the narratives of three participants is compared to the enthralling history of Florcy Mabuza who in her book, Poverty mentality: The root of poverty, explains the dangers of a spiritual and emotional mindset that precipitates and feeds the plight of poverty. Using a literature study to interpret the narratives as well as a method of encoding, basic mindsets of poverty and factors that influence this mindset are identified. The study culminates in conclusions to encourage further research and pastoral involvement.

  13. Social evils, poverty & health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Rajeev; Kumar, Praneet

    2007-10-01

    There is a close association between social circumstances and health. In India, there is a significant burden of both communicable and non communicable diseases. Risk factors responsible for these conditions are underweight, unsafe sex, unsafe water, poor sanitation and hygiene, indoor smoke pollution, zinc, iron and vitamin A deficiency, tobacco use, high blood pressure, and high cholesterol. All these risk factors are influenced by social factors and in India the more important factors are poverty and illiteracy. Changing lifestyles as a result of rising incomes are significant risk factors for non communicable diseases. The social evils that influence poverty and health are macrolevel national and regional issues such as physical geography, governance patterns and failures, geopolitics, economic policy, natural resources decline, population growth, the demographic trap and the fiscal trap. Household and microlevel factors include the poverty trap, cultural barriers, lack of innovation and saving, absence of trade or business, unemployment, technological reversal, adverse productivity shock, social issues related to females, and adolescent social issues. Social determinants important for non communicable diseases, defined by the World Health Organization include the social gradient, stress, early life events, social exclusion, improper work conditions, unemployment, lack of social support, addiction, food scarcity or excess and uneven distribution, lack of proper transport, and illiteracy or low educational status. There are multiple pathways through which social factors influence health, and pathophysiological mechanisms involve homeostatic and allostatic changes in response to stress, neuroendocrine changes and altered autonomic functions, and abnormal inflammatory and immune responses. A concerted action to eradicate these social evils shall have to focus on reducing poverty, improving educational status and providing equitable and accessible healthcare to all.

  14. Study on temporal variation and spatial distribution for rural poverty in China based on GIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xianfeng; Xu, Xiuli; Wang, Yingjie; Cui, Jing; Mo, Hongyuan; Liu, Ling; Yan, Hong; Zhang, Yan; Han, Jiafu

    2009-07-01

    Poverty is one of the most serious challenges all over the world, is an obstacle to hinder economics and agriculture in poverty area. Research on poverty alleviation in China is very useful and important. In this paper, we will explore the comprehensive poverty characteristics in China, analyze the current poverty status, spatial distribution and temporal variations about rural poverty in China, and to category the different poverty types and their spatial distribution. First, we achieved the gathering and processing the relevant data. These data contain investigation data, research reports, statistical yearbook, censuses, social-economic data, physical and anthrop geographical data, etc. After deeply analysis of these data, we will get the distribution of poverty areas by spatial-temporal data model according to different poverty given standard in different stages in China to see the poverty variation and the regional difference in County-level. Then, the current poverty status, spatial pattern about poverty area in villages-level will be lucubrated; the relationship among poverty, environment (including physical and anthrop geographical factors) and economic development, etc. will be expanded. We hope our research will enhance the people knowledge of poverty in China and contribute to the poverty alleviation in China.

  15. An inquiry into socio-historical factors contributing to poverty within the Early Church in Palestine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederick Kakwata

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This article seeks to investigate the root causes of poverty in the early Christian community.The view that is put forward and argued in this article is that poverty was widespread in early Christianity with particular reference to the converted Jews in Palestine. This was the result of socio-historical factors, namely the Israelites’ contact with Canaanites during the conquest,and the implementation of the secular leadership paradigm derived from those paga n nations around Israel, which led to their subjugation under the oppressive and exploitative and economic structures of the Roman Empire. For that reason many believers, newly converted Jews, at that time were destitute and impoverished as they belonged to the lower classes in society. In spite of this state of affairs, the early Christians in Jerusalem seemed to have faced the challenges of poverty with a measure of success as can be attested by the statement ‘for there was no needy person amongst them …’ (Ac 4:34.’n Ondersoek na sosio-historiese faktore wat tot armoede binne die vroeë Christelikekerk in Palestina bygedra het. Die doel van hierdie artikel is om die grondoorsake van armoede in die vroeë Christelike gemeenskap te ondersoek met spesifieke verwysing na die bekeerde Jode in Palestina. Die standpunt wat in hierdie artikel gestel en beredeneer word, is dat armoede algemeen in die vroeë Christendom voorgekom het. Dit was as gevolg van verskeie sosio-historiese faktore, waaronder die Israeliete se kontak met die Kanaäniete ná die inname, asook die instelling van die sekulêre paradigma oor leierskap wat Israel aan die naburige heidennasies ontleen het en wat op hulle verknegting onder die Romeinse Ryk se onderdrukkende en uitbuitende strukture uitgeloop het. ’n Groot aantal gelowiges, bekeerde Jode, was in daardie tyd behoeftig en armoedig omdat hulle deel van die laer klasse in die samelewing was. Tog, ten spyte van hierdie omstandighede, het die vroeë Christene

  16. The neurology of poverty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, G

    1982-01-01

    An intellectual deficit is known to exist in populations where extreme poverty is rife and is thus seen extensively in the lower socio-economic strata of underdeveloped nations. Poverty is a complex entity whose sociological and economic indicators often bear little relevance to the biological agents which can affect the central nervous system. An attempt is made to express poverty in terms of identifiable defects, physiological in nature. Thus adverse socio-economic factors are converted into specific biological entities which, though necessary for adequate development of the brain, are restricted where there is poverty. A number of causative deficiencies, including nutritional, visual, auditory, tactile, vestibular, affective, and other stimuli are postulated. These interact and potentiate one another. Each is capable of an independent action on the brain and examples are given of some sensory deprivations as well as malnutrition and their possible mechanism of action. If the various deficiencies can independently harm the brain, then a number of separate specific functions should be affected; examples are offered. The nature of this intellectual deficit is probably a non-fulfillment of genetic potential of certain specific functions of the brain, which may exhibit limited variations between one community and another, depending on cultural differences. The deleterious effect of this intellectual impairment is seen most clearly in figures of school desertion, for example in Latin America. Analogous data for adults is scarce.

  17. Child poverty and changes in child poverty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen-Hao; Corak, Miles

    2008-08-01

    This article offers a cross-country overview of child poverty, changes in child poverty, and the impact of public policy in North America and Europe. Levels and changes in child poverty rates in 12 Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) countries during the 1990s are documented using data from the Luxembourg Income Study project, and a decomposition analysis is used to uncover the relative role of demographic factors, labor markets, and income transfers from the state in determining the magnitude and direction of the changes. Child poverty rates fell noticeably in only three countries and rose in three others. In no country were demographic factors a force for higher child poverty rates, but these factors were also limited in their ability to cushion children from adverse shocks originating in the labor market or the government sector. Increases in the labor market engagement of mothers consistently lowered child poverty rates, while decreases in the employment rates and earnings of fathers were a force for higher rates. Finally, there is no single road to lower child poverty rates. Reforms to income transfers intended to increase labor supply may or may not end up lowering the child poverty rate.

  18. Lisrel Analysis of Factors for Empowering Producers to Abolish Livelihood Poverty through Optimizing Agricultural Water Resources Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Panahi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Most of the projected increase in global population will take place in third world countries that already suffer from water, food, and health problems. Irrigation in developing countries tends to be stereotyped as equity reducing, in competition with other uses for scarce water resources. Agricultural intensification through the practice of irrigation as a strategy for poverty reduction is examined. Water users were surveyed in order to explore their perception about the factors influencing the optimizing water consumption in agricultural sectors in Iran. This study looks into water-poverty interfaces as well as into approaches to and tools of, managing water in such a manner that water sector activities can contribute to alleviation of poverty. In addition, this study aims to empower water users with information on agricultural waste-water. Approach: The methodology used in this study involved a combination of descriptive and quantitative research. The total population was 350 producers in six provinces in Iran. Results: Based on the perception of the respondents and ordinal factor analysis, the factors were categorized into four group’s namely technical and practical, recognition and managing water equipment and constructive ordered by the magnitude of their impact. The total variance explained by these 4 factors is 54.27% as effective mechanisms in optimizing agricultural water resources management. Structural equation model is expected to be useful for designing targeted optimizing agricultural water resources management and poverty alleviation strategies that also enhance agricultural-productivity growth. Conclusion/Recommendations: Where there is equity in resource distribution, the impact of improved water management on agricultural productivity growth has been more poverty reducing. Using water better means improving the productivity of agricultural water in both irrigated and rainfed systems, through multiple

  19. Poverty in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Anders Bøggild

    2009-01-01

    differentiation in the methods, measurement and results though most accept the concept of relative poverty (see for instance Peter Townsend 2006). We see qualitative and quantitative studies; studies based on the median income, studies based on poverty lines from minimum budget definitions and surveys including......Recently poverty has become an issue in Danish public debates and research after some quiet years with not much attention. The intention with this paper is to make a descriptive covering view of the Danish research on poverty since the year of 2000 until summer 2009. We see quite some...... questions on deprivation etc.. This paper will present all major studies of empirical poverty research and discuss strengths and inadequacies in the research of poverty and finally raise some perspectives from the current political and professional debates which question poverty research....

  20. Urban air pollution, poverty, violence and health--Neurological and immunological aspects as mediating factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristiansson, Marianne; Sörman, Karolina; Tekwe, Carmen; Calderón-Garcidueñas, Lilian

    2015-07-01

    Rapid rural-urban migration has created overcrowded areas characterized by concentrated poverty and increases in indoor and outdoor air pollutants. These "hotspots" constitute an increased risk of violence and disease outbreaks. We hypothesize that the effects of poverty and associated air pollution-related stress on impaired cognitive skills are mediated by inflammatory cytokines. A research framework is proposed, encompassing (i) an epidemiological investigation of associations between poverty, high concentrations of air pollutants, violence and health, (ii) a longitudinal follow-up of working memory capacities and inflammatory markers, and (iii) intervention programs aiming to strengthen employability and decreased exposures to toxic air pollutants.

  1. The manifestation of depression in the context of urban poverty: a factor analysis of the Children's Depression Inventory in low-income urban youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Jeremy J; Grant, Kathryn E; Amrhein, Kelly; Carter, Jocelyn Smith; Farahmand, Farahnaz; Harrison, Aubrey; Thomas, Kina J; Carleton, Russell A; Lugo-Hernandez, Eduardo; Katz, Brian N

    2014-12-01

    The current study used confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) to compare the fit of 2 factor structures for the Children's Depression Inventory (CDI) in an urban community sample of low-income youth. Results suggest that the 6-factor model developed by Craighead and colleagues (1998) was a strong fit to the pattern of symptoms reported by low-income urban youth and was a superior fit with these data than the original 5-factor model of the CDI (Kovacs, 1992). Additionally, results indicated that all 6 factors from the Craighead model contributed to the measurement of depression, including School Problems and Externalizing Problems especially for older adolescents. This pattern of findings may reflect distinct contextual influences of urban poverty on the manifestation and measurement of depression in youth.

  2. Social Structure and Child Poverty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferriss, Abbott L.

    2006-01-01

    Child poverty, as a critical indicator of the QOL, is intricately related to the social structure of the community. This hypothesis is explored for the 159 counties of Georgia for the year 2000. The influence of demographic, economic, family and health factors upon child poverty are explored through models of total, black and white child poverty.…

  3. Accounting for trends in health poverty: a decomposition analysis for Britain, 1991-2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzezinski, Michal

    2015-03-01

    We use data from the British Household Panel Survey to analyse changes in poverty of self-reported health from 1991 to 2008. We use the indices recently introduced by Bennett and Hatzimasoura (Poverty measurement with ordinal data. Institute for International Economic Policy, IIEP-WP-2011-14, 2011), which can be interpreted as ordinal counterparts of the classical Foster et al. (Econometrica 52(3):761-766, 1984) poverty measures. We decompose changes in self-reported health poverty over time into within-group health poverty changes and population shifts between groups. We also provide statistical inference for the Bennett and Hatzimasoura's (Poverty measurement with ordinal data. Institute for International Economic Policy, IIEP-WP-2011-14, 2011) indices. Results suggest that when "fair" self-reported health status is chosen as a health poverty threshold all of the used indices indicate the growth of health poverty in Britain. However, when the health poverty threshold is lower ("poor" self-reported health status) the increase in health poverty incidence was compensated by decreasing average health poverty depth and improving health inequality among those who are poor with respect to health. The subgroup decompositions suggest that the most important factors accounting for the changes in total health poverty in Britain include a rise of both health poverty and population shares of persons cohabiting and couples with no children as well as an increase of the population of retired persons.

  4. Risk Factors for Breast Cancer, Including Occupational Exposures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabete Weiderpass

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The knowledge on the etiology of breast cancer has advanced substantially in recent years, and several etiological factors are now firmly established. However, very few new discoveries have been made in relation to occupational risk factors. The International Agency for Research on Cancer has evaluated over 900 different exposures or agents to-date to determine whether they are carcinogenic to humans. These evaluations are published as a series of Monographs (www.iarc.fr. For breast cancer the following substances have been classified as “carcinogenic to humans” (Group 1: alcoholic beverages, exposure to diethylstilbestrol, estrogen-progestogen contraceptives, estrogen-progestogen hormone replacement therapy and exposure to X-radiation and gamma-radiation (in special populations such as atomic bomb survivors, medical patients, and in-utero exposure. Ethylene oxide is also classified as a Group 1 carcinogen, although the evidence for carcinogenicity in epidemiologic studies, and specifically for the human breast, is limited. The classification “probably carcinogenic to humans” (Group 2A includes estrogen hormone replacement therapy, tobacco smoking, and shift work involving circadian disruption, including work as a flight attendant. If the association between shift work and breast cancer, the most common female cancer, is confirmed, shift work could become the leading cause of occupational cancer in women.

  5. Risk factors for breast cancer, including occupational exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiderpass, Elisabete; Meo, Margrethe; Vainio, Harri

    2011-03-01

    The knowledge on the etiology of breast cancer has advanced substantially in recent years, and several etiological factors are now firmly established. However, very few new discoveries have been made in relation to occupational risk factors. The International Agency for Research on Cancer has evaluated over 900 different exposures or agents to-date to determine whether they are carcinogenic to humans. These evaluations are published as a series of Monographs (www.iarc.fr). For breast cancer the following substances have been classified as "carcinogenic to humans" (Group 1): alcoholic beverages, exposure to diethylstilbestrol, estrogen-progestogen contraceptives, estrogen-progestogen hormone replacement therapy and exposure to X-radiation and gamma-radiation (in special populations such as atomic bomb survivors, medical patients, and in-utero exposure). Ethylene oxide is also classified as a Group 1 carcinogen, although the evidence for carcinogenicity in epidemiologic studies, and specifically for the human breast, is limited. The classification "probably carcinogenic to humans" (Group 2A) includes estrogen hormone replacement therapy, tobacco smoking, and shift work involving circadian disruption, including work as a flight attendant. If the association between shift work and breast cancer, the most common female cancer, is confirmed, shift work could become the leading cause of occupational cancer in women.

  6. Measuring Chronic Non-Income Poverty

    OpenAIRE

    Klasen, Stephan; Günther, Isabel

    2007-01-01

    An increasing interest in poverty dynamics has lately also led to an extensive literature on the analysis of chronic poverty. Based on Amartya Sen?s groundbreaking work on capabilities and functionings static poverty measures have long used non-income indicators. In contrast, measures of poverty dynamics - including chronic poverty – have in general conceptualised poverty only in an income dimension. Hence, this paper first critically discusses the conceptual and empirical potentials and limi...

  7. 边境地区贫困农户多维特征及致贫因素分析--基于广西崇左市贫困户调查数据%Multidimensional Characters of Poor Farmers and Poverty Factors Analysis in Border Areas:Based on the Survey Data of Poor Households in Chongzuo, Guangxi

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶慧; 陈敏莉

    2016-01-01

    Accurate identification is the primary task of precision poverty alleviation in the border areas .Compared with the single di-mension of income poverty indicators, including health, education, housing, labor, land and income of the multidimensional poverty indica-tors more reflected the whole picture of poverty in rural areas.In each dimension, there are different levels of poverty in border areas.Under the characteristics of poverty in the multidimensional and poverty factors of diversification , the border areas of poverty alleviation and develop-ment should be established on the basis of Multidimensional Poverty identification and special poverty reduction as the main body , regional development and targeted assistance as a means of precise system of poverty reduction .%精准识别是边境地区精准扶贫的首要工作。较之单维收入贫困指标,包含健康、教育、居住、劳动力、耕地和收入的多维贫困指标更能反映农村人口的贫困全貌。边境地区贫困农户在每个维度上均存在不同程度的贫困,待遇县比边境县贫困程度更深更广且致贫因素也不尽相同。在贫困特征多维化和致贫因素多元化背景下,边境地区扶贫开发应建立起以多维贫困识别为基础,专项扶贫为主体,区域开发和定点帮扶为手段的精准扶贫体系。

  8. Strategies for poverty reduction

    OpenAIRE

    Øyen, Else

    2003-01-01

    SIU konferanse Solstrand 6.-7. October 2003 Higher education has a value of its own. When linked to the issue of poverty reduction it is necessary to ask another set of questions, including the crutial one whether higher education in general is the best tool for poverty reduction.

  9. Strategies for poverty reduction

    OpenAIRE

    Øyen, Else

    2003-01-01

    SIU konferanse Solstrand 6.-7. October 2003 Higher education has a value of its own. When linked to the issue of poverty reduction it is necessary to ask another set of questions, including the crutial one whether higher education in general is the best tool for poverty reduction.

  10. Challenge Poverty

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1996-01-01

    IN the 1996 International Year for Eliminating Poverty while the world claims a war against poverty, a movement with the aim of helping mothers in poverty is being carried out in China. This movement is entitled "Happiness Project," with the intention of bringing better lives to China’s impoverished mothers. Among the 65 million people living in poverty in China more than 15 million of them are poor mothers.

  11. 农民工贫困的特征·成因及破解对策%The Characteristic, Contributing Factor and Countermeasures of the Migrant Workers' Poverty

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王竹林; 吕默

    2011-01-01

    农民工是我国经济社会转型期的特殊群体,他们的贫困具有转移性、边缘性、介入性、聚集性、发展性、循环累积性以及代际传承性等特征.农民工贫困包括资本贫困、权利贫困及其可持续发展能力贫困,其中资本贫困和权利贫困是阻碍农民工城市生存、发展,乃至于实现市民化的工具性手段,而可持续发展能力贫困才是其贫困的真正根源.只有进行制度重构、资本赋予和能力再造,才能使农民工走出贫困的陷阱.%The migrant workers are the special group during China' s economic and social transition. The migrant workers' poverty has the characteristics oftransfer,periphery,intervention,agglomeration,development,circulatory accumulation and intergenerational inheritance. The migrant workers' poverty includes capital poverty, right poverty and the poverty of sustainable development capacity. The capital poverty and right poverty are the means blocking the migrant workers' existence and development in city, and even the realization of urbanization, while the poverty of sustainable development capacity is actually the root cause of poverty. Only by restructuring system,investing capital and remodeling capacity can farmers get rid of the mire of poverty.

  12. Poverty persistence and poverty dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Biewen, Martin

    2014-01-01

    A considerable part of the poverty that is measured in a single period is transitory rather than persistent. In most countries, only a portion of people who are currently poor are persistently poor. People who are persistently poor or who cycle into and out of poverty should be the main focus of anti-poverty policies. Understanding the characteristics of the persistently poor, and the circumstances and mechanisms associated with entry into and exit from poverty, can help to inform governments...

  13. Early Childhood Poverty: A Statistical Profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Younghwan; Lu, Hsien-Hen

    Noting that young children in poverty face a greater likelihood of impaired development because of their increased exposure to a number of risk factors associated with poverty, this report presents statistical information on the incidence of poverty during early childhood. The report notes that the poverty rate for U.S. children under age 3…

  14. Multidimensional poverty measure and analysis: a case study from Hechi City, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanhui; Wang, Baixue

    2016-01-01

    Aiming at the anti-poverty outline of China and the human-environment sustainable development, we propose a multidimensional poverty measure and analysis methodology for measuring the poverty-stricken counties and their contributing factors. We build a set of multidimensional poverty indicators with Chinese characteristics, integrating A-F double cutoffs, dimensional aggregation and decomposition approach, and GIS spatial analysis to evaluate the poor's multidimensional poverty characteristics under different geographic and socioeconomic conditions. The case study from 11 counties of Hechi City shows that, firstly, each county existed at least four respects of poverty, and overall the poverty level showed the spatial pattern of surrounding higher versus middle lower. Secondly, three main poverty contributing factors were unsafe housing, family health and adults' illiteracy, while the secondary factors include fuel type and children enrollment rate, etc., generally demonstrating strong autocorrelation; in terms of poverty degree, the western of the research area shows a significant aggregation effect, whereas the central and the eastern represent significant spatial heterogeneous distribution. Thirdly, under three kinds of socioeconomic classifications, the intra-classification diversities of H, A, and MPI are greater than their inter-classification ones, while each of the three indexes has a positive correlation with both the rocky desertification degree and topographic fragmentation degree, respectively. This study could help policymakers better understand the local poverty by identifying the poor, locating them and describing their characteristics, so as to take differentiated poverty alleviation measures according to specific conditions of each county.

  15. Poverty, sex and HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nattrass, Nicoli

    2009-10-01

    There is an ongoing debate about the relative importance of economic factors (notably poverty) and sexual behavior in driving the AIDS epidemic. This paper draws on relevant research and cross-country regression analysis to argue that the impact of economic determinants is dwarfed by contextual factors within Africa. The regression analysis suggests that controlling for per capita income, calories per capita and the ratio of female to male participation rates (none of which were statistically significant): being a Southern African country increases expected HIV prevalence 8.3 times; being in the rest of Sub-Saharan Africa 3 times; being a predominantly Protestant country 2.5 times; and being a predominantly Muslim country reduces expected HIV prevalence to 62% of the base case. Including the share of income going to the poor did not improve the model and was itself statistically insignificant. The analysis suggests that poverty may play a role in the HIV epidemic in some countries (and may well be a factor affecting the vulnerability of some people to HIV infection in all countries) but that its overall impact is dwarfed by social and behavioral factors.

  16. Poverty and inequality issues in Albania: trends and determinants

    OpenAIRE

    Myftaraj (Tomori) Elena

    2010-01-01

    Poverty and inequality are complex and widespread phenomena. Poverty is an indicator and the main factor of inequality, so reduction of poverty is one of the biggest challenges for economic and social consolidation of a country. There are different concepts of poverty, in this paper we are focused on the concept of absolute poverty. The main objective of this paper is to conduct an analysis on the trends of poverty and inequality indicators, as well as an analysis on the reduction of poverty ...

  17. Poverty and inequality issues in Albania: trends and determinants

    OpenAIRE

    Myftaraj (Tomori) Elena

    2010-01-01

    Poverty and inequality are complex and widespread phenomena. Poverty is an indicator and the main factor of inequality, so reduction of poverty is one of the biggest challenges for economic and social consolidation of a country. There are different concepts of poverty, in this paper we are focused on the concept of absolute poverty. The main objective of this paper is to conduct an analysis on the trends of poverty and inequality indicators, as well as an analysis on the reduction of poverty ...

  18. Poverty, Trauma, and Infant Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, Alicia F.; Osofsky, Joy D.

    2009-01-01

    Young children growing up in poverty face chronic risk factors, including abuse and neglect, severe maternal depression, parental substance abuse, harsh parenting, and family and community violence as well as greater exposure to physical risks, including substandard housing, lack of access to resources, and environmental toxins. The authors offer…

  19. Some Thoughts on Mexican Poverty Viewed from the Perspective of the World Population Plan of Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serron, Luis A.

    The paper summarizes findings of a study of Mexican poverty (SO 010 522), and relates these findings to guidelines of the World Population Plan of Action. The study indicated that poverty in Mexico is based upon national and international economic, political, and social factors. Included among these factors are exploitation of labor, rapid…

  20. The dynamics of childhood poverty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcoran, M E; Chaudry, A

    1997-01-01

    Child poverty rates have remained high since the middle of the 1970s. While several trends, including declines in the number of children per family and increases in parental years of schooling, worked to reduce child poverty rates, several others, including show economic growth, widening economic inequality, and increases in the proportion of children living in mother-only families, had the opposite effect, pushing more children into poverty. Poverty is a common risk: One-third of all children will be poor for at least one year. For many, poverty lasts only a short while, but for a small percentage, poverty persists both throughout childhood and into the adult years. Poverty is not shared equally across different demographic groups. African-American children. Latino children, and children in mother-only families are disproportionately poor. Long-term poverty is even more concentrated than single-year poverty. In 1992, almost 90% of long-term poor children were African-American as compared to all poor children (single-year and long-term poor), of whom 60% were white. Both family structure and the labor market are implicated in long-term childhood poverty. Changes in employment of family members and changes in family composition are each strongly associated with transitions into and out of childhood poverty. Of these, changes in employment are the most important.

  1. Perinatal risk factors including malformation; Perinatale Risikofaktoren einschliesslich Fehlbildungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brachner, A.; Grosche, B.

    1991-10-01

    The study gives a survey of the factors most frequently mentioned in the literature as factors likely to adversely affect a pregnancy. One essential aspect is the discussion of those factors that can be counted among the causes of malformations, as among others, prenatal radiation exposure. The study prepared within the framework of the research project `Radiobiological environmental monitoring in Bavaria` is intended to serve as a basis for a retrospective and prospective evaluation of infant mortality, perinatal conditions and occurrence of malformations in Bavaria, with the principal idea of drawing up an environment - related health survey. The study therefore, in addition to ionizing radiation also takes into account other detectable risks within the ecologic context, as e.g. industrial installations, refuse incineration plants or waste dumps, or urbanity. (orig./MG). [Deutsch] In der vorliegenden Arbeit wird ein Ueberblick ueber die haeufigsten in der Literatur beschriebenen Faktoren, die einen unguenstigen Einfluss auf den Schwangerschaftsverlauf ausueben koennen, gegeben. Ein Hauptgewicht liegt dabei auf der Beschreibung von solchen Faktoren, die mit der Induktion von Fehlbildungen in Zusammenhang gebracht werden koennen, so unter anderem auch der praenatalen Strahlenexposition. Diese Arbeit, die im Rahmen des Forschungsvorhabens `Strahlenbiologisches Umweltmonitoring Bayern` angefertigt wurde, bildet die Grundlage einer im Sinne einer umweltbezogenen Gesundheitsberichterstattung retro- bzw. prospektiv angelegten Auswertung der Saeuglingssterblichkeit, des Perinatalgeschehens und der Fehlbildungshaeufigkeit in Bayern, wobei neben der ionisierenden Strahlung als Risikofaktor auch andere im Rahmen einer oekologischen Studie erfassbare Risiken, wie beispielsweise Industrieansiedlungen, Muellverbrennungsanlagen und -deponien oder Urbanitaet beruecksichtigt werden sollen. (orig./MG).

  2. What socio-demographic factors influence poverty and financial health care access among disabled people in Flanders: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Margo; Augustyns, Nele; Janssens, Herman; Vriesacker, Bart; Van Hal, Guido

    2014-02-12

    Current literature shows that people with a disability have a lower income than people without a disability. Disabled people often experience difficulties with health care access.The objective of this study is to assess the current financial situation and poverty rate amongst disabled people in Flanders. Furthermore we wanted to analyze factors that contribute to the risk of poverty and problems with financial health care access in adult people with a disability in Flanders. An online and paper survey were constructed and made available through two large organizations for people with different types of disability in Flanders. Descriptive statistics and logistic regression analysis were performed. In this convenience sample, 20.9% of the 889 respondents live under the poverty threshold. Important contributing factors to the risk of poverty are having children (OR 3.43, 95% CI 2.10-5.59) and a low level of dependence (OR 16.40, 95% CI 6.21-43.28). 25.2% of the respondents did not access health care because of financial shortcomings. A low level of dependence is one important contributing factor (OR 3.16, 95% CI 1.41-6.98) to limited financial health care access. This research confirms that disability is associated with a higher risk of poverty and impaired financial health care access.

  3. Reducing Poverty

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    Big cities such as Beijing, Shanghai and Guangzhou are little different from any other world metropolis and belie the unimaginable degree of poverty in certain rural areas of China. Staff reporter Zhang Hua went to Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region to report on a poverty reduction project called "Love of the Earth, Mother's Water Tank" launched by the China Women's

  4. Understanding Poverty

    OpenAIRE

    Anne Jerneck

    2015-01-01

    Policies and strategies to fight global environmental degradation, gender inequality, and poverty are often inadequate, ineffective, or insufficient. In response, this article seeks potential synergies and leverage points between three significant interrelated discourses that are often treated separately—development, gender, and environment. Proceeding from a brief history of development thinking and poverty definition...

  5. Understanding Poverty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Jerneck

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Policies and strategies to fight global environmental degradation, gender inequality, and poverty are often inadequate, ineffective, or insufficient. In response, this article seeks potential synergies and leverage points between three significant interrelated discourses that are often treated separately—development, gender, and environment. Proceeding from a brief history of development thinking and poverty definitions, I describe indicators, strategies, and approaches to poverty reduction and gender equality. Second, I analyze how targeting, mainstreaming, and market-based initiatives all fail both to distinguish empirical from analytical gender and to incorporate environment and gender into development policy and action—despite their key role in meeting the normative goal of poverty reduction. Third, through a political-ecology lens, I suggest an integrated approach to poverty, inequality, and socioenvironmental challenges that arise at the intersections of development, gender, and environment, and for that, I draw examples from research on social and environmental change and action in sub-Saharan Africa.

  6. The relationship of individual and family factors to the psychological well-being of junior high school students living in urban poverty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Haan, L G; MacDermid, S

    1998-01-01

    This study examined the contribution of individual and family factors to psychological adjustment in a sample of junior high school students living in urban poverty. Identity development and perceived parental treatment were hypothesized to serve as mediating, or protective, factors between economic hardship and levels of self-esteem, depression, and loneliness. Consistent with the hypotheses, identity development did serve as a mediator between poverty and psychological adjustment. While perceived parental treatment was not related to economic hardship, it was clearly associated with well-being in this sample. Findings are discussed in terms of the differing contributions of family and individual development, as well as the importance of mediators in assessing the effects of poverty on young adolescents.

  7. Law's Poverty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel M Modiri

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This article adopts an analysis that explicitly politicises poverty and relates it to the concrete history of racialised capitalism and structural inequality that defined colonialism and apartheid and continues to persist and intensify in "post"-apartheid South Africa. Rather than formulating racialised poverty in legalist, economist or managerial terms, it should rather be understood as a form of oppression that comprises exploitation, marginalisation, powerlessness, cultural imperialism and violence. Such a formulation would make social structure, historical injustice and power central and would also allow for poverty to be grasped beyond a purely distributive logic by bringing to light the non-distributive, non-economic dimensions of poverty. Comprehending poverty in this way, as not only a question of economic distribution and empowerment, but also one of ethical, moral and even ontological recognition necessitates an enquiry into the emancipatory force of rights. Given their centrality in political and social discourse and in legal scholarship on poverty, it is worth considering whether and to what extent rights can be utilised in the struggle against (racialised poverty.

  8. What do the World Bank's poverty assessments teach us about poverty in Sub-Saharan Africa?

    OpenAIRE

    Hanmer, L.C.; Pyatt, G.; White, H.

    1999-01-01

    Metadata only record As part of the World Bank's poverty reduction strategy, Poverty Assessments have been carried out for a number of countries which analyse who the poor are, the causes of poverty and poverty reduction policies. This article reviews what can be learnt from the twenty-five Assessments prepared for countries in sub-Saharan Africa up to 1996. Whilst other factors are acknowledged in identifying the poor, the Assessments over-emphasize income-poverty defined against an inevi...

  9. Agricultural Production Assets Transfer and Poverty Upward Mobility in Isolated Areas of Zambia: A Domestic Life Cycle Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin W. Muyunda

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In Zambia poverty mitigation programmes based on agricultural production assets transfer constitute social protection and have been implemented to help the poor change their experiences of poverty and transform their social economic relationships. The effect of these programmes in realizing substantial poverty upward mobility has however been hindered by a myriad of factors including failure to understand the poor’s poverty situation and consequently misdirecting the poverty interventions. This study aims at clarifying changes in experiences of poverty due to agricultural production assets transfer, and identify potential intrinsic household attributes that could influence effective agricultural assets utilization among households within domestic life cycle stages. Participatory poverty profiling and rapid appraisals were done to respectively identify poverty perceptions and experiences, and elicit household attributes perceived to influence effective asset utilization. Data was collected from 150 randomly selected households. Results indicate that agricultural production assets transfer to poor rural households can help mitigate their poverty, but movement out of poverty does not spontaneously cover all poverty dimensions, and could be affected by intrinsic attributes of a household. Thus, anti-poverty programmes should pay enough attention not only to community age stratification but also to intrinsic household attributes and basic need areas which may respond most to interventions among the domestic life cycle stages.

  10. Law's Poverty

    OpenAIRE

    Modiri, Joel M

    2015-01-01

    This article adopts an analysis that explicitly politicises poverty and relates it to the concrete history of racialised capitalism and structural inequality that defined colonialism and apartheid and continues to persist and intensify in "post"-apartheid South Africa. Rather than formulating racialised poverty in legalist, economist or managerial terms, it should rather be understood as a form of oppression that comprises exploitation, marginalisation, powerlessness, cultural imperialism and...

  11. Escaping Poverty

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI LI

    2010-01-01

    @@ While the global economic crisis still threatens to trap tens of millions of people in extreme poverty, alleviation initiatives in China are gaining new momentum and increasing recognition from the international community. From lifting innumerable people out of poverty by satisfying basic needs of food, clothes and shelter during the past three decades, the Chinese Government's antipoverty drive is now to focus more on helping rural poor to start small businesses and guaranteeing access to public services and social welfare.

  12. HIV, poverty and women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigo, Chaturaka; Rajapakse, Senaka

    2010-03-01

    This review examines the interactions of financial status and HIV and its implications for women. MEDLINE and Google scholar were searched using the keywords 'women', 'poverty' and 'HIV' in any field of the article. The search was limited to articles published in English over the last 10 years. The first section of the article tries to establish whether poverty or wealth is a risk factor for HIV. There is credible evidence for both arguments. While wealth shows an increased risk for both sexes, poverty places women at a special disadvantage. The second section explains how the financial status interacts with other 'non biological' factors to put women at increased risk. While discrimination based on these factors disadvantage women, there are some paradoxical observations that do not fit with the traditional line of explanation (e.g. paradoxical impact of wealth and education on HIV). The final section assesses the impact of HIV in driving poverty and the role of women in interventional programmes. The specific impact of poverty on females in families living with HIV is less explored. Though microfinance initiatives to empower women are a good idea in theory, the actual outcome of such a programme is less convincing.

  13. Poverty among Foster Children: Estimates Using the Supplemental Poverty Measure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pac, Jessica; Waldfogel, Jane; Wimer, Christopher

    2017-01-01

    We use data from the Current Population Survey and the new Supplemental Poverty Measure (SPM) to provide estimates for poverty among foster children over the period 1992 to 2013. These are the first large-scale national estimates for foster children who are not included in official poverty statistics. Holding child and family demographics constant, foster children have a lower risk of poverty than other children. Analyzing income in detail suggests that foster care payments likely play an important role in reducing the risk of poverty in this group. In contrast, we find that children living with grandparents have a higher risk of poverty than other children, even after taking demographics into account. Our estimates suggest that this excess risk is likely linked to their lower likelihood of receiving foster care or other income supports. PMID:28659651

  14. Child Poverty: Definition and Measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, Kathleen S

    2016-04-01

    This article provides a discussion of what we mean when we refer to 'child poverty.' Many images come to mind when we discuss child poverty, but when we try to measure and quantify the extent of child poverty, we often use a very narrow concept. In this article a variety of poverty measures that are used in the United States are described and some of the differences between those measures are illustrated. In this article 3 measures are explored in detail: a relative measure of poverty that is used more often in an international context, the official US poverty measure, and a new supplemental poverty measure (SPM). The new measure differs from the other 2 because it takes into account noncash benefits that are provided to poor families. These include nutrition assistance such as food stamps, subsidized housing, and home energy assistance. The SPM also takes account of necessary expenses that families face, such as taxes and expenses related to work and health care. Comparing estimates for 2012, the SPM showed lower poverty rates for children than the other 2 measures. Because noncash benefits help those in extreme poverty, there were also lower percentages of children in extreme poverty with resources below half the SPM threshold. These results suggest that 2 important measures of poverty, the relative measure used in international comparisons, and the official poverty measure, are not able to gauge the effect of government programs on the alleviation of poverty, and the SPM illustrates that noncash benefits do help families meet their basic needs. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Poverty's threat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-03-01

    In the debate on the Report of the World Commission on Environment and Development, chaired by Mrs. Gro Harlem Brundtland, Prime Minister of Norway, delegates to the UN General Assembly asserted that problems generated by the impact of poverty on the environment could not be solved by restricting aid to developing countries unless those countries promised to cease damaging their environment. Rather, most delegates agreed, aid should include the resources which would enable those countries to achieve "sustainable development," i.e., development that does not destroy the environment and deplete natural resources. The United States countered with the opinion that what is needed is not a UN organized "sustainable development program," but rather a grassroots "sustainable development movement" in all countries. Several delegates pointed out that it was the affluent countries which played a large part in the destruction of the environment. The Present of the Maldives, Maumoon Abdul Gayoom, pointed out, for example, that the greenhouse effect, generated by the burning of fossil fuels, would raise the sea level 2 meters, virtually submerging his country. Mrs. Brundtland pointed out that it was not morally acceptable to suggest that the poor remain poor to protect the environment. Governments at all levels, she said, must include environmental concerns in their decision making in all sectors of governmental functioning, e.g., finance, industry, energy, and agriculture.

  16. Poverty Alleviation and Sustainable Development: The Role of Social Capital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Asadi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Developing countries are facing dilemmas such as un-sustainability, and poverty, (especially rural poverty. Poor people are often seen as compelled to exploit their surrounding for short-term survival and are assumed to be the ones most exposed to natural resources degradation. In order that at the first; we review the extensive theoretical literature on social capital, poverty and sustainability and demonstrate the nuanced treatment these concepts have received in this literature. Problem Statement: Current research and observations indicate that (these dilemmas un-sustainability and rural poverty are linked. The only feasible way out of current crisis is to integrate resources. The linkage among environment/agriculture, poverty and social capital are complex and in many cases, poorly understood. The developing countries have been criticized for their inability to reduce poverty and contribute to sustainable agricultural development. Approach: there is a need for improving of social capital to integrate environment and people to alleviate poverty and receive to sustainable development. Social capital has come to be defined in a variety of ways, all of which have been linked to collective norms, values and relationships reflecting the involvement of human individuals in a common life based on family and community. Results: This study argue that social capital as a concept has over the last decade or more been gaining significance in relation to a number of linked fields of analyses, including the identification of factors influencing educational attainment, explanations of differing levels of participation, rural development and poverty alleviation. Conclusions/Recommendations: social capital enhancement appears to have direct links with farmer education in that community development is generally defined as a social learning process which serves to empower people and to involve them as citizens in collective activities aimed at socio- economic

  17. Improving the Measurement of Poverty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutto, Nathan; Waldfogel, Jane; Kaushal, Neeraj; Garfinkel, Irwin

    2011-03-01

    This study estimates 2007 national poverty rates using an approach largely conceptualized by a 1995 National Academy of Sciences panel and similar to the supplemental poverty measure that will soon be produced by the U.S. Census Bureau. The study uses poverty thresholds based on expenditures for shelter, food, clothing, and utilities, as well as a measure of family income that includes earnings, cash transfers, near-cash benefits, tax credits, and tax payments. The measure also accounts for child care, work, and out-of-pocket medical expenses; variation in regional cost of living; and mortgage-free homeownership. Under this method, the rate of poverty is estimated to be higher than the rate calculated in the traditional manner, rising from 12.4 percent in the official measure to 16 percent in the new measure; the rate of child poverty is more than 3 percentage points higher, and elderly poverty is nearly 7 points higher.

  18. High prevalence of type 2 diabetes in all ethnic groups, including Europeans, in a British inner city: relative poverty, history, inactivity, or 21st century Europe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riste, L; Khan, F; Cruickshank, K

    2001-08-01

    To compare the prevalence of type 2 diabetes in white Europeans and individuals of African-Caribbean and Pakistani descent. Random sampling of population-based registers in inner-city Manchester, Britain's third most impoverished area. A total of 1,318 people (25-79 years of age) were screened (minimum response 67%); 533 individuals without known diabetes underwent 2-h glucose tolerance testing, classified by 1999 World Health Organization criteria. More than 60% of individuals reported household annual income poverty, which cosegregate with obesity and physical inactivity, are likely contributors. Whatever the causes, the implications for health services are alarming, although substantial preventive opportunities through small reversals of glucose distributions are the challenge.

  19. Climate Change and Poverty Reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Simon

    2011-08-15

    Climate change will make it increasingly difficult to achieve and sustain development goals. This is largely because climate effects on poverty remain poorly understood, and poverty reduction strategies do not adequately support climate resilience. Ensuring effective development in the face of climate change requires action on six fronts: investing in a stronger climate and poverty evidence base; applying the learning about development effectiveness to how we address adaptation needs; supporting nationally derived, integrated policies and programmes; including the climate-vulnerable poor in developing strategies; and identifying how mitigation strategies can also reduce poverty and enable adaptation.

  20. Determinants Of Poverty During Transition: Household Survey Evidence From Ukraine

    OpenAIRE

    Brück, Tilman; Danzer, Alexander M.; Muravyev, Alexander; Weißhaar, Natalia

    2007-01-01

    The paper analyzes the incidence, the severity and the determinants of household poverty in Ukraine during transition using two comparable surveys from 1996 and 2004. We measure poverty using income and consumption and contrast the effects of various poverty lines. Poverty in both periods follows some of the determinants commonly identified in the literature, including greater poverty among households with children and with less education. We also identify specific features of poverty in tran...

  1. Inequality, Poverty, Insecurity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilona

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the economic connections of globalization, the roots of this phenomenon and its implications for presence. In the 70´, the economic bases of developed countries started changing. Since then the economic power of transnational corporations has risen. The TNCs change the international division of labor and divide the production cycle in an unprecedented manner. The economic sovereignty of countries weakens. All these factors influence the position of labor and consequently phenomena like unemployment, poverty and uncertainty. Since the 70´s the wage share, one of the most important macroeconomic indicators, has started sinking in developed contries. This means that a higher proportion of output goes to capital, i.e. to profits. Unemployment in developed countries has also changed its form since the 70´s – it has become structural and long-term one. Forms of precarious labor increase significantly and in the developed countries (especially obviously in the US the phenomenon of working poverty appears. Hand in hand with these phenomena goes the increase in inequality, of all developed countries again mostly in the US. The implications are not only social, such as the preservation of elite, i.e. the tendency towards oligarchization and decrease in social mobility. These implications are also connected with the debt phenomenon, which serves as a factor of discipline and system preservation, or respectively the postponement of weakened purchasing power of the lower and middle income classes. The rise in insecurity and the impossibility to identify oneself with the job has its political implications as well. In the context of reflecting the problem itself it takes form of various social protests (such as Occupy Wall Street, but also can be shown in the rise of various xenophobe and extreme right movements that destabilize the whole political system, including doubting the regime of democracy as such.

  2. The effects of poverty on child health and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aber, J L; Bennett, N G; Conley, D C; Li, J

    1997-01-01

    Poverty has been shown to negatively influence child health and development along a number of dimensions. For example, poverty-net of a variety of potentially confounding factors-is associated with increased neonatal and postneonatal mortality rates, greater risk of injuries resulting from accidents or physical abuse/neglect, higher risk for asthma, and lower developmental scores in a range of tests at multiple ages. Despite the extensive literature available that addresses the relationship between poverty and child health and development, as yet there is no consensus on how poverty should be operationalized to reflect its dynamic nature. Perhaps more important is the lack of agreement on the set of controls that should be included in the modeling of this relationship in order to determine the "true" or net effect of poverty, independent of its cofactors. In this paper, we suggest a general model that should be adhered to when investigating the effects of poverty on children. We propose a standard set of controls and various measures of poverty that should be incorporated in any study, when possible.

  3. The Characteristics,Cause of Formation and Countermeasures of Migrant Workers’ Poverty

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    The migrant worker is the special group in the process of Chinese economic and social transition.The migrant workers’ poverty has the characteristics as follows:transferability,marginality,intervention,aggregation,development,circulatory cumulativeness and intergenerational transmission of poverty.The migrant workers’ poverty includes capital poverty,right poverty and sustainability poverty.The capital poverty and right poverty hamper migrant workers’ survival,development and farmer’s citizenship,while the sustainability poverty is the root cause of poverty.Only by system reconstruction,endowment of capital and restoration of ability can the migrant workers get rid of the mire of poverty.

  4. Poverty, health and participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosgrove, S

    2007-09-01

    Poverty is an important influence on health and despite continuing economic growth, poverty and health inequalities persist. Current public policy aims to reduce the inequalities in the health, by focussing on the social factors influencing health, improving access to health and personal social services for those who are poor or socially excluded and by improving the information and research base in respect of the health status and service access for the poor and socially excluded groups. It is important that processes for target setting and evaluation involve people experiencing poverty, at all levels through consultative and participative structures and processes and in the roll-out of primary care teams. A number of projects throughout the country aim to address health inequalities using community development. These are essentially about widening participation in the development, planning and delivery of health services and ensuring that the community is actively involved in the decision making process about health services in their area.

  5. Spatial determinants of poverty in rural Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okwi, Paul O; Ndeng'e, Godfrey; Kristjanson, Patti; Arunga, Mike; Notenbaert, An; Omolo, Abisalom; Henninger, Norbert; Benson, Todd; Kariuki, Patrick; Owuor, John

    2007-10-23

    This article investigates the link between poverty incidence and geographical conditions within rural locations in Kenya. Evidence from poverty maps for Kenya and other developing countries suggests that poverty and income distribution are not homogenous. We use spatial regression techniques to explore the effects of geographic factors on poverty. Slope, soil type, distance/travel time to public resources, elevation, type of land use, and demographic variables prove to be significant in explaining spatial patterns of poverty. However, differential influence of these and other factors at the location level shows that provinces in Kenya are highly heterogeneous; hence different spatial factors are important in explaining welfare levels in different areas within provinces, suggesting that targeted propoor policies are needed. Policy simulations are conducted to explore the impact of various interventions on location-level poverty levels. Investments in roads and improvements in soil fertility are shown to potentially reduce poverty rates, with differential impacts in different regions.

  6. The Effects of Poverty on Academic Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacour, Misty; Tissington, Laura D.

    2011-01-01

    Poverty, which forms a specific culture and way of life, is a growing issue in the United States. The number of Americans living in poverty is continually increasing. Poverty indicates the extent to which an individual does without resources. Resources can include financial, emotional, mental, spiritual, and physical resources as well as support…

  7. Subjective Quality of Life in the Psychology of Poverty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shapoval I.A.,

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a theoretical introduction to the discussion of the subjective quality of life for carriers of psychology of poverty. We revealed the socio-cultural determinants of subjective quality of life, systematize its psychological components and factors of its high level. We describe a set of characteristics of psychology of poverty, including the sense of displacement from normal life, hopelessness, fatalism, deprivation, social envy, metapathology of personality, lack of subjectivity, responsibility, an outsider position, survivor guilt complex, and so on. On the criterion of the relationship to own life we revealed types of carriers of psychology of poverty: a passive-contemplative, passive-aggressive, pseudocompensatory-devalued, infantile, anomic. We analyzed the specificity of reflection and benchmarking of carriers of psychology of poverty as a cognitive and affective strategies to assess the quality of own lives, focused on the maintenance of self-esteem

  8. Race, ethnicity, concentrated poverty, and low birth weight disparities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, Mario; Sims, Tammy L; Bruce, Marino A

    2008-07-01

    This study examines the extent to which the relationship between area socioeconomic position (SEP) and low birth weight (LBW) varies by race and ethnicity. A cross-sectional, secondary data analysis was performed with 1992-1994 Vital Statistics and 1990 U.S. Census data for selected metropolitan areas. Low birth weight (poverty was defined as poor persons living in neighborhoods with 40% or more poverty in metropolitan areas. The results showed that the relationship between concentrated poverty and LBW varied by race and ethnicity. Concentrated poverty was significant for Latinos, even when controlling for maternal health and MSA-level factors. By contrast, maternal health characteristics, such as pre-term birth, teen birth and tobacco use, explained much of the variance in African-American and White LBW These findings extend the discussion about race, class, and health disparities to include Latinos and shows how the relationship between SEP and LBW can vary within an ethnic group.

  9. Farmland Loss and Poverty in Hanoi‘s Peri-Urban Areas, Vietnam: Evidence from Household Survey Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Q. Tuyen

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Using a dataset from a 2010 field survey involving 477 households, this paper has contributed to the literature by providing the first econometric evidence for the impacts of farmland loss (due to urbanization and industrialization on household poverty in Hanoi‘s peri-urban areas. Factors affecting poverty were examined using a logit regression model. Our econometric results indicate that the one and two-year effects of farmland loss on poverty are not statistically significant. These results, therefore, confirm that farmland loss has had no impact on poverty in the short-term. This study also found that factors contributing to poverty reduction include households‘ education, access to credit, ownership of productive assets and participation in nonfarm activities before farmland loss. We propose some policy implications that can help households escape poverty and improve their welfare.

  10. Attitudes towards poverty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Derdziuk

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Poverty, perceived as a lack of basic consumer goods, gives rise to a whole range of outcomes which affect not only the material dimension of human existence, but also influence social relations and references to spiritual values. Attitudes which could be associated with involuntary and unacceptable poverty include: doubt in the Divine Providence, bitterness, jealousy and envy, blaming others, lack of gratitude and in perceiving good, laziness, lack of initiative, escalating demands, gluttony and greed as well as meanness. However, joy, peace, freedom and solidarity with the poor, as well as work and enterprise, are symptoms of evangelical attitudes of the poor in spirit. Attitudes to poverty point to a wide range of human behaviours towards possessions and in effect, reveal an individual’s sense of value.

  11. Nursing students' beliefs about poverty and health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reutter, Linda I; Sword, Wendy; Meagher-Stewart, Donna; Rideout, Elizabeth

    2004-11-01

    This paper examines baccalaureate nursing students' beliefs about the relationship between poverty and health, and the factors that influence these beliefs. The relationship between poverty and health is well established, and poverty remains a persistent problem in many industrialized nations. Nurses' understanding of how poverty influences health will affect how they interact with individual clients as well as the strategies they employ to address poverty-related issues. No studies have examined nursing students' understandings of how poverty influences health and the factors that influence that understanding. A cross-sectional survey of a random sample (n = 740) of basic baccalaureate nursing students was conducted in three Canadian universities in 2000. Students completed a 59-item questionnaire eliciting data on demographic variables, personal and educational exposure to poverty, beliefs about the relationship between poverty and health (myth, drift, behavioural, structural), and attitudes to poverty. Students were most likely to adhere to a structural explanation of the relationship between poverty and health. Very little of the variance in myth and drift explanations was accounted for by course or personal exposure, programme level, age, and attitudes toward poverty. Greater course exposure and more positive attitudes toward the poor predicted support for the structural explanation. Support for the behavioural explanation was influenced by attitudes toward the poor and, to a lesser extent, by course exposure, age, and programme level. Students would benefit from greater exposure to poverty through coursework that emphasizes the structural factors contributing to poverty and its negative health consequences. Classroom experience should be complemented with clinical placements that provide students with opportunities to interact with families living in poverty and to work collaboratively with others to address the causes and consequences of poverty at community

  12. Poverty is Not Just an Indicator: The Relationship Between Income, Poverty, and Child Well-Being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudry, Ajay; Wimer, Christopher

    2016-04-01

    In this article, we review the evidence on the effects of poverty and low income on children's development and well-being. We argue that poverty is an important indicator of societal and child well-being, but that poverty is more than just an indicator. Poverty and low income are causally related to worse child development outcomes, particularly cognitive developmental and educational outcomes. Mechanisms through which poverty affects these outcomes include material hardship, family stress, parental and cognitive inputs, and the developmental context to which children are exposed. The timing, duration, and community context of poverty also appear to matter for children's outcomes-with early experiences of poverty, longer durations of poverty, and higher concentrations of poverty in the community leading to worse child outcomes.

  13. [Cardiovascular risk factors in the population at risk of poverty and social exclusión].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez-Fernández, Carlos; Vaquero-Abellán, Manuel; Ruíz-Gandara, África; Romero-Saldaña, Manuel; Álvarez-López, Carlos

    2017-03-01

    Detect if there are differences in prevalence, distribution of cardiovascular risk factors and risk according to REGICOR and SCORE's function; between people belonging to different occupational classes and population at risk of social exclusion. Cross-sectional. SITE: Occupational health unit of the City Hall of Córdoba. Sample availability of 628 people, excluding 59 by age or incomplete data. The group of municipal workers was obtained randomly while all contracted exclusion risk was taken. No preventive, diagnostic or therapeutic actions that modify the course of the previous situation of workers were applied. Smoke, glucose, lipids, blood pressure and BMI as main variables. T-student were used for comparison of means and percentages for Chi(2). Statistical significance attached to an alpha error <5% and confidence interval with a 95% security. Receiver operator curves (ROC) were employed to find out what explanatory variables predict group membership of workers at risk of exclusion. Smoking (95% CI: -.224;-.443), hypercholesterolemia (95% CI: -.127;-.320), obesity (95% CI: -.005;-0.214), diabetes (95% CI: -.060;-.211) and cardiovascular risk were higher in men at risk of exclusion. In women there were differences in the same variables except smoking (P=.053). The existence of inequalities in prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors is checked. In a context of social crisis, health promotion and primary prevention programs directing to the most vulnerable, they are needed to mit. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Accounting for recent trends in absolute poverty in Poland: A decomposition analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Michał Brzeziński

    2011-01-01

    This paper uses several decomposition of poverty and poverty changes to identify factors explaining recent changes in absolute income and consumption poverty in Poland during 1998−2008. Shapley decompositions of poverty changes into growth and redistribution components show that fast economic growth was the main source of a radical fall in absolute poverty since 2005. Distributional changes had a more profound effect on absolute poverty during 1998−2005. Sectoral decompositions of poverty sug...

  15. Poverty is the main environmental factor for obesity in a Mexican-border city.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Cruz, Arturo; Castañeda-Gonzalez, Lidia M; Bacardí-Gascón, Montserrat

    2013-05-01

    Obesity is a pandemic in Mexico. The purpose of this study was to assess the environmental factors that have the strongest association with obesity and abdominal obesity among adults in Tijuana. Four neighborhoods differing in socioeconomic status were chosen. A questionnaire for weekly walking, social cohesion, satisfaction with their community, weekly income, and convenience store, education, family income, crime safety, pedestrian safety, street connectivity, walking/cycling facilities, and sociodemographic characteristics was administered. Weight, height, and waist circumference were measured. Univariate and multivariate binomial logistic regressions were conducted. Three hundred and twenty-two (322) individuals, 70% females with a mean age of 39 years, were assessed. The prevalence of obesity and abdominal obesity was 27% and 43.5% respectively. The odds ratio for obesity and abdominal obesity among those living in the lowest-income neighborhood was 2.4 and 7.8 respectively, compared with those living in a middle-class neighborhood. Residence in a low-income neighborhood was a predictor for obesity.

  16. Poverty and Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Vink, G.; Franco, E.; Fuckar, N. S.; Kalmbach, E. R.; Kayatta, E.; Lankester, K.; Rothschild, R. E.; Sarma, A.; Wall, M. L.

    2008-05-01

    The poor are disproportionately vulnerable to environmental change because they have the least amount of resources with which to adapt, and they live in areas (e.g. flood plains, low-lying coastal areas, and marginal drylands) that are particularly vulnerable to the manifestations of climate change. By quantifying the various environmental, economic, and social factors that can contribute to poverty, we identify populations that are most vulnerable to poverty and poverty traps due to environmental change. We define vulnerability as consisting of risk (probability of event and exposed elements), resiliency, and capacity to respond. Resiliency captures the social system's ability to absorb a natural disaster while retaining the same basic structure, organization, and ways of functioning, as well as its general capacity to adapt to stress and change. Capacity to respond is a surrogate for technical skills, institutional capabilities, and efficacy within countries and their economies. We use a "climate change multiplier" to account for possible increases in the frequency and severity of natural events due to climate change. Through various analytical methods, we quantify the social, political, economic, and environmental factors that contribute to poverty or poverty traps. These data sets are then used to determine vulnerability through raster multiplication in geospatial analysis. The vulnerability of a particular location to climate change is then mapped, with areas of high vulnerability clearly delineated. The success of this methodology indicates that it is indeed possible to quantify the effects of climate change on global vulnerability to natural disasters, and can be used as a mechanism to identify areas where proactive measures, such as improving adaptation or capacity to respond, can reduce the humanitarian and economic impacts of climate change.

  17. Vulnerability Indicators Are More Accurate in Assessing Poverty Problems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭劲光

    2007-01-01

    Poverty is a complex social phenomenon that every country has to contend with at some point in time. Based on an analysis of poverty in China’s rural areas, this article assesses the present poverty alleviation measures from a new perspective. With the goal of better understanding the nature of poverty, new approaches focusing on the vulnerability to poverty are considered. Through a re-examination of the current situation and the underlying reasons for poverty in light of structural and cultural factors, this article attempts to provide new policy suggestions for dealing with poverty.

  18. Information and Communication Technology for Poverty Reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motilal SHARMA

    2005-04-01

    participate and contribute effectively in development efforts. In the past decade, efforts were made to encourage beneficiary participation through non-government organizations (NGOs and community-based organizations (CBOs. However, this could not be fully achieved because of many factors including illiteracy, lack of access to educational opportunities, and limited access to information and resources by the poor. Human development is a key ingredient in economic and poverty reduction. Governments have a crucial role to play in promoting human development. Any poverty reduction strategy should have, among others , three key elements namely pro-poor economic growth; social development; and good governance. The strategy must clearly state that lack of human capital is one of the primary causes of poverty. Without access to basic services, such as primary education and basic health care, the poor will have little opportunity to improve their lives and will be unable to contribute to economic growth.

  19. Mainstreaming Children into National Poverty Strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balcha, Berhanu; Jones, Nicola; Tefera, Bekele

    The purpose of this paper is to assess how the needs of children are incorporated into Ethiopia¿s Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper (PRSP)¿known as the Ethiopian Sustainable Development and Poverty Reduction Programme 2002-2005 (SDRDP) ¿and to develop policy recommendations for the second PRSP based...... on a comparative content analysis with other countries¿ PRSPs. The paper begins by identifying the key ingredients of a child-centred PRSP, including: consideration of childhood poverty in the document¿s poverty analysis; spaces for consultation with children; childspecific policies and programmes as well as child...... the multi-dimensionality of childhood poverty in Ethiopia....

  20. Mainstreaming Children into National Poverty Strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balcha, Berhanu; Jones, Nicola; Tefera, Bekele

    The purpose of this paper is to assess how the needs of children are incorporated into Ethiopia¿s Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper (PRSP)¿known as the Ethiopian Sustainable Development and Poverty Reduction Programme 2002-2005 (SDRDP) ¿and to develop policy recommendations for the second PRSP based...... on a comparative content analysis with other countries¿ PRSPs. The paper begins by identifying the key ingredients of a child-centred PRSP, including: consideration of childhood poverty in the document¿s poverty analysis; spaces for consultation with children; childspecific policies and programmes as well as child...... the multi-dimensionality of childhood poverty in Ethiopia....

  1. Effects of poverty on home environment: an analysis of three-year outcome data for low birth weight premature infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, J E; Kirby, R S; Kelleher, K J; Bradley, R H

    1996-06-01

    Investigated the relationship between poverty and parenting in a sample of low birth weight (poverty levels, poor families scored lower on the HOME inventory (used to measure the caregiving environment) than nonpoor families. A regression model including poverty, race, site, and representative environmental, maternal, and child variables accounted for 60% of variance in total HOME scores. Poverty and maternal IQ had significant and independent effects on HOME scores, whereas maternal distress accounted for little of the variance. In a LBWPT sample, our results find a strong relationship between parenting and poverty, suggest a modest role for maternal psychological distress in this relationship, and indicate that the influence of poverty likely extends beyond commonly measured environmental, maternal, and child factors.

  2. Disability, poverty and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Disability is both a cause and consequence of poverty. Eliminating world poverty is unlikely to be achieved unless the rights and needs of people with disabilities are taken into account. According to the United Nations, one person in 20 has a disability. More than three out of four of these live in a developing country. More often than not they are among the poorest of the poor. Recent World Bank estimates suggest they may account for as many as one in five of the world's poorest. Disability limits access to education and employment, and leads to economic and social exclusion. Poor people with disabilities are caught in a vicious cycle of poverty and disability, each being both a cause and a consequence of the other. A large proportion of disability is preventable. Achieving the international development targets for economic, social and human development will undoubtedly reduce the levels of disability in many poor countries. However, general improvements in living conditions will not be enough. Specific steps are still required, not only for prevention, but also to ensure that people with disabilities are able to participate fully in the development process, obtain a fair share of the benefits, and claim their rights as full and equal members of society. An integrated approach is required, linking prevention and rehabilitation with empowerment strategies and changes in attitudes. This paper assesses the significance of disability as a key development issue, and its importance in relation to poverty, human rights, and the achievement of internationally agreed development targets. It also sets out ways in which development co-operation, including DFID's own work, can help incorporate the rights and needs of people with disabilities into the mainstream of poverty reduction work and the achievement of human rights.

  3. Association of Child Poverty, Brain Development, and Academic Achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hair, Nicole L; Hanson, Jamie L; Wolfe, Barbara L; Pollak, Seth D

    2015-09-01

    Children living in poverty generally perform poorly in school, with markedly lower standardized test scores and lower educational attainment. The longer children live in poverty, the greater their academic deficits. These patterns persist to adulthood, contributing to lifetime-reduced occupational attainment. To determine whether atypical patterns of structural brain development mediate the relationship between household poverty and impaired academic performance. Longitudinal cohort study analyzing 823 magnetic resonance imaging scans of 389 typically developing children and adolescents aged 4 to 22 years from the National Institutes of Health Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study of Normal Brain Development with complete sociodemographic and neuroimaging data. Data collection began in November 2001 and ended in August 2007. Participants were screened for a variety of factors suspected to adversely affect brain development, recruited at 6 data collection sites across the United States, assessed at baseline, and followed up at 24-month intervals for a total of 3 periods. Each study center used community-based sampling to reflect regional and overall US demographics of income, race, and ethnicity based on the US Department of Housing and Urban Development definitions of area income. One-quarter of sample households reported the total family income below 200% of the federal poverty level. Repeated observations were available for 301 participants. Household poverty measured by family income and adjusted for family size as a percentage of the federal poverty level. Children's scores on cognitive and academic achievement assessments and brain tissue, including gray matter of the total brain, frontal lobe, temporal lobe, and hippocampus. Poverty is tied to structural differences in several areas of the brain associated with school readiness skills, with the largest influence observed among children from the poorest households. Regional gray matter volumes of children below 1

  4. Poverty Alleviation and Equity Promotion

    OpenAIRE

    del Valle, Edwin; Reyes, Celia M.

    1998-01-01

    Recent Philippine data indicate that the needs of the poor, which are met unsatisfactorily, include productive employment, access to quality education, access to basic health services, potable water, sanitation facilities and electricity. This paper emphasizes that eradicating poverty entails effective poverty alleviation strategy as an integral part of the government programs. Strategies should be focused on broad-based economic growth for employment generation and livelihood opportunities. ...

  5. Contribution of Environmental Risk Factors Including Lifestyle to Inequalities Noncommunicable (Chronic Diseases such as Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elzbieta Grochowska Niedworok

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Health inequalities: differences in health status or in the distribution of health determinants between different population groups. Some health inequalities are attributable to biological variations or free choice and others are attributable to the external environment and conditions mainly outside the control of the individuals concerned. 347 million people worldwide have diabetes. In 2012 an estimated 1.5 million deaths were directly caused by diabetes. More than 80% of diabetes deaths occur in low- and middle-income countries. WHO projects that diabetes will be the 7th leading cause of death in 2030. Healthy diet, regular physical activity and maintaining a normal body weight can prevent or delay the onset of type 2 diabetes. Risk factors: 1. Age- the prevalence of diabetes rises steeply with age: *one in twenty people over the age of 65 have diabetes, *and this rises to one in five people over the age of 85 years. The diagnosis of diabetes may be delayed in older people, with symptoms of diabetes being wrongly attributed to ageing. 2. Ethnic: type 2 diabetes is up to six times more common in people of South Asian descent and up to three times more common in those of African and African-Caribbean descent then in the white population. It is also more common in people of Chinese descent and other non-Caucasian groups. 3. Gender: the frequency of diabetes usually is higher in men than in women. This may be because gender compounds other aspects of inequality- women often bear the brunt of poverty, and socio-economic differences in the prevalence of diabetes are more marked for women, probably because of differences in smoking rates, food choices and the prevalence of obesity. 4. Overweight/Obesity: every 1 kg/m2 more causes increase risk: cardiovascular diseases 2%, coronary artery disease- 3% , myocardial infarction- 5% , heart failure- 5% , peripheral vascular disease- 5%. Health inqualities important in diabetes -- modifiable:  social

  6. Household income and risk-of-poverty of parents of long-term childhood cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mader, Luzius; Roser, Katharina; Baenziger, Julia; Tinner, Eva Maria; Scheinemann, Katrin; Kuehni, Claudia Elisabeth; Michel, Gisela

    2017-08-01

    Taking care of children diagnosed with cancer affects parents' professional life and may place the family at risk-of-poverty. We aimed to (i) compare the household income and risk-of-poverty of parents of childhood cancer survivors (CCS) to parents of the general population, and (ii) identify sociodemographic and cancer-related factors associated with risk-of-poverty. As part of the Swiss Childhood Cancer Survivor Study, we sent a questionnaire to parents of CCS aged 5-15 years, who survived ≥5 years after diagnosis. Information on parents of the general population came from the Swiss Household Panel (parents with ≥1 child aged 5-15 years). Risk-of-poverty was defined as having a monthly household income of poverty. We included parents of 383 CCS and 769 control parent households. Parent-couples of CCS had a lower household income (Ptrend poverty (30.4% vs. 19.3%, P = 0.001) compared to control parent-couples. Household income and risk-of-poverty of single parents of CCS was similar to control single parents. Parents of CCS were at higher risk-of-poverty if they had only standard education (ORmother = 3.77 [where OR is odds ratio], confidence interval [CI]: 1.61-8.82; ORfather = 8.59, CI: 4.16-17.72) and were from the German language region (OR = 1.99, CI: 1.13-3.50). We found no cancer-related risk factors. Parents of long-term CCS reported lower household income and higher risk-of-poverty than control parents. Support strategies may be developed to mitigate parents' risk-of-poverty in the long term, particularly among parents with lower education. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Women in extreme poverty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    Population is estimated to increase from 5.5 billion in 1990 to 10 billion by 2050; the poverty level is expected to increase from 1 billion to 2-3 billion people. Women in development has been promoted throughout the UN and development system, but women in poverty who perform work in the informal sector are still uncounted, and solutions are elusive. The issue of extreme poverty can not be approached as just another natural disaster with immediate emergency relief. Many people live in precarious economic circumstances throughout their lives. Recent research reveals a greater understanding of the underlying causes and the need for inclusion of poor women in sustainable development. Sanitation, water, housing, health facilities need to be improved. Women must have access to education, opportunities for trading, and loans on reasonable terms. UNESCO makes available a book on survival strategies for poor women in the informal sector. The profile shows common problems of illiteracy, broken marriages, and full time involvement in provision of subsistence level existence. Existence is a fragile balance. Jeanne Vickers' "Women and the World" offers simple, low cost interventions for aiding extremely poor women. The 1992 Commission on the Status of Women was held in Vienna. Excerpts from several speeches are provided. The emphasis is on some global responses and an analysis of solutions. The recommendation is for attention to the gender dimension of poverty. Women's dual role contributes to greater disadvantages. Women are affected differently by macroeconomic factors, and that there is intergenerational transfer of poverty. Social services should be viewed as investments and directed to easing the burdens on time and energy. Public programs must be equipped to deal with poverty and to bring about social and economic change. Programs must be aware of the different distribution of resources within households. Women must be recognized as principal economic providers within

  8. Poverty and health in West Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmert, U; Mielck, A; Shea, S

    1997-01-01

    The relationship between poverty and several health-related characteristics in West Germany was investigated. Data were derived from the National and Regional Health Surveys conducted in West Germany from 1984 to 1992. 25,544 males and 25,719 females with German nationality aged 25-69 years were examined. Poverty was defined as a household income of 50% less than the mean for West Germany. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to analyze the relationship between poverty and four health variables: individual health behavior, subjective assessment of health status, cardiovascular disease risk factors, and self-reported prevalence of lifetime chronic diseases. 10.2% of males and 12.8% of females were classified as being below the poverty line. For most but not all health parameters, less favourable results were found for the segment of the population with a household income below the poverty line. The most striking poverty-related differences were observed for lack of regular sport activities, subjective health satisfaction, obesity and myocardial infarction/stroke. Significantly lower prevalence rates for study subjects below the poverty line were observed for hypercholesterolemia in females only. Allergic disorders were the only chronic diseases reported significantly less often in males and females below the poverty line. Poverty has strong effects on individual health status and the prevalence of chronic diseases. Due to the rising unemployment rates in Germany in the last years it is very likely that the strong negative consequences of poverty for health are increasing.

  9. PARADOX OF POVERTY IN VILLAGE Ubud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Nyoman Sudipa

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The research raises poverty as a social reality in the middle of the sparkling tourism in Ubud Village . This study focused on the discussion : ( 1 why is there poverty , ( 2 what efforts the government and other agencies to reduce poverty , and ( 3 how the effects of poverty are emerging . This study used qualitative methods . Data obtained through observation , interviews , and documentation . The results showed , poverty in the village of Ubud , which is caused by external factors such as government policy reference data, which is not clear , the lack of proper diagnosis , addressing poverty is not integrated and overlapping , and the failure of tourism development policies . External factors supported internal factors , namely the economic constraints , resources , and socio-cultural pressures , lifestyle , consumer behavior , asset ownership , land , and the cost of customs and rituals . Government efforts made ??through the program financially and non- financially poverty reduction through policy or regulation , mentoring , and training . NGOs make efforts to non - financially as a companion , mediator , facilitator and prepare sosial.Dampak mapping poverty in the village of Ubud is to reduce public confidence in the government , social conflict , and economic conflicts . The impact on tourism is tourism failing to provide social welfare . The impact for the community is resulting in social inequality , conflict , rising crime , and the inheritance of poverty

  10. Poverty in American Eyes

    OpenAIRE

    Rainwater, Lee

    1992-01-01

    This study proposes a social rather than an economic conception of poverty in the U.S., exploring the definition of poverty line from this perspective. Data from three sources is used to describe poverty rates in the U.S. in relation to changes over time, a cross national perspective, and variations in persistent poverty for race, sex and age.

  11. Joining together to combat poverty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, I; Haines, A; Malenica, Z; Oulton, J A; Leopando, Z; Kaseje, D; Addington, W W; Giscard D'Estaing, O; Tumwine, J K; Koivusalo, M; Biscoe, G; Nickson, P; Marusić, M; Vuk Pavlović, S

    2000-03-01

    The International Poverty and Health Network (IPHN) was created in December 1997 following a series of conferences organized by the World Health Organization, with the aim of integrating health into plans to eradicate poverty. Around 1.3 billion people live on less than US$1 per day. Of the 4.4 billion people in developing countries nearly 60% lack access to sanitation, 30% do not have clean water, 20% have no health care, and 20% do not have enough dietary energy and protein. Even among rich nations there are gross socioeconomic inequalities. Many children are robbed of their physical and mental potential through poverty. Expressed in constant 1963 US dollars, an average Croatian family needed the annual income of US$894 to meet the poverty line in 1960 and US$9,027 in 1995. Accordingly, 9-25% of Croatian households were below the poverty line between 1960 and 1995. The increase in the poverty rate after 1991 was compounded by the war that destroyed almost a third of industrial capacity and infrastructure. Dissipation of the communist economy and inadequate privatization have contributed to the increase in unemployment rate, corruption, and other social ills. IPHN invited Croatian Medical Journal to publish this editorial to help push the issue of poverty up political and medical agendas on a global level. We argue that a factor contributing to the failure of most large-scale programs against poverty to date is the excessive emphasis on material and infrastructure assistance at the expense of spiritual, moral, and intellectual development.

  12. Measuring and Analyzing Poverty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjaya Acharya

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper makes an assessment of Nepalese poverty situation during 1977 - 1997 using a comparative static approach. Income and human poverty indices have been estimated using World Bank and UNDP methods, respectively. Moreover, it also makes exploratory analysis to study the causes and nature of Nepalese poverty. It concludes that Nepalese income poverty was drastically reduced during the period 1976/77 – 1984/85, but increased afterwards. However, human poverty has reduced in sustenance during the whole period. Poverty in Nepal is more pervasive, deep and uneven as compared to the rest of the South Asia. Comparing the income and human poverty indices, we conclude that income poverty is volatile as compared to the human poverty. Poverty in Nepal has some economic, demographic, and political origins; and more remote and occupational caste people are poorer as compared to the rest

  13. Blindness and poverty in India: the way forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanna, Rohit; Raman, Usha; Rao, Gullapalli N

    2007-11-01

    A few recent studies have shown that poverty is an exacerbating and often determining factor in the incidence of disabling conditions, including visual impairment. Recent estimates from the World Health Organization indicate that 90 per cent of all those affected by visual impairment live in the poorest countries of the world. India is home to one-fifth of the world's visually impaired people and therefore, any strategies to combat avoidable blindness must take into account the socio-economic conditions within which people live. This paper looks at the relationship between poverty and blindness in India and suggests strategies to address blindness prevention in a comprehensive manner.

  14. Education for the Eradication of Poverty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.I. Oriahi

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the possible education for the eradication of poverty in Nigeria. It defines poverty as a state pf shortage or deficiency of meeting basic needs. Majors causes of poverty are overpopulation, illiteracy, unemployment, environmental degradation and government insensitive to the welfare of the people. Effects of poverty include homelessness, malnutrition and starvation, illness, crime, violence and antisocial behaviour like Internet Fraud (Yahoo business and Advance Fee Fraud Populace (419. Some poverty eradication strategies highlighted include: (i Organisation of international workshops on eradication of poverty, (ii Respect for human rights, (iii Quality basic education for girls (iv Meaningful contributions by NGOs, (v Provision of jobs for the people. Some recommendations are made for the way forward.

  15. Measuring and Analyzing Poverty

    OpenAIRE

    Sanjaya Acharya

    2004-01-01

    This paper makes an assessment of Nepalese poverty situation during 1977 - 1997 using a comparative static approach. Income and human poverty indices have been estimated using World Bank and UNDP methods, respectively. Moreover, it also makes exploratory analysis to study the causes and nature of Nepalese poverty. It concludes that Nepalese income poverty was drastically reduced during the period 1976/77 – 1984/85, but increased afterwards. However, human poverty has reduced in sustenance dur...

  16. There is poverty convergence

    OpenAIRE

    Crespo Cuaresma, Jesus; Klasen, Stephan; Wacker, Konstantin M.

    2016-01-01

    Martin Ravallion ("Why Don't We See Poverty Convergence?" American Economic Review, 102(1): 504-23; 2012) presents evidence against the existence of convergence in global poverty rates despite convergence in household mean income levels and the close linkage between income growth and poverty reduction. We show that this finding is driven by a specification that demands more than simple convergence in poverty headcount rates and assumes a growth elasticity of poverty reduction, which is well-k...

  17. Measuring Lifetime Poverty

    OpenAIRE

    Michael Hoy; Buhong Zheng

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents an axiomatic framework for measuring life time poverty over multiple periods. For an individual, we argue that lifetime poverty is influenced by both the snapshot poverty of each period and the poverty level of the "permanent" lifetime consumption; it is also influenced by how poverty spells are distributed over the life time. Two obvious candidates for aggregation are to aggregate over time and then across individuals, or vice versa. For a society, we consider a path-inde...

  18. Examining Effects of Poverty, Maternal Depression, and Children's Self-Regulation Abilities on the Development of Language and Cognition in Early Childhood: An Early Head Start Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharkins, Kimberly A.; Leger, Sarah E.; Ernest, James M.

    2017-01-01

    Early childhood poverty is a prevalent social issue, both in the United States and in the wider international community. It has been well established that factors associated with poverty, including familial income and parental education level, can negatively affect children's language and cognitive development, which can result in academic…

  19. Resource and environmental factors should be included in economic analytical framework

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金碚

    2009-01-01

    In the economic analysis framework,natural resources and environmental factors are included in the category of capital or land.Hence,the explanatory variables of the production function only include capital,labor and the residue term technology.Such framework may be designed for methodological reasons,but it is determined

  20. Ninez y Pobreza (Childhood and Poverty).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didonet, Vital

    1992-01-01

    Reviews data on child poverty worldwide, providing statistics on 20 poverty-related problems. Examines effects of economic factors (i.e., unemployment, wage stagnation, inflation, and internal migration) and political policies (i.e., military spending over health and education) on child well-being, arguing that families and children themselves…

  1. Ninez y Pobreza (Childhood and Poverty).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didonet, Vital

    1992-01-01

    Reviews data on child poverty worldwide, providing statistics on 20 poverty-related problems. Examines effects of economic factors (i.e., unemployment, wage stagnation, inflation, and internal migration) and political policies (i.e., military spending over health and education) on child well-being, arguing that families and children themselves…

  2. An urban neo-poverty population-based quality of life and related social characteristics investigation from northeast China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengrong Ou

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate quality of life (QOL and related characteristics among an urban neo-poverty population in northeast China, and to compare this population with a traditional poverty cohort. DESIGN: The research was a cross-sectional survey executed from June 2005 to October 2007, with a sample of 2940 individuals ages 36 to 55 in three different industrial cities of northeast China. Data were collected on QOL status and sociodemographic characteristics. QOL was assessed using the 36-item Short Form Health Survey (Chinese version. Multiple regression analysis was employed to analyze association between sociodemographic variables and QOL. RESULTS: The scores for QOL in the neo-poverty group were higher than those in the traditional poverty group, but lower than those in the general population. When the neo-poverty population was divided into two subgroups by age, 36-45 years and 46-55 years, the differences in QOL scores were not significant. However, there were significant differences in several dimensions between two subgroups according to unemployment time (5 years. Additionally, stepwise regression analysis indicated that disease burden, including disease and medical expenditures, was a common risk factor for declining QOL in the neo-poverty group. CONCLUSIONS: Despite some limitations, this study provides initial evidence that the QOL of the urban neo-poverty population lies between that of the general population and traditional poverty. QOL of the neo-poverty group approached QOL of the traditional poverty group with increased unemployment years. In addition to decreased income, disease burden is the most important factor influencing QOL status in urban neo-poverty.

  3. An Urban Neo-Poverty Population-Based Quality of Life and Related Social Characteristics Investigation from Northeast China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Fengrong; Li, Kai; Gao, Qian; Liu, Dan; Li, Jinghai; Hu, Liwen; Wu, Xian; Edmiston, E. Kale; Liu, Yang

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate quality of life (QOL) and related characteristics among an urban neo-poverty population in northeast China, and to compare this population with a traditional poverty cohort. Design The research was a cross-sectional survey executed from June 2005 to October 2007, with a sample of 2940 individuals ages 36 to 55 in three different industrial cities of northeast China. Data were collected on QOL status and sociodemographic characteristics. QOL was assessed using the 36-item Short Form Health Survey (Chinese version). Multiple regression analysis was employed to analyze association between sociodemographic variables and QOL. Results The scores for QOL in the neo-poverty group were higher than those in the traditional poverty group, but lower than those in the general population. When the neo-poverty population was divided into two subgroups by age, 36–45 years and 46–55 years, the differences in QOL scores were not significant. However, there were significant differences in several dimensions between two subgroups according to unemployment time (5 years). Additionally, stepwise regression analysis indicated that disease burden, including disease and medical expenditures, was a common risk factor for declining QOL in the neo-poverty group. Conclusions Despite some limitations, this study provides initial evidence that the QOL of the urban neo-poverty population lies between that of the general population and traditional poverty. QOL of the neo-poverty group approached QOL of the traditional poverty group with increased unemployment years. In addition to decreased income, disease burden is the most important factor influencing QOL status in urban neo-poverty. PMID:22719968

  4. Causal Attributions for Poverty in Developing Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Juan Vázquez

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes attributional differences about causes of poverty in the less developed countries, among Nicaraguan ("actors" and Spanish ("observers" undergraduates. A self–applied questionnaire was used. It included socio–demographic questions and an adaptation of the "Causes of Third World Poverty Questionnaire" (CTWPQ. Results show agreement between Spanish and Nicaraguan in attributions about the main causes of poverty in the less developed countries, although there are differences about the perception of the incidence of the different causes in that situation. Nicaraguan students consider, as causes of poverty, more dispositional attributes about the population in those countries.

  5. Implications and Measurement of Energy Poverty across the European Union

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandru Maxim

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Energy poverty, or the inability of households to afford adequate access to energy services, is an issue that can have a significant effect on the quality of life and even the state of health of individuals and even the overall development of a nation. Since it was first brought into focus more than two decades ago in the UK, this topic has gradually gained the attention of academics and policy makers all across the EU and beyond. The current paper addresses the topic by providing not only a renewed discussion, but also an improved energy poverty indicator (with clear and relevant results at the EU level: the Compound Energy Poverty Indicator (CEPI. Moreover, knowing that the risk of poverty and social exclusion, efficiency of heating systems, total consumption of energy per household and rising energy prices tend to increase the severity of this problem in some countries, CEPI is then included into an econometric model so as to determine some possible factors that tend to put pressure on an already existing issue of energy poverty. The results of this research are expected to be relevant not only for academics (as it offers insights into the structure and severity of this topic within the European Union, but also for national and EU policymakers who are confronted in the field with the problem of sustainable development.

  6. Poverty and Health in Malawi | Bowie | Malawi Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lack of income is one limiting factor; lack of education, political freedom, ability to ... In respect of absolute poverty, rural life is more disadvantageous than poverty in child mortality. ... Both education and poverty seem to play a part in malnutrition. ... Underlying determinants of health show a mixed picture – some inequality, ...

  7. POVERTY AND SOCIAL EXCLUSION: WAYS OF COMBATING IN THE CURRENT ECONOMIC CONTEXT IN ROMANIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    STEGĂROIU CARINA-ELENA

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Reducing poverty and social exclusion levels have been established as a main objective by the European Council, based on three indicators. These indicators relate to the rate of the poverty risk (after social transfers, the indicator of the level of poverty and the percentage of people living in households with limited work intensity. Achieving this objective depends on the various factors that cause poverty and/or exclusion, on the diversity of problems faced by the member states and the priorities these states have set for themselves. The total number of people affected by these social plights (116 million people in 2008 includes a larger population than the one normally considered poor, because it includes a broader territorial perspective and different types of exclusion that are no longer only bound to income. The territorial dimension is becoming more and more important,, because the “poorest people” are concentrated in certain, smaller regions.

  8. Poverty nutrition linkages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Prema

    2007-10-01

    cent and about half the children are undernourished. While poverty and mortality rates came down by 50 per cent, fertility rate by 40 per cent, the reduction in undernutrition in children is only 20 per cent. National surveys indicate that a third of the children from high income group who have not experienced any deprivations are undernourished. The high undernutrition rates among children appears to be mainly due to high low birthweight rates, poor infant and young child feeding and caring practices. At the other end of the spectrum, surveys in school children from high income groups indicate that between 10-20 per cent are overnourished; the major factor responsible appears to be reduction in physical activity. Some aspects of the rapidly changing, complex relationship between economic status, poverty, dietary intake, nutritional and health status are explored in this review.

  9. Child poverty can be reduced.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotnick, R D

    1997-01-01

    Child poverty can be reduced by policies that help families earn more and supplement earned income with other sources of cash. A comprehensive antipoverty strategy could use a combination of these approaches. This article reviews recent U.S. experience with these broad approaches to reducing child poverty and discusses lessons from abroad for U.S. policymakers. The evidence reviewed suggests that, although policies to increase earned incomes among low-wage workers can help, these earnings gains will not be sufficient to reduce child poverty substantially. Government income support programs, tax policy, and child support payments from absent parents can be used to supplement earned incomes of poor families with children. Until recently, Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) was the main government assistance program for low-income families with children. Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) has recently replaced AFDC. This article explains why TANF benefits are likely to be less than AFDC benefits. The article also examines the effects of Social Security and Supplemental Security Income on child poverty. The most encouraging recent development in antipoverty policy has been the decline in the federal tax burden on poor families, primarily as a result of the expansion of the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC), now the largest cash assistance program for families with children. In 1995, government transfer programs (including the value of cash, food, housing, medical care, and taxes) decreased child poverty by 38% (from 24.2% to 14.2% of children under 18). Child poverty may also be reduced by policies that increase contributions from absent single parents to support their children. Overall, evidence from the United States and other developed countries suggests that a variety of approaches to reducing child poverty are feasible. Implementation of effective programs will depend, however, on the nation's political willingness to devote more resources to

  10. Young Children in Poverty: A Statistical Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Neil G.; Li, Jiali; Song, Younghwan; Yang, Keming

    This document continues a series of statistical reports from the National Center for Children in Poverty about young child poverty in the United States. The highlights of this update include the current profile of extremely poor, poor, and near poor population of young children; an examination of the changing association between higher education…

  11. Ukraine Poverty Update

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    Ukraine recorded one of the sharpest declines in poverty of any transition economy in recent years. The poverty rate, measured against an absolute poverty line, fell from a high of 32 percent in 2001 to 14 percent in 2004, and then again to 8 percent in 2005. This Update presents simulations of the direct influence of an increase in energy prices on the poverty rate. Using 2005 as a base p...

  12. Construction of the Theoretical Education Countermeasure Model to the Influential Factors to the Self-esteem of Undergraduates in Poverty%贫困生自尊影响因素及教育对策模型建构

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭曌汾

    2015-01-01

    贫困生自尊影响因素及教育对策的理论模型由其自尊的形成过程、影响因素和提高其自尊水平的教育对策三个部分组成。贫困生会根据他人对自己的评价及自我评价,形成自我认知体验和看法,如自信自强或自卑虚荣。家庭经济状况、父母教养方式、学校资助和社会支持作为外因对贫困生自尊程度有明显的影响,心理认知、个人定位、社交能力和学业水平等则是影响其自尊程度的内因。以适当的经济资助、加强家校沟通、改进资助方式、建立朋辈互助等方式构建外力援助体系,以自强教育、自信培养、社交训练、动力激发等方式构建心理干预机制,两种教育对策相辅相成,有助于提高贫困生的自尊水平。%The construction of theoretical education countermeasure model to the influential factors to the self-esteem of undergraduates in poverty consists of three parts,the formation of self-esteem,influen-tial factors and educational countermeasures for improving one's level of self-esteem.Based on others'judg-ments and self-evaluation,the undergraduates in poverty form self-cognition and perspectives,confidence, self-enhancement,inferiority and vanity.External factors such as family finances,parenting pattern, school funds and social support have the apparent impact on the formation of self-esteem level of under-graduates in poverty.Internal factors like psychological cognition,self-assertiveness,sociable competence and the level of attainment also have the impact on it.There are two educational countermeasures for im-proving the self-esteem level of undergraduates in poverty,which are complementary to each other.One is to set up a system of external support,including proper financial assistance,strengthening family-school communication,improving ways for offering financial aid,building up peer counseling system.The other is to set up intervention mechanism of psychology,including

  13. Environmental income improves household-level poverty assessments and dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walelign, Solomon Zena; Charlery, Lindy Callen; Smith-Hall, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    and poverty dynamics. Poverty incidence and dynamics models including environmental income perform better than those without. Rural poverty studies based on welfare measures excluding environmental income may thus be inaccurate for environmental reliant communities.......Household-level poverty assessments and analyses of poverty dynamics in developing countries typically do not include environmental income. Using household (n = 427 in 2006, 2009 and 2012) total income panel data sets, with and without environmental income, from Nepal, we analysed the importance...... of environmental income in household-level poverty assessments (Foster-Greer-Thorbecke indices) and dynamics (movements in the Poverty Transition Matrix). Random effects logit and ordered logit models were applied to estimate variables covarying with poverty categories and compared for annual household incomes...

  14. A Study of Factors Promoting Success in Computer Science Including Gender Differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantwell Wilson, Brenda

    2002-03-01

    This study was conducted to determine factors that promote success in an introductory college computer science course and to determine what, if any, differences appear between genders on those factors. The model included math background, attribution for success/failure, self-efficacy, encouragement, comfort level in the course, work style preference, previous programming experience, previous non-programming computer experience, and gender as possible predictive factors for success in the computer science course. Subjects included 105 students enrolled in an introductory computer science course. The study revealed three predictive factors in the following order of importance: comfort level (with a positive influence), math background (with a positive influence), and attribution to luck (with a negative influence). No significant gender differences were found in these three factors. The study also revealed that both a formal class in programming (which had a positive correlation) and game playing (which had a negative correlation) were predictive of success. The study revealed a significant gender difference in game playing with males reporting more experience with playing games on the computer than females reported.

  15. Poverty in Ecuador

    OpenAIRE

    Sanchez-Paramo, Carolina

    2005-01-01

    The note looks at poverty in Ecuador, assessing macroeconomic developments through its policies to maintain stability with fiscal discipline, and increase economic productivity and competitiveness, in particular, the 1998/99 crisis, the 2000 dollarization and their effect on poverty. From 1990 to 2001, national consumption-based poverty rose from 40 to 45 percent, and the number of poor pe...

  16. Poverty Monitor 1999

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    1999-01-01

    Original title: Armoedemonitor 1999. The Poverty Monitor 1999 (Armoedemonitor 1999) presents as complete and up-to-date a picture as possible of poverty in the Netherlands, and thus provides a factual basis for the debate on poverty. The Netherlands Institute for Social Research/SCP

  17. Poverty Monitor 1998

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    1998-01-01

    Original title: Armoedemonitor 1998. The Poverty Monitor 1998 (Armoedemonitor 1998) presents a complete and up-to-date picture of poverty in the Netherlands. It is intended to provide a factual basis for the current debate on poverty. The Netherlands Institute for Social Research/SCP and

  18. Adolescents and Poverty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wight, Vanessa R.

    2011-01-01

    More youth live in poverty and poor youth comprise a larger share of the youth population than was the case a decade ago. This article first provides a descriptive analysis of children in poverty; examining the incidence of poverty among children by selected demographic, socioeconomic, and geographic characteristics with a particular focus on…

  19. Poverty Monitor 1998

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    1998-01-01

    Original title: Armoedemonitor 1998. The Poverty Monitor 1998 (Armoedemonitor 1998) presents a complete and up-to-date picture of poverty in the Netherlands. It is intended to provide a factual basis for the current debate on poverty. The Netherlands Institute for Social Research/SCP and Statistics

  20. Poverty in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greever, Sadie

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this literature review is to provide a comprehensive summary of the topic of poverty and its effects upon student behavior and academic performance. Presented in this chapter of the review of the related literature will be: (a) description of poverty and the role of education, (b) effects of poverty on student behavior, (c) effects…

  1. Adolescents and Poverty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wight, Vanessa R.

    2011-01-01

    More youth live in poverty and poor youth comprise a larger share of the youth population than was the case a decade ago. This article first provides a descriptive analysis of children in poverty; examining the incidence of poverty among children by selected demographic, socioeconomic, and geographic characteristics with a particular focus on…

  2. Poverty Monitor 1999

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    1999-01-01

    Original title: Armoedemonitor 1999. The Poverty Monitor 1999 (Armoedemonitor 1999) presents as complete and up-to-date a picture as possible of poverty in the Netherlands, and thus provides a factual basis for the debate on poverty. The Netherlands Institute for Social Research/SCP and Statistics

  3. Poverty in Ecuador

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    The note looks at poverty in Ecuador, assessing macroeconomic developments through its policies to maintain stability with fiscal discipline, and increase economic productivity and competitiveness, in particular, the 1998/99 crisis, the 2000 dollarization and their effect on poverty. From 1990 to 2001, national consumption-based poverty rose from 40 to 45 percent, and the number of poor pe...

  4. Emerging Urban Poverty and Effects of the Dibao Program on Alleviating Poverty in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Meiyan Wang

    2007-01-01

    The present paper describes the current urban poverty situation, examines the factors affecting the probability of a household being in poverty and investigates how the urban minimum living standard guarantee (dibao) program helps poor people to get out of poverty.The targeting efficiency of the urban dibao program is discussed. The present study finds that the poverty rate of households with unemployed workers is much higher than that of households without unemployed workers. The urban dibao program is helpful in reducing poverty rates, but it does not reduce poverty rates too much. The government should place emphasis on helping laid-off and unemployed workers to become reemployed. The most urgent problem for the dibao program is improving the efficiency of targeting.

  5. Rural Poverty in Developing Countries; Implications for Public Policy

    OpenAIRE

    Mahmood Hasan Khan

    2001-01-01

    Reviews causes of poverty in rural areas and presents a policy framework for reducing rural poverty, including through land reform, public works programs, access to credit, physical and social infrastructure, subsidies, and transfer of technology. Identifies key elements for drafting a policy to reduce rural poverty.

  6. Education: A Solution for Rural Poverty? Staff Paper 350.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clouser, Rodney L.

    This paper presents an overview of poverty in rural America, and examines the ways in which improved education could alleviate rural poverty. The question of education as a mechanism to reduce poverty includes issues of economic demand and supply. On the demand side, labor market projections indicate that the service sector will continue to grow,…

  7. Using Dialogic Research to Overcome Poverty: From Principles to Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valls, Rosa; Padros, Maria

    2011-01-01

    In the EU commitment to alleviating the high rates of poverty in Europe there is widespread agreement among policy-makers that it is crucial to include the voices of those who are living in poverty in order to fight exclusion most effectively. Similarly, those studying ways to address poverty and inequality are increasingly required to seek…

  8. Poverty in Latin America: A Critical Analysis of Three Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boltvinik, Julio

    1996-01-01

    Critically evaluates the methodologies used in three recent studies on poverty in Latin America. Maintains that some studies measure the relative nature of nutritional poverty while others record the absolute nature of nutritional poverty (physical survival). Includes a comparative analysis of the studies' results. (MJP)

  9. Development and Validation of the Poverty Attributions Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Robert M.; Raiz, Lisa; Davis, Tamara S.

    2016-01-01

    This article describes the process of developing and testing the Poverty Attribution Survey (PAS), a measure of poverty attributions. The PAS is theory based and includes original items as well as items from previously tested poverty attribution instruments. The PAS was electronically administered to a sample of state-licensed professional social…

  10. TUMOR NECROSIS FACTOR-α INHIBITORS IN THE TREATMENT OF AXIAL SPONDYLOARTHRITIS, INCLUDING ANKYLOSING SPONDYLITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Lapshina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper provides guidelines for the use of tumor necrosis factor-α  (TNF-α inhibitors in the treatment of patients with axial spondyloarthritis  (axSpA, including ankylosing spondylitis. It gives data on the efficacy of TNF-α inhibitors in patients with non-radiographic axSpA. By using international and Russian guidelines, the authors lay down indications for this therapy and criteria for evaluation of its efficiency and safety.

  11. Küresel Boyutta Yoksulluk ve Kadın Yoksulluğu (Poverty On A Global Scale And Women Poverty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gülşen GERŞİL

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available As a result of the neo-liberal policies together with the globalization process, poverty in contrast with prosperity and wealth being seen in all over the world has still deepened has been identified by international researchs carried out. Today, the fact that the human needs are not only limited to material dimension but also there are their dimensions in spiritual qualities, cannot be ignored.Definition of poverty, also contains satisfaction of the so-called needs which are not in material quality, has the stiuation further complicated and the failure to be found a completely definition of poverty stems fromranging according to time and space or being addressed in terms of multi-dimensionally. In the framework of human rights;by virtue of being human; mainly the right to life and liberty, including health, education, food, shelter and social services; a healthy lifestyle; being entitled to equal protection of the laws form of the basis of Universal Declaration of Human Rights. As a phenomenon in the global dimension, the problem of poverty has been threatened these owned G. Gerşil / Küresel Boyutta Yoksulluk ve Kadın Yoksulluğu 160 rights has been observed. This situation is inevitable for especially women among disadvantaged groups who intensely feel the severity of poverty. For women, labor market participation is low and educational opportunities are very limited, the state of being woman that social gender roles are shaped, being trained with the traditional female role model, sufficient time is not left to woman in order to generate income, have caused that they limited benefit from the human rights. Discriminatory attitudes towards women in the labor market also have increased the poverty of women. All of these factors,cause that the women povertyhas been worsened, continued over the generations and been permanent. In this context, the most important factor that can reduce women poverty is socio-economic policiesrelated to the

  12. Poverty and postnatal depression: a systematic mapping of the evidence from low and lower middle income countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coast, Ernestina; Leone, Tiziana; Hirose, Atsumi; Jones, Eleri

    2012-09-01

    This study systematically maps, assesses and aggregates research relating to postnatal depression (PND) and poverty in low and lower middle income countries (LLMICs). Our search of 12 databases yielded 2202 articles, of which 47 items from 17 countries were included in our mapping. We highlight mechanisms for the relationships between poverty and PND in LLMICs. The research base on the relationships between poverty and PND in LLMIC is limited, but has recently expanded. It is dominated by studies that consider whether poverty is a risk factor for PND. Income, socio-economic status and education are all inconsistent risk factors for PND. Clues to better ways of framing and capturing economic stress in PND research is found in the qualitative studies included in our mapping. Evidence focuses overwhelmingly on individual-level analyses. To understand the scale and implications of PND in LLMICs, research has to take account of neighbourhoods, communities, and localities.

  13. Application of experimental poverty measures to the aged.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, K A

    1999-01-01

    The U.S. Census Bureau recently released new, experimental measures of poverty based on a National Academy of Sciences (NAS) panel's recommendations. This article examines the effects of the experimental measures on poverty rates among persons aged 65 or older in order to help inform policy debate. Policymakers and analysts use poverty rates to measure the successes and failures of existing programs and to create and defend new policy initiatives. The Census Bureau computes the official rates of poverty using poverty thresholds and definitions of countable income that have changed little since the official poverty measure was adopted in 1965. Amid growing concerns about the adequacy of the official poverty measure, a NAS panel undertook a study of the concepts, methodology, and data needed to measure poverty. The panel concluded in its 1995 report that the current measure no longer provides an accurate picture of relative rates of poverty for different groups in the population or of changes in poverty over time. The panel recommended changes in establishing the poverty thresholds, defining family resources, and obtaining the required data. The Census Bureau report shows how estimated levels of poverty would differ from the official level as specific recommendations of the NAS panel are implemented individually and how estimated trends would differ when many recommendations are implemented simultaneously. It computes nonstandardized and standardized poverty rates. (The latter constrains the overall poverty rate under the experimental measures to match the official rate.) This article reports poverty rates that have not been standardized and provides considerably more detail than the Census report about the effects of the experimental measures on poverty among the aged. It examines the effects of changing the poverty thresholds and the items included or excluded from the definition of available resources. It also explores the effects of the experimental measures on

  14. Z' factor including siRNA design quality parameter in RNAi screening experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazur, Sławomir; Kozak, Karol

    2012-05-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) high-content screening (HCS) enables massive parallel gene silencing and is increasingly being used to reveal novel connections between genes and disease-relevant phenotypes. The application of genome-scale RNAi relies on the development of high quality HCS assays. The Z' factor statistic provides a way to evaluate whether or not screening run conditions (reagents, protocols, instrumentation, kinetics, and other conditions not directly related to the test compounds) are optimized. Z' factor, introduced by Zhang et al., ( 1) is a dimensionless value that represents both the variability and the dynamic range between two sets of sample control data. This paper describe a new extension of the Z' factor, which integrates bioinformatics RNAi non-target compounds for screening quality assessment. Currently presented Z' factor is based on positive and negative control, which may not be sufficient for RNAi experiments including oligonucleotides (oligo) with lack of knock-down. This paper proposes an algorithm which extends existing algorithm by using additional controls generetaed from on-target analysis.

  15. Behavioral factors to include in guidelines for lifelong oral healthiness: an observational study in Japanese adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shimozato Miho

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to determine which behavioral factors to include in guidelines for the Japanese public to achieve an acceptable level of oral healthiness. The objective was to determine the relationship between oral health related behaviors and symptoms related to oral disease and tooth loss in a Japanese adult community. Methods Oral health status and lifestyle were investigated in 777 people aged 20 years and older (390 men and 387 women. Subjects were asked to complete a postal questionnaire concerning past diet and lifestyle. The completed questionnaires were collected when they had health examinations. The 15 questions included their preference for sweets, how many between-meal snacks they usually had per day, smoking and drinking habits, presence of oral symptoms, and attitudes towards dental visits. Participants were asked about their behaviors at different stages of their life. The oral health examinations included examination of the oral cavity and teeth performed by dentists using WHO criteria. Odds ratios were calculated for all subjects, all 10 year age groups, and for subjects 30 years or older, 40 years or older, 50 years or older, and 60 years or older. Results Frequency of tooth brushing (OR = 3.98, having your own toothbrush (OR = 2.11, smoking (OR = 2.71 and bleeding gums (OR = 2.03 were significantly associated with number of retained teeth in males. Frequency of between-meal snacks was strongly associated with number of retained teeth in females (OR = 4.67. Having some hobbies (OR = 2.97, having a family dentist (OR = 2.34 and consulting a dentist as soon as symptoms occurred (OR = 1.74 were significantly associated with number of retained teeth in females. Factors that were significantly associated with tooth loss in both males and females included alcohol consumption (OR = 11.96, males, OR = 3.83, females, swollen gums (OR = 1.93, males, OR = 3.04, females and toothache (OR = 3.39, males, OR

  16. 贫困地区民营经济发展的制约因素及对策分析%Restricting Factors for the Growth of Private Economy in Poverty-Stricken Areas and the Strategy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭贞贞; 马骥

    2014-01-01

    民营经济发展水平低是贫困地区经济发展不发达的重要原因。制约贫困地区民营经济发展的因素有脱贫致富的思想、人力资源状况、金融生态环境和技术创新水平等。促进贫困地区民营经济发展与脱贫致富必须根据民营经济产业发展需求,大力发展职业教育;优化环境,承接产业转移;创新贫困地区新型城镇化发展机制,推动地区民营经济发展;大力发展交通基础设施,破解民营经济发展瓶颈;创新民营企业管理,做大做强民营经济。%Inadequate development of the private economy is a major reason of economic underdevelopment in poverty-driven areas. Fac-tors restricting the growth of the private economy in these areas include people's lack of eagerness for creating a fortune, human resource shortage, and the poor financial environment and technological innovation ability. To shake off poverty, the areas must develop the private economy by proactively develop vocational education, improve environment for carrying on industry transfer, innovate new-type urbaniza-tion mechanism, enhance the transportation infrastructure construction, and innovate the management of private enterprises.

  17. Multidimensional Poverty and Child Survival in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, Sanjay K.

    2011-01-01

    Background Though the concept of multidimensional poverty has been acknowledged cutting across the disciplines (among economists, public health professionals, development thinkers, social scientists, policy makers and international organizations) and included in the development agenda, its measurement and application are still limited. Objectives and Methodology Using unit data from the National Family and Health Survey 3, India, this paper measures poverty in multidimensional space and examine the linkages of multidimensional poverty with child survival. The multidimensional poverty is measured in the dimension of knowledge, health and wealth and the child survival is measured with respect to infant mortality and under-five mortality. Descriptive statistics, principal component analyses and the life table methods are used in the analyses. Results The estimates of multidimensional poverty are robust and the inter-state differentials are large. While infant mortality rate and under-five mortality rate are disproportionately higher among the abject poor compared to the non-poor, there are no significant differences in child survival among educationally, economically and health poor at the national level. State pattern in child survival among the education, economical and health poor are mixed. Conclusion Use of multidimensional poverty measures help to identify abject poor who are unlikely to come out of poverty trap. The child survival is significantly lower among abject poor compared to moderate poor and non-poor. We urge to popularize the concept of multiple deprivations in research and program so as to reduce poverty and inequality in the population. PMID:22046384

  18. Multidimensional poverty and child survival in India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay K Mohanty

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Though the concept of multidimensional poverty has been acknowledged cutting across the disciplines (among economists, public health professionals, development thinkers, social scientists, policy makers and international organizations and included in the development agenda, its measurement and application are still limited. OBJECTIVES AND METHODOLOGY: Using unit data from the National Family and Health Survey 3, India, this paper measures poverty in multidimensional space and examine the linkages of multidimensional poverty with child survival. The multidimensional poverty is measured in the dimension of knowledge, health and wealth and the child survival is measured with respect to infant mortality and under-five mortality. Descriptive statistics, principal component analyses and the life table methods are used in the analyses. RESULTS: The estimates of multidimensional poverty are robust and the inter-state differentials are large. While infant mortality rate and under-five mortality rate are disproportionately higher among the abject poor compared to the non-poor, there are no significant differences in child survival among educationally, economically and health poor at the national level. State pattern in child survival among the education, economical and health poor are mixed. CONCLUSION: Use of multidimensional poverty measures help to identify abject poor who are unlikely to come out of poverty trap. The child survival is significantly lower among abject poor compared to moderate poor and non-poor. We urge to popularize the concept of multiple deprivations in research and program so as to reduce poverty and inequality in the population.

  19. TOURISM AND POVERTY IN BADUNG REGENCY, BALI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Made Patera

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Tourism and poverty’s phenomenon had already been known since the birth of human civilization. In the 1980s poverty became a serious concern of practitioners and scholars in various part of the world, including Indonesia. Poverty is not only understood in understanding as an abstract concept, but also as a reality of economic injustice and inability to meet basic human needs in some rich countries but also in many developing countries in the world. The problem of poverty is a fundamental and tourism is one of the many ways to solve this. The objective of this paper is to study the role of tourism to poverty alleviation including: 1 to analyze the influence of tourism development toward economic performance; 2 to analyze the effect of economic performance on poverty eradication; 3 to analyze the influence of tourism on poverty alleviation; 4 to formulate a strategy to increase tourism's role in poverty alleviation in Badung Regency. This study uses quantitative approach supported by secondary data and qualitative approach using primary data obtained through observation, in-depth interviews and focus group discussions. Research was conducted in South Badung Regency in the most developed tourism growth and considered the richest district among all regencies in Bali Regencies. Various attempts have been made to alleviate poverty, however have not been able to resolve poverty problems. The grand theory of this study refers to Neoliberalism Theory, supported by Social Democratic Theory and Empowerment Theory. Neoliberalism emphasizes that poverty as an individual problem and prosperity can only be achieved by achievement of economic growth through free market mechanism. According to Social Democratic Theory the emergence of poverty came from outside of the community itself. While the emphasis on the Empowerment Theory is in improving the ability of individual or communities to become indepedence on economic, social welfare and political right. Data

  20. Impacto de la pobreza en el desarrollo cognitivo: un análisis teórico de dos factores mediadores (Impact of Poverty on Cognitive Development. A Theoretical Analysis of Two Mediator Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Clara Mazzoni

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available RESUMEN: Numerosos estudios han establecido el impacto negativo de la pobreza sobre el desarrollo cognitivo, examinando parcialmente algunos factores mediadores del mismo. El objetivo del presente artículo consiste en realizar un análisis teórico centrado en la estimulación en el hogar y la nutrición como factores mediadores, retomando los resultados de diferentes trabajos desarrollados desde el año 2000. Estos indican que la estimulación en el hogar sería un factor mediador clave del impacto de la pobreza sobre el desarrollo cognitivo, mientras que los efectos del estado nutricional dependerían del grado de severidad del déficit, no siendo determinantes en los casos de desnutrición leve o moderada. Se concluye sobre la importancia teórico-práctica de profundizar en el estudio simultáneo de los factores mediadores implicados. ABSTRACT: Numerous studies have established the negative impact of poverty on cognitive development, by partially examining some mediator factors thereof. The objective of this article is to perform a theoretical analysis focused on home stimulation and nutrition as mediating factors. To do this we took the results of different studies which address this issue, developed since 2000. The results indicate that home stimulation would be a key mediator factor of the impact of poverty on cognitive development, while the effects of nutritional status would depend on the severity of the deficit, not being decisive in cases of mild or moderate undernutrition. We conclude about the theoretical and practical importance of deepen in the simultaneous study of the involved mediators factors.

  1. Poverty Eradication Dilemma: Understanding Poverty Dynamics in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    sulaiman.adebowale

    2008-10-20

    Oct 20, 2008 ... dilemma using the Poverty Eradication Action Plan (PEAP), an all-inclusive ... security, conflict resolution and disaster management; (iv) good .... modernization and industrialization even if it has meant forest, schools and.

  2. Revised emission factors for gas engines including start/stop emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, Malene; Boll Illerup, J.; Birr-Petersen, K.

    2008-06-15

    Liberalisation of the electricity market has led to Danish gas engine plants increasingly converting to the spot and regulating power markets. In order to offer regulating power, plants need to be able to start and stop the engines at the plants quickly. The liberalisation causes a considerable change of operation practice of the engines e.g. less full load operation hours /year. The project provides an inventory determining the scale of the emissions during the start and stop sequence as well as proposals for engine modifications aimed at reducing start/stop emissions. This report includes calculation of emission factors as well as an inventory of total emissions and reduction potentials. (au)

  3. Poverty and death in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, R A; Eaker, E D; Barker, N D; Teutsch, S M; Sosniak, W A; Krieger, N

    1996-01-01

    The authors conducted a survival analysis to determine the effect of poverty on mortality in a national sample of blacks and whites, 25 to 74 years of age (the first National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES-1) and NHANES-1 Epidemiologic Follow up Study). They estimated the proportion of mortality associated with poverty during 1971-1984 and in 1991 by calculating population attributable risk and assessed confounding by major known risk factors (e.g., smoking, cholesterol levels, and physical inactivity). In 1973, 6.0 percent of U.S. mortality among black and white persons 25 to 74 years of age was attributable to poverty; in 1991, the proportion was 5.9 percent. In 1991, rates of mortality attributable to poverty were lowest for white women, 2.2 times as high for white men, 8.6 times as high for black men, and 3.6 times as high for black women. Adjustment for all these potential confounders combined had little effect on the hazard ratio among men, but reduced the effect of poverty on mortality among women by 42 percent. The proportion of mortality attributable to poverty among U.S. black and white adults has changed only minimally in recent decades. The effect of poverty on mortality must be largely explained by conditions other than commonly recognized risk factors.

  4. Child poverty

    OpenAIRE

    Bradshaw, J

    2011-01-01

    The Elgar Companion to Development Studies is an innovative and unique reference book that includes original contributions covering development economics as well as development studies broadly defined. This major new Companion brings together an international panel of experts from varying backgrounds who discuss theoretical, ethical and practical issues relating to economic, social, cultural, institutional, political and human aspects of development in poor countries. It also includes a selec...

  5. Rural poverty reduction through centrally sponsored schemes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, N C

    2007-10-01

    This paper discusses the evolving profile of poverty in India and reviews the national performance of selected anti-poverty programmes between 1997-1998 and 2005. For each programme, it outlines the budgetary allocation principle used for the States and districts and analyzes budgetary performance over the period. The main objective is to explore the extent to which the anti-poverty programmes are reaching their target groups effectively. Finally, it identifies the specific factors responsible for under-performance and provides a set of recommendations for policy makers and programme implementers which could help improve the outcomes of the schemes.

  6. Have agricultural economists neglected poverty issues?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiesenhusen, W C

    1991-01-01

    Agricultural economists concerned with development issues devote effort to researching agriculture's inputs to produce a surplus and transfer it to nonagriculture, to provide markets for urban-based industry, to maintain a labor reservoir, to assist in capital formation, and to accumulate foreign exchange. Little attention is focused on broader and more sweeping economic problems. Discussion is directed toward answering some questions about why agricultural economists neglect rural poverty. Also, attention is given to why the extent of rural poverty imperils development, in what location should poverty be addressed, what are the issues in the agricultural growth and inequality debate as it affects rural poverty, and whether there are any new or promising ways to combat rural poverty. The extent of poverty is measured by the World Bank as 20% of world population, or 1 billion people, Rural poverty accounts for 60% of the hungry poor in Latin America, 80% in Asia, and 90% in Africa. 11 items are used to define the rural poor, such as a heterogeneous population of primarily small-scale farmers, the landless, nomads, pastoralists, and fisherfolk. 5 reasons are given why economists avoid rural poverty, including the difficulty in modeling the complex problems of rural poverty and the political considerations of free market vs. socialist economies. Other reasons involve land reform which reduces labor needs and a commitment to commercial farming rather than small-scale, labor-intensive farming; the rural agricultural poor's contributions to development are underrated. East Asian countries have been successful in linking growth, distribution, and amelioration of poverty among the peasantry. Environmental degradation may be encouraged by inequalities and unequal access to resources. The example is given of Brazil which has promoted migration to cities due to commercialization of rural agriculture and created urban poverty instead of dealing directly with rural poverty by

  7. Poverty in Edwardian Britain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazeley, Ian; Newell, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    This article introduces a newly discovered household budget data set for 1904. We use these data to estimate urban poverty among working families in the British Isles. Applying Bowley's poverty line, we estimate that at least 23 per cent of people in urban working households and 18 per cent of working households had income insufficient to meet minimum needs. This is well above Rowntree's estimate of primary poverty for York in 1899 and high in the range that Bowley found in northern towns in 1912–13. The skill gradient of poverty is steep; for instance, among labourers' households, the poverty rates are close to 50 per cent. Measures of the depth of poverty are relatively low in the data, suggesting that most poor male-headed working households were close to meeting Bowley's new standard.

  8. Poverty in Belize

    OpenAIRE

    Lomborg, Mette Sakham; Kamper, Anna Sofie

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this project is to examine why the population of people who lives in poverty has increased in Belize, and what the government of Belize is doing in order to defeat the poverty problem. It provides and analysis of Belize's National Poverty Elimination Strategy and Action Plan and the different programmes that are implemented in Belize in order to improve the livelihoods of the poor. The project do also examine the economy, natural disasters, crime and violence, educatio...

  9. Lifting Poverty with Willpower

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1997-01-01

    More than 1 billion people in the world today--the great majority of whom are women--live in absolute poverty....In order to eradicate poverty and achieve sustainable development, women and men must participate fully and equally in the formulation of macroeconomic and social policies and strategies for the eradication of poverty.--Extracts from Platform For Action of the 4th World Conference On Women

  10. Resilience amongst Older Colombians Living in Poverty: an Ecological Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Kate M; Reyes-Rodriguez, Maria F; Altamar, Paula; Soulsby, Laura K

    2016-12-01

    Older Colombians face significant adversities: poverty, violence and displacement. However, there is evidence that Latinos are often resilient. We examine resilience in older Colombians living in poverty using an ecological framework that identifies three levels: individual; community; and societal. In this paper we examine data from 16 semi-structured interviews with older Colombians that explore resilience within the context of poverty. We analyze our data using three stages: (1) modified grounded theory; (2) assignment of resilience status; (3) identification of components of the ecological framework which contribute to resilience in these participants. The most striking feature is that some participants are able to adapt to their situation, demonstrating resilience, whilst others are not. Individual characteristics such as psychological and material resources contribute to resilience. At the community level, family, social support, participation and cohesion promote resilience. Finally, at the societal level, social and welfare services, finance, religion and social policy, are important factors. These different levels of resilience are co-dependent, and we illustrate how this is so. We suggest that older Colombians living in poverty often demonstrate resilience, but that more can be done to enhance their lives. This includes interventions at the individual and community levels alongside changes in social policy.

  11. Prognostic factors of infantile spasms: role of treatment options including a ketogenic diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeehun; Lee, Jun Hwa; Yu, Hee Jun; Lee, Munhyang

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to provide additional evidences on prognostic factors for infantile spasms and the possible role of a ketogenic diet. A retrospective analysis was performed for patients with infantile spasms who had been followed up for more than 6months between January 2000 and July 2012 at Samsung Medical Center (Seoul, Republic of Korea). We analyzed the association between possible prognostic factors and seizure/developmental outcomes. Sixty-nine patients were included in this study and their mean follow-up duration was 52.5 (9-147) months. In the patients who had been followed up for more than 2years, 53.6% (n=30/57) remained seizure-free at the last visit. Sixty patients (86.9%) showed developmental delay at last follow-up. Forty-two patients (60.9%) became spasm-free with one or two antiepileptic drugs, one patient with epilepsy surgery for a tumor, and seven patients with a ketogenic diet after the failure of two or more antiepileptic drugs. The etiology and age of seizure onset were the significant prognostic factors. In this study, about 60% of the patients became spasm-free with vigabatrin and topiramate. Ketogenic diet increased the rate by 10% in the remaining antiepileptic drug resistant patients. However, 86.9% of the patients showed developmental delay, mostly a severe degree. Early diagnosis and prompt application of treatment options such as antiepileptic drugs, a ketogenic diet or epilepsy surgery can improve outcomes in patients with infantile spasms. Copyright © 2013 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Macroenvironmental factors including GDP per capita and physical activity in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Adrian J; Van Stralen, Maartje M; Kunst, Anton E; Te Velde, Saskia J; Van Lenthe, Frank J; Salmon, Jo; Brug, Johannes

    2013-02-01

    Socioeconomic inequalities in physical activity at the individual level are well reported. Whether inequalities in economic development and other macroenvironmental variables between countries are also related to physical activity at the country level is comparatively unstudied. We examined the relationship between country-level data on macroenvironmental factors (gross domestic product (GDP) per capita, public sector expenditure on health, percentage living in urban areas, and cars per 1000 population) with country-level physical activity prevalence obtained from previous pan-European studies. Studies that assessed leisuretime physical activity (n = 3 studies including 27 countries in adults, n = 2 studies including 28 countries in children) and total physical activity (n = 3 studies in adults including 16 countries) were analyzed separately as were studies among adults and children. Strong and consistent positive correlations were observed between country prevalence of leisure-time physical activity and country GDP per capita in adults (average r = 0.70; all studies, P G 0.05). In multivariate analysis, country prevalence of leisure-time physical activity among adults remained associated with country GDP per capita (two of three studies) but not urbanization or educational attainment. Among school-age populations, no association was found between country GDP per capita and country prevalence of leisure-time physical activity. In those studies that assessed total physical activity (which also includes occupational and transport physical activity), no association with country GDP per capita was observed. Clear differences in national leisure-time physical activity levels throughout Europe may be a consequence of economic development. Lack of economic development of some countries in Europe may make increasing leisure-time physical activity more difficult. Further examination of the link between country GDP per capita and national physical activity levels (across

  13. Migration, remittances and poverty in Ecuador

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Etudes & documents; We analyse the influence of the recent wave of migration on the incidence of poverty among stayers in Ecuador. We draw our data from a survey that provides detailed information on migrants. The analysis reveals a significant negative effect of migration on poverty among migrant households. This effect is substantially smaller than the one that we find focusing on recipient households. We explore the factors that account for this divergence. Our analysis entails that the ex...

  14. Association of Breastfeeding and the Federal Poverty Level: National Survey of Family Growth, 2011–2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Constance Wiener

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Breastfeeding is strongly endorsed in the Healthy People 2020 goals; however, there remain many disparities in breastfeeding prevalence. The purpose of this study was to examine the association between breastfeeding and the Federal Poverty Level in the United States. Data from 5,397 women in the National Survey of Family Growth 2011–2013 survey were included in this study. The data were analyzed for descriptive features and logistic regressions of the Federal Poverty Level on breastfeeding. There were 64.1% of women who reported breastfeeding. Over one-third (35.2% of women reported having a household income of 0–99% of the Federal Poverty Level. There were 15.2% of women who reported an income of 400% and above the Federal Poverty Level. With statistical adjustment for maternal age, race/ethnicity, education, marital status, parity, preterm birth, birth weight, insurance, and dwelling, the Federal Poverty Level was not significantly associated with breastfeeding. In this recent survey of mothers, Federal Poverty Level was not shown to be a significant factor in breastfeeding.

  15. Chinese adolescents' explanations of poverty: the Perceived Causes of Poverty Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shek, Daniel T L

    2002-01-01

    The Chinese Perceived Causes of Poverty Scale (CPCPS), constructed to assess how Chinese people explain poverty, covers four categories of explanations: personal problems of poor people, lack of opportunities to escape from the poverty cycle, exploitation of poor people, and bad fate. Chinese secondary school students (N = 1,519) were administered the CPCPS. Four factors were abstracted from their responses (Personal Problems, Lack of Opportunity, Exploitation, and Fate) and these factors (i.e., subscales) could reliably be reproduced in different subsamples. The four subscales were also found to be internally consistent and there was some support for their construct validity.

  16. Helping the most vulnerable out of the poverty trap and reducing inequality: Policies, strategies, and services for individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder, including intellectual and neurodevelopmental disabilities: BASE Project Report (Volume 2) NILT Survey Autism Module

    OpenAIRE

    Dillenburger, Karola; Jordan, Julie-Ann; McKerr, Lynne

    2013-01-01

    The primary purpose of the BASE Project was to establish how to help individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder out of poverty by promoting social inclusion. In order to achieve this, a range of methodologies were utilised that aimed to provide a baseline against which the effect of the Autism Act (NI) 2011 and the associated Autism Strategy (2013-2020) and Action Plans can be measured. The BASE Project is reported in 5 volumes. Volume 2 reports on the analysis of the autism module of the Nort...

  17. A Global Poverty Map Derived from Satellite Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elvidge, Christopher D. [NOAA National Geophysical Data Center,; Sutton, Paul S. [University of Denver; Ghosh, Tilottama [University of Denver; Tuttle, Benjamin T. [NOAA National Geophysical Data Center,; Baugh, Kimberly E. [NOAA National Geophysical Data Center,; Bhaduri, Budhendra L [ORNL; Bright, Eddie A [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    A global poverty map has been produced at 30 arc sec resolution using a poverty index calculated by dividing population count (LandScan2004) by the brightness of satellite observed lighting (DMSP nighttimelights). Inputs to the LandScan product include satellite-derived landcover and topography, plus human settlement outlines derived from high-resolution imagery. The poverty estimates have been calibrated using national level poverty data from the World Development Indicators (WDI) 2006 edition. The total estimate of the numbers of individuals living in poverty is 2.2billion, slightly under the WDI estimate of 2.6 billion. We have demonstrated a new class of poverty map that should improve over time through the inclusion of new reference data for calibration of poverty estimates and as improvements are made in the satellite observation of human activities related to economic activity and technology access.

  18. A global poverty map derived from satellite data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elvidge, Christopher D.; Sutton, Paul C.; Ghosh, Tilottama; Tuttle, Benjamin T.; Baugh, Kimberly E.; Bhaduri, Budhendra; Bright, Edward

    2009-08-01

    A global poverty map has been produced at 30 arcsec resolution using a poverty index calculated by dividing population count (LandScan 2004) by the brightness of satellite observed lighting (DMSP nighttime lights). Inputs to the LandScan product include satellite-derived land cover and topography, plus human settlement outlines derived from high-resolution imagery. The poverty estimates have been calibrated using national level poverty data from the World Development Indicators (WDI) 2006 edition. The total estimate of the numbers of individuals living in poverty is 2.2 billion, slightly under the WDI estimate of 2.6 billion. We have demonstrated a new class of poverty map that should improve over time through the inclusion of new reference data for calibration of poverty estimates and as improvements are made in the satellite observation of human activities related to economic activity and technology access.

  19. Fever in trauma patients: evaluation of risk factors, including traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengualid, Victoria; Talari, Goutham; Rubin, David; Albaeni, Aiham; Ciubotaru, Ronald L; Berger, Judith

    2015-03-01

    The role of fever in trauma patients remains unclear. Fever occurs as a response to release of cytokines and prostaglandins by white blood cells. Many factors, including trauma, can trigger release of these factors. To determine whether (1) fever in the first 48 hours is related to a favorable outcome in trauma patients and (2) fever is more common in patients with head trauma. Retrospective study of trauma patients admitted to the intensive care unit for at least 2 days. Data were analyzed by using multivariate analysis. Of 162 patients studied, 40% had fever during the first 48 hours. Febrile patients had higher mortality rates than did afebrile patients. When adjusted for severity of injuries, fever did not correlate with mortality. Neither the incidence of fever in the first 48 hours after admission to the intensive care unit nor the number of days febrile in the unit differed between patients with and patients without head trauma (traumatic brain injury). About 70% of febrile patients did not have a source found for their fever. Febrile patients without an identified source of infection had lower peak white blood cell counts, lower maximum body temperature, and higher minimum platelet counts than did febrile patients who had an infectious source identified. The most common infection was pneumonia. No relationship was found between the presence of fever during the first 48 hours and mortality. Patients with traumatic brain injury did not have a higher incidence of fever than did patients without traumatic brain injury. About 30% of febrile patients had an identifiable source of infection. Further studies are needed to understand the origin and role of fever in trauma patients. ©2015 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  20. Poverty and Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Pat

    2015-01-01

    In this article the author discusses the multiple ways in which the enduring, and increasing, problems associated with child poverty blight young people's educational opportunities in the school system. Current policies, supported by a sympathetic media, blame individuals for their poverty, and blame teachers when they fail to "close the…

  1. Rethinking Education and Poverty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tierney, William G., Ed.

    2015-01-01

    In "Rethinking Education and Poverty," William G. Tierney brings together scholars from around the world to examine the complex relationship between poverty and education in the twenty first century. International in scope, this book assembles the best contemporary thinking about how education can mediate class and improve the lives of…

  2. Poverty Survey 2011

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2011-01-01

    Original title: Armoedesignalement 2011 In this joint publication, Statistics Netherlands (CBS) and the Netherlands Institute for Social Research/SCP present the most up-to-date figures on poverty in the Netherlands. The trend in the poverty rate is described for the population as a whole and for t

  3. Poverty and Aspirations Failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dalton, P.S.; Ghosal, S.; Mani, A.

    2011-01-01

    We develop a theoretical framework to study the psychology of poverty and 'aspirations failure'. In our framework, the rich and the poor share the same preferences - and also a behavioral bias in setting aspirations. Greater downside risks imposed by poverty exacerbates the effects of this behaviora

  4. Subjective poverty line definitions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Flik; B.M.S. van Praag (Bernard)

    1991-01-01

    textabstractIn this paper we will deal with definitions of subjective poverty lines. To measure a poverty threshold value in terms of household income, which separates the poor from the non-poor, we take into account the opinions of all people in society. Three subjective methods will be discussed

  5. Poverty Survey 2013

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2013-01-01

    Original title: Armoedesignalement 2013 In this joint publication, Statistics Netherlands (CBS) and the Netherlands Institute for Social Research¦SCP present the most recent data on poverty in the Netherlands. The report describes the trend in the poverty rate for the Dutch population as a whole as

  6. Poverty Monitor 2000

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2000-01-01

    Original title: Armoedemonitor 2000. The Poverty Monitor 2000 (Armoedemonitor 2000) contains the most up-to-date figures on poverty in the Netherlands. The data were collected and analysed by the Netherlands Institute for Social Research/SCP and Statistics Netherlands (CBS). The extent of

  7. Poverty monitor 2007

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cok Vrooman; Stella Hoff; Ferdy Otten; Wim Bos

    2007-01-01

    Original title: Armoedemonitor 2007. The Poverty Monitor 2007 contains the most up-to-date figures on poverty in the Netherlands. The data were collected and analysed by the Netherlands Institute for Social Research/SCP in collaboration with Statistics Netherlands (CBS). The report describes

  8. Poverty Monitor 2000

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2000-01-01

    Original title: Armoedemonitor 2000. The Poverty Monitor 2000 (Armoedemonitor 2000) contains the most up-to-date figures on poverty in the Netherlands. The data were collected and analysed by the Netherlands Institute for Social Research/SCP and Statistics Netherlands (CBS). The extent of and tren

  9. Poverty and Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Pat

    2015-01-01

    In this article the author discusses the multiple ways in which the enduring, and increasing, problems associated with child poverty blight young people's educational opportunities in the school system. Current policies, supported by a sympathetic media, blame individuals for their poverty, and blame teachers when they fail to "close the…

  10. Subjective poverty line definitions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Flik; B.M.S. van Praag (Bernard)

    1991-01-01

    textabstractIn this paper we will deal with definitions of subjective poverty lines. To measure a poverty threshold value in terms of household income, which separates the poor from the non-poor, we take into account the opinions of all people in society. Three subjective methods will be discussed a

  11. Poverty monitor 2007

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cok Vrooman; Stella Hoff; Ferdy Otten; Wim Bos

    2007-01-01

    Original title: Armoedemonitor 2007. The Poverty Monitor 2007 contains the most up-to-date figures on poverty in the Netherlands. The data were collected and analysed by the Netherlands Institute for Social Research/SCP in collaboration with Statistics Netherlands (CBS). The report describes povert

  12. Poverty Monitor 2001

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2001-01-01

    Original title: Armoedemonitor 2001. The Poverty Monitor 2001 (Armoedemonitor 2001) contains the most up-to-date figures on poverty in the Netherlands. The data were collected and analysed by the Netherlands Institute for Social Research/SCP and Statistics Netherlands (CBS). The extent of and trend

  13. Poverty Monitor 2003

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cok Vrooman; Henk-Jan Dirven; Stella Hoff; Ger Linden

    2003-01-01

    Original title: Armoedemonitor 2003. The Poverty Monitor 2003 (Armoedemonitor 2003) contains the most up-to-date figures on poverty in the Netherlands. The data were collected and analysed by the Netherlands Institute for Social Research/SCP and Statistics Netherlands (CBS). The extent of and trend

  14. high-poverty schools

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ditions, and serve as role models for the rest of the system (Taylor, 2006:73). Introduction ... Schools are identified as poor based on the relative poverty of the community, in ... The true impact of poverty on the provision of education is evident from ... overcome, and a happy and effective learning environment be created in a.

  15. Redrawing the Poverty Line

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    A new threshold means more than 100 million impoverished people will be eligible for government assistance as China continues to battle poverty The Chinese Government has decided to set the nation’s poverty line at an annual per-capita net income

  16. Poverty Monitor 2001

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2001-01-01

    Original title: Armoedemonitor 2001. The Poverty Monitor 2001 (Armoedemonitor 2001) contains the most up-to-date figures on poverty in the Netherlands. The data were collected and analysed by the Netherlands Institute for Social Research/SCP and Statistics Netherlands (CBS). The extent of and

  17. Poverty and Aspirations Failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dalton, P.S.; Ghosal, S.; Mani, A.

    2011-01-01

    We develop a theoretical framework to study the psychology of poverty and 'aspirations failure'. In our framework, the rich and the poor share the same preferences - and also a behavioral bias in setting aspirations. Greater downside risks imposed by poverty exacerbates the effects of this behaviora

  18. Measuring Poverty: A Rejoinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iceland, John

    2005-01-01

    This article presents the author's rejoinder on commentaries of his article which illustrate the variety of perspectives with which people approach poverty measurement issues. Some of the comments highlight the theoretical concerns underpinning poverty measurement efforts, whereas others focus on empirical considerations. As a social scientist,…

  19. Poverty Survey 2014

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cok Vrooman; Stella Hoff; Ferdy Otten; Wim Bos e.o.

    2014-01-01

    In this joint publication, the Netherlands Institute for Social Research¦SCP and Statistics Netherlands (CBS) present the most up-to-date figures on poverty in the Netherlands. The development of the poverty rate is described for the Dutch population as a whole as well as for the main groups at risk

  20. Last word: prisoners of poverty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, G

    1997-01-01

    This article discusses the issue of poverty and living conditions among the poor in developing countries. The world is divided into the haves and the have nots. The have nots include 1.6 billion who are worse off than they were 15 years ago. 70 countries have 1997 levels of income that are under their income in the 1960s or 1970s. The economic declines in the developing world are "longer and deeper" than the Great Depression of the 1930s. 1.3 billion people live on less than $1. a day, and 3.3 billion live on around $2. a day ($750 per year). This level of poverty occurs in a world where total global income increased during 1960-93 by 6 times to $23 trillion, and average world per capita income tripled. However, 60% of world population live in poverty. The income gap has widened between rich and poor. "The effects of poverty are mediated through low social cohesion, marginalization of poor people, and lack of social participation." The serious health problems of poor people are the result of lack of clean water, decent housing, sanitation, and basic services and the result of despair, anger, fear, worry about debts, job and housing insecurity, and feelings of failure and social alienation. Richard Wilkerson found in a new study that the decline in social cohesion in Eastern Europe and chronic stress may impact on health as seriously as dangerous housing and working conditions among the poor. Polarization, increased inequality, and poverty breed alienation, despair, and crime and challenge principles of justice. Globalization must apply not just to trade and communication but also to social and environmental issues. The global rich with 78% of the global gross domestic product spend only an average of 0.29% of national income on official development aid. Effectiveness in achieving balanced social conditions worldwide will depend on the amount of foreign aid and the actions of recipient countries to strengthen their institutions.

  1. Immigrant Child Poverty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galloway, Taryn Ann; Gustafsson, Björn; Pedersen, Peder J.

    2015-01-01

    Immigrant and native child poverty in Denmark, Norway, and Sweden 1993–2001 is studied using large sets of panel data. While native children face yearly poverty risks of less than 10 percent in all three countries and for all years studied the increasing proportion of immigrant children...... with an origin in middle- and low-income countries have poverty risks that vary from 38 up to as much as 58 percent. At the end of the observation period, one third of the poor children in Norway and as high as about a half in Denmark and in Sweden are of immigrant origin. The strong overrepresentation...... of immigrant children from low- and middle-income countries when measured in yearly data is also found when applying a longer accounting period for poverty measurement. We find that child poverty rates are generally high shortly after arrival to the new country and typically decrease with years since...

  2. Institutions and poverty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tebaldi, Edinaldo; Mohan, Ramesh

    2010-01-01

    This study utilises eight alternative measures of institutions and the instrumental variable method to examine the impacts of institutions on poverty. The estimates show that an economy with a robust system to control corruption, an effective government, and a stable political system will create the conditions to promote economic growth, minimise income distribution conflicts, and reduce poverty. Corruption, ineffective governments, and political instability will not only hurt income levels through market inefficiencies, but also escalate poverty incidence via increased income inequality. The results also imply that the quality of the regulatory system, rule of law, voice and accountability, and expropriation risk are inversely related to poverty but their effect on poverty is via average income rather than income distribution.

  3. Child poverty. Ways forward for the paediatrician: A comprehensive overview of poverty reduction strategies requiring paediatric support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Suparna; Ford-Jones, Elizabeth

    2015-05-01

    The harmful effects of child poverty are well documented. Despite this, progress in poverty reduction in Canada has been slow. A significant gap exists between what is known about eradicating poverty and its implementation. Paediatricians can play an important role in bridging this gap by understanding and advancing child poverty reduction. Establishment of a comprehensive national poverty reduction plan is essential to improving progress. The present review identifies the key components of an effective poverty reduction strategy. These elements include effective poverty screening, promoting healthy child development and readiness to learn, ensuring food and housing security, providing extended health care coverage for the uninsured and using place-based solutions and team-level interventions. Specific economic interventions are also reviewed. Addressing the social determinants of health in these ways is crucial to narrowing disparities in wealth and health so that all children in Canada reach their full potential.

  4. Health Promotion Behavior of Chinese International Students in Korea Including Acculturation Factors: A Structural Equation Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sun Jung; Yoo, Il Young

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to explain the health promotion behavior of Chinese international students in Korea using a structural equation model including acculturation factors. A survey using self-administered questionnaires was employed. Data were collected from 272 Chinese students who have resided in Korea for longer than 6 months. The data were analyzed using structural equation modeling. The p value of final model is .31. The fitness parameters of the final model such as goodness of fit index, adjusted goodness of fit index, normed fit index, non-normed fit index, and comparative fit index were more than .95. Root mean square of residual and root mean square error of approximation also met the criteria. Self-esteem, perceived health status, acculturative stress and acculturation level had direct effects on health promotion behavior of the participants and the model explained 30.0% of variance. The Chinese students in Korea with higher self-esteem, perceived health status, acculturation level, and lower acculturative stress reported higher health promotion behavior. The findings can be applied to develop health promotion strategies for this population. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. 新疆城镇贫困的测度及影响因素分析%Analysis of Urban Poverty Measurement and Influencing Factors in Xinjiang

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张庆红

    2015-01-01

    该文利用2002—2013年新疆城镇居民可支配收入分组数据,计算了新疆城镇 FGT贫困指数,并在此基础上对贫困指数进行分解,探索经济增长、收入分配和贫困线变动对城镇贫困变动的影响。结果表明,2002—2013年,新疆城镇FGT贫困指数大体经历了三个峰值,总体呈下降趋势,基尼系数先升后降,2010年以后下降速度尤为明显。对FGT指数分解后发现,经济增长对降低贫困规模和贫困严重程度效果明显,收入分配的改善对降低贫困人口内部不平等程度效果最好,贫困线上升导致的FGT指数上升幅度与经济增长降低FGT贫困指数幅度大体相当。为有效解决新疆城镇贫困问题,应继续实施快速的经济增长和对穷人有利的收入分配相结合的反贫困战略。%Using disposable income of urban residents grouping data from 2002 to 2013,the paper calculates the FGT poverty index and explores the impact of economic growth, income distribution and poverty line changes on the change of urban poverty through decomposition of poverty index. The results show that FGT urban poverty index experienced three peaks and overall downward trends from 2002 to 2013, the Gene coefficient declines after a rise during the recession, and declination is obvious after 2010. The effect of economic growth to reduce poverty scale and severity is obvious, the effect of improvement of income distribution is best for reducing the inequality among the poor. The effect of poverty line to FGT index and the effect of economic growth to FGT poverty index is roughly equal. The government should implement the anti-poverty strategy that at the same time fuels rapid economic growth and optimizes the income distribution of the poor to solve the poverty problem in urban Xinjiang effectively.

  6. Area-level poverty and preterm birth risk: A population-based multilevel analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muglia Louis A

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Preterm birth is a complex disease with etiologic influences from a variety of social, environmental, hormonal, genetic, and other factors. The purpose of this study was to utilize a large population-based birth registry to estimate the independent effect of county-level poverty on preterm birth risk. To accomplish this, we used a multilevel logistic regression approach to account for multiple co-existent individual-level variables and county-level poverty rate. Methods Population-based study utilizing Missouri's birth certificate database (1989–1997. We conducted a multilevel logistic regression analysis to estimate the effect of county-level poverty on PTB risk. Of 634,994 births nested within 115 counties in Missouri, two levels were considered. Individual-level variables included demographics factors, prenatal care, health-related behavioral risk factors, and medical risk factors. The area-level variable included the percentage of the population within each county living below the poverty line (US census data, 1990. Counties were divided into quartiles of poverty; the first quartile (lowest rate of poverty was the reference group. Results PTB th quartile (4.9%, p adjOR 1.18 (95% CI 1.03, 1.35, with a similar effect at earlier gestational ages (adjOR 1.27 (95% CI 1.06, 1.52. Conclusion Women residing in socioeconomically deprived areas are at increased risk of preterm birth, above other underlying risk factors. Although the risk increase is modest, it affects a large number of pregnancies.

  7. Poverty Vs Parenting: an emergent dichotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Dermott

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Popular and political discussions in the UK about children’s future prospects are currently dominated by an emergent dichotomy in which either ‘poverty’ or ‘parenting’ is posited as the explanatory factor. In the current period of austerity this oppositional framing has become increasingly explicit: in response to the riots which took place across England in August 2011 one set of commentators focused on a lack of personal responsibility with its origins in the absences of appropriate parental role models, while others emphasised poverty and social disadvantage as causal mechanisms. The same pattern of highlighting either poverty or parenting is evident in major policy documents, including two significant government commissioned reports 'The Foundation Years' (2010 and 'Early Intervention' (2011. This paper argues that the development of the poverty/parenting dichotomy should be resisted because it is both unconvincing and unhelpful. Notwithstanding its popular and political prevalence, this discourse is unconvincing because research evidence suggests the importance of both parental engagement 'and' financial resources for outcomes for children. Further, it is unhelpful because the creation and maintenance of this dichotomy works against developing a nuanced understanding of 'how' the practices and attitudes of parents interact with economic circumstances and access to resources. Therefore the paper argues that as social researchers we must actively challenge lazy misrepresentations of existing evidence and counter any simplistic discourse. This needs to be done in combination with conducting work which can develop better understandings of the relationships between material disadvantage and what parents do, as well as effectively communicating these findings.

  8. Educational Consequences of Orphanhood and Poverty in Western Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyambedha, Erick Otieno; Aagaard-Hansen, Jens

    2010-01-01

    During the past decades, many developing countries have been severely hit by a combination of poverty and the HIV pandemic. However, there has been a debate about the relative contribution of these two factors. This study showed that poverty and orphanhood were two separate but interrelated factors contributing to poor schooling. There were no…

  9. The Research on the Influencing Factors of Residents’ Total Financial Exclusion in Chinese Poverty Areas%贫困地区居民完全金融排斥影响因素的实证研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    雷汉云

    2015-01-01

    Based on the survey data of more than 1,600 households in poverty areas about the financial services,the paper analyzes the factors about total financial exclusion using Logistic Regression Model. The research results show that:(1) Residents’ occupation,in-come and educational attainment have significant impact on total financial exclusion,and other important factors include region,age, property rights and family size. (2) The influence of gender,marriage,health,ethnicity and social class have influence to total financial exclusion,but their influence aren’t significant. (3)In order to solve financial exclusion problem in our poverty areas,relevant authori-ties should take measures to improve residents’ income,financial services structure,the level of educational development in poor areas, and increase the accumulation of properties of household property.%笔者基于我国贫困地区10个县1682个样本使用金融服务的调查数据,运用Logistic回归方法对完全金融排斥的影响因素进行分析。研究结果表明,居民就业、收入和受教育程度对完全金融排斥有重要的影响,其他的影响因素还有区域、年龄、房产权和家庭规模。研究结果还表明性别、婚姻、健康、民族、社会阶层对完全金融排斥的影响不明显。本文认为贫困地区居民金融排斥问题的解决需要有关方面采取措施提高居民的收入、改善金融服务的结构、提高贫困地区教育发展水平,增加贫困地区居民家庭财产的累积。

  10. Surveying the hidden attitudes of hospital nurses' towards poverty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittenauer, James; Ludwick, Ruth; Baughman, Kristin; Fishbein, Rebecca

    2015-08-01

    To explore the attitudes held by registered nurses about persons living in poverty. As a profession, nursing has strong commitment to advocating for the socioeconomically disadvantaged. The links among poverty and health disparities are well established and research demonstrates that attitudes of providers can influence how those in poverty use health services. Although nurses are the largest sector of healthcare providers globally, little research has been published on their attitudes towards patients they care for who live in poverty. Cross-sectional survey. Used a convenience sample of 117 registered nurses who completed the Attitudes Towards Poverty Short Form that contained three subscales. Regression analysis was used to examine the associations between the nurses' age, education, and years of experience, political views and financial security with their total score and subscale scores. Nurses were more likely to agree with stigmatising statements than statements that attributed poverty to personal deficiency or structural factors. In the multivariate analysis, years of experience were associated with more positive attitudes towards those living in poverty. Nurses with the most experience had less stigmatising beliefs about poverty and were more likely to endorse structural explanations. Those with a baccalaureate education were also more likely to endorse structural explanations for poverty. Gaining knowledge about attitudes towards and the factors influencing those attitudes, for example, education, are important in helping combat the disparities associated with poverty. Nurses have a duty to evaluate their individual attitudes and biases towards those living in poverty and how those attitudes and biases may influence daily practice. Assessing nurses' attitudes towards poverty may aid in better means of empowering nurses to seek solutions that will improve health conditions for those living in poverty. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Poverty in Capitalism. Why is it Persisting Today?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Víctor Manuel Isidro Luna

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to provide elements to reflect on the way poverty is nowadays conceptualized and on its causing factors. This paper discusses that a classic-neoclassical frame of reference cannot explain the persistence or increase of poverty in today's developed countries. This article suggests that through a Marxist historic-descriptive and theoretical-logical method it may be possible to gain understanding about poverty in capitalism and its current evolution.

  12. Pobreza y procedencia indígena como factores de riesgo de problemas nutricionales de los niños que ingresan a la escuela Poverty and indigenous origin as risk factors of nutritional problems among children who enroll in school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Bustos

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO:Determinar el efecto de ser indígena y de la pobreza, en los problemas nutricionales de escolares chilenos. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS:Se usaron bases de datos de niños que ingresaron a la escuela (1997-2004 que tenían información antropométrica, socioeconómica y origen étnico. Se construyeron modelos de regresión logística para talla baja y obesidad controlando el efecto de la pobreza y la etnia por sexo, edad y año de análisis. RESULTADOS:Se estudió a 1580103 niños: indígenas (7.4%, con talla baja (2.9% y obesidad (16%. Al estratificar por etnia, los más pobres tuvieron mayor riesgo de talla baja: en indígenas RM: 2.30 (IC95%: 2.27-2.33 y no indígenas RM: 2.29 (IC95%: 2.28-2.30. A la inversa, los escolares más pobres tuvieron menos riesgo de ser obesos (RM: 0.63; IC95%: 0.62-0.64. Ser indígena proporcionó 6% más posibilidad de presentar obesidad, comparado con no ser indígena (RM: 1.06; IC95%: 1.05-1.08. CONCLUSIÓN:. En niños chilenos, la pobreza es factor de riesgo de talla baja pero protector de obesidad independiente de la etnia. El mayor riesgo de obesidad en los escolares indígenas, si bien es pequeño, debe ser una voz de alerta para prevenir en ellos el aumento de las cifras.OBJECTIVE:To estimate the effect of indigenous ancestry and poverty on nutritional outcomes in Chilean schoolchildren. MATERIAL AND METHODS:We used the national database of children entering to the public educational system in 1997-2004. This includes anthropometric assessment, socioeconomic status and parental surnames, used to derive the ethnic origin. Logistic regression models related poverty and ethnicity on stunting and obesity were done, controlling for sex, age and calendar year. RESULTS:Data convey 1580103 children being 7.4% indigenous; 2.9% had stunting and around 16.0% were obese. Stratifying by poverty, it was shown that the poorest had higher risk of stunting both in indigenous (OR= 2.30; CI95%=2.27-2.33 and non indigenous

  13. Re-Visiting the Crime-and-Poverty Paradigm: An Empirical Assessment with Alternative Perspectives

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Paul A. Bourne

    2011-01-01

    .... Data from 1989 to 2009 were used to carry out this secondary data analysis. Poverty is not a causal factor of violent crimes in Jamaica, and the positive correlation between poverty and violent crimes is a spurious one...

  14. STUDI KOMPARASI KEMISKINAN DI INDONESIA: MULTIDIMENSIONAL POVERTY DAN MONETARY POVERTY

    OpenAIRE

    Nuryitmawan, Tegar Rismanuar

    2016-01-01

    Research on poverty has long been done by various methods and approaches. Approach to identifying the poor in general by calculating consumption expenditure or income reveneu. The calculation is then known as monetary poverty. Indonesia also use and implemented that approach. However, some experts believe that monetary poverty approach does not capture the whole cause of poverty because the indicator calculation not enough. Though poverty is a multidimensional phenomenon that involves not onl...

  15. Analysis of 1986 Poverty Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Food Research and Action Center, Washington, DC.

    Poverty data released by the U. S. Census Bureau indicates no significant progress toward reducing the poverty rate during a period of economic recovery. The 1986 poverty rate of 13.6 percent remains significantly higher than anytime in the 1970s. Minority group children represent the largest age group of the poverty population. The sluggish…

  16. More Than Poverty: The Effect of Child Abuse and Neglect on Teen Pregnancy Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garwood, Sarah K; Gerassi, Lara; Jonson-Reid, Melissa; Plax, Katie; Drake, Brett

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of the study was to compare risk for teen pregnancies between children living in poverty with no child protective services (CPS) report history and those in poverty with a history of CPS report. Children selected from families in poverty, both with and without CPS report histories were prospectively followed from 1993 to 2009 using electronic administrative records from agencies including CPS, emergency departments, Medicaid services, and juvenile courts. A total of 3,281 adolescent females were followed until the age of 18 years. For teens with history of poverty only, 16.8% had been pregnant at least once by the age of 17 years. In teens with history of both poverty and report of child abuse or neglect, 28.9% had been pregnant at least once by the age of 17 years. Although multivariate survival analyses revealed several other significant factors at the family and youth services levels, a report of maltreatment remained significant (about a 66% higher risk). Maltreatment is a significant risk factor for teen pregnancy among low income youth even after controlling for neighborhood disadvantage, other caregiver risks and indicators of individual emotional and behavioral problems. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Poverty in an unequal world: a quantitative structural analysis of the effects of inequality between and within countries on world poverty, 1980-2007

    OpenAIRE

    Dasandi, N.

    2013-01-01

    The existing explanations of the causes of poverty that dominate the development literature have tended to ignore the influence of international inequality on poverty, instead focusing exclusively on domestic factors. Furthermore, these explanations pay little attention to the effect of domestic inequality on poverty. This study addresses these shortcomings through a quantitative analysis of the effects of inequality between and within countries on poverty, between 1980 and 2007. The study in...

  18. Lay understandings of the effects of poverty: a Canadian perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reutter, Linda I; Veenstra, Gerry; Stewart, Miriam J; Raphael, Dennis; Love, Rhonda; Makwarimba, Edward; McMurray, Susan

    2005-11-01

    Although there is a large body of research dedicated to exploring public attributions for poverty, considerably less attention has been directed to public understandings about the effects of poverty. In this paper, we describe lay understandings of the effects of poverty and the factors that potentially influence these perceptions, using data from a telephone survey conducted in 2002 on a random sample (n=1671) of adults from eight neighbourhoods in two large Canadian cities (Edmonton and Toronto). These data were supplemented with interview data obtained from 153 people living in these same neighbourhoods. Multivariate linear and logistic regressions were used to determine the effects of basic demographic variables, exposure to poverty and attribution for poverty on three dependent variables relating to the effects of poverty: participation in community life, the relationship between poverty and health and challenges facing low-income people. Ninety-one per cent of survey respondents agreed that poverty is linked to health, while 68% agreed that low-income people are less likely to participate in community life. Affordable housing was deemed especially difficult to obtain by 96%, but other resources (obtaining healthy food, giving children a good start in life, and engaging in healthy behaviours) were also viewed as challenging by at least 70% of respondents. The regression models revealed that when controlling for demographics, exposure to poverty explained some of the variance in recognising the effects of poverty. Media exposure positively influenced recognition of the poverty-health link, and attending formal talks was strongly related to understanding challenges of poverty. Attributions for poverty accounted for slightly more of the variance in the dependent variables. Specifically, structural and sociocultural attributions predicted greater recognition of the effects of poverty, in particular the challenges of poverty, while individualistic attributions

  19. Poverty and program participation among immigrant children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borjas, George J

    2011-01-01

    Researchers have long known that poverty in childhood is linked with a range of negative adult socioeconomic outcomes, from lower educational achievement and behavioral problems to lower earnings in the labor market. But few researchers have explored whether exposure to a disadvantaged background affects immigrant children and native children differently. George Borjas uses Current Population Survey (CPS) data on two specific indicators of poverty-the poverty rate and the rate of participation in public assistance programs-to begin answering that question. He finds that immigrant children have significantly higher rates both of poverty and of program participation than do native children. Nearly half of immigrant children are being raised in households that receive some type of public assistance, compared with roughly one-third of native children. Although the shares of immigrant and native children living in poverty are lower, the rate for immigrant children is nonetheless about 15 percentage points higher than that for native children-about the same as the gap in public assistance. Poverty and program participation rates among different groups of immigrant children also vary widely, depending in part on place of birth (foreign- or U.S.-born), parents (immigrant or native), and national origin. According to the CPS data, these native-immigrant differences persist into young adulthood. In particular, the program participation and poverty status of immigrant children is strongly correlated with their program participation and poverty status when they become young adults. But it is not possible, says Borjas, to tell whether the link results from a set of permanent factors associated with specific individuals or groups that tends to lead to "good" or "bad" outcomes systematically over time or from exposure during childhood to adverse socioeconomic outcomes, such as poverty or welfare dependency. Future research must explore the causal impact of childhood poverty on

  20. Poverty, income and ill health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, T K

    1999-01-01

    The article presents an outline of the relationship between poverty, low income, and poor health conditions. A table shows the differences between central Asia and Western Europe in terms of maternal and child health indicators. Various studies also show that the more polarized the income, the worse the population's health status. Countries with higher per capita gross national product (GNP) tend to have lower infant and maternal mortality. Countries who have achieved low mortality rate despite their low levels of per capita GNP, attribute the result to non-health factors such as the spread of education and the drive to provide access to other basic needs, in addition to low cost health services. It is believed that people from deprived backgrounds are more susceptible to diseases, malnutrition, and despair. This may be due to cutbacks in expenditure on food and lower utilization of health services by the socially deprived. Furthermore, poverty is a major cause of death and misery of children and women both in developed and developing countries. It accounts for the social injustices done to women and undermines the physical, social, intellectual and emotional development of children. New patterns of health care service delivery are being developed by the WHO to improve the state of poverty-stricken countries. The article concludes with sound recommendations for both local and national levels.

  1. Factorization of Radiative Leptonic Decays of $B^-$ and $D^-$ Mesons Including the Soft Photon Region

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Ji-Chong

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we study the radiative leptonic decays of $B^-$ and $D^-$ mesons using factorization approach. Factorization is proved to be valid explicitly at 1-loop level at any order of $O(\\Lambda _{\\rm QCD}\\left/m_Q\\right.)$. We consider the contribution in the soft photon region that $E_{\\gamma} \\sim \\left. \\Lambda^2 _{\\rm QCD} /\\right. m_Q$. The numerical results shows that, the soft photon region is very important for both the $B$ and $D$ mesons. The branching ratios of $B\\to \\gamma e\

  2. Poverty and psychology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poluektova, Olga V.; Efremova, Maria V.; Breugelmans, S.M.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a study on the association between dimensions of poverty (income, subjective socioeconomic status, deprivation, and socioeconomic status in childhood) and individual psychological characteristics. In this study, our goal was to determine: 1) the differences in individual psycholo

  3. Growth and Poverty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arndt, Channing; Leyaro, Vincent; Mahrt, Kristi

    2017-01-01

    This chapter considers the evolution of welfare of the Tanzanian population using a multi-dimensional approach. It also employs a detailed economy-wide model of the Tanzanian economy to explore growth and monetary poverty reduction scenarios from 2007 to 2015. This approach permits assessment...... of the coherence of observed trends in macroeconomic variables and projects consumption poverty outcomes to 2015. In the multi-dimensional approach, we find that real gains have been achieved. On monetary poverty, our model broadly reproduces key macroeconomic features of the past eight years. We find...... that published consumption poverty reductions for 2007 to 2011/12 from the most recent assessment fall within a reasonable to optimistic range. And, the simulations generate broader based growth across the income distribution compared with the recent assessment. Looking forward, the simulations from 2012 to 2105...

  4. Explaining Poverty Evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arndt, Channing; Hussain, Mohammad Azhar; Jones, Edward Samuel

    Measuring poverty remains a complex and contentious issue. This is particularly true in sub-Saharan Africa where poverty rates are higher, information bases typically weaker, and the underlying determinants of welfare relatively volatile. This paper employs recently collected data on household...... consumption in Mozambique to examine the evolution of consumption poverty with focus on the period 2002/03 to 2008/09. The paper contributes in four areas. First, the period in question was characterized by major movements in international commodity prices. Mozambique provides an illuminating case study...... of the implications of these world commodity price changes for living standards of poor people. Second, a novel ‘backcasting’ approach using a computable general equilibrium model of Mozambique, linked to a poverty module is introduced. Third, the backcasting approach is also employed to rigorously examine...

  5. How we see poverty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Morduch

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available How we think about poverty is colored by how we measure it. For economists, that often means seeing poverty through quantities measured in large, representative surveys.  The surveys give a comprehensive view, but favor breadth over depth. Typical economic surveys are limited in their ability to tease out informal activity, and, while they capture yearly sums, they offer little about how the year was actually lived by families. Year-long financial diaries provide a complementary way of seeing poverty, with a focus on week by week choices and challenges. The result is a re-framing of poverty and its relationship to money, calling for greater attention to financial access and a broader notion of how finance matters.

  6. Poverty and psychology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poluektova, Olga V.; Efremova, Maria V.; Breugelmans, S.M.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a study on the association between dimensions of poverty (income, subjective socioeconomic status, deprivation, and socioeconomic status in childhood) and individual psychological characteristics. In this study, our goal was to determine: 1) the differences in individual

  7. Poverty and psychology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poluektova, Olga V.; Efremova, Maria V.; Breugelmans, S.M.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a study on the association between dimensions of poverty (income, subjective socioeconomic status, deprivation, and socioeconomic status in childhood) and individual psychological characteristics. In this study, our goal was to determine: 1) the differences in individual psycholo

  8. Breaking out of the Circle of Poverty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, J. D. Ekundayo

    1996-01-01

    Poverty in Africa is related to numerous factors: history of slavery, colonial and neocolonial rule, political and economic dependence, foreign debt, government corruption, high illiteracy, gender insensitivity, civil wars that create refugees, and unemployment. Solutions must take into account the political, economic, and social factors that…

  9. Situational effects of the school factors included in the dynamic model of educational effectiveness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Creerners, Bert; Kyriakides, Leonidas

    2009-01-01

    We present results of a longitudinal study in which 50 schools, 113 classes and 2,542 Cypriot primary students participated. We tested the validity of the dynamic model of educational effectiveness and especially its assumption that the impact of school factors depends on the current situation of th

  10. Latina Resilience in Higher Education: Contributing Factors Including Seasonal Farmworker Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graff, Cristina Santamaria; McCain, Terrence; Gomez-Vilchis, Veronica

    2013-01-01

    Many Latina students overcome multiple obstacles to earn university degrees. Five married Latina women with children and seasonal farmworker backgrounds are the focus of this study which is analyzed through resiliency theory to understand factors contributing to their academic resilience. Variables connected to academic success are explored and…

  11. Poverty and disability : a survey of the literature

    OpenAIRE

    Elwan, Ann

    1999-01-01

    This review summarizes the literature on disability and its relationship to pverty, including education, employment, income, and access to basic social services. Despite the dearth of formal analysis, it is clear that in developing countries, as in more developed areas, disabled people (and their families) are more likely than the rest of the population to live in poverty. It is a two-way relationship--disability adds to the risk of poverty, and conditions of poverty increase the risk of disa...

  12. Ageing and poverty in rural Kenya: community perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oranga, H M

    1997-10-01

    Poverty is widespread among rural African elderly and associated with poor health and unsatisfactory access to health care. The purpose of this study was to determine community perception of the poorest in a community in rural Kenya, more specifically to identify factors considered by community members as associated with poverty in their midst. There is need to protect the aged members of the society from payment for health care and to include them in decision-making process. This study was undertaken in seven sites in Kisumu and Homa Bay districts in western Kenya where the Bamako Initiative was first launched, in 1987, calling on UNICEF and WHO to help accelerate the implementation of primary health care at district level, giving priority to women and children. Two household interview baseline surveys comprising 210 and 87 households, respectively, corroborated by the more qualitative approaches of participatory rural appraisal (PRA) and focus group discussions were conducted. This article analyses the importance of ageing as perceived by the communities as a factor associated with poverty.

  13. The economics of poverty in poor countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, P

    1998-01-01

    This paper, which examines recently studied links between 1) poverty, high fertility, and undernourishment and 2) environmental degradation and civic disconnection in developing countries, opens by reviewing the limitations of orthodox discussions of economic institutions and property rights and the orthodox dichotomy that has located the cause of poverty in the suppression of markets. The introduction also notes that much of the analysis in this paper is based on data from sub-Saharan Africa and India. The next section of the paper summarizes evidence on the magnitude and extent of world poverty. Section 3 exposes the connection between undernourishment and a person's capacity to work as one of the pathways to the poverty trap. Sections 4 and 5 consider the dependence of impoverished rural populations on common-property resources and how the conventional process of economic growth can break down this system and make certain sections of the population especially vulnerable to economic shocks. The next two sections explore the possibility that links between poverty, high fertility, and environmental degradation may constitute another pathway to the poverty trap. The eighth section reviews the methodology of using net national product (which includes resource depletion and environmental deterioration) as an evaluation criterion and argues that mainstream development economists may have neglected environmental and population problems because they have been relying on the wrong economic indices. The final section concludes that a number of policies must be used to improve options for people.

  14. Simultaneous Spectrophotometric Determination of Four Components including Acetaminophen by Taget Factor Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    UV Spectrophotometric Target Factor Analysis (TFA) was used for the simultaneous determination of four components (acetaminophen, guuaifenesin, caffeine, Chlorphenamine maleate) in cough syrup. The computer program of TFA is based on VC++ language. The difficulty of overlapping of absorption spectra of four compounds was overcome by this procedure. The experimental results show that the average recovery of each component is all in the range from 98.9% to 106.8% and each component obtains satisfactory results without any pre-separation.

  15. The N(H2/I(CO Conversion Factor: A Treatment that Includes Radiative Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. F. Wall

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta un tratamiento que explica mejor el factor de conversión N(H2=I(CO y que incluye la transferencia radiativa. A primera vista, incluir la transferencia radiativa parece superfluo para una línea óptimamente gruesa como CO J = 1 0. No obstante, dado que el medio interestelar es inhomogéneo, los fragmentos de gas (es decir, grumos todavía pueden ser óptimamente delgadas hacia sus bordes y en las alas de los pérfiles de la línea. El tratamiento estadístico de Martin et al. (1984 de la transferencia radiativa a través una nube molecular con grumos se usa para derivar una expresión para el factor de conversión que su- pera los defectos de las explicaciones más tradicionales basadas en Dickman et al. (1986. Por un lado, el tratamiento presentado aquí posiblemente representa un avance importante al entender el factor de conversión N(H2=I(CO pero, por otro lado, tiene sus propios defectos, que son discutidos aquí brevemente.

  16. Preoperative Serum Interleukin-6 Is a Potential Prognostic Factor for Colorectal Cancer, including Stage II Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuyoshi Shiga

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. To evaluate the prognostic significance of serum interleukin-6 (IL-6 in colorectal cancer (CRC. Patients and Methods. Preoperative serum IL-6 was measured in 233 CRC patients and 13 healthy controls. Relationships between IL-6 and various clinicopathological factors were evaluated, and the overall survival (OS and disease-free survival (DFS rates according to IL-6 status were calculated for all patients and according to disease stage. Results. The mean IL-6 level was 6.6 pg/mL in CRC patients and 2.6 pg/mL in healthy controls. Using a cutoff of 6.3 pg/mL, obtained using receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, 57 patients had a high IL-6 level. The mean value was higher for stage II disease than for stage III disease. IL-6 status correlated with C-reactive protein (CRP and carcinoembryonic antigen levels, obstruction, and pT4 disease. The OS differed according to the IL-6 status for all patients, whereas the DFS differed for all patients and for those with stage II disease. The Cox proportional hazards model showed that pT4 disease was an independent risk factor for recurrence in all CRC patients; IL-6, CRP, and pT4 were significant risk factors in stage II patients. Conclusions. The preoperative IL-6 level influences the risk of CRC recurrence.

  17. Current Changes in Pubertal Timing: Revised Vision in Relation with Environmental Factors Including Endocrine Disruptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parent, Anne-Simone; Franssen, Delphine; Fudvoye, Julie; Pinson, Anneline; Bourguignon, Jean-Pierre

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this chapter is to revise some common views on changes in pubertal timing. This revision is based on recent epidemiological findings on the clinical indicators of pubertal timing and data on environmental factor effects and underlying mechanisms. A current advancement in timing of female puberty is usually emphasized. It appears, however, that timing is also changing in males. Moreover, the changes are towards earliness for initial pubertal stages and towards lateness for final stages in both sexes. Such observations indicate the complexity of environmental influences on pubertal timing. The mechanisms of changes in pubertal timing may involve both the central neuroendocrine control and peripheral effects at tissues targeted by gonadal steroids. While sufficient energy availability is a clue to the mechanism of pubertal development, changes in the control of both energy balance and reproduction may vary under the influence of common determinants such as endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs). These effects can take place right before puberty as well as much earlier, during fetal and neonatal life. Finally, environmental factors can interact with genetic factors in determining changes in pubertal timing. Therefore, the variance in pubertal timing is no longer to be considered under absolutely separate control by environmental and genetic determinants. Some recommendations are provided for evaluation of EDC impact in the management of pubertal disorders and for possible reduction of EDC exposure along the precautionary principle.

  18. [An end to poverty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelhard, P

    1994-10-01

    The African continent is distinguished by a much higher fertility rate than other regions. Fertility in Africa has remained almost constant at slightly over six children per woman on average, while important declines have occurred elsewhere over the past 25 years. High fertility in Africa is often attributed to poor diffusion of family planning, early marriage, and low female educational attainment, but other cultural and economic factors are involved. The significant decline of infant mortality over the past several decades has produced growth rates never before observed. Africa's very young populations may be at the origin of uncontrollable political disorder, as young persons with bleak prospects fall easy prey to ethnic, religious, and political extremism. Demographic growth has become an additional barrier to development. High fertility is tolerated or encouraged as constituting a cultural trait, but the resulting population growth is not a cultural trait. Demographic pressure has increased environmental problems in many regions. It is estimated that over ten million rural residents of the Sahel have been affected by soil degradation. The per capita availability of arable land fell from one-half to one-third hectare between 1965 and 1987. Shortages of firewood and water have become more common. The relationship between demographic growth, environmental crisis, and poverty in the countryside depends on other factors such as production techniques, modes of access to land and water, and the degree of security of land tenure. Population pressure was not the initial factor that disturbed the balance of the traditional societies, but it exacerbated the effects of other forces such as the introduction of cash crops and monetarization of the economy. Rural exodus and accelerated urban migration have been prompted in large part by the higher incomes and greater availability of services of all types in the cities. Achieving control of fertility in Africa will require

  19. Mediators and Adverse Effects of Child Poverty in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascoe, John M; Wood, David L; Duffee, James H; Kuo, Alice

    2016-04-01

    The link between poverty and children's health is well recognized. Even temporary poverty may have an adverse effect on children's health, and data consistently support the observation that poverty in childhood continues to have a negative effect on health into adulthood. In addition to childhood morbidity being related to child poverty, epidemiologic studies have documented a mortality gradient for children aged 1 to 15 years (and adults), with poor children experiencing a higher mortality rate than children from higher-income families. The global great recession is only now very slowly abating for millions of America's children and their families. At this difficult time in the history of our nation's families and immediately after the 50th anniversary year of President Lyndon Johnson's War on Poverty, it is particularly germane for the American Academy of Pediatrics, which is "dedicated to the health of all children," to publish a research-supported technical report that examines the mediators associated with the long-recognized adverse effects of child poverty on children and their families. This technical report draws on research from a number of disciplines, including physiology, sociology, psychology, economics, and epidemiology, to describe the present state of knowledge regarding poverty's negative impact on children's health and development. Children inherit not only their parents' genes but also the family ecology and its social milieu. Thus, parenting skills, housing, neighborhood, schools, and other factors (eg, medical care) all have complex relations to each other and influence how each child's genetic canvas is expressed. Accompanying this technical report is a policy statement that describes specific actions that pediatricians and other child advocates can take to attenuate the negative effects of the mediators identified in this technical report and improve the well-being of our nation's children and their families.

  20. Mobility and Student Achievement in High Poverty Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, Janet Denise

    2013-01-01

    Student mobility is an issue for high poverty schools in the shadow of increased rigor and accountability for student performance. Whereas mobility is not a sole cause for poor achievement, it is a contributing factor for students in poverty who are already considered to be at risk of low achievement. Student mobility creates a hardship for…

  1. The Elephant in the Room: Poverty, Disability, and Employment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Carolyn; Avoke, Selete K.

    2010-01-01

    Despite more than 40 years of legislation to improve the outcomes of children and youth with disabilities and those growing up in poverty, vast numbers of adults with severe disabilities are unemployed or underemployed and living in poverty. This article suggests that one of the factors maintaining the problem is our failure to acknowledge the…

  2. Attitudes to Chronic Poverty in the "Global Village"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrientos, Armando; Neff, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    The paper explores attitudes to chronic poverty in a cross-section of developed and developing countries contributing data to the World Values Survey Wave Three (1994-1998). The analysis finds a consistent belief among a majority of respondents that poverty is persistent. The paper also explores the factors influencing public attitudes to chronic…

  3. Poverty and the American Family: A Decade in Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edin, Kathryn; Kissane, Rebecca Joyce

    2010-01-01

    Because of dramatic levels of economic volatility and massive changes in welfare policies, scholars in this decade worried anew about whether our official poverty measure, adopted in the 1960s, is adequate. Poverty's causes continued to be debated, with demographic factors often pitted against policy and maternal employment changes. Some scholars…

  4. Mobility and Student Achievement in High Poverty Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, Janet Denise

    2013-01-01

    Student mobility is an issue for high poverty schools in the shadow of increased rigor and accountability for student performance. Whereas mobility is not a sole cause for poor achievement, it is a contributing factor for students in poverty who are already considered to be at risk of low achievement. Student mobility creates a hardship for…

  5. Poverty and the American Family: A Decade in Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edin, Kathryn; Kissane, Rebecca Joyce

    2010-01-01

    Because of dramatic levels of economic volatility and massive changes in welfare policies, scholars in this decade worried anew about whether our official poverty measure, adopted in the 1960s, is adequate. Poverty's causes continued to be debated, with demographic factors often pitted against policy and maternal employment changes. Some scholars…

  6. Attitudes to Chronic Poverty in the "Global Village"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrientos, Armando; Neff, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    The paper explores attitudes to chronic poverty in a cross-section of developed and developing countries contributing data to the World Values Survey Wave Three (1994-1998). The analysis finds a consistent belief among a majority of respondents that poverty is persistent. The paper also explores the factors influencing public attitudes to chronic…

  7. School Sector, School Poverty, and the Catholic School Advantage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallinan, Maureen T.; Kubitschek, Warren N.

    2010-01-01

    Equality of educational opportunity is threatened by long-standing gaps in student achievement by race, gender, and student poverty, as well as by school sector and school poverty. The true magnitude of these gaps cannot be understood, however, unless these factors are considered simultaneously. While accounting for the effects of demographic…

  8. Effects of poverty on education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald Buck

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the effects of poverty on education. Many different aspects contribute to a community becoming impoverished such as deindustrialization, high unemployment rates, untreated mental health, and violent crimes. Impoverished communities rural and urban face many issues. These issues include dilapidated housing, lack of access to professional services, and most importantly inferior education. The education is inferior for a number of reasons; students are showing up to school with numerous problems that the teachers are unable to account for through instruction. The school facilities face structural inadequacies which have been proven to have an effect on the quality of instruction. The teachers in the schools, while qualified, are often times not supported by school administration. School administrators are busy with their own issues in determining what areas to allocate their limited budget. Poverty is a vast and complex issue that plagues communities in a seemingly endless cycle. However, working together to find effective ways of solving issues caused by poverty, the future can become a brighter for American youth growing up in poor communities.

  9. Principles for poverty alleviation among the youth in Northern Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Wilson

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with the statistical data and analysis con-cerning poverty among the young people in Uganda. The poverty is continuously ascending, with the most affected region being Northern Uganda. The major cause of poverty in Uganda has been the “South-North divide” fuelled by poor political leadership, that divides people along the lines of politics and ethnicity. Poverty has caused many young people of Northern Uganda to resort to rebellion against the government currently in power. This has led to unending political instability and civil strife most especially in Northern Uganda. In this article atten-tion is given to the conflict in Northern Uganda and attempts are made to propose some amicable resolutions. The discussion includes the current poverty scenario in Northern Uganda and possible strategies for reducing the poverty rate that has caused much damage in Northern Uganda.

  10. Multidimensional poverty: an alternative measurement approach for the United States?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waglé, Udaya R

    2008-06-01

    International poverty research has increasingly underscored the need to use multidimensional approaches to measure poverty. Largely embraced in Europe and elsewhere, this has not had much impact on the way poverty is measured in the United States. In this paper, I use a comprehensive multidimensional framework including economic well-being, capability, and social inclusion to examine poverty in the US. Data from the 2004 General Social Survey support the interconnectedness among these poverty dimensions, indicating that the multidimensional framework utilizing a comprehensive set of information provides a compelling value added to poverty measurement. The suggested demographic characteristics of the various categories of the poor are somewhat similar between this approach and other traditional approaches. But the more comprehensive and accurate measurement outcomes from this approach help policymakers target resources at the specific groups.

  11. Nuclear monopole charge form factor calculation for relativistic models including center-of-mass corrections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avancini, S.S.; Marinelli, J.R. [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina Florianopolis, Depto de Fisica - CFM, Florianopolis (Brazil); Carlson, B.V. [Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica, Sao Jose dos Campos (Brazil)

    2013-06-15

    Relativistic models for finite nuclei contain spurious center-of-mass motion in most applications for the nuclear many-body problem, where the nuclear wave function is taken as a single Slater determinant within a space-fixed frame description. We use the Peierls-Yoccoz projection method, previously developed for relativistic approaches together with a reparametrization of the coupling constants that fits binding energies and charge radius and apply our results to calculate elastic electron scattering monopole charge form factors for light nuclei. (orig.)

  12. SUBSTANTIATION OF THE COST OF HOUSING CONSTRUCTION INCLUDING THE FACTOR OF INVESTMENT ATTRACTIVENESS OF TERRITORIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZAIATS Yi. I.

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement. For planning and organization of urban construction is necessary to analyze the use of areas. Territorial resources of the city, being used for construction and other urban purposes, consists of plots of land: disposable, reserved and undeveloped in previous years of construction in progress; residential districts and blocks of obsolete housing fund; industrial and municipal and warehouse enterprises being used irrationally or stopped to work; the defence department, where the amortized warehouses and other main funds are that are not used by purpose; agricultural enterprises where the obsolete industrial funds, haying, nurseries, greenhouses. The number of free areas suitable for future urban development is extremely limited. However a considerable part of the territories of almost all functional zones is used inefficiently. Purpose. Formalization of a factor of investment attractiveness of territories for the further identification and research of the connection between it and the cost of housing construction is necessary. Conclusion. The identification of regularities of influence of the factor of investment attractiveness of territories on the cost of construction of high-rise buildings allow to obtain a quantitative estimate of this effect and can be used in the development of the methodology of substantiation of the expediency and effectiveness of the implementation of highrise construction projects, based on organizational and technological aspects.

  13. Urban poverty and infant mortality rate disparities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, Mario; Sims, Tammy L; Bruce, Marino A

    2007-04-01

    This study examined whether the relationship between high poverty and infant mortality rates (IMRs) varied across race- and ethnic-specific populations in large urban areas. Data were drawn from 1990 Census and 1992-1994 Vital Statistics for selected U.S. metropolitan areas. High-poverty areas were defined as neighborhoods in which > or = 40% of the families had incomes below the federal poverty threshold. Bivariate models showed that high poverty was a significant predictor of IMR for each group; however, multivariate analyses demonstrate that maternal health and regional factors explained most of the variance in the group-specific models of IMR. Additional analysis revealed that high poverty was significantly associated with minority-white IMR disparities, and country of origin is an important consideration for ethnic birth outcomes. Findings from this study provide a glimpse into the complexity associated with infant mortality in metropolitan areas because they suggest that the factors associated with infant mortality in urban areas vary by race and ethnicity.

  14. Ending child poverty in the good times and the bad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dornan, Paul

    2009-01-01

    It is now 10 years since the present Government pledged to eradicate child poverty by the year 2020. Some progress has been made, for example through increases in child benefit and the tax credit system, increased parental employment rates, and children's centres. However, the charity Child Poverty Action Group (CPAG) argues that progress has been disappointingly slow and that some aspects of policy development have undermined this progress. This article discusses the implications of the current economic recession on child poverty and includes the key points from the CPAG's manifesto, published in 2009 to mark the 10th anniversary of the pledge to end child poverty.

  15. Women, work, and poverty women centered research for policy change

    CERN Document Server

    Hartmann, Heidi I

    2003-01-01

    Find out how welfare reform has affected women living at the poverty levelWomen, Work, and Poverty presents the latest information on women living at or below the poverty level and the changes that need to be made in public policy to allow them to rise above their economic hardships. Using a wide range of research methods, including in-depth interviews, focus groups, small-scale surveys, and analysis of personnel records, the book explores different aspects of women's poverty since the passage of the 1986 welfare reform bill. Anthropologists, economists, political scientists, socio

  16. Modelling of safety barriers including human and organisational factors to improve process safety

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markert, Frank; Duijm, Nijs Jan; Thommesen, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    explosion, and the Mont Blanc Tunnel Fire, such an approach may have helped to maintain the integrity of the designed provisions against major deviations resulting in these disasters. In order to make this paradigm operational, safety management and in particular risk assessment tools need to be refined....... A valuable approach is the inclusion of human and organisational factors into the simulation of the reliability of the technical system using event trees and fault trees and the concept of safety barriers. This has been demonstrated e.g. in the former European research project ARAMIS (Accidental Risk...... Assessment Methodology for IndustrieS, see Salvi et al 2006). ARAMIS employs the bow-tie approach to modelling hazardous scenarios, and it suggests the outcome of auditing safety management to be connected to a semi-quantitative assessment of the quality of safety barriers. ARAMIS discriminates a number...

  17. Engineering Strategies and Industrial Processing Capacity for Poverty Alleviation in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oladejo, I. O.

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper attempts to identify, discuss and proffer solution to some of the engineering activities that might have contributed to the poverty problem. Engineering profession’s willingness to find some meaningful solutions to the nation’s poverty problem is understandable and laudable. The nature of businesses including public enterprises are increasingly technical and engineering profession is usually involved in their development and maintenance. These enterprises have a remarkable capacity to absorb labour and hence are fruitful sources of jobs and income. The dismay performance of them in recent times is undoubtedly a contributing factor to the current poverty problem in Nigeria. In this paper, it was observed that past approaches to poverty alleviation such as free education, adult education, rural electrification, operation feed the nation, etc has an impact, but they were not successful. In order for engineering to effectively contribute to poverty alleviation, the country does require long-term engineering solution through technological innovation, manufacturing sector, manufacturing Value Added and activities of Engineering professional bodies. Proposal are presented to enhance engineering vision through industries capacity for improve quality of life for the increasing population to survive the competitive international economy

  18. [Medicine inspired by poverty].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard, H

    2000-05-13

    Since his arrival in Egypt in 1994 the author joined a number of archaeological expeditions as a surveyor and part-time physician. During this latter activity he came into contact with the beliefs and practices of the local workmen and those of the Ababda Bedouin in particular. Living a harsh life in the southern part of the Egyptian Eastern Desert, their medicine seems to be inspired by poverty. Widely used for all internal disorders are 'kaya bil-naar': oval scars made with red-hot metal instruments. Another, less common, form of scarification is 'mi'ah-hed'asher', three parallel lines carved deeply into the cheek of the patient. 'Muhawy' is the bite of a snake into the earlobe of the patient, to prevent snake-bites. Another prophylactic is the 'higab', a small leather pouch containing a magical object or text. Therapies for less serious disorders include the use of herbs, spices and foodstuffs, often prepared in special ways. Externally, car fuel and axle grease are widely used. With the development of the Red Sea coast for tourism, the life of the Ababda Bedouin will change fundamentally. The above practices are likely to be replaced by Western medicine, probably a change for the better for these people.

  19. Community Poverty and Child Abuse Fatalities in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Caitlin A; Fleegler, Eric W; Monuteaux, Michael C; Wilson, Celeste R; Christian, Cindy W; Lee, Lois K

    2017-05-01

    Child maltreatment remains a problem in the United States, and individual poverty is a recognized risk factor for abuse. Children in impoverished communities are at risk for negative health outcomes, but the relationship of community poverty to child abuse fatalities is not known. Our objective was to evaluate the association between county poverty concentration and rates of fatal child abuse. This was a retrospective, cross-sectional analysis of child abuse fatalities in US children 0 to 4 years of age from 1999 to 2014 by using the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Compressed Mortality Files. Population and poverty statistics were obtained from US Census data. National child abuse fatality rates were calculated for each category of community poverty concentration. Multivariate negative binomial regression modeling assessed the relationship between county poverty concentration and child abuse fatalities. From 1999 to 2014, 11 149 children 0 to 4 years old died of child abuse; 45% (5053) were poverty concentration had >3 times the rate of child abuse fatalities compared with counties with the lowest poverty concentration (adjusted incidence rate ratio, 3.03; 95% confidence interval, 2.4-3.79). Higher county poverty concentration is associated with increased rates of child abuse fatalities. This finding should inform public health officials in targeting high-risk areas for interventions and resources. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  20. Global notes: counting the world's poor--how do we define poverty?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidyasagar, D

    2006-06-01

    Health professionals are in constant interaction with parents and infants who are victims of poverty and poor socioeconomic status. But an important question remains: do we know how to define poverty? Defining poverty accurately is important as the definition is the basis of policy development. The definition of poverty has changed during the last quarter century. In addition to economic considerations, it is broadened to include other dimensions of life such as literacy, health and longevity. This article attempts to provide national and international definitions of poverty, the magnitude and effects of poverty.

  1. Alleviating energy poverty: Indian experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, Garima

    2010-09-15

    Energy services play an important role in human welfare. India faces acute energy poverty indicating lack of access of clean energy fuels. Access to electricity is limited to 56% households in India and about 89% of rural households depend on polluting energy sources. Energy poverty impacts income poverty as poor find it difficult to acquire high priced cleaner fuels. It also adversely impacts the socio economic conditions of women. The paper highlights the linkage of energy poverty with income poverty and gender inequality. It analyses measures taken to alleviate energy poverty and recommends regulatory and policy measures as way forward.

  2. Defining poverty as distinctively human

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.P.P. Lötter

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available While it is relatively easy for most people to identify human beings suffering from poverty, it is rather more difficult to come to a proper understanding of poverty. In this article the author wants to deepen our understanding of poverty by interpreting the conventional definitions of poverty in a new light. The article starts with a defence of a claim that poverty is a concept uniquely applicable to humans. It then present a critical discussion of the distinction between absolute and relative poverty and it is then argued that a revision of this distinction can provide general standards applicable to humans everywhere.

  3. Poverty persistence and informal risk management: Micro evidence from urban Ethiopia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Azomahou, T.T.; Yitbarek, E.

    2015-01-01

    Two factors that have received limited attention in poverty dynamic studies are the role of risk in causing poverty mobility and attrition bias. Controlling for the attrition bias, we study poverty dynamics in urban Ethiopia with an emphasis on the effect of idiosyncratic shocks and informal risk

  4. Poverty persistence and informal risk management: Micro evidence from urban Ethiopia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Azomahou, T.T.; Yitbarek, E.

    2015-01-01

    Two factors that have received limited attention in poverty dynamic studies are the role of risk in causing poverty mobility and attrition bias. Controlling for the attrition bias, we study poverty dynamics in urban Ethiopia with an emphasis on the effect of idiosyncratic shocks and informal risk ma

  5. Effects of Remittances on Poverty among Rural Households in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olatomide Waheed Olowa

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Poverty in Nigeria is more prevalent in therural sector due to dwindling and inequitabledistribution of real income. Remittances (money and goods sent by migrants to relativesback home can be poverty reducing. However,the extent to which remittances affectpoverty and income inequality has not been adequately documented inNigeria.This paperuses a large, nationally-representative household survey to analyse the impact of domesticremittances (from Nigeria and foreign remittances (from African and other countries onpoverty in rural Nigeria. The socioeconomic characteristics showed that on the average,households that received foreign remittanceshad older heads (61.7± 19.7 years, smallerhousehold size (4.0 ± 2.5, bigger land size(18.53±26.5 ha, higherliteracy rate (0.50 ±0.5 and non-poor (0.08 ±0.3 with higher annual per capita expenditure (₦111,768 ±₦179,868. Poverty analysis showed that both types of remittances reduce the level,depth and severity of poverty in rural Nigeria.However, the size of the poverty reductiondepends on how poverty is being measured. The paper finds that poverty is reduced morewhen domestic, as opposed to foreign remittances are included inhousehold income, andwhen poverty is measured by the more sensitive poverty measures: poverty gap andsquared poverty gap. At a poverty line of₦23,733 per annum, a 10%increase in domesticremittances decreased Poverty Incidence(PI, Poverty Gap (PG and Squared PovertyGap (SPG by 1.80%, 1.60% and 1.60% while10% rise in foreign remittances reducedpoverty incidence (PI, Poverty gap (PG and Squared poverty gap (SPG by 0.86%,0.62% and0.62% respectively in rural Nigeria. Across GPZs, While 10% increase inforeign remittances reduced PI (-0.88% in North-Central (NC it had no effect in NE(0.00%. Same increase in domestic remittances reduced PI, PG, SPG most in the SS (-0.29%, -1.85% and -0.75% and leastin NE (-0.09%, -0.82% and -0.22%

  6. The main approaches to the study of the phenomenon of poverty in foreign psychological studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efremova M.V.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This article is devoted to the analysis of the main theories aimed at the definition and description of the phenomenon of poverty. Up to date, within the framework of psychological studies of the phenomenon of poverty there is no consensus on the definition of poverty and its relationship with different individual and psychological characteristics of personality. The analysis of the literature on the issue helped to allocate four psychological approach to the study of the premises for the emergence and development of the phenomenon of poverty and its possible impact on personality, which focus on the different characteristics of poverty and assert various psychological consequences of poverty for the individual. These approaches include the "culture of poverty", "evolutionary approach to poverty," "situational approach to poverty” and “socio-cognitive theory of a social class". The analysis of these approaches suggests that poverty is a complex and non-homogeneous phenomenon, which manifests a big variety of individual differences. It also highlights the different types of poverty: chronic poverty, short-term poverty, objective and subjective poverty. Further research in this area make it possible to empirically test the hypothesis of the existence of these types of poverty, as well as help to understand in what way each of them interacts with various individual psychological characteristics of personality.

  7. Waging War on Poverty: Poverty Trends Using a Historical Supplemental Poverty Measure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Liana E.; Wimer, Christopher; Garfinkel, Irwin; Kaushal, Neeraj; Waldfogel, Jane

    2015-01-01

    Using data from the Consumer Expenditure Survey and the March Current Population Survey, we provide poverty estimates for 1967 to 2012 based on a historical Supplemental Poverty Measure (SPM). During this period, poverty, as officially measured, has stagnated. However, the official poverty measure (OPM) does not account for the effect of near-cash transfers on the financial resources available to families, an important omission since such transfers have become an increasingly important part of government anti-poverty policy. Applying the historical SPM, which does count such transfers, we find that trends in poverty have been more favorable than the OPM suggests and that government policies have played an important and growing role in reducing poverty—a role that is not evident when the OPM is used to assess poverty. We also find that government programs have played a particularly important role in alleviating child poverty and deep poverty, especially during economic downturns. PMID:26347369

  8. Property rights, collective Action, and poverty: The role of institutions for poverty reduction

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    "This paper presents a conceptual framework on how institutions of property rights and collective action can contribute to poverty reduction, including through external interventions and action by poor people themselves. The first part of the paper examines the initial conditions of poverty, highlighting the role of assets, risks and vulnerability, legal structures and power relations. The latter part investigates the decision-making dynamics of actors—both poor and non-poor—and how they can ...

  9. [Social classes and poverty].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benach, Joan; Amable, Marcelo

    2004-05-01

    Social classes and poverty are two key social determinants fundamental to understand how disease and health inequalities are produced. During the 90's in Spain there has been a notable oscillation in the inequality and poverty levels, with an increase in the middle of the decade when new forms of social exclusion, high levels of unemployment and great difficulties in accessing the labour market, especially for those workers with less resources, emerged. Today society is still characterized by a clear social stratification and the existence of social classes with a predominance of high levels of unemployment and precarious jobs, and where poverty is an endemic social problem much worse than the EU average. To diminish health inequalities and to improve the quality of life will depend very much on the reduction of the poverty levels and the improvement of equal opportunities and quality of employment. To increase understanding of how social class and poverty affect public health, there is a need to improve the quality of both information and research, and furthermore planners and political decision makers must take into account those determinants when undertaking disease prevention and health promotion.

  10. Old age and poverty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vuković Drenka

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The process of demographic changes in Serbia is followed by discussions on the need to provide safety at old age and solve the problems of poverty and social exclusion of older citizens. In the current state there are no mechanisms that guarantee an adequate life standard at old age, the consequence of which is a high poverty rate, deteriorating health and limited access to social programs. The results of the Survey on life standard from 2002 and 2007 show that poverty among population in general and pensioners has decreased, while the poverty risk among people older than 65 has increased twice. The restrictive methods of the reforms cause a change in the relation between the pensions and the earnings, so that more and more pensioners receive below average, i.e. minimal pensions. Not all old people are covered by pension insurance so that a significant number (around 400.000 does not have a safe monthly income at all. The state program of financial aid is of modest size and does not provide help to all of the poor. Welfare aid decreases the risk of poverty, but it do not guarantee an adequate level of material security at old age. The low level of minimal and average pensions, the decline of participation in the average earnings and the strict criteria of the social security system have brought to awareness the necessity of 'social pensions' and various help and support programs for the elderly. .

  11. Impacts of Policies on Poverty: The Definition of Poverty

    OpenAIRE

    Bellù, Lorenzo Giovanni; Liberati, Paolo

    2005-01-01

    This module illustrates how poverty can be defined in the context of policy impact analysis. After reporting and discussing the definition of poverty as “the lack of, or the inability to achieve, a socially acceptable standard of living”, it discusses the mono-dimensional and multi-dimensional approaches to the definition of poverty. Furthermore, the module focuses on the absolute and the relative concept of poverty, also drawing some analogies and differences with the concept of food secu...

  12. Analysis of Anti-poverty Path Selecting in Western Ethnic PovertyBelt——Based on the Perspective of Space Poverty Theory%西部民族贫困地区反贫困路径选择辨析——基于空间贫困理论视角

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王明黔; 王娜

    2011-01-01

    Space poverty thoery provides a factor-analysis framework concerning"geographic capital",including distribution of poverty,cliamte,ecological environment,geograghic distance,infrastructure and public service,which seems meaningful in formulating and evaluating anti-poverty policies in western region.This essay tries to apply some research methods about the space poverty theory to figure out the challenges existing in every anti-poverty path.Drawing lessons from some successful experience on it domestic and overseas to put forward some initial proposals,in the hope of offering a relatively feasible solution to consult to the selecting of anti-poverty path.%西部民族贫困地区面临的反贫困问题是一个复杂的系统工程,它涉及到政治、经济、民族、宗教、历史、文化等方方面面。基于空间贫困理论视角,探讨西部民族贫困地区反贫困进程中各种反贫困路径选择所存在的问题,并借鉴国内外一些成功经验提出初步建议,以期能为西部民族贫困地区的反贫困路径选择提供一种符合实际的参考。

  13. Poverty and fever vulnerability in Nigeria: a multilevel analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusuf, Oyindamola B; Adeoye, Babatunde W; Oladepo, Oladimeji O; Peters, David H; Bishai, David

    2010-08-19

    Malaria remains a major public health problem in Sub Saharan Africa, where widespread poverty also contribute to the burden of the disease. This study was designed to investigate the relationship between the prevalence of childhood fever and socioeconomic factors including poverty in Nigeria, and to examine these effects at the regional levels. Determinants of fever in the last two weeks among children under five years were examined from the 25004 children records extracted from the Nigeria Demographic and Health Survey 2008 data set. A two-level random effects logistic model was fitted. About 16% of children reported having fever in the two weeks preceding the survey. The prevalence of fever was highest among children from the poorest households (17%), compared to 15.8% among the middle households and lowest among the wealthiest (13%) (p6 months), whereas the effect of wealth no longer reached statistical significance. While, overall bednet possession was low, less fever was reported in households that possessed bednets. Malaria control strategies and interventions should be designed that will target the poor and make an impact on poverty. The mechanism through which wealth may affect malaria occurrence needs further investigation.

  14. Poverty and fever vulnerability in Nigeria: a multilevel analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuf Oyindamola B

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria remains a major public health problem in Sub Saharan Africa, where widespread poverty also contribute to the burden of the disease. This study was designed to investigate the relationship between the prevalence of childhood fever and socioeconomic factors including poverty in Nigeria, and to examine these effects at the regional levels. Methods Determinants of fever in the last two weeks among children under five years were examined from the 25004 children records extracted from the Nigeria Demographic and Health Survey 2008 data set. A two-level random effects logistic model was fitted. Results About 16% of children reported having fever in the two weeks preceding the survey. The prevalence of fever was highest among children from the poorest households (17%, compared to 15.8% among the middle households and lowest among the wealthiest (13% (p6months, whereas the effect of wealth no longer reached statistical significance. Conclusion While, overall bednet possession was low, less fever was reported in households that possessed bednets. Malaria control strategies and interventions should be designed that will target the poor and make an impact on poverty. The mechanism through which wealth may affect malaria occurrence needs further investigation.

  15. Joining together to combat poverty

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Heath, I; Haines, A; Malenica, Z; Oulton, J A; Leopando, Z; Kaseje, D; Addington, W W; Giscard D'Estaing, O; Tumwine, J K; Koivusalo, M; Biscoe, G; Nickson, P; Marusić, M; Vuk Pavlović, S

    2000-01-01

    The International Poverty and Health Network (IPHN) was created in December 1997 following a series of conferences organized by the World Health Organization, with the aim of integrating health into plans to eradicate poverty. Around...

  16. Factors influencing Poverty Alleviation among Women Credit Beneficiaries in Tanzania: A Case Study of FINCA’s Women Credit beneficiaries in Mwanza

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Nyambega Nyang’au

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Many credit schemes in Tanzania channel their funds to womenwith the objective of alleviating poverty among them. Despite this, majority ofwomen in the country continue to wallow in poverty. The present research wascarried out among the Foundation for International Community Assistance’s womencredit beneficiaries in Mwanza. The study set out to address the followingobjectives: to analyze the influence of the husband’s cooperation, relevanttraining and interest rate on poverty alleviation among women creditbeneficiaries in Tanzania taking Foundation for International CommunityAssistance in Mwanza as a case study. Using simple regression model, resultsshowed that cooperation from the husband as well as relevant training influencespoverty alleviation among women credit beneficiaries in Tanzania by 56 and 36percent respectively. But interest rate was found to have no significantinfluence at all. The paper recommends that seminars be conducted so thathusbands can be taught the importance of cooperating with their wives. Aboveall giving training to women credit beneficiaries will go a long way insharpening their business skills. Future researchers should research onlaziness and complacency among women credit beneficiaries and the influence onpoverty.

  17. Poverty Simulations: Building Relationships among Extension, Schools, and the Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franck, Karen L.; Barnes, Shelly; Harrison, Julie

    2016-01-01

    Poverty simulations can be effective experiential learning tools for educating community members about the impact of poverty on families. The project described here includes survey results from three simulations with community leaders and teachers. This project illustrated how such workshops can help Extension professionals extend their reach and…

  18. Poverty Simulations: Building Relationships among Extension, Schools, and the Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franck, Karen L.; Barnes, Shelly; Harrison, Julie

    2016-01-01

    Poverty simulations can be effective experiential learning tools for educating community members about the impact of poverty on families. The project described here includes survey results from three simulations with community leaders and teachers. This project illustrated how such workshops can help Extension professionals extend their reach and…

  19. Multidimensional Poverty in China: Findings Based on the CHNS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jiantuo

    2013-01-01

    This paper estimates multidimensional poverty in China by applying the Alkire-Foster methodology to the China Health and Nutrition Survey 2000-2009 data. Five dimensions are included: income, living standard, education, health and social security. Results suggest that rapid economic growth has resulted not only in a reduction in income poverty but…

  20. Poverty and Disability: Addressing the Challenge of Inequality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Carolyn

    2013-01-01

    Living in poverty increases the likelihood that students with disabilities will experience poor postschool outcomes, including unemployment, underemployment, and limited postsecondary education. The effects of the intersection of poverty and disability persist into adulthood where the employment rate for adults with disabilities is only one fourth…

  1. Women, Poverty and Community Development in the Third World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovel, Hermione; Feuerstein, Marie-Therese

    1985-01-01

    Discusses the objectives of this special issue--women, poverty, and community development--and key issues raised by these subjects, including the changing role of the family, generating income through credit and savings, understanding women's fifth world, overcoming poverty and powerlessness, and changing stereotyped roles. (CT)

  2. POVERTY, WELL-BEING AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT: OFFICIAL AND EXPERIMENTAL MEASURES IN POSTMODERN SOCIETIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RALUCA I. IORGULESCU

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Poverty and well-being are concepts that cannot be separated, and research on poverty is implicitly linked to welfare economics. Poverty, in the complex conditions of modern societies affected by financial and economic crises, requires a clear definition and measures as accurate as possible. The paper presents some issues related to official methods and techniques for estimating poverty. Three steps necessary for poverty measurement are introduced and, also, multidimensional and poverty dynamics analyses are highlighted as important issues for poverty eradication policies. Results on youth poverty dynamics, the duration and recurrence of poverty and the perpetuation of poverty in EU countries are presented. The concepts of poverty risk, as well as some results of the search for key factors influencing the likelihood of being at risk of poverty, is discussed. Traditionally the living standard of households is measured by income, but recently other tools for measuring well-being in the broader framework of postmodern societies have been developed. As examples are some experimental methods and techniques for estimating poverty introduced in the U.S. and the European Union. Also, in the context of discussions related to the design of policies for sustainable development, some aspects of well-being measures in ecological economics are presented.

  3. Biofuels, poverty, and growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arndt, Channing; Benfica, Rui; Tarp, Finn

    2010-01-01

    This paper assesses the implications of large-scale investments in biofuels for growth and income distribution. We find that biofuels investment enhances growth and poverty reduction despite some displacement of food crops by biofuels. Overall, the biofuel investment trajectory analyzed increases...... Mozambique's annual economic growth by 0.6 percentage points and reduces the incidence of poverty by about 6 percentage points over a 12-year phase-in period. Benefits depend on production technology. An outgrower approach to producing biofuels is more pro-poor, due to the greater use of unskilled labor...

  4. Poverty in Israel

    OpenAIRE

    Michel, Dirk; Schertges, Claudia

    2007-01-01

    The paper deals with poverty within Israel. Against the background of the history of pre-state Israel and the developments after the establishment of the State of Israel in 1948 the historical roots of Israeli poverty are analyzed. Thus the ‘socialist’-Zionist project, ethnic exclusion, religious and intra-Jewish ethnic lines of conflict as well as the Bedouins, Druzes and Israeli Arabs as ‘specific’ Israeli citizen are discussed. Despite the economic growth in Israel since 2003 ‘the major...

  5. Working their way out of poverty

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stella Hoff

    2010-01-01

    Original title: Uit de armoede werken. Are people who were members of a low-income household in 2004 still poor three years later? This report describes people's chances of escaping from poverty and the factors  which determine whether they end up above or below the low-income threshold. Is fi

  6. Working their way out of poverty

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stella Hoff

    2010-01-01

    Original title: Uit de armoede werken. Are people who were members of a low-income household in 2004 still poor three years later? This report describes people's chances of escaping from poverty and the factors  which determine whether they end up above or below the low-income threshold.

  7. Domestic Violence and Poverty: Some Women's Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slabbert, Ilze

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Domestic violence poses a major challenge to social workers. Low-income families are significantly more likely to have to contend with domestic violence, as poverty can act as a fuelling factor in this type of conflict. The objective of this study was to explore and describe the experiences of low-income abused women. Method: A…

  8. Domestic Violence and Poverty: Some Women's Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slabbert, Ilze

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Domestic violence poses a major challenge to social workers. Low-income families are significantly more likely to have to contend with domestic violence, as poverty can act as a fuelling factor in this type of conflict. The objective of this study was to explore and describe the experiences of low-income abused women. Method: A…

  9. ECONOMIC GROWTH AND EQUALITY IN REDUCING POVERTY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaenal Muttaqin

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In some developing countries, the instrument to alleviate the poverty is by using the economic growth. So, the increasing in investment, infrastructure development, and macroeconomics stability always be priority from developing countries. In this article explain that economic growth is not the important factor to alleviate the poverty, because equality sometimes is more important rather than the economic growth. In this context, its measure by inequality growth trade off index (IGTI. This method is to measure the influence of economic growth to reducing the inequality, with this method every country can measure which one is better to reducing the poverty whether the economic growth or equality. With this method, Laos in 2000 show that economic growth is more important than equality, but in the same year in Thailand show that equality is more important than economic growth.DOI: 10.15408/sjie.v1i1.2592

  10. The boundaries of poverty in Bogota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Consuelo Uribe Mallarino

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The article proposes an analytical perspective on poverty with a multidimensional approach, not only as an aggregate of variables and indicators, but also using a probing strategy that considers the way in which it is perceived between the groups receiving programs to alleviate poverty or use subsidized public services, and those without. Based on tools for quantitative and qualitative analysis applied to data collected on a sample of residents of Bogota, the authors analyze how the boundaries of sense on poverty are related to both objective and subjective factors related to being or not users of these programs, socioeconomic and educational conditions, as well as political participation, degree of association and use of mechanisms to enforce civil rights.

  11. The Chronic Poverty Report 2005

    OpenAIRE

    The Chronic Poverty Research Centre, CPRC

    2005-01-01

    The report examines what chronic poverty is and why it matters, who the chronically poor are, where they live, what causes poverty to be persistent and what should be done about it. It argues that approaches to development policy must acknowledge the agency of the chronically poor themselves in overcoming their poverty. But they also need real commitment, matched by actions and resources, to support their efforts to attain their rights and overcome the obstacles that trap them in poverty.

  12. Does Drug Use Cause Poverty?

    OpenAIRE

    Robert Kaestner

    1998-01-01

    In this study, I examine the effect of drug use on poverty. The main objective of the paper is to provide descriptive empirical information about the relationship between drug use and poverty, and to explore, in a preliminary fashion, the question of whether drug use causes poverty. Toward this end, I present the results of both descriptive and multivariate analyses of the relationship between drug use and poverty for two national samples of young adults. One sample is drawn from the National...

  13. The Chronic Poverty Report 2005

    OpenAIRE

    The Chronic Poverty Research Centre, CPRC

    2005-01-01

    The report examines what chronic poverty is and why it matters, who the chronically poor are, where they live, what causes poverty to be persistent and what should be done about it. It argues that approaches to development policy must acknowledge the agency of the chronically poor themselves in overcoming their poverty. But they also need real commitment, matched by actions and resources, to support their efforts to attain their rights and overcome the obstacles that trap them in poverty.

  14. Quantifying Poverty as a Driver of Ebola Transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gertler, Shai; Yamin, Dan; Galvani, Alison P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Poverty has been implicated as a challenge in the control of the current Ebola outbreak in West Africa. Although disparities between affected countries have been appreciated, disparities within West African countries have not been investigated as drivers of Ebola transmission. To quantify the role that poverty plays in the transmission of Ebola, we analyzed heterogeneity of Ebola incidence and transmission factors among over 300 communities, categorized by socioeconomic status (SES), within Montserrado County, Liberia. Methodology/Principal Findings We evaluated 4,437 Ebola cases reported between February 28, 2014 and December 1, 2014 for Montserrado County to determine SES-stratified temporal trends and drivers of Ebola transmission. A dataset including dates of symptom onset, hospitalization, and death, and specified community of residence was used to stratify cases into high, middle and low SES. Additionally, information about 9,129 contacts was provided for a subset of 1,585 traced individuals. To evaluate transmission within and across socioeconomic subpopulations, as well as over the trajectory of the outbreak, we analyzed these data with a time-dependent stochastic model. Cases in the most impoverished communities reported three more contacts on average than cases in high SES communities (p<0.001). Our transmission model shows that infected individuals from middle and low SES communities were associated with 1.5 (95% CI: 1.4–1.6) and 3.5 (95% CI: 3.1–3.9) times as many secondary cases as those from high SES communities, respectively. Furthermore, most of the spread of Ebola across Montserrado County originated from areas of lower SES. Conclusions/Significance Individuals from areas of poverty were associated with high rates of transmission and spread of Ebola to other regions. Thus, Ebola could most effectively be prevented or contained if disease interventions were targeted to areas of extreme poverty and funding was dedicated to development

  15. Quantifying Poverty as a Driver of Ebola Transmission.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mosoka P Fallah

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Poverty has been implicated as a challenge in the control of the current Ebola outbreak in West Africa. Although disparities between affected countries have been appreciated, disparities within West African countries have not been investigated as drivers of Ebola transmission. To quantify the role that poverty plays in the transmission of Ebola, we analyzed heterogeneity of Ebola incidence and transmission factors among over 300 communities, categorized by socioeconomic status (SES, within Montserrado County, Liberia.We evaluated 4,437 Ebola cases reported between February 28, 2014 and December 1, 2014 for Montserrado County to determine SES-stratified temporal trends and drivers of Ebola transmission. A dataset including dates of symptom onset, hospitalization, and death, and specified community of residence was used to stratify cases into high, middle and low SES. Additionally, information about 9,129 contacts was provided for a subset of 1,585 traced individuals. To evaluate transmission within and across socioeconomic subpopulations, as well as over the trajectory of the outbreak, we analyzed these data with a time-dependent stochastic model. Cases in the most impoverished communities reported three more contacts on average than cases in high SES communities (p<0.001. Our transmission model shows that infected individuals from middle and low SES communities were associated with 1.5 (95% CI: 1.4-1.6 and 3.5 (95% CI: 3.1-3.9 times as many secondary cases as those from high SES communities, respectively. Furthermore, most of the spread of Ebola across Montserrado County originated from areas of lower SES.Individuals from areas of poverty were associated with high rates of transmission and spread of Ebola to other regions. Thus, Ebola could most effectively be prevented or contained if disease interventions were targeted to areas of extreme poverty and funding was dedicated to development projects that meet basic needs.

  16. Screening for Social Determinants of Health Among Children and Families Living in Poverty: A Guide for Clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Esther K; Siegel, Benjamin S; Garg, Arvin; Conroy, Kathleen; Gross, Rachel S; Long, Dayna A; Lewis, Gena; Osman, Cynthia J; Jo Messito, Mary; Wade, Roy; Shonna Yin, H; Cox, Joanne; Fierman, Arthur H

    2016-05-01

    Approximately 20% of all children in the United States live in poverty, which exists in rural, urban, and suburban areas. Thus, all child health clinicians need to be familiar with the effects of poverty on health and to understand associated, preventable, and modifiable social factors that impact health. Social determinants of health are identifiable root causes of medical problems. For children living in poverty, social determinants of health for which clinicians may play a role include the following: child maltreatment, child care and education, family financial support, physical environment, family social support, intimate partner violence, maternal depression and family mental illness, household substance abuse, firearm exposure, and parental health literacy. Children, particularly those living in poverty, exposed to adverse childhood experiences are susceptible to toxic stress and a variety of child and adult health problems, including developmental delay, asthma and heart disease. Despite the detrimental effects of social determinants on health, few child health clinicians routinely address the unmet social and psychosocial factors impacting children and their families during routine primary care visits. Clinicians need tools to screen for social determinants of health and to be familiar with available local and national resources to address these issues. These guidelines provide an overview of social determinants of health impacting children living in poverty and provide clinicians with practical screening tools and resources. Copyright © 2016 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Poverty on the Cards 2016

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stella Hoff; Jean Marie Wildeboer Schut; Benedikt Goderis; Cok Vrooman

    2016-01-01

    Decline in poverty since 2014 According to SCP’s ‘modest but adequate’ poverty threshold, 7.6% of the Dutch population were living in poverty in 2014. That figure is expected to have fallen to 7% in 2016. If the promised measures to improve purchasing power are implemented, thi

  18. Poverty-related diseases (PRDs)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Makoge, Valerie; Maat, Harro; Vaandrager, Lenneke; Koelen, Maria

    2017-01-01

    Background: In Cameroon, poverty-related diseases (PRDs) are a major public health concern. Research and policies addressing PRDs are based on a particular understanding of the interaction between poverty and disease, usually an association between poverty indicators and health indicators for a

  19. Rural Poverty Rate Edges Downward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nord, Mark

    1997-01-01

    Although rural poverty began to decline, 1994-95, many rural households had incomes just above poverty. Rural minorities were especially disadvantaged; racial differences in educational attainment accounted for 20-33% of income gaps. One-quarter of rural children lived in poverty, most in single-parent households. Most rural poor families lived in…

  20. Poverty, Disability, and Employment: Global Perspectives from the National Centre for Promotion of Employment for Disabled People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abidi, Javed; Sharma, Dorodi

    2014-01-01

    The worldwide problems of disability, poverty, and unemployment stem out of the interaction of multiple factors including social stigma, stereotypes, lack of access to physical infrastructure, information, and enabling environments. Given this, a singular approach toward tackling these interrelated issues falls short. This article attempts to…

  1. Poverty, Disability, and Employment: Global Perspectives from the National Centre for Promotion of Employment for Disabled People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abidi, Javed; Sharma, Dorodi

    2014-01-01

    The worldwide problems of disability, poverty, and unemployment stem out of the interaction of multiple factors including social stigma, stereotypes, lack of access to physical infrastructure, information, and enabling environments. Given this, a singular approach toward tackling these interrelated issues falls short. This article attempts to…

  2. Poverty and blindness in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidoo, Kovin

    2007-11-01

    Africa carries a disproportionate responsibility in terms of blindness and visual impairment. With approximately 10 per cent of the world's population, Africa has 19 per cent of the world's blindness. It is no surprise that this reality also mirrors the situation in terms of the burden of world poverty. There is an increasing recognition of the need to highlight the link between poverty, development and health care. Blindness, disabling visual impairment and the overall lack of eye-care services are too often the result of social, economic and developmental challenges of the developing world. The state of eye care in Africa stands in alarming contrast to that in the rest of the world. Poor practitioner-to-patient ratios, absence of eye-care personnel, inadequate facilities, poor state funding and a lack of educational programs are the hallmarks of eye care in Africa, with preventable and treatable conditions being the leading cause of blindness. Eye diseases causing preventable blindness are often the result of a combination of factors such as poverty, lack of education and inadequate health-care services. The challenge that Vision 2020 has set itself in Africa is enormous. Africa is not a homogenous entity, the inter- and intra-country differences in economic development, prevalence of disease, delivery infrastructure and human resources amplify the challenges of meeting eye-care needs. The successful implementation of Vision 2020 programs will be hindered without the development of a comprehensive, co-ordinated strategy that is cognisant of the differences that exist and the need for comprehensive solutions that are rooted in the economic and political realities of the continent as well as the individual countries and regions within countries. This strategy should recognise the need for economic growth that results in greater state funded eye-care services that focus on health promotion to ensure the prevention of eye disease, the development of eye clinics in

  3. Trends in Child Poverty Using an Improved Measure of Poverty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wimer, Christopher; Nam, JaeHyun; Waldfogel, Jane; Fox, Liana

    2016-04-01

    The official measure of poverty has been used to assess trends in children's poverty rates for many decades. But because of flaws in official poverty statistics, these basic trends have the potential to be misleading. We use an augmented Current Population Survey data set that calculates an improved measure of poverty to reexamine child poverty rates between 1967 and 2012. This measure, the Anchored Supplemental Poverty Measure, is based partially on the US Census Bureau and Bureau of Labor Statistics' new Supplemental Poverty Measure. We focus on 3 age groups of children, those aged 0 to 5, 6 to 11, and 12 to 17 years. Young children have the highest poverty rates, both historically and today. However, among all age groups, long-term poverty trends have been more favorable than official statistics would suggest. This is entirely due to the effect of counting resources from government policies and programs, which have reduced poverty rates substantially for children of all ages. However, despite this progress, considerable disparities in the risk of poverty continue to exist by education level and family structure.

  4. Chile's High Growth Economy: Poverty and Income Distribution, 1987-1998. A World Bank Country Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    World Bank, Washington, DC.

    Chile has an outstanding record in reducing poverty, having cut the poverty rate in half in the 11 years ended 1998. Poverty is a multi-dimensional concept, including both income and access to social services and education, as well as such intangibles as empowerment and social capital. This study presents a quantitative assessment of "deficits" in…

  5. Chile's High Growth Economy: Poverty and Income Distribution, 1987-1998. A World Bank Country Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    World Bank, Washington, DC.

    Chile has an outstanding record in reducing poverty, having cut the poverty rate in half in the 11 years ended 1998. Poverty is a multi-dimensional concept, including both income and access to social services and education, as well as such intangibles as empowerment and social capital. This study presents a quantitative assessment of…

  6. The Systematic Integration of Health Care Market and Urban Poverty in Tanzania

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.M. Kida

    2009-01-01

    textabstractThis study analyses the systemic behaviour of the dynamics of a health care system in its interraction with poverty. Specifically, this study ex- amine how urban poverty (including the spatial dimension of poverty) shapes the functioning of the commercialised health care system, in terms

  7. Determinants of Poverty among Rural and Urban Women Who Live Alone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slesinger, Doris P.; Cautley, Eleanor

    1988-01-01

    Examines poverty levels of young and elderly women who live alone. Of all elderly women, 30 percent are in poverty compared with 21 percent of single young women. Variables include participation in labor force, education, age, benefits, and ethnicity. Women in rural areas more likely to be in poverty. (Author/TES)

  8. Economic contribution of participatory agroforestry program to poverty alleviation: a case from Sal forests, Bangladesh

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    K.K.Islam; Marjanke Hoogstra; M.O.Ullah; Noriko Sato

    2012-01-01

    In the Forest Department of Bangladesh,a Participatory Agroforestry Program (PAP) was initiated at a denuded Sal forests area to protect the forest resources and to alleviate poverty amongst the local poor population.We explored whether the PAP reduced poverty and what factors might be responsible for poverty alleviation.We used three poverty measurement methods:the Head Count Index,the Poverty Gap Index and the Foster-Greer-Thorbecke index to determine the extent poverty reduction.We used a linear regression model to determine the possible differences among factors in poverty reduction.Data were collected through semi-structured questionnaires and face to face interviews within the study area.PAP proved effective at poverty alleviation,considerably improving the local situation.The linear regression model showed that PAP output explained the income differences in poverty reduction. Participants identified bureaucracy and illegal money demands by forest department officials,an uncontrolled market system,and underdeveloped road infrastructure as the main obstacles to reduction of poverty.Overall,PAP is quite successful in alleviating poverty.So this program might be of interest at other degraded forest areas as a tool to alleviate poverty.

  9. Poverty, Government Transfers, and the Business Cycle: Evidence for the United States

    OpenAIRE

    Herzer, Dierk; Klump, Rainer

    2006-01-01

    We examine the impact of government transfers and the business cycle on poverty in the United States in the context of a poverty function that includes the official poverty rate, three types of government transfers, real wages, the number of female-headed families, and a business cycle variable. Using cointegration techniques, we find – contrary to most previous studies – that government transfer programs play an important poverty-reducing role. In addition, the findings suggest that the busi...

  10. Taxi, Jitneys and Poverty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbloom, Sandi

    1970-01-01

    Version of the paper given at The Transportation and Poverty Conference of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Argues for revival of jitneys (12-14 capacity motor vehicles, operating on fixed routes, fares zone-rated) to serve ghetto residents and provide employment, too. Taxi company competition also discussed. (KG)

  11. Poverty, Work and Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Kotze, Astrid

    2007-01-01

    This contribution suggests that if we are serious about adult education in the context of poverty eradication we require some shifts away from neo-liberal assumptions and values. Women and/in the informal economy should become the central focus, and livelihood studies would better allow us to understand the complex daily struggle for food and the…

  12. Poverty and Political Culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gouda, Frances

    1995-01-01

    Frances Gouda examines the different rhetorical approaches to poverty, charity, and social welfare embraced by intellectuals and policy-makers in the Netherlands and France in the period 1815 - 1854. She explores the different discourses in Holland and France about the revolutionary threat implicit

  13. Explaining Poverty Evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arndt, Channing; Hussain, Mohammad Azhar; Jones, Edward Samuel

    consumption in Mozambique to examine the evolution of consumption poverty with focus on the period 2002/03 to 2008/09. The paper contributes in four areas. First, the period in question was characterized by major movements in international commodity prices. Mozambique provides an illuminating case study...

  14. Producing Against Poverty

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ypeij, Annelou

    2000-01-01

    Producing against Poverty is an anthropological research on micro-entrepreneurs in Lima, Peru. It analyses the way micro-producers accumulate capital. The anthropological approach of the book starts with an analysis of the daily lives of the micro-producers. Its gender approach makes a comparison be

  15. Tackling Urban Poverty

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Despite fast development, many residents in Chinese cities struggle to find a decent life When talking about poverty in China, people tend to conjure up images of farmers struggling in remote mountain villages or in the arid lands of the far west. Yet behind their gleaming skyscrapers and

  16. Child Poverty & Public Policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chafel, Judith A., Ed.

    This collection documents how far we still are in the United States from putting our knowledge about child well being and policy into practice. It provides an overview of the changing nature of child poverty in the United States through the contributions of authors who use a number of qualitative and quantitative approaches to look at children in…

  17. Poverty and Political Culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gouda, Frances

    1995-01-01

    Frances Gouda examines the different rhetorical approaches to poverty, charity, and social welfare embraced by intellectuals and policy-makers in the Netherlands and France in the period 1815 - 1854. She explores the different discourses in Holland and France about the revolutionary threat implicit

  18. GIS-based poverty and population distribution analysis in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Jing; Wang, Yingjie; Yan, Hong

    2009-07-01

    Geographically, poverty status is not only related with social-economic factors but also strongly affected by geographical environment. In the paper, GIS-based poverty and population distribution analysis method is introduced for revealing their regional differences. More than 100000 poor villages and 592 national key poor counties are chosen for the analysis. The results show that poverty distribution tends to concentrate in most of west China and mountainous rural areas of mid China. Furthermore, the fifth census data are overlaid to those poor areas in order to gain its internal diversity of social-economic characteristics. By overlaying poverty related social-economic parameters, such as sex ratio, illiteracy, education level, percentage of ethnic minorities, family composition, finding shows that poverty distribution is strongly correlated with high illiteracy rate, high percentage minorities, and larger family member.

  19. Grass Roots War on Poverty

    OpenAIRE

    Amsden, Alice H

    2012-01-01

    Sub-Saharan Africa’s failure to slay the dragon of poverty is due to a logical flaw in its policies: the remedies to reduce poverty don’t address the causes. Poverty is caused by unemployment, owing to a scarcity of jobs that pay above bare subsistence, but grass-roots poverty alleviation measures are exclusively designed to make job-seekers more capable although no jobs are available. The ‘appropriate’ technologies of the grass roots movement that dominates anti-poverty policies are ...

  20. Explaining the Evolution of Poverty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arndt, Channing; Hussain, Azhar; Jones, Edward Samuel

    2012-01-01

    We provide a comprehensive approach for analyzing the evolution of poverty using Mozambique as a case study. Bringing together data from disparate sources, we develop a novel “back-casting” framework that links a dynamic computable general equilibrium model to a micro-simulation poverty module....... This framework provides a new approach to explaining and decomposing the evolution of poverty, as well as to examining rigorously the coherence between poverty, economic growth, and inequality outcomes. Finally, various simple but useful and rarely-applied approaches to considering regional changes in poverty...

  1. Alternative Pathways out of Rural Poverty in Mexico

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Darcy Victor Tetreault

    2010-01-01

    ... (farming, labour and migration), with the following questions in mind: Has there been a reduction in the incidence of income poverty in rural Mexico during the neoliberal era and, if so, what are the main contributing factors...

  2. The link between infertility and poverty: evidence from Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahar, Papreen

    2012-03-01

    The link between high fertility and poverty is well established. However, this paper shows how infertility may also generate poverty among childless families in Bangladesh. An ethnographic study was conducted, involving various qualitative research methods that revealed economic consequences to be one of the crucial sequelae of childlessness in Bangladesh. This paper details how the poverty/fertility relationship is dependent on social and institutional characteristics, including patriarchal values, education, urban-rural location and health services. Empirical data show that childlessness generates poverty in various ways, including the deprivation of children's earnings, decline in women's mobility, demoralisation of men to earn an income, marriage devaluation by the husband, disbursements for treatment and denial of microcredit (very small loans to those in poverty, which support them to become self-employed to generate income). The current study shows that the infertility/poverty relationship is mostly contingent upon class and gender. It is therefore the rural poor childless women who are most badly affected economically in Bangladesh rather than the urban middle class childless women. In other words, this study reveal that along with gender, class plays a dominant role in terms of the economic consequences of childlessness in Bangladesh. It sheds light on a different and unusual aspect of poverty and aims to contribute to the gender discussion of livelihood and poverty.

  3. Childhood poverty and health: cumulative risk exposure and stress dysregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Gary W; Kim, Pilyoung

    2007-11-01

    A massive literature documents the inverse association between poverty or low socioeconomic status and health, but little is known about the mechanisms underlying this robust relation. We examined longitudinal relations between duration of poverty exposure since birth, cumulative risk exposure, and physiological stress in two hundred seven 13-year-olds. Chronic stress was assessed by basal blood pressure and overnight cortisol levels; stress regulation was assessed by cardiovascular reactivity to a standard acute stressor and recovery after exposure to this stressor. Cumulative risk exposure was measured by multiple physical (e.g., substandard housing) and social (e.g., family turmoil) risk factors. The greater the number of years spent living in poverty, the more elevated was overnight cortisol and the more dysregulated was the cardiovascular response (i.e., muted reactivity). Cardiovascular recovery was not affected by duration of poverty exposure. Unlike the duration of poverty exposure, concurrent poverty (i.e., during adolescence) did not affect these physiological stress outcomes. The effects of childhood poverty on stress dysregulation are largely explained by cumulative risk exposure accompanying childhood poverty.

  4. Impact of Outliers Arising from Unintended and Unknowingly Included Subpopulations on the Decisions about the Number of Factors in Exploratory Factor Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan; Zumbo, Bruno D.

    2012-01-01

    There is a lack of research on the effects of outliers on the decisions about the number of factors to retain in an exploratory factor analysis, especially for outliers arising from unintended and unknowingly included subpopulations. The purpose of the present research was to investigate how outliers from an unintended and unknowingly included…

  5. Poverty, population and environmental degradation in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozelle, S; Huang, J; Zhang, L

    1997-06-01

    This article examines the relationship between poverty, population, and environmental degradation in China. Environmental conditions include water pollution, deforestation, destruction of grasslands, soil erosion, and salinization. The authors review China's success in controlling environmental degradation through leadership, environmental policies, and institutional capacity. Findings suggest that environmental progress is best achieved indirectly by poverty alleviation, market integration, and population control. Government policies were not very effective. Degradation occurs due to limited financial resources, poorly trained personnel, and political factors. Control of water pollution was instituted since the 1980s. The levels of pollutants have been reduced, but the type of pollutant determines the seriousness of impact. Water pollution is due to industrial wastes, agricultural run-off, and soil erosion. Since the 1970s, reforestation targets have not been met. Technical extension and monitoring of planting is not available in most areas, and private, profit seeking interests control acreage. Grassland destruction is due to deforestation, agricultural expansion, and overgrazing. Independent regional authorities have successfully managed pasture programs. Erosion is the most serious in Loess Plateau, the Red Soils area, the Northeast China Plain, and the Northwest Grasslands, which comprise 70% of total land area. In 1990, erosion control was practiced in 39% of eroded land area. Salinization has remained fairly constant. Environmental controls (direct regulation, planned recovery, and state-mandated technological improvements) are uneven. The main tool for environmental management is the State Environmental Protection Commission and its executive unit, SEPA. Problems stem from vague laws, lack of means of enforcement, lack of coordination of laws, and lack of standards, schedules, and other provisions in ordinances.

  6. After Beijing: emphasis on poverty eradication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    In March 1996, during its first meeting since the Fourth World Conference on Women, the UN Commission on the Status of Women (CSW), called for a gender perspective to be integrated into policies and programs dealing with poverty, child and dependent care, and the media. Three expert panels examined each of these areas through a format which encouraged dialogue and led to the adoption of 17 resolutions, decisions, and agreed conclusions as well as a recommendation that the UN adopt a multi-year work program for the CSW to allow it to review progress in elimination of the 12 main obstacles to women's advancement identified at Beijing. Among the resolutions adopted by the CSW were calls to 1) take a broad and integrated approach to poverty eradication, 2) enhance women's empowerment and autonomy, 3) promote equity and equality in the public domain, 4) promote women's employment, 5) give women social and economic protection when they are unable to work, 6) counteract negative images of women and sex-stereotyping in the media, 7) reduce the representation of violence against women in the media, 8) strengthen the role of women in global communications, 9) encourage the participation of men in child and dependent care, and 10) recognize women's double burden of work. The CSW also agreed to pursue further discussions about drafting an optional protocol to the 1979 Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women. Among its other actions, the CSW called for mechanisms to protect the rights of women migrant workers, to protect women and children during armed conflicts, to include gender-based human rights violations in UN activities, and to address the root factors which lead to social ills such as trafficking in women and girls. In addition, the CSW submitted a draft resolution demanding that Israel protect the rights of Palestinian women and their families.

  7. On the psychology of poverty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haushofer, Johannes; Fehr, Ernst

    2014-05-23

    Poverty remains one of the most pressing problems facing the world; the mechanisms through which poverty arises and perpetuates itself, however, are not well understood. Here, we examine the evidence for the hypothesis that poverty may have particular psychological consequences that can lead to economic behaviors that make it difficult to escape poverty. The evidence indicates that poverty causes stress and negative affective states which in turn may lead to short-sighted and risk-averse decision-making, possibly by limiting attention and favoring habitual behaviors at the expense of goal-directed ones. Together, these relationships may constitute a feedback loop that contributes to the perpetuation of poverty. We conclude by pointing toward specific gaps in our knowledge and outlining poverty alleviation programs that this mechanism suggests.

  8. Poverty in America: trends and new patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'hare, W P

    1985-06-01

    Poverty trends in the US between 1959-83, as revealed by census data, are described, 1984 government expenditures on social programs are delineated, contrasting explanations put forth to explain the increase in poverty between 1978-83 are critically examined, and some practical suggestions for reducing poverty levels are made. Between 1959-73, the absolute number and the proportion of individuals below the poverty line decreased respectively from 39.5-23.0 million and from 22.4%-11.1%. Between 1973-78, poverty rates fluctuated somewhat. Between 1978-83, the absolute number and proportion of poor increased respectively from 24.5-35.3 million and from 11.4%-15.2%. Between 1978-83, the depth of poverty also increased. The proportion of families with incomes below US$5000 increased from 3.9%-5.7%, and the median income for poor families declined. Some experts, such as Charles Murray, attribute the increase in poverty to federal poverty programs. Murray maintains that poverty programs undermine the work ethic and encourage the creation of female headed households. Others, including Michael Harrington, attribute the increase in poverty to structural changes in the economy and to changes in the composition of the population. Harrington maintains that the decline in the number of manufacturing jobs, the lack of employment opportunities for unskilled workers, and the entry of the baby boom generation into the working age population makes it increasingly difficult for young males, and especially for black males, to find jobs offering financial security. The present analysis provided more support for the latter explanation than for the former explanation. Numerous studies indicate that there is considerable movement in and out of poverty and that most individuals are poor because they cannot find jobs. The American public has a mistaken impression about the amount of money expended by the government to provide assistance to the poor. The bulk of the government's social

  9. Resource degradation, marginalization, and poverty in small-scale fisheries: threats to social-ecological resilience in India and Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prateep K. Nayak

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study we examine poverty in local fisheries using a social-ecological resilience lens. In assessing why "fishery may rhyme with poverty", Christophe Béné suggests a typology of impoverishment processes, which includes economic exclusion, social marginalization, class exploitation, and political disempowerment as key mechanisms that accelerate poverty. We extend his analysis by exploring these four mechanisms further and by intertwining them with processes of environmental change and degradation. Our goal is to understand poverty in local fisheries as a process rooted in social and institutional factors as influenced by ecological dynamics. We argue that understanding poverty will require a focus on the social-ecological system (SES as a whole, and addressing poverty will mean rebuilding not only collapsed stocks but the entire social-ecological system, including restoring relationships between resources and people. Information from two cases, the Chilika Lagoon on the Bay of Bengal in India, and the Paraty region on the southeastern coast of Brazil, is used to understand how fishery social-ecological systems come under pressure from drivers at multiple levels, resulting in a range of impacts and pushing the system to a breaking point or collapse. We analyze elements of what it takes for the whole system to break down or collapse and push fishers into poverty and marginalization. The Chilika SES has already broken down, and the Paraty SES is under pressure from multiple drivers of change. The two cases help contrast key dynamics in the social, cultural, economic, political, and environmental spheres, for lessons on system collapse and recovery. Rebuilding fisheries may be examined as a process of building and strengthening resilience. The challenge is to make the fishery social-ecological system more resilient, with more flexibility and options, not only within fishing activities but also within a range of other sectors.

  10. Kosovo : Poverty Assessment, Volume 1. Main Report

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2001-01-01

    As Kosovo goes beyond the emergency relief phase, taking into consideration the situation of those that the conflict has left behind is vital to the effectiveness of any strategy for economic development. The study is designed to inform the current policy debate in the area of poverty alleviation, and social service delivery, and to include these in the Joint Interim Administrative Structu...

  11. Integrating Global Poverty into Mainstream Business Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paton, Bruce; Harris-Boundy, Jason; Melhus, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Most of the products and services discussed in business curricula serve a small portion of humanity. But the great majority of economic growth over the next few decades is expected to occur in emerging and frontier markets. This emerging reality increases the urgency for including topics related to global poverty, unmet human needs, and emergence…

  12. Integrating Global Poverty into Mainstream Business Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paton, Bruce; Harris-Boundy, Jason; Melhus, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Most of the products and services discussed in business curricula serve a small portion of humanity. But the great majority of economic growth over the next few decades is expected to occur in emerging and frontier markets. This emerging reality increases the urgency for including topics related to global poverty, unmet human needs, and emergence…

  13. Impact of Soil Erosion on Rural Poverty

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiangyong; LU; Gong; CHEN

    2013-01-01

    This article gives an overview of the general situation and regional differences of rural poverty in China, and points out that in the rural areas of central and western regions with serious soil erosion, the poverty is particularly prominent. Based on previous studies, we take agricultural GDP as the dependent variable, farmland area, agricultural labor, agricultural capital stock, irrigation area, and consumption of chemical fertilizer as the independent variables, to establish the C-D production function reflecting impact of soil erosion on rural poverty for regression analysis. The results show that farmland, labor, capital, irrigation, chemical fertilizer and other production factors have a positive effect on agricultural GDP; soil erosion has a significant negative effect on agricultural production; in western China, the total factor productivity is the lowest and soil erosion is the most serious. In order to resolve the dilemma of soil erosion and rural poverty, it is necessary to change the extensive mode of agricultural development, protect the ecological environment, and take the road of intensive development of agroecology.

  14. Infrastructure and social tie: Spatial model approach on understanding poverty in Malang regency, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ari, I. R. D.; Hasyim, A. W.; Pratama, B. A.; Helmy, M.; Sheilla, M. N.

    2017-06-01

    Poverty is a problem that requires attention from the government especially in developing countries such as Indonesia. This Research takes Place at Kasembon District because it has 53,19% family below poverty line in the region. The purpose of this research is to measure poverty based on 3 poverty indicators published by World Bank and 1 multidimensional poverty index. Furthermore, this research invesitigas the relationship between poverty with social and infrastructure in Kasembon District. This study using social network analysis, hot spots analysis, and regression analysis with ordinary least squares. From the poverty indicators known that Pondokagung Village has the highest poverty rate compared to another region. Results from regression model indicate that social and infrastructure affecting poverty in Kasembon District. Social parameter that affecting poverty is density. Infrastructure parameter that affecting poverty is length of paved road. Coefficient value of density is the largest in the model. Therefore it can be concluded that social factors can give more opportunity to reduce poverty rates in Kasembon District. In the local model of paved road coefficient, it is known that the coefficient for each village has not much different value from the global model.

  15. Global Insights Based on the Multidimensional Energy Poverty Index (MEPI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Howells

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Energy access metrics are needed to track the progress towards providing sustainable energy for all. This paper presents advancements in the development of the Multidimensional Energy Poverty Index (MEPI, as well as results and analysis for a number of developing countries. The MEPI is a composite index designed to shed light on energy poverty by assessing the services that modern energy provides. The index captures both the incidence and intensity of energy poverty. It provides valuable insights–allowing the analysis of determinants of energy poverty–and, subsequently insights into policy efficacy. Building on previous work, this paper presents results obtained as a result of both increased data availability and enhanced methodology. Specifically, this analysis (i includes an increased number of countries, and (ii tracks the evolution of energy poverty over time of energy poverty in selected countries is reported.

  16. A relational approach to durable poverty, inequality and power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosse, David

    2010-01-01

    The article argues for what can be called a 'relational' approach to poverty: one that first views persistent poverty as the consequence of historically developed economic and political relations, and second, that emphasises poverty and inequality as an effect of social categorisation and identity, drawing in particular on the experience of adivasis ("tribals") and dalits ("untouchables") subordinated in Indian society. The approach follows Charles Tilly's Durable Inequality in combining Marxian ideas of exploitation and dispossession with Weberian notions of social closure. The article then draws on the work of Steven Lukes, Pierre Bourdieu and Arjun Appadurai to argue for the need to incorporate a multidimensional conception of power; including not only power as the direct assertion of will but also 'agenda-setting power' that sets the terms in which poverty becomes (or fails to become) politicised, and closely related to power as political representation. This sets the basis for discussion of the politics of poverty and exclusion.

  17. Poverty Dynamics and Academic Trajectories of Children of Immigrants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liwei

    2017-01-01

    Using Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Kindergarten Class of 1998–1999 (ECLS-K), we investigated the relationship between poverty and academic trajectories for children in immigrant families in the United States. We used family socioeconomic status (SES) which considers parental education, parental occupation, and family income to define poverty in correspondence with the U.S. federal poverty threshold. Three dimensions of poverty were examined including depth (i.e., not-poor, near-poor, poor or extreme poor), stability (i.e., continuously or intermittently), and duration (i.e., for how many times in poverty). Our results indicated that living in poverty, particularly when it was extreme, volatile, and for long spell could compromise children’s reading and math achievements during the first nine schooling years. Children of immigrants were doing as well as, if not better than, children of native-borns in certain areas (i.e., math) or in facing of certain pattern of poverty (i.e., long-spell). However, deep poverty and volatile changes in family SES could compromise academic achievements for children of immigrants throughout their first nine years of schooling, a period holds important key to their future success. Implications to practice and policy as well as future directions were discussed. PMID:28926964

  18. Fuel Poverty Advisory Group (for England). Fifth annual report 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-04-17

    The Fuel Poverty Advisory Group is an non-departmental public body that advises ministers on progress in England towards meeting the goals sets out in the UK fuel poverty strategy. This is its fifth annual report setting out progress in reducing the number of households in fuel poverty and thus achieving the Government's challenging fuel poverty targets for 2010 and 2016. The report examines developments in fuel poverty during the year, targets, energy prices, resources needed to meet fuel poverty targets, the various Fuel Poverty Programmes, high cost measures, information sharing, incomes, the work of other Government departments and the specific roles of the Department of Work and Pensions, the Department for Communities and Local Government, the Department of Health and Ofgem. The report stresses the need for the Government to underline its continued commitment to the statutory fuel poverty targets by including these targets in the Public Service Agreement (PSA) for the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) and the Department of Trade and Industry (DTI), and by clearly defining the roles of other departments within the PSA framework.

  19. Elderly poverty and supplemental security income, 2002-2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholas, Joyce; Wiseman, Michael

    2010-01-01

    The Supplemental Security Income (SSI) program is the nation's safety net for the aged, blind, and disabled. SSI receipt is often not reported by individuals interviewed in the Current Population Survey (CPS), the statistical base for the Census Bureau's annual estimates of poverty rates. In an earlier article, we explored the effect on estimated poverty rates in 2002 of adjusting CPS income reports using administrative data on earnings and benefits from the SSI and Old-Age, Survivors, and Disability Insurance programs. We assessed poverty using both the official standard and a "relative" standard based on half of median pretax, posttransfer income. This article extends that work through 2005. We find that including administrative data presents challenges, but under the methodology we adopt, such adjustments lower estimated official poverty overall and increase estimated poverty rates for elderly SSI recipients. Relative poverty rates are much higher than official poverty rates. By any of the applied standards and procedures for income adjustment, poverty changed little over the 2002-2005 interval.

  20. Poverty and development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Néstor Juan Sanabria Landazábal

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available In this essay there is argued that the notions ofpoverty, development, quality of life and, in general, all the concepts, variables and indicators used in the explanations and theories on this type, are different points of view from the observers' interests,of the same and only social phenomenon. Therefore,there are multiple works on poverty and development. However, an approximation from the perspective of complexity must bear in mind that the development may refer to the social structure as a whole, and to the actions that modify context of the system, just when it has been ordered through the science in order to explain the reality. Therefore,there is a clase relation between poverty and development. These are different ways to see the same phenomenon, which allow us to think about the life quality from a global sense.

  1. Microfinance and Poverty Alleviation

    OpenAIRE

    Augsburg, B.; Haas, R; Harmgart, H.; Meghir, C.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract: We use an RCT to analyze the impact of microcredit on poverty reduction. The study population consists of loan applicants to a large microfinance institution in Bosnia and Herzegovina who would have been rejected through regular screening. Access to credit allowed borrowers to start and expand small-scale businesses. THe re is little evidence that this lead to net increases in household income. Households that already had a business and where the borrower had more education, ran dow...

  2. Microfinance, Poverty and Education

    OpenAIRE

    Britta Augsburg; Ralph de Haas; Heike Harmgart; Costas Meghir

    2012-01-01

    We use an RCT to analyze the impact of microcredit on poverty reduction, child and teenage labour supply, and education in Bosnia and Herzegovina. The study population consists of loan applicants that regular screening would have marginally rejected. Access to credit allowed borrowers to start and expand small-scale businesses. Households that already had a business and where the borrower had more education, ran down savings, presumably to complement the loan and achieve the minimum investmen...

  3. Vaccines against poverty

    OpenAIRE

    MacLennan, Calman A.; Saul, Allan

    2014-01-01

    With the 2010s declared the Decade of Vaccines, and Millennium Development Goals 4 and 5 focused on reducing diseases that are potentially vaccine preventable, now is an exciting time for vaccines against poverty, that is, vaccines against diseases that disproportionately affect low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). The Global Burden of Disease Study 2010 has helped better understand which vaccines are most needed. In 2012, US$1.3 billion was spent on research and development for new vacc...

  4. The Benefits of Including Clinical Factors in Rectal Normal Tissue Complication Probability Modeling After Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Defraene, Gilles, E-mail: gilles.defraene@uzleuven.be [Radiation Oncology Department, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Van den Bergh, Laura [Radiation Oncology Department, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Al-Mamgani, Abrahim [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus Medical Center - Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Haustermans, Karin [Radiation Oncology Department, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Heemsbergen, Wilma [Netherlands Cancer Institute - Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Van den Heuvel, Frank [Radiation Oncology Department, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Lebesque, Joos V. [Netherlands Cancer Institute - Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To study the impact of clinical predisposing factors on rectal normal tissue complication probability modeling using the updated results of the Dutch prostate dose-escalation trial. Methods and Materials: Toxicity data of 512 patients (conformally treated to 68 Gy [n = 284] and 78 Gy [n = 228]) with complete follow-up at 3 years after radiotherapy were studied. Scored end points were rectal bleeding, high stool frequency, and fecal incontinence. Two traditional dose-based models (Lyman-Kutcher-Burman (LKB) and Relative Seriality (RS) and a logistic model were fitted using a maximum likelihood approach. Furthermore, these model fits were improved by including the most significant clinical factors. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) was used to compare the discriminating ability of all fits. Results: Including clinical factors significantly increased the predictive power of the models for all end points. In the optimal LKB, RS, and logistic models for rectal bleeding and fecal incontinence, the first significant (p = 0.011-0.013) clinical factor was 'previous abdominal surgery.' As second significant (p = 0.012-0.016) factor, 'cardiac history' was included in all three rectal bleeding fits, whereas including 'diabetes' was significant (p = 0.039-0.048) in fecal incontinence modeling but only in the LKB and logistic models. High stool frequency fits only benefitted significantly (p = 0.003-0.006) from the inclusion of the baseline toxicity score. For all models rectal bleeding fits had the highest AUC (0.77) where it was 0.63 and 0.68 for high stool frequency and fecal incontinence, respectively. LKB and logistic model fits resulted in similar values for the volume parameter. The steepness parameter was somewhat higher in the logistic model, also resulting in a slightly lower D{sub 50}. Anal wall DVHs were used for fecal incontinence, whereas anorectal wall dose best described the other two endpoints

  5. The impacts of climate change on poverty in 2030, and the potential from rapid, inclusive and climate-informed development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozenberg, J.; Hallegatte, S.

    2016-12-01

    There is a consensus on the fact that poor people are more vulnerable to climate change than the rest of the population, but, until recently, few quantified estimates had been proposed and few frameworks existed to design policies for addressing the issue. In this paper, we analyze the impacts of climate change on poverty using micro-simulation approaches. We start from household surveys that describe the current distribution of income and occupations, we project these households into the future and we look at the impacts of climate change on people's income. To project households into the future, we explore a large range of assumptions on future demographic changes (including on education), technological changes, and socio-economic trends (including redistribution policies). This approach allows us to identify the main combination of factors that lead to fast poverty reduction, and the ones that lead to high climate change impacts on the poor. Identifying these factors is critical for designing efficient policies to protect the poorest from climate change impacts and making economic growth more inclusive. Conclusions are twofold. First, by 2030 climate change can have a large impact on poverty, with between 3 and 122 million more people in poverty, but climate change remains a secondary driver of poverty trends within this time horizon. Climate change impacts do not only affect the poorest: in 2030, the bottom 40 percent lose more than 4 percent of income in many countries. The regional hotspots are Sub-Saharan Africa and - to a lesser extent - India and the rest of South Asia. The most important channel through which climate change increases poverty is through agricultural income and food prices. Second, by 2030 and in the absence of surprises on climate impacts, inclusive climate-informed development can prevent most of (but not all) the impacts on poverty. In a scenario with rapid, inclusive and climate-proof development, climate change impact on poverty is

  6. [Inequality, poverty and obesity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Vanessa Alves; Silva, Aline Elizabeth; Rodrigues, Chrystiellen Ayana Aparecida; Nunes, Nádia Lúcia Almeida; Vigato, Tássia Cassimiro; Magalhães, Rosana

    2010-06-01

    National studies have been demonstrating the positive relationship among inequality, poverty and obesity revealing the singularities and complexity of the nutritional transition in Brazil. In this direction, the women constitute a vulnerable group to the dynamics of the obesity in the poverty context. Such fact imposes the theoretical deepening and the accomplishment of researches that make possible a larger approach with the phenomenon in subject. In this perspective, the study analyzed the daily life of poor and obese women, users of basic units of health of the city of Diamantina, Vale do Jequitinhonha, Minas Gerais State. The results revealed the complex relationship between feminine obesity and poverty. The cultural and material aspects of life, as well as the different feeding and body conceptions that demonstrated to be fundamental elements for the analysis of the multiple faces of the obesity among the investigated group. Facing these results it is appropriate to encourage public policies that promote equity widening the access of those groups to the main resources for the prevention and combat of obesity.

  7. The importance of consecutive spells of poverty: a longitudinal poverty index

    OpenAIRE

    Mendola, Daria; Busetta, Annalisa; Milito, Anna Maria

    2009-01-01

    Traditional measures of poverty persistence, such as 'poverty rate' (i.e., the number of years spent in poverty upon the total number of observations) or the 'persistent-risk-of-poverty rate', do not devote enough attention to the sequence of poverty spells. In particular, they are insufficient in underlining the different effects associated with occasional single spells of poverty and the consecutive years of poverty. We propose a new index which measures the severity of poverty, taking into...

  8. 基于村级尺度的湖北武陵民族地区贫困现状及影响因素研究%Research on Present Situation and Affecting Factors of Poverty Based on Village Scale in Wuling Ethnic Areas of Hubei Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘丽娜; 李俊杰

    2015-01-01

    The article described the overall poor situation of administrative villages in Wuling ethnic areas of Hubei province,and used the linear regression model to make empirical test to affecting factors of the poverty incidence and re-poverty-stricken rate.Results showed that minority population rate posi-tive effects on incidence of poverty obviously and no effect on re-poverty-stricken rate.The labor illitera-cy and half illiteracy rates had significant positive effects on both of them.Labor output rate had negative effect on poverty rate;the but positive effects on re-poverty-stricken rate.The rate of culture activity room and clinic had significant negative influences on poverty rate;the rate of cultural activity room had no effect on re-poverty-stricken rate yet the clinic rate had significant negative influences on it.Further-more,the rate of tap water and asphalt road had great negative effects on poverty rate;but the rate of asphalt road and electricity had no effect on re-poverty-stricken rate.Accordingly,suggestions on promo-ting the poverty alleviation and development of Wuling ethnic areas were proposed as follows,increasing investment in education to raise comprehensive quality of resident's population;improving the labor ex-port strategy and enhancing their capacities of anti-poverty;adjusting measures to local conditions and improving the population plan of poverty alleviation in ethnic areas;establishing database of village-level poverty to form a new poverty alleviation situation.%通过整体描述湖北武陵民族地区行政村贫困总体现状,运用线性回归模型对贫困村的贫困发生率及因病因灾返贫率的影响因素进行实证检验,结果发现:少数民族人口率对贫困发生率具有显著正向影响,对返贫率不具有影响;劳动力文盲、半文盲率对二者具有显著正向影响;劳动力输出率对贫困发生率具有负向影响,而对返贫率有正向影响;有文化活动室

  9. Impact of Poverty on Black Youth Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezeocha, Peter A.

    1976-01-01

    Defines some dimensions of poverty, determines the scope and consequences of poverty in an affluent society to its black youths, reviews the existing strategies to combat poverty, examines a number of the major characteristics of poverty (as different from poverty in less affluent societies) and suggests other ways and means of alleviating and…

  10. On the Poverty in the Rocky Desertification Areas of Southwest China Based on AHP: A Case Study of Liupanshui City in Guizhou Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haibin; ZHU; Xiaodong; REN

    2014-01-01

    Karst rocky desertification mountain areas are regarded as main positions to wipe out poverty for their large poverty population,wide poverty area,high rate of poverty,etc. This paper takes Liupanshui city as an example where the situation of rocky desertification is very serious. We build the indicator system of poverty alleviation and development by analyzing their poverty and using the AHP method and also find the limiting factors which restrict the development of this area then put forward the recommendations to alleviate poverty.

  11. Poverty, education, race, and pregnancy outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savitz, David A; Kaufman, Jay S; Dole, Nancy; Siega-Riz, Anna Maria; Thorp, John M; Kaczor, Diane T

    2004-01-01

    Few studies have considered the differing impact of socioeconomic factors on pregnancy outcomes among racial subgroups. We assessed pregnancy outcome by race, education, and income (poverty index), using data from the Pregnancy, Infection, and Nutrition Study, a cohort study of preterm birth in central North Carolina, using binomial regression. Poverty was associated with an increased risk of preterm birth only among African Americans with 12 or more years of education (RR=1.6, 95% CI: 1.1, 2.2). White participants with both a low level of education and an income below the poverty line were at increased risk of preterm birth (RR=1.7, 95% CI: 1.1, 2.7). White women with 12 or more years of education had increased risk of small-for-gestational-age birth (SGA, defined as poverty status (RR=1.7, 95% CI: 1.1, 2.7). Socioeconomic indicators appear to have complex joint effect patterns among racial subgroups, perhaps because the material and psychological implications of education and income status differ between groups.

  12. Poverty, Policy and Price Transmission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elleby, Christian

    This thesis consists of four self-contained chapters in which different aspects of the relationship between international commodity markets and domestic food markets are explored. What motivates the analysis is the recent surge in international commodity prices and the controversy over the poverty...... domestic goods. Households prefer the traded good which they substitute towards as their incomes increase, thus exposing themselves to world market price swings. Price transmission from international to domestic markets therefore increases with per capita income but also with income inequality. Model...... using a Bayesian simulation methodology. Three main findings emerge from the analysis. Firstly, it seems that domestic rather than global or regional shocks are the main drivers of domestic food prices in all regions. Secondly, global factors have gained importance since 2005. Food inflation...

  13. Poverty, Policy and Price Transmission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elleby, Christian

    This thesis consists of four self-contained chapters in which different aspects of the relationship between international commodity markets and domestic food markets are explored. What motivates the analysis is the recent surge in international commodity prices and the controversy over the poverty...... using a Bayesian simulation methodology. Three main findings emerge from the analysis. Firstly, it seems that domestic rather than global or regional shocks are the main drivers of domestic food prices in all regions. Secondly, global factors have gained importance since 2005. Food inflation...... on the international commodity markets. The fourth paper argues that subsidy programmes can have a destabilizing effect on a country’s inflation in times of surging commodity prices if these lead to chronic public deficits. In the empirical analysis we compare the recent inflation experiences of Egypt, which has...

  14. 贫困女性化内涵、成因及其政策思考%Connotation, Factor and Policy Thinking of Feminisation of Poverty

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宁满秀; 荆彩龙

    2015-01-01

    While the female labor market participation rate has been improved, it does not slow down the impoverishment of women; instead, it compels the women to bear the dual responsibility of labor market and housework. Based on the family responsibility, gender discrimination and occupational segregation of labor market, and the economic dependence on men, this paper analyzes causes of the feminization of poverty. At the same time, according to intrinsic mechanism of women’s poverty, it also discusses the operation mechanism of the poor women and social mutual construction, in order to build proper social security system and alleviate women impoverishment. In conclusion, it will propel the relations of poor women and society, thus promoting harmonious development of the society as a whole.%女性劳动力市场参与率的提高并没有减缓女性贫困化的程度,反而使得女性不得不承担市场劳动和家务劳动的双重责任。基于对家庭的照顾责任、劳动力市场的性别歧视以及职业隔离、在经济上对男性的依赖三个层面分析贫困女性化的原因,通过研究女性贫困化的内在作用机理,探讨在社会运行过程中贫困女性与社会相互建构的机制,以期构建适当的社会保障体制,以便缓解女性贫困化,改善贫困女性与社会的关系,促进整个社会的协调发展。

  15. Dynamics of poverty in Ethiopia

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    This paper addresses issues related to the dynamics of income poverty using unique household panel data for urban and rural areas of Ethiopia covering the period 1994-97. The percentage of households that remained in poverty was twice as large in urban areas as in rural areas. This suggests that income variability is a serious problem in rural areas, while the persistence is a key feature of urban poverty. The paper also discusses household characteristics that are correlated with the inciden...

  16. Poverty - A Source of Conflict,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-08-25

    contend that poor coun- tries are likely to attack richer ones for the spoils of war, but rather that poverty is a breeding ground for instability. He...Studies Institute v POVERTY - A SOURCE OF CONFLICT The rich get richer; the poor get poorer. As this rule has applied to individuals, it has apparently...problems. These problems resulting from poverty create a dangerous threat to the stability of the world. This does not mean that poor countries will

  17. Urban agriculture and poverty alleviation in developing countries ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Urban agriculture and poverty alleviation in developing countries. ... regular institutionalized management in a participatory manner including all relevant ... of the advantage of planning a city, a definition and pros of urban economy in country ...

  18. Rethinking the measures of poverty

    OpenAIRE

    Sallila, Seppo; Hiilamo, Heikki; Sund, Reijo

    2004-01-01

    This study attempts to introduce a new method to measure relative income poverty. The aim is to find a solution which will combine information both on the depth of poverty and the quantity of the poor, i.e. the number of people living in poverty. Furthermore, a yardstick is sought which would be relatively simple and easy to understand, as these properties would facilitate the use of the new method in sociological poverty research and political decision making. The paper begins by discussing ...

  19. Mesenchymal stem cell therapy ameliorates diabetic nephropathy via the paracrine effect of renal trophic factors including exosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaishi, Kanna; Mizue, Yuka; Chikenji, Takako; Otani, Miho; Nakano, Masako; Konari, Naoto; Fujimiya, Mineko

    2016-01-01

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have contributed to the improvement of diabetic nephropathy (DN); however, the actual mediator of this effect and its role has not been characterized thoroughly. We investigated the effects of MSC therapy on DN, focusing on the paracrine effect of renal trophic factors, including exosomes secreted by MSCs. MSCs and MSC-conditioned medium (MSC-CM) as renal trophic factors were administered in parallel to high-fat diet (HFD)-induced type 2 diabetic mice and streptozotocin (STZ)-induced insulin-deficient diabetic mice. Both therapies showed approximately equivalent curative effects, as each inhibited the exacerbation of albuminuria. They also suppressed the excessive infiltration of BMDCs into the kidney by regulating the expression of the adhesion molecule ICAM-1. Proinflammatory cytokine expression (e.g., TNF-α) and fibrosis in tubular interstitium were inhibited. TGF-β1 expression was down-regulated and tight junction protein expression (e.g., ZO-1) was maintained, which sequentially suppressed the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition of tubular epithelial cells (TECs). Exosomes purified from MSC-CM exerted an anti-apoptotic effect and protected tight junction structure in TECs. The increase of glomerular mesangium substrate was inhibited in HFD-diabetic mice. MSC therapy is a promising tool to prevent DN via the paracrine effect of renal trophic factors including exosomes due to its multifactorial action. PMID:27721418

  20. Creating Nurturing Environments: A Science-Based Framework for Promoting Child Health and Development within High-Poverty Neighborhoods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komro, Kelli A.; Flay, Brian R.; Biglan, Anthony

    2011-01-01

    Living in poverty and living in areas of concentrated poverty pose multiple risks for child development and for overall health and wellbeing. Poverty is a major risk factor for several mental, emotional, and behavioral disorders, as well as for other developmental challenges and physical health problems. In this paper, the Promise Neighborhoods…

  1. Explaining threshold effects of globalization on poverty: An institutional perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Sindzingre, Alice

    2005-01-01

    The paper focuses on the non-linearity of the transmission of the impact of globalization on poverty and the existence of threshold effects. Institutions constitute a critical factor for the creation of threshold effects in the impact of globalization on poverty. Institutions—their credibility, ability to be transformed by globalization, and the ways they give the poor access to the beneficial effects of globalization—determine whether the benefits of globalization are spread to the poor or a...

  2. Below the poverty line and non-communicable diseases in Kerala: The Epidemiology of Non-communicable Diseases in Rural Areas (ENDIRA) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Jaideep; Vijayakumar, N; Joseph, Joseph K; David, P C; Menon, M N; Mukundan, Shyam; Dorphy, P D; Banerjee, Amitava

    2015-01-01

    India carries the greatest burden of global non-communicable diseases (NCDs). Poverty is strongly associated with NCDs but there are few prevalence studies which have measured poverty in India, particularly in rural settings. In Kerala, India, a population of 113,462 individuals was identified. The "Epidemiology of Non-communicable Diseases in Rural Areas" (ENDIRA) study was conducted via ASHAs (Accredited Social Health Activists). Standardised questionnaires were used in household interviews of individuals ≥18years during 2012 to gather sociodemographic, lifestyle and medical data for this population. The Government of Kerala definition of "the poverty line" was used. The association between below poverty line (BPL) status, NCDs and risk factors was analysed in multivariable regression models. 84,456 adults were included in the analyses (25.4% below the poverty line). The prevalence of NCDs was relatively common: myocardial infarction (MI) 1.4%, stroke 0.3%, respiratory diseases 5.0%, and cancer 1.1%. BPL status was not associated with age (p=0.96) or gender (p=0.26). Compared with those above the poverty line (APL), the BPL group was less likely to have diabetes, hypertension or dyslipidaemia (ppoverty line status. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. ¿Qué factores explican la pobreza multidimensional en España? Una aproximación a través de los modelos de ecuaciones estructurales || What Factors Explain the Multimensional Poverty in Spain? An Approach by Means of Structural Equation Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poza Lara, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available La finalidad de este estudio es presentar los factores más importantes que explican la pobreza multidimensional en España, destacando las interrelaciones entre los propios elementos explicativos, con el ánimo de potenciar los efectos de la política económica contra la pobreza. Para ello, se ha construido un modelo de ecuaciones estructurales utilizando la muestra ampliada del Panel de Hogares de la Unión Europea del año 2000. El nivel de educación y el empleo parecen ser los constructos más determinantes. Concretamente,el nivel de formación y el tipo de contrato son las variables con mayor poder explicativo sobre la pobreza multidimensional. || The aim of this study is to present the most important factors that explain multidimensional poverty in Spain, highlighting the relationships between the explanatory elements themselves in the spirit of enhancing the effects of poverty policy. For this purpose, we have designed a Structural Equation Model using the enlarged sample of Household Panel European Union in 2000. Education and employment seem to be the most determining latent construct. In particular, the level of education and the type of employment contract are the most important variables to explain the multidimensional poverty.

  4. The Stability of Inequality and Poverty in Russia in the First Period of Transition : Wage Arrears and Secondary Employment

    OpenAIRE

    武田, 友加

    2000-01-01

    The main purpose of this paper is to explain inequality and poverty in Russia in the first period of transition and to get a clear idea of inequality and poverty in Russia. Poverty is closely associated with the stability of inequality. Therefore, examining the process of the stability of inequality will help to identify factors of poverty. Data on wages reported by Goskomstat is "wages due," or contracted wages. However, "wages due" may deviate from "acquired wages." In Russia, "wages due (+...

  5. Age, Poverty, Homicide, and Gun Homicide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mike Males

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Traditional theories of “adolescent risk taking” have not been validated against recent research indicating that youthful traffic crash, violent crime, felony crime, and firearms mortality rates reflect young people’s low-socio-economic status (SES compared with older adults’, not young age. Aside from a small number of recent, conflicting studies, the literature gap on this key issue remains. The present study examines the 54,094 homicide deaths, including 41,123 gun homicides, victimizing California residents ages 15 to 69 during 1991 to 2012 by poverty status. Without controlling for poverty, homicide rates display the traditional age-curve peaking at 19, then declining. When poverty is controlled, the traditional age-curve persists only for high-poverty populations, in which young people are vastly over-represented, and homicide rates are elevated for all ages. This finding reiterates that “adolescent risk taking” may be an artifact of failing to control for age-divergent SES.

  6. An International Inquiry: Stories of Poverty--Poverty Stories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciuffetelli Parker, Darlene; Craig, Cheryl J.

    2017-01-01

    This article features an international inquiry of two high-poverty urban schools, one Canadian and one American. The article examines poverty in terms of "small stories" that educators and students live and tell, often on the edges, unheard and unaccounted for in grand narratives. It also expands the story constellations approach to…

  7. The Literature of Poverty, the Poverty of Literature Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, John

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author focuses on the possibilities--and the limits--of undergraduate courses on the literature of poverty. He describes an undergraduate course he has taught on U.S. literature about poverty, but he also expresses doubt that such courses can help produce major social change. He argues that something about the literature of…

  8. The Literature of Poverty, the Poverty of Literature Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, John

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author focuses on the possibilities--and the limits--of undergraduate courses on the literature of poverty. He describes an undergraduate course he has taught on U.S. literature about poverty, but he also expresses doubt that such courses can help produce major social change. He argues that something about the literature of…

  9. An International Inquiry: Stories of Poverty--Poverty Stories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciuffetelli Parker, Darlene; Craig, Cheryl J.

    2017-01-01

    This article features an international inquiry of two high-poverty urban schools, one Canadian and one American. The article examines poverty in terms of "small stories" that educators and students live and tell, often on the edges, unheard and unaccounted for in grand narratives. It also expands the story constellations approach to…

  10. Brain Drain: A Child's Brain on Poverty. Poverty Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damron, Neil

    2015-01-01

    "Brain Drain: A Child's Brain on Poverty," released in March 2015 and prepared by intern Neil Damron, explores the brain's basic anatomy and recent research findings suggesting that poverty affects the brain development of infants and young children and the potential lifelong effects of the changes. The sheet draws from a variety of…

  11. Brain Drain: A Child's Brain on Poverty. Poverty Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damron, Neil

    2015-01-01

    "Brain Drain: A Child's Brain on Poverty," released in March 2015 and prepared by intern Neil Damron, explores the brain's basic anatomy and recent research findings suggesting that poverty affects the brain development of infants and young children and the potential lifelong effects of the changes. The sheet draws from a variety of…

  12. Poverty and Development——Poverty Alleviation in Rural China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    全辉霞

    2008-01-01

    In the past 20 years, the developing countries have made remarkable progress, but they feel that rapid economic growth has failed to eliminate the widespread absolute poverty except China. In order to fight against poverty, Chinese government has adopted a few measures.

  13. Income and wealth poverty in Germany

    OpenAIRE

    Köhler, Theresa

    2016-01-01

    In general, poverty measures are estimated by applying income information. However, only using income data for calculating relative poverty might lead to an incomplete view. For example, a household can be under a poverty threshold even if a household member owns real estate or equity. In this thesis, at risk of income poverty in Germany is estimated. In order to get a more complete picture of at risk of poverty, a multidimensional approach is applied. Not only at risk of income poverty, also...

  14. Income and wealth poverty in Germany

    OpenAIRE

    Köhler, Theresa

    2016-01-01

    In general, poverty measures are estimated by applying income information. However, only using income data for calculating relative poverty might lead to an incomplete view. For example, a household can be under a poverty threshold even if a household member owns real estate or equity. In this thesis, at risk of income poverty in Germany is estimated. In order to get a more complete picture of at risk of poverty, a multidimensional approach is applied. Not only at risk of income poverty, also...

  15. Poverty alleviation committee considers population among major issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    This article presents a meeting of the Committee on Socioeconomic Measures in Poverty Alleviation, whose main purpose is to review and analyze global and regional trends and developments concerning poverty and to recommend policy options and program strategies to improve the situation. The Committee urged the Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP) secretariat to play a catalytic role in formulating approaches to the alleviation of poverty by conducting research, collecting information, providing training, organizing workshops, and maintaining professional and institutional networks. They also encouraged ESCAP to continue helping countries formulate and implement their population and development programs, including those related to reproductive health.

  16. Poverty and Human Rights: New Direction in Poverty Eradication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pihri Buhaerah

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to support the argument that poverty is multidimensional and part of human rights concern. In doing so, this paper uses relevant literature review on poverty issues. This paper finds that the capability approach is a useful conceptual framework to link conventional approach with human rights and support the argument that poverty is multidimensional. Under this perspective, there are two prerequisites cases of non-fulfillment of human rights can be counted as poverty, namely (i the human rights involved must be those that correspond to the capabilities that are considered basic by a given society; and (ii inadequate command over economic resources must play a role in the causal chain leading to the non-fulfillment of human rights. Furthermore, there are three different ways in which human rights can be relevant to poverty: constitutive relevance, instrumental relevance, and constraint-based relevance.

  17. What Is the Association between Absolute Child Poverty, Poor Governance, and Natural Disasters? A Global Comparison of Some of the Realities of Climate Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daoud, Adel; Halleröd, Björn; Guha-Sapir, Debarati

    2016-01-01

    The paper explores the degree to which exposure to natural disasters and poor governance (quality of governance) is associated with absolute child poverty in sixty-seven middle- and low-income countries. The data is representative for about 2.8 billion of the world´s population. Institutionalist tend to argue that many of society's ills, including poverty, derive from fragile or inefficient institutions. However, our findings show that although increasing quality of government tends to be associated with less poverty, the negative effects of natural disasters on child poverty are independent of a country´s institutional efficiency. Increasing disaster victims (killed and affected) is associated with higher rates of child poverty. A child´s estimated odds ratio to be in a state of absolute poverty increases by about a factor of 5.7 [95% CI: 1.7 to 18.7] when the average yearly toll of disasters in the child´s country increases by one on a log-10 scale. Better governance correlates with less child poverty, but it does not modify the correlation between child poverty and natural disasters. The results are based on hierarchical regression models that partition the variance into three parts: child, household, and country. The models were cross-sectional and based on observational data from the Demographic Health Survey and the Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey, which were collected at the beginning of the twenty-first millennium. The Sustainable Development Goals are a principle declaration to halt climate change, but they lack a clear plan on how the burden of this change should be shared by the global community. Based on our results, we suggest that the development agencies should take this into account and to articulate more equitable global policies to protect the most vulnerable, specifically children.

  18. Poverty of the stimulus revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berwick, Robert C; Pietroski, Paul; Yankama, Beracah; Chomsky, Noam

    2011-01-01

    A central goal of modern generative grammar has been to discover invariant properties of human languages that reflect "the innate schematism of mind that is applied to the data of experience" and that "might reasonably be attributed to the organism itself as its contribution to the task of the acquisition of knowledge" (Chomsky, 1971). Candidates for such invariances include the structure dependence of grammatical rules, and in particular, certain constraints on question formation. Various "poverty of stimulus" (POS) arguments suggest that these invariances reflect an innate human endowment, as opposed to common experience: Such experience warrants selection of the grammars acquired only if humans assume, a priori, that selectable grammars respect substantive constraints. Recently, several researchers have tried to rebut these POS arguments. In response, we illustrate why POS arguments remain an important source of support for appeal to a priori structure-dependent constraints on the grammars that humans naturally acquire.

  19. Analysis of Factors That Affects the Capital Structure within Companies Included In the Index of LQ45 During 2011 - 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominica Rufina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to determine the factors of ROA, Asset Structure, Sales Growth, and Firm Size affecting Capital Structure. The population in this study is the companies included in the Index LQ45 Indonesia Stock Exchange from the period 2011 to 2013, the data of a total of 270 listed companies in LQ45 during that period, only 90 corporate data that successively included in the index LQ45. The data used in this study uses secondary data from the Indonesia Stock Exchange website www.idx.co.id. In the process of data analysis and testing the assumptions of classical hypothesis testing using multiple linear regression analysis using SPSS v20.00. The results showed that partially variable ROA, Asset Structure, and Firm Size has a significant influence on the Capital Structure, Growth Sales whereas variable has no influence on the Capital Structure. Simultaneously ROA, Asset Structure, Sales Growth, and Firm Size effect on Capital Structure.

  20. Protected areas and poverty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockington, Daniel; Wilkie, David

    2015-01-01

    Protected areas are controversial because they are so important for conservation and because they distribute fortune and misfortune unevenly. The nature of that distribution, as well as the terrain of protected areas themselves, have been vigorously contested. In particular, the relationship between protected areas and poverty is a long-running debate in academic and policy circles. We review the origins of this debate and chart its key moments. We then outline the continuing flashpoints and ways in which further evaluation studies could improve the evidence base for policy-making and conservation practice. PMID:26460124

  1. Poverty reduction in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, Paul

    2007-10-23

    Poverty in Africa has been rising for the last quarter-century, while it has been falling in the rest of the developing world. Africa's distinctive problem is that its economies have not been growing. This article attempts to synthesize a range of recent research to account for this failure of the growth process. I argue that the reasons lie not in African peculiarities but rather in geographic features that globally cause problems but that are disproportionately pronounced in Africa. These features interact to create three distinct challenges that are likely to require international interventions beyond the conventional reliance on aid.

  2. Poverty alleviation project review

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Braun, AL

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available stream_source_info Braun_2003.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 4851 Content-Encoding UTF-8 stream_name Braun_2003.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 www.csir.co.za CSIR Poverty Alleviation..., Carding, Roving, Yarn formation Manufacturing (SMME): Knitting / Weaving CASHMERE IS KING Stakeholder: Dept. of Science and Technology Funders of the Cashmere Project Role Players: Get the buy-in and determine roles of each • Department...

  3. Poverty, inequality and a political economy of mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, J K

    2015-04-01

    The relationship between poverty and mental health is indisputable. However, to have an influence on the next set of sustainable global development goals, we need to understand the causal relationships between social determinants such as poverty, inequality, lack of education and unemployment; thereby clarifying which aspects of poverty are the key drivers of mental illness. Some of the major challenges identified by Lund (2014) in understanding the poverty-mental health relationship are discussed including: the need for appropriate poverty indicators; extending this research agenda to a broader range of mental health outcomes; the need to engage with theoretical concepts such as Amartya Sen's capability framework; and the need to integrate the concept of income/economic inequality into studies of poverty and mental health. Although income inequality is a powerful driver of poor physical and mental health outcomes, it features rarely in research and discourse on social determinants of mental health. This paper interrogates in detail the relationships between poverty, income inequality and mental health, specifically: the role of income inequality as a mediator of the poverty-mental health relationship; the relative utility of commonly used income inequality metrics; and the likely mechanisms underlying the impact of inequality on mental health, including direct stress due to the setting up of social comparisons as well as the erosion of social capital leading to social fragmentation. Finally, we need to interrogate the upstream political, social and economic causes of inequality itself, since these should also become potential targets in efforts to promote sustainable development goals and improve population (mental) health. In particular, neoliberal (market-oriented) political doctrines lead to both increased income inequality and reduced social cohesion. In conclusion, understanding the relationships between politics, poverty, inequality and mental health

  4. The role of poverty in antimicrobial resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planta, Margaret B

    2007-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is a worldwide problem that has deleterious long-term effects as the development of drug resistance outpaces the development of new drugs. Poverty has been cited by the World Health Organization as a major force driving the development of antimicrobial resistance. In developing countries, factors such as inadequate access to effective drugs, unregulated dispensing and manufacture of antimicrobials, and truncated antimicrobial therapy because of cost are contributing to the development of multidrug-resistant organisms. Within the United States, poverty-driven practices such as medication-sharing, use of "leftover" antibiotics, and the purchase and use of foreign-made drugs of questionable quality are likely contributing to antimicrobial resistance. However, there is currently a dearth of studies in the United States analyzing the socioeconomic and behavioral factors behind antimicrobial resistance in United States communities. Further studies of these factors, with an emphasis on poverty-driven practices, need to be undertaken in order to fully understand the problem of antimicrobial resistance in the United States and to develop effective intervention to combat this problem.

  5. Oh Canada! Too many children in poverty for too long.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothman, Laurel

    2007-10-01

    Despite continued economic growth, Canada's record on child poverty is worse than it was in 1989, when the House of Commons unanimously resolved to end child poverty by the year 2000. Most recent data indicate that nearly 1.2 million children - almost one of every six children - live in low-income households. Campaign 2000 contends that poverty and income inequality are major barriers to the healthy development of children, the cohesion of our communities and, ultimately, to the social and economic well-being of Canada. Canada needs to adopt a poverty-reduction strategy that responds to the UNICEF challenge to establish credible targets and timetables to bring the child poverty rate well below 10%, as other Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development nations have done. Campaign 2000 calls on the federal government to develop a cross-Canada poverty-reduction strategy in conjunction with the provinces, territories and First Nations, and in consultation with low-income people. This strategy needs to include good jobs at living wages that ensure that full-time work is a pathway out of poverty; an effective child benefit of $5,100 that is indexed; a system of affordable, universally accessible early learning and child care services available to all families irrespective of employment status; an affordable housing program that creates more affordable housing and helps to sustain existing stock; and affordable and accessible postsecondary education and training programs that prepare youth and adults for employment leading to economic independence.

  6. Neighborhood poverty and allostatic load in African American youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brody, Gene H; Lei, Man-Kit; Chen, Edith; Miller, Gregory E

    2014-11-01

    This study was designed to determine whether living in a neighborhood in which poverty levels increase across adolescence is associated with heightened levels of allostatic load (AL), a biological composite reflecting cardiometabolic risk. The researchers also sought to determine whether receipt of emotional support could ameliorate the effects of increases in neighborhood poverty on AL. Neighborhood concentrations of poverty were obtained from the Census Bureau for 420 African American youth living in rural Georgia when they were 11 and 19 years of age. AL was measured at age 19 by using established protocols for children and adolescents. When youth were 18, caregivers reported parental emotional support and youth assessed receipt of peer and mentor emotional support. Covariates included family poverty status at ages 11 and 19, family financial stress, parental employment status, youth stress, and youths' unhealthful behaviors. Youth who lived in neighborhoods in which poverty levels increased from ages 11 to 19 evinced the highest levels of AL even after accounting for the individual-level covariates. The association of increasing neighborhood poverty across adolescence with AL was not significant for youth who received high emotional support. This study is the first to show an association between AL and residence in a neighborhood that increases in poverty. It also highlights the benefits of supportive relationships in ameliorating this association. Copyright © 2014 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  7. Poverty alleviation programmes in India: a social audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    K Yesudian, C A

    2007-10-01

    The review highlights the poverty alleviation programmes of the government in the post-economic reform era to evaluate the contribution of these programmes towards reducing poverty in the country. The poverty alleviation programmes are classified into (i) self-employment programmes; (ii) wage employment programmes; (iii) food security programmes; (iv) social security programmes; and (v) urban poverty alleviation programmes. The parameter used for evaluation included utilization of allocated funds, change in poverty level, employment generation and number or proportion of beneficiaries. The paper attempts to go beyond the economic benefit of the programmes and analyzes the social impact of these programmes on the communities where the poor live, and concludes that too much of government involvement is actually an impediment. On the other hand, involvement of the community, especially the poor has led to better achievement of the goals of the programmes. Such endeavours not only reduced poverty but also empowered the poor to find their own solutions to their economic problems. There is a need for decentralization of the programmes by strengthening the panchayat raj institutions as poverty is not merely economic deprivation but also social marginalization that affects the poor most.

  8. Poverty alleviation in Nigeria: lessons from socioeconomic thoughts of the Yoruba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babalola, Joel B; Oni, Adesoji; Atanda, Ademola; Oyejola-Oshodi, Benedicta O

    2009-01-01

    Nigeria is the 13th largest oil producer in the world. Yet about 56 per cent of the total population lives in absolute poverty. This article confronts conventional theories of poverty with the indigenous thoughts of the Yoruba (one of the three major ethnic groups in Nigeria). Darwinian, individualistic, cultural, situational and structural theories of poverty associate it either with individual-case or economy-wide factors. Approaching anti-poverty strategy through individual-related factors (such as training the unskilled poor) without due consideration to the economy-wide factors (such as job creation for the poor) ends up redistributing rather than actually reducing aggregate poverty. The analysis of poverty-related proverbs of the Yoruba reveals a consistency between the conventional theories and what the Yoruba think about poverty. The Yoruba believe in chronic (osi) versus transitory (ise) poverty, associated with suffering. They believe that poor people can escape the poverty trap through their own personal efforts (such as by developing a positive work attitude, working hard and reducing their family size) along with the help of support systems (such as job creation and food security). The Yoruba believe that job creation is the best anti-poverty strategy. They further believe that by removing hunger, poverty becomes insignificant. Based on these two axioms, this article suggests that attention be paid to job creation and food security for the poor. It also recommends that studies of the socioeconomic thought of the other major Nigerian tribes with respect to poverty be undertaken, so as to arrive at nationally and culturally derived anti-poverty strategies in Nigeria.

  9. Analysis of Poverty Performance and Its Rooted Causes of the Aid-Poverty-Development Counties in Sichuan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ShenMao-ying

    2003-01-01

    There are 36 counties affirmed to be aid-poverty-development county in the early 21st century, which distribute around the circumferential mountain of Sichuan Basin,According to the topographic features and the distribution of nationality, these aid-poverty-development counties can be classified into 4 depressed-regions. Study shows that regional poverty performance of 4 depressed-regions not only has many commons in the field of regional economic structure and industry structure, which is far behind the average development performance of Sichuan in the field of economic sum per capita such as GDP, farmer net income per capita as well as retail scale consumer goods, it is also quite different related to infrastructure and social development within 4 depressed-regions. Regional Poverty is chronically resulted in interaction of the multi-factors. Natural condition constraint is the basic factor contributed to regional poverty, policy influences play key role, the poor culture is inherent factor to regional poverty and the marginal locations play important role.

  10. Analysis of Poverty Performance and Its Rooted Causes of the Aid-Poverty-Development Counties in Sichuan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shen Mao-ying

    2003-01-01

    There are 36 counties affirmed to be aid-poverty-development county in the early 21st century, which distribute around the circumferential mountain of Sichuan Basin.According to the topographic features and the distribution of nationality, these aid-poverty-development counties can be classified into 4 depressed-regions. Study shows that regional poverty performance of 4 depressed-regions not only has many commons in the field of regional economic structure and industry structure, which is far behind the average development performance of Sichuan in the field of economic sum per capita such as GDP, farmer net income per capita as well as retail scale consumer goods, it is also quite different related to infrastructure and social development within 4 depressed-regions. Regional Poverty is chronically resulted in interaction of the multi-factors. Natural condition constraint is the basic factor contributed to regional poverty, policy influences play key role, the poor culture is inherent factor to regional poverty and the marginal locations play important role.

  11. Overcoming poverty through development——A review and assessment of the experiences of large scale poverty reduction in China over the past three decades

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪三贵

    2009-01-01

    China has achieved remarkable accomplishments in poverty reduction in the 30 years since it launched its reform and opening-up policy.During this period,more than 500 million people who once lived on less than US$1 a day have risen out of poverty,including 240 million people out of extreme poverty.China’s massive poverty reduction campaign has contributed enormously to realizing the global poverty reduction objectives and the UN Millennium Development Goals.Massive poverty reduction is primarily driven by economic growth,especially by sustained agricultural and rural economic growth.The single largest challenge facing China’s future poverty reduction is the decreasing effect of economic growth on poverty reduction due to widening inequality.In addition,targeting inaccuracy of government poverty reduction investments has reduced its effectiveness.China needs to adjust its economic growth pattern and realize economic growth in a way more favorable to the poor.Meanwhile, China needs to change the method of implementing its poverty reduction project so as to benefit more poor people.

  12. Gender, poverty and social justice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Chhachhi (Amrita); T-D. Truong (Thanh-Dam)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractViews on poverty are deeply rooted in cultural frameworks about the human condition shaped by histories. In the debate on modernity, perspectives on poverty oscillate between: a) making the poor -- their "morals" and "culture" -- responsible for their own situation and b) positioning the

  13. Gender, poverty and social justice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Chhachhi (Amrita); T-D. Truong (Thanh-Dam)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractViews on poverty are deeply rooted in cultural frameworks about the human condition shaped by histories. In the debate on modernity, perspectives on poverty oscillate between: a) making the poor -- their "morals" and "culture" -- responsible for their own situation and b) positioning the

  14. Nebraska's Families: Poverty Despite Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazere, Edward B.; Ostrom, Kristin Anderson

    The high poverty rate (13.8 percent) among Nebraska's children is cause for concern, since there is strong evidence that poverty can hinder development and adversely affect children's ability to become productive adults. It is commonly assumed that poor children live in families where parents could work but do not. Yet in Nebraska, of poor…

  15. Exposure to Poverty and Productivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dalton, Patricio; Gonzalez Jimenez, Victor; Noussair, Charles

    2016-01-01

    We study whether poverty can induce affective states that decrease productivity. In a controlled laboratory setting, we find that subjects randomly assigned to a treatment, in which they view a video featuring individuals that live in extreme poverty, exhibit lower subsequent productivity compared t

  16. Capability poverty by deficits in net dietary intake at early age – neglected by the Rangarajan poverty line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Per A Eklund

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The Rangarajan Expert Group set up to improve the methodology for measuring poverty fails to: (i shift from uncertain assessments of calorie - consumption poverty to use of ‘direct’ determinants of deficits in net dietary intake, indicating risk of capability poverty; [1,2] (ii include vegetables and fruit as an additional food category; and (iii consider inequity in child nutritional outcomes.  The 2014 poverty line includes raised expenditure on calories, meat, protein and fats and four non-food categories. The report avoids the issue of disparities in social protection that drive capability poverty. It concludes that its normative food basket does offer “a basis for optimism on associated nutrition-status outcomes”. Rationale: Inferior nutrition status, compounded in the lowest wealth groups, argues for use of ‘direct’ indicators of net deficits in nutritional intake in poverty assessments, such as the growth curve of children and measurements of anaemia. [3,4] Objective: Where, and how, do diseases and poor nutrients, contribute to rising deficits in net dietary intake? In 20 of 106 districts, in six states, from the 2002-04 LDHS-2 to the 2011 Hungama survey, child underweight (<-2SD, 5y increased by more than 5 percentage points. [5] Why? Methods and results: Literature confirms socio-economic rationale of addressing capability poverty indicated by child chronic undernutrition. [6,7,8] Iron-poor vegetarian diets, limited coverage of iron supplementation to young children and of food fortification in low-income settings, argue for raised intake of fruit and vegetables. [9] Conclusion: Capability poverty, driven by nutritional deficits at early age, perpetuates socio-economic disparities. Will location-specific determinants be addressed of rising deficits in net dietary intake at early age? Will iron - rich vegetables and fruits become an additional food group in a revised poverty line? 

  17. [Poverty, youth and consumption of tobacco in Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy-Jacobs, Carl; Téllez-Rojo, Martha Ma; Meneses-González, Fernando; Campuzano-Rincón, Julio; Hernández-Avila, Mauricio

    2006-01-01

    To characterize tobacco use according to level of poverty in a random, nationally representative sample of adolescents (10 to 21 years old), living in urban areas with less than 50,000 inhabitants. The study was done in 2001 as part of the baseline assessment of the evaluation of the governmental program, Oportunidades. A questionnaire was applied to 29,548 adolescents living in 30 000 selected households and it included specific questions on individual tobacco use among other questions. The prevalence of smokers was 3.5% (95% CI: 3.3%-3.7%) and experimenters 9.9% (95% CI: 9.6%-10.2%). A logistic regression model for clustered data was constructed in order to evaluate the associated factors that distinguish a smoker from an experimenter. After adjusting for level of poverty of the household and use of alcohol and drugs, a significant association (OR = 1.5, p Oportunidades should include prevention campaigns directed specifically at this population group.

  18. Understanding poverty through the eyes of the poor: The case of Usangu Plains in Tanzania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadigi, Reuben M. J.; Mdoe, N. S. Y.; Ashimogo, G. C.

    Descriptions and perceptions of poverty and its myriad dimensions are as many and varied as the ways in which poverty affects the daily lives of the poor. Poverty is not simply an issue of income. When the poor themselves are asked what poverty means, they highlight a range of aspects. Rather than income-related issues they highlight concerns related to intangible assets, such as a sense of voice vis-à-vis other members of their community as well as their state of health, literacy and access to assets. This paper presents results of analysis that emanate from a participatory poverty assessment (PPA), which was conducted in Usangu Plains between 2002 and 2005. The assessment involved the use of a number of poverty measures including among others, the wealth ranking and livelihood analysis using both qualitative and quantitative approaches. The results of analysis showed an array of poverty indicators differing from one locality to another. However, the access to land with moderate slopes and water for irrigation ranked as the most important indicator. In addition, rice production was perceived as one of the key factors that lift a household from a lower to a higher level of well-being. A person who harvests adequate rice was perceived as having almost everything such as money, food, can build a good house, and has social status in the community. The poor households harvest little rice because they cultivate little land using mostly their own family labour and they have therefore, problems in securing their daily meal. Other indicators included the possession of livestock, education level, membership of local societies and associations as well as the ability to pay for health services. The quantitative analysis for the subset of the ‘poor’ households showed lower direct dependency on water related activities compared to other households. This illustrates the impact of reduced access of poorer households to natural resources (water and land resources in

  19. Exposure to Poverty and Productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    We study whether exposure to poverty can induce affective states that decrease productivity. In a controlled laboratory setting, we find that subjects randomly assigned to a treatment, in which they view a video featuring individuals that live in extreme poverty, exhibit lower subsequent productivity compared to subjects assigned to a control treatment. Questionnaire responses, as well as facial recognition software, provide quantitative measures of the affective state evoked by the two treatments. Subjects exposed to images of poverty experience a more negative affective state than those in the control treatment. Further analysis shows that individuals in a more positive emotional state exhibit less of a treatment effect. Also, those who exhibit greater attentiveness upon viewing the poverty video are less productive. The results are consistent with the notion that exposure to poverty can induce a psychological state in individuals that adversely affects productivity. PMID:28125621

  20. Exposure to Poverty and Productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, Patricio S; Gonzalez Jimenez, Victor H; Noussair, Charles N

    2017-01-01

    We study whether exposure to poverty can induce affective states that decrease productivity. In a controlled laboratory setting, we find that subjects randomly assigned to a treatment, in which they view a video featuring individuals that live in extreme poverty, exhibit lower subsequent productivity compared to subjects assigned to a control treatment. Questionnaire responses, as well as facial recognition software, provide quantitative measures of the affective state evoked by the two treatments. Subjects exposed to images of poverty experience a more negative affective state than those in the control treatment. Further analysis shows that individuals in a more positive emotional state exhibit less of a treatment effect. Also, those who exhibit greater attentiveness upon viewing the poverty video are less productive. The results are consistent with the notion that exposure to poverty can induce a psychological state in individuals that adversely affects productivity.

  1. Poverty and adolescent depressive symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Amy C

    2014-01-01

    Longitudinal data on non-Hispanic White children from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics (N = 1,056) were used to examine whether the relationship between poverty (early childhood poverty, poverty persistence, and current poverty) and adolescent depressive symptoms (measured by the Children's Depression Inventory and the Internalizing Index) can be explained by the mother's own childhood depression and family characteristics measured during the child's first year of life. Associations between poverty and depressive symptoms among adolescents were explained by mother's childhood depression and whether the adolescent had lived with both parents during the first year of life. The findings highlight the need for appropriate treatment of childhood depression so as to reduce the adverse consequences in adulthood and for the next generation.

  2. [Population trends and poverty].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmedo, C

    1998-04-01

    Implications of population growth in Ecuador for the quality of life of the poor population are analyzed. It is argued that if the gross national product (GNP) were to grow at a sustained annual rate of 5% or more, demographic trends would not present a significant obstacle to reducing poverty. National economic projections are for growth of only 2.5-3.5% annually. The continuing rapid growth of the poor population despite general slowing of demographic growth, the young age structure, the need for increased formal education to enable the poor to overcome their poverty, and the effect of unemployment on the dependency ratio will tend to hamper improvements in average productivity and per capita GNP. The need for spending on education, health, basic services, and housing will divert funds away from productive investment, generating a direct negative impact on economic growth. Over half of Ecuadorian children suffer from some degree of malnutrition, indicating that food production is inadequate to meet demand. The export-oriented agricultural policy and poor weather have led to a chronic shortage of basic foods. Progressive increase and diversification of agricultural production, along with maintenance of low prices and substantial increases in income levels and agricultural productivity, will be required if the entire population is to be fed adequately. Intense efforts will be needed from all sectors to bring demographic growth into balance with economic and development needs.

  3. Employment, race and poverty in West Virginia: implications for practicing physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frumkin, R M

    1994-02-01

    Since West Virginia became a state in 1863 and slavery was abolished, poverty has been a persistent problem for black Americans. Although blacks have become increasingly a part of the total workforce, moving from the lowest level, lowest paid jobs to higher level, better paying ones, unemployment, poverty, and their common sequelae still persist and significantly differentiate black from white Americans. While racial discrimination has been a factor in black poverty for many decades, another critical factor responsible for black poverty today and in the past, is something which both blacks and physicians can help to change--unplanned parenthood.

  4. Poverty risk among older immigrants in a Scandinavian welfare state

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Vibeke; Pedersen, Peder J.

    2016-01-01

    Focus in the paper is on poverty among immigrants and refugees 50 years and older coming to Denmark from countries outside the OECD, with main emphasis on immigrants coming as guest workers before 1974, as refugees and as family members and marriage partners – tied movers – relative to individuals...... where you become eligible for State pension. Poverty rates by national background are described using alternative household concepts. Next, a number of background factors of relevance for poverty are summarized. We focus on age, gender, marital status, occupational status at age 55 and duration...... of residence. We find major differences between migrant groups and between migrants and natives regarding how income is composed at different ages on market income, pensions and benefits. Next, we present a number of regressions aiming at explaining differences in the poverty risk with differences in a number...

  5. Child health, poverty and the environment: the Canadian context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhuri, N

    1998-01-01

    In Canada, there has been little research exploring the link between child poverty and exposure to environmental contaminants. However, children living in poverty are more likely to grow up in neighbourhoods adjacent to polluting industries and heavily used transportation corridors. They are also more likely to live in improperly designed or maintained buildings where levels of contaminants and toxic residuals may be high, and indoor air quality poor. Risk factors such as exposure to cigarette smoke and poor nutritional status, together with the above living conditions during growth and development, create conditions that make children living in poverty more vulnerable to the effects of environmental contaminants. In Toronto, the South Riverdale Community Health Centre is developing grassroots techniques to build awareness and protect citizens. Given the growing levels of child poverty in Canada and decreasing environmental protection, the author suggests increased community action and health research for use in advocating for appropriate policy changes.

  6. Rural poverty and development in West Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peacock, F

    1981-07-01

    schemes, but by 1970 these schemes had only absorbed about 100,000 people. The failure to reduce poverty during the 1955-1970 period resulted from the use of strategies that tried to resolve the poverty problem by using more modern methods of agriculture to increase the output of rice and rubber while leaving traditional patterns of peasant agriculture undisturbed. There was a failure to recognize that poverty was the result of these traditional patterns, with its tiny landholdings, high rents, and low-value crops. The strategies, which perpetuated peasant smallholding, worked to reinforce and bind the farmer into a structure that he needed to get away from if he were to escape poverty. Radical initiatives are needed. These would include a faster alienation of land, a shift away from the smallholder cultivation of rice and rubber, and a plan to facilitate a large number of the rural poor moving out of peasant farming.

  7. Beliefs about the Causes of Poverty in Parents and Adolescents Experiencing Economic Disadvantage in Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shek, Daniel T. L.

    2004-01-01

    Over 2 consecutive years, parents and their adolescent children from 199 poor families in Hong Kong responded to the Chinese Perceived Causes of Poverty Scale, which assesses beliefs about the causes of poverty. The author abstracted 4 factors from the scale. Analyses showed that these factors (personal problems, exploitation, lack of opportunity,…

  8. The international child poverty gap: does demography matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuveline, Patrick; Weinshenker, Matthew

    2008-02-01

    According to the Luxembourg Income Study data, the U.S. child poverty rate is the second highest among 15 high-income nations. The present work reveals that 55% of all American children living in a household headed by a single female with no other adult present live in poverty-the highest rate for any of the five living arrangements in the 15 countries examined in this study. While previous analyses have focused on market forces and governmental redistribution across households, we question the contribution of demographic factors that place children in family structures with different poverty risks relative to other factors such as differential market opportunities and governmental benefits for adults caring for children in various living arrangements. Applying a classic demographic decomposition technique to the overall poverty gap, we find that the distributional effect of demographic behavior contributes little to the U.S. poverty gap with other nations (and none with respect to the United Kingdom). Overall differences in labor markets and welfare schemes best explain the U.S. child poverty gap, although for some countries, the gap is accentuated by the gradient of governmental transfers, and for most countries, by the gradient of market earnings across living arrangements.

  9. Information and Communication Technology and Poverty:An Asian Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Quibria, mg; Tschang, Ted

    2001-01-01

    Many commentators have extolled the virtues of new information and communicationtechnologies (ICTs) in reducing poverty and improving the quality of life. While such arguments havebeen used before in relation to many predecessor technologies, including other earliercommunications technologies, the promise has often floundered.This paper attempts to provide a more balanced analysis of the question, by exploring thelinkages between the new ICTs and poverty reduction. It examines the linkages in...

  10. A New Model for Student Support in High-Poverty Urban Elementary Schools: Effects on Elementary and Middle School Academic Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Mary E.; Madaus, George F.; Raczek, Anastasia E.; Dearing, Eric; Foley, Claire; An, Chen; Lee-St. John, Terrence J.; Beaton, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Efforts to support children in schools require addressing not only academic issues, but also out-of-school factors that can affect students' ability to succeed. This study examined academic achievement of students participating in City Connects, a student support intervention operating in high-poverty elementary schools. The sample included 7,948…

  11. Childhood poverty, early motherhood and adult social exclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobcraft, J; Kiernan, K

    2001-09-01

    Childhood poverty and early parenthood are both high on the current political agenda. The key new issue that this research addresses is the relative importance of childhood poverty and of early motherhood as correlates of outcomes later in life. How far are the 'effects' of early motherhood on later outcomes due to childhood precursors, especially experience of childhood poverty? Subsidiary questions relate to the magnitude of these associations, the particular levels of childhood poverty that prove most critical, and whether, as often assumed, only teenage mothers are subsequently disadvantaged, or are those who have their first birth in their early twenties similarly disadvantaged? The source of data for this study is the National Child Development Study. We examine outcomes at age 33 for several domains of adult social exclusion: welfare, socio-economic, physical health, emotional well-being and demographic behaviour. We control for a wide range of childhood factors: poverty; social class of origin and of father; mother's and father's school leaving age; family structure; housing tenure; mother's and father's interest in education; personality attributes; performance on educational tests; and contact with the police by age 16. There are clear associations for the adult outcomes with age at first birth, even after controlling for childhood poverty and the other childhood background factors. Moreover, we demonstrate that the widest gulf in adult outcomes occurs for those who enter motherhood early (before age 23), though further reinforced by teenage motherhood for most adult outcomes. We also show that any experience of childhood poverty is clearly associated with adverse outcomes in adulthood, with reinforcement for higher levels of childhood poverty for a few outcomes.

  12. A new prognostic model for cancer-specific survival after radical cystectomy including pretreatment thrombocytosis and standard pathological risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todenhöfer, Tilman; Renninger, Markus; Schwentner, Christian; Stenzl, Arnulf; Gakis, Georgios

    2012-12-01

    Study Type - Prognosis (cohort series) Level of Evidence 2a What's known on the subject? and What does the study add? Preoperative thrombocytosis has been identified as a predictor of poor outcome in various cancer types. However, the prognostic role of platelet count in patients with invasive bladder cancer undergoing radical cystectomy is unknown. The present study demonstrates that preoperative thrombocytosis is an independent risk factor for decreased cancer-specific survival after radical treatment of invasive bladder cancer. We developed a new prognostic scoring model for cancer-specific outcomes after radical cystectomy including platelet count and established pathological risk factors. Consideration of platelet count in the final model increased its predictive accuracy significantly. Thrombocytosis may be a useful parameter to include within established international bladder cancer nomograms. •  To investigate the oncological significance of preoperative thrombocytosis in patients with invasive bladder cancer undergoing radical cystectomy, as it has been reported as a marker for aggressive tumour biology in a variety of solid tumours. •  The series comprised 258 patients undergoing radical cystectomy between 1999 and 2010 in whom different clinical and histopathological parameters were assessed. •  Elevated platelet count was defined as >450 × 10(9) /L. •  Based on regression estimates of significant parameters in multivariable analysis a new weighted scoring model was developed to predict cancer-specific outcomes. •  The median follow-up was 30 months (6-116). •  Of the 258 patients, 26 (10.1%) had elevated and 232 (89.9%) had normal platelet count. The 3-year cancer-specific survival in patients with normal and elevated platelet count was 61.5% and 32.7%, respectively (P thrombocytosis (2.68, 1.26-5.14; P= 0.011). •  The 3-year cancer-specific survival in patients with a score 0 (low risk), 1-2 (intermediate risk) and 3

  13. Integrated human rights and poverty eradication strategy: the case of civil registration rights in Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musarandega, Reuben

    2009-01-01

    High poverty levels characterise sub-Saharan Africa, Zimbabwe included. Over 80 per cent of Zimbabwe's population lived below the total consumption poverty line and 70 per cent below the food poverty line in 2003. This plummeting of social indicators resulted from the freefall suffered by the country's economy from the 1990s, after unsuccessful attempts to implement structural adjustment programmes prescribed by international financial institutions. The ensuing socioeconomic decay, political crisis and international isolation of the country from the late 1990s reversed gains made in social indicators during the 1980s. Development theories attribute poverty to unchecked population growth, political, economic and environmental mismanagement, while developing countries' leaders attribute it to historical imbalances and global political and economic injustices. Despite this debate, poverty continues to evolve, expand and deepen and the need to eradicate it has become urgent. The complex question of what causes and what drives poverty is perpetually addressed and new ideas are emerging to answer the question. One recent view is that failure to centre development on people and to declare poverty a violation of human rights has allowed poverty to grow the world over. This study uses a hypothesised cause of poverty - civil registration - to exemplify the human right nature of poverty, and how a human rights' policy can be used as an instrument to eradicate poverty. The study demonstrates that civil registration is a right of instrumental relevance to poverty; and achieving civil registration grants people access to numerous other rights, some of which will lift them out of poverty, while the failure of civil registration deprives people of access to livelihoods, thereby entrenching them in poverty.

  14. Are fuel poverty reduction schemes associated with decreased excess winter mortality in elders? A case study from London, U.K.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Ansari, Walid; El-Silimy, Sally

    2008-12-01

    The London Borough of Newham, London piloted the Warm Zone, a government-led fuel poverty reduction scheme. Fuel poverty is often cited as a factor in excess winter mortality (EWM) in the U.K. This study reported in this paper assessed whether EWM decreased for people aged > or =65 years in Newham as compared to all London, employing data from before and throughout the duration of the Warm Zone project. The paper also discusses the difficulties surrounding the measurement and interpretation of health impact relating to fuel poverty. We calculated and compared the yearly EWM indices for people aged > or =65 years for all of London, and for Newham over 12 years (1993-2005). The yearly EWM ratio for Newham in relation to all London was then calculated and compared. No definitive evidence to support the effect of the War Zone on EMW were noted. Relationships between EWM and fewer poverty reduction schemes are difficult to interpret, as many factors are entangled. These include cold strain and biological, genetic, gender, physiological, thermoregulation, environmental, meteorological, socio-economic, healthcare provision/expenditure, lifestyle and co-morbidity aspects, besides the challenges of sample sizes and whether other fuel poverty reduction schemes were simultaneously in operation. Those in privately owned housing might be ;masked' (underestimated) in their vulnerability to fuel poverty. Redefining the specific criteria for eligibility for fuel poverty grants and tackling heat inefficiency in privately owned homes not eligible for home heating improvement despite fulfilling other criteria for vulnerability requires attention. The implications are discussed.

  15. Poverty eradication: a new paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pethe, V P

    1998-08-01

    This article offers a new paradigm for eradicating poverty in India. It was assumed incorrectly by Mahatma Gandhi that a good society without mass poverty would follow after independence. India copied Western models of development and developed giant factories, big dams, and megacities. Agriculture did not expand the number of jobs for people. The Western paradigm failed in India because of the false assumption of "trickle down" of income to the masses. The targeted programs to the poor did not directly benefit enough of the poor. Mega-industrialization led to reduced employment and higher skill needs. The model failed mainly because it was a proxy and relied on indirect ways of reaching the poor. The models failed to be adapted to conditions in India. The Swadeshi paradigm is a direct model for addressing mass poverty. Poverty is affected by immediate, intermediate, and ultimate determinants. Poverty begets social and economic problems, such as ignorance, ill health, high fertility, unemployment, and crime. In India and developing countries, mass poverty results from under use of human resources; lack of equal opportunities; and an outdated non-egalitarian social structure, an unjust global economic order, human cruelty, and erosion of ethical values. Indians are squandering their precious resources mimicking Western consumerism. Poverty leads to rapid population growth. People become productive assets with universal literacy, compulsory and free education, health services and sanitation, vocational training, and work ethics. India needs people-oriented policies with less emphasis on capital accumulation.

  16. Energy poverty in rural Bangladesh

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, Douglas F. [Senior Energy Consultant, World Bank, 1818 H Street, NW, Washington, DC 20433 (United States); Khandker, Shahidur R. [Lead Economist, Development Research Group, World Bank, 1818 H Street, NW, Washington, DC 20433 (United States); Samad, Hussain A. [Consultant, World Bank, 1818 H Street, NW, Washington, DC 20433 (United States)

    2011-02-15

    Energy poverty is a well-established concept among energy and development specialists. International development organizations frequently cite energy-poverty alleviation as a necessary condition to reduce income poverty. Several approaches used to measure energy poverty over the past 20 years have defined the energy poverty line as the minimum quantity of physical energy needed to perform such basic tasks as cooking and lighting. This paper uses a demand-based approach to define the energy poverty line as the threshold point at which energy consumption begins to rise with increases in household income. At or below this threshold point, households consume a bare minimum level of energy and should be considered energy poor. This approach was applied using cross-sectional data from a comprehensive 2004 household survey representative of rural Bangladesh. The findings suggest that some 58 percent of rural households in Bangladesh are energy poor, versus 45 percent that are income poor. The findings also suggest that policies to support rural electrification and greater use of improved biomass stoves might play a significant role in reducing energy poverty. (author)

  17. Work history and U.S. elders' transitions into poverty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, D K; Jensen, L

    2000-08-01

    Poverty risks among elders are shaped in critical ways by their work history, demographic characteristics, current marital status, and residential context. Using 25 years of data from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics, we combined past occupation and work history of elders and their spouses with information on current marital status and residence to estimate discrete time event history models of first transitions into poverty after reaching age 55. Education, work history, and preretirement wages contributed to men's and some women's probability of becoming poor. Work history remained an important predictor of transitions into poverty, even after controlling for preretirement wages and human capital. Metropolitan residence was associated with a lower probability of making transitions into poverty. This residential difference was not appreciably attenuated in three of four elderly subgroups after measures of work history, preretirement wages, current life events, and demographic characteristics of the elders were included in the models.

  18. Study on Rural Poverty Reduction Effect of Traffic Infrastructure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Junping; GUO; Bin; ZHANG; Xiyan; ZHANG

    2014-01-01

    To systematically comb and explore the rural poverty reduction effect of traffic infrastructure,the author analyzed the mechanism,main channels and actual effect of rural traffic infrastructure on poverty reduction.It revealed that rural traffic infrastructure exerts positive or negative effect on poverty reduction directly or indirectly.The positive channel includes increasing non-agricultural employment opportunities,reducing costs for agricultural production,transportation and labor transfer,increasing availability of social service,and promoting adjustment of agricultural industrial structure and development of rural tourism resources.On the whole,traffic infrastructure has significant positive influence on rural poverty reduction.Finally,it summarized policy recommendations for building pro-poor traffic infrastructure,and came up with vacancy of related research field and future exploration direction.

  19. Popular perceptions of poverty in Dutch society

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Halman, L.C.J.M.; van Oorschot, W.J.H.

    1999-01-01

    Studies on poverty are mainly engaged with the definition and measurement of poverty, while the issue of what people consider reasons for living in need is often neglected. In this article we explore four types of poverty explanations based on a) the distinction between poverty as a matter of fate

  20. 24 CFR 598.115 - Poverty rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Poverty rate. 598.115 Section 598... Requirements § 598.115 Poverty rate. (a) General. In order to be eligible for designation, an area's poverty... poverty rate must be not less than 20 percent; and (2) For at least 90 percent of the census tracts...

  1. 7 CFR 25.104 - Poverty rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Poverty rate. 25.104 Section 25.104 Agriculture Office... § 25.104 Poverty rate. (a) General. Eligibility of an area on the basis of poverty shall be established in accordance with the following poverty rate criteria specific to Round I, Round II, Round IIS...

  2. Growth, poverty and chronic poverty in rural Ethiopia: Evidence from 15 Communities 1994-2004

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dercon, S.; Hoddinott, J.; Woldehanna, T.

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines growth, poverty and chronic poverty in 15 Ethiopian villages between 1994 and 2004. Growth and poverty reduction in these communities was substantial; headcount poverty fell from 48 to 35 percent. However, there is also movement in and out of poverty over this period and a

  3. Growth, poverty and chronic poverty in rural Ethiopia: Evidence from 15 Communities 1994-2004

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dercon, S.; Hoddinott, J.; Woldehanna, T.

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines growth, poverty and chronic poverty in 15 Ethiopian villages between 1994 and 2004. Growth and poverty reduction in these communities was substantial; headcount poverty fell from 48 to 35 percent. However, there is also movement in and out of poverty over this period and a signif

  4. Vaccines against poverty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLennan, Calman A; Saul, Allan

    2014-08-26

    With the 2010s declared the Decade of Vaccines, and Millennium Development Goals 4 and 5 focused on reducing diseases that are potentially vaccine preventable, now is an exciting time for vaccines against poverty, that is, vaccines against diseases that disproportionately affect low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). The Global Burden of Disease Study 2010 has helped better understand which vaccines are most needed. In 2012, US$1.3 billion was spent on research and development for new vaccines for neglected infectious diseases. However, the majority of this went to three diseases: HIV/AIDS, malaria, and tuberculosis, and not neglected diseases. Much of it went to basic research rather than development, with an ongoing decline in funding for product development partnerships. Further investment in vaccines against diarrheal diseases, hepatitis C, and group A Streptococcus could lead to a major health impact in LMICs, along with vaccines to prevent sepsis, particularly among mothers and neonates. The Advanced Market Commitment strategy of the Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunisation (GAVI) Alliance is helping to implement vaccines against rotavirus and pneumococcus in LMICs, and the roll out of the MenAfriVac meningococcal A vaccine in the African Meningitis Belt represents a paradigm shift in vaccines against poverty: the development of a vaccine primarily targeted at LMICs. Global health vaccine institutes and increasing capacity of vaccine manufacturers in emerging economies are helping drive forward new vaccines for LMICs. Above all, partnership is needed between those developing and manufacturing LMIC vaccines and the scientists, health care professionals, and policy makers in LMICs where such vaccines will be implemented.

  5. Assessing poverty: some reflections on the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafsson, B

    1995-11-01

    "This paper examines the quantitative poverty measurement literature. After describing the literature a number of issues in poverty research are discussed. It can be concluded that the framework for poverty assessments is not always fixed. Much has been written about the poverty line but the issue of updating it seems to have attracted less attention than deserved. Substantial advancements in poverty research have been gained by fuller reports on the extent of poverty through the use of poverty indices and because of increased availability of panel data."

  6. Brazil: from reduction of poverty to a commitment to eradicate extreme poverty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lena Lavinas

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to summarise certain positive results achieved by the Lula government in the sphere of social policy and to highlight the new challenges taken on by President Dilma Rousseff in terms of eradicating extreme poverty, after her first year in government. After Lula’s success with social policy, Rousseff has committed herself to eradicating extreme poverty over the short term (the four years of her mandate in a federation that is marked by weak links in cooperation, a distinct heterogeneity within the federated bodies and profound socio-economic inequality among citizens. Under Lula’s government, the factors that most helped to reduce poverty and inequality were the recovery of the minimum salary’s real value in rates higher than that of inflation, as well as an increase in formal employment, with the creation of approximately 12,000,000 jobs in eight years. For Dilma’s term of office, which began with a downturn in economic growth rates, an even bigger challenge lies ahead. In light of this, the article evaluates the prospects for success of Dilma’s government in terms of eradicating extreme poverty in Brazil.

  7. Mental health and poverty in developing countries: revisiting the relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Jishnu; Do, Quy-Toan; Friedman, Jed; McKenzie, David; Scott, Kinnon

    2007-08-01

    The relationship between poverty and mental health has received considerable attention in the recent literature. However, the associations presented in existing studies typically rely on limited samples of individuals and on proxy indicators for poverty such as education, the lack of tap water, or being unemployed. We revisit the relationship between poverty and mental health using data from nationally representative household surveys in Bosnia and Herzegovina, Indonesia and Mexico, along with special surveys from India and Tonga. As in previous studies, we find that individuals who are older, female, widowed, and in poor health are more likely to report worse mental health outcomes. Individuals living with others with poor mental health are significantly more likely to report worse mental health themselves. The size of the coefficients and their significance are comparable across the five countries. In contrast to previous studies, the relationship between higher education and better mental health is weak or non-existent. Furthermore, there is no consistent association between consumption poverty and mental health - in two countries mental health measures are marginally worse for the poor; in two countries there is no association; and in one country mental health measures are better for the poor compared to the non-poor. Moreover, the sizes of the coefficients for both education and consumption poverty are small compared to other factors considered here. While the lack of an association between consumption poverty and mental health implies that poor mental health is not a "disease of affluence", neither is it a disease of poverty. Changes in life circumstances brought on, for instance, by illness may have a greater impact on mental health than levels of poverty. Effective public health policy for mental health should focus on protecting individuals and households from adverse events and on targeted interventions following such adverse changes.

  8. Social externalities, overlap and the poverty trap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Chul; Loury, Glenn C

    2014-12-01

    Previous studies find that some social groups are stuck in poverty traps because of network effects. However, these studies do not carefully analyze how these groups overcome low human capital investment activities. Unlike previous studies, the model in this paper includes network externalities in both the human capital investment stage and the subsequent career stages. This implies that not only the current network quality, but also the expectations about future network quality affect the current investment decision. Consequently, the coordinated expectation among the group members can play a crucial role in the determination of the final state. We define "overlap" for some initial skill ranges, whereby the economic performance of a group can be improved simply by increasing expectations of a brighter future. We also define "poverty trap" for some ranges, wherein a disadvantaged group is constrained by its history, and we explore the egalitarian policies to mobilize the group out of the trap.

  9. A patient with refractory shock induced by several factors, including obstruction because of a posterior mediastinal hematoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obinata, Mariko; Ishikawa, Kouhei; Osaka, Hiromichi; Mishima, Kentaro; Omori, Kazuhiko; Oode, Yasumasa; Yanagawa, Youichi

    2015-06-01

    A 44-year-old man who drove a motorcycle experienced a collision with the side of another motorcycle. Because he had sustained a high-energy injury to the spinal cord, he was transferred to our hospital. His circulation was unstable, and received tracheal intubation in addition to thoracostomy for the hemothorax. Whole-body computed tomography (CT) revealed multiple fractures, right hemopneumothorax with pulmonary contusion, and minor liver injury. After infusing 5000 mL of lactated Ringer's solution and 10 units of blood, his circulation remained unstable. On a repeat CT examination, the left atrium was found to be compressed by a posterior mediastinal hematoma induced by the fracture of the thoracic spine, and a diagnosis of shock induced by multiple factors, including hemorrhagic, neurogenic, and obstructive mechanisms, was made. After obtaining stable circulation and respirations, internal fixation of the extremities and extubation were performed on the 12th hospital day. Chest CT performed on the 27th day showed the disappearance of compression of the left atrium by the hematoma.

  10. Pelembagaan Participatory Poverty Assessment Sebagai Strategi Pengentasan Kemiskinan di Samigaluh Kabupaten Kulonprogo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Awang Darumurti

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available This article try to analysis strategy for reducing poverty in Samigaluh Municapy, Kulonprogo Region by using Participatory Poverty Assessment (PPA strategy. PPA known as strategy to reduce poverty by including poor people to find solution of their poverty problem. In Other word, this strategy use bottom up method to reduce poverty. In Samigaluh, Poverty condition clearly seen as so many people live in near poor condition. This research use qualitative approach and data collect technic use interview and observation. From the research is gotten data that poor condition in Samigaluh caused by economic aspect, uncapability, isolation condition. PPA strategy, which is including poor people in solution making, give result that we must do some activities. The Activities are women empowernment, Informal institution empowernment, Increase Education, Training, and so on.

  11. DIMENSIONS OF POVERTY AND SOCIAL EXCLUSION IN ROMANIA. PRESENT AND PERSPECTIVES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ion GHIZDEANU

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In essence, the main cause of poverty and the impossibility to reach a certain life standard derive from lack of income. Discussing the poverty phenomenon implies the delimitation of the population from the point of view of territoriality and from the point of view of an acceptable life standard, generally compared to the average indicators specific to a certain community. In this paper, poverty is analysed both methodologically and conceptually. Therefore, the paper presents aspects regarding poverty and social exclusion, the main dimensions of poverty in Romania. It is generally known that main factor of reducing poverty and social exclusion is the real convergence, and thus the final part of the paper is oriented towards the main aspects of its evolution.

  12. DIMENSIONS OF POVERTY AND SOCIAL EXCLUSION IN ROMANIA. PRESENT AND PERSPECTIVES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ion GHIZDEANU

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In essence, the main cause of poverty and the impossibility to reach a certain life standard derive from lack of income. Discussing the poverty phenomenon implies the delimitation of the population from the point of view of territoriality and from the point of view of an acceptable life standard, generally compared to the average indicators specific to a certain community. In this paper, poverty is analysed both methodologically and conceptually. Therefore, the paper presents aspects regarding poverty and social exclusion, the main dimensions of poverty in Romania. It is generally known that main factor of reducing poverty and social exclusion is the real convergence, and thus the final part of the paper is oriented towards the main aspects of its evolution.

  13. Peru : Opportunities for All, Peru Poverty Assessment

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2005-01-01

    Peru faces high levels of poverty and inequality. In 2004, over half of Peru's population was poor and about 20 percent were extremely poor. Following improvements during the 1990s, poverty increased in the wake of the 1998 economic crisis, while extreme poverty remained stable. Notwithstanding the economic recovery since 2001, with a strong positive impact in reducing extreme poverty, progress on poverty rates however, has been limited to rural areas. A main focus of this report is to explai...

  14. Freedom and poverty in the fishery commons

    OpenAIRE

    Svein Jentoft; Paul Onyango; Mohammad Mahmudul Islam

    2010-01-01

    Abstract In fisheries, alleviating poverty sometimes requires strategies that are inherently in conflict. When aiming to develop a fishery as a means to reduce poverty, its common pool resource basis might be undermined, resulting in greater poverty. But poverty in fisheries is also linked to, or a part of deeper social issues and processes, for instance, the marginalization and exclusion of certain communities. Poverty also has many factors— income, health, literacy, gender, power, sec...

  15. Major parasitic diseases of poverty in mainland China: perspectives for better control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jin-Lei; Li, Ting-Ting; Huang, Si-Yang; Cong, Wei; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2016-08-01

    Significant progress has been made in the prevention, control, and elimination of human parasitic diseases in China in the past 60 years. However, parasitic diseases of poverty remain major causes of morbidity and mortality, and inflict enormous economic costs on societies.In this article, we review the prevalence rates, geographical distributions, epidemic characteristics, risk factors, and clinical manifestations of parasitic diseases of poverty listed in the first issue of the journal Infectious Diseases of Poverty on 25 October 2012. We also address the challenges facing control of parasitic diseases of poverty and provide suggestions for better control.

  16. Child Poverty and the Health Care System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racine, Andrew D

    2016-04-01

    The persistence of child poverty in the United States and the pervasive health consequences it engenders present unique challenges to the health care system. Human capital theory and empirical observation suggest that the increased disease burden experienced by poor children originates from social conditions that provide suboptimal educational, nutritional, environmental, and parental inputs to good health. Faced with the resultant excess rates of pediatric morbidity, the US health care system has developed a variety of compensatory strategies. In the first instance, Medicaid, the federal-state governmental finance system designed to assure health insurance coverage for poor children, has increased its eligibility thresholds and expanded its benefits to allow greater access to health services for this vulnerable population. A second arm of response involves a gradual reengineering of health care delivery at the practice level, including the dissemination of patient-centered medical homes, the use of team-based approaches to care, and the expansion of care management beyond the practice to reach deep into the community. Third is a series of recent experiments involving the federal government and state Medicaid programs that includes payment reforms of various kinds, enhanced reporting, concentration on high-risk populations, and intensive case management. Fourth, pediatric practices have begun to make use of specific tools that permit the identification and referral of children facing social stresses arising from poverty. Finally, constituencies within the health care system participate in enhanced advocacy efforts to raise awareness of poverty as a distinct threat to child health and to press for public policy responses such as minimum wage increases, expansion of tax credits, paid family leave, universal preschool education, and other priorities focused on child poverty.

  17. Effects of poverty on education

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ronald Buck; Joe Deutsch

    2014-01-01

    This article examines the effects of poverty on education. Many different aspects contribute to a community becoming impoverished such as deindustrialization, high unemployment rates, untreated mental health, and violent crimes...

  18. Determinant of Poverty in Ethiopia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    preferred customer

    Teshome Kebede and M. K. Sharma: Determinant of Poverty in Ethiopia. 114. 1. ... share of the population that is multidimensional poor, adjusted by the intensity ... nutrition, as well as clothing, housing and health care and education that can.

  19. Population growth, poverty and health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kibirige, J S

    1997-07-01

    One of the most popular explanations for the many problems that face Africa is population growth. Africa's population has doubled since 1960. Africa has the highest fertility rate in the world and the rate of population growth is higher than in any other region. At the same time, Africa faces a social and economic situation that is viewed by many as alarming. Among the problems that devastate Africa is that of persistent poor health. Africa has lower life expectancy, higher mortality rates and is affected by more disease and illness conditions than any other region. Focusing on sub-Saharan Africa, this paper examines the relationship between population growth, poverty and poor health. While most analyses have focused on population growth as an original cause of poverty and underdevelopment, this paper argues that while both population growth and poor health play a significant role in exacerbating the problem of poverty, they are themselves primary consequences of poverty rather than its cause.

  20. Defining poverty as distinctively human

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    p1243322

    of a claim that poverty is a concept uniquely applicable to humans. It then present a critical ..... mansions, flats – whatever materials, technologies, skills, or functional ideas .... Although many people have an intuitive understanding of what the ...

  1. Poverty determinants in Isla Grande

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    William Orlando Prieto Bustos

    2011-01-01

      This document contrasts the estimations of a nonlinear fixed effects model for determining poverty with a linear fixed event model for income generation for a sample of 136 persons using data panels for 2007 and 2009...

  2. Poverty, health and satellite-derived vegetation indices: their inter-spatial relationship in West Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedda, Luigi; Tatem, Andrew J; Morley, David W; Atkinson, Peter M; Wardrop, Nicola A; Pezzulo, Carla; Sorichetta, Alessandro; Kuleszo, Joanna; Rogers, David J

    2015-03-01

    Previous analyses have shown the individual correlations between poverty, health and satellite-derived vegetation indices such as the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI). However, generally these analyses did not explore the statistical interconnections between poverty, health outcomes and NDVI. In this research aspatial methods (principal component analysis) and spatial models (variography, factorial kriging and cokriging) were applied to investigate the correlations and spatial relationships between intensity of poverty, health (expressed as child mortality and undernutrition), and NDVI for a large area of West Africa. This research showed that the intensity of poverty (and hence child mortality and nutrition) varies inversely with NDVI. From the spatial point-of-view, similarities in the spatial variation of intensity of poverty and NDVI were found. These results highlight the utility of satellite-based metrics for poverty models including health and ecological components and, in general for large scale analysis, estimation and optimisation of multidimensional poverty metrics. However, it also stresses the need for further studies on the causes of the association between NDVI, health and poverty. Once these relationships are confirmed and better understood, the presence of this ecological component in poverty metrics has the potential to facilitate the analysis of the impacts of climate change on the rural populations afflicted by poverty and child mortality. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Implications of Alternative Measures of Poverty on Title I of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act. The Measure of Poverty, Technical Paper XVI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Abdul

    This paper provides a detailed analysis of the differential impact of alternative allocation procedures for Title I funds provided for under the Elementary and Secondary Education Act and including the impact on both selected states and all states of changing the poverty definition, the impact of updating the poverty count, the impact of changing…

  4. Personal factors that influence the development of resilience in children aged between 7 and 12 years to develop in extreme poverty

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    The following investigation was realized with the objective to characterize the personal factors that influence in the development of resilience in 200 children aged between 7 and 12 years in families linked to the program Red UNIDOS in the city of Ibague, for this was applied the inventory of resiliency factors proposed by Salgado (2005), which evaluate the level of self-esteem, empathy, autonomy, humor and creativity. The results show that the sample is in the middle of the factors evaluate...

  5. Personal factors that influence the development of resilience in children aged between 7 and 12 years to develop in extreme poverty

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez Betancourt, Hernán Yair; Universidad de San Buenaventura Medellín extensión Ibagué en convenio con la Fundación Universitaria San Martín; Guzmán Verbel, Laura; Universidad de San Buenaventura Medellín extensión Ibagué en convenio con la Fundación Universitaria San Martín; Yela Solano, Nataly Del Pilar; Universidad de San Buenaventura Medellín extensión Ibagué en convenio con la Fundación Universitaria San Martín

    2012-01-01

    The following investigation was realized with the objective to characterize the personal factors that influence in the development of resilience in 200 children aged between 7 and 12 years in families linked to the program Red UNIDOS in the city of Ibague, for this was applied the inventory of resiliency factors proposed by Salgado (2005), which evaluate the level of self-esteem, empathy, autonomy, humor and creativity. The results show that the sample is in the middle of the factors evaluate...

  6. The UK fuel poverty strategy: Fourth annual progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-06-02

    This is the fourth annual progress report on the UK Fuel Poverty Strategy. It presents positive news over figures and funding, growing evidence of increased engagement in tackling fuel poverty and a snapshot of the UK-wide situation. All of this appears alongside a realistic assessment of the impact of energy price rises and the outlook for the future, both in the medium and long-term. The report provides an update on the actions taken over the last twelve months. The report offers the first opportunity to look at the new phase of the Warm Front Scheme in England, and to explore what the additional funding will mean for the future. Progress and developments in the Schemes across the devolved nations are also considered. The fuel poverty figures for 2004 are presented. The number of vulnerable households in fuel poverty in England in 2004 remained at 1.0 million. This figure is down from four million in 1996.The overall number of households in fuel poverty in England also remained at a similar level of 1.2 million. The UK-wide figures remained broadly the same, with two million households in fuel poverty overall and one and a half million of those in the vulnerable category. The results of detailed modelling work to determine what the implications of recent energy price rises will be for the 2010 target in England are given. Finally, this report is accompanied by a series of internet-based annexes which provide more detail on the progress made in tackling fuel poverty by both Government and industry. These include more in-depth statistics on the demographic, geographic and socio-economic breakdowns of fuel poverty and a broader outline of the actions taken in this area by energy suppliers across the UK. (UK)

  7. Redesigning Health Care Practices to Address Childhood Poverty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fierman, Arthur H; Beck, Andrew F; Chung, Esther K; Tschudy, Megan M; Coker, Tumaini R; Mistry, Kamila B; Siegel, Benjamin; Chamberlain, Lisa J; Conroy, Kathleen; Federico, Steven G; Flanagan, Patricia J; Garg, Arvin; Gitterman, Benjamin A; Grace, Aimee M; Gross, Rachel S; Hole, Michael K; Klass, Perri; Kraft, Colleen; Kuo, Alice; Lewis, Gena; Lobach, Katherine S; Long, Dayna; Ma, Christine T; Messito, Mary; Navsaria, Dipesh; Northrip, Kimberley R; Osman, Cynthia; Sadof, Matthew D; Schickedanz, Adam B; Cox, Joanne

    2016-04-01

    Child poverty in the United States is widespread and has serious negative effects on the health and well-being of children throughout their life course. Child health providers are considering ways to redesign their practices in order to mitigate the negative effects of poverty on children and support the efforts of families to lift themselves out of poverty. To do so, practices need to adopt effective methods to identify poverty-related social determinants of health and provide effective interventions to address them. Identification of needs can be accomplished with a variety of established screening tools. Interventions may include resource directories, best maintained in collaboration with local/regional public health, community, and/or professional organizations; programs embedded in the practice (eg, Reach Out and Read, Healthy Steps for Young Children, Medical-Legal Partnership, Health Leads); and collaboration with home visiting programs. Changes to health care financing are needed to support the delivery of these enhanced services, and active advocacy by child health providers continues to be important in effecting change. We highlight the ongoing work of the Health Care Delivery Subcommittee of the Academic Pediatric Association Task Force on Child Poverty in defining the ways in which child health care practice can be adapted to improve the approach to addressing child poverty.

  8. Empirical Analysis of Factors Influencing Surplus Labor Transfer in Poverty-stricken Areas: A Case Study of Yimatu Town in Fuxin City

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    From the microscopic point of view,taking the surplus labor transfer in the Yimatu Town area as study object,we conduct survey of characteristics and transfer of rural surplus labor in Yimatu Town,through questionnaires and field interviews.Then we analyze the main factors influencing surplus labor transfer in rural areas from the personal characteristics of labor forces and family factor of labor forces.The results show that gender,age,educational level,farmland management days and other factors pertaining to the labor forces all affect the transfer of surplus labor, but the size and extent of the impact vary.In accordance with various influencing factors,we put forward recommendations for promoting the effective transfer of surplus labor in rural areas as follows:first,paying equal attention to macroscopic factors and microscopic factors influencing the transfer of surplus labor;second,focusing on the factors concerning the rural households and individual farmers,to find out the factors influencing the rational transfer;third,shifting the employment concept of surplus labor in rural areas;fourth,speeding up the construction of small towns and developing the secondary and tertiary industries.

  9. The Shapley value for a fuzzy poverty measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lamia ASNAOUI

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This article studies the relationship between poverty, inequality and growth. In classical political economic model, we introduce a residual term to maintain the identity of the model. It does not permit us to find the exact contribution of each factor. To derive the results of the decomposition, the Shapley value augmented by the fuzzy approach is used. In order to take its full advantage, it is of interest to calculate the marginal contribution of each factor in the variation of poverty. An application based on individual wellbeing data from Tunisian households is presented to illustrate use of the proposed concepts.

  10. Pedagogising Poverty Alleviation: A Discourse Analysis of Educational and Social Policies in Argentina and Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rambla, Xavier; Veger, Antoni

    2009-01-01

    For the past decades international organisations and governments have promoted and implemented analogous education policies on the grounds that education is the key factor to foster development and fight poverty. This article sets the context of these educational programmes and analyses their discourse on poverty in Argentina and Chile. Then, it…

  11. Economic contribution of participatory agroforestry program to poverty alleviation: a case from Sal forests, Bangladesh

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Islam, K.K.; Hoogstra, M.A.; Ullah, M.O.; Sato, N.

    2012-01-01

    In the Forest Department of Bangladesh, a Participatory Agroforestry Program (PAP) was initiated at a denuded Sal forests area to protect the forest resources and to alleviate poverty amongst the local poor population. We explored whether the PAP reduced poverty and what factors might be responsible

  12. Analyzing Poverty, Learning, and Teaching through a Critical Race Theory Lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milner, H. Richard, IV

    2013-01-01

    In this article, the author explores poverty as an outside-of-school factor and its influence on the inside-of-school experiences and outcome of students. He considers the interconnected space of learning, instructional practices, and poverty. In particular, he uses critical race theory as an analytic tool to unpack, shed light on, problematize,…

  13. Seeing Disadvantage in Schools: Exploring Student Teachers' Perceptions of Poverty and Disadvantage Using Visual Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, M. L.; Murray, Jean

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes exploratory research into the development of innovative visual pedagogies for investigating how pre-service student-teachers articulate their views about the effects of poverty on educational attainment. Social class emerges as the strongest factor in poverty and educational disadvantage in the UK. The resulting issues are…

  14. Seeing Disadvantage in Schools: Exploring Student Teachers' Perceptions of Poverty and Disadvantage Using Visual Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, M. L.; Murray, Jean

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes exploratory research into the development of innovative visual pedagogies for investigating how pre-service student-teachers articulate their views about the effects of poverty on educational attainment. Social class emerges as the strongest factor in poverty and educational disadvantage in the UK. The resulting issues are…

  15. Economic contribution of participatory agroforestry program to poverty alleviation: a case from Sal forests, Bangladesh

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Islam, K.K.; Hoogstra, M.A.; Ullah, M.O.; Sato, N.

    2012-01-01

    In the Forest Department of Bangladesh, a Participatory Agroforestry Program (PAP) was initiated at a denuded Sal forests area to protect the forest resources and to alleviate poverty amongst the local poor population. We explored whether the PAP reduced poverty and what factors might be responsible

  16. Does urban poverty increase body fluctuating asymmetry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozener, Bariş

    2011-12-01

    Perturbations during development leave enduring signs on the adult body. Fluctuating asymmetry (FA) is a good bio-indicator of stress during ontogeny. The aim of this study is to determine the effect of urban poverty on the fluctuating asymmetry of young Turkish males. Young males from a lower socioeconomic group (N = 140, Mean age = 18.17 +/- 0.61) were selected from slum areas of Ankara, the capital of Turkey, where urban poverty is intense. An upper socioeconomic group, on the other hand, consisted of students from two private colleges and included children from some of the richest families in Turkey (N = 120, Mean age = 18.08 +/- 0.54). Eight anthropometric traits of all subjects were measured. Considering the seven measurements demonstrate ideal FA, the individuals living in poor areas of the city displayed higher FA. The discrepancy between the two groups was even greater for a measure of composite FA. In conclusion, poor living conditions in Ankara, where urban poverty is intense, adversely impact the developmental stability of young Turkish males.

  17. An Explanatory Model of Poverty from the Perspective of Social Psychology and Human Rights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Muñoz, Alfonso; Chacón, Fernando; Martínez Arias, Rosario

    2015-12-09

    Poverty is a social problem, entailing not only an economical perspective but above all a human and social issue. Poverty is promoted, justified and maintained by unique individuals and groups by means of our own attitudes, interests and behavior, as well as with our social structures and social relationships. From this interactive, psychosocial and sociostructural perspective, and also considering poverty as a denial of basic human rights (UNDP, 1998), we carried out a study with the primary objective to design and verify an Explanatory Model of Poverty. This research may helps to increase the validity of diagnostics and the effectiveness of interventions. Most of the hypotheses were accepted during the analysis and verification of the Model (p definition of poverty including its effects, processes and causes; (b) the need for everybody to accept the social responsibility in the prevention and solution to poverty; and (c) the need to conduct longitudinal interventions with scientific methodology and social participation.

  18. Exposure to Childhood Poverty and Mental Health Symptomatology in Adolescence: A Role of Coping Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Pilyoung; Neuendorf, Cynthia; Bianco, Hannah; Evans, Gary W

    2016-12-01

    Childhood poverty is associated with stress dysregulation which contributes to psychological illness in later ages. The adverse effects of childhood poverty on stress regulation may be mediated in part by the use of disengaging strategies to cope with stress. However, the relations among childhood poverty, coping strategies and psychopathology throughout childhood to adolescence have not been explored. This prospective, longitudinal study included 185 low- and middle-income adolescents at age 17. Chronic exposure to poverty from birth to early adolescence (age 13) was prospectively associated with increases in the use of disengagement versus engagement coping four years later. Increased use of disengagement coping between the ages of 13 and 17 explained the indirect link between poverty exposure since birth and both externalizing and internalizing symptoms at age 17. The findings provide evidence for a coping pathway underlying the link between prolonged exposure to childhood poverty and mental health sequelae. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. The mis-measurement of extreme global poverty: A case study in the Pacific Islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deeming, Christopher; Gubhaju, Bina

    2015-09-01

    Debate over the measurement of global poverty in low- and middle-income countries continues unabated. There is considerable controversy surrounding the 'dollar a day' measure used to monitor progress against the Millennium Development Goals. This article shines fresh light on the debate with new empirical analyses of poverty (including child poverty), inequality and deprivation levels in the Pacific island state of Vanuatu. The study focuses not only on economic and monetary metrics and measures, but also the measures of deprivation derived from sociology in relation to shelter, sanitation, water, information, nutrition, health and education. Until recently, there had been few, if any, attempts to study poverty and deprivation disparities among children in this part of the world. Different measures yield strikingly different estimates of poverty. The article, therefore, attempts to situate the study findings in the broader international context of poverty measurement and discusses their implications for future research and the post-2015 development agenda.

  20. Hydrogeomorphic Classification of Wetlands on Mt. Desert Island, Maine, Including Hydrologic Susceptibility Factors for Wetlands in Acadia National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Martha G.

    2006-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the National Park Service, developed a hydrogeomorphic (HGM) classification system for wetlands greater than 0.4 hectares (ha) on Mt. Desert Island, Maine, and applied this classification using map-scale data to more than 1,200 mapped wetland units on the island. In addition, two hydrologic susceptibility factors were defined for a subset of these wetlands, using 11 variables derived from landscape-scale characteristics of the catchment areas of these wetlands. The hydrologic susceptibility factors, one related to the potential hydrologic pathways for contaminants and the other to the susceptibility of wetlands to disruptions in water supply from projected future changes in climate, were used to indicate which wetlands (greater than 1 ha) in Acadia National Park (ANP) may warrant further investigation or monitoring. The HGM classification system consists of 13 categories: Riverine-Upper Perennial, Riverine-Nonperennial, Riverine- Tidal, Depressional-Closed, Depressional-Semiclosed, Depressional-Open, Depressional-No Ground-Water Input, Mineral Soil Flat, Organic Soil Flat, Tidal Fringe, Lacustrine Fringe, Slope, and Hilltop/Upper Hillslope. A dichotomous key was developed to aid in the classification of wetlands. The National Wetland Inventory maps produced by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service provided the wetland mapping units used for this classification. On the basis of topographic map information and geographic information system (GIS) layers at a scale of 1:24,000 or larger, 1,202 wetland units were assigned a preliminary HGM classification. Two of the 13 HGM classes (Riverine-Tidal and Depressional-No Ground-Water Input) were not assigned to any wetlands because criteria for determining those classes are not available at that map scale, and must be determined by more site-specific information. Of the 1,202 wetland polygons classified, which cover 1,830 ha in ANP, 327 were classified as Slope, 258 were

  1. Psychological factors, including alexithymia, in the prediction of cardiovascular risk in HIV infected patients: results of a cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giustino Parruti

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Psychological factors are known predictors of cardiovascular disease in many clinical settings, but data are lacking for HIV infection. We carried out a prospective cohort study to evaluate potential psychological predictors of preclinical and clinical vascular disease in HIV patients. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: HIV patients were consecutively enrolled. Demographics, viral and immune parameters and traditional cardiovascular predictors were considered; Intima-Media Thickness (c-IMT, continuous measure and Carotid Plaques (CPs, focal thickening ≥1.5 mm were investigated by B-mode ultrasonography; depressive symptoms by the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II, Type D personality (Distressed Personality or Type D by the DS14, alexithymia by the Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS-20. Vascular outcomes included transient ischemic attacks or stroke, acute coronary syndrome, myocardial or other organ infarction. We enrolled 232 HIV subjects, 73.9% males, aged 44.5±9.9 y, 38.2% with AIDS diagnosis, 18.3% untreated. Mean Nadir CD4 T-cell counts were 237.5±186.2/mmc. Of them, 224 (96.5% attended IMT measurements; 201 (86.6% attended both IMT assessment and psychological profiling. Mean follow-up was 782±308 days. Fifty-nine patients (29.4% had CPs at baseline. Nineteen patients (9.5% had ≥1 vascular event; 12 (6.0% died due to such events (n = 4 or any cause. At baseline cross-sectional multivariate analysis, increasing age, total cholesterol, current smoking and Alexithymia score≥50 were significantly associated with both increased cIMT (linear regression and CPs (logistic regression. At follow-up analysis, log-rank tests and Cox's regression revealed that only older age (p = 0.001, current smoking (p = 0.019 and alexithymia score≥50 (p = 0.013 were independently associated with vascular events. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In HIV-infected subjects, the Alexithymic trait emerges as a strong predictor of increased IMT, presence of CPs

  2. Effects of Credit on Economic Growth, Unemployment and Poverty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mangasa Augustinus Sipahutar

    2016-06-01

                  Effect of credit on economic growth, unemployment and poverty provides evidence from Indonesia on the role of banks credit for promoting economic growth and reducing both unemployment and poverty.  To document the link between banks credit and economic growth, we estimate a VAR model and variance decompositions of annual GDP per capita growth rates to examine what proxy measures of banks credit are most important in accounting for economic growth over time and how much they contribute to explaining economic growth.  We also estimate an ECM to document the relationship between banks credit to both unemployment and poverty.  This paper revealed bi-direction causality between banks credit and economic growth.  Banks credit promotes economic growth and economic growth affects credit depth and financial development.  Furthermore, banks credit is a growth accelerating factor on Indonesian economic growth.  Banks credit is an endogenous growth and a good predictor on Indonesian economy. Our estimation model explained that credit allocated by banks increases business escalation to the real sectors then promotes economic growth, decreases unemployment rate through increasing in labor demanded, increases income and then decrease poverty.  This overall transmission mechanism just occurred through presence of banks credit by increasing money supply to the real sectors, promotes growth and social welfare.   Keywords :  banks credit, economic growth, growth accelerating factor, poverty, unemployment   JEL Classification : E51, E52, E58

  3. Regional Poverty and Population Response:A Comparison of Three Regions in the United States and Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosemarie Siebert

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we examine poverty in three regions in the United States and Germany and discuss its causes and demographic consequences. The three regions are those with the highest rates of poverty in the two countries: the Mississippi Delta and Texas Borderland in the United States and the Northeastern Border Region in Germany. We show that standard models to explain poverty need to be placed in the historical legacies of the three regions in order to understand their current levels of poverty. While our results show many common factors for poverty in the three regions, they also point to important differences. Similarly, we identify differences among the regions in their demographic responses to poverty, in part reflecting their different historical legacies. Thus, one implication of the paper is the importance of place-based poverty-mitigation strategies for successful policy planning.

  4. Review of the Research on the Influence Factors of thePoverty Students’ Psychological Health at Higher Scools%高校贫困生心理健康影响因素研究综述

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢颖

    2012-01-01

    高校贫困生心理健康一直以来都是人们关注的焦点。文章从人口统计学变量、经济、生活事件、社会支持、人格、自尊、自我概念、应对方式八个方面总结了心理健康的影响因素,并提出了研究方法需创新、研究量表需完善、研究结果需探讨、研究内容需拓宽、提高心理健康水平需加大五点展望。%Poverty Students’ Psychological Health has became the focus of attention.This paper summarizes the influence factor of the psychological health from eight respects,such as demographic variables,economic,life events,social support,personality,self-esteem,self-concept,and coping style.At the same time,the paper also proposes five prospects,such as research methods needed to be innovated;research questionnaire needed to be perfected;research result needed to be discussed;research content needed to be widened and the research of improving psychological health level needed to be increased.

  5. Poverty and mental health: What should we know as mental health professionals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepiéce, Brice; Reynaert, Christine; Jacques, Denis; Zdanowicz, Nicolas

    2015-09-01

    Social inequality as a social and economic phenomenon has become an issue of common interest in Europe and other societies worldwide, mainly after the recent global financial and economic crisis that occurred in 2008. The increasing gap observed between socioeconomically advantaged and disadvantaged people has caused intensive debates in politics, social sciences and in the field of public health. Today, poverty is considered as a major variable adversely influencing health. In this paper we will discuss the link between poverty and mental health. We conducted a literature search focusing on three main objectives: (I) to investigate the definition of "poverty"; (II) to determine the association between poverty and major mental health problems; and (III) to discuss the extent to which poverty could be both a cause and a consequence of mental health. We identified a total of 142 relevant papers, published between 1995 and 2014, only 32 were retained. Main findings are summarised in this paper. Poverty can be considered as a risk factor for mental illness. Yet the relation between poverty and mental health is complex, without direct causation, and bidirectional. As poverty has severe consequences not only on health but also on the whole society, combating poverty should be placed high on the political agenda.

  6. OANA MĂTU, INMA PASTOR, Gender and Poverty in Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ÁNGEL BELZUNEGUI

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we present an analysis of the data retrieved from the Survey onIncome and Living Conditions. A gender-based poverty study was carried out, startingfrom the evolution of global taxes, together with factors that can explain thedifferences between the poverty variable affecting men and the poverty variableaffecting women in Spain. Considering these data, it was deemed necessary toexamine the concept of feminisation of poverty and its empirical basis. We concludethat, although slightly higher poverty levels can be noted in the case of women,compared with men, in accordance with the quantitative data, this difference is notsufficiently significant to indicate that we are dealing with a feminisation of poverty –understood as a process in which differences between poverty among women andpoverty among men increase incrementally. Based on our study, we consider that thesimple presence of a poverty differentiation between men and women is not sufficientto conclude that poverty is undergoing a process of feminization.

  7. Empirical Study on the Relationship between Farmers’ Human Capital Investment and Rural Poverty

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Literatures about the relationship between human capital investment and rural poverty are reviewed.According to the time-series data from 1990 to 2007,VAR model and variance decomposition research are used to study the relationship between household human capital investment and rural poverty.Result shows that there is long-run equilibrium relationship between household human capital investment and rural poverty.Educational investment and health investment have significant impacts on the alleviation of rural poverty;while migration investment does not have significant impact on the alleviation of rural poverty.Among the factors causing poverty fluctuations,educational investment has greater impacts on poverty fluctuations than health investment in the short run,but health investment has greater impacts on poverty fluctuations than educational investment in the long run.Based on this,related countermeasures are put forward,such as further increasing the investment in education and health,implementing the compulsory education and social security system,consolidating the rural cooperative medical care,improving the retirement pension system in rural areas,and perfecting the training and technical extension system for rural population under the poverty line.

  8. Utilitarianism, poverty and development of disabled people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xavier de França, Inacia Sátiro; Freitag Pagliuca, Lorita Marlena

    2007-01-01

    This study aims to analyze the influences of human development factors in the experience of disabled people based on social scenarios of inequality. The data collected were standardized and allocated in thematic categories. The analysis was based on liberal utilitarianism. The conclusion is that there is legislation in Brazil that guarantees the disabled people's development in areas such as health, education and work. However despite the attempts of decision makers in combating discriminatory behaviors and the theory based on equity, these people still face difficulties in breaking the barrier of poverty and achieving all humans rights deserved.

  9. The Africanization of poverty: a retrospective on "Make Poverty History".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Graham

    2010-01-01

    This article explores the ways in which the British campaign coalition Make Poverty History represented Africa throughout 2005. Focusing particularly on the G8 Gleneagles summit, Make Poverty History (MPH) asserted a series of justice claims which had no geographical reference. Nevertheless, as a result of internal tensions within the coalition, and especially as a result of the ways in which MPH interacted with other political agencies as the summit approached, MPH's messages became increasingly interpolated by references to Africa as a result of the emergence of government, media, and celebrity involvement. The result of this was that global poverty increasingly became an African issue. As 2005 became the "Year of Africa," the justice messages that constituted MPH were largely effaced by the more familiar imperial legacy which represents Africa as a place of indigence in need of outside assistance.

  10. Study on the Characteristics and Influence Factors of Chronic Poverty in Rural China%中国农村长期贫困程度、特征与影响因素

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王生云

    2011-01-01

    Based on the survey data of Chinese household income project in 2002, this paper analyzes the chronic poverty and transient poverty in rural China from 1998 to 2002. The major findings are:it shows more characteristics of transient consumption poverty in rural China. large number of households located near the line of consumption poverty. Only few families failed into the chronic poverty. Poor families had few opportunities to enter the group of high - income. The farther away from the poverty line the families are, the lower ability of them to outcome poverty. Those families away from the regional economic center, with heavy family responsibilities and have more children and elderlies, are more vulnerable to chronic poverty. Yonger party secretary of the village the lower and middle poor classes to anti -poverty. Social and political capital, labor quality and also affect the chronic poverty of the middle - poor families. is importrant for living conditions%基于2002年的中国家庭收入项目(CHIP)调查数据,考察了中国农村的长期贫困与暂时性贫困。研究发现:中国农村更多呈现出暂时性消费贫困的特征,并且贫困家庭脱贫后进入高收入阶层的机会较小;离贫困线越远,其脱贫能力越低,离贫困线越近,其返贫的比例越高。远离区域经济中心、家庭负担较重、小孩老人较多的家庭容易陷入长期贫困。村支书的年轻化对于中下层贫困阶层摆脱长期贫困具有重要意义。社会政治资本、劳动力素质和居住条件是影响中等贫困家庭脱离长期贫困的重要因素。

  11. Excitation and charge transfer in He/sup +/ + H collisions. A molecular approach including two-electron translation factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Errea, L.F.; Mendez, L.; Riera, A.

    1983-06-01

    In a previous paper we have pointed out that the common-translation-factor (CTF) method is the only one which, at present, and within the framework of the molecular model of atomic collisions, can be shown to be both convergent and computationally fast, even for many-electron systems. In this Communication we check that this second statement is correct, presenting, for the first time, a molecular calculation involving two-electron translation factors, for He/sup +/ + H collisions. A careful study of the sensitivity of the calculated cross sections to the choice of the CTF is performed, and conclusions on that sensitivity are drawn, for several types of processes.

  12. Indicators System for Poverty Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantin Mitrut

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Poverty represents a life aspect which is focusing the attention of both the macroeconomic analysis and the international comparisons. In order to measure the level being recorded by this phenomenon, there is a system of indicators which are used in order to underline, in a correlated manner, a number of aspects which are characterizing, quality and quantity wise, the evolution of the poverty in a specific country or, to a larger extent, through comparative surveys, at international level. Despite the fact that they are not the only instrument being used within the process of comparison of the stages of social and economic development at the international level, however the poverty indicators are providing a clear significance to the worked out surveys. In fact, the very purpose of the economic activity consists of increasing welfare and, as much as possible, at least reducing, if not eradicating, the poverty. The present work is broadly presenting the methodology as well as, both theoretical and practical, the way of computing the poverty, making a synthesis of the specific used indicators.

  13. Analisis Kondisi Digital Poverty di Indonesia

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    Anton Susanto

    2016-12-01

    , connected and digitally “wealthy”. This research focus on that issue in Indonesia by mapping and analysis the digital poverty. The reseacrh result will be usefull to shaping the pro-poor policy for ICT sector such as universal telecomunication service. By using the data collected from Survey of ICT Indicator for Households and Inviduals that has held in 3 years (2014, 2015 and 2016 and also complemented by data Podes 2014, this reseach found that increasing of both of the  digitally “wealthy” and extremely digitally poor. ICT development has encouraged the use of the internet for e-commerce activities and interaction of e-government and e-business, but on the other hand there is the potential of digital exclusion for individuals who are in conditions of extremely digitally poor. The study also found that in addition of economic factors, factors condition of Human Resources and ICT and electrical supply also affect the digital poverty. Of these three factors, the condition of human resources is the most influential factor.

  14. Childhood Poverty and Its Effect on Health and Well-being: Enhancing Training for Learners Across the Medical Education Continuum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, Lisa J; Hanson, Elizabeth R; Klass, Perri; Schickedanz, Adam; Nakhasi, Ambica; Barnes, Michelle M; Berger, Susan; Boyd, Rhea W; Dreyer, Benard P; Meyer, Dodi; Navsaria, Dipesh; Rao, Sheela; Klein, Melissa

    2016-04-01

    Childhood poverty is unacceptably common in the US and threatens the health, development, and lifelong well-being of millions of children. Health care providers should be prepared through medical curricula to directly address the health harms of poverty. In this article, authors from The Child Poverty Education Subcommittee (CPES) of the Academic Pediatric Association Task Force on Child Poverty describe the development of the first such child poverty curriculum for teachers and learners across the medical education continuum. Educators, physicians, trainees, and public health professionals from 25 institutions across the United States and Canada were convened over a 2-year period and addressed 3 goals: 1) define the core competencies of child poverty education, 2) delineate the scope and aims of a child poverty curriculum, and 3) create a child poverty curriculum ready to implement in undergraduate and graduate medical education settings. The CPES identified 4 core domains for the curriculum including the epidemiology of child poverty, poverty-related social determinants of health, pathophysiology of the health effects of poverty, and leadership and action to reduce and prevent poverty's health effects. Workgroups, focused on each domain, developed learning goals and objectives, built interactive learning modules to meet them, and created evaluation and faculty development materials to supplement the core curriculum. An editorial team with representatives from each workgroup coordinated activities and are preparing the final curriculum for national implementation. This comprehensive, standardized child poverty curriculum developed by an international group of educators in pediatrics and experts in the health effects of poverty should prepare medical trainees to address child poverty and improve the health of poor children. Copyright © 2016 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Poverty, women, and reproduction. Welfare reform and social justice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    As they attempt to redesign the welfare system in the US, policy-makers could learn much by referring to the social justice teachings of the Catholic Church. As early as 1891, the pope was calling for the social protection of the poor. This view was expanded by papal edicts in 1971 and 1981 as well as by US bishops in 1986 and by the new catechism in 1994. In 1992, there were more than 39 million people living in poverty in the US. While the poor are overwhelmingly White, Blacks, who make up 12% of the population, account for 34% of the poor (children account for 70%). The poverty rate increases from 7.2% when both parents are present to 18% in father-only families and 44.7% in mother-only families. The four main definitions of poverty are poverty as deprivation, poverty as inequality, poverty as culture, and poverty as exploitation. The true nature of poverty encompasses all of these aspects. The goals of welfare, then should be to provide assistance and opportunity. While Americans are divided over which proposed changes should be enacted, no one argues against assisting children (which by extension provides aid to the mothers who raise them). The welfare reform movement, however, is fueled by racist and sexist attitudes. All of the potential changes are directed at women and ignore the hundreds of thousands of men benefiting from the system. Even when women have jobs, their income remains below the poverty level. Policy-makers also seek to control the private sphere of women's reproduction through welfare reform. A just welfare system would attempt to help people who need it; integrate the poor into solving the problem of poverty; provide real job training and jobs; offer support during the transition from welfare to self-sufficiency; provide sex education, reproductive services and counseling, and child care; and offer hope to poor children. This requires respect for the poor, access to information, a lack of coercion, the inclusion of poor men, repudiating an

  16. The Dynamics and Persistence of Poverty: Evidence from Italy

    OpenAIRE

    Francesco Devicienti; Valentina Gualtieri

    2007-01-01

    This article studies the dynamics and persistence of poverty in Italy during the nineties, using the ECHP, 1994-2001. Various definitions of poverty are analyzed in parallel, income poverty, subjective poverty and a multidimensional index of life-style deprivation. For each poverty definition, the hazard rates of leaving poverty and re-entering into it are estimated and combined to compute a measure of poverty persistence that takes account of individuals’ repeated spells in poverty. The esti...

  17. The effects of proposed tax changes on poverty and vulnerable groups in Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matković Gordana

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides an empirical analysis of the potential effects of a proposed tax reform in Serbia on poverty and vulnerable groups. The essence of the proposal is transferring the tax burden from wages to personal consumption, thus alleviating one production factor and therefore stimulating economic growth. The analysis utilizes the tax-benefit microstimulation model, based on the Household Budget Survey for 2009. Since the model does not include the production sector, the estimated effects are direct, income-based, without the potential economic growth. As expected, the total personal consumption in Serbia would decrease (-3.4%, while poverty would increase (from 6.9 to 7.4%. All of the potentially vulnerable groups would be relatively equally affected. The conclusion is that it is questionable whether it is prudent to implement a tax reform during times of crisis and increased poverty that would probably result in negative short term social outcomes and whose long term effects are still unclear.

  18. Geographical clustering of mortality from systemic lupus erythematosus in the United States: contributions of poverty, Hispanic ethnicity and solar radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, S J; Gilchrist, A

    2006-01-01

    The objective was to investigate whether spatial variation in poverty, Hispanic ethnicity, and solar radiation explains the strong pattern of geographical clustering of mortality from systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in the United States. SLE mortality counts for women and men of black and white race in US counties, 1979-1998, were obtained from the National Center for Health Statistics. County-level poverty rates and proportions of Hispanic residents were drawn from the 1990 national census. The annual cumulative level of ambient ultraviolet 'B' radiation (UVB) was estimated for each county according to latitude, longitude, and elevation. Maps for the full study population and for sex - and race-specific subpopulations showed that the national pattern of geographical variation in SLE mortality primarily reflected the experience of white women. Formal spatial analysis of the data for white women identified 10 statistically significant, multi-county clusters--four with elevated and six with reduced SLE mortality rates. Multivariate regression modeling established that higher levels of poverty, Hispanic ethnicity, and UVB were each associated with elevated local rates of SLE mortality among white women. Statistical adjustment via the regression model was used to remove effects of these factors on local rates. In a re-application of spatial analysis to the adjusted rates, four clusters 'disappeared'. In those clusters, poverty, Hispanic ethnicity and UVB had explained an average of 58.2% of the deviations between local and national SLE mortality rates. In six clusters (including three that disappeared with adjustment), Hispanic ethnicity explained a larger percentage of the deviations between local and national rates than either poverty or UVB. In multivariate models based on data for black women and for men of both races, poverty and UVB had similar effects on SLE mortality rates to those observed among white women. However, Hispanic ethnicity was not a significant

  19. Deduction of bond length changes of symmetric molecules from experimental vibrational progressions, including a topological mass factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jing; Wei, Fan; Schwarz, W H E; Li, Jun

    2012-12-20

    The change ΔR(x) of bond length R(x) for atom X in a molecule upon electronic transition can be derived from the intensities I(i) of the vibrational stretching progression v = 0 → i of the electronic absorption or emission spectrum. In many cases, a simple model is sufficient for a reasonable estimate of ΔR(x). For symmetric molecules, however, conceptual problems in the literature of many decades are evident. The breathing modes of various types of symmetric molecules X(n) and AX(n) (A at the center) are here discussed. In the simplest case of a harmonic vibration of the same mode in the initial and final electronic states, we obtain ΔR(x) ≈ [2S/(ωm(x))](1/2)/w(1/2) (all quantities in atomic units). ω and S are respectively the observed vibrational quanta and the Huang-Rhys factor (corresponding, e.g., to the vibrational intensity ratio I(1)/I(0) ≈ S), m(x) is the mass of vibrating atom X, and w is a topological factor for molecule X(n) or AX(n). The factor 1/w(1/2) in the expression for ΔR(x) must not be neglected. The spectra and bond length changes of several symmetric molecules AX(n) and X(n) are discussed. The experimental bond length changes correctly derived with factor 1/w(1/2) are verified by reliable quantum chemical calculations.

  20. Suicide and poverty in low-income and middle-income countries: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iemmi, Valentina; Bantjes, Jason; Coast, Ernestina; Channer, Kerrie; Leone, Tiziana; McDaid, David; Palfreyman, Alexis; Stephens, Bevan; Lund, Crick

    2016-08-01

    Suicide is the 15th leading cause of death worldwide, with over 75% of suicides occurring in low-income and middle-income countries. Nonetheless, evidence on the association between suicide and poverty in low-income and middle-income countries is scarce. We did a systematic review to understand the association between suicidal ideations and behaviours and economic poverty in low-income and middle-income countries. We included studies testing the association between suicidal ideations and behaviours and economic poverty in low-income and middle-income countries using bivariate or multivariate analysis and published in English between January, 2004, and April, 2014. We identified 37 studies meeting these inclusion criteria. In 18 studies reporting the association between completed suicide and poverty, 31 associations were explored. The majority reported a positive association. Of the 20 studies reporting on the relationship between non-fatal suicidal ideations and behaviours and poverty, 36 associations were explored. Again, almost all studies reported a positive association. However, when considering each poverty dimension separately, we found substantial variations. These findings show a consistent trend at the individual level indicating that poverty, particularly in the form of worse economic status, diminished wealth, and unemployment is associated with suicidal ideations and behaviours. At the country level, there are insufficient data to draw clear conclusions. Available data show a potential benefit in addressing economic poverty within suicide prevention strategies, with particular attention to both chronic poverty and acute economic events.

  1. Quantifying Poverty Temporal Changes in Association with Rural Transition in Guangxi, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heyuan You

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Poverty is a social problem in developing countries, especially for the rural places experiencing rapid transition. This study characterizes the temporal changes of rural poverty under rural transition during 1991–2010 in Guangxi. In particular, poverty is measured by the Foster-Greer-Thorbecke method, and rural transition is described from three aspects including rural industrialization, regional urbanization, and agriculture commercialization. Relationships are quantified by multivariate linear regression. Results reveal that industry income proportion (IIP and secondary industry proportion (SIP are positive contributors to the poverty incidence, while urban-rural income gap (URIG is a negative contributor to the poverty incidence. Industrial total output of township and village enterprises (ITOE, IIP, and grain commercialization rate (GCR present positive correlation with the poverty depth. The URIG has a negative correlation with the poverty depth. Tertiary industry proportion (TIP and expenditure on fixed productive assets per capita (EFPA are positively correlated with the poverty severity, while URIG and power of agricultural machinery (PAM associate with poverty severity negatively. Redundancy analysis shows that individual influence of rural industrialization is higher than that of regional urbanization and agriculture commercialization. The joint influences of rural industrialization, regional urbanization, and agriculture commercialization are the strongest.

  2. Catchment process affecting drinking water quality, including the significance of rainfall events, using factor analysis and event mean concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinque, Kathy; Jayasuriya, Niranjali

    2010-12-01

    To ensure the protection of drinking water an understanding of the catchment processes which can affect water quality is important as it enables targeted catchment management actions to be implemented. In this study factor analysis (FA) and comparing event mean concentrations (EMCs) with baseline values were techniques used to asses the relationships between water quality parameters and linking those parameters to processes within an agricultural drinking water catchment. FA found that 55% of the variance in the water quality data could be explained by the first factor, which was dominated by parameters usually associated with erosion. Inclusion of pathogenic indicators in an additional FA showed that Enterococcus and Clostridium perfringens (C. perfringens) were also related to the erosion factor. Analysis of the EMCs found that most parameters were significantly higher during periods of rainfall runoff. This study shows that the most dominant processes in an agricultural catchment are surface runoff and erosion. It also shows that it is these processes which mobilise pathogenic indicators and are therefore most likely to influence the transport of pathogens. Catchment management efforts need to focus on reducing the effect of these processes on water quality.

  3. Poverty and Health in Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Alejandra Silva

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available This article examines health conditions in the rural areas of Central Argentina, the country’s main region for soy-bean production and export. Health conditions are analyzed through the concepts of emerging and re-emerging diseases in a context of increasing poverty. Data on poverty and health was obtained from both primary sources (trade union, government officials, rural doctors and the South Watch/FA/FODEPAL/UNR working group and secondary sources (IPEC/INDEC, IDESA, Consultora Equis, the Argentine Ministry of Employment, ILO, the Ministry of Health, the Ministry of the Environment, toxicology centers and rural doctors. Analysis of rural health conditions gives cause for concern. There is evidence of deterioration in the social determinants of health such as an increase in rural and urban poverty associated with informal employment and child labor. At the same time lack of government epidemiological and toxicological data appears to hide or distort the reality of health conditions.

  4. Impact of agricultural intensification on poverty alleviation among rural farm households in Imo state Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iheke, O.R.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This study was on the impact of agricultural intensification on poverty alleviation among rural farm households in Imo State Nigeria. Multi-stage random sampling and purposive sampling technique was used in choosing the samples used for the study. Data collections were by the use of structured questionnaire and interview schedules and data analysis involved the computation per capital household food expenditure and mean per capita household expenditure so as to draw the poverty line and hence derive the poverty status of the respondents, regression analysis as well as computation of the Chow’s statistic. The results of data analysis revealed that poverty is more pronounced with the farm households that are not practicing agricultural intensification. The significant factors influencing the poverty level of the farmers practicing agricultural intensification were sex of household head, years of formal education, assets endowment, and income; while for the farmers not practicing intensification, household size, years of formal education, assets endowment, and income were the significant factors influencing their poverty level. For the two households, age, years of formal education, assets endowment, and income were the significant factors influencing their poverty level. Education, income and the dummy variable indicating intensification status were the significant factors influencing their poverty level for the entire household with a dummy introduced. The Chow’s test revealed that agricultual intensification has a positive and significant impact on poverty reduction. Therefore, creation of awareness and persuading rural farming households to practice more of intensified agriculture would lead increase in productivity and income with a multiplier effect on poverty reduction.

  5. Towards Sustainable Poverty Alleviation in Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FIRST LADY

    resources is concerned, disparities in access to health and education, macro- economic ... measuring the level of poverty based on people's ability to have access to ... meaning of poverty still tends towards lack and below average and poor.

  6. Poverty Could Make Lupus Even Worse

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_165745.html Poverty Could Make Lupus Even Worse Second study saw ... 19, 2017 FRIDAY, May 19, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Poverty and race are tied to the health of ...

  7. Industrial Diversification, Employment and Rural Poverty Reduction ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Industrial Diversification, Employment and Rural Poverty Reduction in China and ... the same poverty background and socio economic history makes it proper for ... Using questionnaire and secondary data for statistical analysis and growth ...

  8. Poverty measurement for a binational population

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Anita Alves Pena

    2013-01-01

      Traditional poverty measures are inappropriate for migrant populations. Frequently cited poverty thresholds are calculated under assumptions that individuals and their families face only one set of prices annually...

  9. Poverty's Impact on A Child's Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_162949.html Poverty's Impact on a Child's Mental Health Poor kids ... Jan. 9, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Growing up in poverty exposes children to greater levels of stress, which ...

  10. The Likelihood of Experiencing Relative Poverty over the Life Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rank, Mark R; Hirschl, Thomas A

    2015-01-01

    Research on poverty in the United States has largely consisted of examining cross-sectional levels of absolute poverty. In this analysis, we focus on understanding relative poverty within a life course context. Specifically, we analyze the likelihood of individuals falling below the 20th percentile and the 10th percentile of the income distribution between the ages of 25 and 60. A series of life tables are constructed using the nationally representative Panel Study of Income Dynamics data set. This includes panel data from 1968 through 2011. Results indicate that the prevalence of relative poverty is quite high. Consequently, between the ages of 25 to 60, 61.8 percent of the population will experience a year below the 20th percentile, and 42.1 percent will experience a year below the 10th percentile. Characteristics associated with experiencing these levels of poverty include those who are younger, nonwhite, female, not married, with 12 years or less of education, or who have a work disability.

  11. The Likelihood of Experiencing Relative Poverty over the Life Course.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark R Rank

    Full Text Available Research on poverty in the United States has largely consisted of examining cross-sectional levels of absolute poverty. In this analysis, we focus on understanding relative poverty within a life course context. Specifically, we analyze the likelihood of individuals falling below the 20th percentile and the 10th percentile of the income distribution between the ages of 25 and 60. A series of life tables are constructed using the nationally representative Panel Study of Income Dynamics data set. This includes panel data from 1968 through 2011. Results indicate that the prevalence of relative poverty is quite high. Consequently, between the ages of 25 to 60, 61.8 percent of the population will experience a year below the 20th percentile, and 42.1 percent will experience a year below the 10th percentile. Characteristics associated with experiencing these levels of poverty include those who are younger, nonwhite, female, not married, with 12 years or less of education, or who have a work disability.

  12. The Likelihood of Experiencing Relative Poverty over the Life Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rank, Mark R.; Hirschl, Thomas A.

    2015-01-01

    Research on poverty in the United States has largely consisted of examining cross-sectional levels of absolute poverty. In this analysis, we focus on understanding relative poverty within a life course context. Specifically, we analyze the likelihood of individuals falling below the 20th percentile and the 10th percentile of the income distribution between the ages of 25 and 60. A series of life tables are constructed using the nationally representative Panel Study of Income Dynamics data set. This includes panel data from 1968 through 2011. Results indicate that the prevalence of relative poverty is quite high. Consequently, between the ages of 25 to 60, 61.8 percent of the population will experience a year below the 20th percentile, and 42.1 percent will experience a year below the 10th percentile. Characteristics associated with experiencing these levels of poverty include those who are younger, nonwhite, female, not married, with 12 years or less of education, or who have a work disability. PMID:26200781

  13. Small Scale Industries and Poverty Reduction in Ondo State, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afolabi Francis Fatusin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ondo State of Nigeria is part of the National Millennium Goal of halving poverty by the year 2015. This paper examines the contribution of small scale industrial enterprises toward achieving this goal, relying on questionnaire which was administered on 353 proprietors and 706 workers randomly. Data were also collected from government agencies and organizations that were responsible for formulating and implementing policies on these categories of industrial establishments. These were analyzed using descriptive means. The study discovered substantial contribution of these enterprises to improvement in income, job creation and linkage with other enterprises, factors necessary for poverty reduction. It was also discovered that even the least proprietor earns an average of $2.8 per day (apart from profits which are mostly saved in cooperative societies and age grade associations which is above poverty line. It also discovered a bias toward Ondo Central which is the most cosmopolitan region in the state in terms of the magnitude of these impacts at reducing poverty. The study concluded by recommending improved support by the government to grow the sector to further reduce poverty in the state.

  14. Tackling the African "poverty trap": the Ijebu-Ode experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabogunje, Akin L

    2007-10-23

    An experiment in poverty reduction began in 1998 in the city of Ijebu-Ode, Nigeria (estimated 1999 population 163,000), where, without the remittances from relatives abroad, an estimated 90% of the population lived below the poverty line of $1.00 (U.S.) per person per day. Central to the experiment was whether poverty can be dramatically reduced through a city consultation process that seeks to mobilize the entire community along with its diaspora. With 7 years of experience, the Ijebu-Ode experiment has been successful in many ways. There is increasing evidence that poverty in the city has been reduced significantly through the microfinancing of existing and new productive activities and the estimated >8,000 jobs these activities have created. Training based on both sustainability science and technology and indigenous practitioner knowledge has been a critical factor in the establishment of cooperatives and the development of new enterprises in specialty crops, small animal, and fish production. Much of this success has been possible as a result of harnessing social capital, especially through the dynamic leadership of the traditional authorities of the city and by the provision of ample loanable funds through the National Poverty Eradication Program of the federal government. The city consultation process itself engendered a participatory focus to the experiment from the beginning and has encouraged sustainability. Yet long-term sustainability is still in question as the initial leadership needs replacement, and credit, the heart of the experiment, lacks sufficient collateral.

  15. Neglect subtypes, race, and poverty: individual, family, and service characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonson-Reid, Melissa; Drake, Brett; Zhou, Pan

    2013-02-01

    Recent child maltreatment research has highlighted the very different context of poverty for Black and White children. Neglect is the most common form of maltreatment and strongly associated with poverty. Neglect is, however, not a unitary construct. We lack an understanding of whether reporting of and responding to different types of neglect may vary by poverty, race, or the intersection of the two. Administrative census, child welfare, welfare, health, and education data were used to examine how family and community poverty factors associate with various subtypes of neglect and subsequent case dispositions for Black and White children. Black children reported to child welfare reside in far poorer communities than Whites, even after taking into account family income (Aid to Families with Dependent Children [AFDC]/Temporary Aid to Needy Families [TANF]). Black children were more commonly reported and substantiated for severe and basic needs neglect. Community poverty indicators had a different relationship to report disposition for Black as compared to White children after controlling for neglect subtypes, child and family characteristics. Implications for practice and policy are discussed.

  16. Subjective Poverty and Its Relation to Objective Poverty Concepts in Hungary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandori, Eszter Siposne

    2011-01-01

    The paper analyzes subjective poverty in Hungary and compares it to the objective poverty concepts. Subjective poverty is defined by examining who people consider to be poor. Based on the Easterlin paradox, the initial hypothesis states that subjective and absolute poverty concepts are highly correlated. Taking into account that Hungary is a…

  17. Characteristics of the population below the poverty level: 1983.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winard, A; Rudolph, S

    1985-02-01

    The US poverty thresholds are updated every year to reflect annual average Consumer Price Index changes; in 1983 the average poverty threshold for a 4 person family was $10,178. This report uses the March 1984 Current Population Survey (CPS) to present detailed social and economic characteristics of the US population below the poverty level. The poverty rate rose from 15.0% in 1982 to 15.2% in 1983, showing a rise from 34.4 to 35.3 million people. Major population subgroups showed no significant changes from 1982 to 1983; classed as poor were 24.0 million whites (12.1%), 9.9 million blacks (35.7%), 4.2 million Hispanics (28.4%), and 13.7 million children under age 18 (22%). No significant changes occurred in either metropolitan or nonmetropolitan areas. Poverty declined in the South (but still remained high at 17.2%), rose in the Midwest, and changed little in the Northeast and West. 7.6 million families lived below the poverty level in 1983, with neither married couple families nor female headed households showing significant change from 1982. Families maintained by women, however, accounted for 47% of poor families, and the number of poor unrelated persons rose from 6.5 to 6.8 million, with women comprising 62% of these persons. In 1983, the average income deficit--the income amount needed to raise a family above the poverty threshold--was $4,020. The CPS estimates are based only on money income and do not include noncash benefits such as food stamps or medicare.

  18. Marginal Returns: Re-Thinking Mobility and Educational Benefit in Contexts of Chronic Poverty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddox, Bryan

    2010-01-01

    As a result of chronic poverty many people in South Asia experience poor quality schooling, interrupted schooling, or no schooling at all. People affected by poverty face multiple constraints on wellbeing, which typically include informal employment, low wages and poor health. In such contexts the benefits and, more specifically, the…

  19. Poverty and Social Developments in Peru, 1994-1997. A World Bank Country Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    World Bank, Washington, DC.

    From 1994 to 1997, social welfare improved in Peru. Areas of improvement included decreased poverty and severe poverty rates, increased school attendance and literacy, and a healthier population. Most important among health improvements was reduced malnutrition among young children. Social improvements stemmed from the favorable overall economic…

  20. The World Bank and poverty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipton, M; Shakow, A

    1982-06-01

    During the 1970s it was World Bank policy to use its funds to raise the productivity and living standards of the poor. It has increased its lending for sector and subsectors considered to offer the most direct benefits to the poor such as rural development, population, health, and nutrition. Projects with particular emphasis on poverty have benefitted large numbers of poor people and have had good economic rates of return. Lending for rural projects increased in the 1970s from US$2.6 billion in 1969-73 to over US$13 billion in 1978-81; rural development projects audited in 1979 benfitted 660 small farmers for every US$1 million loaned compared with 47 farmers/US$1 million in other agricultural projects. Some problems are: 1) low-risk technical packages appropriate for poor farmers in semi-arid rainfed areas are not readily available; 2) the Bank's rural development strategy seeks mainly to raise the production of small farms, but other aspects need to be emphasized; 3) domestic pricing and postharvest policies often undermine the success of projects aimed at the rural poor; and 4) success in rural development often rests on sociological and cultural factors, difficult areas that deserve more attention. For urban areas the Bank has strongly endorsed providing "sites and sources" instead of structures; since 1972, 52 Bank projects centered on urban shelter involving US$1.6 billion have been undertaken. Cost recovery is established at 66-95%. About 5% of Bank lending is for education and despite the importance of population, health, and nutrition, these areas absorb less than 1% of the Bank's total lending program. Only US$400 million in population loans were made to 13 countries in the 1970s and only recently have separate health projects been started. Emphasis for the 1980s must be on rural development, urban shelter, primary education, health, education, and population.