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Sample records for factor release profiles

  1. Protein corona change the drug release profile of nanocarriers: the "overlooked" factor at the nanobio interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behzadi, Shahed; Serpooshan, Vahid; Sakhtianchi, Ramin; Müller, Beate; Landfester, Katharina; Crespy, Daniel; Mahmoudi, Morteza

    2014-11-01

    The emergence of nanocarrier systems in drug delivery applications has ushered in rapid development of new classes of therapeutic agents which can provide an essential breakthrough in the fight against refractory diseases. However, successful clinical application of nano-drug delivery devices has been limited mainly due to the lack of control on sustained release of therapeutics from the carriers. A wide range of sophisticated approaches employs the formation of crosslinkable, non-crosslinkable, stimuli-responsive polymer nanocarriers in order to enhance their delivery efficiency. Despite the extensive research conducted on the development of various nanocarriers, the effect of the biological milieu on the drug release profile of these constructs is not yet fully investigated. In particular, the formation of a protein corona on the surface of nanocarriers, when they interact with living organisms in vivo is largely decisive for their biological function. Using a number of synthetized (i.e., superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles and polymeric nanocapsules) and commercialized nanocarriers (i.e., Abraxane®, albumin-bound paclitaxel drug), this study demonstrates that the protein corona can shield the nanocarriers and, consequently, alters the release profile of the drugs from the nanocarriers. More specifically, the protein corona could significantly reduce the burst effect of either protein conjugated nanocarriers or carriers with surface loaded drug (i.e., SPIONs). However, the corona shell only slightly changed the release profile of polymeric nanocapsules. Therefore, the intermediary, buffer effect of the protein shells on the surface of nanoscale carriers plays a crucial role in their successful high-yield applications in vivo.

  2. Gender-Based Correlation Profiles Among the Release Factors and Distance Thrown in Paralympic Seated Shot Put.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sangwoo; Davis, Ronald; Judge, Lawrence W; Kwon, Young-Hoo; Han, Kihoon; Kim, Jemin; Kim, Jaewoong; Kim, Jaehwa

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationships among release factors (speed, height, and angle) and distance thrown in Paralympic seated shot put. Forty-eight trials performed by 11 men and 5 women during the 2012 US Paralympic trials in track and field were analyzed. With both genders combined, release speed (r = .95, p < .01) and angle (r = .51, p < .01) showed significant correlations to distance thrown. Release speed (r = .94, p < .01) in men and all release factors (r = .60-.98, p < .02) in women showed significant correlations to distance. Release speed and angle were identified as important predictors of the distance, explaining over 89-96% of the variance in distance thrown. Unlike athletes without disability, seated shot-putters exhibited significant positive speed-angle correlations (combined: r = .37, p < .01; women: r = .57, p = .03). Application of these results should address a focus in training on generating speed through the release point with a consistent release angle.

  3. Massive weight loss restores 24-hour growth hormone release profiles and serum insulin-like growth factor-I levels in obese subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, M H; Hvidberg, A; Juul, A

    1995-01-01

    In the present study, we 1) determined whether the impaired spontaneous 24-h GH secretion as well as the blunted GH response to provocative testing in obese subjects are persistent disorders or transient defects reversed with weight loss and 2) investigated 24-h urinary GH excretion and basal...... profiles, the decreased GH responses to insulin-induced hypoglycemia and L-arginine, the decreased basal IGF-I levels and IGF-I/IGFBP-3 molar ratio, as well as the elevated insulin levels were returned to normal after a massive weight loss in the obese subjects. In conclusion, the present study has shown...... levels of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), IGF-binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3), as well as insulin in obese subjects before and after a massive weight loss. We studied 18 obese subjects (age, 26 +/- 1 yr; body mass index, 40.9 +/- 1.1 kg/m2); 18 normal age-, and sex-matched control subjects; and 9...

  4. Activated human neutrophils release hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McCourt, M

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Hepatocyte growth factor or scatter factor (HGF\\/SF) is a pleiotropic cytokine that has potent angiogenic properties. We have previously demonstrated that neutrophils (PMN) are directly angiogenic by releasing vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). We hypothesized that the acute inflammatory response can stimulate PMN to release HGF. AIMS: To examine the effects of inflammatory mediators on PMN HGF release and the effect of recombinant human HGF (rhHGF) on PMN adhesion receptor expression and PMN VEGF release. METHODS: In the first experiment, PMN were isolated from healthy volunteers and stimulated with tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), lipopolysaccharide (LPS), interleukin-8 (IL-8), and formyl methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP). Culture supernatants were assayed for HGF using ELISA. In the second experiment, PMN were lysed to measure total HGF release and HGF expression in the PMN was detected by Western immunoblotting. Finally, PMN were stimulated with rhHGF. PMN CD 11a, CD 11b, and CD 18 receptor expression and VEGF release was measured using flow cytometry and ELISA respectively. RESULTS: TNF-alpha, LPS and fMLP stimulation resulted in significantly increased release of PMN HGF (755+\\/-216, 484+\\/-221 and 565+\\/-278 pg\\/ml, respectively) compared to controls (118+\\/-42 pg\\/ml). IL-8 had no effect. Total HGF release following cell lysis and Western blot suggests that HGF is released from intracellular stores. Recombinant human HGF did not alter PMN adhesion receptor expression and had no effect on PMN VEGF release. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates that pro-inflammatory mediators can stimulate HGF release from a PMN intracellular store and that activated PMN in addition to secreting VEGF have further angiogenic potential by releasing HGF.

  5. Pharmacokinetic profile of once-daily cyclobenzaprine extended-release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darwish, Mona; Hellriegel, Edward T

    2010-11-01

    Cyclobenzaprine immediate-release (CIR) is a widely prescribed skeletal muscle relaxant with an established efficacy and safety profile in patients with muscle spasm associated with acute, painful conditions, although it is commonly associated with sedation. CIR is typically prescribed at a dosage of 10 mg three-times-daily. This review focuses on the pharmacokinetic profile of a new formulation, cyclobenzaprine extended-release (CER), which delivers a sustained plasma cyclobenzaprine concentration over 24 h, allowing once-daily dosing. Results from CER pharmacokinetic studies conducted through August 2010 are summarized. This review provides information on the first four studies assessing the single-dose and steady-state pharmacokinetic profile of CER. Once-daily CER 30 mg and three-times-daily CIR 10 mg produced comparable systemic exposures to cyclobenzaprine, but pharmacokinetic profiles were qualitatively different. CER was characterized by a single daily peak in cyclobenzaprine concentration versus three peaks/day for CIR. With once-daily dosing of CER, cyclobenzaprine concentration is sustained over 24 h. CER 30 mg provides approximately twice the exposure as CER 15 mg. Systemic exposure to CER is increased in the presence of food and in elderly subjects. Steady-state is achieved by day 7 of dosing.

  6. Heat differentiated complement factor profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamsten, Carl; Skattum, Lillemor; Truedsson, Lennart; von Döbeln, Ulrika; Uhlén, Mathias; Schwenk, Jochen M; Hammarström, Lennart; Nilsson, Peter; Neiman, Maja

    2015-08-03

    Complement components and their cascade of reactions are important defense mechanisms within both innate and adaptive immunity. Many complement deficient patients still remain undiagnosed because of a lack of high throughput screening tools. Aiming towards neonatal proteome screening for immunodeficiencies, we used a multiplex profiling approach with antibody bead arrays to measure 9 complement proteins in serum and dried blood spots. Several complement components have been described as heat sensitive, thus their heat-dependent detectability was investigated. Using sera from 16 patients with complement deficiencies and 23 controls, we confirmed that the proteins C1q, C2, C3, C6, C9 and factor H were positively affected by heating, thus the identification of deficient patients was improved when preheating samples. Measurements of C7, C8 and factor I were negatively affected by heating and non-heated samples should be used in analysis of these components. In addition, a proof of concept study demonstrated the feasibility of labeling eluates from dried blood spots to perform a subsequent correct classification of C2-deficiencies. Our study demonstrates the potential of using multiplexed single binder assays for screening of complement components that open possibilities to expand such analysis to other forms of deficiencies.

  7. Modified-release hydrocortisone to provide circadian cortisol profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debono, Miguel; Ghobadi, Cyrus; Rostami-Hodjegan, Amin; Huatan, Hiep; Campbell, Michael J; Newell-Price, John; Darzy, Ken; Merke, Deborah P; Arlt, Wiebke; Ross, Richard J

    2009-05-01

    Cortisol has a distinct circadian rhythm regulated by the brain's central pacemaker. Loss of this rhythm is associated with metabolic abnormalities, fatigue, and poor quality of life. Conventional glucocorticoid replacement cannot replicate this rhythm. Our objectives were to define key variables of physiological cortisol rhythm, and by pharmacokinetic modeling test whether modified-release hydrocortisone (MR-HC) can provide circadian cortisol profiles. The study was performed at a Clinical Research Facility. Using data from a cross-sectional study in healthy reference subjects (n = 33), we defined parameters for the cortisol rhythm. We then tested MR-HC against immediate-release hydrocortisone in healthy volunteers (n = 28) in an open-label, randomized, single-dose, cross-over study. We compared profiles with physiological cortisol levels, and modeled an optimal treatment regimen. The key variables in the physiological cortisol profile included: peak 15.5 microg/dl (95% reference range 11.7-20.6), acrophase 0832 h (95% confidence interval 0759-0905), nadir less than 2 microg/dl (95% reference range 1.5-2.5), time of nadir 0018 h (95% confidence interval 2339-0058), and quiescent phase (below the mesor) 1943-0531 h. MR-HC 15 mg demonstrated delayed and sustained release with a mean (sem) maximum observed concentration of 16.6 (1.4) microg/dl at 7.41 (0.57) h after drug. Bioavailability of MR-HC 5, 10, and 15 mg was 100, 79, and 86% that of immediate-release hydrocortisone. Modeling suggested that MR-HC 15-20 mg at 2300 h and 10 mg at 0700 h could reproduce physiological cortisol levels. By defining circadian rhythms and using modern formulation technology, it is possible to allow a more physiological circadian replacement of cortisol.

  8. Profile of Fluoride Release from a Nanohybrid Composite Resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Assed Bezerra Silva

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro the amount and profile of fluoride release from a fluoride-containing nanohybrid composite resin (Tetric® N-Ceram by direct potentiometry. Thirty specimens (5 mm diameter x 3 mm high; n=10/material were made of Tetric® N-Ceram, Vitremer® resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC (positive control or Filtek® Z350 nanofill composite resin (negative control. The specimens were stored individually in plastic tubes containing 1 mL of artificial saliva at 37°C, which was daily renewed during 15 days. At each renewal of saliva, the amount of fluoride ions released in the solution was measured using a fluoride ion-selective electrode with ion analyzer, and the values obtained in mV were converted to ppm (µg/mL. Data were analyzed statistically by ANOVA and Tukey’s post-hoc test at a significance level of 5%. The results showed that the resins Tetric® N-Ceram and Filtek® Z350 did not release significant amounts of fluoride during the whole period of evaluation (p>0.05. Only Vitremer® released significant amounts of fluoride ions during the 15 days of the experiment, with greater release in first 2 days (p0.05. In conclusion, the nanohybrid composite resin Tetric® N-Ceram did not present in vitro fluoride-releasing capacity throughout the 15 days of study.

  9. Antibody Array-Generated Profiles of Cytokine Release from THP-1 Leukemic Monocytes Exposed to Different Amphotericin B Formulations

    OpenAIRE

    Turtinen, Lloyd W.; Prall, David N.; Bremer, Lindsay A.; Nauss, Rachel E.; Hartsel, Scott C.

    2004-01-01

    Cytokine antibody arrays were used to establish the profiles of cytokine release from THP-1 monocytes exposed to different amphotericin B (AMB) drug delivery systems. Fungizone (FZ) and Amphotec (ABCD) caused the release of significantly more inflammatory molecules and the release of inflammatory molecules at higher levels than either AmBisome (L-AMB) or Abelcet (ABLC) after 6 h of treatment. Specifically, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-8 (IL-8), GRO-(αβγ), monocyte chemoatt...

  10. Temporally controlled release of multiple growth factors from a self-assembling peptide hydrogel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruggeman, Kiara F.; Rodriguez, Alexandra L.; Parish, Clare L.; Williams, Richard J.; Nisbet, David R.

    2016-09-01

    Protein growth factors have demonstrated great potential for tissue repair, but their inherent instability and large size prevents meaningful presentation to biologically protected nervous tissue. Here, we create a nanofibrous network from a self-assembling peptide (SAP) hydrogel to carry and stabilize the growth factors. We significantly reduced growth factor degradation to increase their lifespan by over 40 times. To control the temporal release profile we covalently attached polysaccharide chitosan molecules to the growth factor to increase its interactions with the hydrogel nanofibers and achieved a 4 h delay, demonstrating the potential of this method to provide temporally controlled growth factor delivery. We also describe release rate based analysis to examine the growth factor delivery in more detail than standard cumulative release profiles allow and show that the chitosan attachment method provided a more consistent release profile with a 60% reduction in fluctuations. To prove the potential of this system as a complex growth factor delivery platform we demonstrate for the first time temporally distinct release of multiple growth factors from a single tissue specific SAP hydrogel: a significant goal in regenerative medicine.

  11. Familial growth hormone releasing factor deficiency in pseudopseudohypoparathyroidism.

    OpenAIRE

    Stirling, H F; Barr, D G; Kelnar, C J

    1991-01-01

    A mother with pseudopseudohypoparathyroidism and her short son showed poor spontaneous growth hormone secretion, and provocation tests suggested a deficiency of growth hormone releasing factor. This is the first report of growth hormone releasing factor deficiency in pseudopseudohypoparathyroidism. The boy has responded well to growth hormone treatment over a period of three years.

  12. Release profile and stability evaluation of optimized chitosan/alginate nanoparticles as EGFR antisense vector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebrahim Azizi

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Ebrahim Azizi1,4, Alireza Namazi1, Ismaeil Haririan2,5, Shamileh Fouladdel1, Mohammad R Khoshayand3, Parisa Y Shotorbani6, Alireza Nomani1,7, Taraneh Gazori1,21Molecular Research Lab, Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, 2Department of Pharmaceutics, 3Department of Food and Drug Control, Faculty of Pharmacy, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; 4Department of Medical Biotechnology, School of Advanced Medical Technologies, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; 5Biomaterials Research Center (BRC Tehran, Iran; 6Pharmaceutical Sciences Branch, Azad University, Tehran, Iran; 7Department of Pharmaceutics, Faculty of Pharmacy, Zanjan University of Medical Sciences, Zanjan, IranAbstract: Chitosan/alginate nanoparticles which had been optimized in our previous study using two different N/P ratios were chosen and their ability to release epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR antisense was investigated. In addition, the stability of these nanoparticles in aqueous medium and after freeze-drying was investigated. In the case of both N/P ratios (5, 25, nanoparticles started releasing EGFR antisense as soon as they were exposed to the medium and the release lasted for approximately 50 hours. Nanoparticle size, shape, zeta potential, and release profile did not show any significant change after the freeze-drying process (followed by reswelling. The nanoparticles were reswellable again after freeze-drying in phosphate buffer with a pH of 7.4 over a period of six hours. Agarose gel electrophoresis of the nanoparticles with the two different N/P ratios showed that these nanoparticles could protect EGFR antisense molecules for six hours.Keywords: chitosan/alginate nanoparticles, release profile, freeze-drying, agarose gel electrophoresis

  13. Collagenous matrices as release carriers of exogenous growth factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanematsu, Akihiro; Yamamoto, Shingo; Ozeki, Makoto; Noguchi, Tetsuya; Kanatani, Isao; Ogawa, Osamu; Tabata, Yasuhiko

    2004-08-01

    We have investigated the use of natural and synthetic collagenous matrices as carriers of exogenous growth factors. A bladder acellular matrix (BAM) was processed from rat bladder and compared with sponge matrix of porcine type 1 collagen. The lyophilized matrices were rehydrated by the aqueous solutions of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), platelet derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), insulin like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and heparin binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor (HB-EGF), to obtain the matrix incorporating each growth factor. The rehydration method enabled the growth factor protein to distribute into the matrix homogeneously. In vivo release test in the mouse subcutis revealed that, the property of BAM for growth factor release was similar to that of collagen sponge. Among the growth factors examined, bFGF release was the most sustained, followed by HGF and PDGF-BB. bFGF released from the two matrices showed similar in vivo angiogenic activity at the mouse subcutis in a dose-dependent manner. These findings demonstrate that the collagenous matrices function as release carriers of growth factors. This feature is promising to create a scaffold, which has a nature to control the tissue regeneration actively.

  14. Toxics Release Inventory Chemical Hazard Information Profiles (TRI-CHIP) Dataset

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) Chemical Hazard Information Profiles (TRI-CHIP) dataset contains hazard information about the chemicals reported in TRI. Users can...

  15. Release of Growth Factors into Root Canal by Irrigations in Regenerative Endodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Qian; Nguyen, Sean; Zhang, Hongming; Chebrolu, Hari Priya; Alzebdeh, Dalia; Badi, Mustafa A; Kim, Jong Ryul; Ling, Junqi; Yang, Maobin

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the release of growth factors into root canal space after the irrigation procedure of regenerative endodontic procedure. Sixty standardized root segments were prepared from extracted single-root teeth. Nail varnish was applied to all surfaces except the root canal surface. Root segments were irrigated with 1.5% NaOCl + 17% EDTA, 2.5% NaOCl + 17% EDTA, 17% EDTA, or deionized water. The profile of growth factors that were released after irrigation was studied by growth factor array. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to validate the release of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) at 4 hours, 1 day, and 3 days after irrigation. The final concentrations were calculated on the basis of the root canal volume measured by cone-beam computed tomography. Dental pulp stem cell migration on growth factors released from root segments was measured by using Transwell assay. Total of 11 of 41 growth factors were detected by growth factors array. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay showed that TGF-β1 was released in all irrigation groups. Compared with the group with 17% EDTA (6.92 ± 4.49 ng/mL), the groups with 1.5% NaOCl + 17% EDTA and 2.5% NaOCl + 17% EDTA had significantly higher release of TGF-β1 (69.04 ± 30.41 ng/mL and 59.26 ± 3.37 ng/mL, respectively), with a peak release at day 1. The release of bFGF was detected at a low level in all groups (0 ng/mL to 0.43 ± 0.22 ng/mL). Migration assay showed the growth factors released from root segments induced dental pulp stem cell migration. The root segment model in present study simulated clinical scenario and indicated that the current irrigation protocol released a significant amount of TGF-β1 but not bFGF. The growth factors released into root canal space induced dental pulp stem cell migration. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Bicycling to school improves the cardiometabolic risk factor profile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostergaard, Lars; Børrestad, Line A B; Tarp, Jakob;

    2012-01-01

    To investigate whether bicycling to school improves cardiometabolic risk factor profile and cardiorespiratory fitness among children.......To investigate whether bicycling to school improves cardiometabolic risk factor profile and cardiorespiratory fitness among children....

  17. Time trends in osteoporosis risk factor profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Jakob Præst; Hyldstrup, Lars; Jensen, Jens-Erik Beck

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this article was to identify prevalent osteoporosis risk factors, medications and comorbidities associated with bone mineral density (BMD). Furthermore to evaluate changes in risk factor profiles over 12 years. 6285 women consecutively referred to an osteoporosis specialist clinic were...... was established in a real-life setting. The prevalence of osteoporosis and proportion of patient's having comorbidity's associated with osteoporosis were increasing during the inclusion period (start 23.8 %, end 29.7 %). Increasing age (OR = 1.05), current smoking (OR = 1.18), estrogen deficiency (OR = 1.......7), hyperthyroidism (OR = 1.5), previous major osteoporotic fracture (OR = 1.7), former osteoporosis treatment (OR = 3.5), higher BMI (OR = 0.87), use of calcium supplementation (OR = 1.2), high exercise level (OR = 0.7), and use of thiazide diuretics (OR = 0.7) were identified as predictors of osteoporosis by DXA...

  18. Effect of processing methods on drug release profiles of anti-restenotic self-assembled monolayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoebner, Susan E.; Mani, Gopinath

    2012-04-01

    percentage of drug release when compared to that of other methods on the first day. The treatment at high temperatures (HT-100 °C or HT-140 °C) improved the stability of PAT on alloy surfaces and showed lesser percentage of drug release when compared to that of RT or HT-70 °C at different time points. Large data scatter was observed for the release profiles of quenched specimens. No other major differences in the percentage of drug release were observed for the specimens prepared by different processing methods. These factors should be taken into consideration when drug delivery platforms are developed for stents or other medical devices.

  19. Neuroendocrine Control of the Gut During Stress: Corticotropin-Releasing Factor Signaling Pathways in the Spotlight

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Stress affects the gastrointestinal tract as part of the visceral response. Various stressors induce similar profiles of gut motor function alterations, including inhibition of gastric emptying, stimulation of colonic propulsive motility, and hypersensitivity to colorectal distension. In recent years, substantial progress has been made in our understanding of the underlying mechanisms of stress’s impact on gut function. Activation of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) signaling pathways med...

  20. Controlled release profiles of dipyridamole from biodegradable microspheres on the base of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Novel biodegradable microspheres on the base of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB designed for controlled release of antithrombotic drug, namely dipyridamole (DPD, have been kinetically studied. The profiles of release from the microspheres with different diameters 4, 9, 63, and 92 µm present the progression of nonlinear and linear stages. Diffusionkinetic equation describing both linear (PHB hydrolysis and nonlinear (diffusion stages of the DPD release profiles from the spherical subjects has been written down as the sum of two terms: desorption from the homogeneous sphere in accordance with diffusion mechanism and the zero-order release. In contrast to the diffusivity dependence on microsphere size, the constant characteristics (k of linearity are scarcely affected by the diameter of PHB microparticles. The view of the kinetic profiles as well as the low rate of DPD release are in satisfactory agreement with kinetics of weight loss measured in vitro for the PHB films. Taking into account kinetic results, we suppose that the degradation of both films and PHB microspheres is responsible for the linear stage of DPD release profiles. In the nearest future, combination of biodegradable PHB and DPD as a representative of proliferation cell inhibitors will give possibility to elaborate the novel injectable therapeutic system for a local, long-term, antiproliferative action.

  1. Safety factor profile control in a tokamak

    CERN Document Server

    Bribiesca Argomedo, Federico; Prieur, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    Control of the Safety Factor Profile in a Tokamak uses Lyapunov techniques to address a challenging problem for which even the simplest physically relevant models are represented by nonlinear, time-dependent, partial differential equations (PDEs). This is because of the  spatiotemporal dynamics of transport phenomena (magnetic flux, heat, densities, etc.) in the anisotropic plasma medium. Robustness considerations are ubiquitous in the analysis and control design since direct measurements on the magnetic flux are impossible (its estimation relies on virtual sensors) and large uncertainties remain in the coupling between the plasma particles and the radio-frequency waves (distributed inputs). The Brief begins with a presentation of the reference dynamical model and continues by developing a Lyapunov function for the discretized system (in a polytopic linear-parameter-varying formulation). The limitations of this finite-dimensional approach motivate new developments in the infinite-dimensional framework. The t...

  2. Uniformity of Peptide Release Is Maintained by Methylation of Release Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William E. Pierson

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Termination of protein synthesis on the ribosome is catalyzed by release factors (RFs, which share a conserved glycine-glycine-glutamine (GGQ motif. The glutamine residue is methylated in vivo, but a mechanistic understanding of its contribution to hydrolysis is lacking. Here, we show that the modification, apart from increasing the overall rate of termination on all dipeptides, substantially increases the rate of peptide release on a subset of amino acids. In the presence of unmethylated RFs, we measure rates of hydrolysis that are exceptionally slow on proline and glycine residues and approximately two orders of magnitude faster in the presence of the methylated factors. Structures of 70S ribosomes bound to methylated RF1 and RF2 reveal that the glutamine side-chain methylation packs against 23S rRNA nucleotide 2451, stabilizing the GGQ motif and placing the side-chain amide of the glutamine toward tRNA. These data provide a framework for understanding how release factor modifications impact termination.

  3. Injectable Biodegradable Polyurethane Scaffolds with Release of Platelet-derived Growth Factor for Tissue Repair and Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafeman, Andrea E.; Li, Bing; Yoshii, Toshitaka; Zienkiewicz, Katarzyna; Davidson, Jeffrey M.; Guelcher, Scott A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this work was to investigate the effects of triisocyanate composition on the biological and mechanical properties of biodegradable, injectable polyurethane scaffolds for bone and soft tissue engineering. Methods Scaffolds were synthesized using reactive liquid molding techniques, and were characterized in vivo in a rat subcutaneous model. Porosity, dynamic mechanical properties, degradation rate, and release of growth factors were also measured. Results Polyurethane scaffolds were elastomers with tunable damping properties and degradation rates, and they supported cellular infiltration and generation of new tissue. The scaffolds showed a two-stage release profile of platelet-derived growth factor, characterized by a 75% burst release within the first 24 h and slower release thereafter. Conclusions Biodegradable polyurethanes synthesized from triisocyanates exhibited tunable and superior mechanical properties compared to materials synthesized from lysine diisocyanates. Due to their injectability, biocompatibility, tunable degradation, and potential for release of growth factors, these materials are potentially promising therapies for tissue engineering. PMID:18516665

  4. JASPAR 2010: the greatly expanded open-access database of transcription factor binding profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Portales-Casamar, Elodie; Thongjuea, Supat; Kwon, Andrew T

    2009-01-01

    JASPAR (http://jaspar.genereg.net) is the leading open-access database of matrix profiles describing the DNA-binding patterns of transcription factors (TFs) and other proteins interacting with DNA in a sequence-specific manner. Its fourth major release is the largest expansion of the core database...

  5. The 2008 Public Release of the International Multi-tokamak Confinement Profile Database

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roach, C. M.; Walters, M.; Budny, R. V.; Imbeaux, F.; Fredian, T. W.; Greenwald, M.; Stillerman, J. A.; Alexander, D. A.; Carlsson, J.; Cary, J. R.; Ryter, F.; Stober, J.; Gohil, P.; Greenfield, C.; Murakami, M.; Bracco, G.; Esposito, B.; Romanelli, M.; Parail, V.; Stubberfield, P.; Voitsekhovitch, I.; Brickley, C.; Field, A. R.; Sakamoto, Y.; Fujita, T.; Fukuda, T.; Hayashi, N.; Hogeweij, G. M. D.; Chudnovskiy, A.; Kinerva, N. A.; Kessel, C. E.; Aniel, T.; Hoang, G. T.; Ongena, J.; Doyle, E. J.; Houlberg, W. A.; Polevoi, A. R.

    2008-01-01

    This paper documents the public release PR08 of the International Tokamak Physics Activity (ITPA) profile database, which should be of particular interest to the magnetic confinement fusion community. Data from a wide variety of interesting discharges from many of the world's leading tokamak ex

  6. The effect of hydrophilic and hydrophobic polymers on release profiles of diclofenac sodium from matrix tablets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Imamul Islam

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: The present study demonstrated that Diclofenac could be successfully prepared using an appropriate amount of Methocel K15 MCR® and CA in the form of matrix tablets with similar dissolution profile of patent product Voltaren SR® . The type of polymers used was found to induce a profound effect on release rate and mechanism.

  7. Organosulphide profile and hydrogen sulphide-releasing activity of garlic fermented by Lactobacillus plantarum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tocmo, Restituto; Lai, Abigail Nianci; Wu, Yuchen; Liang, Dong; Fogliano, Vincenzo; Huang, Dejian

    2017-01-01

    Blanched and unblanched garlic were fermented using L. plantarum for investigation of organosulphide profiles, hydrogen sulphide-releasing activity, pH, titratable activity and microbial growth. Both raw and blanched garlic preparations allowed growth of L. plantarum with corresponding lowering of p

  8. Gelatin methacrylate microspheres for controlled growth factor release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Anh H; McKinney, Jay; Miller, Tobias; Bongiorno, Tom; McDevitt, Todd C

    2015-02-01

    Gelatin has been commonly used as a delivery vehicle for various biomolecules for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications due to its simple fabrication methods, inherent electrostatic binding properties, and proteolytic degradability. Compared to traditional chemical cross-linking methods, such as the use of glutaraldehyde (GA), methacrylate modification of gelatin offers an alternative method to better control the extent of hydrogel cross-linking. Here we examined the physical properties and growth factor delivery of gelatin methacrylate (GMA) microparticles (MPs) formulated with a wide range of different cross-linking densities (15-90%). Less methacrylated MPs had decreased elastic moduli and larger mesh sizes compared to GA MPs, with increasing methacrylation correlating to greater moduli and smaller mesh sizes. As expected, an inverse correlation between microparticle cross-linking density and degradation was observed, with the lowest cross-linked GMA MPs degrading at the fastest rate, comparable to GA MPs. Interestingly, GMA MPs at lower cross-linking densities could be loaded with up to a 10-fold higher relative amount of growth factor than conventional GA cross-linked MPs, despite the GA MPs having an order of magnitude greater gelatin content. Moreover, a reduced GMA cross-linking density resulted in more complete release of bone morphogenic protein 4 and basic fibroblast growth factor and accelerated release rate with collagenase treatment. These studies demonstrate that GMA MPs provide a more flexible platform for growth factor delivery by enhancing the relative binding capacity and permitting proteolytic degradation tunability, thereby offering a more potent controlled release system for growth factor delivery.

  9. Square Wave Voltammetry: An Alternative Technique to Determinate Piroxicam Release Profiles from Nanostructured Lipid Carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otarola, Jessica; Garrido, Mariano; Correa, N Mariano; Molina, Patricia G

    2016-08-04

    A new, simple, and fast electrochemical (EC) method has been developed to determine the release profile of piroxicam, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, loaded in a drug delivery system based on nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs). For the first time, the samples were analyzed by using square wave voltammetry, a sensitive EC technique. The piroxicam EC responses allow us to propose a model that explains the experimental results and to subsequently determine the amount of drug loaded into the NLCs formulation as a function of time. In vitro drug release studies showed prolonged drug release (up to 5 days), releasing 60 % of the incorporated drug. The proposed method is a promising and stable alternative for the study of different drug delivery systems.

  10. Controlled growth factor release from synthetic extracellular matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kuen Yong; Peters, Martin C.; Anderson, Kenneth W.; Mooney, David J.

    2000-12-01

    Polymeric matrices can be used to grow new tissues and organs, and the delivery of growth factors from these matrices is one method to regenerate tissues. A problem with engineering tissues that exist in a mechanically dynamic environment, such as bone, muscle and blood vessels, is that most drug delivery systems have been designed to operate under static conditions. We thought that polymeric matrices, which release growth factors in response to mechanical signals, might provide a new approach to guide tissue formation in mechanically stressed environments. Critical design features for this type of system include the ability to undergo repeated deformation, and a reversible binding of the protein growth factors to polymeric matrices to allow for responses to repeated stimuli. Here we report a model delivery system that can respond to mechanical signalling and upregulate the release of a growth factor to promote blood vessel formation. This approach may find a number of applications, including regeneration and engineering of new tissues and more general drug-delivery applications.

  11. Regulation of gonadotropins by corticotropin-releasing factor and urocortin

    OpenAIRE

    Kageyama, Kazunori

    2013-01-01

    While stress activates the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal (HPA) axis, it suppresses the hypothalamic–pituitary–gonadal (HPG) axis. Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) is a major regulatory peptide in the HPA axis during stress. Urocortin 1 (Ucn1), a member of the CRF family of peptides, has a variety of physiological functions and both CRF and Ucn1 contribute to the stress response via G protein-coupled seven transmembrane receptors. Ucn2 and Ucn3, which belong to a separate paralogous linea...

  12. GH responses to growth hormone releasing factor in depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, R; Beer, R; Harris, B; John, R; Scanlon, M

    1989-01-01

    The growth hormone (GH), thyrotrophin (TSH) and prolactin response to growth hormone releasing factor (GRF) was investigated in 18 patients suffering from major depression with melancholia and in 18 age- and sex-matched normal controls. There was no significant difference in the GH response to GRF stimulation between the patients and controls and in neither subject group was there a demonstrable TSH or prolactin response to GRF. These findings indicate that the pathophysiology underlying the blunted GH response to pharmacological challenge, demonstrated in other studies, must lie at a suprapituitary level.

  13. Neuroendocrine control of the gut during stress: corticotropin-releasing factor signaling pathways in the spotlight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stengel, Andreas; Taché, Yvette

    2009-01-01

    Stress affects the gastrointestinal tract as part of the visceral response. Various stressors induce similar profiles of gut motor function alterations, including inhibition of gastric emptying, stimulation of colonic propulsive motility, and hypersensitivity to colorectal distension. In recent years, substantial progress has been made in our understanding of the underlying mechanisms of stress's impact on gut function. Activation of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) signaling pathways mediates both the inhibition of upper gastrointestinal (GI) and the stimulation of lower GI motor function through interaction with different CRF receptor subtypes. Here, we review how various stressors affect the gut, with special emphasis on the central and peripheral CRF signaling systems.

  14. In vitro gentamicin release from commercially available calcium-phosphate bone substitutes influence of carrier type on duration of the release profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bronckers Antonius LJJ

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polymethyl-methacrylate (PMMA beads releasing antibiotics are used extensively to treat osteomyelitis, but require surgical removal afterwards because they do not degrade. Methods As an alternative option, this report compares the in vitro gentamicin release profile from clinically used, biodegradable carrier-materials: six injectable cements and six granule-types. Cement cylinders and coated granules containing 3% gentamicin were submerged in dH2O and placed in a 48-sample parallel drug-release system. At regular intervals (30, 90, 180 min. and then every 24 h, for 21 days, the release fluid was exchanged and the gentamicin concentration was measured. The activity of released gentamicin was tested on Staphylococcus aureus. Results All combinations showed initial burst-release of active gentamicin, two cements had continuous-release (17 days. The relative release of all cements (36–85% and granules (30–62% was higher than previously reported for injectable PMMA-cements (up to 17% and comparable to other biodegradable carriers. From the cements residual gentamicin could be extracted, whereas the granules released all gentamicin that had adhered to the surface. Conclusion The high release achieved shows great promise for clinical application of these biodegradable drug-carriers. Using the appropriate combination, the required release profile (burst or sustained may be achieved.

  15. 3D printing of tablets containing multiple drugs with defined release profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaled, Shaban A; Burley, Jonathan C; Alexander, Morgan R; Yang, Jing; Roberts, Clive J

    2015-10-30

    We have employed three-dimensional (3D) extrusion-based printing as a medicine manufacturing technique for the production of multi-active tablets with well-defined and separate controlled release profiles for three different drugs. This 'polypill' made by a 3D additive manufacture technique demonstrates that complex medication regimes can be combined in a single tablet and that it is viable to formulate and 'dial up' this single tablet for the particular needs of an individual. The tablets used to illustrate this concept incorporate an osmotic pump with the drug captopril and sustained release compartments with the drugs nifedipine and glipizide. This combination of medicines could potentially be used to treat diabetics suffering from hypertension. The room temperature extrusion process used to print the formulations used excipients commonly employed in the pharmaceutical industry. Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) and X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) were used to assess drug-excipient interaction. The printed formulations were evaluated for drug release using USP dissolution testing. We found that the captopril portion showed the intended zero order drug release of an osmotic pump and noted that the nifedipine and glipizide portions showed either first order release or Korsmeyer-Peppas release kinetics dependent upon the active/excipient ratio used.

  16. Characterization of hydrophobic flavor release profile in oil-in-water emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giroux, H J; Perreault, V; Britten, M

    2007-03-01

    An instrumental approach to better understand the release and persistence of flavor in oil-in-water emulsions has been developed. Emulsions were prepared with various whey protein (0.1% to 3.16%), sunflower oil (1% to 8%), and ethyl hexanoate (0% to 0.04%) concentrations. Flavor release profile in real time was measured at 37 degrees C using a specially designed glass cell connected directly to a gas chromatograph equipped with a flame ionization detector. The intensity of flavor released from the emulsion stirred at a shear rate of 100 s(-1) was monitored as a function of time and data were fitted to a 1st-order kinetic equation. Maximum intensity and decay rate constant were both determined from the model and the persistence index (inversely associated to decay rate constant) was calculated. For constant aroma concentration in the emulsion, maximum intensity significantly decreased as whey protein and oil concentrations increased. For increasing aroma concentration, maximum intensity was directly proportional to the ethyl hexanoate concentration when the oil content was kept constant but leveled off when oil content was increased. Persistence of flavor significantly increased with increasing protein and oil concentrations while aroma concentrations had no effect when oil content was constant. The results showed that oil concentration had a greater influence on flavor release characteristics than protein concentration. Aroma concentration in the oil phase, rather than in the emulsion, determines the kinetics of hydrophobic flavor release. The method provides a useful tool for the rapid and reproducible measurement of flavor release profile.

  17. [Evaluation of nutrient release profiles from polymer coated fertilizers using Fourier transform mid-infrared photoacoustic spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Ya-zhen; Du, Chang-wen; Zhou, Jian-min; Wang, Huo-yan; Chen, Xiao-qin

    2012-02-01

    The acrylate-like materials were used to develop the polymer coated controlled release fertilizer, the nutrients release profiles were determined, meanwhile the Fourier transform mid-infrared photoacoustic spectra of the coatings were recorded and characterized; GRNN model was used to predict the nutrients release profiles using the principal components of the mid-infrared photoacoustic spectra as input. Results showed that the GRNN model could fast and effectively predict the nutrient release profiles, and the predicted calibration coefficients were more than 0.93; on the whole, the prediction errors (RMSE) were influenced by the profiling depth of the spectra, the average prediction error was 10.28%, and the spectra from the surface depth resulted in a lowest prediction error with 7.14%. Therefore, coupled with GRNN modeling, Fourier transform mid-infrared photoacoustic spectroscopy can be used as an alternative new technique in the fast and accurate prediction of nutrient release from polymer coated fertilizer.

  18. Intrahypothalamic neuroendocrine actions of corticotropin-releasing factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, O F; Hassan, A H; Holsboer, F

    1993-01-01

    Most studies of the neuroendocrine effects of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) have focused on its role in the regulation of the pituitary-adrenal axis; activation of this axis follows release of the peptide from CRF-containing terminals in the median eminence. However, a sizeable proportion of CRF fibres terminate within the hypothalamus itself, where synaptic contacts with other hypothalamic neuropeptidergic neurons (e.g. gonadotropin-releasing hormone-containing and opioidergic neurons) have been identified. Here, we summarize physiological and pharmacological data which provide insights into the nature and significance of these intrahypothalamic connections. It is now clear that CRF is a potent secretagogue of the three major endogenous opioid peptides (beta-endorphin, Met-enkephalin and dynorphin) and that it stimulates opioidergic neurons tonically. In the case of beta-endorphin, another hypothalamic peptide, arginine vasopressin, appears to be an essential mediator of CRF's effect, suggesting the occurrence of CRF synapses on, or in the vicinity of, vasopressin neurons; morphological support for this assumption is still wanting. Evidence for direct and indirect inhibitory effects of CRF on sexual behaviour and secretion of reproductive hormones is also presented; the indirect pathways include opioidergic neurons. An important conclusion from all these studies is that, in addition to its better known functions in producing adaptive responses during stressful situations, CRF might also contribute to the coordinated functioning of various components of the neuroendocrine system under basal conditions. Although feedback regulation of hypothalamic neuronal activity by peripheral steroids is a well-established tenet of endocrinology, data on modulation of the intrahypothalamic actions of CRF by adrenal and sex steroids are just emerging. Some of these newer findings may be useful in framing questions related to the mechanisms underlying disease states (such as

  19. Influence of polymethacrylates and compritol on release profile of a highly water soluble drug metformin hydrochloride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunita Dahiya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The present investigation studied effect of polymethacrylates Eudragit RSPO, Eudragit RLPO and compritol 888 ATO on release profile of highly water soluble drug metformin hydrochloride (MET. Materials and Methods: The solid dispersions were prepared using drug:polymer ratios 1:1 and 1:5 by coevaporation and coprecipitation techniques. Solid dispersions were characterized by infrared Spectroscopy (IR, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, X-ray diffractometry (XRD as well as content uniformity, in vitro dissolution studies in 0.1 N HCl pH 1.2, phosphate buffer pH 6.8. Results and Discussion: Results of the studies suggested that there were progressive disappearance or changes of prominent peaks in IR, X-ray diffraction and thermotropic drug signals in coevaporates and coprecipitates with increased amount of polymers. Moreover, the in vitro release of highly water soluble MET could be extended at higher drug:polymer ratios. Conclusion: It was summarized that Eudragit RLPO had greater capacity of drug release than Eudragit RSPO and Comproitol 888 and its coevaporates in 1:5 drug:polymer ratio (F11 displayed extended drug release with comparatively higher dissolution rates (92.15 % drug release at 12 hour following near Zero order kinetics (r² =0.9822.

  20. Regulation of gonadotropins by corticotropin-releasing factor and urocortin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazunori eKageyama

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available While stress activates the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis, it suppresses the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG axis. Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF is a major regulatory peptide in the HPA axis during stress. Urocortin1 (Ucn1, a member of the CRF family of peptides, has a variety of physiological functions and both CRF and Ucn1 contribute to the stress response via G protein-coupled seven transmembrane receptors. Ucn2 and Ucn3, which belong to a separate paralogous lineage from CRF, are highly selective for the CRF type 2 receptor (CRF2 receptor. The HPA and HPG axes interact with each other, and gonadal function and reproduction are suppressed in response to various stressors. In this review, we focus on the regulation of gonadotropins by CRF and Ucn2 in pituitary gonadotrophs and of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH via CRF receptors in the hypothalamus. In corticotrophs, stress-induced increases in CRF stimulate Ucn2 production, which leads to the inhibition of gonadotropin secretion via the CRF2 receptor in the pituitary. GnRH in the hypothalamus is regulated by a variety of stress conditions. CRF is also involved in the suppression of the HPG axis, especially the GnRH pulse generator, via CRF receptors in the hypothalamus. Thus, complicated regulation of GnRH in the hypothalamus and gonadotropins in the pituitary via CRF receptors contributes to stress responses and adaptation of gonadal functions.

  1. A novel experimental design method to optimize hydrophilic matrix formulations with drug release profiles and mechanical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Du Hyung; Lim, Jun Yeul; Shin, Sangmun; Choi, Won Jun; Jeong, Seong Hoon; Lee, Sangkil

    2014-10-01

    To investigate the effects of hydrophilic polymers on the matrix system, an experimental design method was developed to integrate response surface methodology and the time series modeling. Moreover, the relationships among polymers on the matrix system were studied with the evaluation of physical properties including water uptake, mass loss, diffusion, and gelling index. A mixture simplex lattice design was proposed while considering eight input control factors: Polyethylene glycol 6000 (x1 ), polyethylene oxide (PEO) N-10 (x2 ), PEO 301 (x3 ), PEO coagulant (x4 ), PEO 303 (x5 ), hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) 100SR (x6 ), HPMC 4000SR (x7 ), and HPMC 10(5) SR (x8 ). With the modeling, optimal formulations were obtained depending on the four types of targets. The optimal formulations showed the four significant factors (x1 , x2 , x3 , and x8 ) and other four input factors (x4 , x5 , x6 , and x7 ) were not significant based on drug release profiles. Moreover, the optimization results were analyzed with estimated values, targets values, absolute biases, and relative biases based on observed times for the drug release rates with four different targets. The result showed that optimal solutions and target values had consistent patterns with small biases. On the basis of the physical properties of the optimal solutions, the type and ratio of the hydrophilic polymer and the relationships between polymers significantly influenced the physical properties of the system and drug release. This experimental design method is very useful in formulating a matrix system with optimal drug release. Moreover, it can distinctly confirm the relationships between excipients and the effects on the system with extensive and intensive evaluations.

  2. Inflammation and activity augment brain-derived neurotrophic factor peripheral release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, L Y; Shen, S; Liu, M; Xia, C; Kay, J C; Zhang, Q L

    2016-03-24

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) release to nerve terminals in the central nervous system is crucial in synaptic transmission and neuronal plasticity. However, BDNF release peripherally from primary afferent neurons has not been investigated. In the present study, we show that BDNF is synthesized by primary afferent neurons located in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) in rat, and releases to spinal nerve terminals in response to depolarization or visceral inflammation. In two-compartmented culture that separates DRG neuronal cell bodies and spinal nerve terminals, application of 50mM K(+) to either the nerve terminal or the cell body evokes BDNF release to the terminal compartment. Inflammatory stimulation of the visceral organ (e.g. the urinary bladder) also facilitates an increase in spontaneous BDNF release from the primary afferent neurons to the axonal terminals. In the inflamed viscera, we show that BDNF immunoreactivity is increased in nerve fibers that are immuno-positive to the neuronal marker PGP9.5. Both BDNF and pro-BDNF levels are increased, however, pro-BDNF immunoreactivity is not expressed in PGP9.5-positive nerve-fiber-like structures. Determination of receptor profiles in the inflamed bladder demonstrates that BDNF high affinity receptor TrkB and general receptor p75 expression levels are elevated, with an increased level of TrkB tyrosine phosphorylation/activity. These results suggest a possibility of pro-proliferative effect in the inflamed bladder. Consistently we show that the proliferation marker Ki67 expression levels are enhanced in the inflamed organ. Our results imply that in vivo BDNF release to the peripheral organ is an important event in neurogenic inflammatory state.

  3. JASPAR 2016: a major expansion and update of the open-access database of transcription factor binding profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathelier, Anthony; Fornes, Oriol; Arenillas, David J;

    2016-01-01

    JASPAR (http://jaspar.genereg.net) is an open-access database storing curated, non-redundant transcription factor (TF) binding profiles representing transcription factor binding preferences as position frequency matrices for multiple species in six taxonomic groups. For this 2016 release, we...

  4. Profile of stress factors associated with mental disorders in children ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Profile of stress factors associated with mental disorders in children and adolescents referred for ... South African Journal of Psychiatry ... and disruptive behaviour disorders, followed by major depressive disorders (22.7%), anxiety disorders ...

  5. Soluble tumour necrosis factor receptor release after anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody treatment in mice is independent of tumour necrosis factor-alpha release.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vossen, A.C.T.M.; Tibbe, G.J.M.; Buurman, W.A.; Benner, R.; Savelkoul, H.F.J.

    1996-01-01

    Soluble tumour necrosis factor receptor release after anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody treatment in mice is independent of tumour necrosis factor-alpha release. Vossen AC, Tibbe GJ, Buurman WA, Benner R, Savelkoul HF. Department of Immunology, Erasmus University, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. The involvem

  6. Formulation parameters affecting the performance of coated gelatin capsules with pulsatile release profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bussemer, T; Bodmeier, R

    2003-11-28

    The objective of this study was to develop and evaluate a rupturable pulsatile drug delivery system based on soft gelatin capsules with or without a swelling layer and an external water-insoluble but -permeable polymer coating, which released the drug after a lag time (rupturing of the external polymer coating). The swelling of the gelatin capsule itself was insufficient to rupture the external polymer coating, an additional swelling layer was applied between the capsule and the polymer coating. Croscarmellose sodium (Ac-Di-Sol) was more effective as a swelling agent than low and high molecular weight hydroxypropylmethyl cellulose (HPMC; E5 or K100M). Brittle polymers, such as ethyl cellulose (EC) and cellulose acetate propionate (CAPr), led to a better rupturing and therefore more complete drug release than the flexible polymer coating, Eudragit RS. The lag time of the release system increased with higher polymer coating levels and decreased with the addition of a hydrophilic pore-former, HPMC E5 and also with an increasing amount of the intermediate swelling layer. The water uptake of the capsules was linear until rupture and was higher with CAPr than with EC. Soft gelatin capsule-based systems showed shorter lag times compared to hard gelatin capsules because of the higher hardness/filling state of the soft gelatin capsules. The swelling pressure was therefore more directed to the external polymer coating with the soft gelatin capsules. Typical pulsatile drug release profiles were obtained at lower polymer coating levels, while the release was slower and incomplete at the higher coating levels. CAPr-coated capsules resulted in a more complete release than EC-coated capsules.

  7. Platelet-Released Growth Factors Induce Differentiation of Primary Keratinocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Bayer

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Autologous thrombocyte concentrate lysates, for example, platelet-released growth factors, (PRGFs or their clinically related formulations (e.g., Vivostat PRF® came recently into the physicians’ focus as they revealed promising effects in regenerative and reparative medicine such as the support of healing of chronic wounds. To elucidate the underlying mechanisms, we analyzed the influence of PRGF and Vivostat PRF on human keratinocyte differentiation in vitro and on epidermal differentiation status of skin wounds in vivo. Therefore, we investigated the expression of early (keratin 1 and keratin 10 and late (transglutaminase-1 and involucrin differentiation markers. PRGF treatment of primary human keratinocytes decreased keratin 1 and keratin 10 gene expression but induced involucrin and transglutaminase-1 gene expression in an epidermal growth factor receptor- (EGFR- dependent manner. In concordance with these results, microscopic analyses revealed that PRGF-treated human keratinocytes displayed morphological features typical of keratinocytes undergoing terminal differentiation. In vivo treatment of artificial human wounds with Vivostat PRF revealed a significant induction of involucrin and transglutaminase-1 gene expression. Together, our results indicate that PRGF and Vivostat PRF induce terminal differentiation of primary human keratinocytes. This potential mechanism may contribute to the observed beneficial effects in the treatment of hard-to-heal wounds with autologous thrombocyte concentrate lysates in vivo.

  8. An improvisation on the Middle-Eastern mijwiz; auditory roughness profiles and tension/release patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassilakis, Pantelis N.

    2005-04-01

    Within western musical tradition, auditory roughness constitutes one of the principle perceptual correlates of dissonance. A previous study [P. N. Vassilakis, Selected Reports in Ethnomusicology, Vol. 12 (in press)] addressed the musical significance of auditory roughness within western as well as three non-western musical traditions. It introduced a new roughness estimation model that predicts successfully roughness ratings of synthesized complex diatonic dyads. For the present study, an application was created that uses the aforementioned model to estimate the roughness of natural signals with arbitrary spectra, as well as roughness profiles of short musical pieces. The application was used to examine if and how the pattern of tension and release within a stylized improvisation on the Middle Eastern mijwiz (double clarinet) relates to roughness changes. Tension/release patterns were indicated by the Lebanese improviser and expert mijwiz player (Dr. A. J. Racy) and were also obtained by both musicians and non-musicians (American-raised) in a perceptual experiment. The results suggest that auditory roughness is a good predictor of the tension/release pattern indicated by the improviser. The patterns obtained by the subjects, although not very consistent, appear to be different overall, suggesting that musical tension and release may be culture-specific concepts.

  9. Release Profile of Andrographis paniculata Leaf Extract Nanocapsule as α-Glucosidase Inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahrani, K.; Imansari, F.; Utami, T. S.; Arbianti, R.

    2017-07-01

    Andrographis paniculata is one of 13 leading commodities Indonesian medicinal plants through the Ditjen POM. Andrographolide as main active compound has been shown to have many pharmacological activities, one of which is as α-glucosidase enzyme inhibitors which has clinical potential as an antitumor, antiviral, antidiabetic, and immunoregulator agents. This study aims to do nanoencapsulation of Andrographis paniculatar leaf extract to increase its active compound bioavailability and get a release profile through synthetic fluids media simulation. Nanoencapsulation with ionic gelation method result the encapsulation efficiency and loading capacity values of 73.47% and 46.29% at 2%: 1% of chitosan: STPP ratio. The maximum α-glucosidase inhibition of 37.17% was obtained at 16% concentration. Burst release at gastric pH conditions indicate that most of the drug (in this study is an Andrographis paniculata leaf extract) adsorbed on the surface of the nanoparticles an indicates that the kind of nanoparticle formed is nanosphere.

  10. Drug release profiles of modified MCM-41 with superparamagnetic behavior correlated with the employed synthesis method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuello, Natalia I; Elías, Verónica R; Mendieta, Silvia N; Longhi, Marcela; Crivello, Mónica E; Oliva, Marcos I; Eimer, Griselda A

    2017-09-01

    Mesoporous materials with superparamagnetic properties were successfully synthesized by two different methods: direct incorporation (DI) and wet impregnation (WI). The synthetized solids were evaluated as host of drugs for delivery systems and their physicochemical properties were characterized by XRD, ICP, N2 adsorption-desorption, spectroscopies of UV-Vis DR, FT-IR and their magnetic properties were measured. Indomethacin (IND) was incorporated into the materials and the kinetic of the release profiles was studied by applying the Pepas and Sahlin model. In this sense, materials modified by DI, particularly that with hydrothermal treatment, showed the higher adsorption capacity and slower release rate. This behavior could be associated to the synthesis method used that allowed a high percentage of silanol groups available in the solids surface, which can interact with the IND molecule. This feature coupled with the superparamagnetic behavior; make these materials very interesting for drug delivery systems. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Factors controlling alkalisalt deposition in recovery boiler- release mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKeough, P.; Kylloenen, H.; Kurkela, M. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland). Process Technology Group

    1996-12-01

    As part of a cooperative effort to develop a model to describe the behaviour of inorganic compounds in kraft recovery boilers, an experimental investigation of the release of sulphur during black liquor pyrolysis has been undertaken. Previous to these studies, the mechanisms of sulphur release and the reasons for the observed effects of process conditions on sulphur release were very poorly understood. On the basis of the experimental results, the main reactions leading to sulphur release have been elucidated with a fair degree of certainty. Logical explanations for the variations of sulphur release with temperature and with liquor solids content have been proposed. The influence of pressure has been investigated in order to gain insights into the effects of mass transfer on the sulphur-release rate. In the near future, the research will be aimed at generating the kinetic data necessary for modelling the release of sulphur in the recovery furnace. (author)

  12. Release factor one is nonessential in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, David B F; Wang, Chong; Xu, Jianfeng; Schultz, Matthew D; Schmitz, Robert J; Ecker, Joseph R; Wang, Lei

    2012-08-17

    Recoding a stop codon to an amino acid may afford orthogonal genetic systems for biosynthesizing new protein and organism properties. Although reassignment of stop codons has been found in extant organisms, a model organism is lacking to investigate the reassignment process and to direct code evolution. Complete reassignment of a stop codon is precluded by release factors (RFs), which recognize stop codons to terminate translation. Here we discovered that RF1 could be unconditionally knocked out from various Escherichia coli stains, demonstrating that the reportedly essential RF1 is generally dispensable for the E. coli species. The apparent essentiality of RF1 was found to be caused by the inefficiency of a mutant RF2 in terminating all UAA stop codons; a wild type RF2 was sufficient for RF1 knockout. The RF1-knockout strains were autonomous and unambiguously reassigned UAG to encode natural or unnatural amino acids (Uaas) at multiple sites, affording a previously unavailable model for studying code evolution and a unique host for exploiting Uaas to evolve new biological functions.

  13. Antibody array-generated profiles of cytokine release from THP-1 leukemic monocytes exposed to different amphotericin B formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turtinen, Lloyd W; Prall, David N; Bremer, Lindsay A; Nauss, Rachel E; Hartsel, Scott C

    2004-02-01

    Cytokine antibody arrays were used to establish the profiles of cytokine release from THP-1 monocytes exposed to different amphotericin B (AMB) drug delivery systems. Fungizone (FZ) and Amphotec (ABCD) caused the release of significantly more inflammatory molecules and the release of inflammatory molecules at higher levels than either AmBisome (L-AMB) or Abelcet (ABLC) after 6 h of treatment. Specifically, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin-8 (IL-8), GRO-(alphabetagamma), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), RANTES, IL-10, and IL-6 were detected and semiquantified with a chemiluminscence imaging system. TNF-alpha, IL-8, and MCP-1 were the most predominant; however, little if any TNF-alpha was present in ABLC- or L-AMB-treated cultures. The TNF- alpha and IL-8 levels determined by quantitative enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay correlated with the relative cytokine levels measured by using the antibody arrays. Although the viabilities of THP-l monocytes in all AMB-treated cultures were similar by trypan blue exclusion, the amount of lactic dehydrogenase released was significantly larger in FZ- and ABCD-treated cultures than in L-AMB- and ABLC-treated cultures, indicating more membrane perturbations with those formulations. Membrane cation channel formation was also measured in model cholesterol-containing large unilamellar vesicles to directly assess the ion channel formation ability of the system. Only FZ and ABCD induced significant ion currents at concentrations less than 1.5 x 10(-5) M. These results may help provide rationales for the immediate cytokine-mediated side effects observed with FZ and ABCD and the reduced side effects observed with L-AMB and ABLC.

  14. In Situ Loading of Basic Fibroblast Growth Factor Within Porous Silica Nanoparticles for a Prolonged Release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Postovit Lynne-Marie

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF, a protein, plays a key role in wound healing and blood vessel regeneration. However, bFGF is easily degraded in biologic systems. Mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs with well-tailored porous structure have been used for hosting guest molecules for drug delivery. Here, we report an in situ route to load bFGF in MSNs for a prolonged release. The average diameter (d of bFGF-loaded MSNs is 57 ± 8 nm produced by a water-in-oil microemulsion method. The in vitro releasing profile of bFGF from MSNs in phosphate buffer saline has been monitored for 20 days through a colorimetric enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. The loading efficiency of bFGF in MSNs is estimated at 72.5 ± 3%. In addition, the cytotoxicity test indicates that the MSNs are not toxic, even at a concentration of 50 μg/mL. It is expected that the in situ loading method makes the MSNs a new delivery system to deliver protein drugs, e.g. growth factors, to help blood vessel regeneration and potentiate greater angiogenesis.

  15. Standardized ileal digestible lysine requirements of male pigs immunized against gonadotrophin releasing factor

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moore, K L; Mullan, B P; Kim, J C; Dunshea, F R

    2016-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to determine the standardized ileal digestible (SID) Lys requirement of entire male and male pigs immunized against gonadotrophin releasing factor (GnRF; immunocastrates...

  16. On-chip assessment of the protein-release profile from 3D hydrogel arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Mariana B; Mano, João F

    2013-02-19

    As the formation of healthy tissue and the treatment of several diseases are often dependent on an effective and prolonged action of bioactive agents, the delivery of molecules for therapeutic or induction purposes in a tissue is a common procedure. The correct administration of those agents is often dependent on tailored delivery mechanisms from hydrogel or polymeric matrixes. To the best of our knowledge, methods for the high-throughput monitoring of bioactive agent delivery are nonexistent. The methods for the in vitro monitoring of molecule release are expensive and laborious. As a simple alternative to these methods, we propose the imprinting of superhydrophobic biomimetic surfaces with ring-shaped transparent spots with concentric superhydrophobic millimetric regions to be used as bioactive agent release study platforms. We designed an array where polymeric precursors mixed with a growth-factor model protein labeled with a fluorescent tag could be dispensed in the concentric highly repellent regions and cross-linked afterward, generating a polymeric protein-loaded sphere. The ring-shaped region was then filled with a physiological-like fluid that covered the polymeric sphere. The acquisition of sequential images of each spot over time using microscopy methods allowed one to easily monitor the protein release by image-based fluorescence quantification. As the platform is easily adaptable and amenable for future automation in order to mimic standardized organ dynamics, we concluded that the device shows applicability for rapid and efficient in vitro bioactive agent release studies.

  17. Influence of Polymer Type on the Physical Properties and Release Profile of Papaverine Hydrochloride From Hard Gelatin Capsules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polski, Andrzej; Iwaniak, Karol; Kasperek, Regina; Modrzewska, Joanna; Sobótka-Polska, Karolina; Sławińska, Karolina; Poleszak, Ewa

    2015-01-01

    The capsule is one of the most important solid dosage forms in the pharmaceutical industry. It is easier and faster to produce than a tablet, because it requires fewer excipients. Generally, capsules are easy to swallow and mask any unpleasant taste of the substances used while their release profiles can be easily modified. Papaverine hydrochloride was used as a model substance to show different release profiles using different excipients. The main aim of the study was to analyze the impact of using different polymers on the release profile of papaverine hydrochloride from hard gelatin capsules. Six series of hard gelatin capsules containing papaverine hydrochloride as a model drug and different excipients were made. Then, the angle of repose, flow rate, mass flow rate and volume flow rate of the powders used for capsule production were analyzed. The uniform weight and disintegration time of the capsules were studied. The dissolution study was performed in a basket apparatus, while the amount of papaverine hydrochloride released was determined spectrophotometrically at 251 nm. Only one formula of powder had satisfactory flow properties, while all formulas had good Hausner ratios. The best properties were from powder containing polyvinylpyrrolidone 10k. The disintegration time of capsules varied from 1:30 min to 2:00 min. As required by Polish Pharmacopoeia X, 80% of the active substance in all cases was released within 15 minutes. The capsules with polyvinylpyrrolidone 10k were characterized by the longest release. On the other hand, capsules containing microcrystalline cellulose had the fastest release profile. Using 10% of different polymers, without changing the other excipients, had a significant impact on the physical properties of the powders and papaverine hydrochloride release profile. The two most preferred capsule formulations contained either polyvinylpyrrolidone 10k or microcrystalline cellulose.

  18. Factors controlling alkali salt deposition in recovery boilers. Release mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKeough, P.; Kurkela, M.; Kylloenen, H.; Tapola, E. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland). Process Technology Group

    1997-10-01

    The research was part of an ongoing cooperative research effort aimed at developing a model to describe the behaviour of inorganic compounds in kraft recovery boilers. During 1996 experimental investigations of sulphur release were continued. Experiments at elevated pressures and employing larger particle sizes were performed in order to gain information about mass transfer effects. The first experiments yielding data on the rates of the sulphur-release reactions were performed. This data will be used as the basis of a drop model for sulphur release being developed in cooperation with another research group. The other part of the work during 1996 explored the possibility of using chemical equilibrium calculations to predict the release of sodium, potassium and chlorine in the recovery furnace. The approach is essentially different from that employed in earlier studies in that the effects of fume formation are taken into account. So far, the predictions of the chemical equilibrium release model have, in no way, conflicted with field measurements. (orig.)

  19. Propolis Varnish: Antimicrobial Properties against Cariogenic Bacteria, Cytotoxicity, and Sustained-Release Profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana P. De Luca

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Varnishes are preparations that differ in the polymeric matrix and therapeutical agents. In dentistry they are used to prevent caries. In this study we developed a propolis varnish, considering propolis properties against cariogenic bacteria. To a chitosan polymeric base (CHV was added ethanolic propolis extract in different concentrations: PV1 (5%, PV2 (10%, and PV3 (15%. Antimicrobial activity was carried out against Streptococcus mutans (SM, Streptococcus sanguinis (SG, Streptococcus salivarius (SS, and Lactobacillus casei (LC through agar diffusion method. The three propolis concentrations incorporated were effective in inhibiting the growth of all microorganisms, but without significant difference between the zones of inhibition observed. Cytotoxicity assay was done by MTT method. Data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and Bonferroni test. None of the varnishes were cytotoxic, keeping 80% of viable cells, while CHV allowed cellular proliferation (120%. Sustained-release test was carried out by applying 40 μL of each varnish in the buccal surface of bovine teeth and kept in an ethanol/water solution removed in regular times. According to the “independent model approach,” the release profiles were distinct from each varnish and the most prolonged was PV3 (8 weeks. Varnish formulations had satisfactory antimicrobial activity against cariogenic bacteria and have a low cytotoxicity (<50%.

  20. The in vitro sustained release profile and antitumor effect of etoposide-layered double hydroxide nanohybrids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin LL

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Lili Qin,1 Mei Wang,2 Rongrong Zhu,3 Songhui You,1 Ping Zhou,1 Shilong Wang31Department of Physical Education, Tongji University, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; 2Department of Chemistry, Tongji University, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; 3School of Life Science and Technology, Tongji University, Shanghai, People's Republic of ChinaAbstract: Magnesium-aluminum layered double hydroxides intercalated with antitumor drug etoposide (VP16 were prepared for the first time using a two-step procedure. The X-ray powder diffraction data suggested the intercalation of VP16 into layers with the increased basal spacing from 0.84–1.18 nm was successful. Then, it was characterized by X-ray powder diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetry and differential thermal analysis, and transmission electron microscopy. The prepared nanoparticles, VP16-LDH, showed an average diameter of 62.5 nm with a zeta potential of 20.5 mV. Evaluation of the buffering effect of VP16-LDH indicated that the nanohybrids were ideal for administration of the drugs that treat human stomach irritation. The loading amount of intercalated VP16 was 21.94% and possessed a profile of sustained release. The mechanism of VP16-LDH release in the phosphate buffered saline solution at pH 7.4 is likely controlled by the diffusion of VP16 anions from inside to the surface of LDH particles. The in vitro cytotoxicity and antitumor assays indicated that VP16-LDH hybrids were less toxic to GES-1 cells while exhibiting better antitumor efficacy on MKN45 and SGC-7901 cells. These results imply that VP16-LDH is a potential antitumor drug for a broad range of gastric cancer therapeutic applications.Keywords: layered double hydroxides, etoposide, drug delivery, antitumor effect, sustained release

  1. The research and preparation of a bi-layer biodegradable external sheath with directional drug release profiles for vein graft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Zhenjie, E-mail: lawson3001@gmail.com [Department of Surgery, Sir Run Run Shaw Hospital, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou (China); Institute of Vascular Surgery, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Department of Surgery, University of Wisconsin-Madison, WI (United States); Guo, Zhenying [Department of Pathology, Zhejiang Cancer Hospital, Hangzhou (China); Si, Yi [Department of Surgery, University of Wisconsin-Madison, WI (United States); Zhang, Xiangman; Shi, Zhenyu [Institute of Vascular Surgery, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Chen, Feng [College of Chemical Engineering and Material Science, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou (China); Fu, Weiguo [Institute of Vascular Surgery, Fudan University, Shanghai (China)

    2013-11-01

    External sheath has been suggested for autologous vein grafts to inhibit neointimal hyperplasia and prevent anastomosis stricture. In this study, we prepared a bi-layer biodegradable paclitaxel-loaded sheaths with a synthetic copolymer poly(ethylene carbonate-ε-caprolactone) at room temperature. The bi-layer drug release profiles of the Paclitaxel-loaded (PTX-loaded) sheath significantly slow down the paclitaxel (PTX) release rates and result in a directional drug release way. Moreover, the nanofibrous layer of PTX-loaded poly(EC-CL) sheaths reduced the cytotoxicity and provided a better support for fibroblast adhesion and proliferation than the PTX-loaded layer of the sheaths. Thus, this study demonstrates that the bi-layer PTX-loaded poly(EC-CL) sheath with directional drug release profiles have a promising application for vein graft to against neointimal hyperplasia and anastomotic stricture.

  2. Factors affecting surface and release properties of thin PDMS films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vudayagiri, Sindhu; Junker, Michael Daniel; Skov, Anne Ladegaard

    2013-01-01

    of perfluoroether allylamide (PFE) lowered the surface energy which could ease the release. This is further investigated together with an evaluation of the resulting change in actuator performance. The relationship between the adhesive energy, surface energy, Young’s modulus and peel force of the films is analyzed....

  3. Spray-dried high-amylose sodium carboxymethyl starch: impact of α-amylase on drug-release profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabais, Teresa; Zaraa, Sarra; Leclair, Grégoire

    2016-11-01

    Spray-dried high-amylose sodium carboxymethyl starch (SD HASCA) is a promising pharmaceutical excipient for sustained-release (SR) matrix tablets produced by direct compression. The presence of α-amylase in the gastrointestinal tract and the variations of the gastric residence time of non-disintegrating dosage forms may affect the presystemic metabolism of this excipient and, consequently, the drug-release profile from formulations produced with SD HASCA. In this study, the influence of α-amylase and the residence time in acidic conditions on the drug-release profile was evaluated for a once-daily acetaminophen formulation (Acetaminophen SR) and a once-daily tramadol hydrochloride formulation (Tramadol SR). Both formulations were based on SD HASCA. α-Amylase concentrations ranging from 0 IU/L to 20000 IU/L did not significantly affect the drug-release profiles of acetaminophen and tramadol hydrochloride from SD HASCA tablets (f2 > 50) for all but only one of the studied conditions (f2 = 47). Moreover, the drug-release properties from both SD HASCA formulations were not significantly different when the residence time in acidic medium was 1 h or 3 h. An increase in α-amylase concentration led to an increase in the importance of polymer erosion as the main mechanism of drug-release instead of drug diffusion, for both formulations and both residence times, even if release profiles remained comparable. As such, it is expected that α-amylase concentration and residence time in the stomach will not clinically affect the performance of both SD HASCA SR formulations, even if the mechanism of release itself may be affected.

  4. Preparation of sustained release co-extrudates by hot-melt extrusion and mathematical modelling of in vitro/in vivo drug release profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintavalle, U; Voinovich, D; Perissutti, B; Serdoz, F; Grassi, G; Dal Col, A; Grassi, M

    2008-03-01

    Aim of this work was to develop a cylindrical co-extrudate characterised by an in vivo sustained release profile by means of a hot-melt extrusion process. Co-extrudate was made up of two concentric extruded matrices: an inner one having a hydrophilic character, based on polyethylene glycol, and an outer one with lipophilic character, based on microcrystalline wax. Both segments contained theophylline as a model drug. A screening between several devices differing for dimensions (diameter and length) and relative proportions of the inner and outer part was carried out on the basis of their in vitro drug release and the release mechanism was studied by means of a mathematical model. The co-extrudate exhibiting the desired sustained release was selected for in vivo bioavailability studies. In vivo studies confirmed the achievement of the purpose of the research, demonstrating the desired release of theophylline on four healthy volunteers. Accordingly, hot-melt extrusion process is a viable method to produce in a single step co-extrudates showing a sustained release. In addition, the developed mathematical model proved to be a reliable descriptor of the both in vitro and in vivo experimental data.

  5. Effect of HPMC - E15 LV premium polymer on release profile and compression characteristics of chitosan/ pectin colon targeted mesalamine matrix tablets and in vitro study on effect of pH impact on the drug release profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, A M J; Lakshmanan, Prabakaran

    2014-04-01

    The study was designed to investigate the in vitro dissolution profile and compression characteristics of colon targeted matrix tablets prepared with HPMC E15 LV in combination with pectin and Chitosan. The matrix tablets were subjected to two dissolution models in various simulated fluids such as pH 1.2, 6, 6.8, 7.2, 5.5. The fluctuations in colonic pH conditions during IBD (inflammatory bowel disease) and the nature of less fluid content in the colon may limit the expected drug release in the polysaccharide-based matrices when used alone. The Hydrophilic hydroxyl propyl methylcellulose ether premium polymer (HPMC E15 LV) of low viscosity grade was used in the formulation design, which made an excellent modification in physical and compression characteristics of the granules. The release studies indicated that the prepared matrices could control the drug release until the dosage form reaches the colon and the addition HPMC E15 LV showed the desirable changes in the dissolution profile by its hydrophilic nature since the colon is known for its less fluid content. The hydrophilic HPMC E15 LV allowed the colonic fluids to enter into the matrix and confirmed the drug release at the target site from a poorly water soluble polymer such as Chitosan and also from water soluble Pectin. The dramatic changes occurred in the drug release profile and physicochemical characteristics of the Pectin, Chitosan matrix tablets when a premium polymer HPMC E15 LV added in the formulation design in the optimized concentration. Various drug release mechanisms used for the examination of drug release characteristics. Drug release followed the combined mechanism of diffusion, erosion, swelling and polymer entanglement. In recent decade, IBD attracts many patents in novel treatment methods by using novel drug delivery systems.

  6. Enhanced Phosphoproteomic Profiling Workflow For Growth Factor Signaling Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sylvester, Marc; Burbridge, Mike; Leclerc, Gregory

    2010-01-01

    understanding of pathological processes. In our study we create and integrate data on phosphorylations that are initiated by several growth factor receptors. We present an approach for quantitative, time-resolved phosphoproteomic profiling that integrates the important contributions by phosphotyrosines. Methods...... A549 lung carcinoma cells were used as a model and stimulated with hepatocyte growth factor, epidermal growth factor or fibroblast growth factor. We employed a quick protein digestion workflow with spin filters without using urea. Phosphopeptides in general were enriched by sequential elution from...... in order to maximize identification of peptides as well as localization of phosphorylation sites. Results and Conclusions The combination of SIMAC with phosphotyrosine enrichment leads to a significant increase in identification of potential signaling events in growth factor receptor signaling networks...

  7. Confirmatory factor analysis of the Oral Health Impact Profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, M T; Feuerstahler, L; Waller, N; Baba, K; Larsson, P; Celebić, A; Kende, D; Rener-Sitar, K; Reissmann, D R

    2014-09-01

    Previous exploratory analyses suggest that the Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP) consists of four correlated dimensions and that individual differences in OHIP total scores reflect an underlying higher-order factor. The aim of this report is to corroborate these findings in the Dimensions of Oral Health-Related Quality of Life (DOQ) Project, an international study of general population subjects and prosthodontic patients. Using the project's Validation Sample (n = 5022), we conducted confirmatory factor analyses in a sample of 4993 subjects with sufficiently complete data. In particular, we compared the psychometric performance of three models: a unidimensional model, a four-factor model and a bifactor model that included one general factor and four group factors. Using model-fit criteria and factor interpretability as guides, the four-factor model was deemed best in terms of strong item loadings, model fit (RMSEA = 0·05, CFI = 0·99) and interpretability. These results corroborate our previous findings that four highly correlated factors - which we have named Oral Function, Oro-facial Pain, Oro-facial Appearance and Psychosocial Impact - can be reliably extracted from the OHIP item pool. However, the good fit of the unidimensional model and the high interfactor correlations in the four-factor solution suggest that OHRQoL can also be sufficiently described with one score.

  8. In vitro release of growth factors from platelet-rich fibrin (PRF): a proposal to optimize the clinical applications of PRF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Chen Yao; Kuo, Ya Po; Tseng, Yu Hong; Su, Ching-Hua; Burnouf, Thierry

    2009-07-01

    Determine the release of growth factors (GF) from platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) and supernatant serum to optimize clinical use. Platelet-derived growth factors-AB (PDGF-AB), transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), epidermal growth factor (EGF), and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) were quantified in PRF releasate and in the supernatant serum (N = 8) over 300 minutes after clot formation. Protein profiles were determined by SDS-PAGE. Mean quantity of PDGF-AB, TGF-ss1, VEGF, and EGF in PRF releasate increased significantly to about 52, 72, 1, and 3 ng, respectively, whereas mean IGF-1 content remained at 250 ng. GF was also found in serum supernatant. Protein profiles of the releasates and the supernatant serum were similar. The PRF membrane should be used immediately after formation to maximize release of GF to the surgical site. The remaining fluid can be recovered as an additional source of GF for grafting.

  9. Drug release profile in core-shell nanofibrous structures: a study on Peppas equation and artificial neural network modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maleki, Mahboubeh; Amani-Tehran, Mohammad; Latifi, Masoud; Mathur, Sanjay

    2014-01-01

    Release profile of drug constituent encapsulated in electrospun core-shell nanofibrous mats was modeled by Peppas equation and artificial neural network. Core-shell fibers were fabricated by co-axial electrospinning process using tetracycline hydrochloride (TCH) as the core and poly(l-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) or polycaprolactone (PCL) as the shell materials. The density and hydrophilicity of the shell polymers, feed rates and concentrations of core and shell phases, the contribution of TCH in core material and electrical field were the parameters fed to the perceptron network to predict Peppas constants in order to derive release pattern. This study demonstrated the viability of the prediction tool in determining drug release profile of electrospun core-shell nanofibrous scaffolds.

  10. Effect of alginate composition on profile release and characteristics of chitosan-alginate microparticles loaded with mangosteen extract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulia, Kamarza; Halimah, Nur; Krisanti, Elsa

    2017-03-01

    Preparation of mangostin-loaded chitosan-alginate microparticles, chemical and physical characterization of the particles, and mangostin release profiles, are described herein. Mangostin rich fraction was obtained from Garcinia mangostana L. pericarp by extraction followed by fractionation. Mangostin-loaded chitosan-alginate microparticles were prepared by ionic gelation method using tripolyphosphate as the linking agent and various concentration of alginate. Mangostin was effectively loaded in all microparticle formulations, resulting in ˜97% encapsulation efficiencies. The loading of mangostin and the in-vitro release profiles in simulated gastrointestinal fluids were affected by the chitosan to alginate ratios used in the preparation of the microparticles. Increased alginate concentration resulted in lowered release of mangostin from microparticles immersed in simulated gastric fluid (pH 1.2) up to two hours. Low release of mangostin in acidic fluid but high release in simulated colon fluid, indicated that the chitosan-alginate microparticles are prospective carrier for extended release of active compound in gastrointestinal system.

  11. Juvenile criminal recidivism : relations with personality and post release environmental risk and protective factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dam, C. van

    2005-01-01

    The general aim of the present dissertation is to get more insight in the contribution of personality traits and post release environmental risk and protective factors on juvenile criminal recidivism. One year after their release from a juvenile detention centre, a sample of 60 adolescent male offen

  12. Platelet activation using electric pulse stimulation: growth factor profile and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Andrew S; Caiafa, Antonio; Garner, Allen L; Klopman, Steve; LaPlante, Nicole; Morton, Christine; Conway, Kenneth; Michelson, Alan D; Frelinger, Andrew L; Neculaes, V Bogdan

    2014-09-01

    Autologous platelet gel therapy using platelet-rich plasma has emerged as a promising alternative for chronic wound healing, hemostasis, and wound infection control. A critical step for this therapeutic approach is platelet activation, typically performed using bovine thrombin (BT) and calcium chloride. However, exposure of humans to BT can stimulate antibody formation, potentially resulting in severe hemorrhagic or thrombotic complications. Electric pulse stimulation using nanosecond PEFs (pulse electric fields) is an alternative, nonbiochemical platelet activation method, thereby avoiding exposure to xenogeneic thrombin and associated risks. In this study, we identified specific requirements for a clinically relevant activator instrument by dynamically measuring current, voltage, and electric impedance for platelet-rich plasma samples. From these samples, we investigated the profile of growth factors released from human platelets with electric pulse stimulation versus BT, specifically platelet-derived growth factor, transforming growth factor β, and epidermal growth factor, using commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits. Electric pulse stimulation triggers growth factor release from platelet α-granules at the same or higher level compared with BT. Electric pulse stimulation is a fast, inexpensive, easy-to-use platelet activation method for autologous platelet gel therapy.

  13. STUDY OF RISK FACTORS AND CLINICAL PROFILE OF ACUTE STROKE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomar

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available `INTRODUCTION: Stroke is the third leading cause of death in developed countries after cardiovascular disease and cancer. In India Community Surveys have shown a crude prevalence rate for hemiplegia 200 per 1, 00, 000 population. It accounts for nearly 1.5% of all urban admissions, 4.5 % of all medical and about 20% of neurological cases. AIMS AND OBJECTIVE: Identification of risk factors and evaluation of clinical profile of acute stroke. MATERIAL AND METHOD: INCLUSION CRITERIA: Cases of acute stoke admitted in SGMH hospital were selected for the study. EXCLUSION CRITERIA: Brain injury cases, infective, neoplastic cases producing stroke were excluded. RESULTS: Stroke was more common in male, 58 % patients were male and 42% patients were female. It was more common in 5th and 6th decade. Most common etiology was infarction. Most common risk factor was hypertension followed by smoking. In addition to limb weakness, headache and vomiting were most common presenting symptoms followed by convulsion. These symptoms were more common in hemorrhagic stroke. Right sided hemiplegia was more common than left sided. Middle cerebral artery was involved in majority of cases in atherothrombotic stroke whereas basal ganglion was most common site of bleed in hemorrhagic stroke. Coma and mortality were more in hemorrhagic stroke. CONCLUSION: The risk factors and clinical profile of acute stroke in India are similar to that of Western countries. Common risk factors are hypertension, smoking, diabetes mellitus and hyperlipidemia

  14. Five-Factor Model personality profiles of drug users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crum Rosa M

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Personality traits are considered risk factors for drug use, and, in turn, the psychoactive substances impact individuals' traits. Furthermore, there is increasing interest in developing treatment approaches that match an individual's personality profile. To advance our knowledge of the role of individual differences in drug use, the present study compares the personality profile of tobacco, marijuana, cocaine, and heroin users and non-users using the wide spectrum Five-Factor Model (FFM of personality in a diverse community sample. Method Participants (N = 1,102; mean age = 57 were part of the Epidemiologic Catchment Area (ECA program in Baltimore, MD, USA. The sample was drawn from a community with a wide range of socio-economic conditions. Personality traits were assessed with the Revised NEO Personality Inventory (NEO-PI-R, and psychoactive substance use was assessed with systematic interview. Results Compared to never smokers, current cigarette smokers score lower on Conscientiousness and higher on Neuroticism. Similar, but more extreme, is the profile of cocaine/heroin users, which score very high on Neuroticism, especially Vulnerability, and very low on Conscientiousness, particularly Competence, Achievement-Striving, and Deliberation. By contrast, marijuana users score high on Openness to Experience, average on Neuroticism, but low on Agreeableness and Conscientiousness. Conclusion In addition to confirming high levels of negative affect and impulsive traits, this study highlights the links between drug use and low Conscientiousness. These links provide insight into the etiology of drug use and have implications for public health interventions.

  15. Wellness Centers in Slovenia: Tourists’ Profiles and Motivational Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milica Rančić

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Wellness and spa tourism has increasingly become an important economic and marketing strategy for hoteliers, resorts and tourist destinations to attract tourist visitations. Deep understanding of consumer profiles and their key motivations within this context is vital in order to sustain the growth of wellness and spa tourism business. This paper presents an exploratory study that seeks to understand the spa and wellness tourists’ motivation during their visits to spa and wellness service centers in Slovenia. The purpose of this research is to examine the characteristics of a healthy-living market segment and its motivational behavior to wellness facilities in Slovenia. The paper provides the broad understanding of wellness and spa tourists’ profiles in Slovenia and the key motivation factors

  16. Influence of the type of vegetable oil on the drug release profile from lipid-core nanocapsules and in vivo genotoxicity study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigo, Lucas Almeida; Frescura, Viviane; Fiel, Luana; Coradini, Karine; Ourique, Aline Ferreira; Emanuelli, Tatiana; Quatrin, Andréia; Tedesco, Solange; Silva, Cristiane B da; Guterres, Silvia Staniçuaski; Pohlmann, Adriana Raffin; Beck, Ruy Carlos Ruver

    2014-11-01

    The use of rice bran (RB), soybean (SB) or sunflower seed (SF) oils to prepare lipid-core nanocapsules (LNCs) as controlled drug delivery systems was investigated. LNCs were prepared by interfacial deposition using the preformed polymer method. All formulations showed negative zeta potential and adequate nanotechnological characteristics (particle size 220-230  nm, polydispersity index oils did not present genotoxic potential. Clobetasol propionate (CP) was selected as a model drug to evaluate the influence of the type of vegetable oil on the control of the drug release from LNCs. Biphasic drug release profiles were observed for all formulations. After 168  h, the concentration of drug released from the formulation containing SF oil was lower (0.36  mg/mL) than from formulations containing SB (0.40  mg/mL) or RB oil (0.45  mg/mL). Good correlations between the consistency indices for the LNC cores and the burst and sustained drug release rate constants were obtained. Therefore, the type of the vegetal oil was shown as an important factor governing the control of drug release from LNCs.

  17. The effect of rheological behavior and microstructure of the emulgels on the release and permeation profiles of Terpinen-4-ol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Lina; Liu, Chao; Cun, Dongmei; Fang, Liang

    2015-10-12

    Terpinen-4-ol, the main component of Australian tea tree oil, which was widely used in pharmaceutical and cosmetic fields, was chosen as the active component in this study because of its excellent antimicrobial properties and good permeability. The objective of this study was to investigate the relationships between rheological characters, in vitro release and permeation profiles of the emulgels. Particle size distribution, optical microscopy tests were performed to characterize the status of the emulgels. Scanning electron microscopy and rheology tests were carried out to assess the strength of the structures. In vitro release and percutaneous permeation study of Terpinen-4-ol through Cellophane® membrane and excised rabbit skin were conducted by vertical Franz diffusion cell, respectively. All of the emulgel samples showed a non-uniform bimodal distribution and the microstructure represented a matrix type which could inhibit the diffusion of oil droplets in formulation in some extent. Rheological data showed a good fit to the Herschel-Bulkley model in viscosimetric studies regardless of the polymers used. Moreover, 10% Sepiplus 400 had obtained the highest zero-shear viscosity, G', G″ value and lowest τ95%G' value corresponding to the strongest structure. The results of in vitro release tests revealed that an increase in viscosity may affect the release profiles inversely, irrespective of the polymers used. In vitro permeation of Terpinen-4-ol tests indicated that when the drug amount released could satisfy the essential driving force, permeation processes was independent of release. In contrast, the drug amount released could not satisfy the essential driving force, the permeation amount was inversely proportional to the viscosity as the release amount did. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Controllable mineral coatings on scaffolds as carriers for growth factor release for bone tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saurez-Gonzalez, Darilis

    The work presented in this document, focused on the development and characterization of mineral coatings on scaffold materials to serve as templates for growth factor binding and release. Mineral coatings were formed using a biomimetic approach that consisted in the incubation of scaffolds in modified simulated body fluids (mSBF). To modulate the properties of the mineral coating, which we hypothesized would dictate growth factor release, we used carbonate (HCO3) concentration in mSBF of 4.2 mM, 25mM, and 100mM. Analysis of the mineral coatings formed using scanning electron microscopy indicated growth of a continuous layer of mineral with different morphologies. X-ray diffraction analysis showed peaks associated with hydroxyapatite. FTIR data confirmed the substitution of HCO3 in the mineral. As the extent of HCO3 substitution increased, the coating exhibited more rapid dissolution kinetics in an environment deficient in calcium and phosphate. The mineral coatings provided an effective mechanism for bioactive growth factor binding and release. Peptide versions of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) were bound with efficiencies up to 90% to mineral-coated PCL scaffolds. Recombinant human vascular endothelial growth factor (rhVEGF) also bound to mineral coated scaffolds with lower efficiency (20%) and released with faster release kinetics compared to peptides growth factor. Released rhVEGF induced human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) proliferation in vitro and enhanced blood vessel formation in vivo in an intramuscular sheep model. In addition to the use the mineral coatings for single growth factor release, we expanded the concept and bound both an angiogenic (rhVEGF) and osteogenic (mBMP2) growth factor by a simple double dipping process. Sustained release of both growth factors was demonstrated for over 60 days. Released rhVEGF enhanced blood vessel formation in vivo in sheep and its biological activity was

  19. Hybrid wound dressings with controlled release of antibiotics: Structure-release profile effects and in vivo study in a guinea pig burn model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilberman, Meital; Egozi, Dana; Shemesh, Maoz; Keren, Aviad; Mazor, Eytan; Baranes-Zeevi, Maya; Goldstein, Nyra; Berdicevsky, Israela; Gilhar, Amos; Ullmann, Yehuda

    2015-08-01

    Over the last decades, wound dressings have evolved from a crude traditional gauze dressing to tissue-engineered scaffolds. Many types of wound dressing formats are commercially available or have been investigated. We developed and studied hybrid bilayer wound dressings which combine a drug-loaded porous poly(dl-lactic-co-glycolic acid) top layer with a spongy collagen sublayer. Such a structure is very promising because it combines the advantageous properties of both layers. The antibiotic drug gentamicin was incorporated into the top layer for preventing and/or defeating infections. In this study, we examined the effect of the top layer's structure on the gentamicin release profile and on the resulting in vivo wound healing. The latter was tested on a guinea pig burn model, compared to the neutral non-adherent dressing material Melolin® (Smith & Nephew) and Aquacel® Ag (ConvaTec). The release kinetics of gentamicin from the various studied formulations exhibited burst release values between 8% and 38%, followed by a drug elution rate that decreased with time and lasted for at least 7 weeks. The hybrid dressing, with relatively slow gentamicin release, enabled the highest degree of wound healing (28%), which is at least double that obtained by the other dressing formats (8-12%). It resulted in the lowest degree of wound contraction and a relatively low amount of inflammatory cells compared to the controls. This dressing was found to be superior to hybrid wound dressings with fast gentamicin release and to the neat hybrid dressing without drug release. Since this dressing exhibited promising results and does not require frequent bandage changes, it offers a potentially valuable concept for treating large infected burns.

  20. Comparative release of growth factors from PRP, PRF, and advanced-PRF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Eizaburo; Flückiger, Laura; Fujioka-Kobayashi, Masako; Sawada, Kosaku; Sculean, Anton; Schaller, Benoit; Miron, Richard J

    2016-12-01

    The use of platelet concentrates has gained increasing awareness in recent years for regenerative procedures in modern dentistry. The aim of the present study was to compare growth factor release over time from platelet-rich plasma (PRP), platelet-rich fibrin (PRF), and a modernized protocol for PRF, advanced-PRF (A-PRF). Eighteen blood samples were collected from six donors (3 samples each for PRP, PRF, and A-PRF). Following preparation, samples were incubated in a plate shaker and assessed for growth factor release at 15 min, 60 min, 8 h, 1 day, 3 days, and 10 days. Thereafter, growth factor release of PDGF-AA, PDGF-AB, PDGF-BB, TGFB1, VEGF, EGF, and IGF was quantified using ELISA. The highest reported growth factor released from platelet concentrates was PDGF-AA followed by PDGF-BB, TGFB1, VEGF, and PDGF-AB. In general, following 15-60 min incubation, PRP released significantly higher growth factors when compared to PRF and A-PRF. At later time points up to 10 days, it was routinely found that A-PRF released the highest total growth factors. Furthermore, A-PRF released significantly higher total protein accumulated over a 10-day period when compared to PRP or PRF. The results from the present study indicate that the various platelet concentrates have quite different release kinetics. The advantage of PRP is the release of significantly higher proteins at earlier time points whereas PRF displayed a continual and steady release of growth factors over a 10-day period. Furthermore, in general, it was observed that the new formulation of PRF (A-PRF) released significantly higher total quantities of growth factors when compared to traditional PRF. Based on these findings, PRP can be recommended for fast delivery of growth factors whereas A-PRF is better-suited for long-term release.

  1. Corneal organ cultures in tyrosinemia release chemotactic factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohr, K M; Hyndiuk, R A; Hatchell, D L; Kurth, C E

    1985-05-01

    Corneal inflammation with subsequent scarring and blindness occurs in the inherited human metabolic disease tyrosinemia type II, yet putative inflammatory mediators in this disorder and in the avascular cornea in general are poorly defined. In a Tyr-fed rat model of tyrosinemia type II, intracellular crystals, presumably Tyr, are hypothesized to be responsible for the increased lysosomal activity observed in corneal epithelial lesions. Because polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) are seen only at the site of these lesions, we used this model to study humoral mediators released from Tyr-fed rat corneal organ cultures. Only Tyr-fed rats developed stromal edema and linear granular opacities in gray edematous corneal epithelium, compatible with a noninfectious keratitis. Electron micrographs confirmed epithelial edema and showed focal epithelial necrosis with PMN invasion of the stroma. Only Tyr-fed rat corneal culture supernatants contained chemotactic activity that was heat labile and moderately trypsin sensitive. Four peaks with varying amounts of chemotactic activity were found on Sephadex G-75 chromatography. Although the identity of these peaks of activity has not yet been established, we suggest that they may be responsible for the PMN infiltration observed in this model of corneal inflammation.

  2. Exploratory factor analysis of the Oral Health Impact Profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, M T; Reissmann, D R; Feuerstahler, L; Waller, N; Baba, K; Larsson, P; Celebić, A; Szabo, G; Rener-Sitar, K

    2014-09-01

    Although oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) as measured by the Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP) is thought to be multidimensional, the nature of these dimensions is not known. The aim of this report was to explore the dimensionality of the OHIP using the Dimensions of OHRQoL (DOQ) Project, an international study of general population subjects and prosthodontic patients. Using the project's Learning Sample (n = 5173), we conducted an exploratory factor analysis on the 46 OHIP items not specifically referring to dentures for 5146 subjects with sufficiently complete data. The first eigenvalue (27·0) of the polychoric correlation matrix was more than ten times larger than the second eigenvalue (2·6), suggesting the presence of a dominant, higher-order general factor. Follow-up analyses with Horn's parallel analysis revealed a viable second-order, four-factor solution. An oblique rotation of this solution revealed four highly correlated factors that we named Oral Function, Oro-facial Pain, Oro-facial Appearance and Psychosocial Impact. These four dimensions and the strong general factor are two viable hypotheses for the factor structure of the OHIP.

  3. Adenosine inhibits neutrophil vascular endothelial growth factor release and transendothelial migration via A2B receptor activation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Wakai, A

    2012-02-03

    The effects of adenosine on neutrophil (polymorphonuclear neutrophils; PMN)-directed changes in vascular permeability are poorly characterized. This study investigated whether adenosine modulates activated PMN vascular endothelial growth factor (vascular permeability factor; VEGF) release and transendothelial migration. PMN activated with tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha, 10 ng\\/mL) were incubated with adenosine and its receptor-specific analogues. Culture supernatants were assayed for VEGF. PMN transendothelial migration across human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) monolayers was assessed in vitro. Adhesion molecule receptor expression was assessed flow cytometrically. Adenosine and some of its receptor-specific analogues dose-dependently inhibited activated PMN VEGF release. The rank order of potency was consistent with the affinity profile of human A2B receptors. The inhibitory effect of adenosine was reversed by 3,7-dimethyl-1-propargylxanthine, an A2 receptor antagonist. Adenosine (100 microM) or the A2B receptor agonist 5\\'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (NECA, 100 microM) significantly reduced PMN transendothelial migration. However, expression of activated PMN beta2 integrins and HUVEC ICAM-1 were not significantly altered by adenosine or NECA. Adenosine attenuates human PMN VEGF release and transendothelial migration via the A2B receptor. This provides a novel target for the modulation of PMN-directed vascular hyperpermeability in conditions such as the capillary leak syndrome.

  4. MODIFIED RELEASE FORMULATIONS TO ACHIEVE THE QUALITY TARGET PRODUCT PROFILE (QTPP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mithilesh Kumar Jha

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Modified Release (MR Formulations have a modification in the release mechanism. Modified release dosage forms are developed by altering drug absorption or the site of drug release in order to achieve predetermined clinical objectives. Modified drug release from dosage forms is complemented by the allied processes of drug design, of dosage administration, and of membrane transport and absorption of drug to the biological site of action. Modified-release drugs have complex formulations that can offer an advantage over standard medication for some patients. Modified-release preparations should only be used where there is a clear clinical advantage over conventional-release preparations. In general, Modified-release preparations should be reserved for specific patients where there is a problem with compliance, effectiveness or side-effects which these preparations could help overcome. Modified–release technologies have become indispensable to resolving critical technical, therapeutic, and marketing challenges, such as improving patience compliance, less dosage timings, better safety, better indications, delivering poorly soluble and poorly absorbable API’s, product differentiation, patent protection, product life-cycle extension, and better margins. Modified-release formulation design can be conducted for oral and non-oral administration routes. Possible therapeutic benefits of an MR product include improved efficacy and reduced adverse events, increased convenience and patient compliance, optimized performance, a greater selectivity of activity, or new indications.

  5. Pharmacokinetic Profiles of Meloxicam and Sustained-release Buprenorphine in Prairie Dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cary, Cynthia D; Lukovsky-Akhsanov, Nicole L; Gallardo-Romero, Nadia F; Tansey, Cassandram M; Ostergaard, Sharon D; Taylor, Willie D; Morgan, Clint N; Powell, Nathaniel; Lathrop, George W; Hutson, Christina L

    2017-03-01

    In this study, we evaluated the pharmacokinetic profiles of meloxicam and sustained-release (SR) buprenorphine in prairie dogs. The 4 treatment groups were: low-dose meloxicam (0.2 mg/kg SC), high-dose meloxicam (4 mg/kg SC), low-dose buprenorphine SR (0.9 mg/kg SC), and high-dose buprenorphine SR (1.2 mg/kg SC). The highest plasma concentrations occurred within 4 h of administration for both meloxicam treatment groups. The therapeutic range of meloxicam in prairie dogs is currently unknown. However, as compared with the therapeutic range documented in other species (0.39 - 0.91 μg/mL), the mean plasma concentration of meloxicam fell below the minimal therapeutic range prior to 24 h in the low-dose group but remained above therapeutic levels for more than 72 h in the high-dose group. These findings suggest that the current meloxicam dosing guidelines may be subtherapeutic for prairie dogs. The highest mean plasma concentration for buprenorphine SR occurred at the 24-h time point (0.0098 μg/mL) in the low-dose group and at the 8-h time point (0.015 μg/mL) for the high-dose group. Both dosages of buprenorphine SR maintained likely plasma therapeutic levels (0.001 μg/mL, based on previous rodent studies) beyond 72 h. Given the small scale of the study and sample size, statistical analysis was not performed. The only adverse reactions in this study were mild erythematous reactions at injection sites for buprenorphine SR.

  6. Changes in risk factor profile after ischemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hornnes, Nete

    up 1 year after stroke. We constructed a baseline risk factor profile (RFP) of 6 variables: smoking, excessive drinking, physical inactivity, untreated hypertension, no cholesterol-lowering, and no antithrombotic treatment/warfarin at discharge from hospital. Each item was rated 0 or 1 giving...... a maximum score of 6 points. Mean baseline RFP-score was 1.6 Results. After 1 year we found a reduction in current smoking (p=0.008) and in excessive drinking (p=0.0001). There was no change in physical activity and in untreated hypertension. There was an increase in the proportion of patients on lipid...

  7. Validation of the IntelliCap® system as a tool to evaluate extended release profiles in human GI tract using metoprolol as model drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Söderlind, Erik; Abrahamsson, Bertil; Erlandsson, Fredrik; Wanke, Christoph; Iordanov, Ventzeslav; von Corswant, Christian

    2015-11-10

    A clinical study was conducted to validate the in vivo drug release performance of IntelliCap® CR capsules. 12 healthy, male volunteers were administered IntelliCap® CR capsules, filled with metoprolol as a BCS 1 model drug, and programmed to release the drug with 3 different release profiles (2 linear profiles extending over 6h and 14h, respectively, and a pulsed profile with two equal pulses separated by 5h) using a cross-over design. An oral metoprolol solution was included as a reference. Standard bioavailability variables were determined. In vivo drug release-time profiles for the IntelliCap® CR capsules were calculated from the plasma drug concentrations by deconvolution, and they were subsequently compared with the in vitro drug release profiles including assessment of level A in vitro/in vivo correlation (IVIVC). The relative bioavailability for the linear, extended release profiles was about 85% which is similar to other extended release administrations of metoprolol. There was an excellent agreement between the predetermined release profiles and the in vivo release for these two administrations. For IntelliCap® CR capsules programmed to deliver 2 distinct and equal drug pulses, the first pulse was delivered as expected whereas only about half of the second dose was released. Thus, it is concluded that the IntelliCap® system is well suited for the fast and reliable generation of in vivo pharmacokinetic data for extended release drug profiles, e.g. in context of regional drug absorption investigations. For immediate release pulses delivered in the distal GI tract this version of the device appears however less suitable.

  8. Clinical Profile & Risk Factors in Acute Coronary Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Yadav, D Joseph, P Joshi, P Sakhi, RK Jha, J Gupta

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Coronary Artery Disease (CAD is becoming a major cause of morbidity & mortality burden in the developing world. Indians have been associated with a more severe form of CAD that has its onset at a younger age group with a male predominance. A prospective study was carried out to identify the risk factors and to know the emerging clinical profile in acute coronary syndrome (ACS including S T elevation & Non S T elevation myocardial infarction. We enrolled 200 consecutive patients with typical ECG changes & clinical history, admitted in emergency department from January 2009 to December 2009. A predefined Performa was completed in every patient with a detailed clinical history, physical examinations, and investigation studies. The clinical history revealed information about age, gender, risk factors, and modes of presentation and duration of symptoms. The details of physical examination including anthropometric data, vital signs and complete systemic evaluation were recorded. The regions of infarction and rhythm disturbances were also documented. Our study showed a significant male predominance with mean age being 56 years. Tobacco was identified as major risk factors (65% & obesity (BMI more than 25 is least common risk factor (13%.Patients had typical chest pain (94% and ECG showed anterior wall changes in54%. Forty percent patients developed complications, majority being arrhythmias (60% and least common is mechanical complication (2.5% Thus we conclude that ACS is more common in adult male with tobacco being major risk factors in our population.

  9. Mercury (Hg) in meteorites: variations in abundance, thermal release profile, mass-dependent and mass-independent isotopic fractionation

    CERN Document Server

    Meier, Matthias M M; Marty, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    We have measured the concentration, isotopic composition and thermal release profiles of Mercury (Hg) in a suite of meteorites, including both chondrites and achondrites. We find large variations in Hg concentration between different meteorites (ca. 10 ppb to 14'000 ppb), with the highest concentration orders of magnitude above the expected bulk solar system silicates value. From the presence of several different Hg carrier phases in thermal release profiles (150 to 650 {\\deg}C), we argue that these variations are unlikely to be mainly due to terrestrial contamination. The Hg abundance of meteorites shows no correlation with petrographic type, or mass-dependent fractionation of Hg isotopes. Most carbonaceous chondrites show mass-independent enrichments in the odd-numbered isotopes 199Hg and 201Hg. We show that the enrichments are not nucleosynthetic, as we do not find corresponding nucleosynthetic deficits of 196Hg. Instead, they can partially be explained by Hg evaporation and redeposition during heating of ...

  10. Polymethylmethacrylate-induced release of bone-resorbing factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herman, J.H.; Sowder, W.G.; Anderson, D.; Appel, A.M.; Hopson, C.N. (Univ. of Cincinnati College of Medicine, OH (USA))

    1989-12-01

    A pseudomembranous structure that has the histological characteristics of a foreign-body-like reaction invariably develops at the bone-cement interface in the proximity of resorption of bone around aseptically loosened cemented prostheses. This study was an attempt to implicate polymethylmethacrylate in this resorptive process. Unfractionated peripheral-blood mononuclear cells (consisting of lymphocytes and monocytes) and surface-adherent cells (monocyte-enriched) were prepared from control subjects who did and did not have clinical evidence of osteoarthrosis and from patients who had osteoarthrosis and were having a revision for failure of a cemented hip or knee implant. Cells were cultured for varying periods in the presence and absence of nonpolymerized methacrylate (one to two-micrometer spherules), pulverized polymerized material, or culture chambers that were pre-coated with polymerized cement. Conditioned media that were derived from both methacrylate-stimulated cell populations were shown to contain specific bone-resorbing mediators (interleukin-1, tumor necrosis factor, or prostaglandin E2) and to directly affect bone resorption in 45Ca-labeled murine limb-bone assays.

  11. Evaluation of gentamicin and lidocaine release profile from gum acacia-crosslinked-poly(2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate)-carbopol based hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Baljit; Dhiman, Abhishek

    2017-01-27

    In this manuscript an attempt has been made to incorporate both, antibiotic agent 'gentamicin' and pain relieving agent 'lidocaine' into the gum acacia-poly(2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate)-carbopol based hydrogel for wound dressing application. Drug release, gel strength, network parameter, antimicrobial activity and biodegradation properties of hydrogel have been evaluated. Porous microstructure of the hydrogel was observed in cryo-SEM images. The hydrogel showed mesh size 37.29 nm, cross-link density 2.19× 10-5 mol/cm3, molecular weight between two cross-links 60.25× 10-3 g/mol and gel strength 0.625±0.112 N in simulated wound fluid. The hydrogels were evaluated as a drug carrier for model drugs gentamicin and lidocaine. The release of these drugs occurred through Fickian diffusion mechanism and release profile of the drugs was best fitted in first order kinetic model.

  12. Corticotropin-releasing factor overexpression gives rise to sex differences in Alzheimer's disease-related signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bangasser, D A; Dong, H; Carroll, J; Plona, Z; Ding, H; Rodriguez, L; McKennan, C; Csernansky, J G; Seeholzer, S H; Valentino, R J

    2016-10-18

    Several neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders share stress as a risk factor and are more prevalent in women than in men. Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) orchestrates the stress response, and excessive CRF is thought to contribute to the pathophysiology of these diseases. We previously found that the CRF1 receptor (CRF1) is sex biased whereby coupling to its GTP-binding protein, Gs, is greater in females, whereas β-arrestin-2 coupling is greater in males. This study used a phosphoproteomic approach in CRF-overexpressing (CRF-OE) mice to test the proof of principle that when CRF is in excess, sex-biased CRF1 coupling translates into divergent cell signaling that is expressed as different brain phosphoprotein profiles. Cortical phosphopeptides that distinguished female and male CRF-OE mice were overrepresented in unique pathways that were consistent with Gs-dependent signaling in females and β-arrestin-2 signaling in males. Notably, phosphopeptides that were more abundant in female CRF-OE mice were overrepresented in an Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathway. Phosphoproteomic results were validated by demonstrating that CRF overexpression in females was associated with increased tau phosphorylation and, in a mouse model of AD pathology, phosphorylation of β-secretase, the enzyme involved in the formation of amyloid β. These females exhibited increased formation of amyloid β plaques and cognitive impairments relative to males. Collectively, the findings are consistent with a mechanism whereby the excess CRF that characterizes stress-related diseases initiates distinct cellular processes in male and female brains, as a result of sex-biased CRF1 signaling. Promotion of AD-related signaling pathways through this mechanism may contribute to female vulnerability to AD.Molecular Psychiatry advance online publication, 18 October 2016; doi:10.1038/mp.2016.185.

  13. Control of angiogenesis by galectins involves the release of platelet-derived proangiogenic factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Etulain

    Full Text Available Platelets contribute to vessel formation through the release of angiogenesis-modulating factors stored in their α-granules. Galectins, a family of lectins that bind β-galactoside residues, are up-regulated in inflammatory and cancerous tissues, trigger platelet activation and mediate vascularization processes. Here we aimed to elucidate whether the release of platelet-derived proangiogenic molecules could represent an alternative mechanism through which galectins promote neovascularization. We show that different members of the galectin family can selectively regulate the release of angiogenic molecules by human platelets. Whereas Galectin (Gal-1, -3, and -8 triggered vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF release, only Gal-8 induced endostatin secretion. Release of VEGF induced by Gal-8 was partially prevented by COX-1, PKC, p38 and Src kinases inhibitors, whereas Gal-1-induced VEGF secretion was inhibited by PKC and ERK blockade, and Gal-3 triggered VEGF release selectively through a PKC-dependent pathway. Regarding endostatin, Gal-8 failed to stimulate its release in the presence of PKC, Src and ERK inhibitors, whereas aspirin or p38 inhibitor had no effect on endostatin release. Despite VEGF or endostatin secretion, platelet releasates generated by stimulation with each galectin stimulated angiogenic responses in vitro including endothelial cell proliferation and tubulogenesis. The platelet angiogenic activity was independent of VEGF and was attributed to the concerted action of other proangiogenic molecules distinctly released by each galectin. Thus, secretion of platelet-derived angiogenic molecules may represent an alternative mechanism by which galectins promote angiogenic responses and its selective blockade may lead to the development of therapeutic strategies for angiogenesis-related diseases.

  14. Sequences, expression patterns and regulation of the corticotropin releasing factor system in a teleost

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Chun-Chun; Fernald, Russell D.

    2008-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) is well known for its role in regulating the stress response in vertebrate species by controlling release of glucocorticoids. CRF also influences other physiological processes via two distinct CRF receptors (CRF-Rs) and is co-regulated by a CRF binding protein (CRFBP). Although CRF was first discovered in mammals, it is important for the regulation of the stress response, motor behavior, and appetite in all vertebrates. However, it is unclear how the actio...

  15. Kozeny-Carman permeability relationship with disintegration process predicted from early dissolution profiles of immediate release tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Parveen; Rathi, Pooja; Kumar, Virender; Lal, Jatin; Kaur, Harmeet; Singh, Jasbir

    2017-07-01

    This study was oriented toward the disintegration profiling of the diclofenac sodium (DS) immediate-release (IR) tablets and development of its relationship with medium permeability kperm based on Kozeny-Carman equation. Batches (L1-L9) of DS IR tablets with different porosities and specific surface area were prepared at different compression forces and evaluated for porosity, in vitro dissolution and particle-size analysis of the disintegrated mass. The kperm was calculated from porosities and specific surface area, and disintegration profiles were predicted from the dissolution profiles of IR tablets by stripping/residual method. The disintegration profiles were subjected to exponential regression to find out the respective disintegration equations and rate constants kd. Batches L1 and L2 showed the fastest disintegration rates as evident from their bi-exponential equations while the rest of the batches L3-L9 exhibited the first order or mono-exponential disintegration kinetics. The 95% confidence interval (CI95%) revealed significant differences between kd values of different batches except L4 and L6. Similar results were also spotted for dissolution profiles of IR tablets by similarity (f2) test. The final relationship between kd and kperm was found to be hyperbolic, signifying the initial effect of kperm on the disintegration rate. The results showed that disintegration profiling is possible because a relationship exists between kd and kperm. The later being relatable with porosity and specific surface area can be determined by nondestructive tests.

  16. Nitrogen Release in Pristine and Drained Peat Profiles in Response to Water Table Fluctuations: A Mesocosm Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merjo P. P. Laine

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the northern hemisphere, variability in hydrological conditions was suggested to increase as a consequence of climate warming, which may result in longer droughts than the area has experienced before. Due to their predominately anoxic conditions, peatlands are expected to respond to changes in hydrological conditions, such as successive drying and rewetting periods. As peatlands are rich in organic matter, any major changes in water table may influence the decomposition of it. The hydrological conditions may also influence release of nutrients from peat profiles as well as affect their transport to downstream ecosystems. In our mesocosm experiment, artificial water table fluctuations in pristine peat profiles caused an increase in dissolved organic nitrogen (DON and ammonium (NH4+-N concentrations, while no response was found in drained peat profiles, although originating from the same peatland complex.

  17. Time-dependent release of growth factors from implant surfaces treated with plasma rich in growth factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Ilárduya, María Belén; Trouche, Elodie; Tejero, Ricardo; Orive, Gorka; Reviakine, Ilya; Anitua, Eduardo

    2013-05-01

    Plasma rich in growth factors (PRGFs) technology is an autologous platelet-rich plasma approach that provides a pool of growth factors and cytokines that have been shown to increase tissue regeneration and accelerate dental implant osseointegration. In this framework, the spatiotemporal release of growth factors and the establishment of a provisional fibrin matrix are likely to be key aspects governing the stimulation of the early phases of tissue regeneration around implants. We investigated the kinetics of growth factor release at implant surfaces functionalized either with PRGFs or platelet-poor plasma and correlated the results obtained with the morphology of the resulting interfaces. Our main finding is that activation and clot formation favors longer residence times of the growth factors at the interfaces studied, probably due to their retention in the adsorbed fibrin matrix. The concentration of the platelet-derived growth factors above the interfaces becomes negligible after 2-4 days and is significantly higher in the case of activated interfaces than in the case of nonactivated ones, whereas that of the plasmatic hepatocyte growth factor is independent of platelet concentration and activation, and remains significant for up to 9 days. Platelet-rich plasma preparations should be activated to permit growth factor release and thereby facilitate implant surface osseointegration.

  18. Influence of storage conditions on the release of growth factors in platelet-rich blood derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Düregger Katharina

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Thrombocytes can be concentrated in blood derivatives and used as autologous transplants e.g. for wound treatment due to the release of growth factors such as platelet derived growth factor (PDGF. Conditions for processing and storage of these platelet-rich blood derivatives influence the release of PDGF from the platelet-bound α-granules into the plasma. In this study Platelet rich plasma (PRP and Platelet concentrate (PC were produced with a fully automated centrifugation system. Storage of PRP and PC for 1 h up to 4 months at temperatures between −20°C and +37°C was applied with the aim of evaluating the influence on the amount of released PDGF. Storage at −20°C resulted in the highest release of PDGF in PRP and a time dependency was determined: prolonged storage up to 1 month in PRP and 10 days in PC increased the release of PDGF. Regardless of the storage conditions, the release of PDGF per platelet was higher in PC than in PRP.

  19. Gelatin-based hydrogel for vascular endothelial growth factor release in peripheral nerve tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnavi, S; di Blasio, L; Tonda-Turo, C; Mancardi, A; Primo, L; Ciardelli, G; Gambarotta, G; Geuna, S; Perroteau, I

    2017-02-01

    Hydrogels are promising materials in regenerative medicine applications, due to their hydrophilicity, biocompatibility and capacity to release drugs and growth factors in a controlled manner. In this study, biocompatible and biodegradable hydrogels based on blends of natural polymers were used in in vitro and ex vivo experiments as a tool for VEGF-controlled release to accelerate the nerve regeneration process. Among different candidates, the angiogenic factor VEGF was selected, since angiogenesis has been long recognized as an important and necessary step during tissue repair. Recent studies have pointed out that VEGF has a beneficial effect on motor neuron survival and Schwann cell vitality and proliferation. Moreover, VEGF administration can sustain and enhance the growth of regenerating peripheral nerve fibres. The hydrogel preparation process was optimized to allow functional incorporation of VEGF, while preventing its degradation and denaturation. VEGF release was quantified through ELISA assay, whereas released VEGF bioactivity was validated in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and in a Schwann cell line (RT4-D6P2T) by assessing VEGFR-2 and downstream effectors Akt and Erk1/2 phosphorylation. Moreover, dorsal root ganglia explants cultured on VEGF-releasing hydrogels displayed increased neurite outgrowth, providing confirmation that released VEGF maintained its effect, as also confirmed in a tubulogenesis assay. In conclusion, a gelatin-based hydrogel system for bioactive VEGF delivery was developed and characterized for its applicability in neural tissue engineering. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Personality factors and profiles in variants of irritable bowel syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To study the association between irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) variants (constipation, diarrhea, or both)and personality traits in non-psychiatric patients.METHODS: IBS was diagnosed using the Rome Ⅱ diagnostic criteria after exclusion of organic bowel pathology. The entry of each patient was confirmed following a psychiatric interview. Personality traits and the score of each factor were evaluated using the NEO Five Factor Inventory.RESULTS: One hundred and fifty patients were studied.The mean age (±SD) was 33.4 (±11.0) year (62% female). Subjects scored higher in neuroticism (26.25±7.80 vs 22.92±9.54, P < 0.0005), openness (26.25±5.22 vs 27.94±4.87, P < 0.0005) and conscientiousness (32.90 ±7.80 vs 31.62±5.64, P < 0.01) compared to our general population derived from universities of Iran. Our studied population consisted of 71 patients with Diarrhea dominant-IBS, 33 with Constipation dominant-IBS and 46 with Altering type-IBS. Scores of conscientiousness and neuroticism were significantly higher in C-IBS compared to D-IBS and A-IBS (35.79±5.65 vs 31.95±6.80,P = 0.035 and 31.97±9.87, P = 0.043, respectively).Conscientiousness was the highest dimension of personality in each of the variants. Patients with C-IBS had almost similar personality profiles, composed of higher scores for neuroticism and conscientiousness, with low levels of agreeableness, openness and extraversion that were close to those of the general population.CONCLUSION: Differences were observed between IBS patients and the general population, as well as between IBS subtypes, in terms of personality factors.Patients with constipation-predominant IBS showed similar personality profiles. Patients with each subtype of IBS may benefit from psychological interventions, which can be focused considering the characteristics of each subtype.

  1. Factors affecting release of ethanol vapour in active modified atmosphere packaging systems for horticultural products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weerawate Utto

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The active modified atmosphere packaging (active MAP system , which provides interactive postharvest control , using ethanol vapour controlled release, is one of the current interests in the development of active packaging for horticultural products. A number of published research work have discussed the relationship between the effectiveness of ethanol vapour and its concentration in the package headspace, including its effect on postharvest decay and physiological controls. This is of importance because a controlled release system should release and maintain ethanol vapour at effective concentrations during the desired storage period. A balance among the mass transfer processes of ethanol vapour in the package results in ethanol vapour accumulation in the package headspace. Key factors affecting these processes include ethanol loading, packaging material, packaged product and storage environment (temperature and relative h umidity. This article reviews their influences and discusses future work required to better understand their influences on ethanol vapour release and accumulations in active MAP.

  2. Effect of angiotensin II, catecholamines and glucocorticoid on corticotropin releasing factor (CRF-induced ACTH release in pituitary cell cultures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murakami,Kazuharu

    1984-08-01

    Full Text Available The effects of angiotensin II, catecholamines and glucocorticoid on CRF-induced ACTH release were examined using rat anterior pituitary cells in monolayer culture. Synthetic ovine CRF induced a significant ACTH release in this system. Angiotensin II produced an additive effect on CRF-induced ACTH release. The ACTH releasing activity of CRF was potentiated by epinephrine and norepinephrine. Dopamine itself at 0.03-30 ng/ml did not show any significant effect on ACTH release, but it inhibited CRF-induced ACTH release. Corticosterone at 10(-7 and 10(-6M inhibited CRF-induced ACTH release. These results indicate that angiotensin II, catecholamines and glucocorticoid modulate ACTH release at the pituitary level.

  3. Ubiquitination profiling identifies sensitivity factors for IAP antagonist treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varfolomeev, Eugene; Izrael-Tomasevic, Anita; Yu, Kebing; Bustos, Daisy; Goncharov, Tatiana; Belmont, Lisa D; Masselot, Alexandre; Bakalarski, Corey E; Kirkpatrick, Donald S; Vucic, Domagoj

    2015-02-15

    Evasion of cell death is one crucial capability acquired by tumour cells to ward-off anti-tumour therapies and represents a fundamental challenge to sustaining clinical efficacy for currently available agents. Inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) proteins use their ubiquitin E3 ligase activity to promote cancer cell survival by mediating proliferative signalling and blocking cell death in response to diverse stimuli. Using immunoaffinity enrichment and MS, ubiquitination sites on thousands of proteins were profiled upon initiation of cell death by IAP antagonists in IAP antagonist-sensitive and -resistant breast cancer cell lines. Our analyses identified hundreds of proteins with elevated levels of ubiquitin-remnant [K-GG (Lys-Gly-Gly)] peptides upon activation of cell death by the IAP antagonist BV6. The majority of these were observed in BV6-sensitive, but not-resistant, cells. Among these were known pro-apoptotic regulators, including CYC (cytochrome c), RIP1 (receptor-interacting protein 1) and a selection of proteins known to reside in the mitochondria or regulate NF-κB (nuclear factor κB) signalling. Analysis of early time-points revealed that IAP antagonist treatment stimulated rapid ubiquitination of NF-κB signalling proteins, including TRAF2 [TNF (tumour necrosis factor) receptor-associated factor 2], HOIL-1 (haem-oxidized iron-regulatory protein 2 ubiquitin ligase-1), NEMO (NF-κB essential modifier), as well as c-IAP1 (cellular IAP1) auto-ubiquitination. Knockdown of several NF-κB pathway members reduced BV6-induced cell death and TNF production in sensitive cell lines. Importantly, RIP1 was found to be constitutively ubiquitinated in sensitive breast-cancer cell lines at higher basal level than in resistant cell lines. Together, these data show the diverse and temporally defined roles of protein ubiquitination following IAP-antagonist treatment and provide critical insights into predictive diagnostics that may enhance clinical efficacy.

  4. Fats and factors: lipid profiles associate with personality factors and suicidal history in bipolar subjects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon J Evans

    Full Text Available Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA have shown efficacy in the treatment of bipolar disorder, however their specific role in treating the illness is unclear. Serum PUFA and dietary intakes of PUFA associate with suicidal behavior in epidemiological studies. The objective of this study was to assess serum n-3 and n-6 PUFA levels in bipolar subjects and determine possible associations with suicidal risk, including suicidal history and relevant personality factors that have been associated with suicidality. We studied 27 bipolar subjects using the NEO-PI to assess the big five personality factors, structured interviews to verify diagnosis and assess suicidal history, and lipomics to quantify n-3 and n-6 PUFA in serum. We found positive associations between personality factors and ratios of n-3 PUFA, suggesting that conversion of short chain to long chain n-3s and the activity of enzymes in this pathway may associate with measures of personality. Thus, ratios of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA to alpha linolenic acid (ALA and the activity of fatty acid desaturase 2 (FADS2 involved in the conversion of ALA to DHA were positively associated with openness factor scores. Ratios of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA to ALA and ratios of EPA to DHA were positively associated with agreeableness factor scores. Finally, serum concentrations of the n-6, arachidonic acid (AA, were significantly lower in subjects with a history of suicide attempt compared to non-attempters. The data suggest that specific lipid profiles, which are controlled by an interaction between diet and genetics, correlate with suicidal history and personality factors related to suicidal risk. This study provides preliminary data for future studies to determine whether manipulation of PUFA profiles (through diet or supplementation can affect personality measures and disease outcome in bipolar subjects and supports the need for further investigations into individualized specific modulations of lipid

  5. Investigation of the criminal and conditional release profiles of Canadian federal offenders as a function of psychopathy and age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, S; Birt, A R; Boer, D P

    2001-12-01

    Using the Psychopathy Checklist-Revised (PCL-R; R. D. Hare, 1991) diagnostic cut-off score of 30, the complete criminal career and community release profiles of 317 Canadian federal offenders (224 low scorers and 93 scoring within the psychopathic range) were investigated. Adult crimes were coded according to age at commission as well as either violent, nonviolent, or nonsexually violent. Changes in performance following release into the community also were examined. Results indicated that offenders scoring within the psychopathic range consistently committed more violent and nonviolent crimes than their counterparts for about three decades, spanning their late adolescence to their late 40s. Numbers of nonviolent criminal offenses committed by high PCL-R scorers declined considerably after age 30 relative to violent offenses, which declined and then rebounded in the late 30s before a major reduction was evidenced. Throughout adulthood, high PCL-R scorers failed during community release significantly faster than did low scorers. Importantly, from a risk management perspective, the release performance of low PCL-R scorers improved with age, whereas the opposite was seen for high scorers. Further, offenders scoring high on the PCL-R did not show a lower charge to conviction ratio with age, suggesting that they may not have been getting better at manipulating the legal system.

  6. Influence of excipients on characteristics and release profiles of poly(ε-caprolactone) microspheres containing immunoglobulin G.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdemli, Özge; Keskin, Dilek; Tezcaner, Ayşen

    2015-03-01

    Protein instability during microencapsulation has been one of the major drawbacks of protein delivery systems. In this study, the effects of various excipients (poly vinyl alcohol, glucose, starch, heparin) on the stability of encapsulated human immunoglobulin G (IgG) in poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) microspheres and on microsphere characteristics were investigated before and after γ-sterilization. Microspheres formulated without any excipients and with glucose had a mean particle size around 3-4μm whereas the mean particle sizes of other microspheres were around 5-6μm. Use of PVA significantly increased the IgG-loading and encapsulation efficiency of microspheres. After γ-irradiation, IgG stability was mostly maintained in the microspheres with excipients compared to microspheres without any excipients. According to the μBCA results, microspheres without any excipient showed a high initial burst release as well as a fast release profile among all groups. Presence of PVA decreased the loss in the activity of IgG released before (completely retained after 6h and 15.69% loss after 7days) and after γ-irradiation (26.04% loss and 52.39% loss after 6h and 7days, respectively). The stabilization effect of PVA on the retention of the activity of released IgG was found more efficient compared to other groups formulated with carbohydrates.

  7. Profile of extended-release oxycodone/acetaminophen for acute pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekhit, Mary Hanna

    2015-01-01

    This article provides a historical and pharmacological overview of a new opioid analgesic that boasts an extended-release (ER) formulation designed to provide both immediate and prolonged analgesia for up to 12 hours in patients who are experiencing acute pain. This novel medication, ER oxycodone/acetaminophen, competes with current US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved opioid formulations available on the market in that it offers two benefits concurrently: a prolonged duration of action, and multimodal analgesia through a combination of an opioid (oxycodone) with a nonopioid component. Current FDA-approved combination analgesics, such as Percocet (oxycodone/acetaminophen), are available solely in immediate-release (IR) formulations.

  8. MORPHOLOGY, IN VITRO - DEGRADATION AND DRUG RELEASE PROFILE OF POLY (ETHYLENE-CO-VINYL ACETATE / MICROCRYSTALLINE CELLULOSE ACETATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Lakshmi Narayana

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Microcrystalline cellulose acetate (MCC was incorporated in poly (ethylene-co-vinyl acetate (EVA at different loading. The morphology, swelling properties and drug release profile were studied with respect to MCC loading to study its potential application as ocular inserts. The XRD patterns showed a good compatibility between the components. However swelling ratio and in-vitro degradation of EVA increase with MCC loading. This has been explained in terms of the hygroscopic nature of cellulose acetate. The study shows that EVA/MCC system can be tuned in terms of important parameters such as swelling behavior, in vitro release and degradation by varying blend composition, thus fulfilling specific biomedical requirements.

  9. Transcriptome Profiling of Pediatric Core Binding Factor AML.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Hao Hsu

    Full Text Available The t(8;21 and Inv(16 translocations disrupt the normal function of core binding factors alpha (CBFA and beta (CBFB, respectively. These translocations represent two of the most common genomic abnormalities in acute myeloid leukemia (AML patients, occurring in approximately 25% pediatric and 15% of adult with this malignancy. Both translocations are associated with favorable clinical outcomes after intensive chemotherapy, and given the perceived mechanistic similarities, patients with these translocations are frequently referred to as having CBF-AML. It remains uncertain as to whether, collectively, these translocations are mechanistically the same or impact different pathways in subtle ways that have both biological and clinical significance. Therefore, we used transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq to investigate the similarities and differences in genes and pathways between these subtypes of pediatric AMLs. Diagnostic RNA from patients with t(8;21 (N = 17, Inv(16 (N = 14, and normal karyotype (NK, N = 33 were subjected to RNA-seq. Analyses compared the transcriptomes across these three cytogenetic subtypes, using the NK cohort as the control. A total of 1291 genes in t(8;21 and 474 genes in Inv(16 were differentially expressed relative to the NK controls, with 198 genes differentially expressed in both subtypes. The majority of these genes (175/198; binomial test p-value < 10(-30 are consistent in expression changes among the two subtypes suggesting the expression profiles are more similar between the CBF cohorts than in the NK cohort. Our analysis also revealed alternative splicing events (ASEs differentially expressed across subtypes, with 337 t(8;21-specific and 407 Inv(16-specific ASEs detected, the majority of which were acetylated proteins (p = 1.5 x 10(-51 and p = 1.8 x 10(-54 for the two subsets. In addition to known fusions, we identified and verified 16 de novo fusions in 43 patients, including three fusions involving NUP98 in six

  10. Transcript profiling of Paoenia ostii during artificial chilling induced dormancy release identifies activation of GA pathway and carbohydrate metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shupeng Gai

    Full Text Available Endo-dormant flower buds must pass through a period of chilling to reinitiate growth and subsequent flowering, which is a major obstacle to the forcing culture of tree peony in winter. Customized cDNA microarray (8×15 K element was used to investigate gene expression profiling in tree peony 'Feng Dan Bai' buds during 24 d chilling treatment at 0-4°C. According to the morphological changes after the whole plants were transferred to green house, endo-dormancy was released after 18 d chilling treatment, and prolonged chilling treatment increased bud break rate. Pearson correlation hierarchical clustering of sample groups was highly consistent with the dormancy transitions revealed by morphological changes. Totally 3,174 significantly differentially-expressed genes (P<0.05 were observed through endo-dormancy release process, of which the number of up-regulated (1,611 and that of down-regulated (1,563 was almost the same. Functional annotation of differentially-expressed genes revealed that cellular process, metabolic process, response to stimulus, regulation of biological process and development process were well-represented. Hierarchical clustering indicated that activation of genes involved in carbohydrate metabolism (Glycolysis, Citrate cycle and Pentose phosphate pathway, energy metabolism and cell growth. Based on the results of GO analysis, totally 51 probes presented in the microarray were associated with GA response and GA signaling pathway, and 22 of them were differently expressed. The expression profiles also revealed that the genes of GA biosynthesis, signaling and response involved in endo-dormancy release. We hypothesized that activation of GA pathway played a central role in the regulation of dormancy release in tree peony.

  11. Physiological and behavioral effects of chronic intracerebroventricular infusion of corticotropin-releasing factor in the rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buwalda, B; deBoer, SF; VanKalkeren, AA; Koolhaas, JM; Kalkeren, A.A. van

    1997-01-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate the Long-term effects of chronic elevation of centrally circulating levels of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) on behavior and physiology. For this purpose ovine CRF was infused continuously far a period of 10 days into the lateral ventricle of rats

  12. Physiological and behavioral effects of chronic intracerebroventricular infusion of corticotropin-releasing factor in the rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buwalda, B; deBoer, SF; VanKalkeren, AA; Koolhaas, JM; Kalkeren, A.A. van

    1997-01-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate the Long-term effects of chronic elevation of centrally circulating levels of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) on behavior and physiology. For this purpose ovine CRF was infused continuously far a period of 10 days into the lateral ventricle of rats

  13. Growth hormone-releasing factor stimulates proliferation of somatotrophs in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Billestrup, Nils; Swanson, L W; Vale, W

    1986-01-01

    The mitogenic effect of the hypothalamic peptides growth hormone-releasing factor (GRF) and somatostatin on cultured growth hormone (GH)-producing cells (somatotrophs) was studied. Using autoradiographic detection of [3H]thymidine uptake and immunocytochemical identification of GH-producing cells...

  14. Ethanol and corticotropin releasing factor receptor modulation of central amygdala neurocircuitry: An update and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silberman, Yuval; Winder, Danny G

    2015-05-01

    The central amygdala is a critical brain region for many aspects of alcohol dependence. Much of the work examining the mechanisms by which the central amygdala mediates the development of alcohol dependence has focused on the interaction of acute and chronic ethanol with central amygdala corticotropin releasing factor signaling. This work has led to a great deal of success in furthering the general understanding of central amygdala neurocircuitry and its role in alcohol dependence. Much of this work has primarily focused on the hypothesis that ethanol utilizes endogenous corticotropin releasing factor signaling to upregulate inhibitory GABAergic transmission in the central amygdala. Work that is more recent suggests that corticotropin releasing factor also plays an important role in mediating anxiety-like behaviors via the enhancement of central amygdala glutamatergic transmission, implying that ethanol/corticotropin releasing factor interactions may modulate excitatory neurotransmission in this brain region. In addition, a number of studies utilizing optogenetic strategies or transgenic mouse lines have begun to examine specific central amygdala neurocircuit dynamics and neuronal subpopulations to better understand overall central amygdala neurocircuitry and the role of neuronal subtypes in mediating anxiety-like behaviors. This review will provide a brief update on this literature and describe some potential future directions that may be important for the development of better treatments for alcohol addiction.

  15. Adenohypophysial changes in mice transgenic for human growth hormone-releasing factor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stefaneanu, L; Kovacs, K; Horvath, E

    1989-01-01

    The effect of protracted GH-releasing factor (GRF) stimulation on adenohypophysial morphology was investigated in six mice transgenic for human GRF (hGRF). All animals had significantly higher plasma levels of GH and GRF and greater body weights than controls. Eight-month-old mice were killed...

  16. Growth hormone-releasing factor induces c-fos expression in cultured primary pituitary cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Billestrup, Nils; Mitchell, R L; Vale, W;

    1987-01-01

    GH-releasing factor (GRF) and somatostatin regulates the secretion and biosynthesis of GH as well as the proliferation of GH-producing cells. In order to further characterize the mitogenic effect of GRF, we studied the expression of the proto-oncogene c-fos in primary pituitary cells. Maximal...

  17. Localization and functional roles of corticotropin-releasing factor receptor type 2 in the cerebellum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gounko, Natalia V.; Gramsbergen, Albert; van der Want, Johannes J. L.

    2008-01-01

    The corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) type 2 receptor has three splice variants alpha, beta, and gamma. In the rodent brain only CRF-R2 alpha is present. In the cerebellum, CRF-R2 alpha has two different isoforms: a full-length form (fl) and truncated (tr). Both forms CRF-R2 have a unique cellula

  18. 76 FR 27888 - Implantation or Injectable Dosage Form New Animal Drugs; Gonadotropin Releasing Factor-Diphtheria...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-13

    ... drug regulations to reflect approval of a new animal drug application (NADA) filed by Pfizer, Inc. The NADA provides for the veterinary prescription use of gonadotropin releasing factor-diphtheria toxoid...-5755, filed NADA 141-322 that provides for the veterinary prescription use of IMPROVEST...

  19. 77 FR 4227 - Implantation or Injectable Dosage Form New Animal Drugs; Gonadotropin Releasing Factor Analog...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-27

    ... drug regulations to reflect approval of a supplemental new animal drug application (NADA) filed by Pfizer, Inc. The supplemental NADA extends the slaughter interval for intact male swine injected with..., filed a supplement to NADA 141-322 for IMPROVEST (gonadotropin releasing factor analog-diphtheria...

  20. ENDOCANNABINOIDS INHIBIT RELEASE OF NERVE GROWTH FACTOR BY INFLAMMATION-ACTIVATED MAST CELLS

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Nerve growth factor (NGF) is a pleiotropic member of the neurotrophin family. Beside its neuronal effects, NGF plays a role in various processes, including angiogenesis. Mast cells release NGF and are among elements contributing to angiogenesis, a process regulated by arrays of factors, including the inhibitory cannabinoids. The possible inhibitory role of cannabinoids on mast cell-related NGF mitogenic effect on endothelial cells was then investigated. Human mastocytic ce...

  1. Electrospraying technique for the fabrication of metronidazole contained PLGA particles and their release profile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prabhakaran, Molamma P., E-mail: nnimpp@nus.edu.sg [Center for Nanofibers and Nanotechnology, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, National University of Singapore, 2 Engineering Drive 3, Singapore 117576 (Singapore); Zamani, Maedeh [Center for Nanofibers and Nanotechnology, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, National University of Singapore, 2 Engineering Drive 3, Singapore 117576 (Singapore); Felice, Betiana [Center for Nanofibers and Nanotechnology, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, National University of Singapore, 2 Engineering Drive 3, Singapore 117576 (Singapore); Laboratorio de Medios e Interfases, Departamento de Bioingeniería, Universidad Nacional de Tucumán, Av. Independencia 1800, Tucumán (Argentina); Ramakrishna, Seeram [Center for Nanofibers and Nanotechnology, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, National University of Singapore, 2 Engineering Drive 3, Singapore 117576 (Singapore)

    2015-11-01

    Advanced engineering of materials for the development of drug delivery devices provides scope for novel and versatile strategies for treatment of various diseases. ‘Electrospraying’ was used to prepare PLGA microparticles and further encapsulate the drug, metronidazole (Met) within the particles to function as a drug delivery system. Two different solvents were utilized for the preparation of drug loaded PLGA particles, whereby the polymeric solution in dichloromethane (DCM) produced particles of bigger sizes than using trifluoroethanol (TFE). Scanning electron microscopy showed the spherical morphology of the particles, with sizes of 3946 ± 407 nm and 1774 ± 167 nm, respectively for PLGA-Met(DCM) and PLGA-Met(TFE). The FTIR spectroscopy proved the incorporation of metronidazole in the polymer, but without any specific drug–polymer interaction. The release of the drug from the particles was studied in phosphate buffered saline, where a sustained drug release was obtained for at least 41 days. Cytotoxicity evaluation of the drug extract using mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) showed not hindering the proliferation of MSCs, and the cell phenotype was retained after incubation in the drug containing media. Electrospraying is suggested as a cost-effective and single step process for the preparation of polymeric microparticles for prolonged and controlled release of drug. - Highlights: • Electrospraying as a novel method for the fabrication of drug delivery device • Metronidazole encapsulated PLGA particles were fabricated by electrospraying. • Solvent DCM produced particles of double the size than using TFE. • Sustained release of metronidazole studied for a period of 41 days • Drug release pattern from particles followed Fickian diffusion. • PLGA-metronidazole particles can function as a substrate for periodontal regeneration.

  2. The Transcription Factor NIN-LIKE PROTEIN7 Controls Border-Like Cell Release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karve, Rucha; Suárez-Román, Frank; Iyer-Pascuzzi, Anjali S

    2016-07-01

    The root cap covers the tip of the root and functions to protect the root from environmental stress. Cells in the last layer of the root cap are known as border cells, or border-like cells (BLCs) in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). These cells separate from the rest of the root cap and are released from its edge as a layer of living cells. BLC release is developmentally regulated, but the mechanism is largely unknown. Here, we show that the transcription factor NIN-LIKE PROTEIN7 (NLP7) is required for the proper release of BLCs in Arabidopsis. Mutations in NLP7 lead to BLCs that are released as single cells instead of an entire layer. NLP7 is highly expressed in BLCs and is activated by exposure to low pH, a condition that causes BLCs to be released as single cells. Mutations in NLP7 lead to decreased levels of cellulose and pectin. Cell wall-loosening enzymes such as CELLULASE5 (CEL5) and a pectin lyase-like gene, as well as the root cap regulators SOMBRERO and BEARSKIN1/2, are activated in nlp7-1 seedlings. Double mutant analysis revealed that the nlp7-1 phenotype depends on the expression level of CEL5 Mutations in NLP7 lead to an increase in susceptibility to a root-infecting fungal pathogen. Together, these data suggest that NLP7 controls the release of BLCs by acting through the cell wall-loosening enzyme CEL5.

  3. Epidemiological profile and prognostic factors in patients with lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damila Cristina Trufelli

    Full Text Available SUMMARY Objective: To describe the epidemiological profile of patients with lung cancer treated at a public tertiary referral hospital specializing in oncology, and to explore variables that may be related to the overall survival (OS of these patients. Method: Data from the medical records of all patients with invasive lung cancer consecutively seen at the Oncology Department of Hospital Estadual Mário Covas between August 2008 and December 2013 were extracted. The information obtained was submitted to statistical analysis. Results: Of the total 210 patients, 39 were excluded from analysis due to lack of information in the medical record. The most common histological type was adenocarcinoma, representing 39.41% of the sample, followed by squamous cell carcinoma with 25.29% and small-cell carcinoma with 13.53%. Other histological types were responsible for the remaining 21.76%. There was a statistically significant association between Karnofsky performance status (KPS ≤ 70%, palliative chemotherapy lines performed and stage at diagnosis, and OS. Additionally, administration of target therapy to patients with EGFR mutation was associated with significantly better overall survival. However, analysis of laboratory variables (hemoglobin, albumin and LDH as possible prognostic factors for survival showed no statistically significant relationship. Among patients with stage III and IV, the median OS was 10.1 months. Conclusion: The risk factors for shorter OS were KPS score ≤ 70%, less than two lines of palliative chemotherapy, and stage III and IV at diagnosis. The implementation of CT screening for risk patients may allow earlier diagnosis of cases and improve these results.

  4. Release kinetics of platelet-derived and plasma-derived growth factors from autologous plasma rich in growth factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anitua, Eduardo; Zalduendo, Mari Mar; Alkhraisat, Mohammad Hamdan; Orive, Gorka

    2013-10-01

    Many studies have evaluated the biological effects of platelet rich plasma reporting the final outcomes on cell and tissues. However, few studies have dealt with the kinetics of growth factor delivery by plasma rich in growth factors. Venous blood was obtained from three healthy volunteers and processed with PRGF-Endoret technology to prepare autologous plasma rich in growth factors. The gel-like fibrin scaffolds were then incubated in triplicate, in a cell culture medium to monitor the release of PDGF-AB, VEGF, HGF and IGF-I during 8 days of incubation. A leukocyte-platelet rich plasma was prepared employing the same technology and the concentrations of growth factors and interleukin-1β were determined after 24h of incubation. After each period, the medium was collected, fibrin clot was destroyed and the supernatants were stored at -80°C until analysis. The growth factor delivery is diffusion controlled with a rapid initial release by 30% of the bioactive content after 1h of incubation and a steady state release when almost 70% of the growth factor content has been delivered. Autologous fibrin matrix retained almost 30% of the amount of the growth factors after 8 days of incubation. The addition of leukocytes to the formula of platelet rich plasma did not increase the concentration of the growth factors, while it drastically increased the presence of pro-inflammatory IL-1β. Further studies employing an in vitro inflammatory model would be interesting to study the difference in growth factors and pro-inflammatory cytokines between leukocyte-free and leukocyte-rich platelet rich plasma.

  5. The Success Factor Profile for clinical computer innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzi, Nancy M; Smith, Janis B; Conner, Susan R; Campion, Thomas R

    2004-01-01

    Fifty to seventy percent of information system projects fail. Most of the failures are not the victims of flawed technology, but rather organizational and people related issues. When Vanderbilt University Medical Center began an intensive electronic health record (EHR) effort, a process was carefully designed to select the clinical areas where new tools could be developed and pilot tested. The Success Factor Profile was created to guide the selection of sites most likely to have innovation success. This paper describes both the tools and the processes used to select clinical sites for new computer tools development and pilot implementation. Early results demonstrated that the tools provided structure for the decision making process, permitting side-by-side comparison of "apples and oranges." Selecting the site most likely to succeed with computer application innovation and early implementation has broad applicability in healthcare informatics. Failure to succeed with early system users is not only costly, but also discourages users and developers alike, and may damage the reputation of the tools and systems across the institution.

  6. Oxygen tension regulates the miRNA profile and bioactivity of exosomes released from extravillous trophoblast cells - Liquid biopsies for monitoring complications of pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Grace; Guanzon, Dominic; Kinhal, Vyjayanthi; Elfeky, Omar; Lai, Andrew; Longo, Sherri; Nuzhat, Zarin; Palma, Carlos; Scholz-Romero, Katherin; Menon, Ramkumar; Mol, Ben W; Rice, Gregory E; Salomon, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Our understanding of how cells communicate has undergone a paradigm shift since the recent recognition of the role of exosomes in intercellular signaling. In this study, we investigated whether oxygen tension alters the exosome release and miRNA profile from extravillous trophoblast (EVT) cells, modifying their bioactivity on endothelial cells (EC). Furthermore, we have established the exosomal miRNA profile at early gestation in women who develop pre-eclampsia (PE) and spontaneous preterm birth (SPTB). HTR-8/SVneo cells were used as an EVT model. The effect of oxygen tension (i.e. 8% and 1% oxygen) on exosome release was quantified using nanocrystals (Qdot®) coupled to CD63 by fluorescence NTA. A real-time, live-cell imaging system (Incucyte™) was used to establish the effect of exosomes on EC. Plasma samples were obtained at early gestation (<18 weeks) and classified according to pregnancy outcomes. An Illumina TrueSeq Small RNA kit was used to construct a small RNA library from exosomal RNA obtained from EVT and plasma samples. The number of exosomes was significantly higher in EVT cultured under 1% compared to 8% oxygen. In total, 741 miRNA were identified in exosomes from EVT. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that these miRNA were associated with cell migration and cytokine production. Interestingly, exosomes isolated from EVT cultured at 8% oxygen increased EC migration, whilst exosomes cultured at 1% oxygen decreased EC migration. These changes were inversely proportional to TNF-α released from EC. Finally, we have identified a set of unique miRNAs in exosomes from EVT cultured at 1% oxygen and exosomes isolated from the circulation of mothers at early gestation, who later developed PE and SPTB. We suggest that aberrant exosomal signalling by placental cells is a common aetiological factor in pregnancy complications characterised by incomplete SpA remodeling and is therefore a clinically relevant biomarker of pregnancy complications.

  7. Oxygen tension regulates the miRNA profile and bioactivity of exosomes released from extravillous trophoblast cells – Liquid biopsies for monitoring complications of pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Grace; Guanzon, Dominic; Kinhal, Vyjayanthi; Elfeky, Omar; Lai, Andrew; Longo, Sherri; Nuzhat, Zarin; Palma, Carlos; Scholz-Romero, Katherin; Menon, Ramkumar; Mol, Ben W.; Rice, Gregory E.; Salomon, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Our understanding of how cells communicate has undergone a paradigm shift since the recent recognition of the role of exosomes in intercellular signaling. In this study, we investigated whether oxygen tension alters the exosome release and miRNA profile from extravillous trophoblast (EVT) cells, modifying their bioactivity on endothelial cells (EC). Furthermore, we have established the exosomal miRNA profile at early gestation in women who develop pre-eclampsia (PE) and spontaneous preterm birth (SPTB). HTR-8/SVneo cells were used as an EVT model. The effect of oxygen tension (i.e. 8% and 1% oxygen) on exosome release was quantified using nanocrystals (Qdot®) coupled to CD63 by fluorescence NTA. A real-time, live-cell imaging system (Incucyte™) was used to establish the effect of exosomes on EC. Plasma samples were obtained at early gestation (<18 weeks) and classified according to pregnancy outcomes. An Illumina TrueSeq Small RNA kit was used to construct a small RNA library from exosomal RNA obtained from EVT and plasma samples. The number of exosomes was significantly higher in EVT cultured under 1% compared to 8% oxygen. In total, 741 miRNA were identified in exosomes from EVT. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that these miRNA were associated with cell migration and cytokine production. Interestingly, exosomes isolated from EVT cultured at 8% oxygen increased EC migration, whilst exosomes cultured at 1% oxygen decreased EC migration. These changes were inversely proportional to TNF-α released from EC. Finally, we have identified a set of unique miRNAs in exosomes from EVT cultured at 1% oxygen and exosomes isolated from the circulation of mothers at early gestation, who later developed PE and SPTB. We suggest that aberrant exosomal signalling by placental cells is a common aetiological factor in pregnancy complications characterised by incomplete SpA remodeling and is therefore a clinically relevant biomarker of pregnancy complications. PMID:28350871

  8. Mast Cell Proteases 6 and 7 Stimulate Angiogenesis by Inducing Endothelial Cells to Release Angiogenic Factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devandir Antonio de Souza Junior

    Full Text Available Mast cell proteases are thought to be involved with tumor progression and neo-vascularization. However, their exact role is still unclear. The present study was undertaken to further elucidate the function of specific subtypes of recombinant mouse mast cell proteases (rmMCP-6 and 7 in neo-vascularization. SVEC4-10 cells were cultured on Geltrex® with either rmMCP-6 or 7 and tube formation was analyzed by fluorescence microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Additionally, the capacity of these proteases to induce the release of angiogenic factors and pro and anti-angiogenic proteins was analyzed. Both rmMCP-6 and 7 were able to stimulate tube formation. Scanning electron microscopy showed that incubation with the proteases induced SVEC4-10 cells to invade the gel matrix. However, the expression and activity of metalloproteases were not altered by incubation with the mast cell proteases. Furthermore, rmMCP-6 and rmMCP-7 were able to induce the differential release of angiogenic factors from the SVEC4-10 cells. rmMCP-7 was more efficient in stimulating tube formation and release of angiogenic factors than rmMCP-6. These results suggest that the subtypes of proteases released by mast cells may influence endothelial cells during in vivo neo-vascularization.

  9. Profile of extended-release oxycodone/acetaminophen for acute pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bekhit MH

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Mary Hanna Bekhit1–51David Geffen School of Medicine, 2Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center, 3UCLA Ambulatory Surgery Center, 4UCLA Wasserman Eye Institute, 5UCLA Martin Luther King Community Hospital, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA Abstract: This article provides a historical and pharmacological overview of a new opioid analgesic that boasts an extended-release (ER formulation designed to provide both immediate and prolonged analgesia for up to 12 hours in patients who are experiencing acute pain. This novel medication, ER oxycodone/acetaminophen, competes with current US Food and Drug Administration (FDA-approved opioid formulations available on the market in that it offers two benefits concurrently: a prolonged duration of action, and multimodal analgesia through a combination of an opioid (oxycodone with a nonopioid component. Current FDA-approved combination analgesics, such as Percocet (oxycodone/acetaminophen, are available solely in immediate-release (IR formulations. Keywords: opioid, analgesic, xartemis, acute postsurgical pain, substance abuse, acetaminophen, extended release 

  10. Characterization of rheology and release profiles of olanzapine-loaded lipid-core nanocapsules in thermosensitive hydrogel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimer, F A; Pohlmann, A R; Guterres, S S

    2013-12-01

    In this study we developed a new drug delivery system for olanzanpine comprised of drug-loaded lipid-core nanocapsules incorporated in a thermosensitive hydrogel, intended to sustain the drug release. Firstly, olanzapine, a hydrophobic drug, was loaded in poly(epsilon-caprolactone) lipid core nanocapsules prepared by interfacial deposition of preformed polymer. The effects of the presence of ethanol and the amounts of sorbitan monostearate and medium-chain triglycerides on the particle size, zeta potential, polydispersity index, presence of microparticles and encapsulation efficiency were investigated using a 2(3) factorial design. The optimized nanocapsules were incorporated into a hydrophilic polymer (Poloxamer 407) dispersion in order to obtain a thermosensitive gel. The formulation containing 0.077 g of sorbitan monostearate, 0.22 ml of medium-chain triglycerides, 3 ml of ethanol and 18% of the thermosensitive polymer was selected according to the physicochemical properties. The rheology and release profiles of the mixed hydrophobic and hydrophilic delivery system were successfully characterized and revealed its great potential for the administration of hydrophobic drugs such as olanzapine with sustained in situ drug release.

  11. Endocannabinoids inhibit release of nerve growth factor by inflammation-activated mast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantarella, Giuseppina; Scollo, Mimmo; Lempereur, Laurence; Saccani-Jotti, Gloria; Basile, Francesco; Bernardini, Renato

    2011-08-15

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) is a pleiotropic member of the neurotrophin family. Beside its neuronal effects, NGF plays a role in various processes, including angiogenesis. Mast cells release NGF and are among elements contributing to angiogenesis, a process regulated by arrays of factors, including the inhibitory cannabinoids. The possible inhibitory role of cannabinoids on mast cell-related NGF mitogenic effect on endothelial cells was then investigated. Human mastocytic cells HMC-1, challenged with PMA to yield release of NGF, were preincubated with the endocannabinoid PEA. Then, conditioned media were added to HUVEC cultures. PMA-activated HMC-1 cells released substantial amounts of NGF, whereas PEA inhibited PMA-induced NGF release. HUVEC proliferation increased after treatment with media from activated HMC-1 cells, while was reduced with media from HMC-1 cells treated with PEA. To characterize receptors mediating such effects of PEA, RT-PCR and western blot analysis were performed on HMC-1 cells. None of the two cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors was expressed by HMC-1 cells, which on the other hand expressed the orphan receptor GPR55. PEA was ineffective in inhibiting NGF release from HMC-1 cells treated with PMA and transfected with positive GPR55 RNAi, whereas it induced significant reduction of NGF in cells transfected with the corresponding negative control RNAi. Results indicate that NGF released from inflammatory mast cells induces angiogenesis. Cannabinoids attenuate such pro-angiogenic effects of NGF. Finally, cannabinoids could be considered for antiangiogenic treatment in disorders characterized by prominent inflammation.

  12. Growth hormone secretion from chicken adenohypophyseal cells in primary culture: effects of human pancreatic growth hormone-releasing factor, thyrotropin-releasing hormone, and somatostatin on growth hormone release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, F M; Malamed, S; Scanes, C G

    1987-03-01

    A primary culture of chicken adenohypophyseal cells has been developed to study the regulation of growth hormone (GH) secretion. Following collagenase dispersion, cells were exposed for 2 hr to vehicle (control) or test agents. Human pancreatic (tumor) growth hormone-releasing factor (hpGRF) and rat hypothalamic growth hormone-releasing factor stimulated GH release to similar levels. GH release was increased by the presence of dibutyryl cyclic AMP. Thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) alone did not influence GH release; however, TRH plus hpGRF together exerted a synergistic (greater than additive) effect, increasing GH release by 100 to 300% over the sum of the values for each secretagogue acting alone. These relationships between TRH and hpGRF were further examined in cultured cells exposed to secretagogues for two consecutive 2-hr incubations. TRH pretreatment enhanced subsequent hpGRF-stimulated GH release by about 80% over that obtained if no secretagogue was present during the first incubation. In other experiments, somatostatin (SRIF) alone did not alter GH secretion. However, SRIF reduced hpGRF-stimulated GH release to levels found in controls. Furthermore, GH release stimulated by the presence of both TRH and hpGRF was lowered to control values by SRIF. The results of these studies demonstrate that a primary culture of chicken adenohypophyseal cells is a useful model for the study of GH secretion. Indeed, these results suggest that TRH and hpGRF regulate GH secretion by mechanisms which are not identical.

  13. Heat Profiling of Three-Dimensionally Optically Trapped Gold Nanoparticles using Vesicle Cargo Release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kyrsting, Anders; Bendix, Pól Martin; Stamou, Dimitrios

    2011-01-01

    Irradiated metallic nanoparticles hold great promise as heat transducers in photothermal applications such as drug delivery assays or photothermal therapy. We quantify the temperature increase of individual gold nanoparticles trapped in three dimensions near lipid vesicles exhibiting temperature ...... sensitive permeability. The surface temperature can increase by hundreds of degrees Celsius even at moderate laser powers. Also, there are significant differences of the heat profiles in two-dimensional and three-dimensional trapping assays....

  14. Material-mediated proangiogenic factor release pattern modulates quality of regenerated blood vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, Max H; Lee, Min Kyung; Baek, Kwanghyun; Jeong, Jae Hyun; Kim, Dong Hyun; Millet, Larry J; Bashir, Rashid; Kong, Hyunjoon

    2014-12-28

    Hydrogels designed to sustainably release bioactive molecules are extensively used to enhance tissue repair and regenerative therapies. Along this line, numerous efforts are made to control the molecular release rate and amount. In contrast, few efforts are made to control the molecular release pattern, and, subsequently, modulate the spatial organization of newly forming tissues, including blood vessels. Therefore, using a hydrogel printed to release vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) into a pre-defined pattern, this study demonstrates that spatial distribution of VEGF is important in guiding growth direction of new blood vessels, and also in retaining the structural integrity of pre-existing vasculature. Guided by a computational model, we fabricated a patch composed of micro-sized VEGF-releasing poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA) hydrogel cylinders using an ink-jet printer. Interestingly, hydrogel printed with computationally optimized spacing created anisotropically aligned vasculature exclusively when the printed gel pattern was placed parallel to pre-existing blood vessels. In contrast, vascular sprouting from placing the printed gel pattern perpendicular to pre-existing vessels resulted in deformation and structural disintegration of the original vasculature. We envision that this study will be useful to better understand angiogenesis-modulated neovascularization and further improve the treatment quality for various wounds and tissue defects.

  15. Elongation factor 1-alpha is released into the culture medium during growth of Giardia intestinalis trophozoites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skarin, Hanna; Ringqvist, Emma; Hellman, Ulf; Svärd, Staffan G

    2011-04-01

    The molecular pathogenesis of the intestinal parasite Giardia intestinalis is still not fully understood but excretory-secretory products have been suggested to be important during host-parasite interactions. Here we used SDS-PAGE gels and MALDI-TOF analysis to identify proteins released by Giardia trophozoites during in vitro growth. Serum proteins (mainly bovine serum albumin) in the growth medium, bind to the parasite surface and they are continuously released, which interfere with parasite secretome characterization. However, we identified two released Giardia proteins: elongation factor-1 alpha (EF-1α) and a 58 kDa protein, identified as arginine deiminase (ADI). This is the first description of EF-1α as a released/secreted Giardia protein, whereas ADI has been identified in an earlier secretome study. Two genes encoding EF-1α were detected in the Giardia WB genome 35 kbp apart with almost identical coding sequences but with different promoter and 3' regions. Promoter luciferase-fusions showed that both genes are transcribed in trophozoites. The EF-1α protein localizes to the nuclear region in trophozoites but it relocalizes to the cytoplasm during host-cell interaction. Recombinant EF-1α is recognized by serum from giardiasis patients. Our results suggest that released EF-1α protein can be important during Giardia infections.

  16. Synthesis, characterization, release kinetics and toxicity profile of drug-loaded starch nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Naggar, Mehrez E; El-Rafie, M H; El-sheikh, M A; El-Feky, Gina S; Hebeish, A

    2015-11-01

    The current research work focuses on the medical application of the cost-effective cross-linked starch nanoparticles, for the transdermal delivery using Diclofenac sodium (DS) as a model drug. The prepared DS-cross-linked starch nanoparticles were synthesized using nanoprecipitation technique at different concentrations of sodium tripolyphosphate (STPP) in the presence of Tween 80 as a surfactant. The resultant cross-linked starch nanoparticles loaded with DS were characterized using world-class facilities such as TEM, DLS, FT-IR, XRD, and DSc. The efficiency of DS loading was also evaluated via entrapment efficiency as well as in vitro release and histopathological study on rat skin. The optimum nanoparticles formulation selected by the JMP(®) software was the formula that composed of 5% maize starch, 57.7mg DS and 0.5% STPP and 0.4% Tween 80, with particle diameter of about 21.04nm, polydispersity index of 0.2 and zeta potential of -35.3mV. It is also worth noting that this selected formula shows an average entrapment efficiency of 95.01 and sustained DS release up to 6h. The histophathological studies using the best formula on rat skin advocate the use of designed transdermal DS loaded cross-linked starch nanoparticles as it is safe and non-irritant to rat skin. The overall results indicate that, the starch nanoparticles could be considered as a good carrier for DS drug regarding the enhancement in its controlled release and successful permeation, thus, offering a promising nanoparticulate system for the transdermal delivery non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID).

  17. Novel systems for tailored neurotrophic factor release based on hydrogel and resorbable glass hollow fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novajra, G; Tonda-Turo, C; Vitale-Brovarone, C; Ciardelli, G; Geuna, S; Raimondo, S

    2014-03-01

    A novel system for the release of neurotrophic factor into a nerve guidance channel (NGC) based on resorbable phosphate glass hollow fibers (50P2O5-30CaO-9Na2O-3SiO2-3MgO-2.5K2O-2.5TiO2 mol%) in combination with a genipin-crosslinked agar/gelatin hydrogel (A/G_GP) is proposed. No negative effect on the growth of neonatal olfactory bulb ensheathing cell line (NOBEC) as well as on the expression of pro- and anti-apoptotic proteins was measured in vitro in the presence of fiber dissolution products in the culture medium. For the release studies, fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran (FD-20), taken as growth factor model molecule, was solubilized in different media and introduced into the fiber lumen exploiting the capillary action. The fibers were filled with i) FD-20/phosphate buffered saline (PBS) solution, ii) FD-20/hydrogel solution before gelation and iii) hydrogel before gelation, subsequently lyophilized and then filled with the FD-20/PBS solution. The different strategies used for the loading of the FD-20 into the fibers resulted in different release kinetics. A slower release was observed with the use of A/G_GP hydrogel. At last, poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) nerve guides containing the hollow fibers and the hydrogel have been fabricated.

  18. Synthesis of multilayered alginate microcapsules for the sustained release of fibroblast growth factor-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanna, Omaditya; Moya, Monica L; Opara, Emmanuel C; Brey, Eric M

    2010-01-01

    Alginate microcapsules coated with a permselective poly-L-ornithine (PLO) membrane have been investigated for the encapsulation and transplantation of islets as a treatment for type 1 diabetes. The therapeutic potential of this approach could be improved through local stimulation of microvascular networks in order to meet mass transport demands of the encapsulated cells. Fibroblast growth factor-1 (FGF-1) is a potent angiogenic factor with optimal effect occurring when it is delivered in a sustained manner. In this paper, a technique is described for the generation of multilayered alginate microcapsules with an outer alginate layer that can be used for the delivery of FGF-1. The influence of alginate concentration and composition (high mannuronic acid (M) or guluronic acid (G) content) on outer layer size and stability, protein encapsulation efficiency, and release kinetics was investigated. The technique results in a stable outer layer of alginate with a mean thickness between 113–164 µm, increasing with alginate concentration and G-content. The outer layer was able to encapsulate and release FGF-1 for up to thirty days, with 1.25% of high G alginate displaying the most sustained release. The released FGF-1 retained its biologic activity in the presence of heparin, and the addition of the outer layer did not alter the permselectivity of the PLO coat. This technique could be used to generate encapsulation systems that deliver proteins to stimulate local neovascularization around encapsulated islets. PMID:20725969

  19. Influence of excipients on characteristics and release profiles of poly(ε-caprolactone) microspheres containing immunoglobulin G

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erdemli, Özge [Department of Engineering Sciences, Middle East Technical University, Ankara (Turkey); Keskin, Dilek [Department of Engineering Sciences, Middle East Technical University, Ankara (Turkey); Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering Center of Excellence, Middle East Technical University, Ankara (Turkey); Tezcaner, Ayşen, E-mail: tezcaner@metu.edu.tr [Department of Engineering Sciences, Middle East Technical University, Ankara (Turkey); Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering Center of Excellence, Middle East Technical University, Ankara (Turkey)

    2015-03-01

    Protein instability during microencapsulation has been one of the major drawbacks of protein delivery systems. In this study, the effects of various excipients (poly vinyl alcohol, glucose, starch, heparin) on the stability of encapsulated human immunoglobulin G (IgG) in poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) microspheres and on microsphere characteristics were investigated before and after γ-sterilization. Microspheres formulated without any excipients and with glucose had a mean particle size around 3–4 μm whereas the mean particle sizes of other microspheres were around 5–6 μm. Use of PVA significantly increased the IgG-loading and encapsulation efficiency of microspheres. After γ-irradiation, IgG stability was mostly maintained in the microspheres with excipients compared to microspheres without any excipients. According to the μBCA results, microspheres without any excipient showed a high initial burst release as well as a fast release profile among all groups. Presence of PVA decreased the loss in the activity of IgG released before (completely retained after 6 h and 15.69% loss after 7 days) and after γ-irradiation (26.04% loss and 52.39% loss after 6 h and 7 days, respectively). The stabilization effect of PVA on the retention of the activity of released IgG was found more efficient compared to other groups formulated with carbohydrates. - Highlights: • Good excipient provides retention of protein stability during microencapsulation. • PVA was more effective on retention of the IgG stability compared to carbohydrates. • Starch was not an appropriate excipient for the retention of IgG stability.

  20. risk-factor profile for chronic lifestyle diseases in three rural Free ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    risk-factor profile for chronic lifestyle diseases in three rural Free State towns. ... Journal Home > Vol 52, No 1 (2010) > ... Results: Multiple risk factors for noncommunicable diseases were identified in this study population, including high blood ...

  1. Original Article Risk Factors and Bacterial Profile of Suspected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-08-11

    Aug 11, 2011 ... The aim of this study is to evaluate the bacterial profile, antibiotics susceptibility pattern and associated risk ..... Ako-Nai AK, Torimiro SEA, Lamikanra A and. Ogunbiyi AD ... Neonatal Septicaemia in Ilorin: Bacteria Pathogens.

  2. Studies on the biological effects of ozone: 10. Release of factors from ozonated human platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valacchi, G; Bocci, V

    1999-01-01

    In a previous work we have shown that heparin, in the presence of ozone (O3), promotes a dose-dependent platelet aggregation, while after Ca2+ chelation with citrate, platelet aggregation is almost negligible. These results led us to think that aggregation may enhance the release of platelet components. We have here shown that indeed significantly higher amount of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), transforming growth factor beta1 (TGF-beta1) and interleukin-8 (IL-8) are released in a dose-dependent manner after ozonation of heparinised platelet-rich plasma samples. These findings may explain the enhanced healing of torpid ulcers in patients with chronic limb ischemia treated with O3 autohaemoteraphy (O3-AHT).

  3. Studies on the Biological Effects of Ozone: 10. Release of Factors from Ozonated Human Platelets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Valacchi

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available In a previous work we have shown that heparin, in the presence of ozone (O3, promotes a dose-dependent platelet aggregation, while after Ca2+ chelation with citrate, platelet aggregation is almost negligible. These results led us to think that aggregation may enhance the release of platelet components. We have here shown that indeed significantly higher amount of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF, transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1 and interleukin-8(IL-8 are released in a dose-dependent manner after ozonation of heparinised platelet-rich plasma samples. These findings may explain the enhanced healing of torpid ulcers in patients with chronic limbischemia treated with O3 autohaemoteraphy (O3-AHT.

  4. Mechanisms in bradykinin stimulated arachidonate release and synthesis of prostaglandin and platelet activating factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Ricupero

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available Regulatory mechanisms in bradykinin (BK activated release of arachidonate (ARA and synthesis of prostaglandin (PG and platelet activating factor (PAF were studied in bovine pulmonary artery endothelial cells (BPAEC. A role for GTP binding protein (G-protein in the binding of BK to the cells was determined. Guanosine 5-O- (thiotriphosphate, (GTPτS, lowered the binding affinity for BK and increased the Kd for the binding from 0.45 to 1.99 nM. The Bmax remained unaltered at 2.25 × 10-11 mole. Exposure of the cells to aluminium fluoride also reduced the affinity for BK. Bradykinin-induced release of ARA proved pertussis toxin (PTX sensitive, with a maximum sensitivity at 10 ug/ml PTX. GTPτS at 100 μM increased the release of arachidonate. The effect of GTPτS and BK was additive at suboptimal doses of BK up to 0.5 nM but never exceeded the levels of maximal BK stimulation at 50 nM. PTX also inhibited the release of ARA induced by the calcium ionophore, A23187. Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate or more commonly known as tetradecanoyl phorbol acetate (TPA itself had little effect on release by the intact cells. However, at 100 nM it augmented the BK activated release. This was downregulated by overnight exposure to TPA and correlated with down-regulation of protein kinase C (PKC activity. The down-regulation only affected the augmentation of ARA release by TPA but not the original BK activated release. TPA displayed a similar, but more potent amplification of PAF synthesis in response to both BK or the calcium ionophore A23187. These results taken together point to the participation of G-protein in the binding of BK to BPAEC and its activation of ARA release. Possibly two types of G-protein are involved, one associated with the receptor, the other activated by Ca2+ and perhaps associated with phospholipase A2 (PLA2. Our results further suggest that a separate route of activation, probably also PLA2 related, takes place through a PKC catalysed

  5. Corticotropin-releasing factor receptors and stress-related alterations of gut motor function.

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    International audience; Over the past few decades, corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) signaling pathways have been shown to be the main coordinators of the endocrine, behavioral, and immune responses to stress. Emerging evidence also links the activation of CRF receptors type 1 and type 2 with stress-related alterations of gut motor function. Here, we review the role of CRF receptors in both the brain and the gut as part of key mechanisms through which various stressors impact propulsive ac...

  6. Corticotropin-Releasing Factor and the Brain-Gut Motor Response to Stress

    OpenAIRE

    1999-01-01

    The characterization of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and CRF receptors, and the development of specific CRF receptor antagonists selective for the receptor subtypes have paved the way to the understanding of the biochemical coding of stress-related alterations of gut motor function. Reports have consistently established that central administration of CRF acts in the brain to inhibit gastric emptying while stimulating colonic motor function through modulation of the vagal and sacral pa...

  7. Selection between Linear Factor Models and Latent Profile Models Using Conditional Covariances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpin, Peter F.; Maraun, Michael D.

    2010-01-01

    A method for selecting between K-dimensional linear factor models and (K + 1)-class latent profile models is proposed. In particular, it is shown that the conditional covariances of observed variables are constant under factor models but nonlinear functions of the conditioning variable under latent profile models. The performance of a convenient…

  8. Selection between Linear Factor Models and Latent Profile Models Using Conditional Covariances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpin, Peter F.; Maraun, Michael D.

    2010-01-01

    A method for selecting between K-dimensional linear factor models and (K + 1)-class latent profile models is proposed. In particular, it is shown that the conditional covariances of observed variables are constant under factor models but nonlinear functions of the conditioning variable under latent profile models. The performance of a convenient…

  9. Immunochemical determination of cellular content of translation release factor RF4 in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars Dyrskjøt; Manuel Palacios Moreno, Juan; Clark, Brian F. C.

    1999-01-01

    of the stop codons, and RF3 is known to accelerate the overall termination process. Release factor RF4 is a protein involved in the release of the mRNA and tRNA from the ribosomal complex. Furthermore, RF4 is involved in the proofreading in the elongation step of protein biosynthesis. The cellular contents...... of RF1, RF2, and RF3 were determined earlier. Here we report the cellular content of RF4 in Escherichia coli to be approximately 16,500 molecules per cell. The cells were grown in a rich medium and harvested in the beginning of the exponential growth phase. The quantifications were performed by using......The biosynthesis of proteins in prokaryotes is terminated when a stop codon is present in the A-site of the 70S ribosomal complex. Four different translation termination factors are known to participate in the termination process. Release factor RF1 and RF2 are responsible for the recognition...

  10. Solvent-free fabrication of polyHIPE microspheres for controlled release of growth factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moglia, Robert; Whitely, Michael; Brooks, Megan; Robinson, Jennifer; Pishko, Michael; Cosgriff-Hernandez, Elizabeth

    2014-07-01

    The growth factor bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2) is utilized in surgical procedures to improve bone regeneration; however, current treatments deliver BMP-2 at amounts greater than 100,000 fold of physiological levels, which increases treatment costs and risk of side effects. Drug-eluting microcarriers developed to improve these therapies have faced significant commercialization challenges including particle size distributions, solvent removal, low encapsulation efficiency, and bioactivity loss. In this study, a solvent-free method is presented for fabrication of uniform polyHIPE microspheres for controlled growth factor release. Emulsion templating principles and fluid dynamics were used to fabricate uniform particles with tunable particle size (200-800 μm) and pore size (10-30 μm). The ability to independently tune particle and pore size is expected to provide excellent control of release kinetics. Overall, this solvent-free method for making porous microspheres displays strong promise for the controlled release of BMP-2 and other growth factors. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Evaluation of physicochemical properties and in-vitro release profile of glipizide-matrix patch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kajal Ghosal

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The aim of the present investigation was to form matrix patches with ethyl cellulose (EC as the base polymer, polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP as the copolymer, plasticizer with dibutyl phthalate (DBP or acetyl tributyl citrate (ATBC and the drug glipizide (gz by the solvent casting method. Physicochemical properties of the patches and in vitro drug release were determined in a modified Keshary-chien diffusion cell to optimize the patch formulations with the help of experimental data and figures for further studies. TECHNIQUES: EC and PVP of different proportions with different weight percentages of either DBP or ATBC and a fixed amount of glipizide were taken for matrix patch formations. The dried patches were used for measuring their drug contents as well as their thicknesses, tensile strengths, moisture contents and water absorption amounts in percentage. In vitro release amounts at different intervals were measured by UV-spectrophotometer. RESULTS: Drug contents varied from 96 - 99%. Thickness and tensile strength varied due to weight variation of the ingredients in the matrix patches. Moisture content and water absorption in wt % were greater for the patches containing higher amount of PVP due to its hydrophilic nature. Variations in drug release were observed among various formulations. It was found that all of the releases followed diffusion controlled zero order kinetics. Two DBP patches yielded better and more adequate release. CONCLUSIONS: The two formulations with DBP were the preferred choice for making matrix patches for further studies.O objetivo da presente pesquisa foi formar matrizes para bandagens de liberação transdérmica com etilcelulose (EC como polímero base, polivinilpirrolidona (PVP, como copolímero, plastificante com ftalato de dibutila (DBP ou citrato de tributilacetila (ATBC e o fármaco glipizida (gz pelo método de evaporação do solvente (moldagem com solvente. As propriedades físico-químicas das

  12. In situ formation of poly(vinyl alcohol–heparin hydrogels for mild encapsulation and prolonged release of basic fibroblast growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justine J Roberts

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Heparin-based hydrogels are attractive for controlled growth factor delivery, due to the native ability of heparin to bind and stabilize growth factors. Basic fibroblast growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor are heparin-binding growth factors that synergistically enhance angiogenesis. Mild, in situ encapsulation of both basic fibroblast growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor and subsequent bioactive dual release has not been demonstrated from heparin-crosslinked hydrogels, and the combined long-term delivery of both growth factors from biomaterials is still a major challenge. Both basic fibroblast growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor were encapsulated in poly(vinyl alcohol-heparin hydrogels and demonstrated controlled release. A model cell line, BaF32, was used to show bioactivity of heparin and basic fibroblast growth factor released from the gels over multiple days. Released basic fibroblast growth factor promoted higher human umbilical vein endothelial cell outgrowth over 24 h and proliferation for 3 days than the poly(vinyl alcohol-heparin hydrogels alone. The release of vascular endothelial growth factor from poly(vinyl alcohol-heparin hydrogels promoted human umbilical vein endothelial cell outgrowth but not significant proliferation. Dual-growth factor release of basic fibroblast growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor from poly(vinyl alcohol-heparin hydrogels resulted in a synergistic effect with significantly higher human umbilical vein endothelial cell outgrowth compared to basic fibroblast growth factor or vascular endothelial growth factor alone. Poly(vinyl alcohol-heparin hydrogels allowed bioactive growth factor encapsulation and provided controlled release of multiple growth factors which is beneficial toward tissue regeneration applications.

  13. Anti-inflammatory drugs for Duchenne muscular dystrophy: focus on skeletal muscle-releasing factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyatake, Shouta; Shimizu-Motohashi, Yuko; Takeda, Shin'ichi; Aoki, Yoshitsugu

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), an incurable and a progressive muscle wasting disease, is caused by the absence of dystrophin protein, leading to recurrent muscle fiber damage during contraction. The inflammatory response to fiber damage is a compelling candidate mechanism for disease exacerbation. The only established pharmacological treatment for DMD is corticosteroids to suppress muscle inflammation, however this treatment is limited by its insufficient therapeutic efficacy and considerable side effects. Recent reports show the therapeutic potential of inhibiting or enhancing pro- or anti-inflammatory factors released from DMD skeletal muscles, resulting in significant recovery from muscle atrophy and dysfunction. We discuss and review the recent findings of DMD inflammation and opportunities for drug development targeting specific releasing factors from skeletal muscles. It has been speculated that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs targeting specific inflammatory factors are more effective and have less side effects for DMD compared with steroidal drugs. For example, calcium channels, reactive oxygen species, and nuclear factor-κB signaling factors are the most promising targets as master regulators of inflammatory response in DMD skeletal muscles. If they are combined with an oligonucleotide-based exon skipping therapy to restore dystrophin expression, the anti-inflammatory drug therapies may address the present therapeutic limitation of low efficiency for DMD.

  14. Corticotropin releasing factor and catecholamines enhance glutamatergic neurotransmission in the lateral subdivision of the central amygdala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silberman, Yuval; Winder, Danny G

    2013-07-01

    Glutamatergic neurotransmission in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) plays an important role in many behaviors including anxiety, memory consolidation and cardiovascular responses. While these behaviors can be modulated by corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) and catecholamine signaling, the mechanism(s) by which these signals modify CeA glutamatergic neurotransmission remains unclear. Utilizing whole-cell patch-clamp electrophysiology recordings from neurons in the lateral subdivision of the CeA (CeAL), we show that CRF, dopamine (DA) and the β-adrenergic receptor agonist isoproterenol (ISO) all enhance the frequency of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSC) without altering sEPSC kinetics, suggesting they increase presynaptic glutamate release. The effect of CRF on sEPSCs was mediated by a combination of CRFR1 and CRFR2 receptors. While previous work from our lab suggests that CRFRs mediate the effect of catecholamines on excitatory transmission in other subregions of the extended amygdala, blockade of CRFRs in the CeAL failed to significantly alter effects of DA and ISO on glutamatergic transmission. These findings suggest that catecholamine and CRF enhancement of glutamatergic transmission onto CeAL neurons occurs via distinct mechanisms. While CRF increased spontaneous glutamate release in the CeAL, CRF caused no significant changes to optogenetically evoked glutamate release in this region. The dissociable effects of CRF on different types of glutamatergic neurotransmission suggest that CRF may specifically regulate spontaneous excitatory transmission. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Release profiles and morphological characterization by atomic force microscopy and photon correlation spectroscopy of 99mTechnetium-fluconazole nanocapsules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Assis, Danielle Nogueira; Mosqueira, Vanessa Carla Furtado; Vilela, José Mário Carneiro; Andrade, Margareth Spangler; Cardoso, Valbert Nascimento

    2008-02-12

    Several classes of antifungal have been employed in candidiasis treatment, but patients with advanced immunodeficiency can present unsatisfactory results after therapy. In these cases, high doses of drugs or the use of multiple agents are sometimes used, and hence increasing the risk of serious side effects. Considering theses difficulties, the encapsulation of antifungal agents in nanoparticulate carriers has been used with the objective of modifying the pharmacokinetic of drugs resulting in more efficient treatments with less side effects. The purpose of this work was the preparation, characterization and the investigation of the release profiles of radiolabeled fluconazole nanocapsules. The size, homogeneity and zeta potential of NC preparations were determined with a Zetasizer 3000HS. The morphology and the structural organization were evaluated by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The release study in vitro of NC was evaluated in physiologic solution with or without 70% mouse plasma. The labeling yield of fluconazole with 99mTc was 94% and the radiolabeled drug was stable within 24h period. The encapsulation percentage of 99mTc-fluconazole in PLA-POLOX NC and PLA-PEG NC was approximately of 30%. The average diameter calculated by photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS) varied from 236 to 356 nm, while the average diameter determined by AFM varied from 238 to 411 nm. The diameter/height relation decreased significantly when 25% glutaraldehyde was used for NC fixation on mica. The zeta potential varied from -55 to -69 nm and surface-modified NC showed lower absolute values than conventional NC. The in vitro release of 99mTc-fluconazole in plasma medium of the conventional and surface-modified NC was greater than in saline. The drug release in plasma medium from conventional NC was faster than for surface-modified NC. The results obtained in this work suggest that the nanocapsules containing fluconazole could be used to identify infectious foci, due to the properties

  16. Mercury (Hg) in meteorites: Variations in abundance, thermal release profile, mass-dependent and mass-independent isotopic fractionation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Matthias M. M.; Cloquet, Christophe; Marty, Bernard

    2016-06-01

    We have measured the concentration, isotopic composition and thermal release profiles of Mercury (Hg) in a suite of meteorites, including both chondrites and achondrites. We find large variations in Hg concentration between different meteorites (ca. 10 ppb to 14,000 ppb), with the highest concentration orders of magnitude above the expected bulk solar system silicates value. From the presence of several different Hg carrier phases in thermal release profiles (150-650 °C), we argue that these variations are unlikely to be mainly due to terrestrial contamination. The Hg abundance of meteorites shows no correlation with petrographic type, or mass-dependent fractionation of Hg isotopes. Most carbonaceous chondrites show mass-independent enrichments in the odd-numbered isotopes 199Hg and 201Hg. We show that the enrichments are not nucleosynthetic, as we do not find corresponding nucleosynthetic deficits of 196Hg. Instead, they can partially be explained by Hg evaporation and redeposition during heating of asteroids from primordial radionuclides and late-stage impact heating. Non-carbonaceous chondrites, most achondrites and the Earth do not show these enrichments in vapor-phase Hg. All meteorites studied here have however isotopically light Hg (δ202Hg = ∼-7 to -1) relative to the Earth's average crustal values, which could suggest that the Earth has lost a significant fraction of its primordial Hg. However, the late accretion of carbonaceous chondritic material on the order of ∼2%, which has been suggested to account for the water, carbon, nitrogen and noble gas inventories of the Earth, can also contribute most or all of the Earth's current Hg budget. In this case, the isotopically heavy Hg of the Earth's crust would have to be the result of isotopic fractionation between surface and deep-Earth reservoirs.

  17. Predicting absorption and pharmacokinetic profile of carbamazepine from controlled-release tablet formulation in humans using rabbit model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Homšek Irena

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Controlled-release (CR pharmaceutical formulations offer several advantages over the conventional, immediate release dosage forms of the same drug, including reduced dosing frequency, decreased incidence and/or intensity of adverse effects, greater selectivity of pharmacological activity, reduced drug plasma fluctuation, and better compliance. After a drug product has been registered, and is already on market, minor changes in formulation might be needed. At the same time, the product has to remain effective and safe for patients that could be confirmed via plasma drug concentrations and pharmacokinetic characteristics. It is challenging to predict human absorption and pharmacokinetic characteristics of a drug based on the in vitro dissolution test and the animal pharmacokinetic data. Therefore, the objective of this study was to establish correlation of the pharmacokinetic parameters of carbamazepine (CBZ CR tablet formulation between the rabbit and the human model, and to establish in vitro in vivo correlation (IVIVC based on the predicted fractions of absorbed CBZ. Although differences in mean plasma concentration profiles were notified, the data concerning the predicted fraction of drug absorbed were almost superimposable. Accordingly, it can be concluded that rabbits may be representative as an in vivo model for predicting the pharmacokinetics of the CR formulation of CBZ in humans.

  18. Coaxial electrospinning with acetic acid for preparing ferulic acid/zein composite fibers with improved drug release profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jian-Mao; Zha, Liu-sheng; Yu, Deng-Guang; Liu, Jianyun

    2013-02-01

    This study investigated drug/zein composite fibers prepared using a modified coaxial electrospinning process. With unspinnable acetic acid as sheath liquid and an electrospinnable co-dissolving solution of zein and ferulic acid (FA) as core fluid, the modified coaxial process could run smoothly and continuously without any clogging. Compared with those from the single-fluid electrospinning process, the FA-loaded zein fibers from the modified process were rounder and possessed higher quality in terms of diameter and distribution, as verified by scanning electron microscopic observations of their surface and cross-section. Differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffraction showed that fibers from both processes similarly formed a composite with the FA present in the zein matrix in an amorphous state. The driving force of encapsulation of FA into zein fibers was hydrogen bonding, as evidenced by the attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectra. However, in vitro dissolution tests demonstrated that the fibers from the coaxial process exhibited better sustained-release profiles with a smaller initial burst effect and less tailing-off release compared with those from the single process. The modified coaxial electrospinning process is a useful tool for generating nanofibers with higher quality and improved functional performance.

  19. Effects of coformers on phase transformation and release profiles of carbamazepine cocrystals in hydroxypropyl methylcellulose based matrix tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Shi; Li, Mingzhong

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of coformers on phase transformation and release profiles of carbamazepine (CBZ) cocrystals in hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) based matrix tablets. It has been found that selection of different coformers of saccharin (SAC) and cinnamic acid (CIN) can affect the stability of CBZ cocrystals in solution, resulting in significant differences in the apparent solubility of CBZ. The dissolution advantage of CBZ-SAC cocrystals can only be shown for a short period during dissolution because of the fast conversion to its dihydrate form (DH). HPMC can partially inhibit the crystallisation of CBZ DH during dissolution of CBZ-SAC cocrystal. However, the increased viscosity of HPMC dissolution medium reduced the dissolution rate of CBZ-SAC cocrystals. Therefore the CBZ-SAC cocrystal formulation did not show any significant advantage in CBZ release rate. In contrast the improved CBZ dissolution rate of CBZ-CIN cocrystal can be realised in both solution and formulation due to its high stability. In conclusion, exploring and understanding the mechanisms of the phase transformation of pharmaceutical cocrystals in aqueous medium for selection of lead cocrystals is the key for success of product development.

  20. Preparation and characterization of TAM-loaded HPMC/PAN composite fibers for improving drug-release profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xiaxia; Yu, Dengguang; Zhang, Xiaofei; Branford-White, Christopher; Zhu, Limin

    2011-01-01

    The present paper reports the preparation and characterization of composite hydroxypropyl methylcellulose/polyacrylonitrile (HPMC/PAN)-medicated fibers via a wet spinning technique. Tamoxifen (TAM) was selected as a model drug. Numerous analyses were conducted to characterize the mechanical, structure and morphology properties of the composite fibers. The drug content and in vitro dissolution behavior were also investigated. SEM images showed that the TAM-loaded HPMC/PAN composite fibers had a finger-like outer skin and a porous structure. FT-IR spectra demonstrated that there was a good compatibility between polymer and drug. Results from X-ray diffraction and DSC suggested that most of the incorporated TAM was evenly distributed in the fiber matrix in an amorphous state, except for a minority that aggregated on the surface of fibers. The drug content in the fibers was lower than that in the spinning solution and about 10% of TAM was lost during spinning process. In vitro dissolution results indicated that, compared to TAM-PAN fibers, HPMC/PAN composite systems had weaker initial burst release effects and more drug-loading. The combination of hydrophilic polymer HPMC with PAN could improve the performance of polymer matrix composite fibers in regulating the drug-release profiles.

  1. The influence of cationic lipid type on in-vitro release kinetic profiles of antisense oligonucleotide from cationic nanoemulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagigit, Tal; Nassar, Taher; Behar-Cohen, Francine; Lambert, Gregory; Benita, Simon

    2008-09-01

    Novel formulations of cationic nanoemulsions based on three different lipids were developed to strengthen the attraction of the polyanionic oligonucleotide (ODN) macromolecules to the cationic moieties on the oil nanodroplets. These formulations were developed to prolong the release of the ODN from the nanoemulsion under appropriate physiological dilutions as encountered in the eye following topical application. Increasing the concentration of the new cationic lipid exhibiting two cationic amine groups (AOA) in the emulsion from 0.05% to 0.4% did not alter markedly the particle size or zeta potential value of the blank cationic nanoemulsion. The extent of ODN association did not vary significantly when the initial concentration of ODN remained constant at 10 microM irrespective of the cationic lipid nature. However, the zeta potential value dropped consistently with the low concentrations of 0.05% and 0.1% of AOA in the emulsions suggesting that an electrostatic attraction occurred between the cationic lipids and the polyanionic ODN molecules at the o/w interface. Only the nanoemulsion prepared with N-[1-(2,3-dioleoyloxy)propyl]-N,N,N-trimethylammonium salts (DOTAP) remained physically stable over time. DOTAP cationic lipid nanoemulsion was the most efficient formulation capable of retaining the ODN despite the high dilution of 1:100 with simulated tear solution (STS). Less than 10% of the ODN was exchanged in contrast to 40-50% with the other cationic nanoemulsions. The in-vitro release kinetic behavior of ODN exchange with physiological anions present in the STS appears to be complex and difficult to characterize using mathematical fitting model equations. Further pharmacokinetic studies are needed to verify our kinetic assumptions and confirm the in-vitro ODN release profile from DOTAP cationic nanoemulsions.

  2. Cyclic strain alters the expression and release of angiogenic factors by human tendon cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousavizadeh, Rouhollah; Khosravi, Shahram; Behzad, Hayedeh; McCormack, Robert G; Duronio, Vincent; Scott, Alex

    2014-01-01

    Angiogenesis is associated with the tissue changes underlying chronic overuse tendinopathy. We hypothesized that repetitive, cyclic loading of human tendon cells would lead to increased expression and activity of angiogenic factors. We subjected isolated human tendon cells to overuse tensile loading using an in vitro model (1 Hz, 10% equibiaxial strain). We found that mechanically stimulated human tendon cells released factors that promoted in vitro proliferation and tube formation by human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). In response to cyclic strain, there was a transient increase in the expression of several angiogenic genes including ANGPTL4, FGF-2, COX-2, SPHK1, TGF-alpha, VEGF-A and VEGF-C, with no change in anti-angiogenic genes (BAI1, SERPINF1, THBS1 and 2, TIMP1-3). Cyclic strain also resulted in the extracellular release of ANGPTL4 protein by tendon cells. Our study is the first report demonstrating the induction of ANGPTL4 mRNA and release of ANGPTL4 protein in response to cyclic strain. Tenocytes may contribute to the upregulation of angiogenesis during the development of overuse tendinopathy.

  3. Regulation of duodenal bicarbonate secretion during stress by corticotropin-releasing factor and beta-endorphin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenz, H J

    1989-02-01

    Proximal duodenal mucosal bicarbonate secretion is an important factor in the pathogenesis of duodenal ulcer disease. To examine the central nervous system regulation of duodenal bicarbonate secretion, an animal model was developed that allowed cerebroventricular and intravenous injections as well as collection of duodenal perfusates in awake, freely moving rats. The hypothalamic peptide corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and stress (physical restraint) significantly stimulated duodenal bicarbonate secretion. These responses were abolished by pretreatment of the animals with the CRF receptor antagonist alpha-helical CRF-(9-41), hypophysectomy, and naloxone. In contrast, blockade of autonomic efferents by surgical and pharmacological means did not prevent the stimulatory effects of stress and CRF. Intravenous, but not cerebroventricular, administration of beta-endorphin that produced plasma concentrations of beta-endorphin that were similar to those produced by exogenous CRF and stress significantly stimulated duodenal bicarbonate secretion. These results indicate that endogenous CRF released during stress and exogenously administered CRF stimulate duodenal bicarbonate secretion by release of beta-endorphin from the pituitary, thus, demonstrating a functional hypothalamus-pituitary-gut axis.

  4. Neuroprotection elicited by nerve growth factor and brain-derived neurotrophic factor released from astrocytes in response to methylmercury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takemoto, Takuya; Ishihara, Yasuhiro; Ishida, Atsuhiko; Yamazaki, Takeshi

    2015-07-01

    The protective roles of astrocytes in neurotoxicity induced by environmental chemicals, such as methylmercury (MeHg), are largely unknown. We found that conditioned medium of MeHg-treated astrocytes (MCM) attenuated neuronal cell death induced by MeHg, suggesting that astrocytes-released factors can protect neuronal cells. The increased expression of nerve growth factor (NGF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) was observed in MeHg-treated astrocytes. NGF and BDNF were detected in culture media as homodimers, which are able to bind specific tyrosine kinase receptors, tropomyosin related kinase (Trk) A and TrkB, respectively. The TrkA antagonist and TrkB antagonist abolished the protective effects of MCM in neuronal cell death induced by MeHg. Taken together, astrocytes synthesize and release NGF and BDNF in response to MeHg to protect neurons from MeHg toxicity. This study is considered to show a novel defense mechanism against MeHg-induced neurotoxicity.

  5. Evidence for a release of brain-derived neurotrophic factor from the brain during exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Peter; Brassard, Patrice; Adser, Helle

    2009-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has an important role in regulating maintenance, growth and survival of neurons. However, the main source of circulating BDNF in response to exercise is unknown. To identify whether the brain is a source of BDNF during exercise, eight volunteers rowed for 4...... h while simultaneous blood samples were obtained from the radial artery and the internal jugular vein. To further identify putative cerebral region(s) responsible for BDNF release, mouse brains were dissected and analysed for BDNF mRNA expression following treadmill exercise. In humans, a BDNF...... release from the brain was observed at rest (P exercise (P exercise, the brain contributed 70-80% of circulating BDNF, while that contribution decreased following 1 h of recovery. In mice, exercise induced a three...

  6. A novel collagen/platelet-rich plasma (COL/PRP) scaffold: preparation and growth factor release analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiujie; Wang, Jingwei; Ren, Mingguang; Li, Lifeng; Wang, Qingwen; Hou, Xiaohua

    2016-06-01

    Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has been widely used in clinical practice for more than 20 years because it causes the release of many growth factors. However, the burst release pattern and short release period of PRP have become obstacles to its application. An optimal controllable release system is an urgent need for researchers. This study investigated whether collagen/PRP (COL/PRP) scaffolds can serve as a vehicle for the controllable release of growth factors. We fabricated a novel scaffold that integrates PRP activated by thrombin or collagen into type I collagen. The mechanical properties, cytotoxicity, and transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1), platelet derived growth factor (PDGF), fibroblast growth factor (FGF) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) content were evaluated. Our results demonstrate that the COL/PRP scaffolds were not cytotoxic to L-929 fibroblasts. The PDGF and FGF content in the thrombin group was at a higher level and lasted for a long period of time. Collagen and thrombin played the same role in the release of TGF-β1 and VEGF. These data suggest that the novel COL/PRP scaffolds provide a carrier for the controllable release of growth factors and may be used in tissue- regenerative therapies.

  7. Evaluation of drug delivery profiles in geometric three-layered tablets with various mechanical properties, in vitro-in vivo drug release, and Raman imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Du Hyung; Kim, Ki Hyun; Park, Jun Sang; Jeong, Seong Hoon; Park, Kinam

    2013-12-28

    Even though various multi-layered tablets have been developed for sustained release formulations, evaluations of mechanical properties during dissolution with drug release and imaging in the tablets have been limited. A novel geometric system consisting of an inner immediate release layer and two extended release barrier layers with swellable hydrophilic polymers was suggested as a once-a-day formulation. To evaluate drug release mechanisms with geometric properties, various mechanical characteristics during swelling were investigated to comprehend the relationship among in vitro drug release, human pharmacokinetics, and geometric characteristics. Imaging of drug movement was also studied in real-time using Raman spectroscopy. Drug delivery in the tablets might be divided into three processes through the geometric properties. When exposed to aqueous environments, the drug in the mid-layer was released until wrapped by the swollen barrier layers. Then, the drug in the mid-layer was mainly delivered to the barrier layers and a small amount of the drug was delivered to the contact region of the swollen barrier layers. Finally, the delivered drug to the barrier layers was consistently released out in response to the characteristics of the polymer of the barrier layers. Using Raman spectroscopy, these processes were confirmed in real-time analysis. Moreover, in vitro drug release profiles and human pharmacokinetics showed consistent results suggesting that drug release might be dependent on the various geometric properties and be modified consistently during the formulation development. © 2013.

  8. A prospective study of prognostic factors for duration of sick leave after endoscopic carpal tunnel release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalsgaard Jesper

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Endoscopic carpal tunnel release with a single portal technique has been shown to reduce sick leave compared to open carpal tunnel release, claiming to be a less invasive procedure and reducing scar tenderness leading to a more rapid return to work, and the purpose of this study was to identify prognostic factors for prolonged sick leave after endoscopic carpal tunnel release in a group of employed Danish patients. Methods The design was a prospective study including 75 employed patients with carpal tunnel syndrome operated with ECTR at two hospitals. The mean age was 46 years (SD 10.1, the male/female ratio was 0.42, and the mean preoperative duration of symptoms 10 months (range 6-12. Only 21 (28% were unable to work preoperatively and mean sick leave was 4 weeks (range 1-4. At base-line and at the 3-month follow-up, a self-administered questionnaire was collected concerning physical, psychological, and social circumstances in relation to the hand problem. Data from a nerve conduction examination were collected at baseline and at the 3-month follow-up. Significant prognostic factors were identified through multiple logistic regression analysis. Results After the operation, the mean functional score was reduced from 2.3 to 1.4 (SD 0.8 and the mean symptom score from 2.9 to 1.5 (SD 0.7. The mean sick leave from work after the operation was 19.8 days (SD 14.3. Eighteen patients (24% had more than 21 days of sick leave. Two patients (3% were still unable to work after 3 months. Significant prognostic factors in the multivariate analysis for more than 21 days of postoperative sick leave were preoperative sick leave, blaming oneself for the hand problem and a preoperative distal motor latency. Conclusion Preoperative sick leave, blaming oneself for the hand problem, and a preoperative distal nerve conduction motor latency were prognostic factors for postoperative work absence of more than 21 days. Other factors may be important

  9. The factors affecting lipid profile in adult patients with Mucopolysaccharidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolina M. Stepien

    2017-09-01

    Conclusions: MPS disorders are not associated with significant hypercholesterolaemia or diabetes mellitus despite increased BMI. Total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol were within the targets for primary prevention for non-MPS population. Lipoprotein (a is not a useful marker of cardiovascular disease in a small group of adult MPS IV patients irrespectively of treatment option. Whether long-term cardiovascular risk is dependent on lipid profile, diabetes, obesity or GAGs deposition within the organ system remains unanswered.

  10. In vitro drug release profiles of pH-sensitive hydroxyethylacryl chitosan/sodium alginate hydrogels using paracetamol as a soluble model drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treenate, Pitchaya; Monvisade, Pathavuth

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate in vitro drug release profiles of pH-sensitive hydrogels composed of hydroxyethylacryl chitosan (HC) and sodium alginate (SA). The hydrogels were crosslinked by dipping method using different ionic crosslinkers (e.g., Ca(2+), Zn(2+) and Cu(2+)). The crosslinking reaction was confirmed by FT-IR. Swelling behavior and stability of the hydrogels in simulated digestive media were investigated. The result indicated that the combination between HC and SA could delay the degradation time of the hydrogels. Calcium crosslinking system showed higher stability than that of zinc or copper crosslinking system. In vitro drug release profiles were studied using paracetamol as a soluble model drug. The amount of paracetamol release in simulated gastric fluid (SGF) was relatively low (<20%). In simulated intestinal fluid (SIF), the burst release of paracetamol was depressed with increasing HC content and/or applying crosslinker. The HC75SA25 formulation demonstrated the linearity of drug release profile. Additionally, the amount of drug release from the 0.5M calcium HC50SA50 hydrogel in SIF was lower than 20%. The comprehensive results of this study suggested their potential in the application of site-specific oral drug delivery in intestine and colon. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Development of realistic environmental release factors based on measured data: approach and lessons from the EU metal industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdonck, Frederik A M; Van Assche, Frank; Hicks, Keegan; Mertens, Jelle; Voigt, Astrid; Verougstraete, Violaine

    2014-10-01

    The assessment of environmental exposure and risks associated with the production or use of a substance on an industrial site includes the estimation of the releases to the environment. In the absence of measured release data on the specific substance, a risk assessor would rely on default release factors to the environmental compartments as developed in international, national, or regional context. Because a wide variety of substances, processes, and uses has to be covered, default release factors are as a rule conservative, usually leading to significant overprediction of releases and hence to overpredicted environmental exposure concentrations and risks. In practice, unrealistic and worst-case predictions do not support a more efficient management of releases and risk. The objective of this article is to propose a more realistic approach to characterize the environmental releases from manufacture, processing, and downstream uses of the metals and their compounds. Although developed in the European Union (EU), this approach can also be used in other regions and in other chemical management systems addressing metals. A database consisting of more than 1300 recent (1993-2010), site-specific measured release factors to air and water of 18 different metals from various EU Member States was compiled and used to calculate average and reasonable worst-case release factors for multiple metal manufacture and industrial use processes. The parameters influencing releases to water were found to depend predominantly on life cycle step (manufacture and/or use), the sector and/or the solid-water partition coefficient (K(d)). The release factors can be used as advanced tier instrument in environmental safety assessments, increasing the realism of the estimates while still keeping a sufficient level of conservatism.

  12. Effect of trehalose coating on basic fibroblast growth factor release from tailor-made bone implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sungjin; Lee, Jongil; Igawa, Kazuyo; Suzuki, Shigeki; Mochizuki, Manabu; Nishimura, Ryohei; Chung, Ung-il; Sasaki, Nobuo

    2011-12-01

    Artificial bone implants are often incorporated with osteoinductive factors to facilitate early bone regeneration. Calcium phosphate, the main component in artificial bone implants, strongly binds these factors, and in a few cases, the incorporated proteins are not released from the implant under conditions of physiological pH, thereby leading to reduction in their osteoinductivity. In this study, we coated tailor-made bone implants with trehalose to facilitate the release of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). In an in vitro study, mouse osteoblastic cells were separately cultured for 48 hr in a medium with a untreated implant (T-), trehalose-coated implant (T+), bFGF-incorporated implant (FT-), and bFGF-incorporated implant with trehalose coating (FT+). In the FT+ group, cell viability was significantly higher than that in the other groups (P<0.05). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) revealed that trehalose effectively covered the surface of the artificial bone implant without affecting the crystallinity or the mechanical strength of the artificial bone implant. These results suggest that coating artificial bone implants with trehalose could limit the binding of bFGF to calcium phosphate.

  13. Somatosensory regulation of serotonin release in the central nucleus of the amygdala is mediated via corticotropin releasing factor and gamma-aminobutyric acid in the dorsal raphe nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokunaga, Ryota; Shimoju, Rie; Shibata, Hideshi; Kurosawa, Mieko

    2016-10-15

    Noxious cutaneous stimulation increases, whereas innocuous cutaneous stimulation decreases serotonin (5-HT) release in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) in anesthetized rats. In the present study, we investigated the contribution of corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) receptors and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) to those responses. Release of 5-HT in the CeA was monitored by microdialysis before and after 10-min stimulation by pinching or stroking. Increased 5-HT release in the CeA in response to pinching was abolished by CRF2 receptor antagonism in the DRN. Decreased 5-HT release in the CeA in response to stroking was abolished by either CRF1 receptor antagonism or GABAA receptor antagonism in the DRN. These results suggest that opposite responses of 5-HT release in the CeA to noxious versus innocuous stimulation of the skin are due to separate contributions of CRF2, CRF1 and GABAA receptors in the DRN.

  14. Arabidopsis MAP Kinase 4 regulates gene expression via transcription factor release in the nucleus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qiu, Jin-Long; Fiil, Berthe Katrine; Petersen, Klaus

    2008-01-01

    Plant and animal perception of microbes through pathogen surveillance proteins leads to MAP kinase signalling and the expression of defence genes. However, little is known about how plant MAP kinases regulate specific gene expression. We report that, in the absence of pathogens, Arabidopsis MAP...... supported by the suppression of PAD3 expression in mpk4-wrky33 double mutant backgrounds. Our data establish direct links between MPK4 and innate immunity and provide an example of how a plant MAP kinase can regulate gene expression by releasing transcription factors in the nucleus upon activation....

  15. Performance of optimized noncanonical amino acid mutagenesis systems in the absence of release factor 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yunan; Lajoie, Marc J; Italia, James S; Chin, Melissa A; Church, George M; Chatterjee, Abhishek

    2016-05-24

    Site-specific incorporation of noncanonical amino acids (ncAAs) into proteins expressed in E. coli using UAG-suppression competes with termination mediated by release factor 1 (RF1). Recently, unconditional deletion of RF1 was achieved in a genomically recoded E. coli (C321), devoid of all endogenous UAG stop codons. Here we evaluate the efficiency of ncAA incorporation in this strain using optimized suppression vectors. Even though the absence of RF1 does not benefit the suppression efficiency of a single UAG codon, multi-site incorporation of a series of chemically distinct ncAAs was significantly improved.

  16. The corticotropin-releasing factor system in inflammatory bowel disease: prospects for new therapeutic approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paschos, Konstantinos A; Kolios, George; Chatzaki, Ekaterini

    2009-07-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that stress is implicated in the development of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), via initial nervous disturbance and subsequent immune dysfunction through brain-gut interactions. The corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) system, being the principal neuroendocrine coordinator of stress responses, is involved in the inflammatory process within the gastrointestinal tract, via vagal and peripheral pathways, as implied by multiple reports reviewed here. Blocking of CRF receptors could theoretically exert beneficial anti-inflammatory effects in colonic tissues. The recently synthesised small-molecule CRF(1) antagonists or alternatively non-peptide CRF(2) antagonists when available, may become new reliable options in the treatment of IBD.

  17. Corticotropin-releasing factor receptors and stress-related alterations of gut motor function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taché, Yvette; Bonaz, Bruno

    2007-01-01

    Over the past few decades, corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) signaling pathways have been shown to be the main coordinators of the endocrine, behavioral, and immune responses to stress. Emerging evidence also links the activation of CRF receptors type 1 and type 2 with stress-related alterations of gut motor function. Here, we review the role of CRF receptors in both the brain and the gut as part of key mechanisms through which various stressors impact propulsive activity of the gastrointestinal system. We also examine how these mechanisms translate into the development of new approaches for irritable bowel syndrome, a multifactorial disorder for which stress has been implicated in the pathophysiology.

  18. Deletion of Corticotropin-releasing Factor Binding Protein Selectively Impairs Maternal, but not Intermale Aggression

    OpenAIRE

    Gammie, Stephen C.; Seasholtz, Audrey F.; Stevenson, Sharon A.

    2008-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) binding protein (CRF-BP) is a secreted protein that acts to bind and limit the activity of the neuropeptides, CRF and urocortin (Ucn) 1. We previously selected for high maternal defense (protection of offspring) in mice and found CRF-BP to be elevated in the CNS of selected mice. We also previously determined that both CRF and Ucn 1 are potent inhibitors of offspring protection when administered centrally. Thus, elevated CRF-BP could promote defense by lim...

  19. Leukotriene B4 and tumor necrosis factor release from leukocytes: effect of peritoneal dialysate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jörres, A; Jörres, D; Gahl, G M; Kessel, M; Müller, C; Köttgen, E; Serke, S; Schulz, E; Mahiout, A

    1991-01-01

    The effect of peritoneal dialysate on the capacity of peripheral blood polymorphonuclear (PMNL) and mononuclear leukocytes (MNC) to release leukotriene B4 (LTB4) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha) was investigated in vitro. Following density gradient separation, aliquots of 5 x 10(6) PMNL or MNC were incubated in peritoneal dialysis fluid containing 1.5% glucose or Hanks' buffer (= control) for 1-2 h at 37 degrees C. TNF alpha and LTB4 production was stimulated with Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and calcium ionophore A23187, respectively. MNC incubated in buffer and LPS produced (mean +/- SD) 1,006 +/- 522 pg TNF alpha/5 x 10(6) cells; no significant amounts of TNF alpha were detectable in the presence of dialysate. An inhibition of TNF alpha release was also observed in MNC exposed to bicarbonate-buffered dialysates (pH 7.40) and 4.25% and 1.5% glucose solution with physiologic osmolality. Incubation of PMNL in Hanks' buffer followed by A23187 stimulation led to production of 29.1 +/- 19.2 ng LTB4/5 x 10(6) cells, whereas glucose-incubated cells were refractory to ionophore stimulation (less than 0.1 ng LTB4/5 x 10(6) cells). The failure of dialysate-exposed leukocytes to release inflammatory mediators in response to adequate stimuli may contribute to the impairment of cellular host defense in the setting of continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis.

  20. Fluid flow releases fibroblast growth factor-2 from human aortic smooth muscle cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhoads, D. N.; Eskin, S. G.; McIntire, L. V.

    2000-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that fluid shear stress regulates the release of fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-2 from human aortic smooth muscle cells. FGF-2 is a potent mitogen that is involved in the response to vascular injury and is expressed in a wide variety of cell types. FGF-2 is found in the cytoplasm of cells and outside cells, where it associates with extracellular proteoglycans. To test the hypothesis that shear stress regulates FGF-2 release, cells were exposed to flow, and FGF-2 amounts were measured from the conditioned medium, pericellular fraction (extracted by heparin treatment), and cell lysate. Results from the present study show that after 15 minutes of shear stress at 25 dyne/cm(2) in a parallel-plate flow system, a small but significant fraction (17%) of the total FGF-2 was released from human aortic smooth muscle cells. FGF-2 levels in the circulating medium increased 10-fold over medium from static controls (Pmuscle cells is likely due to transient membrane disruption on initiation of flow.

  1. Orexin-corticotropin-releasing factor receptor heteromers in the ventral tegmental area as targets for cocaine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Gemma; Quiroz, César; Moreno-Delgado, David; Sierakowiak, Adam; McDowell, Kimberly; Moreno, Estefanía; Rea, William; Cai, Ning-Sheng; Aguinaga, David; Howell, Lesley A; Hausch, Felix; Cortés, Antonio; Mallol, Josefa; Casadó, Vicent; Lluís, Carme; Canela, Enric I; Ferré, Sergi; McCormick, Peter J

    2015-04-29

    Release of the neuropeptides corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and orexin-A in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) play an important role in stress-induced cocaine-seeking behavior. We provide evidence for pharmacologically significant interactions between CRF and orexin-A that depend on oligomerization of CRF1 receptor (CRF1R) and orexin OX1 receptors (OX1R). CRF1R-OX1R heteromers are the conduits of a negative crosstalk between orexin-A and CRF as demonstrated in transfected cells and rat VTA, in which they significantly modulate dendritic dopamine release. The cocaine target σ1 receptor (σ1R) also associates with the CRF1R-OX1R heteromer. Cocaine binding to the σ1R-CRF1R-OX1R complex promotes a long-term disruption of the orexin-A-CRF negative crosstalk. Through this mechanism, cocaine sensitizes VTA cells to the excitatory effects of both CRF and orexin-A, thus providing a mechanism by which stress induces cocaine seeking.

  2. Fluid flow releases fibroblast growth factor-2 from human aortic smooth muscle cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhoads, D. N.; Eskin, S. G.; McIntire, L. V.

    2000-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that fluid shear stress regulates the release of fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-2 from human aortic smooth muscle cells. FGF-2 is a potent mitogen that is involved in the response to vascular injury and is expressed in a wide variety of cell types. FGF-2 is found in the cytoplasm of cells and outside cells, where it associates with extracellular proteoglycans. To test the hypothesis that shear stress regulates FGF-2 release, cells were exposed to flow, and FGF-2 amounts were measured from the conditioned medium, pericellular fraction (extracted by heparin treatment), and cell lysate. Results from the present study show that after 15 minutes of shear stress at 25 dyne/cm(2) in a parallel-plate flow system, a small but significant fraction (17%) of the total FGF-2 was released from human aortic smooth muscle cells. FGF-2 levels in the circulating medium increased 10-fold over medium from static controls (Pmuscle cells is likely due to transient membrane disruption on initiation of flow.

  3. Immobilization increases interleukin-6, but not tumour necrosis factor-a, release from the leg during exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reihmane, Dace; Hansen, Andreas Vigelsø; Jensen, Martin Gram;

    2013-01-01

    Data on interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumour necrosis factor-a (TNF-a) release during acute exercise are not conclusive, and information is lacking about the impact of physical inactivity. Some studies have shown an increase, but others report no changes in IL-6 and TNF-a release during exercise. We...

  4. Anti-inflammatory drugs for Duchenne muscular dystrophy: focus on skeletal muscle-releasing factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miyatake S

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Shouta Miyatake,1 Yuko Shimizu-Motohashi,2 Shin’ichi Takeda,1 Yoshitsugu Aoki1 1Department of Molecular Therapy, National Institute of Neuroscience, National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, Kodaira, Tokyo, Japan; 2Department of Child Neurology, National Center Hospital, National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, Kodaira, Tokyo, Japan Abstract: Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD, an incurable and a progressive muscle wasting disease, is caused by the absence of dystrophin protein, leading to recurrent muscle fiber damage during contraction. The inflammatory response to fiber damage is a compelling candidate mechanism for disease exacerbation. The only established pharmacological treatment for DMD is corticosteroids to suppress muscle inflammation, however this treatment is limited by its insufficient therapeutic efficacy and considerable side effects. Recent reports show the therapeutic potential of inhibiting or enhancing pro- or anti-inflammatory factors released from DMD skeletal muscles, resulting in significant recovery from muscle atrophy and dysfunction. We discuss and review the recent findings of DMD inflammation and opportunities for drug development targeting specific releasing factors from skeletal muscles. It has been speculated that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs targeting specific inflammatory factors are more effective and have less side effects for DMD compared with steroidal drugs. For example, calcium channels, reactive oxygen species, and nuclear factor-κB signaling factors are the most promising targets as master regulators of inflammatory response in DMD skeletal muscles. If they are combined with an oligonucleotide-based exon skipping therapy to restore dystrophin expression, the anti-inflammatory drug therapies may address the present therapeutic limitation of low efficiency for DMD. Keywords: calcium channels, ryanodine receptor 1, exon skipping, NF-κB, myokine, ROS

  5. Outer mitochondrial membrane localization of apoptosis-inducing factor: mechanistic implications for release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seong‑Woon Yu

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Poly(ADP-ribose polymerase-1-dependent cell death (known as parthanatos plays a pivotal role in many clinically important events including ischaemia/reperfusion injury and glutamate excitotoxicity. A recent study by us has shown that uncleaved AIF (apoptosis-inducing factor, but not calpain-hydrolysed truncated-AIF, was rapidly released from the mitochondria during parthanatos, implicating a second pool of AIF that might be present in brain mitochondria contributing to the rapid release. In the present study, a novel AIF pool is revealed in brain mitochondria by multiple biochemical analyses. Approx. 30% of AIF loosely associates with the outer mitochondrial membrane on the cytosolic side, in addition to its main localization in the mitochondrial intermembrane space attached to the inner membrane. Immunogold electron microscopic analysis of mouse brain further supports AIF association with the outer, as well as the inner, mitochondrial membrane in vivo. In line with these observations, approx. 20% of uncleaved AIF rapidly translocates to the nucleus and functionally causes neuronal death upon NMDA (N-methyl-d-aspartate treatment. In the present study we show for the first time a second pool of AIF in brain mitochondria and demonstrate that this pool does not require cleavage and that it contributes to the rapid release of AIF. Moreover, these results suggest that this outer mitochondrial pool of AIF is sufficient to cause cell death during parthanatos. Interfering with the release of this outer mitochondrial pool of AIF during cell injury paradigms that use parthanatos hold particular promise for novel therapies to treat neurological disorders.

  6. Outer Mitochondrial Membrane Localization of Apoptosis-Inducing Factor: Mechanistic Implications for Release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seong-Woon Yu

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Poly(ADP-ribose polymerase-1-dependent cell death (known as parthanatos plays a pivotal role in many clinically important events including ischaemia/reperfusion injury and glutamate excitotoxicity. A recent study by us has shown that uncleaved AIF (apoptosis-inducing factor, but not calpain-hydrolysed truncated-AIF, was rapidly released from the mitochondria during parthanatos, implicating a second pool of AIF that might be present in brain mitochondria contributing to the rapid release. In the present study, a novel AIF pool is revealed in brain mitochondria by multiple biochemical analyses. Approx. 30% of AIF loosely associates with the outer mitochondrial membrane on the cytosolic side, in addition to its main localization in the mitochondrial intermembrane space attached to the inner membrane. Immunogold electron microscopic analysis of mouse brain further supports AIF association with the outer, as well as the inner, mitochondrial membrane in vivo. In line with these observations, approx. 20% of uncleaved AIF rapidly translocates to the nucleus and functionally causes neuronal death upon NMDA (N-methyl-d-aspartate treatment. In the present study we show for the first time a second pool of AIF in brain mitochondria and demonstrate that this pool does not require cleavage and that it contributes to the rapid release of AIF. Moreover, these results suggest that this outer mitochondrial pool of AIF is sufficient to cause cell death during parthanatos. Interfering with the release of this outer mitochondrial pool of AIF during cell injury paradigms that use parthanatos hold particular promise for novel therapies to treat neurological disorders.

  7. Wnt3a regulates tumor necrosis factor-α-stimulated interleukin-6 release in osteoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natsume, Hideo; Tokuda, Haruhiko; Adachi, Seiji; Matsushima-Nishiwaki, Rie; Kato, Kenji; Minamitani, Chiho; Otsuka, Takanobu; Kozawa, Osamu

    2011-01-01

    It is recognized that Wnt pathways regulate bone metabolism. We have previously shown that tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) stimulates synthesis of interleukin-6 (IL-6), a potent bone resorptive agent, via p44/p42 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-kinase)/Akt in osteoblast-like MC3T3-E1 cells. In the present study, we investigated the effect of Wnt3a on TNF-α-stimulated IL-6 synthesis in these cells. Wnt3a, which alone did not affect the IL-6 levels, significantly suppressed the TNF-α-stimulated IL-6 release. Lithium Chloride (LiCl), which is an inhibitor of GSK3β, markedly reduced the TNF-α-stimulated IL-6 release, similar to the results with Wnt3a. The suppression by Wnt3a or LiCl was also observed in the intracellular protein levels of IL-6 elicited by TNF-α. Wnt3a failed to affect the TNF-α-induced phosphorylation of p44/p42 MAP kinase, Akt, IκB or NFκB. Either Wnt3a or LiCl failed to reduce, rather increased the IL-6 mRNA expression stimulated by TNF-α. Lactacystin, a proteasome inhibitor, and bafilomycin A1, a lysosomal protease inhibitor, significantly restored the suppressive effect of Wnt3a on TNF-α-stimulated IL-6 release. Taken together, our results strongly suggest that Wnt3a regulates IL-6 release stimulated by TNF-α at post-transcriptional level in osteoblasts.

  8. Corticotropin releasing factor dose-dependently modulates excitatory synaptic transmission in the noradrenergic nucleus locus coeruleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prouty, Eric W; Waterhouse, Barry D; Chandler, Daniel J

    2017-03-01

    The noradrenergic nucleus locus coeruleus (LC) is critically involved in the stress response and receives afferent input from a number of corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) containing structures. Several in vivo and in vitro studies in rat have shown that CRF robustly increases the firing rate of LC neurons in a dose-dependent manner. While it is known that these increases are dependent on CRF receptor subtype 1 and mediated by effects of cAMP intracellular signaling cascades on potassium conductance, the impact of CRF on synaptic transmission within LC has not been clarified. In the present study, we used whole-cell patch clamp electrophysiology to assess how varying concentrations of bath-applied CRF affect AMPA-receptor dependent spontaneous excitatory post-synaptic currents (sEPSCs). Compared to vehicle, 10, 25, and 100 nm CRF had no significant effects on any sEPSC parameters. Fifty nanomolar CRF, however, significantly increased sEPSC amplitude, half-width, and charge transfer, while these measures were significantly decreased by 200 nm CRF. These observations suggest that stress may differentially affect ongoing excitatory synaptic transmission in LC depending on how much CRF is released from presynaptic terminals. Combined with the well-documented effects of CRF on membrane properties and spontaneous LC discharge, these observations may help explain how stress and CRF release are able to modulate the signal to noise ratio of LC neurons. These findings have implications for how stress affects the fidelity of signal transmission and information flow through LC and how it might impact norepinephrine release in the CNS.

  9. Profiling healthy eaters: determining factors that predict healthy eating practices among Dutch adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swan, E.; Bouwman, L.; Hiddink, G.J.; Aarts, N.; Koelen, M.

    2015-01-01

    Research has identified multiple factors that predict unhealthy eating practices. However what remains poorly understood are factors that promote healthy eating practices. This study aimed to determine a set of factors that represent a profile of healthy eaters. This research applied Antonovsky's

  10. Profiling healthy eaters. Determining factors that predict healthy eating practices among Dutch adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swan, E.C.; Bouwman, L.I.; Hiddink, G.J.; Aarts, N.; Koelen, M.

    2015-01-01

    Research has identified multiple factors that predict unhealthy eating practices. However what remains poorly understood are factors that promote healthy eating practices. This study aimed to determine a set of factors that represent a profile of healthy eaters. This research applied Antonovsky's

  11. Possible participation of calcium in growth hormone release and in thyrotropin-releasing hormone and human pancreatic growth hormone-releasing factor synergy in a primary culture of chicken pituitary cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, F M; Malamed, S; Scanes, C G

    1989-09-01

    We previously reported that thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) and human pancreatic growth hormone-releasing factor (hpGRF) exert synergistic (greater than additive) effects on growth hormone (GH) release from chicken pituitary cells in primary culture. In the present studies the possible participation of calcium in GH release and in TRH and hpGRF synergy was investigated. Following dispersion with collagenase, cells were cultured for 48 hr prior to exposure (2 hr) to test agents. Cultured cells were exposed to a range of calcium concentrations (0, 0.02, 0.2, and 2.0 mM) in the presence and absence of secretagogues. These results demonstrated that basal GH release was not altered by the concentration of calcium in the medium: however, secretagogue-induced GH release required calcium. Thus, TRH, hpGRF, 8 Br-cAMP, or forskolin stimulated GH release in the absence of calcium. Furthermore, synergistic GH release evoked by TRH and hpGRF, 8 Br-cAMP, or forskolin was observed only at the highest calcium concentration (2.0 mM). In other studies, ionomycin (10(-5) M), a calcium ionophore, stimulated GH release to a value about 125% over the basal (absence of test agent) value. Ionomycin-induced GH release was not affected by TRH (5.0 ng/ml); the combined effects of ionomycin (10(-7)-10(-5) M) and hpGRF (5.0 ng/ml) on GH release were less than additive. However, ionomycin (10(-5) M) further increased GH release over that resulting from the synergistic action of TRH and hpGRF (5.0 ng/ml each). Verapamil (a calcium channel blocker) did not affect GH release induced by either TRH or hpGRF (5.0 ng/ml each). However, this agent did inhibit synergistic GH release evoked by TRH and hpGRF, 8 Br-cAMP, forskolin, or isobutylmethylxanthine. These results suggest that calcium participates in secretagogue-induced GH release from chicken somatotrophs in vitro.

  12. Changes in the atherogenic risk factor profile according to degree of weight loss

    OpenAIRE

    Reinehr, T; Andler, W

    2004-01-01

    Background: The atherogenic risk factor profile in obese subjects is characterised by hypertension, reduced high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, increased low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and triglycerides, and insulin resistance.

  13. Arabidopsis MAP kinase 4 regulates gene expression through transcription factor release in the nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Jin-Long; Fiil, Berthe Katrine; Petersen, Klaus; Nielsen, Henrik Bjørn; Botanga, Christopher J; Thorgrimsen, Stephan; Palma, Kristoffer; Suarez-Rodriguez, Maria Cristina; Sandbech-Clausen, Signe; Lichota, Jacek; Brodersen, Peter; Grasser, Klaus D; Mattsson, Ole; Glazebrook, Jane; Mundy, John; Petersen, Morten

    2008-08-20

    Plant and animal perception of microbes through pathogen surveillance proteins leads to MAP kinase signalling and the expression of defence genes. However, little is known about how plant MAP kinases regulate specific gene expression. We report that, in the absence of pathogens, Arabidopsis MAP kinase 4 (MPK4) exists in nuclear complexes with the WRKY33 transcription factor. This complex depends on the MPK4 substrate MKS1. Challenge with Pseudomonas syringae or flagellin leads to the activation of MPK4 and phosphorylation of MKS1. Subsequently, complexes with MKS1 and WRKY33 are released from MPK4, and WRKY33 targets the promoter of PHYTOALEXIN DEFICIENT3 (PAD3) encoding an enzyme required for the synthesis of antimicrobial camalexin. Hence, wrky33 mutants are impaired in the accumulation of PAD3 mRNA and camalexin production upon infection. That WRKY33 is an effector of MPK4 is further supported by the suppression of PAD3 expression in mpk4-wrky33 double mutant backgrounds. Our data establish direct links between MPK4 and innate immunity and provide an example of how a plant MAP kinase can regulate gene expression by releasing transcription factors in the nucleus upon activation.

  14. Distribution of corticotropin-releasing factor neurons in the mouse brain: a study using corticotropin-releasing factor-modified yellow fluorescent protein knock-in mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kono, Junko; Konno, Kohtarou; Talukder, Ashraf Hossain; Fuse, Toshimitsu; Abe, Manabu; Uchida, Katsuya; Horio, Shuhei; Sakimura, Kenji; Watanabe, Masahiko; Itoi, Keiichi

    2017-05-01

    We examined the morphological features of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) neurons in a mouse line in which modified yellow fluorescent protein (Venus) was expressed under the CRF promoter. We previously generated the CRF-Venus knock-in mouse, in which Venus is inserted into the CRF gene locus by homologous recombination. In the present study, the neomycin phosphotransferase gene (Neo), driven by the pgk-1 promoter, was deleted from the CRF-Venus mouse genome, and a CRF-Venus∆Neo mouse was generated. Venus expression is much more prominent in the CRF-Venus∆Neo mouse when compared to the CRF-Venus mouse. In addition, most Venus-expressing neurons co-express CRF mRNA. Venus-expressing neurons constitute a discrete population of neuroendocrine neurons in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVH) that project to the median eminence. Venus-expressing neurons were also found in brain regions outside the neuroendocrine PVH, including the olfactory bulb, the piriform cortex (Pir), the extended amygdala, the hippocampus, the neocortices, Barrington's nucleus, the midbrain/pontine dorsal tegmentum, the periaqueductal gray, and the inferior olivary nucleus (IO). Venus-expressing perikarya co-expressing CRF mRNA could be observed clearly even in regions where CRF-immunoreactive perikarya could hardly be identified. We demonstrated that the CRF neurons contain glutamate in the Pir and IO, while they contain gamma-aminobutyric acid in the neocortex, the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, the hippocampus, and the amygdala. A population of CRF neurons was demonstrated to be cholinergic in the midbrain tegmentum. The CRF-Venus∆Neo mouse may be useful for studying the structural and functional properties of CRF neurons in the mouse brain.

  15. Substance P induces tumor necrosis factor-alpha release from human skin via mitogen-activated protein kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okabe, T; Hide, M; Koro, O; Yamamoto, S

    2000-06-16

    Substance P plays an important role in neurogenic inflammation with granulocyte infiltration. To investigate cytokines involved in the substance P-induced inflammation and the mechanism of cell activation, we studied the release of TNF (tumor necrosis factor)-alpha and histamine from human skin slices in response to substance P and antigen. Substance P induced the release of histamine and TNF-alpha in a dose-dependent manner at concentrations from 0.8 to 100 microM. PD 098059 (2'-amino-3'-methoxyflavone) selectively inhibited the release of TNF-alpha, but not the release of histamine induced by either substance P or antigen. SB 203580 ([4-(4-fluorophenyl)-2-(4-methylsulfinylphenyl)-5-(4-pyridyl)1H-++ +imida zole]) slightly inhibited TNF-alpha release induced by antigen, but not that induced by substance P, and slightly enhanced histamine release induced by either stimulation. The release of TNF-alpha in response to either stimulation was inhibited by 1 nM-1 microM dexamethasone, but histamine release was not affected. These results suggest that substance P, in addition to antigen, induced TNF-alpha release from human skin by a mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase, predominantly extracellular signaling-regulated protein kinase (ERK)-dependent, and dexamethasone-sensitive pathway, which is separate from that for histamine release from mast cells.

  16. Enhanced Phosphoproteomic Profiling Workflow For Growth Factor Signaling Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sylvester, Marc; Burbridge, Mike; Leclerc, Gregory;

    2010-01-01

    Background Our understanding of complex signaling networks is still fragmentary. Isolated processes have been studied extensively but cross-talk is omnipresent and precludes intuitive predictions of signaling outcomes. The need for quantitative data on dynamic systems is apparent especially for our...... A549 lung carcinoma cells were used as a model and stimulated with hepatocyte growth factor, epidermal growth factor or fibroblast growth factor. We employed a quick protein digestion workflow with spin filters without using urea. Phosphopeptides in general were enriched by sequential elution from...... transfer dissociation adds confidence in modification site assignment. The workflow is relatively simple but the integration of complementary techniques leads to a deeper insight into cellular signaling networks and the potential pharmacological intervention thereof....

  17. Growth hormone-releasing factor regulates growth hormone mRNA in primary cultures of rat pituitary cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Gick, G G; Zeytin, F N; BRAZEAU, P.; Ling, N C; Esch, F S; Bancroft, C

    1984-01-01

    A peptide with high intrinsic activity for specifically stimulating the secretion of immunoreactive growth hormone (GH; somatotropin) has been characterized and reproduced by total synthesis. This peptide, human pancreatic growth hormone-releasing factor, 44-amino-acid form (hpGRF1-44-NH2), was isolated from a tumor localized in the pancreas of a patient with acromegaly. We report here the effect of this growth hormone-releasing factor (GRF) on GH release and the GH mRNA levels in monolayer c...

  18. A latent profile analysis of the Five Factor Model of personality: Modeling trait interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merz, Erin L; Roesch, Scott C

    2011-12-01

    Interactions among the dimensions of the Five Factor Model (FFM) have not typically been evaluated in mental health research, with the extant literature focusing on bivariate relationships with psychological constructs of interest. This study used latent profile analysis to mimic higher-order interactions to identify homogenous personality profiles using the FFM, and also examined relationships between resultant profiles and affect, self-esteem, depression, anxiety, and coping efficacy. Participants (N = 371) completed self-report and daily diary questionnaires. A 3-profile solution provided the best fit to the data; the profiles were characterized as well-adjusted, reserved, and excitable. The well-adjusted group reported better psychological functioning in validation analyses. The reserved and excitable groups differed on anxiety, with the excitable group reporting generally higher anxiety than the reserved group. Latent profile analysis may be a parsimonious way to model personality heterogeneity.

  19. Growth Factors Released from Gelatin Hydrogel Microspheres Increase New Neurons in the Adult Mouse Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanako Nakaguchi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have shown that new neurons are continuously generated by endogenous neural stem cells in the subventricular zone (SVZ of the adult mammalian brain. Some of these new neurons migrate to injured brain tissues and differentiate into mature neurons, suggesting that such new neurons may be able to replace neurons lost to degenerative disease or injury and improve or repair neurological deficits. Here, we tested whether delivering growth factors via gelatin hydrogel microspheres would support neurogenesis in the SVZ. Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1-containing microspheres increased the number of new neurons in the SVZ. Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF-containing microspheres increased the number of new neurons migrating from the SVZ towards the injured striatum in a stroke model in mouse. These results suggest that the strategy of using gelatin hydrogel microspheres to achieve the sustained release of growth factors holds promise for the clinical regeneration of damaged brain tissues from endogenous neural stem cells in the adult SVZ.

  20. Confounding factors and genetic polymorphism in the evaluation of individual steroid profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuuranne, Tiia; Saugy, Martial; Baume, Norbert

    2014-05-01

    In the fight against doping, steroid profiling is a powerful tool to detect drug misuse with endogenous anabolic androgenic steroids. To establish sensitive and reliable models, the factors influencing profiling should be recognised. We performed an extensive literature review of the multiple factors that could influence the quantitative levels and ratios of endogenous steroids in urine matrix. For a comprehensive and scientific evaluation of the urinary steroid profile, it is necessary to define the target analytes as well as testosterone metabolism. The two main confounding factors, that is, endogenous and exogenous factors, are detailed to show the complex process of quantifying the steroid profile within WADA-accredited laboratories. Technical aspects are also discussed as they could have a significant impact on the steroid profile, and thus the steroid module of the athlete biological passport (ABP). The different factors impacting the major components of the steroid profile must be understood to ensure scientifically sound interpretation through the Bayesian model of the ABP. Not only should the statistical data be considered but also the experts in the field must be consulted for successful implementation of the steroidal module.

  1. Transcriptional profiling of intrinsic PNS factors in the postnatal mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Robin P; Lerch-Haner, Jessica K; Pardinas, Jose R; Buchser, William J; Bixby, John L; Lemmon, Vance P

    2011-01-01

    Neurons in the peripheral nervous system (PNS) display a higher capacity to regenerate after injury than those in the central nervous system, suggesting cell specific transcriptional modules underlying axon growth and inhibition. We report a systems biology based search for PNS specific transcription factors (TFs). Messenger RNAs enriched in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons compared to cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs) were identified using subtractive hybridization and DNA microarray approaches. Network and transcription factor binding site enrichment analyses were used to further identify TFs that may be differentially active. Combining these techniques, we identified 32 TFs likely to be enriched and/or active in the PNS. Twenty-five of these TFs were then tested for an ability to promote CNS neurite outgrowth in an overexpression screen. Real-time PCR and immunohistochemical studies confirmed that one representative TF, STAT3, is intrinsic to PNS neurons, and that constitutively active STAT3 is sufficient to promote CGN neurite outgrowth.

  2. [Determination and analysis of protein profile of different transfer factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidos-Fogelbach, Guillermo Arturo; Paredes-Aguilar, Jorge Antonio; Colín-Martínez, Nayeli Montserrat; Rojo-Gutiérrez, María Isabel; López-Hidalgo, Marisol; Reyes-López, César Augusto Sandino

    2016-01-01

    Introducción: El factor de transferencia (FT) es el extracto dializable de leucocitos con propiedades de transferencia de inmunidad celular. Su uso se ha extendido en el tratamiento de una amplia gama de padecimientos inmunológicos, infecciosos y como coadyuvante de padecimientos oncológicos. A pesar de ello, no se conocen completamente aspectos importantes de su perfil proteico, concentraciones de componentes y mecanismos de acción. Objetivos: Analizar los perfiles proteicos de diferentes factores de transferencia comercializados en México. Métodos: Se obtuvieron y analizaron 6 FT comercializados en México. Se realizó la cuantificación de proteínas por el método de Bradford, cromatografía líquida de alta resolución (HPLC) y electroforesis en geles de poliacrilamida (SDS-PAGE). Todas las muestras fueron analizadas por duplicado. Resultados: Las concentraciones de proteínas totales de todos los FT analizados fueron menores de 0.2 mg/mL. Los perfiles cromatográficos mostraron diferencias en algunos FT. La concentración de proteínas resultó de 6 hasta casi mil veces más baja en comparación con lo informado por algunos fabricantes. Conclusión: Casi la totalidad de los factores de transferencia comercializados en México carecen de un etiquetado y registro sanitario que cumpla con las normas oficiales vigentes.

  3. Epidemiologic profile and triggering factors of voluntary poisoning in teenagers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nistor, Nicolai; Jitareanu, Cristina; Frasinariu, Otilia Elena; Ciomaga, Irina Mihaela; Rugina, Aniela Luminita; Streanga, Violeta

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Self-poisoning is an important medical and social problem in adolescents. We performed an observational cross-sectional retrospective study on a group of 219 adolescents admitted for voluntary intoxications at “St. Mary” Children's Emergency Hospital, Iasi during 1 year period. Epidemiological aspects and triggering factors have been analyzed. Data collected from the patients’ files were centralized in an SPSS 18.0 database and processed with confidence interval of 95%. We found that pharmaceutical drugs have been usually involved (34.7%), mostly in girls (56.3% vs. 15.5%; P = 0.0001). The most frequently cited reason for poisoning was family conflict, with a relative risk (RR) 1.43 times higher in girls, as well as scholar conflict (RR = 1.39). A great percentage of the monitored girls presented severe depression (23.3% vs. 6.9%; P = 0.001), with an RR more than 3 times higher than in the case of boys. All cases evolved favorably, no death having been recorded, even if 18 teenagers initially presented an extremely serious condition, being admitted in various stages of coma (Glasgow coma scale score poisonings with pharmaceutical drugs was more common in girls and the use of drug and alcohol intoxication was found especially in boys. The most common pharmaceutical drug involved in self-poisoning was acetaminophen. Psychological disorders and family or school conflicts are the most important triggering factors of voluntary poisoning. Risk factors should be identified after stabilizing the patient, and actions should be taken in order to prevent a fatal recurrence. PMID:28151858

  4. Expression and purification of growth hormone-releasing factor with the aid of dihydrofolate reductase handle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwakura, M; Obara, K; Kokubu, T; Ohashi, S; Izutsu, H

    1992-07-01

    Expression of a fusion protein composed of dihydrofolate reductase and a derivative of growth hormone-releasing factor resulted in the formation of inclusion bodies in Escherichia coli at 37 degrees C. Among various chemicals, such as detergents, protein denaturants, and acetic acid, tested for the ability to dissolve the inclusion bodies, acetic acid, Brij-35, deoxycholic acid sodium salts, guanidine-HCl, and urea showed a strong solubilizing effect without damaging the DHFR activity. Acetic acid was useful in terms of preparing GRF derivatives, since it could be easily removed by lyophilization, and this made it easy to perform the succeeding BrCN treatment for cutting out the GRF derivative from the fusion protein. The GRF derivative was purified by reversed phase HPLC from the BrCN digest of the acetic acid extract, and its growth hormone-releasing activity was demonstrated. However, for obtaining a highly purified fusion protein itself, solubilization of inclusion bodies by urea was preferred because urea was the only agent which did not cause serious precipitation of the regenerated fusion protein after 10-fold dilution of the extracted inclusion bodies with buffer. The fusion protein was highly purified by means of a methotrexate affinity chromatography.

  5. Corticotropin-releasing factor and the brain-gut motor response to stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taché, Y; Martinez, V; Million, M; Rivier, J

    1999-03-01

    The characterization of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and CRF receptors, and the development of specific CRF receptor antagonists selective for the receptor subtypes have paved the way to the understanding of the biochemical coding of stress-related alterations of gut motor function. Reports have consistently established that central administration of CRF acts in the brain to inhibit gastric emptying while stimulating colonic motor function through modulation of the vagal and sacral parasympathetic outflow in rodents. Endogenous CRF in the brain plays a role in mediating various forms of stressor-induced gastric stasis, including postoperative gastric ileus, and activates colonic transit and fecal excretion elicited by psychologically aversive or fearful stimuli. It is known that brain CRF is involved in the cross-talk between the immune and gastrointestinal systems because systemic or central administration of interleukin-1-beta delays gastric emptying while stimulating colonic motor activity through activation of CRF release in the brain. The paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus and the dorsal vagal complex are important sites of action for CRF to inhibit gastric motor function, while the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus and the locus coeruleus complex are sites of action for CRF to stimulate colonic motor function. The inhibition of gastric emptying by CRF may be mediated by the interaction with the CRF2 receptors, while the anxiogenic and colonic motor responses may involve CRF1 receptors. Hypersecretion of CRF in the brain may contribute to the pathophysiology of stress-related exacerbation of irritable bowel syndrome.

  6. Complement factor B expression profile in a spontaneous uveitis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zipplies, Johanna K; Kirschfink, Michael; Amann, Barbara; Hauck, Stefanie M; Stangassinger, Manfred; Deeg, Cornelia A

    2010-12-01

    Equine recurrent uveitis serves as a spontaneous model for human autoimmune uveitis. Unpredictable relapses and ongoing inflammation in the eyes of diseased horses as well as in humans lead to destruction of the retina and finally result in blindness. However, the molecular mechanisms leading to inflammation and retinal degeneration are not well understood. An initial screening for differentially regulated proteins in sera of uveitic cases compared to healthy controls revealed an increase of the alternative pathway complement component factor B in ERU cases. To determine the activation status of the complement system, sera were subsequently examined for complement split products. We could demonstrate a significant higher concentration of the activation products B/Ba, B/Bb, Bb neoantigen, iC3b and C3d in uveitic condition compared to healthy controls, whereas for C5b-9 no differences were detected. Additionally, we investigated complement activation directly in the retina by immunohistochemistry, since it is the main target organ of this autoimmune disease. Interestingly, infiltrating cells co-expressed activated factor Bb neoantigen, complement split product C3d as well as CD68, a macrophage marker. In this study, we could demonstrate activation of the complement system both systemically as well as in the eye, the target organ of spontaneous recurrent uveitis. Based on these novel findings, we postulate a novel role for macrophages in connection with complement synthesis at the site of inflammation.

  7. Applications of human factors engineering to LNG release prevention and control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shikiar, R.; Rankin, W.L.; Rideout, T.B.

    1982-06-01

    The results of an investigation of human factors engineering and human reliability applications to LNG release prevention and control are reported. The report includes a discussion of possible human error contributions to previous LNG accidents and incidents, and a discussion of generic HF considerations for peakshaving plants. More specific recommendations for improving HF practices at peakshaving plants are offered based on visits to six facilities. The HF aspects of the recently promulgated DOT regulations are reviewed, and recommendations are made concerning how these regulations can be implemented utilizing standard HF practices. Finally, the integration of HF considerations into overall system safety is illustrated by a presentation of human error probabilities applicable to LNG operations and by an expanded fault tree analysis which explicitly recognizes man-machine interfaces.

  8. Expression of growth hormone (GH)-releasing factor gene in GH-producing pituitary adenoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakabayashi, I; Inokuchi, K; Hasegawa, O; Sugihara, H; Minami, S

    1992-02-01

    Pituitary cells synthesize various neuropeptides that influence pituitary hormone secretion. GH-releasing factor (GRF) may also be produced by normal or pituitary tumor cells. We examined GRF gene expression in pituitary tumors. Standard techniques for the analysis of GRF gene expression did not appear to be suitable. Highly sensitive reverse transcription coupled to polymerase chain reaction was used. Specimens of pituitary adenoma were obtained by transsphenoidal adenomectomy from six patients with acromegaly and three patients with no clinical evidence of pituitary hormone overproduction; non-functioning adenoma. Pituitary glands were collected at autopsy from three patients who died from nonendocrine disorders. A specific GRF gene transcript was detected in five out of six GH-producing pituitary adenomas, whereas this was not found in three separate specimens of nonfunctioning pituitary adenoma or anterior and posterior pituitary tissue. The data suggest that GRF is synthesized as an intrinsic product in human GH-producing pituitary adenoma.

  9. Sustained release of tissue factor following thrombosis of lower limb trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walenga, Jeanine M; Kaiser, Phoebe C; Prechel, M Margaret; Hoppensteadt, Debra; Jeske, Walter P; Misselwitz, Frank; Bacher, Peter; Lassen, Michael R; Fareed, Jawed

    2014-10-01

    This study was undertaken to provide evidence for the mechanism of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in healthy patients with minor lower limb injury (fracture; Achilles tendon rupture) that was medically managed with plaster cast/brace immobilization. The Plaster Cast clinical trial provided a unique opportunity to identify the natural history of VTE using placebo-controlled patients (n = 183) with validation of the mechanism using the low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH; reviparin)-treated patients (n = 182). Confirmed VTE in this population was associated with a burst of tissue factor release (and a minor fibrinolytic deficit) leading to thrombin generation that was sustained at least 5 weeks, greater with fractures than with soft-tissue injuries and greater with surgery than with conservative treatment. The root cause likely involves platelet/leukocyte activation (inflammation) rather than endothelial cell injury. Thromboprophylaxis with a low dose of LMWH reduced thrombin generation, with patients undergoing surgery benefitting the most.

  10. Corticotropin-releasing factor has an anxiogenic action in the social interaction test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, A J; File, S E

    1987-06-01

    The effects of intracerebroventricular (icv) injections of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF, 100 and 300 ng) were investigated in the social interaction test of anxiety in rats. Both doses of CRF significantly decreased active social interaction without a concomitant decrease in locomotor activity. CRF also significantly increased self-grooming, an effect that was independent of the decrease in social interaction. These results indicate an anxiogenic action for CRF. Chlordiazepoxide (CDP, 5 mg/kg ip) pretreatment reversed the anxiogenic effects of icv CRF (100 ng), but CRF did not prevent the sedative effects of CDP. There were no statistically significant changes due to CRF in locomotor activity or rears or head dipping in the holeboard test. Both doses of CRF significantly increased plasma concentrations of corticosterone. The possible mechanisms of the behavioral effects of CRF are discussed.

  11. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Elementary School Success Profile for Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webber, Kristina C.; Rizo, Cynthia F.; Bowen, Natasha K.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: This study examines the factor structure and scale quality of data collected with the online Elementary School Success Profile (ESSP) for Teachers from a sample of teachers of 1,145 third through fifth graders. Methods: Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) using Mplus and weighted least squares means and variances adjusted (WLSMV)…

  12. Safety profile of dalfampridine extended release in multiple sclerosis: 5-year postmarketing experience in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jara M

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Michele Jara, Thomas Aquilina, Peter Aupperle, Adrian L Rabinowicz Acorda Therapeutics, Inc., Ardsley, NY, USA Background: Dalfampridine extended release tablets (dalfampridine-ER; prolonged-, modified, or sustained-release fampridine outside the US, 10 mg twice daily, was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA in January 2010 to improve walking in people with multiple sclerosis, as determined by an increase in walking speed. Objective: To provide a descriptive analysis of reported adverse events (AEs for commercially available dalfampridine-ER from March 2010 through March 31, 2015. Methods: Five-year postmarketing data for dalfampridine-ER were available from the exposure of approximately 107,000 patients in the US (103,700 patient-years. Commonly reported AEs (≥2% of all reported AEs and serious AEs were determined. The incidence of reported seizures was determined and the events were further investigated. Results: Among the 107,000 patients exposed to dalfampridine-ER (70% female; mean age 52.1, the most common AEs were dizziness (3.7%, insomnia (3.2%, balance disorder (3%, fall (2.4%, headache (2.4%, nausea (2.1%, and urinary tract infection (2%. Other common AEs were drug ineffectiveness (5.8%, gait disturbance (4.6%, and inappropriate dosing (3.1%. Serious AEs included rare anaphylactic reactions (five cases and drug hypersensitivity reactions (eight cases. A total of 657 seizure cases were reported (6.3/1,000 patient-years; of these, 324 were medically confirmed (3.1/1,000 patient-years. Incidence of reported seizures was stable over time. Duration of treatment prior to a seizure ranged from a single dose to >4 years; 12% of the seizures occurred within a week of starting treatment. Conclusion: The 5-year US postmarketing safety data of dalfampridine-ER is consistent with the safety profile observed in clinical trials. Incidence of reported seizures remained stable over time. Since commercial availability in March 2010, a

  13. Profile of guanfacine extended release and its potential in the treatment of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martinez-Raga J

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Jose Martinez-Raga,1,2 Carlos Knecht,3 Raquel de Alvaro4 1Teaching Unit of Psychiatry and Psychological Medicine, University Hospital Doctor Peset, University of Valencia, 2CEU Cardenal Herrera University, 3Área de Salud Mental, Hospital Padre Jofré, Valencia, 4Hospital General, Consorcio Hospitalario Provincial, Castellon, Spain Abstract: The α2-adrenergic receptor agonist guanfacine, in its extended-release formulation (GXR, is the most recent nonstimulant medication approved in several countries for the treatment of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD as monotherapy and as adjunctive pharmacotherapy to stimulants in children and adolescents. The present paper aims to review comprehensively and critically the pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic characteristics and the published evidence on the efficacy and safety profile of GXR in the treatment of ADHD. A comprehensive search of relevant databases (PubMed, Embase, and PsycInfo was conducted to identify studies published in peer-reviewed journals until January 15, 2015. Though the precise mechanism of action of guanfacine in the treatment of ADHD is not fully understood, it is thought to act directly by enhancing noradrenaline functioning via α2A-adrenoceptors in the prefrontal cortex. Weight-adjusted doses should be used, with a dosing regime on a milligram per kilogram basis, starting at doses in the range 0.05–0.08 mg/kg/day, up to 0.12 mg/kg/day. As evidenced in short-term randomized controlled trials and in long-term open-label extension studies, GXR has been shown to be effective as monotherapy in the treatment of ADHD. Furthermore, GXR has also been found to be effective as adjunctive therapy to stimulant medications in patients with suboptimal responses to stimulants. Many of the adverse reactions associated with GXR, particularly sedation-related effects, were dose-related, transient, mild to moderate in severity, and did not interfere with attention or overall

  14. Stress, sex, and addiction: potential roles of corticotropin-releasing factor, oxytocin, and arginine-vasopressin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisagno, Verónica; Cadet, Jean Lud

    2014-09-01

    Stress sensitivity and sex are predictive factors for the development of neuropsychiatric disorders. Life stresses are not only risk factors for the development of addiction but also are triggers for relapse to drug use. Therefore, it is imperative to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying the interactions between stress and drug abuse, as an understanding of this may help in the development of novel and more effective therapeutic approaches to block the clinical manifestations of drug addiction. The development and clinical course of addiction-related disorders do appear to involve neuroadaptations within neurocircuitries that modulate stress responses and are influenced by several neuropeptides. These include corticotropin-releasing factor, the prototypic member of this class, as well as oxytocin and arginine-vasopressin that play important roles in affiliative behaviors. Interestingly, these peptides function to balance emotional behavior, with sexual dimorphism in the oxytocin/arginine-vasopressin systems, a fact that might play an important role in the differential responses of women and men to stressful stimuli and the specific sex-based prevalence of certain addictive disorders. Thus, this review aims to summarize (i) the contribution of sex differences to the function of dopamine systems, and (ii) the behavioral, neurochemical, and anatomical changes in brain stress systems.

  15. NMR metabolomics profiling of blood plasma mimics shows that medium- and long-chain fatty acids differently release metabolites from human serum albumin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jupin, M.; Michiels, P. J.; Girard, F. C.; Spraul, M.; Wijmenga, S. S.

    2014-02-01

    Metabolite profiling by NMR of body fluids is increasingly used to successfully differentiate patients from healthy individuals. Metabolites and their concentrations are direct reporters of body biochemistry. However, in blood plasma the NMR-detected free-metabolite concentrations are also strongly affected by interactions with the abundant plasma proteins, which have as of yet not been considered much in metabolic profiling. We previously reported that many of the common NMR-detected metabolites in blood plasma bind to human serum albumin (HSA) and many are released by fatty acids present in fatted HSA. HSA is the most abundant plasma protein and main transporter of endogenous and exogenous metabolites. Here, we show by NMR how the two most common fatty acids (FAs) in blood plasma - the long-chain FA, stearate (C18:0) and medium-chain FA, myristate (C14:0) - affect metabolite-HSA interaction. Of the set of 18 common NMR-detected metabolites, many are released by stearate and/or myristate, lactate appearing the most strongly affected. Myristate, but not stearate, reduces HSA-binding of phenylalanine and pyruvate. Citrate signals were NMR invisible in the presence of HSA. Only at high myristate-HSA mole ratios 11:1, is citrate sufficiently released to be detected. Finally, we find that limited dilution of blood-plasma mimics releases HSA-bound metabolites, a finding confirmed in real blood plasma samples. Based on these findings, we provide recommendations for NMR experiments for quantitative metabolite profiling.

  16. The portal-drained viscera release fibroblast growth factor 19 in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koelfat, Kiran V K; Bloemen, Johanne G; Jansen, Peter L M; Dejong, Cornelis H C; Schaap, Frank G; Olde Damink, Steven W M

    2016-12-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 19 (FGF19) is an ileum-derived endrocrine factor that is produced in response to transepithelial bile salt flux. FGF19 represses bile salt synthesis in the liver. Despite the general assumption that FGF19 signals to the liver via portal blood, no human data are available to support this notion. The aim was to study portal FGF19 levels, and determined bile salt and FGF19 fluxes across visceral organs in humans. Bile salt and FGF19 levels were assessed in arterial, portal, and hepatic venous blood collected from fasted patients who underwent partial liver resection for colorectal liver metastases (n = 30). Fluxes across the portal-drained viscera (PDV), liver, and splanchnic area were calculated. Portal bile salt levels (7.8 [5.0-12.4] μmol/L) were higher than levels in arterial (2.7 [1.7-5.5] μmol/L, P FGF19 (161 ± 78 pg/mL) were higher than arterial levels (135 ± 65 pg/mL, P = 0.046). A net release of FGF19 by the PDV (+4.0 [+2.1 to +9.9] ng kg(-1) h(-1), P FGF19 across the liver (-0.2 [-3.7 to +7.4] ng kg(-1) h(-1), P = 0.93). In conclusion, FGF19 levels in human portal blood are higher than in arterial blood. FGF19 is released by the portal-drained viscera under fasted steady state conditions.

  17. Insulin/IGF signaling in Drosophila and other insects: factors that regulate production, release and post-release action of the insulin-like peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nässel, Dick R; Vanden Broeck, Jozef

    2016-01-01

    Insulin, insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) and insulin-like peptides (ILPs) are important regulators of metabolism, growth, reproduction and lifespan, and mechanisms of insulin/IGF signaling (IIS) have been well conserved over evolution. In insects, between one and 38 ILPs have been identified in each species. Relatively few insect species have been investigated in depth with respect to ILP functions, and therefore we focus mainly on the well-studied fruitfly Drosophila melanogaster. In Drosophila eight ILPs (DILP1-8), but only two receptors (dInR and Lgr3) are known. DILP2, 3 and 5 are produced by a set of neurosecretory cells (IPCs) in the brain and their biosynthesis and release are controlled by a number of mechanisms differing between larvae and adults. Adult IPCs display cell-autonomous sensing of circulating glucose, coupled to evolutionarily conserved mechanisms for DILP release. The glucose-mediated DILP secretion is modulated by neurotransmitters and neuropeptides, as well as by factors released from the intestine and adipocytes. Larval IPCs, however, are indirectly regulated by glucose-sensing endocrine cells producing adipokinetic hormone, or by circulating factors from the intestine and fat body. Furthermore, IIS is situated within a complex physiological regulatory network that also encompasses the lipophilic hormones, 20-hydroxyecdysone and juvenile hormone. After release from IPCs, the ILP action can be modulated by circulating proteins that act either as protective carriers (binding proteins), or competitive inhibitors. Some of these proteins appear to have additional functions that are independent of ILPs. Taken together, the signaling with multiple ILPs is under complex control, ensuring tightly regulated IIS in the organism.

  18. Expression and Regulation of Corticotropin-Releasing Factor Receptor Type 2 beta in Developing and Mature Mouse Skeletal Muscle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuperman, Yael; Issler, Orna; Vaughan, Joan; Bilezikjian, Louise; Vale, Wylie; Chen, Alon

    2011-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing factor receptor type 2 (CRFR2) is highly expressed in skeletal muscle (SM) tissue where it is suggested to inhibit interactions between insulin signaling pathway components affecting whole-body glucose homeostasis. However, little is known about factors regulating SM CRFR2 ex

  19. Factors influencing immediate post-release survival of spectacled eiders following surgical implantation of transmitters with percutaneous antennae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sexson, Matthew G.; Mulcahy, Daniel M.; Spriggs, Maria; Myers, Gwen E.

    2014-01-01

    Surgically implanted transmitters are a common method for tracking animal movements. Immediately following surgical implantation, animals pass through a critical recovery phase when behaviors may deviate from normal and the likelihood of individual survival may be reduced. Therefore, data collected during this period may be censored to minimize bias introduced by surgery-related behaviors or mortality. However, immediate post-release mortalities negate a sampling effort and reduce the amount of data potentially collected after the censoring period. Wildlife biologists should employ methods to support an animal’s survival through this period, but factors contributing to immediate post-release survival have not been formally assessed. We evaluated factors that potentially influenced the immediate post-release survival of 56 spectacled eiders (Somateria fischeri) marked with coelomically implanted satellite transmitters with percutaneous antennae in northern Alaska in 2010 and 2011. We modeled survival through the first 14 days following release and assessed the relative importance and effect of 15 covariates hypothesized to influence survival during this immediate post-release period. Estimated daily survival rate increased over the duration of the immediate post-release period; the probability of mortality was greatest within the first 5 days following release. Our top-ranking model included the effect of 2 blood analytes, pH and hematocrit, measured prior to surgical implantation of a transmitter. We found a positive response to pH; eiders exhibiting acidemia (low pH) prior to surgery were less likely to survive the immediate post-release period. We found a curvilinear response to hematocrit; eiders exhibiting extremely low or high pre-surgery hematocrit were also less likely to survive the immediate post-release period. In the interest of maximizing the survival of marked birds following release, hematological data obtained prior to surgical implantation of

  20. Flavor release measurement by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap mass spectrometry, construction of interface and mathematical modeling of release profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haahr, Anne-Mette; Madsen, Henrik; Smedsgaard, Jørn

    2003-01-01

    An instrumental on-line retronasal flavor analysis was developed to obtain information about the release of flavor compounds in expired air from humans during eating. The volatile flavor compounds were measured by ion trap mass spectrometry with an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source...

  1. Functional Impact of Corticotropin-Releasing Factor Exposure on Tau Phosphorylation and Axon Transport.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle H Le

    Full Text Available Stress exposure or increased levels of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF induce hippocampal tau phosphorylation (tau-P in rodent models, a process that is dependent on the type-1 CRF receptor (CRFR1. Although these preclinical studies on stress-induced tau-P provide mechanistic insight for epidemiological work that identifies stress as a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD, the actual impact of stress-induced tau-P on neuronal function remains unclear. To determine the functional consequences of stress-induced tau-P, we developed a novel mouse neuronal cell culture system to explore the impact of acute (0.5hr and chronic (2hr CRF treatment on tau-P and integral cell processes such as axon transport. Consistent with in vivo reports, we found that chronic CRF treatment increased tau-P levels and caused globular accumulations of phosphorylated tau in dendritic and axonal processes. Furthermore, while both acute and chronic CRF treatment led to significant reduction in CREB activation and axon transport of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, this was not the case with mitochondrial transport. Acute CRF treatment caused increased mitochondrial velocity and distance traveled in neurons, while chronic CRF treatment modestly decreased mitochondrial velocity and greatly increased distance traveled. These results suggest that transport of cellular energetics may take priority over growth factors during stress. Tau-P was required for these changes, as co-treatment of CRF with a GSK kinase inhibitor prevented CRF-induced tau-P and all axon transport changes. Collectively, our results provide mechanistic insight into the consequences of stress peptide-induced tau-P and provide an explanation for how chronic stress via CRF may lead to neuronal vulnerability in AD.

  2. Early outgrowth cells release soluble endocrine antifibrotic factors that reduce progressive organ fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, Darren A; Connelly, Kim A; Zhang, Yanling; Advani, Suzanne L; Thai, Kerri; Kabir, Golam; Kepecs, David; Spring, Christopher; Smith, Christopher; Batruch, Ihor; Kosanam, Hari; Advani, Andrew; Diamandis, Eleftherios; Marsden, Philip A; Gilbert, Richard E

    2013-11-01

    Adult bone marrow-derived cells can improve organ function in chronic disease models, ostensibly by the release of paracrine factors. It has, however, been difficult to reconcile this prevailing paradigm with the lack of cell retention within injured organs and their rapid migration to the reticuloendothelial system. Here, we provide evidence that the salutary antifibrotic effects of bone marrow-derived early outgrowth cells (EOCs) are more consistent with an endocrine mode of action, demonstrating not only the presence of antifibrotic factors in the plasma of EOC-treated rats but also that EOC conditioned medium (EOC-CM) potently attenuates both TGF-β- and angiotensin II-induced fibroblast collagen production in vitro. To examine the therapeutic relevance of these findings in vivo, 5/6 subtotally nephrectomized rats, a model of chronic kidney and heart failure characterized by progressive fibrosis of both organs, were randomized to receive i.v. injections of EOC-CM, unconditioned medium, or 10(6) EOCs. Rats that received unconditioned medium developed severe kidney injury with cardiac diastolic dysfunction. In comparison, EOC-CM-treated rats demonstrated substantially improved renal and cardiac function and structure, mimicking the changes found in EOC-treated animals. Mass spectrometric analysis of EOC-CM identified proteins that regulate cellular functions implicated in fibrosis. These results indicate that EOCs secrete soluble factor(s) with highly potent antifibrotic activity, that when injected intravenously replicate the salutary effects of the cells themselves. Together, these findings suggest that an endocrine mode of action may underlie the effectiveness of cell therapy in certain settings and portend the possibility for systemic delivery of cell-free therapy.

  3. Functional Impact of Corticotropin-Releasing Factor Exposure on Tau Phosphorylation and Axon Transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Michelle H; Weissmiller, April M; Monte, Louise; Lin, Po Han; Hexom, Tia C; Natera, Orlangie; Wu, Chengbiao; Rissman, Robert A

    2016-01-01

    Stress exposure or increased levels of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) induce hippocampal tau phosphorylation (tau-P) in rodent models, a process that is dependent on the type-1 CRF receptor (CRFR1). Although these preclinical studies on stress-induced tau-P provide mechanistic insight for epidemiological work that identifies stress as a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD), the actual impact of stress-induced tau-P on neuronal function remains unclear. To determine the functional consequences of stress-induced tau-P, we developed a novel mouse neuronal cell culture system to explore the impact of acute (0.5hr) and chronic (2hr) CRF treatment on tau-P and integral cell processes such as axon transport. Consistent with in vivo reports, we found that chronic CRF treatment increased tau-P levels and caused globular accumulations of phosphorylated tau in dendritic and axonal processes. Furthermore, while both acute and chronic CRF treatment led to significant reduction in CREB activation and axon transport of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), this was not the case with mitochondrial transport. Acute CRF treatment caused increased mitochondrial velocity and distance traveled in neurons, while chronic CRF treatment modestly decreased mitochondrial velocity and greatly increased distance traveled. These results suggest that transport of cellular energetics may take priority over growth factors during stress. Tau-P was required for these changes, as co-treatment of CRF with a GSK kinase inhibitor prevented CRF-induced tau-P and all axon transport changes. Collectively, our results provide mechanistic insight into the consequences of stress peptide-induced tau-P and provide an explanation for how chronic stress via CRF may lead to neuronal vulnerability in AD.

  4. Rapid release of growth factors regenerates force output in volumetric muscle loss injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasman, Jonathan M; Do, Duc M; Page, Raymond L; Pins, George D

    2015-12-01

    A significant challenge in the design and development of biomaterial scaffolds is to incorporate mechanical and biochemical cues to direct organized tissue growth. In this study, we investigated the effect of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) loaded, crosslinked fibrin (EDCn-HGF) microthread scaffolds on skeletal muscle regeneration in a mouse model of volumetric muscle loss (VML). The rapid, sustained release of HGF significantly enhanced the force production of muscle tissue 60 days after injury, recovering more than 200% of the force output relative to measurements recorded immediately after injury. HGF delivery increased the number of differentiating myoblasts 14 days after injury, and supported an enhanced angiogenic response. The architectural morphology of microthread scaffolds supported the ingrowth of nascent myofibers into the wound site, in contrast to fibrin gel implants which did not support functional regeneration. Together, these data suggest that EDCn-HGF microthreads recapitulate several of the regenerative cues lost in VML injuries, promote remodeling of functional muscle tissue, and enhance the functional regeneration of skeletal muscle. Further, by strategically incorporating specific biochemical factors and precisely tuning the structural and mechanical properties of fibrin microthreads, we have developed a powerful platform technology that may enhance regeneration in other axially aligned tissues.

  5. Corticotropin releasing factor impairs sustained attention in male and female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Robert D; Kawasumi, Yushi; Parikh, Vinay; Bangasser, Debra A

    2016-01-01

    Stressful life events and stress-related psychiatric disorders impair sustained attention, the ability to monitor rare and unpredictable stimulus events over prolonged periods of time. Despite the link between stress and attentional disruptions, the neurobiological basis for stress regulation of attention systems remains underexplored. Here we examined whether corticotropin releasing factor (CRF), which orchestrates stress responses and is hypersecreted in patients with stress-related psychiatric disorders, impairs sustained attention. To this end, male and female rats received central infusions of CRF prior to testing on an operant sustained attention task (SAT), where rats were trained to discriminate signaled from non-signaled events. CRF caused a dose-dependent decrease in SAT performance in both male and female rats. Females were more impaired than males following a moderate dose of CRF, particularly during the middle part of the session. This sex difference was moderated by ovarian hormones. Females in the estrous cycle stage characterized by lower ovarian hormones had a greater CRF-induced attentional impairment than males and females in other cycle stages. Collectively, these studies highlight CRF as a critical stress-related factor that can regulate attentional performance. As sustained attention subserves other cognitive processes, these studies suggest that mitigating high levels of CRF in patients with stress-related psychiatric disorders may ameliorate their cognitive deficits.

  6. Preliminary Effects of Real-World Factors on the Recovery and Exploitation of Forensic Impurity Profiles of a Nerve-Agent Simulant from Office Media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraga, Carlos G.; Sego, Landon H.; Hoggard, Jamin C.; Perez Acosta, Gabriel A.; Viglino, Emilie A.; Wahl, Jon H.; Synovec, Robert E.

    2012-12-28

    Dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP) was used as a chemical threat agent (CTA) simulant for a first look at the effects of real-world factors on the recovery and exploitation of a CTA’s impurity profile for source matching. Four stocks of DMMP having different impurity profiles were disseminated as aerosols onto cotton, painted wall board, and nylon coupons according to a thorough experimental design. The DMMP-exposed coupons were then solvent extracted and analyzed for DMMP impurities by comprehensive 2-D gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC×GC/MS). The similarities between the coupon DMMP impurity profiles and the known (reference) DMMP profiles were measured by dot products of the coupon profiles and known profiles and by score values obtained from principal component analysis. One stock, with a high impurity-profile selectivity value of 0.9 out of 1, had 100% of its respective coupons correctly classified and no false positives from other coupons. Coupons from the other three stocks with low selectivity values (0.0073, 0.012, and 0.018) could not be sufficiently distinguished from one another for reliable matching to their respective stocks. The results from this work support that: (1) extraction solvents, if not appropriately selected, can have some of the same impurities present in a CTA reducing a CTA’s useable impurity profile, (2) low selectivity among a CTA’s known impurity profiles will likely make definitive source matching impossible in some real-world conditions, (3) no detrimental chemical-matrix interference was encountered during the analysis of actual office media, (4) a short elapsed time between release and sample storage is advantageous for the recovery of the impurity profile because it minimizes volatilization of forensic impurities, and (5) forensic impurity profiles weighted towards higher volatility impurities are more likely to be altered by volatilization following CTA exposure.

  7. Expression of type 1 corticotropin-releasing factor receptor in the guinea pig enteric nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Sumei; Gao, Xiang; Gao, Na; Wang, Xiyu; Fang, Xiucai; Hu, Hong-Zhen; Wang, Guo-Du; Xia, Yun; Wood, Jackie D

    2005-01-17

    Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), immunohistochemistry, electrophysiological recording, and intraneuronal injection of the neuronal tracer biocytin were integrated in a study of the functional expression of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) receptors in the guinea pig enteric nervous system. RT-PCR revealed expression of CRF1 receptor mRNA, but not CRF2, in both myenteric and submucosal plexuses. Immunoreactivity for the CRF1 receptor was distributed widely in the myenteric plexus of the stomach and small and large intestine and in the submucosal plexus of the small and large intestine. CRF1 receptor immunoreactivity was coexpressed with calbindin, choline acetyltransferase, and substance P in the myenteric plexus. In the submucosal plexus, CRF1 receptor immunoreactivity was found in neurons that expressed calbindin, substance P, choline acetyltransferase, or neuropeptide Y. Application of CRF evoked slowly activating depolarizing responses associated with elevated excitability in both myenteric and submucosal neurons. Histological analysis of biocytin-filled neurons revealed that both uniaxonal neurons with S-type electrophysiological behavior and neurons with AH-type electrophysiological behavior and Dogiel II morphology responded to CRF. The CRF-evoked depolarizing responses were suppressed by the CRF1/CRF2 receptor antagonist astressin and the selective CRF1 receptor antagonist NBI27914 and were unaffected by the selective CRF2 receptor antagonist antisauvagine-30. The findings support the hypothesis that the CRF1 receptor mediates the excitatory actions of CRF on neurons in the enteric nervous system. Actions on enteric neurons might underlie the neural mechanisms by which stress-related release of CRF in the periphery alters intestinal propulsive motor function, mucosal secretion, and barrier functions.

  8. Delta opioid receptors colocalize with corticotropin releasing factor in hippocampal interneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, T J; Milner, T A

    2011-04-14

    The hippocampal formation (HF) is an important site at which stress circuits and endogenous opioid systems intersect, likely playing a critical role in the interaction between stress and drug addiction. Prior study findings suggest that the stress-related neuropeptide corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) and the delta opioid receptor (DOR) may localize to similar neuronal populations within HF lamina. Here, hippocampal sections of male and cycling female adult Sprague-Dawley rats were processed for immunolabeling using antisera directed against the DOR and CRF peptide, as well as interneuron subtype markers somatostatin or parvalbumin, and analyzed by fluorescence and electron microscopy. Both DOR- and CRF-labeling was observed in interneurons in the CA1, CA3, and dentate hilus. Males and normal cycling females displayed a similar number of CRF immunoreactive neurons co-labeled with DOR and a similar average number of CRF-labeled neurons in the dentate hilus and stratum oriens of CA1 and CA3. In addition, 70% of DOR/CRF dual-labeled neurons in the hilar region co-labeled with somatostatin, suggesting a role for these interneurons in regulating perforant path input to dentate granule cells. Ultrastructural analysis of CRF-labeled axon terminals within the hilar region revealed that proestrus females have a similar number of CRF-labeled axon terminals that contain DORs compared to males but an increased number of CRF-labeled axon terminals without DORs. Taken together, these findings suggest that while DORs are anatomically positioned to modulate CRF immunoreactive interneuron activity and CRF peptide release, their ability to exert such regulatory activity may be compromised in females when estrogen levels are high.

  9. Interferon regulatory factor-1 mediates the release of high mobility group box-1 in endotoxemia in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PAN Pin-hua; Jon Cardinal; LI Mo-li; HU Cheng-ping; Allan Tsung

    2013-01-01

    Background The extracellular release of the danger signal high mobility group box-1 (HMGB1) has been implicated in the pathogenesis and outcomes of sepsis.Understanding the mechanisms responsible for HMGB1 release can lead to the identification of targets that may inhibit this process.The transcription factor interferon regulatory factor-1 (IRF-1) is an important mediator of innate immune responses and has been shown to participate in mortality associated with endotoxemia; however,its role in mediating the release of HMGB1 in these settings is unknown.Methods Male IRF-1 knockout (KO) and age matched C57BL/6 wild type (WT) mice were given intraperitoneal (IP)injections of lipopolysaccharide (LPS).In some experiments,96 hours survival rates were observed.In other experiments,mice were sacrificed 12 hours after LPS administration and sera were harvested for future analysis.In in vitro study,RAW 264.7 murine monocyte/macrophage-like cells or primary peritoneal macrophage obtained from IRF-1 KO and WF mice were cultured for LPS mediated HMGB1 release analysis.And the mechanism for HMGB1 release was analyzed by immune-precipitation.Results IRF-1 KO mice experienced less mortality,and released less systerric HMGB1 compared to their WT counterparts.Exogenous administration of recombinant HMGB1 to IRF-1 KO mice returned the mortality rate to that seen originally in IRF-1 WT mice.Using cultures of peritoneal macrophages or RAW264.7 cells,in vitro LPS stimulation induced the release of HMGB1 in an IRF-1 dependent manner.And the janus associated kinase (JAK)-IRF-1 signal pathway appeared to participate in the signaling mechanisms of LPS-induced HMGB1 release by mediating acetylation of HMGB1.Conclusion IRF-1 plays a role in LPS induced release of HMGB1 and therefore may serve as a novel target in sepsis.

  10. Understanding Drug Release Data through Thermodynamic Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjorie Caroline Liberato Cavalcanti Freire

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the factors that can modify the drug release profile of a drug from a Drug-Delivery-System (DDS is a mandatory step to determine the effectiveness of new therapies. The aim of this study was to assess the Amphotericin-B (AmB kinetic release profiles from polymeric systems with different compositions and geometries and to correlate these profiles with the thermodynamic parameters through mathematical modeling. Film casting and electrospinning techniques were used to compare behavior of films and fibers, respectively. Release profiles from the DDSs were performed, and the mathematical modeling of the data was carried out. Activation energy, enthalpy, entropy and Gibbs free energy of the drug release process were determined. AmB release profiles showed that the relationship to overcome the enthalpic barrier was PVA-fiber > PVA-film > PLA-fiber > PLA-film. Drug release kinetics from the fibers and the films were better fitted on the Peppas–Sahlin and Higuchi models, respectively. The thermodynamic parameters corroborate these findings, revealing that the AmB release from the evaluated systems was an endothermic and non-spontaneous process. Thermodynamic parameters can be used to explain the drug kinetic release profiles. Such an approach is of utmost importance for DDS containing insoluble compounds, such as AmB, which is associated with an erratic bioavailability.

  11. Electrospun tri-layered zein/PVP-GO/zein nanofiber mats for providing biphasic drug release profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hoik; Xu, Gang; Kharaghani, Davood; Nishino, Masayoshi; Song, Kyung Hun; Lee, Jung Soon; Kim, Ick Soo

    2017-10-05

    Simple sequential electrospinning was utilized to create a functional tri-layered nanofiber mesh that achieves time-regulated biphasic drug release behavior. A tri-layered nanofiber mesh -composed of zein and poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP) as the top/bottom and middle layers, respectively - was constructed through sequential electrospinning with ketoprofen (KET) as the model drug. PVP was blended with graphene oxide (GO) to improve the drug release functionality of PVP nanofiber as well as its mechanical properties. Scanning electron microscopy confirmed that the resultant nanofibers had a linear morphology, smooth surface, and tri-layered structure. In addition, X-ray diffraction patterns, differential scanning calorimetric analyses, and Fourier transform infrared spectra verified that the drugs were uniformly dispersed throughout the nanofiber due to good compatibility between the polymer and KET induced by hydrogen interaction. In vitro release test of the tri-layered structure, each component of which had distinct release features, successfully demonstrated time-regulated biphasic drug release. Also, it was confirmed that the drug release rate and duration can be controlled by designing a morphological feature - namely, mesh thickness - which was achieved by simply regulating the spinning time of the first and third layer. This multilayered electrospun nanofiber mesh fabricated by sequential electrospinning could provide a useful method of controlling drug release behavior over time, which will open new routes for practical applications and stimulate further research in the development of effective drug release carriers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Gastrointestinal pH and Transit Time Profiling in Healthy Volunteers Using the IntelliCap System Confirms Ileo-Colonic Release of ColoPulse Tablets.

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    Jacoba M Maurer

    Full Text Available ColoPulse tablets are an innovative development in the field of oral dosage forms characterized by a distal ileum and colon-specific release. Previous studies in humans showed release in the ileo-colonic region, but the relationship between gastrointestinal pH and release was not experimentally proven in vivo. This information will complete the in vivo release-profile of ColoPulse tablets.Release from ColoPulse tablets was studied in 16 healthy volunteers using the dual label isotope strategy. To determine gastrointestinal pH profiles and transit times the IntelliCap system was used. A ColoPulse tablet containing 13C-urea and an uncoated, immediate release tablet containing 15N2-urea were taken simultaneously followed by a standardized breakfast after three hours. Five minutes after intake of the tablets the IntelliCap capsule was swallowed and pH was measured until excretion in the feces. Breath and urine samples were collected for isotope analysis.Full analysis could be performed in 12 subjects. Median bioavailability of 13C -urea was 82% (95% CI 74-94%, range 61-114%. The median lag time (5% release of 13C was 5:42 h (95% CI 5:18-6:18 h, range 2:36-6:36 h, There was no statistically significant difference between lag time based on isotope signal and colon arrival time (CAT based on pH (median 5:42 vs 5:31 h p = 0.903. In all subjects an intestinal pH value of 7.0 was reached before release of 13C from the ColoPulse tablet occurred.From the combined data from the IntelliCap system and the 13C -isotope signal it can be concluded that release from a ColoPulse tablet in vivo is not related to transit times but occurs in the ileo-colonic region after pH 7.0 is reached. This supports our earlier findings and confirms that the ColoPulse system is a promising delivery system for targeting the distal ileum and colon.ISRCTN Registry 18301880.

  13. Stress and addiction: contribution of the corticotropin releasing factor (CRF system in neuroplasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina L Haass-Koffler

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Corticotropin releasing factor (CRF has been shown to induce various behavioral changes related to adaptation to stress. Dysregulation of the CRF system at any point can lead to a variety of psychiatric disorders, including substance use disorders (SUDs. CRF has been associated with stress-induced drug reinforcement. Extensive literature has identified CRF to play an important role in the molecular mechanisms that lead to an increase in susceptibility that precipitates relapse to SUDs. The CRF system has a heterogeneous role in SUDs. It enhances the acute effects of drugs of abuse and is also responsible for the potentiation of drug-induced neuroplasticity evoked during the withdrawal period. We present in this review the brain regions and circuitries where CRF is expressed and may participate in stress-induced drug abuse. Finally, we attempt to evaluate the role of modulating the CRF system as a possible therapeutic strategy for treating the dysregulation of emotional behaviors that result from the acute positive reinforcement of substances of abuse as well as the negative reinforcement produced by withdrawal.

  14. Detecting transforming growth factorrelease from liver cells using an aptasensor integrated with microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matharu, Zimple; Patel, Dipali; Gao, Yandong; Haque, Amranul; Zhou, Qing; Revzin, Alexander

    2014-09-02

    We developed a cell-culture/biosensor platform consisting of aptamer-modified Au electrodes integrated with reconfigurable microfluidics for monitoring of transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-β1), an important inflammatory and pro-fibrotic cytokine. Aptamers were thiolated, labeled with redox reporters, and self-assembled on gold surfaces. The biosensor was determined to be specific for TGF-β1 with an experimental detection limit of 1 ng/mL and linear range extending to 250 ng/mL. Upon determining figures of merit, aptasensor was miniaturized and integrated with human hepatic stellate cells inside microfluidic devices. Reconfigurable microfluidics were developed to ensure that seeding of "sticky" stromal cells did not foul the electrode and compromise sensor performance. This microsystem with integrated aptasensors was used to monitor TGF-β1 release from activated stellate cells over the course of 20 h. The electrochemical response went down upon infusing anti-TGF-β1 antibodies into the microfluidic devices containing activated stellate cells. To further validate aptasensor responses, stellate cells were stained for markers of activation (e.g., alpha smooth muscle actin) and were also tested for presence of TGF-β1 using enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Given the importance of TGF-β1 as a fibrogenic signal, a microsystem with integrated biosensors for local and continuous detection of TGF-β1 may prove to be an important tool to study fibrosis of the liver and other organs.

  15. Structural evolution of urotensin-I: reflections of life before corticotropin releasing factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovejoy, David A

    2009-10-01

    Peptides have a long evolutionary history that predates the appearance of metazoans. The corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) family of peptides is among the most ancient peptide lineages. The identification and characterization of urotensin-I and related orthologues led the way for the elucidation of the entire CRF peptide family. A comparative analysis of the CRF paralogue sequences suggest that CRF is the most derived of these peptides and has lost many of its ancestral characteristics after it became associated with the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal/interrenal (HPA/I axis). In vertebrates, the urotensin-I group of orthologues, which includes sauvagine and urocortin, possess a number of shared characteristics that may be indicative of the ancestral peptide. Given the early origin of the CRF family peptides, it is likely that other peptide lineages are distantly related to the CRF family. In silico or cDNA library screening using probes based on urotensin-I/urocortin characteristics have been used to identify novel CRF family and related sequences that provide clues the evolutionary origin of the CRF family.

  16. Structural study of human growth hormone-releasing factor fragment (1?29) by vibrational spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmona, P.; Molina, M.; Lasagabaster, A.

    1995-05-01

    The conformational structure of fragment 1-29 of human growth hormone releasing factor, hGHRF (1-29), in aqueous solution and in the solid state is investigated by infrared and Raman spectroscopy. The polypeptide backbone is found to be unordered in the solid state. However, the spectra of the peptide prepared as 5% (w/w) aqueous solutions show that approximately 28% of the peptide is involved in intermolecular β-sheet aggregation. The remainder of the peptide exists largely as disordered and β-sheet conformations with a small portion of α-helices. Tyrosine residues are found to be exposed to the solvent. The secondary structures are quantitatively examined through infrared spectroscopy, the conformational percentages being near those obtained by HONDAet al. [ Biopolymers31, 869 (1991)] using circular dichroism. The fast hydrogen/deuterium exchange in peptide groups and the absence of any NMR sign indicative of ordered structure [ G. M. CLOREet al., J. Molec. Biol.191, 553 (1986)] support that the solution conformations of the non-aggregated peptide interconvert in dynamic equilibrium. Some physiological advantages that may derive from this conformational flexibility are also discussed

  17. Corticotropin-releasing factor secretion from dendritic cells stimulated by commensal bacteria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mariko Hojo; Toshifumi Ohkusa; Harumi Tomeoku; Shigeo Koido; Daisuke Asaoka; Akihito Nagahara; Sumio Watanabe

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To study the production and secretion of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) by dendritic cells and the influence of commensal bacteria.METHODS: JAWSⅡ cells (ATCC CRL-11904), a mouse dendritic cell line, were seeded into 24-well culture plates and grown for 3 d. Commensal bacterial strains of Clostridium clostrodiiforme (JCM1291), Bacteroides vulgatus (B. vulgatus) (JCM5856), Escherichia coli (JCM1649), or Fusobacterium varium (F. varium) (ATCC8501) were added to the cells except for the control well, and incubated for 2 h. After incubation, we performed enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the cultured medium and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction for the dendritic cells, and compared these values with controls.RESULTS: The level of CRF secretion by control dendritic cells was 40.4 ± 6.2 pg/mL. The CRF levels for cells incubated with F. varium and B. vulgatus were significantly higher than that of the control (P < 0.0001). CRF mRNA was present in the control sample without bacteria, and CRF mRNA levels in all samples treated with bacteria were above that of the control sample.F. varium caused the greatest increase in CRF mRNA expression. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that dendritic cells produce CRF, a process augmented by commensal bacteria.

  18. Intrahypothalamic corticotropin-releasing factor elevates gastric bicarbonate and inhibits stress ulcers in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunion, M W; Kauffman, G L; Taché, Y

    1990-01-01

    The effects of intrahyopthalamic microinfusions of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) on gastric bicarbonate, acid, and pepsin content and on cold restraint-induced gastric lesion formation were tested in three experiments. Bilateral microinfusions of CRF into the hypothalamic ventromedial nucleus (0.86 nmol/rat) significantly increased both gastric bicarbonate concentration and total bicarbonate output. These effects were observed irrespective of whether rats were pretreated with the acid antisecretory drug omeprazole. In nonomeprazole-pretreated rats, CRF microinfusions also significantly reduced acid secretion and raised pH. The increase in bicarbonate content accounted for half of the observed decrease in acid output, suggesting that CRF microinfusions activated separable bicarbonate-stimulating and acid-inhibiting hypothalamic systems. In non-omeprazole-pretreated rats, CRF microinfusions significantly increased serum gastrin, whereas pepsin output was unchanged. Gastric mucosal damage produced by 4 h of cold restraint was significantly diminished by CRF microinfusion into the ventromedial hypothalamus. These data demonstrate that ventromedial hypothalamic microinfusions of CRF increase bicarbonate content, decrease gastric acid content, and confer protection against cold restraint-induced gastric mucosal damage. Hypothalamic CRF neuronal terminals and receptors may be involved in the central regulation of gastric bicarbonate secretion as well as acid secretion.

  19. Stress and addiction: contribution of the corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) system in neuroplasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haass-Koffler, Carolina L; Bartlett, Selena E

    2012-01-01

    Corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) has been shown to induce various behavioral changes related to adaptation to stress. Dysregulation of the CRF system at any point can lead to a variety of psychiatric disorders, including substance use disorders (SUDs). CRF has been associated with stress-induced drug reinforcement. Extensive literature has identified CRF to play an important role in the molecular mechanisms that lead to an increase in susceptibility that precipitates relapse to SUDs. The CRF system has a heterogeneous role in SUDs. It enhances the acute effects of drugs of abuse and is also responsible for the potentiation of drug-induced neuroplasticity evoked during the withdrawal period. We present in this review the brain regions and circuitries where CRF is expressed and may participate in stress-induced drug abuse. Finally, we attempt to evaluate the role of modulating the CRF system as a possible therapeutic strategy for treating the dysregulation of emotional behaviors that result from the acute positive reinforcement of substances of abuse as well as the negative reinforcement produced by withdrawal.

  20. Corticotropin-releasing factor: a possible key to gut dysfunction in the critically ill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Lauren T; Kidson, Susan H; Michell, William L

    2013-01-01

    Critically ill patients frequently display unexplained or incompletely explained features of gastrointestinal (GI) dysfunction, including gastric stasis, ileus, and diarrhea. This makes nutrition delivery challenging, and may contribute to poor outcomes. The typical bowel dysfunction seen in severely ill patients includes retarded gastric emptying, unsynchronized intestinal motility, and intestinal hyperpermeability. These functional changes appear similar to the corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF)-mediated bowel dysfunctions associated with stress of various types and some GI disorders and diseases. CRF has been shown to be present within the GI tract and its action on CRF receptors within the gut have been shown to reduce gastric emptying, alter intestinal motility, and increase intestinal permeability. However, the precise role of CRF in the GI dysfunction in critical illness remains unclear. In this short review, we provide an update on GI dysfunction during stress and review the possible role of CRF in the aetiology of gut dysfunction. We suggest that activation of CRF signaling pathways in critical illness might be key to understanding the mechanisms underlying the gut dysfunction that impairs enteral feeding in the intensive care unit.

  1. Stimulation of rat B-lymphocyte proliferation by corticotropin-releasing factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGillis, J P; Park, A; Rubin-Fletter, P; Turck, C; Dallman, M F; Payan, D G

    1989-07-01

    The mitogenic effect of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) on rat lymphocytes was investigated. When rat splenocytes were cultured for 48 hr with CFR, a dose-dependent increase in incorporation of 3H-thymidine (3H-Tdr) was observed, with a maximal response at 10 nM CRF. Comparison of the proliferative effect of CRF on enriched populations of B lymphocytes, T lymphocytes, or macrophages revealed that only B lymphocytes responded following treatment with CRF. When lymphocytes derived from different lymphoid tissues were compared, CRF had a greater proliferative effect on lymphocytes derived from gut-associated lymphoid tissue (mesenteric lymph nodes and Peyer's patches) than on lymphocytes from spleen or inguinal lymph nodes; CRF had no effect on thymocytes. Synthetic fragments of CRF were used to determine which portions of the peptide are recognized by lymphocytes. The C-terminal fragments alpha-helical CRF9-41 and CRF21-41 were as potent as native CRF in stimulating B-lymphocyte proliferation, whereas CRF1-20 did not stimulate proliferation. The activity of these peptides suggests that CRF stimulates lymphocyte proliferation by cellular recognition of structural determinants in the C-terminal one-half of the peptide.

  2. Numerical Studies on Heat Release Rate in Room Fire on Liquid Fuel under Different Ventilation Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Cai

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Heat release rate (HRR of the design fire is the most important parameter in assessing building fire hazards. However, HRR in room fire was only studied by computational fluid dynamics (CFD in most of the projects determining fire safety provisions by performance-based design. In contrast to ten years ago, officers in the Far East are now having better knowledge of CFD. Two common questions are raised on CFD-predicted results on describing free boundaries; and on computing grid size. In this work, predicting HRR by the CFD model was justified with experimental room pool fire data reported earlier. The software fire dynamics simulator (FDS version 5 was selected as the CFD simulation tool. Prescribed input heating rate based on the experimental results was used with the liquid fuel model in FDS. Five different free boundary conditions were investigated to predict HRR. Grid sensitivity study was carried out using one stretched mesh and multiple uniform meshes with different grid sizes. As it is difficult to have the entire set of CFD predicted results agreed with experiments, macroscopic flow parameters on the mass flow rate through door opening predicted by CFD were also justified by another four conditions with different ventilation factors.

  3. Molecular Recognition of Corticotropin releasing Factor by Its G protein-coupled Receptor CRFR1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pioszak, Augen A.; Parker, Naomi R.; Suino-Powell, Kelly; Xu, H. Eric (Van Andel)

    2009-01-15

    The bimolecular interaction between corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF), a neuropeptide, and its type 1 receptor (CRFR1), a class B G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), is crucial for activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in response to stress, and has been a target of intense drug design for the treatment of anxiety, depression, and related disorders. As a class B GPCR, CRFR1 contains an N-terminal extracellular domain (ECD) that provides the primary ligand binding determinants. Here we present three crystal structures of the human CRFR1 ECD, one in a ligand-free form and two in distinct CRF-bound states. The CRFR1 ECD adopts the alpha-beta-betaalpha fold observed for other class B GPCR ECDs, but the N-terminal alpha-helix is significantly shorter and does not contact CRF. CRF adopts a continuous alpha-helix that docks in a hydrophobic surface of the ECD that is distinct from the peptide-binding site of other class B GPCRs, thereby providing a basis for the specificity of ligand recognition between CRFR1 and other class B GPCRs. The binding of CRF is accompanied by clamp-like conformational changes of two loops of the receptor that anchor the CRF C terminus, including the C-terminal amide group. These structural studies provide a molecular framework for understanding peptide binding and specificity by the CRF receptors as well as a template for designing potent and selective CRFR1 antagonists for therapeutic applications.

  4. Hypothalamic corticotropin-releasing factor is centrally involved in learning under moderate stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Morgan; Chen, Alon; Richter-Levin, Gal

    2013-08-01

    The corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) neuropeptide is found to have a pivotal role in the regulation of the behavioral and neuroendocrine responses to stressful challenges. Here, we studied the involvement of the hypothalamic CRF in learning under stressful conditions. We have used a site-specific viral approach to knockdown (KD) CRF expression in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN). The two-way shuttle avoidance (TWSA) task was chosen to assess learning and memory under stressful conditions. Control animals learned to shuttle from one side to the other to avoid electrical foot shock by responding to a tone. Novel object and social recognition tasks were used to assess memory under less stressful conditions. KD of PVN-CRF expression decreased the number of avoidance responses in a TWSA session under moderate (0.8 mA), but not strong (1.5 mA), stimulus intensity compared to control rats. On the other hand, KD of PVN-CRF had no effect on memory performance in the less stressful novel object or social recognition tasks. Interestingly, basal or stress-induced corticosterone levels in CRF KD rats were not significantly different from controls. Taken together, the data suggest that the observed impairment was not a result of alteration in HPA axis activity, but rather due to reduced PVN-CRF activity on other brain areas. We propose that hypothalamic CRF is centrally involved in learning under moderate stressful challenge. Under 'basal' (less stressful) conditions or when the intensity of the stress is more demanding, central CRF ceases to be the determinant factor, as was indicated by performances in the TWSA with higher stimulus intensity or in the less stressful tasks of object and social recognition.

  5. Confirmatory factor analysis of the Child Oral Health Impact Profile (Korean version).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Young Il; Lee, Soonmook; Patton, Lauren L; Kim, Hae-Young

    2016-04-01

    Empirical support for the factor structure of the Child Oral Health Impact Profile (COHIP) has not been fully established. The purposes of this study were to evaluate the factor structure of the Korean version of the COHIP (COHIP-K) empirically using confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) based on the theoretical framework and then to assess whether any of the factors in the structure could be grouped into a simpler single second-order factor. Data were collected through self-reported COHIP-K responses from a representative community sample of 2,236 Korean children, 8-15 yr of age. Because a large inter-factor correlation of 0.92 was estimated in the original five-factor structure, the two strongly correlated factors were combined into one factor, resulting in a four-factor structure. The revised four-factor model showed a reasonable fit with appropriate inter-factor correlations. Additionally, the second-order model with four sub-factors was reasonable with sufficient fit and showed equal fit to the revised four-factor model. A cross-validation procedure confirmed the appropriateness of the findings. Our analysis empirically supported a four-factor structure of COHIP-K, a summarized second-order model, and the use of an integrated summary COHIP score.

  6. Pharmacological analysis for mechanisms of GPI-80 release from tumour necrosis factor-alpha-stimulated human neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitto, Takeaki; Araki, Yoshihiko; Takeda, Yuji; Sendo, Fujiro

    2002-10-01

    1 GPI-80, a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored protein initially identified on human neutrophils, plays a role(s) in the regulation of beta2 integrin function. Previous studies have shown that GPI-80 is sublocated in secretory vesicles. It is also found in soluble form in the synovial fluid of rheumatoid arthritis patients, and in the culture supernatant of formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine-stimulated neutrophils. To understand the behaviour of GPI-80 under conditions of stimulation, we investigated the effects of tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha on its expression and release. We also probed the mechanism of its release with various pharmacologic tools. 2 TNF-alpha induced the release of GPI-80 from human neutrophils in a concentration- and time-dependent manner (in the range of 1-100 u ml(-1) and 30-120 min, respectively), but did not affect surface GPI-80 levels. 3 Cytochalasin B, genistein, and SB203580 but not PD98059 inhibited TNF-alpha-stimulated GPI-80 release and neutrophil adherence at the same concentration. In addition, TNF-alpha-induced GPI-80 release was inhibited by blocking monoclonal antibodies specific to components of Mac-1 (CD11b and CD18). 4 Antioxidants (pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate and N-acetyl-L-cysteine) inhibited GPI-80 release by TNF-alpha stimulation, but superoxide dismutase did not. Antioxidants but not superoxide dismutase reduced an intracellular oxidation state. 5 These findings indicate that TNF-alpha-stimulated GPI-80 release from human neutrophils depends upon adherence via beta2 integrins. They also suggest that cytochalasin B, genistein, and SB203580 inhibit GPI-80 release by suppressing signals for cell adherence, rather than by a direct effect on its secretion. Finally, we suggest that GPI-80 release involves an intracellular change in a redox state.

  7. Preadipocyte factor-1 is associated with metabolic profile in severe obesity.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connell, J

    2011-04-01

    Dysfunctional adipose tissue has been proposed as a key pathological process linking obesity and metabolic disease. Preadipocyte factor-1 (Pref-1) has been shown to inhibit differentiation in adipocyte precursor cells and could thereby play a role in determining adipocyte size, adipose tissue functioning, and metabolic profile in obese individuals.

  8. Lipid profile of nutrition students and its association with cardiovascular disease risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Mara Fisberg

    2001-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To describe the lipid profile and to verify its relationship with cardiovascular disease risk factors in students at a public university in São Paulo. METHODS: After obtaining clinical, anthropomorphic, and lipid profile data from 118 students, variables of the lipid profile were related to other risk factors. RESULTS: The mean age of the students was 20.3 years (SD=1.5. The risk of cardiovascular disease was characterized by a positive family history of ischemic heart disease in 38.9%; sedentariness in 35.6%; limiting and increased total and LDL-C cholesterol levels in 17.7% and 10.2%, respectively; decreased HDL-C levels in 11.1%; increased triglyceride levels in 11.1%; body mass index >25 in 8.5%, and smoking in 6.7% of the subjects. Students' diet was found to be inadequate regarding protein, total fat, saturated fat, sodium, and fiber contents. A statistically significant association between cholesterol and contraceptive use, between HDL-C and contraceptive use, age and percent body fat, and triglycerides and percent lean weight was observed. CONCLUSION: A high prevalence of some risk factors of cardiovascular disease as well as the association between these factors with altered lipid profiles was observed in the young population studied.

  9. On the relation between the linear factor model and the latent profile model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Halpin, P.F.; Dolan, C.V.; Grasman, R.P.P.P.; de Boeck, P.

    2011-01-01

    The relationship between linear factor models and latent profile models is addressed within the context of maximum likelihood estimation based on the joint distribution of the manifest variables. Although the two models are well known to imply equivalent covariance decompositions, in general they do

  10. On the Relation between the Linear Factor Model and the Latent Profile Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpin, Peter F.; Dolan, Conor V.; Grasman, Raoul P. P. P.; De Boeck, Paul

    2011-01-01

    The relationship between linear factor models and latent profile models is addressed within the context of maximum likelihood estimation based on the joint distribution of the manifest variables. Although the two models are well known to imply equivalent covariance decompositions, in general they do not yield equivalent estimates of the…

  11. Corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) binding protein: a novel regulator of CRF and related peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behan, D P; De Souza, E B; Lowry, P J; Potter, E; Sawchenko, P; Vale, W W

    1995-10-01

    A 37-kDa corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) binding protein (CRF-BP) was purified from human plasma by repeated affinity purification and subsequently sequenced and cloned. The human and rat CRF-BP cDNAs encode proteins of 322 amino acids with one putative signal sequence, one N-glycosylation site, and 10 conserved cysteines. Human CRF-BP binds human CRF with high affinity but has low affinity for the ovine peptide. In contrast, sheep CRF-BP binds human and ovine CRF with high affinity. The CRF-BP gene consists of seven exons and six introns and is located on chromosome 13 and loci 5q of the mouse and human genomes, respectively. CRF-BP inhibits the adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) releasing properties of CRF in vitro. CRF-BP dimerizes after binding CRF and clears the peptide from blood. This clearance mechanism protects the maternal pituitary gland from elevated plasma CRF levels found during the third trimester of human pregnancy. CRF-BP is expressed in the brains of all species so far tested but is uniquely expressed in human liver and placenta. In brain, CRF-BP is membrane associated and is predominantly expressed in the cerebral cortex and subcortical limbic structures. In some brain areas CRF-BP colocalizes with CRF and CRF receptors. The protein is also present in pituitary corticotropes, where it is under positive glucocorticoid control, and is likely to locally modulate CRF-induced ACTH secretion. The ligand requirements of the CRF receptor and the CRF-BP can be distinguished in that central human CRF fragments, such as CRF (6-33) and CRF (9-33), have high affinity for CRF-BP but low affinity for the CRF receptor. The binding protein's ability to inhibit CRF-induced ACTH secretion can be reversed by CRF (6-33) and CRF (9-33), suggesting that ligand inhibitors may have utility in elevating free CRF levels in disease states associated with decreased CRF. Thus, by controlling the amount of free CRF which activates CRF receptors, it is likely that the CRF

  12. Platelet-rich plasma stimulated by pulse electric fields: Platelet activation, procoagulant markers, growth factor release and cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frelinger, A L; Torres, A S; Caiafa, A; Morton, C A; Berny-Lang, M A; Gerrits, A J; Carmichael, S L; Neculaes, V B; Michelson, A D

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic use of activated platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has been explored for wound healing, hemostasis and antimicrobial wound applications. Pulse electric field (PEF) stimulation may provide more consistent platelet activation and avoid complications associated with the addition of bovine thrombin, the current state of the art ex vivo activator of therapeutic PRP. The aim of this study was to compare the ability of PEF, bovine thrombin and thrombin receptor activating peptide (TRAP) to activate human PRP, release growth factors and induce cell proliferation in vitro. Human PRP was prepared in the Harvest SmartPreP2 System and treated with vehicle, PEF, bovine thrombin, TRAP or Triton X-100. Platelet activation and procoagulant markers and microparticle generation were measured by flow cytometry. Released growth factors were measured by ELISA. The releasates were tested for their ability to stimulate proliferation of human epithelial cells in culture. PEF produced more platelet-derived microparticles, P-selectin-positive particles and procoagulant annexin V-positive particles than bovine thrombin or TRAP. These differences were associated with higher levels of released epidermal growth factor after PEF than after bovine thrombin or TRAP but similar levels of platelet-derived, vascular-endothelial, and basic fibroblast growth factors, and platelet factor 4. Supernatant from PEF-treated platelets significantly increased cell proliferation compared to plasma. In conclusion, PEF treatment of fresh PRP results in generation of microparticles, exposure of prothrombotic platelet surfaces, differential release of growth factors compared to bovine thrombin and TRAP and significant cell proliferation. These results, together with PEF's inherent advantages, suggest that PEF may be a superior alternative to bovine thrombin activation of PRP for therapeutic applications.

  13. Flavor release measurement by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap mass spectrometry, construction of interface and mathematical modeling of release profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haahr, Anne-Mette; Madsen, Henrik; Smedsgaard, Jørn

    2003-01-01

    An instrumental on-line retronasal flavor analysis was developed to obtain information about the release of flavor compounds in expired air from humans during eating. The volatile flavor compounds were measured by ion trap mass spectrometry with an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source...... (APCI). An interface was designed to sample the breath directly from the nose. The repeat-ability in vitro for seven different flavor compounds came out with relative standard derivation less than 10% in most cases, which is acceptable. In vitro quantification was carried out by a determination...... of the concentration in the gas phase over a flavor solution by GC/MS, followed by measurements of intensities by the APCI ion trap. Ion suppression by acetone in the breath was negligible at concentration levels relevant in these experiments. The instrumental limits of detection for menthone and menthol coincide...

  14. Pore geometry of ceramic device: The key factor of drug release kinetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Čolović B.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Release kinetics of tigecycline, a potential antibiotic in treatment of osteomyelitis, from calcium hydroxyapatite (CHA, as one of the most important ceramic materials in bone tissue engineering, was investigated in this study. Tigecycline, in solid state, was mixed with CHA powder and the obtained mixture was compressed into tablets using two different pressures. These tablets were immersed in a phosphate-buffered saline solution and tigecycline release was measured by a UV-VIS spectrophotometer. The total release time was 5 or 28 days, depending on the pressure applied during compression. It was shown that there is a close relationship between pore sizes and drug release rate. The drug release kinetics was interpreted on the base of pore sizes and pore size distribution. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 172026

  15. Nitric oxide-releasing agents enhance cytokine-induced tumor necrosis factor synthesis in human mononuclear cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eigler, A; Sinha, B; Endres, S

    1993-01-01

    In septic shock tumor necrosis factor (TNF) leads to increased nitric oxide (NO) production by induction of NO synthase. An inverse regulatory effect, the influence of NO on cytokine synthesis, has rarely been investigated. The present study assessed the influence of NO-releasing agents on TNF produ

  16. Platelet-rich plasma preparation using three devices : Implications for platelet activation and platelet growth factor release

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Everts, Peter A. M.; Mahoney, Christine Brown; Hoffmann, Johannes J. M. L.; Schonberger, Jacques P. A. M.; Box, Henk A. M.; Van Zundert, Andre; Knape, Johannes T. A.

    2006-01-01

    Background: In this study, three commercial systems for the preparation of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) were compared and platelet growth factors release was measured. Methods: Ten healthy volunteers donated whole blood that was fractionated by a blood cell separator, and a table-top centrifuge to pre

  17. EFFECT OF CORTICOTROPIN-RELEASING FACTOR ANTAGONIST ON BEHAVIORAL AND NEUROENDOCRINE RESPONSES DURING EXPOSURE TO DEFENSIVE BURYING PARADIGM IN RATS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KORTE, SM; KORTEBOUWS, GAH; BOHUS, B; KOOB, GF

    1994-01-01

    Defensive burying behavior is a coping strategy in rodents in response to an aversive stimulus where fear will facilitate burying and treatment with anxiolytics will result in less burying. To test the hypothesis that endogenous corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) is involved in the defensive buryi

  18. Common Mechanisms Underlying the Proconflict Effects of Corticotropin-Releasing Factor, A Benzodiazepine Inverse Agonist and Electric Foot-Shock

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, Sietse F. de; Katz, Jonathan L.; Valentino, Rita J.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF), a benzodiazepine inverse agonist (methyl-6,7-dimethoxy-4-ethyl-β-carboline-3-carboxylate; DMCM) and electric foot-shock on rat conflict behavior were characterized and compared. Rats were trained to lever press under a multiple fixed-ratio schedul

  19. Analysis of the potential of cancer cell lines to release tissue factor-containing microvesicles: correlation with tissue factor and PAR2 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettelaie, Camille; Collier, Mary Ew; Featherby, Sophie; Benelhaj, Naima E; Greenman, John; Maraveyas, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Despite the association of cancer-derived circulating tissue factor (TF)-containing microvesicles and hypercoagulable state, correlations with the incidence of thrombosis remain unclear. In this study the upregulation of TF release upon activation of various cancer cell lines, and the correlation with TF and PAR2 expression and/or activity was examined. Microvesicle release was induced by PAR2 activation in seventeen cell lines and released microvesicle density, microvesicle-associated TF activity, and phoshpatidylserine-mediated activity were measured. The time-course for TF release was monitored over 90 min in each cell line. In addition, TF mRNA expression, cellular TF protein and cell-surface TF activities were quantified. Moreover, the relative expression of PAR2 mRNA and cellular protein were analysed. Any correlations between the above parameters were examined by determining the Pearson's correlation coefficients. TF release as microvesicles peaked between 30-60 min post-activation in the majority of cell lines tested. The magnitude of the maximal TF release positively correlated with TF mRNA (c = 0.717; p microvesicle release. However, TF release in resting cells did not significantly correlate with any of the parameters examined. Furthermore, TF mRNA expression correlated with PAR2 mRNA expression (c = 0.745; p < 0.001). In conclusion, our data suggest that TF and PAR2 mRNA, and PAR2 protein are better indicators of the ability of cancer cells to release TF and may constitute more accurate predictors of risk of thrombosis.

  20. Functional specificity of amino acid at position 246 in the tRNA mimicry domain of bacterial release factor 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uno, M; Ito, K; Nakamura, Y

    1996-01-01

    The termination of protein synthesis in bacteria requires codon-specific polypeptide release factors RF-1 (UAG/UAA specific) and RF-2 (UGA/UAA specific). We have proposed that release factors mimic tRNA and recognize the stop codon for polypeptide release (Nakamura et al (1996) Cell 87, 147-150). In contrast to the textbook view, genetic experiments have indicated that Escherichia coli RF-2 terminates translation very weakly at UAA while Salmonella RF-2 decodes this signal efficiently. Moreover, an excess of E coli RF-2 was toxic to cells while an excess of Salmonella RF-2 was not. These two RF-2 proteins are identical except for 16 out of 365 amino acids. Fragment swap experiments and site-directed mutagenesis revealed that a residue at position 246 is solely responsible for these two phenotypes. Upon substituting Ala (equivalent to Salmonella RF-2) for Thr-246 of E coli RF-2, the protein acquired increased release activity for UAA as well as for UGA. These results led us to conclude that E coli RF-2 activity is potentially weak and that the amino acid at position 246 plays a crucial role, not for codon discrimination, but for stop codon recognition or polypeptide release, presumably constituting an essential moiety of tRNA mimicry or interacting with peptidyltransferase centers of the ribosome.

  1. Serum Potassium Profile and Associated Factors in Incident Peritoneal Dialysis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Liu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Abnormal potassium profiles are common in peritoneal dialysis (PD patients. We studied the factors associated with serum potassium profiles in incident PD patients. Methods: Patients were enrolled from two hospital-facilitated PD centers from May 2013 to May 2016 and January 2009 to December 2015. A total of 319 incident PD patients were examined for factors associated with serum potassium profile. Average serum potassium levels were obtained for analysis during the first 3 months after PD initiation. Clinically factors and parameters associated with PD were assessed by logistic regression. Results: There were 168 men and 151 women (mean age, 50.8 years. Blood urea nitrogen (BUN, creatinine (Cr, and intact parathyroid hormone levels were significantly increased in patients in the higher serum potassium group. There were no significant risk factors for hypokalemia, including sex, age, diabetes, blood examination parameters, medication use, or PD-related parameters by multivariate logistic regression analysis. BUN (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 1.02, 95% CI 1.01-1.03, p = 0.001 and Cr (adjusted OR 1.08, 95% CI 1.01-1.16, p = 0.029 levels were significant risk factors for hyperkalemia by multivariate logistic regression analysis. Conclusion: Hyperkalemia and blood BUN and Cr levels were significantly associated in incident PD patients.

  2. The molecular and biological analysis of ixodid ticks histamine release factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulenga, Albert; Azad, Abdu F

    2005-01-01

    We previously described a Dermacentor varibialis (DV) cDNA that encodes a ubiquitously expressed and tick saliva-secreted functional histamine release factor (HRF) homolog. In this study gene specific primers based on DVHRF open reading frame nucleotide sequence were utilized to amplify three orthologs, from the wood tick, D. andersoni (DA), the black legged tick, the southern cattle tick, Boophilus microplus (BM) and the lone star tick, Amblyomma americanum (AA). At nucleotide level, sequence comparisons revealed 98 89 and 84% similarity to DVHRF for DAHRF, AAHRF and BMHRF, respectively, while predicted polypeptide comparisons revealed 98, 96 and 91% similarity for DAHRF, AAHRF and BMHRF respectively. Phylogenetically, the tick HRF clade, while distinct (100% bootstrap value), is closely related to other arthropods, but distantly related to vertebrate and protozoan clades. Consistent with sequence similarity analysis, a DVHRF-specific northern blotting probe hybridized a approximately 900 base pair (bp) mRNA band on all RNA blots. Likewise a mouse polyclonal antibody to E. coli-expressed recombinant (r) DVHRF, cross-reacted baculovirus-expressed non-fusion rAAHRF, rDAHRF, and rBMHRF. As revealed by northern blotting analysis of larvae and nymph RNA, DVHRF mRNA is expressed in both immature and mature ticks indicating that its transcription is not developmentally regulated. Unlike rHRF/TCTP proteins of other organisms, the calcium-binding function may not be conserved for tick HRF homologs as revealed by the 45CaCl2+ overlay assay. Apparent global expression of DVHRF and its orthologs make this protein family an ideal target antigen for development of novel tick control strategies targeting multiple tick species.

  3. Conformational origin of a difficult coupling in a human growth hormone releasing factor analog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deber, C M; Lutek, M K; Heimer, E P; Felix, A M

    1989-01-01

    During the solid-phase synthesis of the human growth hormone releasing factor (GRF) analog [Ala15, Leu27, Asn28] -GRF(1-32)-OH, incorporation of Boc-Gln16 was determined to be incomplete. While aggregation of growing resin-bound peptide chains with concomitant beta-sheet formation and "precipitation" has been proposed to account in general for such "difficult coupling," no feature of sequence in the Gln16 region of this GRF analog provided an immediate rationale for this result. We now report 500 MHz 1H NMR spectra of a series of resin-bound GRF segments surrounding the Gln16 position (19-32 through 14-32), swelled in dimethylsulfoxide-d6 solutions [GRF(14-32) = Leu14-Ala-Gln-Leu-Ser(Bzl)-Ala-Arg(Tos)-Lys(CIZ)-Leu- Leu-Gln-Asp(OcHex)-Ile-Leu-Asn-Arg(Tos)-Gln-Gln-Gly32-PAM resin]. While relatively sharp spectra are observed for GRF(19-32), components with resonances broadened by an order-of-magnitude appear in spectra of the 18-32 and 17-32 peptide-resin, and the entire spectrum of 16-32 is ill-resolved and highly broadened. Subsequent spectra sharpen again (15-32, 14-32). These combined synthesis/spectroscopic experimental results, in conjunction with predictive analyses using standard Chou-Fasman 2 degrees structure parameters, suggest that the completeness of the Gln16 coupling is hindered by formation of a specific, folded beta-sheet/beta-turn structure in GRF(16-32) (with the turn located at 18-21, "upstream" of the difficult coupling site), and accompanying aggregation of peptide chains. This analysis suggests that awareness of such potential beta-sheet/beta-turn sequences can guide analog choices, and/or facilitate pre-programming of synthesis steps in anticipation of problem couplings.

  4. Corticotropin-releasing factor enhances locomotion and medullary neuronal firing in an amphibian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowry, C A; Rose, J D; Moore, F L

    1996-03-01

    Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) administration has been shown to act centrally to enhance locomotion in rats and amphibians. In the present study we used an amphibian, the roughskin newt (Taricha granulosa), to characterize changes in medullary neuronal activity associated with CRF-induced walking and swimming in animals chronically implanted with fine-wire microelectrodes. Neuronal activity was recorded from the raphe and adjacent reticular region of the rostral medulla. Under baseline conditions most of the recorded neurons showed low to moderate amounts of neuronal activity during periods of immobility and pronounced increases in firing that were time-locked with episodes of walking. These neurons sometimes showed further increases in discharge during swimming. Injections of CRF but not saline into the lateral ventricle produced a rapidly appearing increase in walking and pronounced changes (mostly increases) in firing rates of the medullary neurons. CRF produced diverse changes in patterns of firing in different neurons, but for these neurons as a group, the effects of CRF showed a close temporal association with the onset and expression of the peptide's effect on locomotion. In neurons that were active exclusively during movement prior to CRF treatment, the post-CRF increase in firing was evident during episodes of walking; in other neurons that also were spontaneously active during immobility prior to CRF infusion, post-CRF activity changes were evident during immobility as well as during episodes of locomotion. Thus, a principal effect of CRF was to potentiate the level of neuronal firing in a population of medullary neurons with locomotor-related properties. Due to the route of administration CRF may have acted on multiple central nervous system sites to enhance locomotion, but the results are consistent with neurophysiological effects involving medullary locomotion-regulating neurons.

  5. Corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) modulates fear-induced alterations in sleep in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Linghui; Tang, Xiangdong; Wellman, Laurie L; Liu, Xianling; Sanford, Larry D

    2009-06-18

    Contextual fear significantly reduces rapid eye movement sleep (REM) during post-exposure sleep in mice and rats. Corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) plays a major role in CNS responses to stressors. We examined the influence of CRF and astressin (AST), a non-specific CRF antagonist, on sleep after contextual fear in BALB/c mice. Male mice were implanted with transmitters for recording sleep via telemetry and with a guide cannula aimed into the lateral ventricle. Recordings for vehicle and handling control were obtained after ICV microinjection of saline (SAL) followed by exposure to a novel chamber. Afterwards, the mice were subjected to shock training (20 trials, 0.5 mA, 0.5 s duration) for 2 sessions. After training, separate groups of mice received ICV microinjections of SAL (0.2 microl, n=9), CRF (0.4 microg, n=8), or AST (1.0 microg, n=8) prior to exposure to the shock context alone. Sleep was then recorded for 20 h (8-hour light and 12-hour dark period). Compared to handling control, contextual fear significantly decreased REM during the 8-h light period in mice receiving SAL and in mice receiving CRF, but not in the mice receiving AST. Mice receiving CRF exhibited reductions in REM during the 12-h dark period after contextual fear, whereas mice receiving SAL or AST did not. CRF also reduced non-REM (NREM) delta (slow wave) amplitude in the EEG. Only mice receiving SAL prior to contextual fear exhibited significant reductions in NREM and total sleep. These findings demonstrate a role for the central CRF system in regulating alterations in sleep induced by contextual fear.

  6. Altered Responses to Cold Environment in Urocortin 1 and Corticotropin-Releasing Factor Deficient Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bayan Chaker

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We examined core body temperature (CBT of urocortin 1 (UCN1 and corticotropin releasing factor (CRF knockout (KO mice exposed to 4°C for 2 h. UCN1KO mice showed higher average CBT during cold exposure as compared to WT. The CBT of male and female WT mice dropped significantly to 34.1 ± 2.4 and 34.9 ± 3.1 C at 4°C, respectively. In contrast, the CBT of male and female UCN1KO mice dropped only slightly after 2 h at 4°C to 36.8 ± 0.7 and 38.1 ± 0.5 C, respectively. WT female and male UCN1KO mice showed significant acclimatization to cold; however, female UCN1KO mice did not show such a significant acclimatization. CRFKO mice showed a dramatic decline in CBT from 38.2 ±  0.4 at 22°C to 26.1 ± 9.8 at 4°C for 2 h. The CRF/UCN1 double KO (dKO mice dropped their CBT to 32.5 ± 4.0 after 2 h exposure to 4°C. Dexamethasone treatment prevented the decline in CBT of the CRFKO and the dKO mice. Taken together, the data suggest a novel role for UCN1 in thermoregulation. The role of CRF is likely secondary to adrenal glucocorticoids, which have an important regulatory role on carbohydrate, fat, and protein metabolism.

  7. Corticotropin-releasing factor receptor type 1 and type 2 interaction in irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozu, Tsukasa; Okumura, Toshikatsu

    2015-08-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) displays chronic abdominal pain or discomfort with altered defecation, and stress-induced altered gut motility and visceral sensation play an important role in the pathophysiology. Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) is a main mediator of stress responses and mediates these gastrointestinal functional changes. CRF in brain and periphery acts through two subtype receptors such as CRF receptor type 1 (CRF1) and type 2 (CRF2), and activating CRF1 exclusively stimulates colonic motor function and induces visceral hypersensitivity. Meanwhile, several recent studies have demonstrated that CRF2 has a counter regulatory action against CRF1, which may imply that CRF2 inhibits stress response induced by CRF1 in order to prevent it from going into an overdrive state. Colonic contractility and sensation may be explained by the state of the intensity of CRF1 signaling. CRF2 signaling may play a role in CRF1-triggered enhanced colonic functions through modulation of CRF1 activity. Blocking CRF2 further enhances CRF-induced stimulation of colonic contractility and activating CRF2 inhibits stress-induced visceral sensitization. Therefore, we proposed the hypothesis, i.e., balance theory of CRF1 and CRF2 signaling as follows. Both CRF receptors may be activated simultaneously and the signaling balance of CRF1 and CRF2 may determine the functional changes of gastrointestinal tract induced by stress. CRF signaling balance might be abnormally shifted toward CRF1, leading to enhanced colonic motility and visceral sensitization in IBS. This theory may lead to understanding the pathophysiology and provide the novel therapeutic options targeting altered signaling balance of CRF1 and CRF2 in IBS.

  8. Corticortophin releasing factor 2 receptor agonist treatment significantly slows disease progression in mdx mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stevens Paula J

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Duchenne muscular dystrophy results from mutation of the dystrophin gene, causing skeletal and cardiac muscle loss of function. The mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy is widely utilized to evaluate the potential of therapeutic regimens to modulate the loss of skeletal muscle function associated with dystrophin mutation. Importantly, progressive loss of diaphragm function is the most consistent striated muscle effect observed in the mdx mouse model, which is the same as in patients suffering from Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Methods Using the mdx mouse model, we have evaluated the effect that corticotrophin releasing factor 2 receptor (CRF2R agonist treatment has on diaphragm function, morphology and gene expression. Results We have observed that treatment with the potent CRF2R-selective agonist PG-873637 prevents the progressive loss of diaphragm specific force observed during aging of mdx mice. In addition, the combination of PG-873637 with glucocorticoids not only prevents the loss of diaphragm specific force over time, but also results in recovery of specific force. Pathological analysis of CRF2R agonist-treated diaphragm muscle demonstrates that treatment reduces fibrosis, immune cell infiltration, and muscle architectural disruption. Gene expression analysis of CRF2R-treated diaphragm muscle showed multiple gene expression changes including globally decreased immune cell-related gene expression, decreased extracellular matrix gene expression, increased metabolism-related gene expression, and, surprisingly, modulation of circadian rhythm gene expression. Conclusion Together, these data demonstrate that CRF2R activation can prevent the progressive degeneration of diaphragm muscle associated with dystrophin gene mutation.

  9. Pathways involved in gut mucosal barrier dysfunction induced in adult rats by maternal deprivation: corticotrophin-releasing factor and nerve growth factor interplay

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    Neonatal maternal deprivation (NMD) increases gut paracellular permeability (GPP) through mast cells and nerve growth factor (NGF), and modifies corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF) and corticosterone levels. CRF, corticosterone and mast cells are involved in stress-induced mucosal barrier impairment. Consequently, this study aimed to specify whether corticosteronaemia and colonic expression of both preproCRF and CRF are modified by NMD, and to determine if altered expression may participate...

  10. Biodegradation of a biochar-modified waterborne polyacrylate membrane coating for controlled-release fertilizer and its effects on soil bacterial community profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zijun; Du, Changwen; Li, Ting; Shen, Yazhen; Zeng, Yin; Du, Jie; Zhou, Jianmin

    2015-06-01

    Biochar-modified polyacrylate-like polymers are promising waterborne polymer-based membrane coatings for controlled-release fertilizers. However, the effect of these membrane polymers on paddy soil is unknown. A soil incubation experiment was conducted using Fourier transform infrared photoacoustic spectroscopy to monitor the changes in the polymer-coated membranes in paddy soil, and Biolog EcoPlates and polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis were used to detect the effects of the membranes on soil bacterial community profiles. Compared to unmodified membranes, the biodegradation rate of the biochar-modified membrane was slower, and the membrane was more intact, which improved and guaranteed the controlled release of nutrients. Compared to the soil without membranes, the biochar-modified membranes, as well as unmodified ones, showed no significant impacts on the composition diversity of soil dominant bacterial community. The activity and functional diversity of soil culturable microbial community during the early stage of incubation were reduced by biochar-modified membranes due to the release of small amount of soluble organic materials but were both recovered in the 12(th) month of the incubation period. Therefore, the biochar-modified waterborne polyacrylate was environmentally friendly, demonstrating its potential both in the development of coated controlled-release fertilizers and in the utilization of crop residue.

  11. Effects of Electroacupuncture of Different Frequencies on the Release Profile of Endogenous Opioid Peptides in the Central Nerve System of Goats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Li Cheng

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the release profile of met-enkephalin, β-endorphin, and dynorphin-A in ruminants’ CNS, goats were stimulated by electroacupuncture of 0, 2, 40, 60, 80, or 100 Hz for 30 min. The pain threshold was measured using potassium iontophoresis. The peptide levels were determined with SABC immunohistochemisty. The results showed that 60 Hz increased pain threshold by 91%; its increasing rate was higher (P<0.01 than any other frequency did. 2 Hz and 100 Hz increased met-enkephalin immunoactivities (P<0.05 in nucleus accumbens, septal area, caudate nucleus, amygdala, paraventricular nucleus of hypothalamus, periaqueductal gray, dorsal raphe nucleus, and locus ceruleus. The two frequencies elicited β-endorphin release (P<0.05 in nucleus accumbens, septal area, supraoptic nucleus, ventromedial nucleus of hypothalamus, periaqueductal gray, dorsal raphe nucleus, locus ceruleus, solitary nucleus and amygdala. 60 Hz increased (P<0.05 met-enkephalin or β-endorphin immunoactivities in the nuclei and areas mentioned above, and habenular nucleus, substantia nigra, parabrachial nucleus, and nucleus raphe magnus. High frequencies increased dynorphin-A release (P<0.05 in spinal cord dorsal horn and most analgesia-related nuclei. It suggested that 60 Hz induced the simultaneous release of the three peptides in extensive analgesia-related nuclei and areas of the CNS, which may be contributive to optimal analgesic effects and species variation.

  12. Factors predicting sensory profile of 4 to 18 month old infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carina Pedrosa

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To identify environment factors predicting sensory profile of infants between 4 and 18 months old. METHODS: This cross-sectional study evaluated 97 infants (40 females e 57 males, with a mean age of 1.05±0.32 years with the Test of Sensory Functions in Infants (TSFI and also asked 97 parents and 11 kindergarten teachers of seven daycare centers to answer the Affordances in the Home Environment for Motor Development-Infant Scale (AHEMD-IS. The AHEMD-IS is a questionnaire that characterizes the opportunities in the home environment for infants between 3 and 18 months of age. We tested the association between affordances and the sensory profile of infants. Significant variables were entered into a regression model to determine predictors of sensory profile. RESULTS: The majority of infants (66% had a normal sensory profile and 34% were at risk or deficit. Affordances in the home were classified as adequate and they were good in the studied daycare centers. The results of the regression revealed that only daily hours in daycare center and daycare outside space influenced the sensory profile of infants, in particular the Ocular-Motor Control component. CONCLUSIONS: The sensory profile of infants was between normal and at risk. While the family home offered adequate affordances for motor development, the daycare centers of the infants involved demonstrated a good quantity and quality of affordances. Overall, we conclude that daily hours in the daycare center and daycare outside space were predictors of the sensory profile, particular on Ocular-Motor Control component.

  13. Towards an Enhancement of Organizational Information Security through Threat Factor Profiling (TFP) Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidi, Fatimah; Daud, Maslina; Ahmad, Sabariah; Zainuddin, Naqliyah; Anneisa Abdullah, Syafiqa; Jabar, Marzanah A.; Suriani Affendey, Lilly; Ishak, Iskandar; Sharef, Nurfadhlina Mohd; Zolkepli, Maslina; Nur Majdina Nordin, Fatin; Amat Sejani, Hashimah; Ramadzan Hairani, Saiful

    2017-09-01

    Information security has been identified by organizations as part of internal operations that need to be well implemented and protected. This is because each day the organizations face a high probability of increase of threats to their networks and services that will lead to information security issues. Thus, effective information security management is required in order to protect their information assets. Threat profiling is a method that can be used by an organization to address the security challenges. Threat profiling allows analysts to understand and organize intelligent information related to threat groups. This paper presents a comparative analysis that was conducted to study the existing threat profiling models. It was found that existing threat models were constructed based on specific objectives, thus each model is limited to only certain components or factors such as assets, threat sources, countermeasures, threat agents, threat outcomes and threat actors. It is suggested that threat profiling can be improved by the combination of components found in each existing threat profiling model/framework. The proposed model can be used by an organization in executing a proactive approach to incident management.

  14. Optimization of the Safety Factor Profile for High Noninductive Current Fraction Discharges in DIII-D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferron, J.R. [General Atomics, San Diego; Holcomb, C T [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Luce, T.C. [General Atomics, San Diego; Politzer, P. A. [General Atomics, San Diego; Turco, F. [Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU); White, A. E. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); DeBoo, J. C. [General Atomics; Doyle, E. J. [University of California, Los Angeles; Hyatt, A. W. [General Atomics, San Diego; La Haye, R. [General Atomics, San Diego; Murakami, Masanori [ORNL; Petrie, T W [General Atomics, San Diego; Petty, C C. [General Atomics, San Diego; Rhodes, T. L. [University of California, Los Angeles; Zeng, L. [University of California, Los Angeles

    2011-01-01

    In order to assess the optimum q profile for discharges in DIII-D with 100% of the current driven noninductively (f(NI) = 1), the self-consistent response of the plasma profiles to changes in the q profile was studied in high f(NI), high beta(N) discharges through a scan of q(min) and q(95) at two values of beta(N). As expected, both the bootstrap current fraction, f(BS), and f(NI) increased with q(95). The temperature and density profiles were found to broaden as either q(min) or beta(N) is increased. A consequence is that f(BS) does not continue to increase at the highest values of q(min). A scaling function that depends on q(min), q(95), and the peaking factor for the thermal pressure was found to represent well the f(BS)/beta(N) inferred from the experimental profiles. The changes in the shapes of the density and temperature profiles as beta(N) is increased modify the bootstrap current density (J(BS)) profile from peaked close to the axis to relatively flat in the region between the axis and the H-mode pedestal. Therefore, significant externally driven current density in the region inside the H-mode pedestal is required in addition to J(BS) in order to match the profiles of the noninductive current density (J(NI)) to the desired total current density (J). In this experiment, the additional current density was provided mostly by neutral beam current drive with the neutral-beam-driven current fraction 40-90% of f(BS). The profiles of J(NI) and J were most similar at q(min) approximate to 1.35-1.65, q(95) approximate to 6.8, where f(BS) is also maximum, establishing this q profile as the optimal choice for f(NI) = 1 operation in DIII-D with the existing set of external current drive sources.

  15. Improved cortisol exposure-time profile and outcome in patients with adrenal insufficiency: a prospective randomized trial of a novel hydrocortisone dual-release formulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johannsson, G; Nilsson, A G; Bergthorsdottir, R; Burman, P; Dahlqvist, P; Ekman, B; Engström, B E; Olsson, T; Ragnarsson, O; Ryberg, M; Wahlberg, J; Biller, B M K; Monson, J P; Stewart, P M; Lennernäs, H; Skrtic, S

    2012-02-01

    Patients with treated adrenal insufficiency (AI) have increased morbidity and mortality rate. Our goal was to improve outcome by developing a once-daily (OD) oral hydrocortisone dual-release tablet with a more physiological exposure-time cortisol profile. The aim was to compare pharmacokinetics and metabolic outcome between OD and the same daily dose of thrice-daily (TID) dose of conventional hydrocortisone tablets. We conducted an open, randomized, two-period, 12-wk crossover multicenter trial with a 24-wk extension at five university hospital centers. The trial enrolled 64 adults with primary AI; 11 had concomitant diabetes mellitus (DM). The same daily dose of hydrocortisone was administered as OD dual-release or TID. We evaluated cortisol pharmacokinetics. Compared with conventional TID, OD provided a sustained serum cortisol profile 0-4 h after the morning intake and reduced the late afternoon and the 24-h cortisol exposure. The mean weight (difference = -0.7 kg, P = 0.005), systolic blood pressure (difference = -5.5 mm Hg, P = 0.0001) and diastolic blood pressure (difference: -2.3 mm Hg; P = 0.03), and glycated hemoglobin (absolute difference = -0.1%, P = 0.0006) were all reduced after OD compared with TID at 12 wk. Compared with TID, a reduction in glycated hemoglobin by 0.6% was observed in patients with concomitant DM during OD (P = 0.004). The OD dual-release tablet provided a more circadian-based serum cortisol profile. Reduced body weight, reduced blood pressure, and improved glucose metabolism were observed during OD treatment. In particular, glucose metabolism improved in patients with concomitant DM.

  16. PEGylated PLGA Nanoparticles as Tumor Ecrosis Factor-α Receptor Blocking Peptide Carriers: Preparation,Characterization and Release in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Wei; YANG Anshu; LI Zhuoya; XU Huibi; YANG Xiangliang

    2007-01-01

    To assess the merits of PEGylated poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PEG-PLGA) nanoparticles as drug carriers for tumor necrosis factor-α receptor blocking peptide (TNFR-BP), PEG-PLGA copolymer,which could be used to prepare the stealth nanoparticles, was synthesized with methoxypolyethyleneglycol,DL-lactide and glycolide. The structure of PEG-PLGA was confirmed with 1H-NMR and FT-IR spectroscopy,and the molecular weight (MW) was determined by gel permeation chromatography. Fluorescent FITC-TNFR-BP was chosen as model protein and encapsulated within PEG-PLGA nanoparticles using the double emulsion method. Atomic force microscopy and photon correlation spectroscopy were employed to characterize the stealth nanoparticles fabricated for morphology, size with polydispersity index and zeta potential. Encapsulation efficiency (EE) and the release of FITC-TNFR-BP in nanoparticles in vitro were measured by the fluorescence measurement. The stealth nanoparticles were found to have the mean diameter less than 270 nm and zeta potential less than-20 mV. In all nanoparticle formulations, more than 45% of EE were obtained. FITC-TNFR-BP release from the PEG-PLGA nanoparticles exhibited a biphasic pattern, initial burst release and consequently sustained release. The experimental results show that PEG-PLGA nanoparticles possess the potential to develop as drug carriers for controlled release applications of TNFR-BP.

  17. [The profile of fragility and associated factors among the elderly registered in a Family Health Unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Patrícia Honório Silva; Fernandes, Marcos Henrique; Casotti, Cezar Augusto; Coqueiro, Raildo da Silva; Carneiro, José Ailton Oliveira

    2015-06-01

    The scope of this study was to identify the profile of fragility and associated factors among the elderly registered in a Family Health Unit. It involved an observational, exploratory, household -based and cross-sectional study conducted with 139 elderly individuals. The data were collected using a structured questionnaire requesting the following information: personal history, family and self-reported diseases, socio-demographic information, level of physical activity, behavior variables, number of falls in the last year, depressive symptoms, unintentional weight loss and fatigue. Anthropometric measurements (weight and height) were also taken and the body mass index (BMI) was calculated. Descriptive analyses and Pearson's chi-square test or Fisher's exact test were performed, with a significance level of p fragility among the elderly was: frail (16.9%), pre-frail (61.8%) and non-frail (21.3%), respectively. The fragility profile was associated with: age (p factors associated with this syndrome.

  18. Risk Factors and Plasma Glucose Profile of Gestational Diabetes in Omani Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitme, Havagiray R; Al Shibli, Sumaiya Abdallah Said; Al-Shamiry, Raya Mahmood

    2016-01-01

    Objectives We sought to conduct a detailed study on the risk factors of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) in Omani women to determine the actual and applicable risk factors and glucose profile in this population. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional case-control study using pregnant women diagnosed with GDM. Pregnant women without GDM were used as a control group. We collected information related to age, family history, prior history of pregnancy complications, age of marriage, age of first pregnancy, fasting glucose level, and oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) results from three hospitals in Oman through face-to-face interviews and hospital records. Results The median age of women with GDM was 33 years old (p 3 deliveries, height marriage at age family history, anthropometric profile, and age of first pregnancy and marriage should be considered while screening for GDM and determining the care needs of Omani women with GDM. PMID:27602192

  19. Distinct cytokine release profiles from human endothelial and THP-1 macrophage-like cells exposed to different amphotericin B formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turtinen, Lloyd W; Bremer, Lindsay A; Prall, David N; Schwartzhoff, Jenifer; Hartsel, Scott C

    2005-01-01

    Amphotericin B(AmB) formulations, Fungizone, and Amphotec caused substantially greater proinflammatory cytokine release than AmBisome (L-AMB) and Abelcet in TPA differentiated THP-1 macrophages as determined by antibody based protein arrays. Lipopolysaccharide but not AmB induced significant pro-inflammatory cytokines in human endothelial cells.

  20. Genomic and Metabolomic Profile Associated to Clustering of Cardio-Metabolic Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrachelli, Vannina G.; Rentero, Pilar; Mansego, María L.; Morales, Jose Manuel; Galan, Inma; Pardo-Tendero, Mercedes; Martinez, Fernando; Martin-Escudero, Juan Carlos; Briongos, Laisa; Chaves, Felipe Javier; Redon, Josep; Monleon, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Background To identify metabolomic and genomic markers associated with the presence of clustering of cardiometabolic risk factors (CMRFs) from a general population. Methods and Findings One thousand five hundred and two subjects, Caucasian, > 18 years, representative of the general population, were included. Blood pressure measurement, anthropometric parameters and metabolic markers were measured. Subjects were grouped according the number of CMRFs (Group 1: <2; Group 2: 2; Group 3: 3 or more CMRFs). Using SNPlex, 1251 SNPs potentially associated to clustering of three or more CMRFs were analyzed. Serum metabolomic profile was assessed by 1H NMR spectra using a Brucker Advance DRX 600 spectrometer. From the total population, 1217 (mean age 54±19, 50.6% men) with high genotyping call rate were analysed. A differential metabolomic profile, which included products from mitochondrial metabolism, extra mitochondrial metabolism, branched amino acids and fatty acid signals were observed among the three groups. The comparison of metabolomic patterns between subjects of Groups 1 to 3 for each of the genotypes associated to those subjects with three or more CMRFs revealed two SNPs, the rs174577_AA of FADS2 gene and the rs3803_TT of GATA2 transcription factor gene, with minimal or no statistically significant differences. Subjects with and without three or more CMRFs who shared the same genotype and metabolomic profile differed in the pattern of CMRFS cluster. Subjects of Group 3 and the AA genotype of the rs174577 had a lower prevalence of hypertension compared to the CC and CT genotype. In contrast, subjects of Group 3 and the TT genotype of the rs3803 polymorphism had a lower prevalence of T2DM, although they were predominantly males and had higher values of plasma creatinine. Conclusions The results of the present study add information to the metabolomics profile and to the potential impact of genetic factors on the variants of clustering of cardiometabolic risk factors

  1. Insulin-like growth factor and fibroblast growth factor expression profiles in growth-restricted fetal sheep pancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaochuan; Rozance, Paul J; Hay, William W; Limesand, Sean W

    2012-05-01

    Placental insufficiency results in intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), impaired fetal insulin secretion and less fetal pancreatic β-cell mass, partly due to lower β-cell proliferation rates. Insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) and fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) regulate fetal β-cell proliferation and pancreas development, along with transcription factors, such as pancreatic and duodenal homeobox 1 (PDX-1). We determined expression levels for these growth factors, their receptors and IGF binding proteins in ovine fetal pancreas and isolated islets. In the IUGR pancreas, relative mRNA expression levels of IGF-I, PDX-1, FGF7 and FGFR2IIIb were 64% (P pancreas compared with controls. In isolated islets from IUGR fetuses, IGF-II and IGFBP-2 mRNA concentrations were 1.5- and 3.7-fold greater (P < 0.05), and insulin mRNA was 56% less (P < 0.05) than control islets. The growth factor expression profiles for IGF and FGF signaling pathways indicate that declines in β-cell mass are due to decreased growth factor signals for both pancreatic progenitor epithelial cell and mature β-cell replication.

  2. Profiling healthy eaters. Determining factors that predict healthy eating practices among Dutch adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swan, Emily; Bouwman, Laura; Hiddink, Gerrit Jan; Aarts, Noelle; Koelen, Maria

    2015-06-01

    Research has identified multiple factors that predict unhealthy eating practices. However what remains poorly understood are factors that promote healthy eating practices. This study aimed to determine a set of factors that represent a profile of healthy eaters. This research applied Antonovsky's salutogenic framework for health development to examine a set of factors that predict healthy eating in a cross-sectional study of Dutch adults. Data were analyzed from participants (n = 703) who completed the study's survey in January 2013. Logistic regression analysis was performed to test the association of survey factors on the outcome variable high dietary score. In the multivariate logistic regression model, five factors contributed significantly (p eating, and self-efficacy for healthy eating. Findings complement what is already known of the factors that relate to poor eating practices. This can provide nutrition promotion with a more comprehensive picture of the factors that both support and hinder healthy eating practices. Future research should explore these factors to better understand their origins and mechanisms in relation to healthy eating practices. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Tyrosine Pretreatment Alleviates Suppression of Schedule-Controlled Responding Produced by Corticotropin Releasing Factor (CRF) in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    specific interaction with tyrosine hydroxylase . Thus, (3,13,14). alleviation of CRF with tyrosine may result from an affect of The 200 mg/kg dose of tyrosine...G., Dana, R.; Risch, S. C.; Koob, G. F. Activating aspartame, phenylalanine , and tyrosine. Fund. Appl. Toxicol. 16: and anxiogenic effects of...Onali, P. Corticotropin-releasing factor activates ty- Pharmacol. Biochem. Behav. 32:967-970: 1989. rosine hydroxylase in rat and mouse striatal

  4. Asbestos fibres and man made mineral fibres: induction and release of tumour necrosis factor-alpha from rat alveolar macrophages.

    OpenAIRE

    Ljungman, A G; Lindahl, M.; Tagesson, C

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--Mounting evidence suggests that asbestos fibres can stimulate alveolar macrophages to generate the potent inflammatory and fibrogenic mediator, tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), and that this may play an important part in the onset and development of airway inflammation and lung fibrosis due to asbestos fibre inhalation. Little is known, however, about the ability of other mineral fibres to initiate formation and release of TNF-alpha by alveolar macrophages. Therefore the ...

  5. Catalyst-dependent drug loading of LDI-glycerol polyurethane foams leads to differing controlled release profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivak, Wesley N; Pollack, Ian F; Petoud, Stéphane; Zamboni, William C; Zhang, Jianying; Beckman, Eric J

    2008-09-01

    The purpose of the present study was to develop biodegradable and biocompatible polyurethane foams based on lysine diisocyanate (LDI) and glycerol to be used as drug-delivery systems for the controlled release of 7-tert-butyldimethylsilyl-10-hydroxy-camptothecin (DB-67). The impact of urethane catalysts on cellular proliferation was assessed in an attempt to enhance the biocompatibility of our polyurethane materials. DB-67, a potent camptothecin analog, was then incorporated into LDI-glycerol polyurethane foams with two different amine urethane catalysts: 1,4-diazobicyclo[2.2.2]-octane (DABCO) and 4,4'-(oxydi-2,1-ethane-diyl)bismorpholine (DMDEE). The material morphologies of the polyurethane foams were analyzed via scanning electron microscopy, and DB-67 distribution was assessed by way of fluorescence microscopy. Both foam morphology and drug distribution were found to correlate to the amine catalyst used. Hydrolytic release rates of DB-67 from the polyurethane foams were catalyst dependent and also demonstrated greater drug loads being released at higher temperatures. The foams were capable of delivering therapeutic concentrations of DB-67 in vitro over an 11week test period. Cellular proliferation assays demonstrate that empty LDI-glycerol foams did not significantly alter the growth of malignant human glioma cell lines (Ppolyurethane foams were found to inhibit cellular proliferation by at least 75% in all the malignant glioma cell lines tested (Pcatalyst-dependent release of DB-67 from LDI-glycerol polyurethane foams, indicating their potential for use in implantable drug-delivery devices.

  6. ENDOTOXIN RELEASE AND TUMOR-NECROSIS-FACTOR FORMATION DURING CARDIOPULMONARY BYPASS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    JANSEN, NJG; VANOEVEREN, W; GU, YJ; VANVLIET, MH; EIJSMAN, L; WILDEVUUR, CRH

    1992-01-01

    Endotoxin, when released into the systemic circulation during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), might induce activation of plasmatic systems and blood cells during CPB, in addition to a material-dependent blood activation during CPB. However, the role of endotoxin in the development of this so-called wh

  7. Factor VII-activating protease: Mechanism and regulation of nucleosome release from dead cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Stephan

    2014-01-01

    Cell death is indispensable for tissue homeostasis and is a fundamental principle of inflammation and lymphocyte generation. Rapid removal and destruction of cellular corpses is critical and insufficient removal may lead to the release of cellular content into the environment. These immunogenic "hos

  8. Peptide profiling of bovine kefir reveals 236 unique peptides released from caseins during its production by starter culture or kefir grains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebner, Jennifer; Aşçı Arslan, Ayşe; Fedorova, Maria; Hoffmann, Ralf; Küçükçetin, Ahmet; Pischetsrieder, Monika

    2015-03-18

    Kefir has a long tradition in human nutrition due to its presupposed health promoting effects. To investigate the potential contribution of bioactive peptides to the physiological effects of kefir, comprehensive analysis of the peptide profile was performed by nano-ESI-LTQ-Orbitrap MS coupled to nano-ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography. Thus, 257 peptides were identified, mainly released from β-casein, followed by αS1-, κ-, and αS2-casein. Most (236) peptides were uniquely detected in kefir, but not in raw milk indicating that the fermentation step does not only increase the proteolytic activity 1.7- to 2.4-fold compared to unfermented milk, but also alters the composition of the peptide fraction. The influence of the microflora was determined by analyzing kefir produced from traditional kefir grains or commercial starter culture. Kefir from starter culture featured 230 peptide sequences and showed a significantly, 1.4-fold higher proteolytic activity than kefir from kefir grains with 127 peptides. A match of 97 peptides in both varieties indicates the presence of a typical kefir peptide profile that is not influenced by the individual composition of the microflora. Sixteen of the newly identified peptides were previously described as bioactive, including angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE)-inhibitory, antimicrobial, immunomodulating, opioid, mineral binding, antioxidant, and antithrombotic effects. The present study describes a comprehensive peptide profile of kefir comprising 257 sequences. The peptide list was used to identify 16 bioactive peptides with ACE-inhibitory, antioxidant, antithrombotic, mineral binding, antimicrobial, immunomodulating and opioid activity in kefir. Furthermore, it was shown that a majority of the kefir peptides were not endogenously present in the raw material milk, but were released from milk caseins by proteases of the microbiota and are therefore specific for the product. Consequently, the proteolytic activity and the

  9. Chitosan microparticles: influence of the gelation process on the release profile and oral bioavailability of albendazole, a class II compound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccirilli, Gisela N; García, Agustina; Leonardi, Darío; Mamprin, María E; Bolmaro, Raúl E; Salomón, Claudio J; Lamas, María C

    2014-11-01

    Encapsulation of albendazole, a class II compound, into polymeric microparticles based on chitosan-sodium lauryl sulfate was investigated as a strategy to improve drug dissolution and oral bioavailability. The microparticles were prepared by spray drying technique and further characterized by means of X-ray powder diffractometry, infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The formation of a novel polymeric structure between chitosan and sodium lauryl sulfate, after the internal or external gelation process, was observed by infrared spectroscopy. The efficiency of encapsulation was found to be between 60 and 85% depending on the internal or external gelation process. Almost spherically spray dried microparticles were observed using scanning electron microscopy. In vitro dissolution results indicated that the microparticles prepared by internal gelation released 8% of the drug within 30 min, while the microparticles prepared by external gelation released 67% within 30 min. It was observed that the AUC and Cmax values of ABZ from microparticles were greatly improved, in comparison with the non-encapsulated drug. In conclusion, the release properties and oral bioavailability of albendazole were greatly improved by using spraydried chitosan-sodium lauryl sulphate microparticles.

  10. Characterization of the release profile of doxycycline by PLGA microspheres adjunct to non-surgical periodontal therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura, Lucas Alves; Ribeiro, Fernanda Vieira; Aiello, Talita Bianchi; Duek, Eliana Ap De Rezende; Sallum, Enilson Antonio; Nociti Junior, Francisco Humberto; Casati, Márcio Zaffalon; Sallum, Antonio Wilson

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this pilot study was to assess the release of locally delivered doxycycline by poly (l-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) microspheres in the periodontal pocket of patients with chronic periodontitis, treated by non-surgical periodontal therapy. Nineteen sites of non-adjacent teeth of four different patients were evaluated. Five milligram of PLGA microspheres loaded with 16 doxycycline hyclate (DOX) was administered per periodontal site. To quantify DOX released into the periodontal pocket, gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) was collected from the sites on days 2, 5, 7, 10, 15, and 20 after DOX application, and high-performance liquid chromatography was performed. Data were statistically assessed by ANOVA/Tukey test. At days 2, 5, and 7, the DOX concentration was stably sustained (23.33 ± 1.38, 23.4 ± 1.82, and 22.75 ± 1.33 μg/mL, respectively), with no significant differences over these assessment times (p > 0.05). At days 10 and 15, a tendency was observed toward a decrease in DOX concentration (21.74 ± 0.91 and 20.53 ± 4.88 μg/mL, respectively), but a significant decrease in GCF drug concentration (19.69 ± 4.70 μg/mL) was observed only on day 20. The DOX delivery system developed demonstrated a successful sustained release after local administration, as an adjunct to non-surgical periodontal therapy.

  11. Cardiac regeneration by pharmacologically active microcarriers releasing growth factors and/or transporting adipose-derived stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monia Savi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We tested the hypothesis that cardiac regeneration through local delivery of adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs, activation of resident cardiac stem cells via growth factors (GFs [hepatocyte growth factor (HGF and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1:GFs] or both, are improved by pharmacologically active microcarriers (PAMs interacting with cells/molecules conveyed on their surface. Rats with one-month old myocardial infarction were treated with ASCs, ASCs+PAMs, GF-releasing PAMs, ASCs+GF-releasing PAMs or vehicle. Two weeks later, hemodynamic function and inducibility of ventricular arrhythmias (VAs were assessed. Eventually, the hearts were subjected to anatomical and immunohistochemical analyses. A significant ASCs engraftment and the largest improvement in cardiac mechanics occurred in ASC+GF-releasing PAM rats which by contrast were more vulnerable to VAs. Thus, PAMs may improve cell/GF-based cardiac regeneration although caution should be paid on the electrophysiological impact of their physical interaction with the myocardium.

  12. Dopamine D2 receptor desensitization by dopamine or corticotropin releasing factor in ventral tegmental area neurons is associated with increased glutamate release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimitvilai, Sudarat; Herman, Melissa; You, Chang; Arora, Devinder S; McElvain, Maureen A; Roberto, Marisa; Brodie, Mark S

    2014-07-01

    Neurons of the ventral tegmental area (VTA) are the source of dopaminergic (DAergic) input to important brain regions related to addiction. Prolonged exposure of these VTA neurons to moderate concentrations of dopamine (DA) causes a time-dependent decrease in DA-induced inhibition, a complex desensitization called DA inhibition reversal (DIR). DIR is mediated by conventional protein kinase C (cPKC) through concurrent stimulation of D2 and D1-like DA receptors, or by D2 stimulation concurrent with activation of some Gq-linked receptors. Corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) acts via Gq, and can modulate glutamater neurotransmission in the VTA. In the present study, we used brain slice electrophysiology to characterize the interaction of DA, glutamate antagonists, and CRF agonists in the induction and maintenance of DIR in the VTA. Glutamate receptor antagonists blocked induction but not maintenance of DIR. Putative blockers of neurotransmitter release and store-operated calcium channels blocked and reversed DIR. CRF and the CRF agonist urocortin reversed inhibition produced by the D2 agonist quinpirole, consistent with our earlier work indicating that Gq activation reverses quinpirole-mediated inhibition. In whole cell recordings, the combination of urocortin and quinpirole, but not either agent alone, increased spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs) in VTA neurons. Likewise, the combination of a D1-like receptor agonist and quinpirole, but not either agent alone, increased sEPSCs in VTA neurons. In summary, desensitization of D2 receptors induced by dopamine or CRF on DAergic VTA neurons is associated with increased glutamatergic signaling in the VTA.

  13. Acute stress modulates the histamine content of mast cells in the gastrointestinal tract through interleukin-1 and corticotropin-releasing factor release in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eutamene, Helene; Theodorou, Vassilia; Fioramonti, Jean; Bueno, Lionel

    2003-12-15

    Stress results in activation of the hypothalamic pituitary adrenal axis and affects illnesses such as neuroinflammatory syndrome. In vivo acute stress (restraint stress) induces gastrointestinal function disturbances through colonic mast cell activation. This study investigated the effect of acute stress in histamine content of colonic mast cells, and the central role of interleukin-1 (IL-1) and corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) in this effect. After a restraint stress session colonic segments were isolated and submitted to three protocols: (i) determination of histamine levels by radioimmunoassay (RIA) after incubation with 48/80 compound, (ii) evaluation by histology of mucosal mast cell (MMC) number and (iii) determination of histamine immunoreactivity of MMC. These procedures were conducted (1) in sham or stressed rats, (2) in stressed rats previously treated with intracerebroventricular (I.C.V.) IL-1ra or alpha-helical CRF9-41, (3) in naive rats pretreated with I.C.V. rhIL-1beta or CRF and (4) in rats treated with central IL-1beta and CRF plus alpha-helical CRF and IL-1ra, respectively (cross-antagonism reaction). Acute stress increases histamine content in colonic mast cells, without degranulation. I.C.V. pretreatment with IL-1ra or alpha-helical CRF9-41 blocked stress-induced mast cell histamine content increase. Both I.C.V. rhIL-1beta and CRF injections reproduced the stress-linked changes. I.C.V. treatment with CRF antagonist blocked I.C.V. rhIL-1beta-induced mast cell histamine content increase, whereas central IL-1ra did not affect stress events induced by I.C.V. CRF administration. These results suggest that in rats acute stress increases colonic mast cell histamine content. This effect is mediated by the release in cascade in the brain first of IL-1 and secondly of CRF.

  14. Factors influencing the predictability of soft tissue profile changes following mandibular setback surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobarak, K A; Krogstad, O; Espeland, L; Lyberg, T

    2001-06-01

    The objective of this cephalometric study was to assess long-term changes in the soft tissue profile following mandibular setback surgery and investigate the presence of factors that may influence the soft tissue response to skeletal repositioning. The subjects enrolled were 80 consecutive mandibular prognathism patients operated with bilateral sagittal split osteotomy and rigid fixation. Lateral cephalograms were taken at 6 occasions: immediate presurgical, immediate postsurgical, 2 and 6 months postsurgical, and 1 and 3 years postsurgical. The subjects were grouped according to gender and magnitude of setback. Ratios of soft tissue to hard tissue movements were calculated for the subgroups. Females generally demonstrated greater ratios than males with a statistically significant difference for the upper lip and chin (P < .05). Postsurgical alterations in the profiles were more predictable in patients with larger setbacks compared to patients with smaller ones. Skeletal relapse had a profound influence on long-term profile changes. Based on these findings, it is proposed that the database used in prediction software be adjusted to account for such factors in an attempt to improve the accuracy of computerized treatment simulations.

  15. Vertical Profiles of Latent Heat Release over the Global Tropics using TRMM Rainfall Products from December 1997 to November 2002

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, W.-K.; Lang, S.; Simpson, J.; Meneghini, R.; Halverson, J.; Johnson, R.; Adler, R.

    2003-01-01

    NASA Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) precipitation radar (PR) derived rainfall information will be used to estimate the four-dimensional structure of global monthly latent heating and rainfall profiles over the global tropics from December 1997 to November 2000. Rainfall, latent heating and radar reflectivity structures between El Nino (DJF 1997-98) and La Nina (DJF 1998-99) will be examined and compared. The seasonal variation of heating over various geographic locations (i.e., oceanic vs continental, Indian ocean vs west Pacific, Africa vs. S. America ) will also be analyzed. In addition, the relationship between rainfall, latent heating (maximum heating level), radar reflectivity and SST is examined and will be presented in the meeting. The impact of random error and bias in stratiform percentage estimates from PR on latent heating profiles is studied and will also be presented in the meeting. The Goddard Cumulus Ensemble Model is being used to simulate various mesoscale convective systems that developed in different geographic locations. Specifically, the model estimated rainfall, radar reflectivity and latent heating profiles will be compared to observational data collected from TRMM field campaigns over the South China Sea in 1998 (SCSMEX), Brazil in 1999 (TRMM-LBA), and the central Pacific in 1999 (KWAJEX). Sounding diagnosed heating budgets and radar reflectivity from these experiments can provide the means to validate (heating product) as well as improve the GCE model. Review of other latent heating algorithms will be discussed in the workshop.

  16. The nucleotide exchange factors Grp170 and Sil1 induce cholera toxin release from BiP to enable retrotranslocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jeffrey M; Inoue, Takamasa; Chen, Grace; Tsai, Billy

    2015-06-15

    Cholera toxin (CT) intoxicates cells by trafficking from the cell surface to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), where the catalytic CTA1 subunit hijacks components of the ER-associated degradation (ERAD) machinery to retrotranslocate to the cytosol and induce toxicity. In the ER, CT targets to the ERAD machinery composed of the E3 ubiquitin ligase Hrd1-Sel1L complex, in part via the activity of the Sel1L-binding partner ERdj5. This J protein stimulates BiP's ATPase activity, allowing BiP to capture the toxin. Presumably, toxin release from BiP must occur before retrotranslocation. Here, using loss-and gain-of-function approaches coupled with binding studies, we demonstrate that the ER-resident nucleotide exchange factors (NEFs) Grp170 and Sil1 induce CT release from BiP in order to promote toxin retrotranslocation. In addition, we find that after NEF-dependent release from BiP, the toxin is transferred to protein disulfide isomerase; this ER redox chaperone is known to unfold CTA1, which allows the toxin to cross the Hrd1-Sel1L complex. Our data thus identify two NEFs that trigger toxin release from BiP to enable successful retrotranslocation and clarify the fate of the toxin after it disengages from BiP.

  17. A tubular gelatin scaffold capable of the time-dependent controlled release of epidermal growth factor and mitomycin C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jixiang; Yang, Fanwen; He, Fupo; Tian, Xiumei; Tang, Shuo; Chen, Xiaoming

    2015-11-01

    A tubular gelatin scaffold for the time-dependent controlled release of epidermal growth factor (EGF) and mitomycin C (MMC) was fabricated. EGF was incorporated using silk fibroin carriers, and MMC was planted using polylactide (PLA) microspheres. The relationship between scaffold properties and crosslinking degrees was evaluated. As the crosslinking degree was increased from 23.7% to 65.3%, the mechanical properties of the scaffold obviously improved, and the compressive modulus increased to approximately 65kPa. The mass degradation of the scaffold was also controlled from 9 days to approximately 1 month. In vitro release tests indicated that the scaffold mainly released EGF in the early period and MMC in the later period. Urethral epithelial cells (UECs) and urethral scar derived fibroblast cells (UFCs) were coseeded in the scaffold at a ratio of 1:1. After 9 days of coculture, immunostaining results displayed that the proportion of UECs continuously increased to approximately 71%. These changes in cell proportion were confirmed by the results of Western blot analysis. Therefore, the scaffold promoted the growth but inhibited the regeneration of UFCs. This scaffold for time-dependent controlled release of multiple biofactors may be potentially useful in urethral reconstruction and other tissue engineering studies.

  18. THE EFFECT OF BASIC FIBROBLAST GROWTH FACTOR SLOW-RELEASE MICROCAPSULES ON ANGIOGENESIS IN INFARCTED RABBIT MYOCARDIUM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱洪生; 连锋; 郑家豪

    2000-01-01

    Objectives. To observe the effect of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) slow-release microcapsules on angiogen esis in infarcted myocardial regions. Methods. Myocardial infarction was induced in 24 New Zealand rabbits by ligating the root of left anterior de scending coronary artery. Group Ⅰ (n = 8) served as control, group Ⅱ (n = 8) as a blank microcapsule group, group Ⅲ (n = 8, each microcapsule contains lμg bFGF) as micrpcapsule group. In group Ⅱ and Ⅲ, 5 blank microcapsules or bFGF slow-release microcapsules were implanted into myocardium underneath the epicardium between the left ante fior descending coronary artery and left circumflex artery. Infarct size was evaluated by infarcted weight/left ventricle weight ratio and angiogenesis was evaluated by immunohistochemical examinations 5 weeks later. Results. As compared with group Ⅰ and Ⅱ, rabbits treated with bFGF slow-release microcapsules showed higher microvessel counts (group Ⅰ 37.75 + 4.50, group Ⅱ 38.37 ± 4.98, vs. group Ⅲ 135.50 ± 4.81, P < 0. 001 ) and less infarcted weight/left ventricle weight (group Ⅰ 16.8% ± 0.4%, group Ⅱ 16.7% ± 0.5%, vs. group Ⅲ 7.0% ± 0.2% ,P< 0.001). Conclusions. Subepicardial administration of bFGF slow-release microcapsule in the infarcted rabbit model results in effective angiogenesis and reduction in infarct size.

  19. Influence of oxygen and long term storage on the profile of volatile compounds released from polymeric multilayer food contact materials sterilized by gamma irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salafranca, Jesús, E-mail: fjsl@unizar.es [Aragón Institute of Engineering Research (I3A), EINA, Department of Analytical Chemistry, University of Zaragoza, María de Luna 3 (Torres Quevedo Bldg.), 50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Clemente, Isabel, E-mail: isabelclemente1984@gmail.com [Aragón Institute of Engineering Research (I3A), EINA, Department of Analytical Chemistry, University of Zaragoza, María de Luna 3 (Torres Quevedo Bldg.), 50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Isella, Francesca, E-mail: Francesca.Isella@goglio.it [Goglio S.p.A. Packaging Division, Via dell' Industria 7, 21020 Daverio (Italy); Nerín, Cristina, E-mail: cnerin@unizar.es [Aragón Institute of Engineering Research (I3A), EINA, Department of Analytical Chemistry, University of Zaragoza, María de Luna 3 (Torres Quevedo Bldg.), 50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Bosetti, Osvaldo, E-mail: Osvaldo.Bosetti@goglio.it [Goglio S.p.A. Packaging Division, Via dell' Industria 7, 21020 Daverio (Italy)

    2015-06-09

    Highlights: • 13 different food-use multilayers unirradiated and gamma-irradiated were studied. • 60–80 compounds/sample were identified by SPME–GC–MS even after 8-month storage. • Volatile profile of air- and N{sub 2}-filled bags greatly differed after irradiation. • Principal component analysis classified the samples into 4 groups. • Migration from irradiated materials to vapor phase was much lower than EU limits. - Abstract: The profile of volatile compounds released from 13 different multilayer polymeric materials for food use, before and after their exposure to gamma radiation, has been assessed by solid-phase microextraction–gas chromatography–mass spectrometry. Thermosealed bags of different materials were filled with either air or nitrogen to evaluate the oxygen influence. One-third of the samples were analyzed without irradiation, whereas the rest were irradiated at 15 and 25 kGy. Half of the samples were processed just after preparation and the other half was stored for 8 months at room temperature prior to analysis. Very significant differences between unirradiated and irradiated bags were found. About 60–80 compounds were released and identified per sample. A huge peak of 1,3-ditertbutylbenzene was present in most of the irradiated samples. An outstanding reproducibility in all the variables evaluated (chromatograms, oxygen percentage, volume of bags) was noticed. Independently of filling gas, the results of unirradiated materials were almost identical. In contrast, the chromatographic profile and the odor of irradiated bags filled with nitrogen were completely different to those filled with air. Principal component analysis was performed and 86.9% of the accumulated variance was explained with the first two components. The migration of compounds from irradiated materials to the vapor phase was much lower than the limits established in the Commission Regulation (EU) No 10/2011.

  20. Power profiling of Cholesky and QR factorizations on distributed memory systems

    KAUST Repository

    Bosilca, George

    2012-08-30

    This paper presents the power profile of two high performance dense linear algebra libraries on distributed memory systems, ScaLAPACK and DPLASMA. From the algorithmic perspective, their methodologies are opposite. The former is based on block algorithms and relies on multithreaded BLAS and a two-dimensional block cyclic data distribution to achieve high parallel performance. The latter is based on tile algorithms running on top of a tile data layout and uses fine-grained task parallelism combined with a dynamic distributed scheduler (DAGuE) to leverage distributed memory systems. We present performance results (Gflop/s) as well as the power profile (Watts) of two common dense factorizations needed to solve linear systems of equations, namely Cholesky and QR. The reported numbers show that DPLASMA surpasses ScaLAPACK not only in terms of performance (up to 2X speedup) but also in terms of energy efficiency (up to 62 %). © 2012 Springer-Verlag (outside the USA).

  1. DNA methylation profiling of transcription factor genes in normal lymphocyte development and lymphomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivascu, Claudia; Wasserkort, Reinhold; Lesche, Ralf; Dong, Jun; Stein, Harald; Thiel, Andreas; Eckhardt, Florian

    2007-01-01

    Transcription factors play a crucial role during hematopoiesis by orchestrating lineage commitment and determining cellular fate. Although tight regulation of transcription factor expression appears to be essential, little is known about the epigenetic mechanisms involved in transcription factor gene regulation. We have analyzed DNA methylation profiles of 13 key transcription factor genes in primary cells of the hematopoietic cascade, lymphoma cell lines and lymph node biopsies of diffuse large B-cell- and T-cell-non-Hodgkin lymphoma patients. Several of the transcription factor genes (SPI1, GATA3, TCF-7, Etv5, c-maf and TBX21) are differentially methylated in specific cell lineages and stages of the hematopoietic cascade. For some genes, such as SPI1, Etv5 and Eomes, we found an inverse correlation between the methylation of the 5' untranslated region and expression of the associated gene suggesting that these genes are regulated by DNA methylation. Differential methylation is not limited to cells of the healthy hematopoietic cascade, as we observed aberrant methylation of c-maf, TCF7, Eomes and SPI1 in diffuse large B-cell lymphomas. Our results suggest that epigenetic remodelling of transcription factor genes is a frequent mechanism during hematopoietic development. Aberrant methylation of transcription factor genes is frequently observed in diffuse large B-cell lymphomas and might have a functional role during tumorigenesis.

  2. Regulatory Perspectives on Strength-Dependent Dissolution Profiles and Biowaiver Approaches for Immediate Release (IR) Oral Tablets in New Drug Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez-Sharp, Sandra; Delvadia, Poonam R; Dorantes, Angelica; Duan, John; Externbrink, Anna; Gao, Zongming; Ghosh, Tapash; Miksinski, Sarah Pope; Seo, Paul

    2016-05-01

    Dissolution profile comparisons are used by the pharmaceutical industry to assess the similarity in the dissolution characteristics of two formulations to decide whether the implemented changes, usually minor/moderate in nature, will have an impact on the in vitro/in vivo performance of the drug product. When similarity testing is applied to support the approval of lower strengths of the same formulation, the traditional approach for dissolution profile comparison is not always applicable for drug products exhibiting strength-dependent dissolution and may lead to incorrect conclusions about product performance. The objective of this article is to describe reasonable biopharmaceutic approaches for developing a biowaiver strategy for low solubility, proportionally similar/non-proportionally similar in composition immediate release drug products that exhibit strength-dependent dissolution profiles. The paths highlighted in the article include (1) approaches to address biowaiver requests, such as the use of multi-unit dissolution testing to account for sink condition differences between the higher and lower strengths; (2) the use of a single- vs. strength-dependent dissolution method; and (3) the use of single- vs. strength-dependent dissolution acceptance criteria. These approaches are cost- and time-effective and can avoid unnecessary bioequivalence studies.

  3. Comparison of risk factor profiles in incidental Lewy body disease and Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frigerio, Roberta; Fujishiro, Hiroshige; Maraganore, Demetrius M; Klos, Kevin J; DelleDonne, Anthony; Heckman, Michael G; Crook, Julia E; Josephs, Keith A; Parisi, Joseph E; Boeve, Bradley F; Dickson, Dennis W; Ahlskog, J Eric

    2009-09-01

    To explore whether associations of potential risk factors for incidental Lewy body disease (iLBD) are similar to those for Parkinson disease (PD). Brain autopsy study (1988-2004) of subjects without evidence of neurodegenerative disease or tremor who were evaluated by at least 1 physician within 1 year of death. Researchers analyzed incidental Lewy pathology blinded to clinical abstraction. Olmsted County, Minnesota. Subjects Residents of Olmsted County and the immediate vicinity aged older than 60 years. Whether risk factors previously associated with PD in Olmsted County are also associated with iLBD. Of 235 subjects, 34 had iLBD (14.5%). The overall risk factor profiles for iLBD and PD were fairly similar between the 2 sets of odds ratio (OR) estimates, with 11 of 16 ORs in the same direction. Prior Olmsted County studies documented 7 risk factors with statistically significant associations with PD; for physician occupation and caffeine intake, the ORs for iLBD were in the same direction and statistically significant, whereas for education, head injury, and number of children, they were in the same direction but not significant; they were in the opposite direction but not statistically significant for depression and anxiety. Incidental Lewy body disease was not associated with various end-of-life conditions or causes of death, though these patients were slightly older and more likely cachectic. Based on this exploratory study, iLBD and PD appear to have similar risk factor profiles. Thus, at least some cases of iLBD could represent preclinical PD, arrested PD, or a partial syndrome due to a lesser burden of causative factors. Incidental Lewy body disease is not explained by nonspecific end-of-life brain insults.

  4. Effects of morphine on hypothalamic corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF, norepinephrine and dopamine in non-stressed and stressed rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suemaru,Shuso

    1985-12-01

    Full Text Available The effects of morphine on the hypothalamic corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF, norepinephrine (NE and dopamine (DA concentrations were investigated in non-stressed and stressed rats. Acutely administered morphine stimulated both the synthesis and release of CRF in the hypothalamus, thereby activating the pituitary-adrenocortical system in non-stressed rats, but inhibited the stress-induced CRF synthesis and ACTH-corticosterone secretion. Either a morphine or ether-laparotomy stress reduced NE and DA concentrations in the hypothalamus. A pretreatment with morphine inhibited the stress-induced reduction in the hypothalamic NE and DA concentrations, and induced a significant increase in the DA concentration. These observations suggest that hypothalamic NE and DA are involved in morphine-induced changes in hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA activity and that endogenous opiates have a role in regulating CRF secretion by interacting with hypothalamic biogenic amines.

  5. Bacteria-induced release of white cell--and platelet-derived vascular endothelial growth factor in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans Jørgen; Werther, K; Mynster, T;

    2001-01-01

    endothelial growth factor (VEGF), may be involved in this process. Therefore, we studied the in vitro release of VEGF from white blood cells and platelets stimulated by bacterial antigens and supernatants from stored red cell components. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Eight units of whole blood (WB) and eight units...... of the supernatants were removed from the units and frozen at -80 degrees C. WB from other healthy donors was stimulated for 2 h with sodium chloride (controls), with Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS) alone, or with LPS plus supernatants from the non-filtered or prestorage leucofiltered WB units (diluted 1....... CONCLUSIONS: Extracellular VEGF may accumulate in non-filtered red cell components, but this can be prevented by prestorage leucocyte depletion using filtration. In addition, bacterial antigens appear to induce release of VEGF from white blood cells and platelets. Addition of supernatants from stored, non...

  6. Study on the sustained-release profile of nano selenium chitosan composite%纳米硒-壳聚糖复合物缓释作用研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴永军

    2012-01-01

    High scattered red amorphous nano selenium was synthesized in the presence of food-grade sodium alginate,employing SeO2 and NH2OH·HCl as the reactants.Then Nano selenium/chitosan composite particles were synthesized by compounding Nano selenium with chitosan and corn starch.The selenium sustained-release behavior of complex had been studied in simulation digestive juice,some factors influencing the release rate of selenium were systematically investigated,such as the pOH of simulation digestive juice,the sustained-release temperature and time.Experiments showed that Nano selenium complex was fit for slow-release.The optimal sustained-release conditions as follows:the pOH of simulation digestive juice was 12.8,sustained-release temperature was 38℃,sustained-release time was 2.8h.Under the condition,the release rate of selenium was up to 68.43%.The analysis capability of model was significant as the relative error between experimental result and model predicted value was 0.48%.%以盐酸羟胺、亚硒酸为反应物,食品级海藻酸钠为软模板,制备了分散性良好的红色无定形纳米硒。辅以壳聚糖、玉米淀粉,合成出了纳米硒-壳聚糖复合颗粒,在模拟消化液中研究了复合物的硒缓释行为,考察了模拟消化液pOH、缓释温度、缓释时间对硒释放率的影响。结果表明,含硒复合物适合于缓释,最佳缓释条件为:模拟消化液pOH=12.80,缓释温度38℃,缓释2.8h,纳米硒-壳聚糖复合物的硒释放率达到68.43%,实测结果与模型预测值的相对误差仅为0.48%。

  7. Surgical wound healing using hemostatic gauze scaffold loaded with nanoparticles containing sustained-release granulocyte colony-stimulating factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan W

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Weien Yuan1,2, Zhenguo Liu11Department of Neurology, Xinhua Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, 2School of Pharmacy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, People's Republic of ChinaBackground: The therapeutic strategies for malignant melanoma are still cancer chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and tumor resection. However, these therapeutic strategies often lead to a reduced neutrophilic granulocyte count or loss of more blood after surgical tumor resection. In this study, we developed a formulation of hemostatic gauze impregnated with sustained-release granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF with increasing of the neutrophilic granulocyte count in the blood following chemotherapy and decreasing blood loss after surgical tumor resection.Methods: We designed a formulation with both hemostatic properties and increased neutrophil content to be used in cancer chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and tumor resection, comprising a hemostatic gauze as a scaffold and (G-CSF-loaded dextran nanoparticles coated with polylactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA solution fabricated by direct spray-painting onto the scaffold and then vacuum-dried at room temperature. The performance of this system was evaluated in vitro and in vivo.Results: Nearly zero-order release of G-CSF was recorded for 12–14 days, and the cumulative release of G-CSF retained over 90% of its bioactivity in a NFS-60 cell line proliferation assay when the scaffold was incubated in phosphate-buffered saline (pH 7.4 at 37°C. The in vivo hemostatic efficacy of this formulation was greater than that of native G-CSF, the scaffold directly spray-painted with G-CSF solution or PLGA organic solution as a coating, or when a blank scaffold was covered with the coating.Conclusion: Our results suggest that this formulation has both hemostatic properties and increased neutrophil activity.Keywords: hemostatic gauze scaffold, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, bioactivity

  8. Sequential antibiotic and growth factor releasing chitosan-PAAm semi-IPN hydrogel as a novel wound dressing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulat, Mehlika; Kahraman, Anıl Sera; Tan, Nur; Gümüşderelioğlu, Menemşe

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to prepare a novel wound dressing material which provides burst release of an antibiotic in combination with sustained release of growth factor delivery. This might be beneficial for the prevention of infections and to stimulate wound healing. As a wound dressing material, the semi-interpenetrating network (semi-IPN) hydrogel based on polyacrylamide (PAAm) and chitosan (CS) was synthesized via free radical polymerization. Ethylene glycol dimethacrylate was used for cross-linking of PAAm to form semi-IPN hydrogel. The hydrogel shows high water content (∼1800%, in dry basis) and stable swelling characteristics in the pH range of the wound media (∼4.0-7.4). The antibiotic, piperacillin-tazobactam, which belongs to the penicillin group was loaded into the hydrogel. The therapeutic serum dose of piperacillin-tazobactam for topic introduction was reached at 1st hour of the release. Additionally, in order to increase the mitogenic activity of hydrogel, epidermal growth factor (EGF) was embedded into the CS-PAAm in different amounts. Cell culture studies were performed with L929 mouse fibroblasts and the simulated cell growth was investigated by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. The successful sustained release behavior of CS-PAAm hydrogel for EGF maintained the presence of EGF in the culture up to 5 days and the highest mitochondrial activities were recorded for the 0.4 μg EGF-loaded/mg of hydrogel group. In conclusion, CS-PAAm semi-IPN hydrogel loaded with piperacillin-tazobactam and EGF could be proposed for an effective system in wound-healing management.

  9. Effects of hydrocolloids addition on the retention and release profile of diacetyl and (--α-pinene in model reduced fat salad dressings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grażyna Bortnowska

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Background. Salad dressings due to their gustatory and nutritious advantages have been very often used in many food products. Traditional dressings usually contain large amount of fat (20-65%. Reduction of its content in such systems in most cases leads to their physical destabilization and causes worsening of sensory properties particularly because of increase in volatility of lipophilic aroma compounds which have been mostly found in food products. The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of hydrocolloid type and concentration on the retention and release profile of diacetyl and (--α-pinene in model reduced fat salad dressings formed with sodium caseinate. Material and methods. Model reduced fat salad dressings containing 10 wt% vegetable fat and stabilized by both 1 wt% sodium caseinate and 0.01-0.2 wt% hydrocolloids (xanthan gum, guar gum, gum arabic, native pregelatinised rice starch – Remyline XS-DR-P and acetylated distarch phosphate – Microlys CA – produced from potato starch were investigated. The samples were flavoured with diacetyl or (--α-pinene at concentration of 0.1 wt% for each flavour compound. Following measurements were done: dressings characteristics (oil droplet size and distribution, apparent viscosity, thermodynamic and kinetic stability, stability of the odorants (relative retention and release profile and odour intensity by method using scale. Results. The studies showed significant dependence (α £ 0.001 between relative retention of the investigated odorants and hydrocolloid type as well as concentration. Moreover, it was detected that the values of persistence index of flavour compounds (related to the release profile were in majority significantly correlated (α £ 0.05 with viscosity and creaming stability of the dressings, whereas relatively low and mostly statistically insignificantly with mean droplet size (D[3,2]. Furthermore, significant correlation values (α £ 0.05 were

  10. Studying wedge factors and beam profiles for physical and enhanced dynamic wedges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Misbah

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to investigate variation in Varian′s Physical and Enhanced Dynamic Wedge Factors (WF as a function of depth and field size. The profiles for physical wedges (PWs and enhanced dynamic wedges (EDWs were also measured using LDA-99 array and compared for confirmation of EDW angles at different depths and field sizes. WF measurements were performed in water phantom using cylindrical 0.66 cc ionization chamber. WF was measured by taking the ratio of wedge and open field ionization data. A normalized wedge factor (NWF was introduced to circumvent large differences between wedge factors for different wedge angles. A strong linear dependence of PW Factor (PWF with depth was observed. Maximum variation of 8.9% and 4.1% was observed for 60° PW with depth at 6 and 15 MV beams respectively. The variation in EDW Factor (EDWF with depth was almost negligible and less than two per cent. The highest variation in PWF as a function of field size was 4.1% and 3.4% for thicker wedge (60° at 6 and 15 MV beams respectively and decreases with decreasing wedge angle. EDWF shows strong field size dependence and significant variation was observed for all wedges at both photon energies. Differences in profiles between PW and EDW were observed on toe and heel sides. These differences were dominant for larger fields, shallow depths, thicker wedges and low energy beam. The study indicated that ignoring depth and field size dependence of WF may result in under/over dose to the patient especially doing manual point dose calculation.

  11. Carbon Monoxide Poisoning in the Region of Fez-Boulemane, Morocco: Epidemiological Profile and Risk Factors (2009-2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Awatef Tahouri

    2013-12-01

    How to cite this article: Tahouri A, Lyoussi B, Achour S. Carbon Monoxide Poisoning in the Region of Fez-Boulemane, Morocco: Epidemiological Profile and Risk Factors (2009-2012. Asia Pac J Med Toxicol 2013;2:131-5.

  12. Modulating protein release profiles by incorporating hyaluronic acid into PLGA microparticles Via a spray dryer equipped with a 3-fluid nozzle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wan, Feng; Maltesen, Morten Jonas; Andersen, Sune Klint

    2014-01-01

    obtained. Addition of HA in inner feed solutions increased the feed viscosity, but with no influence on the surface tension. All inner feed solutions showed non-Newtonian shear thinning behavior and the rheological properties were not time dependent. The CLSM and XPS analyses suggested a core-shell like...... with or without HA were prepared using a spray dryer equipped with a 3-fluid nozzle. The effects of HA on the surface tension and the rheological behavior of the inner feed solution were investigated. The physicochemical properties of the resulting microparticles were characterized using scanning electron......: The present work demonstrates the potential of HA to modulate protein release profile from PLGA microparticle formulations produced via spray drying using 3-fluid nozzle....

  13. Release Profile and Inhibition Test of The Nanoparticles A. Paniculata Extract as Inhibitor of α-Glucosidase in The Process of Carbohydrates Breakdown Into Glucose Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imansari, Farisa; Sahlan, Muhammad; Arbianti, Rita

    2017-07-01

    Andrographis paniculata (A.paniculata) contain the main active substances Andrographolide which helps lower glucose levels in diabetics by inhibiting the enzyme α-glucosidase. The ability of the extract A.paniculata in lowering glucose levels will increase with the technique encapsulation with a coating of composition Chitosan-STPP as a drug delivery to the target organ. This study aimed to get an overview of A.paniculata release profile of nanoparticles in a synthetic fluid media with various concentrations of coating and inhibition testing nasty shard extract in inhibiting the enzyme α-glucosidase. This research resulted in nanoparticles by coating efficiency and loading capacity of chitosan greatest variation of 2% and 1% STPP 60% and 46.29%. chitosan greatest variation of 2% and 1% STPP 60% and 46.29%. The ability of A.paniculata extracts as α-glucosidase enzyme inhibitors has been demonstrated in this study, the percent inhibition of 33.17%.

  14. Pharmacokinetic profile of a new controlled-release isosorbide-5-mononitrate 60 mg scored tablet (Monoket Multitab).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockis, Armel; De Bruyn, Steven; Deroubaix, Xavier; Jeanbaptiste, Bernard; Lebacq, Edouard; Nollevaux, Fabrice; Poli, Gianluigi; Acerbi, Daniela

    2002-01-01

    The influences of food, tablet splitting, and fractional dosing on the pharmacokinetics of a new controlled-release double-scored tablet containing 60 mg isosorbide-5-mononitrate (Monoket Multitab) were investigated in healthy male volunteers. Food interaction was evaluated after single dose administration under fasted conditions and after a standard high-fat breakfast. The effect of tablet splitting was assessed at steady-state, after 5 days of once daily dosing with the tablet taken intact or trisected. The influence of fractional dosing was assessed after 1 and 6 days of daily regimen of 40 mg in the morning (2/3 of a tablet) and 20 mg in the evening (1/3 of a tablet). The pharmacokinetics of isosorbide-5-mononitrate after taking the tablet intact or in three fragments were very similar with a mere 10% increase of maximum plasma concentration (C(max)) for the latter, while the time to peak (T(max)) decreased from 5 to 4 h and areas under the concentration vs. time curves (AUCs) were virtually unchanged. Morning trough concentration reached 53 and 46 ng/ml, respectively. Administration of the intact tablet after a high-fat breakfast increased C(max) by 18% and AUC by 21%, and slightly delayed T(max) from 5 to 6h. During fractional dosing, morning and evening C(max) reached 364 and 315 ng/ml on the first day, and 373 and 300 ng/ml on the 6th day, respectively. The ratio of AUC(0-24 h) on the last day to AUC(infinity) on the first day, was 82.1% (confidence limits 71.7-94.1%) possibly resulting from peripheral volume expansion. The release characteristics of Monoket Multitab are thus moderately influenced by concomitant intake of food and to a very minor extent by tablet breaking. Fractional dosing allows to achieve lower peak and higher morning trough levels, while total exposure is comparable to that during once daily dosing (AUC(0-24 h, s.s.) of 5.55+/-1.78 and 5.71+/-1.08 microg h/ml).

  15. Combination of niacin extended-release and simvastatin results in a less atherogenic lipid profile than atorvastatin monotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Insull Jr

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available William Insull Jr1, Peter P Toth2, H Robert Superko3, Roopal B Thakkar4, Scott Krause4, Ping Jiang4, Rhea A Parreno4, Robert J Padley41Baylor College of Medicine and Methodist Hospital, Houston, Texas; 2University of Illinois College of Medicine, Peoria, Illinois; 3Celera, Alameda, California, Mercer University, Atlanta, Georgia; 4Abbott, Abbott Park, Illinois, USAObjective: To compare the effects of combination niacin extended-release + simvastatin (NER/S versus atorvastatin alone on apolipoproteins and lipid fractions in a post hoc analysis from SUPREME, a study which compared the lipid effects of niacin extended-release + simvastatin and atorvastatin in patients with hyperlipidemia or mixed dyslipidemia.Patients and methods: Patients (n = 137 with dyslipidemia (not previously receiving statin therapy or having discontinued any lipid-altering treatment 4–5 weeks prior to the study received NER/S (1000/40 mg/day for four weeks, then 2000/40 mg/day for eight weeks or atorvastatin 40 mg/day for 12 weeks. Median percent changes in apolipoprotein (apo A-1, apo B, and the apo B:A-I ratio, and nuclear magnetic resonance lipoprotein subclasses from baseline to week 12 were compared using the Wilcoxon rank-sum test and Fisher’s exact test.Results: NER/S treatment produced significantly greater percent changes in apo A-I and apo B:A-I, and, at the final visit, apo B <80 mg/dL was attained by 59% versus 33% of patients, compared with atorvastatin treatment (P = 0.003. NER/S treatment resulted in greater percent reductions in calculated particle numbers for low-density lipoprotein (LDL, 52% versus 43%; P = 0.022, small LDL (55% versus 45%; P = 0.011, very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL and total chylomicrons (63% versus 39%; P < 0.001, and greater increases in particle size for LDL (2.7% versus 1.0%; P = 0.007 and VLDL (9.3% versus 0.1%; P < 0.001, compared with atorvastatin.Conclusion: NER/S treatment significantly improved apo A-I levels and the apo

  16. Coagulation profile, gene expression and bioinformatics characterization of coagulation factor X of striped murrel Channa striatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arasu, Abirami; Kumaresan, Venkatesh; Sathyamoorthi, Akila; Arasu, Mariadhas Valan; Al-Dhabi, Naif Abdullah; Arockiaraj, Jesu

    2016-08-01

    A transcriptome wide analysis of the constructed cDNA library of snakehead murrel Channa striatus revealed a full length cDNA sequence of coagulation factor X. Sequence analysis of C. striatus coagulation factor X (CsFX) showed that the cDNA contained 1232 base pairs (bp) comprising 1209 bp open reading frame (ORF). The ORF region encodes 424 amino acids with a molecular mass of 59 kDa. The polypeptide contains γ-carboxyglutamic acid (GLA) rich domain and two epidermal growth factor (EGF) like domains including EGF-CA domain and serine proteases trypsin signature profile. CsFX exhibited the maximum similarity with fish species such as Stegastes partitus (78%), Poecilia formosa (76%) and Cynoglossus semilaevis (74%). Phylogenetically, CsFX is clustered together with the fish group belonging to Actinopterygii. Secondary structure of factor X includes alpha helix 28.54%, extended strand 20.75%, beta turn 7.78% and random coil 42.92%. A predicted 3D model of CsFX revealed a short α-helix and a Ca(2+) (Gla domain) binding site in the coil. Four disulfide bridges were found in serine protease trypsin profile. Obviously, the highest gene expression (P < 0.05) was noticed in blood. Further, the changes in expression of CsFX was observed after inducing with bacterial (Aeromonas hydrophila) and fungal (Aphanomyces invadans) infections and other synthetic immune stimulants. Variation in blood clotting time (CT), prothrombin time (PT) and activated prothromboplastin time (APTT) was analyzed and compared between healthy and bacterial infected fishes. During infection, PT and APTT showed a declined clotting time due to the raised level of thrombocytes.

  17. ObStruct: a method to objectively analyse factors driving population structure using Bayesian ancestry profiles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Velimir Gayevskiy

    Full Text Available Bayesian inference methods are extensively used to detect the presence of population structure given genetic data. The primary output of software implementing these methods are ancestry profiles of sampled individuals. While these profiles robustly partition the data into subgroups, currently there is no objective method to determine whether the fixed factor of interest (e.g. geographic origin correlates with inferred subgroups or not, and if so, which populations are driving this correlation. We present ObStruct, a novel tool to objectively analyse the nature of structure revealed in Bayesian ancestry profiles using established statistical methods. ObStruct evaluates the extent of structural similarity between sampled and inferred populations, tests the significance of population differentiation, provides information on the contribution of sampled and inferred populations to the observed structure and crucially determines whether the predetermined factor of interest correlates with inferred population structure. Analyses of simulated and experimental data highlight ObStruct's ability to objectively assess the nature of structure in populations. We show the method is capable of capturing an increase in the level of structure with increasing time since divergence between simulated populations. Further, we applied the method to a highly structured dataset of 1,484 humans from seven continents and a less structured dataset of 179 Saccharomyces cerevisiae from three regions in New Zealand. Our results show that ObStruct provides an objective metric to classify the degree, drivers and significance of inferred structure, as well as providing novel insights into the relationships between sampled populations, and adds a final step to the pipeline for population structure analyses.

  18. The membrane fraction of homogenized rat kidney contains an enzyme that releases epidermal growth factor from the kidney membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nexø, Ebba; Poulsen, Steen Seier

    1991-01-01

    High levels of epidermal growth factor (EGF) are excreted in the urine and high levels of mRNA for the EGF-precursor have been demonstrated in the kidney. The EGF-precursor is a membrane bound peptide in the kidney, but little is known about the renal processing of the precursor. The present stud....... The EGF releasing enzyme is inhibited by the serine proteinase inhibitor aprotinin and by low temperatures (4 degrees C). The pH optimum of the reaction is pH 7.5-8.0....

  19. Synthesis and evaluation of carbamate and aryl ether substituted pyrazinones as corticotropin releasing factor-1 (CRF₁) receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahuja, Vijay T; Hartz, Richard A; Molski, Thaddeus F; Mattson, Gail K; Lentz, Kimberley A; Grace, James E; Lodge, Nicholas J; Bronson, Joanne J; Macor, John E

    2016-05-01

    A series of pyrazinone-based compounds incorporating either carbamate or aryl ether groups was synthesized and evaluated as corticotropin-releasing factor-1 (CRF1) receptor antagonists. Structure-activity relationship studies led to the identification of highly potent CRF1 receptor antagonists 14a (IC50=0.74 nM) and 14b (IC50=1.9 nM). The synthesis, structure-activity relationships and in vitro metabolic stability properties of compounds in this series will be described. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Noradrenergic inhibition of canine gallbladder contraction and murine pancreatic secretion during stress by corticotropin-releasing factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenz, H J; Messmer, B; Zimmerman, F G

    1992-02-01

    Gastrointestinal secretory and motor responses are profoundly altered during stress; but the effects of stress and its mediator(s) on the two major gut functions, exocrine pancreatic secretion and gallbladder motility, are unknown. We therefore developed two animal models that allowed us to examine the effects of acoustic stress on canine gallbladder contraction and restraint stress on rat exocrine pancreatic secretion. Acoustic stress inhibited cholecystokinin-8 (CCK)- and meal-induced gallbladder contraction, and restraint stress inhibited basal and CCK/secretin-stimulated pancreatic secretion. These inhibitory responses were mimicked by cerebral injection of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and abolished by the CRF antagonist, alpha-helical CRF-(9-41). The effects of stress and exogenous CRF were simulated by intravenous infusion of norepinephrine but prevented by ganglionic, noradrenergic, and alpha-adrenergic but not beta-adrenergic receptor blockade. Vagotomy, adrenalectomy, and--in rats--hypophysectomy did not alter the effects produced by stress and CRF. These results indicate that endogenous CRF released in response to different stressors in distinct species inhibits canine gallbladder contraction and murine exocrine pancreatic secretion via activation of sympathetic efferents. Release of norepinephrine appears to be the final common pathway producing inhibition of biliary and pancreatic digestive function during stress mediated by cerebral CRF.

  1. Executive Order 12898 and Social, Economic, and Sociopolitical Factors Influencing Toxic Release Inventory Facility Location in EPA Region 6: A Multi-Scale Spatial Assessment of Environmental Justice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Andrea Lisa

    2013-01-01

    Toxic Release Inventory facilities are among the many environmental hazards shown to create environmental inequities in the United States. This project examined four factors associated with Toxic Release Inventory, specifically, manufacturing facility location at multiple spatial scales using spatial analysis techniques (i.e., O-ring statistic and…

  2. Executive Order 12898 and Social, Economic, and Sociopolitical Factors Influencing Toxic Release Inventory Facility Location in EPA Region 6: A Multi-Scale Spatial Assessment of Environmental Justice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Andrea Lisa

    2013-01-01

    Toxic Release Inventory facilities are among the many environmental hazards shown to create environmental inequities in the United States. This project examined four factors associated with Toxic Release Inventory, specifically, manufacturing facility location at multiple spatial scales using spatial analysis techniques (i.e., O-ring statistic and…

  3. Identifying sources and controlling factors of arsenic release in saline groundwater aquifers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.-W. Liu

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available An integrated hydrogeochemical study is carried out to realize the occurrence of arsenic (As in a saline aquifer. Saline groundwater was mostly concentrated in the uppermost aquifer and non-saline water was in the lower aquifer in the study area. High As concentrations were found in both uppermost and lower aquifers. No correlation among salination, well depth and As concentration was observed. Both reducing and oxidizing forms of Fe oxyhydroxides were identified in the magnetic fractions, which were concentrated by high gradient magnetic separation (HGMS technique, revealing that the redox cycling of Fe occurred in the subsurface. High levels of Fe, HCO3-, DOC and NH4+ concentrations accompanying alkaline pH in the As-rich groundwater were consistent with the mechanism triggered by the microbial-mediated reductive dissolution of Fe oxyhydroxides. A threshold value of 50 μg L−1. As concentration was used as an indicator for identification of active proceeding reductive dissolution of As-bearing Fe oxyhydroxides in the saline aquifer. Desorption behaviors of As were relevant to its valence in the sediments and the co-existence of anions. Experimental and numerical results showed that additions of Cl- and SO42-, which represented the main anions of saline water, had minor effect on leaching sedimentary As. Although bicarbonate addition resulted in less As desorption than that of phosphate on a molar basis, the contribution of bicarbonate to the total release of As was greater than phosphate due to the much higher concentration of bicarbonate in groundwater and the associated microbial mediation. Collectively, the chemical effect of saline water on the As-release to groundwater is mild in the coastal aquifer.

  4. Factors affecting lead release in sodium silicate-treated partial lead service line replacements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Emily; Payne, Sarah Jane O; Hofmann, Ron; Andrews, Robert C

    2015-01-01

    Water quality parameters affecting sodium silicate performance in partial lead service line replacements were examined using a fractional factorial experimental design and static pipe systems. An external copper wire was used to create a galvanic connection between a former lead service line and a new copper pipe. The pipe systems were filled with lab prepared water made to mimic real water quality. Water was changed on a three times per week basis. A 2(4-1) fractional factorial design was used to evaluate the impact of alkalinity (15 mg L(-1) or 250 mg L(-1) as CaCO3), nitrate (1 mg L(-1) or 7 mg L(-1) as N), natural organic matter (1 mg L(-1) or 7 mg L(-1) as dissolved organic carbon), and disinfectant type (1 mg L(-1) chlorine or 3 mg L(-1) monochloramine), resulting in eight treatment conditions. Fractional factorial analysis revealed that alkalinity, natural organic matter and monochloramine had a significant positive effect on galvanic current. Natural organic matter and monochloramine also had a significant positive effect with respect to both total and dissolved lead release. For the treatment conditions examined, 67-98% of the lead released through galvanic currents was stored as corrosion scales and predominantly comprised of particulate lead (96.1-99.9%) for all eight treatments. The use of monochloramine and the presence of natural organic matter (7 mg L(-1)) were not favourable for corrosion control in sodium silicate-treated partial lead service line replacements, although further studies would be required to characterize optimal water quality parameters for specific water quality types. For utilities operating with sodium silicate as a corrosion inhibitor, this work offers further evidence regarding the consideration of chlorine as a secondary disinfectant instead of monochloramine, as well as the value of controlling natural organic matter in distributed water.

  5. Adenosine A2B receptor-mediated leukemia inhibitory factor release from astrocytes protects cortical neurons against excitotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moidunny Shamsudheen

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neuroprotective and neurotrophic properties of leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF have been widely reported. In the central nervous system (CNS, astrocytes are the major source for LIF, expression of which is enhanced following disturbances leading to neuronal damage. How astrocytic LIF expression is regulated, however, has remained an unanswered question. Since neuronal stress is associated with production of extracellular adenosine, we investigated whether LIF expression in astrocytes was mediated through adenosine receptor signaling. Methods Mouse cortical neuronal and astrocyte cultures from wild-type and adenosine A2B receptor knock-out animals, as well as adenosine receptor agonists/antagonists and various enzymatic inhibitors, were used to study LIF expression and release in astrocytes. When needed, a one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA followed by Bonferroni post-hoc test was used for statistical analysis. Results We show here that glutamate-stressed cortical neurons induce LIF expression through activation of adenosine A2B receptor subtype in cultured astrocytes and require signaling of protein kinase C (PKC, mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs: p38 and ERK1/2, and the nuclear transcription factor (NF-κB. Moreover, LIF concentration in the supernatant in response to 5′-N-ethylcarboxamide (NECA stimulation was directly correlated to de novo protein synthesis, suggesting that LIF release did not occur through a regulated release pathway. Immunocytochemistry experiments show that LIF-containing vesicles co-localize with clathrin and Rab11, but not with pHogrin, Chromogranin (CgA and CgB, suggesting that LIF might be secreted through recycling endosomes. We further show that pre-treatment with supernatants from NECA-treated astrocytes increased survival of cultured cortical neurons against glutamate, which was absent when the supernatants were pre-treated with an anti-LIF neutralizing antibody. Conclusions

  6. TRPC3 Regulates Release of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor From Human Airway Smooth Muscle

    OpenAIRE

    Vohra, Pawan K.; Thompson, Michael A.; Sathish, Venkatachalem; Kiel, Alexander; Jerde, Calvin; Pabelick, Christina M.; Singh, Brij B.; Prakash, Y. S.

    2013-01-01

    Exogenous brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) enhances Ca2+ signaling and cell proliferation in human airway smooth muscle (ASM), especially with inflammation. Human ASM also expresses BDNF, raising the potential for autocrine/paracrine effects. The mechanisms by which ASM BDNF secretion occurs are not known. Transient receptor potential channels (TRPCs) regulate a variety of intracellular processes including store-operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE; including in ASM) and secretion of factors suc...

  7. Coaxial Electrospinning with Mixed Solvents: From Flat to Round Eudragit L100 Nanofibers for Better Colon-Targeted Sustained Drug Release Profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deng-Guang Yu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A modified coaxial electrospinning process was developed for creating drug-loaded composite nanofibers. Using a mixed solvent of ethanol and N,N-dimethylacetamide as a sheath fluid, the electrospinning of a codissolving solution of diclofenac sodium (DS and Eudragit L100 (EL100 could run smoothly and continuously without any clogging. A series of analyses were undertaken to characterize the resultant nanofibers from both the modified coaxial process and a one-fluid electrospinning in terms of their morphology, physical form of the components, and their functional performance. Compared with those from the one-fluid electrospinning, the DS-loaded EL100 fibers from the modified coaxial process were rounder and smoother and possessed higher quality in terms of diameter and distribution with the DS existing in the EL100 matrix in an amorphous state; they also provided a better colon-targeted sustained drug release profile with a longer release time period. The modified coaxial process not only can smooth the electrospinning process to prevent clogging of spinneret, but also is a useful tool to tailor the shape of electrospun nanofibers and thus endow them improved functions.

  8. Genetic and environmental factors in associations between infant growth and adult cardiometabolic risk profile in twins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touwslager, Robbert N H; Gielen, Marij; Mulder, Antonius L M; Gerver, Willem J M; Zimmermann, Luc J; Dagnelie, Pieter C; Houben, Alfons J H M; Stehouwer, Coen D A; Derom, Catherine; Vlietinck, Robert; Loos, Ruth J F; Zeegers, Maurice P

    2013-10-01

    Accelerated infant growth is associated with an altered, mostly adverse adult cardiometabolic risk profile. The importance of genetic and environmental factors to these associations is unclear. The objective was to examine the importance of genetic and environmental factors in the associations between infant growth and adult cardiometabolic risk factors (anthropometric characteristics, lipids, insulin sensitivity, leptin, blood pressure, and fibrinogen) in twins. Cardiometabolic risk factors were assessed in 240 twin pairs (aged 18-34 y) from the East Flanders Prospective Twin Survey. Infant growth was defined as change in weight z score. We regressed intrapair differences in growth during 4 growth windows (0-1, 1-6, 6-12, and 12-24 mo) against intrapair differences in the risk factors in monozygotic and dizygotic twins separately. Within monozygotic twin pairs only, associations between infant growth and most adult lipids, glucose, leptin, and blood pressure (eg, systolic blood pressure: b = 5.95 mm Hg per change in z score, P = 0.01 in monozygotic twins; b = -1.64, P = 0.82 in dizygotic twins from 12 to 24 mo) were found. Within dizygotic twin pairs only, associations between growth and triglycerides and fibrinogen (eg, fibrinogen: b = 0.07 ln mg/dL per change in z score, P = 0.31 in monozygotic twins; b = 0.79, P = 0.01 in dizygotic twins from 0 to 1 mo) were identified. Most associations showed a detrimental effect of accelerated growth, but beneficial associations were also identified (eg, total-to-high-density-lipoprotein cholesterol ratio: b = -0.22 per change in z score from 1 to 6 mo, P = 0.008 in monozygotic twins). Our data showed that environmental factors play a role in the associations between infant growth and most adult lipids, glucose, leptin, and blood pressure, whereas genetic factors are involved regarding triglycerides and fibrinogen.

  9. Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factor Profiling of Group C Employees in JIPMER, Puducherry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aswin, K; Ghorpade, Arun G; Kar, Sitanshu Sekhar; Kumar, Ganesh

    2014-07-01

    Settings-based approach for health promotion includes conducting risk factor surveillance as one of its component. It was aimed to estimate the prevalence of CVD risk factors among group C employees of tertiary care hospital in south India. A cross-sectional survey was conducted among 400 group C employees aged ≥20 years using the WHO "STEPwise approach to surveillance of non-communicable diseases" (STEPS) methodology. Standardized international protocols were used to measure behavioral risk factors (smoking, alcohol consumption, fruit and vegetable consumption, physical activity) and physical characteristics (weight, waist and hip circumferences, height, and blood pressure). Multivariate analysis was done to predict the factors, which carry independent risk of hypertension. Risk factor profiling of the staff was done using WHO/ISH risk prediction chart to calculate the 10-year risk of a fatal or non-fatal major cardiovascular events (myocardial infarction or stroke), according to age, gender, blood pressure, smoking status, and presence or absence of diabetes mellitus. Mean age in years was 40.9 (±10.4), and men constituted 81.3% of study population. Prevalence of major cardiovascular risk factors was as follows: Current smokers 12.3% men, regular alcohol intake 33.2% among men, overweight (≥23 kg/m(2)) 74.5%, central obesity 78.7%, hypertension 38.8%, and history of diabetes mellitus 13.2%. Age, gender, physical inactivity, obesity, and family history of hypertension were found to be independently associated with hypertension. Four percent participants had a >10% risk of developing CVD in next 10 years. The prevalence of CVD risk factors is high in the sample population. Employee wellness program should be started in the institute to combat the burden of cardiovascular diseases.

  10. Improved wound healing in pressure-induced decubitus ulcer with controlled release of basic fibroblast growth factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang Wei [Department of Respiratory Diseases, Tangdu Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710038 (China); Wang Hailun [Department of Dermatology, Tangdu Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710038 (China); Jin Faguang [Department of Respiratory Diseases, Tangdu Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710038 (China)], E-mail: nidewenzhang@163.com; Yu Chunyan [Department of Dermatology, Tangdu Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710038 (China); Chu Dongling [Department of Respiratory Diseases, Tangdu Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710038 (China); Wang Lin [Department of Internal Medicine, 316 Hospital of PLA, Beijing 100093 (China); Lu Xian [93942 Unit Hospital of PLA, Xianyang 710012 (China)

    2008-07-14

    The purpose was to evaluate the efficacy of the wound dressing containing basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF)-loaded microspheres on promoting healing in pressure-induced decubitus ulcer. In this study, the pressure-induced ulcer in swine was used as a model to demonstrate the hypothesis that controlled release of bFGF has the potential to provide optimal healing milieu for chronic wounds in the repair process. Average size of the microspheres was 14.36 {+-} 3.56 {mu}m and the network gelatin sponges were characterized with an average pore size of 80-160 {mu}m. Both the in vitro release efficiency and the protein bioactivity revealed that bFGF was released from the microspheres in a controlled manner and it was biologically active as assessed by its ability to induce the proliferation of fibroblasts. Pressure-induced ulcer was created at 500 g/cm{sup 2} pressure loaded on swine dorsal skin 12 h daily for 2 consecutive days. After removal of the pressure load, the gelatin sponge containing bFGF gelatin microspheres or bFGF in solution was implanted into the wound. Swine were sacrificed at 7, 14, and 21 days after implantation, and a full-thickness biopsy was taken and stained for histological analysis. It was observed that controlled release of bFGF provided an accelerated recovery in the wound areas. Histological investigations showed that the dressings were biocompatible and had capability of proliferating fibroblasts and inducing neovascularisation. The present study implied the clinical potential of gelatin sponge with bFGF microspheres to promote the healing in pressure-induced decubitus ulcer.

  11. THE EFFECT OF BASIC FIBROBLAST GROWTH FACTOR SLOW-RELEASE MICROCAPSULES ON ANGIOGENESIS IN INFARCTED RABBIT MYOCARDIUM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱洪生; 连锋; 郑家豪

    2000-01-01

    Objectives. To observe the effect of basic flbroblast growth factor (bFGF) slow-release mierocapsules on angiogen-esis in infarcted myocardial regions.Methods. Myocardial infarction was induced in 24 New Zealand rabbits by ligating the root of left anterior de-scending coronary artery. Group Ⅰ (n=8) served as control, group Ⅱ (n=8) as a blank mieroeapsule group, group Ⅲ (n= 8, each mierocapsule contains 1μg bFGF) as mierpcapsule group. In group Ⅱ and Ⅲ, 5 blank mierocapsules or bFGF slow-release mierocapsules were implanted into myocardium underneath the epieardium between the left ante-rior descending coronary artery and left circumflex artery. Infarct size was evaluated by infarcted weight/left ventricle weight ratio and angiogenesis was evaluated by immunohistochemieal examinations 5 weeks later.Results. As compared with group Ⅰ and Ⅱ , rabbits treated with bFGF slow-release mierocapsules showed higher microvessel counts (group Ⅰ37.75±4.50, group Ⅱ8.37 ±4.98,vs.group Ⅲ 135.50±4.81,P<0.001) and lessinfarcted weight/left ventricle weight ( group Ⅰ 16.8 % ± 0.4 %, group Ⅱ 16.7 % ± 0.5 %, vs. group Ⅲ 7.0 % ±0.2%,P< 0.001).Conclusions. Subepicardial administration of bFGF slow-release microcapsule in the infarcted rabbit model results in effective angiogenesis and reduction in infarct size.

  12. Investigation of some factors affecting on release of radon-222 from phosphogypsum waste associated with phosphate ore processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilal, M A; El Afifi, E M; Nayl, A A

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study is oriented to investigate the influence of some physicochemical factors such as radium distribution, grain size, moisture content and chemical constituents on releases of radon-222 from the accumulated phosphogypsum (PG) waste. The emanation fraction, activity concentration in the pore and the surface exhalation rate of radon-222 in the bulk PG waste are 34.5 ± 0.3%, 238.6 ± 7.8 kBq m(-3) and 213 ± 6.9 mBq m(-2) s(-1), respectively. These values were varied and enhanced slightly in the fine grain sizes (F1 radon from residue PG waste was controlled positively by radium (Ra-226), calcium (CaSO4) and strontium (SrO). About 67% of radon release attributed to the grain size below 0.5 mm, while 33% due to the large grain size above 0.5 mm. The emanation fraction of Rn-222 is increased with moisture content and the maximum emanation is ∼43% of moisture of 3-8%. It reduced slowly with the continuous increase in moisture till 20%. Due to PG waste in situ can be enhancing the background to the surround workers and/or public. Therefore, the environmental negative impacts due to release of Rn-222 can be minimized by legislation to restrict its civil uses, or increasing its moisture to ∼10%, or by the particle size separation of the fine fraction containing the high levels of Ra-226 followed by a suitable chemical treatment or disposal; whereas the low release amount can be diluted and used in cement industry, roads or dam construction.

  13. Coadministration of adipose-derived stem cells and control-released basic fibroblast growth factor facilitates angiogenesis in a murine ischemic hind limb model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horikoshi-Ishihara, Hisako; Tobita, Morikuni; Tajima, Satoshi; Tanaka, Rica; Oshita, Takashi; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Mizuno, Hiroshi

    2016-12-01

    Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) have angiogenic potential owing to their differentiation into endothelial cells and their release of angiogenic growth factors to elicit paracrine effects. In addition, control-released basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) sustained with a gelatin hydrogel also supports effective angiogenesis. We sought to determine if coadministration of ASCs and control-released bFGF into murine ischemic limbs facilitates angiogenesis. Levels of growth factors in the conditioned media of ASCs cultured with or without control-released bFGF were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. A murine ischemic hind limb model was generated and intramuscularly injected with the following: gelatin hydrogel (group 1), a high number of ASCs (group 2), control-released bFGF (group 3), a small number of ASCs and control-released bFGF (group 4), and a high number of ASCs and control-released bFGF (group 5). Macroscopic and microscopic vascular changes were evaluated until day 7 by laser Doppler perfusion imaging and histologic analyses, respectively. Secretion of hepatocyte growth factor, vascular endothelial growth factor, and transforming growth factor-β1 was enhanced by control-released bFGF. Vascular improvement was achieved in groups 4 and 5 according to laser Doppler perfusion imaging. Hematoxylin and eosin staining and CD31 immunohistochemical staining demonstrated an increase in the vascular density, vessel diameter, and thickness of vessel walls in groups 4 and 5. Cells positively stained for CD146, α-smooth muscle actin, and transforming growth factor-β1 were observed around vessel walls in groups 4 and 5. These findings suggest that coadministration of ASCs and control-released bFGF facilitates angiogenesis in terms of vessel maturation in a murine ischemic hind limb model. Copyright © 2015 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Factors to consider in developing individual pharmaceutical product quality risk profiles useful to government procurement agencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wei; Boehm, Garth; Zheng, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Governments that procure pharmaceutical products from an Essential Medicine List (EML) bear special responsibility for the quality of these products. In this article we examine the possibility of developing a pharmaceutical product quality risk assessment scheme for use by government procurement officials. We use the Chinese EML as a basis, and US recall data is examined as it is publically available.This is justified as the article is only concerned with inherent product quality risks. After establishing a link between Chinese essential medicines and those available in the US, we examine US recall data to separate product specific recalls. We conclude that, in addition to existing manufacturing based risks, there are two other product specific risks that stand out from all others, degradation and dissolution failure. Methodology for relative product risk for degradation is needed to be developed and further work is required to better understand dissolution failures which largely occur with modified-release solid oral products. We conclude that a product specific quality risk profile would be enhanced by including a risk assessment for degradation for all products, and in the case of solid oral products, dissolution.

  15. Certain hormonal profiles of postpartum anestrus jersey crossbred cows treated with controlled internal drug release and ovsynch protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayanidhi Jena

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The study was conducted to determine the serum levels of certain hormones in post-partum anestrus cows following treatment with controlled internal drug release (CIDR and Ovsynch protocol. Materials and Methods: A total of 30 postpartum anestrus cows were divided into three equal groups after thorough gynecoclinical examination. The Group 1 animals received an intravaginal progesterone device on day 0 and 2 ml of prostaglandin F2α (PGF2α on day of CIDR removal (7th day, Group 2 cows were treated with ovsynch protocol (gonadotropinreleasing hormone [GnRH]-PGF2α-GnRH on day 0, 7 and 9, respectively, and Group 3 cows were supplemented with mineral mixture and treated as control. The serum estrogen, progesterone, triiodothyronine, and thyroxine concentration were estimated using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit and absorbance was read at 450 nm with Perkin Elmer Wallac 1420 Microplate Reader. Results: There was a significant increase in progesterone level in Group 1 after withdrawal of CIDR as compared to other two groups. However, the estrogen assay revealed a greater concentration in Group 2 against Group 1 on day 7 of sampling. However, there was no significant difference for serum triiodothyronine (T3 and thyroxine (T4 irrespective of treatment protocols and days of sampling. Conclusion: Treatment with CIDR based progesterone therapy and drug combinations may affect the reproductive hormonal balance like estrogen and progesterone, which is inevitable for successful return to cyclicity and subsequent fertilization and conception. However, as far as serum T3 and T4 concentration concerned it may not give an astounding result.

  16. Factor 8 (F8) gene mutation profile of Turkish hemophilia A patients with inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fidanci, Inanç D; Kavakli, Kaan; Uçar, Canan; Timur, Cetin; Meral, Adalet; Kilinç, Yurdanur; Sayilan, Hülya; Kazanci, Elif; Cağlayan, S Hande

    2008-07-01

    Factor VIII (FVIII) replacement therapy is ineffective in hemophilia A patients who develop alloantibodies (inhibitors) against FVIII. The type of factor 8 (F8) gene mutation, genes in the major histocompatibility complex loci, and also polymorphisms in IL-10 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha are the major predisposing factors for inhibitor formation. The present study was initiated to reveal the F8 gene mutation profile of 30 severely affected high-responder patients with inhibitor levels of more than 5 Bethesda U (BU)/ml and four low-responder patients with inhibitors less than 5 BU/ml. Southern blot and PCR analysis were performed to detect intron 22 and intron 1 inversions, respectively. Point mutations were screened by DNA sequence analysis of all coding regions, intron/exon boundaries, promoter and 3' UTR regions of the F8 gene. The prevalent mutation was the intron 22 inversion among the high-responder patients followed by large deletions, small deletions, and nonsense mutations. Only one missense and one splicing error mutation was seen. Among the low-responder patients, three single nucleotide deletions and one intron 22 inversion were found. All mutation types detected were in agreement with the severe hemophilia A phenotype, most likely leading to a deficiency of and predisposition to the development of alloantibodies against FVIII. It is seen that Turkish hemophilia A patients with major molecular defects have a higher possibility of developing inhibitors.

  17. Different risk factor profiles for ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke in type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hägg, Stefanie; Thorn, Lena M; Forsblom, Carol M; Gordin, Daniel; Saraheimo, Markku; Tolonen, Nina; Wadén, Johan; Liebkind, Ron; Putaala, Jukka; Tatlisumak, Turgut; Groop, Per-Henrik

    2014-09-01

    Despite the fact that patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus have a markedly increased risk of experiencing a stroke, independent risk factors for stroke and its subtypes in these patients have remained unclear. A total of 4083 patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus from the Finnish Diabetic Nephropathy (FinnDiane) Study, without a history of stroke at baseline, were included. Strokes were classified based on medical files and brain imaging. At baseline, mean age was 37.4±11.8 years, duration of diabetes mellitus was 20.0 (11.0-30.0) years, and 51% were men. During 9.0±2.7 years (36 680 patient-years) of follow-up, 105 patients experienced an ischemic stroke and 44 a hemorrhagic stroke. Cox proportional hazards analyses were performed to determine independent risk factors. Independent risk factors for ischemic stroke were duration of diabetes mellitus, presence of diabetic nephropathy, higher hemoglobin A1c, higher systolic blood pressure, insulin resistance, and history of smoking, whereas sex, lipids, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, and the metabolic syndrome were not associated with an increased risk. Diabetic nephropathy, severe diabetic retinopathy, higher systolic blood pressure, and lower body mass index were independently associated with hemorrhagic stroke. The risk factor profile for ischemic stroke seems partly different from that of hemorrhagic stroke in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  18. Transcription profile of Escherichia coli: genomic SELEX search for regulatory targets of transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishihama, Akira; Shimada, Tomohiro; Yamazaki, Yukiko

    2016-03-18

    Bacterial genomes are transcribed by DNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RNAP), which achieves gene selectivity through interaction with sigma factors that recognize promoters, and transcription factors (TFs) that control the activity and specificity of RNAP holoenzyme. To understand the molecular mechanisms of transcriptional regulation, the identification of regulatory targets is needed for all these factors. We then performed genomic SELEX screenings of targets under the control of each sigma factor and each TF. Here we describe the assembly of 156 SELEX patterns of a total of 116 TFs performed in the presence and absence of effector ligands. The results reveal several novel concepts: (i) each TF regulates more targets than hitherto recognized; (ii) each promoter is regulated by more TFs than hitherto recognized; and (iii) the binding sites of some TFs are located within operons and even inside open reading frames. The binding sites of a set of global regulators, including cAMP receptor protein, LeuO and Lrp, overlap with those of the silencer H-NS, suggesting that certain global regulators play an anti-silencing role. To facilitate sharing of these accumulated SELEX datasets with the research community, we compiled a database, 'Transcription Profile of Escherichia coli' (www.shigen.nig.ac.jp/ecoli/tec/). © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  19. Hereditary and microbiological factors influencing the airway immunological profile of neonates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Følsgaard, Nilofar

    2012-01-01

    to environmental factors such as microorganisms, airborne allergens and pollutants. Depending on the composition of this exposome, specific types of immune cells become activated releasing a fingerprint of cytokines and chemokines in the airway mucosa. The immune competence of the new-born child determines....... influenzae and S. aureus affects the expression of immune mediators in 4 week old infants. In paper I we explore the effect of atopic heredity on the immune expression, showing that children of mothers with atopic disease express down-regulation of nearly all their chemokines and cytokines in the airway...... inflammatory response. In conclusion, maternal atopic disease influences the immune expression in the airways of the new born child by inducing a general down regulation of the mediators in children of atopic mothers. Colonization of the airways of asymptomatic neonates with pathogenic bacteria induces species...

  20. Staphylococcus aureus protein A binding to osteoblast tumour necrosis factor receptor 1 results in activation of nuclear factor kappa B and release of interleukin-6 in bone infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claro, Tânia; Widaa, Amro; McDonnell, Cormac; Foster, Timothy J; O'Brien, Fergal J; Kerrigan, Steven W

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is the major pathogen among the staphylococci and the most common cause of bone infections. These infections are mainly characterized by bone destruction and inflammation, and are often debilitating and very difficult to treat. Previously we demonstrated that S. aureus protein A (SpA) can bind to osteoblasts, which results in inhibition of osteoblast proliferation and mineralization, apoptosis, and activation of osteoclasts. In this study we used small interfering RNA (siRNA) to demonstrate that osteoblast tumour necrosis factor receptor-1 (TNFR-1) is responsible for the recognition of and binding to SpA. TNFR-1 binding to SpA results in the activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB). In turn, NFκB translocates to the nucleus of the osteoblast, which leads to release of interleukin 6 (IL-6). Silencing TNFR-1 in osteoblasts or disruption of the spa gene in S. aureus prevented both NFκB activation and IL-6 release. As well as playing a key role in proinflammatory reactions, IL-6 is also an important osteotropic factor. Release of IL-6 from osteoblasts results in the activation of the bone-resorbing cells, the osteoclasts. Consistent with our results described above, both silencing TNFR-1 in osteoblasts and disruption of spa in S. aureus prevented osteoclast activation. These studies are the first to demonstrate the importance of the TNFR-1-SpA interaction in bone infection, and may help explain the mechanism through which osteoclasts become overactivated, leading to bone destruction. Anti-inflammatory drug therapy could be used either alone or in conjunction with antibiotics to treat osteomyelitis or for prophylaxis in high-risk patients.

  1. Novel atherosclerotic risk factors and angiographic profile of young Gujarati patients with acute coronary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prajapati, Jayesh; Jain, Sharad; Virpariya, Kapil; Rawal, Jayesh; Joshi, Hasit; Sharma, Kamal; Roy, Bhavesh; Thakkar, Ashok

    2014-07-01

    In this study we aimed to analyse the frequency of atherosclerotic risk factors with focus to novel risk factors for coronary artery disease and angiographic profile in young (≤ 40 years) acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patient with healthy controls in Gujarat, India. Between January 2008 and December 2012, 109 consecutive young patients aged ≤ 40 years old, diagnosed to have ACS were included in the study. All ACS patients underwent diagnostic coronary angiography. An equivalent age and sex matched population without coronary disease with similar risk factors without tobacco considered a control group. All angiographic patients were evaluated for conventional risk factors for coronary artery disease like diabetes mellitus, hypertension, smoking, obesity as well as novel atherogenic risk factors like high sensitivity C-reactive protein (Hs-CRP), Lipoprotein(a) [LP(a)], homocysteine, apolipoprotein A1 (ApoA1) and B (ApoB). In a study group, out of 109 young patients, 90 (82.6%) patients were presented to our hospital as ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), 10 (9.2%) presented as known non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) and 9 (8.3%) presented as unstable angina (UA). Serum cholesterol, triglycerides, LDL, LP(a) and lipid tetrad index were significantly higher in the study group whereas the HDL levels significantly lower as compared to the control group. A quite common risk factors of premature CAD are smoking, high Hs-CRP, high LP(a), hyperhomocysteinaemia and positive family history in the young ACS. Most common presentation of ACS in young was STEMI. On angiography, single vessel involvement was the most common finding.

  2. Profiling immunologic risk for acute rejection in liver transplantation: Recipient age is an important risk factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kueht, Michael L; Cotton, Ronald T; Galvan, N Thao N; O'Mahony, Christine A; Goss, John A; Rana, Abbas

    2016-09-01

    Careful management of induction and maintenance of immunosuppression is paramount to prevent acute rejection in liver transplantation. A methodical analysis of risk factors for acute cellular rejection may provide a more comprehensive method to profile the immunologic risk of candidates. Using registry data from the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network (OPTN), we identified 42,508 adult recipients who underwent orthotopic liver transplant (OLT) between 2002 and 2013. We excluded recipients with a blank entry for treated rejection. We analyzed this all inclusive cohort in addition to a subset of 27,493 patients with just tacrolimus immunosuppression. Multivariate logistic regression was used on both cohorts and identified independent risk factors for treated acute rejection at one year. Recipient age (reference group was 40 to 60years) was a dominant risk factor for rejection in both cohorts and had a dose response relationship. The strongest risk factors in the inclusive cohort were: age 18-25 (OR 2.20), age 26-29 (OR 2.03), and primary biliary cholangitis (OR 1.55). The most protective factors were age 70 and older (OR 0.68), and age 65-69 (OR 0.70). The rates of rejection had a similar pattern. Although prior studies have suggested age as a risk factor for rejection in liver transplantation, this is the first study of national-level data to demonstrate a robust dose dependent relationship between age and risk for rejection at one year. Clinicians should place significant weight on recipient age when they assess their recipients for the immunologic risk of rejection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Effect of clinical and social risk factors on hospital profiling for stroke readmission: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyhani, Salomeh; Myers, Laura J; Cheng, Eric; Hebert, Paul; Williams, Linda S; Bravata, Dawn M

    2014-12-02

    The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) and Veterans Health Administration (VA) will report 30-day stroke readmission rates as a measure of hospital quality. A national debate on whether social risk factors should be included in models developed for hospital profiling is ongoing. To compare a CMS-based model of 30-day readmission with a more comprehensive model that includes measures of social risk (such as homelessness) or clinical factors (such as stroke severity and functional status). Data from a retrospective cohort study were used to develop a CMS-based 30-day readmission model that included age and comorbid conditions based on codes from the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (model 1). This model was then compared with one that included administrative social risk factors (model 2). Finally, the CMS model (model 1) was compared with a model that included social risk and clinical factors from chart review (model 3). These 3 models were used to rank hospitals by 30-day risk-standardized readmission rates and examine facility rankings among the models. Hospitals in the VA. Patients hospitalized with stroke in 2007. 30-day readmission rates. The 30-day readmission rate was 12.8%. The c-statistics for the 3 models were 0.636, 0.646, and 0.661, respectively. All hospitals were classified as performing "as expected" using all 3 models (that is, performance did not differ from the VA national average); therefore, the addition of detailed clinical information or social risk factors did not alter assessment of facility performance. A predominantly male veteran cohort limits the generalizability of these findings. In the VA, more comprehensive models that included social risk and clinical factors did not affect hospital comparisons based on 30-day readmission rates. U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs.

  4. HANS SELYE AND THE STRESS RESPONSE: FROM "THE FIRST MEDIATOR" TO THE IDENTIFICATION OF THE HYPOTHALAMIC CORTICOTROPIN-RELEASING FACTOR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachè, Yvette

    2014-03-30

    Selye pioneered the stress concept that is ingrained in the vocabulary of daily life. This was originally build on experimental observations that divers noxious agents can trigger a similar triad of endocrine (adrenal enlargement), immune (involution of thymus) and gut (gastric erosion formation) responses as reported in a letter to Nature in 1936. Subsequently, he articulated the underlying mechanisms and hypothesized the existence of a "first mediator" in the hypothalamus able to orchestrate this bodily changes. However he took two generations to identify this mediator. The Nobel Laureate, Roger Guillemin, a former Selye's PhD student, demonstrated in 1955 the existence of a hypothalamic factor that elicited adrenocorticotropic hormone release from the rat pituitary and named it corticotropin releasing factor (CRF). In 1981, Wylie Vale, a former Guillemin's Ph Student, characterized CRF as 41 amino acid and cloned the CRF1 and CRF2 receptors. This paves the way to experimental studies establishing that the activation of the CRF signaling pathways in the brain plays a key role in mediating the stress-related endocrine, behavioral, autonomic and visceral responses. The unraveling of the biochemical coding of stress is rooted in Selye legacy continues to have increasing impact on the scientific community.

  5. Activity-dependent release of precursor nerve growth factor, conversion to mature nerve growth factor, and its degradation by a protease cascade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Martin A; Cuello, A Claudio

    2006-04-25

    In this report, we provide direct demonstration that the neurotrophin nerve growth factor (NGF) is released in the extracellular space in an activity-dependent manner in its precursor form (proNGF) and that it is in this compartment that its maturation and degradation takes place because of the coordinated release and the action of proenzymes and enzyme regulators. This converting protease cascade and its endogenous regulators (including tissue plasminogen activator, plasminogen, neuroserpin, precursor matrix metalloproteinase 9, and tissue inhibitor metalloproteinase 1) are colocalized in neurons of the cerebral cortex and released upon neuronal stimulation. We also provide evidence that this mechanism operates in in vivo conditions, as the CNS application of inhibitors of converting and degrading enzymes lead to dramatic alterations in the tissue levels of either precursor NGF or mature NGF. Pathological alterations of this cascade in the CNS might cause or contribute to a lack of proper neuronal trophic support in conditions such as cerebral ischemia, seizure and Alzheimer's disease or, conversely, to excessive local production of neurotrophins as reported in inflammatory arthritis pain.

  6. 76 FR 61098 - Exposure Factors Handbook: 2011 Edition; Release of Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-03

    ... and soil adherence factors; consumption of fruits and vegetables, fish, meats, dairy products, and... National Center for Environmental Assessment (NCEA) within EPA's Office of Research and Development. The... the Recent Additions and Publications menus at http://www.epa.gov/ncea . Paper copies of the report...

  7. Five factor model personality traits relate to adult attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder but not to their distinct neurocognitive profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dijk, Fiona E; Mostert, Jeannette; Glennon, Jeffrey; Onnink, Marten; Dammers, Janneke; Vasquez, Alejandro Arias; Kan, Cornelis; Verkes, Robbert Jan; Hoogman, Martine; Franke, Barbara; Buitelaar, Jan K

    2017-08-19

    Deficits in multiple neuropsychological domains and specific personality profiles have been observed in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). In this study we investigated whether personality traits are related to neurocognitive profiles in adults with ADHD. Neuropsychological performance and Five Factor Model (FFM) personality traits were measured in adults with ADHD (n = 133) and healthy controls (n = 132). Three neuropsychological profiles, derived from previous community detection analyses, were investigated for personality trait differences. Irrespective of cognitive profile, participants with ADHD showed significantly higher Neuroticism and lower Extraversion, Agreeableness, and Conscientiousness than healthy controls. Only the FFM personality factor Openness differed significantly between the three profiles. Higher Openness was more common in those with aberrant attention and inhibition than those with increased delay discounting and atypical working memory / verbal fluency. The results suggest that the personality trait Openness, but not any other FFM factor, is linked to neurocognitive profiles in ADHD. ADHD symptoms rather than profiles of cognitive impairment have associations with personality traits. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Influence of the ozone profile above Madrid (Spain) on Brewer estimation of ozone air mass factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anton, M. [Univ. de Extremadura, Badajoz (Spain). Dept. de Fisica; Evora Univ. (PT). Goephysics Centre of Evora (CGE); Lopez, M.; Banon, M. [Agenica Estatal de Meteorologia (AEMET), Madrid (Spain); Costa, M.J.; Silva, A.M. [Evora Univ. (PT). Goephysics Centre of Evora (CGE); Evora Univ. (Portugal). Dept. of Physics; Serrano, A. [Univ. de Extremadura, Badajoz (Spain). Dept. de Fisica; Bortoli, D. [Evora Univ. (PT). Goephysics Centre of Evora (CGE); Vilaplana, J.M. [Instituto Nacional de Tecnica Aeroespacial (INTA), Huelva (Spain). Estacion de Sondeos Atmosferico ' ' El Arenosillo' '

    2009-07-01

    The methodology used by Brewer spectroradiometers to estimate the ozone column is based on differential absorption spectroscopy. This methodology employs the ozone air mass factor (AMF) to derive the total ozone column from the slant path ozone amount. For the calculating the ozone AMF, the Brewer algorithm assumes that the ozone layer is located at a fixed height of 22 km. However, for a real specific site the ozone presents a certain profile, which varies spatially and temporally depending on the latitude, altitude and dynamical conditions of the atmosphere above the site of measurements. In this sense, this work address the reliability of the mentioned assumption and analyses the influence of the ozone profiles measured above Madrid (Spain) in the ozone AMF calculations. The approximated ozone AMF used by the Brewer algorithm is compared with simulations obtained using the libRadtran radiative transfer model code. The results show an excellent agreement between the simulated and the approximated AMF values for solar zenith angle lower than 75 . In addition, the relative differences remain lower than 2% at 85 . These good results are mainly due to the fact that the altitude of the ozone layer assumed constant by the Brewer algorithm for all latitudes notably can be considered representative of the real profile of ozone above Madrid (average value of 21.7{+-}1.8 km). The operational ozone AMF calculations for Brewer instruments are limited, in general, to SZA below 80 . Extending the usable SZA range is especially relevant for Brewer instruments located at high mid-latitudes. (orig.)

  9. Influence of the ozone profile above Madrid (Spain) on Brewer estimation of ozone air mass factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antón, M.; López, M.; Costa, M. J.; Serrano, A.; Bortoli, D.; Bañón, M.; Vilaplana, J. M.; Silva, A. M.

    2009-08-01

    The methodology used by Brewer spectroradiometers to estimate the ozone column is based on differential absorption spectroscopy. This methodology employs the ozone air mass factor (AMF) to derive the total ozone column from the slant path ozone amount. For the calculating the ozone AMF, the Brewer algorithm assumes that the ozone layer is located at a fixed height of 22 km. However, for a real specific site the ozone presents a certain profile, which varies spatially and temporally depending on the latitude, altitude and dynamical conditions of the atmosphere above the site of measurements. In this sense, this work address the reliability of the mentioned assumption and analyses the influence of the ozone profiles measured above Madrid (Spain) in the ozone AMF calculations. The approximated ozone AMF used by the Brewer algorithm is compared with simulations obtained using the libRadtran radiative transfer model code. The results show an excellent agreement between the simulated and the approximated AMF values for solar zenith angle lower than 75°. In addition, the relative differences remain lower than 2% at 85°. These good results are mainly due to the fact that the altitude of the ozone layer assumed constant by the Brewer algorithm for all latitudes notably can be considered representative of the real profile of ozone above Madrid (average value of 21.7±1.8 km). The operational ozone AMF calculations for Brewer instruments are limited, in general, to SZA below 80°. Extending the usable SZA range is especially relevant for Brewer instruments located at high mid-latitudes.

  10. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) fragment-guided anticancer theranostic particles for pH-responsive release of doxorubicin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Myun Koo; Mao, Wei; Lee, Jun Bae; Yoo, Hyuk Sang

    2017-03-15

    EGF fragment (EGFfr) and doxorubicin were chemically co-decorated on single magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) for concomitant cancer targeting and treatment. Magnetic nanoparticles were prepared by the precipitation of ferric chloride hydrates in an ammonia solution and subsequent surface-functionalization with amines. The terminal thiol group of the EGF fragment was first conjugated to surface amines of the MNPs using a heterofunctional crosslinker, and doxorubicin was sequentially conjugated to the MNPs via a hydrazone linker, where the degree of subsitution of the surface amines to EGFfr was varied from 1% to 40%. The decorated doxorubicin showed clear pH-dependency in the release profile, and doxorubicin showed fast release at pH 5.0 in comparison to pH 7.4. The EGF-decorated MNPs were tested for differential cellular uptakes against EGF overexpressing cells (A549), and the uptake levels gradually increased to 10% and saturated, which was quantified by ICP-OES. Internalized doxorubicin was also visualized by confocal microscopy, and A549 cells with EGF-decorated MNPs with EGF decoration showed higher fluorescence intensity of doxorubicin than those with non-decorated MNPs. Anti-cancer activity of the MNPs was compared at various concentrations of doxorubicin and EGFfr. Decoration of EGFfr significantly increased the anti-cancer activity of doxorubicin-incorporated MNPs in A549 cells; however, EGFfr alone did not affect the viability of the cells. Thus, we concluded that MNPs with optimized EGFfr and doxorubicin ratios showed higher targeting and drug payload against EGF receptor overexpressing cancer cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Profiling of anti-fibrotic signaling by hepatocyte growth factor in renal fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schievenbusch, Stephanie; Strack, Ingo; Scheffler, Melanie; Wennhold, Kerstin; Maurer, Julia [Institute for Pathology, University Hospital Cologne, Kerpener Str. 62, 50924 Koeln (Germany); Nischt, Roswitha [Department of Dermatology, University Hospital of Cologne (Germany); Dienes, Hans Peter [Institute for Pathology, University Hospital Cologne, Kerpener Str. 62, 50924 Koeln (Germany); Odenthal, Margarete, E-mail: m.odenthal@uni-koeln.de [Institute for Pathology, University Hospital Cologne, Kerpener Str. 62, 50924 Koeln (Germany)

    2009-07-17

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is a multifunctional growth factor affecting cell proliferation and differentiation. Due to its mitogenic potential, HGF plays an important role in tubular repair and regeneration after acute renal injury. However, recent reports have shown that HGF also acts as an anti-inflammatory and anti-fibrotic factor, affecting various cell types such as renal fibroblasts and triggering tubulointerstitial fibrosis of the kidney. The present study provides evidence that HGF stimulation of renal fibroblasts results in the activation of both the Erk1/2 and the Akt pathways. As previously shown, Erk1/2 phosphorylation results in Smad-linker phosphorylation, thereby antagonizing cellular signals induced by TGF{beta}. By siRNA mediated silencing of the Erk1/2-Smad linkage, however, we now demonstrate that Akt signaling acts as an auxiliary pathway responsible for the anti-fibrotic effects of HGF. In order to define the anti-fibrotic function of HGF we performed comprehensive expression profiling of HGF-stimulated renal fibroblasts by microarray hybridization. Functional cluster analyses and quantitative PCR assays indicate that the HGF-stimulated pathways transfer the anti-fibrotic effects in renal interstitial fibroblasts by reducing expression of extracellular matrix proteins, various chemokines, and members of the CCN family.

  12. Expression Profile of Intravitreous Cytokines, Chemokines and Growth Factors in Patients with Fuchs Heterochromic Iridocyclitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaori Suzuki

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To report the postoperative courses of 2 patients with Fuchs heterochromic iridocyclitis (FHI and the concentrations of various cytokines, chemokines and growth factors in vitreous fluid samples to obtain insights into pathobiochemical aspects. Subjects: The patients were a 27- and a 47-year-old woman. Phacoemulsification and aspiration, intraocular lens (IOL implantation, and pars plana vitrectomy were performed to treat their cataracts and vitreous opacities. During their early postoperative periods, inflammatory cells precipitated on the IOL and intraocular pressure was increased in both patients. Methods: At the time of surgery, undiluted vitreous fluid specimens were collected. The concentrations of multiple cytokines, chemokines and growth factors were measured by a bead array immunodetection system. Results: The levels of interleukin-1ra, -5, -6, -8, -10 and -13, interferon-inducible 10-kDa protein, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1, macrophage inflammatory protein 1β, and regulated upon activation, normal T-cell expressed and secreted (RANTES were significantly elevated in vitreous fluid in both patients. Conclusion: Although the postoperative course was generally favorable in patients with FHI, steroid instillation was necessary for a few months postoperatively, as precipitates easily formed on the IOL surface and elevated intraocular pressure. The profiles of intravitreal concentrations of cytokines, chemokines and growth factors may characterize postoperative inflammatory reactions.

  13. Risk Factors Profile of Shoulder Dystocia in Oman: A Case Control Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maha M. Al-Khaduri

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study aimed to assess the risk factor profile of shoulder dystocia and associated neonatal complications in Oman, a developing Arab country. Methods: A retrospective case-control study was conducted among 111 cases with dystocia and 111 controls, identified during 1994-2006 period in a tertiary care hospital in Oman. Controls were randomly selected among women who did not have dystocia, and were matched to cases on the day of delivery. Data related to potential risk factors, delivery, and obstetric complications were collected. Results: Dystocia was significantly associated with older maternal age, higher parity, larger BMI, diabetes, and previous record of dystocia. In addition, dystocia was associated more with vacuum and forceps deliveries. Routine traction (51% was the most used manoeuvre. Among dystocia cases, 13% were associated with fetal complications of which Erb’s Palsy was the most prevalent (79%. Conclusion: Our finding of significant associations with risk factors lays out the ground to develop a predictability index for shoulder dystocia, which would help in making it preventable. Further prospective studies are required to confirm the obtained results.

  14. metagene Profiles Analyses Reveal Regulatory Element's Factor-Specific Recruitment Patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joly Beauparlant, Charles; Lamaze, Fabien C; Deschênes, Astrid; Samb, Rawane; Lemaçon, Audrey; Belleau, Pascal; Bilodeau, Steve; Droit, Arnaud

    2016-08-01

    ChIP-Sequencing (ChIP-Seq) provides a vast amount of information regarding the localization of proteins across the genome. The aggregation of ChIP-Seq enrichment signal in a metagene plot is an approach commonly used to summarize data complexity and to obtain a high level visual representation of the general occupancy pattern of a protein. Here we present the R package metagene, the graphical interface Imetagene and the companion package similaRpeak. Together, they provide a framework to integrate, summarize and compare the ChIP-Seq enrichment signal from complex experimental designs. Those packages identify and quantify similarities or dissimilarities in patterns between large numbers of ChIP-Seq profiles. We used metagene to investigate the differential occupancy of regulatory factors at noncoding regulatory regions (promoters and enhancers) in relation to transcriptional activity in GM12878 B-lymphocytes. The relationships between occupancy patterns and transcriptional activity suggest two different mechanisms of action for transcriptional control: i) a "gradient effect" where the regulatory factor occupancy levels follow transcription and ii) a "threshold effect" where the regulatory factor occupancy levels max out prior to reaching maximal transcription. metagene, Imetagene and similaRpeak are implemented in R under the Artistic license 2.0 and are available on Bioconductor.

  15. metagene Profiles Analyses Reveal Regulatory Element’s Factor-Specific Recruitment Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samb, Rawane; Lemaçon, Audrey; Bilodeau, Steve; Droit, Arnaud

    2016-01-01

    ChIP-Sequencing (ChIP-Seq) provides a vast amount of information regarding the localization of proteins across the genome. The aggregation of ChIP-Seq enrichment signal in a metagene plot is an approach commonly used to summarize data complexity and to obtain a high level visual representation of the general occupancy pattern of a protein. Here we present the R package metagene, the graphical interface Imetagene and the companion package similaRpeak. Together, they provide a framework to integrate, summarize and compare the ChIP-Seq enrichment signal from complex experimental designs. Those packages identify and quantify similarities or dissimilarities in patterns between large numbers of ChIP-Seq profiles. We used metagene to investigate the differential occupancy of regulatory factors at noncoding regulatory regions (promoters and enhancers) in relation to transcriptional activity in GM12878 B-lymphocytes. The relationships between occupancy patterns and transcriptional activity suggest two different mechanisms of action for transcriptional control: i) a “gradient effect” where the regulatory factor occupancy levels follow transcription and ii) a “threshold effect” where the regulatory factor occupancy levels max out prior to reaching maximal transcription. metagene, Imetagene and similaRpeak are implemented in R under the Artistic license 2.0 and are available on Bioconductor. PMID:27538250

  16. Tumor necrosis factor/cachectin interacts with endothelial cell receptors to induce release of interleukin 1

    OpenAIRE

    1986-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor/cachectin (TNF) has been implicated as a mediator of the host response in sepsis and neoplasia. Recent work has shown that TNF can modulate endothelial cell hemostatic properties, suggesting that endothelium is a target tissue for TNF. This led us to examine whether endothelial cells have specific binding sites for TNF and augment the biological response to TNF by elaborating the inflammatory mediator, IL-1. Incubation of 125I-recombinant human TNF with confluent, cultur...

  17. Q-factor emotional intelligence profiles as an area for development in graduate nurse anesthesia students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Shawn Bryant; Covrig, Duane; Newman, Isadore

    2014-09-01

    Some fear that the added demands of the Affordable Care Act may worsen already high attrition rates among nurses. One potential solution is that graduate nursing programs must do a better job of selecting and retaining those who can persist in training to gain the clinical and leadership skills necessary to fill these new roles. Some believe emotional intelligence (EI) may help with the selection and retention of graduate nursing students. This study examined EI in 216 nurse anesthesia (NA) students. Q-factor analysis was used to create EI profiles of first-semester, 1-year, and last-semester NA students. It showed one EI type was consistent at each point in the program: High Facial Reader/Low EI Manager. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  18. Mental health services for homeless: patient profile and factors associated with suicide and homicide.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dunne, E

    2012-03-01

    This study aimed to establish a profile of users of the mental health service for homeless in Cork, comparing this group with those attending a General Adult Service. The homeless group were significantly more likely to be male (89% v. 46%o), unemployed (96% v. 68%), unmarried (98% v. 75%) and under 65 (94% v. 83%). Diagnostically, there was a significantly higher prevalence of schizophrenia (50% v. 34%); personality disorder (37% v. 11%) and substance dependence (74% v. 19%) in the homeless service users. They were more likely to have a history of deliberate self harm (54% v. 21%) and violence (48% v. 10%). Severe mental illness has a high prevalence in the homeless population, with particularly high levels of factors associated with suicide and homicide. Poor compliance and complexity of illness lead to a requirement for significant input from multidisciplinary mental health teams members.

  19. Comprehensive inhibitor profiling of the Proteus mirabilis metalloprotease virulence factor ZapA (mirabilysin).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, Louise; Cathcart, George R; Scott, Christopher J; Hollenberg, Morley D; Walker, Brian; Ceri, Howard; Gilmore, Brendan F

    2011-10-01

    In this study we report for the first time the comprehensive inhibitor profiling of the Proteus mirabilis metalloprotease virulence factor ZapA (mirabilysin) using a 160 compound focused library of N-alpha mercaptoamide dipeptides, in order to map the S(1)(') and S(2)(') binding site preferences of this important enzyme. This study has revealed a preference for the aromatic residues tyrosine and tryptophan in P(1)(') and aliphatic residues in P(2)('). From this library, six compounds were identified which exhibited sub- to low-micromolar K(i) values. The most potent inactivator, SH-CO(2)-Y-V-NH(2) was capable of preventing ZapA-mediated hydrolysis of heat-denatured IgA, indicating that these inhibitors may be capable of protecting host proteins against ZapA during colonisation and infection. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Discovery of directional and nondirectional pioneer transcription factors by modeling DNase profile magnitude and shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwood, Richard I; Hashimoto, Tatsunori; O'Donnell, Charles W; Lewis, Sophia; Barkal, Amira A; van Hoff, John Peter; Karun, Vivek; Jaakkola, Tommi; Gifford, David K

    2014-02-01

    We describe protein interaction quantitation (PIQ), a computational method for modeling the magnitude and shape of genome-wide DNase I hypersensitivity profiles to identify transcription factor (TF) binding sites. Through the use of machine-learning techniques, PIQ identified binding sites for >700 TFs from one DNase I hypersensitivity analysis followed by sequencing (DNase-seq) experiment with accuracy comparable to that of chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by sequencing (ChIP-seq). We applied PIQ to analyze DNase-seq data from mouse embryonic stem cells differentiating into prepancreatic and intestinal endoderm. We identified 120 and experimentally validated eight 'pioneer' TF families that dynamically open chromatin. Four pioneer TF families only opened chromatin in one direction from their motifs. Furthermore, we identified 'settler' TFs whose genomic binding is principally governed by proximity to open chromatin. Our results support a model of hierarchical TF binding in which directional and nondirectional pioneer activity shapes the chromatin landscape for population by settler TFs.

  1. Risk Factors and Health Profiles of Recent Migrant Women Who Experienced Violence Associated with Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Anita J.; Merry, Lisa A.; Dennis, Cindy-Lee

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Violence associated with pregnancy is a major public health concern, but little is known about it in recent migrant women. This study looked at (1) risk factors for violence associated with pregnancy among newly arrived migrant women in Canada and (2) if those who experienced violence associated with pregnancy had a different health profile or use of healthcare services for themselves or their infants during pregnancy and up to 4 months postpartum compared to other childbearing migrant women. Methods Pregnant migrant women in Canada social support and report more depression, anxiety, somatization, and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) on standardized tests. No differences were found in the health status of the infants of women who experienced violence compared to those who did not. Conclusions Clinicians should sensitively ask recent migrant women (asylum seekers, refugees, and nonrefugee immigrants) about violence associated with pregnancy and appropriately assess, treat, and refer them. PMID:22900928

  2. Virulence factors and antimicrobial susceptibility profile of extraintestinal Escherichia coli isolated from an avian colisepticemia outbreak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciel, Jonas Fernandes; Matter, Letícia Beatriz; Trindade, Michele Martins; Camillo, Giovana; Lovato, Maristela; de Ávila Botton, Sônia; Castagna de Vargas, Agueda

    2017-02-01

    In this study an avian colisepticemia outbreak was investigated. Two isolates from a chicken with colisepticemia were characterized for antimicrobial susceptibility and virulence factors profile. For this purpose 7 antimicrobial and 29 genes (fimH, hrlA/hek, iha, papC, sfa/focCD, tsh, mat, tia, gimB, ibeA, chuA, fyuA, ireA, iroN, irp2, iucD, sitD. chr., sitD. ep., iss, neuC, ompA, traT, astA, hlyA, sat, vat, pic, malX, cvi/cva) were tested. The outbreak happened in a hick chicken breeding located in the northwestern region of Rio Grande do Sul state in South of Brazil and caused 28.3% (102 deads of a total of 360 chickens) of mortality rate. Escherichia coli isolates obtained from the avian spleen and liver belong to the same phylogenetic group A and present resistance to all antimicrobials tested (ampicillin, tetracycline, gentamicin, neomycin, sulfa + trimethoprim, enrofloxacin, and norfloxacin). Both isolates harbor virulence factors related to adhesion (fimH, papC, mat), invasion (tia), iron acquisition system (iroN) and serum resistance (iss, ompA, traT), showing that these groups are important for Avian Pathogenic E. coli (APEC). However, they present different virulence profiles for some genes, whereas liver-isolate carries more hrlA/hek (adhesin), gimB (invasin), sitD ep. (iron acquisition system), sat (toxin) and hylA (toxin) genes, the spleen-isolate harbors fyuA (iron acquisition system) gene. Here, we highlight a coinfection by different strains of APEC in the same animal with colisepticemia, the great antimicrobial resistance of these bacterial isolates and the genetic traits that modulate the virulence for high mortality rate of chickens for human consumption. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. TRPC3 regulates release of brain-derived neurotrophic factor from human airway smooth muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vohra, Pawan K; Thompson, Michael A; Sathish, Venkatachalem; Kiel, Alexander; Jerde, Calvin; Pabelick, Christina M; Singh, Brij B; Prakash, Y S

    2013-12-01

    Exogenous brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) enhances Ca(2+) signaling and cell proliferation in human airway smooth muscle (ASM), especially with inflammation. Human ASM also expresses BDNF, raising the potential for autocrine/paracrine effects. The mechanisms by which ASM BDNF secretion occurs are not known. Transient receptor potential channels (TRPCs) regulate a variety of intracellular processes including store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE; including in ASM) and secretion of factors such as cytokines. In human ASM, we tested the hypothesis that TRPC3 regulates BDNF secretion. At baseline, intracellular BDNF was present, and BDNF secretion was detectable by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) of cell supernatants or by real-time fluorescence imaging of cells transfected with GFP-BDNF vector. Exposure to the pro-inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα) (20ng/ml, 48h) or a mixture of allergens (ovalbumin, house dust mite, Alternaria, and Aspergillus extracts) significantly enhanced BDNF secretion and increased TRPC3 expression. TRPC3 knockdown (siRNA or inhibitor Pyr3; 10μM) blunted BDNF secretion, and prevented inflammation effects. Chelation of extracellular Ca(2+) (EGTA; 1mM) or intracellular Ca(2+) (BAPTA; 5μM) significantly reduced secreted BDNF, as did the knockdown of SOCE proteins STIM1 and Orai1 or plasma membrane caveolin-1. Functionally, secreted BDNF had autocrine effects suggested by phosphorylation of high-affinity tropomyosin-related kinase TrkB receptor, prevented by chelating extracellular BDNF with chimeric TrkB-Fc. These data emphasize the role of TRPC3 and Ca(2+) influx in the regulation of BDNF secretion by human ASM and the enhancing effects of inflammation. Given the BDNF effects on Ca(2+) and cell proliferation, BDNF secretion may contribute to altered airway structure and function in diseases such as asthma.

  4. Lipid profiles and obesity as potential risk factors of sudden sensorineural hearing loss.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joong Seob Lee

    Full Text Available The objective of our study was to establish whether increased lipid profiles and obesity affect the prevalence and prognosis of sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL.This was a case-controlled study with a longitudinal design. According to our criteria, 324 patients with SSNHL were included in this study. To manage potential covariates, 972 subjects with normal hearing from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey were matched as control group according to their propensity scores. Age, level of total cholesterol (TC, high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C, triglycerides (TG, and body mass index (BMI were obtained from the clinical data. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to investigate the association between SSNHL and lipid profiles or obesity in the 1296 subjects. Multivariate Cox regression analysis was used to determine whether lipid profiles and obesity are prognostic factors in patients with SSNHL.Mean body weight, BMI, TC, and TG were significantly higher in patients with SSNHL compared with control subjects (p<0.05. However, LDL-C values did not differ significantly between the two groups. Subjects with elevated TC and TG levels had a 2.20- (95% CI 1.50-3.24 and 1.50-fold (95% CI 1.08-2.08 increased odds, respectively, of SSNHL compared with subjects with normal TC and TG levels. Subjects with grade III BMI had a 1.59-fold (95% CI 1.17-2.16 increased odds of SSNHL. Multivariate Cox regression analyses revealed that BMI was an independent risk factor of treatment outcome, as patients with BMI ≥27.5 were less likely to achieve complete recovery than those with BMI <27.5 (p<0.05.The results of this study revealed that elevated TC and TG levels and increased BMI are significantly associated with the prevalence of SSNHL and its prognosis, indicating that vascular compromise may play an important role in the pathogenesis of SSNHL.

  5. Intermedia transfer factors for fifteen toxic pollutants released to air basins in California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKone, T.E.; Daniels, J.I. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Chiao, F.F.; Hsieh, D.P.H. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    1993-10-01

    This report provides a summary definition of the intermedia-transfer factors (ITFs). Methods are discussed for estimating these parameters in the absence of measured values, and the estimation errors inherent in these estimation methods are considered. A detailed summary is provided of measured and estimated ITF values for fifteen air contaminants. They include: 1,3 butadiene; cadmium; cellosolve; cellosolve acetate; chloroform; di-2-ethylhexylphthalate; 1,4-dioxame; hexachlorobenzene; inorganic arsenic; inorganic lead; nickel; tetrachloroethylene; toluene; toluene-2,4-diisocyanate; and 1,3-xylene. Recommendations are made regarding the expected value and variance in these values for use in exposure models.

  6. Immunohistochemistry profiles of breast ductal carcinoma: factor analysis of digital image analysis data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurinavicius Arvydas

    2012-03-01

    the major factor of variation. Finally, we confirmed high expression levels of p16 in Triple-negative tumours. Conclusion Factor analysis of multiple IHC biomarkers measured by automated DA is an efficient exploratory tool clarifying complex interdependencies in the breast ductal carcinoma IHC profiles and informative value of single IHC markers. Integrated IHC indices may provide additional risk stratifications for the currently used grading systems and prove to be useful in clinical outcome studies. Virtual Slides The virtual slide(s for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/1512077125668949

  7. Immunohistochemistry profiles of breast ductal carcinoma: factor analysis of digital image analysis data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurinavicius, Arvydas; Laurinaviciene, Aida; Ostapenko, Valerijus; Dasevicius, Darius; Jarmalaite, Sonata; Lazutka, Juozas

    2012-03-16

    confirmed high expression levels of p16 in Triple-negative tumours. Factor analysis of multiple IHC biomarkers measured by automated DA is an efficient exploratory tool clarifying complex interdependencies in the breast ductal carcinoma IHC profiles and informative value of single IHC markers. Integrated IHC indices may provide additional risk stratifications for the currently used grading systems and prove to be useful in clinical outcome studies. The virtual slide(s) for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/1512077125668949.

  8. Insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) stimulate the release of alpha 1-antichymotrypsin and soluble IGF-II/mannose 6-phosphate receptor from MCF7 breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Confort, C; Rochefort, H; Vignon, F

    1995-09-01

    The growth of hormone-responsive MCF7 human breast cancer cells is controlled by steroid hormones and growth factors. By metabolic labeling of cells grown in steroid- and growth factor-stripped serum conditions, we show that insulin-like growth factors (IGF-I and IGF-II) increase by approximately 5-fold the release of several proteins including cathepsin D, alpha 1-antichymotrypsin, and soluble forms of the multifunctional IGF-II/mannose 6-phosphate (M6P) receptor. Two soluble forms of IGF-II/M6P receptors were detected, one major (approximately 260 kilodaltons) and one minor (approximately 85 kilodaltons) that probably represents a proteolytic fragment of the larger soluble molecule. IGFs increased receptor release in a dose-dependent fashion with 50-60% of newly synthesized receptor released at 5-10 nM IGFs. The release of IGF-II/M6P receptors correlated with the levels of secreted cathepsin D in different human breast cancer cells or in rats stable transfectants that are constitutively expressing variable levels of human cathepsin D. IGFs had a stronger effect on IGF-II/M6P receptor release, whereas estradiol treatment preferentially enhanced the release of protease and antiprotease. We thus demonstrate that in human breast cancer cells, IGFs not only act as strong mitogens but also regulate release of alpha 1-antichymotrypsin, IGF-II/M6P-soluble receptor, and cathepsin D; three proteins that potentially regulate cell proliferation and/or invasion.

  9. Angiotensin type 1a receptors on corticotropin-releasing factor neurons contribute to the expression of conditioned fear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurt, R C; Garrett, J C; Keifer, O P; Linares, A; Couling, L; Speth, R C; Ressler, K J; Marvar, P J

    2015-09-01

    Although generally associated with cardiovascular regulation, angiotensin II receptor type 1a (AT1a R) blockade in mouse models and humans has also been associated with enhanced fear extinction and decreased post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptom severity, respectively. The mechanisms mediating these effects remain unknown, but may involve alterations in the activities of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF)-expressing cells, which are known to be involved in fear regulation. To test the hypothesis that AT1a R signaling in CRFergic neurons is involved in conditioned fear expression, we generated and characterized a conditional knockout mouse strain with a deletion of the AT1a R gene from its CRF-releasing cells (CRF-AT1a R((-/-)) ). These mice exhibit normal baseline heart rate, blood pressure, anxiety and locomotion, and freeze at normal levels during acquisition of auditory fear conditioning. However, CRF-AT1a R((-/-)) mice exhibit less freezing than wild-type mice during tests of conditioned fear expression-an effect that may be caused by a decrease in the consolidation of fear memory. These results suggest that central AT1a R activity in CRF-expressing cells plays a role in the expression of conditioned fear, and identify CRFergic cells as a population on which AT1 R antagonists may act to modulate fear extinction. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and International Behavioural and Neural Genetics Society.

  10. Incorporation of chitosan microspheres into collagen-chitosan scaffolds for the controlled release of nerve growth factor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Zeng

    Full Text Available Artifical nerve scaffold can be used as a promising alternative to autologous nerve grafts to enhance the repair of peripheral nerve defects. However, current nerve scaffolds lack efficient microstructure and neurotrophic support.Microsphere-Scaffold composite was developed by incorporating chitosan microspheres loaded with nerve growth factor (NGF-CMSs into collagen-chitosan scaffolds (CCH with longitudinally oriented microchannels (NGF-CMSs/CCH. The morphological characterizations, in vitro release kinetics study, neurite outgrowth assay, and bioactivity assay were evaluated. After that, a 15-mm-long sciatic nerve gap in rats was bridged by the NGF-CMSs/CCH, CCH physically absorbed NGF (NGF/CCH, CCH or nerve autograft. 16 weeks after implantation, electrophysiology, fluoro-gold retrograde tracing, and nerve morphometry were performed.The NGF-CMSs were evenly distributed throughout the longitudinally oriented microchannels of the scaffold. The NGF-CMSs/CCH was capable of sustained release of bioactive NGF within 28 days as compared with others in vitro. In vivo animal study demonstrated that the outcomes of NGF-CMSs/CCH were better than those of NGF/CCH or CCH.Our findings suggest that incorporation of NGF-CMSs into the CCH may be a promising tool in the repair of peripheral nerve defects.

  11. The regulation and function of fibroblast growth factor 8 and its function during gonadotropin-releasing hormone neuron development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson CJ Chung

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Over the last few years, numerous studies solidified the hypothesis that fibroblast growth factor (FGF signaling regulates neuroendocrine progenitor cell proliferation, fate-specification, and cell survival, and therefore is critical for the regulation and maintenance of homeostasis of the body. One important example that underscores the involvement of FGF signaling during neuroendocrine cell development is gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH neuron ontogenesis. Indeed, transgenic mice with reduced olfactory placode (OP Fgf8 expression do not have GnRH neurons. This observation indicates the requirement of FGF8 signaling for the emergence of the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH neuronal system in the embryonic OP, the putative birth place of GnRH neurons. Mammalian reproductive success depends on the presence of GnRH neurons to stimulate gonadotropin secretion from the anterior pituitary, which activates gonadal steroidogenesis and gametogenesis. Together, these observations are critical for understanding the function of GnRH neurons and their control of the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal (HPG axis to maintain fertility. Taken together, these studies illustrate that GnRH neuron emergence, and hence HPG-function is vulnerable to genomic and molecular signals that abnormally modify Fgf8 expression in the developing mouse OP. In this short review, we focus on research that is aimed at unraveling how androgen, all-trans retinoic acid and epigenetic modifies control mouse OP Fgf8 transcription in the context of GnRH neuronal development, and mammalian reproductive success.

  12. Effect of controlled release of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and neurotrophin-3 from collagen gel on neural stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Fei; Wu, Yunfeng; Wang, Hao; Chang, Jun; Ma, Guangwen; Yin, Zongsheng

    2016-01-20

    This study aimed to examine the effect of controlled release of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) from collagen gel on rat neural stem cells (NSCs). With three groups of collagen gel, BDNF/collagen gel, and NT-3/collagen gel as controls, BDNF and NT-3 were tested in the BDNF-NT-3/collagen gel group at different time points. The enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay results showed that BDNF and NT-3 were steadily released from collagen gels for 10 days. The cell viability test and the bromodeoxyuridine incorporation assay showed that BDNF-NT-3/collagen gel supported the survival and proliferation of NSCs. The results also showed that the length of processes was markedly longer and differentiation percentage from NSCs into neurons was much higher in the BDNF-NT-3/collagen gel group than those in the collagen gel, BDNF/collagen gel, and NT-3/collagen gel groups. These findings suggest that BDNF-NT-3/collagen gel could significantly improve the ability of NSCs proliferation and differentiation.

  13. The effect of basic fibroblast growth factor on glutamate-injured neuroarchitecture and arachidonic acid release in adult hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himmelseher, S; Pfenninger, E; Georgieff, M

    1996-01-22

    During development in culture, basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) protected immature primary hippocampal neurons against glutamate-induced neurotoxicity. We investigated the effects of bFGF on mature, differentiated rat hippocampal neurons cultured for 10-12 days after an 8-min exposure to 500 microM glutamate. Seven days post-injury, hippocampal cells demonstrated severe reductions in cellular viability and axonal and dendritic outgrowth, which were accompanied by a marked increase in [3H]arachidonic acid (ARA) release from prelabelled neurons. bFGF applied post-injury attenuated cell death and cytoarchitectural destruction at all concentrations used (500 pg/ml, 1, 10, 20 ng/ml). However, neurite elongation and branching processes were only significantly protected by 10 ng/ml bFGF. [3H]ARA release decreased in a dose-related fashion within a concentration range of 1-10 ng/ml bFGF. 20 ng/ml bFGF was not superior to 10 ng/ml bFGF. Therefore, bFGF's neurotropic actions appear to be concentration-dependent. Our data suggest that bFGF applied post-injury may have a neuroprotective potential for mature, differentiated, completely polarized hippocampal neurons.

  14. Apoptotic neutrophils containing Staphylococcus epidermidis stimulate macrophages to release the proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilsson, Asa; Lind, Sara; Ohman, Lena; Nilsdotter-Augustinsson, Asa; Lundqvist-Setterud, Helen

    2008-06-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis infections are usually nosocomial and involve colonization of biomaterials. The immune defense system cannot efficiently control the bacteria during these infections, which often results in protracted chronic inflammation, in which a key event is disturbed removal of neutrophils by tissue macrophages. While ingesting uninfected apoptotic neutrophils, macrophages release anti-inflammatory cytokines that lead to resolution of inflammation. In clinical studies, we have previously found elevated levels of the proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-6 in synovial fluid from prostheses infected with coagulase negative staphylococci. We show that macrophages phagocytosing apoptotic neutrophils containing S. epidermidis released TNF-alpha and interleukin-6, whereas macrophages phagocytosing spontaneously apoptotic neutrophils did not. This difference was not due to dissimilar phagocytic capacities, because macrophages ingested both types of neutrophils to the same extent. The activation was induced mainly by the apoptotic neutrophils themselves, not by the few remaining extracellular bacteria. Macrophages were not activated by apoptotic neutrophils that contained paraformaldehyde-killed S. epidermidis. Proinflammatory reactions induced by clearance of apoptotic neutrophils containing S. epidermidis might represent an important mechanism to combat the infective agent. This activation of macrophages may contribute to the development of chronic inflammation instead of inflammation resolution.

  15. Characterisation of a novel, multifunctional, co-processed excipient and its effect on release profile of paracetamol from tablets prepared by direct compression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eraga Sylvester Okhuelegbe; Arhewoh Matthew Ikhuoria; Uhumwangho Michael Uwumagbe; Iwuagwu Magnus Amara

    2015-01-01

    To characterise a novel multifunctional pharmaceutical excipient and investigate its effect on paracetamol release from tablets prepared by direct compression. Methods: The excipient was prepared by co-processing gelatinized maize starch with sodium carboxymethyl cellulose and microcrystalline cellulose in a ratio of 2:1:1, dried and pulverized into powder. The excipient formulated was characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry. The excipient was used to prepare batches of tablets by direct compression with drug-excipient ratios of 1:1, 1:2, 1:3 and 1:4. Parameters evaluated on tablets include crushing strength, friability and in vitro dissolution studies. Results: Differential scanning calorimetry analysis revealed a crystalline excipient while Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy showed no interaction between the excipient and paracetamol. Tablets from all the batches gave average crushing strength values between 3.47 and 4.88 kp. The 1:1 and 1:2 tablet batches were comparable to each other while 1:3 and 1:4 were also comparable to one another in their dissolution profiles. The dissolution parameters of the 1:4 batch was faster with - m∞(90.5%), t50% (3.5 min), t70% (11.6 min) while that of ratio 1:1 was the least with - m∞ (48.6%), m5min (23.8%). Their release kinetics followed a Korsmeyer-Peppas model with a super case-II transport mechanism. Conclusions: The drug-excipient ratios of 1:3 and 1:4 gave pharmaceutically acceptable tablets that met the British Pharmacopoeia specifications. The t50% value of the 1:4 batch of tablets may find its usefulness in formulating drugs for which a fast onset of action is desired.

  16. Prevalence of conventional risk factors and lipid profiles in patients with acute coronary syndrome and significant coronary disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Pacheco, Héctor; Vargas-Barrón, Jesús; Vallejo, Maite; Piña-Reyna, Yigal; Altamirano-Castillo, Alfredo; Sánchez-Tapia, Pedro; Martínez-Sánchez, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Background Among patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), 80%–90% present at least one conventional risk factor. On the other hand, lipid profile modification after a cardiovascular event related to acute coronary syndrome (ACS) has been recognized. The prevalence of conventional risk factors and the lipid profile at the time of admission in patients with ACS and significant CAD (stenosis ≥50%) determined through coronary angiography is not well described. Methods We studied 3,447 patients with a diagnosis of ACS and significant CAD with stenosis ≥50%, as shown o n angiography. We recorded the presence of conventional risk factors, including smoking, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and diabetes. In addition, we analyzed the lipid profiles within the first 24 hours of admission. We analyzed the studied population and compared findings according to sex. Results Most patients (81.7%) were male. ST-elevation myocardial infarction was present in 51.3% of patients, and non-ST-elevation acute coronary syndrome was present in 48.7%. The most frequent risk factor was smoking, which was present in 68% of patients, followed by hypertension (57.8%), dyslipidemia (47.5%), and diabetes (37.7%). In women, the most frequent risk factors were hypertension, diabetes, and dyslipidemia, whereas in men, smoking was the most frequent. We identified at least one risk factor in 95.7% of all patients, two or three risk factors in 62%, and four risk factors in 8.6% of patients. The lipid profile analysis revealed that 85.1% of patients had some type of dyslipidemia, and the most frequent was low levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (68.6% of cases). Conclusion We found at least one conventional risk factor in 95.7% of patients with ACS and significant CAD. The lipid profile analysis revealed that two thirds of cases had low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. PMID:25328397

  17. Over-expression of corticotropin-releasing factor mRNA in inferior olivary neurons of rolling mouse Nagoya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawada, Kazuhiko; Kawano, Michihiro; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Sakata-Haga, Hiromi; Hisano, Setsuji; Fukui, Yoshihiro

    2003-10-01

    Expression of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) mRNA was examined in the inferior olivary nucleus (ION) of an ataxic mutant, rolling mouse Nagoya (RMN) by semi-quantitative in situ hybridization. The most marked difference in the level of CRF mRNA signals between RMN and non-ataxic littermates (control mice) was observed in the beta-subnucleus and ventrolateral protrusion of the ION. The level of signals in these subnuclei was about twofold higher in RMN than in the controls. Signal levels in the dorsal nucleus, principal nucleus and subnucleus A were slightly but significantly higher in RMN than in the controls. In the other subnuclei, there were no differences in signal level between RMN and controls. These results suggest a region-related over-expression of CRF mRNA in the ION of RMN. This may be responsible for the increased sensitivity of some Purkinje cells to glutamate, resulting in ataxic symptoms of RMN.

  18. Pavlovian conditioning of corticotropin-releasing factor-induced increase of blood pressure and corticosterone secretion in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreutz, M; Hellhammer, D; Murison, R; Vetter, H; Krause, U; Lehnert, H

    1992-05-01

    Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) is clearly involved in the central regulation of the pituitary-adrenal axis and, moreover, of autonomic nervous system functions. Enhanced sympathetic activity with subsequent increases in blood pressure and heart rate and attenuation of the baroreceptor reflex results from the intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration of CRF. Additionally, the peptide has a variety of potent effects on behavioural responses in animals similar to those observed after an experimentally evoked stress. It was therefore of obvious interest to examine whether CRF is a possible mediator of the learning processes associated with physiological stress reaction patterns. This report clearly demonstrates a classical conditioning of the endocrine (i.e. corticosterone secretion) and haemodynamic (i.e. blood pressure) sequelae following central CRF application and thus indicates that this mechanism is of physiological significance for learned stress responses.

  19. Tubercular meningitis in children: Clinical, pathological, and radiological profile and factors associated with mortality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil V Israni

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Childhood tuberculosis is a major public health problem in developing countries with tubercular meningitis being a serious complication with high mortality and morbidity. Aim: To study the clinicopathological as well as radiological profile of childhood tuberculous meningitis (TBM cases. Settings and Design: Prospective, observational study including children <14 years of age with TBM admitted in a tertiary care hospital from Western India. Subjects and Methods: TBM was diagnosed based on predefined criteria. Glassgow coma scale (GCS and intracranial pressure (ICP was recorded. Staging was done as per British Medical Council Staging System. Mantoux test, chest X-ray, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF examination, neuroimaging, and other investigations were done to confirm TB. Statistical Analysis Used: STATA software (version 9.0 was used for data analysis. Various risk factors were determined using Chi-square tests, and a P< 0.05 was considered significant. Results: Forty-seven children were included, of which 11 (24.3% died. Fever was the most common presenting symptom, and meningismus was the most common sign. Twenty-nine (62% children presented with Stage III disease. Stage III disease, low GCS, and raised ICP were predictors of mortality. Findings on neuroimaging or CSF examination did not predict mortality. Conclusions: Childhood TBM presents with nonspecific clinical features. Stage III disease, low GCS, lack of Bacillus Calmette–Gu͹rin vaccination at birth and raised ICP seem to the most important adverse prognostic factors.

  20. Premorbid Adjustment Profiles in Psychosis and the Role of Familial Factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quee, Piotr J.; Meijer, Julia H.; Islam, Md Atiqul; Aleman, Andre; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z.; Meijer, Carin J.; van den Heuvel, Edwin R.

    2014-01-01

    Disease heterogeneity in patients with psychotic disorder may be explained by distinct profiles of premorbid adjustment. The current study explored premorbid adjustment profiles in patients with psychotic disorders, associations with cognitive and clinical characteristics after disease onset, and th

  1. Premorbid adjustment profiles in psychosis and the role of familial factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quee, Piotr J; Meijer, Julia H; Islam, Md Atiqul; Aleman, André; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z; Meijer, Carin J; van den Heuvel, Edwin R

    2014-01-01

    Disease heterogeneity in patients with psychotic disorder may be explained by distinct profiles of premorbid adjustment. The current study explored premorbid adjustment profiles in patients with psychotic disorders, associations with cognitive and clinical characteristics after disease onset, and th

  2. The Antimicrobial Peptide Human Beta-Defensin-3 Is Induced by Platelet-Released Growth Factors in Primary Keratinocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Bayer

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Platelet-released growth factors (PRGF and its related clinically used formulations (e.g., Vivostat Platelet-Rich Fibrin (PRF® contain a variety of chemokines, cytokines, and growth factors and are therefore used to support healing of chronic, hard-to-heal, or infected wounds. Human beta-defensin-3 (hBD-3 is an antimicrobial peptide inducibly expressed in human keratinocytes especially upon wounding. The potent antimicrobial activity of hBD-3 together with its wound closure-promoting activities suggests that hBD-3 may play a crucial role in wound healing. Therefore, we analyzed the influence of PRGF on hBD-3 expression in human primary keratinocytes in vitro. In addition, we investigated the influence of Vivostat PRF on hBD-3 expression in artificially generated human skin wounds in vivo. PRGF treatment of primary keratinocytes induced a significant, concentration- and time-dependent increase in hBD-3 gene expression which was partially mediated by the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR. In line with these cell culture data, in vivo experiments revealed an enhanced hBD-3 expression in experimentally produced human wounds after the treatment with Vivostat PRF. Thus, the induction of hBD-3 may contribute to the beneficial effects of thrombocyte concentrate lysates in the treatment of chronic or infected wounds.

  3. Factors to predict positive results of gonadotropin releasing hormone stimulation test in girls with suspected precocious puberty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Hyo-Kyoung; Rhie, Young Jun; Son, Chang Sung; Park, Sang Hee; Lee, Kee-Hyoung

    2012-02-01

    Sometimes, the clinical findings and the results of the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) stimulation test are inconsistent in girls with early breast development and bone age advancement. We aimed to investigate the factors predicting positive results of the GnRH stimulation test in girls with suspected central precocious puberty (CPP). We reviewed the records of 574 girls who developed breast budding before the age of 8 yr and underwent the GnRH stimulation test under the age of 9 yr. Positive results of the GnRH stimulated peak luteinizing hormone (LH) level were defined as 5 IU/L and over. Girls with the initial positive results (n = 375) showed accelerated growth, advanced bone age and higher serum basal LH, follicle-stimulating hormone, and estradiol levels, compared to those with the initial negative results (n = 199). Girls with the follow-up positive results (n = 64) showed accelerated growth and advanced bone age, compared to those with the follow-up negative results. In the binary logistic regression, the growth velocity ratio was the most significant predictive factor of positive results. We suggest that the rapid growth velocity is the most useful predictive factor for positive results in the GnRH stimulation test in girls with suspected precocious puberty.

  4. Efficacy of unfractionated heparin, low molecular weight heparin and both combined for releasing total and free tissue factor pathway inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altman, R; Scazziota, A; Rouvier, J

    1998-01-01

    Unfractionated heparin (UFH) exerts its anticoagulant properties by increasing the inactivation of thrombin and activated factor X by antithrombin III. Apart from this main action release of tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI) from endothelial cells could also be important for the antithrombotic activity of heparins. Four different heparin preparations were injected subcutaneously into 5 healthy volunteers 1 week apart: (1) UFH 2,500 IU fix dose (FixUFH), (2) 1 mg/kg body weight of low molecular weight heparin (LMWH), (3) the combined LMWH-adjusted dose plus UFH 2,500 IU fix dose (ComHep) and (4) UFH 2,500 IU/10 kg body weight (UFHvar). Plasma samples were drawn before and 1, 2, 4, 6, 12 and 24 h afterwards. FixUFH did not affect the concentration of total and free TFPI. Total TFPI increased in the 1st hour after LMWH injection from 74 to 124 ng/ml (p < 0.01), after ComHep from 82 to 144 ng/ml (p < 0.01), and after UFHvar from 91 to 113 ng/ml (p < 0.05). All observed elevations were significant at the peak value (+/- 2 h, p < 0.01 compared with baselines). The increase of free TFPI produced by UFHvar (74.5 and 70.5 ng/ml) was significantly higher than with LMWH (42.8 and 38.0 ng/ml) at 2 and 4 h (p < 0.001 and p < 0.01, respectively). UFHvar and ComHep but not LMWH produced a statistically significant increase of free TFPI compared with FixUFH at 2, 4 and 6 h (p < 0. 01). We concluded that at comparable therapeutic doses, subcutaneous UFHvar released more free TFPI than LMWH and ComHep. A synergism between LMWH and low dose of UFH was found in 4-, 6- and 12-hour blood samples.

  5. Expression and functional characterization of membrane-integrated mammalian corticotropin releasing factor receptors 1 and 2 in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Jappelli

    Full Text Available Corticotropin-Releasing Factor Receptors (CRFRs are class B1 G-protein-coupled receptors, which bind peptides of the corticotropin releasing factor family and are key mediators in the stress response. In order to dissect the receptors' binding specificity and enable structural studies, full-length human CRFR1α and mouse CRFR2β as well as fragments lacking the N-terminal extracellular domain, were overproduced in E. coli. The characteristics of different CRFR2β-PhoA gene fusion products expressed in bacteria were found to be in agreement with the predicted ones in the hepta-helical membrane topology model. Recombinant histidine-tagged CRFR1α and CRFR2β expression levels and bacterial subcellular localization were evaluated by cell fractionation and Western blot analysis. Protein expression parameters were assessed, including the influence of E. coli bacterial hosts, culture media and the impact of either PelB or DsbA signal peptide. In general, the large majority of receptor proteins became inserted in the bacterial membrane. Across all experimental conditions significantly more CRFR2β product was obtained in comparison to CRFR1α. Following a detergent screen analysis, bacterial membranes containing CRFR1α and CRFR2β were best solubilized with the zwitterionic detergent FC-14. Binding of different peptide ligands to CRFR1α and CRFR2β membrane fractions were similar, in part, to the complex pharmacology observed in eukaryotic cells. We suggest that our E. coli expression system producing functional CRFRs will be useful for large-scale expression of these receptors for structural studies.

  6. Colorectal distention induces acute and delayed visceral hypersensitivity: role of peripheral corticotropin-releasing factor and interleukin-1 in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozu, Tsukasa; Kumei, Shima; Miyagishi, Saori; Takakusaki, Kaoru; Okumura, Toshikatsu

    2015-12-01

    Most studies evaluating visceral sensation measure visceromotor response (VMR) to colorectal distention (CRD). However, CRD itself induces visceral sensitization, and little is known about the detailed characteristics of this response. The present study tried to clarify this question. VMR was determined by measuring abdominal muscle contractions as a response to CRD in rats. The CRD set consisted of two isobaric distentions (60 mmHg for 10 min twice, with a 30-min rest), and the CRD set was performed on two separate days, i.e., days 1 and 3, 8. On day 1, VMR to the second CRD was increased as compared with that to the first CRD, which is the acute sensitization. VMR to the first CRD on day 3 returned to the same level as that to the first CRD on day 1, and total VMR, i.e., the whole response to the CRD set, was not different between day 1 and day 3. However, total VMR was significantly increased on day 8 as compared with that on day 1, suggesting CRD induced the delayed sensitization. Intraperitoneally administered astressin (200 µg/kg), a corticotropin-releasing factor receptor antagonist, at the end of the first CRD blocked the acute sensitization, but anakinra (20 mg/kg, intraperitoneally), an interleukin-1 receptor antagonist, did not modify it. Astressin (200 µg/kg, twice before CRD on day 8) did not alter the delayed sensitization, but anakinra (20 mg/kg, twice) abolished it. CRD induced both acute sensitization and delayed sensitization, which were mediated through peripheral corticotropin-releasing factor and interleukin-1 pathways, respectively.

  7. [Determination of head scatter factors released from a scanning-type therapeutic accelerator].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Tomoharu

    2003-07-01

    The MM50 is a racetrack microtron capable of taking out photon beams and electron beams with energies of up to 50 MeV. It flattens the beam by the beam-scanning method, while the microtron MM22 utilizes a flattening filter. The head-scatter factors (hereafter called S(h)), which are important for evaluating the output of the photon beam of the MM50 and MM22, were measured using a mini-phantom and build-up cap. S(h) measured with the build-up cap showed the influence of contaminated electrons, whereas S(h) measured with the mini-phantom showed less influence, even for 50 MV photon beams. Compared with the MM22, the MM50 showed less change in S(h) according to field size and energy. The reason for this seemed to be that the MM50 has a smaller extra-focal region than other accelerators equipped with flattening filters and, therefore, can essentially be considered a point source by using the beam-scanning method without a flattening filter. This study demonstrated that photons scattered by the flattening filter used for beam flattening in typical medical accelerators mainly contribute to S(h).

  8. Brain changes in Alzheimer's disease patients with implanted encapsulated cells releasing nerve growth factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Daniel; Westman, Eric; Eyjolfsdottir, Helga; Almqvist, Per; Lind, Göran; Linderoth, Bengt; Seiger, Ake; Blennow, Kaj; Karami, Azadeh; Darreh-Shori, Taher; Wiberg, Maria; Simmons, Andrew; Wahlund, Lars-Olof; Wahlberg, Lars; Eriksdotter, Maria

    2015-01-01

    New therapies with disease-modifying effects are urgently needed for treating Alzheimer's disease (AD). Nerve growth factor (NGF) protein has demonstrated regenerative and neuroprotective effects on basal forebrain cholinergic neurons in animal studies. In addition, AD patients treated with NGF have previously shown improved cognition, EEG activity, nicotinic binding, and glucose metabolism. However, no study to date has analyzed brain atrophy in patients treated with NGF producing cells. In this study we present MRI results of the first clinical trial in patients with AD using encapsulated NGF biodelivery to the basal forebrain. Six AD patients received the treatment during twelve months. Patients were grouped as responders and non-responders according to their twelve-months change in MMSE. Normative values were created from 131 AD patients from ADNI, selecting 36 age- and MMSE-matched patients for interpreting the longitudinal changes in MMSE and brain atrophy. Results at baseline indicated that responders showed better clinical status and less pathological levels of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) Aβ1-42. However, they showed more brain atrophy, and neuronal degeneration as evidenced by higher CSF levels of T-tau and neurofilaments. At follow-up, responders showed less brain shrinkage and better progression in the clinical variables and CSF biomarkers. Noteworthy, two responders showed less brain shrinkage than the normative ADNI group. These results together with previous evidence supports the idea that encapsulated biodelivery of NGF might have the potential to become a new treatment strategy for AD with both symptomatic and disease-modifying effects.

  9. JASPAR, the open access database of transcription factor-binding profiles: new content and tools in the 2008 update

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bryne, J.C.; Valen, E.; Tang, M.H.E.

    2008-01-01

    JASPAR is a popular open-access database for matrix models describing DNA-binding preferences for transcription factors and other DNA patterns. With its third major release, JASPAR has been expanded and equipped with additional functions aimed at both casual and power users. The heart of the JASPAR...

  10. COMPARATIVE STUDY OF ANTHROPOMETRIC MEASUREMENTS & LIPID PROFILE IN CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE RISK FACTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rupali S.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Obesity is now a global epidemic called as “globesity”. Diabetes mellitus, hypertension is the important cardiovascular disease risk factors that are associated with obesity. Cardiovascular risk is counted partly by metabolic alterations associated with abdominal obesity, disturbances in plasma glucose homeostasis and lipoprotein metabolism. AIM: To determine the level risk of coronary artery disease (CAD in the study group depending on waist circumference (WC & Body mass index (BMI. Secondly, to compare the anthropometric measurements and lipid profile in the three groups. MATERIALS & METHODS: Study comprised of three groups: group I (n=30 type II diabetes mellitus, group II (n=30 primary essential hypertension, group III (n=30 hypertensive diabetics. WC, Weight & Height were measured. Lipid profile was estimated. Blood pressure was recorded. Statistical analysis was done by SPSS. RESULTS: The Mean & Standard Deviations (SD values for WC & BMI in Group I were seen to be highest in group II 88.1±15.06 & 28.69±4.7 respectively. Statistically significant difference seen in systolic blood pressure between three groups with F value of 18.29 & p value of <0.001. Diastolic blood pressure also showed statistically significant difference in the three groups with F value 21.92 of & p value of < 0.001. statistically significant difference in HDL levels with p value of <0.05, serum cholesterol/ HDL ratio with p value of <0.05 and highly significant difference in triglyceride levels between three groups with p value of <0.001. Conclusion: Waist circumference is a better anthropometric marker as compared to BMI to assess the CAD risk. All the three groups had risk of CAD, but Hypertensive diabetics had highest predisposition for CAD

  11. Clinical profile, common thrombophilia markers and risk factors in 85 young Indian patients with arterial thrombosis

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    Mahendra Narain Mishra

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Arterial thrombosis may occur consequent to hereditary thrombophilia and increased lipoprotein(a [Lp(a] and fibrinogen. Our aim was to study the prevalence of common thrombophilia markers in 85 consecutive cases of arterial thrombosis. DESIGN AND SETTING: A retrospective study was conducted from 85 consecutive young patients treated as outpatients or admitted due to stroke or myocardial infarction at a tertiary care hospital. METHODS: Eighty-five Indian patients (age < 45 years presenting ischemic stroke (n = 48 or myocardial infarction (n = 37 and 50 controls were studied for seven thrombophilia markers including antithrombin (AT, factor V, protein C, protein S, activated protein C resistance (APC-R, fibrinogen and Lp(a. Functional assays for protein C, protein S, factor V and APC-R were performed using clotting-based methods. Semi-quantitative estimation of fibrinogen was done using Clauss's method and Lp(a using immunoturbidimetry. Statistical analysis was done using the Epi Info 6 software. RESULTS: Thirty-three samples (38.8% tested positive for one or more thrombophilia markers. The three commonest abnormalities were elevated Lp(a (20%, fibrinogen (17.6% and low APC-R (14.2%. Low levels of protein C, protein S and AT were present in 4.7, 9.4 and 7% of the patients, respectively. Overall, the risk factor profile was: smoking (33%, positive family history (15.3%, hyperlipidemia (7%, hypertension, diabetes mellitus and obesity (2.3% each. CONCLUSIONS: An association was found between low levels of protein C, protein S and AT and arterial thrombosis, but only elevated fibrinogen levels, smoking, positive family history and hyperlipidemia showed statistical significance.

  12. FORMULATION OF FLOATING TABLETS OF MEFENAMIC ACID WITH DIFFERENT GRADES OF HYDROXY PROPYL METHYL CELLULOSE POLYMER AND STUDYING THE RELEASE PROFILES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramanathan.G, Kavitha.K

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Hydrodynamically balanced system (HBS or Floating tablets has gained importance in recent days to improve absorption of drugs especially those that are absorbed from stomach and small intestine. In the present study, an attempt was made to fabricate and evaluate an HBS dosage form of Mefenamic Acid tablet The different viscosity grades of Hydroxypropylmethyl cellulose polymer like HPMC K100, HPMC K4M, HPMC KV600, HPMC K50 was incorpated as hydrophilic swellable polymers for preparing matrix-floating tablets. Sodium bicarbonate was incorporated as a gas-generating agent. The prepared floating tablets were evaluated for the physical parameters like thickness, hardness, friability, drug content, floating lag time, floating time and Invitro dissolution studies. The mechanism of drug release was anomalous type and depends upon the viscosity of polymers, which was mainly concluded as the major controlling factor for the drug release. The results showed that the formulation containing Drug: Hpmc kv600 in the ratio of 1:0.5 is suitable for the formulation of gastroretentive floating tablets of mefenamic acid

  13. Compounding of slow-release niacinamide capsules: feasibility and characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radojkovic, Branko; Milić, Jela; Calija, Bojan

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility of extemporaneous compounding of slow-release oral dosage form of niacinamide and to evaluate its release kinetics. The model formulation (preparation) was developed in the form of powder-filled hard gelatin capsules. Two slow-release preparations with different ratios of hypromellose have been prepared and evaluated in comparison with an immediate-release preparation. The dissolution tests were performed as per United States Pharmacopoeia requirements: Type I Apparatus, over 7 hours. Both slow-release preparations, containing 40% and 60% v/v hypromellose, respectively, have showed slow release kinetics. The dissolution profiles were significantly different, with similarity factor f2niacinamide capsules can be successfully compounded using hypromellose as a sole release rate modifier, and that the release mechanism is comparable to hydrophilic polymer matrix-based systems.

  14. A STUDY ON RISK FACTORS AND LIPID PROFILE PATTERN IN PATIENTS OF STROKE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jawgam Umbon

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Stroke is usually end result of predisposing conditions that originated years before the ictus. Creating awareness and treatment of its modifiable risk factors will reduce the incidence of stroke. OBJECTIVE To study the risk factors and lipid profile pattern in stroke patients. METHODS Patients with diagnosis of stroke comprising 50 consecutive patients each of ischaemic and haemorrhagic strokes who were admitted in Jorhat Medical College & Hospital, Assam over a period of 1 year (May 2015 - April 2016 included in the study, while patients on lipid lowering therapy were excluded from the study. History of risk factors like hypertension, diabetes mellitus, smoking and alcoholism were taken. To determine the subtype of stroke, clinical examination followed by CT scan/MRI of brain were done. A serum sample after 8 hours of overnight fasting was taken on the next day of admission for both groups of patients. Total serum cholesterol, triglycerides, LDL-cholesterol, VLDL-cholesterol and HDL-cholesterol was determined, using enzymatic colorimetric method. RESULTS A total of 100 patients were studied, of whom 66 were males and 34 were females. The mean age for the ischaemic group was 62±12 years and for the haemorrhagic group were 55±14 years. In this study, dyslipidaemia was present in 58 (58% patients. Patients with high total cholesterol - 33 (18 ischaemic, 15 haemorrhagic, high LDL-cholesterol was found in 38 (22 ischaemic, 16 haemorrhagic, high triglycerides in 31 (14 ischaemic, 17 haemorrhagic and low HDL-cholesterol in 47 (29 ischaemic, 18 haemorrhagic. Among 100 patients, 66 had hypertension, 20 had diabetes mellitus, 18 had both diabetes and hypertension, 43 were smokers, 36 consumed alcohol and >2 risk factor were found in 44. CONCLUSION Dyslipidaemia was found in 58% of patients and most striating features were low HDL-cholesterol and elevated triglycerides level, indicating they are independent risk factors for stroke. No

  15. Profile and risk factors for congenital heart defects: A study in a tertiary care hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abqari, Shaad; Gupta, Akash; Shahab, Tabassum; Rabbani, MU; Ali, S Manazir; Firdaus, Uzma

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Congenital heart defects (CHDs) are an important cause of mortality and morbidity in children representing a major global health burden. It is thus important to determine their prevalence and spectrum and identify risk factors associated with the development of heart defects. Materials and Methods: A case-control study was carried out in the Department of Pediatrics and Center of Cardiology, Jawaharlal Nehru Medical College, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh, Uttar Pradesh, India, from February 2014 to August 2015. All patients referred with complaints or clinical examination suggestive of CHDs were further evaluated with echocardiography. On Echocardiography, patients having CHDs were included as cases and those having a normal echocardiographic study were included as controls. Healthy controls were also included. 400 cases and 400 controls were thus identified; preterms having patent ductus arteriosus and patent foramen ovale and those with acquired heart defects were excluded. Risk factors among cases and controls were further studied. Results: Acyanotic heart defects were 290 (72.50%) of the total heart defects, whereas the contribution of cyanotic heart defects was 110 (27.50%). Out of all CHDs, ventricular septal defect was the most common lesion with contribution of 152 (38%) cases, whereas among the cyanotic heart defects, Tetralogy of Fallot was the most common lesion (18% of total cases). Out of the total 400 cases, 261 were males (65.25%). On univariate analysis, paternal age (odds ratio, OR, 2.01), bad obstetric history (OR, 2.65), antenatal febrile illness (OR, 4.12), and advanced maternal age (OR, 3.28) were found to increase the risk of CHD whereas intake of multivitamin (OR, 3.02) was found to be protective. The risk factors were further analyzed with multivariate logistic regression analysis and all the above factors were found to be significantly associated. Conclusion: We noted that the profile of CHD in our population was similar

  16. Inhibitory activity of the white wine compounds, tyrosol and caffeic acid, on lipopolysaccharide-induced tumor necrosis factor-alpha release in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovannini, L; Migliori, M; Filippi, C; Origlia, N; Panichi, V; Falchi, M; Bertelli, A A E; Bertelli, A

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess whether tyrosol and caffeic acid are able to inhibit lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha release. TNF is one of the most important cytokines involved in inflammatory reactions. The results show that both tyrosol and caffeic acid are able to inhibit LPS-induced TNF-alpha release from human monocytes, even at low doses. Their mechanisms of action are discussed and we conclude that high doses of the two compounds are not required to achieve effective inhibition of inflammatory reactions due to TNF-alpha release.

  17. Accelerating protein release from microparticles for regenerative medicine applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, Lisa J., E-mail: lisa.white@nottingham.ac.uk; Kirby, Giles T.S.; Cox, Helen C.; Qodratnama, Roozbeh; Qutachi, Omar; Rose, Felicity R.A.J.; Shakesheff, Kevin M.

    2013-07-01

    There is a need to control the spatio-temporal release kinetics of growth factors in order to mitigate current usage of high doses. A novel delivery system, capable of providing both structural support and controlled release kinetics, has been developed from PLGA microparticles. The inclusion of a hydrophilic PLGA–PEG–PLGA triblock copolymer altered release kinetics such that they were decoupled from polymer degradation. A quasi zero order release profile over four weeks was produced using 10% w/w PLGA–PEG–PLGA with 50:50 PLGA whereas complete and sustained release was achieved over ten days using 30% w/w PLGA–PEG–PLGA with 85:15 PLGA and over four days using 30% w/w PLGA–PEG–PLGA with 50:50 PLGA. These three formulations are promising candidates for delivery of growth factors such as BMP-2, PDGF and VEGF. Release profiles were also modified by mixing microparticles of two different formulations providing another route, not previously reported, for controlling release kinetics. This system provides customisable, localised and controlled delivery with adjustable release profiles, which will improve the efficacy and safety of recombinant growth factor delivery. Highlights: ► A new delivery system providing controlled release kinetics has been developed. ► Inclusion of hydrophilic PLGA–PEG–PLGA decoupled release kinetics from degradation. ► Using 10% triblock copolymer produced quasi zero order release over four weeks. ► Mixing microparticle formulations provided another route for controlling release. ► This system provides customisable, localised and controlled delivery of growth factors.

  18. The profile of physical activity and coronary risk factors in Monica Jakarta survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dede Kusmana

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available A population study was done to know the profile of daily physical activity including sports, and its influence on major coronary risk factors in three districts of Jakarta using questionnaire, physicaL and laboratory examination, and 12 leads ECC. The questionnaire gave the data about physical activity (work load and sport, and smoking habit. Work load was divided into light, moderate and heavy. Sport activity was divided into regular (≥ twice a week, 20 minutes or more, irregular (≤ once or occasional, and no sport activity. In addition, blood pressure  (hypertension was grouped according to WHO criteria, total cholesterol (regarded as hypercholesterolemia when > 200 mg%, and ECG were measured. ECG interpretation was done using Minnesota Code. Statistical analysis was done using SPSS. Out of 2400 people there were  2073(86.4%  respondents that consist of 1086 females and 987 males. The profile of physical activity as a whole showed 33.4% light, 50.7% moderate and 15.8% heavy activity. OnLy 22.5% of respondents had sport regularly, while 30.3% had sport irregularly, and 47.2% had no sport activity. The type of sport was walking (45.0%, callisthenic (22.0% jogging/running (15.6%, badminton (6.5%, volley ball/soccer (4.1%, tennis (3.8%, and golf (0.1%. There was a significant difference in the prevalence of hypertension between people with heavy (12.0%, moderate (44.8% and light work load (43.2% (P<0.003, in the prevalence of hypercholesterolemia (13.2%: 50.8%: 36% (P<0.0003, and smoking (19.7%; 44.1%: 36.2% (P<0.00001, respectively. The difference also occurred in the prevalence of abnormal ECG (Q/QS, ST and T  abnormalities between people having regular sport (19.0%, irregular (22.7%, and no sport activity (58.3% (P<0.05. The number of respondents having enough physical activity (including regular sport was relatively low. Therefore, promotion should be done as a preventive method to overcome cardiovascular risk factors. (Med J Indones

  19. Pathways involved in gut mucosal barrier dysfunction induced in adult rats by maternal deprivation: corticotrophin-releasing factor and nerve growth factor interplay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreau, Frederick; Cartier, Christel; Leveque, Mathilde; Ferrier, Laurent; Moriez, Raphael; Laroute, Valerie; Rosztoczy, Andras; Fioramonti, Jean; Bueno, Lionel

    2007-04-01

    Neonatal maternal deprivation (NMD) increases gut paracellular permeability (GPP) through mast cells and nerve growth factor (NGF), and modifies corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF) and corticosterone levels. CRF, corticosterone and mast cells are involved in stress-induced mucosal barrier impairment. Consequently, this study aimed to specify whether corticosteronaemia and colonic expression of both preproCRF and CRF are modified by NMD, and to determine if altered expression may participate in the elevated GPP in connection with NGF and mast cells. Male Wistar rat pups were either separated from postnatal days 2-14, or left undisturbed with their dam. At 12 weeks of age, adult rats were treated with mifepristone (an antagonist of corticoid receptors), alpha-helical CRF((9-41)) (a non-specific CRF receptor antagonist), or SSR-125543 (CRF-R(1) receptor antagonist). We also determined corticosteronaemia and both colonic preproCRF and CRF expression. Then, control rats were treated by CRF, doxantrazole (mast cell stabilizer), BRX-537A (a mast cell activator) and anti-NGF antibody. NMD did not modify colonic CRF level but increased colonic preproCRF expression and corticosteronaemia. Peripheral CRF, via CRF-R(1) receptor, but not corticosterone, was involved in the elevated GPP observed in these rats, through a mast-cell-mediated mechanism, since the increase of GPP induced by exogenous CRF was abolished by doxantrazole. Anti-NGF antibody treatment also reduced the elevated GPP induced by CRF or BRX-537A. CRF acts through CRF-R(1) receptors to stimulate NGF release from mast cells, which participates in the elevated GPP observed in NMD adult rats. This suggests that early traumatic experience induced neuro-endocrine dysfunction, involved in alterations of gut mucosal barrier.

  20. Risk factors, lipid profile, and histopathological study of oral cancers in Kolar district: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamath, Amith; Shashidhar, Kurpad Nagaraj; Anantharamaiah, Hemalatha; Rangareddy, Harish; Sathyanarayana, Vinaya Babu

    2014-01-01

    To estimate serum lipid profile in oral squamous cell carcinoma and correlate the risk factors and lipid profile with oral squamous cell carcinoma. Lipid profile was done in agriculturists/laborers in the age group of 30-70 years; 56 subjects (cases = 28, control = 28) were included. Study was carried out for a duration of four months; statistical analyses applied were mean, standard deviation, and independent 't' test. P Lipid profile such as total cholesterol, triglycerides, LDL cholesterol, non-high-density lipoprotein (non-HDL) cholesterol, and very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) were marginally and slightly elevated in cases compared to controls. HDL was grossly decreased in cases compared to controls. There was a significant association between HDL and squamous cell carcinoma; maximum number of SCC had a history of smoking in the range of 10-19 years, irrespective of other lipid parameters, constrained to the fact that lipids are genetically determined, have geographical variation, and are highly skewed.

  1. Enrichment Factor and profiles of elemental composition of PM 2.5 in the city of Guadalajara, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Mena, Leonel; Murillo-Tovar, Mario; Ramírez-Muñíz, Martín; Colunga-Urbina, Edith; de la Garza-Rodríguez, Iliana; Saldarriaga-Noreña, Hugo

    2011-11-01

    In this study, the Enrichment Factors and elemental composition profiles of the PM2.5 were used to suggest the emission sources. The selected sites were Miravalle and Centro, and in both cases there were high values lead, Cadmium, Cobalt, Chromium, Cupper, Molybdenum, Nickel, Antimony, Selenium and Zinc for EF (>5), suggesting an anthropogenic origin. The remaining elements (Iron, Magnesium, Manganese, Strontium and Titanium) had Enrichment Factors <5, attributable to a geological origin, probably due to the suspension of particles from motor vehicles or wind. Comparing the elemental composition profiles of the two sites allowed establishing similarities with some reference profiles (SPECIATE database Version 4.2-EPA) from sources such as Paved Road Dust (PRD) and Industrial Soil (IS) and profiles of combustion sources such as Diesel Exhaust (DE). Through the estimation the Enrichment Factors and of the elemental composition profiles of two different sites in the city, it was possible to suggest not only the general type of emission source (geological or anthropogenic), but also more specific sources based on elemental composition of PM2.5.

  2. The protective effect of platelet released growth factors and bone augmentation (Bio-Oss(®)) on ethanol impaired osteoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sönmez, Tolga Taha; Bayer, Andreas; Cremer, Tillman; Hock, Jennifer Vanessa Phi; Lethaus, Bernd; Kweider, Nisreen; Wruck, Christoph Jan; Drescher, Wolf; Jahr, Holger; Lippross, Sebastian; Pufe, Thomas; Tohidnezhad, Mersedeh

    2017-07-31

    Chronic alcohol consumption is a known limiting factor for bone healing. One promising strategy to improve bone augmentation techniques with Bio-Oss(®) in oral and maxillofacial surgery might be the supportive application of platelet-concentrated biomaterials as platelet-released growth factor (PRGF). To address this matter, we performed an in vitro study investigating the protective effects of PRGF and Bio-Oss(®) in ethanol (EtOH) treated osteoblasts. The SAOS-2 osteosarcoma cell line, with and without EtOH pretreatment was used. The cell viability, proliferation and alkali phosphatase activity (ALP) after application of 0%, 5% and 10% PRGF and Bio-Oss(®) were assessed. The application of PRGF and Bio-Oss(®) in EtOH impaired osteoblasts showed a significant beneficial influence increasing the viability of the osteoblasts in cell culture. The synergistic effect of Bio-Oss(®) and 5% PRGF on the proliferation of osteoblasts was also demonstrated. Bio-Oss(®) only in combination with PRGF increases the alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity in EtOH pretreated cells. These results indicate that the simultaneous application of PRGF and Bio-Oss(®) inhibits EtOH induced bone healing impairment. Furthermore, in the cells, PRGF induced a protective mechanism which might promote bone regeneration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  3. [Effects of PRF and released three growth factors on migration of rat adipose tissue-derived stem cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jie; Wang, Ming-guo; Yang, Shuai; Li, Xiu-mei; Yang, Shi-mao; Li, Xue

    2015-12-01

    To analyze the effects of PRF and released three growth factors on migration of rat adipose tissue-derived stem cells and to investigate the mechanism of migration. The inguinal adipose tissue of rat was excised at aseptic condition to obtain primary ADSCs by enzyme digestion. Multi-directional differentiation was used to identify the ADSCs. PRF membrane was acquired through one time centrifuge. The cell migration was examined by Transwell assay and wound healing assay. The mRNA expression of MMP2 and MT1-MMP was tested by real-time PCR. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS 13.0 software package. Cell migration test showed that the migration of rat ADSCs in PRF group were significantly higher than those in the negative group(PPRF group than control group (PPRF and three growth factors consistently enhanced the migration of rat ADSCs in a dose-response manner. The migration increase of rat ADSCs may be associated with the up-regulation of MMP2 and MT1-MMP gene expression.

  4. Chronic traumatic stress impairs memory in mice: Potential roles of acetylcholine, neuroinflammation and corticotropin releasing factor expression in the hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhakta, Ami; Gavini, Kartheek; Yang, Euitaek; Lyman-Henley, Lani; Parameshwaran, Kodeeswaran

    2017-09-29

    Chronic stress in humans can result in multiple adverse psychiatric and neurobiological outcomes, including memory deficits. These adverse outcomes can be more severe if each episode of stress is very traumatic. When compared to acute or short term stress relatively little is known about the effects of chronic traumatic stress on memory and molecular changes in hippocampus, a brain area involved in memory processing. Here we studied the effects of chronic traumatic stress in mice by exposing them to adult Long Evan rats for 28 consecutive days and subsequently analyzing behavioral outcomes and the changes in the hippocampus. Results show that stressed mice developed memory deficits when assayed with radial arm maze tasks. However, chronic traumatic stress did not induce anxiety, locomotor hyperactivity or anhedonia. In the hippocampus of stressed mice interleukin-1β protein expression was increased along with decreased corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH) gene expression. Furthermore, there was a reduction in acetylcholine levels in the hippocampus of stressed mice. There were no changes in brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) or nerve growth factor (NGF) levels in the hippocampus of stressed mice. Gene expression of immediate early genes (Zif268, Arc, C-Fos) as well as glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid receptors were also not affected by chronic stress. These data demonstrate that chronic traumatic stress followed by a recovery period might lead to development of resilience resulting in the development of selected, most vulnerable behavioral alterations and molecular changes in the hippocampus. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Evaluation of skeletal tissue repair, part 2: enhancement of skeletal tissue repair through dual-growth-factor-releasing hydrogels within an ex vivo chick femur defect model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, E L; Kanczler, J M; Gothard, D; Roberts, C A; Wells, J A; White, L J; Qutachi, O; Sawkins, M J; Peto, H; Rashidi, H; Rojo, L; Stevens, M M; El Haj, A J; Rose, F R A J; Shakesheff, K M; Oreffo, R O C

    2014-10-01

    There is an unmet need for improved, effective tissue engineering strategies to replace or repair bone damaged through disease or injury. Recent research has focused on developing biomaterial scaffolds capable of spatially and temporally releasing combinations of bioactive growth factors, rather than individual molecules, to recapitulate repair pathways present in vivo. We have developed an ex vivo embryonic chick femur critical size defect model and applied the model in the study of novel extracellular matrix (ECM) hydrogel scaffolds containing spatio-temporal combinatorial growth factor-releasing microparticles and skeletal stem cells for bone regeneration. Alginate/bovine bone ECM (bECM) hydrogels combined with poly(d,l-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PDLLGA)/triblock copolymer (10-30% PDLLGA-PEG-PLDLGA) microparticles releasing dual combinations of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), chondrogenic transforming growth factor beta 3 (TGF-β3) and the bone morphogenetic protein BMP2, with human adult Stro-1+bone marrow stromal cells (HBMSCs), were placed into 2mm central segmental defects in embryonic day 11 chick femurs and organotypically cultured. Hydrogels loaded with VEGF combinations induced host cell migration and type I collagen deposition. Combinations of TGF-β3/BMP2, particularly with Stro-1+HBMSCs, induced significant formation of structured bone matrix, evidenced by increased Sirius red-stained matrix together with collagen expression demonstrating birefringent alignment within hydrogels. This study demonstrates the successful use of the chick femur organotypic culture system as a high-throughput test model for scaffold/cell/growth factor therapies in regenerative medicine. Temporal release of dual growth factors, combined with enriched Stro-1+HBMSCs, improved the formation of a highly structured bone matrix compared to single release modalities. These studies highlight the potential of a unique alginate/bECM hydrogel dual growth factor release

  6. Lipopolysaccharide induces visceral hypersensitivity: role of interleukin-1, interleukin-6, and peripheral corticotropin-releasing factor in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozu, Tsukasa; Miyagishi, Saori; Nozu, Rintaro; Takakusaki, Kaoru; Okumura, Toshikatsu

    2017-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induces visceral hypersensitivity, and corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) also modulates visceral sensation. Besides, LPS increases CRF immunoreactivity in rat colon, which raises the possibility of the existence of a link between LPS and the CRF system in modulating visceral sensation. The present study tried to clarify this possibility. Visceral sensation was assessed by abdominal muscle contractions induced by colonic balloon distention, i.e., visceromotor response, electrophysiologically in conscious rats. The threshold of visceromotor response was measured before and after administration of drugs. LPS at a dose of 1 mg/kg subcutaneously (sc) decreased the threshold at 3 h after the administration. Intraperitoneal (ip) administration of anakinra (20 mg/kg), an interleukin-1 (IL-1) receptor antagonist, or interleukin-6 (IL-6) antibody (16.6 µg/kg) blocked this effect. Additionally, IL-1β (10 µg/kg, sc) or IL-6 (10 µg/kg, sc) induced visceral allodynia. Astressin (200 µg/kg, ip), a non-selective CRF receptor antagonist, abolished the effect of LPS, but astressin2-B (200 µg/kg, ip), a CRF receptor type 2 (CRF2) antagonist, did not alter it. Peripheral CRF receptor type 1 (CRF1) stimulation by cortagine (60 µg/kg, ip) exaggerated the effect of LPS, but activation of CRF2 by urocortin 2 (60 µg/kg, ip) abolished it. LPS induced visceral allodynia possibly through stimulating IL-1 and IL-6 release. In addition, this effect was mediated through peripheral CRF signaling. Since the LPS-cytokine system is thought to contribute to altered visceral sensation in the patients with irritable bowel syndrome, these results may further suggest that CRF plays a crucial role in the pathophysiology of this disease.

  7. Factor H Binds to Extracellular DNA Traps Released from Human Blood Monocytes in Response to Candida albicans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halder, Luke D.; Abdelfatah, Mahmoud A.; Jo, Emeraldo A. H.; Jacobsen, Ilse D.; Westermann, Martin; Beyersdorf, Niklas; Lorkowski, Stefan; Zipfel, Peter F.; Skerka, Christine

    2017-01-01

    Upon systemic infection with human pathogenic yeast Candida albicans (C. albicans), human monocytes and polymorph nuclear neutrophilic granulocytes are the first immune cells to respond and come into contact with C. albicans. Monocytes exert immediate candidacidal activity and inhibit germination, mediate phagocytosis, and kill fungal cells. Here, we show that human monocytes spontaneously respond to C. albicans cells via phagocytosis, decondensation of nuclear DNA, and release of this decondensed DNA in the form of extracellular traps (called monocytic extracellular traps: MoETs). Both subtypes of monocytes (CD14++CD16−/CD14+CD16+) formed MoETs within the first hours upon contact with C. albicans. MoETs were characterized by the presence of citrullinated histone, myeloperoxidase, lactoferrin, and elastase. MoETs were also formed in response to Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli, indicating a general reaction of monocytes to infectious microbes. MoET induction differs from extracellular trap formation in macrophages as MoETs are not triggered by simvastatin, an inhibitor of cholesterol synthesis and inducer of extracellular traps in macrophages. Extracellular traps from both monocytes and neutrophils activate complement and C3b is deposited. However, factor H (FH) binds via C3b to the extracellular DNA, mediates cofactor activity, and inhibits the induction of the inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1 beta in monocytes. Altogether, the results show that human monocytes release extracellular DNA traps in response to C. albicans and that these traps finally bind FH via C3b to presumably support clearance without further inflammation. PMID:28133459

  8. Effects of corticotropin-releasing factor 1 receptor antagonism on the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis of rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehlert, Donald R; Cramer, Jeffrey; Morin, S Michelle

    2012-06-01

    Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) is the major hypothalamic neuropeptide responsible for stimulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPAA), resulting in the synthesis and release of glucocorticoids from the adrenal cortex. In a recent study, we reported the discovery of the CRF1 receptor antagonist, 3-(4-chloro-2-morpholin-4-yl-thiazol-5-yl)-8-(1-ethylpropyl)-2,6-dimethyl-imidazo[1,2-b]pyridazine (MTIP), which has efficacy in preclinical models of stress-induced alcohol consumption. Because CRF1 is important in HPAA activation, we evaluated the effects of MTIP administration on rodent HPAA function. Initial studies established the MTIP doses required for brain and pituitary CRF1 occupancy and those associated with the inhibition of intracerebroventricular CRF on the HPAA in mice. Then, rat basal plasma corticosterone (CORT) concentrations were measured hourly by radioimmunoassay for 24 h after three daily doses of MTIP or vehicle. In these studies, the early phase of the nocturnal CORT surge was reduced; however, the area under the CORT curve was identical for the 24-h period. In subsequent studies, increases in plasma CORT due to direct pharmacological manipulation of the HPAA axis or by stressors were evaluated after MTIP treatment in mice. MTIP attenuated CORT responses generated by immediate bolus administration of insulin or ethanol; however, MTIP did not affect activation of the HPAA by other stressors and pharmacological agents. Therefore, MTIP can modulate basal HPAA activity during the CORT surge and reduced activation after a select number of stressors but does not produce a lasting suppression of basal CORT. The ability of MTIP to modulate plasma CORT after hyperinsulinemia may provide a surrogate strategy for a target occupancy biomarker.

  9. Corticotropin-releasing factor increases GABA synaptic activity and induces inward current in 5-hydroxytryptamine dorsal raphe neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, Lynn G; Freeman-Daniels, Emily; Lemos, Julia C; Nunan, John D; Lamy, Christophe; Akanwa, Adaure; Beck, Sheryl G

    2008-11-26

    Stress-related psychiatric disorders such as anxiety and depression involve dysfunction of the serotonin [5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)] system. Previous studies have found that the stress neurohormone corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) inhibits 5-HT neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) in vivo. The goals of the present study were to characterize the CRF receptor subtypes (CRF-R1 and -R2) and cellular mechanisms underlying CRF-5-HT interactions. Visualized whole-cell patch-clamp recording techniques in brain slices were used to measure spontaneous or evoked GABA synaptic activity in DRN neurons of rats and CRF effects on these measures. CRF-R1 and -R2-selective agonists were bath applied alone or in combination with receptor-selective antagonists. CRF increased presynaptic GABA release selectively onto 5-HT neurons, an effect mediated by the CRF-R1 receptor. CRF increased postsynaptic GABA receptor sensitivity selectively in 5-HT neurons, an effect to which both receptor subtypes contributed. CRF also had direct effects on DRN neurons, eliciting an inward current in 5-HT neurons mediated by the CRF-R2 receptor and in non-5-HT neurons mediated by the CRF-R1 receptor. These results indicate that CRF has direct membrane effects on 5-HT DRN neurons as well as indirect effects on GABAergic synaptic transmission that are mediated by distinct receptor subtypes. The inhibition of 5-HT DRN neurons by CRF in vivo may therefore be primarily an indirect effect via stimulation of inhibitory GABA synaptic transmission. These results regarding the cellular mechanisms underlying the complex interaction between CRF, 5-HT, and GABA systems could contribute to the development of novel treatments for stress-related psychiatric disorders.

  10. Revisiting the IFN-γ release assay: Whole blood or PBMC cultures? - And other factors of influence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Sofie Bruun; Emnéus, Jenny; Wolff, Anders; Jungersen, Gregers

    2016-07-01

    The interferon-γ release assay (IGRA) is a widely used test for the presence of a cell-mediated immune (CMI) response in vitro. This measure is used to test for infection with intracellular pathogens or for validating vaccine efficacy, and it is a widely used test for both human as well as cattle. However, there is no consensus whether to use whole blood cultures or purified PBMCs for the assay, and both cell populations are being used and results compared. Therefore the aim of this study was to compare different culture settings using immune cells from previously vaccinated calves, and to shed light on external factors that could influence the read out in terms of IFN-γ levels. It was found that optimal culture conditions varied between individual animals; when polyclonal activated, cells from whole blood cultures were most responsive, but when activated specifically, the optimal cell concentration/population varied with whole blood, 10×10(6)cells/ml PBMC and 5×10(6)cells/ml PBMC being the highest performing conditions. A further investigation of the distribution of cell populations in PBMCs compared to whole blood was conducted, and a significant (pcultures from five calves. Six plates (a-f) were tested and no significant difference in absolute levels of IFN-γ was detected in the six plates when cells were polyclonal and specifically activated. However, we observed a significant (pculture population, the concentration of cells being cultured, and the plastic ware used for the in vitro culture. These findings stress the importance of documenting the precise assay conditions when publishing results of in vitro IFN-γ release assays.

  11. Peritonitis after liver transplantation: Incidence, risk factors, microbiology profiles, and outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pungpapong, Surakit; Alvarez, Salvador; Hellinger, Walter C; Kramer, David J; Willingham, Darrin L; Mendez, Julio C; Nguyen, Justin H; Hewitt, Winston R; Aranda-Michel, Jaime; Harnois, Denise M; Rosser, Barry G; Hughes, Christopher B; Grewal, Hani P; Satyanarayana, Raj; Dickson, Rolland C; Steers, Jeffrey L; Keaveny, Andrew P

    2006-08-01

    Peritonitis occurring after liver transplantation (PLT) has been poorly characterized to date. The aims of this study were to define the incidence, risk factors, microbiology profiles, and outcome of nonlocalized PLT. This was a retrospective study of 950 cadaveric liver transplantation (LT) procedures in 837 patients, followed for a mean of 1,086 days (range, 104-2,483 days) after LT. PLT was defined as the presence of at least one positive ascitic fluid culture after LT. There were 108 PLT episodes in 91 patients occurring at a median of 14 days (range, 1-102 days) after LT. Significant risk factors associated with the development of PLT by multivariate analysis included pre-LT model for end-stage liver disease score, duration of LT surgery, Roux-en-Y biliary anastomosis, and renal replacement therapy after LT. Biliary complications, intra-abdominal bleeding, and bowel leak/perforation were associated with 34.3%, 26.9%, and 18.5% of episodes, respectively. Multiple organisms, gram-positive cocci, fungus, and multidrug-resistant bacteria were isolated in 61.1%, 92.6%, 25.9%, and 76.9% of ascitic fluid cultures, respectively. The 28 fungal PLT episodes were associated with bowel leak/perforation and polymicrobial peritonitis. Patients who developed PLT after their first LT had a significantly greater risk of graft loss or mortality compared to unaffected patients. Parameters significantly associated with these adverse outcomes by multivariate analysis were recipient age at LT and bowel leak or perforation after LT. In conclusion, PLT is a serious infectious complication of LT, associated with significant intra-abdominal pathology and reduced recipient and graft survival.

  12. Dynamic, large-scale profiling of transcription factor activity from live cells in 3D culture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael S Weiss

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Extracellular activation of signal transduction pathways and their downstream target transcription factors (TFs are critical regulators of cellular processes and tissue development. The intracellular signaling network is complex, and techniques that quantify the activities of numerous pathways and connect their activities to the resulting phenotype would identify the signals and mechanisms regulating tissue development. The ability to investigate tissue development should capture the dynamic pathway activity and requires an environment that supports cellular organization into structures that mimic in vivo phenotypes. Taken together, our objective was to develop cellular arrays for dynamic, large-scale quantification of TF activity as cells organized into spherical structures within 3D culture. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: TF-specific and normalization reporter constructs were delivered in parallel to a cellular array containing a well-established breast cancer cell line cultured in Matrigel. Bioluminescence imaging provided a rapid, non-invasive, and sensitive method to quantify luciferase levels, and was applied repeatedly on each sample to monitor dynamic activity. Arrays measuring 28 TFs identified up to 19 active, with 13 factors changing significantly over time. Stimulation of cells with β-estradiol or activin A resulted in differential TF activity profiles evolving from initial stimulation of the ligand. Many TFs changed as expected based on previous reports, yet arrays were able to replicate these results in a single experiment. Additionally, arrays identified TFs that had not previously been linked with activin A. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This system provides a method for large-scale, non-invasive, and dynamic quantification of signaling pathway activity as cells organize into structures. The arrays may find utility for investigating mechanisms regulating normal and abnormal tissue growth, biomaterial design, or as a

  13. Antiradical activity, phenolics profile, and hydroxymethylfurfural in espresso coffee: influence of technological factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Rita C; Costa, Anabela S G; Jerez, María; Casal, Susana; Sineiro, Jorge; Núñez, María J; Oliveira, Beatriz

    2010-12-08

    The influence of technological factors (decaffeination, brew volume, coffee species, and roast degree) on antiradical activity and phenolics content of espresso coffee is described. The screenings of phenolics profile and other compounds (caffeine and trigonelline), as well as the quantification of hydroxymethylfurfural, were performed by LC-DAD-ESI-MS. Significantly lower (p decaffeinated espressos when compared with regular ones (32 vs 38% and 324 vs 410 mg/30 mL cup, respectively). A long espresso (70 mL) offers more than twice the phenolics amount of a short one (20 mL). Robusta brews showed higher (p 0.05) were observed for scavenging activities of differently roasted robusta brews, whereas an increase in medium-dark brews was observed for arabica samples. Total phenolics in robusta espressos decreased (p 0.05) were found between arabica espressos from different roasts. By LC-DAD-ESI-MS, 23 hydroxycinnamic derivatives were found, including chlorogenic acids, lactones, and cinnamoyl-amino acid conjugates. The amount of each compound was differently affected by species and roast. Robusta brews presented superior levels of caffeine and chlorogenic acids, whereas arabica ones contained more trigonelline. Hydroxymethylfurfural contents in the brew (30 mL) varied from 2.60 to 0.84 mg for light- and dark-roasted arabicas and from 1.29 to 0.68 mg for light- and dark-roasted robustas, respectively.

  14. Generation and gene expression profiling of 48 transcription-factor-inducible mouse embryonic stem cell lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamizu, Kohei; Sharov, Alexei A.; Piao, Yulan; Amano, Misa; Yu, Hong; Nishiyama, Akira; Dudekula, Dawood B.; Schlessinger, David; Ko, Minoru S. H.

    2016-01-01

    Mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) can differentiate into a wide range – and possibly all cell types in vitro, and thus provide an ideal platform to study systematically the action of transcription factors (TFs) in cell differentiation. Previously, we have generated and analyzed 137 TF-inducible mouse ESC lines. As an extension of this “NIA Mouse ESC Bank,” we generated and characterized 48 additional mouse ESC lines, in which single TFs in each line could be induced in a doxycycline-controllable manner. Together, with the previous ESC lines, the bank now comprises 185 TF-manipulable ESC lines (>10% of all mouse TFs). Global gene expression (transcriptome) profiling revealed that the induction of individual TFs in mouse ESCs for 48 hours shifts their transcriptomes toward specific differentiation fates (e.g., neural lineages by Myt1 Isl1, and St18; mesodermal lineages by Pitx1, Pitx2, Barhl2, and Lmx1a; white blood cells by Myb, Etv2, and Tbx6, and ovary by Pitx1, Pitx2, and Dmrtc2). These data also provide and lists of inferred target genes of each TF and possible functions of these TFs. The results demonstrate the utility of mouse ESC lines and their transcriptome data for understanding the mechanism of cell differentiation and the function of TFs. PMID:27150017

  15. Systemic inflammatory profile and response to anti-tumor necrosis factor therapy in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loza Matthew J

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is characterized by progressive worsening of airflow limitation associated with abnormally inflamed airways in older smokers. Despite correlative evidence for a role for tumor necrosis factor-alpha in the pathogenesis of COPD, the anti-tumor necrosis factor-alpha, infliximab did not show clinical efficacy in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase II clinical trial. This study sought to evaluate the systemic inflammatory profile associated with COPD and to assess the impact of tumor necrosis factor neutralization on systemic inflammation. Methods Serum samples (n = 234 from the phase II trial were collected at baseline and after 24 weeks of placebo or infliximab. Additionally, baseline serum samples were obtained from an independent COPD cohort (n = 160 and 2 healthy control cohorts (n = 50; n = 109. Serum concentrations of a broad panel of inflammation-associated analytes were measured using a 92-analyte multiplex assay. Results Twenty-five proteins were significantly elevated and 2 were decreased in COPD, including highly elevated CD40 ligand, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, epidermal growth factor, acute-phase proteins, and neutrophil-associated proteins. This profile was largely independent of smoking status, age, and clinical phenotype. The majority of these associations of serum analytes with COPD are novel findings. Increased serum creatine kinase-muscle/brain and myoglobin correlated modestly with decreased forced expiratory volume at 1 second, suggesting cardiac involvement. Infliximab did not affect this systemic inflammatory profile. Conclusions A robust systemic inflammatory profile was associated with COPD. This profile was generally independent of disease severity. Because anti-tumor necrosis factor-alpha did not influence systemic inflammation, how to control the underlying pathology beyond symptom suppression remains unclear. Trial Registration Clinical

  16. PTSD in ICD-10 and proposed ICD-11 in elderly with childhood trauma: prevalence, factor structure, and symptom profiles

    OpenAIRE

    Glück, Tobias M.; Knefel, Matthias; Tran, Ulrich S.; Lueger-Schuster, Brigitte

    2016-01-01

    Background: The proposal for ICD-11 postulates major changes for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) diagnosis, which needs investigation in different samples.Aims: To investigate differences of PTSD prevalence and diagnostic agreement between ICD-10 and ICD-11, factor structure of proposed ICD-11 PTSD, and diagnostic value of PTSD symptom severity classes.Method: Confirmatory factor analysis and latent profile analysis were used on data of elderly survivors of childhood trauma (>60 years...

  17. Survey of the anti-factor IX immunoglobulin profiles in patients with hemophilia B using a fluorescence-based immunoassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boylan, B; Rice, A S; Neff, A T; Manco-Johnson, M J; Kempton, C L; Miller, C H

    2016-10-01

    Essentials Studies characterizing neutralizing antibodies (inhibitors) in hemophilia B (HB) are lacking. The current study describes anti-factor (F) IX antibody profiles in 37 patients who have HB. Anti-FIX IgG4 levels exhibited a strong positive correlation with Nijmegen-Bethesda results. These data will help to more clearly define, predict, and treat alloantibody formation in HB.

  18. Comparison of conventional risk factors, clinical and angiographic profile between younger and older coronary heart disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gajanan D. Khadkikar

    2016-02-01

    Conclusions: Young patients with Coronary heart disease had different risk profile and less extensive coronary artery disease as compared to older counterparts. Emphasis should be given on diagnosis and management of major modifiable risk factors. [Int J Res Med Sci 2016; 4(2.000: 567-570

  19. A Confirmatory Factor Analysis of Home Environment and Home Social Behavior Data from the Elementary School Success Profile for Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegmann, Kate M.; Thompson, Aaron M.; Bowen, Natasha K.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to test the factor structure and scale quality of data provided by caregivers about the home environment and child behavior at home using the Elementary School Success Profile (ESSP) for Families. The ESSP for Families is one component of the ESSP, an online social-environmental assessment that also collects…

  20. Cytokine, chemokine, and growth factor profile of platelet-rich plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mussano, F; Genova, T; Munaron, L; Petrillo, S; Erovigni, F; Carossa, S

    2016-07-01

    During wound healing, biologically active molecules are released from platelets. The rationale of using platelet-rich plasma (PRP) relies on the concentration of bioactive molecules and subsequent delivery to healing sites. These bioactive molecules have been seldom simultaneously quantified within the same PRP preparation. In the present study, the flexible Bio-Plex system was employed to assess the concentration of a large range of cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors in 16 healthy volunteers so as to determine whether significant baseline differences may be found. Besides IL-1b, IL-1ra, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, IL-12, IL-13, IL-17, INF-γ, TNF-α, MCP-1, MIP-1a, RANTES, bFGF, PDGF, and VEGF that were already quantified elsewhere, the authors reported also on the presence of IL-2, IL-5, IL-7, IL-9, IL-10, IL-15 G-CSF, GM-CSF, Eotaxin, CXCL10 chemokine (IP-10), and MIP 1b. Among the most interesting results, it is convenient to mention the high concentrations of the HIV-suppressive and inflammatory cytokine RANTES and a statistically significant difference between males and females in the content of PDGF-BB. These data are consistent with previous reports pointing out that gender, diet, and test system affect the results of platelet function in healthy subjects, but seem contradictory when compared to other quantification assays in serum and plasma. The inconsistencies affecting the experimental results found in literature, along with the variability found in the content of bioactive molecules, urge further research, hopefully in form of randomized controlled clinical trials, in order to find definitive evidence of the efficacy of PRP treatment in various pathologic and regenerative conditions.

  1. Development of controlled release tablet by optimizing HPMC: consideration of theoretical release and RSM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pani, Nihar R; Nath, Lila K

    2014-04-15

    The objective of the study was to develop controlled release tablets of nateglinide, a meglitinide derivative anti-diabetic drug, considering theoretical release profile and response surface methodology (RSM). 3(2) factorial design was utilized to optimize concentration of hydroxylpropylmethylcellulose (HPMC) K15M and K100M to obtain the desired responses (drug release at one and six hours). Theoretical release profile of drug for controlled release formulation was calculated and considered as reference for the determination of similarity factor (f2) and desimilarity factor (f1). RSM, f2 and f1 were used to select the optimum formulation. Formulation containing HPMC K15M (5%) and HPMC K100M (15%) was found optimum with desired responses with f2=86.05 and drug release profile followed zero order kinetics. Excipients used were compatible with drug, confirmed initially through DSC and IST study. The optimization of experiments was validated and optimum formulation was passed the stability study. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. A fixed-dose combination tablet of gemigliptin and metformin sustained release has comparable pharmacodynamic, pharmacokinetic, and tolerability profiles to separate tablets in healthy subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park SI

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Sang-In Park,1,* Howard Lee,1,2,* Jaeseong Oh,1 Kyoung Soo Lim,3 In-Jin Jang,1 Jeong-Ae Kim,4 Jong Hyuk Jung,4 Kyung-Sang Yu1 1Department of Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Seoul National University College of Medicine and Hospital, Seoul, 2Department of Transdisciplinary Studies, Graduate School of Convergence Science and Technology, Seoul National University, Clinical Trials Center, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, 3Department of Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics, CHA University School of Medicine and CHA Bundang Medical Center, Seongnam, 4LG Life Sciences, Ltd, Seoul, Republic of Korea *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: In type 2 diabetes mellitus, fixed-dose combination (FDC can provide the complementary benefits of correction of multiple pathophysiologic defects such as dysfunctions in glycemic or metabolic control while improving compliance compared with separate tablets taken together. The objective of the study reported here was to compare the pharmacodynamic (PD, pharmacokinetic (PK, and tolerability profiles of gemigliptin and extended-release metformin (metformin XR between FDC and separate tablets.Methods: A randomized, open-label, single-dose, two-way, two-period, crossover study was conducted in 28 healthy male volunteers. Two FDC tablets of gemigliptin/metformin 25/500 mg or separate tablets of gemigliptin (50 mg ×1 and metformin XR (500 mg ×2 were orally administered in each period. Serial blood samples were collected up to 48 hours post-dose to determine dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP-4 activity using spectrophotometric assay and concentrations of gemigliptin and metformin using tandem mass spectrometry. Geometric mean ratios (GMRs of FDC to separate tablet formulations and their 90% confidence intervals (CIs were calculated to compare the PD and PK parameters between the two formulations. Tolerability was assessed throughout the study.Results: The plasma DPP-4 activity

  3. Risk factors for acute chemical releases with public health consequences: Hazardous Substances Emergency Events Surveillance in the U.S., 1996–2001

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaye Wendy E

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Releases of hazardous materials can cause substantial morbidity and mortality. To reduce and prevent the public health consequences (victims or evacuations from uncontrolled or illegally released hazardous substances, a more comprehensive analysis is needed to determine risk factors for hazardous materials incidents. Methods Hazardous Substances Emergency Events Surveillance (HSEES data from 1996 through 2001 were analyzed using bivariate and multiple logistic regression. Fixed-facility and transportation-related events were analyzed separately. Results For fixed-facility events, 2,327 (8% resulted in at least one victim and 2,844 (10% involved ordered evacuations. For transportation-related events, 759 (8% resulted in at least one victim, and 405 (4% caused evacuation orders. Fire and/or explosion were the strongest risk factors for events involving either victims or evacuations. Stratified analysis of fixed-facility events involving victims showed a strong association for acid releases in the agriculture, forestry, and fisheries industry. Chlorine releases in fixed-facility events resulted in victims and evacuations in more industry categories than any other substance. Conclusions Outreach efforts should focus on preventing and preparing for fires and explosions, acid releases in the agricultural industry, and chlorine releases in fixed facilities.

  4. Genome-wide identification and expression profiling of auxin response factor (ARF gene family in maize

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Yirong

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Auxin signaling is vital for plant growth and development, and plays important role in apical dominance, tropic response, lateral root formation, vascular differentiation, embryo patterning and shoot elongation. Auxin Response Factors (ARFs are the transcription factors that regulate the expression of auxin responsive genes. The ARF genes are represented by a large multigene family in plants. The first draft of full maize genome assembly has recently been released, however, to our knowledge, the ARF gene family from maize (ZmARF genes has not been characterized in detail. Results In this study, 31 maize (Zea mays L. genes that encode ARF proteins were identified in maize genome. It was shown that maize ARF genes fall into related sister pairs and chromosomal mapping revealed that duplication of ZmARFs was associated with the chromosomal block duplications. As expected, duplication of some ZmARFs showed a conserved intron/exon structure, whereas some others were more divergent, suggesting the possibility of functional diversification for these genes. Out of these 31 ZmARF genes, 14 possess auxin-responsive element in their promoter region, among which 7 appear to show small or negligible response to exogenous auxin. The 18 ZmARF genes were predicted to be the potential targets of small RNAs. Transgenic analysis revealed that increased miR167 level could cause degradation of transcripts of six potential targets (ZmARF3, 9, 16, 18, 22 and 30. The expressions of maize ARF genes are responsive to exogenous auxin treatment. Dynamic expression patterns of ZmARF genes were observed in different stages of embryo development. Conclusions Maize ARF gene family is expanded (31 genes as compared to Arabidopsis (23 genes and rice (25 genes. The expression of these genes in maize is regulated by auxin and small RNAs. Dynamic expression patterns of ZmARF genes in embryo at different stages were detected which suggest that maize ARF genes may

  5. Assessment of chronic spontaneous urticaria by serum-induced tumor necrosis factor alpha and matrix metalloproteinase-9 release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falkencrone, Sidsel; Bindslev-Jensen, Carsten; Skov, Per Stahl

    BACKGROUND Previous studies from our group have demonstrated that IgE-mediated basophil activation leads to release of TNFα that in turn can induce matrix metallo-proteinase-9 (MMP-9) release from monocytes. We wished to investigate if serum from chronic spontaneous urticaria-patients with auto......-antibodies against IgE/IgE-receptor could induce TNFα and MMP-9 release from donor PBMCs, and if release levels could be used to assess severity and activity of chronic spontaneous urticaria (CSU). METHODS Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were isolated from whole blood from healthy donors and basophils...... observed to induce highly significant MMP-9 and TNFα release from donor PBMCs when compared to sera from healthy controls (pUrticaria assessment score (UAS) did not appear to correlate with release levels for histamine, TNFa or MMP-9 in either group but in the ASST+ group, the ASST score appeared...

  6. Prevalence of conventional risk factors and lipid profiles in patients with acute coronary syndrome and significant coronary disease

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    González-Pacheco H

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Héctor González-Pacheco,1 Jesús Vargas-Barrón,2 Maite Vallejo,2 Yigal Piña-Reyna,3 Alfredo Altamirano-Castillo,1 Pedro Sánchez-Tapia,1 Carlos Martínez-Sánchez1 1Coronary Care Unit, National Institute of Cardiology in Mexico City, Mexico City, Mexico; 2Department of Clinical Research, National Institute of Cardiology in Mexico City, Mexico City, Mexico; 3Catheterization Laboratory, National Institute of Cardiology in Mexico City, Mexico City, Mexico Background: Among patients with coronary artery disease (CAD, 80%–90% present at least one conventional risk factor. On the other hand, lipid profile modification after a cardiovascular event related to acute coronary syndrome (ACS has been recognized. The prevalence of conventional risk factors and the lipid profile at the time of admission in patients with ACS and significant CAD (stenosis ≥50% determined through coronary angiography is not well described. Methods: We studied 3,447 patients with a diagnosis of ACS and significant CAD with stenosis ≥50%, as shown on angiography. We recorded the presence of conventional risk factors, including smoking, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and diabetes. In addition, we analyzed the lipid profiles within the first 24 hours of admission. We analyzed the studied population and compared findings according to sex.Results: Most patients (81.7% were male. ST-elevation myocardial infarction was present in 51.3% of patients, and non-ST-elevation acute coronary syndrome was present in 48.7%. The most frequent risk factor was smoking, which was present in 68% of patients, followed by hypertension (57.8%, dyslipidemia (47.5%, and diabetes (37.7%. In women, the most frequent risk factors were hypertension, diabetes, and dyslipidemia, whereas in men, smoking was the most frequent. We identified at least one risk factor in 95.7% of all patients, two or three risk factors in 62%, and four risk factors in 8.6% of patients. The lipid profile analysis revealed that

  7. Migration inhibitory factor (MIF) released by macrophages upon recognition of immune complexes is critical to inflammation in Arthus reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paiva, Claudia N; Arras, Rosa H; Magalhães, Elisabeth S; Alves, Letícia S; Lessa, Luiz Paulo; Silva, Maria Helena; Ejzemberg, Regina; Canetti, Cláudio; Bozza, Marcelo T

    2009-05-01

    Deposition of immune complexes (IC) triggers Fc gamma R-dependent inflammation, leading to tissue damage in rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematous, immune glomerulonephritis, and several immune vasculitides. Evidences support a role for macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) in a number of inflammatory diseases, but the triggering of its secretion and its physiopathological role upon IC deposition remain elusive. Herein, we show that human macrophages secreted MIF after IC recognition, which in turn controlled the secretion of TNF. Macrophages from Mif-/- mice produced smaller amounts of TNF when stimulated with IgG-opsonized erythrocytes than wild-type (WT) cells. Using passive reverse Arthus reaction in the peritoneum and lungs as a model for IC-induced inflammation, we demonstrated that Mif-/- mice had a milder response, observed by reduced neutrophil recruitment, vascular leakage, and secretion of TNF, MIP-2, and keratinocyte-derived chemokine compared with WT controls. Adoptive transfer of alveolar macrophages from WT to Mif-/- mice rescued pulmonary neutrophil recruitment and TNF production upon passive reverse Arthus reaction. Our study indicates that Arthus inflammatory reaction is largely dependent on MIF and poses macrophages as a source of the MIF released upon IC recognition. These results give experimental support to the proposition that blockade of MIF might constitute an adjunctive, therapeutic approach to IC disease.

  8. Repair effect of diabetic ulcers with recombinant human epidermal growth factor loaded by sustained-release microspheres

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In this study the w/o/w extraction–evaporation technique was adopted to prepare poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microspheres loading recombinant human epidermal growth factor (rhEGF). The micro-spheres were characterized for morphology by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and particle size distribution. The release performances, the proliferation effects and therapeutic effects of rhEGF-loaded PLGA microspheres were all studied. The results showed that these spherical micro-spheres had a narrow size distribution and a high drug encapsulation efficiency (85.6%). RhEGF-loaded microspheres enhanced the growth rate of fibroblasts and wound healing more efficiently than pure rhEGF. The number of the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) in the epidermis layer with the mi-crosphere treatment was significantly larger than those of the control groups. Overall locally sustained delivery of rhEGF from biodegradable PLGA microspheres may serve as a novel therapeutic strategy for diabetic ulcer repair.

  9. Tissue plasminogen activator promotes the effects of corticotropin-releasing factor on the amygdala and anxiety-like behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matys, Tomasz; Pawlak, Robert; Matys, Elzbieta; Pavlides, Constantine; McEwen, Bruce S; Strickland, Sidney

    2004-11-16

    Stress-induced plasticity in the brain requires a precisely orchestrated sequence of cellular events involving novel as well as well known mediators. We have previously demonstrated that tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) in the amygdala promotes stress-induced synaptic plasticity and anxiety-like behavior. Here, we show that tPA activity in the amygdala is up-regulated by a major stress neuromodulator, corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF), acting on CRF type-1 receptors. Compared with WT, tPA-deficient mice responded to CRF treatment with attenuated expression of c-fos (an indicator of neuronal activation) in the central and medial amygdala but had normal c-fos responses in paraventricular nuclei. They exhibited reduced anxiety-like behavior to CRF but had a sustained corticosterone response after CRF administration. This effect of tPA deficiency was not mediated by plasminogen, because plasminogen-deficient mice demonstrated normal behavioral and hormonal changes to CRF. These studies establish tPA as an important mediator of cellular, behavioral, and hormonal responses to CRF.

  10. Hypothalamic corticotropin-releasing factor immunoreactivity is reduced during induction of pituitary tumors by chronic estrogen treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haas, D.A.; Borgundvaag, B.; Sturtridge, W.C.; George, S.R.

    1987-11-02

    The role that estrogen plays in the regulation of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) is not known. A radioimmunoassay specific for rat CRF was utilized to measure the CRF-like immunoreactivity (CRF-ir) in the hypothalamus of ovariectomized rats treated with estradiol for periods up to 12 weeks. Compared to ovariectomized controls, estradiol treatment resulted in significantly reduced CRF-ir after 3 and 12 weeks, although no significant change was seen after 8 weeks. Anterior pituitary (AP) weight was greatly increased by estradiol treatment at all time points studied. Bromocriptine treatment for the last 3 weeks of the 12-week period, or removal of estradiol for 3 weeks after 9 weeks of treatment did not reverse the changes in CRF-ir even though significant regressions of tumor size was achieved. There was no correlation between AP weight and CRF-ir in individual animals. These data show that chronic treatment with estrogen reduced hypothalamic CRF-ir content. Neither a direct estrogenic effect or an indirect effect mediated through alterations in the adenohypophysis could be ruled out. 21 references, 3 figures.

  11. Post-stroke recovery: the role of activity-dependent release of brain-derived neurotrophic factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berretta, Antonio; Tzeng, Yu-Chieh; Clarkson, Andrew N

    2014-11-01

    Stroke remains the leading cause of long-term disability with no pharmacological approaches available to limit the degree of damage or aid in recovery. Considerable effort has been made to minimize neuronal damage using neuroprotective compounds. However, attempts have so far failed to translate into the clinic. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its receptor tropomyosin-related kinase type B are actively produced throughout the brain and are involved in regulating neuronal activity and normal day-to-day function. Further, BDNF has been shown to play a role in both protection and recovery of functions after stroke. This review focuses on the endogenous release of BDNF as well as activity-induced (pharmacological and physical) elevation in BDNF, and the role this plays during both acute (hours to days) and subacute (days to weeks) periods after stroke. Exogenous administration has previously been shown not to cross the blood-brain barrier; therefore, we have focused this review on approaches that allow us to directly stimulate, using pharmacological therapies and mimetics, physical activity and potential drug delivery systems that can be used to administer BDNF. Finally, we also discuss the role of BDNF polymorphisms and the influence of epigenetic regulation of BDNF on post-stroke recovery.

  12. Neither bovine somatotropin nor growth hormone-releasing factor alters expression of thyroid hormone receptors in liver and mammary tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capuco, A V; Binelli, M; Tucker, H A

    2011-10-01

    Physiological effects of thyroid hormones are mediated primarily by binding of triiodothyronine to specific nuclear receptors. Organ-specific changes in production of triiodothyronine from its prohormone, thyroxine, have been hypothesized to target the action of thyroid hormones on the mammary gland and play a role in mediating or augmenting a galactopoietic response to bovine somatotropin (bST). Additionally, tissue responsiveness to thyroid hormones may be altered by changes in the number or affinity of nuclear receptors for thyroid hormones. In the present study, effects of bST and bovine growth hormone-releasing factor (bGRF) on thyroid hormone receptors in liver and mammary gland were studied. Lactating Holstein cows received continuous infusions of bST or bGRF for 63 d or served as uninfused controls. Nuclei were isolated from harvested mammary and liver tissues and incubated with [(125)I]-triiodothyronine. Treatments did not alter the capacity or affinity of specific binding sites for triiodothyronine in liver or mammary nuclei. Evaluation of transcript abundance for thyroid hormone receptors showed that isoforms of thyroid hormone receptor or retinoid receptor (which may influence thyroid receptor action) expressed in the mammary gland were not altered by bST or bGRF treatment. Data do not support the hypothesis that administration of bST or bGRF alters sensitivity of mammary tissue by changing expression of thyroid hormone receptors.

  13. Repair effect of diabetic ulcers with recombinant human epidermal growth factor loaded by sustained-release microspheres

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG XiaoQing; XU Jun; WANG WeiCai; Luo Hao; LIANG XiaoFei; Zhang Lei; Wang HanJie; Wang PengHua; CHANG Jin

    2008-01-01

    In this study the w/o/w extraction-evaporation technique was adopted to prepare poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microspheres loading recombinant human epidermal growth factor (rhEGF). The micro-spheres were characterized for morphology by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and particle size distribution. The release performances, the proliferation effects and therapeutic effects of rhEGF-Ioaded PLGA microspheres were all studied. The results showed that these spherical micro-spheres had a narrow size distribution and a high drug encapsulation efficiency (85.6%). RhEGF-ioaded microspheres enhanced the growth rate of fibroblasts and wound healing more efficiently than pure rhEGF. The number of the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) in the epidermis layer with the mi-crosphere treatment was significantly larger than those of the control groups. Overall locally sustained delivery of rhEGF from biodegradable PLGA microspheres may serve as a novel therapeutic strategy for diabetic ulcer repair.

  14. Cerebrospinal fluid corticotropin-releasing factor and perceived early-life stress in depressed patients and healthy control subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Linda L; Tyrka, Audrey R; McDougle, Christopher J; Malison, Robert T; Owens, Michael J; Nemeroff, Charles B; Price, Lawrence H

    2004-04-01

    Previous studies have reported elevated concentrations of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) in patients with major depression. Elevations of CSF CRF have also been reported in adult laboratory animals exposed to the stress of brief maternal deprivation or maternal neglect in the neonatal or preweaning period. The present study was designed to determine whether major depression and a history of perceived early adversity in childhood are independently associated with elevated CSF CRF concentrations in adults. In this case-control study, 27 medication-free adults with major depression and 25 matched controls underwent standardized lumbar puncture for collection of a single CSF sample at 1200. Subjects provided data about significant adverse early-life experiences and rated their global perceived level of stress during pre-school and preteen years on a six-point Likert scale. The mean difference in CSF CRF between depressed patients and controls did not reach statistical significance. In a regression model, perceived early-life stress was a significant predictor of CSF CRF, but depression was not. Perinatal adversity and perceived adversity in the preteen adversity years (ages 6-13 years) were both independently associated with decreasing CSF CRF concentrations. The relationship observed between perceived early-life stress and adult CSF CRF concentrations in this study closely parallels recent preclinical findings. More work is needed to elucidate the critical nature and timing of early events that may be associated with enduring neuroendocrine changes in humans.

  15. Isolation and characterisation of the corticotropin releasing factor receptor 1 (CRFR1) gene in a teleost fish, Fugu rubripes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, João C; Power, Deborah M; Elgar, Greg; Clark, Melody S

    2003-06-01

    Corticotropin releasing factor receptor (CRF) is a member of the secretin family of the G-protein coupled receptor superfamily. These are characterised by the presence of seven transmembrane domains and six conserved cysteines that are important for receptor conformation and ligand binding. IN vertebrates two CRF receptors (CRF1 and CRF2) have been isolated and characterised. In this study the complete structure of the CRF1 receptor was isolated and partially characterised for the first time in a vertebrate using the compact genome of the Japanese pufferfish, Fugu rubripes as a model. The Fugu CRF1 receptor gene is composed of 14 exons is approximately 27 kb in length. A tissue distribution of this receptor in Fugu reveals that it is expressed mainly in liver, gonads, heart and brain, however, expression in the kidney, gut and gills was also detected. In vertebrates this receptor appears to have a different tissue distribution and its presence in the gills may indicate a new role in osmoregulatory processes.

  16. Differential stress-induced alterations of colonic corticotropin-releasing factor receptors in the Wistar Kyoto rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    o'malley, D; Julio-Pieper, M; Gibney, S M; Gosselin, R D; Dinan, T G; Cryan, J F

    2010-03-01

    BACKGROUND A growing body of data implicates increased life stresses with the initiation, persistence and severity of symptoms associated with functional gut disorders such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Activation of central and peripheral corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) receptors is key to stress-induced changes in gastrointestinal (GI) function. METHODS This study utilised immunofluorescent and Western blotting techniques to investigate colonic expression of CRF receptors in stress-sensitive Wistar Kyoto (WKY) and control Sprague Dawley (SD) rats. KEY RESULTS No intra-strain differences were observed in the numbers of colonic CRFR1 and CRFR2 positive cells. Protein expression of functional CRFR1 was found to be comparable in control proximal and distal colon samples. Sham levels of CRFR1 were also similar in the proximal colon but significantly higher in WKY distal colons (SD: 0.38 +/- 0.14, WKY: 2.06 +/- 0.52, P CRF receptor expression and further support a role for local colonic CRF signalling in stress-induced changes in GI function.

  17. The hemK gene in Escherichia coli encodes the N5-glutamine methyltransferase that modifies peptide release factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heurgué-Hamard, Valérie; Champ, Stéphanie; Engström, Åke; Ehrenberg, Måns; Buckingham, Richard H.

    2002-01-01

    Class 1 peptide release factors (RFs) in Escherichia coli are N5-methylated on the glutamine residue of the universally conserved GGQ motif. One other protein alone has been shown to contain N5-methylglutamine: E.coli ribosomal protein L3. We identify the L3 methyltransferase as YfcB and show that it methylates ribosomes from a yfcB strain in vitro, but not RF1 or RF2. HemK, a close orthologue of YfcB, is shown to methylate RF1 and RF2 in vitro. hemK is immediately downstream of and co-expressed with prfA. Its deletion in E.coli K12 leads to very poor growth on rich media and abolishes methylation of RF1. The activity of unmethylated RF2 from K12 strains is extremely low due to the cumulative effects of threonine at position 246, in place of alanine or serine present in all other bacterial RFs, and the lack of N5-methylation of Gln252. Fast-growing spontaneous revertants in hemK K12 strains contain the mutations Thr246Ala or Thr246Ser in RF2. HemK and YfcB are the first identified methyltransferases modifying glutamine, and are widely distributed in nature. PMID:11847124

  18. Longitudinal Study of Cytokine Expression, Lipid Profile and Neuronal Growth Factors in Human Breast Milk from Term and Preterm Deliveries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collado, Maria Carmen; Santaella, Marina; Mira-Pascual, Laia; Martínez-Arias, Elena; Khodayar-Pardo, Parisá; Ros, Gaspar; Martínez-Costa, Cecilia

    2015-10-19

    Breast milk (BM) is considered as a reference for infant nutrition. The role of bioactive components, such as cytokines, hormones, growth factors (GFs) and fatty acids (FAs) is poorly known, but they might be implicated in immune response development. The aim of this study was to identify the lipid profile and the spectrum of cytokines and neuronal GF in BM samples and analyse the influence of gestational age and lactation time on these components. This study used a longitudinal prospective method for the characterization of cytokines, FAs and GFs global profiles in 120 BM samples from 40 healthy mothers (20 preterm and 20 term) collected as colostrum, transitional and mature milk. The cytokines were analysed by protein array (Ray Bio® Human Cytokine Array G6. Ray Biotech, Inc. Norcross, GA, USA) and the FAs were analysed by gas chromatography. The FA profile was similar between the term and the preterm BM samples. Omega-3-α-linoleic and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and omega-6-linoleic acid were the most abundant in the term and preterm samples during lactation. Omega-3 ETA and omega-3 EPA we observed exclusively in the preterm samples. The cytokine profile showed a different trend based on gestational age. A significantly higher expression of neurotrophic factors was found in the mature preterm milk samples as compared to the mature term samples. Our study is the first to identify the influence and interactions of perinatal factors on cytokine, GFs and FAs in human milk.

  19. Molecular Characterization and Expression Profiling of NAC Transcription Factors in Brachypodium distachyon L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Gengrui; Chen, Guanxing; Zhu, Jiantang; Zhu, Yan; Lu, Xiaobing; Li, Xiaohui; Hu, Yingkao; Yan, Yueming

    2015-01-01

    NAC (NAM, ATAF1/2, CUC2) transcription factors are involved in regulating plant developmental processes and response to environmental stresses. Brachypodium distachyon is an emerging model system for cereals, temperate grasses and biofuel crops. In this study, a comprehensive investigation of the molecular characterizations, phylogenetics and expression profiles under various abiotic stresses of the NAC gene family in Brachypodium distachyon was performed. In total, 118 BNAC genes in B. distachyon were identified, of which 22 (18.64%) were tandemly duplicated and segmentally duplicated, respectively. The Bayesian phylogenetic inference using Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithms showed that they were divided into two clades and fourteen subfamilies, supported by similar motif compositions within one subfamily. Some critical amino acids detected using DIVERGE v3.0 might contribute to functional divergence among subfamilies. The different exon-intron organizations among subfamilies revealed structural differentiation. Promoter sequence predictions showed that the BNAC genes were involved in various developmental processes and diverse stress responses. Three NAC domain-encoding genes (BNAC012, BNAC078 and BNAC108), orthologous of NAC1, were targeted by five miRNA164 (Bdi-miR164a-c, e, f), suggesting that they might function in lateral organ enlargement, floral development and the responses to abiotic stress. Eleven (~9.32%) BNAC proteins containing α-helical transmembrane motifs were identified. 23 representative BNAC genes were analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR, showing different expression patterns under various abiotic stresses, of which 18, 17 and 11 genes were up-regulated significantly under drought, H2O2 and salt stresses, respectively. Only four and two genes were up-regulated under cold and cadmium stresses, respectively. Dynamic transcriptional expression analysis revealed that six genes showed constitutive expression and period

  20. Molecular Characterization and Expression Profiling of NAC Transcription Factors in Brachypodium distachyon L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gengrui Zhu

    Full Text Available NAC (NAM, ATAF1/2, CUC2 transcription factors are involved in regulating plant developmental processes and response to environmental stresses. Brachypodium distachyon is an emerging model system for cereals, temperate grasses and biofuel crops. In this study, a comprehensive investigation of the molecular characterizations, phylogenetics and expression profiles under various abiotic stresses of the NAC gene family in Brachypodium distachyon was performed. In total, 118 BNAC genes in B. distachyon were identified, of which 22 (18.64% were tandemly duplicated and segmentally duplicated, respectively. The Bayesian phylogenetic inference using Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC algorithms showed that they were divided into two clades and fourteen subfamilies, supported by similar motif compositions within one subfamily. Some critical amino acids detected using DIVERGE v3.0 might contribute to functional divergence among subfamilies. The different exon-intron organizations among subfamilies revealed structural differentiation. Promoter sequence predictions showed that the BNAC genes were involved in various developmental processes and diverse stress responses. Three NAC domain-encoding genes (BNAC012, BNAC078 and BNAC108, orthologous of NAC1, were targeted by five miRNA164 (Bdi-miR164a-c, e, f, suggesting that they might function in lateral organ enlargement, floral development and the responses to abiotic stress. Eleven (~9.32% BNAC proteins containing α-helical transmembrane motifs were identified. 23 representative BNAC genes were analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR, showing different expression patterns under various abiotic stresses, of which 18, 17 and 11 genes were up-regulated significantly under drought, H2O2 and salt stresses, respectively. Only four and two genes were up-regulated under cold and cadmium stresses, respectively. Dynamic transcriptional expression analysis revealed that six genes showed constitutive expression and period

  1. Metabolic Profiling of Retrograde Pathway Transcription Factors Rtg1 and Rtg3 Knockout Yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zanariah Hashim

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Rtg1 and Rtg3 are two basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH transcription factors found in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae that are involved in the regulation of the mitochondrial retrograde (RTG pathway. Under RTG response, anaplerotic synthesis of citrate is activated, consequently maintaining the supply of important precursors necessary for amino acid and nucleotide synthesis. Although the roles of Rtg1 and Rtg3 in TCA and glyoxylate cycles have been extensively reported, the investigation of other metabolic pathways has been lacking. Characteristic dimer formation in bHLH proteins, which allows for combinatorial gene expression, and the link between RTG and other regulatory pathways suggest more complex metabolic signaling involved in Rtg1/Rtg3 regulation. In this study, using a metabolomics approach, we examined metabolic alteration following RTG1 and RTG3 deletion. We found that apart from TCA and glyoxylate cycles, which have been previously reported, polyamine biosynthesis and other amino acid metabolism were significantly altered in RTG-deficient strains. We revealed that metabolic alterations occurred at various metabolic sites and that these changes relate to different growth phases, but the difference can be detected even at the mid-exponential phase, when mitochondrial function is repressed. Moreover, the effect of metabolic rearrangements can be seen through the chronological lifespan (CLS measurement, where we confirmed the role of the RTG pathway in extending the yeast lifespan. Through a comprehensive metabolic profiling, we were able to explore metabolic phenotypes previously unidentified by other means and illustrate the possible correlations of Rtg1 and Rtg3 in different pathways.

  2. Hematological and Biochemistry Profile and Risk Factors Associated with Pulmonary Tuberculosis Patients in Guyana

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    Rajini Kurup

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate the hematological and biochemistry profile of patients with or without HIV-TB at the Georgetown Chest Clinic, Guyana. Methods. An observational, laboratory based study was designed to assess the relationship of PTB and HIV with patients routine biochemical and hematological values. The study was conducted during the period January 2013 to December 2014; a total sample size of 316 patients was enrolled following exclusion and inclusion criteria. Results. Mean age of study population was 40.1 ± 13.8 (95% CI 38.6–41.7 and most were between 40 and 49 age group (27.8%, 95% CI 23.2–33.0. More males were in the study 74.4% (95% CI 69.3–78.8 than females 81% (95% CI 21.1–30.7. 30% (95% CI 25.3–35.3 had a sputum smear grade of 3+ and 62.5% (95% CI 47.0–75.7 showed a CD4 count <200. The study demonstrated significantly low hemoglobin (Hb 91.7% (95% CI 78.2–97.1, low WBC 27.8% (95% CI 15.8–44.0, high indirect bilirubin 7.4% (95% CI 2.1–23.3, ALT 41.8% (95% CI 28.4–56.7, and AST 72.2% (95% CI 57.3–83.3 among TB-HIV patients. Homelessness RR (relative risk 2.2 (95% CI 0.48–12.3, smoking RR 1.09 (95% CI 1.01–1.19, and gender (male RR 1.2 (95% CI 0.61–2.26 were main associated risk factors. Conclusions. There is slight variation among PTB and PTB-HIV coinfected patients in some hematological and biochemistry parameters.

  3. Epidemiologic profile and risk factors of patients at intensive care unit, Hospital San José, Popayán

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    Diego Illera

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: I.C.U. is an area dedicated to integral attention of severe ill patients. Objective: To establish the epidemiological profile of patients admitted to adult I.C.U. of Hospital Universitario San José of Popayán, Colombia, 2012. To determine risk factors associated to mortality and most prevalent diagnoses. Methods: Descriptive, retrospective study of the epidemiological profile of patients admitted to I.C.U. After authorization from ethics committee, 949 patients selected from the database were studied. Variables were codified according to investigators criteria. Associations were established among variables and mortality and diagnoses using chi² to determine statistical significance (p

  4. Increased depression-like behaviors in corticotropin-releasing factor receptor-2-deficient mice: sexually dichotomous responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bale, Tracy L; Vale, Wylie W

    2003-06-15

    Depressive disorders affect nearly 19 million American adults, making depression and the susceptibility for developing depression a critical focus of mental health research today. Females are twice as likely to develop depression as males. Stress is a known risk factor for developing depression, and recent hypotheses suggest an involvement of an overactive stress axis. As mediators of the stress response, corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and its receptors (CRFR1 and CRFR2) have been implicated in the propensity for developing stress-related mood disorders. Mice deficient in CRFR2 display increased anxiety-like behaviors and a hypersensitive stress response. As a possible animal model of depression, these mice were tested for depression-like behaviors in the forced swim test. Comparisons were made between wild-type and mutant animals, as well as between sexes. Male and female CRFR2-mutant mice showed increased immobility as an indicator of depression compared with wild-type mice of the same sex. In addition, mutant and wild-type female mice demonstrated increased immobile time compared with males of the same genotype. Treatment of CRFR2-deficient mice with the CRFR1 antagonist antalarmin decreased immobile time and increased swim time in both sexes. We found a significant effect of sex for both time spent immobile and swimming after antalarmin treatment. Because differences in behaviors in the forced swim test are good indicators of serotonergic and catecholaminergic involvement, our results may reveal an interaction of CRF pathways with other known antidepressant systems and may also support an involvement of CRF receptors in the development of depression such that elevated CRFR1 activity, in the absence of CRFR2, increases depression-like behaviors.

  5. AGE-Related Differences of Novel Atherosclerotic Risk Factors and Angiographic Profile Among Gujarati Acute Coronary Syndrome Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prajapati, Jayesh; Joshi, Hasit; Sahoo, Sibasis; Virpariya, Kapil; Parmar, Meena; Shah, Komal

    2015-06-01

    Although numerous risk factors have been established to predict the development of acute coronary syndrome (ACS), the risk factor profile may be different between the younger and older individuals. To analyse the frequency and pattern of atherogenic risk factors and angiographic profiles in age-stratified Gujarati patients with ACS. ACS patients undergoing coronary angiography at U.N. Mehta Institute of Cardiology and Research, Gujarat, India between January 2008 and December 2012 were classified in to two age groups with 40y as cut-off. Patients were assessed for conventional risk factors (diabetes mellitus, dyslipidaemia, hypertension, smoking, obesity), novel risk factors (high sensitivity C-reactive protein, lipoprotein (a), homocysteine), and angiographic profiles.The statistical difference between two age groups was determined by Student's t-test for continuous variables and Chi-square or Fisher's exact test for categorical variables. A total of 200 patients, 100 patients ≤40 y of age and 100 patients >40 y of age, were evaluated. Older patients had higher frequency of hypertension (32 vs. 16%, p=0.008), while family history of coronary artery disease was more common among younger patients (19 vs. 9%, p=0.041). The incidence of diabetes, dyslipidaemia, smoking and tobacco chewing did not vary significantly between the two groups. Total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels were significantly higher in the younger group (p<0.05). Lipoprotein (a), homocysteine and high-sensitivity C reactive protein levels were comparable between two age groups. Multi-vessel coronary artery disease was more common among older group. The most commonly affected coronary artery was the left anterior descending artery among younger patients (44%) and the left circumflex artery among older patients (38.1%). Young patients with ACS had different atherosclerotic risk profile and less extensive coronary artery disease as compared to older counterparts. Emphasis

  6. Identification of key transcription factors in caerulein-induced pancreatitis through expression profiling data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Dachuan; Wu, Bo; Tong, Danian; Pan, Ye; Chen, Wei

    2015-08-01

    The current study aimed to isolate key transcription factors (TFs) in caerulein-induced pancreatitis, and to identify the difference between wild type and Mist1 knockout (KO) mice, in order to elucidate the contribution of Mist1 to pancreatitis. The gene profile of GSE3644 was downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus database then analyzed using the t-test. The isolated differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were mapped into a transcriptional regulatory network derived from the Integrated Transcription Factor Platform database and in the network, the interaction pairs involving at least one DEG were screened. Fisher's exact test was used to analyze the functional enrichment of the target genes. A total of 1,555 and 3,057 DEGs were identified in the wild type and Mist1KO mice treated with caerulein, respectively. DEGs screened in Mist1KO mice were predominantly enriched in apoptosis, mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling and other cancer-associated pathways. A total of 188 and 51 TFs associated with pathopoiesis were isolated in Mist1KO and wild type mice, respectively. Out of the top 10 TFs (ranked by P-value), 7 TFs, including S-phase kinase-associated protein 2 (Skp2); minichromosome maintenance complex component 3 (Mcm3); cell division cycle 6 (Cdc6); cyclin B1 (Ccnb1); mutS homolog 6 (Msh6); cyclin A2 (Ccna2); and cyclin B2 (Ccnb2), were expressed in the two types of mouse. These TFs were predominantly involved in phosphorylation, DNA replication, cell division and DNA mismatch repair. In addition, specific TFs, including minichromosome maintenance complex component 7 (Mcm7); lymphoid-specific helicase (Hells); and minichromosome maintenance complex component 6 (Mcm6), that function in the unwinding of DNA were identified to participate in Mist1KO pancreatitis. The DEGs, including Cdc6, Mcm6, Msh6 and Wdr1 are closely associated with the regulation of caerulein-induced pancreatitis. Furthermore, other identified TFs were also involved in this type of

  7. Histamine release factor from Dermanyssus gallinae (De Geer): characterization and in vitro assessment as a protective antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartley, Kathryn; Nisbet, Alasdair J; Offer, Jill E; Sparks, Nicholas H C; Wright, Harry W; Huntley, John F

    2009-03-01

    A cDNA encoding a 174-amino-acid orthologue of a tick histamine release factor (HRF) was identified from the haematophagous poultry red mite Dermanyssus gallinae. The predicted D. gallinae HRF protein (Dg-HRF-1) sequence is highly conserved with the tick HRFs (identity 52-54%) and to a lesser degree with translationally controlled tumour proteins (TCTP) from mammals and other invertebrates (range 38-47%). Phylogenetically, Dg-HRF-1 partitions with the tick HRF clade suggesting a shared linage and potentially similar function(s). A recombinant Dg-HRF-1 protein (rDg-HRF-1) was produced and shown to induce degranulation of rat peritoneal mast cells in vitro, confirming conservation of the histamine-releasing function in D. gallinae. Polyclonal antibodies were generated in rabbits and hens to rDg-HRF-1. Western blotting demonstrated that native Dg-HRF is a soluble protein and immunohistochemical staining of mite sections revealed that the distribution of Dg-HRF, although ubiquitous, is more common in mite reproductive, digestive and synganglion tissues. A survey of hens housed continuously in a mite-infested commercial poultry unit failed to identify IgY specific for recombinant or native Dg-HRF, indicating that Dg-HRF is not exposed to the host during infestation/feeding and may therefore have potential as a vaccine using the concealed antigen approach. To test the protective capability of rDg-HRF-1, fresh heparinised chicken blood was enriched with yolk-derived anti-Dg-HRF IgY antibodies and fed to semi-starved mites using an in vitro feeding system. A statistically significant increase in mortality was shown (P=0.004) in mites fed with anti-Dg-HRF IgY after just one blood meal. The work presented here demonstrates, to our knowledge for the first time, the feasibility of vaccinating hens with recombinant D. gallinae antigens to control mite infestation and the potential of rDg-HRF-1 as a vaccine antigen.

  8. Nucleus accumbens corticotropin-releasing factor increases cue-triggered motivation for sucrose reward: paradoxical positive incentive effects in stress?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peciña, Susana; Schulkin, Jay; Berridge, Kent C

    2006-01-01

    Background Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) is typically considered to mediate aversive aspects of stress, fear and anxiety. However, CRF release in the brain is also elicited by natural rewards and incentive cues, raising the possibility that some CRF systems in the brain mediate an independent function of positive incentive motivation, such as amplifying incentive salience. Here we asked whether activation of a limbic CRF subsystem magnifies the increase in positive motivation for reward elicited by incentive cues previously associated with that reward, in a way that might exacerbate cue-triggered binge pursuit of food or other incentives? We assessed the impact of CRF microinjections into the medial shell of nucleus accumbens using a pure incentive version of Pavlovian-Instrumental transfer, a measure specifically sensitive to the incentive salience of reward cues (which it separates from influences of aversive stress, stress reduction, frustration and other traditional explanations for stress-increased behavior). Rats were first trained to press one of two levers to obtain sucrose pellets, and then separately conditioned to associate a Pavlovian cue with free sucrose pellets. On test days, rats received microinjections of vehicle, CRF (250 or 500 ng/0.2 μl) or amphetamine (20 μg/0.2 μl). Lever pressing was assessed in the presence or absence of the Pavlovian cues during a half-hour test. Results Microinjections of the highest dose of CRF (500 ng) or amphetamine (20 μg) selectively enhanced the ability of Pavlovian reward cues to trigger phasic peaks of increased instrumental performance for a sucrose reward, each peak lasting a minute or so before decaying after the cue. Lever pressing was not enhanced by CRF microinjections in the baseline absence of the Pavlovian cue or during the presentation without a cue, showing that the CRF enhancement could not be explained as a result of generalized motor arousal, frustration or stress, or by persistent

  9. Nucleus accumbens corticotropin-releasing factor increases cue-triggered motivation for sucrose reward: paradoxical positive incentive effects in stress?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schulkin Jay

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF is typically considered to mediate aversive aspects of stress, fear and anxiety. However, CRF release in the brain is also elicited by natural rewards and incentive cues, raising the possibility that some CRF systems in the brain mediate an independent function of positive incentive motivation, such as amplifying incentive salience. Here we asked whether activation of a limbic CRF subsystem magnifies the increase in positive motivation for reward elicited by incentive cues previously associated with that reward, in a way that might exacerbate cue-triggered binge pursuit of food or other incentives? We assessed the impact of CRF microinjections into the medial shell of nucleus accumbens using a pure incentive version of Pavlovian-Instrumental transfer, a measure specifically sensitive to the incentive salience of reward cues (which it separates from influences of aversive stress, stress reduction, frustration and other traditional explanations for stress-increased behavior. Rats were first trained to press one of two levers to obtain sucrose pellets, and then separately conditioned to associate a Pavlovian cue with free sucrose pellets. On test days, rats received microinjections of vehicle, CRF (250 or 500 ng/0.2 μl or amphetamine (20 μg/0.2 μl. Lever pressing was assessed in the presence or absence of the Pavlovian cues during a half-hour test. Results Microinjections of the highest dose of CRF (500 ng or amphetamine (20 μg selectively enhanced the ability of Pavlovian reward cues to trigger phasic peaks of increased instrumental performance for a sucrose reward, each peak lasting a minute or so before decaying after the cue. Lever pressing was not enhanced by CRF microinjections in the baseline absence of the Pavlovian cue or during the presentation without a cue, showing that the CRF enhancement could not be explained as a result of generalized motor arousal, frustration or stress

  10. Immunolocalization of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and corticotropin-releasing factor receptor 2 (CRF-R2) in the developing gut of the sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mola, Lucrezia; Gambarelli, Andrea; Pederzoli, Aurora

    2011-05-01

    Our previous data indicated an important role for adrenocorticotropic (ACTH)-like molecules co-operating with macrophages to control the modifications in body homeostasis during the first period of the life of sea bass (up to 30 days post-hatching) before the lymphoid cells have reached complete maturation. The aim of the study was to determine the immunolocalization of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF), which is a very important mediator of stress-related responses. Our data showed that immunostaining for CRF is localized already at 8 days after hatching in nerve fibers of the gastrointestinal tract wall from the pharynx to the anterior gut, when the larvae are still feeding on yolk. This pattern of immunolocalization appeared similar to that in 24-day-old larvae, but at this stage there were also large cells immunopositive to CRF located in the wall of the midgut and hindgut. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) treatment, which is a known stimulator of stress hormone responses, did not modify the CRF immunostaining pattern, though it did affect the immunolocalization of the peripheral CRF receptor, i.e. CRF-R2. Immunolocalization of CRF-R2 appeared in nerve fibers of the gut wall in larvae fixed 1h after the end of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) treatment. The present results suggest that CRF plays important autocrine and/or paracrine roles in the early immune responses at the gut level in the larval stages of sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax L.) as already proposed for ACTH. Moreover, our studies taken together with other research on fish, in comparison with mammals, suggest a phylogenetically old role of CRF in immune-endocrine interactions.

  11. 78 FR 14533 - Official Release of EMFAC2011 Motor Vehicle Emission Factor Model for Use in the State of California

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-06

    ... available on the California Air Resources Board (CARB) Web site: http://www.arb.ca.gov/msei/modeling.htm... California were developed using EMFAC2007 (released by CARB in October 2007) or EMFAC2002 (released by CARB... April 6, 2012 letter, CARB requested that EPA approve EMFAC2011 for use in developing SIPs and in...

  12. Distribution of capsular types and production of muramidase-released protein (MRP) and extracellular factor (EF) of Streptococcus suis strains isolated from diseased pigs in seven European countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wisselink, H.J.; Smith, H.E.; Stockhofe-Zurwieden, N.; Peperkamp, K.; Vecht, U.

    2000-01-01

    Streptococcus suis strains (n=411), isolated from diseased pigs in seven European countries were serotyped using specific antisera against serotype 1 to 28, and were phenotyped on the basis of their muramidase-released-protein (MRP) and extracellular-factor protein (EF) production. Overall, S. suis

  13. Protection of pigs against challenge with virulent Streptococcus suis serotype 2 strains by a muramidase-released protein and extracellular factor vaccine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wisselink, H.J.; Vecht, U.; Stockhofe Zurwieden, N.; Smith, H.E.

    2001-01-01

    The efficacy of a muramidase-released protein (MRP) and extracellular factor (EF) vaccine in preventing infection and disease in pigs challenged either with a homologous or a heterologous Streptococcus suis serotype 2 strain (MRP EF ) was compared with the efficacy of a vaccine containing formalin-k

  14. Tuberculosis screening in patients with psoriasis before antitumour necrosis factor therapy : comparison of an interferon-gamma release assay vs. tuberculin skin test

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laffitte, E.; Janssens, J. P.; Roux-Lombard, P.; Thielen, A. M.; Barde, C.; Marazza, G.; Panizzon, R. G.; Saurat, J-H.

    2009-01-01

    Background Antitumour necrosis factor (anti-TNF) treatments may reactivate latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI). For detecting LTBI, the tuberculin skin test (TST) has low sensitivity and specificity. Interferon-gamma release assays (IGRA) have been shown to be more sensitive and specific than TST.

  15. Effect of central corticotropin releasing factor on hepatic circulation in rats: the role of the CRF2 receptor in the brain

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    Backgrounds: Corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) is distributed in the central nervous system and acts as a neurotransmitter to regulate gastric functions through vagal-muscarinic pathways. We have recently demonstrated that central CRF aggravates experimental acute liver injury in rats. In the present study, the central effect of CRF on hepatic circulation was investigated.

  16. Three-dimensional Printed Scaffolds with Gelatin and Platelets Enhance In vitro Preosteoblast Growth Behavior and the Sustained-release Effect of Growth Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhu

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: Our experiments confirmed that the 3D printed scaffolds we had designed could provide a sustained-release effect for growth factors and improve the proliferation of preosteoblasts with little cytotoxicity in vitro. They may hold promise as bone graft substitute materials in the future.

  17. Saliva cortisol profiles in field research: internal structure, confounding factors, quantification, and stability

    OpenAIRE

    Bernhardt, Alexandra

    2007-01-01

    The last decades of research on hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis activity have established salivary cortisol as a prevalent biological marker of stress. Diurnal salivary cortisol profiles in healthy adults are characterized by peak values in the post-awakening period and a consecutive decline thereafter. Basically, the variety of published measures quantifying basal salivary cortisol profiles can be classified into level and dynamic parameters reflecting both state and trait aspects. A tot...

  18. 新型大球包膜控释复合肥养分释放特征及影响因素%Properties and Impacting Factors of Nutrient Releasing of New Large Spherical Coated Controlled-Release Compound Fertilizer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李长洲; 张民; 杨越超

    2013-01-01

    The writing revolves around the effect of such factors as coating thickness , application amount of cell opener , temperature and granular diameter on release rate of nutrition of large spherical coated controlled-release compound fertilizer by using water extraction method .The experiment results have showed that releasing rate of nitrogen and potassium is obviously higher than that of phosphorus . Reducing coating thickness or increasing amount of cell opener can increase release rate of different nutrients .At temperature of 25~40 ℃, there has been no obvious releasing difference of nitrogen , phosphorus and potassium .However , when the temperature is raised from 40 ℃to 60 ℃, the release rate of nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium has been increased remarkably .It has been concluded increasing spherical diameter of large spherical coated controlled-release compound fertilizer can not directly affect release rate of nitrogen , phosphorus and potassium greatly , but it brings the benefits of saving coat material and reducing production costs .%通过水溶出率法试验测定了包膜厚度、开孔剂添加量、温度和球径大小等因素对大球包膜控释复合肥养分释放速率的影响。试验结果表明:氮素和钾素的释放率显著大于磷素释放率,减小膜厚或增加开孔剂添加量均可加快各养分释放速率;当温度在25~40℃时,其氮、磷、钾的释放速率无显著变化,但温度从40℃升高至60℃时,氮、磷、钾的释放速率均显著加快;增大大球包膜控释复合肥的球径并未显著影响氮、磷、钾的释放速率,但节省了包膜材料,可降低生产成本。

  19. In vitro stress effect on degradation and drug release behaviors of basic fibroblast growth factor--poly(lactic-co-glycolic-acid) microsphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Yan; Yu, Zeping; Lang, Yun; Hu, Juanyu; Li, Hong; Yan, Yonggang; Tu, Chongqi; Yang, Tianfu; Song, Yueming; Duan, Hong; Pei, Fuxing

    2016-01-01

    To study the degradation and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) release activity of bFGF - poly(lactic-co-glycolic-acid) microsphere (bFGF-PLGA MS) under stress in vitro, including the static pressure and shearing force-simulating mechanical environment of the joint cavity. First, bFGF-PLGA MSs were created. Meanwhile, two self-made experimental instruments (static pressure and shearing force loading instruments) were initially explored to provide stress-simulating mechanical environment of the joint cavity. Then, bFGF-PLGA MSs were loaded into the two instruments respectively, to study microsphere degradation and drug release experiments. In the static pressure loading experiment, normal atmospheric pressure loading (approximately 0.1 MPa), 0.35 MPa, and 4.0 MPa pressure loading and shaking flask oscillation groups were designed to study bFGF-PLGA MS degradation and bFGF release. In the shearing force loading experiment, a pulsating pump was used to give the experimental group an output of 1,000 mL/min and the control group an output of 10 mL/min to carry out bFGF-PLGA MS degradation and drug release experiments. Changes of bFGF-PLGA MSs, including microsphere morphology, quality, weight-average molecular weight of polymer, and microsphere degradation and bFGF release, were analyzed respectively. In the static pressure loading experiment, bFGF-PLGA MSs at different pressure were stable initially. The trend of molecular weight change, quality loss, and bFGF release was consistent. Meanwhile, microsphere degradation and bFGF release rates in the 4.0 MPa pressure loading group were faster than those in the normal and 0.35 MPa pressure loading groups. It was the fastest in the shaking flask group, showing a statistically significant difference (P<0.0001). In the shearing force loading experiment, there were no distinctive differences in the rates of microsphere degradation and bFGF release between experimental and control group. Meanwhile, microsphere degradation

  20. Bacterial profiles of saliva in relation to diet, lifestyle factors, and socioeconomic status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Belstrøm

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective: The bacterial profile of saliva is composed of bacteria from different oral surfaces. The objective of this study was to determine whether different diet intake, lifestyle, or socioeconomic status is associated with characteristic bacterial saliva profiles. Design: Stimulated saliva samples from 292 participants with low levels of dental caries and periodontitis, enrolled in the Danish Health Examination Survey (DANHES, were analyzed for the presence of approximately 300 bacterial species by means of the Human Oral Microbe Identification Microarray (HOMIM. Using presence and levels (mean HOMIM-value of bacterial probes as endpoints, the influence of diet intake, lifestyle, and socioeconomic status on the bacterial saliva profile was analyzed by Mann–Whitney tests with Benjamini–Hochberg's correction for multiple comparisons and principal component analysis. Results: Targets for 131 different probes were identified in 292 samples, with Streptococcus and Veillonella being the most predominant genera identified. Two bacterial taxa (Streptococcus sobrinus and Eubacterium [11][G-3] brachy were more associated with smokers than non-smokers (adjusted p-value<0.01. Stratification of the group based on extreme ends of the parameters age, gender, alcohol consumption, body mass index (BMI, and diet intake had no statistical influence on the composition of the bacterial profile of saliva. Conversely, differences in socioeconomic status were reflected by the bacterial profiles of saliva. Conclusions: The bacterial profile of saliva seems independent of diet intake, but influenced by smoking and maybe socioeconomic status.

  1. Lactate induces tumour necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-6 and interleukin-1beta release in microglial- and astroglial-enriched primary cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Anna K; Rönnbäck, Lars; Hansson, Elisabeth

    2005-06-01

    Hyperammonaemia has deleterious effects on the CNS in patients with liver dysfunction. Cellular mechanisms underlying the effects of hyperammonaemia are largely unknown, although astrocytes have been the main target of interest. This study investigated how treatment with NH4Cl and lactate, which increase in the brain as a consequence of hyperammonaemia, affects cells in primary rat cultures enriched in either astrocytes or microglia. Morphological changes were studied over time using light microscopy. Release of the proinflammatory cytokines tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-1beta was measured using ELISA. NH4Cl was found to induce vacuole formation in both culture systems. Lactate treatment altered astrocytic appearance, resulting in increased space between individual cells. Microglia adopted a round morphology with either NH4Cl or lactate treatment. Lactate, but not NH4Cl, induced release of TNF-alpha and IL-6 in both astroglial- and microglial-enriched cultures, while IL-1beta was released only in microglial cultures. Cytokine release was higher in the microglial- than in the astroglial-enriched cultures. Additionally, the astroglial-enriched cultures containing approximately 10% microglial cells released more cytokines than cultures containing about 5% microglial cells. Taken together, our data suggest that most TNF-alpha, IL-6 and IL-1beta release comes from microglia. Thus, microglia could play an important role in the pathological process of hyperammonaemia.

  2. Predicting nicotine dependence profiles among adolescent smokers: the roles of personal and social-environmental factors in a longitudinal framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kleinjan Marloes

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although several studies have reported that symptoms of nicotine dependence can occur after limited exposure to smoking, the majority of research on nicotine dependence has focused on adult smokers. Insufficient knowledge exists regarding the epidemiology and aetiology of nicotine dependence among adolescent smokers. The objective of the present study is to identify the effects of theoretically driven social and individual predictors of nicotine dependence symptom profiles in a population-based sample of adolescent smokers. Method A longitudinal study among 6,783 adolescents (12 to 14 years old at baseline was conducted. In the first and second year of secondary education, personality traits and exposure to smoking in the social environment were assessed. Two and a half years later, adolescents' smoking status and nicotine dependence symptom profiles were assessed. A total of 796 adolescents were identified as smokers and included in the analyses. Results At follow-up, four distinct dependence symptom profiles were identified: low cravings only, high cravings and withdrawal, high cravings and behavioural dependence, and overall highly dependent. Personality traits of neuroticism and extraversion did not independently predict nicotine dependence profiles, whereas exposure to smoking in the social environment posed a risk for the initial development of nicotine dependence symptoms. However, in combination with environmental exposure to smoking, extraversion and neuroticism increased the risk of developing more severe dependence symptom profiles. Conclusions Nicotine dependence profiles are predicted by interactions between personal and environmental factors. These insights offer important directions for tailoring interventions to prevent the onset and escalation of nicotine dependence. Opportunities for intervention programs that target individuals with a high risk of developing more severe dependence symptom profiles are

  3. Home literacy environment profiles of children with language impairment: associations with caregiver- and child-specific factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tambyraja, Sherine R; Schmitt, Mary Beth; Farquharson, Kelly; Justice, Laura M

    2017-03-01

    Numerous studies suggest a positive relationship between the home literacy environment (HLE) and children's language and literacy skills, yet very little research has focused on the HLE of children with language impairment (LI). Children with LI are at risk for reading difficulties; thus, understanding the nature and frequency of their home literacy interactions is warranted. To identify unique HLE profiles within a large sample of children with LI, and to determine relevant caregiver- and child-specific factors that predict children's profile membership. Participants were 195 kindergarten and first-grade children with LI who were receiving school-based language therapy. Caregivers completed a comprehensive questionnaire regarding their child's HLE, and the extent to which their child engaged in shared book reading, were taught about letters, initiated or asked to be read to, and chose to read independently. Caregivers also answered questions regarding the highest level of maternal education, caregiver history of reading difficulties, and caregiver reading habits. Children completed a language and literacy battery in the fall of their academic year. Latent profile analyses indicated a three-profile solution, representing high, average and low frequency of the selected HLE indicators. Multinomial regression further revealed that caregivers' own reading habits influenced children's profile membership, as did child age and language abilities. These results highlight the considerable variability in the frequency of home literacy interactions of children with LI. Future work examining relations between familial reading practices and literacy outcomes for children with LI is warranted. © 2016 Royal College of Speech and Language Therapists.

  4. Deconstructing the Iboga Alkaloid Skeleton: Potentiation of FGF2-induced Glial Cell Line-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Release by a Novel Compound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gassaway, Madalee M; Jacques, Teresa L; Kruegel, Andrew C; Karpowicz, Richard J; Li, Xiaoguang; Li, Shu; Myer, Yves; Sames, Dalibor

    2016-01-15

    Modulation of growth factor signaling pathways in the brain represents a new experimental approach to treating neuropsychiatric disorders such as depression, anxiety, and addiction. Neurotrophins and growth factors exert synaptic, neuronal, and circuit level effects on a wide temporal range, which suggests a possibility of rapid and lasting therapeutic effects. Consequently, identification of small molecules that can either enhance the release of growth factors or potentiate their respective pathways will provide a drug-like alternative to direct neurotrophin administration or viral gene delivery and thus represents an important frontier in chemical biology and drug design. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), in particular, has been implicated in marked reduction of alcohol consumption in rodent addiction models, and the natural product ibogaine, a substance used traditionally in ritualistic ceremonies, has been suggested to increase the synthesis and release of GDNF in the dopaminergic system in rats. In this report, we describe a novel iboga analog, XL-008, created by unraveling the medium size ring of the ibogamine skeleton, and its ability to induce release of GDNF in C6 glioma cells. Additionally, XL-008 potentiates the release of GDNF induced by fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2), another neurotrophin implicated in major depressive disorder, increasing potency more than 2-fold (from 7.85 ± 2.59 ng/mL to 3.31 ± 0.98 ng/mL) and efficacy more than 3-fold. The GDNF release by both XL-008 and the FGF2/XL-008 mixture was found to be mediated through the MEK and PI3K signaling pathways but not through PLCγ in C6 glioma cells.

  5. NESHAP Area-Specific Dose-Release Factors for Potential Onsite Member-of-the-Public Locations at SRS using CAP88-PC Version 4.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trimor, P. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-08-09

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requires the use of the computer model CAP88-PC to estimate the total effective doses (TED) for demonstrating compliance with 40 CFR 61, Subpart H (EPA 2006), the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) regulations. As such, CAP88 Version 4.0 was used to calculate the receptor dose due to routine atmospheric releases at the Savannah River Site (SRS). For estimation, NESHAP dose-release factors (DRFs) have been supplied to Environmental Compliance and Area Closure Projects (EC&ACP) for many years. DRFs represent the dose to a maximum receptor exposed to 1 Ci of a specified radionuclide being released into the atmosphere. They are periodically updated to include changes in the CAP88 version, input parameter values, site meteorology, and location of the maximally exposed individual (MEI). In this report, the DRFs were calculated for potential radionuclide atmospheric releases from 13 SRS release points. The three potential onsite MEI locations to be evaluated are B-Area, Three Rivers Landfill (TRL), and Savannah River Ecology Lab Conference Center (SRELCC) with TRL’s onsite workers considered as members-of-the-public, and the potential future constructions of dormitories at SRELCC and Barracks at B-Area. Each MEI location was evaluated at a specified compass sector with different area to receptor distances and was conducted for both ground-level and elevated release points. The analysis makes use of area-specific meteorological data (Viner 2014). The resulting DRFs are compared to the 2014 NESHAP offsite MEI DRFs for three operational areas; A-Area, H-Area, and COS for a release rate of 1 Ci of tritium oxide at 0 ft. elevation. CAP88 was executed again using the 2016 NESHAP MEI release rates for 0 and 61 m stack heights to determine the radionuclide dose at TRL from the center-of-site (COS).

  6. Factor structure of the Disability and Impact Profile in patients with multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cohen, J. L.; Pouwer, F; Pfennings, L E

    1999-01-01

    and their complementary weighted scores share common variance? What is the factor structure of the weighted scores? To what extent do disease-related information and information from psychological questionnaires offer concurrent validity for the factors? Correlations between impairment ratings and the weighted item...... to sensory-cognitive intactness and a psychological well-being factor. A two-factor solution provides a first factor identical to that of the three-factor solution and a second factor representing psychological well-being. The two factors correlate well with instruments measuring disability...

  7. Psoriasis is the independent factor for early atherosclerosis: A prospective study of cardiometabolic risk profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinić Miroslav Ž.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Psoriasis as multisystemic inflammatory dis-ease is related with an increased cardiometabolic risk. The aim of the study was to analyze risk biomarkers, peripheral and renal arteries ultrasonography and echocardiography for subclinical atherosclerosis and metabolic disease in 106 subjects (66 psoriasis patients and 40 controls, 20 eczema patients and 20 healthy volunteers. Methods. In all exameenes following parameters were analyzed: body mass index (BMI, C-reactive protein, D-dimer, serum amyloid A (SAA, apolipoprotein (Apo A1, ApoB, ApoB/Apo A1 index, fasting glucose, C-peptide, fasting insulinemia, homeostatic model assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR, HOMA-β-cell, lipid profile, serum uric acid concentration (SUAC, 24-h proteinuria and microalbuminuria. Carotid, brachial, femoral and renal arteries ultrasonography, as well as echocardiography was also performed. Results. Five of 66 (7.6% psoriasis patients had metabolic syndrome (not present in both control groups. The following variables were increased in patients with psoriasis compared to both control groups: BMI (p = 0.012, insulinemia (p < 0.001, HOMA-IR (p = 0.003, HOMA-β cell (p < 0.001, SUAC (p = 0.006, ApoB/ApoA1 ra-tio (p = 0.006 and microalbuminuria (p < 0.001. Also, increased C-peptide (p = 0.034, D-dimer (p = 0.029, triglycerides (p = 0.044, SAA (p = 0.005 and decreased ApoA1 (p = 0.014 were found in the psoriasis patients compared to healthy controls. HDL cholesterol was decreased in the psoriasis patients compared to the control group of eczema patients (p = 0.004. Common carotid (CIMT and femoral artery intima-media thicknes