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Sample records for factor viii therapy

  1. Factor VIII therapy for hemophilia A: current and future issues.

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    Aledort, Louis; Ljung, Rolf; Mann, Kenneth; Pipe, Steven

    2014-06-01

    Hemophilia A is a congenital, recessive, X-linked bleeding disorder that is managed with infusions of plasma-derived or recombinant factor (F) VIII. The primary considerations in FVIII replacement therapy today are the: 1) immunogenicity of FVIII concentrates, 2) role of longer-acting FVIII products, 3) prophylactic use of FVIII in children and adults with severe hemophilia A, and 4) affordability and availability of FVIII products. Improving patient outcomes by increasing the use of FVIII prophylaxis, preventing or eliminating FVIII inhibitors, and expanding access to FVIII concentrates in developing countries are the major challenges confronting clinicians who care for patients with hemophilia A.

  2. Comparison of factor VIII transgenes bioengineered for improved expression in gene therapy of hemophilia A.

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    Dooriss, Kerry L; Denning, Gabriela; Gangadharan, Bagirath; Javazon, Elisabeth H; McCarty, David A; Spencer, H Trent; Doering, Christopher B

    2009-05-01

    Successful gene therapy of hemophilia A depends on the sustained expression of therapeutic levels of factor VIII (fVIII). Because of mRNA instability, interactions with resident endoplasmic reticulum (ER) chaperones, and the requirement for carbohydrate-facilitated transport from the ER to the Golgi apparatus, fVIII is expressed at much lower levels from mammalian cells than other proteins of similar size and complexity. A number of bioengineered forms of B domain-deleted (BDD) human fVIII have been generated and shown to have enhanced expression. Previously, we demonstrated that recombinant BDD porcine fVIII exhibits high-level expression due to specific sequence elements that increase biosynthesis via enhanced posttranslational transit through the secretory pathway. In the current study, high-expression recombinant fVIII constructs were compared directly in order to determine the relative expression of the various bioengineered fVIII transgenes. The data demonstrate that BDD porcine fVIII expression is superior to that of any of the human fVIII variant constructs tested. Mean fVIII expression of 18 units/10(6) cells/24 hr was observed from HEK-293 cells expressing a single copy of the porcine fVIII transgene, which was 36- to 225-fold greater than that of any human fVIII transgene tested. Furthermore, greater than 10-fold higher expression was observed in human cells transduced with BDD porcine fVIII versus BDD human fVIII-encoding lentiviral vectors, even at low proviral copy numbers, supporting its use over other human fVIII variants in future hemophilia A gene therapy clinical trials.

  3. Neonatal helper-dependent adenoviral vector gene therapy mediates correction of hemophilia A and tolerance to human factor VIII.

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    Hu, Chuhong; Cela, Racel G; Suzuki, Masataka; Lee, Brendan; Lipshutz, Gerald S

    2011-02-01

    Neonatal gene therapy is a promising strategy for treating a number of congenital diseases diagnosed shortly after birth as expression of therapeutic proteins during postnatal life may limit the pathologic consequences and result in a potential "cure." Hemophilia A is often complicated by the development of antibodies to recombinant protein resulting in treatment failure. Neonatal administration of vectors may avoid inhibitory antibody formation to factor VIII (FVIII) by taking advantage of immune immaturity. A helper-dependent adenoviral vector expressing human factor VIII was administered i.v. to neonatal hemophilia A knockout mice. Three days later, mice produced high levels of FVIII. Levels declined rapidly with animal growth to 5 wk of age with stable factor VIII expression thereafter to >1 y of age. Decline in factor VIII expression was not related to cell-mediated or humoral responses with lack of development of antibodies to capsid or human factor VIII proteins. Subsequent readministration and augmentation of expression was possible as operational tolerance was established to factor VIII without development of inhibitors; however, protective immunity to adenovirus remained.

  4. Hemophilia A gene therapy via intraosseous delivery of factor VIII-lentiviral vectors.

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    Miao, Carol H

    2016-01-01

    Current treatment of hemophilia A (HemA) patients with repeated infusions of factor VIII (FVIII; abbreviated as F8 in constructs) is costly, inconvenient, and incompletely effective. In addition, approximately 25 % of treated patients develop anti-factor VIII immune responses. Gene therapy that can achieve long-term phenotypic correction without the complication of anti-factor VIII antibody formation is highly desired. Lentiviral vector (LV)-mediated gene transfer into hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) results in stable integration of FVIII gene into the host genome, leading to persistent therapeutic effect. However, ex vivo HSC gene therapy requires pre-conditioning which is highly undesirable for hemophilia patients. The recently developed novel methodology of direct intraosseous (IO) delivery of LVs can efficiently transduce bone marrow cells, generating high levels of transgene expression in HSCs. IO delivery of E-F8-LV utilizing a ubiquitous EF1α promoter generated initially therapeutic levels of FVIII, however, robust anti-FVIII antibody responses ensued neutralized functional FVIII activity in the circulation. In contrast, a single IO delivery of G-FVIII-LV utilizing a megakaryocytic-specific GP1bα promoter achieved platelet-specific FVIII expression, leading to persistent, partial correction of HemA in treated animals. Most interestingly, comparable therapeutic benefit with G-F8-LV was obtained in HemA mice with pre-existing anti-FVIII inhibitors. Platelets is an ideal IO delivery vehicle since FVIII stored in α-granules of platelets is protected from high-titer anti-FVIII antibodies; and that even relatively small numbers of activated platelets that locally excrete FVIII may be sufficient to promote efficient clot formation during bleeding. Additionally, combination of pharmacological agents improved transduction of LVs and persistence of transduced cells and transgene expression. Overall, a single IO infusion of G-F8-LV can generate long-term stable

  5. Eradication of neutralizing antibodies to factor VIII in canine hemophilia A after liver gene therapy.

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    Finn, Jonathan D; Ozelo, Margareth C; Sabatino, Denise E; Franck, Helen W G; Merricks, Elizabeth P; Crudele, Julie M; Zhou, Shangzhen; Kazazian, Haig H; Lillicrap, David; Nichols, Timothy C; Arruda, Valder R

    2010-12-23

    Inhibitory antibodies to factor VIII (FVIII) are a major complication in the treatment of hemophilia A, affecting approximately 20% to 30% of patients. Current treatment for inhibitors is based on long-term, daily injections of large amounts of FVIII protein. Liver-directed gene therapy has been used to induce antigen-specific tolerance, but there are no data in hemophilic animals with pre-existing inhibitors. To determine whether sustained endogenous expression of FVIII could eradicate inhibitors, we injected adeno-associated viral vectors encoding canine FVIII (cFVIII) in 2 strains of inhibitor hemophilia A dogs. In 3 dogs, a transient increase in inhibitor titers (up to 7 Bethesda Units [BU]) at 2 weeks was followed by continuous decline to complete disappearance within 4-5 weeks. Subsequently, an increase in cFVIII levels (1.5%-8%), a shortening of clotting times, and a reduction (> 90%) of bleeding episodes were observed. Immune tolerance was confirmed by lack of antibody formation after repeated challenges with cFVIII protein and normal protein half-life. A fourth dog exhibited a strong early anamnestic response (216 BU), with slow decline to 0.8 BU and cFVIII antigen detection by 18 months after vector delivery. These data suggest that liver gene therapy has the potential to eradicate inhibitors and could improve the outcomes of hemophilia A patients.

  6. Anti-CD3 antibodies modulate anti-factor VIII immune responses in hemophilia A mice after factor VIII plasmid-mediated gene therapy.

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    Peng, Baowei; Ye, Peiqing; Rawlings, David J; Ochs, Hans D; Miao, Carol H

    2009-11-12

    One major obstacle in gene therapy is the generation of immune responses directed against transgene product. Five consecutive anti-CD3 treatments concomitant with factor VIII (FVIII) plasmid injection prevented the formation of inhibitory antibodies against FVIII and achieved persistent, therapeutic levels of FVIII gene expression in treated hemophilia A mice. Repeated plasmid gene transfer is applicable in tolerized mice without eliciting immune responses. Anti-CD3 treatment significantly depleted both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, whereas increased transforming growth factor-beta levels in plasma and the frequency of both CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ and CD4+CD25-Foxp3+ regulatory T cells in the initial few weeks after treatment. Although prior depletion of CD4+CD25+ cells did not abrogate tolerance induction, adoptive transfer of CD4+ cells from tolerized mice at 6 weeks after treatment protected recipient mice from anti-FVIII immune responses. Anti-CD3-treated mice mounted immune responses against both T-dependent and T-independent neo-antigens, indicating that anti-CD3 did not hamper the immune systems in the long term. Concomitant FVIII plasmid + anti-CD3 treatment induced long-term tolerance specific to FVIII via a mechanism involving the increase in transforming growth factor-beta levels and the generation of adaptive FVIII-specific CD4+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells at the periphery. Furthermore, anti-CD3 can reduce the titers of preexisting anti-FVIII inhibitory antibodies in hemophilia A mice.

  7. Enhanced factor VIII heavy chain for gene therapy of hemophilia A.

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    Chen, Lingxia; Lu, Hui; Wang, Jinhui; Sarkar, Rita; Yang, Xiao; Wang, Hongli; High, Katherine A; Xiao, Weidong

    2009-03-01

    Hemophilia A gene therapy using recombinant adenovirus-associated virus (AAV) vectors has been hampered by the size of the factor VIII (FVIII) cDNA. Previously, splitting the FVIII coding sequence into a heavy-chain (HC) fragment and a light-chain (LC) fragment for dual recombinant AAV vector delivery has been successfully explored. However, the main disadvantage of this approach is a "chain imbalance" problem in which LC secretion is approximately 1-2 logs higher than that of HC, and therefore, the majority of protein synthesized is nonfunctional. To improve HC secretion, we constructed alternate FVIII HCs based on our observation that LC facilitates HC secretion. To our surprise, most of the new HC molecules exhibited enhanced expression over the traditional HC molecule (HC(745)). The optimized HC mutein, HC(HL), including additional acidic-region-3 (ar3) sequences, exhibited three- to fivefold higher activity in both enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) assay in in vitro testing. Further characterization suggested ar3 sequences increased HC secretion, rather than promoting HC synthesis. Intravenous delivery of AAV8-HC(HL)+AAV8-LC or AAV8-HC(745)+AAV8-LC achieved phenotypic correction in hemophilia A mice. Mice receiving AAV8-HC(HL)+AAV8-LC achieved three- to fourfold higher HC expression than AAV8-HC(745)+AAV8-LC, consistent with the FVIII functional assays. HC(HL) should be substituted for HC(745) in a dual AAV vector strategy due to its enhanced expression.

  8. Generation of an optimized lentiviral vector encoding a high-expression factor VIII transgene for gene therapy of hemophilia A.

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    Johnston, J M; Denning, G; Doering, C B; Spencer, H T

    2013-06-01

    We previously compared the expression of several human factor VIII (fVIII) transgene variants and demonstrated the superior expression properties of B domain-deleted porcine fVIII. Subsequently, a hybrid human/porcine fVIII molecule (HP-fVIII) comprising 91% human amino-acid sequence was engineered to maintain the high-expression characteristics of porcine fVIII. The bioengineered construct then was used effectively to treat knockout mice with hemophilia A. In the current study, we focused on optimizing self-inactivating (SIN) lentiviral vector systems by analyzing the efficacy of various lentiviral components in terms of virus production, transduction efficiency and transgene expression. Specifically, three parameters were evaluated: (1) the woodchuck hepatitis post-transcriptional regulatory element (WPRE), (2) HIV versus SIV viral vector systems and (3) various internal promoters. The inclusion of a WPRE sequence had negligible effects on viral production and HP-fVIII expression. HIV and SIV vectors were compared and found to be similar with respect to transduction efficiency in both K562s and HEK-293T cells. However, there was an enhanced expression of HP-fVIII by the SIV system, which was evident in both K562 and BHK-M cell lines. To further compare expression of HP-fVIII from an SIV-based lentiviral system, we constructed expression vectors containing the high expression transgene and a human elongation factor-1 alpha, cytomegalovirus (CMV) or phosphoglycerate kinase promoter. Expression was significantly greater from the CMV promoter, which also yielded therapeutic levels of HP-fVIII in hemophilia A mice. Based on these studies, an optimized vector contains the HP-fVIII transgene driven by a CMV internal promoter within a SIV-based lentiviral backbone lacking a WPRE.

  9. Phenotypic correction and stable expression of factor VIII in hemophilia A mice by embryonic stem cell therapy.

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    Wang, J J; Kuang, Y; Zhang, L L; Shen, C L; Wang, L; Lu, S Y; Lu, X B; Fei, J; Gu, M M; Wang, Z G

    2013-05-13

    Hereditary deficiency of factor VIII (FVIII) leads to hemophilia A, a severe X-linked bleeding disorder. Current therapies include fixed-dose FVIII prophylaxis, factor replacement therapy, and most recently, gene therapy. Prophylaxis and FVIII replacement therapies are limited by incomplete efficacy, high cost, restricted availability, and development of neutralizing antibodies in chronically treated individuals. Limited success has been obtained in preclinical trials using gene therapy for the treatment of hemophilia. Therefore, new options for therapy for hemophilia A are needed. We evaluated the potential of embryonic stem cells for correcting hemophilia A in mice. FVIII-deficient mouse blastocysts were collected and injected with mouse embryonic stem cells stably expressing green-fluorescent protein (GFP) and transferred to pseudopregnant recipient mice. Expression of FVIII was measured in the liver and plasma of the 5 chimeric mice that were produced. Three of these mice were GFP-positive at the age of 6 months. The plasma FVIII activity levels were equal to those of wild-type mice. These data demonstrate that embryonic stem cell transplantation at an early embryonic stage has potential as therapy for this progressively debilitating, life-threatening bleeding disorder.

  10. Targeting factor VIII expression to platelets for hemophilia A gene therapy does not induce an apparent thrombotic risk in mice.

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    Baumgartner, C K; Mattson, J G; Weiler, H; Shi, Q; Montgomery, R R

    2017-01-01

    Essentials Platelet-Factor (F) VIII gene therapy is a promising treatment in hemophilia A. This study aims to evaluate if platelet-FVIII expression would increase the risk for thrombosis. Targeting FVIII expression to platelets does not induce or elevate thrombosis risk. Platelets expressing FVIII are neither hyper-activated nor hyper-responsive. Background Targeting factor (F) VIII expression to platelets is a promising gene therapy approach for hemophilia A, and is successful even in the presence of inhibitors. It is well known that platelets play important roles not only in hemostasis, but also in thrombosis and inflammation. Objective To evaluate whether platelet-FVIII expression might increase thrombotic risk and thereby compromise the safety of this approach. Methods In this study, platelet-FVIII-expressing transgenic mice were examined either in steady-state conditions or under prothrombotic conditions induced by inflammation or the FV Leiden mutation. Native whole blood thrombin generation assay, rotational thromboelastometry analysis and ferric chloride-induced vessel injury were used to evaluate the hemostatic properties. Various parameters associated with thrombosis risk, including D-dimer, thrombin-antithrombin complexes, fibrinogen, tissue fibrin deposition, platelet activation status and activatability, and platelet-leukocyte aggregates, were assessed. Results We generated a new line of transgenic mice that expressed 30-fold higher levels of platelet-expressed FVIII than are therapeutically required to restore hemostasis in hemophilic mice. Under both steady-state conditions and prothrombotic conditions induced by lipopolysaccharide-mediated inflammation or the FV Leiden mutation, supratherapeutic levels of platelet-expressed FVIII did not appear to be thrombogenic. Furthermore, FVIII-expressing platelets were neither hyperactivated nor hyperactivatable upon agonist activation. Conclusion We conclude that, in mice, more than 30-fold higher levels of

  11. Transient B cell depletion or improved transgene expression by codon optimization promote tolerance to factor VIII in gene therapy.

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    Brandon K Sack

    Full Text Available The major complication in the treatment of hemophilia A is the development of neutralizing antibodies (inhibitors against factor VIII (FVIII. The current method for eradicating inhibitors, termed immune tolerance induction (ITI, is costly and protracted. Clinical protocols that prevent rather than treat inhibitors are not yet established. Liver-directed gene therapy hopes to achieve long-term correction of the disease while also inducing immune tolerance. We sought to investigate the use of adeno-associated viral (serotype 8 gene transfer to induce tolerance to human B domain deleted FVIII in hemophilia A mice. We administered an AAV8 vector with either human B domain deleted FVIII or a codon-optimized transgene, both under a liver-specific promoter to two strains of hemophilia A mice. Protein therapy or gene therapy was given either alone or in conjunction with anti-CD20 antibody-mediated B cell depletion. Gene therapy with a low-expressing vector resulted in sustained near-therapeutic expression. However, supplementary protein therapy revealed that gene transfer had sensitized mice to hFVIII in a high-responder strain but not in mice of a low-responding strain. This heightened response was ameliorated when gene therapy was delivered with anti-murine CD20 treatment. Transient B cell depletion prevented inhibitor formation in protein therapy, but failed to achieve a sustained hypo-responsiveness. Importantly, use of a codon-optimized hFVIII transgene resulted in sustained therapeutic expression and tolerance without a need for B cell depletion. Therefore, anti-CD20 may be beneficial in preventing vector-induced immune priming to FVIII, but higher levels of liver-restricted expression are preferred for tolerance.

  12. Novel factor VIII variants with a modified furin cleavage site improve the efficacy of gene therapy for hemophilia A.

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    Nguyen, G N; George, L A; Siner, J I; Davidson, R J; Zander, C B; Zheng, X L; Arruda, V R; Camire, R M; Sabatino, D E

    2017-01-01

    Essentials Factor (F) VIII is an inefficiently expressed protein. Furin deletion FVIII variants were purified and characterized using in vitro and in vivo assays. These minimally modified novel FVIII variants have enhanced function. These variants provide a strategy for increasing FVIII expression in hemophilia A gene therapy. Background The major challenge for developing gene-based therapies for hemophilia A is that human factor VIII (hFVIII) has intrinsic properties that result in inefficient biosynthesis. During intracellular processing, hFVIII is predominantly cleaved at a paired basic amino acid cleaving enzyme (PACE) or furin cleavage site to yield a heterodimer that is the major form of secreted protein. Previous studies with B-domain-deleted (BDD) canine FVIII and hFVIII-R1645H, both differing from hFVIII by a single amino acid at this site, suggested that these proteins are secreted mainly in a single polypeptide chain (SC) form and exhibit enhanced function. Objective We hypothesized that deletion(s) of the furin site modulates FVIII biology and may enhance its function. Methods A series of recombinant hFVIII-furin deletion variants were introduced into hFVIII-BDD [Δ1645, 1645-46(Δ2), 1645-47(Δ3), 1645-48(Δ4), or Δ1648] and characterized. Results In vitro, recombinant purified Δ3 and Δ4 were primarily SC and, interestingly, had 2-fold higher procoagulant activity compared with FVIII-BDD. In vivo, the variants also have improved hemostatic function. After adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector delivery, the expression of these variants is 2-4-fold higher than hFVIII-BDD. Protein challenges of each variant in mice tolerant to hFVIII-BDD showed no anti-FVIII immune response. Conclusions These data suggest that the furin deletion hFVIII variants are superior to hFVIII-BDD without increased immunogenicity. In the setting of gene-based therapeutics, these novel variants provide a unique strategy to increase FVIII expression, thus lowering the vector dose, a

  13. Continuous infusion of factor VIII for surgery and major bleeding.

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    Hay, C R; Doughty, H I; Savidge, G F

    1996-03-01

    In a clinical trial, 24 patients with haemophilia A who needed surgery or had suffered severe bleeding were treated by continuous infusion of Monoclate P, a factor VIII concentrate that is immunopurified by monoclonal antibodies. Continuous infusion of Monoclate P began with a dose of 2 U/kg per h that was adjusted according to the results of factor VIII assays to achieve a factor VIII target level of 100 IU/dl for 2 days and then 80 IU/dl for 5 days. The safety, efficacy, and economics of this approach were assessed. No haemorrhagic episodes were observed. The continuous infusion was convenient and had the advantage of producing steady-state levels of factor VIII. With a single-compartment model, we found median factor VIII clearance values of 3.11 (range 1.79-7.78) x 10(3) litres/kg per h, elimination rates of 5.0-19.4 x 10(-2)/h and a median half-life of 9.9 h (range 4.8-20.0 h). Clearance and the elimination rate appeared to decline over the infusion period, as judged by the decreasing infusion rate required to maintain the target concentration of factor VIII. An economic comparison with bolus therapy, using theoretically derived bolus dosages, indicated that the potential saving was related inversely to the factor VIII half-life. Potential savings of 75% were predicted on the first postoperative day, averaging 35% over the full course of therapy.

  14. Therapeutic levels of human factor VIII in mice implanted with encapsulated cells: potential for gene therapy of haemophilia A.

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    García-Martín, Carmen; Chuah, Marinee K L; Van Damme, An; Robinson, Kelly E; Vanzieleghem, Beatrijs; Saint-Remy, Jean-Marie; Gallardo, Dominique; Ofosu, Frederick A; Vandendriessche, Thierry; Hortelano, Gonzalo

    2002-01-01

    A gene therapy delivery system based on microcapsules enclosing recombinant cells engineered to secrete a therapeutic protein has been evaluated. The microcapsules are implanted intraperitoneally. In order to prevent cell immune rejection, cells are enclosed in non-antigenic biocompatible alginate microcapsules prior to their implantation into mice. It has been shown that encapsulated myoblasts can deliver therapeutic levels of Factor IX (FIX) in mice. The delivery of human Factor VIII (hFVIII) in mice using microcapsules was evaluated in this study. Mouse C2C12 myoblasts and canine MDCK epithelial kidney cells were transduced with MFG-FVIII (B-domain deleted) vector. Selected recombinant clones were enclosed in alginate microcapsules. Encapsulated recombinant clones were subsequently implanted intraperitoneally into C57BL/6 and immunodeficient SCID mice. Plasma of mice receiving C2C12 and encapsulated MDCK cells had transient therapeutic levels of FVIII in immunocompetent C57BL/6 mice (up to 20% and 7% of physiological levels, respectively). In addition, FVIII delivery in SCID mice was also transient, suggesting that a non-immune mechanism must have contributed to the decline of hFVIII in plasma. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis confirmed directly that the decline of hFVIII is due to a reduction in steady-state hFVIII mRNA, consistent with transcriptional repression. Furthermore, encapsulated cells retrieved from implanted mice were viable, but secreted FVIII ex vivo at three-fold lower levels than the pre-implantation levels. In addition, antibodies to hFVIII were detected in immunocompetent C57BL/6 mice. Implantable microcapsules can deliver therapeutic levels of FVIII in mice, suggesting the potential of this gene therapy approach for haemophilia A. The findings suggest vector down-regulation in vivo. Copyright 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Development and characterization of recombinant ovine coagulation factor VIII.

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    Zakas, Philip M; Gangadharan, Bagirath; Almeida-Porada, Graca; Porada, Christopher D; Spencer, H Trent; Doering, Christopher B

    2012-01-01

    Animal models of the bleeding disorder, hemophilia A, have been an integral component of the biopharmaceutical development process and have facilitated the development of recombinant coagulation factor VIII (fVIII) products capable of restoring median survival of persons with hemophilia A to that of the general population. However, there remain several limitations to recombinant fVIII as a biotherapeutic, including invasiveness of intravenous infusion, short half-life, immunogenicity, and lack of availability to the majority of the world's population. The recently described ovine model of hemophilia A is the largest and most accurate phenocopy. Affected sheep die prematurely due to bleeding-related pathogenesis and display robust adaptive humoral immunity to non-ovine fVIII. Herein, we describe the development and characterization of recombinant ovine fVIII (ofVIII) to support further the utility of the ovine hemophilia A model. Full-length and B-domain deleted (BDD) ofVIII cDNAs were generated and demonstrated to facilitate greater biosynthetic rates than their human fVIII counterparts while both BDD constructs showed greater expression rates than the same-species full-length versions. A top recombinant BDD ofVIII producing baby hamster kidney clone was identified and used to biosynthesize raw material for purification and biochemical characterization. Highly purified recombinant BDD ofVIII preparations possess a specific activity nearly 2-fold higher than recombinant BDD human fVIII and display a differential glycosylation pattern. However, binding to the carrier protein, von Willebrand factor, which is critical for stability of fVIII in circulation, is indistinguishable. Decay of thrombin-activated ofVIIIa is 2-fold slower than human fVIII indicating greater intrinsic stability. Furthermore, intravenous administration of ofVIII effectively reverses the bleeding phenotype in the murine model of hemophilia A. Recombinant ofVIII should facilitate the maintenance of

  16. Development and characterization of recombinant ovine coagulation factor VIII.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip M Zakas

    Full Text Available Animal models of the bleeding disorder, hemophilia A, have been an integral component of the biopharmaceutical development process and have facilitated the development of recombinant coagulation factor VIII (fVIII products capable of restoring median survival of persons with hemophilia A to that of the general population. However, there remain several limitations to recombinant fVIII as a biotherapeutic, including invasiveness of intravenous infusion, short half-life, immunogenicity, and lack of availability to the majority of the world's population. The recently described ovine model of hemophilia A is the largest and most accurate phenocopy. Affected sheep die prematurely due to bleeding-related pathogenesis and display robust adaptive humoral immunity to non-ovine fVIII. Herein, we describe the development and characterization of recombinant ovine fVIII (ofVIII to support further the utility of the ovine hemophilia A model. Full-length and B-domain deleted (BDD ofVIII cDNAs were generated and demonstrated to facilitate greater biosynthetic rates than their human fVIII counterparts while both BDD constructs showed greater expression rates than the same-species full-length versions. A top recombinant BDD ofVIII producing baby hamster kidney clone was identified and used to biosynthesize raw material for purification and biochemical characterization. Highly purified recombinant BDD ofVIII preparations possess a specific activity nearly 2-fold higher than recombinant BDD human fVIII and display a differential glycosylation pattern. However, binding to the carrier protein, von Willebrand factor, which is critical for stability of fVIII in circulation, is indistinguishable. Decay of thrombin-activated ofVIIIa is 2-fold slower than human fVIII indicating greater intrinsic stability. Furthermore, intravenous administration of ofVIII effectively reverses the bleeding phenotype in the murine model of hemophilia A. Recombinant ofVIII should facilitate

  17. Coagulation factor VIII activity in diabetic patients

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    Nermina Babić

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim To examine coagulation factor VIII activity in plasma, as a risk factor for thrombosis, in the patients with diabetes mellitus (DM. Also, to assess its relationship with ibrinogen and fasting blood glucose concentrations and with body mass index. Methods The plasma coagulation factor VIII activity, plasma levels of ibrinogen and blood glucose concentrations were measured in 30 patients with DM type 1, 30 patients with DM type 2 and in 30 healthy subjects. Body weight and body height were also measured and BMI was calculated.Results The plasma factor VIII activity in patients with DM type 1 and patients with DM type 2 was signiicantly higher than the values measured in healthy subjects. There was no signiicant difference in the factor VIII activity between patients with DM type 1 and type 2. The concentrations of ibrinogen and blood glucose in both groups of patients were signiicantly higher than in the group of healthy subjects. Patients with DM type 2 had a signiicantly higher BMI compared to healthy subjects, as well as compared to patients with DM type 1. There was a signiicant positive correlation between plasma factor VIII activity and plasma level of ibrinogen and a signiicant negative correlation between factor VIII activity and BMI in patients with DM type 2. Conclusion Diabetic patients have the elevated plasma coagulation factor VIII activity and increased ibrinogen concentration thus an increased risk of thrombosis and vascular diseases.

  18. Characterization of Adeno-Associated Viral Vector-Mediated Human Factor VIII Gene Therapy in Hemophilia A Mice.

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    Greig, Jenny A; Wang, Qiang; Reicherter, Amanda L; Chen, Shu-Jen; Hanlon, Alexandra L; Tipper, Christopher H; Clark, K Reed; Wadsworth, Samuel; Wang, Lili; Wilson, James M

    2017-05-01

    Adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors are promising vehicles for hemophilia gene therapy, with favorable clinical trial data seen in the treatment of hemophilia B. In an effort to optimize the expression of human coagulation factor VIII (hFVIII) for the treatment of hemophilia A, an extensive study was performed with numerous combinations of liver-specific promoter and enhancer elements with a codon-optimized hFVIII transgene. After generating 42 variants of three reduced-size promoters and three small enhancers, transgene cassettes were packaged within a single AAV capsid, AAVrh10, to eliminate performance differences due to the capsid type. Each hFVIII vector was administered to FVIII knockout (KO) mice at a dose of 10(10) genome copies (GC) per mouse. Criteria for distinguishing the performance of the different enhancer/promoter combinations were established prior to the initiation of the studies. These criteria included prominently the level of hFVIII activity (0.12-2.12 IU/mL) and the pattern of development of anti-hFVIII antibodies. In order to evaluate the impact of capsid on hFVIII expression and antibody formation, one of the enhancer and promoter combinations that exhibited high hFVIII immunogenicity was evaluated using AAV8, AAV9, AAVrh10, AAVhu37, and AAVrh64R1 capsids. The capsids subdivided into two groups: those that generated anti-hFVIII antibodies in ≤20% of mice (AAV8 and AAV9), and those that generated anti-hFVIII antibodies in >20% of mice (AAVrh10, AAVhu37, and AAVrh64R1). The results of this study, which entailed extensive vector optimization and in vivo testing, demonstrate the significant impact that transcriptional control elements and capsid can have on vector performance.

  19. In vivo expansion of regulatory T cells with IL-2/IL-2 mAb complexes prevents anti-factor VIII immune responses in hemophilia A mice treated with factor VIII plasmid-mediated gene therapy.

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    Liu, Chao-Lien; Ye, Peiqing; Yen, Benjamin C; Miao, Carol H

    2011-08-01

    Generation of transgene-specific immune responses can constitute a major complication following gene therapy treatment. An in vivo approach to inducing selective expansion of Regulatory T (Treg) cells by injecting interleukin-2 (IL-2) mixed with a specific IL-2 monoclonal antibody (JES6-1) was adopted to modulate anti-factor VIII (anti-FVIII) immune responses. Three consecutive IL-2 complexes treatments combined with FVIII plasmid injection prevented anti-FVIII formation and achieved persistent, therapeutic-level of FVIII expression in hemophilia A (HemA) mice. The IL-2 complexes treatment expanded CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) Treg cells five- to sevenfold on peak day, and they gradually returned to normal levels within 7-14 days without changing other lymphocyte populations. The transiently expanded Treg cells are highly activated and display suppressive function in vitro. Adoptive transfer of the expanded Treg cells protected recipient mice from generation of high-titer antibodies following FVIII plasmid challenge. Repeated plasmid transfer is applicable in tolerized mice without eliciting immune responses. Mice treated with IL-2 complexes mounted immune responses against both T-dependent and T-independent neoantigens, indicating that IL-2 complexes did not hamper the immune system for long. These results demonstrate the important role of Treg cells in suppressing anti-FVIII immune responses and the potential of developing Treg cell expansion therapies that induce long-term tolerance to FVIII.

  20. Idiopathic Acquired Hemophilia A with Undetectable Factor VIII Inhibitor

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    Nicholas B. Abt

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. We present the case of a 73-year-old female, with no family or personal history of a bleeding disorder, who had a classic presentation for acquired hemophilia A. Factor VIII activity was low but detectable and a factor VIII inhibitor was undetectable. Methods. The patient’s plasma was comprehensively studied to determine the cause of the acquired coagulopathy. Using the Nijmegen modification of the Bethesda assay, no factor VIII autoantibody was measureable despite varying the incubation time from 1 to 3 hours. Results. The aPTT was prolonged at 46.8 seconds, which did not correct in the 4 : 1 mix but did with 1 : 1 mix. Using a one stage factor VIII activity assay, the FVIII activity was 16% and chromogenic FVIII activity was also 16%. The patient was treated with recombinant FVII and transfusion, significantly reducing bleeding. Long-term therapy was initiated with cyclophosphamide and prednisone with normalization of FVIII activity. Conclusions. Physicians can be presented with the challenging clinical picture of an acquired factor VIII inhibitor without a detectable inhibitor by the Bethesda assay. Standard therapy for an acquired hemophilia A should be considered.

  1. Blood coagulation factor VIII: An overview

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G M Bhopale; R K Nanda

    2003-12-01

    Factor VIII (FVIII) functions as a co-factor in the blood coagulation cascade for the proteolytic activation of factor X by factor IXa. Deficiency of FVIII causes hemophilia A, the most commonly inherited bleeding disorder. This review highlights current knowledge on selected aspects of FVIII in which both the scientist and the clinician should be interested.

  2. Game, set, match for factor VIII mismatch?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Connie H

    2015-08-13

    In this issue of Blood, Gunasekera et al provide evidence that the high rate of factor VIII (FVIII) inhibitors seen in black hemophilia A (HA) patients is not due to a mismatch between the structure of treatment products and FVIII genotypes common in blacks.

  3. The C1 and C2 domains of blood coagulation factor VIII mediate its endocytosis by dendritic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangadharan, Bagirath; Ing, Mathieu; Delignat, Sandrine; Peyron, Ivan; Teyssandier, Maud; Kaveri, Srinivas V.; Lacroix-Desmazes, Sébastien

    2017-01-01

    The development of inhibitory antibodies to therapeutic factor VIII is the major complication of replacement therapy in patients with hemophilia A. The first step in the initiation of the anti-factor VIII immune response is factor VIII interaction with receptor(s) on antigen-presenting cells, followed by endocytosis and presentation to naïve CD4+ T cells. Recent studies indicate a role for the C1 domain in factor VIII uptake. We investigated whether charged residues in the C2 domain participate in immunogenic factor VIII uptake. Co-incubation of factor VIII with BO2C11, a monoclonal C2-specific immunoglobulin G, reduced factor VIII endocytosis by dendritic cells and presentation to CD4+ T cells, and diminished factor VIII immunogenicity in factor VIII-deficient mice. The mutation of basic residues within the BO2C11 epitope of C2 replicated reduced in vitro immunogenic uptake, but failed to prevent factor VIII immunogenicity in mice. BO2C11 prevents factor VIII binding to von Willebrand factor, thus potentially biasing factor VIII immunogenicity by perturbing its half-life. Interestingly, a factor VIIIY1680C mutant, that does not bind von Willebrand factor, demonstrated unaltered endocytosis by dendritic cells as well as immunogenicity in factor VIII-deficient mice. Co-incubation of factor VIIIY1680C with BO2C11, however, resulted in decreased factor VIII immunogenicity in vivo. In addition, a previously described triple C1 mutant showed decreased uptake in vitro, and reduced immunogenicity in vivo, but only in the absence of endogenous von Willebrand factor. Taken together, the results indicate that residues in the C1 and/or C2 domains of factor VIII are implicated in immunogenic factor VIII uptake, at least in vitro. Conversely, in vivo, the binding to endogenous von Willebrand factor masks the reducing effect of mutations in the C domains on factor VIII immunogenicity. PMID:27758819

  4. The effect of factor VIII deficiencies and replacement and bypass therapies on thrombus formation under venous flow conditions in microfluidic and computational models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abimbola A Onasoga-Jarvis

    Full Text Available Clinical evidence suggests that individuals with factor VIII (FVIII deficiency (hemophilia A are protected against venous thrombosis, but treatment with recombinant proteins can increase their risk for thrombosis. In this study we examined the dynamics of thrombus formation in individuals with hemophilia A and their response to replacement and bypass therapies under venous flow conditions. Fibrin and platelet accumulation were measured in microfluidic flow assays on a TF-rich surface at a shear rate of 100 s⁻¹. Thrombin generation was calculated with a computational spatial-temporal model of thrombus formation. Mild FVIII deficiencies (5-30% normal levels could support fibrin fiber formation, while severe (1 nM, but too low to support fibrin formation (<10 nM. In the absence of platelets, fibrin formation was not supported even at normal FVIII levels, suggesting platelet adhesion is necessary for fibrin formation. Individuals treated by replacement therapy, recombinant FVIII, showed normalized fibrin formation. Individuals treated with bypass therapy, recombinant FVIIa, had a reduced lag time in fibrin formation, as well as elevated fibrin accumulation compared to healthy controls. Treatment of rFVIIa, but not rFVIII, resulted in significant changes in fibrin dynamics that could lead to a prothrombotic state.

  5. Immune tolerance induced by platelet-targeted factor VIII gene therapy in hemophilia A mice is CD4 T cell mediated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y; Luo, X; Schroeder, J A; Chen, J; Baumgartner, C K; Hu, J; Shi, Q

    2017-10-01

    Essentials The immune response is a significant concern in gene therapy. Platelet-targeted gene therapy can restore hemostasis and induce immune tolerance. CD4 T cell compartment is tolerized after platelet gene therapy. Preconditioning regimen affects immune tolerance induction in platelet gene therapy. Background Immune responses are a major concern in gene therapy. Our previous studies demonstrated that platelet-targeted factor VIII (FVIII) (2bF8) gene therapy together with in vivo drug selection of transduced cells can rescue the bleeding diathesis and induce immune tolerance in FVIII(null) mice. Objective To investigate whether non-selectable 2bF8 lentiviral vector (LV) for the induction of platelet-FVIII expression is sufficient to induce immune tolerance and how immune tolerance is induced after 2bF8LV gene therapy. Methods Platelet-FVIII expression was introduced by 2bF8LV transduction and transplantation. FVIII assays and tail bleeding tests were used to confirm the success of platelet gene therapy. Animals were challenged with rhF8 to explore if immune tolerance was induced after gene therapy. Treg cell analysis, T-cell proliferation assay and memory B-cell-mediated ELISPOT assay were used to investigate the potential mechanisms of immune tolerance. Results We showed that platelet-FVIII expression was sustained and the bleeding diathesis was restored in FVIII(null) mice after 2bF8LV gene therapy. None of the transduced recipients developed anti-FVIII inhibitory antibodies in the groups preconditioned with 660 cGy irradiation or busulfan plus ATG treatment even after rhF8 challenge. Treg cells significantly increased in 2bF8LV-transduced recipients and the immune tolerance developed was transferable. CD4(+) T cells from treated animals failed to proliferate in response to rhF8 re-stimulation, but memory B cells could differentiate into antibody secreting cells in 2bF8LV-transduced recipients. Conclusion 2bF8LV gene transfer without in vivo selection of

  6. Acquired Factor VIII Inhibitors: Three Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tay Za Kyaw

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Acquired hemophilia A is a rare, but devastating bleeding disorder caused by spontaneous development of autoantibodies directed against coagulation factor VIII. In 40%-50% of patients it is associated with such conditions as the postpartum period, malignancy, use of medications, and autoimmune diseases; however, its cause is unknown in most cases. Acquired hemophilia A should be suspected in patients that present with a coagulation abnormality, and a negative personal and family history of bleeding. Herein we report 3 patients with acquired hemophilia A that had different underlying pathologies, clinical presentations, and therapeutic responses. Factor VIII inhibitor formation in case 1 occurred 6 months after giving birth; underlying disorders were not identified in cases 2 or 3. The bleeding phenotype in these patients’ ranged from no bleeding tendency with isolated prolongation of APTT (activated partial thromboplastin time to severe intramuscular hematoma and hemarthrosis necessitating recombinant activated factor VII infusion and blood components transfusion. Variable responses to immunosuppressive treatment were also observed.

  7. Lentivirus-mediated platelet gene therapy of murine hemophilia A with pre-existing anti-factor VIII immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuether, E L; Schroeder, J A; Fahs, S A; Cooley, B C; Chen, Y; Montgomery, R R; Wilcox, D A; Shi, Q

    2012-08-01

    The development of inhibitory antibodies, referred to as inhibitors, against exogenous factor VIII in a significant subset of patients with hemophilia A remains a persistent challenge to the efficacy of protein replacement therapy. Our previous studies using the transgenic approach provided proof-of-principle that platelet-specific expression could be successful in treating hemophilia A in the presence of inhibitory antibodies. To investigate a clinically translatable approach for platelet gene therapy of hemophilia A with pre-existing inhibitors. Platelet FVIII expression in preimmunized FVIII(null) mice was introduced by transplantation of lentivirus-transduced bone marrow or enriched hematopoietic stem cells. FVIII expression was determined with a chromogenic assay. The transgene copy number per cell was quantitated with real-time PCR. Inhibitor titer was measured with the Bethesda assay. Phenotypic correction was assessed by the tail clipping assay and an electrolytically induced venous injury model. Integration sites were analyzed with linear amplification-mediated PCR. Therapeutic levels of platelet FVIII expression were sustained in the long term without evoking an anti-FVIII memory response in the transduced preimmunized recipients. The tail clip survival test and the electrolytic injury model confirmed that hemostasis was improved in the treated animals. Sequential bone marrow transplants showed sustained platelet FVIII expression resulting in phenotypic correction in preimmunized secondary and tertiary recipients. Lentivirus-mediated platelet-specific gene transfer improves hemostasis in mice with hemophilia A with pre-existing inhibitors, indicating that this approach may be a promising strategy for gene therapy of hemophilia A even in the high-risk setting of pre-existing inhibitory antibodies. © 2012 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  8. Case of acquired hemophilia with factor VIII inhibitor in a mother and newborn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotani, Yasushi; Shiota, Mitsuru; Umemoto, Masahiko; Koike, Eiji; Tsuritani, Mitsuhiro; Hoshiai, Hiroshi

    2011-08-01

    We report a mother and newborn in the puerperium with hemorrhage secondary to factor VIII inhibitor. A 31-year-old gravida 1 para 1 delivered at a local clinic with a massive postpartum hemorrhage. The activated partial thromboplastin time was prolonged and factor VIII inhibitor was detected. The persistent hemorrhage improved following treatment, including transfusion, steroid therapy, and bypass therapy with factor VII formulations. After hysteroscopic removal of the retained placenta, the hemorrhage decreased. The newborn developed significant swelling of the hands after routine blood sampling and factor VIII inhibitor was detected. The inhibitor disappeared without any special treatment in the 5th month postpartum in the mother and the 4th month postpartum in the newborn. Factor VIII inhibitor may be transferred via the placenta from the mother to the fetus. Therefore, the newborn should also be carefully observed in a case of massive hemorrhage after delivery.

  9. Anti-CD20 as the B cells targeting agent in the combined therapy to modulate anti-factor VIII immune responses in hemophilia A inhibitor mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Lien eLiu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Neutralizing antibody formation against transgene products can represent a major complication following gene therapy with treatment of genetic diseases, such as hemophilia A. Although successful approaches have been developed to prevent the formation of anti-factor VIII (FVIII antibodies, innovative strategies to overcome pre-existing anti-FVIII immune responses in FVIII-primed subjects are still lacking. Anti-FVIII neutralizing antibodies circulate for long periods in part due to persistence of memory B cells. Anti-CD20 targets a variety of B cells (pre-B cells to mature/memory cells; therefore, we investigated the impact of B cell depletion on anti-FVIII immune responses in hemophilia A mice using anti-CD20 combined with regulatory T (Treg cell expansion using IL-2/IL-2mAb complexes plus rapamycin. We found that anti-CD20 alone can partially modulate anti-FVIII immune responses in both unprimed and FVIII-primed hemophilia A mice. Moreover, in mice treated with anti-CD20 + IL-2/IL-2mAb complexes + rapamycin + FVIII, anti-FVIII antibody titers were significantly reduced in comparison to mice treated with regimens targeting only B or T cells. In addition, titers remained low after a second challenge with FVIII plasmid . Treg cells and activation markers were transiently and significantly increased in the groups treated with IL-2/IL-2mAb complexes ; however,significant B cell depletion was obtained in anti-CD20-treated groups. Importantly, both FVIII-specific antibody-secreting cells and memory B cells were significantly reduced in mice treated with combination therapy. This study demonstrates that a combination regimen is highly promising as a treatment option for modulating anti-FVIII antibodies and facilitating induction of long-term tolerance to FVIII in hemophilia A mice.

  10. Factor VIII and von Willebrand factor co-delivery by endothelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwens, E.A.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/314061894

    2011-01-01

    A defect in coagulation factor VIII (FVIII) results in the inherited bleeding disorder hemophilia A. Current treatment of hemophilia A is hampered by the need of frequent administration of costly FVIII products. Therefore gene therapy is an attractive alternative for protein replacement to treat

  11. Factor VIII and von Willebrand factor co-delivery by endothelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwens, E.A.M.

    2011-01-01

    A defect in coagulation factor VIII (FVIII) results in the inherited bleeding disorder hemophilia A. Current treatment of hemophilia A is hampered by the need of frequent administration of costly FVIII products. Therefore gene therapy is an attractive alternative for protein replacement to treat hem

  12. Reduction of Factor VIII Inhibitor Titers During Immune Tolerance Induction With Recombinant Factor VIII-Fc Fusion Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groomes, Charles L; Gianferante, David M; Crouch, Gary D; Parekh, Dina S; Scott, David W; Lieuw, Kenneth

    2016-05-01

    The development of inhibitors toward factor VIII (FVIII) is a common and serious complication of hemophilia A (HA) therapy. Patients with hemophilia who develop inhibitors often undergo time- and resource-intensive immune tolerance induction (ITI) protocols. We report a 15-month-old male with severe HA and a high-titer inhibitor that occurred while receiving prophylactic treatment with recombinant FVIII (rFVIII), in whom significant inhibitor titer reduction was achieved with thrice weekly infusions of a new, prolonged half-life rFVIII-Fc fusion protein product (trade name Eloctate). Further studies are warranted to explore the potential of Eloctate in ITI protocols.

  13. Extrahepatic sources of factor VIII potentially contribute to the coagulation cascade correcting the bleeding phenotype of mice with hemophilia A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanolini, Diego; Merlin, Simone; Feola, Maria; Ranaldo, Gabriella; Amoruso, Angela; Gaidano, Gianluca; Zaffaroni, Mauro; Ferrero, Alessandro; Brunelleschi, Sandra; Valente, Guido; Gupta, Sanjeev; Prat, Maria; Follenzi, Antonia

    2015-07-01

    A large fraction of factor VIII in blood originates from liver sinusoidal endothelial cells although extrahepatic sources also contribute to plasma factor VIII levels. Identification of cell-types other than endothelial cells with the capacity to synthesize and release factor VIII will be helpful for therapeutic approaches in hemophilia A. Recent cell therapy and bone marrow transplantation studies indicated that Küpffer cells, monocytes and mesenchymal stromal cells could synthesize factor VIII in sufficient amount to ameliorate the bleeding phenotype in hemophilic mice. To further establish the role of blood cells in expressing factor VIII, we studied various types of mouse and human hematopoietic cells. We identified factor VIII in cells isolated from peripheral and cord blood, as well as bone marrow. Co-staining for cell type-specific markers verified that factor VIII was expressed in monocytes, macrophages and megakaryocytes. We additionally verified that factor VIII was expressed in liver sinusoidal endothelial cells and endothelial cells elsewhere, e.g., in the spleen, lungs and kidneys. Factor VIII was well expressed in sinusoidal endothelial cells and Küpffer cells isolated from human liver, whereas by comparison isolated human hepatocytes expressed factor VIII at very low levels. After transplantation of CD34(+) human cord blood cells into NOD/SCIDγNull-hemophilia A mice, fluorescence activated cell sorting of peripheral blood showed >40% donor cells engrafted in the majority of mice. In these animals, plasma factor VIII activity 12 weeks after cell transplantation was up to 5% and nine of 12 mice survived after a tail clip-assay. In conclusion, hematopoietic cells, in addition to endothelial cells, express and secrete factor VIII: this information should offer further opportunities for understanding mechanisms of factor VIII synthesis and replenishment.

  14. Storage and regulated secretion of factor VIII in blood outgrowth endothelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Biggelaar, M.; Bouwens, E.A.M.; Kootstra, N.A.; Hebbel, R.P.; Voorberg, J.; Mertens, K.

    2009-01-01

    Background Gene therapy provides an attractive alternative for protein replacement therapy in hemophilia A patients. Recent studies have shown the potential benefit of directing factor (F)VIII gene delivery to cells that also express its natural carrier protein von Willebrand factor (VWF). In this

  15. Storage and regulated secretion of factor VIII in blood outgrowth endothelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Biggelaar, M.; Bouwens, E.A.M.; Kootstra, N.A.; Hebbel, R.P.; Voorberg, J.; Mertens, K.

    2009-01-01

    Background Gene therapy provides an attractive alternative for protein replacement therapy in hemophilia A patients. Recent studies have shown the potential benefit of directing factor (F)VIII gene delivery to cells that also express its natural carrier protein von Willebrand factor (VWF). In this s

  16. Storage and regulated secretion of factor VIII in blood outgrowth endothelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Biggelaar, M.; Bouwens, E.A.M.; Kootstra, N.A.; Hebbel, R.P.; Voorberg, J.; Mertens, K.

    2009-01-01

    Background Gene therapy provides an attractive alternative for protein replacement therapy in hemophilia A patients. Recent studies have shown the potential benefit of directing factor (F)VIII gene delivery to cells that also express its natural carrier protein von Willebrand factor (VWF). In this s

  17. Recombinant factor VIII in the management of hemophilia A: current use and future promise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerry S Powell

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Jerry S PowellDivision of Hematology and Oncology, University of California Davis Cancer Center, Sacramento, CA, USAAbstract: Hemophilia A is a rare inherited bleeding disorder due to mutation of the gene that encodes the coagulation protein factor VIII. Historically, prior to the availability of treatment with factor VIII preparations, most boys died from uncontrolled bleeding, either spontaneous bleeding or after injury, before reaching 20 years of age. One of the most impressive triumphs of modern medicine is that with current recombinant factor VIII replacement therapy, a boy born in the 21st century with severe hemophilia A can anticipate a normal life expectancy with essentially no permanent complications from bleeding. For severe hemophilia A, current optimal treatment should have two goals: first, to provide sufficient factor VIII to prevent spontaneous bleeding, and second, to provide sufficient factor VIII to have normal coagulation function after any trauma. However, the replacement therapy requires tremendous resources for effective use, and remains extraordinarily expensive. Thus there are opportunities for further advances in therapy for hemophilia A. Two major concerns continue to trouble current optimal treatment approaches: some patients will develop neutralizing antibodies during the first 50 infusions of therapeutic factor VIII, and second, to administer therapeutic factor VIII every other day in young boys often requires placement of a central venous access device, and such use carries the life-threatening risks of infection and thrombosis. Because of the effectiveness of current therapy, any new developments in treatment will require significant concerns for safety, both immediate and in the long term. A number of research groups seek to prolong the biological efficacy of infused recombinant factor VIII. Currently, one such promising development is in the advanced stages of clinical trial. The goals will be to improve

  18. Potentiation of thrombin generation in hemophilia A plasma by coagulation factor VIII and characterization of antibody-specific inhibition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhavya S Doshi

    Full Text Available Development of inhibitory antibodies to coagulation factor VIII (fVIII is the primary obstacle to the treatment of hemophilia A in the developed world. This adverse reaction occurs in 20-30% of persons with severe hemophilia A treated with fVIII-replacement products and is characterized by the development of a humoral and neutralizing immune response to fVIII. Patients with inhibitory anti-fVIII antibodies are treated with bypassing agents including recombinant factor VIIa (rfVIIa. However, some patients display poor hemostatic response to bypass therapy and improved treatment options are needed. Recently, we demonstrated that fVIII inhibitors display widely variable kinetics of inhibition that correlate with their respective target epitopes. Thus, it was hypothesized that for antibodies that display slow rates of inhibition, supplementation of rfVIIa with fVIII would result in improved thrombin generation and be predictive of clinical responses to this novel treatment regimen. In order to test this hypothesis, 10 murine monoclonal antibodies (MAbs with non-overlapping epitopes spanning fVIII, differential inhibition titers, and inhibition kinetics were studied using a thrombin generation assay. Of the 3 MAbs with high inhibitory titers, only the one with fast and complete (classically defined as "type I" kinetics displayed significant inhibition of thrombin generation with no improvement upon supplementation of rfVIIa with fVIII. The other two MAbs that displayed incomplete (classically defined as "type II" inhibition did not suppress the potentiation of thrombin generation by fVIII. All antibodies that did not completely inhibit fVIII activity demonstrated potentiation of thrombin generation by the addition of fVIII as compared to rfVIIa alone. In conclusion, fVIII alone or in combination with rfVIIa corrects the thrombin generation defect produced by the majority of anti-fVIII MAbs better than single agent rfVIIa. Therefore, combined fVIII

  19. Hemodialysis in a patient with severe hemophilia A and factor VIII inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalakrishnan, Natarajan; Usha, Thiruvengadam; Thopalan, Balasubramaniyan; Dhanapriya, Jeyachandran; Dineshkumar, Thanigachalam; Thirumalvalavan, Kaliaperumal; Sakthirajan, Ramanathan

    2016-10-01

    Hemophilia A is a hereditary X-linked recessive disease caused by mutations in the gene encoding factor VIII (FVIII), occurring in 1 out of 10,000 persons. Life expectancy and quality of life have dramatically improved recently in patients with hemophilia. Chronic kidney disease and need for renal replacement therapy in these patients are rare. The development of inhibitors to FVIII is the most serious complication of hemophilia and makes treatment of bleeds very challenging. We describe here a 28-year-old male patient with severe hemophilia A with presence of factor VIII inhibitor, who had end stage renal disease. Central venous access device was inserted along with infusion of factor eight inhibitor bypass activity before and after the procedure. He is currently on thrice weekly hemodialysis and doing well for 6 months without bleeding episodes. To our knowledge, hemophilia A with factor VIII inhibitor managed with hemodialysis has not been reported so far. © 2016 International Society for Hemodialysis.

  20. The F309S mutation increases factor VIII secretion in human cell line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daianne Maciely Carvalho Fantacini

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVES: The capacity of a human cell line to secrete recombinant factor VIII with a F309S point mutation was investigated, as was the effect of the addition of chemical chaperones (betaine and sodium-4-phenylbutyrate on the secretion of factor VIII. METHODS: This work used a vector with a F309S mutation in the A1 domain to investigate FVIII production in the HEK 293 human cell line. Factor VIII activity was measured by chromogenic assay. Furthermore, the effects of chemical drugs on the culture were evaluated. RESULTS: The addition of the F309S mutation to a previously described FVIII variant increased FVIII secretion by 4.5 fold. Moreover, the addition of betaine or sodium-4-phenylbutyrate increased the secretion rate of FVIIIΔB proteins in HEK 293 cells, but the same effect was not seen for FVIIIΔB-F309S indicating that all the recombinant protein produced had been efficiently secreted. CONCLUSION: Bioengineering factor VIII expressed in human cells may lead to an efficient production of recombinant factor VIII and contribute toward low-cost coagulation factor replacement therapy for hemophilia A. FVIII-F309S produced in human cells can be effective in vivo.

  1. Functional regions in coagulation factor VIII explored by mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bloem, E.

    2013-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms behind the function of factor VIII (FVIII) have remained poorly understood. FVIII acts in the blood coagulation cascade as cofactor for activated factor IX (FIXa) in the membrane bound activated factor X generating (FXase) complex. A functional absence in FVIII leads to the

  2. Immunogenicity and pharmacokinetic studies of recombinant Factor VIII containing lipid cochleates

    OpenAIRE

    Kosloski, Matthew P.; Peng, Aaron; Varma, Prashant R.; Fathallah, Anas M.; MICLEA, RAZVAN D.; Mager, Donald E.; Balu-Iyer, Sathy V.

    2010-01-01

    Replacement therapy using recombinant factor VIII (rFVIII) is currently the most common therapy for hemophilia A, a bleeding disorder caused by the deficiency of FVIII. However, 15–30% of patients develop inhibitory antibodies against administered rFVIII which complicates the therapy. Encapsulation or association of protein with lipidic structures can reduce this immune response. Previously, we developed and characterized rFVIII-containing phosphatidylserine (PS) cochleate cylinders using bio...

  3. Collagen-bound von Willebrand factor has reduced affinity for factor VIII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendetowicz, A V; Wise, R J; Gilbert, G E

    1999-04-30

    von Willebrand factor (vWf) is a multimeric adhesive glycoprotein that serves as a carrier for factor VIII in plasma. Although each vWf subunit displays a high affinity binding site for factor VIII in vitro, in plasma, only 2% of the vWf sites for factor VIII are occupied. We investigated whether interaction of plasma proteins with vWf or adhesion of vWf to collagen may alter the affinity or availability of factor VIII-binding sites on vWf. When vWf was immobilized on agarose-linked monoclonal antibody, factor VIII bound to vWf with high affinity, and neither the affinity nor binding site availability was influenced by the presence of 50% plasma. Therefore, plasma proteins do not alter the affinity or availability of factor VIII-binding sites. In contrast, when vWf was immobilized on agarose-linked collagen, its affinity for factor VIII was reduced 4-fold, with KD increasing from 0.9 to 3.8 nM. However, one factor VIII-binding site remained available on each vWf subunit. A comparable reduction in affinity for factor VIII was observed when vWf was a constituent of the subendothelial cell matrix and when it was bound to purified type VI collagen. In parallel with the decreased affinity for factor VIII, collagen-bound vWf displayed a 6-fold lower affinity for monoclonal antibody W5-6A, with an epitope composed of residues 78-96 within the factor VIII-binding motif of vWf. We conclude that collagen induces a conformational change within the factor VIII-binding motif of vWf that lowers the affinity for factor VIII.

  4. Isolation, subunit structure, and proteolytic modification of bovine factor VIII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legaz, M E; Weinstein, M J; Heldebrant, C M; Davie, E W

    1975-01-20

    A new method has been described for the isolation of factor VIII. The method results in a high yield of factor VIII that is homogeneous by several different criteria. The purified protein is very stable and is not dissociated in the presence of 1 M NaCl or 0.25 M CaCl2. The highly purified protein is readily activated and inactivated by various proteolytic enzymes, such as thrombin, plasmin, and trypsin. The molecular events that lead to the activation reaction, however, have not been established.

  5. Endogenous factor VIII synthesis from the intron 22-inverted F8 locus may modulate the immunogenicity of replacement therapy for hemophilia A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Gouri Shankar; Yanover, Chen; Miller-Jenkins, Lisa M; Garfield, Susan; Cole, Shelley A; Curran, Joanne E; Moses, Eric K; Rydz, Natalia; Simhadri, Vijaya; Kimchi-Sarfaty, Chava; Lillicrap, David; Viel, Kevin R; Przytycka, Teresa M; Pierce, Glenn F; Howard, Tom E; Sauna, Zuben E

    2013-10-01

    Neutralizing antibodies (inhibitors) to replacement factor VIII (FVIII, either plasma derived or recombinant) impair the effective management of hemophilia A. Individuals with hemophilia A due to major deletions of the FVIII gene (F8) lack antigenically cross-reactive material in their plasma ("CRM-negative"), and the prevalence of inhibitors in these individuals may be as high as 90%. Conversely, individuals with hemophilia A caused by F8 missense mutations are CRM-positive, and their overall prevalence of inhibitors is hemophilia A) have been grouped with the former on the basis of their genetic defect and CRM-negative status. However, only ∼20% of these individuals develop inhibitors. Here we demonstrate that the levels of F8 mRNA and intracellular FVIII protein in B lymphoblastoid cells and liver biopsies from individuals with the intron 22 inversion are comparable to those in healthy controls. These results support the hypothesis that most individuals with the intron 22 inversion are tolerized to FVIII and thus do not develop inhibitors. Furthermore, we developed a new pharmacogenetic algorithm that permits the stratification of inhibitor risk for individuals and subpopulations by predicting the immunogenicity of replacement FVIII using, as input, the number of putative T cell epitopes in the infused protein and the competence of major histocompatibility complex class II molecules to present such epitopes. This algorithm showed statistically significant accuracy in predicting the presence of inhibitors in 25 unrelated individuals with the intron 22 inversion.

  6. piggyBac-mediated phenotypic correction of factor VIII deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janice M Staber

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemophilia A, caused by a deficiency in factor VIII (FVIII, is the most severe inherited bleeding disorder. Hemophilia A is an attractive gene therapy candidate because even small increases in FVIII levels will positively alter the phenotype. While several vectors are under investigation, gene addition from an integrated transgene offers the possibility of long term expression. We engineered the DNA transposon-based vector, piggyBac (PB, to carry a codon-optimized B-domain deleted human FVIII cDNA. Evaluation of gene transfer efficiency in FVIII null mice demonstrated that PB containing the FVIII cDNA, delivered via hydrodynamic injection to immunocompetent hemophilia mice, conferred persistent gene expression, attaining mean FVIII activity of approximately 60% with 3/19 developing inhibitors. In addition to efficacious expression, a goal of gene transfer-based therapies is to develop vectors with low toxicity. To assess endoplasmic reticulum stress in hepatocytes stably expressing the transgene, we evaluated levels of ER stress markers via qPCR and found no evidence of cell stress. To evaluate phenotypic correction, a tail clip assay performed at the end of the study revealed reduced blood loss. These data demonstrate that PB can be used to achieve sustained FVIII expression and long-term therapeutic benefit in a mouse model.

  7. Development and characterization of lipidic cochleate containing recombinant factor VIII

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miclea, Razvan D.; Varma, Prashant R.; Peng, Aaron; Balu-Iyer, Sathy V.

    2007-01-01

    Hemophilia A, a life threatening bleeding disorder is caused by deficiency of Factor VIII (FVIII). Replacement therapy using rFVIII is the first line therapy for hemophilia A. However, 15-30% of patients develop neutralizing antibody, mainly against the C2, A3 and A2 domains. It has been reported that PS-FVIII complex reduced total and neutralizing anti-rFVIII antibody titers in hemophilia A murine models. Here, we developed FVIII – containing cochleate cylinders, utilizing PS-Ca2+ interactions and characterized these particles for optimal in vivo properties using biophysical and biochemical techniques. Approximately 75% of the protein was associated with cochleate cylinders. Sandwich ELISA, acrylamide quenching and enzymatic digestion studies established that rFVIII was shielded from the bulk aqueous phase by the lipidic structures, possibly leading to improved in vivo stability. Freeze – thawing and rate limiting diffusion studies revealed that small cochleate cylinders with a particles size of 500 nm or less could be generated. The release kinetics and in vivo experiments suggested that there is slow and sustained release of FVIII from the complex upon systemic exposure. In vivo studies using tail clip method indicated that FVIII-cochleate complex is effective and protects hemophilic mice from bleeding. Based on these studies, we speculate that the molecular interaction between FVIII and PS may provide a basis for the design of novel FVIII lipidic structures for delivery applications. PMID:17936245

  8. Presentation and management of a stage Ia lung cancer patient with a paraneoplastic factor VIII inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laselle, Brooks T; Boggio, Lisa N; Blum, Matthew G

    2006-01-01

    Acquired inhibitors to clotting factors most commonly involve factor VIII and are associated with autoimmune disease. Factor VIII inhibitors can cause severe spontaneous and iatrogenic bleeding that is difficult to manage. Factor VIII inhibitors are rarely associated with solid tumors and only three cases of adenocarcinoma of the lung have been reported. This report describes the multidisciplinary management of a factor VIII inhibitor-producing stage Ia lung adenocarcinoma that ultimately resulted in complete resectability.

  9. Factor VIII/V C-domain swaps reveal discrete C-domain roles in factor VIII function and intracellular trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebberink, Eduard H T M; Bouwens, Eveline A M; Bloem, Esther; Boon-Spijker, Mariëtte; van den Biggelaar, Maartje; Voorberg, Jan; Meijer, Alexander B; Mertens, Koen

    2017-04-01

    Factor VIII C-domains are believed to have specific functions in cofactor activity and in interactions with von Willebrand factor. We have previously shown that factor VIII is co-targeted with von Willebrand factor to the Weibel-Palade bodies in blood outgrowth endothelial cells, even when factor VIII carries mutations in the light chain that are associated with defective von Willebrand factor binding. In this study, we addressed the contribution of individual factor VIII C-domains in intracellular targeting, von Willebrand factor binding and cofactor activity by factor VIII/V C-domain swapping. Blood outgrowth endothelial cells were transduced with lentivirus encoding factor V, factor VIII or YFP-tagged C-domain chimeras, and examined by confocal microscopy. The same chimeras were produced in HEK293-cells for in vitro characterization and chemical foot-printing by mass spectrometry. In contrast to factor VIII, factor V did not target to Weibel-Palade bodies. The chimeras showed reduced Weibel-Palade body targeting, suggesting that this requires the factor VIII C1-C2 region. The factor VIII/V-C1 chimera did not bind von Willebrand factor and had reduced affinity for activated factor IX, whereas the factor VIII/V-C2 chimera showed a minor reduction in von Willebrand factor binding and normal interaction with activated factor IX. This suggests that mainly the C1-domain carries factor VIII-specific features in assembly with von Willebrand factor and activated factor IX. Foot-printing analysis of the chimeras revealed increased exposure of lysine residues in the A1/C2- and C1/C2-domain interface, suggesting increased C2-domain mobility and disruption of the natural C-domain tandem pair orientation. Apparently, this affects intracellular trafficking, but not extracellular function. Copyright© Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  10. A study of reported factor VIII use around the world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stonebraker, J S; Brooker, M; Amand, R E; Farrugia, A; Srivastava, A

    2010-01-01

    The effect of replacement therapy has significantly improved the morbidity and mortality of people with haemophilia A in high income countries, a recent socio-economic development as the availability of safe concentrates has been matched by a willingness for their provision through reimbursement. In the developing world, however, this state has not been achieved, primarily because of the low visibility of haemophilia coupled with its expense, leading to inadequate treatment with its sequelae of severe pain, joint deformities, arthropathy, disabilities, and even death in childhood or early adult life. The objective of this paper was to study the reported factor VIII (FVIII) use on a country-by-country basis. Data on the reported FVIII use for 104 countries were obtained from the Marketing Research Bureau, Inc. and the World Federation of Hemophilia. The results show that FVIII use varies considerably among countries, even among the wealthiest of countries. The use of FVIII concentrate increases as economic capacity increases; in addition, consumption of FVIII has been increasing at a greater rate in high income countries. Given these trends, there probably will be a global increase in FVIII concentrates usage. Such information is critical for national healthcare agencies to determine realistic budget priorities in planning for an increased allocation of resources required to improve the treatment of patients with haemophilia A. This information is also important for pharmaceutical manufacturers to adequately plan for increased production of FVIII concentrates.

  11. Treatment of radiation osteomyelitis of the mandible in a patient with acquired factor VIII inhibitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arimoto, Takamasa; Kishimoto, Hiromitsu; Matsumoto, Suwako; Kawanaka, Masao; Urabe, Masahiro; Yoshioka, Wataru [Hyogo Coll. of Medicine, Nishinomiya (Japan)

    1996-07-01

    A case of radiation osteomyelitis of mandible in a 56-year-old man with acquired factor VIII inhibitor is presented. He had undergone radiation therapy for malignant lymphoma of the tonsilar region seven years earlier, and also had received steroids to treat acquired factor VIII inhibitor for a year. On initial examination, he was given a diagnosis of phlegmon of the cheek caused by pericoronitis of the left lower wisdom tooth. To prevent the recurrence of inflammation, the wisdom tooth was extracted carefully, but radiation osteomyelitis occurred in association with a pathological fracture of the condylar head. After mini-pulse therapy with methylpredonisolone, segmental mandibulectomy and reconstruction with a titanium metal plate were performed. The postoperative course was satisfactory with no complications such as bleeding or infection. (author)

  12. Evaluation of Factor VIII as a Risk Factor in Indian Patients with DVT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazra, Darpanarayan; Sen, Indrani; Stephen, Edwin; Agarwal, Sunil; Nair, Sukesh Chandran; Mammen, Joy

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Elevated factor VIII population in the Indian population has not been studied as a possible risk factor for deep vein thrombosis (DVT). High factor VIII level is considered a predisposing factor for DVT and its recurrence. However it is known to vary between populations and its exact role in the etiopathogenesis of thrombophilia remains unknown. Material and Methods. Factor VIII levels of patients with DVT who had undergone a prothrombotic workup as a part of their workup was compared to normal age matched controls in a 1 : 3 ratio. Results. There were 75 patients with DVT who had undergone a prothrombotic workup in the course of their treatment for lower limb DVT. In these, 64% had levels of factor VIII more than 150 as compared to 63% of normal controls (p > 0.05, not significant). Conclusion. Elevated factor VIII in the Indians may not be associated with the same thrombotic risk as seen in the West. We find a variation in the levels of factor VIII with a different "normal" than what is reported in other populations. This needs further study to elucidate the role of factor VIII in the evaluation and treatment of thrombophilia.

  13. Renal Vein Thrombosis in a Newborn With Abnormal Factor VIII Level: Clinical Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szafranska, Agnieszka; Pajak, Agata; Kilis-Pstrusinska, Katarzyna; Królak-Olejnik, Barbara

    2015-08-01

    Renal vein thrombosis (RVT) in neonates is a rare condition of low mortality but significant morbidity due to renal impairment.We report the case of a male term newborn with left RVT and elevated serum factor VIII (FVIII).The main symptoms of the patient and the important clinical findings: prompt diagnosis of RVT was possible because the classic clinical presentation of macroscopic hematuria, thrombocytopenia, and palpable flank mass were present in this newborn infant.The main diagnoses: finally, the reason of RVT was established when the infant was 3 months of age: the increased level of FVIII was confirmed. We discuss the diagnosis, therapy, and outcome of the patient and compare with the literature.Therapeutics interventions: however, despite anticoagulant therapy the left kidney developed areas of scarring and then atrophy.Conclusions and outcomes: Prothrombotic defects should be considered in all patients with perinatal RVT. Elevated factor VIII as a reason of RVT in neonatal period is particularly rare. Given a poor renal outcome in children associated with elevated levels of factor VIII, consideration could be given to more aggressive antithrombotic therapy in such cases.

  14. Construction of a mouse model of factor VIII deficiency by gene targeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bi, L.; Lawler, A.; Gearhart, J. [Univ. of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    To develop a small animal model of hemophilia A for gene therapy experiments, we set out to construct a mouse model for factor VIII deficiency by gene targeting. First, we screened a mouse liver cDNA library using a human FVIII cDNA probe. We cloned a 2.6 Kb partial mouse factor VIII cDNA which extends from 800 base pairs of the 3{prime} end of exon 14 to the 5{prime} end of exon 26. A mouse genomic library made from strain 129 was then screened to obtain genomic fragments covering the exons desired for homologous recombination. Two genomic clones were obtained, and one covering exon 15 through 22 was used for gene targeting. To make gene targeting constructs, a 5.8 Kb genomic DNA fragment covering exons 15 to 19 of the mouse FVIII gene was subcloned, and the neo expression cassette was inserted into exons 16 and 17 separately by different strategies. These two constructs were named MFVIIIC-16 and MFVIIIC-17. The constructs were linearized and transfected into strain 129 mouse ES cells by electroporation. Factor VIII gene-knockout ES cell lines were selected by G-418 and screened by genomic Southern blots. Eight exon 16 targeted cell lines and five exon 17 targeted cell lines were obtained. Three cell lines from each construct were injected into blastocysts and surgically transferred into foster mothers. Multiple chimeric mice with 70-90% hair color derived from the ES-cell genotype were seen with both constructs. Germ line transmission of the ES-cell genotype has been obtained for the MFVIIIC-16 construct, and multiple hemophilia A carrier females have been identified. Factor VIII-deficient males will be conceived soon.

  15. von Willebrand factor binds to the surface of dendritic cells and modulates peptide presentation of factor VIII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorvillo, Nicoletta; Hartholt, Robin B; Bloem, Esther; Sedek, Magdalena; ten Brinke, Anja; van der Zwaan, Carmen; van Alphen, Floris P; Meijer, Alexander B; Voorberg, Jan

    2016-03-01

    It has been proposed that von Willebrand factor might affect factor VIII immunogenicity by reducing factor VIII uptake by antigen presenting cells. Here we investigate the interaction of recombinant von Willebrand factor with immature monocyte-derived dendritic cells using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. Surprisingly, von Willebrand factor was not internalized by immature dendritic cells, but remained bound to the cell surface. As von Willebrand factor reduces the uptake of factor VIII, we investigated the repertoire of factor VIII presented peptides when in complex with von Willebrand factor. Interestingly, factor VIII-derived peptides were still abundantly presented on major histocompatibility complex class II molecules, even though a reduction of factor VIII uptake by immature dendritic cells was observed. Inspection of peptide profiles from 5 different donors showed that different core factor VIII peptide sequences were presented upon incubation with factor VIII/von Willebrand factor complex when compared to factor VIII alone. No von Willebrand factor peptides were detected when immature dendritic cells were pulsed with different concentrations of von Willebrand factor, confirming lack of von Willebrand factor endocytosis. Several von Willebrand factor derived peptides were recovered when cells were pulsed with von Willebrand factor/factor VIII complex, suggesting that factor VIII promotes endocytosis of small amounts of von Willebrand factor by immature dendritic cells. Taken together, our results establish that von Willebrand factor is poorly internalized by immature dendritic cells. We also show that von Willebrand factor modulates the internalization and presentation of factor VIII-derived peptides on major histocompatibility complex class II.

  16. Acquired factor VIII inhibitor syndrome: A rare cause of hematuria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muthuvel Seral Kannan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A 50-year-old woman presented with gross hematuria for 1 month. Clinical examinations, laboratory investigations, ultrasound and contrast computed tomography were normal, except anemia. Cystoscopy revealed bloody efflux from the right side. Retrograde pyelogram showed filling defect in the renal pelvis and biopsy was inconclusive. Renal angiogram was normal. She developed ecchymosis on the right thigh and arm with elevated activated partial thromboplastin time. The partial thromboplastin time correction study and Bethesda study confirmed the presence of acquired factor VIII inhibitor (acquired hemophilia. With flexible ureterorenoscopy, the mass in the renal pelvis was removed and its histopathology revealed clotted blood. The patient was subsequently managed with steroids and Factor eight inhibitor bypass activity.

  17. Factor VIII and von Willebrand factor changes during normal pregnancy and puerperium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Luceros, Analía; Meschengieser, Susana S; Marchese, Carlos; Votta, Roberto; Casais, Patricia; Woods, Adriana I; Nadal, María V; Salviú, María J; Lazzari, María A

    2003-10-01

    Gestation is a challenge to haemostasis and it is associated with significant haemostatic changes. Several studies have evaluated von Willebrand factor in normal pregnancy, but none considered the personal history of bleeding. We studied a group of healthy non-bleeding women (184 pregnant, 64 puerperium, 37 non-pregnant) to evaluate normal ranges and their relationship to blood group and parity. The von Willebrand factor increased markedly from non-pregnant values up to the end of early puerperium (P < 0.0001), while factor VIII only showed a slight increase. Factor VIII and von Willebrand factor activity remained within the normal range for non-pregnant women. The return to non-pregnant factor levels occurred in late puerperium, later than previously reported. Only factor VIII was significantly lower in the O blood group (P = 0.035). As regards parity, there were no differences in factor VIII, von Willebrand factor antigen and von Willebrand factor ristocetin cofactor between primigravidae and multigravidae for any period studied (P = 0.888, 0.999, and 0.237, respectively). Our results provide reference ranges that may help to design a study in von Willebrand factor disease in pregnancy.

  18. Purification of coagulation factor VIII by immobilized metal affinity chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Estela S; Verinaud, Claudia I; Oliveira, Douglas S; Raw, Isaías; Lopes, Alexandre P Y; Martins, Elizabeth A L; Cheng, Elisabeth

    2015-01-01

    Factor VIII (FVIII) is a glycoprotein that plays an essential role in blood coagulation cascade. Purification of plasma-derived coagulation FVIII by direct application of plasma to a chromatographic column is a method of choice. Anion exchange column is a very powerful method because FVIII is strongly adsorbed, resulting in good activity recovery and high purification factor. However, vitamin-K-dependent coagulation factors coelute with FVIII. In the present study, we report the separation of vitamin-K-dependent coagulation proteins from FVIII using immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) with Cu(2+) as the metal ligand. Plasma was directly loaded to a Q Sepharose Big Beads column, and FVIII was recovered with 65% activity and a purification factor of approximately 50 times. Then, the Q Sepharose eluate was applied to the IMAC-Cu(2+) column, and FVIII was eluted with 200 mM imidazole, with up to 85% recovery of activity. The mass recovery in this fraction was less than 10% of the applied mass of protein. Vitamin-K-dependent proteins elute with imidazole concentrations of lower than 60 mM. Because of the difference in affinity, FVIII could be completely separated from the vitamin-K-dependent proteins in the IMAC column.

  19. Successful immune tolerance induction consisting of high-dose factor VIII rich in von Willebrand factor and pulsed intravenous immunoglobulin: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kubisz Peter

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The development of factor VIII inhibitors is a serious complication of replacement therapy in patients with congenital hemophilia A. Immune tolerance induction has been accepted as the only clinically proven treatment allowing antigen-specific tolerance to factor VIII. However, some of its issues, such as patient selection, timing, factor VIII dosing, use of immunosuppressive or immunomodulatory procedures, still remain the subject of debate. Case presentation A case of a 3-year-old Caucasian boy with severe congenital hemophilia A, intron 22 inversion of the F8 gene and high-titer inhibitor, who underwent an immune tolerance induction according to the modified Bonn regimen (high doses of plasma-derived factor VIII rich in von Willebrand factor and pulsed intravenous immunoglobulin is presented. The treatment lasted for 13 months and led to the eradication of inhibitor. Conclusion Addition of intravenous immunoglobulin did not negatively affect the course of immune tolerance induction and led to the rapid eradication of factor VIII inhibitor.

  20. Bioengineered coagulation factor VIII enables long-term correction of murine hemophilia A following liver-directed adeno-associated viral vector delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harrison C Brown

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical data support the feasibility and safety of adeno-associated viral (AAV vectors in gene therapy applications. Despite several clinical trials of AAV-based gene transfer for hemophilia B, a unique set of obstacles impede the development of a similar approach for hemophilia A. These include (i the size of the factor VIII (fVIII transgene, (ii humoral immune responses to fVIII, (iii inefficient biosynthesis of human fVIII, and (iv AAV vector immunity. Through bioengineering approaches, a novel fVIII molecule, designated ET3, was developed and shown to improve biosynthetic efficiency 10- to 100-fold. In this study, the utility of ET3 was assessed in the context of liver-directed, AAV-mediated gene transfer into hemophilia A mice. Due to the large size of the expression cassette, AAV-ET3 genomes packaged into viral particles as partial genome fragments. Despite this potential limitation, a single peripheral vein administration of AAV-ET3 into immune-competent hemophilia A mice resulted in correction of the fVIII deficiency at lower vector doses than previously reported for similarly oversized AAV-fVIII vectors. Therefore, ET3 appears to improve vector potency and mitigate at least one of the critical barriers to AAV-based clinical gene therapy for hemophilia A.

  1. [Ssp DnaB intein-mediated ligation of heavy and light chains of coagulation factor VIII in Escherichia coli].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Fuxiang; Liu, Zelong; Qu, Huige; Xin, Xiaolin; Dong, Hongxin; Liu, Xiangqin

    2009-07-01

    We studied the ligation of coagulation factor VIII heavy and light chains in Escherichia coli by utilizing the intein-mediated protein trans-splicing. A B-domain deleted factor VIII (BDD-FVIII) gene was broken into two halves of heavy and light chains before Ser1657 which meets the splicing required conserved residue and then fused to 106 and 48 amino acid-containing N-part termed Int-N and C-part termed Int-C coding sequences of split mini Ssp DnaB intein respectively. These two fusion genes were constructed into a prokaryotic expression vector pBV220. Through induction for expression of recombinant protein it displayed an obvious protein band as predicted size of BDD-FVIII protein on SDS-PAGE gel. Western blotting using factor VIII specific antibodies confirmed that this protein band is BDD-FVIII produced by protein trans-splicing. It demonstrated that the heavy and light chains of BDD-FVIII can be efficiently ligated with the Ssp DnaB intein-mediated protein trans-splicing. These results provided evidence for encouraging our ongoing investigation with intein as a means in dual AAV vectors carrying the factor VIII gene to overcome the packaging size limitation of a single AAV vector in hemophilia A gene therapy.

  2. [Structure and function of the factor VIII/von Willebrand factor complex].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, G

    1990-03-01

    In the blood plasma factor VIII is bound to the von Willebrand factor. The primary structure of the two proteins were clarified by gene clonation. Factor VIII descends from a precursor protein with 2,351 amino acids by splitting of 19 amino acid residues and is activated by partial proteolysis. In the blood coagulation factor VIII acts as co-factor for the activation of factor X by factor IX in the presence of phospholipids and Ca++ within the intrinsic coagulation system. The formation of the von Willebrand factor takes place by splitting of 22 and 741 amino acid residues, respectively, from pre-pro-von Willebrand factor via pro-von Willebrand factor. The subunits of the von Willebrand factor consist od 2,050 amino acid residues. In the blood plasma the von Willebrand factor is existing as a mixture of multimeres. Receptors of the von Willebrand factor on the thrombocytic membrane are the glycoproteins GPIb and GPIIb/GPIIIa, by means of which the adhesion of thrombocytes at the subendoethelium of the vascular wall and the aggregation of thrombocytes are mediated.

  3. Recombinant B domain deleted porcine factor VIII for the treatment of bleeding episodes in adults with acquired hemophilia A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomperts, Edward

    2015-08-01

    Hemophilia A is an inherited deficiency of clotting factor VIII (FVIII) often complicated by inhibitor development (CHAWI) in which neutralizing antibodies block the therapeutic benefit of replacement therapy. Inhibitors to FVIII can also be seen in an auto-immune disease known as acquired hemophilia A (AHA). 'Bypassing' therapies have been shown to provide hemostasis but dosing must be done empirically because current assays cannot measure objective markers of treatment efficacy and safety. A recombinant porcine sequence factor VIII (r-pFVIII) has been developed for the management of AHA. Preclinical, Phase I and Phase II clinical research studies in CHAWI subjects showed therapeutic potential and safety of this agent. A Phase II/III study in AHA with serious bleeding episodes shows a positive response in all subjects after administration. Based on current preclinical and clinical trial data, r-pFVIII should become the first line of treatment in the management of hemorrhage in patients with AHA.

  4. A case of renal infarction associated with elevated factor VIII level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, O Asif; Al-Absi, A; Showkat, A

    2011-09-01

    Elevated factor VIII level has recently been shown to be associated with increased risk of thrombosis. We report here a case of renal infarction in association with elevated factor VIII level. The patient presented with a three-day history of flank pain. Laboratory studies on presentation showed an elevated serum creatinine concentration and microscopic hematuria. He was found to have bilateral pulmonary emboli and left common femoral vein thrombosis; imaging studies showed evidence of renal arterial thrombosis with infarction. Hypercoagulability assessment showed an elevated factor VIII level. He was treated with heparin and warfarin with significant improvement in his renal function. Consideration should be given to measurement of factor VIII level as a part of the workup of unexplained thrombo-embolic events.

  5. Crystal Structure of Human Factor VIII: Implications for the Formation of the Factor IXa-Factor VIIIa Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ngo, J.C.; Huang, M.; Roth, D.A.; Furie, B.C.; Furie, B. (Wyeth); (MBL)

    2008-06-03

    Factor VIII is a procofactor that plays a critical role in blood coagulation, and is missing or defective in hemophilia A. We determined the X-ray crystal structure of B domain-deleted human factor VIII. This protein is composed of five globular domains and contains one Ca{sup 2+} and two Cu{sup 2+} ions. The three homologous A domains form a triangular heterotrimer where the A1 and A3 domains serve as the base and interact with the C2 and C1 domains, respectively. The structurally homologous C1 and C2 domains reveal membrane binding features. Based on biochemical studies, a model of the factor IXa-factor VIIIa complex was constructed by in silico docking. Factor IXa wraps across the side of factor VIII, and an extended interface spans the factor VIII heavy and light chains. This model provides insight into the activation of factor VIII and the interaction of factor VIIIa with factor IXa on the membrane surface.

  6. Crystal Structure of Human Factor VIII: Implications for the Formation of the Factor IXa-Factor VIIIa Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chi Ki Ngo,J.; Huang, M.; Roth, D.; Furie, B.; Furie, B.

    2008-01-01

    Factor VIII is a procofactor that plays a critical role in blood coagulation, and is missing or defective in hemophilia A. We determined the X-ray crystal structure of B domain-deleted human factor VIII. This protein is composed of five globular domains and contains one Ca(2+) and two Cu(2+) ions. The three homologous A domains form a triangular heterotrimer where the A1 and A3 domains serve as the base and interact with the C2 and C1 domains, respectively. The structurally homologous C1 and C2 domains reveal membrane binding features. Based on biochemical studies, a model of the factor IXa-factor VIIIa complex was constructed by in silico docking. Factor IXa wraps across the side of factor VIII, and an extended interface spans the factor VIII heavy and light chains. This model provides insight into the activation of factor VIII and the interaction of factor VIIIa with factor IXa on the membrane surface.

  7. In vitro differentiation of mouse ES cells into hepatocytes with coagulation factors VIII and IX expression profiles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MENG; Ying; HUANG; Shaoliang; MIN; Jun; GUO; Zhongmin

    2006-01-01

    Coagulation factors II, V, VII, VIII, IX and X are produced by hepatocytes. So factors VIII and IX deficiencies, which result in hemophilia A and B, have the potential to respond to cellular re- placement therapy. Embryonic stem (ES) cells provide a unique source for therapeutic applications. Here, E14 mouse ES cells have been induced into hepatocytes in vitro. Morphology revealed that ES-derived hepatic-like cells were round or polyhedral shaped with distinct boundary of individual cells, and some arranged in trabeculae. These cells expressed endodermal- or liver-specific mRNA --transthyretin (TTR), α1-anti-trypsin (AAT), α-fetoprotein (AFP), albumin (ALB), glucose-6- phoshpatase (G6P) and tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT). Approximately (85.1(0.5)% of the ES-de- rived cells was stained positive green with ICG uptake. These cells were also stained magenta as a result of PAS reaction. In this paper, expression of coagulation factors VIII and IX mRNA in the ES-derived cells is documented. Therefore, ES cells might be developed as substitute donor cells for the therapy of coagulation factor deficiencies.

  8. Human von Willebrand factor/factor VIII concentrates in the management of pediatric patients with von Willebrand disease/hemophilia A

    OpenAIRE

    Castaman G; Linari S

    2016-01-01

    Giancarlo Castaman, Silvia Linari Department of Oncology, Center for Bleeding Disorders, Careggi University Hospital, Florence, ItalyAbstract: Several plasma-derived intermediate and high-purity concentrates containing von Willebrand factor (VWF) and factor VIII (FVIII) are currently available. The main role of these products in the management of pediatric the population is represented by the replacement therapy in patients with severe or intermediate forms of von Willebrand disease, in whom ...

  9. Severe Hemophilia A in a Male Old English Sheep Dog with a C→T Transition that Created a Premature Stop Codon in Factor VIII

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozier, Jay N; Kloos, Mark T; Merricks, Elizabeth P; Lemoine, Nathaly; Whitford, Margaret H; Raymer, Robin A; Bellinger, Dwight A; Nichols, Timothy C

    2016-01-01

    Animals with hemophilia are models for gene therapy, factor replacement, and inhibitor development in humans. We have actively sought dogs with severe hemophilia A that have novel factor VIII mutations unlike the previously described factor VIII intron 22 inversion. A male Old English Sheepdog with recurrent soft-tissue hemorrhage and hemarthrosis was diagnosed with severe hemophilia A (factor VIII activity less than 1% of normal). We purified genomic DNA from this dog and ruled out the common intron 22 inversion; we then sequenced all 26 exons. Comparing the results with the normal canine factor VIII sequence revealed a C→T transition in exon 12 of the factor VIII gene that created a premature stop codon at amino acid 577 in the A2 domain of the protein. In addition, 2 previously described polymorphisms that do not cause hemophilia were present at amino acids 909 and 1184. The hemophilia mutation creates a new TaqI site that facilitates rapid genotyping of affected offspring by PCR and restriction endonuclease analyses. This mutation is analogous to the previously described human factor VIII mutation at Arg583, which likewise is a CpG dinucleotide transition causing a premature stop codon in exon 12. Thus far, despite extensive treatment with factor VIII, this dog has not developed neutralizing antibodies (‘inhibitors’) to the protein. This novel mutation in a dog gives rise to severe hemophilia A analogous to a mutation seen in humans. This model will be useful for studies of the treatment of hemophilia. PMID:27780008

  10. Circumventing furin enhances factor VIII biological activity and ameliorates bleeding phenotypes in hemophilia models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siner, Joshua I.; Samelson-Jones, Benjamin J.; Crudele, Julie M.; French, Robert A.; Lee, Benjamin J.; Zhou, Shanzhen; Merricks, Elizabeth; Raymer, Robin; Camire, Rodney M.; Arruda, Valder R.

    2016-01-01

    Processing by the proprotein convertase furin is believed to be critical for the biological activity of multiple proteins involved in hemostasis, including coagulation factor VIII (FVIII). This belief prompted the retention of the furin recognition motif (amino acids 1645–1648) in the design of B-domain–deleted FVIII (FVIII-BDD) products in current clinical use and in the drug development pipeline, as well as in experimental FVIII gene therapy strategies. Here, we report that processing by furin is in fact deleterious to FVIII-BDD secretion and procoagulant activity. Inhibition of furin increases the secretion and decreases the intracellular retention of FVIII-BDD protein in mammalian cells. Our new variant (FVIII-ΔF), in which this recognition motif is removed, efficiently circumvents furin. FVIII-ΔF demonstrates increased recombinant protein yields, enhanced clotting activity, and higher circulating FVIII levels after adeno-associated viral vector–based liver gene therapy in a murine model of severe hemophilia A (HA) compared with FVIII-BDD. Moreover, we observed an amelioration of the bleeding phenotype in severe HA dogs with sustained therapeutic FVIII levels after FVIII-ΔF gene therapy at a lower vector dose than previously employed in this model. The immunogenicity of FVIII-ΔF did not differ from that of FVIII-BDD as a protein or a gene therapeutic. Thus, contrary to previous suppositions, FVIII variants that can avoid furin processing are likely to have enhanced translational potential for HA therapy. PMID:27734034

  11. Immunogenicity and pharmacokinetic studies of recombinant factor VIII containing lipid cochleates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosloski, Matthew P; Peng, Aaron; Varma, Prashant R; Fathallah, Anas M; Miclea, Razvan D; Mager, Donald E; Balu-iyer, Sathy V

    2011-05-01

    Replacement therapy using recombinant factor VIII (rFVIII) is currently the most common therapy for hemophilia A, a bleeding disorder caused by the deficiency of FVIII. However, 15-30% of patients develop inhibitory antibodies against administered rFVIII, which complicates the therapy. Encapsulation or association of protein with lipidic structures can reduce this immune response. Previous studies developed and characterized rFVIII-containing phosphatidylserine (PS) cochleate cylinders using biophysical techniques. It was hypothesized that these structures may provide a reduction in immunogenicity while avoiding the rapid clearance by the reticuloendothelial system (RES) previously observed with liposomal vesicles of similar composition. This study investigated in vivo behavior of the cochleates containing rFVIII including immunogenicity and pharmacokinetics in hemophilia A mice. The rFVIII-cochleate complex significantly reduced the level of inhibitory antibody developed against rFVIII following intravenous (i.v.) administration. Pharmacokinetic modeling allowed assessment of in vivo release kinetics. Cochleates acted as a delayed release delivery vehicle with an input peak of cochleates showed limited RES uptake and associated rFVIII displayed a similar disposition to the free protein upon release from the structure. Incomplete disassociation from the complex limits systemic availability of the protein. Further formulation efforts are warranted to regulate the rate and extent of release of rFVIII from cochleate complexes.

  12. Immunological abnormalities in haemophilia: are they caused by American factor VIII concentrate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froebel, K S; Madhok, R; Forbes, C D; Lennie, S E; Lowe, G D; Sturrock, R D

    1983-10-15

    Scottish patients with haemophilia, most of whom had received no American factor VIII concentrate for over two years, were found to have immunological abnormalities similar to those in their American counterparts--that is, a reduced proportion of T helper cells, an increased proportion of T suppressor cells, and a reduced response to concanavilin A. Factor VIII from both the United States and Scotland severely inhibited the in vitro lymphocyte response to mitogens in patients and controls. The American and Scottish concentrates could not be distinguished in terms of either patient usage or their effect in vitro. These results argue against a disease vector specific to American blood products.

  13. Safety and Efficacy of BAY 94-9027, a Prolonged-Half-Life Factor VIII

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reding, M T; Ng, H J; Poulsen, Lone Hvitfeldt

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: BAY 94-9027 is a B-domain-deleted prolonged-half-life recombinant factor VIII (FVIII) conjugates in a site-specific manner with polyethylene glycol. OBJECTIVE: Assess efficacy and safety of BAY 94-9027 for prophylaxis and treatment of bleeds in patients with severe hemophilia A PATIEN...

  14. Immune recognition and processing of blood coagulation factor VIII by antigen-presenting cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Haren, S.D.

    2011-01-01

    Hemophilia A is an X chromosome-linked bleeding disorder caused by a reduction or com­plete absence of coagulation factor VIII (FVIII). The bleeding tendency in patients suffering from hemophilia A can be treated by regular intravenous administrations of FVIII. A severe complication that occurs in

  15. Analysis of mutations in the entire coding sequence of the factor VIII gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bidichadani, S.I.; Lanyon, W.G.; Connor, J.M. [Glascow Univ. (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Hemophilia A is a common X-linked recessive disorder of bleeding caused by deleterious mutations in the gene for clotting factor VIII. The large size of the factor VIII gene, the high frequency of de novo mutations and its tissue-specific expression complicate the detection of mutations. We have used a combination of RT-PCR of ectopic factor VIII transcripts and genomic DNA-PCRs to amplify the entire essential sequence of the factor VIII gene. This is followed by chemical mismatch cleavage analysis and direct sequencing in order to facilitate a comprehensive search for mutations. We describe the characterization of nine potentially pathogenic mutations, six of which are novel. In each case, a correlation of the genotype with the observed phenotype is presented. In order to evaluate the pathogenicity of the five missense mutations detected, we have analyzed them for evolutionary sequence conservation and for their involvement of sequence motifs catalogued in the PROSITE database of protein sites and patterns.

  16. Potential role of a new PEGylated recombinant factor VIII for hemophilia A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wynn TT

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Tung Thanh Wynn,1 Burak Gumuscu,2,3 1Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, 2Pediatric Hematology-Oncology, Bon Secours Health System, St. Mary’s Hospital, Richmond, VA, 3Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USA Abstract: Hemophilia A, a deficiency in the activity of coagulation factor (F VIII, is an X-linked bleeding disorder with an approximate incidence of one in 5,000 male infants. Bleeding-related complications often result in greater severity of disease, poor quality of life, surgical interventions for severe joint destruction, and shortened life span. With the availability of plasma-derived and recombinant FVIII products, the benefits of primary prophylaxis were demonstrated and is now the standard of care for patients with severe factor deficiencies. Current hemophilia research is focusing on the creation of new factor replacement therapies with longer half-lives; accessing alternative mechanisms to achieve desired hemostasis and enhance bypassing ­activity; and limiting the immunogenicity of the protein. PEGylation involves the covalent attachment of polyethylene glycol (PEG to a protein, peptide, or a small molecule drug. PEG effectively increases the molecular weight and size of the protein by creating a hydrophilic cloud around the molecule. This molecular change may reduce susceptibility of the molecule to proteolytic activity and degradation. It is also believed that PEGylation changes the surface charge of the protein that ultimately interferes with some receptor-mediated clearance processes. The half-life of PEGylated factor is more prolonged when compared to non-PEGylated full-length recombinant FVIII. The dawn of a new era in the care of hemophilia patients is upon us with the release of recombinant FVIII products with extended half-lives, and products with even more extended half

  17. Binding of factor VIII to von willebrand factor is enabled by cleavage of the von Willebrand factor propeptide and enhanced by formation of disulfide-linked multimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendetowicz, A V; Morris, J A; Wise, R J; Gilbert, G E; Kaufman, R J

    1998-07-15

    von Willebrand factor (vWF) is a multimeric adhesive glycoprotein with one factor VIII binding site/subunit. Prior reports suggest that posttranslational modifications of vWF, including formation of N-terminal intersubunit disulfide bonds and subsequent cleavage of the propeptide, influence availability and/or affinity of factor VIII binding sites. We found that deletion of the vWF propeptide produced a dimeric vWF molecule lacking N-terminal intersubunit disulfide bonds. This molecule bound fluorescein-labeled factor VIII with sixfold lower affinity than multimeric vWF in an equilibrium flow cytometry assay (approximate KDs, 5 nmol/L v 0.9 nmol/L). Coexpression of propeptide-deleted vWF with the vWF propeptide in trans yielded multimeric vWF that displayed increased affinity for factor VIII. Insertion of an alanine residue at the N-terminus of the mature vWF subunit destroyed binding to factor VIII, indicating that the native mature N-terminus is required for factor VIII binding. The requirement for vWF propeptide cleavage was shown by (1) a point mutation of the vWF propeptide cleavage site yielding pro-vWF that was defective in factor VIII binding and (2) correlation between efficiency of intracellular propeptide cleavage and factor VIII binding. Furthermore, in a cell-free system, addition of the propeptide-cleaving enzyme PACE/furin enabled factor VIII binding in parallel with propeptide cleavage. Our results indicate that high-affinity factor VIII binding sites are located on N-terminal disulfide-linked vWF subunits from which the propeptide has been cleaved.

  18. Potential for cellular stress response to hepatic factor VIII expression from AAV vector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Zolotukhin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemophilia A and B are coagulation disorders resulting from the loss of functional coagulation factor VIII (FVIII or factor IX proteins, respectively. Gene therapy for hemophilia with adeno-associated virus vectors has shown efficacy in hemophilia B patients. Although hemophilia A patients are more prevalent, the development of therapeutic adeno-associated virus vectors has been impeded by the size of the F8 cDNA and impaired secretion of FVIII protein. Further, it has been reported that over-expression of the FVIII protein induces endoplasmic reticulum stress and activates the unfolded protein response pathway both in vitro and in hepatocytes in vivo, presumably due to retention of misfolded FVIII protein within the endoplasmic reticulum. Engineering of the F8 transgene, including removal of the B domain (BDD-FVIII and codon optimization, now allows for the generation of adeno-associated virus vectors capable of expressing therapeutic levels of FVIII. Here we sought to determine if the risks of inducing the unfolded protein response in murine hepatocytes extend to adeno-associated virus gene transfer. Although our data show a mild activation of unfolded protein response markers following F8 gene delivery at a certain vector dose in C57BL/6 mice, it was not augmented upon further elevated dosing, did not induce liver pathology or apoptosis, and did not impact FVIII immunogenicity.

  19. Potential for cellular stress response to hepatic factor VIII expression from AAV vector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolotukhin, Irene; Markusic, David M; Palaschak, Brett; Hoffman, Brad E; Srikanthan, Meera A; Herzog, Roland W

    2016-01-01

    Hemophilia A and B are coagulation disorders resulting from the loss of functional coagulation factor VIII (FVIII) or factor IX proteins, respectively. Gene therapy for hemophilia with adeno-associated virus vectors has shown efficacy in hemophilia B patients. Although hemophilia A patients are more prevalent, the development of therapeutic adeno-associated virus vectors has been impeded by the size of the F8 cDNA and impaired secretion of FVIII protein. Further, it has been reported that over-expression of the FVIII protein induces endoplasmic reticulum stress and activates the unfolded protein response pathway both in vitro and in hepatocytes in vivo, presumably due to retention of misfolded FVIII protein within the endoplasmic reticulum. Engineering of the F8 transgene, including removal of the B domain (BDD-FVIII) and codon optimization, now allows for the generation of adeno-associated virus vectors capable of expressing therapeutic levels of FVIII. Here we sought to determine if the risks of inducing the unfolded protein response in murine hepatocytes extend to adeno-associated virus gene transfer. Although our data show a mild activation of unfolded protein response markers following F8 gene delivery at a certain vector dose in C57BL/6 mice, it was not augmented upon further elevated dosing, did not induce liver pathology or apoptosis, and did not impact FVIII immunogenicity. PMID:27738644

  20. A population pharmacokinetic model for perioperative dosing of factor VIII in hemophilia A patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazendonk, Hendrika; Fijnvandraat, Karin; Lock, Janske; Driessens, Mariëtte; van der Meer, Felix; Meijer, Karina; Kruip, Marieke; Gorkom, Britta Laros-van; Peters, Marjolein; de Wildt, Saskia; Leebeek, Frank; Cnossen, Marjon; Mathôt, Ron

    2016-10-01

    The role of pharmacokinetic-guided dosing of factor concentrates in hemophilia is currently a subject of debate and focuses on long-term prophylactic treatment. Few data are available on its impact in the perioperative period. In this study, a population pharmacokinetic model for currently registered factor VIII concentrates was developed for severe and moderate adult and pediatric hemophilia A patients (FVIII levels modeling was performed using non-linear mixed-effects modeling. Population pharmacokinetic parameters were estimated in 75 adults undergoing 140 surgeries (median age: 48 years; median weight: 80 kg) and 44 children undergoing 58 surgeries (median age: 4.3 years; median weight: 18.5 kg). Pharmacokinetic profiles were best described by a two-compartment model. Typical values for clearance, intercompartment clearance, central and peripheral volume were 0.15 L/h/68 kg, 0.16 L/h/68 kg, 2.81 L/68 kg and 1.90 L/68 kg. Interpatient variability in clearance and central volume was 37% and 27%. Clearance decreased with increasing age (Pmodel describes the perioperative pharmacokinetics of various FVIII concentrates, allowing individualization of perioperative FVIII therapy for severe and moderate hemophilia A patients by Bayesian adaptive dosing. Copyright© Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  1. Variation in baseline factor VIII concentration in a retrospective cohort of mild/moderate hemophilia A patients carrying identical F8 mutations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loomans, J.I.; Velzen, A.S. van; Eckhardt, C.L.; Peters, M.; Makipernaa, A.; Holmstrom, M.; Brons, P.P.T.; Dors, N.; Haya, S.; Voorberg, J.; Bom, J.G. Van Der; Fijnvandraat, K.

    2017-01-01

    Essentials Factor VIII levels vary in mild and moderate hemophilia A (MHA) patients with the same mutation. We aimed to estimate the variation and determinants of factor VIII levels among MHA patients. Age and genotype explain 59% of the observed inter-individual variation in factor VIII levels.

  2. Desenvolvimento de inibidores do fator VIII na hemofilia A Development of factor VIII inhibitors in hemophilia A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel G. Chaves

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A hemofilia A é uma coagulopatia genética com herança recessiva ligada ao cromossomo X que afeta 1-2 a cada 10 mil indivíduos do sexo masculino nascidos vivos. Estes indivíduos têm baixas concentrações ou ausência do fator VIII (FVIII da coagulação no plasma e apresentam quadros hemorrágicos leves, moderados e graves, dependendo da atividade de FVIII circulante. Estes pacientes necessitam de constante reposição proteica e aproximadamente 30% deles desenvolvem aloanticorpos contra a proteína exógena. A síntese dos anticorpos anti-FVIII é iniciada quando o FVIII exógeno é endocitado por células apresentadoras de antígeno, degradado e apresentado às células T CD4+ na forma de peptídeos ligados a moléculas do complexo maior de histocompatibilidade (MHC de classe II. Alguns fatores de risco (paciente/tratamento podem ser relacionados ao desenvolvimento desta resposta imune. Neste contexto, as mutações no gene do FVIII e polimorfismos em genes envolvidos na resposta imune são candidatos moleculares como determinantes imunogenéticos na predisposição para o desenvolvimento de inibidores. Por não ser completamente entendido e controlado, o desenvolvimento desta resposta imune contra o FVIII constitui o maior problema decorrente do tratamento de indivíduos portadores de hemofilia A e faz-se necessária busca de opções que visem minimizar suas ações deletérias. Algumas alternativas de tratamento têm se mostrado eficazes no tratamento (anti-CD20, plasmaférese, concentrado de complexo protrombínico (PCCs, concentrado de complexo protrombínico ativado (APCCs, fator VII humano ativado, mas a retirada ou neutralização específica dos inibidores de FVIII ainda não foram alcançadas.Hemophilia A, which affects 1-2:10,000 live-born male neonates, is a genetic coagulopathy with recessive inheritance linked to the X chromosome. These individuals have low concentrations or no coagulation factor VIII (FVIII in the plasma

  3. Evolution of recombinant factor VIII safety: KOGENATE and Kogenate FS/Bayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lusher, Jeanne M; Scharrer, Inge

    2009-11-01

    The use of factor VIII (FVIII) concentrates in the treatment of hemophilia A has raised important safety issues, historically of pathogen transmission and increasingly of inhibitor development to FVIII treatment. While manufacturing processes of current recombinant FVIII products have been shaped entirely around preventing pathogen transmission, the same modifications that afford a greater margin of safety could affect immunogenicity of the product, consequences of which could only be seen through long-term clinical experience. This review summarizes pathogen safety and inhibitor reports from clinical trials, post-marketing surveillance studies, and study reports on KOGENATE and its successor, Kogenate FS/Bayer. Although KOGENATE and Kogenate FS/Bayer are nearly identical products, subtle manufacturing improvements to address the need for greater margins of safety from a pathogen transmission perspective have also led to a potentially improved immunogenicity profile (15% in previously untreated/minimally treated patients with severe hemophilia A for Kogenate FS/Bayer). Notably, there has been no occurrence of pathogen contamination, and minimal de novo inhibitor formation in previously treated patients throughout the use of both products. Overall, KOGENATE and Kogenate FS/Bayer have a long history of safety in a variety of clinical settings, including treatment of bleeding, surgical management, and prophylaxis therapy.

  4. A population pharmacokinetic model for perioperative dosing of factor VIII in hemophilia A patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazendonk, Hendrika; Fijnvandraat, Karin; Lock, Janske; Driessens, Mariëtte; van der Meer, Felix; Meijer, Karina; Kruip, Marieke; Gorkom, Britta Laros-van; Peters, Marjolein; de Wildt, Saskia; Leebeek, Frank; Cnossen, Marjon; Mathôt, Ron

    2016-01-01

    The role of pharmacokinetic-guided dosing of factor concentrates in hemophilia is currently a subject of debate and focuses on long-term prophylactic treatment. Few data are available on its impact in the perioperative period. In this study, a population pharmacokinetic model for currently registered factor VIII concentrates was developed for severe and moderate adult and pediatric hemophilia A patients (FVIII levels hemophilia A patients by Bayesian adaptive dosing. PMID:27390359

  5. EFFECT OF ORAL CONTRACEPTIVES (LD AND CILEST ON CLOTTING FACTORS VIII AND IX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.R. Sadeghipour Roudsari

    1997-10-01

    Full Text Available Based on epidemiologic data, women who take oral contraceptives seem to have an increased risk of developing thromboembollic disease. The thrombotic effects of oral contraceptive (OC are probably mediated, at least partly through their effects on the coagulation system. Plasma levels of several clotting factors have been shown to be elevated in OC users, and this increase is graduated according to the dose of estrogen. In this study, fifty healthy and non smoking women, aged 18-35 years, were randomly assigned to treatment with 2 different OCs: a monophasic pill containing 30 pg of ethinyl estradiol plus 150µg levonorgestrel (LD and a monophasic pill containing 35µg ethinylestradiol plus 250pg norgestimate (Cilest. Factor VIII plasma values were significantly decreased (P<0.05 only in women treated with the preparation LD, but the levels of factor VIII were not significantly different in the group treated with Cilest. Factor IX plasma values were significantly increased (P<0.05 only in women treated with the preparation Cilest, but the levels of factor Ix were not significantly different in the group treated with LD. In LD and cilest users factors VIII and IX were not significantly changed (P<0.05 in overweight and obese subjects in comparison to normal weight.

  6. Effect of transmembrane pressure on Factor VIII yield in ATF perfusion culture for the production of recombinant human Factor VIII co-expressed with von Willebrand factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seung-Chul; An, Sora; Kim, Hyun-Ki; Park, Beom-Soo; Na, Kyu-Heum; Kim, Byung-Gee

    2016-10-01

    In this study, we evaluated three cell retention devices, an alternating tangential flow (ATF) system, a spin-filter, and a Centritech Lab III centrifuge, for the production of recombinant human Factor VIII co-expressed with von Willebrand factor. From the results, it was found that the FVIII activity in bioreactor was significantly higher in the ATF perfusion culture than two other perfusion cultures. Moreover, the FVIII activity yield was unexpectedly low in the ATF perfusion culture. We have, therefore, studied the reasons for this low FVIII activity yield. It was revealed that the inactivation and the surface adsorption of FVIII onto the harvest bag were not the main reasons for the low yield in the ATF perfusion culture. The FVIII activity yield was not increased by the use of a hollow fiber filter with 0.5 μm pore size instead of 0.2 μm pore size. Additionally, the retention of FVIII molecules by the hollow fiber filter was a dominant factor in the low FVIII activity yield in the ATF perfusion culture. We demonstrated that FVIII yield was significantly improved by controlling transmembrane pressure (TMP) across the hollow fiber filter membrane. Taken together, these results suggest that TMP control could be an efficient method for the enhancement of FVIII yield in an ATF perfusion culture.

  7. Molecular Analysis of Factor VIII and Factor IX Genes in Hemophilia Patients: Identification of Novel Mutations and Molecular Dynamics Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Allaf, Faisal A.; Taher, Mohiuddin M.; Abduljaleel, Zainularifeen; Bouazzaoui, Abdellatif; Athar, Mohammed; Bogari, Neda M.; Abalkhail, Halah A.; Owaidah, Tarek MA.

    2017-01-01

    Background Hemophilias A and B are X-linked bleeding disorders caused by mutations in the factor VIII and factor IX genes, respectively. Our objective was to identify the spectrum of mutations of the factor VIII and factor IX genes in Saudi Arabian population and determine the genotype and phenotype correlations by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. Methods For genotyping, blood samples from Saudi Arabian patients were collected, and the genomic DNA was amplified, and then sequenced by Sanger method. For molecular simulations, we have used softwares such as CHARMM (Chemistry at Harvard Macromolecular Mechanics; http://www.charmm-gui.org) and GROMACS. In addition, the secondary structure was determined based on the solvent accessibility for the confirmation of the protein stability at the site of mutation. Results Six mutations (three novel and three known) were identified in factor VIII gene, and six mutations (one novel and five known) were identified in factor IX gene. The factor VIII novel mutations identified were c.99G>T, p. (W33C) in exon 1, c.2138 DelA, p. (N713Tfs*9) in eon14, also a novel mutation at splicing acceptor site of exon 23 c.6430 - 1G>A. In factor IX, we found a novel mutation c.855G>C, p. (E285D) in exon 8. These novel mutations were not reported in any factor VIII or factor IX databases previously. The deleterious effects of these novel mutations were confirmed by PolyPhen2 and SIFT programs. Conclusion The protein functional and structural studies and the models built in this work would be appropriate for predicting the effects of deleterious amino acid substitutions causing these genetic disorders. These findings are useful for genetic counseling in the case of consanguineous marriages which is more common in the Saudi Arabia. PMID:28270892

  8. Detection of Intracellular Factor VIII Protein in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells by Flow Cytometry

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    Gouri Shankar Pandey

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Flow cytometry is widely used in cancer research for diagnosis, detection of minimal residual disease, as well as immune monitoring and profiling following immunotherapy. Detection of specific host proteins for diagnosis predominantly uses quantitative PCR and western blotting assays. In this study, we optimized a flow cytometry-based detection assay for Factor VIII protein in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs. An indirect intracellular staining (ICS method was standardized using monoclonal antibodies to different domains of human Factor VIII protein. The FVIII protein expression level was estimated by calculating the mean and median fluorescence intensities (MFI values for each monoclonal antibody. ICS staining of transiently transfected cell lines supported the method's specificity. Intracellular FVIII protein expression was also detected by the monoclonal antibodies used in the study in PBMCs of five blood donors. In summary, our data suggest that intracellular FVIII detection in PBMCs of hemophilia A patients can be a rapid and reliable method to detect intracellular FVIII levels.

  9. Potential role of a new PEGylated recombinant factor VIII for hemophilia A

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Tung Thanh Wynn,1 Burak Gumuscu,2,3 1Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, 2Pediatric Hematology-Oncology, Bon Secours Health System, St. Mary’s Hospital, Richmond, VA, 3Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USA Abstract: Hemophilia A, a deficiency in the activity of coagulation factor (F) VIII, is an X-linked bleeding disorder with an ap...

  10. HTLV-III seropositivity in European haemophiliacs exposed to Factor VIII concentrate imported from the USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melbye, M; Froebel, K S; Madhok, R; Biggar, R J; Sarin, P S; Stenbjerg, S; Lowe, G D; Forbes, C D; Goedert, J J; Gallo, R C

    1984-12-22

    77 Scottish haemophiliacs and 22 Danish haemophiliacs were serologically tested for antibodies to human T-cell leukaemia virus III (HTLV-III). Since 1979 the Scottish patients had been treated largely with factor VIII concentrate produced in Scotland, whereas all but 2 of the Danish patients had received both locally prepared concentrate and commercial concentrate made from US donor material. 15.6% of Scottish and 59.1% of Danish haemophiliacs were antibody positive (p less than 0.001). None of 11 haemophiliacs not treated in the period 1979-84 was seropositive. 2 (6.7%) of 30 subjects who had been treated with locally produced concentrate only were antibody positive, compared with 23 (39.7%) of 58 subjects who had been treated with commercial concentrate. Among 52 users of both commercially and locally produced factor VIII concentrate, seropositivity was directly correlated with the consumption of commercial concentrate (p less than 0.001) but not locally produced material. These data indicate that European haemophiliacs were exposed to HTLV-III via some factor VIII concentrates obtained from the USA.

  11. Lineages of human T-cell clones, including T helper 17/T helper 1 cells, isolated at different stages of anti–factor VIII immune responses

    OpenAIRE

    Ettinger, Ruth A.; James, Eddie A.; Kwok, William W.; Arthur R Thompson; Pratt, Kathleen P.

    2009-01-01

    The development of neutralizing antibodies (inhibitors) after factor VIII (FVIII) infusions is a serious complication that affects approximately one-quarter of hemophilia A patients who have access to replacement therapy. To investigate the differentiation of naive T cells into FVIII-specific helper T cells that promote B-cell activation and antibody secretion, HLA-DRA-DRB1*0101-restricted T-cell clones that respond to a specific epitope in FVIII were isolated from a mild hemophilia A subject...

  12. Recombinant factor VIII Fc (rFVIIIFc) fusion protein reduces immunogenicity and induces tolerance in hemophilia A mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Liu, Tongyao; Drager, Douglas; Patarroyo-White, Susannah; Chhabra, Ekta Seth; Peters, Robert; Josephson, Neil; Lillicrap, David; Blumberg, Richard S; Pierce, Glenn F; Jiang, Haiyan

    2016-03-01

    Anti-factor VIII (FVIII) antibodies is a major complication of FVIII replacement therapy for hemophilia A. We investigated the immune response to recombinant human factor VIII Fc (rFVIIIFc) in comparison to BDD-rFVIII and full-length rFVIII (FL-rFVIII) in hemophilia A mice. Repeated administration of therapeutically relevant doses of rFVIIIFc in these mice resulted in significantly lower antibody responses to rFVIII compared to BDD-rFVIII and FL-rFVIII and reduced antibody production upon subsequent challenge with high doses of rFVIIIFc. The induction of a tolerogenic response by rFVIIIFc was associated with higher percentage of regulatory T-cells, a lower percentage of pro-inflammatory splenic T-cells, and up-regulation of tolerogenic cytokines and markers. Disruption of Fc interactions with either FcRn or Fcγ receptors diminished tolerance induction, suggesting the involvement of these pathways. These results indicate that rFVIIIFc reduces immunogenicity and imparts tolerance to rFVIII demonstrating that recombinant therapeutic proteins may be modified to influence immunogenicity and facilitate tolerance.

  13. Elevated factor VIII level and stroke in patients without traditional risk factors associated with cardiovascular diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lasek-Bal A

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Anetta Lasek-Bal, Przemyslaw Puz, Zofia KazibutowskaStroke Unit, Department of Neurology, Medical University of Silesia, Professor Leszek Giec Upper Silesian Medical Centre, Katowice, PolandIntroduction: Hemostasis is affected by interactions between physiological processes, including those connected with the coagulation system, whose essence is converting fibrinogen into fibrin. The role of factor VIII (FVIII consists in activating factor X, which directly participates in the generation of thrombin, which is able to produce stable fibrin, which in turn forms blood clots. There are divergent opinions regarding the significance of high levels of FVIII in stroke pathogenesis.Aim: The aim of our study was to evaluate FVIII activity in individuals with cryptogenic stroke in order to determine a potential relationship between it and cerebral ischemia.Material and methods: Nine patients suffering with stroke were used in this study: six women and three men aged 49–63 years. In all of the patients, the presence of known and potential risk factors for stroke had been excluded during previous diagnostic procedures. These patients accounted for 1.2% of the 719 people who suffered a stroke and were hospitalized in 2011 at the Stroke Unit. FVIII activity was examined in each of the nine qualified subjects within 1–2 months of the occurrence of stroke (the first test and repeated (the second test in five patients with abnormal results obtained from the first examination.Results: Increased activity of FVIII was found in 5 out of 9 patients. In patients with abnormal results, elevated FVIII was found in follow-up examinations in the 8th–10th month following stroke. Hemodynamic abnormalities in carotid or cerebral artery (presence of thrombus were found in 3 of the 5 patients with increased FVIII levels. In the first 24 hours following stroke the neurological state of patients with abnormal FVIII was worse than individuals with normal FVIII activity. The

  14. Application of a novel affinity adsorbent for the capture and purification of recombinant factor VIII compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCue, Justin T; Selvitelli, Keith; Walker, Joshua

    2009-11-06

    Recombinant Factor VIII (FVIII) therapies have been created to provide treatment for Hemophilia A, an inherited bleeding disorder caused by mutation in the FVIII gene. A major challenge in the purification of recombinant FVIII molecules is the development of an affinity chromatography step. Such a step must be highly specific and selective for the FVIII molecule, but also must be designed appropriately to ensure the FVIII molecule can be effectively recovered without resorting to harsh elution conditions which may be harmful to the product. Additionally, it is desirable to have affinity adsorbents designed to be reusable over a large number of column cycles while maintaining consistent purification performance. In this work, we describe the use of VIIISelect, a commercially available affinity adsorbent designed specifically for the purification of FVIII compounds. The VIIISelect adsorbent consists of a 13kDa recombinant protein ligand attached to a cross-linked agarose base matrix. The structure of the recombinant ligand is based upon Camelid-derived single domain antibody fragments. The VIIISelect adsorbent is produced using a process free of animal-derived raw materials, which is a highly desirable attribute for adsorbents used in the purification processes of recombinant protein therapeutics. The VIIISelect adsorbent was used as the initial capture column to purify a FVIII compound directly from clarified cell culture fluid prior to further downstream purification. The purification performance of the VIIISelect was evaluated, which included measurement of the static binding capacity, dynamic binding capacity, product recovery, impurity clearance, and adsorbent reuse. Following laboratory-scale process development, the VIIISelect adsorbent was scaled up and used in the large scale manufacturing of a FVIII compound.

  15. Recurrent myocardial infarctions in a young football player secondary to thrombophilia, associated with elevated factor VIII activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vacek TP

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Thomas P Vacek, Shipeng Yu, Shahnaz Rehman, Blair P Grubb, Daniel Kosinski, Cherian Verghese, Ehab A Eltahawy, Shafiq Qaiser Department of Medicine, University of Toledo Medical Center, Toledo, OH, USAAbstract: Myocardial infarction (MI due to coronary atherosclerosis in young adults is uncommon; rare causes such as cocaine abuse, arterial dissection, and thromboembolism should be considered. A 21-year-old football player, and otherwise healthy African American man, developed chest pain during exercise while bench-pressing 400 lbs. Acute MI was diagnosed based on physical examination, electrocardiography findings, and elevated cardiac enzymes. Coronary arteriography showed a thrombus occluding the proximal left anterior descending artery (LAD. Aggressive antiplatelet therapy with aspirin, clopidogrel, and eptifibatide was pursued, in addition to standard post-MI care. This led to the successful resolution of symptoms and dissolution of the thrombus, demonstrated by repeat coronary arteriography. Five months later, he presented with similar symptoms during exercise after lifting heavy weights, and was found to have another acute MI. Coronary arteriography again showed a thrombus occluding the LAD. No evidence of coronary artery dissection or vasospasm was found. Only mild atherosclerotic plaque burden was observed on both occasions by intravascular ultrasound. A bare metal stent was placed at the site as it was thought this site had acted as a nidus for small plaque rupture and thrombus formation. Elevated serum factor VIII activity at 205% (reference range 60%–140% was found, a rare cause of hypercoagulability. Further workup revealed a patent foramen ovale during a Valsalva maneuver by transesophageal echocardiography. Both events occurred during weight lifting, which can transiently increase right heart pressure in a similar way to the Valsalva maneuver. In light of all the findings, we concluded that an exercise-related increase in factor

  16. Recurrent myocardial infarctions in a young football player secondary to thrombophilia, associated with elevated factor VIII activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacek, Thomas P; Yu, Shipeng; Rehman, Shahnaz; Grubb, Blair P; Kosinski, Daniel; Verghese, Cherian; Eltahawy, Ehab A; Shafiq, Qaiser

    2014-01-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) due to coronary atherosclerosis in young adults is uncommon; rare causes such as cocaine abuse, arterial dissection, and thromboembolism should be considered. A 21-year-old football player, and otherwise healthy African American man, developed chest pain during exercise while bench-pressing 400 lbs. Acute MI was diagnosed based on physical examination, electrocardiography findings, and elevated cardiac enzymes. Coronary arteriography showed a thrombus occluding the proximal left anterior descending artery (LAD). Aggressive antiplatelet therapy with aspirin, clopidogrel, and eptifibatide was pursued, in addition to standard post-MI care. This led to the successful resolution of symptoms and dissolution of the thrombus, demonstrated by repeat coronary arteriography. Five months later, he presented with similar symptoms during exercise after lifting heavy weights, and was found to have another acute MI. Coronary arteriography again showed a thrombus occluding the LAD. No evidence of coronary artery dissection or vasospasm was found. Only mild atherosclerotic plaque burden was observed on both occasions by intravascular ultrasound. A bare metal stent was placed at the site as it was thought this site had acted as a nidus for small plaque rupture and thrombus formation. Elevated serum factor VIII activity at 205% (reference range 60%-140%) was found, a rare cause of hypercoagulability. Further workup revealed a patent foramen ovale during a Valsalva maneuver by transesophageal echocardiography. Both events occurred during weight lifting, which can transiently increase right heart pressure in a similar way to the Valsalva maneuver. In light of all the findings, we concluded that an exercise-related increase in factor VIII activity led to coronary arterial thrombosis in the presence of a small ruptured plaque. Alternatively, venous clots may have traversed the patent foramen ovale and occluded the LAD. In addition to continuing aggressive risk

  17. Refreezing previously thawed fresh-frozen plasma. Stability of coagulation factors V and VIII:C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzik, W H; Riibner, M A; Linehan, S K

    1989-09-01

    With the growth in autologous blood programs and the increased scrutiny of the indications for transfusion of fresh-frozen plasma (FFP), an increase has been seen in the number of occasions on which FFP was requested and thawed but then not transfused. The coagulation properties of FFP units that were refrozen and then rethawed were therefore studied. Fifty-eight units of plasma were studied, with each experimental unit of FFP paired with an identical control unit. Experimental units were frozen, stored at -65 degrees C, thawed, stored at 1 to 6 degrees C for various periods of time up to 24 hours, and then refrozen, stored at -65 degrees C, rethawed, and stored again in the refrigerator for up to 24 hours. Control units were frozen once at the time the experimental units were first frozen and thawed once at the time of the second thaw of the experimental units. Aliquots of plasma were sampled periodically and were later batch-tested for prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), and factor V and VIII:C activity. The results of coagulation testing of the twice-frozen plasmas were always within the normal range. There was a slight but statistically valid prolongation of the PT and aPTT and a decrease in the factor V and VIII:C levels for twice-frozen plasma compared with control plasma. The greatest decline occurred in the level of factor VIII:C. The measured deterioration in coagulation of twice-frozen FFP is unlikely to be of clinical importance. Refreezing FFP may eventually prove useful for rare donor, autologous, and massive transfusion programs.

  18. Analysis of inversions in the factor VIII gene in Spanish hemophilia A patients and families

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domenech, M.; Tizzano, E.; Baiget, M. [Hospital de Sant Pau, Barcelona (Spain); Altisent, C. [Hospital Vall d`Hebron, Barcelona (Spain)

    1994-09-01

    Intron 22 is the largest intron of the factor VIII gene and contains a CpG island from which two additional transcripts originate. One of these transcripts corresponds to the F8A gene which have telomeric extragenic copies in the X chromosome. An inversion involving homologous recombination between the intragenic and the distal or proximal copies of the F8A gene has been recently described as a common cause of severe hemophilia A (HA). We analyzed intron 22 rearrangements in 195 HA patients (123 familial and 72 sporadic cases). According to factor VIII levels, our sample was classified as severe in 114 cases, moderate in 29 cases and mild in 52 cases. An intron 22 (F8A) probe was hybridized to Southern blots of BcII digested DNA obtained from peripheral blood. A clear pattern of altered bands identifies distal or proximal inversions. We detected an abnormal pattern identifying an inversion in 49 (25%) of the analyzed cases. 43% of severe HA patients (49 cases) showed an inversion. As expected, no inversion was found in the moderate and mild group of patients. We found a high proportion (78%) of the distal rearrangement. From 49 identified inversions, 33 were found in familial cases (27%), while the remaining 15 were detected in sporadic patients (22%) in support that this mutational event occurs with a similar frequency in familial or sporadic cases. In addition, we detected a significant tendency of distal inversion to occur more frequently in familial cases than in sporadic cases. Inhibitor development to factor VIII was documented in approximately 1/3 of the patients with inversion. The identification of such a frequent molecular event in severe hemophilia A patients has been applied in our families to carrier and prenatal diagnosis, to determine the origin of the mutation in the sporadic cases and to detect the presence of germinal mosaicism.

  19. Production of factor VIII by human liver sinusoidal endothelial cells transplanted in immunodeficient uPA mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina E Fomin

    Full Text Available Liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs form a semi-permeable barrier between parenchymal hepatocytes and the blood. LSECs participate in liver metabolism, clearance of pathological agents, immunological responses, architectural maintenance of the liver and synthesis of growth factors and cytokines. LSECs also play an important role in coagulation through the synthesis of Factor VIII (FVIII. Herein, we phenotypically define human LSECs isolated from fetal liver using flow cytometry and immunofluorescence microscopy. Isolated LSECs were cultured and shown to express endothelial markers and markers specific for the LSEC lineage. LSECs were also shown to engraft the liver when human fetal liver cells were transplanted into immunodeficient mice with liver specific expression of the urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA transgene (uPA-NOG mice. Engrafted cells expressed human Factor VIII at levels approaching those found in human plasma. We also demonstrate engraftment of adult LSECs, as well as hepatocytes, transplanted into uPA-NOG mice. We propose that overexpression of uPA provides beneficial conditions for LSEC engraftment due to elevated expression of the angiogenic cytokine, vascular endothelial growth factor. This work provides a detailed characterization of human midgestation LSECs, thereby providing the means for their purification and culture based on their expression of CD14 and CD32 as well as a lack of CD45 expression. The uPA-NOG mouse is shown to be a permissive host for human LSECs and adult hepatocytes, but not fetal hepatoblasts. Thus, these mice provide a useful model system to study these cell types in vivo. Demonstration of human FVIII production by transplanted LSECs encourages further pursuit of LSEC transplantation as a cellular therapy for the treatment of hemophilia A.

  20. The 1.7 A X-ray crystal structure of the porcine factor VIII C2 domain and binding analysis to anti-human C2 domain antibodies and phospholipid surfaces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caileen M Brison

    Full Text Available The factor VIII C2 domain is essential for binding to activated platelet surfaces as well as the cofactor activity of factor VIII in blood coagulation. Inhibitory antibodies against the C2 domain commonly develop following factor VIII replacement therapy for hemophilia A patients, or they may spontaneously arise in cases of acquired hemophilia. Porcine factor VIII is an effective therapeutic for hemophilia patients with inhibitor due to its low cross-reactivity; however, the molecular basis for this behavior is poorly understood. In this study, the X-ray crystal structure of the porcine factor VIII C2 domain was determined, and superposition of the human and porcine C2 domains demonstrates that most surface-exposed differences cluster on the face harboring the "non-classical" antibody epitopes. Furthermore, antibody-binding results illustrate that the "classical" 3E6 antibody can bind both the human and porcine C2 domains, although the inhibitory titer to human factor VIII is 41 Bethesda Units (BU/mg IgG versus 0.8 BU/mg IgG to porcine factor VIII, while the non-classical G99 antibody does not bind to the porcine C2 domain nor inhibit porcine factor VIII activity. Further structural analysis of differences between the electrostatic surface potentials suggest that the C2 domain binds to the negatively charged phospholipid surfaces of activated platelets primarily through the 3E6 epitope region. In contrast, the G99 face, which contains residue 2227, should be distal to the membrane surface. Phospholipid binding assays indicate that both porcine and human factor VIII C2 domains bind with comparable affinities, and the human K2227A and K2227E mutants bind to phospholipid surfaces with similar affinities as well. Lastly, the G99 IgG bound to PS-immobilized factor VIII C2 domain with an apparent dissociation constant of 15.5 nM, whereas 3E6 antibody binding to PS-bound C2 domain was not observed.

  1. Characterization of Chinese Hamster Ovary Cells Producing Coagulation Factor VIII Using Multi-omics Tools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaas, Christian Schrøder

    ,000 fold over the last couple of years due to the revolution of next-generation sequencing (NGS), has dramatically accelerated CHO-omics from virtually non-existent to a vibrant growing field. The aim of this thesis was to investigate the impact of coagulation factor VIII (FVIII) production in CHO cells...... for analysis and engineering of industrially relevant CHO cells. Full implementation of such tools for generating specifically engineered CHO production cell lines may allow significant cost-reductions in production of complex biopharmaceuticals such as FVIII....

  2. ADAMTS13 content in plasma-derived factor VIII/von Willebrand factor concentrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyvandi, Flora; Mannucci, Pier M; Valsecchi, Carla; Pontiggia, Silvia; Farina, Claudio; Retzios, Anastassios D

    2013-10-01

    Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is a microangiopathy syndrome caused by a congenital or acquired deficiency of ADAMTS13, a plasma metalloprotease that cleaves von Willebrand factor (VWF) and thus prevents the formation of platelet-rich thrombi in the microcirculation. TTP can be fatal if not appropriately and timely treated with the infusion of fresh frozen plasma (FFP) or exchange plasmapheresis, that reverse the process of microangiopathy by removing anti-ADAMTS13 autoantibodies and replacing functional ADAMTS13. The treatment of TTP with FFP is not free from risks and must be administered in hospitals or clinics, owing to the substantial amount of plasma volume infused or exchanged and the frequent need of catheter application. Moreover, most FFPs are not subjected to treatments to remove or inactivate blood-borne infectious agents. A number of recent reports indicate that certain plasma-derived VWF-factor VIII (FVIII) concentrates are clinically effective in the treatment of congenital TTP. In this study, we measured ADAMTS13 levels in various plasma-derived VWF-FVIII concentrates, showing that Koate(®) -DVI (Grifols), contained relatively high amounts of ADAMTS13 and that Alphanate(®) (Grifols) was the closest other product in terms of protease content. Koate(®) -DVI contains, on average (five lots tested), 0.091 ± 0.007 Units of ADAMTS13 activity per IU of FVIII. On the basis of this analysis and other reports of VWF-FVIII concentrate utilization in congenital TTP, potential dosing, and future clinical developments are discussed.

  3. The impact of von Willebrand factor on factor VIII memory immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Juan; Schroeder, Jocelyn A; Luo, Xiaofeng; Shi, Qizhen

    2017-08-22

    Immune tolerance induction (ITI) with aggressive infusion of factor VIII (FVIII) is the current strategy used to eradicate FVIII inhibitors and restore normal FVIII pharmacokinetics in inhibitor patients. Whether the use of FVIII products containing von Willebrand factor (VWF) will affect the efficacy of ITI is still controversial. In this study, we explored the impact of VWF on FVIII memory immune responses in hemophilia A (HA) mice. A T-cell proliferation assay and cytokine profile analysis were used to study FVIII-primed CD4(+) T cells. When CD4(+) T cells from primed FVIII(null) mice were restimulated with recombinant human FVIII (rhF8) plus recombinant human VWF (rhVWF) in vitro, the percentages of daughter CD4(+) T cells were significantly decreased compared with the groups cultured with rhF8 only. Levels of interferon-γ and interleukin 10 were significantly lower in the rhF8 plus rhVWF groups than in the rhF8 groups. When memory B-cell pools from primed FVIII(null) mice were cultured with rhF8 with or without rhVWF to induce differentiation of memory B cells into antibody-secreting cells (ASCs), the number of ASCs was significantly lower in the rhF8 plus VWF group than in the rhF8 group. When memory B-cell pools were transferred into NSGF8KO mice followed by rhF8 immunization with or without rhVWF, the titers of anti-F8 inhibitors and total immunoglobulin G were significantly higher in the rhF8 group than in the rhF8 plus rhVWF group, with an average difference of 2.23- and 2.04-fold. Together, our data demonstrate that VWF attenuates FVIII memory immune responses in HA mice.

  4. A novel cell-sheet technology that achieves durable factor VIII delivery in a mouse model of hemophilia A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatsumi, Kohei; Sugimoto, Mitsuhiko; Lillicrap, David; Shima, Midori; Ohashi, Kazuo; Okano, Teruo; Matsui, Hideto

    2013-01-01

    Gene- or cell-based therapies aimed at creating delivery systems for coagulation factor VIII (FVIII) protein have emerged as promising options for hemophilia A treatment. However, several issues remain to be addressed regarding the efficacies and adverse events of these new classes of therapies. To improve an existing cell-based therapy involving the subcutaneous transplantation of FVIII-transduced blood outgrowth endothelial cells (BOECs), we employed a novel cell-sheet technology that allows individual dispersed cells to form a thin and contiguous monolayer without traditional bioabsorbable scaffold matrices. Compared to the traditional methodology, our cell-sheet approach resulted in longer-term and 3-5-fold higher expression of FVIII (up to 11% of normal) in recipient hemophilia A mice that lacked a FVIII humoral immune response due to transient immunosuppression with cyclophosphamide. Histological studies revealed that the transplanted BOEC sheets were structured as flat clusters, supporting the long-term expression of therapeutic FVIII in plasma from an ectopic subcutaneous space. Our novel tissue-engineering approach using genetically modified BOEC sheets could aid in development of cell-based therapy that will allow safe and effective in vivo delivery of functional FVIII protein in patients with hemophilia A.

  5. A novel cell-sheet technology that achieves durable factor VIII delivery in a mouse model of hemophilia A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohei Tatsumi

    Full Text Available Gene- or cell-based therapies aimed at creating delivery systems for coagulation factor VIII (FVIII protein have emerged as promising options for hemophilia A treatment. However, several issues remain to be addressed regarding the efficacies and adverse events of these new classes of therapies. To improve an existing cell-based therapy involving the subcutaneous transplantation of FVIII-transduced blood outgrowth endothelial cells (BOECs, we employed a novel cell-sheet technology that allows individual dispersed cells to form a thin and contiguous monolayer without traditional bioabsorbable scaffold matrices. Compared to the traditional methodology, our cell-sheet approach resulted in longer-term and 3-5-fold higher expression of FVIII (up to 11% of normal in recipient hemophilia A mice that lacked a FVIII humoral immune response due to transient immunosuppression with cyclophosphamide. Histological studies revealed that the transplanted BOEC sheets were structured as flat clusters, supporting the long-term expression of therapeutic FVIII in plasma from an ectopic subcutaneous space. Our novel tissue-engineering approach using genetically modified BOEC sheets could aid in development of cell-based therapy that will allow safe and effective in vivo delivery of functional FVIII protein in patients with hemophilia A.

  6. Many factor VIII products available in the treatment of hemophilia A: an embarrassment of riches?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieuw, Kenneth

    2017-01-01

    Hemophilia A (HA) is a common bleeding disorder caused by the deficiency of factor VIII (FVIII) with an incidence of ~1 in 5000 male births. Replacement of FVIII is necessary to prevent and treat bleeding episodes. However, with multiple new drugs in addition to old standards, choosing among the different FVIII treatment options is harder than ever. There are FVIII products that are plasma derived or recombinant, FVIII products designed to extend the half-life of FVIII, and the first single-chain FVIII product, recombinant factor VIII single chain (rFVIII-SC). As development of inhibitors to FVIII continues to be a major problem in the care of HA patients, recent studies showing lower rates of inhibitor development with plasma-derived FVIIII products versus recombinant FVIII products have made choosing among the many options now available even more complex. Although still unproven, extended half-life (EHL) products may provide the hope of decreased immunogenicity but need further testing in previously untreated patients (PUPs). This review highlights some of the differences between FVIII products currently available and hopefully assists the clinician to decide which FVIII product to choose for their patients.

  7. Factor V and VIII combined deficiency: clinical perioperative management for tonsillectomy in a child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanchon, R; Robin, F; Brissaud, O; Marro, M; Nouette-Gaulain, K

    2014-03-01

    Combined factors V (FV) and VIII (FVIII) deficiency is a rarely seen hereditary coagulation disease. Experience of its management in surgery with a high-risk of bleeding is rare. The interest of this case report is to propose a strategy of perioperative management for such a deficit, but also to recall that a careful preoperative anesthetic evaluation with questioning and physical examination permits to detect unsuspected coagulation disorders and to schedule the preventive treatment. The protocol for the perioperative period consisted of the administration of desmopressin and fresh frozen plasma one hour before surgery. The administration of desmopressin was continued for 48hours. Fresh frozen plasma and tranexamic acid were administered during the first 9 postoperative days. A local bleeding occurred at 8 days (scab coming off) and required systematically a surgical hemostasis and an intensification of the therapeutic protocol. Recombinant plasmatic factor VIII was administered for 7 days together with a daily perfusion of fresh frozen plasma for a total treatment period of 14 days.

  8. A new recombinant factor VIII: from genetics to clinical use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santagostino E

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Elena Santagostino Angelo Bianchi Bonomi Hemophilia and Thrombosis Center, Fondazione IRCCS Ca’ Granda, Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milan, Italy Abstract: Advances in recombinant technology and knowledge about coagulation factor VIII (FVIII are building a platform for new therapeutic options in patients with hemophilia A. The development of turoctocog alfa, a novel, high-purity, third-generation, B-domain truncated recombinant FVIII, has been produced and formulated without the use of animal-derived or human serum-derived components, in the wake of understanding of the new biochemical characteristics of FVIII, namely its protein structure, and glycosylation and sulfating patterns. Culture conditions and a five-step purification process have been developed to optimize the safety of turoctocog alfa. The results of two pilot clinical trials using turoctocog alfa confirmed high safety levels, with no patient developing inhibitors during the period of observation. The purpose of this review is to describe briefly the molecular and biological properties of turoctocog alfa, together with details of its clinical development, with emphasis on the needs of patients with hemophilia A. Keywords: hemophilia A, recombinant factor VIII, turoctocog alfa, purification, inhibitor, safety

  9. Continuous infusion of porcine factor VIII in patients with haemophilia A and high-responding inhibitors: stability and clinical experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Gorman, P; Dimichele, D M; Kasper, C K; Mannucci, P M; Santagostini, E; Hay, C R

    2001-11-01

    A multicentre retrospective survey was conducted to assess the efficacy and side-effect profile of porcine factor VIII (pFVIII:C) given by continuous infusion (CI) to patients with congenital haemophilia A and inhibitors. Twenty-nine episodes in 18 patients were treated by CI of pFVIII:C. Efficacy was graded as good in 79% of infusions and fair in 17%. There was a failed response in only one episode. Fourteen percent of patients experienced transfusion reactions with bolus doses, but no reactions were observed in patients given CI. There were no severe reactions. All the reactions resolved following interruption of the infusion and administration of steroids. Premedication did not prevent reactions. In this series the median decrease in platelet count after bolus injection of pFVIII:C was -67 X 10(9) L(-1) compared with a median decrease of -2 x 109 L(-1) during the course of CI, thus, continuous infusion of pFVIII:C appears to have less effect on platelet count than bolus injection. An anamnestic response was associated with 77% of infusions. This high rate of anamnesis reflects patient selection, in that they were all known to have high-level high-responding FVIII inhibitors with cross-reactivity to pFVIII. After reconstitution, the pFVIII:C showed little loss in factor VIII activity in solution over a 24-h period. We conclude that pFVIII:C may be effectively administered by CI to patients with haemophilia A and high-responding FVIII inhibitors. CI is the probably the mode of administration of choice for intensive replacement therapy with pFVIII.

  10. Structural investigation of zymogenic and activated forms of human blood coagulation factor VIII: a computational molecular dynamics study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkateswarlu Divi

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human blood coagulation factor VIII (fVIII is a large plasma glycoprotein with sequential domain arrangement in the order A1-a1-A2-a2-B-a3-A3-C1-C2. The A1, A2 and A3 domains are interconnected by long linker peptides (a1, a2 and a3 that possess the activation sites. Proteolysis of fVIII zymogen by thrombin or factor Xa results in the generation of the activated form (fVIIIa which serves as a critical co-factor for factor IXa (fIXa enzyme in the intrinsic coagulation pathway. Results In our efforts to elucidate the structural differences between fVIII and fVIIIa, we developed the solution structural models of both forms, starting from an incomplete 3.7 Å X-ray crystal structure of fVIII zymogen, using explicit solvent MD simulations. The full assembly of B-domainless single-chain fVIII was built between the A1-A2 (Ala1-Arg740 and A3-C1-C2 (Ser1669-Tyr2332 domains. The structural dynamics of fVIII and fVIIIa, simulated for over 70 ns of time scale, enabled us to evaluate the integral motions of the multi-domain assembly of the co-factor and the possible coordination pattern of the functionally important calcium and copper ion binding in the protein. Conclusions MD simulations predicted that the acidic linker peptide (a1 between the A1 and A2 domains is largely flexible and appears to mask the exposure of putative fIXa enzyme binding loop (Tyr555-Asp569 region in the A2 domain. The simulation of fVIIIa, generated from the zymogen structure, predicted that the linker peptide (a1 undergoes significant conformational reorganization upon activation by relocating completely to the A1-domain. The conformational transition led to the exposure of the Tyr555-Asp569 loop and the surrounding region in the A2 domain. While the proposed linker peptide conformation is predictive in nature and warrants further experimental validation, the observed conformational differences between the zymogen and activated forms may explain and support the

  11. The course of preexistent immune abnormalities in HIV-negative hemophiliacs treated for 2 years with a monoclonal purified factor-VIII concentrate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smid, W. M.; van der Meer, J.; Smit, J. W.; Halie, M. R.

    1993-01-01

    The administration of factor VIII concentrates has been associated with immune abnormalities in patients with severe haemophilia A, even in the absence of HIV infection. The effects of a monoclonal purified factor VIII concentrate, Hemofil M (Baxter), on preexistent immune abnormalities were

  12. Evaluation of B&W UO2/ThO2 VIII experimental core: criticality and thermal disadvantage factor analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlo Parisi; Emanuele Negrenti

    2017-02-01

    In the framework of the OECD/NEA International Reactor Physics Experiment (IRPHE) Project, an evaluation of core VIII of the Babcock & Wilcox (B&W) Spectral Shift Control Reactor (SSCR) critical experiment program was performed. The SSCR concept, moderated and cooled by a variable mixture of heavy and light water, envisaged changing of the thermal neutron spectrum during the operation to encourage breeding and to sustain the core criticality. Core VIII contained 2188 fuel rods with 93% enriched UO2-ThO2 fuel in a moderator mixture of heavy and light water. The criticality experiment and measurements of the thermal disadvantage factor were evaluated.

  13. Factor VIII brand and the incidence of factor VIII inhibitors in previously untreated UK children with severe hemophilia A, 2000-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Peter W; Palmer, Benedict P; Chalmers, Elizabeth A; Hart, Daniel P; Liesner, Ri; Rangarajan, Savita; Talks, Katherine; Williams, Michael; Hay, Charles R M

    2014-11-27

    The effect of recombinant factor VIII (rFVIII) brand on inhibitor development was investigated in all 407 severe hemophilia A previously untreated patients born in the United Kingdom (UK) between 1 January 2000 and 31 December 2011. Eighty-eight (22%) had been in the RODIN study. Information was extracted from the National Haemophilia Database. Because exposure days (EDs) were not known for some patients, time from first treatment was used as a surrogate for rFVIII exposure. An inhibitor developed in 118 (29%) patients, 60 high and 58 low titer, after a median (interquartile range) of 7.8 (3.3-13.5) months from first exposure and 16 (9-30) EDs. Of 128 patients treated with Kogenate Bayer/Helixate NexGen, 45 (35.2%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 27.4-43.8) developed an inhibitor compared with 42/172 (24.4%, 95% CI 18.6% to 31.4%) with Advate (P = .04). The adjusted hazard ratio (HR) (95% CI) for Kogenate Bayer/Helixate NexGen compared with Advate was 2.14 (1.12-4.10) (P = .02) for high titer and 1.75 (1.11-2.76) (P = .02) for all inhibitors. When excluding UK-RODIN patients, the adjusted HR (95% CI) for high-titer inhibitors was 2.00 (0.93-4.34) (P = .08). ReFacto AF was associated with a higher incidence of all, but not high-titer, inhibitors than Advate. These results will help inform debate around the relative immunogenicity and use of rFVIII brands.

  14. Half-life extended factor VIII for the treatment of hemophilia A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiede, A

    2015-06-01

    Prophylactic infusion of factor VIII (FVIII) prevents joint bleeding and other hemorrhages in patients with hemophilia A. Conventional FVIII concentrates have a short half-life, with an average of about 12 h in adults, ranging in individual patients between 6 and 24 h, and even shorter in younger children. Therefore, effective prophylaxis requires frequent intravenous injection, usually three times per week or every other day. Several technologies are currently under investigation to extend the half-life of FVIII, including Fc fusion (Eloctate, Elocta, efmoroctocog alfa), addition of polyethylene glycol (turoctocog alfa pegol [N8-GP], BAY 94-9027, BAX 855), and a single-chain construct (CSL627). This review summarizes characteristics of products in clinical development and discusses their potential benefits.

  15. Development of a peptidomimetic ligand for efficient isolation and purification of factor VIII via affinity chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knör, Sebastian; Khrenov, Alexey V; Laufer, Burkhardt; Saenko, Evgueni L; Hauser, Charlotte A E; Kessler, Horst

    2007-09-06

    Hemophilia A, one of the most severe bleeding disorders, results from an inherited deficiency of factor VIII (FVIII) function. Treatment by injection of FVIII has been a common procedure for decades. Nevertheless, the production and purification of FVIII remains a challenging task. Current procedures using immunoaffinity chromatography are expensive and suffer from the instability of the applied antibody ligands, which elute along with the product and contaminate it. Recently, FVIII was purified by use of octapeptide ligands, but their low protease-resistance limits their application. We here report the systematic rational and combinatorial optimization procedure that allowed us to transfer the octapeptide ligands into a small peptidomimetic. This compound is the smallest ligand known for separation of such a large protein (330 kDa). It not only binds and purifies FVIII with high efficiency but also is stable, protease-resistant, and cheap to produce in preparative scale. Hence it offers a valuable alternative to antibody-based purification procedures.

  16. Pharmacokinetics and dose requirements of factor VIII over the age range 3-74 years

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Björkman, Sven; Folkesson, Anna; Jönsson, Siv

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: The three aims of this investigation were (1) to develop a population pharmacokinetic (PK) model for factor VIII (FVIII) in haemophilia A patients, with estimates of inter-occasion and inter-individual variance, (2) to investigate whether appropriate dosing of FVIII for regular prophylaxis...... can be calculated according to patient characteristics, and (3) to present dosing recommendations for initiating prophylactic treatment. METHODS: A population PK model was developed using data from four PK studies on patients aged 7-74 years. The model was tested on sparse FVIII data from 42...... outpatient visits by haemophilia prophylaxis patients aged 3-66 years. Dose requirements for prophylaxis were calculated both according to the population model and from empirical Bayesian estimates of FVIII PK in the individual patients. RESULTS: The study data were well characterised by a two-compartment PK...

  17. Assessing patients' and caregivers' perspectives on stability of factor VIII products for haemophilia A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    DiBenedetti, D B; Coles, T M; Sharma, T

    2014-01-01

    Haemophilia A is a rare inherited bleeding disorder characterized by an inability of the blood to clot normally. Patients can experience spontaneous or trauma-induced joint and soft tissue bleeding and must keep coagulation factor VIII (FVIII) accessible at all times; thus, FVIII product storage ...... convenient and accessible FVIII products for patients in daily life and while travelling. In addition, the use of social media has potential value in recruiting this population....... and stability are critical. Our primary objective was to assess haemophilia A patients' and caregivers' experiences and preferences with FVIII product storage and stability. A secondary objective was to evaluate the use of the social media site Facebook in recruitment. In this cross-sectional study, 145 English...

  18. Challenges of the management of severe hemophilia A with inhibitors: two case reports emphasizing the potential interest of a high-purity human Factor VIII/von Willebrand factor concentrate and individually tailored prophylaxis guided by thrombin-generation test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieu, Sophie; Crampe, Carine; Dargaud, Yesim; Lavigne-Lissalde, Géraldine; Escuriola-Ettingshausen, Carmen; Tardy, Brigitte; Meley, Roland; Thouvenin, Sandrine; Stephan, Jean L; Berger, Claire

    2015-12-01

    Severe hemophilia A is an X-linked bleeding disorder. Immune tolerance induction (ITI) is the best strategy of treatment when patients develop inhibitors. The objective is to illustrate the benefit of a high-purity human factor VIII/von Willebrand factor (VWF) concentrate (Octanate) in the management of ITI. We also wanted to raise the potential interest of laboratory assays such as thrombin-generation test (TGT) and epitope mapping. Two patients were treated during ITI, first with a recombinant FVIII and then with plasma-derived factor VIII without success, and, finally, with Octanate. Bypassing agents were used based on the results of TGT. Epitope mapping was performed during ITI therapy. These observations suggest the potential contribution of Octanate in the management of ITI in difficult cases. The use of bypassing agents can be necessary in prophylaxis or to treat bleedings, and may be guided by TGT results. Epitope mapping is used to describe the inhibitor. This article shows a decrease of the inhibitor directed against the C2 domain after initiation of Octanate. A high-purity human factor VIII/von Willebrand factor concentrate (Octanate) may be a valuable therapeutical option for ITI therapy. TGT and epitope mapping could be of help in the management of ITI.

  19. Analysis of factor VIII gene inversions in 164 unrelated hemophilia A families

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vnencak-Jones, L.; Phillips, J.A. III; Janco, R.L. [Vanderbilt Univ. School of Medicine, Nashville, TN (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Hemophilia A is an X-linked recessive disease with variable phenotype and both heterogeneous and wide spread mutations in the factor VIII (F8) gene. As a result, diagnostic carrier or prenatal testing often relies upon laborious DNA linkage analysis. Recently, inversion mutations resulting from an intrachromosomal recombination between DNA sequences in one of two A genes {approximately}500 kb upstream from the F8 gene and a homologous A gene in intron 22 of the F8 gene were identified and found in 45% of severe hemophiliacs. We have analyzed banked DNA collected since 1986 from affected males or obligate carrier females representing 164 unrelated hemophilia A families. The disease was sporadic in 37%, familial in 54% and in 10% of families incomplete information was given. A unique deletion was identified in 1/164, a normal pattern was observed in 110/164 (67%), and 53/164 (32%) families had inversion mutations with 43/53 (81%) involving the distal A gene (R3 pattern) and 10/53 (19%) involving the proximal A gene (R2 pattern). While 19% of all rearrangements were R2, in 35 families with severe disease (< 1% VIII:C activity) all 16 rearrangements seen were R3. In 18 families with the R3 pattern and known activities, 16 (89%) had levels < 1%, with the remaining 2 families having {le} 2.4% activity. Further, 18 referrals specifically noted the production of inhibitors and 8/18 (45%) had the R3 pattern. Our findings demonstrate that the R3 inversion mutation patterns is (1) only seen with VIII:C activity levels of {le} 2.4%, (2) seen in 46% of families with severe hemophilia, (3) seen in 45% of hemophiliacs known to have inhibitors, (4) not correlated with sporadic or familial disease and (5) not in disequilibrium with the Bcl I or Taq I intron 18 or ST14 polymorphisms. Finally, in families positive for an inversion mutation, direct testing offers a highly accurate and less expensive alternative to DNA linkage analysis.

  20. Antidote strategies to reverse anticoagulation with TB-402, a long-acting partial inhibitor of factor VIII

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tangelder, M.; Long, C.; Emmerechts, J.; Jacquemin, M.; Peerlinck, K.; Vanassche, T.; Glazer, S.; Giesen, P.; Hoylaerts, M.; Verhamme, P.

    2012-01-01

    . Background: TB-402 is a partially inhibiting antibody of factor VIII that is under development as a long-acting anticoagulant. Patients and Methods: The reversibility of FVIII inhibition by TB-402 was evaluated in vitro after spiking with recombinant human FVIII (rhFVIII), human plasma-derived FVI

  1. Evaluation of the biological differences of canine and human factor VIII in gene delivery: Implications in human hemophilia treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    The canine is the most important large animal model for testing novel hemophilia A(HA) treatment. It is often necessary to use canine factor VIII (cFIII) gene or protein for the evaluation of HA treatment in the canine model. However, the different biological properties between cFVIII and human FVII...

  2. Patient preference for needleless factor VIII reconstitution device: the Italian experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Musso

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Roberto Musso1, Rita Santoro2, Antonio Coppola3, Maura Marcucci4, Gianluca Sottilotta5, Roberto Targhetta6, Ezio Zanon7, Massimo Franchini81Centro Emofilia, Istituto di Ematologia Università degli Studi di Catania, Ospedale Ferrarotto, Catania, Italy; 2Haemophilia Centre, Hemostasis and Thrombosis Service, Department of Haematology and Oncology, Azienda Ospedaliera “Pugliese-Ciaccio”, Catanzaro, Italy; 3Regional Reference Centre for Coagulation Disorders, Federico II University, Naples, Italy; 4Internal and Vascular Medicine, University of Perugia, Perugia, Italy; 5Hemophilia Centre, Hemostasis and Thrombosis Service, Azienda Ospedaliera “Bianchi-Melacrino-Morelli”, Reggio Calabria, Italy; 6Centro Emofilia Struttura Semplice Patologie della Coagulazione, Ospedale Microcitemico, Cagliari, Italy; 7Centro Emofilia, Clinica Medica II, Azienda Ospedaliera di Padova, Padova, Italy; 8Immunohaematology and Transfusion Centre, Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University Hospital of Parma, Parma, ItalyBackground: Needlestick injuries, mostly due to unsafe needle devices, are a frequent adverse event among health care workers and patients on chronic treatment, such as hemophiliacs. To improve the safety of these procedures, a needleless reconstitution system, Bio-Set® has been implemented for the sucrose-formulated recombinant factor VIII (rFVIII-FS Kogenate® Bayer (Bayer Healthcare, Berlin, Germany. The aim of this study was to collect patients’ satisfaction and safety data regarding the administration of rFVIII-FS with this new device.Methods: This was a multicenter, prospective, postmarketing surveillance study collecting data from seven Italian Haemophilia Centers within the framework of an international project involving patients from nine European countries. The patients were asked to fill out two preference questionnaires (one assessing the old method and one assessing the new method directly after the training and two

  3. Nanocapsule-delivered Sleeping Beauty mediates therapeutic Factor VIII expression in liver sinusoidal endothelial cells of hemophilia A mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kren, Betsy T; Unger, Gretchen M; Sjeklocha, Lucas; Trossen, Alycia A; Korman, Vicci; Diethelm-Okita, Brenda M; Reding, Mark T; Steer, Clifford J

    2009-07-01

    Liver sinusoidal endothelial cells are a major endogenous source of Factor VIII (FVIII), lack of which causes the human congenital bleeding disorder hemophilia A. Despite extensive efforts, gene therapy using viral vectors has shown little success in clinical hemophilia trials. Here we achieved cell type-specific gene targeting using hyaluronan- and asialoorosomucoid-coated nanocapsules, generated using dispersion atomization, to direct genes to liver sinusoidal endothelial cells and hepatocytes, respectively. To highlight the therapeutic potential of this approach, we encapsulated Sleeping Beauty transposon expressing the B domain-deleted canine FVIII in cis with Sleeping Beauty transposase in hyaluronan nanocapsules and injected them intravenously into hemophilia A mice. The treated mice exhibited activated partial thromboplastin times that were comparable to those of wild-type mice at 5 and 50 weeks and substantially shorter than those of untreated controls at the same time points. Further, plasma FVIII activity in the treated hemophilia A mice was nearly identical to that in wild-type mice through 50 weeks, while untreated hemophilia A mice exhibited no detectable FVIII activity. Thus, Sleeping Beauty transposon targeted to liver sinusoidal endothelial cells provided long-term expression of FVIII, without apparent antibody formation, and improved the phenotype of hemophilia A mice.

  4. Continuous infusion of porcine factor VIII: stability, microbiological safety and clinical experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiMichele, D M; Gorman, P O; Kasper, C K; Mannucci, P M; Santagostino, E; Hay, C R M

    2002-01-01

    Porcine factor VIII (pFVIII) is an effective haemostatic treatment for bleeding in selected patients with FVIII inhibitors. Its use is sometimes associated with a transient fall in platelet count and transfusion reactions, the risk of which may be related to the rate of administration. Theoretical considerations suggest that the administration of pFVIII by continuous infusion should be effective, and could have pharmacokinetic advantages that lead to an improvement in the side-effect profile. The results of a retrospective survey of continuous infusion of pFVIII with respect to clinical safety and efficacy are reported. Porcine FVIII stability and microbiological studies are included. It is concluded that pFVIII given by continuous infusion is safe and effective. The risk of transfusion reactions and fall in platelet count appears to be reduced, compared with bolus administration. Stability studies showed that pFVIII activity declined at room temperature, most rapidly in the dilute solution (5-10 U mL(-1)). More concentrated mixtures showed acceptable stability for up to 24 h using a variety of infusion devices. Various concentrations of pFVIII did not support the growth of Escherichia coli or Staphylococcus aureus. These observations suggest that the porcine factor is suitable for continuous infusion (CI).

  5. Improvement of fibrin clot structure after factor VIII injection in haemophilia A patients treated on demand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antovic, Aleksandra; Mikovic, Danijela; Elezovic, Ivo; Zabczyk, Michael; Hutenby, Kjell; Antovic, Jovan P

    2014-04-01

    Patients with haemophilia A have seriously impaired thrombin generation due to an inherited deficiency of factor (F)VIII, making them form unstable fibrin clots that are unable to maintain haemostasis. Data on fibrin structure in haemophilia patients remain limited. Fibrin permeability, assessed by a flow measurement technique, was investigated in plasma from 20 patients with severe haemophilia A treated on demand, before and 30 minutes after FVIII injection. The results were correlated with concentrations of fibrinogen, FVIII and thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFI), and global haemostatic markers: endogenous thrombin potential (ETP) and overall haemostatic potential (OHP). Fibrin structure was visualised using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The permeability coefficient Ks decreased significantly after FVIII treatment. Ks correlated significantly with FVIII levels and dosage, and with ETP, OHP and levels of TAFI. SEM images revealed irregular, porous fibrin clots composed of thick and short fibers before FVIII treatment. The clots had recovered after FVIII replacement almost to levels in control samples, revealing compact fibrin with smaller intrinsic pores. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first description of fibrin porosity and structure before and after FVIII treatment of selected haemophilia patients. It seems that thrombin generation is the main determinant of fibrin structure in haemophilic plasma.

  6. BAY 81-8973, a full-length recombinant factor VIII: manufacturing processes and product characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garger, S; Severs, J; Regan, L; Hesslein, A; Ignowski, J; Wu, P; Long, E; Gupta, S; Liu, S; Wang, W

    2017-03-01

    BAY 81-8973 (Kovaltry(®) , Bayer, Berkeley, CA, USA) is an unmodified, full-length recombinant human factor VIII (FVIII) approved for prophylaxis and on-demand treatment of bleeding episodes in patients with haemophilia A. The BAY 81-8973 manufacturing process is based on the process used for sucrose-formulated recombinant FVIII (rFVIII-FS), with changes and enhancements made to improve production efficiency, further augment pathogen safety, and eliminate animal- and human-derived raw materials from the production processes. The baby hamster kidney cell line used for BAY 81-8973 was developed by introducing the gene for human heat shock protein 70 into the rFVIII-FS cell line, a change that improved cell line robustness and productivity. Pathogen safety was enhanced by including a 20-nm filtration step, which can remove viruses, transmissible spongiform encephalopathy agents and potential protein aggregates. No human- or animal-derived proteins are added to the cell culture process, purification or final formulation. The BAY 81-8973 manufacturing process results in a product of enhanced purity with a consistently high degree of sialylation of N-linked glycans on the molecular surface. The innovative manufacturing techniques used for BAY 81-8973 yield an effective rFVIII product with a favourable safety profile for treatment of haemophilia A. © 2016 Bayer. Haemophilia Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Joint bleeds increase the inhibitor response to human factor VIII in a rat model of severe haemophilia A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lövgren, K M; Søndergaard, H; Skov, S; Wiinberg, B

    2016-09-01

    The most serious complication in haemophilia A (HA) replacement therapy with coagulation factor VIII (FVIII) is neutralizing antibodies, i.e. inhibitors. It has been hypothesized that danger signals generated during a bleed might have an adjuvant effect on the immune response to FVIII in on-demand treatment, increasing the inhibitor risk. To compare the antibody response to treatment with recombinant human FVIII (rhFVIII) in relation to induced knee joint bleeds and treatment without concurrent bleeds in a HA rat model. HA rats were divided into two groups: one group (n = 10) receiving three needle induced knee joint bleeds 14 days apart and a control group (n = 9) receiving three sham procedures. Three hours after each injury/sham 50 IU kg(-1) rhFVIII was administrated intravenously. Subsequently, both groups continued rhFVIII treatment for another 9 weeks. Binding antibodies were analysed using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and neutralizing antibodies using a Bethesda-like assay. Rats in the knee-bleed group developed a significantly faster inhibitor response and reached significantly higher inhibitor levels. In the knee-bleed group, 80% developed inhibitors vs. 33% in the control group, demonstrating a 2.4 times higher inhibitor risk when treating concurrent with bleeds. FVIII treatment in relation to a bleed potentiates inhibitor development compared to FVIII treatment alone in this HA rat, indicating that bleeding is a potential danger signal. Our results support the theory that FVIII replacement therapy concurrent with a bleeding episode increases the inhibitor risk, which to the best of our knowledge, has not been confirmed in an animal model before. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. [Detection of alloantibodies against Factor VIII in plasma of patients with hemophilia A and its relationship with Factor VIIIC domain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lu-Lu; Yu, Zi-Qiang; Wan, Chu-Cheng; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Zheng-Hua; Ruan, Chang-Geng

    2013-10-01

    This study was purposed to detect the alloantibodies against Factor VIII (FVIII) by ELISA for estimating the incidence of the alloantibodies against Factor VIII (FVIII) in patients with hemophilia A, and to investigate the relationship between factor VIIIC domain and alloantibodies. Total of 140 patients with hemophilia A and 80 normal controls were enrolled in this study, among them plasma FVIII level of 84 patients was less than 1%, plasma FVIII level of 34 patients was between 1% and 5%, and plasma FVIII level of 22 patients was more than 5%. All patients were treated with plasma-derived FVIII concentrate or plasma before. The ELISA plate was coated with McAb (SZ-132) against FVIII prepared in our laboratory, then human recombinant FVIII concentrates were applied. After incubation in room temperature for 2 hours, diluted plasma samples and HRP-conjugated goat anti-human IgG were added successively, finally A490 was recorded. The threshold of alloantibody of patient plasma was set as mean value>3 SD more than control. The plate was coated with antibody against His, then human recombinant FVIII-C1C2 prepared in our laboratory was added. After incubation in room temperature for 2 hours, diluted plasma samples and HRP-conjugated goat anti-human IgG were added successively, finally A490 were recorded. The threshold was set as the mean value>3 SD more than control. The results showed that the alloantibodies against FVIII were found in 56 patients (40%) by ELISA, and 82.1% (46/56) of this kind of alloantibody could interact with the C domain of FVIII. It is concluded that C domain of FVIII is one of the primary binding sites for the alloantibodies against FVIII in Chinese patients with hemophilia A.

  9. Danger signal-dependent activation of human dendritic cells by plasma-derived factor VIII products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, L; Weissmüller, S; Ringler, E; Crauwels, P; van Zandbergen, G; Seitz, R; Waibler, Z

    2015-08-01

    Treatment of haemophilia A by infusions of the clotting factor VIII (FVIII) results in the development of inhibitors/anti-drug antibodies in up to 25 % of patients. Mechanisms leading to immunogenicity of FVIII products are not yet fully understood. Amongst other factors, danger signals as elicited upon infection or surgery have been proposed to play a role. In the present study, we focused on effects of danger signals on maturation and activation of dendritic cells (DC) in the context of FVIII application. Human monocyte-derived DC were treated with FVIII alone, with a danger signal alone or a combination of both. By testing more than 60 different healthy donors, we show that FVIII and the bacterial danger signal lipopolysaccharide synergise in increasing DC activation, as characterised by increased expression of co-stimulatory molecules and secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines. The degree and frequency of this synergistic activation correlate with CD86 expression levels on immature DC prior to stimulation. In our assay system, plasma-derived but not recombinant FVIII products activate human DC in a danger signal-dependent manner. Further tested danger signals, such as R848 also induced DC activation in combination with FVIII, albeit not in every tested donor. In our hands, human DC but not human B cells or macrophages could be activated by FVIII in a danger signal-dependent manner. Our results suggest that immunogenicity of FVIII is a result of multiple factors including the presence of danger, predisposition of the patient, and the choice of a FVIII product for treatment.

  10. [Intein-mediated F309SfVIII ligation with enhanced secretion of its heavy chain.].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Fu-Xiang; Liu, Ze-Long; Qu, Hui-Ge; Chi, Xiao-Yan

    2009-12-25

    Coagulation factor VIII (fVIII) is a secretion protein and plays a crucial role in the coagulation cascade. Hemophilia A resulted from deficiency of fVIII is the most common X-linked recessive bleeding disorder. Gene therapy is recognized as an attractive strategy for the eventual cure of this disease. However, the gene therapy is hampered by the big size of fVIII gene when using the most promising gene vectors, adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors. In this study we explored the intein-mediated protein trans-splicing to deliver a Phe(309)-->Ser mutant full-length fVIII (F309SfVIII) gene by using a dual-vector system. An intein is a protein sequence embedded within a precursor protein and can excise itself through protein splicing. The F309SfVIII is proven to be beneficial to its secretion. The F309SfVIII gene was broken into heavy and light chains before Ser(1239) in B domain and fused with the coding sequences of Ssp DnaB intein respectively to construct a pair of plasmid vectors by inserting them into the pcDNA3.1 vectors. Forty-eight hours after co- or separate transfection of 293 cells, the co-transfected cell lysate showed an obvious ligated F309SfVIII protein band by Western blot with a polyclonal antibody against fVIII. The amounts of secreted F309SfVIII protein in culture supernatants and their bioactivities were (71+/-9) ng/mL and (0.38+/-0.09) IU/mL determined by ELISA and Coatest assay respectively. The supernatant from combined cells with separate transfections also displayed lower levels of F309SfVIII antigen and fVIII activity [(25+/-6) ng/mL and (0.12+/-0.05) IU/mL], indicating the F309SfVIII could be formed by splicing both before and after secretion. The content of F309SfVIII heavy chain protein from co-transfected cell supernatant was higher than that of intein-fused heavy chain transfection alone [(135+/-10) ng/mL vs (37+/-7) ng/mL, Pintein could be used as a technical strategy in a dual-vector system delivering F309SfVIII gene with improved

  11. Partial correction of a severe molecular defect in hemophilia A, because of errors during expression of the factor VIII gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, M.; Antonarakis, S.E. [Univ. of Geneva (Switzerland); Inaba, Hiroshi [Tokyo Medical College (Japan)] [and others

    1997-03-01

    Although the molecular defect in patients in a Japanese family with mild to moderately severe hemophilia A was a deletion of a single nucleotide T within an A{sub 8}TA{sub 2} sequence of exon 14 of the factor VIII gene, the severity of the clinical phenotype did not correspond to that expected of a frameshift mutation. A small amount of functional factor VIII protein was detected in the patient`s plasma. Analysis of DNA and RNA molecules from normal and affected individuals and in vitro transcription/translation suggested a partial correction of the molecular defect, because of the following: (i) DNA replication/RNA transcription errors resulting in restoration of the reading frame and/or (ii) {open_quotes}ribosomal frameshifting{close_quotes} resulting in the production of normal factor VIII polypeptide and, thus, in a milder than expected hemophilia A. All of these mechanisms probably were promoted by the longer run of adenines, A{sub 10} instead of A{sub 8}TA{sub 2}, after the delT. Errors in the complex steps of gene expression therefore may partially correct a severe frameshift defect and ameliorate an expected severe phenotype. 36 refs., 6 figs.

  12. Factor VIII gene variants and inhibitor risk in African American hemophilia A patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunasekera, Devi; Ettinger, Ruth A; Nakaya Fletcher, Shelley; James, Eddie A; Liu, Maochang; Barrett, John C; Withycombe, Janice; Matthews, Dana C; Epstein, Melinda S; Hughes, Richard J; Pratt, Kathleen P

    2015-08-13

    African American hemophilia A (HA) patients experience a higher incidence of neutralizing anti-factor VIII (FVIII) antibodies ("inhibitors") vis-à-vis white patients. Nonsynonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms (ns-SNPs) in the F8 gene encoding FVIII-H484, FVIII-E1241, and FVIII-V2238 are more prevalent in African Americans. This study tested the hypothesis that immune responses to these sites provoke inhibitors. Blood samples were obtained from 174 African American and 198 white HA subjects and their F8 gene sequences determined. Major histocompatibility complex class II binding and T-cell recognition of polymorphic sequences were evaluated using quantitative binding assays and HLA-DRB1 tetramers. Peptides corresponding to 4 common ns-SNPs showed limited binding to 11 HLA-DRB1 proteins. CD4 T cells from 22 subjects treated with FVIII products having sequences at residues FVIII-484, 1241, and 2238 differing from those of putative proteins encoded by their F8 genes did not show high-avidity tetramer binding, whereas positive-control staining of tetanus-specific CD4 T cells was routinely successful. African Americans with an intron-22 inversion mutation showed a 2-3 times-higher inhibitor incidence than whites with the same mutation (odds ratio = 2.3 [1.1-5.0, P = .04]), but this did not correlate with any of the ns-SNPs. We conclude that immune responses to "sequence-mismatched" FVIII products are unlikely to contribute appreciably to the inhibitor incidence in African Americans.

  13. Intraosseous delivery of lentiviral vectors targeting factor VIII expression in platelets corrects murine hemophilia A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuefeng; Shin, Simon C; Chiang, Andy F J; Khan, Iram; Pan, Dao; Rawlings, David J; Miao, Carol H

    2015-04-01

    Intraosseous (IO) infusion of lentiviral vectors (LVs) for in situ gene transfer into bone marrow may avoid specific challenges posed by ex vivo gene delivery, including, in particular, the requirement of preconditioning. We utilized IO delivery of LVs encoding a GFP or factor VIII (FVIII) transgene directed by ubiquitous promoters (a MND or EF-1α-short element; M-GFP-LV, E-F8-LV) or a platelet-specific, glycoprotein-1bα promoter (G-GFP-LV, G-F8-LV). A single IO infusion of M-GFP-LV or G-GFP-LV achieved long-term and efficient GFP expression in Lineage(-)Sca1(+)c-Kit(+) hematopoietic stem cells and platelets, respectively. While E-F8-LV produced initially high-level FVIII expression, robust anti-FVIII immune responses eliminated functional FVIII in circulation. In contrast, IO delivery of G-F8-LV achieved long-term platelet-specific expression of FVIII, resulting in partial correction of hemophilia A. Furthermore, similar clinical benefit with G-F8-LV was achieved in animals with pre-existing anti-FVIII inhibitors. These findings further support platelets as an ideal FVIII delivery vehicle, as FVIII, stored in α-granules, is protected from neutralizing antibodies and, during bleeding, activated platelets locally excrete FVIII to promote clot formation. Overall, a single IO infusion of G-F8-LV was sufficient to correct hemophilia phenotype for long term, indicating that this approach may provide an effective means to permanently treat FVIII deficiency.

  14. The factor VIII Structure and Mutation Resource Site: HAMSTeRS version 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemball-Cook, G; Tuddenham, E G; Wacey, A I

    1998-01-01

    Since 1996 the HAMSTeRS (Haemophilia A Mutation, Search, Test and Resource Site) WWW site has provided an online resource for access to data on the molecular pathology of haemophilia A, replacing previous text editions of the Haemophilia A Database published in Nucleic Acids Research . This report describes the continued development of the site (version 4), and in particular the expansion of factor VIII (FVIII) structure-related features. Access to the mutation database itself, both for searching the listings and for submission of new mutations, is via custom-designed forms: more powerful Boolean searches of the point mutations in the database are also available. During 1997 a total of 22 novel missense mutations were reported, increasing the total number of unique variants now described to 252 (238 in exonic sequences and 14 at intronic splice junctions). Currently, a total of 586 individual reports with associated phenotypic data are available for searching by any category including phenotype. The FVIII structure section now includes a download of a FVIII A domain homology model in Protein Data Bank format and a multiple alignment of the FVIII amino-acid sequencies from four species (human, murine, porcine and canine) in addition to the virtual reality simulations, secondary structural data and FVIII animation already available. Finally, to aid navigation across this site, a clickable roadmap of the main features provides easy access to the page desired. Our intention is that continued development and updating of the site shall provide workers in the fields of molecular and structural biology with a one-stop resource site to facilitate FVIII research and education. The HAMSTeRS URL is http://europium.mrc.rpms.ac.uk

  15. Frequencies of VNTR and RFLP polymorphisms associated with factor VIII gene in Singapore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fong, I.; Lai, P.S.; Ouah, T.C. [National Univ. of Singapore (Malaysia)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The allelic frequency of any polymorphism within a population determines its usefulness for genetic counselling. This is important in populations of non-Caucasian origin as RFLPs may significantly differ among ethnic groups. We report a study of five intragenic polymorphisms in factor VIII gene carried out in Singapore. The three PCR-based RFLP markers studied were Intron 18/Bcl I, Intron 19/Hind III and Intron 22/Xba I. In an analysis of 148 unrelated normal X chromosomes, the allele frequencies were found to be A1 = 0.18, A2 = 0.82 (Bcl I RFLP), A1 = 0.80, A2 = 0.20 (Hind III RFLP) and A1 = 0.58, and A2 = 0.42 (Xba I RFLP). The heterozygosity rates of 74 females analyzed separately were 31%, 32% and 84.2%, respectively. Linkage disequilibrium was also observed to some degree between Bcl I and Hind III polymorphism in our population. We have also analyzed a sequence polymorphism in Intron 7 using hybridization with radioactive-labelled {sup 32}P allele-specific oligonucleotide probes. This polymorphism was not very polymorphic in our population with only 2% of 117 individuals analyzed being informative. However, the use of a hypervariable dinucleotide repeat sequence (VNTR) in Intron 13 showed that 25 of our of 27 (93%) females were heterozygous. Allele frequencies ranged from 1 to 55 %. We conclude that a viable strategy for molecular analysis of Hemophilia A families in our population should include the use of Intron 18/Bcl I and Intron 22/Xba I RFLP markers and the Intron 13 VNTR marker.

  16. Pharmacokinetic properties of BAY 81-8973, a full-length recombinant factor VIII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, A; Delesen, H; Garger, S; Lalezari, S

    2015-11-01

    BAY 81-8973 is a full-length recombinant factor VIII (FVIII) with the same primary amino acid sequence as sucrose-formulated recombinant FVIII (rFVIII-FS) but is produced with advanced manufacturing technologies. To analyse the pharmacokinetics (PK) of BAY 81-8973 after single and multiple dosing across different age and ethnic groups in the LEOPOLD clinical trial programme. The LEOPOLD trials enrolled patients with severe haemophilia A aged 12-65 years (LEOPOLD I and II) or ≤12 years (LEOPOLD Kids) with ≥150 (LEOPOLD I and II) or ≥50 (LEOPOLD Kids) exposure days to any FVIII product and no history of FVIII inhibitors. PK were assessed using chromogenic and one-stage assays (only chromogenic assay for LEOPOLD Kids) after a single 50-IU kg(-1) dose of BAY 81-8973 and, in a subset of patients in LEOPOLD I, after repeated dosing. Pharmacokinetic analyses were also performed based on age (18 to 65, 12 to <18, 6 to <12 and <6 years) and ethnicity (Asian and non-Asian). Pharmacokinetic assessments in the LEOPOLD I trial showed non-inferiority of BAY 81-8973 vs. rFVIII-FS. The PK of BAY 81-8973 were comparable after single and multiple dosing. Age-based analysis in the three trials showed that plasma concentrations were slightly lower for children, but similar for adolescents compared with adults. Pharmacokinetic results were similar in the different ethnic groups. Results of the LEOPOLD trials show that the BAY 81-8973 pharmacokinetic profile is non-inferior to rFVIII-FS. Similar BAY 81-8973 pharmacokinetic values were observed following single and repeated dosing and across ethnic groups. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. The mesenchymal stem cells derived from transgenic mice carrying human coagulation factor VIII can correct phenotype in hemophilia A mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qing; Gong, Xiuli; Gong, Zhijuan; Ren, Xiaoyie; Ren, Zhaorui; Huang, Shuzhen; Zeng, Yitao

    2013-12-20

    Hemophilia A (HA) is an inherited X-linked recessive bleeding disorder caused by coagulant factor VIII (FVIII) deficiency. Previous studies showed that introduction of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) modified by FVIII-expressing retrovirus may result in phenotypic correction of HA animals. This study aimed at the investigation of an alternative gene therapy strategy that may lead to sustained FVIII transgene expression in HA mice. B-domain-deleted human FVIII (hFVIIIBD) vector was microinjected into single-cell embryos of wild-type mice to generate a transgenic mouse line, from which hFVIIIBD-MSCs were isolated, followed by transplantation into HA mice. RT-PCR and real-time PCR analysis demonstrated the expression of hFVIIIBD in multi-organs of recipient HA mice. Immunohistochemistry showed the presence of hFVIIIBD positive staining in multi-organs of recipient HA mice. ELISA indicated that plasma hFVIIIBD level in recipient mice reached its peak (77 ng/mL) at the 3rd week after implantation, and achieved sustained expression during the 5-week observation period. Plasma FVIII activities of recipient HA mice increased from 0% to 32% after hFVIIIBD-MSCs transplantation. APTT (activated partial thromboplastin time) value decreased in hFVIIIBD-MSCs transplanted HA mice compared with untreated HA mice (45.5 s vs. 91.3 s). Our study demonstrated an effective phenotypic correction in HA mice using genetically modified MSCs from hFVIIIBD transgenic mice. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Antibody response to recombinant human coagulation factor VIII in a new rat model of severe hemophilia A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lövgren, K M; Søndergaard, H; Skov, S; Weldingh, K N; Tranholm, M; Wiinberg, B

    2016-04-01

    Neutralizing antibodies toward FVIII replacement therapy (inhibitors) are the most serious treatment-related complication in hemophilia A (HA). A rat model of severe HA (F8(-/-) ) has recently been developed, but an immunological characterization is needed to determine the value of using the model for research into inhibitor development. Characterize the antibody response towards recombinant human coagulation factor VIII (rhFVIII) in the HA rat, following a human prophylactic dosing regimen. Two identical studies were performed, which included a total of 17 homozygous HA rats (F8(-/-) , 0% FVIII activity), 12 heterozygous rats (F8(+/-) ), and 12 wild-type (F8(+/+) ) rats. All rats received intravenous injections of rhFVIII at 50 IU kg(-1) twice weekly for 4 weeks. Predosing blood samples were analyzed for binding and neutralizing anti-rhFVIII antibodies at weeks 1-7. In both studies, antibodies developed after 4-6 administrations of rhFVIII, and neutralizing antibodies reached levels similar to human patients (range 1-111 BU, median 6.0 BU) at the end of the study. There was no significant difference between the two studies or between genotypes in time to response or levels reached for binding and neutralizing antibodies. Interestingly, early spontaneous bleeds were associated with a faster antibody response. Following intravenous administration of human FVIII, according to a clinical prophylaxis regimen, a robust and reproducible antibody response is seen in this HA rat model, suggesting that the model is useful for intervention studies with the aim of suppressing, delaying, or preventing the inhibitor response. Also, bleeds seem to have an adjuvant effect on the immune response. © 2016 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  19. Von Willebrand factor and coagulation factor VIII in Moyamoya disease associated with Graves' disease: A case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Shou-Chen; Gao, Bao-Qin; Yang, Wei-Li; Feng, Wei-Xin; Xu, Jian; Li, Shao-Wu; Wang, Yong-Jun

    2016-01-01

    The present study reported the case of a Chinese boy who was diagnosed with Moyamoya disease (MMD) associated with Graves' disease (GD). An overactivation of von Willebrand factor (vWF) and coagulation factor VIII (FVIII) was identified in the plasma of the patient. Thiamazole and metoprolol treatment was thus administrated. After 2 months of treatment, the patient's thyroid function returned to normal and the neurological symptoms improved gradually. At the same time, the activities of vWF and FVIII were depressed. During the 20-month follow-up, information regarding the neurological symptoms, cerebrovascular imaging, thyroid function, thyroid autoantibodies and coagulation parameters was collected. High levels of thyroid autoantibodies persisted throughout the follow-up period, while other coagulation parameters remained in the normal range. In conclusion, considering the vital role of vWF and FVIII in vascular diseases, it is hypothesized that these two factors may serve an important role in the occurrence of GD associated with MMD. PMID:27882137

  20. Therapeutic and routine prophylactic properties of rFactor VIII Fc (efraloctocog alfa, Eloctate®) in hemophilia A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdary, Pratima; Fosbury, Emma; Riddell, Anne; Mathias, Mary

    2016-01-01

    rFVIIIFc (efraloctocog alfa, Eloctate®) is an extended half-life (EHL) factor VIII licensed for use in patients with hemophilia A for prophylaxis and treatment of bleeding and surgical episodes. Pharmacokinetic studies in adults have shown a mean 1.5-fold increase in half-life compared to full-length factor VIII. When compared to adults, the half-life is decreased by 8% in adolescents between 12 and 17 years, by 18% in children 6 to <12 years, and by 33% in children between the ages of 2 and <6 years. There is a considerable interindividual variation in the prolongation of the half-life particularly in children and across the age groups, the range extending from no increase to a 2.5-fold increase. In addition to age, von willebrand factor (VWF) antigen level has demonstrated a significant impact on rFVIIIFc half-life, with higher VWF levels associated with greater prolongation of half-life. The pivotal and pediatric clinical trials have demonstrated the efficacy and safety of rFVIIIFc for use in regular prophylaxis and in management of bleeds and surgery. In these studies, just under half the participants showed a zero annualized bleed rate (ABR), and the median ABR (1.6 in the pivotal study for the individualized prophylaxis arm) showed a further decrease in the extension study. On average, the patients required fewer infusions (reduced by at least a third), and the mean weekly consumption seems to be in keeping with standard recombinant factor VIII. EHL rFVIIIFc has made decreased infusion frequency a possibility. However, the interindividual variability in dose and infusion frequency highlights the need for a personalized approach based on individual patient’s half-life and/or response to treatment. PMID:27695377

  1. Factor VIII alters tubular organization and functional properties of von Willebrand factor stored in Weibel-Palade bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouwens, Eveline A M; Mourik, Marjon J; van den Biggelaar, Maartje; Eikenboom, Jeroen C J; Voorberg, Jan; Valentijn, Karine M; Mertens, Koen

    2011-11-24

    In endothelial cells, von Willebrand factor (VWF) multimers are packaged into tubules that direct biogenesis of elongated Weibel-Palade bodies (WPBs). WPB release results in unfurling of VWF tubules and assembly into strings that serve to recruit platelets. By confocal microscopy, we have previously observed a rounded morphology of WPBs in blood outgrowth endothelial cells transduced to express factor VIII (FVIII). Using correlative light-electron microscopy and tomography, we now demonstrate that FVIII-containing WPBs have disorganized, short VWF tubules. Whereas normal FVIII and FVIII Y1680F interfered with formation of ultra-large VWF multimers, release of the WPBs resulted in VWF strings of equal length as those from nontransduced blood outgrowth endothelial cells. After release, both WPB-derived FVIII and FVIII Y1680F remained bound to VWF strings, which however had largely lost their ability to recruit platelets. Strings from nontransduced cells, however, were capable of simultaneously recruiting exogenous FVIII and platelets. These findings suggest that the interaction of FVIII with VWF during WPB formation is independent of Y1680, is maintained after WPB release in FVIII-covered VWF strings, and impairs recruitment of platelets. Apparently, intra-cellular and extracellular assembly of FVIII-VWF complex involves distinct mechanisms, which differ with regard to their implications for platelet binding to released VWF strings.

  2. Combined deficiency of factor V and factor VIII is due to mutations in either LMAN1 or MCFD2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bin; McGee, Beth; Yamaoka, Jennifer S.; Guglielmone, Hugo; Downes, Katharine A.; Minoldo, Salvador; Jarchum, Gustavo; Peyvandi, Flora; de Bosch, Norma B.; Ruiz-Saez, Arlette; Chatelain, Bernard; Olpinski, Marian; Bockenstedt, Paula; Sperl, Wolfgang; Kaufman, Randal J.; Nichols, William C.; Tuddenham, Edward G. D.; Ginsburg, David

    2006-01-01

    Mutations in LMAN1 (ERGIC-53) or MCFD2 cause combined deficiency of factor V and factor VIII (F5F8D). LMAN1 and MCFD2 form a protein complex that functions as a cargo receptor ferrying FV and FVIII from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi. In this study, we analyzed 10 previously reported and 10 new F5F8D families. Mutations in the LMAN1 or MCFD2 genes accounted for 15 of these families, including 3 alleles resulting in no LMAN1 mRNA accumulation. Combined with our previous reports, we have identified LMAN1 or MCFD2 mutations as the causes of F5F8D in 71 of 76 families. Among the 5 families in which no mutations were identified, 3 were due to misdiagnosis, with the remaining 2 likely carrying LMAN1 or MCFD2 mutations that were missed by direct sequencing. Our results suggest that mutations in LMAN1 and MCFD2 may account for all cases of F5F8D. Immunoprecipitation and Western blot analysis detected a low level of LMAN1-MCFD2 complex in lymphoblasts derived from patients with missense mutations in LMAN1 (C475R) or MCFD2 (I136T), suggesting that complete loss of the complex may not be required for clinically significant reduction in FV and FVIII. PMID:16304051

  3. Sustaining expression of B domain-deleted human factor VIII mediated by using lentiviral vectors in NOD/SCID mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan-Jie; Chen, Chong; Zeng, Ling-Yu; Cao, Jiang; Xu, Kai-Lin

    2012-06-01

    Recently, gene therapy has been become a promising approach to cure hemophilia A, a most common recessive bleeding disease. The aim of this study was to determine the perspective of lentiviral vector in hemophilia A gene therapy in vitro and in NOD/SCID mice. Lentivirus transfer vector pXZ9/BDDFVIII containing human B-domain-deleted Factor VIII-IRES-eGFP coding sequence and mock control pXZ9 were constructed. Lentivirus was prepared by co-transfecting 3 plasmids into 293FT cells. 293FT, HLF, human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and Chang-liver cells were transfected with the prepared virus. Coagulant activity of human FVIII, human FVIII antigen, human FVIII mRNA transcription and genomic integration were assayed by ELISA, one-step method, RT-PCR and PCR after infection. Lentiviral particles were concentrated by ultracentrifugation and NOD/SCID mice were transfected via portal vein injection. Human FVIII antigen in mouse blood plasma was analyzed by ELISA. eGFP expression was observed by fluorescent microscopy and human FVIII transcription in mouse liver was analyzed by RT-PCR at one month after transduction. The results showed that the high titer of recombinant virus was prepared and used to efficiently transduce the target cells in vitro. At 72 h after transfection, high levels of FVIII activity and FVIII antigen were detected. Human FVIII gene transcription could be detected in the liver of NOD/SCID mice received lentiviral particles carrying FVIII gene. Mouse hepatocytes were transfected with recombinant lentivirus efficiently in vivo. Human FVIII level in mouse blood plasma reached to (49 ± 6) mU, (54 ± 8) mU and (23 ± 4) mU at 72 h, one week and one month after transfection respectively. It is concluded that the lentiviral particles carrying BDDhFVIII gene can high efficiently transfect the target cells both in vitro and in vivo, and the transfected target cells can secrete hFVIII efficiently. The sustained expression of human FVIII in NOD/SCID mice is

  4. Stable high-level expression of factor VIII in Chinese hamster ovary cells in improved elongation factor-1 alpha-based system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlova, Nadezhda A; Kovnir, Sergey V; Gabibov, Alexandre G; Vorobiev, Ivan I

    2017-03-24

    Recombinant factor VIII (FVIII), used for haemophilia A therapy, is one of the most challenging among the therapeutic proteins produced in heterologous expression systems. Deletion variant of FVIII, in which the entire domain B is replaced by a short linker peptide, was approved for medical use. Efficacy and safety of this FVIII deletion variant are similar to full-length FVIII preparations while the level of production in CHO cells is substantially higher. Typical levels of productivity for CHO cell lines producing deletion variant FVIII-BDD SQ, described elsewhere, are 0.5-2 IU/ml, corresponding to the concentration of FVIII of about 0.2 μg/ml. Using standard vectors based on the cytomegalovirus promoter (CMV) and the dihydrofolate reductase cDNA we have previously obtained the cell line secreting 0.5 IU/ml of FVIII-BDD, which roughly corresponds to the previously published data. An expression system based on CHO genomic sequences including CHO-EEF1A promoter and Epstein-Barr virus terminal repeat fragment allowed us to achieve 80-fold increase in the production level as compared with the conventional expression system based on the CMV promoter. Immediately after the primary selection FVIII -producing cells secreted 5-10 IU/ml of FVIII-BDD, and after multi-stage methotrexate-driven amplification a stable clonal line 11A4H was selected, secreting 39 IU/ml of FVIII-BDD in the simple batch culturing conditions, which considerably exceeds known indicators for industrial producers of this protein. In contrast to other FVIII-BDD producing lines 11A4H accumulates low proportion of the secreted FVIII on the membrane. Its productivity may be further increased approximately two-fold by adding sodium butyrate and butylated hydroxyanisol to the culture medium. A five-stage purification process for the factor VIII was employed. It allowed isolation of the intact FVIII-BDD as was confirmed by mass spectrometry. Purified FVIII-BDD has a specific activity of 11,000

  5. Expression, purification, and partial in vitro characterization of biologically active human coagulation factor VIII light chain (A3-C1-C2) in Pichia pastoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    A R, Sudheer Reddy; Satheeshkumar, Padikara Kutty; Vijayalakshmi, Mookambeswaran A

    2013-09-01

    Recombinant coagulation factor VIII (FVIII) expressed in mammalian expression systems is used extensively in the treatment of hemophilia A. It is reported that the heavy (A1-A2) and light chains (A3-C1-C2) of factor VIII purified from plasma regained the coagulation activity by dimerization in vitro. In this work, cDNA coding for the light chain of human coagulation factor VIII (FVIII-LC) was cloned into pPICZα-A expression vector downstream of alcohol oxidase promoter and α-mating signal sequence from Saccharomyces cerevisiae in order to express the protein with a native N-terminus. The methylotrophic yeast, Pichia pastoris X-33, was transformed with this cassette, and transformants were selected for production of human factor VIII light chain into culture media. SDS-PAGE and Western blot analysis confirmed the expression of factor VIII light chain protein. The expressed protein was purified to near homogeneity using histidine ligand affinity chromatography (2.342 mg/L). The biological activity of FVIII-LC was confirmed by analyzing the interaction between FVIII-LC and phospholipid vesicles. The data presented here indicate the possibilities of exploring cost-effective systems to express complex proteins of therapeutic value.

  6. Transient blockade of the inducible costimulator pathway generates long-term tolerance to factor VIII after nonviral gene transfer into hemophilia A mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Baowei; Ye, Peiqing; Blazar, Bruce R; Freeman, Gordon J; Rawlings, David J; Ochs, Hans D; Miao, Carol H

    2008-09-01

    Formation of inhibitory antibodies is a common problem encountered in clinical treatment for hemophilia. Human factor VIII (hFVIII) plasmid gene therapy in hemophilia A mice also leads to strong humoral responses. We demonstrate that short-term therapy with an anti-ICOS monoclonal antibody to transiently block the inducible costimulator/inducible costimulator ligand (ICOS/ICOSL) signaling pathway led to sustained tolerance to hFVIII in hFVIII plasmid-treated hemophilia A mice and allowed persistent, high-level FVIII functional activity (100%-300% of normal). Anti-ICOS treatment resulted in depletion of ICOS(+)CD4(+) T cells and activation of CD25(+)Foxp3(+) Tregs in the peripheral blood, spleen, and lymph nodes. CD4(+) T cells from anti-ICOS-treated mice did not proliferate in response to hFVIII stimulation and produced high levels of regulatory cytokines, including interleukin-10 and transforming growth factor-beta. Moreover, CD4(+)CD25(+) Tregs from tolerized mice adoptively transferred dominant tolerance in syngeneic hFVIII plasmid-treated hemophilia A mice and reduced the production of antibodies against FVIII. Anti-ICOS-treated mice tolerized to hFVIII generated normal primary and secondary antibody responses after immunization with the T-dependent antigen, bacteriophage Phix 174, indicating maintenance of immune competency. Our data indicate that transient anti-ICOS monoclonal antibody treatment represents a novel single-agent immunomodulatory strategy to overcome the immune responses against transgene product after gene therapy.

  7. Storage of factor VIII variants with impaired von Willebrand factor binding in Weibel-Palade bodies in endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maartje van den Biggelaar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Point mutations resulting in reduced factor VIII (FVIII binding to von Willebrand factor (VWF are an important cause of mild/moderate hemophilia A. Treatment includes desmopressin infusion, which concomitantly increases VWF and FVIII plasma levels, apparently from storage pools containing both proteins. The source of these VWF/FVIII co-storage pools and the mechanism of granule biogenesis are not fully understood. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We studied intracellular trafficking of FVIII variants implicated in mild/moderate hemophilia A together with VWF in HEK293 cells and primary endothelial cells. The role of VWF binding was addressed using FVIII variants displaying reduced VWF interaction. Binding studies using purified FVIII proteins revealed moderate (Arg2150His, Del2201, Pro2300Ser to severe (Tyr1680Phe, Ser2119Tyr VWF binding defects. Expression studies in HEK293 cells and primary endothelial cells revealed that all FVIII variants were present within VWF-containing organelles. Quantitative studies showed that the relative amount of FVIII storage was independent of various mutations. Substantial amounts of FVIII variants are co-stored in VWF-containing storage organelles, presumably by virtue of their ability to interact with VWF at low pH. CONCLUSIONS: Our data suggest that the potential of FVIII co-storage with VWF is not affected in mild/moderate hemophilia A caused by reduced FVIII/VWF interaction in the circulation. These data support the hypothesis that Weibel-Palade bodies comprise the desmopressin-releasable FVIII storage pool in vivo.

  8. Immune regulatory gene polymorphisms as predisposing risk factors for the development of factor VIII inhibitors in Indian severe haemophilia A patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, P; Ghosh, K; Shetty, S

    2012-09-01

    Development of inhibitors to factor VIII, a serious complication of replacement therapy in haemophilia A patients, leads to increased bleeding, morbidity and mortality. There is no data on the risk factors for inhibitor development in Indian patients with severe haemophilia A. Our aim was to study the role of immune regulatory gene polymorphisms in the development of inhibitors. Fourteen immune regulatory gene polymorphisms (IL1β, IL4, IL10, TNFA and CTLA4) were analysed in 120 patients with severe haemophilia A, i.e. 50 inhibitor positive patients, and 70 inhibitor negative control patients, by PCR-RFLP, DNA sequencing and allele-specific PCRs. The IL10 promoter 'GCC' haplotypes overall (P: 0.002, OR: 3.452, 95% CI: 1.607-7.416), and 'GCC/ATA' (P: 0.011, OR: 3.492, 95% CI: 1.402-8.696) haplotype, associated with high and intermediate IL10 production, respectively, were significantly higher in inhibitor positive patients, whereas the 'non-GCC' haplotypes overall (P: 0.002,OR: 0.290, 95% CI 0.135-0.622) and 'ATA/ATA' haplotype (P: 0.025, OR: 0.278, 95% CI: 0.096-0.802), associated with low IL10 synthesis, were significantly higher among inhibitor negative patients. The TNFA rs1799724 C/T heterozygote prevalence was significantly higher in the inhibitor positive group (P: 0.021, OR: 3.190, 95% CI: 1.273-7.990), whereas the other polymorphisms showed no statistically significant association with the presence of inhibitors. Different immune regulatory gene polymorphisms play a significant role as possible risk factors for the development of inhibitors in severe haemophilia A patients. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  9. Successful immune tolerance induction with low-dose coagulation factor VIII in a patient with hemophilia A from a developing country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ay, Yilmaz; Ersin, Toret; Yesim, Oymak; Hilkay, Karapinar Tuba; Dilek, Ince; Gulcihan, Ozek; Ahmet, Koc

    2016-09-01

    Inhibitor development is the most frequent and serious complication of the treatment in patients with hemophilia. Immune tolerance induction (ITI) is the only option of treatment for the eradication of factor VIII (FVIII) inhibitor. We would like to present our case with hemophilia whose FVIII inhibitor eradication was done by a low-dose ITI regimen. Our patient has been applied on-demand therapy until 8 years of age. Secondary prophylaxis was began because of having hemophilic arthropathy. A low titer of FVIII inhibitor (4.2 BU/ml) was detected in the fifth month of the prophylaxis. The peak inhibitor titer of patient was 4.6 BU/ml, and there was no decrease in inhibitor titer in the follow-up duration. The low-dose ITI (50 IU/kg, 3 days a week) was started. His inhibitor level was detected negative and the recovery test was ameliorated in the 15th of the ITI therapy. High-dose regimen ITI could not be given particularly in developing countries such as Turkey in view of the high cost of treatment. Patients who had good risk factors might be successfully treated by using low-dose ITI regimen as effective as high-dose ITI regimen.

  10. Tranexamic acid combined with recombinant factor VIII increases clot resistance to accelerated fibrinolysis in severe hemophilia A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvas, Anne-Mette; Sørensen, Hanne Thykjær; Norengaard, Lisbeth

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Most patients with severe hemophilia A suffer from a profoundly compromised hemostatic response. In addition to both the delayed and slow development of a clot, previous studies have documented that severe hemophilia A is also associated with reduced clot stability. OBJECTIVES: We...... examined whether the clot stability in hemophiliacs could be improved by treatment with tranexamic acid (TXA) in combination with recombinant factor VIII (rFVIII). PATIENTS/METHODS: Baseline blood samples were obtained from eight males with severe hemophilia A. Thereafter, a bolus injection of r...... the elasticity curve increased 5-fold after rFVIII and 24-fold after addition of TXA. CONCLUSIONS: The study demonstrates that simultaneous treatment with TXA and rFVIII significantly improves the clot stability in patients with hemophilia A. Udgivelsesdato: December...

  11. Impact of quality control matrix effect: application to the calculation of uncertainty of measurement in one-stage clotting factor VIII assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobas, Frédéric; Benattar, Norbert; Bellisario, Audrey; Marin, Sylvie; Nougier, Christophe; Lienhart, Anne; Négrier, Claude

    2010-07-01

    In Europe, the ISO 15 189 standard requires uncertainty of measurement to be calculated for all measurands. We calculated the analytical imprecision and bias of our factor VIII coagulometric assay method between 5 and 80 U/dl, using plasmas expected to be at 5, 30 and 80 U/dl of factor VIII. We implemented Meijer et al.'s [Clin Chem 2002; 48:1011-1015] long-term coefficient of variance, bias and also uncertainty of measurement calculations. Assessments used reference plasma diluted in severe haemophilic plasma, in immunodepleted factor VIII-deficient plasma and in bovine serum albumin. With plasmas diluted in severe haemophilic and immunodepleted factor VIII-deficient plasma, calculated uncertainty of measurement was 10% compared with 15% (i.e., 50% greater) for plasma diluted in albumin buffer or as calculated from European Concerted Action on Thrombosis consensus values. It is thus important to approximate the patient sample matrix to obtain as precise an estimation as possible of assay method uncertainty of measurement.

  12. EFFICACY AND SAFETY OF A MONOCLONAL PURIFIED FACTOR-VIII CONCENTRATE - 5-YEAR FOLLOW-UP IN PREVIOUSLY TREATED HIV-NEGATIVE HEMOPHILIACS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SMID, WM; VANDERMEER, J; HALIE, MR

    1995-01-01

    The efficacy and safety of a monoclonal purified factor VIII concentrate (Hemofil M) were assessed in a historically controlled study in 22 HIV-negative patients with haemophilia A, previously treated with various concentrates. Data from 5 years of follow-up were compared with those from the precedi

  13. Efficacy and safety of a monoclonal purified factor-VIII concentrate - 5-year follow-up in previously treated HIV-negative hemophiliacs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smid, W. M.; van der Meer, J.; Halie, M. R.

    1995-01-01

    The efficacy and safety of a monoclonal purified factor VIII concentrate (Hemofil M) were assessed in a historically controlled study in 22 HIV-negative patients with haemophilia A, previously treated with various concentrates. Data from 5 years of follow-up were compared with those from the

  14. Delivery of full-length factor VIII using a piggyBac transposon vector to correct a mouse model of hemophilia A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideto Matsui

    Full Text Available Viral vectors have been used for hemophilia A gene therapy. However, due to its large size, full-length Factor VIII (FVIII cDNA has not been successfully delivered using conventional viral vectors. Moreover, viral vectors may pose safety risks, e.g., adverse immunological reactions or virus-mediated cytotoxicity. Here, we took advantages of the non-viral vector gene delivery system based on piggyBac DNA transposon to transfer the full-length FVIII cDNA, for the purpose of treating hemophilia A. We tested the efficiency of this new vector system in human 293T cells and iPS cells, and confirmed the expression of the full-length FVIII in culture media using activity-sensitive coagulation assays. Hydrodynamic injection of the piggyBac vectors into hemophilia A mice temporally treated with an immunosuppressant resulted in stable production of circulating FVIII for over 300 days without development of anti-FVIII antibodies. Furthermore, tail-clip assay revealed significant improvement of blood coagulation time in the treated mice. piggyBac transposon vectors can facilitate the long-term expression of therapeutic transgenes in vitro and in vivo. This novel gene transfer strategy should provide safe and efficient delivery of FVIII.

  15. Delivery of full-length factor VIII using a piggyBac transposon vector to correct a mouse model of hemophilia A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Hideto; Fujimoto, Naoko; Sasakawa, Noriko; Ohinata, Yasuhide; Shima, Midori; Yamanaka, Shinya; Sugimoto, Mitsuhiko; Hotta, Akitsu

    2014-01-01

    Viral vectors have been used for hemophilia A gene therapy. However, due to its large size, full-length Factor VIII (FVIII) cDNA has not been successfully delivered using conventional viral vectors. Moreover, viral vectors may pose safety risks, e.g., adverse immunological reactions or virus-mediated cytotoxicity. Here, we took advantages of the non-viral vector gene delivery system based on piggyBac DNA transposon to transfer the full-length FVIII cDNA, for the purpose of treating hemophilia A. We tested the efficiency of this new vector system in human 293T cells and iPS cells, and confirmed the expression of the full-length FVIII in culture media using activity-sensitive coagulation assays. Hydrodynamic injection of the piggyBac vectors into hemophilia A mice temporally treated with an immunosuppressant resulted in stable production of circulating FVIII for over 300 days without development of anti-FVIII antibodies. Furthermore, tail-clip assay revealed significant improvement of blood coagulation time in the treated mice. piggyBac transposon vectors can facilitate the long-term expression of therapeutic transgenes in vitro and in vivo. This novel gene transfer strategy should provide safe and efficient delivery of FVIII.

  16. Early eradication of factor VIII inhibitor in patients with congenital hemophilia A by immune tolerance induction with a high dose of immunoglobulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizoguchi, Yoko; Furue, Aya; Kagawa, Reiko; Chijimatsu, Ikue; Tomioka, Keita; Shimomura, Maiko; Imanaka, Yusuke; Nishimura, Shiho; Saito, Satoshi; Miki, Mizuka; Ono, Atsushi; Konishi, Nakao; Kawaguchi, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Masao

    2016-04-01

    The production of factor VIII (FVIII) inhibitory antibodies is a serious problem in patients with hemophilia A. Immune tolerance induction (ITI) is the only strategy proven to eradicate persistent inhibitors and has been shown to be successful in 70 % of patients with hemophilia A. However, a minority of hemophilia patients present life-long inhibitors. To eliminate such inhibitors, we designed an intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) strategy in combination with high dose recombinant FVIII for ITI in hemophilia A children with inhibitors. Four previously untreated patients produced inhibitors within 16 exposures to FVIII. The peak inhibitor titers in these patients ranged from 3 to 14 BU/mL. The patients received ITI combined with IVIG within 1.5 months after the inhibitors were detected. All patients showed a negative titer for inhibitors by 28 days, with no anamnestic responses. The recovery of FVIII in the plasma concentration was normalized within three months after initiation of ITI. An additional course of IVIG administration led to induction of complete tolerance by 20 months after initiation of ITI therapy in all patients. ITI treatment with high-dose FVIII combined with IVIG may be effective for the early elimination of inhibitors.

  17. Factors Associated with the Time of Admission among Notified Dengue Fever Cases in Region VIII Philippines from 2008 to 2014.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Echavez Abello

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In cases of Dengue fever, late hospital admission can lead to treatment delay and even death. In order to improve early disease notification and management, it is essential to investigate the factors affecting the time of admission of Dengue cases. This study determined the factors associated with the time of admission among notified Dengue cases. The study covered the period between 2008 and 2014 in Region VIII, Philippines. The factors assessed were age, sex, hospital sector, hospital level, disease severity based on the 1997 WHO Dengue classification, and period of admission (distinguishing between the 2010 Dengue epidemic and non-epidemic time. We analysed secondary data from the surveillance of notified Dengue cases. We calculated the association through chi-square test, ordinal logistic regression and linear regression at p value < 0.05. The study included 16,357 admitted Dengue cases. The reported cases included a majority of children (70.09%, mild cases of the disease (64.00%, patients from the public sector (69.82%, and non-tertiary hospitals (62.76%. Only 1.40% of cases had a laboratory confirmation. The epidemic period in 2010 comprised 48.68% of all the admitted cases during this period. Late admission was more likely among adults than children (p<0.05. The severe type of the disease was more likely to be admitted late than the mild type (p<0.05. Late admission was also more likely in public hospitals than in private hospitals (p<0.05; and within tertiary level hospitals than non-tertiary hospitals (p<0.05. Late admission was more likely during the non-epidemic period than the 2010 epidemic period (p<0.05. A case fatality rate of 1 or greater was significantly associated with children, severe diseases, tertiary hospitals and public hospitals when admitted late (p<0.05. Data suggests that early admission among child cases was common in Region VIII. This behavior is encouraging, and should be continued. However, further study is needed

  18. Limit of detection and threshold for positivity of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention assay for factor VIII inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, C H; Boylan, B; Shapiro, A D; Lentz, S R; Wicklund, B M

    2017-08-10

    Essentials Immunologic methods detect factor VIII (FVIII) antibodies in some inhibitor-negative specimens. Specimens were tested by modified Nijmegen-Bethesda assay (NBA) and fluorescence immunoassay. The NBA with preanalytical heat inactivation detects FVIII inhibitors down to 0.2 NBU. IgG4 frequency validates the established threshold for positivity of ≥ 0.5 NBU for this NBA. Background The Bethesda assay for measurement of factor VIII inhibitors called for quantification of positive inhibitors by using dilutions producing 25-75% residual activity (RA), corresponding to 0.4-2.0 Bethesda units, with the use of 'more sensitive methods' for samples with RA closer to 100% being recommended. The Nijmegen modification (Nijmegen-Bethesda assay [NBA]) changed the reagents used but not these calculations. Some specimens negative by the NBA have been shown to have FVIII antibodies detectable with sensitive immunologic methods. Objective To examine the performance at very low inhibitor titers of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)-modified NBA (CDC-NBA), which includes preanalytic heat inactivation to liberate bound anti-FVIII antibodies. Methods Specimens with known inhibitors were tested with the CDC-NBA. IgG4 anti-FVIII antibodies were measured by fluorescence immunoassay (FLI). Results Diluted inhibitors showed linearity below 0.4 Nijmegen-Bethesda units (NBU). With four statistical methods, the limit of detection of the CDC-NBA was determined to be 0.2 NBU. IgG4 anti-FVIII antibodies, which correlate most strongly with functional inhibitors, were present at rates above the background rate of healthy controls in specimens with titers ≥ 0.2 NBU and showed an increase in frequency from 14.3% at 0.4 NBU to 67% at the established threshold for positivity of 0.5 NBU. Conclusions The CDC-NBA can detect inhibitors down to 0.2 NBU. The FLI, which is more sensitive, demonstrates anti-FVIII IgG4 in some patients with negative (NBA, supporting the need for

  19. Evaluation of the expression of VIII factor and VEGF in the regeneration of non-vital teeth in dogs using propolis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mina Zarei

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: The purpose of the present study was the immunohistochemical evaluation of VEGF and VII factors in dog’s teeth pulp revascularized with MTA and propolis. Materials and Methods: 144 mature and immature two rooted dog’s premolar canals were selected.  Pulp necrosis and infection were established after 2 weeks and the disinfection of the canals was done with copious NaOCl irrigation and triantibiotic mixture (ciprofloxacin, metronidazole, and minocycline for 3 weeks. Subsequently, the blood clot was evoked in the canal by periapical tissue irritation with a k-file. The samples were randomly divided into 6 experimental groups: propolis (groups 1, 2, MTA (groups 3, 4, and parafilm (groups 5, 6 in immature and mature teeth. The animals were sacrificed and samples were prepared for immunohistochemical evaluation of VEGF and the VIII factor. Results: Tissue regeneration was seen in 64.5% of MTA, 38% of propolis, and 0% of parafilm group samples. Expression of VEGF and VIII factor in the propolis group was more than the MTA group and it showed a reduction after 3 months in comparison to 1 month. VEGF and VIII factor were seen in stromal cells in addition to endothelial vessel cells. Overall, expression of angiogenic factors was more in the open apex teeth compared to close apex ones. Conclusion: According to the results of this study, propolis can induce the expression of VEGF and VIII factor in infected mature and immature dog’s teeth and is a suitable biomaterial for the revascularization technique.

  20. Evaluation of the expression of VIII factor and VEGF in the regeneration of non-vital teeth in dogs using propolis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarei, Mina; Jafarian, Amir Hossein; Harandi, Azadeh; Javidi, Maryam; Gharechahi, Maryam

    2017-01-01

    Objective(s): The purpose of the present study was the immunohistochemical evaluation of VEGF and VII factors in dog’s teeth pulp revascularized with MTA and propolis. Materials and Methods: 144 mature and immature two rooted dog’s premolar canals were selected. Pulp necrosis and infection were established after 2 weeks and the disinfection of the canals was done with copious NaOCl irrigation and triantibiotic mixture (ciprofloxacin, metronidazole, and minocycline) for 3 weeks. Subsequently, the blood clot was evoked in the canal by periapical tissue irritation with a k-file. The samples were randomly divided into 6 experimental groups: propolis (groups 1, 2), MTA (groups 3, 4), and parafilm (groups 5, 6) in immature and mature teeth. The animals were sacrificed and samples were prepared for immunohistochemical evaluation of VEGF and the VIII factor. Results: Tissue regeneration was seen in 64.5% of MTA, 38% of propolis, and 0% of parafilm group samples. Expression of VEGF and VIII factor in the propolis group was more than the MTA group and it showed a reduction after 3 months in comparison to 1 month. VEGF and VIII factor were seen in stromal cells in addition to endothelial vessel cells. Overall, expression of angiogenic factors was more in the open apex teeth compared to close apex ones. Conclusion: According to the results of this study, propolis can induce the expression of VEGF and VIII factor in infected mature and immature dog’s teeth and is a suitable biomaterial for the revascularization technique. PMID:28293394

  1. Minimal modification in the factor VIII B-domain sequence ameliorates the murine hemophilia A phenotype

    OpenAIRE

    Siner, Joshua I.; Iacobelli, Nicholas P.; Sabatino, Denise E.; Ivanciu, Lacramiora; Zhou, Shangzhen; Poncz, Mortimer; Camire, Rodney M.; Arruda, Valder R.

    2013-01-01

    The novel FVIII variant (FVIII-RH) has enhanced stability and procoagulant activity in both in vitro and in vivo models.FVIII-RH is efficacious and safe; thus, it is an attractive molecule for protein replacement and as a transgene in gene-therapy strategies.

  2. Overexpression of factor VIII after AAV delivery is transiently associated with cellular stress in hemophilia A mice

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    Amy M Lange

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Factor VIII (FVIII is a large glycoprotein that is challenging to express both in vitro and in vivo. Several studies suggest that high levels of FVIII expression can lead to cellular stress. After gene transfer, transgene expression is restricted to a subset of cells and the increased FVIII load per cell may impact activation of the unfolded protein response. We sought to determine whether increased FVIII expression in mice after adeno-associated viral liver gene transfer would affect the unfolded protein response and/or immune response to the transgene. The FVIII gene was delivered as B-domain deleted single chain or two chain (light and heavy chains at a range of doses in hemophilia A mice. A correlation between FVIII expression and anti-FVIII antibody titers was observed. Analysis of key components of the unfolded protein response, binding immunoglobulin protein (BiP, and C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP, showed transient unfolded protein response activation in the single chain treated group expressing >200% of FVIII but not after two chain delivery. These studies suggest that supraphysiological single chain FVIII expression may increase the likelihood of a cellular stress response but does not alter liver function. These data are in agreement with the observed long-term expression of FVIII at therapeutic levels after adeno-associated viral delivery in hemophilia A dogs without evidence of cellular toxicity.

  3. An Acquired Factor VIII Inhibitor in a Patient with HIV and HCV: A Case Presentation and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. B. Zeichner

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Despite its low incidence, acquired factor VIII inhibitor is the most common autoantibody affecting the clotting cascade. The exact mechanism of acquisition remains unclear, but postpartum patients, those with autoimmune conditions or malignancies, and those with exposure to particular drugs appear most susceptible. There have been several case reports describing acquired FVIII inhibitors in patients receiving interferon alpha for HCV treatment and in patients being treated for HIV. To our knowledge, this is the first case of a patient with HCV and HIV who was not actively receiving treatment for either condition. Case Presentation. A 57-year-old Caucasian male with a history of HIV and HCV was admitted to our hospital for a several day history of progressively worsening right thigh bruising and generalized weakness. CTA of the abdominal arteries revealed large bilateral retroperitoneal hematomas. Laboratory studies revealed the presence of a high titer FVIII inhibitor. Conclusion. Our case of a very rare condition highlights the importance of recognizing and understanding the diagnosis of acquired FVIII inhibitor. Laboratory research and clinical data on the role of newer agents are needed in order to better characterize disease pathogenesis, disease associations, genetic markers, and optimal disease management.

  4. Molecular design and downstream processing of turoctocog alfa (NovoEight), a B-domain truncated factor VIII molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadian, Haleh; Hansen, Ernst B; Faber, Johan H; Sejergaard, Lars; Karlsson, Johan; Bolt, Gert; Hansen, Jens J; Thim, Lars

    2016-07-01

    Turoctocog alfa (NovoEight) is a third-generation recombinant factor VIII (rFVIII) with a truncated B-domain that is manufactured in Chinese hamster ovary cells. No human or animal-derived materials are used in the process. The aim of this study is to describe the molecular design and purification process for turoctocog alfa. A five-step purification process is applied to turoctocog alfa: protein capture on mixed-mode resin; immunoaffinity chromatography using a unique, recombinantly produced anti-FVIII mAb; anion exchange chromatography; nanofiltration and size exclusion chromatography. This process enabled reduction of impurities such as host cell proteins (HCPs) and high molecular weight proteins (HMWPs) to a very low level. The immunoaffinity step is very important for the removal of FVIII-related degradation products. Manufacturing scale data shown in this article confirmed the robustness of the purification process and a reliable and consistent reduction of the impurities. The contribution of each step to the final product purity is described and shown for three manufacturing batches. Turoctocog alfa, a third-generation B-domain truncated rFVIII product is manufactured in Chinese hamster ovary cells without the use of animal or human-derived proteins. The five-step purification process results in a homogenous, highly purified rFVIII product.

  5. Overexpression of factor VIII after AAV delivery is transiently associated with cellular stress in hemophilia A mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Amy M; Altynova, Ekaterina S; Nguyen, Giang N; Sabatino, Denise E

    2016-01-01

    Factor VIII (FVIII) is a large glycoprotein that is challenging to express both in vitro and in vivo. Several studies suggest that high levels of FVIII expression can lead to cellular stress. After gene transfer, transgene expression is restricted to a subset of cells and the increased FVIII load per cell may impact activation of the unfolded protein response. We sought to determine whether increased FVIII expression in mice after adeno-associated viral liver gene transfer would affect the unfolded protein response and/or immune response to the transgene. The FVIII gene was delivered as B-domain deleted single chain or two chain (light and heavy chains) at a range of doses in hemophilia A mice. A correlation between FVIII expression and anti-FVIII antibody titers was observed. Analysis of key components of the unfolded protein response, binding immunoglobulin protein (BiP), and C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP), showed transient unfolded protein response activation in the single chain treated group expressing >200% of FVIII but not after two chain delivery. These studies suggest that supraphysiological single chain FVIII expression may increase the likelihood of a cellular stress response but does not alter liver function. These data are in agreement with the observed long-term expression of FVIII at therapeutic levels after adeno-associated viral delivery in hemophilia A dogs without evidence of cellular toxicity. PMID:27738645

  6. Enhancement of pig embryonic implants in factor VIII KO mice: a novel role for the coagulation cascade in organ size control.

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    Anna Aronovich

    Full Text Available Very little is known about the mechanisms that contribute to organ size differences between species. In the present study, we used a mouse model of embryonic pig tissue implantation to define the role of host Factor VIII in controlling the final size attained by the implant. We show here that pig embryonic spleen, pancreas, and liver all grow to an increased size in mice that are deficient in the Factor VIII clotting cascade. Similar results were obtained using the transplantation model after treatment with the low molecular weight heparin derivative Clexane which markedly enhanced transplant size. Likewise, enhanced size was found upon treatment with the direct thrombin inhibitor Dabigatran, suggesting that organ size regulation might be mediated by thrombin, downstream of Factor VIII. Considering that thrombin was shown to mediate various functions unrelated to blood clotting, either directly by cleavage of protease-activated receptors (PARs or indirectly by cleaving osteopontin (OPN on stroma cells, the role of PAR1 and PAR4 antagonists as well as treatment with cleaved form of OPN (tcOPN were tested. While the former was not found to have an impact on overgrowth of embryonic pig spleen implants, marked reduction of size was noted upon treatment with the (tcOPN. Collectively, our surprising set of observations suggests that factors of the coagulation cascade have a novel role in organ size control.

  7. Factoring nonviral gene therapy into a cure for hemophilia A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrovsky, Vanessa; Calos, Michele P

    2008-10-01

    Gene therapy for hemophilia A has fallen short of success despite several clinical trials conducted over the past decade. Challenges to its success include vector immunogenicity, insufficient transgene expression levels of Factor VIII, and inhibitor antibody formation. Gene therapy has been dominated by the use of viral vectors, as well as the immunogenic and oncogenic concerns that accompany these strategies. Because of the complexity of viral vectors, the development of nonviral DNA delivery methods may provide an efficient and safe alternative for the treatment of hemophilia A. New types of nonviral strategies, such as DNA integrating vectors, and the success of several nonviral animal studies, suggest that nonviral gene therapy has curative potential and justifies its clinical development.

  8. Identification and multidimensional optimization of an asymmetric bispecific IgG antibody mimicking the function of factor VIII cofactor activity.

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    Zenjiro Sampei

    Full Text Available In hemophilia A, routine prophylaxis with exogenous factor VIII (FVIII requires frequent intravenous injections and can lead to the development of anti-FVIII alloantibodies (FVIII inhibitors. To overcome these drawbacks, we screened asymmetric bispecific IgG antibodies to factor IXa (FIXa and factor X (FX, mimicking the FVIII cofactor function. Since the therapeutic potential of the lead bispecific antibody was marginal, FVIII-mimetic activity was improved by modifying its binding properties to FIXa and FX, and the pharmacokinetics was improved by engineering the charge properties of the variable region. Difficulties in manufacturing the bispecific antibody were overcome by identifying a common light chain for the anti-FIXa and anti-FX heavy chains through framework/complementarity determining region shuffling, and by pI engineering of the two heavy chains to facilitate ion exchange chromatographic purification of the bispecific antibody from the mixture of byproducts. Engineering to overcome low solubility and deamidation was also performed. The multidimensionally optimized bispecific antibody hBS910 exhibited potent FVIII-mimetic activity in human FVIII-deficient plasma, and had a half-life of 3 weeks and high subcutaneous bioavailability in cynomolgus monkeys. Importantly, the activity of hBS910 was not affected by FVIII inhibitors, while anti-hBS910 antibodies did not inhibit FVIII activity, allowing the use of hBS910 without considering the development or presence of FVIII inhibitors. Furthermore, hBS910 could be purified on a large manufacturing scale and formulated into a subcutaneously injectable liquid formulation for clinical use. These features of hBS910 enable routine prophylaxis by subcutaneous delivery at a long dosing interval without considering the development or presence of FVIII inhibitors. We expect that hBS910 (investigational drug name: ACE910 will provide significant benefit for severe hemophilia A patients.

  9. Factor VIII Is Synthesized in Human Endothelial Cells, Packaged in Weibel-Palade Bodies and Secreted Bound to ULVWF Strings.

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    Nancy A Turner

    Full Text Available The cellular synthesis site and ensuing storage location for human factor VIII (FVIII, the coagulation protein deficient in hemophilia A, has been elusive. FVIII stability and half-life is dependent on non-covalent complex formation with von Willebrand factor (VWF to avoid proteolysis and clearance. VWF is synthesized in megakaryocytes and endothelial cells, and is stored and secreted from platelet alpha granules and Weibel-Palade bodies of endothelial cells. In this paper we provide direct evidence for FVIII synthesis in 2 types of primary human endothelial cells: glomerular microvascular endothelial cells (GMVECs and umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs. Gene expression quantified by real time PCR revealed that levels of F8 and VWF are similar in GMVECs and HUVECs. Previous clinical studies have shown that stimulation of vasopressin V2 receptors causes parallel secretion of both proteins. In this study, we found that both endothelial cell types express AVPR2 (vasopressin V2 receptor gene and that AVPR2 mRNA levels are 5-fold higher in GMVECs than HUVECs. FVIII and VWF proteins were detected by fluorescent microscopy in Weibel-Palade bodies within GMVECs and HUVECs using antibodies proven to be target specific. Visual presence of FVIII and VWF in Weibel-Palade bodies was confirmed by correlation measurements. The high extent of correlation was compared with negative correlation values obtained from FVIII detection with cytoplasmic proteins, β-actin and Factor H. FVIII activity was positive in GMVEC and HUVEC cell lysates. Stimulated GMVECs and HUVECs were found to secrete cell-anchored ultra-large VWF strings covered with bound FVIII.

  10. Factor VIII Is Synthesized in Human Endothelial Cells, Packaged in Weibel-Palade Bodies and Secreted Bound to ULVWF Strings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Nancy A; Moake, Joel L

    2015-01-01

    The cellular synthesis site and ensuing storage location for human factor VIII (FVIII), the coagulation protein deficient in hemophilia A, has been elusive. FVIII stability and half-life is dependent on non-covalent complex formation with von Willebrand factor (VWF) to avoid proteolysis and clearance. VWF is synthesized in megakaryocytes and endothelial cells, and is stored and secreted from platelet alpha granules and Weibel-Palade bodies of endothelial cells. In this paper we provide direct evidence for FVIII synthesis in 2 types of primary human endothelial cells: glomerular microvascular endothelial cells (GMVECs) and umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Gene expression quantified by real time PCR revealed that levels of F8 and VWF are similar in GMVECs and HUVECs. Previous clinical studies have shown that stimulation of vasopressin V2 receptors causes parallel secretion of both proteins. In this study, we found that both endothelial cell types express AVPR2 (vasopressin V2 receptor gene) and that AVPR2 mRNA levels are 5-fold higher in GMVECs than HUVECs. FVIII and VWF proteins were detected by fluorescent microscopy in Weibel-Palade bodies within GMVECs and HUVECs using antibodies proven to be target specific. Visual presence of FVIII and VWF in Weibel-Palade bodies was confirmed by correlation measurements. The high extent of correlation was compared with negative correlation values obtained from FVIII detection with cytoplasmic proteins, β-actin and Factor H. FVIII activity was positive in GMVEC and HUVEC cell lysates. Stimulated GMVECs and HUVECs were found to secrete cell-anchored ultra-large VWF strings covered with bound FVIII.

  11. The prevalence of latex sensitisation and allergy and associated risk factors among healthcare workers using hypoallergenic latex gloves at King Edward VIII Hospital, KwaZulu-Natal South Africa: a cross-sectional study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Phaswana, Shumani Makwarela; Naidoo, Saloshni

    2013-01-01

    The present study describes latex sensitisation and allergy prevalence and associated factors among healthcare workers using hypoallergenic latex gloves at King Edward VIII Hospital in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa...

  12. [Relationship between factor VIII inhibitor development and polymorphisms of TNFα and CTLA-4 gene in Chinese Han patients with hemophilia A].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lu-lu; Yu, Zi-qiang; Zhang, Wei; Cao, Li-juan; Su, Jian; Bai, Xia; Ruan, Chang-geng

    2011-03-01

    To investigate the potential association between factor VIII inhibitor development and polymorphisms of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)-308 and cytotoxic T-lymphocyte associated protein-4 gene in Chinese Han patients with hemophilia A (HA). The single base change polymorphism in TNF-α and CTLA-4 gene was analyzed in 140 Chinese Han patients with hemophilia A who have been treated with plasma-derived FVIII concentrates and 108 normal controls by using PCR-restrictive fragment length polymorphism (RFLP). All of the HA patients' plasma samples were measured by modified-Nijmegen assay simultaneously. In HA patients, G/G genotype, G/A genotype and A/A genotype were detected in 118 (84.3%), 18 (12.8%) and 4 cases (2.9%) respectively; C/C genotype, C/T genotype and T/T genotype were detected in 108 (77.2%), 30 (21.4%) and 2 cases (1.4%) respectively. The difference in the genotype frequencies between HA patients and controls was nonsignificant (P > 0.05). Patients who were carriers of homozygotes for A allele had a higher risk of inhibitor development compared with those who were not (OR = 7.519, 95% CI = 3.168 - 17.844). Severe HA patients who were carriers of homozygotes for A allele had a higher risk of inhibitor development compared with those who were not (OR = 8.163, 95% CI = 2.521 - 26.434). There was no statistical difference in the risk of inhibitor development between the patients who were carriers or not (OR = 1.586, 95% CI = 0.729 - 3.450). TNF-α-308 gene polymorphism is significantly associated with inhibitor development in Chinese Han patients with severe hemophilia A. TNF-α gene may be a useful marker and potential modulator of the immune response to replacement therapy for hemophilia A patients.

  13. Assessment of the frequency of regulatory T cells (CD4+CD25+CD127-) in children with hemophilia A: relation to factor VIII inhibitors and disease severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Asrar, Mohamed Abo; Hamed, Ahmed El-Saeed; Darwish, Yasser Wagih; Ismail, Eman Abdel Rahman; Ismail, Noha Ali

    2016-01-01

    A rapidly growing evidence showed that regulatory T cells (Tregs) play a crucial role in tolerance to coagulation factors and may be involved in the pathogenesis of inhibitor formation in patients with hemophilia. We determined the percentage of Tregs (CD4CD25CD127) in 45 children with hemophilia A compared with 45 healthy controls, and assessed their relation to the clinical characteristics of patients and factor VIII (FVIII) inhibitors. Patients were studied stressing on frequency of bleeding attacks, joint pain, history of viral hepatitis, and the received therapy (FVIII precipitate/cryotherapy). FVIII activity and FVIII inhibitors were assessed with flow cytometric analysis of CD4CD25CD127 Tregs. According to residual FVIII activity levels, 30 patients (66.7%) had mild/moderate hemophilia A, whereas 15 (33.3%) patients had severe hemophilia A. The frequency of Tregs was significantly lower among all patients with hemophilia A compared with controls (2.59 ± 1.1 versus 3.73 ± 1.12%; P = 0.002). Tregs were significantly decreased among patients with FVIII inhibitors compared with the inhibitor-negative group (P hemophilia A had lower Tregs levels than those without (P = 0.34 and P = 0.011, respectively). A significant positive correlation was found between the percentage of Tregs and FVIII among hemophilia A patients. ROC curve analysis revealed that the cut-off value of Tregs at 1.91% could differentiate patients with and without FVIII inhibitors, with a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 91.3%. We suggest that alteration in the frequency of Tregs in young patients with hemophilia A may contribute to inhibitor formation and disease severity.

  14. Endothelial cell processing and alternatively spliced transcripts of factor VIII: potential implications for coagulation cascades and pulmonary hypertension.

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    Claire L Shovlin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Coagulation factor VIII (FVIII deficiency leads to haemophilia A. Conversely, elevated plasma levels are a strong predictor of recurrent venous thromboemboli and pulmonary hypertension phenotypes in which in situ thromboses are implicated. Extrahepatic sources of plasma FVIII are implicated, but have remained elusive. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Immunohistochemistry of normal human lung tissue, and confocal microscopy, flow cytometry, and ELISA quantification of conditioned media from normal primary endothelial cells were used to examine endothelial expression of FVIII and coexpression with von Willebrand Factor (vWF, which protects secreted FVIII heavy chain from rapid proteloysis. FVIII transcripts predicted from database mining were identified by RT-PCR and sequencing. FVIII mAb-reactive material was demonstrated in CD31+ endothelial cells in normal human lung tissue, and in primary pulmonary artery, pulmonary microvascular, and dermal microvascular endothelial cells. In pulmonary endothelial cells, this protein occasionally colocalized with vWF, centered on Weibel Palade bodies. Pulmonary artery and pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells secreted low levels of FVIII and vWF to conditioned media, and demonstrated cell surface expression of FVIII and vWF Ab-reacting proteins compared to an isotype control. Four endothelial splice isoforms were identified. Two utilize transcription start sites in alternate 5' exons within the int22h-1 repeat responsible for intron 22 inversions in 40% of severe haemophiliacs. A reciprocal relationship between the presence of short isoforms and full-length FVIII transcript suggested potential splice-switching mechanisms. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The pulmonary endothelium is confirmed as a site of FVIII secretion, with evidence of synthesis, cell surface expression, and coexpression with vWF. There is complex alternate transcription initiation from the FVIII gene. These findings provide a

  15. A population pharmacokinetic model for perioperative dosing of factor VIII in hemophilia A patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hazendonk, Hendrika; Fijnvandraat, Karin; Lock, Janske; Driessens, Mariette; van der Meer, Felix; Meijer, Karina; Kruip, Marieke; Laros-van Gorkom, Britta; Peters, Marjolein; de Wildt, Saskia; Leebeek, Frank; Cnossen, Marjon; Mathot, Ron

    2016-01-01

    The role of pharmacokinetic-guided dosing of factor concentrates in hemophilia is currently a subject of debate and focuses on long-term prophylactic treatment. Few data are available on its impact in the perioperative period. In this study, a population pharmacokinetic model for currently registere

  16. A population pharmacokinetic model for perioperative dosing of factor VIII in hemophilia A patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hazendonk, Hendrika; Fijnvandraat, Karin; Lock, Janske; Driessens, Mariette; van der Meer, Felix; Meijer, Karina; Kruip, Marieke; Laros-van Gorkom, Britta; Peters, Marjolein; de Wildt, Saskia; Leebeek, Frank; Cnossen, Marjon; Mathot, Ron

    2016-01-01

    The role of pharmacokinetic-guided dosing of factor concentrates in hemophilia is currently a subject of debate and focuses on long-term prophylactic treatment. Few data are available on its impact in the perioperative period. In this study, a population pharmacokinetic model for currently

  17. Associations between high factor VIII and low free protein S levels with traditional arterial thrombotic risk factors and their risk on arterial thrombosis : Results from a retrospective family cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, Rene; van Schouwenburg, Inge M.; Mahmoodi, Bakhtawar K.; Veeger, Nic J. G. M.; Mulder, Andre B.; Middeldorp, Saskia; Kluin-Nelemans, Hanneke C.; Lijfering, Willem M.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Whether high factor (F)VIII and low free protein S levels are risk factors for arterial thrombosis is unclarified. Material and Methods: In a post-hoc analysis of a single-centre retrospective family cohort, we determined if these two proteins could increase the risk of arterial

  18. Factor VIII delivery devices in haemophilia A. Barriers and drivers for treatment adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Arias, Isabel; Kim, Hae Kyung

    2016-11-01

    Introducción y objetivo: Recabar la experiencia de pacientes con hemofilia A con sus dispositivos de reconstitucion de factor de coagulacion, barreras para la adherencia y determinar sus preferencias, presentando una nueva jeringa de doble camara (JDC). Método: Investigacion transversal mediante encuesta dirigida y sesion de prueba de la JDC. Resultados: Participaron 74 pacientes, el 50% en tratamiento con profilaxis, y 7 anos (mediana) con su tratamiento habitual (RIC 17,25). En la encuesta, la JDC recibio la mayor puntuacion (75/100, p probabilidad de uso en profilaxis (p probabilidad de favorecer la profilaxis.

  19. A sequence variation scan of the coagulation factor VIII (FVIII) structural gene and associations with plasma FVIII activity levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viel, Kevin R; Machiah, Deepa K; Warren, Diane M; Khachidze, Manana; Buil, Alfonso; Fernstrom, Karl; Souto, Juan C; Peralta, Juan M; Smith, Todd; Blangero, John; Porter, Sandra; Warren, Stephen T; Fontcuberta, Jordi; Soria, Jose M; Flanders, W Dana; Almasy, Laura; Howard, Tom E

    2007-05-01

    Plasma factor VIII coagulant activity (FVIII:C) level is a highly heritable quantitative trait that is strongly correlated with thrombosis risk. Polymorphisms within only 1 gene, the ABO blood-group locus, have been unequivocally demonstrated to contribute to the broad population variability observed for this trait. Because less than 2.5% of the structural FVIII gene (F8) has been examined previously, we resequenced all known functional regions in 222 potentially distinct alleles from 137 unrelated nonhemophilic individuals representing 7 racial groups. Eighteen of the 47 variants identified, including 17 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), were previously unknown. As the degree of linkage disequilibrium across F8 was weak overall, we used measured-genotype association analysis to evaluate the influence of each polymorphism on the FVIII:C levels in 398 subjects from 21 pedigrees known as the Genetic Analysis of Idiopathic Thrombophilia project (GAIT). Our results suggested that 92714C>G, a nonsynonymous SNP encoding the B-domain substitution D1241E, was significantly associated with FVIII:C level. After accounting for important covariates, including age and ABO genotype, the association persisted with each C-allele additively increasing the FVIII:C level by 14.3 IU dL(-1) (P = .016). Nevertheless, because the alleles of 56010G>A, a SNP within the 3' splice junction of intron 7, are strongly associated with 92714C>G in GAIT, additional studies are required to determine whether D1241E is itself a functional variant.

  20. Factor VIII (F8) inversions in severe hemophilia A: Male germ cell origin and diagnosis with RT-PCR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antonarakis, S.E. [Geneva Medical School (Switzerland)]|[Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Rossiter, J.P. [Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Young, M. [Geneva Medical School (Switzerland)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The Factor VIII (F8) gene, which is defective in hemophilia A, is located in the most telomeric megabase of Xq. Inversions due to intrachromosomal homologous recombination between mispaired copies of gene A located within intron 22 of the gene and about 500 kb telomeric to it account for nearly half of the cases of severe hemophilia A. We hypothesized that pairing of Xq with its homolog inhibits the inversion process, and that therefore the event originates predominantly in male germ cells. In all 21 informative cases in which the inversion originated in a maternal grandparent, DNA polymorphism analysis using markers within or very closely linked to F8, determined that it occurred in the male germline. In addition, all but one of 56 mothers of sporadic cases due to inversions were carriers. The data indicate that the F8 gene inversions leading to severe hemophilia A occur almost exclusively in male germ cells. The mean age of maternal grandfathers at the birth of their carrier daughters was 29.9 years (13 cases), i.e. not different from the mean paternal age in the general population, supporting the hypothesis that the inversions occur in meiosis. The inversions can be diagnosed by Southern blot analysis. For more rapid diagnosis we have used RT-PCR of RNA ectopically expressed in blood. Oligonucleotides were used to PCR amplify, after the initial RT reaction of RNA samples using random hexamers, either the normal transcript (F8 exons 21 to 24;312 bp product) or the novel abnormal transcript that is generated after the inversion. Both type 1 and 2 inversions can be recognized in affecteds and carriers by the presence of the diagnostic PcR product of 248 bp. Correct diagnoses were made in samples from 6 patients and 2 carriers with type 1 inversions, 2 patients and 2 carriers with type 2 inversions and 5 normal controls.

  1. Severe hemophilia A in a female by cryptic translocation: Order and orientation of factor VIII within Xq28

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Migeon, B.R.; McGinniss, M.J.; Antonarakis, S.E.; Axelman, J.; Stasiowski, B.A.; Youssoufian, H.; Kearns, W.G.; Chung, A.; Pearson, P.L.; Kazazian, H.H. Jr. (Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States)); Muneer, R.S. (Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman (United States))

    1993-04-01

    The authors report studies of a female with severe hemophilia A resulting from a complex de novo translocation of chromosomes X and 17 (46,X,t(X; 17)). Somatic cell hybrids containing the normal X, the der(X), or the der(17) were analyzed for coagulation factor VIII (F8C) sequences using Southern blots and polymerase chain reaction. The normal X, always late replicating, contains a normal F8C gene, whereas the der(X) has no F8C sequences. The der(17) chromosome containing Xq24-Xq28 carries a functional G6PD locus and a deleted F8C allele that lacks exons 1--15. Also, it lacks the DXYS64-X locus, situated between the F8C locus and the Xq telomere. These results indicate that a cryptic breakpoint within Xq28 deleted the 5[prime] end of F8C, but left the more proximal G6PD locus intact on the der(17)chromosome. As the deleted segment includes the 5[prime] half of F8C as well as the subtelomeric DXYS64 locus, F8C must be oriented on the chromosome with its 5[prime] region closest to the telomere. Therefore, the order of these loci is Xcen-G6PD-3[prime]F8C-5[prime]F8C-DXYS64-Xqtel. The analysis of somatic cell hybrids has elucidated the true nature of the F8C mutation in the pro-band, revealing a more complex rearrangement (three chromosomes involved) than that expected from cytogenetic analysis, chromosome painting, and Southern blots. A 900-kb segment within Xq28 has been translocated to another autosome. Hemophilia A in this heterozygous female is due to the decapitation of the F8C gene on the der(17) and inactivation of the intact allele on the normal X. 27 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Characterization of the anti-factor VIII immunoglobulin profile in patients with hemophilia A by use of a fluorescence-based immunoassay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boylan, Brian; Rice, Anne S.; Dunn, Amy L.; Tarantino, Michael D.; Brettler, Doreen B.; Barrett, John C.; Miller, Connie H.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background The development of neutralizing antibodies, referred to as inhibitors, against factor VIII (FVIII) is a major complication associated with FVIII infusion therapy for the treatment of hemophilia A (HA). Previous studies have shown that a subset of HA patients and a low percentage of healthy individuals harbor non-neutralizing anti-FVIII antibodies that do not elicit the clinical manifestations associated with inhibitor development. Objective Assess HA patients' anti-FVIII antibody profiles as potential predictors of clinical outcomes. Methods A fluorescence immunoassay (FLI) was used to detect anti-FVIII antibodies in 491 samples from 371 HA patients. Results Assessments of antibody profiles showed that the presence of anti-FVIII IgG1, IgG2, or IgG4 correlated qualitatively and quantitatively with the presence of a FVIII inhibitor as reported by the Nijmegen-Bethesda assay (NBA). Forty-eight patients with a negative inhibitor history contributed serial samples to the study, including seven patients who had negative NBA titers initially and later converted to NBA-positive. The FLI detected anti-FVIII IgG1 in five of those seven patients prior to their conversion to NBA-positive. Five of 15 serial-sample patients who had a negative inhibitor history and a positive anti-FVIII IgG1 later developed an inhibitor, compared to 2 of 33 patients with a negative inhibitor history without anti-FVIII IgG1. Conclusions These data provide a rationale for future studies designed both to monitor the dynamics of anti-FVIII antibody profiles in HA patients as a potential predictor of future inhibitor development and to assess the value of the anti-FVIII FLI as a supplement to traditional inhibitor testing. PMID:25354263

  3. Optimisation of the Factor VIII yield in mammalian cell cultures by reducing the membrane bound fraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolind, Mille Petersen; Nørby, Peder Lisby; Berchtold, Martin Werner

    2011-01-01

    and forms the tenase complex together with clotting Factor IX. In vitro, during serum free production of recombinant FVIII (rFVIII), production cells also expose PS, and since vWF is not present to hinder interaction of secreted rFVIII with PS, rFVIII is partly associated with the cell membrane...... of active membrane bound rFVIII to the culture medium. Moreover, the attachment of rFVIII to cell membranes of un-transfected HEK293 cells was studied in the presence of compounds that competes for interactions between rFVIII and PS. Competitive assays between iodinated rFVIII (¹²5I-rFVIII) and annexin V...... or ortho-phospho-L-serine (OPLS) demonstrated that annexin V and OPLS were able to reduce the membrane bound fraction of rFVIII by 70% and 30%, respectively. Finally, adding OPLS to CHO cells stably expressing FVIII increased the yield by 50%. Using this new knowledge, the recovery of rFVIII could...

  4. Plasma levels of plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1, factor VIII, prothrombin activation fragment 1+2, anticardiolipin, and antiprothrombin antibodies are risk factors for thrombosis in hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molino, Daniela; De Santo, Natale G; Marotta, Rosa; Anastasio, Pietro; Mosavat, Mahrokh; De Lucia, Domenico

    2004-09-01

    Patients with end-stage renal disease are prone to hemorrhagic complications and simultaneously are at risk for a variety of thrombotic complications such as thrombosis of dialysis blood access, the subclavian vein, coronary arteries, cerebral vessel, and retinal veins, as well as priapism. The study was devised for the following purposes: (1) to identify the markers of thrombophilia in hemodialyzed patients, (2) to establish a role for antiphospholipid antibodies in thrombosis of the vascular access, (3) to characterize phospholipid antibodies in hemodialysis patients, and (4) to study the effects of dialysis on coagulation cascade. A group of 20 hemodialysis patients with no thrombotic complications (NTC) and 20 hemodialysis patients with thrombotic complications (TC) were studied along with 400 volunteer blood donors. Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and those with nephrotic syndrome were excluded. All patients underwent a screening prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, fibrinogen (Fg), coagulation factors of the intrinsic and extrinsic pathways, antithrombin III (AT-III), protein C (PC), protein S (PS), resistance to activated protein C, prothrombin activation fragment 1+2 (F1+2), plasminogen, tissue type plasminogen activator (t-PA), plasminogen tissue activator inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1), anticardiolipin antibodies type M and G (ACA-IgM and ACA-IgG), lupus anticoagulant antibodies, and antiprothrombin antibodies type M and G (aPT-IgM and aPT-IgG). The study showed that PAI-1, F 1+2, factor VIII, ACA-IgM, and aPT-IgM levels were increased significantly over controls both in TC and NTC, however, they could distinguish patients with thrombotic complications from those without, being increased maximally in the former group. The novelty of the study is represented by the significant aPT increase that was observed in non-systemic lupus erythematosus hemodialysis patients, and particularly in those with thrombotic events. In addition

  5. BAY 81-8973, a full-length recombinant factor VIII: results from an International comparative laboratory field study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitchen, S; Beckmann, H; Katterle, Y; Bruns, S; Tseneklidou-Stoeter, D; Maas Enriquez, M

    2016-05-01

    BAY 81-8973 is a full-length, unmodified, recombinant human factor VIII (FVIII) with the same primary amino acid sequence as sucrose-formulated recombinant FVIII but produced with certain more advanced manufacturing technologies. This global laboratory study evaluated variability in measurement of BAY 81-8973 using one-stage and chromogenic assays compared with antihaemophilic factor (recombinant) plasma/albumin-free method (rAHF-PFM; Advate(®) ) under assay conditions routinely used in clinical laboratories. BAY 81-8973 or rAHF-PFM was spiked into FVIII-deficient plasma at 0.043 (low), 0.375 (medium) and 0.865 (normal) IU mL(-1) . Participating laboratories analysed blinded samples and normal plasma in triplicate using their routine assay, reagents and standards. Results were analysed for intra- and interlaboratory variability. Forty-one laboratories in 11 countries participated in the study. One-stage assay and chromogenic assays were used by 40 and 10 laboratories, respectively; 9 laboratories used both assays. Intralaboratory variability was <11% for both assays and both products at all concentrations. Interlaboratory variability was highest at the low concentration in the chromogenic and one-stage assay for BAY 81-8973 (60.0% and 33.7%, respectively) and rAHF-PFM (51.0% and 30.8%) and was lowest at the normal concentration (BAY 81-8973, 5.4% and 14.0%; rAHF-PFM, 5.8% and 12.4%), which was similar to the plasma control (6.6% and 10.3%). The chromogenic:one-stage assay ratio ranged from 0.95 (low concentration) to 1.10 (normal concentration) for BAY 81-8973 and 0.96-1.18 for rAHF-PFM. BAY 81-8973 can be accurately measured in plasma using the one-stage and chromogenic assays routinely used in clinical laboratories without a product-specific standard. © 2016 The Authors. Haemophilia Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Pathogen inactivation in fresh frozen plasma using riboflavin and ultraviolet light: Effects on plasma proteins and coagulation factor VIII

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    Stanojković Zoran

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Riboflavin (vitamin B2 activated by ultraviolet (UV light, produces active oxygen which damages cell membrane and prevents replication of the carrier of diseases (viruses, bacteria, protozoa in all blood products. The aim of this study was to establish the influence of the process of photo inactivation in pathogens using riboflavin and UV rays on the concentration of coagulation factor VIII:C (FVIII:C and proteins in plasma that were treated before freezing. Methods. The examination included 20 units of plasma, separated from whole blood donated by voluntary blood donors around 6 hours from the moment of collection. The units were pooled and separated in to two groups: one consisted of 10 control units and the other of 10 experimental units. Experimental units of the plasma were treated by riboflavin (35 mL and UV rays (6.24 J/mL, 265-370 nm on Mirasol aparature (Caridian BCT Biotechnologies, USA in approximate duration of 6 minutes. Furthermore, 35 mL of saline solution was added to the control plasma. One sample for examining was taken from the control plasma (KG and two residual were taken from experimental plasma after the addition of riboflavin either before (EG1 or post illumination (EG2. Results. Comparing the mean values of FVIII:C (% we noticed statistically significantly higher level in the EG1 group than in the EG2 group (65.00 ± 4.52 vs 63.20 ± 4.73; t = 4.323, p = 0.002, while between the KG and experimental groups (EG1 and EG2 there was no statistically significant difference in the concentration of FVIII:C. There was a statistically significant decrease of albumin concentration (g/L in the EG2 group comparing to the KG (33.35 ± 0.94 vs 31.94 ± 0.84; t = 3.534, p = 0.002, but there was no mentioned difference in albumin concentration between the KG and the EG1, so as between the EG1 and the EG2. Conclusion. Plasma inactivated by riboflavin and UV rays (Mirasol PRT sistem, Caridian BCT, USA keeps all the

  7. A computer-based model to assess costs associated with the use of factor VIII and factor IX one-stage and chromogenic activity assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitchen, S; Blakemore, J; Friedman, K D; Hart, D P; Ko, R H; Perry, D; Platton, S; Tan-Castillo, D; Young, G; Luddington, R J

    2016-04-01

    Measurement of coagulation factor factor VIII (FVIII) and factor IX (FIX) activity can be associated with a high level of variability using one-stage assays based on activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT). Chromogenic assays show less variability, but are less commonly used in clinical laboratories. In addition, one-stage assay accuracy using certain reagent and instrument combinations is compromised by some modified recombinant factor concentrates. Reluctance among some in the hematology laboratory community to adopt the use of chromogenic assays may be partly attributable to lack of familiarity and perceived higher associated costs. To identify and characterize key cost parameters associated with one-stage APTT and chromogenic assays for FVIII and FIX activity using a computer-based cost analysis model. A cost model for FVIII and FIX chromogenic assays relative to APTT assays was generated using assumptions derived from interviews with hematologists and laboratory scientists, common clinical laboratory practise, manufacturer list prices and assay kit configurations. Key factors that contribute to costs are factor-deficient plasma and kit reagents for one-stage and chromogenic assays, respectively. The stability of chromogenic assay kit reagents also limits the cost efficiency compared with APTT testing. Costs for chromogenic assays might be reduced by 50-75% using batch testing, aliquoting and freezing of kit reagents. Both batch testing and aliquoting of chromogenic kit reagents might improve cost efficiency for FVIII and FIX chromogenic assays, but would require validation. Laboratory validation and regulatory approval as well as education and training in the use of chromogenic assays might facilitate wider adoption by clinical laboratories. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  8. Estudo citofotométrico da expressão do marcador tumoral Fator VIII e fatores prognósticos no adenocarcinoma gástrico Cytophotometric study of the expression of the tumoral marker Factor VIII and prognostic factors in gastrci adenocarcinoma

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    Mary Tossa Nakamura

    2007-12-01

    ção III ou IV apresentaram índice de marcagem maiores do que aqueles com Bormann I ou II, porém sem correlação com a profundidade de invasão tumoral, grau de diferenciação, envolvimento nodal e padrão histológico. CONCLUSÕES: O presente estudo identificou e marcou 95,24% das amostras para o Fator VIII. Em relação aos fatores prognósticos não houve correlação significativa exceto entre o Fator VIII e a classificação de Bormann no qual o tipo III ou IV foi maior que o tipo I ou II.INTRODUCTION: Regarding gastric cancer, the incidence, diagnosis and therapeutic options showed improvement in the last decades, but prognosis remains gloomy, specially due the fact that most patients, already diagnosed present advanced tumors, metastatic and not liable to be surgically resected. Molecular biology is an area in science, which can give the answer to many questions and current scientific facts show that the this should be through detection of tumoral markers. The great advances in informatics refined cell image analysis by image cytophotometry makes it possible to study cell proliferation and angiogenesis in various tumor processes using immunohistochemistry and several markers. At present, studies are conducted to demonstrate the prognostic value of their expressions, however, in gastric adenocarcinoma the results have been divergent and studies are scarce. AIM: To identify and quantify the expression of cell proliferation markers using Ki-67 and of angiogenesis with Factor VIII in gastric adenocarcinoma using cytophotometry, and compare their expressions with factors such as Bormanns´ classification, tumor invasion depth, degree of differentiation, nodal involvement, histologic pattern and age. METHODS: Twenty-one patients with gastric adenocarcinoma identified between 1998 and 2006 were studied. Ki-67 and Factor VIII expressions were performed using immunohistochemistry with clone MIB-1 primary antibodies, monoclonal for Ki-67 and policlonal for Factor VIII

  9. Distinct roles of Ser-764 and Lys-773 at the N terminus of von Willebrand factor in complex assembly with coagulation factor VIII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Núñez, Lydia; Bloem, Esther; Boon-Spijker, Mariëtte G; van der Zwaan, Carmen; van den Biggelaar, Maartje; Mertens, Koen; Meijer, Alexander B

    2013-01-04

    Complex formation between coagulation factor VIII (FVIII) and von Willebrand factor (VWF) is of critical importance to protect FVIII from rapid in vivo clearance and degradation. We have now employed a chemical footprinting approach to identify regions on VWF involved in FVIII binding. To this end, lysine amino acid residues of VWF were chemically modified in the presence of FVIII or activated FVIII, which does not bind VWF. Nano-LC-MS analysis showed that the lysine residues of almost all identified VWF peptides were not differentially modified upon incubation of VWF with FVIII or activated FVIII. However, Lys-773 of peptide Ser-766-Leu-774 was protected from chemical modification in the presence of FVIII. In addition, peptide Ser-764-Arg-782, which comprises the first 19 amino acid residues of mature VWF, showed a differential modification of both Lys-773 and the α-amino group of Ser-764. To verify the role of Lys-773 and the N-terminal Ser-764 in FVIII binding, we employed VWF variants in which either Lys-773 or Ser-764 was replaced with Ala. Surface plasmon resonance analysis and competition studies revealed that VWF(K773A) exhibited reduced binding to FVIII and the FVIII light chain, which harbors the VWF-binding site. In contrast, VWF(S764A) revealed more effective binding to FVIII and the FVIII light chain compared with WT VWF. The results of our study show that the N terminus of VWF is critical for the interaction with FVIII and that Ser-764 and Lys-773 have opposite roles in the binding mechanism.

  10. Patient preference and ease of use for different coagulation factor VIII reconstitution device scenarios: a cross-sectional survey in five European countries

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    Cimino E

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Ernesto Cimino,1 Silvia Linari,2 Mara Malerba,3 Susan Halimeh,4 Francesca Biondo,5 Martina Westfeld5 1Dipartimento Medicina Clinica e Sperimentale, Universita’ degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, Naples, Italy; 2Agenzia per l’ Emofilia, AOU Careggi di Firenze, Florence, Italy; 3Fondazione Cà Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Centro Emofilia e Trombosi “A Bianchi Bonomi”, Milan, Italy; 4CRC Coagulation Research Centre GmbH, Duisburg, Germany; 5Pfizer Italia, Rome, Italy Introduction: Hemophilia A treatment involves replacing the deficient coagulation factor VIII. This process may involve multiple steps that might create a barrier to adherence. A new dual-chamber syringe (DCS; FuseNGo® was recently introduced with the aim of simplifying reconstitution. Aim: This study aimed to identify factors associated with adult patients’ preferences for different coagulation factor VIII reconstitution systems and to test ease of use and patient preference for the DCS. Methods: A cross-sectional survey of adults with hemophilia A in five European countries was conducted; a subset of subjects also participated in a practical testing session of the DCS. Results: Among the 299 survey participants, the device scenario requiring the least equipment and reconstitution steps (the DCS received a median preference rating of 71 out of 100 (0 being “the least desirable” and 100 “the most desirable” rating. This was significantly higher than the other scenarios (the next highest achieved a median of 50 points; P<0.001. Participants would be more likely to use this device prophylactically (P<0.001. Among the 98 participants who tested the DCS, 57% preferred this device over their current device, 26% preferred their current device, and 17% had no preference. The DCS was rated as easier to use than current treatment devices (median score 9/10 versus 7/10 for current treatment, P=0.001. Conclusion: The survey indicates that the prefilled DCS, Fuse

  11. Immunotherapy of murine leukemia. VIII. Efficacy of passive serum therapy of Friend leukemia virus-induced disease in immunocompromised mice

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    Genovesi, E.V.; Livnat, D.; Collins, J.J.

    1983-02-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the passive therapy of Friend murine leukemia virus (F-MuLV)-induced disease with chimpanzee anti-F-MuLV serum is accompanied by the development of host antiviral humoral and cellular immunity, the latter measurable in adoptive transfer protocols and by the ability of serum-protected mice to resist virus rechallenge. The present study was designed to further examine the contribution of various compartments of the host immune system to serum therapy itself, as well as to the acquired antiviral immunity that develops in serum-protected mice, through the use of naturally immunocompromised animals (e.g., nude athymic mice and natural killer (NK)-deficient beige mutant mice) or mice treated with immunoabrogating agents such as sublethal irradiation, cyclophosphamide (Cytoxan (Cy)), cortisone, and /sup 89/Sr. The studies in nude mice indicate that while mature T-cells are not needed for effective serum therapy, they do appear to be necessary for the long-term resistance of serum-protected mice to virus rechallenge and for the generation of the cell population(s) responsible for adoptive transfer of antiviral immunity. Lastly, while the immunocompromise systems examined did effect various host antiviral immune responses, none of them, including the NK-deficient beige mutation, significantly diminished the efficacy of the passive serum therapy of F-MuLV-induced disease.

  12. Murine leukemia virus-derived retroviral vector has differential integration patterns in human cell lines used to produce recombinant factor VIII

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    Marcela Cristina Correa de Freitas

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Nowadays recombinant factor VIII is produced in murine cells including in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO and baby hamster kidney cells (BHK. Previous studies, using the murine leukemia virus-derived retroviral vector pMFG-FVIII-P140K, modified two recombinant human cell lines, HepG2 and Hek293 to produce recombinant factor VIII. In order to characterize these cells, the present study aimed to analyze the integration pattern of retroviral vector pMFG-FVIII-P140K.METHODS: This study used ligation-mediated polymerase chain reaction to locate the site of viral vector integration by sequencing polymerase chain reaction products. The sequences were compared to genomic databases to characterize respective clones.RESULTS: The retroviral vector presented different and non-random profiles of integration between cells lines. A preference of integration for chromosomes 19, 17 and 11 was observed for HepG2FVIIIdB/P140K and chromosome 9 for Hek293FVIIIdB/P140K. In genomic regions such as CpG islands and transcription factor binding sites, there was no difference in the integration profiles for both cell lines. Integration in intronic regions of encoding protein genes (RefSeq genes was also observed in both cell lines. Twenty percent of integrations occurred at fragile sites in the genome of the HepG2 cell line and 17% in Hek293.CONCLUSION: The results suggest that the cell type can affect the profile of chromosomal integration of the retroviral vector used; these differences may interfere in the level of expression of recombinant proteins.

  13. Directed engineering of a high-expression chimeric transgene as a strategy for gene therapy of hemophilia A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doering, Christopher B; Denning, Gabriela; Dooriss, Kerry; Gangadharan, Bagirath; Johnston, Jennifer M; Kerstann, Keith W; McCarty, David A; Spencer, H Trent

    2009-07-01

    Human coagulation factor VIII (fVIII) is inefficiently biosynthesized in vitro and has proven difficult to express at therapeutic levels using available clinical gene-transfer technologies. Recently, we showed that a porcine and certain hybrid human/porcine fVIII transgenes demonstrate up to 100-fold greater expression than human fVIII. In this study, we extend these results to describe the use of a humanized, high-expression, hybrid human/porcine fVIII transgene that is 89% identical to human fVIII and was delivered by lentiviral vectors (LVs) to hematopoietic stem cells for gene therapy of hemophilia A. Recombinant human immunodeficiency virus-based vectors encoding the fVIII chimera efficiently transduced human embryonic kidney (HEK)-293T cells. Cells transduced with hybrid human/porcine fVIII encoding vectors expressed fVIII at levels 6- to 100-fold greater than cells transduced with vectors encoding human fVIII. Transplantation of transduced hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells into hemophilia A mice resulted in long-term fVIII expression at therapeutic levels despite gene therapy applications for hemophilia A to significantly increase fVIII expression levels compared to what has been previously achieved.

  14. The intron-22-inverted F8 locus permits factor VIII synthesis: explanation for low inhibitor risk and a role for pharmacogenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauna, Zuben E; Lozier, Jay N; Kasper, Carol K; Yanover, Chen; Nichols, Timothy; Howard, Tom E

    2015-01-01

    Intron-22-inversion patients express the entire Factor VIII (FVIII)-amino-acid sequence intracellularly as 2 non-secreted polypeptides and have a positive "intracellular (I)-FVIII-CRM" status. Mutations conferring a positive I-FVIII-CRM status are associated with low inhibitor risk and are pharmacogenetically relevant because inhibitor risk may be affected by the nature of the therapeutic FVIII-protein (tFVIII), the affinity of any tFVIII-derived foreign peptide (tFVIII-fp) for any HLA class-II isomer (HLA-II) comprising individual major histocompatibility complex (MHC) repertoires, and the stability of any tFVIII-fp/HLA-II complex. We hypothesize that mutations conferring a completely or substantially negative I-FVIII-CRM status are pharmacogenetically irrelevant because inhibitor risk is high with any tFVIII and individual MHC repertoire.

  15. A novel mutation (4040-4045 nt. delA in exon 14 of the factor VIII gene causing severe hemophilia A

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    Habib Onsori

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemophilia A is an X-linked congenital bleeding disorder caused by Factor VIII deficiency. Different mutations including point mutations, deletions, insertions and inversions have been reported in the FVIII gene, which cause hemophilia A. In the current study, with the use of conformational sensitive gel electrophoresis (CSGE analysis, we report a novel 1-nt deletion in the A6 sequence at codons 1328-1330 (4040-4045 nt delA occurring in exon 14 of the FVIII gene in a seven-year-old Iranian boy with severe hemophilia A. This mutation that causes frameshift and premature stop-codon at 1331 has not previously been reported in the F8 Hemophilia A Mutation, Structure, Test and Resource Site (HAMSTeRS database.

  16. Efficacy and safety of rVIII-Singlechain : Results of a phase 1/3 multicenter clinical trial in severe hemophilia A

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mahlangu, Johnny; Kuliczkowski, Kazimierz; Karim, Faraizah Abdul; Stasyshyn, Oleksandra; Kosinova, Marina V.; Lepatan, Lynda Mae; Skotnicki, Aleksander; Boggio, Lisa N.; Klamroth, Robert; Oldenburg, Johannes; Hellmann, Andrzej; Santagostino, Elena; Baker, Ross I.; Fischer, Kathelijn; Gill, Joan C.; P'Ng, Stephanie; Chowdary, Pratima; Escobar, Miguel A.; Khayat, Claudia Djambas; Rusen, Luminita; Bensen-Kennedy, Debra; Blackman, Nicole; Limsakun, Tharin; Veldman, Alex; Ledger, Katie St; Pabinger, Ingrid

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant VIII (rVIII)-SingleChain is a novel B-domain–truncated recombinant factor VIII (rFVIII), comprised of covalently bonded factor VIII (FVIII) heavy and light chains. It was designed to have a higher binding affinity for von Willebrand factor (VWF). This phase 1/3 study investigated the eff

  17. Gene therapy for hemophilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hortelano, G; Chang, P L

    2000-01-01

    Hemophilia A and B are X-linked genetic disorders caused by deficiency of the coagulation factors VIII and IX, respectively. Because of the health hazards and costs of current product replacement therapy, much effort is devoted to the development of gene therapy for these disorders. Approaches to gene therapy for the hemophilias include: ex vivo gene therapy in which cells from the intended recipients are explanted, genetically modified to secrete Factor VIII or IX, and reimplanted into the donor; in vivo gene therapy in which Factor VIII or IX encoding vectors are directly injected into the recipient; and non-autologous gene therapy in which universal cell lines engineered to secrete Factor VIII or IX are enclosed in immuno-protective devices before implantation into recipients. Research into these approaches is aided by the many murine and canine models available. While problems of achieving high and sustained levels of factor delivery, and issues related to efficacy, safety and cost are still to be resolved, progress in gene therapy for the hemophilias has been encouraging and is likely to reach human clinical trial in the foreseeable future.

  18. The Factor VIII Mutation Database on the World Wide Web: the haemophilia A mutation, search, test and resource site. HAMSTeRS update (version 3.0).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemball-Cook, G; Tuddenham, E G

    1997-01-01

    The HAMSTeRS WWW site was set up in 1996 in order to facilitate easy access to, and aid understanding of, the causes of haemophilia A at the molecular level; previously, the first and second text editions of the database have been published in Nucleic Acids Research. This report describes the facilities originally available at the site and the recent additions which we have made to increase its usefulness to clinicians, the molecular genetics community and structural biologists interested in factor VIII. The database (version 3.0) has been completely updated with easy submission of point mutations, deletions and insertions via e-mail of custom-designed forms. The searching of point mutations in the database has been made simpler and more robust, with a concomitantly expanded real-time bioinformatic analysis of the database. A methods section devoted to mutation detection has been added, highlighting issues such as choice of technique and PCR primer sequences. Finally, a FVIII structure section gives access to 3D VRML (Virtual Reality Modelling Language) files for any user-definable residue in a FVIII A domain homology model based on the crystal structure of human caeruloplasmin, together with secondary structural data and a sound+video animation of the model. It is intended that the general availability of this model will assist both in interpretation of causative mutations and selection of candidate residues forin vitromutagenesis. The HAMSTeRS URL is http://europium.mrc.rpms.ac.uk.

  19. Elective surgery on factor VIII inhibitor patients using continuous infusion of recombinant activated factor VII: plasma factor VII activity of 10 IU/ml is associated with an increased incidence of bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, M P; Ludlam, C A; Collins, P W; Hay, C R; Wilde, J T; Grigeri, A; Melsen, T; Savidge, G F

    2001-10-01

    We examined recombinant activated factor VII (rVIIa) administered by continuous infusion to eight patients with inhibitors to factor VIII, undergoing elective surgery. rVIIa was infused at a fixed rate of 16.5 microg/kg/h for a median of 13.5 days (range 1-26). There was effective haemostasis at this infusion rate in only one of two minor procedures and two of six major operations. Three patients experienced excessive bleeding despite plasma factor VII activity around 10 IU/ml. Serious bleeding occurred in two other patients caused by procedural errors unrelated to rVIIa and required re-operation. The median rVIIa clearance on day 1 was 57 ml/h/kg (range 18-100) and on day 3 was 100 ml/h/kg (range 61-200). Clearance on the final infusion day was not significantly different from day 3. The infusion did not induce pathological activation of the coagulation mechanism. The only thrombotic adverse events were two episodes of superficial thrombophlebitis of the infused vein in one subject. In conclusion, the 16.5 microg/kg/h infusion rate reliably achieves plasma factor VII activity levels of 10 IU/ml, but this level does not provide reliable haemostasis.

  20. Efficacy and safety of BAY 81-8973, a full-length recombinant factor VIII: results from the LEOPOLD I trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, K; Lalezari, S; Oldenburg, J; Tseneklidou-Stoeter, D; Beckmann, H; Yoon, M; Maas Enriquez, M

    2016-09-01

    BAY 81-8973 (Kovaltry(®) ) is a full-length, unmodified recombinant human factor VIII (FVIII) with the same amino acid sequence as sucrose-formulated recombinant FVIII and is produced using additional advanced manufacturing technologies. To demonstrate efficacy and safety of BAY 81-8973 for treatment of bleeds and as prophylaxis based on two different potency assignments. In LEOPOLD I (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier, NCT01029340), males aged 12-65 years with severe haemophilia A and ≥150 exposure days received BAY 81-8973 20-50 IU kg(-1) two or three times per week for 12 months. Potency was based on chromogenic substrate assay per European Pharmacopoeia and label adjusted to mimic one-stage assay potency. Patients were randomized for potency sequence and crossed over potency groups after 6 months, followed by an optional 12-month extension. Primary efficacy endpoint was annualized bleeding rate (ABR). Patients also received BAY 81-8973 during major surgeries. Sixty-two patients received BAY 81-8973 prophylaxis and were included in the analysis. Median ABR was 1.0 (quartile 1, 0; quartile 3, 5.1) without clinically relevant differences between potency periods. Median ABR was similar for twice-weekly vs. three times-weekly dosing (1.0 vs. 2.0). Haemostasis was maintained during 12 major surgeries. Treatment-related adverse event (AE) incidence was ≤7% overall; no patient developed inhibitors. One patient with risk factors for cardiovascular disease developed a myocardial infarction. BAY 81-8973 was efficacious in preventing and treating bleeding episodes, irrespective of the potency assignment method, with few treatment-related AEs. Caution should be used when treating older patients with cardiovascular risk factors. © 2016 Bayer. Haemophilia Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Photoionization of Ar VIII

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Liang; Jiang, Wen-xian; Zhou, Chao

    2017-01-01

    The photoionization cross section, energy levels and widths of 22 Rydberg series (in the autoionization region) for Na-like Ar VIII were investigated by using of R-matrix method. The relativistic distorted-wave method is used to calculate the radial functions, and QB method of Quigly-Berrington [Quigley et al. 1998] is employed to calculate the resonance levels and widths. We have identified the formant in the figure of the photoionization cross section.

  2. Influence of factor VIII level and its inhibitor titer on the therapeutic response to corticosteroids alone in the management of acquired hemophilia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vautier, Mathieu; de Boysson, Hubert; Creveuil, Christian; Repesse, Yohan; Borel-Derlon, Annie; Troussard, Xavier; Damaj, Gandhi L.; Bienvenu, Boris; Gautier, Philippe; Aouba, Achille

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The treatment of acquired hemophilia (AH) involves discussing whether corticosteroids should be administered alone or combined with immunosuppressant drugs, which increase the risk of infection especially in elderly patients and/or those with autoimmunity or neoplastic diseases, who represent the target population of the disease. Prognostic factors highlighting adequate responses to corticosteroids alone must be identified for satisfactory clinical response and lower infectious risk. We aimed to evaluating the efficacy of corticosteroids alone in the management of AH depending on factor VIII (FVIII, ≥ or 20 Bethesda units per milliliter [BU/mL]) titer. We conducted a retrospective single-center study including 24 patients treated for AH with corticosteroids alone. Time to achieve partial remission (PR: absence of hemorrhage and FVIII levels >50 IU/dL) was significantly shorter in the FVIII ≥ 1 IU/dL group than in the FVIII  20 BU/mL group (15 [11–35] vs 41 [20–207] days, P = 0.003). In both subgroups, time to achieve complete remission (CR: negative INH and corticosteroids below 10 mg/d) was also significantly shorter than that observed in the opposite subgroups. INH titer, considered alone, did not affect the length of time to onset of PR or CR. CR and PR rates did not differ significantly depending on these variables. Our study suggests that in AH, patients with FVIII levels ≥1 IU/dL considered alone or combined with INH titer ≤20 BU/mL could be treated by corticosteroids alone, given that this subgroup of patients displayed faster therapeutic responses to this strategy. PMID:27902587

  3. Six amino acid residues in a 1200 A2 interface mediate binding of factor VIII to an IgG4κ inhibitory antibody.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasper C Lin

    Full Text Available The development of neutralizing anti-factor VIII (FVIII antibodies complicates the treatment of many hemophilia A patients. The C-terminal C2 domain is a particularly antigenic FVIII region. A crystal structure of recombinant FVIII-C2 bound to an Fab fragment of the patient-derived monoclonal antibody BO2C11, which recognizes an immunodominant inhibitor epitope on FVIII and blocks its ability to bind von Willebrand factor (VWF and phospholipids, revealed that 15 amino acids in FVIII contact this antibody. Forty-three recombinant FVIII-C2 proteins, each with a surface-exposed side chain mutated to alanine or another residue, were generated, and surface plasmon resonance studies were carried out to evaluate effects of these substitutions on BO2C11/FVIII-C2 binding affinity. Thermodynamic analysis of experiments carried out at three temperatures indicated that one beta hairpin turn at the antigen-antibody interface (FVIII-F2196, N2198, M2199 and F2200 plus two non-contiguous arginines (FVIII-R2215 and R2220, contributed appreciably to the affinity. B-domain-deleted (BDD FVIII-F2196A, FVIII-F2196K and FVIII-M2199A were generated and characterized. Their pro-coagulant activities and binding to VWF were similar to those of WT-BDD-FVIII, and FVIII-F2196K avoided neutralization by BO2C11 and murine inhibitory mAb 1B5. This study suggests specific sites for amino acid substitutions to rationally design FVIII variants capable of evading immunodominant neutralizing anti-FVIII antibodies.

  4. A single chain variant of factor VIII Fc fusion protein retains normal in vivo efficacy but exhibits altered in vitro activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Buyue

    Full Text Available Recombinant factor VIII Fc (rFVIIIFc is a fusion protein consisting of a single B-domain-deleted (BDD FVIII linked recombinantly to the Fc domain of human IgG1 to extend half-life. To determine if rFVIIIFc could be further improved by maintaining the heavy and light chains within a contiguous single chain (SC, we evaluated the activity and function of SC rFVIIIFc, an isoform that is not processed at residue R1648. SC rFVIIIFc showed equivalent activity in a chromogenic assay compared to rFVIIIFc, but approximately 40% activity by the one-stage clotting assay in the presence of von Willebrand Factor (VWF, with full activity in the absence of VWF. Moreover, SC rFVIIIFc demonstrated markedly delayed thrombin-mediated release from VWF, but an activity similar to that of rFVIIIFc upon activation in FXa generation assays. Therefore, the apparent reduction in specific activity in the aPTT assay appears to be primarily due to delayed release of FVIII from VWF. To assess whether stability and activity of SC rFVIIIFc were affected in vivo, a tail vein transection model in Hemophilia A mice was utilized. The results demonstrated similar pharmacokinetic profiles and comparable efficacy for SC rFVIIIFc and rFVIIIFc. Thus, while the single chain configuration did not promote enhanced half-life, it reduced the rate of release of FVIII from VWF required for activation. This impaired release may underlie the observed reduction in the one-stage clotting assay, but does not appear to affect the physiological activity of SC rFVIIIFc.

  5. Coronary artery calcification in hemophilia A: No evidence for a protective effect of factor VIII deficiency on atherosclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuinenburg, A.; Rutten, A.; Kavousi, M.; Leebeek, F.W.G.; Ypma, P.F.; Laros-Van Gorkom, B.A.P.; Nijziel, M.R.; Kamphuisen, P.W.; Mauser-Bunschoten, E.P.; Roosendaal, G.; Biesma, D.H.; Van Der Lugt A., [No Value; Hofman, A.; Witteman, J.C.M.; Bots, M.L.; Schutgens, R.E.G.

    2011-01-01

    Mortality due to ischemic heart disease is lower in hemophilia patients when compared to the general male population. As coagulation plays a role in the inflammatory pathways involved in atherogenesis, we investigated whether the clotting factor deficiency protects hemophilia patients from developin

  6. Plasmin-induced procoagulant effects in the blood coagulation: a crucial role of coagulation factors V and VIII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogiwara, Kenichi; Nogami, Keiji; Nishiya, Katsumi; Shima, Midori

    2010-09-01

    Plasminogen activators provide effective treatment for patients with acute myocardial infarction. However, paradoxical elevation of thrombin activity associated with failure of clot lysis and recurrent thrombosis has been reported. Generation of thrombin in these circumstances appears to be owing to plasmin (Plm)-induced activation of factor (F) XII. Plm catalyzes proteolysis of several coagulant factors, but the roles of these factors on Plm-mediated procoagulant activity remain to be determined. Recently developed global coagulation assays were used in this investigation. Rotational thromboelastometry using whole blood, clot waveform analysis and thrombin generation tests using plasma, showed that Plm (> or =125 nmol/l) shortened the clotting times in similar dose-dependent manners. In particular, the thrombin generation test, which was unaffected by products of fibrinolysis, revealed the enhanced coagulation with an approximately two-fold increase of peak level of thrombin generation. Studies using alpha2-antiplasmin-deficient plasma revealed that much lower dose of Plm (> or =16 nmol/l) actually contributed to enhancing thrombin generation. The shortening of clotting time could be observed even in the presence of corn trypsin inhibitor, supporting that Plm exerted the procoagulant activity independently of FXII. In addition, using specific coagulation-deficient plasmas, the clot waveform analysis showed that Plm did not shorten the clotting time in only FV-deficient or FVIII-deficient plasma in prothrombin time-based or activated partial thromboplastin time-based assay, respectively. Our results indicated that Plm did possess procoagulant activity in the blood coagulation, and this effect was likely attributed by multicoagulation factors, dependent on FV and/or FVIII.

  7. Novel, human cell line-derived recombinant factor VIII (Human-cl rhFVIII, Nuwiq(®) ) in children with severe haemophilia A: efficacy, safety and pharmacokinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klukowska, A; Szczepański, T; Vdovin, V; Knaub, S; Jansen, M; Liesner, R

    2015-09-14

    Nuwiq(®) (Human-cl rhFVIII) is a new-generation recombinant factor VIII (rFVIII) protein, without chemical modification or fusion to any other protein, produced in a human cell line. This prospective, open-label, multinational phase III study assessed the efficacy and safety of Human-cl rhFVIII in 59 previously treated patients (PTPs) with severe haemophilia A aged 2-12 years (2-5 [N = 29]; 6-12 [N = 30]) during standard prophylaxis (≥50 exposure days and ≥6 months). Efficacy in treating breakthrough bleeds and during surgical prophylaxis was also assessed. An initial pharmacokinetic assessment (N = 13 per age subgroup) demonstrated comparable results with the one-stage and chromogenic assays. Mean (SD) half-life was 11.9 (5.4) and 13.1 (2.6) hours in children aged 2-5 years and 6-12 years respectively (one-stage assay). Prophylactic efficacy, based on mean monthly bleeding rate, was 'excellent' or 'good' in 91.5% of children for all bleeds and in 96.6% of children for spontaneous bleeds. Mean (SD) annualized bleeding rate was 4.12 (5.22) [median 1.9] for all bleeds, 1.50 (3.32) [median 0] for spontaneous bleeds and 2.34 (3.54) [median 1.57] for traumatic bleeds. There were no major, life-threatening bleeds. Efficacy was 'excellent' or 'good' in the treatment of 82.4% of breakthrough bleeds. Overall efficacy during five major surgeries was rated as 'excellent'. There were no FVIII inhibitors or treatment-related serious adverse events. These results in paediatric PTPs indicate that Human-cl rhFVIII is effective for the prevention and treatment of bleeds. © 2015 The Authors. Haemophilia Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Genotyping of intron 22 inversion of factor VIII gene for diagnosis of hemophilia A by inverse-shifting polymerase chain reaction and capillary electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Tzu-Yu; Wang, Chun-Chi; Shih, Chi-Jen; Wu, Hui-Fen; Chiou, Shyh-Shin; Wu, Shou-Mei

    2014-09-01

    This is the first capillary electrophoresis (CE) analysis for diagnosis of hemophilia A (HA). The intron 22 inversion of factor VIII gene (F8) causes 40-50 % of severe bleeding disorder of HA in all human populations. Consequently, identification of the disease-causing mutations is becoming increasingly important for accurate genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis. In this study, the key steps of inverse-shifting polymerase chain reaction (IS-PCR) and of short-end injection capillary electrophoresis were used for more specific and rapid genotyping of intron 22 inversion of F8. In IS-PCR, three specific primers were used to amplify 512-bp amplicon for wild type and 584-bp amplicon for patients with intron 22 inversion. The capillary gel electrophoresis (CGE) system was performed using 1× Tris-borate-EDTA (TBE) buffer containing 0.3 % (w/v) polyethylene oxide (PEO). The PCR amplicons were electrokinetically injected at 10 kV for 10 s at a temperature of 25 °C. The optimal short-end injection CGE was applied to detect the F8 gene of HA patients and carriers within 5 min. Intron 22 inversion was indeed found on some HA patients (13/35, 37.1 %). All genotyping results showed good agreement with DNA sequencing method and long-distance polymerase chain reaction (LD-PCR). The IS-PCR combined with short-end injection CGE method was feasible and efficient for intron 22 inversion screening of F8 in the HA populations.

  9. BAY 81-8973, a full-length recombinant factor VIII: Human heat shock protein 70 improves the manufacturing process without affecting clinical safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maas Enriquez, Monika; Thrift, John; Garger, Stephen; Katterle, Yvonne

    2016-11-01

    BAY 81-8973 is a full-length, unmodified recombinant human factor VIII (FVIII) approved for the treatment of hemophilia A. BAY 81-8973 has the same amino acid sequence as the currently marketed sucrose-formulated recombinant FVIII (rFVIII-FS) product and is produced using additional advanced manufacturing technologies. One of the key manufacturing advances for BAY 81-8973 is introduction of the gene for human heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) into the rFVIII-FS cell line. HSP70 facilitates proper folding of proteins, enhances cell survival by inhibiting apoptosis, and potentially impacts rFVIII glycosylation. HSP70 expression in the BAY 81-8973 cell line along with other manufacturing advances resulted in a higher-producing cell line and improvements in the pharmacokinetics of the final product as determined in clinical studies. HSP70 protein is not detected in the harvest or in the final BAY 81-8973 product. However, because this is a new process, clinical trial safety assessments included monitoring for anti-HSP70 antibodies. Most patients, across all age groups, had low levels of anti-HSP70 antibodies before exposure to the investigational product. During BAY 81-8973 treatment, 5% of patients had sporadic increases in anti-HSP70 antibody levels above a predefined threshold (cutoff value, 239 ng/mL). No clinical symptoms related to anti-HSP70 antibody development occurred. In conclusion, addition of HSP70 to the BAY 81-8973 cell line is an innovative technology for manufacturing rFVIII aimed at improving protein folding and expression. Improved pharmacokinetics and no effect on safety of BAY 81-8973 were observed in clinical trials in patients with hemophilia A. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The B-domain of factor VIII reduces cell membrane attachement to host cells in serum free conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolind, Mille Petersen; Nørby, Peder Lisby; Flintegaard, Thomas Veje

    2010-01-01

    engineered extensively throughout the years to increase the low production yields that initially were obtained from mammalian cell cultures. The scope of this work was to investigate the interaction of rFVIII with the cell membrane surface of the producing cells in serum free medium. We wondered whether...... binding of rFVIII to the cell membrane could be a factor diminishing the production yield. We studied the contribution of the rFVIII B-domain to membrane attachment by transfecting several constructs containing increasing lengths of the B-domain into cells under serum free conditions. We found that 90......% of rFVIII is attached to the cell membrane of the producing cell when the rFVIII variant contains a short B-domain (21 aa). By increasing the length of the B-domain the membrane attached fraction can be reduced to 50% of the total expressed rFVIII. Further, our studies show that the N...

  11. Obtenção e caracterização de anticorpo monoclonal murino anti-fator VIII da coagulação sangüínea Attainment and characterization of murine monoclonal anti-factor VIII antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosana Rossi-Ferreira

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Entre os avanços da engenharia celular e biotecnologia nas últimas décadas, destaca-se a produção de anticorpos monoclonais murinos (AcMm utilizados no aprimoramento diagnóstico nas rotinas laboratoriais. A produção de fator VIII de alta pureza sempre foi o desejo e a preocupação das indústrias de hemoderivados para tratamento de pacientes portadores de hemofilia A, porém este produto inexiste no Brasil, sendo necessária sua obtenção no mercado internacional a custos elevados. O trabalho tem por objetivo a produção de AcMm anti-fator VIII humano (FVIII H através da expansão dos clones e caracterização imunoquímica do anticorpo. Camundongos Balb/c foram imunizados com FVIII H purificado como também proveniente de crioprecipitado e as células esplênicas dos animais foram fusionadas com células mielomatosas murinas segundo o método descrito por Kohler e Milstein para produção de híbridos em cultura. Foram testados 1.983 híbridos dos quais 105 foram submetidos à clonagem. Destes, 39 obtiveram monoclonalidade e 7 destes clones foram caracterizados através de técnicas de immunoblotting. Foram submetidas à purificação por cromatografia três imunoglobulinas de diferentes classes pertencentes aos clones LAMB1-10A1A4, LAMB1-17A1A1 e LAMB1-24A2A1. A imunoglobulina purificada pertencente ao clone LAMB1-10A1A4 foi adsorvida em coluna de imunoafinidade para purificação de concentrado de FVIII proveniente de crioprecipitado plasmático.Among the advances in cellular engineering and biotechnology over the last decades, the production of murine monoclonal antibodies (AcMm, used to improve laboratory diagnoses, stands out. The production of very pure factor VIII has always been a concern of suppliers of blood products to treat patients with hemophilia A and this product is still not produced in Brazil. Hence, it can only be attained on the international market at a high cost. The aim of this work was to produce AcMm anti-factor

  12. Transfer factors in medical therapy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sánchez-González, Dolores J; Sosa-Luna, Carlos A; Vásquez-Moctezuma, Ismael

    2011-01-01

    Transfer factor (TF) consists of messenger peptides produced by activated T lymphocytes as part of cellular immunity, and it acts in virgin lymphocytes through TF inducers, suppressors and specific antigens...

  13. Clinical evaluation of recombinant factor VIII preparation (Kogenate) in previously treated patients with hemophilia A: descriptive meta-analysis of post-marketing study data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshioka, A; Fukutake, K; Takamatsu, J; Shirahata, A

    2006-08-01

    The safety and efficacy of Kogenate, a recombinant factor VIII (rFVIII) preparation for the treatment of bleeding episodes, were studied in a 123-patient meta-analysis population of previously treated patients (PTPs), including 15 enrolled in the registration Phase III trial (PTP-I group), 93 from the post-marketing special investigation (PTP-II group), and 15 from short-term special investigations in surgery or tooth extraction (SI group). These patients (82 severe, 31 moderate, 9 mild, and 1 unknown), aged 11 months to 72 years, were enrolled in 28 centers in Japan. Blood samples taken at the baseline and at 3, 6, 9, 12, 18, and 24 months after the introduction of Kogenate were evaluated for FVIII inhibitor antibodies, antibodies formed against trace proteins derived from the rFVIII production process, and for general changes in laboratory test results. Mean exposure to Kogenate was 1103 days in PTP-I, 86 days in PTP-II, 27 days in patients in surgery, and 2 days in patients with tooth extraction. Assessment of FVIII inhibitor activity was conducted in 115 of the 123 patients by means of the Bethesda assay. Twelve patients were found to have a low titer of FVIII inhibitor (0.5-3.0 BU/mL) prior to any administration of Kogenate, and 103 were inhibitor-negative at the baseline. Among this latter group, 3 patients (2.9%) tested inhibitor-positive, with titers ranging from 1.2 to 2.1 BU/mL, with 4 patients below 1.0 BU/mL. One patient in the 11 PTPs investigated (PTP-I) developed antibodies against baby hamster kidney protein and mouse immunoglobulin G, but these findings were transient and asymptomatic. Hemostasis was achieved (markedly effective or effective) in 3666 of the 3855 bleeding episodes (95.1%) observed in 108 patients. Only 1 infusion was necessary in 3790 (98.3%) of these episodes. These data indicate that Kogenate is safe and very effective for the treatment of bleeding in PTPs with hemophilia A.

  14. Characterization of the factor VIII defect in 147 patients with sporadic hemophilia A: Family studies indicate a mutation type-dependent sex ratio of mutation frequencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, J.; Schmidt, W.; Olek, K. [Univ. of Bonn (Germany)] [and others

    1996-04-01

    The clinical manifestation of hemophilia A is caused by a wide range of different mutations. In this study the factor VIII genes of 147 severe hemophilia A patients-all exclusively from sporadic families-were screened for mutations by use of the complete panel of modern DNA techniques. The pathogenous defect could be characterized in 126 patients (85.7%). Fifty-five patients (37.4%) showed a F8A-gene inversion, 47 (32.0%) a point mutation, 14 (9.5%) a small deletion, 8 (5.4%) a large deletion, and 2 (1.4%) a small insertion. Further, four (2.7%) mutations were localized but could not be sequenced yet. No mutation could be identified in 17 patients (11.6%). Sixteen (10.9%) of the P identified mutations occurred in the B domain. Four of these were located in an adenosine nucleotide stretch at codon 1192, indicating a mutation hotspot. Somatic mosaicisms were detected in 3 (3.9%) of 76 patients` mothers, comprising 3 of 16 de novo mutations in the patients` mothers. Investigation of family relatives allowed detection of a de novo mutation in 16 of 76 two-generation and 28 of 34 three-generation families. On the basis of these data, the male:female ratio of mutation frequencies (k) was estimated as k = 3.6. By use of the quotients of mutation origin in maternal grandfather to patient`s mother or to maternal grandmother, k was directly estimated as k = 15 and k = 7.5, respectively. Considering each mutation type separately, we revealed a mutation type-specific sex ratio of mutation frequencies. Point mutations showed a 5-to-10-fold-higher and inversions a >10-fold- higher mutation rate in male germ cells, whereas deletions showed a >5-fold-higher mutation rate in female germ cells. Consequently, and in accordance with the data of other diseases like Duchenne muscular dystrophy, our results indicate that at least for X-chromosomal disorders the male:female mutation rate of a disease is determined by its proportion of the different mutation types. 68 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  15. Comparison of Clot-based, Chromogenic, and Fluorescence Assays for Measurement of Factor VIII Inhibitors in the U.S. Hemophilia Inhibitor Research Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Connie H.; Rice, Anne S.; Boylan, Brian; Shapiro, Amy D.; Lentz, Steven R.; Wicklund, Brian M.; Kelly, Fiona M.; Soucie, J. Michael

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Detection and validation of inhibitors (antibodies) to hemophilia treatment products are important for clinical care, evaluation of product safety, and assessment of population trends. Methods Centralized monitoring for factor VIII (FVIII) inhibitors was conducted for patients in the Hemophilia Inhibitor Research Study using a previously reported modified Nijmegen-Bethesda clotting assay (NBA), a chromogenic Bethesda assay (CBA), and a novel fluorescence immunoassay (FLI). Results NBA and CBA were performed on 1005 specimens and FLI on 272 specimens. CBA was negative on 880/883 specimens (99.7%) with Nijmegen-Bethesda units (NBU)<0.5 and positive on 42/42 specimens (100%) with NBU≥2.0 and 43/80 specimens (53.8%) with NBU 0.5–1.9. Among specimens with positive NBA and negative CBA, 58.1% were FLI-negative, 12.9% had evidence of lupus anticoagulant, and 35.5% had non-time-dependent inhibition. CBA and FLI were positive on 72.4% and 100% of 1.0–1.9 NBU specimens and 43.1% and 50.0% of 0.5–0.9 NBU specimens. FLI detected antibodies in 98.0% of CBA-positive and 81.6% of NBA-positive specimens (P=0.004). Among 21 new inhibitors detected by NBA, 5 (23.8%) with 0.7–1.3 NBU did not react in CBA or FLI. Among previously positive patients with 0.5–1.9 NBU, 7/25 (28%) were not CBA or FLI positive. FLI was positive on 36/169 NBU-negative specimens (21.3%). Conclusions FVIII specificity could not be demonstrated by CBA or FLI for 26% of inhibitors of 0.5–1.9 NBU; such results must be interpreted with caution. Low titer inhibitors detected in clot-based assays should always be repeated, with consideration given to evaluating their reactivity with FVIII using more specific assays. PMID:23601690

  16. First prospective report on immune tolerance in poor risk haemophilia A inhibitor patients with a single factor VIII/von Willebrand factor concentrate in an observational immune tolerance induction study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreuz, W; Escuriola Ettingshausen, C; Vdovin, V; Zozulya, N; Plyushch, O; Svirin, P; Andreeva, T; Bubanská, E; Campos, M; Benedik-Dolničar, M; Jiménez-Yuste, V; Kitanovski, L; Klukowska, A; Momot, A; Osmulskaya, N; Prieto, M; Šalek, S Z; Velasco, F; Pavlova, A; Oldenburg, J; Knaub, S; Jansen, M; Belyanskaya, L; Walter, O

    2016-01-01

    Development of neutralizing inhibitors against factor VIII (FVIII) is a major complication of haemophilia A treatment. The ongoing, international, open-label, uncontrolled, observational immune tolerance induction (ObsITI) study evaluates ITI, the standard of care in patients with inhibitors. Forty-eight prospective patients in this interim analysis received a single plasma-derived, von Willebrand factor-stabilized, FVIII concentrate (pdFVIII/VWF) for ITI. According to recommended Bonn protocol, 'low responders' at ITI start (2 years since inhibitor diagnosis, inhibitor titre ≥10 BU at the start of ITI, or prior ITI failure). Nonetheless, 34 patients (70.8%) achieved complete success, 3 (6.3%) partial success, 1 (2.1%) partial response; ITI failed in 10 patients (20.8%), all with poor prognosis factors. All six low responders achieved complete success. ITI outcome was significantly associated with inhibitor titre level at ITI start (P = 0.0068), number of poor prognosis factors for ITI success (P = 0.0187), monthly bleeding rate during ITI (P = 0.0005) and peak inhibitor titre during ITI (P = 0.0007). Twenty-two of 35 high responder patients (62.9%) with ≥1 poor prognosis factor achieved complete success. Treatment with a single pdFVIII/VWF concentrate, mainly according to the Bonn protocol, resulted in a high ITI success rate in haemophilia A patients with inhibitors and poor prognosis for ITI success. © 2015 The Authors. Haemophilia Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Long-term results of International Breast Cancer Study Group Trial VIII: adjuvant chemotherapy plus goserelin compared with either therapy alone for premenopausal patients with node-negative breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, P; Sun, Z; Braun, D; Price, K N; Castiglione-Gertsch, M; Rabaglio, M; Gelber, R D; Crivellari, D; Collins, J; Murray, E; Zaman, K; Colleoni, M; Gusterson, B A; Viale, G; Regan, M M; Coates, A S; Goldhirsch, A

    2011-10-01

    The International Breast Cancer Study Group Trial VIII compared long-term efficacy of endocrine therapy (goserelin), chemotherapy [cyclophosphamide, methotrexate and fluorouracil (CMF)], and chemoendocrine therapy (CMF followed by goserelin) for pre/perimenopausal women with lymph-node-negative breast cancer. From 1990 to 1999, 1063 patients were randomized to receive (i) goserelin for 24 months (n = 346), (ii) six courses of 'classical' CMF (cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, 5-fluorouracil) chemotherapy (n = 360), or (iii) six courses of CMF plus 18 months goserelin (CMF→ goserelin; n = 357). Tumors were classified as estrogen receptor (ER) negative (19%), ER positive (80%), or ER unknown (1%); 19% of patients were younger than 40. Median follow-up was 12.1 years. For the ER-positive cohort, sequential therapy provided a statistically significant benefit in disease-free survival (DFS) (12-year DFS = 77%) compared with CMF alone (69%) and goserelin alone (68%) (P = 0.04 for each comparison), due largely to the effect in younger patients. Patients with ER-negative tumors whose treatment included CMF had similar DFS (12-year DFS CMF = 67%; 12-year DFS CMF→ goserelin = 69%) compared with goserelin alone (12-year DFS = 61%, P= NS). For pre/perimenopausal women with lymph-node-negative ER-positive breast cancer, CMF followed by goserelin improved DFS in comparison with either modality alone. The improvement was the most pronounced in those aged below 40, suggesting an endocrine effect of prolonged CMF-induced amenorrhea.

  18. Polymorphisms in the F8 gene and MHC-II variants as risk factors for the development of inhibitory anti-factor VIII antibodies during the treatment of hemophilia a: a computational assessment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gouri Shankar Pandey

    Full Text Available The development of neutralizing anti-drug-antibodies to the Factor VIII protein-therapeutic is currently the most significant impediment to the effective management of hemophilia A. Common non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (ns-SNPs in the F8 gene occur as six haplotypes in the human population (denoted H1 to H6 of which H3 and H4 have been associated with an increased risk of developing anti-drug antibodies. There is evidence that CD4+ T-cell response is essential for the development of anti-drug antibodies and such a response requires the presentation of the peptides by the MHC-class-II (MHC-II molecules of the patient. We measured the binding and half-life of peptide-MHC-II complexes using synthetic peptides from regions of the Factor VIII protein where ns-SNPs occur and showed that these wild type peptides form stable complexes with six common MHC-II alleles, representing 46.5% of the North American population. Next, we compared the affinities computed by NetMHCIIpan, a neural network-based algorithm for MHC-II peptide binding prediction, to the experimentally measured values and concluded that these are in good agreement (area under the ROC-curve of 0.778 to 0.972 for the six MHC-II variants. Using a computational binding predictor, we were able to expand our analysis to (a include all wild type peptides spanning each polymorphic position; and (b consider more MHC-II variants, thus allowing for a better estimation of the risk for clinical manifestation of anti-drug antibodies in the entire population (or a specific sub-population. Analysis of these computational data confirmed that peptides which have the wild type sequence at positions where the polymorphisms associated with haplotypes H3, H4 and H5 occur bind MHC-II proteins significantly more than a negative control. Taken together, the experimental and computational results suggest that wild type peptides from polymorphic regions of FVIII constitute potential T-cell epitopes

  19. Process development for human factor VIII purification by chromatography, the use of specific antibodies against fragments of the protein for evaluation of purity and stability during purification processes.

    OpenAIRE

    Daniela Jinzenji

    2008-01-01

    O fator VIII de coagulação (FVIII), recombinante ou purificado de plasma, é o biofármaco necessário para o tratamento da hemofília A, a doença hemorrágica mais freqüente em humanos. O método tradicional para a purificação de FVIII parte de crioprecipitado de plasma e precipitação alcoólica. No Instituto Butantan, foi proposto um método alternativo, utilizando somente cromatografia para esta purificação. Este projeto teve por objetivo comparar dois métodos cromatográficos de purificação do FVI...

  20. OCULAR HYPERTENSION - RISK FACTORS AND THERAPY?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janićijević Katarina

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction/Aim: The goal of our study was to analyze the epidemiological`s characteristics of ocular hypertension, as well as the influence of chronic risk factors on glaucoma development (conversion in glaucoma. We tried to make some entries for solving this complex ophthalmological problem. Material /Methods: From 2009 to 2015, a retrospective control study was performed on 121 patient with diagnoses of bilateral ocular hypertension and without disease progression/conversion of glaucoma (by standard protocols of diagnosis and basic procedures on tertiary level at Clinic of Ophthalmology, Clinical Centre of Kragujevac, Serbia.. The authors analyzed epidemiological characteristics: sex, age groups, positive/negative family history and personal history with chronic risk factors (one and/or two of ocular hypertension. The data obtained from this study were statistically analyzed in SPSS program, version 20.00. Results: As for the patients, 69 of them (57.02% were male and 52 female (42.98%. Dominant age group was between 40-49 (42.15% and then group between 50-59 (40.50% years of age. Anamnesis data indicated the absence of family anamnesis 71 (58.68%. Risk factors for ocular hypertension were presented in 103 (85.13% patients, 18 of them (14.87% did not respond. One risk factor - cardiovascular disease was noted in 83 (68.59%, with two risk factors - cardiovascular diseases and diabetes mellitus in 20 patients (16.53% and with PEX syndroma at other respondents. Conclusion: Ocular hypertension is not a common disease, but with risk factors, such as older age, positive family history, and chronic risk factors syndicated, represents a serious clinical and social problem, so the question remains for ophthalmologists - pro or against therapy? Those in favor of therapy would state the safety and protection from conversion/progression of glaucoma; but those  against therapy would only mention adequate monitoring of patients.

  1. A Serotype VIII Strain among Colonizing Group B Streptococcal Isolates in Boston, Massachusetts

    OpenAIRE

    Paoletti, Leanne J.; Bradford, Jessica; Paoletti, Lawrence C.

    1999-01-01

    Maternal colonization with group B Streptococcus (GBS) is a risk factor for neonatal GBS disease. Whereas serotypes Ia, Ib, II, III, and V are prevalent in the United States, types VI and VIII predominate in Japan. Recently, a serotype VIII strain was detected among 114 clinical GBS isolates from a Boston, Mass., hospital.

  2. A factor VIII-derived peptide enables von Willebrand factor (VWF)-binding of artificial platelet nanoconstructs without interfering with VWF-adhesion of natural platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haji-Valizadeh, Hassan; Modery-Pawlowski, Christa L; Sen Gupta, Anirban

    2014-05-01

    There is substantial clinical interest in synthetic platelet analogs for potential application in transfusion medicine. To this end, our research is focused on self-assembled peptide-lipid nanoconstructs that can undergo injury site-selective adhesion and subsequently promote site-directed active platelet aggregation, thus mimicking platelet's primary hemostatic actions. For injury site-selective adhesion, we have utilized a coagulation factor FVIII-derived VWF-binding peptide (VBP). FVIII binds to VWF's D'-D3 domain while natural platelet GPIbα binds to VWF's A1 domain. Therefore, we hypothesized that the VBP-decorated nanoconstructs will adhere to VWF without mutual competition with natural platelets. We further hypothesized that the adherent VBP-decorated constructs can enhance platelet aggregation when co-decorated with a fibrinogen-mimetic peptide (FMP). To test these hypotheses, we used glycocalicin to selectively block VWF's A1 domain and, using fluorescence microscopy, studied the binding of fluorescently labeled VBP-decorated nanoconstructs versus platelets to ristocetin-treated VWF. Subsequently, we co-decorated the nanoconstructs with VBP and FMP and incubated them with human platelets to study construct-mediated enhancement of platelet aggregation. Decoration with VBP resulted in substantial construct adhesion to ristocetin-treated VWF even if the A1-domain was blocked by glycocalicin. In comparison, such A1-blocking resulted in significant reduction of platelet adhesion. Without A1-blocking, the VBP-decorated constructs and natural platelets could adhere to VWF concomitantly. Furthermore, the constructs co-decorated with VBP and FMP enhanced active platelet aggregation. The results indicate significant promise in utilizing the FVIII-derived VBP in developing synthetic platelet analogs that do not interfere with VWF-binding of natural platelets but allow site-directed enhancement of platelet aggregation when combined with FMP.

  3. Trp[superscript 2313]-His[superscript 2315] of Factor VIII C2 Domain Is Involved in Membrane Binding Structure of a Complex Between the C[subscript 2] Domain and an Inhibitor of Membrane Binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Zhuo; Lin, Lin; Yuan, Cai; Nicolaes, Gerry A.F.; Chen, Liqing; Meehan, Edward J.; Furie, Bruce; Furie, Barbara; Huang, Mingdong (Harvard-Med); (UAH); (Maastricht); (Chinese Aca. Sci.)

    2010-11-03

    Factor VIII (FVIII) plays a critical role in blood coagulation by forming the tenase complex with factor IXa and calcium ions on a membrane surface containing negatively charged phospholipids. The tenase complex activates factor X during blood coagulation. The carboxyl-terminal C2 domain of FVIII is the main membrane-binding and von Willebrand factor-binding region of the protein. Mutations of FVIII cause hemophilia A, whereas elevation of FVIII activity is a risk factor for thromboembolic diseases. The C2 domain-membrane interaction has been proposed as a target of intervention for regulation of blood coagulation. A number of molecules that interrupt FVIII or factor V (FV) binding to cell membranes have been identified through high throughput screening or structure-based design. We report crystal structures of the FVIII C2 domain under three new crystallization conditions, and a high resolution (1.15 {angstrom}) crystal structure of the FVIII C2 domain bound to a small molecular inhibitor. The latter structure shows that the inhibitor binds to the surface of an exposed {beta}-strand of the C2 domain, Trp{sup 2313}-His{sup 2315}. This result indicates that the Trp{sup 2313}-His{sup 2315} segment is an important constituent of the membrane-binding motif and provides a model to understand the molecular mechanism of the C2 domain membrane interaction.

  4. Three essential factors in effective acupunture therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bresler, D E; Kroening, R J

    1976-01-01

    Three essential factors for achieving effective therapeutic results utilizing acupuncture are described: (1) Immune/inflammatory reactions are mobilized when any area of the skin is sufficiently stimulated. (2) Peripheral neural stimulation occurs when specific acupuncture loci are mechanically, electrically, chemically, or thermally activated. Precise stimulation of specific loci (i.e. peripheral neural receptors) may modulate central nervous system regulation of specific physiological functions in the body. (3) Psychological support is well known to be an important factor in all healing experiences, and that includes acupuncture therapy. The authors suggest that the most effective application of acupuncture involves sufficient stimulation of properly selected and precisely localized acupuncture loci combined with a dedicated concern for health that is clearly communicated to patients.

  5. Scatter factors assessment in microbeam radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prezado, Y.; Martinez-Rovira, I.; Sanchez, M. [Laboratoire Imagerie et Modelisation en Neurobiologie et Cancerologie IMNC-UMR 8165, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), Campus Universitaire, Bat. 440, 15 rue Georges Clemenceau, 91406 Orsay Cedex (France); Institut de Tecniques Energetiques, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Diagonal 647, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain) and ID17 Biomedical Beamline, European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, B.P. 220, 38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); Servicio de Radiofisica, Complejo Hospitalario de Santiago de Compostela, Rua Choupana S/N, 15706 Santiago de Compostela (Spain)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: The success of the preclinical studies in Microbeam Radiation Therapy (MRT) paved the way to the clinical trials under preparation at the Biomedical Beamline of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility. Within this framework, an accurate determination of the deposited dose is crucial. With that aim, the scatter factors, which translate the absolute dose measured in reference conditions (2 x 2 cm{sup 2} field size at 2 cm-depth in water) to peak doses, were assessed. Methods: Monte Carlo (MC) simulations were performed with two different widely used codes, PENELOPE and GEANT4, for the sake of safety. The scatter factors were obtained as the ratio of the doses that are deposited by a microbeam and by a field of reference size, at the reference depth. The calculated values were compared with the experimental data obtained by radiochromic (ISP HD-810) films and a PTW 34070 large area chamber. Results: The scatter factors for different microbeam field sizes assessed by the two MC codes were in agreement and reproduced the experimental data within uncertainty bars. Those correction factors were shown to be non-negligible for the future MRT clinical settings: an average 30% lower dose was deposited by a 50 {mu}m microbeam with respect to the reference conditions. Conclusions: For the first time, the scatter factors in MRT were systematically studied. They constitute an essential key to deposit accurate doses in the forthcoming clinical trials in MRT. The good agreement between the different calculations and the experimental data confirms the reliability of this challenging micrometric dose estimation.

  6. Osteoradionecrosis: predisposing factors and outcomes of therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beumer, J.; Harrison, R.; Sanders, B.; Kurrasch, M.

    Eighty-three episodes of osteoradionecrosis are reported. Of those episodes affecting the mandible (78), 23 (29.5%) required radical resection. The most common precipitating factors were postradiation extractions (22/83), periodontal disease (19/83), and preradiation extractions (17/83). Those episodes initially located within the zone of attached mucosa fared well with conservative measures while those initially located beyond the zone of attached mucosa fared poorly. In bone necroses where the external radiation dose to the affected bone exceeded 7,000 rad, the mandibular resection rate was high (44%). The most effective way of resolving advanced bone necroses was achieved with a course of hyperbaric oxygen therapy combined with a surgical sequestrectomy.

  7. Status and trend analysis of prophylactic usage of recombinant factor VIII in Chinese pediatric patients with hemophilia A: ReCare - a retrospective, phase IV, non-interventional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Changgang; Zhang, Xinsheng; Zhao, Yongqiang; Wu, Runhui; Hu, Qun; Xu, Vicky; Sun, Jing; Yang, Renchi; Li, Xiaojing; Zhou, Rongfu; Lian, Shinmei; Gu, Jian; Wu, Junde; Hou, Qingsong

    2017-09-01

    No study has reported the status and chronological trend of prophylactic recombinant factor VIII (rFVIII) use in Chinese pediatric patients with hemophilia A (HA). We aimed to analyze the status and trend of rFVIII-containing prophylaxis in Chinese pediatric patients with HA. ReCARE (Retrospective study in Chinese pediatric hemophilia A patients with rFVIII contained REgular prophylaxis) was a retrospective study conducted in 12 hemophilia treatment centers across China. The trend of prophylaxis was evaluated by determining the mean duration of prophylaxis, mean injection frequency (per week), mean dose of each injection (IU/kg), mean total dose injected/week (IU) and proportion of rFVIII consumption relative to factor VIII (FVIII) consumption over the study period. We analyzed 183 male pediatric patients with HA (mean age, 7.1 ± 4.23 years), who received intermittent prophylaxis between 1 November 2007 and 31 May 2013. The mean duration of prophylaxis with rFVIII increased from 16.72 weeks in 2008 to 32.77 in 2012. Per injection dose of rFVIII increased significantly from 2008 to 2013 (25.89 to 28.31 IU/kg, p < .001). An increase was also reported in the mean total FVIII consumed (699.97 ± 173.25 IU in 2008 and 891.30 ± 730.341 in 2013) and mean proportion of rFVIII used (33.33 ± 57.73% in 2008 to 85.50 ± 29.077% in 2013). Our data revealed an overall improvement in treatment dosage and duration with an increase in the number of patients receiving prophylaxis. The total proportion of rFVIII also increased gradually indicating the development of economy and safety awareness. The trial is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (CT.gov identifier: NCT02263066).

  8. Alfonso VIII, Cruzada y Cristiandad = Alfonso VIII, Crusade and Christendom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos de Ayala Martínez

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Lacruzada fue el cauce más directo para la integración de la Península Ibérica en el conjunto de la Cristiandad. Este hecho se pone especialmente de relieve cuando nos acercamos al reinado de Alfonso VIII de Castilla. El monarca, que casó con la hija del rey de Inglaterra, comprometió el matrimonio de su primogénita con el heredero del emperador alemán y casó a otra de sus hijas con el futuro rey de Francia, representa esa plena integración cuyo seguimiento es posible a través de diversos indicadores –políticos, ideológicos, culturales…-, que, en todo caso, refuerzan la imagen propagandística de un rey al servicio de la defensa de la Cristiandad.Crusading was the most effective method of integrating the Iberian Peninsula within Christendom. This fact is most evident when we consider the reign of Alfonso VIII of Castile. This monarch married the daughter of the king of England, arranged the marriage of his eldest daughter with the heir of the German Emperor and married another of his daughters with the future king of France. These actions convey the need for maximum integration which can be traced using several indicators –political, ideological, cultural...– that moreover reinforce the propaganda image of a king at the service and in defence of Christianity.

  9. Functional Role of Milk Fat Globule-Epidermal Growth Factor VIII in Macrophage-Mediated Inflammatory Responses and Inflammatory/Autoimmune Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Young-Su Yi

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation involves a series of complex biological processes mediated by innate immunity for host defense against pathogen infection. Chronic inflammation is considered to be one of the major causes of serious diseases, including a number of autoimmune/inflammatory diseases, cancers, cardiovascular diseases, and neurological diseases. Milk fat globule-epidermal growth factor 8 (MFG-E8) is a secreted protein found in vertebrates and was initially discovered as a critical component of the mil...

  10. 12 CFR 611.1137 - Title VIII service corporations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Title VIII service corporations. 611.1137... Organizations § 611.1137 Title VIII service corporations. (a) What is a title VIII service corporation? A title VIII service corporation is a service corporation organized for the purpose of exercising...

  11. Prospective surveillance study of haemophilia A patients switching from moroctocog alfa or other factor VIII products to moroctocog alfa albumin-free cell culture (AF-CC) in usual care settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra Lopez, Rafael; Nemes, Laszlo; Jimenez-Yuste, Victor; Rusen, Luminita; Cid, Ana R; Charnigo, Robert J; Baumann, James A; Smith, Lynne; Korth-Bradley, Joan M; Rendo, Pablo

    2015-10-01

    This prospective, open-label, postauthorisation safety surveillance study assessed clinically significant inhibitor development in patients with severe haemophilia A transitioning from moroctocog alfa or other factor VIII (FVIII) replacement products to reformulated moroctocog alfa (AF-CC). Males aged ≥ 12 years with severe haemophilia A (FVIII:C) 150 exposure days (EDs) to recombinant or plasma-derived FVIII products, and no detectable inhibitor at screening were enrolled. Primary end point was the incidence of clinically significant FVIII inhibitor development. Secondary end points included annualised bleeding rate (ABR), less-than-expected therapeutic effect (LETE), and FVIII recovery. Patients were assigned to one of two cohorts based on whether they were transitioning to moroctocog alfa (AF-CC) from moroctocog alfa (cohort 1; n=146) or from another recombinant or plasma-derived FVIII product (cohort 2; n=62). Mean number of EDs on study was 94 (range, 1-139). Six positive FVIII inhibitor results, as determined by local laboratories, were reported in four patients; none were confirmed by a central laboratory, no inhibitor-related clinical manifestations were reported, and all anti-FVIII antibody assays were negative. Median ABRs were 23.4 and 3.4 in patients categorised at baseline as following on-demand and prophylactic regimens, respectively; 86.5% of bleeding episodes resolved after one infusion. LETE incidence was 0.06% and 0.19% in the on-demand and prophylaxis settings, respectively. FVIII recovery remained constant throughout the study. No new safety concerns were identified. This study found no increased risk of clinically significant FVIII inhibitor development in patients transitioning from moroctocog alfa or other FVIII replacement products to moroctocog alfa (AF-CC).

  12. Low risk of inhibitor formation in haemophilia A patients following en masse switch in treatment to a third generation full length plasma and albumin-free recombinant factor VIII product (ADVATE®).

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bacon, C L

    2011-05-01

    Previous studies have suggested that development of inhibitors in previously treated patients (PTPs) may be attributable to a switch in factor VIII (FVIII) therapeutic product. Consequently, it is widely recognized that inhibitor development must be assessed in PTPs following the introduction of any new FVIII product. Following a national tender process in 2006, all patients with haemophilia A in Ireland changed their FVIII treatment product en masse to a plasma and albumin-free recombinant full-length FVIII product (ADVATE(®)). In this study, we retrospectively reviewed the case records of Irish PTPs to evaluate risk of inhibitor formation following this treatment switch. One hundred and thirteen patients participated in the study. Most patients (89%) had severe haemophilia. Only one of 96 patients with no inhibitor history developed an inhibitor. Prior to the switch in his recombinant FVIII (rFVIII) treatment of choice, this child had only experienced three exposure days (EDs). Consequently, in total he had only received 6 EDs when his inhibitor was first diagnosed. In keeping with this lack of de novo inhibitor development, we observed no evidence of any recurrent inhibitor formation in any of 16 patients with previously documented inhibitors. Similarly, following a previous en masse switch, we have previously reported that changing from a Chinese hamster ovary cell-produced to a baby hamster kidney cell-produced rFVIII was also associated with a low risk of inhibitor formation in PTPs. Our cumulative findings from these two studies clearly emphasizes that the risk of inhibitor development for PTPs following changes in commercial rFVIII product is low, at least in the Irish population.

  13. Influencing factors of radioiodine therapy in hyperthyroidism in adults

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Jiehua; ZHANG Zikang; CHENG Muhua; WANG Ping; WU Chunxing; SHAN Hong

    2007-01-01

    The study was to evaluate factors affecting outcome of 131I therapy in hyperthyroidism for optimizing the method. Data from 213 patients who received 131I treatment from July 2003 to July 2005 in our department were retrospectively analyzed. Factors possibly contributing to the outcome of the 131I therapy were analyzed, including gender, age, history of antithyroid drug, thyroid volume, duration of disease and radioactive iodine uptake rate. Multivariate analysis was done. The rates of euthyroidism and hypothyroidism were 69% and 8.5%, respectively, after one time 131I therapy. Multivariate analysis of the patients showed no statistically significant factors affecting the outcome of 131I therapy. The study showed that 131I dose can be directly calculated, and this simplifies the dose-determined method and individualizes the therapy.

  14. F8 gene mutation profile in Indian hemophilia A patients: Identification of 23 novel mutations and factor VIII inhibitor risk association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Patricia; Ghosh, Kanjaksha; Shetty, Shrimati

    2016-04-01

    'FVIII inhibitors', especially in severe hemophilia A (HA) patients, is a serious adverse effect that complicates their clinical management. Many genetic and non-genetic risk factors have been proposed for FVIII inhibitor development, diverse in different population groups. This is the first study in Indian hemophiliacs that analyzes inhibitor risk in relation to the complete F8 mutation profile, in a case-control study that included 145 Indian severe HA patients, i.e. 69 inhibitor positive (with 18 inhibitor concordant/discordant family members), and 58 inhibitor negative patients, after informed consent. While 53.54% (68/127) index cases were positive for intron 22 or intron 1 inversions, 55 causative F8 mutations were detected in the 59 inversion negative patients, of which 23 were novel mutations (in 24 patients) and 32 were reported earlier (in 35 patients). A higher incidence of mutations, in the C1 and C2 domains in inhibitor positive patients, and in the A1 domain in inhibitor negative patients was observed, though not significantly different. The study suggests that large F8 rearrangements (significantly higher in the inhibitor positive patients) pose the highest risk, while missense mutations (significantly higher in the inhibitor negative patients) pose the lowest risk of inhibitor development in Indian hemophilia A patients.

  15. Functional Role of Milk Fat Globule-Epidermal Growth Factor VIII in Macrophage-Mediated Inflammatory Responses and Inflammatory/Autoimmune Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Su Yi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation involves a series of complex biological processes mediated by innate immunity for host defense against pathogen infection. Chronic inflammation is considered to be one of the major causes of serious diseases, including a number of autoimmune/inflammatory diseases, cancers, cardiovascular diseases, and neurological diseases. Milk fat globule-epidermal growth factor 8 (MFG-E8 is a secreted protein found in vertebrates and was initially discovered as a critical component of the milk fat globule. Previously, a number of studies have reported that MFG-E8 contributes to various biological functions including the phagocytic removal of damaged and apoptotic cells from tissues, the induction of VEGF-mediated neovascularization, the maintenance of intestinal epithelial homeostasis, and the promotion of mucosal healing. Recently, emerging studies have reported that MFG-E8 plays a role in inflammatory responses and inflammatory/autoimmune diseases. This review describes the characteristics of MFG-E8-mediated signaling pathways, summarizes recent findings supporting the roles of MFG-E8 in inflammatory responses and inflammatory/autoimmune diseases, and discusses MFG-E8 targeting as a potential therapeutic strategy for the development of anti-inflammatory/autoimmune disease drugs.

  16. Functional Role of Milk Fat Globule-Epidermal Growth Factor VIII in Macrophage-Mediated Inflammatory Responses and Inflammatory/Autoimmune Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Young-Su

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation involves a series of complex biological processes mediated by innate immunity for host defense against pathogen infection. Chronic inflammation is considered to be one of the major causes of serious diseases, including a number of autoimmune/inflammatory diseases, cancers, cardiovascular diseases, and neurological diseases. Milk fat globule-epidermal growth factor 8 (MFG-E8) is a secreted protein found in vertebrates and was initially discovered as a critical component of the milk fat globule. Previously, a number of studies have reported that MFG-E8 contributes to various biological functions including the phagocytic removal of damaged and apoptotic cells from tissues, the induction of VEGF-mediated neovascularization, the maintenance of intestinal epithelial homeostasis, and the promotion of mucosal healing. Recently, emerging studies have reported that MFG-E8 plays a role in inflammatory responses and inflammatory/autoimmune diseases. This review describes the characteristics of MFG-E8-mediated signaling pathways, summarizes recent findings supporting the roles of MFG-E8 in inflammatory responses and inflammatory/autoimmune diseases, and discusses MFG-E8 targeting as a potential therapeutic strategy for the development of anti-inflammatory/autoimmune disease drugs.

  17. Granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor therapy for pulmonary alveolar proteinosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shende, Ruchira P; Sampat, Bhavin K; Prabhudesai, Pralhad; Kulkarni, Satish

    2013-03-01

    We report a case of 58 year old female diagnosed with Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis (PAP) with recurrence of PAP after 5 repeated whole lung lavage, responding to subcutaneous injections of Granulocyte Macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor therapy (GM-CSF). Thus indicating that GM-CSF therapy is a promising alternative in those requiring repeated whole lung lavage

  18. Radiation therapy in pseudotumour haemarthrosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lal, P.; Biswal, B.M.; Thulkar, S.; Patel, A.K.; Venkatesh, R.; Julka, P.K. [Institute Rotary Cancer Hospital, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Ansari Nagar, New Delhi (India). Departments of Radiation Oncology, Radiodiagnosis and Haematology

    1998-11-01

    Total or partial deficiency of factor VIII and IX in the coagulation cascade leads to haemophilia. Haemophilia affecting weight-bearing joints gives a `pseudotumour` or haemarthrosis-like condition. Surgery and cryoprecipitate infusions have been the treatment for this condition. Radiocolloids and radiation therapy have been used with some benefit. One case of ankle pseudotumour which was treated by low-dose external beam radiation is presented here. Copyright (1998) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd 14 refs., 2 figs.

  19. On building a science of common factors in trauma therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalenberg, Constance J

    2014-01-01

    Research on therapy outcome routinely finds that common factors (e.g., warmth, genuineness, trustworthiness) account for more variance than does therapy technique. This article makes the case for more attention to training in positive common factor variables within graduate schools and internships and for research on the effectiveness of such training. Recommendations are given for a change in focus in research and training, including more discussion of taboo topics in trauma therapy; attention to therapist behaviors that enhance the experience of warmth or trustworthiness; and research on client characteristics that impede the experience of being in the presence of a warm, genuine, and trustworthy other.

  20. Co-segregation of thrombophilic disorders in factor V Leiden carriers; the contributions of factor VIII, factor XI, thrombin activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor and lipoprotein(a) to the absolute risk of venous thromboembolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Libourel, EJ; Bank, [No Value; Meinardi, [No Value; Balje-Volkers, CP; Hamulyak, K; Middeldorp, S; Koopman, MMW; van Pampus, ECM; Prins, MH; Buller, HR; van der Meer, J

    2002-01-01

    Background and Objectives. The clinical expression of factor V Leiden varies widely within and between families and only a minority of carriers will ever develop venous thromboembolism. Co-segregation of thrombophilic disorders is a possible explanation, Our aim was to assess the contributions of

  1. Current status of haemophilia gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    High, K H; Nathwani, A; Spencer, T; Lillicrap, D

    2014-05-01

    After many reports of successful gene therapy studies in small and large animal models of haemophilia, we have, at last, seen the first signs of success in human patients. These very encouraging results have been achieved with the use of adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors in patients with severe haemophilia B. Following on from these initial promising studies, there are now three ongoing trials of AAV-mediated gene transfer in haemophilia B all aiming to express the factor IX gene from the liver. Nevertheless, as discussed in the first section of this article, there are still a number of significant hurdles to overcome if haemophilia B gene therapy is to become more widely available. The second section of this article deals with the challenges relating to factor VIII gene transfer. While the recent results in haemophilia B are extremely encouraging, there is, as yet, no similar data for factor VIII gene therapy. It is widely accepted that this therapeutic target will be significantly more problematic for a variety of reasons including accommodating the larger factor VIII cDNA, achieving adequate levels of transgene expression and preventing the far more frequent complication of antifactor VIII immunity. In the final section of the article, the alternative approach of lentiviral vector-mediated gene transfer is discussed. While AAV-mediated approaches to transgene delivery have led the way in clinical haemophilia gene therapy, there are still a number of potential advantages of using an alternative delivery vehicle including the fact that ex vivo host cell transduction will avoid the likelihood of immune responses to the vector. Overall, these are exciting times for haemophilia gene therapy with the likelihood of further clinical successes in the near future. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Factor XI and Contact Activation as Targets for Antithrombotic Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Gailani, David; Bane, Charles E.; Gruber, Andras

    2015-01-01

    The most commonly used anticoagulants produce therapeutic antithrombotic effects either by inhibiting thrombin or factor Xa, or by lowering the plasma levels of the precursors of these key enzymes, prothrombin and factor X. These drugs do not distinguish between thrombin generation contributing to thrombosis from thrombin generation required for hemostasis. Thus, anticoagulants increase bleeding risk, and many patients who would benefit from therapy go untreated because of comorbidities that ...

  3. Factors associated with the lack of antiretroviral therapy initiation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    among eligible HIV-positive pregnant women in Swaziland ... to study the factors associated with ART initiation among eligible ... and also if the χ2 test p-value was ≤0.25 in univariate analysis as ..... World Health Organization. ... Myer L. Barriers to initiating antiretroviral therapy during pregnancy: A qualitative study.

  4. Incidence and risk factors of bleeding-related adverse events in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia treated with ibrutinib

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lipsky, Andrew H; Farooqui, Mohammed Z H; Tian, Xin

    2015-01-01

    , suggesting that the risk of bleeding decreases with continued therapy. At baseline, von Willebrand factor and factor VIII levels were often high and normalized on treatment. Platelet function measured via the platelet function analyzer (PFA-100™) was impaired in 22 patients at baseline and in an additional...

  5. In vitro and In vivo Model Systems for Hemophilia A Gene Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Jianhua; Xi, Xiaodong; Kapranov, Philipp; Dong, Biao; Firrman, Jenni; Xu, Ruian; Xiao, Weidong

    2013-01-17

    Hemophilia A is a hereditary disorder caused by various mutations in factor VIII gene resulting in either a severe deficit or total lack of the corresponding activity. Recent success in gene therapy of a related disease, hemophilia B, gives new hope that similar success can be achieved for hemophilia A as well. To develop a gene therapy strategy for the latter, a variety of model systems are needed to evaluate molecular engineering of the factor VIII gene, vector delivery efficacy and safety-related issues. Typically, a tissue culture cell line is the most convenient way to get a preliminary glimpse of the potential of a vector delivery strategy. It is then followed by extensive testing in hemophilia A mouse and dog models. Newly developed hemophilia A sheep may provide yet another tool for evaluation of factor VIII gene delivery vectors. Hemophilia models based on other species may also be developed since hemophiliac animals have been identified or generated in rat, pig, cattle and horse. Although a genetic nonhuman primate hemophilia A model has yet to be developed, the non-genetic hemophilia A model can also be used for special purposes when specific questions need to be addressed that cannot not be answered in other model systems. Hemophilia A is caused by a functional deficiency in the factor VIII gene. This X-linked, recessive bleeding disorder affects approximately 1 in 5000 males [1-3]. Clinically, it is characterized by frequent and spontaneous joint hemorrhages, easy bruising and prolonged bleeding time. The coagulation activity of FVIII dictates severity of the clinical symptoms. Approximately 50% of all cases are classified as severe with less than 1% of normal levels of factor VIII detected [4]. This deficiency may lead to spontaneous joint hemorrhages or life-threatening bleeding. In contrast, patients with 5-30% of normal factor VIII activity exhibit mild clinical manifestations.

  6. Factors associated with therapy noncompliance in type-2 diabetes patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernández-Ronquillo Lizbeth

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To identify the frequency and factors associated with therapy noncompliance in type-2 diabetes mellitus patients. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A cross-sectional study was carried out in 79 patients with type-2 diabetes mellitus seen in major hospitals of Mexico City. Patients were visited at home, from March 1998 to August 1999, to measure compliance with prescribed therapy. Complying patients were defined as those taking at least 80% of their pills or 80% of their corresponding insulin dose. The degree of compliance with therapy components (diet, amount of exercise, and keeping appointments was measured. RESULTS: The average age of study subjects was 59 years (SD 11 years; 73% (n=58 were female subjects. The overall frequency of noncompliance was 39%. Noncompliance rates were: 62% for dietary recommendations, 85% for exercise, 17% for intake of oral hypoglycemic medication, 13% for insulin application, and 3% for appointment keeping. Hypertension plus obesity was the only factor significantly associated with noncompliance (OR 4.58, CI 95% 1.0, 22.4, p=0.02. CONCLUSIONS: The frequency of therapy noncompliance was very high, especially for diet and exercise.

  7. Biofeedback therapy for pediatric headache: factors associated with response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blume, Heidi K; Brockman, Libby N; Breuner, Cora C

    2012-10-01

    The goal of this study was to measure the effect of biofeedback therapy on pediatric headache and to identify factors associated with response to biofeedback therapy. In the United States, 17% of children have frequent or severe headaches. Biofeedback therapy (BFT) appears to be an effective treatment for headaches in adults and is often recommended for children with headaches, but there are few data in the pediatric population. It is also not clear which patients are most likely to benefit from biofeedback therapy. We examined the records of patients, aged 8 to 18 years old, who were referred to a pediatric BFT clinic for management of headache between 2004 and 2008. We extracted data regarding patient and headache characteristics, medication use, family history, and measures of depression, anxiety, and somatization. Chronic headache was defined as ≥4 headache days/week. Positive response to biofeedback was defined as a 50% reduction in number of headache days/week or hours/week, or ≥3-point decrease in severity (0-10 scale) between first and last visits. We analyzed the responder rate for those with episodic and chronic headaches and performed multivariable analysis to determine what factors were associated with headache response to biofeedback therapy. We analyzed records from 132 children who attended ≥2 biofeedback sessions. Median headache frequency dropped from 3.5 to 2 headache days/week between the first and last visits. The response rate was 58% overall; 48% for chronic headaches and 73% episodic headaches. In multivariate analysis, ability to raise hand temperature by >3°F at the last visit and use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) were associated with a positive response, and preventive medication use was associated with nonresponse. Anxiety, depression, and somatization were not significantly associated with response to biofeedback therapy. Biofeedback therapy appears to be an effective treatment for children and adolescents

  8. Protein trans-splicing based dual-vector delivery of the coagulation factor Ⅷ gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    A dual-vector system was explored for the delivery of the coagulation factor VIII gene,using intein-mediated protein trans-splicing as a means to produce intact functional factor VIII post-translationally.A pair of eukaryotic expression vectors,expressing Ssp DnaB intein-fused heavy and light chain genes of B-domain deleted factor VIII (BDD-FVIII),was constructed.With transient co-transfection of the two vectors into 293 and COS-7 cells,the culture supernatants contained (137±23) and (109±22) ng mL–1 spliced BDD-FVIII antigen with an activity of (1.05±0.16) and (0.79±0.23) IU mL–1 for 293 and COS-7 cells,respectively.The spliced BDD-FVIII was also detected in supernatants from a mixture of cells transfected with inteinfused heavy and light chain genes.The spliced BDD-FVIII protein bands from cell lysates were visualized by Western blotting.The data demonstrated that intein could be used to transfer the split factor VIII gene and provided valuable information on factor VIII gene delivery by dual-adeno-associated virus in hemophilia A gene therapy.

  9. Factors influencing radiation therapy student clinical placement satisfaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bridge, Pete; Carmichael, Mary-Ann [School of Clinical Sciences, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane (Australia)

    2014-02-15

    Introduction: Radiation therapy students at Queensland University of Technology (QUT) attend clinical placements at five different clinical departments with varying resources and support strategies. This study aimed to determine the relative availability and perceived importance of different factors affecting student support while on clinical placement. The purpose of the research was to inform development of future support mechanisms to enhance radiation therapy students’ experience on clinical placement. Methods: This study used anonymous Likert-style surveys to gather data from years 1 and 2 radiation therapy students from QUT and clinical educators from Queensland relating to availability and importance of support mechanisms during clinical placements in a semester. Results: The study findings demonstrated student satisfaction with clinical support and suggested that level of support on placement influenced student employment choices. Staff support was perceived as more important than physical resources; particularly access to a named mentor, a clinical educator and weekly formative feedback. Both students and educators highlighted the impact of time pressures. Conclusions: The support offered to radiation therapy students by clinical staff is more highly valued than physical resources or models of placement support. Protected time and acknowledgement of the importance of clinical education roles are both invaluable. Joint investment in mentor support by both universities and clinical departments is crucial for facilitation of effective clinical learning.

  10. Prehospital Volume Therapy as an Independent Risk Factor after Trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuer, Matthias; Lefering, Rolf; Touma, Alexander; Schoeneberg, Carsten; Keitel, Judith; Lendemans, Sven

    2015-01-01

    Background. Prehospital volume therapy remains widely used after trauma, while evidence regarding its disadvantages is growing. The primary objective of this study was to investigate the volume administered in a prehospital setting as an independent risk factor for mortality. Material and Methods. Patients who met the following criteria were analyzed retrospectively: Injury Severity Score = 16, primary admission (between 2002 and 2010), and age = 16 years. The following data had to be available: volume administered (including packed red cells), blood pressure, Glasgow Coma Scale, therapeutic measures, and laboratory results. Following a univariate analysis, independent risk factors for mortality after trauma were investigated using a multivariate regression analysis. Results. A collective of 7,641 patients met the inclusion criteria, showing that increasing volumes administered in a prehospital setting were an independent risk factor for mortality (odds ratio: 1.34). This tendency was even more pronounced in patients without severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) (odds ratio: 2.71), while the opposite tendency was observed in patients with TBI. Conclusions. Prehospital volume therapy in patients without severe TBI represents an independent risk factor for mortality. In such cases, respiratory and circulatory conditions should be stabilized during permissive hypotension, and patient transfer should not be delayed. PMID:25949995

  11. Prehospital Volume Therapy as an Independent Risk Factor after Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bjoern Hussmann

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Prehospital volume therapy remains widely used after trauma, while evidence regarding its disadvantages is growing. The primary objective of this study was to investigate the volume administered in a prehospital setting as an independent risk factor for mortality. Material and Methods. Patients who met the following criteria were analyzed retrospectively: Injury Severity Score = 16, primary admission (between 2002 and 2010, and age = 16 years. The following data had to be available: volume administered (including packed red cells, blood pressure, Glasgow Coma Scale, therapeutic measures, and laboratory results. Following a univariate analysis, independent risk factors for mortality after trauma were investigated using a multivariate regression analysis. Results. A collective of 7,641 patients met the inclusion criteria, showing that increasing volumes administered in a prehospital setting were an independent risk factor for mortality (odds ratio: 1.34. This tendency was even more pronounced in patients without severe traumatic brain injury (TBI (odds ratio: 2.71, while the opposite tendency was observed in patients with TBI. Conclusions. Prehospital volume therapy in patients without severe TBI represents an independent risk factor for mortality. In such cases, respiratory and circulatory conditions should be stabilized during permissive hypotension, and patient transfer should not be delayed.

  12. The physician's role in selecting a factor replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pipe, S W

    2006-03-01

    Over the past 20 years, transmissions of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B virus or hepatitis C virus have been virtually eliminated from plasma-derived or recombinant therapy in the USA, a record that can be largely attributed to the use of effective screening and inactivation technologies for known pathogens. The next significant threat will likely come from the emergence of a new, blood-borne infectious disease, perhaps one transmitted by a non-lipid-enveloped virus or prion, for which current inactivation methods are ineffective. Following the HIV crisis of the 1980s, government, patient advocacy groups, medical and scientific communities and the manufacturers of clotting therapies can learn from the past and approach potential threats from emerging pathogens in a proactive and productive manner. For clinicians, this includes actively engaging patients in a dialogue about all the factors that may influence their choice of clotting factor therapies, including emerging pathogens, patient convenience, consistency and reliability of supply, relative cost/benefit ratios, reimbursement issues (where applicable), patient preference and brand loyalty. It is our obligation as healthcare providers to understand potential risks and help make proactive decisions with our patients, decisions that often must be made in an environment of scientific uncertainty. Threats from infectious agents that were once deemed theoretical can, and often do, ultimately become real, with serious implications for morbidity and mortality.

  13. Risk factors and periimplantitis in implant therapy. Narrative review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis Bravo

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Diseases involving tissue around the teeth and osseointegrated implants are the result of an interaction between some type of pathological agent (bacterial, viral, etc. and host immune response. These interactions can occur both in the dental tissues as those biomaterials which are introduced to attempt to correct some type of periodontal disease, the implant being a biocompatible substitute of the teeth is not free from this type of interaction often enrolled periodontal and peri-implant pathology. The peri-implantitis is a type of disease that results from this interaction, the risk factors and risk indicators of peri-implantitis are broad and complex. This article summarizes the multiple sources of information in the scientific literature to address in detail the aspects of the main risk factors and the peri-implantitis in the peri implant therapy.

  14. Risk factors for nephrotoxicity onset associated with polymyxin B therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubrovskaya, Yanina; Prasad, Nishant; Lee, Yuman; Esaian, Diana; Figueroa, Deborah A; Tam, Vincent H

    2015-01-01

    Polymyxin B is an active agent against many MDR Gram-negative bacteria, but nephrotoxicity is a major hindrance to its widespread use. To guide its optimal use, we determined the risk factors for nephrotoxicity onset associated with polymyxin B. In a multicentre, retrospective, cohort study, we evaluated adult patients with normal renal function who received ≥72 h of polymyxin B therapy. Pertinent information was retrieved from medical records; patients were followed for up to 30 days after therapy was started. The primary endpoint of this study was the onset of nephrotoxicity. A Cox proportional hazards model was used for analysis. A total of 192 patients (52.1% male, 67.7% Caucasian) were evaluated. The mean ± SD age, actual body weight (ABW) and daily dose by ABW were 68.3 ± 17.2 years, 71.5 ± 20.4 kg and 1.5 ± 0.5 mg/kg, respectively. The median duration of therapy was 9.5 days. The overall prevalence rate of nephrotoxicity was 45.8% and the median onset of nephrotoxicity was 9 days. Independent risk factors for the onset of nephrotoxicity included daily dose by ABW (HR = 1.73; P = 0.022), concurrent use of vancomycin (HR = 1.89; P = 0.005) and contrast media (HR = 1.79; P = 0.009). Nephrotoxicity was seen earlier in the high-risk group (P = 0.003). Risk factors for nephrotoxicity onset associated with polymyxin B were identified. In conjunction with susceptibility and other pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic data, our results can be used to optimize treatment for MDR Gram-negative infections. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Factor XI and contact activation as targets for antithrombotic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gailani, D; Bane, C E; Gruber, A

    2015-08-01

    The most commonly used anticoagulants produce therapeutic antithrombotic effects either by inhibiting thrombin or factor Xa (FXa) or by lowering the plasma levels of the precursors of these key enzymes, prothrombin and FX. These drugs do not distinguish between thrombin generation contributing to thrombosis from thrombin generation required for hemostasis. Thus, anticoagulants increase bleeding risk, and many patients who would benefit from therapy go untreated because of comorbidities that place them at unacceptable risk for hemorrhage. Studies in animals demonstrate that components of the plasma contact activation system contribute to experimentally induced thrombosis, despite playing little or no role in hemostasis. Attention has focused on FXII, the zymogen of a protease (FXIIa) that initiates contact activation when blood is exposed to foreign surfaces, and FXI, the zymogen of the protease FXIa, which links contact activation to the thrombin generation mechanism. In the case of FXI, epidemiologic data indicate this protein contributes to stroke and venous thromboembolism, and perhaps myocardial infarction, in humans. A phase 2 trial showing that reduction of FXI may be more effective than low molecular weight heparin at preventing venous thrombosis during knee replacement surgery provides proof of concept for the premise that an antithrombotic effect can be uncoupled from an anticoagulant effect in humans by targeting components of contact activation. Here, we review data on the role of FXI and FXII in thrombosis and results of preclinical and human trials for therapies targeting these proteins.

  16. Factors Affecting Hemodialysis Patients' Satisfaction with Their Dialysis Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Al Eissa

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To assess the degree of satisfaction among hemodialysis patients and the factors influencing this satisfaction. Methods. Patients were recruited from 3 Saudi dialysis centers. Demographic data was collected. Using 1 to 10 Likert scale, the patients were asked to rate the overall satisfaction with, and the overall impact of, their dialysis therapy on their lives and to rate the effect of the dialysis therapy on 15 qualities of life domains. Results. 322 patients were recruited (72.6% of the total eligible patients. The mean age was 51.7 years (±15.4; 58% have been on dialysis for >3 years. The mean Charlson Comorbidity Index was 3.2 (±2, and Kt/V was 1.3 (±0.44. The mean satisfaction score was (7.41 ± 2.75 and the mean score of the impact of the dialysis on the patients' lives was 5.32 ± 2.55. Male patients reported worse effect of dialysis on family life, social life, energy, and appetite. Longer period since the commencement of dialysis was associated with adverse effect on finances and energy. Lower level of education was associated with worse dialysis effect on stress, overall health, sexual life, hobbies, and exercise ability. Conclusion. The level of satisfaction is affected by gender, duration on dialysis, educational level, and standard of care given.

  17. Risk factors in the development of stem cell therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hermsen Harm PH

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Stem cell therapy holds the promise to treat degenerative diseases, cancer and repair of damaged tissues for which there are currently no or limited therapeutic options. The potential of stem cell therapies has long been recognised and the creation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC has boosted the stem cell field leading to increasing development and scientific knowledge. Despite the clinical potential of stem cell based medicinal products there are also potential and unanticipated risks. These risks deserve a thorough discussion within the perspective of current scientific knowledge and experience. Evaluation of potential risks should be a prerequisite step before clinical use of stem cell based medicinal products. The risk profile of stem cell based medicinal products depends on many risk factors, which include the type of stem cells, their differentiation status and proliferation capacity, the route of administration, the intended location, in vitro culture and/or other manipulation steps, irreversibility of treatment, need/possibility for concurrent tissue regeneration in case of irreversible tissue loss, and long-term survival of engrafted cells. Together these factors determine the risk profile associated with a stem cell based medicinal product. The identified risks (i.e. risks identified in clinical experience or potential/theoretical risks (i.e. risks observed in animal studies include tumour formation, unwanted immune responses and the transmission of adventitious agents. Currently, there is no clinical experience with pluripotent stem cells (i.e. embryonal stem cells and iPSC. Based on their characteristics of unlimited self-renewal and high proliferation rate the risks associated with a product containing these cells (e.g. risk on tumour formation are considered high, if not perceived to be unacceptable. In contrast, the vast majority of small-sized clinical trials conducted with mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSC in

  18. Wilms tumour: prognostic factors, staging, therapy and late effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaste, Sue C. [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Department of Radiological Sciences, Memphis, TN (United States); Dome, Jeffrey S. [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Department of Oncology, Memphis, TN (United States); Babyn, Paul S. [Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Radiology, Toronto (Canada); Graf, Norbert M. [University Hospital of the Saarland, Clinic for Pediatric Oncology and Hematology, Homburg (Germany); Grundy, Paul [University of Alberta, Division of Pediatric Hematology, Oncology and Palliative Care, and Northern Alberta Children' s Cancer Program, Edmonton (Canada); Godzinski, Jan [Mother and Child Institute, Department of Oncological Surgery for Children and Adolescents, Warsaw (Poland); Levitt, Gill A. [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Sick Children NHS Trust, Paediatric Oncology, London (United Kingdom); Jenkinson, Helen [Birmingham Children' s Hospital NHS Trust, Oncology Department, Birmingham (United Kingdom)

    2008-01-15

    Wilms tumour is the most common malignant renal tumour in children. Dramatic improvements in survival have occurred as the result of advances in anaesthetic and surgical management, irradiation and chemotherapy. Current therapies are based on trials and studies primarily conducted by large multi-institutional cooperatives including the Societe Internationale d'Oncologie Pediatrique (SIOP) and the Children's Oncology Group (COG). The primary goals are to treat patients according to well-defined risk groups in order to achieve the highest cure rates, to decrease the frequency and intensity of acute and late toxicity and to minimize the cost of therapy. The SIOP trials and studies largely focus on the issue of preoperative therapy, whereas the COG trials and studies start with primary surgery. This paper reviews prognostic factors and staging systems for Wilms tumour and its current treatment with surgery and chemotherapy. Surgery remains a crucial part of treatment for nephroblastoma, providing local primary tumour control and adequate staging and possibly controlling the metastatic spread and central vascular extension of the disease. Partial nephrectomy, when technically feasible, seems reasonable not only in those with bilateral disease but also in those with unilateral disease where the patient has urological disorders or syndromes predisposing to malignancy. Partial nephrectomy, however, is frequently not sufficient for an anaplastic variant of tumour. The late effects for Wilms tumour and its treatment are also reviewed. The treatment of Wilms tumour has been a success story, and currently in excess of 80% of children diagnosed with Wilms tumour can look forward to long-term survival, with less than 20% experiencing serious morbidity at 20 years from diagnosis. The late complications are a consequence of the type and intensity of treatment required, which in turn reflects the nature and extent of the original tumour. Continual international trial

  19. Efficacy and safety of rVIII-SingleChain: results of a phase 1/3 multicenter clinical trial in severe hemophilia A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahlangu, Johnny; Kuliczkowski, Kazimierz; Karim, Faraizah Abdul; Stasyshyn, Oleksandra; Kosinova, Marina V.; Lepatan, Lynda Mae; Skotnicki, Aleksander; Boggio, Lisa N.; Klamroth, Robert; Oldenburg, Johannes; Hellmann, Andrzej; Santagostino, Elena; Baker, Ross I.; Fischer, Kathelijn; Gill, Joan C.; P’Ng, Stephanie; Chowdary, Pratima; Escobar, Miguel A.; Khayat, Claudia Djambas; Rusen, Luminita; Bensen-Kennedy, Debra; Blackman, Nicole; Limsakun, Tharin; Veldman, Alex; St. Ledger, Katie

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant VIII (rVIII)-SingleChain is a novel B-domain–truncated recombinant factor VIII (rFVIII), comprised of covalently bonded factor VIII (FVIII) heavy and light chains. It was designed to have a higher binding affinity for von Willebrand factor (VWF). This phase 1/3 study investigated the efficacy and safety of rVIII-SingleChain in the treatment of bleeding episodes, routine prophylaxis, and surgical prophylaxis. Participants were ≥12 years of age, with severe hemophilia A (endogenous FVIII <1%). The participants were allocated by the investigator to receive rVIII-SingleChain in either an on-demand or prophylaxis regimen. Of the 175 patients meeting study eligibility criteria, 173 were treated with rVIII-SingleChain, prophylactically (N = 146) or on-demand (N = 27). The total cumulative exposure was 14 306 exposure days (EDs), with 120 participants reaching ≥50 EDs and 52 participants having ≥100 EDs. Hemostatic efficacy was rated by the investigator as excellent or good in 93.8% of the 835 bleeds treated and assessed. Across all prophylaxis regimens, the median annualized spontaneous bleeding rate was 0.00 (Q1, Q3: 0.0, 2.4) and the median overall annualized bleeding rate (ABR) was 1.14 (Q1, Q3: 0.0, 4.2). Surgical hemostasis was rated as excellent/good in 100% of major surgeries by the investigator. No participant developed FVIII inhibitors. In conclusion, rVIII-SingleChain is a novel rFVIII molecule showing excellent hemostatic efficacy in surgery and in the control of bleeding events, low ABR in patients on prophylaxis, and a favorable safety profile in this large clinical study. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT01486927. PMID:27330001

  20. Efficacy and safety of rVIII-SingleChain: results of a phase 1/3 multicenter clinical trial in severe hemophilia A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahlangu, Johnny; Kuliczkowski, Kazimierz; Karim, Faraizah Abdul; Stasyshyn, Oleksandra; Kosinova, Marina V; Lepatan, Lynda Mae; Skotnicki, Aleksander; Boggio, Lisa N; Klamroth, Robert; Oldenburg, Johannes; Hellmann, Andrzej; Santagostino, Elena; Baker, Ross I; Fischer, Kathelijn; Gill, Joan C; P'Ng, Stephanie; Chowdary, Pratima; Escobar, Miguel A; Khayat, Claudia Djambas; Rusen, Luminita; Bensen-Kennedy, Debra; Blackman, Nicole; Limsakun, Tharin; Veldman, Alex; St Ledger, Katie; Pabinger, Ingrid

    2016-08-04

    Recombinant VIII (rVIII)-SingleChain is a novel B-domain-truncated recombinant factor VIII (rFVIII), comprised of covalently bonded factor VIII (FVIII) heavy and light chains. It was designed to have a higher binding affinity for von Willebrand factor (VWF). This phase 1/3 study investigated the efficacy and safety of rVIII-SingleChain in the treatment of bleeding episodes, routine prophylaxis, and surgical prophylaxis. Participants were ≥12 years of age, with severe hemophilia A (endogenous FVIII <1%). The participants were allocated by the investigator to receive rVIII-SingleChain in either an on-demand or prophylaxis regimen. Of the 175 patients meeting study eligibility criteria, 173 were treated with rVIII-SingleChain, prophylactically (N = 146) or on-demand (N = 27). The total cumulative exposure was 14 306 exposure days (EDs), with 120 participants reaching ≥50 EDs and 52 participants having ≥100 EDs. Hemostatic efficacy was rated by the investigator as excellent or good in 93.8% of the 835 bleeds treated and assessed. Across all prophylaxis regimens, the median annualized spontaneous bleeding rate was 0.00 (Q1, Q3: 0.0, 2.4) and the median overall annualized bleeding rate (ABR) was 1.14 (Q1, Q3: 0.0, 4.2). Surgical hemostasis was rated as excellent/good in 100% of major surgeries by the investigator. No participant developed FVIII inhibitors. In conclusion, rVIII-SingleChain is a novel rFVIII molecule showing excellent hemostatic efficacy in surgery and in the control of bleeding events, low ABR in patients on prophylaxis, and a favorable safety profile in this large clinical study. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT01486927.

  1. The intricacies of neurotrophic factor therapy for retinal ganglion cell rescue in glaucoma: a case for gene therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianna Foldvari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Regeneration of damaged retinal ganglion cells (RGC and their axons is an important aspect of reversing vision loss in glaucoma patients. While current therapies can effectively lower intraocular pressure, they do not provide extrinsic support to RGCs to actively aid in their protection and regeneration. The unmet need could be addressed by neurotrophic factor gene therapy, where plasmid DNA, encoding neurotrophic factors, is delivered to retinal cells to maintain sufficient levels of neurotrophins in the retina. In this review, we aim to describe the intricacies in the design of the therapy including: the choice of neurotrophic factor, the site and route of administration and target cell populations for gene delivery. Furthermore, we also discuss the challenges currently being faced in RGC-related therapy development with special considerations to the existence of multiple RGC subtypes and the lack of efficient and representative in vitro models for rapid and reliable screening in the drug development process.

  2. The intricacies of neurotrophic factor therapy for retinal ganglion cell rescue in glaucoma:a case for gene therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marianna Foldvari; Ding Wen Chen

    2016-01-01

    Regeneration of damaged retinal ganglion cells (RGC) and their axons is an important aspect of reversing vision loss in glaucoma patients. While current therapies can effectively lower intraocular pressure, they do not provide extrinsic support to RGCs to actively aid in their protection and regeneration. The unmet need could be addressed by neurotrophic factor gene therapy, where plasmid DNA, encoding neurotrophic factors, is delivered to retinal cells to maintain sufifcient levels of neurotrophins in the retina. In this review, we aim to describe the intricacies in the design of the therapy including: the choice of neurotrophic factor, the site and route of administration and target cell populations for gene delivery. Furthermore, we also dis-cuss the challenges currently being faced in RGC-related therapy development with special considerations to the existence of multiple RGC subtypes and the lack of efifcient and representativein vitro models for rapid and reliable screening in the drug development process.

  3. Gene therapy for hemophilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuah, M K; Evens, H; VandenDriessche, T

    2013-06-01

    Hemophilia A and B are X-linked monogenic disorders resulting from deficiencies of factor VIII and FIX, respectively. Purified clotting factor concentrates are currently intravenously administered to treat hemophilia, but this treatment is non-curative. Therefore, gene-based therapies for hemophilia have been developed to achieve sustained high levels of clotting factor expression to correct the clinical phenotype. Over the past two decades, different types of viral and non-viral gene delivery systems have been explored for hemophilia gene therapy research with a variety of target cells, particularly hepatocytes, hematopoietic stem cells, skeletal muscle cells, and endothelial cells. Lentiviral and adeno-associated virus (AAV)-based vectors are among the most promising vectors for hemophilia gene therapy. In preclinical hemophilia A and B animal models, the bleeding phenotype was corrected with these vectors. Some of these promising preclinical results prompted clinical translation to patients suffering from a severe hemophilic phenotype. These patients receiving gene therapy with AAV vectors showed long-term expression of therapeutic FIX levels, which is a major step forwards in this field. Nevertheless, the levels were insufficient to prevent trauma or injury-induced bleeding episodes. Another challenge that remains is the possible immune destruction of gene-modified cells by effector T cells, which are directed against the AAV vector antigens. It is therefore important to continuously improve the current gene therapy approaches to ultimately establish a real cure for hemophilia. © 2013 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  4. Factors associated with suboptimal adherence to antiretroviral therapy in Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Awachana Jiamsakul

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART plays an important role in treatment outcomes. It is crucial to identify factors influencing adherence in order to optimize treatment responses. The aim of this study was to assess the rates of, and factors associated with, suboptimal adherence (SubAdh in the first 24 months of ART in an Asian HIV cohort. Methods: As part of a prospective resistance monitoring study, the TREAT Asia Studies to Evaluate Resistance Monitoring Study (TASER-M collected patients’ adherence based on the World Health Organization-validated Adherence Visual Analogue Scale. SubAdh was defined in two ways: (i 14 days. Time was divided into four intervals: 0–6, 6–12, 12–18 and 18–24 months. Factors associated with SubAdh were analysed using generalized estimating equations. Results: Out of 1316 patients, 32% ever reported 2 assessments per patient per year had an odds ratio (OR=0.7 (95% confidence interval (CI (0.55 to 0.90, p=0.006, compared to sites with ≤2 assessments per patient per year. Compared to heterosexual exposure, SubAdh was higher in injecting drug users (IDUs (OR=1.92, 95% CI (1.23 to 3.00, p=0.004 and lower in homosexual exposure (OR=0.52, 95% CI (0.38 to 0.71, p<0.001. Patients taking a nucleoside transcriptase inhibitor and protease inhibitor (NRTI+PI combination were less likely to report adherence <100% (OR=0.36, 95% CI (0.20 to 0.67, p=0.001 compared to patients taking an NRTI and non-nucleoside transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI+NNRTI combination. SubAdh decreased with increasing time on ART (all p<0.001. Similar associations were found with adherence <95% as the outcome. Conclusions: We found that SubAdh, defined as either <100% and <95%, was associated with mode of HIV exposure, ART regimen, time on ART and frequency of adherence measurement. The more frequently sites assessed patients, the lower the SubAdh, possibly reflecting site resourcing for patient counselling. Although social

  5. Cardiovascular risk factors in high-need psoriasis patients and its implications for biological therapies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driessen, R.J.B.; Boezeman, J.B.M.; Kerkhof, P.C.M. van de; Jong, E.M.G.J. de

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The associations between psoriasis and cardiovascular risk factors are reported to be stronger as psoriasis severity increases. This makes studying cardiovascular risk factors in high-need psoriasis patients, eligible for biological therapy, interesting. OBJECTIVE: To survey the prevalen

  6. Testosterone Therapy Can Interact With Thrombophilia, Leading to Osteonecrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glueck, Charles J; Riaz, Rashid; Prince, Marloe; Freiberg, Richard A; Wang, Ping

    2015-12-01

    Although this effect is not widely recognized, testosterone therapy can interact with thrombophilia, causing osteonecrosis. In 12 men and 4 women who had idiopathic osteonecrosis a median of 6 months after the onset of testosterone therapy, the authors examined the interaction between testosterone therapy and previously undiagnosed thrombophilia. The authors hypothesized that patients who had osteonecrosis after starting testosterone therapy were more likely than 110 normal control subjects or 48 patients who had osteonecrosis and were not receiving testosterone therapy to have thrombophilia. Measures of thrombophilia included Factor V Leiden, prothrombin, PAI-1 gene mutations, Factor VIII, Factor XI, anticardiolipin antibody immunoglobulin G or immunoglobulin M, and homocysteine values. In 10 cases, osteonecrosis occurred 6 months or less after the onset of testosterone therapy, and in all 16 cases, it occurred after a median of 6 months of testosterone therapy. Of the 16 cases, 5 (31%) were Factor V Leiden heterozygotes vs 2 of 109 (2%) healthy control subjects (P=.0003) and 4 of 48 patients who had osteonecrosis and were not receiving testosterone therapy (P=.04). Of the 16 cases, 4 (25%) had high (>150%) Factor VIII levels vs 7 of 103 (7%) healthy control subjects (P=.04), and 3 (19%) had high (>150%) Factor XI levels vs 3 of 101 (3%) healthy control subjects (P=.03). Of the 16 patients with osteonecrosis, 14 (88%) had at least 1 abnormal procoagulant value (of the 8 measured) vs 47 of 110 (43%) healthy control subjects (P=.0009). Of the 5 men whose serum estradiol level was measured while they were receiving testosterone therapy, this level was high (≥42.6 pg/mL) in 4. When testosterone therapy is given to patients with thrombophilia, they are at increased risk for osteonecrosis.

  7. Short story of antirheumatic therapy.VIII. The immunodepressants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Marson

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The use of immunosuppressive drugs in rheumatology is fairly recent, starting just after the Second World War with the introduction of the first alkylating agents in oncohematology. When it became clear that some rheumatic diseases, particularly rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus, showed an immune-mediated pathogenesis, including proliferation of immunocompetent cells, an application was soon found for immunosuppressive drugs in their treatment. This review outlines the historical milestones that led to the current use of drugs belonging to the major groups of immunosuppressants, i.e. alkylating agents (cyclophosphamide, folic acid (methotrexate and purine (azathioprine antagonists. We will also talk about the history of cyclosporin A, the first “selective” immunosuppressive agent, and that of some immunoactive drugs used more recently in rheumatology, such as mycophenolate mofetil, dapson and thalidomide.

  8. Factors contributing to defaulting scheduled therapy sessions by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    contributing to caregivers' defaulting scheduled rehabilitation therapy sessions. Methods ... disabilities poses excess psychological2,3, physical, and economic strain on the caregiver4. ... Weekly clinics are conducted every. Monday for ...

  9. Keratinocyte growth factor gene therapy ameliorates ulcerative colitis in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chun-Jie Liu; Ji-De Jin; Tong-De Lv; Zu-Ze Wu; Xiao-Qin Ha

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of keratinocyte growth factor (KGF) gene therapy in acetic acid-induced ulcerative colitis in rat model. METHODS: The colitis of Sprague-Dawley rats was induced by intrarectal infusion of 1 mL 5% (v/v) acetic acid. Twenty-four hours after exposed to acetic acid, rats were divided into three experimental groups: control group, attenuated Salmonella typhimurium Ty21a strain (SP) group and SP strain carrying human KGF gene (SPK) group, and they were separately administered orally with 10% NaHCO3, SP or SPK. Animals were sacrificed and colonic tissues were harvested respectively on day 3, 5, 7 and 10 after administration. Weights of rats, colonic weight/ length ratio and stool score were evaluated. Histological changes of colonic tissues were examined by hematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining method. The expression of KGF, KGF receptor (KGFR) and TNF-α were measured either by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay or Western blotting. Immunohistochemistry was used to detect the cellular localization of KGFR and Ki67. In addition, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and malondialdehyde (MDA) contents in the homogenate were measured. RESULTS: Body weight and colonic weight/length ratio were declined in SPK group compared with SP and control groups (body weight: 272.78 ± 17.92 g vs 243.72 ± 14.02 g and 240.68 ± 12.63 g, P < 0.01; colonic weight/length ratio: 115.76 ± 7.47 vs 150.32 ± 5.99 and 153.67 ± 5.50 mg/cm, P < 0.01). Moreover, pathological changes of damaged colon were improved in SPK group as well. After administration of SPK strain, KGF expression increased markedly from the 3rd d, and remained at a high level till the 10th d. Furthermore, KGFR expression and Ki67 expression elevated, whereas TNF-α expression was inhibited in SPK group. In the group administered with SPK, SOD activity increased significantly (d 5: 26.18 ± 5.84 vs 18.12 ± 3.30 and 18.79 ± 4.74 U/mg, P < 0.01; d 7: 35.48 ± 3.35 vs 22.57 ± 3.44 and 21.69 ± 3.94 U

  10. Effects of different progestin regimens in hormone replacement therapy on blood coagulation factor VII and tissue factor pathway inhibitor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bladbjerg, E-M; Skouby, S O.; Andersen, L F;

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Long-term hormone replacement therapy (HRT) reduces cardiovascular risk, but an early increased risk was reported in women with coronary heart disease. In such women the arterial intima can express tissue factor, and changes in coagulation factor VII (factor VII) and tissue factor...... after progestin intake. The integrated response, AUC, for TFPI was significantly lower in the HRT groups compared with the reference group. CONCLUSION: The observed changes may increase the early thrombotic risk associated with HRT use. Udgivelsesdato: 2002-Dec...

  11. Influence of patient and treatment factors on adherence to adjuvant endocrine therapy in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Catherine M; Gentry, Amanda L; Brufsky, Adam M; Casillo, Frances E; Cohen, Susan M; Dailey, Meredith M; Donovan, Heidi S; Dunbar-Jacob, Jacqueline; Jankowitz, Rachel C; Rosenzweig, Margaret Q; Sherwood, Paula R; Sereika, Susan M

    2014-05-01

    To comprehensively assess the patient and illness or treatment factors that may predict nonadherence to adjuvant endocrine therapy and to explore whether an interaction occurs between these factors in women with breast cancer. Repeated-measures design. The Outpatient Services of the Women's Cancer Program at the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute and participants' homes. 91 women with early-stage breast cancer who received endocrine therapy. Adherence was assessed continuously for the first 18 months of endocrine therapy. Patient and illness or treatment factors were assessed at four time points (Time 1 to Time 4). Time 1 (baseline) was within two weeks prior to the initiation of endocrine therapy. Times 2-4 occurred at six-month intervals, as many as 18 months after Time 1. Adherence, patient factors, and illness or treatment factors. Adherence to endocrine therapy declined significantly during the first 18 months of treatment in women with breast cancer. The presence of negative mood and symptoms before starting treatment predicted nonadherence to endocrine therapy over time. Perceptions of financial hardship, symptoms, disease stage, and more complex medication regimens intensified the effect of negative mood on adherence over time. Women with breast cancer may be at risk for nonadherence to prescribed endocrine therapy if they experience depression or anxiety and symptoms prior to initiating therapy. Oncology nurses should be alert to women with breast cancer who are depressed or anxious or who are experiencing symptoms. Management of negative mood and symptoms may result in better adherence.

  12. Gene therapy in an era of emerging treatment options for hemophilia B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monahan, P. E.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Factor IX deficiency (hemophilia B) is less common than factor VIII deficiency (hemophilia A) and innovations in therapy for hemophilia B have generally lagged behind those for hemophilia A. Recently the first sustained correction of the hemophilia bleeding phenotype by clotting factor gene therapy has been described using recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) to deliver factor IX. Despite this success, many individuals with hemophilia B, including children, men with active hepatitis, and individuals who have pre-existing natural immunity to AAV are not eligible for the current iteration of hemophilia B gene therapy. In addition, recent advances in recombinant factor IX protein engineering have led some hemophilia treaters to reconsider the urgency of genetic cure. Current clinical and preclinical approaches to advancing AAV-based and alternative approaches to factor IX gene therapy are considered in the context of current demographics and treatment of the hemophilia B population. PMID:26149016

  13. Factors related to pain during routine photodynamic therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, I M; Nielsen, J S; Lophaven, S

    2011-01-01

    between pain-reducing intervention and diagnosis, pre-treatment, gender or age was found. CONCLUSIONS: Pain-reducing intervention was required in 44% of the PDT treatments. Intervention was particularly required when treating lesions in areas suited for PDT therapy for cosmetic reasons such as the scalp...

  14. Factors impacting the combination of topical corticosteroid therapies for psoriasis: perspectives from the international psoriasis council

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerkhof, P.C. van de; Kragballe, K.; Segaert, S.; Lebwohl, M.

    2011-01-01

    Corticosteroids are the mainstay of topical therapies for the treatment of mild to moderate psoriasis. Selection of vehicle, concentrations of corticosteroid and coadministered medications, and frequency of administration are critical factors that enhance bioavailability of topical corticosteroids.

  15. Male infertility: lifestyle factors and holistic, complementary, and alternative therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David F Yao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available While we may be comfortable with an allopathic approach to male infertility, we are also responsible for knowledge about lifestyle modifications and holistic, complementary, and alternative therapies that are used by many of our patients. This paper provides an evidence-based review separating fact from fiction for several of these therapies. There is sufficient literature to support weight reduction by diet and exercise, smoking cessation, and alcohol moderation. Supplements that have demonstrated positive effects on male fertility on small randomized controlled trial (RCT include aescin, coenzyme Q 10 , glutathione, Korean red ginseng, L-carnitine, nigella sativa, omega-3, selenium, a combination of zinc and folate, and the Menevit antioxidant. There is no support for the use of Vitamin C, Vitamin E, or saffron. The data for Chinese herbal medications, acupuncture, mind-body practice, scrotal cooling, and faith-based healing are sparse or inconclusive.

  16. Predicting Retrograde Autobiographical Memory Changes Following Electroconvulsive Therapy: Relationships between Individual, Treatment, and Early Clinical Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Donel M; Gálvez, Verònica; Loo, Colleen K

    2015-06-19

    Loss of personal memories experienced prior to receiving electroconvulsive therapy is common and distressing and in some patients can persist for many months following treatment. Improved understanding of the relationships between individual patient factors, electroconvulsive therapy treatment factors, and clinical indicators measured early in the electroconvulsive therapy course may help clinicians minimize these side effects through better management of the electroconvulsive therapy treatment approach. In this study we examined the associations between the above factors for predicting retrograde autobiographical memory changes following electroconvulsive therapy. Seventy-four depressed participants with major depressive disorder were administered electroconvulsive therapy 3 times per week using either a right unilateral or bitemporal electrode placement and brief or ultrabrief pulse width. Verbal fluency and retrograde autobiographical memory (assessed using the Columbia Autobiographical Memory Interview - Short Form) were tested at baseline and after the last electroconvulsive therapy treatment. Time to reorientation was measured immediately following the third and sixth electroconvulsive therapy treatments. Results confirmed the utility of measuring time to reorientation early during the electroconvulsive therapy treatment course as a predictor of greater retrograde amnesia and the importance of assessing baseline cognitive status for identifying patients at greater risk for developing later side effects. With increased number of electroconvulsive therapy treatments, older age was associated with increased time to reorientation. Consistency of verbal fluency performance was moderately correlated with change in Columbia Autobiographical Memory Interview - Short Form scores following right unilateral electroconvulsive therapy. Electroconvulsive therapy treatment techniques associated with lesser cognitive side effects should be particularly considered for

  17. Risk factors for nutritional status determination and indications for preventive nutrition therapy in hospitalized gastroenterological patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roganović Branka

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Risk factors for the intrahospital nutritional status worsening (NSW have not been precisely defined in the literature. The objective was defining thoese factors among gastroenterological patients and defining the risk patients requiring a preventive nutritional therapy. Methods. In 650 gastroenterological patients, NSW was evaluated on the basis of reducing of the six parameters: body weight, body mass index (BMI, triceps skinfold thickness (TSF, midupper arm muscle circumference (MAMC, serum albumin level (ALB, and lymphocyte count (LYM. The influence on NSW was tested for 13 factors concerning characteristics of the patient, disease, and diagnostic procedures. Among the factors influencing significantly the NSW, primary and secondary risk factors were selected. After scoring of risk factors had been performed, the risk-score for NSW (RSNSW was defined. The critical value of RSNSW which required preventive nutritional therapy was also calculated. Results. The incidence of NSW was in the range 29.2%−57.9%. The presence of general complications and severe disease activity were considered as primary risk factors, whereas malignant disease, age above 71, hepato-billiary tract involvement, hospitalization longer than 14 days, and mobility worsening were considered as secondary risk factors. The best predictive value for the NSW was proved for the RSNSW ≥ 6. Because of that, preventive nutritional therapy should be indicated in patients presenting with both primary risk factors or in patients presenting with one primary factor combined with three secondary risk factors at least. Conclusion. There are 7 risk factors for NSW in gastroenterological patients, but they are not of the same importance - two primary and five secondary risk factors can be differentiated. Preventive nutritional therapy is indicated only in patients having both primary risk factors or in those presenting with one primary risk factor combined with three

  18. Analysis of the influence of dabigatran on coagulation factors and inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsumi, Y; Shimono, J; Ohhigashi, H; Ito, S; Shiratori, S; Teshima, T

    2015-04-01

    Dabigatran is an oral intake thrombin inhibitor for preventive administration against stroke accompanied by atrial fibrillation. Although dabigatran causes prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), the effect of dabigatran on each coagulation factor and coagulation factor inhibitor remains to be investigated. Our aim was to analyze the influence of dabigatran on coagulation factors and coagulation factor inhibitors. We administered dabigatran to 40 patients. In 26 of these 40, we analyzed the activity of several coagulation factors and their inhibitors. We used Fisher's exact test to determine statistical significance. The activities of many coagulation factors changed during the dabigatran therapy. Factor II levels decreased in all patients showing prolongation of partial thromboplastin (PT) and APTT. The antifactor VIII inhibitor was positive in the majority of patients with prolonged PT and APTT, while activities of protein C, protein S, and antifactor IX inhibitor were not associated with PT and APTT prolongation. Dabigatran affects the activities of many coagulation factors, including factors II, V, VIII, and IX, as well as the antifactor VIII inhibitor. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Igor Zabel 14. VIII 1958 - 23. VII 2005

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2005-01-01

    Igor Zabel oli Ida-Euroopa tuntumaid kunstiteoreetikuid ja kuraatoreid. Töötas 1986. aastast Ljubljana moodsa kunsti muuseumi kuraatorina. 9. VIII avatakse seal viimane I. Zabeli kureeritud näitus "Territories, Identities, Nets-Slovene Art 1995-2005"

  20. Factors associated with suitability of empiric antibiotic therapy in hospitalized patients with bloodstream infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Chagai; Keller, Nathan; Bornstein, Gil; Ben-Zvi, Ilan; Koren-Morag, Nira; Rahav, Galia

    2017-06-01

    Bacteremia is associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. Initiation of inadequate empiric antibiotic therapy is associated with a worse outcome. The aim of this study was to establish the prevalence and the factors associated with inappropriate empiric antibiotic therapy in patients hospitalized with bacteremia. A cross-sectional study was conducted during January 2010-December 2011 at the medical wards of the Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Israel. The records of all patients with bacteremia were reviewed. Clinical and laboratory characteristics, bacteremic pathogens and antimicrobial agents were retrieved from the medical records. Factors associated with appropriateness of empiric antibiotic therapy were assessed. A total of 681 eligible adults were included in the study. Antibiotic therapy was found to be inappropriate in 138 (20.2%) patients (95% C.I. 17.2-23.2). The rate of appropriateness was not related to the type of antibiotic regimen and the type of bacteria. Patients with healthcare-associated infections were more likely to be administrated inappropriate antibiotic therapy. Patients with primary bloodstream infections were also more likely to be administrated inappropriate antibiotic therapy. Empiric combination therapy was more likely to be appropriate than monotherapy, except for an aminoglycosides-based combination. Combination empiric antibiotic therapy should be considered in patients with healthcare-associated infections and in those with primary bloodstream infections.

  1. Nerve Growth Factor: A Focus on Neuroscience and Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aloe, Luigi; Rocco, Maria Luisa; Omar Balzamino, Bijorn; Micera, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) is the firstly discovered and best characterized neurotrophic factor, known to play a critical protective role in the development and survival of sympathetic, sensory and forebrain cholinergic neurons. NGF promotes neuritis outgrowth both in vivo and in vitro and nerve cell recovery after ischemic, surgical or chemical injuries. Recently, the therapeutic property of NGF has been demonstrated on human cutaneous and corneal ulcers, pressure ulcer, glaucoma, maculopathy and retinitis pigmentosa. NGF eye drops administration is well tolerated, with no detectable clinical evidence of systemic or local adverse effects. The aim of this review is to summarize these biological properties and the potential clinical development of NGF. PMID:26411962

  2. Analysis of the factors motivating HCV-infected patients to accept interferon therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagao Yumiko

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aims of this study were to analyze factors motivating the acceptance of interferon (IFN therapy and to clarify the prevalence of oral mucosal diseases in hepatitis C virus (HCV-infected Japanese patients treated with IFN. Findings A total of 94 HCV-infected patients who were admitted to our hospital for IFN therapy were asked questions regarding their motivation to accept IFN therapy and were investigated for the presence of oral lichen planus (OLP before and during IFN treatment. Recommendation and encouragement from other people were the most common factors motivating the acceptance of IFN therapy (49/94, 52.13%. The other motivators were independent decision (30.85%, economic reasons (5.32%, and others. According to multivariate analysis, three factors – sex (male, retreatment after previous IFN therapy, and independent decision to accept IFN therapy - were associated with patients after curative treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. The adjusted odds ratios for these three factors were 26.06, 14.17, and 8.72, respectively. The most common oral mucosal lesions included OLP in 11 cases (11.70%. One patient with OLP had postoperative squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue. The rate of sustained virological response (SVR was 45.45% in cases with OLP and 54.55% in cases without OLP. There were no patients who discontinued IFN therapy because of side effects such as oral mucosal diseases. Conclusions We should give full explanation and recommend a course of treatment for a patient to accept IFN therapy. The system to support liver disease as well as oral diseases is also necessary for patient treated for IFN therapy.

  3. Therapeutic Factors Experienced by Members of an Out-Patient Therapy Group for Older Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeod, John

    1993-01-01

    The Yalom curative factors Q-sort was administered to eight members of an outpatient therapy group for older women, who were also interviewed on the group experiences they had viewed as helpful. Results indicated that Existential Awareness was seen as the most helpful mechanism, in contrast to other studies in which interpersonal factors have been…

  4. Factor VIII deficiency does not protect against atherosclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biere-Rafi, S.; Tuinenburg, A.; Haak, B.W.; Peters, M.; Huijgen, R.; de Groot, E.; Verhamme, P.; Peerlinck, K.; Visseren, F.L.J.; Kruip, M.J.H.A.; Laros-van Gorkom, B.A.P.; Gerdes, V.E.A.; Buller, H.R.; Schutgens, R.E.G.; Kamphuisen, P.W.

    2012-01-01

    Summary. Background: Hemophilia A patients have a lower cardiovascular mortality rate than the general population. Whether this protection is caused by hypocoagulability or decreased atherogenesis is unclear. Objectives: To evaluate atherosclerosis and endothelial function in hemophilia A patients w

  5. Secondary failure of plasma therapy in factor H deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathanson, Sylvie; Ulinski, Tim; Frémeaux-Bacchi, Véronique; Deschênes, Georges

    2006-11-01

    We report a patient with homozygous factor H deficiency leading to permanent alternate complement activation and early onset of the hemolytic uremic syndrome. He was successfully treated with weekly infusions of fresh frozen plasma over 4 years, displaying normal blood pressure while only treated with an angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor, a steady level of haptoglobin, low-range proteinuria and normal creatinine clearance. By the end of the fourth year of treatment, he dramatically developed a relapse of hemolytic and uremic syndrome, displaying undetectable haptoglobin, nephrotic range proteinuria and progressive renal failure. Despite a ten-fold increase in the dosage of plasma infusion through daily plasma exchange, haptoglobin remained undetectable while circulating antigenic factor H levels reached 22-24% (normal values 65-140%). Three months following the biological onset of the relapse, a bilateral nephrectomy was performed owing to uncontrolled hypertension and rapidly progressive renal failure. The molecular mechanism of plasma resistance remained unclear while antifactor H antibodies were not detected in the plasma. We suggest that protracted administration of exogenous factor H might not be a long-term strategy in homozygous factor H deficiency.

  6. Exposure to occupational therapy as a factor influencing recruitment to the profession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Nicole

    2015-08-01

    This article provides insight into the impact that exposure to an occupational therapist, in personal capacity or via a professional interaction, has on the decision to enter an occupational therapy undergraduate programme. A quantitative survey was completed by 139 occupational therapy students. The survey tool focussed on the students' exposure to a range of allied health professions (e.g. occupational therapy, physiotherapy, psychology) and investigated how exposure to occupational therapy had influenced their decision to enter the programme. The results indicated that over 70% of respondents had personal professional exposure to occupational therapy prior to making a career decision. Exposure most frequently involved occupational therapy intervention of a friend or family member. The majority of students who had professional exposure to occupational therapy (e.g. family, self, friend received occupational therapy) identified that it was the most influential factor in their career choice. Forty per cent of the occupational therapy students did not enter the programme straight from school and the influence of 'working with an occupational therapist' was noteworthy for mature aged students. Occupational therapists need to consider that every interaction they have with the community provides valuable information regarding the profession and gives insight into occupational therapy as a potential career path for other people. Additionally, the current research identifies there were differences in the impact, type and number of exposures for different student groups, and this potentially offers some insight into ways in which occupational therapy could target specific groups within the community to increase future diversity in the profession. © 2015 Occupational Therapy Australia.

  7. Chronic inflammation in FMF: markers, risk factors, outcomes and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Zvi, Ilan; Livneh, Avi

    2011-02-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is the most common of the hereditary periodic fever syndromes. Although the typical clinical course of FMF is characterized by bouts of painful inflammation, this presentation represents only the tip of the iceberg. In many patients inflammation can persist in attack-free periods, as shown by high levels of acute-phase proteins, cytokines and inflammation-induced proteins. This subclinical inflammation puts patients at risk of developing complications such as anemia, splenomegaly, decreased bone mineral density, heart disease and life-threatening amyloid A amyloidosis, among others. In this article, we review the published data on markers and other factors involved in the persistence of inflammation in patients with FMF during attack-free periods, examine the risk factors for the development of this subclinical inflammation, summarize the complications of chronic inflammation in FMF and propose a new strategy for treatment, based on these data.

  8. Endothelial dysfunction: cardiovascular risk factors, therapy, and outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadi AR Hadi

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Hadi AR Hadi, Cornelia S Carr, Jassim Al SuwaidiDepartment of Cardiology and Cardiovascular Surgery, Hamad General Hospital – Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, State of QatarAbstract: Endothelial dysfunction is a well established response to cardiovascular risk factors and precedes the development of atherosclerosis. Endothelial dysfunction is involved in lesion formation by the promotion of both the early and late mechanisms of atherosclerosis including up-regulation of adhesion molecules, increased chemokine secretion and leukocyte adherence, increased cell permeability, enhanced low-density lipoprotein oxidation, platelet activation, cytokine elaboration, and vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation and migration. Endothelial dysfunction is a term that covers diminished production/availability of nitric oxide and/or an imbalance in the relative contribution of endothelium-derived relaxing and contracting factors. Also, when cardiovascular risk factors are treated the endothelial dysfunction is reversed and it is an independent predictor of cardiac events. We review the literature concerning endothelial dysfunction in regard to its pathogenesis, treatment, and outcome.Keywords: endothelial dysfunction, coronary atherosclerosis, coronary artery disease

  9. Hepatocyte growth factor gene therapy reduces ventricular arrhythmia in animal models of myocardial ischemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yumoto,Akihisa

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available

    It was recently reported that gene therapy using hepatocyte growth factor (HGF has the potential to preserve cardiac function after myocardial ischemia. We speculated that this HGF gene therapy could also prevent ventricular arrhythmia. To investigate this possibility, we examined the antiarrhythmic effect of HGF gene therapy in rat acute and old myocardial infarction models. Myocardial ischemia was induced by ligation of the left descending coronary artery. Hemagglutinating virus of Japan (HVJ-coated liposome containing HGF genes were injected directly into the myocardium fourteen days before programmed pacing. Ventricular fibrillation (VFwas induced by programmed pacing. The VF duration was reduced and the VF threshold increased after HGF gene therapy ( p< 0.01. Histological analyses revealed that the number of vessels in the ischemic border zone was greatly increased after HGF gene injection. These findings revealed that HGF gene therapy has an anti-arrhythmic effect after myocardial ischemia.

  10. Implications of photophysical and physicochemical factors on successful application of photodynamic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Shubhajit; Heng, Paul Wan Sia; Chan, Lai Wah

    2017-03-06

    Photodynamic therapy is an evolving treatment modality for cancer owing to its non-invasive approach. This mode of therapy depends on the dynamic interaction of light, oxygen and a photoactive drug to induce oxidative damage to affected cells. This apparently simple technique could be complicated by several factors, mainly contributed by the nature of the physicochemical properties of the photoactive drug, variation in light source and exposure time, as well as tumor physiological environment. This review covers a brief history on the use of various fluorophores in photodynamic therapy, successful marketed formulations and the factors affecting the treatment modalities. The potential of nanostructures as effective delivery carriers with improved photodynamic efficacy is also elaborated. A thorough understanding of the chemistry of photoactive drugs, characteristics of the delivery carriers and light irradiation parameters will enable optimal efficacy of photodynamic therapy. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  11. Risk factors for developing hyponatremia in thyroid cancer patients undergoing radioactive iodine therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Eun Lee

    Full Text Available Due to the alarming increase in the incidence of thyroid cancer worldwide, more patients are receiving postoperative radioactive iodine (RAI therapy and these patients are given a low-iodine diet along with levothyroxine withdrawal to induce a hypothyroid state to maximize the uptake of RAI by thyroid tissues. Recently, the reported cases of patients suffering from life-threatening severe hyponatremia following postoperative RAI therapy have increased. This study aimed to systematically assess risk factors for developing hyponatremia following RAI therapy in post-thyroidectomy patients.We reviewed the medical records of all thyroid cancer patients who underwent thyroidectomy and postoperative RAI therapy from July 2009 to February 2012. Demographic and biochemical parameters including serum sodium and thyroid function tests were assessed along with medication history.A total of 2229 patients (47.0±11.0 years, female 76.3% were enrolled in the analysis. Three hundred seven patients (13.8% of all patients developed hyponatremia; 44 patients (2.0% developed moderate to severe hyponatremia (serum Na+≤130 mEq/L and another 263 (11.8% patients showed mild hyponatremia (130 mEq/Ltherapy were significantly associated with hyponatremia in patients undergoing RAI therapy after total thyroidectomy. Multivariate analysis showed that old age, female sex, use of thiazide diuretics, and hyponatremia at the initiation of RAI therapy were independent risk factors for the development of hyponatremia.Our data suggest that age greater than 60 years, female sex, use of thiazide, and hyponatremia at the initiation of RAI therapy are important

  12. The FIRO model of family therapy: implications of factor analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafner, R J; Ross, M W

    1989-11-01

    Schutz's FIRO model contains three main elements: inclusion, control, and affection. It is used widely in mental health research and practice, but has received little empirical validation. The present study is based on factor analysis of the resources to FIRO questionnaire of 120 normal couples and 191 couples who were attending a clinic for marital/psychiatric problems. Results confirmed the validity of the FIRO model for women only. The differences between the sexes reflected a considerable degree of sex-role stereotyping, the clinical implications of which are discussed.

  13. Occupational Therapy After Myocardial or Cerebrovascular Infarction: Which Factors Influence Referrals?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Drosselmeyer

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cardiovascular diseases remain the number one cause of death worldwide, and many survivors suffer lasting disabilities. Occupational therapy can help such patients regain as much function as possible. However, little is known about the factors influencing referrals to occupational therapy after stroke or myocardial infarction (MI. Method: Data from the IMS Disease Analyzer® database were observed for a three-year period. The study population included 7,440 patients who were examined by a cardiologist due to stroke or MI. In addition to baseline characteristics, the presence of certain cardiovascular risk factors or comorbidities was recorded. Cox regression analyses were performed and the Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI was utilized. Results: Occupational therapy was received by 1,779 patients; 88.5% had suffered an MI and 11.5% a stroke. In the group without referral (n = 5,661, 60.7% had experienced an MI and 39.3% a stroke. No significant gender-related differences were observed. Younger age, an MI diagnosis, and the presence of hypertension positively influenced referral rate and time, while risk factors, such as adiposity, delayed therapy. The CCI was higher in the group with occupational therapy. Conclusion: The chance of being offered occupational therapy increased with younger age, history of MI, and the presence of hypertension. Future studies should also consider severity of ischemic lesion to account for the degree of remaining impairment.

  14. Influential Factors and Synergies for Radiation-Gene Therapy on Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei Lin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiation-gene therapy, a dual anticancer strategy of radiation therapy and gene therapy through connecting radiation-inducible regulatory sequence to therapeutic gene, leading to the gene being induced to express by radiation while radiotherapy is performed and finally resulting in a double synergistic antitumor effect of radiation and gene, has become one of hotspots in the field of cancer treatment in recent years. But under routine dose of radiation, especially in the hypoxia environment of solid tumor, it is difficult for this therapy to achieve desired effect because of low activity of radiation-inducible regulatory elements, low level and transient expression of target gene induced by radiation, inferior target specificity and poor biosecurity, and so on. Based on the problems existing in radiation-gene therapy, many efforts have been devoted to the curative effect improvement of radiation-gene therapy by various means to increase radiation sensitivity or enhance target gene expression and the expression’s controllability. Among these synergistic techniques, gene circuit, hypoxic sensitization, and optimization of radiation-induced sequence exhibit a good application potential. This review provides the main influential factors to radiation-gene therapy on cancer and the synergistic techniques to improve the anticancer effect of radiation-gene therapy.

  15. Predictive factors for interferon and ribavirin combination therapy in patients with chronic hepatitis C

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To confirm the predictive factors for interferon (IFN)-α and ribavirin combination therapy for chronic hepatitis patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 1b.METHODS: HCV RNA from 50 patients infected with HCV genotype 1b was studied by cloning and sequencing of interferon sensitivity determining region (ISDR), PKR-eIF2α phosphorylation homology domain (PePHD).Patients were treated with IFN-α and ribavirin for 6 mo and grouped by effectiveness of the therapy. A variety of factors were analyzed.RESULTS: Our data showed that age, HCV RNA titer,and ISDR type could be used as the predictive factors for combined IFN-α and ribavirin efficacy. Characteristically,mutations in PePHD appeared only when the combination therapy was effective. Other factors, such as sex and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) level, were not related to its efficacy. Adjusting for age and HCV RNA titer indicated that the ISDR type was the most potent predictive factor.CONCLUSION: HCV RNA ISDR type is an important factor for predicting efficacy of IFN-α and ribavirin combination therapy in Korean patients.

  16. Psychosocial factors in adjuvant hormone therapy for breast cancer: an emerging context for adherence research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Liew, Julia R; Christensen, Alan J; de Moor, Janet S

    2014-09-01

    For patients with hormone receptor positive breast cancer, survivorship entails prolonged self-management of adjuvant treatment in the form of daily hormone therapy. Although sustained daily adherence across the 5-year course of therapy is associated with improved recurrence-free survival outcomes, adherence is suboptimal and many women discontinue hormone therapy prematurely. Factors associated with breast cancer survivors' nonadherence and nonpersistence are not comprehensively understood. Furthermore, psychosocial variables have only received limited research attention, despite their documented relationships with adherence in other chronic illness populations. A systematic literature review identified 14 studies that analyzed relationships between psychosocial factors and breast cancer survivors' adherence and/or persistence with adjuvant hormone therapy. Although identified relationships were complex and at times inconsistent, salient conclusions emerged. Interpersonal factors, in the form of positive social support and patient-centered interactions with medical providers, as well as intrapersonal factors, such as anxiety and beliefs about the relative benefits of medication use, were reliably associated with better adherence and persistence. Depression did not demonstrate the negative impact on adherence that has been observed in other medical populations. No relationships between quality of life and adherence were identified. Adjuvant hormone therapy appears to be a unique context for medication adherence, which warrants further attention and more rigorous analysis in future research. Individual patients' psychosocial characteristics and health care preferences should be considered when striving to optimize medication adherence.

  17. Innovative physical therapy practice: a qualitative verification of factors that support diffusion of innovation in outpatient physical therapy practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabus C

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Carla Sabus,1 Ellen Spake2 1Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS, 2Rockhurst University, Kansas City, MO, USA Background and purpose: New ideas, methods, and technologies spread through cultures through typical patterns described by diffusion of innovation (DOI theory. Professional cultures, including the physical therapy profession, have distinctive features and traditions that determine the adoption of practice innovation. The Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research (CFIR proposes a framework of innovation implementation specific to health care services. While the CFIR has been applied to medical and nursing practice, it has not been extended to rehabilitation professions. The purpose of this qualitative study was to verify the CFIR factors in outpatient physical therapy practice.Design: Through a nomination process of area rehabilitation managers and area directors of clinical education, 2 exemplar, outpatient, privately owned physical therapy clinics were identified as innovation practices. A total of 18 physical therapists (PTs, including 3 owners and a manager, participated in the study.Methods: The 2 clinics served as case studies within a qualitative approach of directed content analysis. Data were collected through observation, spontaneous, unstructured questioning, ­workflow analysis, structured focus group sessions, and artifact analysis including clinical documents. Focus group data were transcribed. All the data were analyzed and coded among 4 investigators.Results: Through data analysis and alignment with literature in DOI theory in health care practice, the factors that determine innovation adoption were verified. The phenomena of implementation in PT practice are largely consistent with models of implementation in health care service. Within the outpatient practices studied, patient-centered care and collaborative learning were foundational

  18. Factors influencing the degree and pattern of parental involvement in play therapy for sexually abused children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Although much has been written about the role of therapists in children's recovery from child sexual abuse, relatively little attention has been paid to the role of nonoffending parents. This study investigated the work of a team of therapists who sometimes included such parents in therapy sessions with children. The study sought to understand what factors were influencing the degree and pattern of parental involvement and to understand what effect these patterns of parental involvement were having on the process and outcomes of therapy. The study successfully identified a range of factors influencing the patterns of parental involvement, but more research will be needed to understand the effect on outcomes.

  19. Compliance with antimicrobial therapy: Evaluating the related factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandana Moradi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Uncontrolled and irrational use of antibiotics increases the rate of antimicrobial resistance and treatment failure. Compliance with antibiotics is an important indicator to show how patients use their prescribed drugs and it can explain the relationship between drug administration and treatment outcome that needs to be monitored and promoted. We decided to evaluate compliance to antimicrobial drugs in this study.Methods: In a cross-sectional study, 100 patients referring to 4 different specialists’ offices were enrolled. The rate and type of non prescribed antibiotic administration were evaluated using predesigned questionnaires. The data were analyzed by SPSS 17.0 software using descriptive statistics and chi-square test for categorical data.Results: Our results showed that 62.4% of the study population had poor compliance and 37.6 % had good compliance with their prescribed regimen. “Feeling better “and “getting worse” on prescribed regimen were major reasons for drug discontinuation. About 70% of our study population get non prescribed antibiotic from pharmacies at least once a year. Most of the requested antibiotics were not first line options. Level of education was the only factor significantly related to the rate of patient compliance. Conclusion: This study shows the high rate of non prescribed antibiotic administration and low rate of compliance among the study population that emerge the need for particular patient education and putting restrictive rules to bound  non-prescribed and unsupervised  antibiotic marketing.

  20. Obesity and endocrine therapy: host factors and breast cancer outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Pamela J

    2013-08-01

    Obesity is becoming increasingly prevalent and it has been linked to poor breast cancer outcomes. Because obesity is associated with increased adipose tissue mass and aromatase activity [the target of aromatase inhibitors (AIs)], there is concern that these agents may be less effective in women who are overweight or obese. Four of the randomized trials of AIs vs. tamoxifen conducted in the adjuvant breast cancer setting (ATAC, BIG 1-98 and TEAM in the postmenopausal setting and ABCSG-12 in the premenopausal setting) have reported effects of body mass index (BMI) on the relative effectiveness of an AI vs. tamoxifen. Obesity was confirmed as an adverse prognostic factor in ATAC and BIG 1-98 but not the TEAM study; in ABSCG-12, obesity was associated with poor outcomes in the anastrozole arm only. In the three postmenopausal trials, the use of an AI vs. tamoxifen was associated with better outcomes at all levels of BMI [all hazard ratios for recurrence breast cancer. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Changing Paradigm of Hemophilia Management: Extended Half-Life Factor Concentrates and Gene Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Riten; Dunn, Amy; Carcao, Manuel

    2016-02-01

    Management of hemophilia has evolved significantly in the last century-from recognition of the causative mechanism in the 1950s to commercially available clotting factor concentrates in the 1960s. Availability of lyophilized concentrates in the 1970s set the stage for home-based therapy, followed by introduction of virally attenuated plasma-derived, and then recombinant factor concentrates in the 1980s and 1990s, respectively. The subsequent years saw a paradigm shift in treatment goals from on-demand therapy to prophylactic factor replacement starting at an early age, to prevent hemarthrosis becoming the standard of care for patients with severe hemophilia. In the developed world, the increasing use of home-based prophylactic regimens has significantly improved the quality of life, and life expectancy of patients with severe hemophilia. Seminal developments in the past 5 years, including the commercial availability of extended half-life factor concentrates and the publication of successful results of gene therapy for patients with hemophilia B, promise to further revolutionize hemophilia care over the next few decades. In this review, we summarize the evolution of management for hemophilia, with a focus on extended half-life factor concentrates and gene therapy. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  2. New study on the XeVIII spectrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallardo, M. [Centro de Investigaciones Opticas (CIOp) Casilla de Correo 124, 1900 La Plata (Argentina)]. E-mail: gallardom@ciop.unlp.edu.ar; Raineri, M. [Centro de Investigaciones Opticas (CIOp) Casilla de Correo 124, 1900 La Plata (Argentina)]. E-mail: monicar@ciop.unlp.edu.ar; Giuliani, M. [Dto. de Fisica, Fac. de C. Exactas y Naturales, Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata Funes 3350 (7600) Mar del Plata (Argentina); Lagorio, C. [Dto. de Fisica, Fac. de C. Exactas y Naturales, Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata Funes 3350 (7600) Mar del Plata (Argentina); Padilla, S. [Dto. de Fisica, Fac. de C. Exactas y Naturales, Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata Funes 3350 (7600) Mar del Plata (Argentina); Sarmiento, R. [Dto. De Fisica, Universidad del Atlantico, A.A 1890 Barranquilla (Colombia); Reyna Almandos, J.G. [Centro de Investigaciones Opticas (CIOp) Casilla de Correo 124, 1900 La Plata (Argentina)]. E-mail: jreyna@ciop.unlp.edu.ar

    2005-10-15

    Capillary light sources were used to observe the spectrum of seven-times-ionized xenon, XeVIII, in the 300-6000 A wavelength range. Twenty-eight energy levels belonging to the 5s-9s, 5d-9d, 5g-9g, 7i-10i, 9l, 5p-9p, 4f-9f, 6h-9h and 8k-10k configurations were adjusted and 38 new spectral lines were classified. The XeVIII ionization energy was determined with improved accuracy using the polarization model. The analysis was supported by Hartree-Fock calculations. The weighted oscillator strengths for all the observed spectral lines were also calculated considering the fitted values for the energy parameters.

  3. [Helpful Factors of Ambulant Art Therapy in the Group and Changes of Experiences in Psychosomatic Patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oster, Jörg; Moser, Anna Sophie; Danner-Weinberger, Alexandra; von Wietersheim, Jörn

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the experiences of patients suffering from mostly chronic psychosomatic disorders in an ambulant art therapy in the group. Especially, the focus was on the experienced changes, helpful factors and specifics of the therapy as well as on the experienced benefit. For this, 30 patients were interviewed in a semi-standardized way. Additionally, the symptom-based strain was psychometrically recorded in a part of the patients (21) at the beginning of the therapy and after at least 6 months of participation. The evaluation of those interviews with the qualitative analysis of the therapy subjects surrendered an improvement of the health state in most of the participants. Especially group factors, art as a mean of communication, becoming aware of feelings but also diversion and fun were proved to be beneficial. The art therapy also serves for structuring the week as well as a contact point and a resource in the interpersonal communication of everyday life. Nearly all of the patients referred to some important turning point pictures. Mostly, the benefit was valued as being high. But, in contrast, the psychometric measure did not show any significant change. The results emphasize the stabilizing function of art therapy in the examined patients, whereat the classification of the psychometric result is complicated by the absence of a control group. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  4. Zwitterionic Group VIII transition metal initiators supported by olefin ligands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazan, Guillermo C.; Chen, Yaofeng

    2011-10-25

    A zwitterionic Group VIII transition metal complex containing the simple and relatively small 3-(arylimino)-but-1-en-2-olato ligand that catalyzes the formation of polypropylene and high molecular weight polyethylene. A novel feature of this catalyst is that the active species is stabilized by a chelated olefin adduct. The present invention also provides methods of polymerizing olefin monomers using zwitterionic catalysts, particularly polypropylene and high molecular weight polyethylene.

  5. Identifying items to assess methodological quality in physical therapy trials: a factor analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armijo-Olivo, Susan; Cummings, Greta G; Fuentes, Jorge; Saltaji, Humam; Ha, Christine; Chisholm, Annabritt; Pasichnyk, Dion; Rogers, Todd

    2014-09-01

    Numerous tools and individual items have been proposed to assess the methodological quality of randomized controlled trials (RCTs). The frequency of use of these items varies according to health area, which suggests a lack of agreement regarding their relevance to trial quality or risk of bias. The objectives of this study were: (1) to identify the underlying component structure of items and (2) to determine relevant items to evaluate the quality and risk of bias of trials in physical therapy by using an exploratory factor analysis (EFA). A methodological research design was used, and an EFA was performed. Randomized controlled trials used for this study were randomly selected from searches of the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. Two reviewers used 45 items gathered from 7 different quality tools to assess the methodological quality of the RCTs. An exploratory factor analysis was conducted using the principal axis factoring (PAF) method followed by varimax rotation. Principal axis factoring identified 34 items loaded on 9 common factors: (1) selection bias; (2) performance and detection bias; (3) eligibility, intervention details, and description of outcome measures; (4) psychometric properties of the main outcome; (5) contamination and adherence to treatment; (6) attrition bias; (7) data analysis; (8) sample size; and (9) control and placebo adequacy. Because of the exploratory nature of the results, a confirmatory factor analysis is needed to validate this model. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first factor analysis to explore the underlying component items used to evaluate the methodological quality or risk of bias of RCTs in physical therapy. The items and factors represent a starting point for evaluating the methodological quality and risk of bias in physical therapy trials. Empirical evidence of the association among these items with treatment effects and a confirmatory factor analysis of these results are needed to validate these items.

  6. Treatment of pancreatic cancer with epidermal growth factor receptor-targeted therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan A Faller

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Bryan A Faller, Barbara BurtnessDepartment of Medical Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA, USAAbstract: Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is a common malignancy that remains refractory to available therapies. Gemcitabine has long been the standard, first-line agent in advanced disease. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR is a commonly expressed target in pancreatic cancer that is involved in tumor proliferation, metastasis, and induction of angiogenesis. The addition of the EGFR inhibitor erlotinib to gemcitabine has recently been demonstrated to provide a small, yet statistically significant, survival benefit in advanced disease. This has prompted further research into the applications of EGFR-targeted therapy in pancreatic cancer, albeit with disappointing results. Resistance to these therapies seems highly prevalent and has been implicated in their limited efficacy. The development of rash is associated with treatment efficacy and suggests that predictive factors may one day be identified to guide appropriate patient selection for these agents. Preclinical research has shown promise that resistance to EGFR-targeted therapies can be overcome through a variety of approaches. Application of this research in clinical trials may ultimately yield an unquestioned role for EGFR-targeted therapy in the management of this disease.Keywords: cetuximab, drug resistance, epidermal growth factor receptor, erlotinib, gemcitabine, pancreatic cancer

  7. Prevalence, Response to Cysticidal Therapy, and Risk Factors for Persistent Seizure in Indian Children with Neurocysticercosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Animesh; Mandal, Anirban; Sinha, Sheela; Singh, Amitabh

    2017-01-01

    Background. Neurocysticercosis (NCC) is the commonest cause of childhood acquired epilepsy in developing countries. The use of cysticidal therapy in NCC, except “single lesion NCC,” is still debated in view of its doubtful usefulness and potential adverse effects. Methods. Children presenting with first episode of seizure or acute focal neurological deficit without fever were screened for NCC and received appropriate therapy (followup done for 1 year to look for the response and side effects). Results. The prevalence of NCC was 4.5%. Most common presenting feature was generalized seizure and commonest imaging finding was single small enhancing lesion in the parietal lobe. Abnormal EEG and CSF abnormalities were found in almost half of the children. The response to therapy was very good with infrequent recurrence of seizure and adverse effects of therapy were encountered rarely. No risk factors for persistent seizure could be identified. Conclusion. Present study shows that the response to cysticidal therapy is very good in NCC as seizure recurrence was observed in only 5%, 4.2%, and 4.2% of cases at 3-month, 6-month, and 1-year followup. Adverse effects of therapy were observed in 20% of cases during therapy but they were mild and self-limiting. PMID:28167968

  8. Prevalence, Response to Cysticidal Therapy, and Risk Factors for Persistent Seizure in Indian Children with Neurocysticercosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Animesh Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Neurocysticercosis (NCC is the commonest cause of childhood acquired epilepsy in developing countries. The use of cysticidal therapy in NCC, except “single lesion NCC,” is still debated in view of its doubtful usefulness and potential adverse effects. Methods. Children presenting with first episode of seizure or acute focal neurological deficit without fever were screened for NCC and received appropriate therapy (followup done for 1 year to look for the response and side effects. Results. The prevalence of NCC was 4.5%. Most common presenting feature was generalized seizure and commonest imaging finding was single small enhancing lesion in the parietal lobe. Abnormal EEG and CSF abnormalities were found in almost half of the children. The response to therapy was very good with infrequent recurrence of seizure and adverse effects of therapy were encountered rarely. No risk factors for persistent seizure could be identified. Conclusion. Present study shows that the response to cysticidal therapy is very good in NCC as seizure recurrence was observed in only 5%, 4.2%, and 4.2% of cases at 3-month, 6-month, and 1-year followup. Adverse effects of therapy were observed in 20% of cases during therapy but they were mild and self-limiting.

  9. The Future of Hemophilia Treatment: Longer-Acting Factor Concentrates versus Gene Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giangrande, Paul

    2016-07-01

    Gene therapy is the only novel technology that currently offers the prospect of a lasting cure for hemophilia and freedom from the burden of repeated injections. Recent data from a handful of patients who have undergone gene therapy for hemophilia B are very encouraging with a sustained factor IX (FIX) level of 0.05 IU/mL maintained for over 4 years. While this level is above the current usual target trough levels, it falls well short of the level that patients on prophylaxis with longer-acting products can expect. Prophylaxis is also associated with high peak levels, which permits patients to maintain an active lifestyle. A major barrier to widespread adoption of gene therapy is a high seroprevalence of antibodies to adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors in the general population. Young children would be the best candidates for gene therapy in view of much lower seroprevalence to AAV in infants. A stable level of FIX early in life would prevent the onset of joint bleeds and the development of arthropathy. The recent experience with apolipoprotein tiparvovec (Glybera; uniQure, Amsterdam, the Netherlands) indicates that gene therapy is unlikely to prove to be a cheap therapeutic option. It is also quite possible that other new technologies that do not require viral vectors (such as stem cell therapy) may overtake gene therapy during development and make it redundant. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  10. Type I pityriasis rubra pilaris: upregulation of tumor necrosis factor alpha and response to adalimumab therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yao-Hua; Zhou, Youwen; Ball, Nigel; Su, Ming-Wan; Xu, Jin-Hua; Zheng, Zhi-Zhong

    2010-01-01

    pityriasis rubra pilaris (PRP) has unknown etiology and is often refractory to conventional therapies. to document a PRP patient's response to adalimumab therapy and to highlight the potential role of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) in the development of PRP skin lesions. a patient received adalimumab therapy at standard dosing intervals. In addition, the messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) of TNF in the lesional and perilesional normal skin was quantified in two patients with PRP. the patient responded to adalimumab therapy and achieved clinical remission by 4 months. There was a significant elevation of TNF mRNA in the lesional skin of PRP. TNF upregulation is detected in PRP lesional skin, consistent with the observed clinical efficacy of TNF blockade for the treatment of PRP.

  11. Medical factors influencing decision making regarding radiation therapy for breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilaveri CA

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Christina A Dilaveri,1 Nicole P Sandhu,1 Lonzetta Neal,1 Michelle A Neben-Wittich,1,2 Tina J Hieken,3 Maire Brid Mac Bride,1 Dietlind L Wahner-Roedler,1 Karthik Ghosh1 1Division of General Internal Medicine, 2Department of Radiation Oncology, 3Division of Subspecialty General Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA Abstract: Radiation therapy is an important and effective adjuvant therapy for breast cancer. Numerous health conditions may affect medical decisions regarding tolerance of breast radiation therapy. These factors must be considered during the decision-making process after breast-conserving surgery or mastectomy for breast cancer. Here, we review currently available evidence focusing on medical conditions that may affect the patient–provider decision-making process regarding the use of radiation therapy. Keywords: cardiac devices, connective tissue disease, prior radiation

  12. Erectile Dysfunction Among HIV Patients Undergoing Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy: Dyslipidemia as a Main Risk Factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Romero‐Velez, MD

    2014-04-01

    Conclusions: ED is highly prevalent in HIV patients. Dyslipidemia should be considered as a risk factor for ED in HIV patients. Romero‐Velez G, Lisker‐Cervantes A, Villeda‐Sandoval CI, Sotomayor de Zavaleta M, Olvera‐Posada D, Sierra‐Madero JG, Arreguin‐Camacho LO, and Castillejos‐Molina RA. Erectile dysfunction among HIV patients undergoing highly active antiretroviral therapy: Dyslipidemia as a main risk factor. Sex Med 2014;2:24–30.

  13. Factors that affect cancer patient compliance to oral anti-neoplastic therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Marques,Patrícia Andréa Crippa; Pierin, Angela Maria Geraldo

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To identify factors that can affect compliance to treatment with neoplastic oral drugs in a group of cancer patients. METHODS: Interviews were performed on 61 patients diagnosed with cancer and under anti-neoplastic oral therapy in a private hospital. The interviews were carried out using instruments to assess compliance. RESULTS: Most patients (95%) reported the oral treatment was not difficult. The Morisky and Green Test were positive in 28% of the patients. Factors that may aff...

  14. Hormone therapy affects plasma measures of factor VII-activating protease in younger postmenopausal women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiasen, Jørn Sidelmann; Skouby, S.O.; Vitzthum, F.;

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Current reviews indicate that hormone therapy (HT) has a protective role in coronary heart disease (CHD) in younger postmenopausal women, whereas HT contributes to CHD in older women Factor VII-activating protease (FSAP) is a serine protease that accumulates in unstable atherosclerotic...

  15. Influence of age on the outcome of antitumour necrosis factor alpha therapy in rheumatoid arthritis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Radovits, B.J.; Kievit, W.; Fransen, J.; Laar, M.A. van de; Jansen, T.L.Th.A.; Riel, P.L.C.M. van; Laan, R.F.J.M.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the influence of age on the effectiveness and tolerance of antitumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) therapy in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). METHODS: 730 patients of the Dutch Rheumatoid Arthritis Monitoring (DREAM) register were categorised into three groups according to t

  16. Characteristics and risk factors of thyroid dysfunction following interferon therapy in patients with chronic viral hepatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    桂红莲

    2013-01-01

    Objective To find out the clinical characteristics of thyroid dysfunction during interferon(IFN) therapy in patients with chronic viral hepatitis,and to analyze its risk factors based on biochemical and virological results of these patients.Methods Between January 2007 and March 2010,385 patients

  17. Retained placenta in Friesian mares : incidence, risk factors, therapy, and consequences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sevinga, M; Hesselink, JW; Barkema, H.W.

    2001-01-01

    This study concerns incidence, risk factors, therapy and consequences of retained placenta after normal foalings in Friesian mares. Retained placenta was defined as failure to expel all fetal membranes within 3 hours after the delivery of the foal. Incidence of retained placenta was studied in 495 p

  18. An Exploratory Factor Analysis of the URICA among Couple Therapy Participants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tambling, Rachel B.; Johnson, Lee N.

    2012-01-01

    Assessing and measuring client motivation to change has been of great interest to therapists and researchers in a variety of fields. This article presents the results of an exploratory factor analysis of the University of Rhode Island Change Assessment (URICA), a measure of motivation to change, in a sample of individuals in couple therapy. Four…

  19. Prognostic factors for successful insulin therapy in subjects with type 2 diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolffenbuttel, B H; Sels, J P; Rondas-Colbers, G J; Menheere, P P

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess which factors influence or predict the efficacy of insulin therapy in subjects with type 2 diabetes, who were poorly controlled despite maximal doses of oral glucose lowering agents. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Seventy-five patients with type 2 diabetes participated (mean age (

  20. [Factors related to the length of solution-focused brief therapy working with adolescents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gostautas, Antanas; Pakrosnis, Rytis; Cepukiene, Viktorija; Pilkauskiene, Ina; Fleming, James Slate

    2007-01-01

    The objective of the study was to identify factors related to the number of solution-focused brief therapy sessions required to solve adolescents' problems. The study was conducted at the foster care and health care institutions. The sample consisted of 73 adolescents (41% of males, 59% of females), aged 12 to 18 years, who achieved high level of therapeutic progress during solution-focused brief therapy. Respondents from foster care institutions made up 47% and from health care institutions--53%. The study design included: (1) an initial evaluation, where adolescents' psychosocial adjustment and personality traits were evaluated as well as information on demographic characteristics and type of referral for therapy was collected; (2) solution-focused brief therapy was carried out. In the first session, information on the type and severity of the problem presented for the therapy and motivation to solve the problem was collected; (3) the effectiveness of solution-focused brief therapy was evaluated. Standardized interview for the evaluation of psychosocial adjustment of adolescents was used to evaluate the difficulties of adolescents' psychosocial functioning. Eysenck Personality Questionnaire was administered to evaluate adolescents' personality traits. Therapist's evaluation of improvement was used to evaluate the effectiveness of solution-focused brief therapy. The analysis of results showed that 60.3% of adolescents needed two to three solution-focused brief therapy sessions to solve their problems. Lower number of sessions needed to achieve a solution was related to lower level of psychoticism, lower level of subjectively evaluated problem severity, and living with parents (as the opposite of living in foster care institutions). Ordinal regression analysis revealed that living with parents, self-referral to the therapy, lower level of subjectively evaluated problem severity, and higher self-confidence were significant predictors of lower number of sessions

  1. Successful Renal Replacement Therapy for a Patient with Severe Hemophilia after Surgical Treatment of Intracranial Hemorrhage and Hydrocephalus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noriko Kato

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A 21-year-old Japanese male with severe hemophilia A was developed end-stage renal failure. He was placed on combination therapy with peritoneal dialysis (PD and hemodialysis (HD. Eight months later, he developed a hypertensive cerebral hemorrhage. After emergency surgery, he was managed with PD without HD to avoid cerebral edema. One month later, his renal replacement therapy was switched to HD (three times a week from PD, since a ventriculoperitoneal shunt catheter was placed to treat his hydrocephalus. HD could be performed safety without anticoagulant agents on condition that factor VIII is given after every HD.

  2. Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Type VIII: A Rare Cause of Leg Ulcers in Young Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Antoine; Piérard, Gérald E.; Hermanns-Lê, Trinh; De Paepe, Anne; Dupuy, Alain

    2013-01-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type VIII (EDS-VIII) is a very rare autosomal dominant disease characterized by early-onset periodontitis associated with features of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. We report a 32-year-old man whose chronic leg ulcer led to the diagnosis of EDS-VIII. He had severe periodontitis with complete loss of permanent teeth and skin fragility with thin skin, atrophic scars, and brownish atrophic pretibial plaques. Leg ulcer is not a prominent feature of EDS-VIII. We suggest adding EDS-VIII to the list of rare diseases accounting for chronic leg ulcers, if this case report prompts others to report leg ulcers associated with EDS-VIII. PMID:24198978

  3. Antiepidermal Growth Factor Receptor Therapy in Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walid Shaib

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck (SCCHN is the most common neoplasm of the upper aerodigestive tract. In this paper, we attempt to summarize the role and applications of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR inhibitors monoclonal antibodies (moAbs and tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs locally advanced as well as metastatic SCCHN. Targeted therapy in SCCHN is now incorporated in the first-line regimes for advanced disease. Novel targeted agents, including the EGFR antibody, cetuximab, have been approved for use as single agents or in combination with radiation therapy or chemotherapy in treatment of recurrent metastatic or locally advanced SCCHN. Refractory mechanisms that bypass the pathway of EGFR inhibitors activity are identified explaining resistance to targeted therapy. Strategies of cotargeting EGFR and other pathways are under investigation. Examples of targeted therapy being used include mammalian target of rapamycin (mtor inhibitors, antivascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF moAb, and other inhibitors. We will be focusing our paper on the preclinical and clinical aspects of EGFR inhibition in SCCHN and touch upon other targeted therapies in application.

  4. Factors in Gestational Diabetes Mellitus Predicting the Needs for Insulin Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To identify factors predicting the need for insulin therapy in pregnancies complicated by gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM. Methods. A total of 1352 patients with GDM diagnosed by the 75-g/2-h oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT were enrolled in this study. Univariate and multivariate analysis were performed; receiver operating characteristics (ROC were also drawn. Results. There was a significant difference in factors such as maternal age, pregestational BMI, first visit SBP, first visit DBP, FBG of first visit, FBG at time of OGTT, 75-g OGTT glucose value (fasting, after 1 h and 2 h, and serum HbA1c level at diagnosis between patients with insulin therapy and patients with medical nutrition therapy (MNT alone. Multivariate analysis showed that higher FBG at time of OGTT, first 75 g OGTT 2 h plasma glucose, and HbA1c concentration at diagnosis lead to more likely need of insulin therapy. Conclusion. The probability of insulin therapy can be estimated in pregnant women with GDM based on fasting and 2 h glucose values during OGTT and HbA1c value at diagnosis of GDM.

  5. Factors in Gestational Diabetes Mellitus Predicting the Needs for Insulin Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ya; Shao, Jiashen; Li, Feifei

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To identify factors predicting the need for insulin therapy in pregnancies complicated by gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Methods. A total of 1352 patients with GDM diagnosed by the 75-g/2-h oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) were enrolled in this study. Univariate and multivariate analysis were performed; receiver operating characteristics (ROC) were also drawn. Results. There was a significant difference in factors such as maternal age, pregestational BMI, first visit SBP, first visit DBP, FBG of first visit, FBG at time of OGTT, 75-g OGTT glucose value (fasting, after 1 h and 2 h), and serum HbA1c level at diagnosis between patients with insulin therapy and patients with medical nutrition therapy (MNT) alone. Multivariate analysis showed that higher FBG at time of OGTT, first 75 g OGTT 2 h plasma glucose, and HbA1c concentration at diagnosis lead to more likely need of insulin therapy. Conclusion. The probability of insulin therapy can be estimated in pregnant women with GDM based on fasting and 2 h glucose values during OGTT and HbA1c value at diagnosis of GDM. PMID:27478440

  6. Effect of Intensive Therapy of Multiple Factors Intervention on Vascular Complications in Type 2 Diabetes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴汉妮; 张淑玲; 沈迪

    2003-01-01

    The effects of intensive versus regular therapy on incidence and progress of microalbuminuria in type 2 diabetes were compared. During a follow-up of 3 years, 96 cases of diabetes mellitus were randomized to intensive and regular therapy groups. HbA1c goal was same in the two groups,but the goal of blood pressure (Bp) and lipid was more strict in the intensive therapy group than in the regular therapy group. There was statistically significant difference in the incidence and progression of vascular complications between the two groups. Logistic stepwise-regression analysis (odds ration, OR) showed that there was significant difference in the progression of nephropathy (OR 0. 24,95 % CI 0. 12-0. 76), retinopathy (OR 0.38, 95 % CI 0.16-0. 88), peripheral neuropathy (OR 0. 42, 95 % CI 0. 22-0. 86) and autonomic neuropathy (OR 0. 29, 95 % CI 0. 12-0. 86) between the two groups (P<0. 01). It was concluded that intensive blood glucose controlling could retard diabetic vascular complications. Intensive therapy of multiple factors interventions (controlling Bp, regulating blood lipid, improving microcirculation) could decrease various risk factors for diabetic vascular complications.

  7. Radiation therapy for Kasabach-Merritt syndrome. Analysis of unfavorable factors in 5 children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawamori, Jiro; Saito, Tsutomu; Tanaka, Yoshiaki [Nihon Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine; Sato, Katsuhiko

    1996-03-01

    During the past 10 years, five infants with Kasabach-Merritt syndrome (K-M) receiving radiation therapy were reported. We investigated whether radiation therapy for K-M was useful and what the unfavorable factors of K-M were. During the past 10 years, we have treated five infants with K-M. The syndrome occurred at ages ranging from birth to 4 months. The incidence of female to male ratio was 3:2. Among 5 cases, the site of hemangioma was as follows; shoulder, anterior chest wall, lower abdominal wall, face and neck and inguinal site. All 5 cases received medication to control the coagulopathy including prednisone and blood transfusion at first. Because the platelet count and the bleeding tendency did not improve in any case, these cases received radiation therapy. Total dose ranged from 5 to 10 Gy and fraction-size ranged from 0.5 to 1.75 Gy. Irradiation session was 2 or 3 times per week. In 5 cases, 4 cases showed cure of bleeding tendency and disappearance of tumor, and survived. In these 4 cases, normalization of platelet count was obtained at the early phase of dose ranging from 3 to 5 Gy by radiation therapy. In the remaining case, bleeding tendency was improved at the late phase by initial radiation therapy, however, after that immediately relapsed. In this case, the salvage radiation therapy was not effective and she died from airway obstruction. This case was of neonatal age and had bulky neck tumor. We recognized that radiation therapy was effective for K-M. A serious case was of neonatal age and had bulky neck tumor. It was estimated that the unfavorable factors of K-M were neonatal case and bulky neck tumor case. (author).

  8. Identifying Items to Assess Methodological Quality in Physical Therapy Trials: A Factor Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, Greta G.; Fuentes, Jorge; Saltaji, Humam; Ha, Christine; Chisholm, Annabritt; Pasichnyk, Dion; Rogers, Todd

    2014-01-01

    Background Numerous tools and individual items have been proposed to assess the methodological quality of randomized controlled trials (RCTs). The frequency of use of these items varies according to health area, which suggests a lack of agreement regarding their relevance to trial quality or risk of bias. Objective The objectives of this study were: (1) to identify the underlying component structure of items and (2) to determine relevant items to evaluate the quality and risk of bias of trials in physical therapy by using an exploratory factor analysis (EFA). Design A methodological research design was used, and an EFA was performed. Methods Randomized controlled trials used for this study were randomly selected from searches of the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. Two reviewers used 45 items gathered from 7 different quality tools to assess the methodological quality of the RCTs. An exploratory factor analysis was conducted using the principal axis factoring (PAF) method followed by varimax rotation. Results Principal axis factoring identified 34 items loaded on 9 common factors: (1) selection bias; (2) performance and detection bias; (3) eligibility, intervention details, and description of outcome measures; (4) psychometric properties of the main outcome; (5) contamination and adherence to treatment; (6) attrition bias; (7) data analysis; (8) sample size; and (9) control and placebo adequacy. Limitation Because of the exploratory nature of the results, a confirmatory factor analysis is needed to validate this model. Conclusions To the authors' knowledge, this is the first factor analysis to explore the underlying component items used to evaluate the methodological quality or risk of bias of RCTs in physical therapy. The items and factors represent a starting point for evaluating the methodological quality and risk of bias in physical therapy trials. Empirical evidence of the association among these items with treatment effects and a confirmatory factor

  9. 40 CFR Appendix Viii to Part 600 - Fuel Economy Label Formats

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fuel Economy Label Formats VIII... POLICY FUEL ECONOMY AND CARBON-RELATED EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Pt. 600, App. VIII Appendix VIII to Part 600—Fuel Economy Label Formats EC01MY92.117 EC01MY92.118 EC01MY92.119 EC01MY92.120...

  10. Occupational Therapy Practitioners with Occupational Musculoskeletal Injuries: Prevalence and Risk Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alnaser, Musaed Z

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the prevalence and risk factors of occupational musculoskeletal injuries (OMIs) among occupational therapy practitioners over a 12-month period. A self-administered questionnaire mailed to 500 randomly selected practicing occupational therapists (OTs) and occupational therapy assistants (OTAs) living in the state of Texas. A response rate of 38 % was attained with 192 questionnaires returned. In a 12-months working period, 23 % of occupational therapy practitioners experienced musculoskeletal injuries. Muscle strain (52 %) was most reported injury and lower back (32 %) was most injured body part. Years of practicing experience (t = 2.83, p = 0.01), and age x(2)(2, N = 192) = 8.28, p = 0.02 were found as significant factors associated with injuries among OTAs. No factors were significantly associated with injuries among OTs. Patient handling was the primary factor associated with injuries. Also, minimal experience and older age were concluded as risk factors that might contribute to OMIs.

  11. In Vivo Gene Therapy of Hemophilia B: Sustained Partial Correction in Factor IX-Deficient Dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, Mark A.; Rothenberg, Steven; Landen, Charles N.; Bellinger, Dwight A.; Leland, Frances; Toman, Carol; Finegold, Milton; Thompson, Arthur R.; Read, M. S.; Brinkhous, Kenneth M.; Woo, Savio L. C.

    1993-10-01

    The liver represents a model organ for gene therapy. A method has been developed for hepatic gene transfer in vivo by the direct infusion of recombinant retroviral vectors into the portal vasculature, which results in the persistent expression of exogenous genes. To determine if these technologies are applicable for the treatment of hemophilia B patients, preclinical efficacy studies were done in a hemophilia B dog model. When the canine factor IX complementary DNA was transduced directly into the hepatocytes of affected dogs in vivo, the animals constitutively expressed low levels of canine factor IX for more than 5 months. Persistent expression of the clotting. factor resulted in reductions of whole blood clotting and partial thromboplastin times of the treated animals. Thus, long-term treatment of hemophilia B patients may be feasible by direct hepatic gene therapy in vivo.

  12. [Encircling needling combined with physical factor therapy for severe pressure sore].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Chengjie; Su, Bin; Gong, Lili; Wang, Wenying; Zhang, Xiuhua

    2015-11-01

    To compare the clinical efficacy difference between encircling needling combined with physical factor therapy and simple physical factor therapy for severe pressure sore, and to explore the optimal method for severe pressure sores. Thirty-four patients with IV-grade pressure sore were randomly divided into an observation group and a control group, 17 cases in each one. Patients in the control group were treated with conventional nursing, ultrasonic wave and short-wave ultraviolet therapy; additionally, the encircling needling was applied in the observation group. All the treatment was given once a day, 5 times a week, and 4-week treatment constituted one session. Totally, two sessions of treatment were performed. Three indices, including the area of pressure sore, 24-h volume of exudates and wound-bed tissue type, were compared between the two groups before and after treatment; the clinical efficacy was evaluated in the two groups. After treatment of one session and two sessions, the area of pressure sore, 24-h volume of exudates and wound-bed tissue type were significantly reduced in the two groups (P pressure sore area and 24-h volume of exudates and improve wound-bed tissue type, which is superior to simple physical factor therapy.

  13. Rituximab therapy for factor II inhibitor in a patient with antiphospholipid antibody syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guddati, Achuta K; Kuter, David J

    2014-04-01

    Factor II inhibitors have been associated with an increased risk of bleeding. The management of patients with factor II inhibitors has not been adequately described. We describe a patient with an increased bleeding tendency due to factor II inhibitor who was unable to undergo surgery due to her bleeding tendency. The patient was successfully treated with a course of rituximab, which markedly reduced her factor II inhibitor: the factor II level rose from 12 to 61%; prothrombin time decreased from 20 to 14.7 s; and partial thromboplastin time (PTT) decreased from 148 to 38.8 s. She was able to undergo abdominal surgery without any hemorrhagic complications. This case exemplifies the possibility of treating patients with factor II inhibitors with rituximab therapy.

  14. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor therapy to induce neovascularization in ischemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ripa, Rasmus Sejersten

    2012-01-01

    Cell based therapy for ischemic heart disease has the potential to reduce post infarct heart failure and chronic ischemia. Treatment with granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) mobilizes cells from the bone marrow to the peripheral blood. Some of these cells are putative stem or progenitor...... cells. G-CSF is injected subcutaneously. This therapy is intuitively attractive compared to other cell based techniques since repeated catheterizations and ex vivo cell purification and expansion are avoided. Previous preclinical and early clinical trials have indicated that treatment with G-CSF leads...

  15. Antiangiogenic therapy in lung cancer: focus on vascular endothelial growth factor pathway.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Korpanty, Grzegorz

    2010-01-01

    Lung cancer (LC) is a leading cause of death worldwide. Recent advances in chemotherapeutic agents have not yielded any significant improvement in the prognosis of patients with LC. The five-year survival rate for all combined disease stages remains about 15%. For this reason, new therapies such as those that inhibit tumor angiogenesis or block activity of growth factor receptors are of special interest in this group of patients. In this review we will summarize the most recent clinical data on biologic therapies that inhibit tumor angiogenesis in LC, focusing on those that are most clinically relevant.

  16. Regenerative medicine for the kidney: renotropic factors, renal stem/progenitor cells, and stem cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeshima, Akito; Nakasatomi, Masao; Nojima, Yoshihisa

    2014-01-01

    The kidney has the capacity for regeneration and repair after a variety of insults. Over the past few decades, factors that promote repair of the injured kidney have been extensively investigated. By using kidney injury animal models, the role of intrinsic and extrinsic growth factors, transcription factors, and extracellular matrix in this process has been examined. The identification of renal stem cells in the adult kidney as well as in the embryonic kidney is an active area of research. Cell populations expressing putative stem cell markers or possessing stem cell properties have been found in the tubules, interstitium, and glomeruli of the normal kidney. Cell therapies with bone marrow-derived hematopoietic stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells, endothelial progenitor cells, and amniotic fluid-derived stem cells have been highly effective for the treatment of acute or chronic renal failure in animals. Embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells are also utilized for the construction of artificial kidneys or renal components. In this review, we highlight the advances in regenerative medicine for the kidney from the perspective of renotropic factors, renal stem/progenitor cells, and stem cell therapies and discuss the issues to be solved to realize regenerative therapy for kidney diseases in humans.

  17. Risk factors for Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea and the effectiveness of prophylactic probiotic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizui, T; Teramachi, H; Tachi, T; Tamura, K; Shiga, H; Komada, N; Umeda, M; Koda, A; Aoyama, S; Goto, C; Tsuchiya, T

    2013-08-01

    Measures for prevention of Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea, a common nosocomial infection, in hospital settings are urgently needed. This study was conducted to identify the risk factors contributing to C. difficile-associated diarrhea and to evaluate the clinical benefit of probiotics in its prevention. The study included 2716 patients at least 20 years old who received an injected antibiotic at any time between February 2010 and February 2011; a total of 2687 patients (98.9%) were assigned to the non-C. difficile-associated diarrhea group, and 29 patients (1.1%) were assigned to the C. difficile-associated diarrhea group. Univariate analysis revealed a significant difference between the two groups for the following factors: antibiotic therapy for > or = 8 days; enteral nutrition; intravenous hyperalimentation; fasting; proton pump inhibitor use; H2 blocker use; and serum albumin factors. Antibiotic therapy for > or = 8 days, intravenous hyperalimentation, proton pump inhibitor use, and H2 blocker use were therefore shown to be risk factors for C. difficile-associated diarrhea. Prophylactic probiotic therapy was not shown to suppress the occurrence of C. difficile-associated diarrhea.

  18. Design and characteristics of cytotoxic fibroblast growth factor 1 conjugate for fibroblast growth factor receptor-targeted cancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szlachcic A

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Anna Szlachcic, Malgorzata Zakrzewska, Michal Lobocki, Piotr Jakimowicz, Jacek Otlewski Department of Protein Engineering, Faculty of Biotechnology, University of Wroclaw, Wroclaw, Poland Abstract: Fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs are attractive candidate cancer therapy targets as they are overexpressed in multiple types of tumors, such as breast, prostate, bladder, and lung cancer. In this study, a natural ligand of FGFR, an engineered variant of fibroblast growth factor 1 (FGF1V, was conjugated to a potent cytotoxic drug, monomethyl auristatin E (MMAE, and used as a targeting agent for cancer cells overexpressing FGFRs, similar to antibodies in antibody–drug conjugates. The FGF1V–valine–citrulline–MMAE conjugate showed a favorable stability profile, bound FGFRs on the cell surface specifically, and efficiently released the drug (MMAE upon cleavage by the lysosomal protease cathepsin B. Importantly, the conjugate showed a prominent cytotoxic effect toward cell lines expressing FGFR. FGF1V–vcMMAE was highly cytotoxic at concentrations even an order of magnitude lower than those found for free MMAE. This effect was FGFR-specific as cells lacking FGFR did not show any increased mortality. Keywords: fibroblast growth factor 1, FGF receptor, targeted cancer therapy, cytotoxic conjugates, FGFR-dependent cancer, MMAE, auristatin

  19. Advances in clotting factor treatment for congenital hemorrhagic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarantino, Michael D; Aledort, Louis M

    2004-06-01

    During the last 50 years, clotting factor replacement has evolved from the use of frozen plasma in the 1950s, through the serendipitous discovery of cryoprecipitate in the 1960s and the development of purified clotting factors in the 1970s and 1980s, to the era of recombinant clotting factors beginning in the 1990s. The dawn of the new millennium has seen the refinement of recombinant factor (rF) VIII with enhanced safety via the elimination of plasma-derived culture media or product stabilizers. During the last decade of the 20th century, a cure for hemophilia through gene therapy became a possibility. This was, in part, facilitated by availability of large (dogs) and small (mice) animal models for hemophilia A and B. Although this review will focus primarily on clotting factor replacement, the reader may refer to recent discourse on gene therapy for hemophilia.

  20. Varicella zoster meningitis complicating combined anti-tumor necrosis factor and corticosteroid therapy in Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Christopher; Walters, Brennan; Fedorak, Richard N

    2013-06-01

    Opportunistic viral infections are a well-recognized complication of anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) therapy for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Cases of severe or atypical varicella zoster virus infection, both primary and latent reactivation, have been described in association with immunosuppression of Crohn's disease (CD) patients. However, central nervous system varicella zoster virus infections have been rarely described, and there are no previous reports of varicella zoster virus meningitis associated with anti-TNF therapy among the CD population. Here, we present the case of a 40-year-old male with severe ileocecal-CD who developed a reactivation of dermatomal herpes zoster after treatment with prednisone and adalimumab. The reactivation presented as debilitating varicella zoster virus meningitis, which was not completely resolved despite aggressive antiviral therapy with prolonged intravenous acyclovir and subsequent oral valacyclovir. This is the first reported case of opportunistic central nervous system varicella zoster infection complicating anti-TNF therapy in the CD population. This paper also reviews the literature on varicella zoster virus infections of immunosuppressed IBD patients and the importance of vaccination prior to initiation of anti-TNF therapy.

  1. Risk factors for discontinuation of insulin pump therapy in pediatric and young adult patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostev, Karel; Rockel, Timo; Rosenbauer, Joachim; Rathmann, Wolfgang

    2014-12-01

    Previous studies have shown that only a small number of pediatric and young adult patients discontinue pump therapy, but risk factors for discontinuation are unclear. To identify characteristics of pediatric and young adult patients with pump therapy which are associated with discontinuation of treatment. Retrospective cohort study using a representative nationwide database (LRx; IMS Health) in Germany covering >80% of all prescriptions to members of statutory health insurances in 2008-2011. All patients (age group insulin pumps were identified (2009-2010) and were followed for 12 months. Overall, 2452 new pump users were identified, of whom 177 (7.2%) switched to other forms of insulin therapy within 12 months. In multivariate logistic regression, younger age (pump discontinuation. A non-significant trend was found for male sex (OR, 95% CI: 0.75; 0.52-1.08). Prescriptions of thyroid therapeutics (ATC H03A: OR, 95% CI: 1.79; 1.23-2.61) and antiepileptics (N03: OR, 95% CI: 3.14; 1.49-6.59) were significantly associated with discontinuation of pump therapy. About 93% of pediatric and young adult patients maintained insulin pump therapy within 12 months. Age insulin pump treatment. Copyright © 2014 Primary Care Diabetes Europe. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Adverse drug events and associated factors in heart failure therapy among the very elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sztramko, Richard; Chau, Vicky; Wong, Roger

    2011-12-01

    Heart failure (HF) is common in older adults and standard therapy involves the use of multiple medications. We assessed the nature, frequency, and factors associated with adverse drug events (ADEs) associated with standard HF therapy among older adults greater than 75 years of age. The efficacy and predictors of ADEs were assessed in this patient population, as well. Systematic review using standardized databases including MEDLINE, Ageline, and CINAHL from January 1st 1988 to January 1st, 2010 and references from published literature. Randomized trials and studies with observational, cohort, and cross-sectional design were included. Two investigators independently selected the studies and extracted the data (kappa = 0.86). Twenty-five studies were identified. ADEs were reported in 13/23 (57%) studies. Syncope, bradycardia, and hypotension as a result of beta blockers occurred in greater frequency compared to younger populations. Spironolactone therapy resulted in increased rates of hyperkalemia, acute renal failure, and medication discontinuation. Factors associated with ADEs included advanced age, poor left ventricular function, and increasing New York Heart Association Class. Efficacy of beta blockers and ACE inhibitors appears to extend to the elderly population, but the magnitude of effect size is unclear. Very few studies reported associations between ADE and patients' comorbidities (4/13 studies, 31%) or functional status (3/13 studies, 23%). ADEs in CHF therapy among the very elderly occurred at a greater frequency, but were generally poorly characterized in the literature despite a relatively common occurrence. Further studies are warranted.

  3. Factors influencing student selection of marriage and family therapy graduate programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertlein, Katherine M; Lambert-Shute, Jennifer

    2007-01-01

    To understand which factors students consider most important in choosing a marriage and family therapy (MFT) graduate program and how programs met or did not meet these expectations of students over the course of graduate study, we conducted an online mixed-method investigation. One hundred twelve graduate students in Commission on Accreditation for Marriage and Family Therapy Education-accredited programs responded to an online survey assessing what factors led them to select a specific graduate program in MFT. In the quantitative portion, students ranked each factor (personal fit, faculty, funding, research, clinical work, and teaching) as well as characteristics of each factor in relation to its importance in their selection of an MFT program. Additionally, students indicated to what level their programs meet their expectations. In the qualitative portion, students described how they believed their chosen program was or was not meeting their expectations. Both doctoral and master's students ranked personal fit as the top factor affecting their choice of graduate program in MFT, but they differed on the characteristics of each of these factors and their importance in selecting an MFT program. Implications for this research include program evaluation and program advertising, and are consistent with the scientist-practitioner model.

  4. Trophic factors as modulators of motor neuron physiology and survival: implications for ALS therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis B Tovar-y-Romo

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Motor neuron physiology and development depend on a continuous and tightly regulated trophic support from a variety of cellular sources. Trophic factors guide the generation and positioning of motor neurons during every stage of the developmental process. As well, they are involved in axon guidance and synapse formation. Even in the adult spinal cord an uninterrupted trophic input is required to maintain neuronal functioning and protection from noxious stimuli. Among the trophic factors that have been demonstrated to participate in motor neuron physiology are vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, glial-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF, ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1. Upon binding to membrane receptors expressed in motor neurons or neighboring glia, these trophic factors activate intracellular signaling pathways that promote cell survival and have protective action on motor neurons, in both in vivo and in vitro models of neuronal degeneration. For these reasons these factors have been considered a promising therapeutic method for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS and other neurodegenerative diseases, although their efficacy in human clinical trials have not yet shown the expected protection. In this review we summarize experimental data on the role of these trophic factors in motor neuron function and survival, as well as their mechanisms of action. We also briefly discuss the potential therapeutic use of the trophic factors and why these therapies may have not been yet successful in the clinical use.

  5. Factors influencing adherence to paediatric antiretroviral therapy in Portharcourt, South- South Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Ugwu, Rosemary; Eneh, Augusta

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The efficiency of antiretroviral therapy (ART) depends on a near-perfect level of patient's adherence. Adherence in children poses peculiar challenges. The aim of the study was to determine the adherence level and factors influencing adherence among HIV-infected children and adolescents in University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital, Nigeria. Methods A cross-sectional survey of HIV-infected children and adolescents on ART using self-report by the caregiver/child in the past one...

  6. Identifying factors hampering physical activity in longstanding rheumatoid arthritis: what is the role of glucocorticoid therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Goes, M C; Hoes, J N; Cramer, M J; van der Veen, M J; van der Werf, J H; Bijlsma, J W J; Jacobs, J W G

    2014-01-01

    To identify factors hampering the level of physical activity in longstanding rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, and to evaluate the effects of glucocorticoid therapy on physical activity. Patient characteristics, disease characteristics and cardiovascular parameters were recorded in 170 patients, who participated in a study about glucose metabolism in longstanding RA treated with or without glucocorticoids. Disease activity scores (DAS28) were calculated and x-rays of hands and feet were taken and scored according to the Sharp van der Heijde score (SHS). Participants completed the health assessment questionnaire and short questionnaire to assess health-enhancing physical activity (SQUASH), which reflect physical disability and physical activity, respectively. Adherence rates to recommendations on physical activity were calculated, and patients were categorised as fully adhering, insufficiently adhering (adherence on less than the recommended number of days per week) or inactive (adherence on none of the days). Forty-four percent of the patients showed adherence to the recommended minimum level of physical activity, and 22% were classified as inactive. Higher DAS28 and SHS, glucocorticoid therapy, and presence of cardiovascular risk factors were associated with lower total SQUASH physical activity scores univariately. In a multivariate model, higher age, higher body mass index (BMI), higher DAS28, and higher SHS negatively influenced the score significantly; cardiovascular risk factors and glucocorticoid therapy were no longer significantly influencing physical activity. Physical activity in longstanding RA is hampered by higher age, higher BMI, higher disease activity, and more radiographic joint damage. Glucocorticoid therapy was not identified as independent risk factor in multivariate analyses.

  7. Naprapathic manual therapy and other factors of importance for the prognosis of neck and back ain

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Neck and back pain common health problems causing economic burden and individual suffering worldwide. Aim: The overall aim of this thesis was to increase understanding of naprapathic manual therapy and other factors of potential importance for the prognosis of back and neck pain. Specific aims: Study I: 1) to assess and compare the sex-specific recovery from spinal pain and psychological distress as single and comorbid conditions, 2) to describe the interrelationships bet...

  8. Trends and risk factors for obesity among HIV positive Nigerians on antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezechi, L O; Musa, Z A; Otobo, V O; Idigbe, I E; Ezechi, O C

    2016-06-01

    The increased access to antiretroviral therapy has changed the once deadly infection to a chronic medical condition, resulting in a dramatic change in causes of morbidity and mortality among HIV infected individuals. Obesity and its cardiovascular sequelae are increasingly reported in the literature. However, data on the burden, trends and risk factors for obesity are sparse in countries worst hit by the epidemic. To investigate the trend and risk factors for obesity among a cohort of HIV infected adults on antiretroviral therapy. We analysed prospectively collected data in an ongoing longitudinal observational study conducted at the HIV treatment centre, Nigerian Institute of Medical Research, Lagos, Nigeria. Patients who started treatment between June 2004 and December 2009, and completed a five year follow up were included in the analysis. Multivariate analysis was used to determine the risk factors for obesity among the cohort. A total of 12 585 adults were enrolled in the treatment programme during the study period. Of which, 8819 (70.1%) met the inclusion criteria. At the start of treatment, 27.0% were either overweight (19.6%) or obese (7.4%) compared to 62.2% that were either overweight (35.7%) or obese (26.5%) at the end of 5 years. The observed differences were statistically significant (pobesity at multivariate analysis. Type of antiretroviral drug, age, marital status, viral load and haemoglobin level were not associated with obesity after controlling for confounding variables. Obesity is common among HIV infected Nigerians on antiretroviral therapy and is associated with.

  9. Risk stratification in multiple myeloma, part 2: the significance of genetic risk factors in the era of currently available therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biran, Noa; Jagannath, Sundar; Chari, Ajai

    2013-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a heterogeneous disease, and a variety of risk factors at the time of initial diagnosis can be used to stratify patients. In the first part of this 2-part series, we reviewed the currently identified prognostic factors, characterized by disease burden, host factors, tumor biology, and depth of response to therapy. However, these risk factors cannot be interpreted independently of therapies. Novel therapies have the potential to worsen or improve outcomes compared with conventional therapy in high-risk patients, or actually overcome the high-risk status, thereby resulting in reclassification as standard risk. For example, thalidomide (Thalomid, Celgene) is associated with worse outcomes in patients with high-risk cytogenetic abnormalities, such as deletion of chromosomes 13 and 17p, whereas proteasome inhibitors appear to overcome t(4;14). The second part of this series reviews the significance of various genetic risks in the era of novel therapies for MM.

  10. The Results and Prognostic Factors of Postoperative Radiation Therapy in the Early Stages of Endometrial Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kyung Ja [Ewha Womans University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-09-15

    To evaluate the results and prognostic factors for postoperative adjuvant radiation therapy in patients at stages I and II of endometrial cancer. Materials and Methods: Between January 1991 and December 2006, 35 patients with FIGO stages I and II disease, who received adjuvant radiation therapy following surgery for endometrial cancer at Ewha Womans University Hospital, were enrolled in this study. A total of 17 patients received postoperative pelvic external beam radiation therapy; whereas, 12 patients received vaginal brachytherapy alone, and 6 patients received both pelvic radiation therapy and vaginal brachytherapy. Results: The median follow-up period for all patients was 54 months. The 5-yr overall survival and disease-free survival rates for all patients were 91.4% and 81.7%, respectively. The 5-yr overall survival rates for low-risk, intermediate-risk, and high-risk groups were 100%, 100% and 55.6%, respectively. In addition, the 5-yr disease-free survival rates were 100%, 70.0%, and 45.7%, respectively. Although no locoregional relapses were identified, distant metastases were observed in 5 patients (14%). The most common site of distant metastases was the lung, followed by bone, liver, adrenal gland, and peritoneum. A univariate analysis revealed a significant correlation between distant metastases and risk-group (p=0.018), pathology type (p=0.001), and grade (p=0.019). A multivariate analysis also revealed that distant metastases were correlated with pathology type (p=0.009). Papillary, serous and clear cell carcinoma cases demonstrated a poor patient survival rate compared to cases of endometrioid adenocarcinoma or adenosquamous carcinoma. The most common complication of pelvic external beam radiation therapy was enteritis (30%), followed by proctitis, leucopenia, and lymphedema. All these complications were of RTOG grades 1 and 2; no grades 3 and 4 were observed. Conclusion: For the low-risk and intermediate-risk groups (stages 1 and 2) endometrial

  11. Differential efficacy of cognitive behavioral therapy and psychodynamic therapy for major depression : A study of prescriptive factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driessen, E.; Smits, N.; Dekker, J.J.M.; Peen, J.; Don, F.J.; Kool, S.; Westra, D.; Hendriksen, M.; Cuijpers, P.; Van, H.L.

    2016-01-01

    Minimal efficacy differences have been found between cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and psychodynamic therapies for depression, but little is known about patient characteristics that might moderate differential treatment effects. We aimed to generate hypotheses regarding such potential

  12. Effectiveness of Mind Mapping in English Teaching among VIII Standard Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallen, D.; Sangeetha, N.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study is to find out the effectiveness of mind mapping technique over conventional method in teaching English at high school level (VIII), in terms of Control and Experimental group. The sample of the study comprised, 60 VIII Standard students in Tiruchendur Taluk. Mind Maps and Achievement Test (Pretest & Posttest) were…

  13. The treatment of hemophilia A: from protein replacement to AAV-mediated gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youjin, Shen; Jun, Yin

    2009-03-01

    Factor VIII (FVIII) is an essential component in blood coagulation, a deficiency of which causes the serious bleeding disorder hemophilia A. Recently, with the development of purification level and recombinant techniques, protein replacement treatment to hemophiliacs is relatively safe and can prolong their life expectancy. However, because of the possibility of unknown contaminants in plasma-derived FVIII and recombinant FVIII, and high cost for hemophiliacs to use these products, gene therapy for hemophilia A is an attractive alternative to protein replacement therapy. Thus far, the adeno-associated virus (AAV) is a promising vector for gene therapy. Further improvement of the virus for clinical application depends on better understanding of the molecular structure and fate of the vector genome. It is likely that hemophilia will be the first genetic disease to be cured by somatic cell gene therapy.

  14. [Risk factors of upper gastrointestinal complications in outpatients on antiplatelet therapy: description and management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducrocq, G; Bigard, M-A; Marouene, S; Delaage, P-H; Fabry, C; Barthelemy, P; Steg, P-G

    2012-08-01

    Patients on antiplatelet therapy have a gastrointestinal bleeding risk. It is increased by risk factors. The frequency of those risk factors, the prevalence of upper digestive symptoms and their management in patients on antiplatelet agents is unknown. We performed an observational multi-centred prospective survey among 560 French cardiologists with private practice. Each cardiologist completed a questionnaire for the first four patients treated with antiplatelet agents in primary or secondary prevention. Among the 2182 patients included, (age = 67 ± 11 years; 74% male), 83% had at least one gastrointestinal bleeding risk factor and 38.9% had a history of upper digestive tract symptom. A history of gastrointestinal bleeding was reported in 3.4% and a history of documented gastro-duodenal ulcer in 5.5%. A proton pump inhibitor was already prescribed in 39% of the patients. At the time of the consultation, upper digestive symptoms were described in 21% of the patients. In those patients with symptoms, 85% had no modification in antiplatelet therapy and 62.7% were prescribed gastro-protective drugs (proton pump inhibitors: 51.8%, H(2)-blockers 3.6% other anti-acid medication: 7.3%). Among patients on antiplatelet agents, the prevalence of upper digestive symptoms and risk factors for gastrointestinal bleeding is high. Preventative management needs to be clarified in this population. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Outcome of ventilator-associated pneumonia: Impact of antibiotic therapy and other factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noyal Mariya Joseph

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundVentilator-associated pneumonia (VAP is the most frequent infection in patients intubated for longer than 48 hours. There is a great interest in determining the factors influencing the outcome of VAP, as it may help in reducing the associated morbidity and mortality. This study aimed to determine the impact of appropriate antibiotic therapy based on endotracheal aspirate cultures on the outcome of VAP. We have also studied the other factors that may influence the outcome of VAP.MethodA cohort study was conducted in the intensive care units of a tertiary care hospital in South India over a period of 15 months.The outcome of VAP was assessed by prolongation of the duration of mechanical ventilation and/ or death of the patient.ResultsThe duration of mechanical ventilation was significantly prolonged in patients with VAP (16.61 ± 8.2 d vs. 8.21 ± 5.9 d, P 2 days in administering the first dose of appropriate antibiotic therapy significantly prolonged the duration of ventilation (P < 0.0001. Infection by multi-drug resistant pathogens, polymicrobial infection and time of onset of VAP did not have significant impact on the outcome of VAP.ConclusionEarly administration of appropriate antibiotic therapy, based on the antibiogram of the VAP pathogens identified by quantitative culture of endotracheal aspirate, could lead to an improved outcome of patients with ventilator-associated pneumonia.

  16. Risk factors for therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia treated with allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    International audience; BACKGROUND: After successful treatment of malignant diseases, therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia have emerged as significant problems. DESIGN AND METHODS: The aim of this study was to investigate outcome and risk factors in patients with therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome or acute myeloid leukemia who underwent allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Between 1981 and 2006, 461 patients with therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome o...

  17. Delaying ACL reconstruction and treating with exercise therapy alone may alter prognostic factors for 5-year outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filbay, Stephanie R; Roos, Ewa M; Frobell, Richard B

    2017-01-01

    AIM: Identify injury-related, patient-reported and treatment-related prognostic factors for 5-year outcomes in acutely ACL-ruptured individuals managed with early reconstruction plus exercise therapy, exercise therapy plus delayed reconstruction or exercise therapy alone. METHODS: Exploratory......, body mass index, preinjury activity level, education and smoking. RESULTS: For all participants (n=118), graft/contralateral ACL rupture, non-ACL surgery and worse baseline 36-item Short-Form Mental Component Scores were associated with worse outcomes. Treatment with exercise therapy alone...... was a prognostic factor for less pain (14.3, 95% CI 0.7 to 27.9). Following exercise therapy alone, undergoing non-ACL surgery was prognostic for worse pain. CONCLUSIONS: Treatment-dependent differences in prognostic factors for 5-year outcomes may support individualised treatment after acute ACL rupture in young...

  18. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF therapy for Parkinson's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shingo,Tetsuro

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Many studies using animals clarify that glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF has strong neuroprotective and neurorestorative effects on dopaminergic neurons. Several pilot studies clarified the validity of continuous intraputaminal GDNF infusion to patients with Parkinson's disease (PD, although a randomized controlled trial of GDNF therapy published in 2006 resulted in negative outcomes, and controversy remains about the efficacy and safety of the treatment. For a decade, our laboratory has investigated the efficacy and the most appropriate method of GDNF administration using animals, and consequently we have obtained some solid data that correspond to the results of clinical trials. In this review, we present an outline of our studies and other key studies related to GDNF, the current state of the research, problems to be overcome, and predictions regarding the use of GDNF therapy for PD in the future.

  19. [Adherence to Therapy as a Factor Determining Prognosis of Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomeshkina, S A; Borovik, I V; Zavyrylina, I N; Kagan, E S; Barbarash, O L

    2015-01-01

    to study the influence of the patients adherence to the recommended therapy after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) on prognosis of postoperative period. We examined 197 consecutive patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD) who had undergone CABG. Age of patients was 38-75 years. Assessment of modifiable cardiovascular risk factors showed that about half of patients had smoked before CABG and only a few gave up smoking after surgery. Number of patients with abdominal obesity increased by 8% after surgery. Number of patients involved in physical trainings remained unchanged. Adherence to drug therapy before CABG was low. Less than half of the patients took antiplatelet agents, beta-blockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, only 25% took statins. One year after CABG number of patients taking appropriate medications significantly increased. However, only half of patients managed to achieve the main objectives of secondary prevention.

  20. Risk factors for mortality among malnourished HIV-infected adults eligible for antiretroviral therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woodd, Susannah L; Kelly, Paul; Koethe, John R

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A substantial proportion of HIV-infected adults starting antiretroviral therapy (ART) in sub-Saharan Africa are malnourished. We aimed to increase understanding of the factors affecting their high mortality, particularly in the high-risk period before ART initiation. METHODS: We...... analysed potential risk factors for mortality of Zambian and Tanzanian participants enrolled in the NUSTART clinical trial. Malnourished adults (n = 1815; body mass index [BMI] ART and randomised to receive different nutritional supplements. Demographics......, measures of body composition, blood electrolytes and clinical conditions were investigated as potential risk factors using Poisson regression models. RESULTS: The mortality rate was higher in the period from referral to starting ART (121 deaths/100 person-years; 95 % CI 103, 142) than during the first 12...

  1. Factors associated with non-adherence to highly active antiretroviral therapy in Nairobi, Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wakibi Samwel N

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antiretroviral therapy (ART requires high-level (> 95% adherence. Kenya is rolling out ART access programmes and, issue of adherence to therapy is therefore imperative. However, published data on adherence to ART in Kenya is limited. This study assessed adherence to ART and identified factors responsible for non adherence in Nairobi. Methods This is a multiple facility-based cross-sectional study, where 416 patients aged over 18 years were systematically selected and interviewed using a structured questionnaire about their experience taking ART. Additional data was extracted from hospital records. Patients were grouped into adherent and non-adherent based on a composite score derived from a three questions adherence tool developed by Center for Adherence Support Evaluation (CASE. Multivariate regression model was used to determine predictors of non-adherence. Results Overall, 403 patients responded; 35% males and 65% females, 18% were non-adherent, and main (38% reason for missing therapy were being busy and forgetting. Accessing ART in a clinic within walking distance from home (OR = 2.387, CI.95 = 1.155-4.931; p = 0.019 and difficulty with dosing schedule (OR = 2.310, CI.95 = 1.211-4.408, p = 0.011 predicted non-adherence. Conclusions The study found better adherence to HAART in Nairobi compared to previous studies in Kenya. However, this can be improved further by employing fitting strategies to improve patients' ability to fit therapy in own lifestyle and cue-dose training to impact forgetfulness. Further work to determine why patients accessing therapy from ARV clinics within walking distance from their residence did not adhere is recommended.

  2. Noninvasive Imaging of Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α Gene Therapy for Myocardial Ischemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ian Y.; Gheysens, Olivier; Li, Zongjin; Rasooly, Julia A.; Wang, Qian; Paulmurugan, Ramasamy; Rosenberg, Jarrett; Rodriguez-Porcel, Martin; Willmann, Juergen K.; Wang, David S.; Contag, Christopher H.; Robbins, Robert C.; Wu, Joseph C.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α) gene therapy holds great promise for the treatment of myocardial ischemia. Both preclinical and clinical evaluations of this therapy are underway and can benefit from a vector strategy that allows noninvasive assessment of HIF-1α expression as an objective measure of gene delivery. We have developed a novel bidirectional plasmid vector (pcTnT-HIF-1α-VP2-TSTA-fluc), which employs the cardiac troponin T (cTnT) promoter in conjunction with a two-step transcriptional amplification (TSTA) system to drive the linked expression of a recombinant HIF-1α gene (HIF-1α-VP2) and the firefly luciferase gene (fluc). The firefly luciferase (FLuc) activity serves as a surrogate for HIF-1α-VP2 expression, and can be noninvasively assessed in mice using bioluminescence imaging after vector delivery. Transfection of cultured HL-1 cardiomyocytes with pcTnT-HIF-1α-VP2-TSTA-fluc led to a strong correlation between FLuc and HIF-1α-dependent vascular endothelial growth factor expression (r2=0.88). Intramyocardial delivery of pcTnT-HIF-1α-VP2-TSTA-fluc into infarcted mouse myocardium led to persistent HIF-1α-VP2 expression for 4 weeks, even though it improved neither CD31+ microvessel density nor echocardiographically determined left ventricular systolic function. These results lend support to recent findings of suboptimal efficacy associated with plasmid-mediated HIF-1α therapy. The imaging techniques developed herein should be useful for further optimizing HIF-1α-VP2 therapy in preclinical models of myocardial ischemia. PMID:23937265

  3. Risk factors for therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia treated with allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroger, N.; Brand, R.; Biezen, A. van; Zander, A.; Dierlamm, J.; Niederwieser, D.; Devergie, A.; Ruutu, T.; Cornish, J.; Ljungman, P.; Gratwohl, A.; Cordonnier, C.; Beelen, D.; Deconinck, E.; Symeonidis, A.; Witte, T.J.M. de

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: After successful treatment of malignant diseases, therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia have emerged as significant problems. DESIGN AND METHODS: The aim of this study was to investigate outcome and risk factors in patients with therapy-related myelodysplast

  4. Would Lipophilic Statin Therapy as a Prognostic Factor Improve Survival in Patients With Uterine Cervical Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Moo-Kon; Shin, Byoung-Sub; Ha, Chung-Sik; Park, Won-Young

    2017-09-01

    In vitro studies showed that lipophilic statins inhibit cell growth, adhesion, and invasion and induce apoptosis in cancer cell lines. In uterine cervical cancer, several important factors including age, stage, anemia, lymphovascular invasion, lymph node metastases, and parametrial spread were known to significantly predict survival. We investigated whether statin therapy as a prognostic factor would significantly predict survival in cervical cancer. Patients with stages IB to IV cervical cancer who received radical hysterectomy and/or para-aortic lymph node dissection were included. The statin-use group was identified as patients who were continuously prescribed with lipophilic statins from prediagnostic period of the cancer. The baseline characteristics of both statin-use group and control group were comparable. During a median follow-up of 36.6 months, progression-free survival and overall survival of the statin-use group were significantly higher than the control group (P < 0.001 and P = 0.004, respectively). In multivariate analysis, the statin-use group had an independent prognostic significance compared with other prognostic factors (progression-free survival: hazards ratio = 0.062, 95% confidence interval = 0.008-0.517, P = 0.010; overall survival: hazards ratio = 0.098, 95% confidence interval = 0.041-0.459, P = 0.032). In the present study, continuous lipophilic statin therapy from the prediagnostic period of uterine cervical cancer could reflect favorable outcome, independently.

  5. Surgery as a risk factor for inhibitor development in haemophilia A : A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eckhardt, C.; Van Der Bom, J.; Van Der Naald, M.; Peters, M.; Kamphuisen, P.; Fijnvandraat, K.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Surgery is a risk factor for the development of factor VIII inhibiting antibodies (inhibitors) in haemophilia A. This may be due to the combination of danger signal release resulting from tissue damage and intensive exposure to factor VIII (FVIII) concentrate. The purpose of this syste

  6. Surgery as a risk factor for inhibitor development in haemophilia A : A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eckhardt, C.; Van Der Bom, J.; Van Der Naald, M.; Peters, M.; Kamphuisen, P.; Fijnvandraat, K.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Surgery is a risk factor for the development of factor VIII inhibiting antibodies (inhibitors) in haemophilia A. This may be due to the combination of danger signal release resulting from tissue damage and intensive exposure to factor VIII (FVIII) concentrate. The purpose of this syste

  7. Risk factors for early mortality on antiretroviral therapy in advanced HIV-infected adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisson, Gregory P; Ramchandani, Ritesh; Miyahara, Sachiko; Mngqibisa, Rosie; Matoga, Mitch; Ngongondo, McNeil; Samaneka, Wadzanai; Koech, Lucy; Naidoo, Kogieleum; Rassool, Mohammed; Kirui, Fredrick; Banda, Peter; Mave, Vidya; Kadam, Dileep; Leger, Paul; Henostroza, German; Manabe, Yukari C; Bao, Jing; Kumwenda, Johnstone; Gupta, Amita; Hosseinipour, Mina C

    2017-07-24

    Many HIV-infected individuals present with advanced HIV disease. These patients are at high risk of death after antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation, but risk factors for death in these patients are unclear. We used data from a multi-site randomized trial comparing empiric versus preventive TB therapy in HIV-infected adults initiating ART with CD4 counts <50 cells/mm to evaluate risk factors for death within 48 weeks after ART initiation. Cox proportional hazards models were fit to evaluate characteristics present at baseline and at 4 weeks after ART initiation, including the week 4 CD4 cell response and new opportunistic infections (OIs). Of 850 enrolled, the median pre-ART CD4 count was 18 cells/mm and 67 (7.9%) died. Baseline risk factors for death included lymphadenopathy, lower CD4 count, lower serum albumin, high white blood cell (WBC) count, elevated neutrophil percent, and lower hemoglobin. Among 746 participants with data at week 4, the median changes in CD4 count and viral load for those who died (n = 43) vs. survived were 26 vs. 56 cells/mm and -2.7 vs. -2.7 log10 copies/mL, respectively. Each 20 cell/mm lower change in week 4 CD4 count was associated with a 20% increased risk of post week-4 mortality (adj. HR 1.20, 1.01-1.42, p = .038). Evidence of active infection and sub-optimal immunologic response during the first month of ART are associated with death in the first year after ART initiation in those with advanced HIV disease taking TB preventative therapy. Strategies to reduce early mortality in this population warrant further investigation.

  8. Changes in pulmonary function and influencing factors after high-dose intrathoracic radio(chemo)therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, Christina [University Clinic Giessen and Marburg, Clinic for Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Marburg (Germany); Ruppiner Kliniken GmbH, Clinic for Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Neuruppin (Germany); Engenhart-Cabillic, Rita; Vorwerk, Hilke [University Clinic Giessen and Marburg, Clinic for Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Marburg (Germany); Schmidt, Michael; Huhnt, Winfried; Blank, Eyck; Sidow, Dietrich; Buchali, Andre [Ruppiner Kliniken GmbH, Clinic for Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Neuruppin (Germany)

    2017-02-15

    Using prospectively collected patient-related, dose-related, and pulmonary function test (PFT) data before radiotherapy (RT) and at several follow-up visits after RT, the time course of PFT changes after high-dose radio(chemo)therapy and influencing factors were analyzed. From April 2012 to October 2015, 81 patients with non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC), small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC), or esophageal carcinoma where treated with high-dose radio(chemo)therapy. PFT data were collected before treatment and 6 weeks, 12 weeks, and 6 months after RT. The influence of patient- and treatment-related factors on PFT was analyzed. Mean forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) constantly declined during follow-up (p = 0.001). In total, 68% of patients had a reduced FEV1 at 6 months. Mean vital capacity (VC) didn't change during follow-up (p > 0.05). Mean total lung capacity (TLC) showed a constant decline after RT (p = 0.026). At 6 months, 60% of patients showed a decline in VC and 73% in TLC. The mean diffusion capacity for carbon monoxide (DLCO) declined at 6 and 12 weeks, but recovered slightly at 6 months (p < 0.0005). At 6 months, 86% of patients had a reduced DLCO. After treatment, the partial pressure of CO{sub 2} in the blood (pCO{sub 2}) was increased and pO{sub 2} was decreased (p > 0.05). Only the pretreatment PFT classification had a significant influence on the post-RT FEV1. DLCO seems to be the most reliable indicator for lung tissue damage after thoracic RT. Ventilation parameters appear to be less reliable. Concerning patient- or treatment-related factors, no reliable conclusion can be drawn regarding which factors may be relevant. (orig.) [German] Patientenbezogene, therapiebezogene und Lungenfunktionsdaten (''pulmonary function test'', PFT) wurden vor Radiotherapie (RT) und an verschiedenen Nachsorgeterminen nach RT prospektiv gesammelt, um PFT-Veraenderungen sowie Einflussfaktoren nach Hochdosis-Radio(chemo)therapie zu

  9. Factors associated with adherence to antiretroviral therapy in HIV-infected patients in Kathmandu District, Nepal

    OpenAIRE

    Shigdel R; Klouman E; Bhandari A; Ahmed LA

    2014-01-01

    Rajesh Shigdel,1 Elise Klouman,2 Anita Bhandari,2 Luai A Ahmed11Department of Health and Care Sciences, 2Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, NorwayPurpose: There are a high number of HIV-infected patients receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) in the Kathmandu District of Nepal, but information on adherence and factors influencing it are scarce in this population. The present study aimed to estimate ART adherence am...

  10. Nonviral gene therapy approaches to hemophilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Vargas, Andrew; Hortelano, Gonzalo

    2004-04-01

    The goal of hemophilia gene therapy is to obtain long-term therapeutic levels of factor VIII (FVIII) or factor IX (FIX) without stimulating an immune response against the transgene product or the vector. The success of gene therapy is largely dependent on the development of appropriate gene delivery vectors. Both viral vectors and nonviral vectors have been considered for the development of hemophilia gene therapy. In general, viral vectors are far more efficient than nonviral gene delivery approaches and resulted in long-term therapeutic levels of FVIII or FIX in preclinical animal models. However, there are several reasons why a nonviral treatment would still be desirable, particularly because some viral vectors are associated with inflammatory reactions, that render transgene expression transient, or with an increased risk of insertional oncogenesis when random integrating vectors are used. Nonviral vectors may obviate some of these concerns. Since nonviral vectors are typically assembled in cell-free systems from well-defined components, they have significant manufacturing advantages over viral vectors. The continued development of improved nonviral gene delivery approaches offers new perspectives for gene therapy of chronic diseases including hemophilia.

  11. Risk factors for nosocomial infections in patients receiving extracorporeal membrane oxygenation supportive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Geqin; Li, Binfei; Lan, Haili; Wang, Juan; Lu, Lanfei; Feng, Xueqin; Luo, Xihua; Yan, Haizhong; Mu, Yuejing

    2017-06-22

    The aim of this study was to analyze risk factors for nosocomial infection (NI) in patients receiving extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) support. Clinical NI data were collected from patients who received ECMO support therapy, and analyzed retrospectively. Among 75 ECMO patients, 20 were found to have developed NI (infection rate 26.7%); a total of 58 pathogens were isolated, including 43 strains of gram-negative bacteria (74.1%) and 15 strains of gram-positive bacteria (25.9%). Multi-drug resistant strains were highly concentrated and were mainly shown to be Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and coagulase-negative staphylococci. Incidence of NI was related to the duration of ECMO support therapy and the total length of hospital stay, and the differences were statistically significant (P<.05). A prolonged period of ECMO support extended the hospital stay, but it did not increase the mortality rate. However, an elevated level of lactic acid increased the mortality rate in this study population. ECMO-associated secondary NIs correlated significantly with the length of hospital stay and with the duration of ECMO support. Therefore, to reduce the incidence of ECMO-associated NIs, preventive strategies that aim to shorten the duration of ECMO support therapy and avoid lengthy hospitalization should be applied, wherever possible. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Strategies to overcome resistance to epidermal growth factor receptor monoclonal antibody therapy in metastatic colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Woo-Jeong; Cha, Pu-Hyeon; Choi, Kang-Yell

    2014-08-07

    Administration of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) such as cetuximab and panitumumab in combination with conventional chemotherapy substantially prolongs survival of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). However, the efficacy of these mAbs is limited due to genetic variation among patients, in particular K-ras mutations. The discovery of K-ras mutation as a predictor of non-responsiveness to EGFR mAb therapy has caused a major change in the treatment of mCRC. Drugs that inhibit transformation caused by oncogenic alterations of Ras and its downstream components such as BRAF, MEK and AKT seem to be promising cancer therapeutics as single agents or when given with EGFR inhibitors. Although multiple therapeutic strategies to overcome EGFR mAb-resistance are under investigation, our understanding of their mode of action is limited. Rational drug development based on stringent preclinical data, biomarker validation, and proper selection of patients is of paramount importance in the treatment of mCRC. In this review, we will discuss diverse approaches to overcome the problem of resistance to existing anti-EGFR therapies and potential future directions for cancer therapies related to the mutational status of genes associated with EGFR-Ras-ERK and PI3K signalings.

  13. Preoperative risk factor analysis in orthotopic liver transplantation with pretransplant artificial liver support therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin-Zhong Yuan; Qi-Fa Ye; Ling-Ling Zhao; Ying-Zi Ming; Hong Sun; Shai-Hong Zhu; Zu-Fa Huang; Min-Min Wang

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To assess the value of pre-transplant artificial liver support in reducing the pre-operative risk factors relating to early mortality after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT).METHODS: Fifty adult patients with various stages and various etiologies undergoing OLT procedures were treated with molecular adsorbent recycling system (MARS) as preoperative liver support therapy. The study included two parts, the first one is to evaluate the medical effectiveness of single MARS treatment with some clinical and laboratory parameters, which were supposed to be the therapeutical pre-transplant risk factors, the second part is to study the patients undergoing OLT using the regression analysis on preoperative risk factors relating to early mortality (30 d)after OLT.RESULTS: In the 50 patients, the statistically significant improvement in the biochemical parameters was observed (pre-treatment and post-treatment). Eight patients avoided the scheduled Ltx due to significant relief of clinical condition or recovery of failing liver function, 8 patients died, 34 patients were successfully bridged to Ltx, the immediate outcome of this 34patients within 30d observation was: 28 kept alive and 6patients died.CONCLUSION: Pre-operative SOFA, level of creatinine,INR, TNF-α, IL-10 are the main preoperative risk factors that cause early death after operation, MARS treatment before transplantion can relieve these factors significantly.

  14. Oncological outcome and prognostic factors in the therapy of soft tissue sarcoma of the extremities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingmar Ipach

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Uniform conclusions about therapeutic concepts and survival time of bone and soft tissue sarcoma patients are difficult due to the heterogeneity of histological subtypes as well as the different responses to neoadjuvant therapy. The subject of this retrospective study was the analysis of tumour free survival, risk and prognostic factors of sarcoma patients treated by limb sparing techniques or amputation. We included 118 patients with soft tissue sarcoma of the extremities treated primarily or secondarily at our institution between 1990 and 2008 with a minimum follow-up of 12 months. Data about the tumour free survival time, operative techniques and potential prognostic factors were analysed. The tumour-specific and overall survival were significantly influenced by two factors: the grading and distant metastases present at time of diagnosis. Optimal multimodal therapeutic concepts at a specialized Cancer Center decreased the risk of local recurrence. The importance of optimal preoperative and surgical course concerning the oncological long term outcome was investigated. The decrease in local recurrence as a result of multimodal therapeutic concepts at a specialized Cancer Center was confirmed. To evaluate the individual prognosis of a patient, multiple factors have to be considered. Factors for a poor prognosis are primary metastasis, high-grade tumours and several histological entities (e.g. synovial sarcoma, not other specified.

  15. Preparation for radioactive iodine therapy is not a risk factor for the development of hyponatremia in thyroid cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jahae; Cho, Sang-Geon; Kang, Sae-Ryung; Kwon, Seong Young; Cho, Dong-Hyeok; Cho, Jin-Seong; Song, Ho-Chun

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the preparation for radioactive iodine (RAI) therapy by thyroid hormone withdrawal (THW) or a low-iodine diet (LID) can be risk factors for the development of hyponatremia in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer after thyroidectomy. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records and laboratory findings of 326 patients who underwent preparation for RAI therapy after thyroidectomy from 2012 to 2014. Demographic and clinical variables including the method of thyrotropin stimulation and duration of LID were assessed. Serum sodium was measured twice, before operation and before RAI therapy. Hyponatremia was detected in only 3 patients (0.9%) before operation, but in 15 patients (4.6%) before RAI therapy. None of the patients had severe hyponatremia after preparation for RAI therapy. Pre-RAI therapy serum sodium was correlated with the method of thyrotropin stimulation (TWH vs recombinant human thyroid stimulating hormone, P = 0.014) and duration of LID (r = −0.131, P = 0.018); however, the preparation of RAI therapy, THW and LID, did not affect the development of hyponatremia in logistic regression analysis. Preoperative serum sodium was a significant risk factor for hyponatremia during preparation for RAI therapy. Preparation for RAI therapy by THW or LID is not a risk factor for the development of hyponatremia in patients with thyroid cancer. The development of hyponatremia was neither frequent nor severe during preparation for RAI therapy. Physicians should not be greatly concerned about rare life-threatening hyponatremia during preparation for RAI therapy. PMID:28151897

  16. The factors affecting effectiveness of treatment in phages therapy, mini review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mai Huong eCHATAIN-LY

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the use of lytic bacteriophages as antimicrobial agents controlling pathogenic bacteria has appeared as a promising new alternative strategy in the face of growing antibiotic resistance which has caused problems in many fields including medicine, veterinary medicine and aquaculture. The use of bacteriophages has numerous advantages over traditional antimicrobials. The effectiveness of phage applications in fighting against pathogenic bacteria depends on several factors such as the bacteriophages/target bacteria ratio, the mode and moment of treatment, environmental conditions (pH, temperature ..., the neutralization of phage and accessibility to target bacteria, amongst others. This report presents these factors and the challenges involved in developing phage therapy applications

  17. Antiangiogenic effects of anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha therapy with infliximab in psoriatic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cañete, Juan D; Pablos, José L; Sanmartí, Raimon; Mallofré, Carmen; Marsal, Sara; Maymó, Joan; Gratacós, Jordi; Mezquita, Jovita; Mezquita, Cristobal; Cid, Maria C

    2004-05-01

    Neovascularization, with an increased number of synovial vessels with a characteristic morphology, seems to contribute to the progression of psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Accordingly, angiogenesis may be an important therapeutic target in PsA. The aim of this study was to analyze the effects of infliximab on angiogenesis in the synovial membrane of patients with PsA who responded to this therapy. The study group comprised 9 patients with PsA who were selected for the presence of active polyarthritis (including knee synovitis) despite methotrexate therapy. Clinical and biologic evaluations were performed at each visit. Arthroscopy and synovial biopsies were performed at week 0, before infliximab therapy was initiated, and at week 8, after administration of 3 intravenous infusions of infliximab (5 mg/kg). We used immunohistochemistry to identify changes in infiltrating cells and in the angiogenesis modulators alphavbeta3 integrin, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), angiopoietin 2 (Ang-2), flt-1 (VEGF receptor 1 [VEGFR-1]), kinase insert domain receptor [KDR]/flk-1 (VEGFR-2), and stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1). Neovascularization was assessed by automated histomorphometry of CD31+ vessels and by measuring alphavbeta3 expression. Rapid and significant clinical and biological improvement were observed after treatment in all patients. In the synovium, infliximab therapy induced a significant reduction in macrophages, the CD31+ vascular area, alphavbeta3+ neovessels/Ulex europaeus agglutinin+ vessels, VEGF and its receptor KDR/flk-1 (VEGFR-2), and SDF-1+ vessels. Expression of flt-1 (VEGFR-1), and SDF-1 in lining cells showed a nonsignificant reduction, whereas expression of Ang-2 increased. In 3 patients, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction confirmed the changes in some of these markers at the messenger RNA level. These results show consistent changes in several factors involved in angiogenesis regulation, in parallel with the clinical response to

  18. [Risk factors associated with failure from endoscopic therapy in acute non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jia-ying; Wang, Ye; Zhang, Jing; Ding, Shi-gang; Zhou, Li-ya; Lin, San-ren

    2010-12-18

    To determine risk factors associated with failure of endoscopic therapy in acute non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (ANVUGIB ). This was a retrospective cohort study of 223 patients admitted to Peking University Third Hospital between 1 January 2005 and 31 December 2009, with acute non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Data on clinical presentation, laboratory test, endoscopic findings, and treatment outcomes were collected. Risk factors for treatment failure were identified using multivariable Logistic regression with backward selection. Therapeutic failure rate was 19.3%(43/223). In univariate analysis, the two groups had significant difference in age, history of gastrointestinal bleeding, ASA, shock, haemoglobin level, Hct, PLT, time of endoscopic treatment, gastric ulcer, duodenal ulcer, lesion size and active spurting of blood. Multivariate Logistic regression analysis revealed that shock [odds ratio (OR) 3.058, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.295-7.221], history of gastrointestinal bleeding (OR 2.809, 95% CI 1.207-6.539), PLT>100×10⁹/L (OR 0.067, 95% CI 0.009-0.497), active spurting of blood (OR 10.390, 95% CI 2.835-38.080) and lesion size≥2.0 cm (OR 7.111, 95% CI 1.628-31.069) were risk factors associated with failure of endoscopic therapy. The number of comorbidities>1 (OR 9.580,95%CI 1.383-66.390) and active spurting of blood (OR 9.971, 95% CI 1.820-54.621) were factors related with need for surgical intervention or death. Patients with shock, history of gastrointestinal bleeding, PLTrisks for continued bleeding or rebleeding after endoscopic treatment. These patients may be more likely to benefit from aggressive post-hemostasis care.

  19. Late, severe, noninfectious diarrhea after renal transplantation: high-risk factors, therapy, and prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Y J; Wen, J Q; Cheng, K; Ming, Y Z; She, X G; Liu, H; Liu, L; Ye, Q F; Ding, B N

    2013-01-01

    Late severe noninfectious diarrhea in renal transplant recipients can lead to malnutrition and even graft loss. The purpose of this study was to evaluate risk factors associated with this condition and summarize therapy for these patients. For more than 36 months we observed a cohort of 541 recipients who underwent kidney transplantation from January 2001 to June 2007. They were provided a calcineurin inhibitor (CNI) combined with mycophenolate mofetil (MMF). The four group includes a continuous cyclosporine (CsA); a preconversion to tacrolimus and a postconversion group as well as a continuous tacrolimus group. The rate of severe late noninfectious diarrhea was compared among the four groups. Risk factors were analyzed between the diarrhea and nondiarrhea cohorts. Clinical characteristics, efficacy, and safety were observed after modifying the immunosuppressive protocol for late severe noninfectious diarrhea recipients. Twenty-eight recipients presented with late sever noninfectious diarrhea. No patients displayed chronic diarrhea in the CsA (n = 145) or preconversion group (n = 95). The rate of diarrhea was 7.31% in the postconversion and 7.35% in the tacrolimus group. Using multivariate Cox proportional hazards analysis, factors associated with an increased risk of noninfectious diarrhea were cytochrome P450(CYP)3A5 *3/*3 type, chronic renal allograft dysfunction, and patient ingestion of Tripterygium wilfordii Hook F. All diarrheal recipients experienced weight loss, hypoalbuminia, and an increased serum creatinine. All affected patients underwent adjustment of the immunosuppressive regimen to achieve remission. Renal allograft survival in recipients with diarrhea was worse than that in nondiarrheal recipients receiving tacrolimus combined with MMF. Tacrolimus with MMF increased the risk of late severe noninfectious diarrhea among renal transplant recipients compared with hosts treats with CsA plus MMF. The CYP3A5 *3/*3 type, chronic renal allograft dysfunction

  20. Treatment outcome of thymic epithelial tumor: prognostic factors and optimal postoperative radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Dong Ryul; Ahn, Yong Chan; Kim, Kwan Min; Kim, Jhin Gook; Shim, Young Mog; Han, Jung Ho [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-06-15

    This study was conducted to analyze treatment outcome and prognostic significance of World Health Organization (WHO)-defined thymic epithelial tumor (TET) subtype and to assess optimal radiation target volume in patients receiving surgery and adjuvant radiation therapy with TET. The record of 160 patients with TET, who received surgical resection at the Samsung medical Center, from December 1994 to June 2004, were reviewed. 99 patients were treated with postoperative radiation therapy (PORT). PORT was recommended when patients had more than one findings among suspicious incomplete resection or positive resection margin or Masaoka stage II {approx} IV or WHO tumor type B2 {approx} C. PORT performed to primary tumor bed only with a mean dose of 54 Gy. The prognostic factor and pattern of failure were analyzed retrospectively. The overall survival rate at 5 years was 87.3%. Age (more than 60 years 77.8%, less than 60 years 91.1%; {rho} = 0.03), Masaoka stage (I 92.2%, II 95.4%, III 82.1%, IV 67.5%; {rho} = 0.001), WHO tumor type (A-B1 96.0%, B2-C 82.3%; {rho} = 0.001), Extent of resection (R0 resection 92.3%, R1 or 2 resection 72.6%; {rho} = 0.001) were the prognostic factors according to univariate analysis. But WHO tumor type was the only significant prognostic factor according to multivariate analysis. Recurrence was observed in 5 patients of 71 Masoka stage I-III patients who received grossly complete tumor removal (R0, R1 resection ) and PORT to primary tumor bed. Mediastinal recurrence was observed in only one patients. There were no recurrence within irradiation field. WHO tumor type was the important prognostic factor to predict survival of patients with TET. This study suggest that PORT to only primary tumor bed was optimal. To avoid pleura-or pericardium-based recurrence, further study of effective chemotherapy should be investigated.

  1. Factors Affecting Patients' Perception On, and Adherence To, Anticoagulant Therapy: Anticipating the Role of Direct Oral Anticoagulants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandya, Ekta Y; Bajorek, Beata

    2017-04-01

    The role of the direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) in practice has been given extensive consideration recently, albeit largely from the clinician's perspective. However, the effectiveness and safety of using anticoagulants is highly dependent on the patient's ability to manage and take these complex, high-risk medicines. This structured narrative review explores the published literature to identify the factors underpinning patients' non-adherence to anticoagulants in atrial fibrillation (AF), and subsequently contemplates to what extent the DOACs might overcome the known challenges with traditional warfarin therapy. This review comprised a two-tier search of various databases and search platforms (CINAHL, Cochrane, Current Contents Connect, EMBASE, MEDLINE Ovid, EBSCO, PubMed, Google, Google Scholar) to yield 47 articles reporting patients perspectives on, and patients adherence to, anticoagulant therapy. The findings from the literature were synthesised under five interacting dimensions of adherence: therapy-related factors, patient-related factors, condition-related factors, social-economic factors and health system factors. Factors negatively affecting patients' day-to-day lives (especially regular therapeutic drug monitoring, dose adjustments, dietary considerations) predominantly underpin a patient's reluctance to take warfarin therapy, leading to non-adherence. Other patient-related factors underpinning non-adherence include patients' perceptions and knowledge about the purpose of anticoagulation; understanding of the risks and benefits of therapy; socioeconomic status; and expectations of care from health professionals. In considering these findings, it is apparent that the DOACs may overcome some of the barriers to traditional warfarin therapy at least to an extent, particularly the need for regular monitoring, frequent dose adjustment and dietary considerations. However, their high cost, twice-daily dosing and gastrointestinal adverse effects may present

  2. Factors related to attrition from trauma-focused cognitive behavioral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wamser-Nanney, Rachel; Steinzor, Cazzie E

    2016-12-23

    Attrition from child trauma-focused treatments such as Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT) is common; yet, the factors of children who prematurely terminate are unknown. The aim of the current study was to identify risk factors for attrition from TF-CBT. One hundred and twenty-two children (ages 3-18; M=9.97, SD=3.56; 67.2% females; 50.8% Caucasian) who received TF-CBT were included in the study. Demographic and family variables, characteristics of the trauma, and caregiver- and child-reported pretreatment symptoms levels were assessed in relation to two operational definitions of attrition: 1) clinician-rated dropout, and 2) whether the child received an adequate dose of treatment (i.e., 12 or more sessions). Several demographic factors, number of traumatic events, and children's caregiver-rated pretreatment symptoms were related to clinician-rated dropout. Fewer factors were associated with the adequate dose definition. Child Protective Services involvement, complex trauma exposure, and child-reported pretreatment trauma symptoms were unrelated to either attrition definition. Demographics, trauma characteristics, and level of caregiver-reported symptoms may help to identify clients at risk for premature termination from TF-CBT. Clinical and research implications for different operational definitions and suggestions for future work will be presented.

  3. Assessing adherence factors in patients under topical treatment: development of the Topical Therapy Adherence Questionnaire (TTAQ).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zschocke, Ina; Mrowietz, Ulrich; Lotzin, Annett; Karakasili, Eleni; Reich, Kristian

    2014-04-01

    Medication adherence rates strongly depend on favorable disease outcomes. It is known that medication adherence rates are lower for topical treatment than for systemic treatment. However, to date no validated instrument for the assessment of adherence factors in topical treatment is available. The aim of this study was to develop a new questionnaire to assess adherence risk factors in topical treatment. The development of the Topical Therapy Adherence Questionnaire (TTAQ) and Patient Preference Questionnaire (PPQ) was based on a systematic literature review, and qualitative patient focus interviews and expert focus groups' input. The psychometric properties and comprehensibility of the TTAQ and PPQ were assessed in a feasibility study with 59 psoriasis patients. Our first preliminary results indicate that the TTAQ and PPQ are psychometrically sound and reliable measures for the assessment of factors influencing topical treatment adherence. The questionnaires are currently being further developed and various parameters (e.g., time point of assessment) are currently being tested in an exploratory pilot study with ca. 2,000 psoriasis patients receiving topical treatment in a European clinical trial. The use of the final versions of TTAQ and PPQ in clinical practice may facilitate the early identification of specific non-adherence factors in patients under topical treatment, which could enable designing and applying adherence-enhancing interventions according to the patient's individual needs.

  4. Factors associated with the response to interferon-based antiviral therapies for chronic hepatitis C

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hirayuki; Enomoto; Shuhei; Nishiguchi

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus(HCV) infection is a major health concern worldwide. Interferon-α(IFN-α) therapy has been the main antiviral treatment for more than 20 years. Because of its established antitumor effects, IFNbased treatments for chronic HCV infection still have a clinical impact, particularly for patients with high risk conditions of developing hepatocellular carcinoma, such as older age and advanced liver fibrosis. As a result of exhaustive research, several viral factors, including NS5 A amino acid mutations such as the IFN sensitivitydetermining region and the IFN/ribavirin resistancedetermining region, and mutations of amino acids in the core protein region(core 70 and 91) were shown to be associated with the response to IFN-α treatment. In addition, among the host factors related to the response to IFN-α treatment, polymorphisms of the interleukin-28 B gene were identified to be the most important factor. In this article, we review the factors associated with the efficacy of IFN-α treatment for chronic HCV infection. In addition, our recent findings regarding the possible involvement of anti-IFN-α neutralizing antibodies in a non-response to pegylated-IFN-α treatment are also described.

  5. Factors associated with abrupt discontinuation of dabigatran therapy in patients with atrial fibrillation in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beshir, Semira Abdi; Chee, Kok-Han; Lo, Yoke-Lin

    2016-10-01

    Background Oral anticoagulant therapy is indicated for the prevention of stroke or other thromboembolic events. Premature discontinuation of oral anticoagulants may increase the risk of thromboembolism resulting in adverse sequelae. There are sparse data on the prevalence and the predictors of dabigatran discontinuation in Malaysian patients with atrial fibrillation. Objectives Determine the reasons and identify associated factors for abrupt discontinuation of dabigatran, assess the switching pattern and the occurrence of thromboembolic events after dabigatran discontinuation. Setting A university-affiliated tertiary hospital in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Methods The clinical and demographic data of a cohort who were initiated with dabigatran between 2010 and 2012 at the University of Malaya Medical Centre were reviewed until the date of death or on 31st December 2013. Those patients who discontinued dabigatran were further followed up until 31st December 2015 to determine the occurrence of any thromboembolic event. Main outcome measure Permanent discontinuation of dabigatran for more than 8 weeks. Results 26 (14 %) of a cohort of 192 patients discontinued dabigatran therapy during a median follow-up period of 20 (range 3-45) months. About one-half of the discontinuation occurred within the first 6 months of dabigatran use. The three most cited reasons for discontinuation are bleeding events (19 %), high out-of-pocket drug payment (19 %) and cardioversion (19 %). Heart failure [adjusted odds ratio 3.699 (95 % confidence interval 1.393-9.574)] or chronic kidney disease [adjusted odds ratio 5.211 (95 % confidence interval 1.068-23.475)] were found to be independent risk factors for abrupt dabigatran discontinuation. Patients who discontinued dabigatran received warfarin (38 %), antiplatelet agents (16 %) or no alternative antithrombotic therapy (46 %). Five of the 26 patients who discontinued dabigatran developed an ischaemic stroke within 3-34 months after

  6. Esophageal Dose Tolerance to Hypofractionated Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy: Risk Factors for Late Toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephans, Kevin L., E-mail: stephak@ccf.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Taussig Cancer Center, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Djemil, Toufik [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Taussig Cancer Center, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Diaconu, Claudiu [Cleveland Clinic Learner College of Medicine, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Reddy, Chandana A.; Xia, Ping; Woody, Neil M.; Greskovich, John [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Taussig Cancer Center, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Makkar, Vinit [Department of Medical Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Taussig Cancer Center, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Videtic, Gregory M.M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Taussig Cancer Center, Cleveland, Ohio (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: To identify factors associated with grade ≥3 treatment related late esophageal toxicity after lung or liver stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: This was a retrospective review of 52 patients with a planning target volume within 2 cm of the esophagus from a prospective registry of 607 lung and liver SBRT patients treated between 2005 and 2011. Patients were treated using a risk-adapted dose regimen to a median dose of 50 Gy in 5 fractions (range, 37.5-60 Gy in 3-10 fractions). Normal structures were contoured using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) defined criteria. Results: The median esophageal point dose and 1-cc dose were 32.3 Gy (range, 8.9-55.4 Gy) and 24.0 Gy (range, 7.8-50.9 Gy), respectively. Two patients had an esophageal fistula at a median of 8.4 months after SBRT, with maximum esophageal point doses of 51.5 and 52 Gy, and 1-cc doses of 48.1 and 50 Gy, respectively. These point and 1-cc doses were exceeded by 9 and 2 patients, respectively, without a fistula. The risk of a fistula for point doses exceeding 40, 45, and 50 Gy was 9.5% (n=2/21), 10.5% (n=2/19), and 12.5% (n=2/16), respectively. The risk of fistula for 1-cc doses exceeding 40, 45, and 50 Gy was 25% (n=2/9), 50% (n=2/4), and 50% (n=2/4), respectively. Eighteen patients received systemic therapy after SBRT (11 systemic chemotherapy, and 6 biologic agents, and 1 both). Both patients with fistulas had received adjuvant anti-angiogenic (vascular endothelial growth factor) agents within 2 months of completing SBRT. No patient had a fistula in the absence of adjuvant VEGF-modulating agents. Conclusions: Esophageal fistula is a rare complication of SBRT. In this series, fistula was seen with esophageal point doses exceeding 51 Gy and 1-cc doses greater than 48 Gy. Notably, however, fistula was seen only in those patients who also received adjuvant VEGF-modulating agents after SBRT. The potential interaction of dose and adjuvant therapy

  7. Therapy-relevant factors in adult ADHD from a cognitive behavioural perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newark, Patricia Elizabeth; Stieglitz, Rolf-Dieter

    2010-06-01

    Adult individuals with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have been suffering from this neurobiological and highly heritable disorder chronically since childhood. Resulting from their longstanding neuropsychological impairments, such as attentional problems, emotional instability, and disinhibition, they are familiar to a multiplicity of negative life outcomes and underachievement. Furthermore, a large part of this population suffers from psychiatric comorbidity. This accumulation of negative experiences has an impact on therapy-relevant factors such as the individual's self-esteem, self-efficacy, development of core beliefs/schemas, and coping strategies. Based on negative beliefs about the self, individuals confronted with difficult situations develop maladaptive coping strategies, for instance avoidance and procrastination. These strategies lead to maintenance and reinforcement of maladaptive beliefs, and as such they acquit themselves as schema-confirming. Captured in this vicious cycle, the individual sees her negative view of the self confirmed. The purpose of this paper is to illuminate these interactive factors that influence the aforementioned cycle in order to emphasize the cognitive behavioural interventions tailored to those factors on the basis of latest research. Furthermore, the authors want to attract notice to the resources people with ADHD are said to have, namely creativity and resilience. These postulated resources could be therapy-relevant by creating positive beliefs about the self, hence improving coping skills and breaking the vicious circle of negative appraisal. Taking into account personal resources and their fostering may be an important fundament for the treatment plan of adult ADHD. Information on the current state of research and theoretical approaches concerning the below-mentioned key words was gathered through MEDLINE, PsycINFO, PSYNDEXplus, and PubMed databases.

  8. Functional characteristics of coronary vasomotor function following intramyocardial gene therapy with naked DNA encoding for vascular endothelial growth factor 165

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tio, RA; Wijpkema, JS; Tan, ES; Asselbergs, FW; Hospers, GAP; Jessurun, GAJ; Zijlstra, F

    2005-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a potent angiogenic factor. VEGF gene therapy improves perfusion of ischemic myocardium in experimental models and possibly in patients with end-stage coronary artery disease. In addition to its proliferative and migratory effect on endothelial cells, it

  9. Factor structure of the Beck Depression Inventory-II among South Africans receiving antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagee, Ashraf; Nel, Adriaan; Saal, Wylene

    2014-02-01

    Considerable evidence suggests that mood disturbance is common among patients living with HIV and may be an important barrier to anti-retroviral therapy (ART) adherence. Thus the assessment of depressed mood is an important and necessary aspect of the experience of persons living with HIV as it may impact the health status of individuals directly and indirectly. We sought to determine the factor structure of the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) among a sample of 185 South Africans living with HIV and receiving ART. The mean BDI score was 16.5 (SD 12.15) with a range from 0-50 (out of a possible 63), indicating on average moderate levels of depression. Cronbach's alpha for the total scale was 0.90. Although the four factors had eigenvalues that were technically above 1.0, only three factors could logically be extracted, the combination of which accounted for 47.29% of the variance. These three factors were Cognitive, Affective and Somatic. The results indicate that the BDI-II is a reliable measure of symptoms of depression among persons living with HIV. The factor structure among South Africans receiving ART is similar to that of other samples, although surprisingly, the item assessing appetite disturbance did not load on any factor. The results of the study suggest that the BDI-II is a useful measure among South Africans living with HIV. In the context of the need to rapidly identify depressed mood among persons receiving ART in public health clinics, the BDI may be a useful instrument. We end the paper with certain cautions associated with routine screening.

  10. Solar Wind Charge Exchange and O VIII emission toward MBM 12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgar, Richard J.; Wargelin, B. J.; Raymond, J. C.; Slavin, J. D.; Smith, R. K.; Kharchenko, V.

    2006-09-01

    A Chandra observation toward MBM-12, a nearby (MBM 12 during the Chandra observation. The Solar Wind Charge Exchange mechanism can account for essentially all of the O VIII emission seen in this observation.

  11. Use of Folk Therapy in Taiwan: A Nationwide Cross-Sectional Survey of Prevalence and Associated Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Chuan Shih

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. This study investigates the prevalence of and factors associated with users of folk therapy in Taiwan. Methods. Using data from the 2005 National Health Interview Survey and the National Health Insurance Research Database, we identified 16,750 adults aged 20 years and older. Sociodemographic factors, lifestyle, medical utilization, and health behaviors were compared between people using and not using folk therapy. Adjusted odds ratios (ORs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs of factors associated with folk therapy were analyzed. Results. The one-month prevalence of folk therapy use was 6.8%, which was significantly associated with ages of 30–59 years (OR = 1.98, 95% CI = 1.49–2.63, women (OR = 1.63, 95% CI = 1.40–1.90, nonindigenous population (OR = 1.90, 95% CI = 1.14–3.17, having two or more unhealthy lifestyle habits (OR = 1.51, 95% CI = 1.26–1.81, high density of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM physicians (OR = 1.40, 95% CI = 1.20–1.62, and being ill without receiving medical care in past six months (OR = 2.11, 95% CI = 1.76–2.53. Medical care utilization of TCM and Western medicine were also associated factors for folk therapy. Conclusions. The use of folk therapy is correlated with sociodemographics, lifestyle and health behaviors.

  12. Use of Folk Therapy in Taiwan: A Nationwide Cross-Sectional Survey of Prevalence and Associated Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Chun-Chuan; Huang, Lu-Hsiang; Lane, Hsin-Long; Tsai, Chin-Chuan; Lin, Jaung-Geng; Chen, Ta-Liang; Yeh, Chun-Chieh; Liao, Chien-Chang

    2015-01-01

    Background. This study investigates the prevalence of and factors associated with users of folk therapy in Taiwan. Methods. Using data from the 2005 National Health Interview Survey and the National Health Insurance Research Database, we identified 16,750 adults aged 20 years and older. Sociodemographic factors, lifestyle, medical utilization, and health behaviors were compared between people using and not using folk therapy. Adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of factors associated with folk therapy were analyzed. Results. The one-month prevalence of folk therapy use was 6.8%, which was significantly associated with ages of 30-59 years (OR = 1.98, 95% CI = 1.49-2.63), women (OR = 1.63, 95% CI = 1.40-1.90), nonindigenous population (OR = 1.90, 95% CI = 1.14-3.17), having two or more unhealthy lifestyle habits (OR = 1.51, 95% CI = 1.26-1.81), high density of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) physicians (OR = 1.40, 95% CI = 1.20-1.62), and being ill without receiving medical care in past six months (OR = 2.11, 95% CI = 1.76-2.53). Medical care utilization of TCM and Western medicine were also associated factors for folk therapy. Conclusions. The use of folk therapy is correlated with sociodemographics, lifestyle and health behaviors.

  13. Advanced therapies for the treatment of hemophilia: future perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Monogenic diseases are ideal candidates for treatment by the emerging advanced therapies, which are capable of correcting alterations in protein expression that result from genetic mutation. In hemophilia A and B such alterations affect the activity of coagulation factors VIII and IX, respectively, and are responsible for the development of the disease. Advanced therapies may involve the replacement of a deficient gene by a healthy gene so that it generates a certain functional, structural or transport protein (gene therapy); the incorporation of a full array of healthy genes and proteins through perfusion or transplantation of healthy cells (cell therapy); or tissue transplantation and formation of healthy organs (tissue engineering). For their part, induced pluripotent stem cells have recently been shown to also play a significant role in the fields of cell therapy and tissue engineering. Hemophilia is optimally suited for advanced therapies owing to the fact that, as a monogenic condition, it does not require very high expression levels of a coagulation factor to reach moderate disease status. As a result, significant progress has been possible with respect to these kinds of strategies, especially in the fields of gene therapy (by using viral and non-viral vectors) and cell therapy (by means of several types of target cells). Thus, although still considered a rare disorder, hemophilia is now recognized as a condition amenable to gene therapy, which can be administered in the form of lentiviral and adeno-associated vectors applied to adult stem cells, autologous fibroblasts, platelets and hematopoietic stem cells; by means of non-viral vectors; or through the repair of mutations by chimeric oligonucleotides. In hemophilia, cell therapy approaches have been based mainly on transplantation of healthy cells (adult stem cells or induced pluripotent cell-derived progenitor cells) in order to restore alterations in coagulation factor expression. PMID:23237078

  14. Advanced therapies for the treatment of hemophilia: future perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liras Antonio

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Monogenic diseases are ideal candidates for treatment by the emerging advanced therapies, which are capable of correcting alterations in protein expression that result from genetic mutation. In hemophilia A and B such alterations affect the activity of coagulation factors VIII and IX, respectively, and are responsible for the development of the disease. Advanced therapies may involve the replacement of a deficient gene by a healthy gene so that it generates a certain functional, structural or transport protein (gene therapy; the incorporation of a full array of healthy genes and proteins through perfusion or transplantation of healthy cells (cell therapy; or tissue transplantation and formation of healthy organs (tissue engineering. For their part, induced pluripotent stem cells have recently been shown to also play a significant role in the fields of cell therapy and tissue engineering. Hemophilia is optimally suited for advanced therapies owing to the fact that, as a monogenic condition, it does not require very high expression levels of a coagulation factor to reach moderate disease status. As a result, significant progress has been possible with respect to these kinds of strategies, especially in the fields of gene therapy (by using viral and non-viral vectors and cell therapy (by means of several types of target cells. Thus, although still considered a rare disorder, hemophilia is now recognized as a condition amenable to gene therapy, which can be administered in the form of lentiviral and adeno-associated vectors applied to adult stem cells, autologous fibroblasts, platelets and hematopoietic stem cells; by means of non-viral vectors; or through the repair of mutations by chimeric oligonucleotides. In hemophilia, cell therapy approaches have been based mainly on transplantation of healthy cells (adult stem cells or induced pluripotent cell-derived progenitor cells in order to restore alterations in coagulation factor expression.

  15. Combined anti-tumor necrosis factor-alpha therapy and DMARD therapy in rheumatoid arthritis patients reduces inflammatory gene expression in whole blood compared to DMARD therapy alone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Edwards, C.K., 3rd; Green, J.S.; Volk, H.D.; Schiff, M.; Kotzin, B.L.; Mitsuya, H.; Kawaguchi, T.; Sakata, K.M.; Cheronis, J.; Trollinger, D.; Bankaitis-Davis, D.; Dinarello, C.A.; Norris, D.A.; Bevilacqua, M.P.; Fujita, M.; Burmester, G.R.

    2012-01-01

    Periodic assessment of gene expression for diagnosis and monitoring in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) may provide a readily available and useful method to detect subclinical disease progression and follow responses to therapy with disease modifying anti-rheumatic agents (DMARDs) or anti-TNF-alpha therapy

  16. Factors Associated with Myelosuppression Related to Low-Dose Methotrexate Therapy for Inflammatory Rheumatic Diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shunsuke Mori

    Full Text Available Severe myelosuppression is a serious concern in the management of rheumatic disease patients receiving methotrexate (MTX therapy. This study was intended to explore factors associated with the development of MTX-related myelosuppression and its disease severity.We retrospectively examined a total of 40 cases of MTX-related myelosuppression that had been filed in the registries of participating rheumatology and hematology divisions. Data before onset were compared with those of 120 controls matched for age and sex. Cytopenia was graded according to the National Cancer Institute criteria for adverse events. Data before and at onset were compared between the severe and non-severe groups.Non-use of folic acid supplements, concurrent medications, and low renal function were significantly associated with the development of myelosuppression (p < 0.001, p < 0.001, and p = 0.002, respectively. In addition, significantly lower MTX dosages, higher blood cell counts, and lower hemoglobin levels were seen in the myelosuppression group (p < 0.001. No patients exhibited leukocytopenia, neutropenia, or thrombocytopenia in routine blood monitoring taken within the past month. One-fourth developed myelosuppression within the first two months (an early-onset period. Myelosuppression was severe in approximately 40% of patients. Hypoalbuminemia and non-use of folic acid supplements were significantly associated with the severity of pancytopenia (p = 0.001 and 0.008, respectively. Besides these two factors, early onset and the use of lower doses of MTX were significantly associated with the severity of neutropenia (p = 0.003, 0.007, 0.003, and 0.002, respectively.Myelosuppression can occur abruptly at any time during low-dose MTX therapy, but severe neutropenia is more likely to occur in the early-onset period of this therapy. Contrary to our expectations, disease severity was not dependent on MTX doses. Serum albumin levels and folic acid supplementation are the

  17. INSIGHT in risk factors and treatment of inhibitors in nonsevere hemophilia A

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Velzen, A.S.

    2016-01-01

    Hemophilia A is an inherited X-linked bleeding disorder that occurs in male offspring of carrier females. In these individuals a mutation in the F8 gene, located on the X-chromosome, causes a deficiency of the factor VIII protein, clotting factor VIII. The worldwide prevalence of hemophilia is 1 in

  18. Mutagenesis in sequence encoding of human factor VII for gene therapy of hemophilia

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    B Kazemi

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: Current treatment of hemophilia which is one of the most common bleeding disorders, involves replacement therapy using concentrates of FVIII and FIX .However, these concentrates have been associated with viral infections and thromboembolic complications and development of antibodies. "nThe use of recombinant human factor VII (rhFVII is effective  for the treatment of patients with  hemophilia A or B, who develop antibodies ( referred as inhibitors against  replacement therapy , because it induces coagulation independent of FVIII and FIX. However, its short half-life and high cost have limited its use. One potential solution to this problem may be the use of FVIIa gene transfer, which would attain continuing therapeutic levels of expression from a single injection. The aim of this study was to engineer a novel hFVII (human FVII gene containing a cleavage site for the intracellular protease and furin, by PCR mutagenesis "nMethods: The sequence encoding light and heavy chains of hFVII, were amplified by using hFVII/pTZ57R and specific primers, separately. The PCR products were cloned in pTZ57R vector. "nResults and discussion: Cloning was confirmed by restriction analysis or PCR amplification using specific primers and plasmid universal primers. Mutagenesis of sequence encoding light and heavy chain was confirmed by restriction enzyme. "nConclusion: In the present study, it was provided recombinant plasmids based on mutant form of DNA encoding light and heavy chains.  Joining mutant form of DNA encoding light chain with mutant heavy chain led to a new variant of hFVII. This variant can be activated by furin and an increase in the proportion of activated form of FVII. This mutant form of hFVII may be used for gene therapy of hemophilia.

  19. Measurement of Blood Coagulation Factor Synthesis in Cultures of Human Hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinz, Stefan; Braspenning, Joris

    2015-01-01

    An important function of the liver is the synthesis and secretion of blood coagulation factors. Within the liver, hepatocytes are involved in the synthesis of most blood coagulation factors, such as fibrinogen, prothrombin, factor V, VII, IX, X, XI, XII, as well as protein C and S, and antithrombin, whereas liver sinusoidal endothelial cells produce factor VIII and von Willebrand factor. Here, we describe methods for the detection and quantification of most blood coagulation factors in hepatocytes in vitro. Hepatocyte cultures indeed provide a valuable tool to study blood coagulation factors. In addition, the generation and expansion of hepatocytes or hepatocyte-like cells may be used in future for cell-based therapies of liver diseases, including blood coagulation factor deficiencies.

  20. Factors influencing pain therapy for metastatic cancer patients in Bosnia and Herzegovina

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    Ivana Tica Sedlar

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To investigate cancer pain management and evaluate factors that could be addressed and lead to potential improvement of pain therapy. Materials and methods. Two hundred patients with metastatic cancer pain at the Department of Oncology, University Hospital Mostar, completed questionnaires about cancer pain treatment. Thirty oncologists from the Cancer Institute, University of Sarajevo and the Department of Oncology, Clinical Hospital, Mostar were asked to complete the questionnaire about cancer pain management. Results. Compliance for analgesics was statistically better (p=0.013 for patients who were regularly asked about pain than for those patients who were asked periodically. Nearly twice as many patients, whom the doctor always asked about pain, regularly took medication (65.5% versus 32.8%. There was a statistically significant, positive relationship between regular use of analgesics and the interest of the doctor about pain reduction after initiation of analgesic therapy (p=0.008. Almost half of the patients, 47%, stated that their doctor did not devote enough time to their pain problems during the interview. Statistically significantly more patients took analgesic medication regularly if they were not afraid of narcotics (p=0.006. Numerical or VAS scales in description of cancer pain were used by only 30% of interviewed oncologists. The vast majority of doctors, 86.7%, used opiates for the terminal phase of the illness. Conclusion. Assessment and the treatment of cancer pain in Bosnia and Herzegovina remains inadequate, emphasizing the need for changes to cancer pain patient care.

  1. Energy Optimization And Calculation Of Dose Absorption Enhancement Factor In Photon Activation Therapy

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    Hassan Ranjbar

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Secondary radiation such as photoelectrons, Auger electrons and characteristic radiations cause a local boost in dose for a tumor when irradiated with an external X-ray beam after being loaded with elements capable of activating the tumor, e.g.; I and Gd. Materials and Methods:  In this investigation, the MCNPX code was used for simulation and calculation of dose enhancement factor for a tumor loaded with activating elements. The designed model comprised the X-ray source, phantom (target tissue and loaded tumor with activating agent, detector, interactions modeling and results. The source was defined as monochromatic and plane surface situated at 50 cm (z = 50. Phantom geometry was a 10 × 10 × 10 cm3 cube centered at (0, 0, 0 with a 2.2 × 2.2 × 2.2 cm3 cubic tumor with a center located at 3 cm depth inside the phantom Results: Dose enhancement factor and optimum energy in radiotherapy are evaluated using the photon activation therapy method. Result show that the dose enhancement factor increases with activating concentration in the tumor. The maximum dose enhancement factor for iodine in the tumor occurs for photons in the energy range of 50-60 keV. Dose uniformity is less for lower energy photons within the activated region inside the tumor. Results indicate that the dose enhancement factor varies linearly with the activating concentration agent. Discussion and Conclusion: In this study, the obtained results point out a considerable enhancement in dose in the presence of activating agents in the tumor regions.

  2. Risk factors for pan-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteremia and the adequacy of antibiotic therapy

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    Felipe F. Tuon

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The aim of this study was to determine risk factors for acquiring carbapenemresistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteremia (CR-PA and factors associated with in-hospital mortality. METHODS: Seventy-seven cases of bacteremia caused by P. aeruginosa were evaluated in a hospital with high incidence of CR-PA. Clinical and laboratorial factors, and previous use of antibiotics were also evaluated. In one analysis, CR-PA and carbapenem-susceptible P. aeruginosa (CS-PA bacteremia were compared. A second analysis compared patients who died with survivors. RESULTS: Among 77 P. aeruginosa bacteremia, 29 were caused by CR-PA. Admission to the intensive care unit, higher number of total leukocytes, and previous use of carbapenem were statistically associated with CR-PA. In the multivariate analysis, only previous use of carbapenem (including ertapenem turned out to be a risk factor for CR-PA (p = 0.014. The 30-day mortality of patients with P. aeruginosa bloodstream infection was 44.8% for CS-PA and 54.2% for patients with CR-PA (p = 0.288. Chronic renal failure, admission to the intensive care unit, mechanical ventilation, and central venous catheter were risk factors for mortality. Incorrect treatment increased mortality of patients with bacteremia caused by CS-PA, but not for CR-SA. The odd ratio of mortality associated with incorrect therapy in patients with CS-PA was 3.30 (1.01-10.82; p = 0.043. The mortality of patients with bacteremia caused by CR-PA was unexpectedly similar regardless of antimicrobial treatment adequacy. CONCLUSION: Appropriate treatment for CS-PA bacteremia initiated within the first 24 hours was associated with lower mortality, but this cannot be extrapolated for CR-PA.

  3. Radiation Therapy without Surgery for Spinal Metastases: Clinical Outcome and Prognostic Factors Analysis for Pain Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumura, Akira; Hoshi, Manabu; Takami, Masatsugu; Tashiro, Takahiko; Nakamura, Hiroaki

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of radiation therapy (RT) for patients with spinal metastases is pain relief and control of paralysis. The aim of the present study was to assess pain relief using RT and to evaluate prognostic factors for pain control. We evaluated 97 consecutive patients, of mean age 62.7 years (range 28 to 86), with spinal metastases that had been treated by RT. We evaluated the effects of RT using pain level assessed using a drug grading scale based on the World Health Organization standards. The following potential prognostic factors for pain control of RT were evaluated using multivariate logistic regression analysis: age, gender, tumor type, performance status (PS), number of spinal metastases, and a history of chemotherapy. Among the 97 patients who underwent RT for pain relief, 68 patients (70.1%) presented with pain reduction. PS (odds ratio: 1.931; 95% confidence interval: 1.244 to 2.980) was revealed by multivariate logistic regression analysis to be the most important prognostic factor for pain control using RT. In conclusion, we found that RT was more effective for patients with spinal metastases while they maintained their PS.

  4. Factors associated with intentional and unintentional non-adherence to adjuvant endocrine therapy following breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brett, J; Fenlon, D; Boulton, M; Hulbert-Williams, N J; Walter, F M; Donnelly, P; Lavery, B; Morgan, A; Morris, C; Watson, E

    2016-11-30

    Adherence to adjuvant endocrine therapy (AET) following breast cancer is known to be suboptimal despite its known efficacy in reducing recurrence and mortality. This study aims to investigate factors associated with non-adherence and inform the development of interventions to support women and promote adherence. A questionnaire survey to measure level of adherence, side effects experienced, beliefs about medicine, support received and socio-demographic details was sent to 292 women 2-4 years post breast cancer diagnosis. Differences between non-adherers and adherers to AET were explored, and factors associated with intentional and unintentional non-adherence are reported. Approximately one quarter of respondents, 46 (22%), were non-adherers, comprising 29 (14%) intentional non-adherers and 17 (8%) unintentional non-adherers. Factors significantly associated with intentional non-adherence were the presence of side effects (p adherence were younger age (adherence and unintentional non-adherence. Differentiation between the two types of non-adherence may help tailor support and advice interventions. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Intravenous immunoglobulin therapy and systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zandman-Goddard, Gisele; Levy, Yair; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2005-12-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multisystem autoimmune disease with diverse manifestations. We suggest that intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) therapy may be beneficial and safe for various manifestations in SLE. A structured literature search of articles published on the efficacy of IVIg in the treatment of SLE between 1983 and 2005 was conducted. We searched the terms "IVIg," "intravenous immunoglobulin," "lupus," "SLE," and "systemic lupus erythematosus." The various clinical manifestations of SLE that were reported to be successfully treated by IVIg in case reports include autoimmune hemolytic anemia, acquired factor VIII inhibitors, acquired von Willebrand disease, pure red cell aplasia, thrombocytopenia, pancytopenia, myelofibrosis, pneumonitis, pleural effusion, pericarditis, myocarditis, cardiogenic shock, nephritis, end-stage renal disease, encephalitis, neuropsychiatric lupus, psychosis, peripheral neuropathy, polyradiculoneuropathy, and vasculitis. The most extensive experience is with lupus nephritis. There are only a few case series of IVIg use in patients with SLE with various manifestations, in which the response rate to IVIg therapy ranged from 33 to 100%. We suggest that IVIg devoid of sucrose, at a dose of 2 g/kg over a 5-d period given uniformly and at a slow infusion rate in patients without an increased risk for thromboembolic events or renal failure, is a safe and beneficial adjunct therapy for cases of SLE that are resistant to or refuse conventional treatment. The duration of therapy is yet to be established. Controlled trials are warranted.

  6. The risk of tuberculosis related to tumour necrosis factor antagonist therapies: a TBNET consensus statement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solovic, I.; Sester, M.; Gomez-Reino, J.J.

    2010-01-01

    a history of bacille Calmette-Guerin vaccination, tuberculin skin testing is recommended to screen all adult candidates for TNF antagonist treatment for the presence of latent infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Moreover, paediatric practice suggests concomitant use of both the tuberculin skin test......Anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF) monoclonal antibodies or soluble TNF receptors have become an invaluable treatment against chronic inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease and psoriasis. Individuals who are treated with TNF antagonists are at an increased...... risk of reactivating latent infections, especially tuberculosis (TB). Following TNF antagonist therapy, the relative risk for TB is increased up to 25 times, depending on the clinical setting and the TNF antagonist used. Interferon-gamma release assays or, as an alternative in individuals without...

  7. The risk of tuberculosis related to tumour necrosis factor antagonist therapies: a TBNET consensus statement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solovic, I; Sester, M; Gomez-Reino, J J

    2010-01-01

    of bacille Calmette-Guérin vaccination, tuberculin skin testing is recommended to screen all adult candidates for TNF antagonist treatment for the presence of latent infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Moreover, paediatric practice suggests concomitant use of both the tuberculin skin test......Anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF) monoclonal antibodies or soluble TNF receptors have become an invaluable treatment against chronic inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease and psoriasis. Individuals who are treated with TNF antagonists are at an increased...... risk of reactivating latent infections, especially tuberculosis (TB). Following TNF antagonist therapy, the relative risk for TB is increased up to 25 times, depending on the clinical setting and the TNF antagonist used. Interferon-¿ release assays or, as an alternative in individuals without a history...

  8. Risk factors for treatment-limiting toxicities in patients starting nevirapine-containing antiretroviral therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kesselring, Anouk M; Wit, Ferdinand W; Sabin, Caroline A;

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This collaboration of seven observational clinical cohorts investigated risk factors for treatment-limiting toxicities in both antiretroviral-naive and experienced patients starting nevirapine-based combination antiretroviral therapy (NVPc). METHODS: Patients starting NVPc after 1...... to treatment-limiting toxicities and/or patient/physician choice (TOXPC, n = 10,186). Patients were classified according to prior antiretroviral treatment experience and CD4 cell count/viral load at start NVPc. Models were stratified by cohort and adjusted for age, sex, nadir CD4 cell count, calendar year...... of starting NVPc and mode of transmission. RESULTS: Median time from starting NVPc to TOXPC and HSR were 162 days [interquartile range (IQR) 31-737] and 30 days (IQR 17-60), respectively. In adjusted Cox analyses, compared to naive patients with a low CD4 cell count, treatment-experienced patients with high...

  9. Factores relacionados con rehusar el tratamiento antirretroviral en prisión Factors related to refuse antiretroviral therapy in prison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Sordo del Castillo

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: A pesar de los beneficios sobre la morbilidad y la mortalidad que tiene el tratamiento antirretroviral de gran actividad, hay pacientes seropositivos que rehúsan tomarlo. Las prisiones nos permiten acceder con más facilidad a esta población. Objetivo: Determinar las características psicosociales de los reclusos que rehúsan el tratamiento antirretroviral. Metodología: Estudio transversal realizado a 580 reclusos seropositivos de 3 cárceles andaluzas. Como variable dependiente se estableció estar en tratamiento o rehusarlo. Las variables independientes fueron: sociodemográficas, psicosociales, relacionadas con el medio penitenciario, clínicas, y relacionadas con el estado de salud y con las drogodependencias. Se realizó un análisis de regresión logística para determinar qué factores se relacionaban con rehusar el tratamiento antirretroviral. Resultados: Al 73,1% de los reclusos seropositivos se les recomendaba el tratamiento con antirretrovirales. De éstos, el 23,1% rechazaba tomarlo, mientras el 76,9% lo tomaba. Los factores relacionados con los reclusos que rehusaban el tratamiento antirretroviral fueron una carga viral elevada, una peor salud autopercibida, un mayor número de entradas en la cárcel y ser visitados por personas diferentes a los familiares. Conclusiones: Hay un grupo de reclusos con características propias que rechazan el tratamiento antirretroviral, sobre el que deben realizarse intervenciones específicas encaminadas a que conozcan las consecuencias de su decisión sobre la evolución de su enfermedad.Introduction: Despite the benefits of highly-active antiretroviral therapy (HAART on morbidity and mortality, some seropositive patients refuse to accept this treatment. Prisons provide easier access to this population. Objective: To determine the psychosocial characteristics of prisoners who refuse HAART. Methods: We performed a cross-sectional study in 580 seropositive prisoners in 3 hospitals in

  10. Antihemophilic factor (recombinant plasma/albumin-free method for the management and prevention of bleeding episodes in patients with hemophilia A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Pipe

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Steven PipeDepartment of Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USAAbstract: Hemophilia is a rare genetic bleeding disorder that, if not adequately controlled, is associated with life-threatening bleeding events and serious and costly complications, primarily from joint damage. The advent of effective clotting factor replacement therapy for patients with hemophilia is considered one of the foremost medical advances of the 20th century. The last 3 decades of experience in hemophilia care have witnessed the effectiveness of the care of patients with hemophilia within specialized comprehensive care centers, advances in factor replacement therapies, the benefits of prophylaxis over on-demand replacement therapy, and the role of aggressive management of joint disease to prevent dysfunction. Ongoing challenges, including the management of inhibitors to factor therapies and the consequences of thousands of patients with hemophilia becoming infected with human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitis C virus in the 1980s from contaminated plasma-derived factor concentrates, have highlighted the need for vigilance with respect to clotting factor product safety, access to care, and a full complement of choice of factor replacement therapies. Advate® (antihemophilic factor [recombinant] plasma/albumin-free method [rAHF-PFM] is the first recombinant factor VIII therapy manufactured without human or animal protein additives to eliminate the risk of pathogen transmission that could be carried by these additives. Preclinical studies established bioequivalence with recombinant antihemophilic factor (Recombinate®, a product with 16 years of clinical experience. Currently licensed in 44 countries worldwide, rAHF-PFM has over 7 years of clinical research within 5 global studies supporting its safety and efficacy in the treatment of patients with hemophilia A.Keywords: factor VIII, hemophilia A, recombinant proteins, clinical

  11. Multidisciplinary therapy reduces risk factors for metabolic syndrome in obese adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchini, Josiane Aparecida Alves; da Silva, Danilo Fernandes; Nardo, Claudia Christina Sanchez; Carolino, Idalina Diair Regla; Hernandes, Florencio; Nardo, Nelson

    2013-02-01

    This study aims to assess the effects of a 16-week multidisciplinary program of obesity treatment on the control of metabolic syndrome (MS) and dyslipidemia in obese adolescents. Eighty-six adolescents aged 10-18 years were allocated in either the intervention group (IG; n = 44) or control group (CG; n = 42). IG was submitted to a multidisciplinary intervention based on cognitive behavioral therapy that aimed to modify eating habits and exercise behavior. We analyzed, before and after the intervention period, anthropometric parameters, body composition, bone mineral density, cardiorespiratory fitness, blood pressure, glucose, insulin, and lipid profile of the subjects. MS was classified according to International Diabetes Federation (2007) and the presence of dyslipidemia according to Back et al. (Arq Bras Cardiol 85:4-36, 2005). In the beginning of the intervention, the median number (range) of risk factors for MS present was 2.0 (0.0-5.0) in the IG and 2.0 (0.0-4.0) in the CG. After the intervention, this parameter reduced significantly in the IG (1.0 (0.0-5.0); p = 0.004) while no change was observed in the CG (2.0 (0.0-4.0); p = 0.349). In addition, we observed improvements in body mass index, waist circumference, hip circumference, maximal oxygen uptake, absolute and relative body fat, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, and total cholesterol in the IG which was not identified in the CG. Conclusio n: We suggest that a 16-week multidisciplinary intervention based on cognitive behavioral therapy was adequate to reduce risk factors for MS in obese adolescents.

  12. Oxidant and antioxidant events during epidermal growth factor therapy to cutaneous wound healing in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalay, Zeynep; Cevher, Sule Coskun

    2012-08-01

    Cutaneous wound healing is a highly complex process, which includes inflammation, cell proliferation, matrix deposition and remodelling phases. Various growth factors, like epidermal growth factor (EGF), play an important role during wound healing. However, little is known about relationship between EGF and oxidant-antioxidant events in cutaneous wound healing models. Thus we planned to evaluate the connection between EGF therapy and oxidative stress in dermal tissue followed by wounding. Fifty-four adult male Wistar-albino rats were randomly divided into three groups: control, untreated and topical EGF administrated group. A linear full-thickness excision of 40 mm in length on both sides of spinal cord was made on the back of each rat and sutured under anaesthesia and sterile conditions. Excision was closed with 4/0 atraumatic silk suture. EGF solution was freshly prepared at 10 ng/ml dose in thilotears gel under aseptic conditions. Following the surgery, 1 ml of EGF solution was administered to wound strips one time in everyday. The animals were euthanised and wound tissues were collected on days 1, 5, 7 and 14. Thiobarbituric acid reactive substans (TBARS), glutathione (GSH), reactive nitrogen oxide species (NOx), ascorbic acid levels and superoxide dismutase activity were measured spectrophotometrically. TBARS levels decreased and NOx levels increased on day 5 after operation, and GSH levels were increased on day 14 in EGF administered group compared with untreated group. Our data showed that EGF may act like an antioxidant by scavenging toxic oxidation products in wound tissue. In addition, it may contribute healing of the wound tissue in earlier stages and suggest a potential effective role for antioxidant therapies, especially until day 5.

  13. Delayed xenograft rejection of pig-to-baboon cardiac transplants after cobra venom factor therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, T; Taniguchi, S; Neethling, F A; Rose, A G; Hancock, W W; Ye, Y; Niekrasz, M; Kosanke, S; Wright, L J; White, D J; Cooper, D K

    1997-11-15

    This study sought to (i) investigate the efficacy of cobra venom factor (CVF) in preventing hyperacute rejection (HAR) after pig-to-baboon heart transplantation, (ii) examine the effect of additional splenectomy (Spx) and pharmacologic immunosuppression (IS), and (iii) study delayed graft rejection when HAR is avoided by complement depletion. Eleven recipient baboons received heterotopic pig heart transplants. Three received either no therapy or IS (cyclosporine + methylprednisolone +/- cyclophosphamide +/- methotrexate) at clinically well-tolerated doses, with graft survival for only 40, 32, and 15 min, respectively. Two received CVF+/-Spx, which extended survival to 5 and 6 days, respectively. Six underwent Spx + CVF therapy + IS; graft survival was 3 hr (technical complication), 6 days (death from sepsis), 10, 12, and 22 days (vascular rejection), and <25 days (euthanized for viral pneumonia with a functioning graft that showed histopathologic features of vascular rejection). Dense deposition of IgM and, to a lesser extent, IgG and IgA were seen on the endothelial cells within 1 hr of transplantation, but only trace levels of complement deposition were present in CVF-treated recipients. Within approximately 5-12 days, cardiac xenografts showed progressive infiltration by mononuclear cells, consisting primarily of activated macrophages producing tumor necrosis factor-alpha and small numbers of natural killer cells; T and B cells were absent. We conclude that (i) CVF prevents HAR, (ii) the addition of Spx + IS delays rejection, but (iii) the early deposition of antibody leads to progressive graft injury, resulting in (iv) delayed vascular rejection. Our findings indicate that the features of delayed xenograft rejection described in small animal models also occur in the pig-to-baboon model, and that rejection may occur in a complement-independent manner from the effects of antibody and/or host macrophages.

  14. Predictors of response to anti-tumor necrosis factor therapy in ulcerative colitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Evanthia; Zampeli; Michalis; Gizis; Spyros; I; Siakavellas; Giorgos; Bamias

    2014-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis(UC) is an immune-mediated, chronic inflammatory disease of the large intestine. Its course is characterized by flares of acute inflammation and periods of low-grade chronic inflammatory activity or remission. Monoclonal antibodies against tumor necrosis factor(anti-TNF) are part of the therapeutic armamentarium and are used in cases of moderate to severe UC that is refractory to conventional treatment with corticosteroids and/or immunosuppressants. Therapeutic response to these agents is not uniform and a large percentage of patients either fail to improve(primary non-response) or lose response after a period of improvement(secondary non-response/loss of response). In addition, the use of anti-TNF agents has been related to uncommon but potentially serious adverse effects that preclude their administration or lead to their discontinuation. Finally, use of these medications is associated with a considerable cost for the health system. The identification of parameters thatmay predict response to anti-TNF drugs in UC would help to better select for patients with a high probability to respond and minimize risk and costs for those who will not respond. Analysis of the major clinical trials and the accumulated experience with the use of anti-TNF drugs in UC has resulted to the report of such prognostic factors. Included are clinical and epidemiological characteristics, laboratory markers, endoscopic indicators and molecular(immunological/genetic) signatures. Such predictive parameters of long-term outcomes may either be present at the commencement of treatment or determined during the early period of therapy. Validation of these prognostic markers in large cohorts of patients with variable characteristics will facilitate their introduction into clinical practice and the best selection of UC patients who will benefit from anti-TNF therapy.

  15. Factors Associated with Delay in Thrombolytic Therapy in Patients with ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahrooz Yazdani

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Treatment delay in the management of ST-elevation myocardial infarction conversely correlates with prognosis and survival of the patients. This study aimed to investigate factors associated with delay in the thrombolytic therapy of these patients in Tehran. Methods: Between 2007 and 2010, the interval between the self-reported time of the onset of symptoms and initiation of the thrombolytic agent in 513 patients with a diagnosis of acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction was recorded. Medical history and socio-demographic characteristics of the patients treated within two hours after the onset of symptoms and patients treated after two hours from the onset of symptoms were compared, and the odds ratios were calculated using logistic regression. Results: The mean age of the patients was 61.2 (SD = 11.1 years, and 76% of the patients were male. The median time between the onset of symptoms and treatment was 158 (SD = 30.4 minutes. Mean for decision time was 61 (SD = 19, which was responsible for 83% of the entire treatment delay. The mean transportation time was 34 (SD = 12 minutes, and the median door-to-needle time was 44 minutes. Odds ratio for history of diabetes mellitus was 1.90 (95% CI: 1.26-2.87, for hypertension was 1.55 (95% CI: 1.08-2.23, and for prior coronary heart disease was 1.47 (95% CI: 1.17-1.84. Conclusion: The most important factor associated with delay in treatment was decision time. Improving emergency medical services dispatch time, obtaining pre-hospital electrocardiograms for early diagnosis, and pre-hospital initiation of thrombolytic therapy may reduce the delay time.

  16. Concurrent Intervention With Exercises and Stabilized Tumor Necrosis Factor Inhibitor Therapy Reduced the Disease Activity in Patients With Ankylosing Spondylitis: A Meta-Analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Liang, Hui; Li, Wen-Rong; Zhang, Hua; Tian, Xu; Wei, Wei; Wang, Chun-Mei

    2015-01-01

    Since the use of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitor therapy is becoming wider, the effects of concurrent intervention with exercises and stabilized TNF inhibitors therapy in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) are different...

  17. Factors associated with the decrease in hepatitis B surface antigen titers following interferon therapy in patients with chronic hepatitis B: Is interferon and adefovir combination therapy effective?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Yoshihiko; Seo, Yasushi; Hayashi, Hiroki; Hatazawa, Yuri; Hirano, Hirotaka; Minami, Akihiro; Kawano, Yuki; Saito, Masaya; Ninomiya, Toshiaki; Sugano, Masahiko; Yamada, Hajime; Kitajima, Naoto; Yoon, Seitetsu; Hayashi, Yoshitake

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of antiviral therapy in chronic hepatitis B (CHB) is generally to achieve a decrease and ultimately disappearance of HBs antigen (HBsAg). Interferon (IFN) therapy of CHB appears to be less effective in Asian countries than in European countries, and the advantage of IFN and nucleotide(s) analog (NA) combination therapy has yet to be fully investigated. The present study focused on the factors associated with a decrease in HBs antigen following IFN monotherapy or IFN + NA combination therapy. A total of 35 patients with CHB who received IFN-based therapy (mean ± standard deviation age 36.7±8.5 years; 27 males and 8 females) were enrolled in this study. Of the 35 patients, 21 patients received pegylated IFN monotherapy and 14 patients received IFN and adefovir (ADV) combination therapy. We examined the factors associated with reductions in the HBsAg titer of >1.0 log IU/ml from the initial HBsAg titer to the end of treatment and to 24 weeks after treatment. Although 13 patients (37%) had a reduction in HBsAg of >1.0 IU/ml at the end of treatment, it was only maintained to 24 weeks after treatment in 7 patients (20%). The HBV core-related antigen (HBcrAg) titer before treatment was significantly higher in patients with a decrease in HBsAg at the end of treatment than in patients without a decrease in HBsAg (6.56±0.78 vs. 5.30±1.66 log IU/ml, P2 times from baseline occurred significantly more frequently in patients with a decrease in HBsAg (62 vs. 14%, Pdecrease in HBsAg was significantly greater in patients who received IFN monotherapy than in patients who received IFN and ADV combination therapy (43 vs. 29%, Pdecrease in HBsAg titers after IFN-based therapy. The efficacy of IFN and ADV combination therapy was not apparent in terms of a reduction in the HBsAg titer.

  18. Combined anti-tumor necrosis factortherapy and DMARD therapy in rheumatoid arthritis patients reduces inflammatory gene expression in whole blood compared to DMARD therapy alone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl K Edwards

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Periodic assessment of gene expression for diagnosis and monitoring in rheumatoid arthritis (RA may provide a readily available and useful method to detect subclinical disease progression and follow responses to therapy with disease modifying anti-rheumatic agents (DMARDs or anti-TNF-α therapy. We used quantitative real-time PCR to compare peripheral blood gene expression profiles in active ("unstable" RA patients on DMARDs, stable RA patients on DMARDs, and stable RA patients treated with a combination of a DMARD and an anti-TNF-α agent (infliximab or etanercept to healthy human controls. The expression of 48 inflammatory genes were compared between healthy controls (N=122, unstable DMARD patients (N=18, stable DMARD patients (N=26, and stable patients on combination therapy (N=20. Expression of 13 genes was very low or undetectable in all study groups. Compared to healthy controls, patients with unstable RA on DMARDs exhibited increased expression of 25 genes, stable DMARD patients exhibited increased expression of 14 genes and decreased expression of five genes, and combined therapy patients exhibited increased expression of six genes and decreased expression of 10 genes. These findings demonstrate that active RA is associated with increased expression of circulating inflammatory markers whereas increases in inflammatory gene expression are diminished in patients with stable disease on either DMARD or anti-TNF-α therapy. Furthermore, combination DMARD and anti-TNF-α therapy is associated with greater reductions in circulating inflammatory gene expression compared to DMARD therapy alone. These results suggest that assessment of peripheral blood gene expression may prove useful to monitor disease progression and response to therapy.

  19. A pilot study of factors associated with glycaemic control in adults with Type 1 diabetes mellitus on insulin pump therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, W; Frampton, R; Wright, K; Fattore, S; Shadbolt, B; Perampalam, S

    2016-02-01

    To identify the knowledge and management factors associated with glycaemic control among adults with Type 1 diabetes mellitus treated with insulin pump therapy. A cross-sectional study of adults with Type 1 diabetes mellitus on insulin pump therapy for at least 12 months (n = 50, 18-70 years old) was undertaken between December 2013 and May 2014. A new questionnaire was developed to evaluate participants' knowledge and management related to insulin pump therapy, and were correlated with insulin pump data, HbA1c and frequency of hypoglycaemia. Participants who changed their insulin pump settings when indicated had significantly better glycaemic control than those who did not (P = 0.04). Multivariate logistic regression analysis found that better overall insulin pump therapy management was a significant predictor of better glycaemic control (odds ratio 4.45, 95% confidence interval 1.61-12.3; P = 0.004) after adjusting for potential confounders including age, gender, duration of diabetes and insulin pump therapy. However, overall insulin pump therapy knowledge was not a significant predictor of glycaemic control (P = 0.058). There was no significant association between frequency of hypoglycaemia and insulin pump therapy knowledge or management. We identified some key knowledge and management factors associated with glycaemic control in adults with Type 1 diabetes mellitus on insulin pump therapy using a newly designed questionnaire. The pilot study assessed the clinical utility of this evaluation tool, which may facilitate provision of targeted education to insulin pump therapy users to achieve optimal glycaemic control. © 2015 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine © 2015 Diabetes UK.

  20. Leukocytoclastic Vasculitis as a Complication of Recombinant Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor Therapy in a Heart Transplant Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanbattista Ippoliti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Recombinant granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rG-CSF is a myeloid growth factor that is widely used in haematology to recover neutropenia secondary to myelosuppressive chemotherapy. Leukocytoclastic vasculitis is an acknowledged side effect of the above therapy. Its pathogenesis involves many mechanisms that collectively induce an increase in neutrophil function and a subsequent release of cytokines. Here, we report a case of leukocytoclastic vasculitis proven by skin biopsy, following the use of rG-CSF in a heart transplant patient with leukopenia secondary to immunosuppressive therapy.

  1. Systemic delivery of factor IX messenger RNA for protein replacement therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaswamy, Suvasini; Tonnu, Nina; Tachikawa, Kiyoshi; Limphong, Pattraranee; Vega, Jerel B.; Karmali, Priya P.; Chivukula, Pad; Verma, Inder M.

    2017-01-01

    Safe and efficient delivery of messenger RNAs for protein replacement therapies offers great promise but remains challenging. In this report, we demonstrate systemic, in vivo, nonviral mRNA delivery through lipid nanoparticles (LNPs) to treat a Factor IX (FIX)-deficient mouse model of hemophilia B. Delivery of human FIX (hFIX) mRNA encapsulated in our LUNAR LNPs results in a rapid pulse of FIX protein (within 4–6 h) that remains stable for up to 4–6 d and is therapeutically effective, like the recombinant human factor IX protein (rhFIX) that is the current standard of care. Extensive cytokine and liver enzyme profiling showed that repeated administration of the mRNA–LUNAR complex does not cause any adverse innate or adaptive immune responses in immune-competent, hemophilic mice. The levels of hFIX protein that were produced also remained consistent during repeated administrations. These results suggest that delivery of long mRNAs is a viable therapeutic alternative for many clotting disorders and for other hepatic diseases where recombinant proteins may be unaffordable or unsuitable. PMID:28202722

  2. Changing Incidence and Risk Factors for Kaposi Sarcoma by Time Since Starting Antiretroviral Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wyss, Natascha; Zwahlen, Marcel; Bohlius, Julia

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND:  Kaposi sarcoma (KS) remains a frequent cancer in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patients starting combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). We examined incidence rates and risk factors for developing KS in different periods after starting cART in patients from European...... observational HIV cohorts. METHODS:  We included HIV-positive adults starting cART after 1 January 1996. We analyzed incidence rates and risk factors for developing KS up to 90 and 180 days and 1, 2, 5, and 8 years after cART start and fitted univariable and multivariable Cox regression models. RESULTS:  We...... included 109 461 patients from 21 prospective clinical cohorts in Europe with 916 incident KS cases. The incidence rate per 100 000 person-years was highest 6 months after starting cART, at 953 (95% confidence interval, 866-1048), declining to 82 (68-100) after 5-8 years. In multivariable analyses adjusted...

  3. Effect of androgen deprivation therapy on cardiovascular risk factors in prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahnaz Roayaei

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Androgen deprivation is the basis of treatment for advanced stages of prostate cancer. Cardiovascular disease may be a risk factor for mortality in prostate cancer. Therefore, we decided to evaluate the effect of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT on the cardiovascular risk factors in patients with prostate cancer. Materials and Methods: In a cross-sectional study on 2011, 35 patients suffering from metastatic prostate cancer as candidates for ADT were enrolled. Serum levels of fasting blood sugar (FBS, triglyceride (TG and total cholesterol (TC were measured at the beginning and after the 5 th month of ADT. Results: The mean level of TG increased significantly from 130.82 ± 41.57 mg/dl to 150.05 ± 48.29 mg/dl (P < 0.012. Furthermore, serum level of TC increased from 197.62 ± 40.71 mg/dl to 212.54 ± 38.25 mg/dl, which is statistically significant (P < 0.001. A non-significant increase in the serum level of FBS from 96.74 ± 14.04 mg/dl to 99.17 ± 15.23 mg/dl was also seen (P = 0.27. Conclusion: ADT in prostate cancer may lead to an increase in TG and TC levels. In patients with a high risk of cardiovascular disease patient′s lipid profile should be considered during ADT.

  4. Factors influencing the outcome of idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss treated with hyperbaric oxygen therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Körpinar, Sefika; Alkan, Zeynep; Yiğit, Ozgür; Gör, Ayşe Pelin; Toklu, Akin Savaş; Cakir, Burak; Soyuyüce, Ozlem Gedik; Ozkul, Haluk

    2011-01-01

    Idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSNHL) is an otologic emergency with an incidence of about 5-20 per 100,000 of the population per year. There is no universally accepted standard protocol for the treatment of patients with ISSNHL. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT), was first reported to improve the outcome following acute inner ear disorders during the late 1960s by both French and German authors. The increase in perilymph oxygenation produced by HBOT provides logical basis for the use of this treatment modality in ISSNHL. We reviewed the records of 97 cases that received HBOT for SSNHL to identify the factors that may affect the treatment outcomes. The effects of age, gender, affected ear, status of the contralateral ear, symptoms associated with hearing loss, presence of a cardiovascular disease, dyslipidemia, history of diabetes mellitus, seasonal factor, smoking, degree of hearing loss, audiogram type, medical treatments provided prior to HBOT, onset time, and number of HBOT sessions were evaluated. The mean hearing gain in all cases after the HBOT was 29.5 dB. The gains were statistically significant in the following cases: early onset of HBOT (p = 0.016), higher number of HBOT sessions (p hearing loss (p = 0.011). The success rate was significantly lower in cases with high frequency-descending audiogram configuration (p hearing loss.

  5. Microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF – from Waardenburg syndrome genetics to melanoma therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Šamija

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF was first discovered as protein coded by gene whose mutations are associated with Waardenburg syndrome. Later, MITF was shown to be key transcription factor regulating melanogenesis. Further studies have shown that in addition to regulating melanogenesis MITF also plays central role in regulation of melanocyte development and survival. MITF gene is amplified in a proportion of melanomas and ectopic MITF expression can transform melanocytes so MITF can function as melanoma “lineage survival” oncogene. Different studies have further revealed MITF’s important but complex role in tumorigenesis and progression of melanoma. As expected from its important role in melanocytes and melanoma MITF is intricately regulated on all the levels from transcription to post-translational modifications. Although complex mechanisms of MITF functioning are still being revealed, MITF already has a valuable role in managing melanoma patients. Immunohistochemical analysis of MITF has shown both diagnostic and prognostic value in patients with melanoma. MITF is also a valuable specific marker for detection of circulating melanoma cells by reverse-transcription – polymerase chain reaction. MITF has recently been investigated as a potential target for melanoma therapy.

  6. Implications of an updated ultraviolet background for the ionization mechanisms of intervening Ne VIII absorbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Tanvir; Khaire, Vikram; Srianand, Raghunathan; Muzahid, Sowgat; Pathak, Amit

    2017-04-01

    Ne VIII absorbers seen in QSO spectra are useful tracers of warm ionized gas, when collisional ionization is the dominant ionization process. While photoionization by the ultraviolet background (UVB) is a viable option, it tends to predict large line-of-sight thickness for the absorbing gas. Here, we study the implications of the recently updated UVB at low z to understand the ionization mechanisms of intervening Ne VIII absorbers. With the updated UVB, one typically needs higher density and metallicity to reproduce the observed ionic column densities under photoionization. Both reduce the inferred line-of-sight thicknesses of the absorbers. We find a critical density of ≥5 × 10-5 cm-3 above which the observed N({Ne VIII})/N({O VI}) can be reproduced by pure collisional processes. If the gas is of near solar metallicity (as measured for the low ions) then the cooling time-scales will be small (<108 yrs). Therefore, a continuous injection of heat is required in order to enhance the detectability of the collisionally ionized gas. Using photoionization models we find that in almost all Ne VIII systems the inferred low ion metallicity is near solar or supersolar. If we assume the Ne VIII phase to have similar metallicities then photoionization can reproduce the observed N({Ne VIII})/N({O VI}) without the line-of-sight thickness being unreasonably large and avoids cooling issues related to the collisional ionization at these metallicities. However, the indication of broad Lyα absorption in a couple of systems, if true, suggests that the Ne VIII phase is distinct from the low ion phase having much lower metallicity.

  7. Influencing and moderating factors analyzed in the group art therapy of two schizophrenic inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Chung-Chieh; Ku, Yung-Wen

    2015-12-01

    Art therapy has been considered a guideline treatment for schizophrenia. Due to difficulty in the outcome measurement, the research is difficult and controversial. Here, we presented two schizophrenic patients receiving the regular art group therapy. We compared their characteristics and different outcome. Art therapy is difficult to quantify. However, we could qualify the improvement from the individual case. Further study might be focus on how to make appropriate qualification of art therapy and individualized difference instead of enrollment of huge data bank.

  8. Gastroduodenal Complications After Concurrent Chemoradiation Therapy in Patients With Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Endoscopic Findings and Risk Factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chon, Young Eun [Department of Internal Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seong, Jinsil [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Beom Kyung [Department of Internal Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cha, Jihye [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seung Up; Park, Jun Yong; Ahn, Sang Hoon; Han, Kwang-Hyub; Chon, Chae Yoon [Department of Internal Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Gastroenterology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Liver Cirrhosis Clinical Research Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Sung Kwan, E-mail: kaarma@yuhs.ac [Department of Internal Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Gastroenterology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Do Young, E-mail: dyk1025@yuhs.ac [Department of Internal Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Gastroenterology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Liver Cirrhosis Clinical Research Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: Concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CCRT) is useful in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), but little is known about radiation-induced gastroduodenal complications following therapy. To determine risk factors, we investigated the prevalence and patterns of gastroduodenal complications following CCRT using endoscopy. Methods and Materials: Enrolled in the study were 123 patients treated with CCRT for unresectable HCC between January 1998 and December 2005. Radiation-induced gastroduodenal complications were defined as radiation gastritis/duodenitis, radiation gastric/duodenal ulcer, or other gastroduodenal toxicity associated with radiation, based on Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE 3.0). Serious gastroduodenal complications were defined as events occurring within 12 months from completion of CCRT, those requiring prompt therapeutic intervention, or symptoms equivalent to Grade 3 or 4 radiation-related gastroduodenal toxicity, including nausea or vomiting, based on CTCAE 3.0. Results: A month after completion of CCRT, 65 (52.8%) patients displayed endoscopic evidence of radiation-induced gastroduodenal complications. Radiation gastric and duodenal ulcers were found in 32 (26.0%) and 20 (16.3%) patients, respectively; radiation gastritis and duodenitis were found in 50 (40.7%) and 42 (34.1%) patients, respectively. Radiation-related bleeding was observed in 13 patients (10.6%). Serious gastroduodenal complications occurred in 18 patients (14.6%) and were significantly more frequent in patients with liver cirrhosis than in those without cirrhosis (p = 0.043). There were no radiation-related deaths. Conclusions: Endoscopically detectable radiation-induced gastroduodenal complications were common in HCC following CCRT. Although serious complications were uncommon, the frequency was higher in patients with liver cirrhosis; thus, these patients should be closely monitored when receiving CCRT.

  9. Prognostic factors in breast cancer with extracranial oligometastases and the appropriate role of radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Gyu Sang; Yu, Jeong Il; Park, Won; Huh, Seung Jae; Choi, Doo Ho [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    To identify prognostic factors for disease progression and survival of patients with extracranial oligometastatic breast cancer (EOMBC), and to investigate the role of radiation therapy (RT) for metastatic lesions. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 50 patients who had been diagnosed with EOMBC following standard treatment for primary breast cancer initially, and received RT for metastatic lesions, with or without other systemic therapy between January 2004 and December 2008. EOMBC was defined as breast cancer with five or less metastases involving any organs except the brain. All patients had bone metastasis (BM) and seven patients had pulmonary, hepatic, or lymph node metastasis. Median RT dose applied to metastatic lesions was 30 Gy (range, 20 to 60 Gy). The 5-year tumor local control (LC) and 3-year distant progression-free survival (DPFS) rate were 66.1% and 36.8%, respectively. High RT dose (> or =50 Gy10) was significantly associated with improved LC. The 5-year overall survival (OS) rate was 49%. Positive hormone receptor status, pathologic nodal stage of primary cancer, solitary BM, and whole-lesion RT (WLRT), defined as RT whose field encompassed entire extent of disease, were associated with better survival. On analysis for subgroup of solitary BM, high RT dose was significantly associated with improved LC and DPFS, shorter metastasis-to-RT interval (< or =1 month) with improved DPFS, and WLRT with improved DPFS and OS, respectively. High-dose RT in solitary BM status and WLRT have the potential to improve the progression-free survival and OS of patients with EOMBC.

  10. Factors associated with glycemic control in adult type 1 diabetes patients treated with insulin pump therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matejko, Bartłomiej; Skupien, Jan; Mrozińska, Sandra; Grzanka, Małgorzata; Cyganek, Katarzyna; Kiec-Wilk, Beata; Malecki, Maciej T; Klupa, Tomasz

    2015-02-01

    Continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) by insulin pump seems to improve glycemia and quality of life as compared to conventional insulin therapy in type 1 diabetes (T1DM). However, while many T1DM subjects achieve excellent glycemic control, some others cannot reach recommended goals. In a retrospective analysis, we searched for factors associated with glycemic control in T1DM patients treated with insulin pump therapy. Data from 192 patients (133 women and 59 men) treated with personal insulin pumps at the Department of Metabolic Diseases, University Hospital, Krakow, Poland were analyzed. Sources of information included medical records, memory read-outs from insulin pumps and data from glucose meters. Univariate, multivariate linear and logistic regression analysis for the association with hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) level were performed. The mean age of the subjects was 28.9 (±11.2) years, the mean duration of T1DM-14.6 (±7.6) years, mean body mass index-23.5 (±3.1) kg/m2. The mean HbA1c level in the entire study group was 7.4% (57 mmol/mol). In the multivariate linear regression analysis, HbA1c correlated with the mean number of daily blood glucose measurements, number of hypoglycemic episodes per 100 blood glucose measurements, age at the examination, and continuous glucose monitoring system use. Multivariate logistic regression analysis for reaching the therapeutic target of HbA1cpump-treated T1DM subjects.

  11. Correction factors to convert microdosimetry measurements in silicon to tissue in 12C ion therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolst, David; Guatelli, Susanna; Tran, Linh T.; Chartier, Lachlan; Lerch, Michael L. F.; Matsufuji, Naruhiro; Rosenfeld, Anatoly B.

    2017-03-01

    Silicon microdosimetry is a promising technology for heavy ion therapy (HIT) quality assurance, because of its sub-mm spatial resolution and capability to determine radiation effects at a cellular level in a mixed radiation field. A drawback of silicon is not being tissue-equivalent, thus the need to convert the detector response obtained in silicon to tissue. This paper presents a method for converting silicon microdosimetric spectra to tissue for a therapeutic 12C beam, based on Monte Carlo simulations. The energy deposition spectra in a 10 μm sized silicon cylindrical sensitive volume (SV) were found to be equivalent to those measured in a tissue SV, with the same shape, but with dimensions scaled by a factor κ equal to 0.57 and 0.54 for muscle and water, respectively. A low energy correction factor was determined to account for the enhanced response in silicon at low energy depositions, produced by electrons. The concept of the mean path length to calculate the lineal energy was introduced as an alternative to the mean chord length because it was found that adopting Cauchy’s formula for the was not appropriate for the radiation field typical of HIT as it is very directional. can be determined based on the peak of the lineal energy distribution produced by the incident carbon beam. Furthermore it was demonstrated that the thickness of the SV along the direction of the incident 12C ion beam can be adopted as . The tissue equivalence conversion method and were adopted to determine the RBE10, calculated using a modified microdosimetric kinetic model, applied to the microdosimetric spectra resulting from the simulation study. Comparison of the RBE10 along the Bragg peak to experimental TEPC measurements at HIMAC, NIRS, showed good agreement. Such agreement demonstrates the validity of the developed tissue equivalence correction factors and of the determination of .

  12. Systematic review and network meta-analysis of the efficacy and safety of tumour necrosis factor inhibitor–methotrexate combination therapy versus triple therapy in rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischmann, Roy; Tongbram, Vanita; van Vollenhoven, Ronald; Tang, Derek H; Chung, James; Collier, David; Urs, Shilpa; Ndirangu, Kerigo; Wells, George; Pope, Janet

    2017-01-01

    Objective Clinical trials have not consistently demonstrated differences between tumour necrosis factor inhibitor (TNFi) plus methotrexate and triple therapy (methotrexate plus hydroxychloroquine plus sulfasalazine) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The study objective was to estimate the efficacy, radiographic benefits, safety and patient-reported outcomes of TNFi–methotrexate versus triple therapy in patients with RA. Methods A systematic review and network meta-analysis (NMA) of randomised controlled trials of TNFi–methotrexate or triple therapy as one of the treatment arms in patients with an inadequate response to or who were naive to methotrexate was conducted. American College of Rheumatology 70% response criteria (ACR70) at 6 months was the prespecified primary endpoint to evaluate depth of response. Data from direct and indirect comparisons between TNFi–methotrexate and triple therapy were pooled and quantitatively analysed using fixed-effects and random-effects Bayesian models. Results We analysed 33 studies in patients with inadequate response to methotrexate and 19 in patients naive to methotrexate. In inadequate responders, triple therapy was associated with lower odds of achieving ACR70 at 6 months compared with TNFi–methotrexate (OR 0.35, 95% credible interval (CrI) 0.19 to 0.64). Most secondary endpoints tended to favour TNFi–methotrexate in terms of OR direction; however, no clear increased likelihood of achieving these endpoints was observed for either therapy. The odds of infection were lower with triple therapy than with TNFi−methotrexate (OR 0.08, 95% CrI 0.00 to 0.57). There were no differences observed between the two regimens in patients naive to methotrexate. Conclusions In this NMA, triple therapy was associated with 65% lower odds of achieving ACR70 at 6 months compared with TNFi–methotrexate in patients with inadequate response to methotrexate. Although secondary endpoints numerically favoured TNFi–methotrexate, no

  13. Optimum scratch assay condition to evaluate connective tissue growth factor expression for anti-scar therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Heekyung; Yong, Hyeyoung; Lee, Ae-Ri Cho

    2012-02-01

    To evaluate a potential anti-scar therapy, we first need to have a reliable in vitro wound model to understand dermal fibroblast response upon cell injury and how cytokine levels are changed upon different wound heal phases. An in vitro wound model with different scratch assay conditions on primary human foreskin fibroblast monolayer cultures was prepared and cytokine levels and growth properties were evaluated with the aim of determining optimum injury conditions and observation time. Morphological characteristics of differently scratched fibroblasts from 0 to 36 h post injury (1 line, 2 lines and 3 lines) were investigated. The expression of connective tissue growth factor, CTGF, which is a key mediator in hyper-tropic scarring, and relative intensity of CTGF as a function of time were determined by western blot and gelatin Zymography. After injury (1 line), CTGF level was increased more than 2-fold within 1 h and continuously increased up to 3-fold at 6 h and was leveled down to reach normal value at 36 h, at which cell migration was complete. In more serious injury (2 lines), higher expression of CTGF was observed. The down regulation of CTGF expression after CTGF siRNA/lipofectamine transfection in control, 1 line and 2 lines scratch conditions were 40%, 75% and 55%, respectively. As a model anti-CTGF based therapy, CTGF siRNA with different ratios of linear polyethyleneimine (PEI) complexes (1:1, 1:5, 1:10, 1:20 and 1:30) were prepared and down-regulation efficacy of CTGF was evaluated with our optimized scratch assay, which is 1 line injury at 6 h post injury observation time. As the cationic linear PEI ratio increased, the down regulation efficacy was increased from 20% (1:20) to 55% (1:30). As CTGF level was increased to the highest at 6 h and leveled down afterwards, CTGF level at 6 h could provide the most sensitive response upon CTGF siRNA transfection. The scratch assay in the present study can be employed as a useful experimental tool to differentiate

  14. Risk factors and the effect of cardiac resynchronization therapy on cardiac and non-cardiac mortality in MADIT-CRT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perkiomaki, Juha S; Ruwald, Anne-Christine; Kutyifa, Valentina;

    2015-01-01

    causes, 108 (63.9%) deemed cardiac, and 61 (36.1%) non-cardiac. In multivariate analysis, increased baseline creatinine was significantly associated with both cardiac and non-cardiac deaths [hazard ratio (HR) 2.97, P ...AIMS: To understand modes of death and factors associated with the risk for cardiac and non-cardiac deaths in patients with cardiac resynchronization therapy with implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (CRT-D) vs. implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) therapy, which may help clarify...... the action and limitations of cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) in relieving myocardial dysfunction. METHODS AND RESULTS: In Multicenter Automatic Defibrillator Implantation Trial-Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy (MADIT-CRT), during 4 years of follow-up, 169 (9.3%) of 1820 patients died of known...

  15. Risk factors for bone loss with prostate cancer in Korean men not receiving androgen deprivation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun-Ouck Kim

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Preexisting bone loss in men with prostate cancer is an important issue due to the accelerated bone loss during androgen deprivation therapy (ADT. In addition, a high prostate-specific antigen (PSA level has been reported to be related to bone metabolism. This study assessed the factors associated with osteoporosis in Korean men with non-metastatic prostate cancer before undergoing ADT. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study enrolled patients admitted for a prostate biopsy because of a high PSA or palpable nodule on a digital rectal examination. We divided the patients (n = 172 according to the results of the biopsy: group I, non-metastatic prostate cancer (n = 42 and group II, benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH; n = 130. The lumbar bone mineral density (BMD was evaluated using quantitative computed tomography. The demographic, health status, lifestyle, body mass index (BMI, serum testosterone concentration, and disease variables in prostate cancer (Gleason score, clinical stage, and PSA were analyzed prospectively to determine their effect on the BMD. RESULTS: The estimated mean T-score was higher in group I than in group II (-1.96 ± 3.35 vs. -2.66 ± 3.20, but without statistic significance (p = 0.235. The significant factors correlated with BMD in group I were a high serum PSA (ß = -0.346, p = 0.010 and low BMI (ß = 0.345, p = 0.014 in the multiple linear regression model. Also old age (r = -0.481, p = 0.001, a high serum PSA (r = -0.571, p < 0.001, low BMI (r = 0.598, p < 0.001, and a high Gleason’s score (r = -0.319, p = 0.040 were the factors related to BMD in the correlation. The significant factors correlated with BMD in group II were old age (ß = -0.324, p = 0.001 and BMI (ß = 0.143, p = 0.014 in the multiple linear regression model. CONCLUSIONS: The risk factors for osteoporosis in men with prostate cancer include a low BMI, and elevated serum PSA. Monitoring BMD from the outset of ADT is a logical first step in the clinical

  16. Gene therapy for hemophilia "A" and "B": efficacy, safety and immune consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuah, M; Vandendriessche, T

    2007-01-01

    The first successful gene therapy trials for the treatment of hereditary disorders underscore the potential of gene therapy to combat disease and alleviate human suffering. The development of gene therapy for hemophilia is not only a research priority in its own right but also serves as an ideal trailblazer for many different diseases. Significant progress has recently been made in the development of gene therapy for the treatment of hemophilia A and B. Long-term therapeutic levels of factor VIII and IX could be expressed following gene therapy in hemophilic mice, stably correcting the bleeding diathesis. These advances parallel the development of improved gene delivery systems. The induction of neutralizing antibodies (inhibitors) to the clotting factors could potentially preclude stable phenotypic correction. The risk of inhibitor formation varied, depending at least in part on the type of vector used and its in vivo tropism. We also demonstrated that the risk of immune responses to the vector particles, the clotting factors and/or transduced cells can be reduced by using vectors that only minimally interact with antigen presenting cells. In hemophilic mice, robust and stable clotting factor expression levels were achieved using adeno-associated viral vectors based on the newly disovered serotypes AAV8 and AAV9 which can efficient deliver the clotting factor genes into hepatocytes without triggering any inflammatory responses or adverse events. Pre-clinical studies in large animal models will be initiated to further validate these improved AAV vectors to ultimately justify a clinical trial in patients with severe hemophilia.

  17. Quality of Life and Its Related Factors of Radiation Therapy Cancer Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Ryung Mi; Jung, Won Seok; Oh, Byeong Heon; Jo, Jun Young; Kim, Gi Chul; Choi, Tae Gyu [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Kyunghee University Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sok Goo [Dept. of Preventive Medicine, Chungnam National University College of Medicine, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-03-15

    The purpose of this master's thesis is to utilize basic data in order to improve the quality of life of cancer patients who received radiation therapy after analysing related factors that influence patient's quality of life and obtaining information about physical, mental problems of patients. By using a structured questionnaire about various characteristics and forms of support, I carried out a survey targeting 107 patients that experienced radiation therapy at a university hospital in the Daejeon metropolitan area from July 15 to August 15, 2010 and analysed the factors influencing quality of life. In case of pain due to disease, 65.15 and painless 81.87 showed a high grade quality of life. As body weight decreases, the quality of life become lower. When the grade of quality of life according to economic characteristics was compared, all items except treatment period showed a difference (P=0.000). When the score of social support, family support, medical support and self-esteem was low, the mark of quality of life showed respectively 61.71, 68.77, 71.31, and 69.39 on the basis of 128 points. When the score of support form was high, the mark of quality of life showed 90.47, 83.29, 90.40, and 90.36 (P<0.05). When analyzing the correlation between social support, family support, medical support and self-esteem and the degree of quality of life, social support was 0.768, family support 0.596, medical support 0.434, self-esteem 0.516. They indicated the correlation of meaningful quantity statistically (P<0.01). The factors that improved the quality of life were married state, having a job and painless status. As monthly income increases, the quality of life was also much improved (P<0.05). Among the factors related to quality of life, social support and medical support and higher self-esteem scores of the quality of life score increased 0.979 point, 0.508 points and 1.667 point, respectively. In conclusion, the quality of life of cancer patients that

  18. Cardiovascular disease risk factors in HIV patients--association with antiretroviral therapy. Results from the DAD study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis-Møller, Nina; Weber, Rainer; Reiss, Peter

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD) among HIV-infected persons, and to investigate any association between such risk factors, stage of HIV disease, and use of antiretroviral therapies. DESIGN: Baseline data from 17,852 subjects enrolled in DAD, ...... in combination), particularly among older subjects with normalized CD4 cell counts and suppressed HIV replication, was associated with a lipid profile known to increase the risk of coronary heart disease....

  19. Multicenter Retrospective Study of the Risk Factors of Hemorrhage After Tooth Extraction in Patients Receiving Antiplatelet Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanamoto, Souichi; Hasegawa, Takumi; Rokutanda, Satoshi; Komori, Sayaka; Tachibana, Akira; Kojima, Yuka; Koyama, Yoshito; Shibuya, Yasuyuki; Kurita, Hiroshi; Komori, Takahide; Umeda, Masahiro

    2017-07-01

    To identify the risk factors affecting hemorrhage after tooth extraction in patients receiving antiplatelet therapy, this study investigated the relation between various factors and hemorrhage events after tooth extraction. The records of 264 patients receiving antiplatelet therapy who underwent tooth extraction were retrospectively reviewed from 6 institutions belonging to the Japanese Study Group of Cooperative Dentistry with Medicine. Demographic information, hemorrhage events after tooth extraction, the presence or absence of comorbidities, antiplatelet agent, the use of preoperative antibiotics or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, number of teeth extracted, serum creatinine level, estimated glomerular filtration rate, and alanine transaminase level were assessed. Risk factors for hemorrhage after tooth extraction were evaluated by univariate and multivariate analyses. The study population of 264 patients consisted of 153 men and 111 women with a mean age of 73.6 years (range, 24 to 96 yr). Six hundred ninety-four teeth were extracted (mean, 2.6 ± 2.3 teeth per patient). In patients receiving antiplatelet therapy, the frequency of hemorrhage after tooth extraction, including mild and self-controlled hemorrhages, was 17.4%. Univariate analysis showed that serum creatinine level and dual antiplatelet therapy were correlated with hemorrhage after tooth extraction (P = .001 and P = .049, respectively). Only serum creatinine was identified as an independent risk factor for hemorrhage after tooth extraction in patients receiving antiplatelet therapy (P = .037). The risk of hemorrhage after tooth extraction is increased in patients receiving dual antiplatelet therapy with or without chronic kidney disease. Local hemostatic treatments, such as at least suturing, are recommended. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Rituximab inhibits structural joint damage in patients with rheumatoid arthritis with an inadequate response to tumour necrosis factor inhibitor therapies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keystone, E.; Emery, P.; Peterfy, C.G.; Tak, P.P.; Cohen, S.; Genovese, M.C.; Dougados, M.; Burmester, G.R.; Greenwald, M.; Kvien, T.K.; Williams, S.; Hagerty, D.; Cravets, M.W.; Shaw, T.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine if treatment with a B cell-targeted therapy can inhibit the progression of structural joint damage in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), exhibiting an inadequate response to tumour necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitors. METHODS: In this phase III study, patients with an inad

  1. Factors Influencing the Decision To Return to Graduate School in One Professional Group, Physical Therapy. ASHE 1988 Annual Meeting Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoecker, Judith L.

    The factors influencing the decision to return to graduate school in an emerging professional group, physical therapy, are described, and a causal model incorporating the principal constructs of the status attainment and college impact model is proposed. The five variable sets included are background characteristics, college characteristics,…

  2. Tumour necrosis factor alpha inhibitor therapy and rehabilitation for the treatment of ankylosing spondylitis: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubrano, Ennio; Spadaro, Antonio; Amato, Giorgio; Benucci, Maurizio; Cavazzana, Ilaria; Chimenti, Maria Sole; Ciancio, Giovanni; D Alessandro, Giuseppe; Angelis, Rossella De; Lupoli, Salvatore; Lurati, Alfredo Maria; Naclerio, Caterina; Russo, Romualdo; Semeraro, Angelo; Tomietto, Paola; Zuccaro, Carmelo; De Marco, Gabriele

    2015-04-01

    To systematically review the evidence for a synergistic effect of combining rehabilitation with biological anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF) therapy in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Data were analysed to identify the most effective rehabilitation programmes, the best endpoints for effectiveness, and patient subgroups most likely to benefit from combination therapy. Systematic MEDLINE and Embase searches were performed to identify studies evaluating rehabilitation programmes and biological therapy in patients with AS. Evidence was categorised by study type, and efficacy, adverse effects and other outcomes were summarised. Of the 75 studies identified, 13 investigated the combination of a rehabilitation programme with TNF inhibitor therapy, while the remainder studied rehabilitation with standard therapy (often not specified). Data from these few studies suggest that combined rehabilitation plus anti-TNF therapy is more effective in terms of symptom severity, disease activity, disability and quality-of-life indices versus biologic alone or rehabilitation with standard medical therapy, or, in non-comparative studies, compared with baseline. The most effective rehabilitation appears to be supervised or in-patient programmes with an educational component. Available data do not provide guidance on most appropriate endpoints or identify patients most likely to benefit from combination therapy. Combined, TNF inhibitor and rehabilitation therapy appear to have a synergistic effect, possibly due to increased adherence to exercise. Exercise regimes are more effective if supervised and include an education component. Further randomized, controlled trials comparing endpoints and investigating longer-term benefits of combining TNF inhibitors with rehabilitation in different AS subgroups are needed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Vascular-endothelial-growth-factor (VEGF) targeting therapies for endocrine refractory or resistant metastatic breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Anna Dorothea; Thomssen, Christoph; Haerting, Johannes; Unverzagt, Susanne

    2012-07-11

    Vascular-endothelial-growth-factor (VEGF) is a key mediator of angiogenesis. VEGF-targeting therapies have shown significant benefits and been successfully integrated in routine clinical practice for other types of cancer, such as metastatic colorectal cancer. By contrast, individual trial results in metastatic breast cancer (MBC) are highly variable and their value is controversial. To evaluate the benefits (in progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS)) and harms (toxicity) of VEGF-targeting therapies in patients with hormone-refractory or hormone-receptor negative metastatic breast cancer. Searches of CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Breast Cancer Group's Specialised Register, registers of ongoing trials and proceedings of conferences were conducted in January and September 2011, starting in 2000. Reference lists were scanned and members of the Cochrane Breast Cancer Group, experts and manufacturers of relevant drug were contacted to obtain further information. No language restrictions were applied. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) to evaluate treatment benefit and non-randomised studies in the routine oncology practice setting to evaluate treatment harms. We performed data collection and analysis according to the published protocol. Individual patient data was sought but not provided. Therefore, the meta-analysis had to be based on published data. Summary statistics for the primary endpoint (PFS) were hazard ratios (HRs). We identified seven RCTs, one register, and five ongoing trials from a total of 347 references. The published trials for VEGF-targeting drugs in MBC were limited to bevacizumab. Four trials, including a total of 2886 patients, were available for the comparison of first-line chemotherapy, with versus without bevacizumab. PFS (HR 0.67; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.61 to 0.73) and response rate were significantly better for patients treated with bevacizumab, with moderate heterogeneity regarding the magnitude of the

  4. Non-genetic risk factors and their influence on the management of patients in the clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez, Teresa; Soto, Immaculada; Astermark, Jan

    2015-02-01

    The development of inhibitors is the most serious iatrogenic complication affecting patients with haemophilia. This complication is associated with impaired vital or functional prognosis, reduced quality of life and increased cost of treatment. The reasons why some patients develop antibodies to factor replacement and others do not remain unclear. It is however clear that inhibitor development results from a complex multifactorial interaction between genetic and non-genetic risk factors. Environmental influences implicated in increasing the risk of inhibitor formation can be viewed as modifiable risk factors. Therefore, identification of the non-genetic risk factors may offer the possibility of personalising haemophilia therapy by modifying treatment strategies in high-risk patients in the critical early phase of factor VIII exposure. In this article, we review the non-genetic factors reported as well as the potential impact of danger signals and the different scores for inhibitor development risk stratification.

  5. Vertebral Compression Fracture (VCF) After Spine Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT): Analysis of Predictive Factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunha, Marcelo V.R. [Division of Neurosurgery, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Al-Omair, Ameen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Atenafu, Eshetu G. [Department of Biostatistics, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Masucci, Giuseppina Laura; Letourneau, Daniel [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Korol, Renee [Department of Medical Physics, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Yu, Eugene [Department of Radiology and Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University Health Network, Mount Sinai Hospital and Women' s College Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Howard, Peter [Department of Radiology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Lochray, Fiona [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Costa, Leodante B. da [Department of Radiology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Fehlings, Michael G. [Division of Neurosurgery and Spinal Program, Toronto Western Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Sahgal, Arjun, E-mail: arjun.sahgal@sunnybrook.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: Vertebral compression fractures (VCFs) are increasingly observed after spine stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). The aim of this study was to determine the risk of VCF after spine SBRT and identify clinical and dosimetric factors predictive for VCF. The analysis incorporated the recently described Spinal Instability Neoplastic Score (SINS) criteria. Methods and Materials: The primary endpoint of this study was the development of a de novo VCF (ie, new endplate fracture or collapse deformity) or fracture progression based on an existing fracture at the site of treatment after SBRT. We retrospectively scored 167 spinal segments in 90 patients treated with spine SBRT according to each of the 6 SINS criteria. We also evaluated the presence of paraspinal extension, prior radiation, various dosimetric parameters including dose per fraction ({>=}20 Gy vs <20 Gy), age, and histology. Results: The median follow-up was 7.4 months. We identified 19 fractures (11%): 12 de novo fractures (63%) and 7 cases of fracture progression (37%). The mean time to fracture after SBRT was 3.3 months (range, 0.5-21.6 months). The 1-year fracture-free probability was 87.3%. Multivariate analysis confirmed that alignment (P=.0003), lytic lesions (P=.007), lung (P=.03) and hepatocellular (P<.0001) primary histologies, and dose per fraction of 20 Gy or greater (P=.004) were significant predictors of VCF. Conclusions: The presence of kyphotic/scoliotic deformity and the presence of lytic tumor were the only predictive factors of VCF based on the original 6 SINS criteria. We also report that patients with lung and hepatocellular tumors and treatment with SBRT of 20 Gy or greater in a single fraction are at a higher risk of VCF.

  6. Effect of Tumor Necrosis Factor Inhibitor Therapy on Osteoclasts Precursors in Ankylosing Spondylitis.

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    Inês P Perpétuo

    Full Text Available Ankylosing Spondylitis (AS is characterized by excessive local bone formation and concomitant systemic bone loss. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF plays a central role in the inflammation of axial skeleton and enthesis of AS patients. Despite reduction of inflammation and systemic bone loss, AS patients treated with TNF inhibitors (TNFi have ongoing local bone formation. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of TNFi in the differentiation and activity of osteoclasts (OC in AS patients.13 AS patients treated with TNFi were analyzed at baseline and after a minimum follow-up period of 6 months. 25 healthy donors were recruited as controls. Blood samples were collected to assess receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL surface expression on circulating leukocytes and frequency and phenotype of monocyte subpopulations. Quantification of serum levels of bone turnover markers and cytokines, in vitro OC differentiation assay and qRT-PCR for OC specific genes were performed.RANKL+ circulating lymphocytes (B and T cells and IL-17A, IL-23 and TGF-β levels were decreased after TNFi treatment. We found no differences in the frequency of the different monocyte subpopulations, however, we found decreased expression of CCR2 and increased expression of CD62L after TNFi treatment. OC number was reduced in patients at baseline when compared to controls. OC specific gene expression was reduced in circulating OC precursors after TNFi treatment. However, when cultured in OC differentiating conditions, OC precursors from AS TNFi-treated patients showed increased activity as compared to baseline.In AS patients, TNFi treatment reduces systemic pro osteoclastogenic stimuli. However, OC precursors from AS patients exposed to TNFi therapy have increased in vitro activity in response to osteoclastogenic stimuli.

  7. Role of viral and host factors in interferon based therapy of hepatitis C virus infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    The current standard of care (SOC) for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is the combination of pegylated interferon (PEG-IFN), Ribavirin and protease inhibitor for HCV genotype 1. Nevertheless, this treatment is successful only in 70-80% of the patients. In addition, the treatment is not economical and is of immense physical burden for the subject. It has been established now, that virus-host interactions play a significant role in determining treatment outcomes. Therefore identifying biological markers that may predict the treatment response and hence treatment outcome would be useful. Both IFN and Ribavirin mainly act by modulating the immune system of the patient. Therefore, the treatment response is influenced by genetic variations of the human as well as the HCV genome. The goal of this review article is to summarize the impact of recent scientific advances in this area regarding the understanding of human and HCV genetic variations and their effect on treatment outcomes. Google scholar and PubMed have been used for literature research. Among the host factors, the most prominent associations are polymorphisms within the region of the interleukin 28B (IL28B) gene, but variations in other cytokine genes have also been linked with the treatment outcome. Among the viral factors, HCV genotypes are noteworthy. Moreover, for sustained virological responses (SVR), variations in core, p7, non-structural 2 (NS2), NS3 and NS5A genes are also important. However, all considered single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of IL28B and viral genotypes are the most important predictors for interferon based therapy of HCV infection. PMID:24079723

  8. Dermatologic infections in cancer patients treated with epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eilers, R E; Gandhi, M; Patel, J D; Mulcahy, M F; Agulnik, M; Hensing, T; Lacouture, Mario E

    2010-01-06

    Patients treated with epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors (EGFRIs) frequently experience dermatologic toxic effects. Whereas the impact of these effects on quality of life and EGFRI dosing has been described, their impact on physical health has not been ascertained. We examined the prevalence of infections that complicate dermatologic toxic effects of EGFRIs. We used retrospective chart review methods to analyze 221 patients who were treated in the Skin and Eye Reactions to Inhibitors of EGFR and Kinases clinic, a referral clinic for dermatologic toxic effects of cancer therapies. We reviewed results of bacterial cultures, histopathologic assessment of biopsy samples, and immunohistochemical staining of skin specimens for viral pathogens that were recorded in the patients' medical records. Associations between patient demographic and treatment characteristics and the development of infections were examined using the Fisher exact test. All statistical tests were two-sided. Eighty-four (38%) of the 221 patients showed evidence of infection at sites of dermatologic toxic effect. Fifty (22.6%) of the 221 patients had cultures positive for Staphylococcus aureus, and 12 (5.4%) of the 221 patients cultured positive for methicillin-resistant S aureus. Less frequent infections included herpes simplex (3.2%), herpes zoster (1.8%), and dermatophytes (10.4%). The seborrheic region was the most prevalent site of infection, and patients with leukopenia had higher risk for infection than patients who did not have leukopenia (P = .005). Demographic factors and associated treatments were not associated with the occurrence of a dermatologic infection (P > or = .05). Patients with dermatologic toxic effects following treatment with EGFRIs have a high prevalence of cutaneous infections. Most notably, bacterial infections developed at sites previously affected by dermatologic toxic effects, with leukopenic patients being at greater risk.

  9. SU-E-T-577: Obliquity Factor and Surface Dose in Proton Beam Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, I; Andersen, A [Indiana University- School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Coutinho, L [Procure Proton Therapy Center, Somerset, NJ (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The advantage of lower skin dose in proton beam may be diminished creating radiation related sequalae usually seen with photon and electron beams. This study evaluates the surface dose as a complex function of beam parameters but more importantly the effect of beam angle. Methods: Surface dose in proton beam depends on the beam energy, source to surface distance, the air gap between snout and surface, field size, material thickness in front of surface, atomic number of the medium, beam angle and type of nozzle (ie double scattering, (DS), uniform scanning (US) or pencil beam scanning (PBS). Obliquity factor (OF) is defined as ratio of surface dose in 0° to beam angle Θ. Measurements were made in water phantom at various beam angles using very small microdiamond that has shown favorable beam characteristics for high, medium and low proton energy. Depth dose measurements were performed in the central axis of the beam in each respective gantry angle. Results: It is observed that surface dose is energy dependent but more predominantly on the SOBP. It is found that as SSD increases, surface dose decreases. In general, SSD, and air gap has limited impact in clinical proton range. High energy has higher surface dose and so the beam angle. The OF rises with beam angle. Compared to OF of 1.0 at 0° beam angle, the value is 1.5, 1.6, 1,7 for small, medium and large range respectively for 60 degree angle. Conclusion: It is advised that just like range and SOBP, surface dose should be clearly understood and a method to reduce the surface dose should be employed. Obliquity factor is a critical parameter that should be accounted in proton beam therapy and a perpendicular beam should be used to reduce surface dose.

  10. Recent progress in gene therapy for hemophilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuah, Marinee K; Nair, Nisha; VandenDriessche, Thierry

    2012-06-01

    Hemophilia A and B are X-linked monogenic disorders caused by deficiencies in coagulation factor VIII (FVIII) and factor IX (FIX), respectively. Current treatment for hemophilia involves intravenous infusion of clotting factor concentrates. However, this does not constitute a cure, and the development of gene-based therapies for hemophilia to achieve prolonged high level expression of clotting factors to correct the bleeding diathesis are warranted. Different types of viral and nonviral gene delivery systems and a wide range of different target cells, including hepatocytes, skeletal muscle cells, hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), and endothelial cells, have been explored for hemophilia gene therapy. Adeno-associated virus (AAV)-based and lentiviral vectors are among the most promising vectors for hemophilia gene therapy. Stable correction of the bleeding phenotypes in hemophilia A and B was achieved in murine and canine models, and these promising preclinical studies prompted clinical trials in patients suffering from severe hemophilia. These studies recently resulted in the first demonstration that long-term expression of therapeutic FIX levels could be achieved in patients undergoing gene therapy. Despite this progress, there are still a number of hurdles that need to be overcome. In particular, the FIX levels obtained were insufficient to prevent bleeding induced by trauma or injury. Moreover, the gene-modified cells in these patients can become potential targets for immune destruction by effector T cells, specific for the AAV vector antigens. Consequently, more efficacious approaches are needed to achieve full hemostatic correction and to ultimately establish a cure for hemophilia A and B.

  11. Progress of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor therapy for ocular neovascular disease: benefits and challenges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Jianjiang; Li Yimin; Hong Jiaxu

    2014-01-01

    Objective This review aims to summarize the progress of current clinical studies in ocular angiogenesis treated with antivascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) therapy and to discuss the benefits and challenges of the treatment.Data sources Pubmed,Embase and the Cochrane Library were searched with no limitations of language and year of publication.Study selection Clinical trials and case studies presented at medical conferences and published in peer-reviewed literature in the past decade were reviewed.Results Anti-VEGF agents have manifested great potential and promising outcomes in treating ocular neovascularization,though some of them are still used as off-label drugs.Intravitreal injection of anti-VEGF agents could be accompanied by devastating ocular or systemic complications,and intimate monitoring in both adult and pediatric population are warranted.Future directions should be focused on carrying out more well-designed large-scale controlled trials,promoting sustained duration of action,developing safer and more efficient generation of anti-VEGF agents.Conclusions Anti-VEGF treatment has proved to be beneficial in treating both anterior and posterior neovascular ocular diseases.However,more safer and affordable antiangiogenic agencies and regimens are warranted to be explored.

  12. Neurogenesis and brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels in herbal therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Kamelia

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Neurogenesis is the process of formation of new neurons from precursor cells that involves a series includes the proliferation, migration, differentiation, maturation and synapse formation. During the formation, some neurons will undergo a process of programmed cell death or apoptosis; it is related to the trophic factor / neurotrophin molecules of the substance that is to sustain life as BDNF cells found in the nervous system among other areas in the hippocampus. Problem neurogenesis is expected to reach 17% of the entire population, basic pathology due to reduced synapse, neurotransmitters and neuronal networks. Provision of adequate stimuli can trigger neurogenesis and synaptic plasticity in the nervous system. WHO estimates that 80% of the world population use herbal medicine for the treatment of major health considering safe and without side effects. So banyak tanaman herb is currently used as a treatment for nerve. In a review of this article we try to give an overview illustration of our understanding of neurogenesis and BDNF with various problems related to the prospect of therapy for both of them, through the treatment of phytochemicals as an alternative treatment that is safe and effective, using several types of herbs below levels / doses used, how to work, and the methods used. [Int J Res Med Sci 2016; 4(11.000: 4654-4658

  13. Cardiometabolic and Skeletal Risk Factors in Black Men with Prostate Cancer Starting Androgen Deprivation Therapy

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    Orvar Gunnarsson

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT for prostate cancer (PCa is associated with multiple metabolic complications, previously predominantly evaluated in the white population. Methods: A chart-based retrospective review was conducted on black patients with PCa, considered for ADT, from September 2007 to July 2010. Baseline data were collected on body mass index (BMI, vitamin-D status, bone mineral density (BMD, dyslipidemia and diabetes. Overweight and obesity were classified as BMI ≥ 25 and BMI ≥ 30, respectively. Vitamin-D sufficiency was defined as levels ≥30 ng/mL, insufficiency as <30 ng/mL and deficiency as ≤20 ng/mL. Osteopenia was defined as T scores between −1 to −2.5 and osteoporosis when T scores ≤−2.5. Results: Of the initial cohort of 130 black men, 111 (85.4% patients underwent ADT. At baseline, average BMI was 28.1 ± 5.9 with 43.3% of men being overweight and 30.8% obese. More than one-third of the patients had pre-existing dyslipidemia while 28.8% were diabetics. 50% were vitamin-D deficient while 41% had low bone mass. Conclusions: Black men with PCa presenting for consideration of ADT have a high prevalence of existing metabolic risk factors. Close monitoring of this patient population is needed during ADT to prevent and treat metabolic complications.

  14. Bilateral choroidal neovascularization associated with optic nerve head drusen treated by antivascular endothelial growth factor therapy

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    Carreras A

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Barbara Delas, Lorena Almudí, Anabel Carreras, Mouafk AsaadOphthalmology Service, Hospital de Terrassa, Barcelona, SpainObjective: To report a good clinical outcome in a patient with bilateral choroidal neovascularization (CNV associated with optic nerve head drusen (ONHD treated with intravitreal ranibizumab injection.Methods: A 12-year-old girl was referred for loss of right eye vision detected in a routine check-up. Best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA was hand movements in the right eye and 0.9 in the left eye. Funduscopy revealed the presence of superficial and buried bilateral ONHD, which was confirmed by ultrasonography and computed tomography, and the study was completed with perimetry. The presence of bilateral CNV, active in the right eye, was observed and subsequently confirmed using fluorescein angiography and optical coherence tomography.Results: Treatment with two consecutive injections of intravitreal ranibizumab resulted in inactivation of the neovascular membrane with subretinal fluid reabsorption and improved right eye BCVA. After 12 months’ follow-up, this was 20/60 and stable.Conclusion: Although there are no published studies of safety in children, antiangiogenic therapy for CNV secondary to ONHD may be