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Sample records for factor ix gene

  1. Three distinct point mutations in the factor IX gene of three Japanese CRM+ hemophilia B patients (factor IX BMNagoya 2, factor IX Nagoya 3 and 4).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamaguchi, M; Matsushita, T; Tanimoto, M; Takahashi, I; Yamamoto, K; Sugiura, I; Takamatsu, J; Ogata, K; Kamiya, T; Saito, H

    1991-05-06

    Enzymatic DNA amplification and complete sequence analysis were used to investigate human factor IX coding sequences in three CRM+ hemophilia B patients. In a patient with severe hemophilia B and a markedly prolonged ox-brain prothrombin time, a C to T transition in exon VI changed the codon for Arg180 to Trp (factor IX BMNagoya 2). This mutation would impair the cleavage by factor XIa required for activation of the zymogen. In a patient with mild hemophilia B, a G to A transition in exon VI changed the codon for Arg145 to His(factor IX Nagoya 3). This substitution also would be predicted to preclude the cleavage of factor IX by factor XIa at this peptide bond (Arg145-Ala146). Furthermore, this point mutation creates a new NlaIII restriction site which provides a quick and reliable method for carrier detection in the affected family members. A patient with severe hemophilia B (factor IX Nagoya 4) had a G to A transition in exon II changing the codon for Glu21 to Lys. This novel point mutation is assumed to impair the function of factor IX by disrupting the calcium binding of factor IX.

  2. In Vivo Gene Therapy of Hemophilia B: Sustained Partial Correction in Factor IX-Deficient Dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, Mark A.; Rothenberg, Steven; Landen, Charles N.; Bellinger, Dwight A.; Leland, Frances; Toman, Carol; Finegold, Milton; Thompson, Arthur R.; Read, M. S.; Brinkhous, Kenneth M.; Woo, Savio L. C.

    1993-10-01

    The liver represents a model organ for gene therapy. A method has been developed for hepatic gene transfer in vivo by the direct infusion of recombinant retroviral vectors into the portal vasculature, which results in the persistent expression of exogenous genes. To determine if these technologies are applicable for the treatment of hemophilia B patients, preclinical efficacy studies were done in a hemophilia B dog model. When the canine factor IX complementary DNA was transduced directly into the hepatocytes of affected dogs in vivo, the animals constitutively expressed low levels of canine factor IX for more than 5 months. Persistent expression of the clotting. factor resulted in reductions of whole blood clotting and partial thromboplastin times of the treated animals. Thus, long-term treatment of hemophilia B patients may be feasible by direct hepatic gene therapy in vivo.

  3. The rates and patterns of deletions in the human factor IX gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ketterling, R.P.; Vielhaber, E.L.; Lind, T.J.; Thorland, E.C.; Sommer S.S. (Mayo Clinic/Foundation, Rochester, MN (United States))

    1994-02-01

    Deletions are commonly observed in genes with either segments of highly homologous sequences or excessive gene length. However, in the factor IX gene and in most genes, deletions (of [ge]21 bp) are uncommon. The authors have analyzed DNA from 290 families with hemophilia B (203 independent mutations) and have found 12 deletions >20 bp. Eleven of these are >2 kb (range >3-163 kb), and one is 1.1 kb. The junctions of the four deletions that are completely contained within the factor IX gene have been determined. A novel mutation occurred in patient HB128: the data suggest that a 26.8-kb deletion occurred between two segments of alternating purines and pyrimidines and that a 2.3-kb sense strand segment derived from the deleted region was inserted. For a sample of 203 independent mutations, the authors estimate the [open quotes]baseline[close quotes] rates of deletional mutation per base pair per generation as a function of size. The rate for large (>2 kb)I deletions is exceedingly low. For every mutational event in which a given base is at the junction of a large deletion, there are an estimated 58 microdeletions (<20 bp) and 985 single-base substitutions at that base. Analysis of the nine reported deletion junctions in the factor IX gene literature reveals that (i) five are associated with inversion, orphan sequences, or sense strand insertions; (ii) four are simple deletions that display an excess of short direct repeats at their junctions; (iii) there is no dramatic clustering of junctions within the gene; and (iv) with the exception of alternating purines and pyrimidines, deletion junctions are not preferentially associated with repetitive DNA. 58 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  4. Gene therapy with adeno-associated virus vector 5-human factor IX in adults with hemophilia B

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miesbach, Wolfgang; Meijer, Karina; Coppens, Michiel

    2018-01-01

    Hemophilia B gene therapy aims to ameliorate bleeding risk and provide endogenous factor IX (FIX) activity/synthesis through a single treatment, eliminating the requirement for FIX concentrate. AMT-060 combines an adeno-associated virus-5 (AAV5) vector with a liver-specific promoter driving...

  5. Factor IX[sub Madrid 2]: A deletion/insertion in Facotr IX gene which abolishes the sequence of the donor junction at the exon IV-intron d splice site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solera, J. (Unidades de Genetica Molecular, Madrid (Spain)); Magallon, M.; Martin-Villar, J. (Hemofilia Hospital, Madrid (Spain)); Coloma, A. (Departamento deBioquimica de la Facultad de Medicina de la Universidad Autonoma, Madrid (Spain))

    1992-02-01

    DNA from a patient with severe hemophilia B was evaluated by RFLP analysis, producing results which suggested the existence of a partial deletion within the factor IX gene. The deletion was further localized and characterized by PCR amplification and sequencing. The altered allele has a 4,442-bp deletion which removes both the donor splice site located at the 5[prime] end of intron d and the two last coding nucleotides located at the 3[prime] end of exon IV in the normal factor IX gene; this fragment has been inserted in inverted orientation. Two homologous sequences have been discovered at the ends of the deleted DNA fragment.

  6. Platelets contain releasable coagulation factor IX antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romp, K G; Monroe, D M; Hoffman, M

    1993-12-01

    Platelets take up plasma proteins into their alpha granules. Platelet activation releases the alpha granule contents. The goal of this study was to test the hypothesis that human platelets also contain some coagulation factor IX in their alpha granules. Platelets were examined by immunofluorescence microscopy. Activated and unactivated platelets were quick frozen on to slides and dehydrated in situ to preserve optimal morphology. The slides were stained by indirect immunofluorescence for factors V and IX. Unactivated platelets showed coarsely granular staining for factor V and finely granular staining for factor IX. Staining for factor V was diffuse after activation, while staining for factor IX disappeared. Thus, the results support the conclusion that platelets contain factor IX which can be released upon activation. Immunoelectron microscopic studies were conducted to more precisely localize the site of the platelet factor IX. As expected, factor V was primarily localized in the alpha granules of unactivated platelets. By contrast, factor IX was observed both in alpha granules and diffusely in the platelet cytoplasm and membrane-bounded vesicles. After activation, staining for both factors V and IX was primarily in the open canalicular system. The physiological importance of this small amount of factor IX is unknown. However, it may be significant since only a few percent of normal IX levels are required to support haemostasis in the absence of trauma, and platelet factor IX could be released at sites of active coagulation.

  7. Identification and Genetic Analysis of a Factor IX Gene Intron 3 Mutation in a Hemophilia B Pedigree in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Hua Cao

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Hemophilia B is caused by coagulation defects in the factor IX gene located in Xq27.1 on the X chromosome. A wide range of mutations, showing extensive molecular heterogeneity, have been described in hemophilia B patients. Our study was aimed at genetic analysis and prenatal diagnosis of hemophilia B in order to further elucidate the pathogenesis of the hemophilia B pedigree in China. METHODS: Polymerase chain reaction amplification and direct sequencing of all the coding regions was conducted in hemophilia B patients and carriers. Prenatal diagnosis of the proband was conducted at 20 weeks. RESULTS: We identified the novel point mutation 10.389 A>G, located upstream of the intron 3 acceptor site in hemophilia B patients. The fetus of the proband’s cousin was identified as a carrier. CONCLUSION: Our identification of a novel mutation in the F9 gene associated with hemophilia B provides novel insight into the pathogenesis of this genetically inherited disorder and also represents the basis of prenatal diagnosis.

  8. Variations among Japanese of the factor IX gene (F9) detected by PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satoh, Chiyoko; Takahashi, Norio; Asakawa, Junichi; Hiyama, Keiko; Kodaira, Meiko (Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan))

    1993-01-01

    In the course of feasibility studies to examine the efficiencies and practicalities of various techniques for screening for genetic variations, the human coagulation factor IX (F9) genes of 63 Japanese families were examined by PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE). Four target sequences with lengths of 983-2,891 bp from the F9 genes of 126 unrelated individuals from Hiroshima and their 100 children were amplified by PCR, digested with restriction enzymes to approximately 500-bp fragments, and examined by DGGE - a total of 6,724 bp being examined per individual. GC-rich sequences (GC-clamps) of 40 bp were attached to both ends of the target sequences, as far as was feasible. Eleven types of new nucleotide substitutions were detected in the population, none of which produced RFLPs or caused hemophilia B. By examining two target sequences in a single lane, approximately 8,000 bp in a diploid individual could be examined. This approach is very effective for the detection of variations in DNA and is applicable to large-scale population studies. 46 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Evolutionary pattern of mutation in the factor IX genes of great apes: How does it compare to the pattern of recent germline mutation in patients with hemophilia B?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grouse, L.H.; Ketterling, R.P.; Sommer, S.S. [Mayo Clinic/Foundation, Rochester, MN (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Most mutations causing hemophilia B have arisen within the past 150 years. By correcting for multiple biases, the underlying rates of spontaneous germline mutation have been estimated in the factor IX gene. From these rates, an underlying pattern of mutation has emerged. To determine if this pattern compares to a underlying pattern found in the great apes, sequence changes were determined in intronic regions of the factor IX gene. The following species were studied: Gorilla gorilla, Pan troglodytes (chimpanzee), Pongo pygmacus (orangutan) and Homo sapiens. Intronic sequences at least 200 bp from a splice junction were randomly chosen, amplified by cross-species PCR, and sequenced. These regions are expected to be subject to little if any selective pressure. Early diverged species of Old World monkeys were also studied to help determine the direction of mutational changes. A total of 62 sequence changes were observed. Initial data suggest that the average pattern since evolution of the great apes has a paucity of transitions at CpG dinucleotides and an excess of microinsertions to microdeletions when compared to the pattern observed in humans during the past 150 years (p<.05). A larger study is in progress to confirm these results.

  10. [Human coagulation factor IX gene therapy in murine hemophilia B by hydrodynamic delivery and site-specific genomic integration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Gu, Dong-Sheng; DU, Wei-Ting; Liu, Peng-Xia; Lu, Shi-Hong; Yang, Ren-Chi

    2010-05-01

    To investigate whether the plasmid bearing attB and human coagulation factor IX (hFIX) coding sequence could insert into hemophilia B mice genome and persistently express hFIX with co-injected integrase. The plasmid attB-hFIX-pIRES2-EGFP was constructed, which bore attB site and hFIX coding sequence and was proved in vitro to express hFIX. The plasmid and CMV-int expressing integrase was co-infused rapidly in a large-volume solution through tail vein of hemophilia B mice. Mice infused with the plasmid alone served as controls. ELISA was performed to determine serum hFIX level. Correction of coagulation defect in vivo by plasmid infusion was assessed by bleeding time. Genomic integration of the plasmid was determined by nested PCR. The plasmid attB-hFIX-pIRES2-EGFP was successfully constructed. The hemophilia B mice produced (1533 ± 239) ng/ml hFIX at 24 hour after infusion of the hFIX encoding plasmid and the bleeding diathesis of the hemophilia B mice was significantly corrected as measured by clotting assays. However, whether or not co-injected with CMV-int, the serum hFIX level decreased to background level in 10 days after infusion. Nested-PCR results indicated that the integrase phiC31 resulted in the integration of the plasmid in the mouse liver chromosomes. Integrase phiC31 can catalyze recombination of 34 bp attB and pseudo-attP. Human FIX driven by CMV promoter can be transiently and highly expressed after infusion, but rapidly silenced in vivo.

  11. New polymorphic variants of human blood clotting factor IX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Surin, V.L.; Luk`yanenko, A.V.; Tagiev, A.F.; Smirnova, O.V. [Hematological Research Center, Moscow (Russian Federation); Plutalov, O.V.; Berlin, Yu.A. [Shemyakin Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1995-04-01

    The polymorphism of Alu-repeats, which are located in the introns of the human factor IX gene (copies 1-3), was studied. To identify polymorphic variants, direct sequencing of PCR products that contained appropriate repeats was used. In each case, 20 unrelated X chromosomes were studied. A polymorphic Dra I site was found near the 3{prime}-end of Alu copy 3 within the region of the polyA tract. A PCR-based testing system with internal control of restriction hydrolysis was suggested. Testing 81 unrelated X chromosomes revealed that the frequency of the polymorphic Dra I site is 0.23. Taq I polymorphism, which was revealed in Alu copy 4 of factor IX gene in our previous work, was found to be closely linked to Dra I polymorphism. Studies in linkage between different types of polymorphisms of the factor IX gene revealed the presence of a rare polymorphism in intron a that was located within the same minisatellite region as the known polymorphic insertion 50 bp/Dde I. However, the size of the insertion in our case was 26 bp. Only one polymorphic variant was found among over 150 unrelated X chromosomes derived from humans from Moscow and its vicinity. 10 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Evaluation of factor IX deficiency by interdigitated electrode (IDE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopinath, Subash C. B.; Hashim, Uda; Uda, M. N. A.

    2017-03-01

    Factor IX deficiency is the main cause of hemophilia A and B. This a severe excessive bleeding disorder that can even kill the patient if not treated with the right prescription of Factor IX hormone to stop the bleeding. The bleeding can be caused by an injury or even a sudden bleeding in some very rare cases. To find the Factor IX effectiveness and to understand the deficiency more carefully for the future of medicine, experiments are conducted to test the Factor IX using the Interdigitated Electrode (IDE) and gold Nanoparticle with the help of Nanoelectrical technology.

  13. The rates of G:C[yields]T:A and G:C[yields]C:G transversions at CpG dinucleotides in the human factor IX gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ketterling, R.P.; Vielhaber, E.; Sommer, S.S. (Mayo Clinic/Foundation, Rochester, MN (United States))

    1994-05-01

    The authors have identified eight independent transversions at CpG in 290 consecutive families with hemophilia B. These eight transversions account for 16.3% of all independent transversions in the sample, yet the expected frequency of CpG transversions at random in the factor IX gene is only 2.6% (P<0.1). The aggregate data suggest that the two types of CpG transversions (G:C[yields]T:A and G:C[yields]C:G) possess similar mutation rates (24.8 [times] 10[sup [minus]10] and 20.6 [times] 10[sup [minus]10], respectively), which are about fivefold greater than the comparable rates for transversions at non-CpG dinucleotides. The enhancement of transversions at CpG suggest that the model by which mutations occur at CpG may need to be reevaluated. The relationship, if any, between deamination of 5-methyl cytosine and enhancement of transversions at CpG remains to be defined. 28 refs., 2 tabs.

  14. Labeled factor IX kinetics in patients with hemophilia-B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, K.J.; Thompson, A.R.

    1981-01-01

    Labeled factor IX was infused five time into four patients with hemophilia-B. Ten-minute plasma recovery average 35% (SD +/- 2) and the mean T 1/2 beta-phase elimination was 23 hr (+/- 5). No alteration in the postinfusion 125I-factor-IX could be detected by radioautography of plasma samples run on polyacrylamide gels or on crossed-immunoelectrophoresis. Label was excreted into the urine as free 125I-iodide. Kinetics were similar when the labeled preparation was infused alone or with a commercial concentrate containing unlabeled factor IX. Infusion of factor IX in man is best described by a two-compartment open pharmacokinetic model where factor IX is distributed in a space larger than the plasma volume

  15. Single nucleotide primer extension to detect genetic diseases: Experimental application to hemophilia B (factor IX) and cystic fibrosis genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuppuswamy, M.N.; Hoffmann, J.W.; Spitzer, S.G.; Groce, S.L.; Bajaj, S.P.; Kasper, C.K.

    1991-01-01

    In this report, the authors describe an approach to detect the presence of abnormal alleles in those genetic diseases in which frequency of occurrence of the same mutation is high (e.g., hemophilia B). Initially, from each subject, the DNA fragment containing the putative mutation site is amplified by the polymerase chain reaction. For each fragment two reaction mixtures are then prepared. Each contains the amplified fragment, a primer (18-mer or longer) whose sequence is identical to the coding sequence of the normal gene immediately flanking the 5' end of the mutation site, and either an α- 32 P-labeled nucleotide corresponding to the normal coding sequence at the mutation site or an α- 32 P-labeled nucleotide corresponding to the mutant sequence. An essential feature of the present methodology is that the base immediately 3' to the template-bound primer is one of those altered in the mutant, since in this way an extension of the primer by a single base will give an extended molecule characteristic of either the mutant or the wild type. The method is rapid and should be useful in carrier detection and prenatal diagnosis of every genetic disease with a known sequence variation

  16. Somatic mosaicism and female-to-female transmission in a kindred with hemophilia B (factor IX deficiency)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, S.A.M.; Deugau, K.V.; Lillicrap, D.P.

    1991-01-01

    Studies have shown that hemophilia B (Christmas disease; factor IX deficiency) results from many different mutations in the factor IX gene, of which >95% are single nulceotide substitutions. This study has identified a previously unreported form of hemophilia B in a patient who was a somatic mosaic for a guanine-to-cytosine transversion at nucleotide 31,170 in the factor IX gene. This point mutation changes the codon for residue 350 in the catalytic domain of factor IX from a cysteine to a serine. The authors used differential termination of primer extension to confirm and measure the degree of mosaicism. The study shows that a varying proportion of cells from hepatic, renal, smooth muscle, and hematopoietic populations possessed normal as well as mutant factor IX sequences. These results indicate that the mutation in this patient occurred either as an uncorrected half-chromatid mutation in the female gamete or as a replication or postreplication error in the initial mitotic divisions of the zygote preceding implantation. In addition, this kindred also contains two females in successive generations who have moderately severe factor IX deficiency. The molecular pathogenesis of this latter phenomenon has been studied and seems to relate to the unaccompanied expression of the mutant factor IX gene consequent upon a second, as yet undefined, genetic event that has prevented inactivation of sequences including the mutant factor IX gene on the X chromosome inherited from the affected male

  17. Kinetics of the Factor XIa catalyzed activation of human blood coagulation Factor IX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walsh, P.N.; Bradford, H.; Sinha, D.; Piperno, J.R.; Tuszynski, G.P.

    1984-01-01

    The kinetics of activation of human Factor IX by human Factor XIa was studied by measuring the release of a trichloroacetic acid-soluble tritium-labeled activation peptide from Factor IX. Initial rates of trichloroacetic acid-soluble 3 H-release were linear over 10-30 min of incubation of Factor IX (88 nM) with CaCl 2 (5 mM) and with pure (greater than 98%) Factor XIa (0.06-1.3 nM), which was prepared by incubating human Factor XI with bovine Factor XIIa. Release of 3 H preceded the appearance of Factor IXa activity, and the percentage of 3 H released remained constant when the mole fraction of 3 H-labeled and unlabeled Factor IX was varied and the total Factor IX concentration remained constant. A linear correlation (r greater than 0.98, P less than 0.001) was observed between initial rates of 3 H-release and the concentration of Factor XIa, measured by chromogenic assay and by radioimmunoassay and added at a Factor IX:Factor XIa molar ratio of 70-5,600. Kinetic parameters, determined by Lineweaver-Burk analysis, include K/sub m/ (0.49 microM) of about five- to sixfold higher than the plasma Factor IX concentration, which could therefore regulate the reaction. The catalytic constant (k/sub cat/) (7.7/s) is approximately 20-50 times higher than that reported by Zur and Nemerson for Factor IX activation by Factor VIIa plus tissue factor. Therefore, depending on the relative amounts of Factor XIa and Factor VIIa generated in vivo and other factors which may influence reaction rates, these kinetic parameters provide part of the information required for assessing the relative contributions of the intrinsic and extrinsic pathways to Factor IX activation, and suggest that the Factor XIa catalyzed reaction is physiologically significant

  18. Incidence of factor IX inhibitor development in severe haemophilia B patients treated with only one brand of high purity plasma derived factor IX concentrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parquet, A; Laurian, Y; Rothschild, C; Navarro, R; Guérois, C; Gay, V; Durin, A; Peynet, J; Sultan, Y

    1999-10-01

    Fifteen previously untreated patients (Pups) with severe haemophilia B (factor IX activity brand of plasma-derived high purity factor IX concentrate (FIX LFB) were studied. Age at first injection varied from 1 to 137 months and follow-up since this first injection from 21 to 86 months (median: 35). Cumulative exposure days (CED) were from 4 to over 100 (median: 26). Among these 15 Pups only one developed an inhibitor. Mutation analysis performed in all patients showed total gene deletion in the patient with inhibitor, partial gene deletion in another one, and missense mutations in 9 families. Mutation was not found in one patient. Actually, according to the data already published, only two patients were at high risk for inhibitor development in our population. Our study, although rather small, confirms the previously reported low incidence of inhibitors in haemophilia B. Large studies on incidence of FIX inhibitors are indeed difficult to perform, due to both the overall small number of severe haemophilia B patients and the low incidence of FIX inhibitors. Consequently, the impact of bias, such as prevalence of different types of gene defects in a given population, is major. Therefore, any study, dealing with incidence of FIX inhibitors in severe haemophilia B should report, for each patient, the type of gene defect.

  19. Variability of in vivo recovery of factor IX after infusion of monoclonal antibody purified factor IX concentrates in patients with hemophilia B. The Mononine Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, G C; Shapiro, A D; Kurczynski, E M; Kim, H C; Bergman, G E

    1995-05-01

    Monoclonal antibody purified factor IX concentrate, Mononine (Armour Pharmaceutical Company, Kankakee, Illinois, USA), is a recently developed replacement factor concentrate for the treatment of patients with hemophilia B. The pharmacokinetic properties of monoclonal antibody purified factor IX concentrate (MAb Factor IX concentrate) have been evaluated in only small samples of patients, and little is known about those factors that might influenced in vivo recovery of factor IX after infusion is a larger patient population. In vivo recovery of factor IX was therefore evaluated for 80 different indications in 72 patients who received MAb Factor IX concentrate for the management of spontaneous or trauma-induced bleeding, or as prophylaxis with surgery. The average recovery after infusions for presurgical pharmacokinetic analysis (mean +/- standard deviation) was 1.28 +/- 0.56 U/dl rise per U/kg infused (range 0.41-2.80), and the average recovery after all infusions for treatment was 1.23 +/- 0.49 U/dl rise per U/kg infused (range - 0.35-2.92). Recovery values for multiple MAb Factor IX doses in a given patient were also variable; the average recovery was 1.22 +/- 0.53 U/dl rise per U/kg given, and standard deviations ranged from 0.03 to 1.26. Patient age, weight, and MAb Factor IX concentrate dose minimally but significantly influenced factor IX recovery. There was no significant effect of either race, history of previous thrombotic complications during treatment with other replacement factor concentrates, or bleeding state on recovery. All of the patients treated with this preparation experienced excellent hemostasis, and no thrombotic complications were observed.

  20. In vitro characterization of high purity factor IX concentrates for the treatment of hemophilia B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limentani, S A; Gowell, K P; Deitcher, S R

    1995-04-01

    This study employed sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) analysis and immunoblotting to assess the purity of seven high purity factor IX concentrates: Aimafix (Aima), AlphaNine-SD (Alpha Therapeutic), Factor IX VHP (Biotransfusion), Immunine (Immuno), Mononine (Armour Pharmaceutical), Nanotiv (Kabi Pharmacia), and 9MC (Blood Products Laboratory). The mean specific activity of these products ranged from 68 U factor IX/mg (Aimafix) to 246 U factor IX/mg (Mononine). SDS-PAGE analysis showed that the highest purity product, Mononine, had a single contaminating band under non-reducing conditions. Two additional bands were detected when this product was analyzed under reducing conditions. All other products had multiple contaminating bands that were more apparent under reducing than non-reducing conditions. The immunoblot for factor IX showed a dominant factor IX band for all products. In addition, visible light chain of factor IX was detected for AlphaNine-SD, Factor IX VHP, Immunine, Mononine, Nanotiv, and 9MC, suggesting that the factor IX in these products had undergone partial activation to factor IXa. Another contaminating band was visible at 49,500 for all of the products except 9MC. In addition to this band, high molecular weight contaminants were apparent for some products, most notably AlphaNine-SD. The identity of these bands is unknown. Immunoblotting failed to demonstrate factor VII as a contaminant of any of the high purity products, although factor VIIa could be detected in some lots of Immunine, Nanotiv, and 9MC by a clot-based assay. Factor X contaminated Aimafix, AlphaNine-SD, Factor IX VHP, Immunine, Nanotiv, and 9MC, but activation products of factor X were not detected.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Complexity of immune responses to AAV transgene products - Example of factor IX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzog, Roland W

    2017-05-29

    After two decades of research, in vivo gene transfer with adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors has now resulted in successful treatments and even cures for several human diseases. However, the potential for immune responses against the therapeutic gene products remains one of the concerns as this approach is broadened to more patients, diverse diseases, and target organs. Immune responses following gene transfer of coagulation factor IX (FIX) for the treatment of the bleeding disorder hemophilia B has been extensively investigated in multiple animal models. Findings from these studies have not only influenced clinical trial design but have broader implications for other diseases. The impact of vector design and dose, as well as target organ/route of administration on humoral and cellular immune responses are reviewed. Furthermore, the potential for tolerance induction by hepatic gene transfer or combination with immune modulation is discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The feasibility of using concentrates containing factor IX for continuous infusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulman, S; Gitel, S; Zivelin, A; Katsarou, O; Mandalaki, T; Varon, D; Martinowitz, U

    1995-04-01

    We have investigated the feasibility of continuous infusion of undiluted factor IX (F IX) over several days using minipumps. The stabilities of seven different reconstituted F IX products were substantially better than those declared by the manufacturers. Several concentrates maintained factor activities 80% of baseline for the entire period of 4 weeks at 4-8d̀C as did one product at 20-23d̀A. At 37d̀C the latter concentrate was stable for at least 1 week. The stability seemed to correlate with the purity of the product. Analysis of two prothrombin comples concentrates by gel electrophoresis demonstrated degradation of prothrombin to prethrombin-1 and fragment 1 at 37d̀C and in one of the concentrates also at 20-23d̀C. In two F IX concentrates the corresponding analysis did not reveal any degradation. Four patients were treated with continuous infusion with a pure F IX concentrate (Mononine™, Armour) after surgery or for serious haemorrhage (two each) with good haemostatic effect, an initial progressive decrease of the F IX clearance, and no side-effects. Continuous infusion with F IX, using a minipump and undiluted reconstituted factor, is therefore feasible and effective, and can be conveniently prepared for several days at a time. Pure F IX products are more stable and probably safer for this purpose.

  3. Tissue factor-dependent activation of tritium-labeled factor IX and factor X in human plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrison, S.A.; Jesty, J.

    1984-01-01

    A comparism was made of the tissue factor-dependent activation of tritium-labeled factor IX and factor X in a human plasma system and a study was made of the role of proteases known to stimulate factor VII activity. Plasma was defibrinated by heating and depleted of its factors IX and X by passing it through antibody columns. Addition of human brain thromboplastin, Ca2+, and purified 3H-labeled factor X to the plasma resulted, after a short lag, in burst-like activation of the factor X, measured as the release of radiolabeled activation peptide. The progress of activation was slowed by both heparin and a specific inhibitor of factor Xa but factor X activation could not be completely abolished by such inhibitors. In the case of 3H-factor IX activation, the rate also increased for approximately 3 min after addition of thromboplastin, but was not subsequently curtailed. A survey of proteases implicated as activators of factor VII in other settings showed that both factor Xa and factor IXa could accelerate the activation of factor IX. However, factor Xa was unique in obliterating activation when present at concentrations greater than approximately 1 nM. Heparin inhibited the tissue factor-dependent activation of factor IX almost completely, apparently through the effect of antithrombin on the feedback reactions of factors Xa and IXa on factor VII. These results suggest that a very tight, biphasic control of factor VII activity exists in human plasma, which is modulated mainly by factor Xa. At saturation of factor VIIa/tissue factor, factor IX activation was significantly more rapid than was previously found in bovine plasma under similar conditions. The activation of factor X at saturation was slightly more rapid than in bovine plasma, despite the presence of heparin

  4. Expression of functional recombinant human factor IX in milk of mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisauskas, Sharon F C; Cunha, Nicolau B; Vianna, Giovanni R; Mendes, Erica A; Ramos, Gustavo L; Maranhão, Andréia Q; Brígido, Marcelo M; Almeida, Jussara O S C; Baptista, Heloisa A; Motta, Fabiana L T; Pesquero, João B; Aragão, Francisco J L; Rech, Elíbio L

    2008-12-01

    Human factor IX is synthesized in the liver and secreted in the blood, where it participates in a group of reactions involving coagulation factors and proteins that permit sanguinary coagulation. In this work two lines of transgenic mice were developed to express the FIX gene in the mammalian glands under control of milk beta-casein promoter. The founding females secreted the FIX in their milk (3% total soluble protein). The stable integration of transgene was confirmed by southern blot analysis. The presence of the FIX recombinant protein in the milk of transgenic females was confirmed by western blot and the clotting activity was revealed in blood-clotting assays. The coagulation activity in human blood treated with recombinant FIX increased while the time of coagulation decreased. Our results confirm the production of a large amount of recombinant biologically active FIX in the mammary gland of transgenic mice.

  5. Two novel mutations in the PPIB gene cause a rare pedigree of osteogenesis imperfecta type IX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yu; Pan, Jingxin; Guo, Dongwei; Zhang, Wei; Xie, Jie; Fang, Zishui; Guo, Chunmiao; Fang, Qun; Jiang, Weiying; Guo, Yibin

    2017-06-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a rare genetic skeletal disorder characterized by increased bone fragility and vulnerability to fractures. PPIB is identified as a candidate gene for OI-IX, here we detect two pathogenic mutations in PPIB and analyze the genotype-phenotype correlation in a Chinese family with OI. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) was used to screen the whole exome of the parents of proband. Screening of variation frequency, evolutionary conservation comparisons, pathogenicity evaluation, and protein structure prediction were conducted to assess the pathogenicity of the novel mutations. Sanger sequencing was used to confirm the candidate variants. RTQ-PCR was used to analyze the PPIB gene expression. All mutant genes screened out by NGS were excluded except PPIB. Two novel heterozygous PPIB mutations (father, c.25A>G; mother, c.509G>A) were identified in relation to osteogenesis imperfecta type IX. Both mutations were predicted to be pathogenic by bioinformatics analysis and RTQ-PCR analysis revealed downregulated PPIB expression in the two carriers. We report a rare pedigree with an autosomal recessive osteogenesis imperfecta type IX (OI-IX) caused by two novel PPIB mutations identified for the first time in China. The current study expands our knowledge of PPIB mutations and their associated phenotypes, and provides new information on the genetic defects associated with this disease for clinical diagnosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Expression of human coagulation Factor IX in transgenic tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui; Zhao, Lingxia; Chen, Yuhui; Cui, Lijie; Ren, Weiwei; Tang, Kexuan

    2007-10-01

    In the present study, a plant binary expression vector PG-pRD12-hFIX (where PG is polygalacturonase) harbouring the hFIX (human coagulation Factor IX) gene was constructed and introduced into tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) via Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. After kanamycin selection, 32 putative independent transgenic tomato plants were regenerated. PCR and Southern-blot analyses confirmed the transgenic status of some plants. RT (reverse transcription)-PCR analysis for the expression of the introduced gene (hFIX) demonstrated that the hFIX gene was expressed specifically in fruits of the tomato. Western-blot analysis confirmed the presence of a 56 kDa band specific to hFIX in the transformed tomatoes. ELISA results showed that the expression of hFIX protein reached a maximum of 15.84 ng/g fresh weight in mature fruit. A blood-clotting assay demonstrated the clotting activity of the expressed hFIX protein in transgenic tomato fruits. This is the first report on the expression of hFIX in plants, and our research provides potentially valuable knowledge for further development of the plant-derived therapeutic proteins.

  7. Genetic fusion to albumin improves the pharmacokinetic properties of factor IX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzner, Hubert J; Weimer, Thomas; Kronthaler, Ulrich; Lang, Wiegand; Schulte, Stefan

    2009-10-01

    Haemophilia B is a X-chromosome linked disease characterised by a deficiency of functionally active coagulation Factor IX (FIX). Patients with severe haemophilia B at risk of recurrent bleeding are treated approximately twice a week in a prophylactic setting by application of FIX concentrates. To increase convenience and compliance of the therapy it is desirable to reduce the dosing frequency by improving the pharmacokinetic properties of FIX. Here a concept of rFIX (recombinant factor IX) albumin fusion proteins (rIX-FPs) with cleavable linker peptides derived from the FIX activation sequence is presented. Constructs of the genetic fusion of FIX to albumin via cleavable linkers were expressed in mammalian cells and characterised after purification. In vitro activation studies with FXIa demonstrated that cleavage of the linker and the activation peptide proceeded comparably well. In a clotting assay the rIX-FPs with cleavable linker showed a 10- to 30-fold increase in the molar specific clotting activity compared to fusion proteins with non-cleavable linkers. Furthermore, in-vivo recovery, terminal half-life and the AUC of rIX-FPs in rats and rabbits as determined by FIX antigen measurements were significantly increased compared to rFIX (BeneFIX). In FIX deficient (FIX(-/-)) mice the in-vivo recovery and the AUC were also significantly increased. The efficacy in reducing bleeding time was shown in FIX(-/-) mice by a tail tip bleeding model. The results suggest that rIX-FPs with a cleavable linker between FIX and albumin are a promising concept that may support the use of the albumin fusion technology to extend the half-life of FIX.

  8. Genes VI, VII, and IX of phage M13 code for minor capsid proteins of the virion.

    OpenAIRE

    Simons, G F; Konings, R N; Schoenmakers, J G

    1981-01-01

    The minor capsid proteins C and D from phage M13 have been characterized by differential amino acid labeling and amino-terminal sequence analysis. We demonstrate that D protein (Mr 12,260) is the product of gene VI, whereas the C component is composed of the products of both gene VII (Mr 3580) and gene IX (Mr 3650). Our data further show that the proteins of genes VI, VII, and IX are not subject to proteolytic processing but are packaged into mature virions as their primary translational prod...

  9. Transgenic mice can express mutant human coagulation factor IX with higher level of clotting activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jing-Bin; Wang, Shu; Huang, Wen-Ying; Xiao, Yan-Ping; Ren, Zhao-Rui; Huang, Shu-Zheng; Zeng, Yi-Tao

    2006-10-01

    To improve the available values of transgenic animals, we produced a mutant human coagulation factor IX minigene (including cDNA and intron I) with arginine at 338 changed to alanine (R338A-hFIX) by using a direct mutation technique. The R338A-hFIX minigene was then cloned into a plasmid carrying the goat beta-casein promoter to get a mammary gland-specific expression vector. The clotting activity in the supernatant of the transfected HC-11 cells increased to approximately three times more than that of wild-type hFIX. Nine transgenic mice (three females and six males) were produced, and the copy number of the foreign gene was very different, ranging from 1 to 43 in different lines. ELISA, Western blot, and clotting assay experiments showed that the transgenic mice could express R338A-hFIX, showing higher average levels of clotting activity than wild-type hFIX in the milk (103.76% vs. 49.95%). The highest concentration and clotting activity of hFIX reached 26 mug/mL and 1287% in one founder (F(0)-7), which was over 10 times higher than that in human plasma. Furthermore, RT-PCR, APTT assay, and histological analysis indicated that hFIX was expressed specifically in the mammary gland without affecting the intrinsic coagulation pathway and physiologic performance of the local tissue.

  10. The Malmö polymorphism of factor IX: establishing the genotypes by rapid analysis of DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, J B; Kunkel, G R; Tennyson, G S; Lord, S T; Fowlkes, D M

    1989-06-01

    A DNA polymorphism in the coding region of coagulation factor IX--potentially valuable for carrier detection, prenatal diagnosis, and population studies--was described in 1985. It had been discovered with monoclonal antibodies that distinguish between threonine and alanine as the 148th residue of the peptide. Its use as a diagnostic tool has been limited because threonine-containing factor IX (Malmö A) is dominant to alanine-containing factor IX (Malmö B) in immunoassays of plasma; therefore, detection of Malmö heterozygotes is not possible in all instances. A DNA method for recognizing all heterozygotes has been developed, but it also has limitations. We report the development of another DNA procedure based on amplification of the relevant DNA with the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). This method is quick, avoids the use of isotopes and x-ray film, and specifically identifies all the Malmö genotypes: hemizygotes, homozygotes, and heterozygotes. The procedure can be performed satisfactorily on small samples of blood (less than 1 mL) as suggested by Kogan et al (N Engl J Med 317:985, 1987). The method described is applicable to any genetic polymorphism that overlaps a restriction enzyme recognition site.

  11. Factor Activity Assays for Monitoring Extended Half-Life FVIII and Factor IX Replacement Therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitchen, Steve; Tiefenbacher, Stefan; Gosselin, Robert

    2017-04-01

    The advent of modified factor VIII (FVIII) and factor IX (FIX) molecules with extended half-lives (EHLs) compared with native FVIII and FIX represents a major advance in the field of hemophilia care, with the potential to reduce the frequency of prophylactic injections and/or to increase the trough level prior to subsequent injections. Monitoring treatment through laboratory assays will be an important part of ensuring patient safety, including any tailoring of prophylaxis. Several approaches have been used to extend half-lives, including PEGylation, and fusion to albumin or immunoglobulin. Some of these modifications affect factor assays as routinely performed in hemophilia centers; so, laboratories will need to use FVIII and FIX assays which have been shown to be suitable on a product-by-product basis. For some products, there are marked differences between results obtained using one-stage or chromogenic assays and results obtained using different reagents in the one-stage assay. The laboratory should use an assay in which the recovery of the product closely aligns with the assay used by the pharmaceutical company to assign potency to the product, so that the units reported by the laboratory agree with those used to demonstrate efficacy of the product during clinical trials. Reported assay differences in relation to several of the EHL FVIII and FIX molecules will be reviewed in this article. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  12. Recombinant to modified factor VIII and factor IX - chromogenic and one-stage assays issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitchen, S; Kershaw, G; Tiefenbacher, S

    2016-07-01

    The recent development of modified recombinant factor VIII (FVIII) and factor IX (FIX) therapeutic products with extended half-lives will create challenges for the haemostasis laboratory in obtaining recovery estimates of these products in clinical samples using existing assays. The new long-acting therapeutic concentrates contain molecular modifications of Fc fusion, site-specific of polyethylene glycol or albumin fusion. The optimum methods for monitoring each new product will need to be assessed individually and laboratories should select an assay which gives similar results to the assay used to assign potency to the product in question. For some extended half-life FVIII and FIX products some one stage assays are entirely unsuitable for monitoring purposes. For most products and assay reagents studied so far, and reviewed in this manuscript, chromogenic FVIII or FIX assays can be safely used with conventional plasma standards. If one stage assays are used then they should be performed using carefully selected reagents/methods which have been shown to recover activity close to the labelled potency for the specific product being monitored. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Hemophilia as a defect of the tissue factor pathway of blood coagulation: Effect of factors VIII and IX on factor X activation in a continuous-flow reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Repke, D.; Gemmell, C.H.; Guha, A.; Turitto, V.T.; Nemerson, Y.; Broze, G.J. Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of factors VIII and IX on the ability of the tissue factor-factor VIIa complex to activate factor X was studied in a continuous-flow tubular enzyme reactor. Tissue factor immobilized in a phospholipid bilayer on the inner surface of the tube was exposed to a perfusate containing factors VIIa, VIII, IX, and X flowing at a wall shear rate of 57, 300, or 1130 sec -1 . The addition of factors VIII and IX at their respective plasma concentrations resulted in a further 2 endash-to 3 endash fold increase. The direct activation of factor X by tissue factor-factor VIIa could be virtually eliminated by the lipoprotein-associated coagulation inhibitor. These results suggest that the tissue factor pathway, mediated through factors VIII and IX, produces significant levels of factor Xa even in the presence of an inhibitor of the tissue factor-factor VIIa complex; moreover, the activation is dependent on local shear conditions. These findings are consistent both with a model of blood coagulation in which initiation of the system results from tissue factor and with the bleeding observed in hemophilia

  14. Hemophilia B with mutations at glycine-48 of factor IX exhibited delayed activation by the factor VIIa-tissue factor complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, P C; Hamaguchi, N; Yu, Y S; Shen, M C; Lin, S W

    2000-10-01

    Gly-48 is in the conserved DGDQC sequence (residues 47-51 of human factor IX) of the first EGF (EGF-1)-like domain of factor IX. The importance of the Gly-48 is manifested by two hemophilia B patients; factor IXTainan and factor IXMalmo27, with Gly-48 replaced by arginine (designated IXG48R) and valine (IXG48V), respectively. Both patients were CRM+ exhibiting mild hemophilic episodes with 25% (former) and 19% (latter) normal clotting activities. We characterize both factor IX variants to show the roles of Gly-48 and the conservation of the DGDQC sequence in factor IX. Purified plasma and recombinant factor IX variants exhibited approximately 26%-27% normal factor IX's clotting activities with G48R or G48V mutation. Both variants depicted normal quenching of the intrinsic fluorescence by increasing concentrations of calcium ions and Tb3+, indicating that arginine and valine substitution for Gly-48 did not perturb the calcium site in the EGF-1 domain. Activation of both mutants by factor XIa appeared normal. The reduced clotting activity of factors IXG48R and IXG48V was attributed to the failure of both mutants to cleavage factor X: in the presence of only phospholipids and calcium ions, both mutants showed a 4 to approximately 7-fold elevation in Km, and by adding factor VIIIa to the system, although factor VIIIa potentiated the activation of factor X by the mutants factor IXaG48R and factor IXaG48V, a 2 to approximately 3-fold decrease in the catalytic function was observed with the mutant factor IXa's, despite that they bound factor VIIIa on the phospholipid vesicles with only slightly reduced affinity when compared to wild-type factor IXa. The apparent Kd for factor VIIIa binding was 0.83 nM for normal factor IXa, 1.74 nM for IXaG48R and 1.4 nM for IXaG48V. Strikingly, when interaction with the factor VIIa-TF complex was examined, both mutations were barely activated by the VIIa-TF complex and they also showed abnormal interaction with VIIa-TF in bovine

  15. Oral delivery of bioencapsulated coagulation factor IX prevents inhibitor formation and fatal anaphylaxis in hemophilia B mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Dheeraj; Moghimi, Babak; LoDuca, Paul A; Singh, Harminder D; Hoffman, Brad E; Herzog, Roland W; Daniell, Henry

    2010-04-13

    To address complications of pathogenic antibody or life-threatening anaphylactic reactions in protein replacement therapy for patients with hemophilia or other inherited protein deficiencies, we have developed a prophylactic protocol using a murine hemophilia B model. Oral delivery of coagulation factor IX fused with cholera toxin beta-subunit (with or without a furin cleavage site; CTB-FFIX or CTB-FIX), expressed in chloroplasts (up to 3.8% soluble protein or 0.4 mg/g leaf tissue), bioencapsulated in plant cells, effectively blocked formation of inhibitory antibodies (undetectable or up to 100-fold less than controls). Moreover, this treatment eliminated fatal anaphylactic reactions that occurred after four to six exposures to intravenous F.IX. Whereas only 20-25% of control animals survived after six to eight F.IX doses, 90-93% of F.IX-fed mice survived 12 injections without signs of allergy or anaphylaxis. Immunostaining confirmed delivery of F.IX to Peyer's patches in the ileum. Within 2-5 h, feeding of CTB-FFIX additionally resulted in systemic delivery of F.IX antigen. This high-responder strain of hemophilia B mice represents a new animal model to study anaphylactic reactions. The protocol was effective over a range of oral antigen doses (equivalent to 5-80 microg recombinant F.IX/kg), and controlled inhibitor formation and anaphylaxis long-term, up to 7 months (approximately 40% life span of this mouse strain). Oral antigen administration caused a deviant immune response that suppressed formation of IgE and inhibitory antibodies. This cost-effective and efficient approach of antigen delivery to the gut should be applicable to several genetic diseases that are prone to pathogenic antibody responses during treatment.

  16. Physiological levels of blood coagulation factors IX and X control coagulation kinetics in an in vitro model of circulating tissue factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tormoen, Garth W; Khader, Ayesha; Gruber, András; McCarty, Owen J T

    2013-01-01

    Thrombosis significantly contributes to cancer morbidity and mortality. The mechanism behind thrombosis in cancer may be circulating tissue factor (TF), as levels of circulating TF are associated with thrombosis. However, circulating TF antigen level alone has failed to predict thrombosis in patients with cancer. We hypothesize that coagulation factor levels regulate the kinetics of circulating TF-induced thrombosis. Coagulation kinetics were measured as a function of individual coagulation factor levels and TF particle concentration. Clotting times increased when pooled plasma was mixed at or above a ratio of 4:6 with PBS. Clotting times increased when pooled plasma was mixed at or above a ratio of 8:2 with factor VII-depleted plasma, 7:3 with factor IX- or factor X-depleted plasmas, or 2:8 with factor II-, V- or VIII-depleted plasmas. Addition of coagulation factors VII, X, IX, V and II to depleted plasmas shortened clotting and enzyme initiation times, and increased enzyme generation rates in a concentration-dependent manner. Only additions of factors IX and X from low-normal to high-normal levels shortened clotting times and increased enzyme generation rates. Our results demonstrate that coagulation kinetics for TF particles are controlled by factor IX and X levels within the normal physiological range. We hypothesize that individual patient factor IX and X levels may be prognostic for susceptibility to circulating TF-induced thrombosis. (paper)

  17. Ectopic expression of Arabidopsis L-type lectin receptor kinase genes LecRK-I.9 and LecRK-IX.1 in Nicotiana benthamiana confers Phytophthora resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Yan; Nsibo, D.L.; Juhar, H.M.; Govers, Francine; Bouwmeester, Klaas

    2016-01-01

    Key message: TransgenicNicotiana benthamianalines with constitutive expression of an Arabidopsis lectin receptor kinase gene (LecRK-I.9orLecRK-IX.1) show enhanced resistance toPhytophthorapathogens, demonstrating conserved gene functionality after interfamily transfer.Abstract: In plants, cell

  18. Baboon envelope pseudotyped lentiviral vectors efficiently transduce human B cells and allow active factor IX B cell secretion in vivo in NOD/SCIDγc-/-mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, C; Fusil, F; Amirache, F; Costa, C; Girard-Gagnepain, A; Negre, D; Bernadin, O; Garaulet, G; Rodriguez, A; Nair, N; Vandendriessche, T; Chuah, M; Cosset, F-L; Verhoeyen, E

    2016-12-01

    Essentials B cells are attractive targets for gene therapy and particularly interesting for immunotherapy. A baboon envelope pseudotyped lentiviral vector (BaEV-LV) was tested for B-cell transduction. BaEV-LVs transduced mature and plasma human B cells with very high efficacy. BaEV-LVs allowed secretion of functional factor IX from B cells at therapeutic levels in vivo. Background B cells are attractive targets for gene therapy for diseases associated with B-cell dysfunction and particularly interesting for immunotherapy. Moreover, B cells are potent protein-secreting cells and can be tolerogenic antigen-presenting cells. Objective Evaluation of human B cells for secretion of clotting factors such as factor IX (FIX) as a possible treatment for hemophilia. Methods We tested here for the first time our newly developed baboon envelope (BaEV) pseudotyped lentiviral vectors (LVs) for human (h) B-cell transduction following their adaptive transfer into an NOD/SCIDγc -/- (NSG) mouse. Results Upon B-cell receptor stimulation, BaEV-LVs transduced up to 80% of hB cells, whereas vesicular stomatitis virus G protein VSV-G-LV only reached 5%. Remarkably, BaEVTR-LVs permitted efficient transduction of 20% of resting naive and 40% of resting memory B cells. Importantly, BaEV-LVs reached up to 100% transduction of human plasmocytes ex vivo. Adoptive transfer of BaEV-LV-transduced mature B cells into NOD/SCID/γc -/- (NSG) [non-obese diabetic (NOD), severe combined immuno-deficiency (SCID)] mice allowed differentiation into plasmablasts and plasma B cells, confirming a sustained high-level gene marking in vivo. As proof of principle, we assessed BaEV-LV for transfer of human factor IX (hFIX) into B cells. BaEV-LVs encoding FIX efficiently transduced hB cells and their transfer into NSG mice demonstrated for the first time secretion of functional hFIX from hB cells at therapeutic levels in vivo. Conclusions The BaEV-LVs might represent a valuable tool for therapeutic protein

  19. Potency determination of factor VIII and factor IX for new product labelling and postinfusion testing: challenges for caregivers and regulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodt, J; Hubbard, A R; Wicks, S J; Gray, E; Neugebauer, B; Charton, E; Silvester, G

    2015-07-01

    A workshop organized by the European Medicines Agency and the European Directorate for the Quality of Medicines and HealthCare was held in London, UK on November 28-29, 2013, to provide an overview of the current knowledge of the characterization of new factor VIII (FVIII) and factor IX (FIX) concentrates with respect to potency assays and testing of postinfusion material. The objective was to set the basis for regulatory authorities' discussion on the most appropriate potency assay for the individual products, and European Pharmacopoeia (Ph. Eur.) discussion on whether to propose revision of the Ph. Eur. monographs with respect to potency assays in the light of information on new FVIII and FIX concentrates. The workshop showed that for all products valid assays vs. the international concentrate standards were obtained and potency could be expressed in International Units. The Ph. Eur. chromogenic potency assay gave valid assay results which correlate with in vivo functionality of rFVIII products. For some modified rFVIII products and all modified rFIX products, one-stage clotting assay methods result in different potencies depending on the activated partial thromboplastin time reagent. As a consequence, monitoring of patients' postinfusion levels is challenging but it was pointed out that manufacturers are responsible for providing the users with appropriate information for use and laboratory testing of their product. Strategies to avoid misleading determination of patents' plasma levels, e.g. information on suitable assays, laboratory standards or correction factors were discussed. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Efficacy of a high-purity factor IX concentrate in hemophilia B patients undergoing surgery Eficácia do concentrado de alta pureza do fator IX em pacientes cirúrgicos portadores de hemofilia B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vesa Rasi

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available A plasma derived, high purity, solvent-detergent treated and subsequently nanofiltered factor IX concentrate (BEMOFIL was evaluated in 19 hemophilia B patients, including four with severe, thirteen with mild or moderate type of disease and two hemophilia B carriers undergoing 31 surgical procedures. The mean in vivo recovery was 52 %, range 36 - 76 %. The mean preoperative plasma factor IX activity after the initial loading dose was 0.86 IU mL-1, range 0.59 - 1.32 IU mL-1. In eight major orthopedic procedures, the mean usage of factor IX was 44600 IU or 574 IU kg-1 during the hospital stay, mean 11.6 days. Thromboprophylaxis was not used. The hemostatic efficacy was evaluated good in all cases and there were no thromboembolic complications. In conclusion, BEMOFIL used as bolus dosing was found to be safe and effective in achieving hemostasis in subjects with hereditary F IX deficiency undergoing surgery.O concentrado de fator IX ( Bemofil , um derivado plasmático de alta pureza tratado com solventes- detergente e nano-filtrado , foi avaliado em 19 pacientes portadores de Hemofilia B .Quatro pacientes apresentavam a forma grave da moléstia, 13 a forma leve e moderada e dois portadores em um total de 31 atos cirúrgicos.A recuperação média "in vivo" foi de 52% (36-76%. A atividade plasmática média pré-operatória do fator IX após a dose inicial foi de 0,86 UI ml -1 , média de 0,59 - 1,32 UI ml-1. Em oito procedimentos ortopédicos extensos , a média de utilização do fator IX foi de 44.600 UI ou 574 UI kg -1 durante a hospitalização que teve a média de 11,6 dias. A tromboprofilaxia não foi utilizada. A eficácia hemostática avaliada em todos os casos foi boa ,e não ocorreu nenhum tipo de complicação tromboembólica. Concluímos que o Bemofil em bolus foi considerado seguro e eficaz para a hemostasia em pacientes portadores de hemofilia B que necessitam de um procedimento cirúrgico.

  1. Efficient detection of factor IX mutations by denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography in Taiwanese hemophilia B patients, and the identification of two novel mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Chin Lin

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Hemophilia B (HB is an X-linked recessive disorder characterized by mutations in the clotting factor IX (FIX gene that result in FIX deficiency. Previous studies have shown a wide variation of FIX gene mutations in HB. Although the quality of life in HB has greatly improved mainly because of prophylactic replacement therapy with FIX concentrates, there exists a significant burden on affected families and the medical care system. Accurate detection of FIX gene mutations is critical for genetic counseling and disease prevention in HB. In this study, we used denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC, which has proved to be a highly informative and practical means of detecting mutations, for the molecular diagnosis of our patients with HB. Ten Taiwanese families affected by HB were enrolled. We used the DHPLC technique followed by direct sequencing of suspected segments to detect FIX gene mutations. In all, 11 FIX gene mutations (8 point mutations, 2 small deletions/insertions, and 1 large deletion, including two novel mutations (exon6 c.687–695, del 9 mer and c.460–461, ins T were found. According to the HB pedigrees, 25% and 75% of our patients were defined as familial and sporadic HB cases, respectively. We show that DHPLC is a highly sensitive and cost-effective method for FIX gene analysis and can be used as a convenient system for disease prevention.

  2. Identification of the chlE gene encoding oxygen-independent Mg-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester cyclase in cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanashi, Kaori; Minamizaki, Kei; Fujita, Yuichi

    2015-08-07

    The fifth ring (E-ring) of chlorophyll (Chl) a is produced by Mg-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester (MPE) cyclase. There are two evolutionarily unrelated MPE cyclases: oxygen-independent (BchE) and oxygen-dependent (ChlA/AcsF) MPE cyclases. Although ChlA is the sole MPE cyclase in Synechocystis PCC 6803, it is yet unclear whether BchE exists in cyanobacteria. A BLAST search suggests that only few cyanobacteria possess bchE. Here, we report that two bchE candidate genes from Cyanothece strains PCC 7425 and PCC 7822 restore the photosynthetic growth and bacteriochlorophyll production in a bchE-lacking mutant of Rhodobacter capsulatus. We termed these cyanobacterial bchE orthologs "chlE." Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Breeding of transgenic cattle for human coagulation factor IX by a combination of lentiviral system and cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monzani, P S; Sangalli, J R; De Bem, T H C; Bressan, F F; Fantinato-Neto, P; Pimentel, J R V; Birgel-Junior, E H; Fontes, A M; Covas, D T; Meirelles, F V

    2013-02-28

    Recombinant coagulation factor IX must be produced in mammalian cells because FIX synthesis involves translational modifications. Human cell culture-based expression of human coagulation factor IX (hFIX) is expensive, and large-scale production capacity is limited. Transgenic animals may greatly increase the yield of therapeutic proteins and reduce costs. In this study, we used a lentiviral system to obtain transgenic cells and somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) to produce transgenic animals. Lentiviral vectors carrying hFIX driven by 3 bovine β-casein promoters were constructed. Bovine epithelial mammary cells were transduced by lentivirus, selected with blasticidin, plated on extracellular matrix, and induced by lactogenic hormones; promoter activity was evaluated by quantitative PCR. Transcriptional activity of the 5.335-kb promoter was 6-fold higher than the 3.392- and 4.279-kb promoters, which did not significantly differ. Transgenic bovine fibroblasts were transduced with lentivirus carrying the 5.335-kb promoter and used as donor cells for SCNT. Cloned transgenic embryo production yielded development rates of 28.4%, similar to previous reports on cloned non-transgenic embryos. The embryos were transferred to recipient cows (N = 21) and 2 births of cloned transgenic cattle were obtained. These results suggest combination of the lentiviral system and cloning may be a good strategy for production of transgenic cattle.

  4. Results of a phase I/II open-label, safety and efficacy trial of coagulation factor IX (recombinant), albumin fusion protein in haemophilia B patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinowitz, U; Lissitchkov, T; Lubetsky, A; Jotov, G; Barazani-Brutman, T; Voigt, C; Jacobs, I; Wuerfel, T; Santagostino, E

    2015-11-01

    rIX-FP is a coagulation factor IX (recombinant), albumin fusion protein with more than fivefold half-life prolongation over other standard factor IX (FIX) products available on the market. This prospective phase II, open-label study evaluated the safety and efficacy of rIX-FP for the prevention of bleeding episodes during weekly prophylaxis and assessed the haemostatic efficacy for on-demand treatment of bleeding episodes in previously treated patients with haemophilia B. The study consisted of a 10-14 day evaluation of rIX-FP pharmacokinetics (PK), and an 11 month safety and efficacy evaluation period with subjects receiving weekly prophylaxis treatment. Safety was evaluated by the occurrence of related adverse events, and immunogenic events, including development of inhibitors. Efficacy was evaluated by annualized spontaneous bleeding rate (AsBR), and the number of injections to achieve haemostasis. Seventeen subjects participated in the study, 13 received weekly prophylaxis and 4 received episodic treatment only. No inhibitors were detected in any subject. The mean and median AsBR were 1.25, and 1.13 respectively in the weekly prophylaxis arm. All bleeding episodes were treated with 1 or 2 injections of rIX-FP. Three prophylaxis subjects who were treated on demand prior to study entry had >85% reduction in AsBR compared to the bleeding rate prior to study entry. This study demonstrated the efficacy for weekly routine prophylaxis of rIX-FP to prevent spontaneous bleeding episodes and for the treatment of bleeding episodes. In addition no safety issues were detected during the study and an improved PK profile was demonstrated. © 2015 CSL Behring. Haemophilia published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. A pilot study on potential plasma hypoxia markers in the radiotherapy of non-small cell lung cancer. Osteopontin, carbonic anhydrase IX and vascular endothelial growth factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ostheimer, C.; Bache, M.; Guettler, A.; Vordermark, D. [Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Halle (Saale) (Germany); Kotzsch, M. [Technical University Dresden, Department of Pathology, Dresden (Germany)

    2014-03-15

    Hypoxic radioresistance plays a critical role in the radiotherapy of cancer and adversely impacts prognosis and treatment response. This prospective study investigated the interrelationship and the prognostic significance of several hypoxia-related proteins in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients treated by radiotherapy ± chemotherapy. Pretreatment osteopontin (OPN), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and carbonic anhydrase IX (CA IX) plasma levels were determined by ELISA in 55 NSCLC (M0) patients receiving 66 Gy curative-intent radiotherapy or chemoradiation. Marker correlation, association with clinicopathological parameters and the prognostic value of a biomarker combination was evaluated. All biomarkers were linearly correlated and linked to different clinical parameters including lung function, weight loss (OPN), gross tumor volume (VEGF) and T stage (CA IX). High OPN (p = 0.03), VEGF (p = 0.02) and CA IX (p = 0.04) values were significantly associated with poor survival. Double marker combination additively increased the risk of death by a factor of 2 and high plasma levels of the triple combination OPN/VEGF/CA IX yielded a 5.9-fold risk of death (p = 0.009). The combined assessment of OPN/VEGF/CA IX correlated independently with prognosis (p = 0.03) in a multivariate Cox regression model including N stage, T stage and GTV. This pilot study suggests that a co-detection augments the prognostic value of single markers and that the integration of OPN, VEGF and CA IX into a hypoxic biomarker profile for the identification of patients with largely hypoxic and radioresistant tumors should be further evaluated. (orig.) [German] Hypoxische Radioresistenz spielt eine kritische Rolle in der Radiotherapie maligner Tumoren und beeinflusst Prognose und Therapieansprechen negativ. Diese prospektive Studie untersuchte den Zusammenhang und die prognostische Bedeutung einiger hypoxieassoziierter Proteine bei Patienten mit nicht-kleinzelligem Bronchialkarzinom

  6. Activation of factor IX zymogen results in exposure of a binding site for low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neels, J G; van Den Berg, B M; Mertens, K; ter Maat, H; Pannekoek, H; van Zonneveld, A J; Lenting, P J

    2000-11-15

    The interaction between the endocytic receptor low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP) and either coagulation factor IX or its active derivative factor IXa was studied. Purified factor IX was unable to associate with LRP when analyzed by surface plasmon resonance. By contrast, factor XIa-mediated conversion of factor IX into factor IXa resulted in reversible dose- and calcium-dependent binding to LRP. Active-site blocking of factor IXa did not affect binding to LRP, whereas LRP binding was efficiently inhibited in the presence of heparin or antibodies against factor IX or LRP. The factor IXa-LRP interaction could be described by a 2-site binding model with equilibrium dissociation constants of 27 nmol/L and 69 nmol/L. Consistent with this model, it was observed that factor IXa binds to 2 different recombinant receptor fragments of LRP (denoted cluster II and cluster IV) with equilibrium dissociation constants of 227 nmol/L and 53 nmol/L, respectively. The amount of factor IXa degraded by LRP-deficient cells was 35% lower than by LRP-expressing cells, demonstrating that LRP contributes to the transport of factor IXa to the intracellular degradation pathway. Because ligand binding to LRP is often preceded by binding to proteoglycans, the contribution of proteoglycans to the catabolism of factor IXa was addressed by employing proteoglycan-deficient cells. Degradation of factor IXa by proteoglycan-deficient cells proceeded at a 83% lower rate than wild-type cells. In conclusion, the data presented here indicate that both LRP and proteoglycans have the potential to contribute to the catabolism of factor IXa.

  7. Characterization of IXINITY® (Trenonacog Alfa, a Recombinant Factor IX with Primary Sequence Corresponding to the Threonine-148 Polymorph

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dougald M. Monroe

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of these studies was to extensively characterize the first recombinant FIX therapeutic corresponding to the threonine-148 (Thr-148 polymorph, IXINITY (trenonacog alfa [coagulation factor IX (recombinant]. Gel electrophoresis, circular dichroism, and gel filtration were used to determine purity and confirm structure. Chromatographic and mass spectrometry techniques were used to identify and quantify posttranslational modifications. Activity was assessed as the ability to activate factor X (FX both with and without factor VIIIa (FVIIIa and in a standard clotting assay. All results were consistent across multiple lots. Trenonacog alfa migrated as a single band on Coomassie-stained gels; activity assays were normal and showed 97%  γ-carboxylation and underwent the appropriate structural change upon binding calcium ions. Trenonacog alfa was activated normally with factor XIa (FXIa; once activated it bound to FVIIIa and FXa. When activated to FIXa, it was inhibited efficiently by antithrombin. Glycosylation patterns were similar to plasma-derived FIX with sialic acid content consistent with the literature reports of good pharmacokinetic performance. These studies have shown that trenonacog alfa is a highly pure product with a primary sequence and posttranslational modifications consistent with the common Thr-148 polymorphism of plasma-derived FIX.

  8. Novel mutations in PHKA2 gene in glycogen storage disease type IX patients from Hong Kong, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Chi-Kong; Hui, Joannie; Fong, Fion N Y; To, Ka-Fai; Fok, Tai-Fai; Tang, Nelson L S; Tsui, Stephen K W

    2011-02-01

    The diagnosis of glycogen storage disease (GSD) type IX is often complicated by the complexity of the phosphorylase kinase enzyme (PHK), and molecular analysis is the preferred way to provide definitive diagnosis. Here we reported two novel mutations found in two GSD type IX patients with different residual enzyme activities from Hong Kong, China using genetic analysis and, provided the molecular interpretation of the deficient PHK activity. These two newly described mutations would be useful for the study of future GSD patients. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Identification of genes encoding the type IX secretion system and secreted proteins in Flavobacterium columnare IA-S-4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flavobacterium columnare, a member of the phylum Bacteroidetes, causes columnaris disease in wild and aquaculture-reared freshwater fish. The mechanisms responsible for columnaris disease are not known. Many members of the phylum Bacteroidetes use type IX secretion systems (T9SSs) to secrete enzymes...

  10. Intersex (ix) mutations of Drosophila melanogaster cause ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In Drosophila melanogaster, the intersex (ix) is a terminally positioned gene in somatic sex determination hierarchy and function with the female specific product of double sex (DSXF) to implement female sexual differentiation. The null phenotype of ix is to transform diplo-X individuals into intersexes while leaving haplo-X ...

  11. Low cost industrial production of coagulation factor IX bioencapsulated in lettuce cells for oral tolerance induction in hemophilia B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jin; Zhu, Liqing; Sherman, Alexandra; Wang, Xiaomei; Lin, Shina; Kamesh, Aditya; Norikane, Joey H; Streatfield, Stephen J; Herzog, Roland W; Daniell, Henry

    2015-11-01

    Antibodies (inhibitors) developed by hemophilia B patients against coagulation factor IX (FIX) are challenging to eliminate because of anaphylaxis or nephrotic syndrome after continued infusion. To address this urgent unmet medical need, FIX fused with a transmucosal carrier (CTB) was produced in a commercial lettuce (Simpson Elite) cultivar using species specific chloroplast vectors regulated by endogenous psbA sequences. CTB-FIX (∼1 mg/g) in lyophilized cells was stable with proper folding, disulfide bonds and pentamer assembly when stored ∼2 years at ambient temperature. Feeding lettuce cells to hemophilia B mice delivered CTB-FIX efficiently to the gut immune system, induced LAP(+) regulatory T cells and suppressed inhibitor/IgE formation and anaphylaxis against FIX. Lyophilized cells enabled 10-fold dose escalation studies and successful induction of oral tolerance was observed in all tested doses. Induction of tolerance in such a broad dose range should enable oral delivery to patients of different age groups and diverse genetic background. Using Fraunhofer cGMP hydroponic system, ∼870 kg fresh or 43.5 kg dry weight can be harvested per 1000 ft(2) per annum yielding 24,000-36,000 doses for 20-kg pediatric patients, enabling first commercial development of an oral drug, addressing prohibitively expensive purification, cold storage/transportation and short shelf life of current protein drugs. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. Investigations into, and development of, a lyophilized and formulated recombinant human factor IX produced from CHO cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Aline G; Pinto, Rodrigo C V; Smales, C Mark; Castilho, Leda R

    2017-08-01

    To develop a recombinant human factor IX (rFIX) formulation equivalent to commercially available products in terms of cake appearance, residual moisture, proportion of soluble aggregates and activity maintenance for 3 months at 4-8 °C. NaCl and low bulking agent/cryoprotectant mass ratio had a negative impact on cake quality upon lyophilisation for a wide range of formulations tested. Particular devised formulations maintained rFIX activity after lyophilization with a similar performance when compared with the rFIX formulated using the excipients reported for a commercially available FIX formulation (Benefix). rFIX remained active after 3 months when stored at 4 °C, though this was not the case with samples stored at 40 °C. Interestingly, particular formulations had an increase in residual moisture after 3 months storage, but not above a 3% threshold. All four formulations tested were equivalent to the Benefix formulation in terms of particle size distribution and cake appearance. Three specific formulations, consisting of surfactant polysorbate-80, sucrose or trehalose as cryoprotectant, mannitol or glycine as bulking agent, L-histidine as buffering agent, and NaCl added in the reconstitution liquid at 0.234% (w/v) were suitable for use with a CHO cell-derived recombinant FIX.

  13. Title IX Resource Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Office for Civil Rights, US Department of Education, 2015

    2015-01-01

    Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 (Title IX) prohibits discrimination based on sex in education programs and activities in federally funded schools at all levels. If any part of a school district or college receives any Federal funds for any purpose, all of the operations of the district or college are covered by Title IX. The essence…

  14. Gene regulation by growth factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metz, R.; Gorham, J.; Siegfried, Z.; Leonard, D.; Gizang-Ginsberg, E.; Thompson, M.A.; Lawe, D.; Kouzarides, T.; Vosatka, R.; MacGregor, D.; Jamal, S.; Greenberg, M.E.; Ziff, E.B.

    1988-01-01

    To coordinate the proliferation and differentiation of diverse cell types, cells of higher eukaryotes communicate through the release of growth factors. These peptides interact with specific transmembrane receptors of other cells and thereby generate intracellular messengers. The many changes in cellular physiology and activity that can be induced by growth factors imply that growth factor-induced signals can reach the nucleus and control gene activity. Moreover, current evidence also suggests that unregulated signaling along such pathways can induce aberrant proliferation and the formation of tumors. This paper reviews investigations of growth factor regulation of gene expression conducted by the authors' laboratory

  15. Prognostic Relevance of the Expression of CA IX, GLUT-1, and VEGF in Ovarian Epithelial Cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyungbin; Park, Won Young; Kim, Jee Yeon; Sol, Mee Young; Shin, Dong Hun; Park, Do Youn; Lee, Chang Hun; Lee, Jeong Hee; Choi, Kyung Un

    2012-12-01

    Tumor hypoxia is associated with malignant progression and treatment resistance. Hypoxia-related factors, such as carbonic anhydrase IX (CA IX), glucose transporter-1 (GLUT-1), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) permit tumor cell adaptation to hypoxia. We attempted to elucidate the correlation of these markers with variable clinicopathological factors and overall prognosis. Immunohistochemistry for CA IX, GLUT-1, and VEGF was performed on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues from 125 cases of ovarian epithelial cancer (OEC). CA IX expression was significantly associated with an endometrioid and mucinous histology, nuclear grade, tumor necrosis, and mitosis. GLUT-1 expression was associated with tumor necrosis and mitosis. VEGF expression was correlated only with disease recurrence. Expression of each marker was not significant in terms of overall survival in OECs; however, there was a significant correlation between poor overall survival rate and high coexpression of these markers. The present study suggests that it is questionable whether CA IX, GLUT-1, or VEGF can be used alone as independent prognostic factors in OECs. Using at least two markers helps to predict patient outcomes in total OECs. Moreover, the inhibition of two target gene combinations might prove to be a novel anticancer therapy.

  16. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of coagulation factor IX-binding protein from habu snake venom at pH 6.5 and 4.6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Nobuhiro [Institute of Applied Biochemistry, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8572 (Japan); Department of Biochemisty, National Institute of Agrobiological Sciences, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8602 (Japan); Shikamoto, Yasuo; Fujimoto, Zui [Department of Biochemisty, National Institute of Agrobiological Sciences, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8602 (Japan); Morita, Takashi [Department of Biochemistry, Meiji Pharmaceutical University, Kiyose, Tokyo 204-8588 (Japan); Mizuno, Hiroshi, E-mail: mizuno@affrc.go.jp [Department of Biochemisty, National Institute of Agrobiological Sciences, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8602 (Japan); Institute of Applied Biochemistry, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8572 (Japan)

    2005-01-01

    Crystals of habu coagulation factor IX-binding protein have been obtained at pH 6.5 and 4.6 and characterized by X-ray diffraction. Coagulation factor IX-binding protein isolated from Trimeresurus flavoviridis (IX-bp) is a C-type lectin-like protein. It is an anticoagulant protein consisting of homologous subunits A and B. The subunits both contain a Ca{sup 2+}-binding site with differing affinity (K{sub d} values of 14 and 130 µM at pH 7.5). These binding characteristics are pH-dependent; under acidic conditions, the affinity of the low-affinity site was reduced considerably. In order to identify which site has high affinity and also to investigate the Ca{sup 2+}-releasing mechanism, IX-bp was crystallized at pH 6.5 and 4.6. The crystals at pH 6.5 and 4.6 diffracted to 1.72 and 2.29 Å resolution, respectively; the former crystals belong to the monoclinic space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 60.7, b = 63.5, c = 66.9 Å, β = 117.0°, while the latter belong to the monoclinic space group C2, with a = 134.1, b = 37.8, c = 55.8 Å, β = 110.4°.

  17. The Role of Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α, Glucose Transporter-1, (GLUT-1 and Carbon Anhydrase IX in Endometrial Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawel Sadlecki

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α, glucose transporter-1 (GLUT-1, and carbon anhydrase IX (CAIX are important molecules that allow adaptation to hypoxic environments. The aim of our study was to investigate the correlation between HIF-1α, GLUT-1, and CAIX protein level with the clinicopathological features of endometrial cancer patients. Materials and Methods. 92 endometrial cancer patients, aged 37–84, were enrolled to our study. In all patients clinical stage, histologic grade, myometrial invasion, lymph node, and distant metastases were determined. Moreover, the survival time was assessed. Immunohistochemical analyses were performed on archive formalin fixed paraffin embedded tissue sections. Results. High significant differences (P=0.0115 were reported between HIF-1α expression and the histologic subtype of cancer. Higher HIF-1α expression was associated with the higher risk of recurrence (P=0.0434. The results of GLUT-1 and CAIX expression did not reveal any significant differences between the proteins expression in the primary tumor and the clinicopathological features. Conclusion. The important role of HIF-1α in the group of patients with the high risk of recurrence and the negative histologic subtype of the tumor suggest that the expression of this factor might be useful in the panel of accessory pathomorphological tests and could be helpful in establishing more accurate prognosis in endometrial cancer patients.

  18. Identification of a point mutation in type IIB von Willebrand disease illustrating the regulation of von Willebrand factor affinity for the platelet membrane glycoprotein Ib-IX receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ware, J.; Dent, J.A.; Azuma, Hiroyuki; Sugimoto, Mitsuhiko; Kyrle, P.A.; Yoshioka, Akira; Ruggeri, Z.M.

    1991-01-01

    von Willebrand factor (vWF) supports platelet adhesion on thrombogenic surfaces by binding to platelet membrane glycoprotein (GP) Ib in the GP Ib-IX receptor complex. This interaction is physiologically regulated so that it does not occur between circulating vWF and platelets but, rather, only at a site of vascular injury. The abnormal vWF found in type IIB von Willebrand disease, however, has a characteristically increased affinity for GP Ib and binds to circulating platelets. The authors have analyzed the molecular basis of this abnormality by sequence analysis of a type IIB vWF cDNA and have identified a single amino acid change, Trp 550 to Cys 550 , located in the GP IB-binding domain of the molecule comprising residues 449-728. Bacterial expression of recombinant fragments corresponding to this vWF domain yielded molecules that, whether containing a normal Trp 550 or a mutant Cys 550 residue, bound directly to GP Ib in the absence of modulators and with similar affinity. These results identify a region of vWF that, although not thought to be directly involved in binding to GP Ib, may modulate the interaction through conformational changes

  19. Carbonic anhydrase IX (CA IX) mediates tumor cell interactions with microenvironment

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Závadová, Zuzana; Závada, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 5 (2005), s. 977-982 ISSN 1021-335X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA203/02/0405 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : carbonic anhydrase IX * cell adhesion * microenvironment Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.572, year: 2005

  20. The glycoprotein Ib-IX-V complex contributes to tissue factor-independent thrombin generation by recombinant factor VIIa on the activated platelet surface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weeterings, Cees; de Groot, Philip G.; Adelmeijer, Jelle; Lisman, Ton

    2008-01-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that recombinant factor VIIa (rFVIIa) is able to activate factor X on an activated platelet, in a tissue factor-independent manner. We hypothesized that, besides the anionic surface, a receptor on the activated platelet surface is involved in this process. Here, we

  1. Pharmacological modulation of humoral immunity in a nonhuman primate model of AAV gene transfer for hemophilia B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mingozzi, Federico; Chen, Yifeng; Murphy, Samuel L; Edmonson, Shyrie C; Tai, Alex; Price, Sandra D; Metzger, Mark E; Zhou, Shangzhen; Wright, J Fraser; Donahue, Robert E; Dunbar, Cynthia E; High, Katherine A

    2012-07-01

    Liver gene transfer for hemophilia B has shown very promising results in recent clinical studies. A potential complication of gene-based treatments for hemophilia and other inherited disorders, however, is the development of neutralizing antibodies (NAb) against the therapeutic transgene. The risk of developing NAb to the coagulation factor IX (F.IX) transgene product following adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated hepatic gene transfer for hemophilia is small but not absent, as formation of inhibitory antibodies to F.IX is observed in experimental animals following liver gene transfer. Thus, strategies to modulate antitransgene NAb responses are needed. Here, we used the anti-B cell monoclonal antibody rituximab (rtx) in combination with cyclosporine A (CsA) to eradicate anti-human F.IX NAb in rhesus macaques previously injected intravenously with AAV8 vectors expressing human F.IX. A short course of immunosuppression (IS) resulted in eradication of anti-F.IX NAb with restoration of plasma F.IX transgene product detection. In one animal, following IS anti-AAV6 antibodies also dropped below detection, allowing for successful AAV vector readministration and resulting in high levels (60% or normal) of F.IX transgene product in plasma. Though the number of animals is small, this study supports for the safety and efficacy of B cell-targeting therapies to eradicate NAb developed following AAV-mediated gene transfer.

  2. Arabidopsis Lectin Receptor Kinases LecRK-IX.1 and LecRK-IX.2 Are Functional Analogs in Regulating Phytophthora Resistance and Plant Cell Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Cordewener, Jan H G; America, Antoine H P; Shan, Weixing; Bouwmeester, Klaas; Govers, Francine

    2015-09-01

    L-type lectin receptor kinases (LecRK) are potential immune receptors. Here, we characterized two closely-related Arabidopsis LecRK, LecRK-IX.1 and LecRK-IX.2, of which T-DNA insertion mutants showed compromised resistance to Phytophthora brassicae and Phytophthora capsici, with double mutants showing additive susceptibility. Overexpression of LecRK-IX.1 or LecRK-IX.2 in Arabidopsis and transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana increased Phytophthora resistance but also induced cell death. Phytophthora resistance required both the lectin domain and kinase activity, but for cell death, the lectin domain was not needed. Silencing of the two closely related mitogen-activated protein kinase genes NbSIPK and NbNTF4 in N. benthamiana completely abolished LecRK-IX.1-induced cell death but not Phytophthora resistance. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of protein complexes coimmunoprecipitated in planta with LecRK-IX.1 or LecRK-IX.2 as bait, resulted in the identification of the N. benthamiana ABC transporter NbPDR1 as a potential interactor of both LecRK. The closest homolog of NbPDR1 in Arabidopsis is ABCG40, and coimmunoprecipitation experiments showed that ABCG40 associates with LecRK-IX.1 and LecRK-IX.2 in planta. Similar to the LecRK mutants, ABCG40 mutants showed compromised Phytophthora resistance. This study shows that LecRK-IX.1 and LecRK-IX.2 are Phytophthora resistance components that function independent of each other and independent of the cell-death phenotype. They both interact with the same ABC transporter, suggesting that they exploit similar signal transduction pathways.

  3. Methods of producing protoporphyrin IX and bacterial mutants therefor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Jizhong; Qiu, Dongru; He, Zhili; Xie, Ming

    2016-03-01

    The presently disclosed inventive concepts are directed in certain embodiments to a method of producing protoporphyrin IX by (1) cultivating a strain of Shewanella bacteria in a culture medium under conditions suitable for growth thereof, and (2) recovering the protoporphyrin IX from the culture medium. The strain of Shewanella bacteria comprises at least one mutant hemH gene which is incapable of normal expression, thereby causing an accumulation of protoporphyrin IX. In certain embodiments of the method, the strain of Shewanella bacteria is a strain of S. loihica, and more specifically may be S. loihica PV-4. In certain embodiments, the mutant hemH gene of the strain of Shewanella bacteria may be a mutant of shew_2229 and/or of shew_1140. In other embodiments, the presently disclosed inventive concepts are directed to mutant strains of Shewanella bacteria having at least one mutant hemH gene which is incapable of normal expression, thereby causing an accumulation of protoporphyrin IX during cultivation of the bacteria. In certain embodiments the strain of Shewanella bacteria is a strain of S. loihica, and more specifically may be S. loihica PV-4. In certain embodiments, the mutant hemH gene of the strain of Shewanella bacteria may be a mutant of shew_2229 and/or shew_1140.

  4. The PorX Response Regulator of the Porphyromonas gingivalis PorXY Two-Component System Does Not Directly Regulate the Type IX Secretion Genes but Binds the PorL Subunit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Maxence S.; Durand, Eric; Cascales, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The Type IX secretion system (T9SS) is a versatile multi-protein complex restricted to bacteria of the Bacteriodetes phylum and responsible for the secretion or cell surface exposition of diverse proteins that participate to S-layer formation, gliding motility or pathogenesis. The T9SS is poorly characterized but a number of proteins involved in the assembly of the secretion apparatus in the oral pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis have been identified based on genome substractive analyses. Among these proteins, PorY, and PorX encode typical two-component system (TCS) sensor and CheY-like response regulator respectively. Although the porX and porY genes do not localize at the same genetic locus, it has been proposed that PorXY form a bona fide TCS. Deletion of porX in P. gingivalis causes a slight decrease of the expression of a number of other T9SS genes, including sov, porT, porP, porK, porL, porM, porN, and porY. Here, we show that PorX and the soluble cytoplasmic domain of PorY interact. Using electrophoretic mobility shift, DNA-protein co-purification and heterologous host expression assays, we demonstrate that PorX does not bind T9SS gene promoters and does not directly regulate expression of the T9SS genes. Finally, we show that PorX interacts with the cytoplasmic domain of PorL, a component of the T9SS membrane core complex and propose that the CheY-like PorX protein might be involved in the dynamics of the T9SS. PMID:27630829

  5. Apoptosis-induced ectodomain shedding of hypoxia-regulated carbonic anhydrase IX from tumor cells: a double-edged response to chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vidlickova, Ivana; Dequiedt, Franck; Jelenska, Lenka; Sedlakova, Olga; Pastorek, Michal; Stuchlik, Stanislav; Pastorek, Jaromir; Zatovicova, Miriam; Pastorekova, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrase IX (CA IX) is a tumor-associated, highly active, transmembrane carbonic anhydrase isoform regulated by hypoxia and implicated in pH control and adhesion-migration-invasion. CA IX ectodomain (ECD) is shed from the tumor cell surface to serum/plasma of patients, where it can signify cancer prognosis. We previously showed that the CA IX ECD release is mediated by disintegrin and metalloproteinase ADAM17. Here we investigated the CA IX ECD shedding in tumor cells undergoing apoptosis in response to cytotoxic drugs, including cycloheximide and doxorubicin. Presence of cell surface CA IX was correlated to the extent of apoptosis by flow cytometry in cell lines with natural or ectopic CA IX expression. CA IX ECD level was assessed by ELISA using CA IX-specific monoclonal antibodies. Effect of recombinant CA IX ECD on the activation of molecular pathways was evaluated using the cell-based dual-luciferase reporter assay. We found a significantly lower occurrence of apoptosis in the CA IX-positive cell subpopulation than in the CA IX-negative one. We also demonstrated that the cell-surface CA IX level dropped during the death progress due to an increased ECD shedding, which required a functional ADAM17. Inhibitors of metalloproteinases reduced CA IX ECD shedding, but not apoptosis. The CA IX ECD release induced by cytotoxic drugs was connected to elevated expression of CA IX in the surviving fraction of cells. Moreover, an externally added recombinant CA IX ECD activated a pathway driven by the Nanog transcription factor implicated in epithelial-mesenchymal transition and stemness. These findings imply that the increased level of the circulating CA IX ECD might be useful as an indicator of an effective antitumor chemotherapy. Conversely, elevated CA IX ECD might generate unwanted effects through autocrine/paracrine signaling potentially contributing to resistance and tumor progression

  6. In-vivo fluorescence dosimetry of aminolevulinate-based protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) accumulation in human nonmelanoma skin cancers and precancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Christine B.; Lohser, Sara; Chang, Sung; Bailin, Philip A.; Maytin, Edward V.

    2009-06-01

    PDT is clinically useful for precancers (actinic keratoses; AK) of the skin, but the optimal duration for 5-ALA application is still controversial. For basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), cure rates remain inferior to surgical excision. Lack of knowledge about regional levels of PpIX levels within target tissues clearly contribute to these suboptimal results. To investigate PpIX levels achievable in human skin neoplasias in-vivo, a clinical study to monitor PpIX accumulation in vivo was performed. PpIX-fluorescence in patients undergoing ALA-PDT for facial AK was monitored via real-time in-vivo fluorescence dosimetry, with measurements q20 min following application of 5-ALA (Levulan Kerastick). PpIX accumulation followed linear kinetics in nearly all cases. The slopes varied widely, and did not correlate with clinical outcome in all patients. Some patients with a low accumulation of PpIX fluorescence had a good response to therapy, whereas others with high PpIX accumulation required repeat treatment (although not necessarily of the same lesion). PpIX accumulation rates did correlate to a certain degree with the overall amount of erythema. We conclude that unknown factors besides PpIX levels must be critical for the response to treatment. To assess the relationship between PpIX levels in various skin cancers, patients undergoing routine Mohs surgery for BCC or SCC were measured by in-vivo dosimetry at 2 h after 5-ALA application. Overall, a progressive increase in PpIX signal during malignant progression was observed, in the following rank order: Normal skin < AK < SCC ~ BCC.

  7. The PorX response regulator of the Porphyromonas gingivalis PorXY two-component system does not directly regulate the Type IX secretion genes but binds the PorL subunit.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxence S Vincent

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The Type IX secretion system (T9SS is a versatile multi-protein complex restricted to bacteria of the Bacteriodetes phylum and responsible for the secretion of surface attachment of diverse proteins that participate to S-layer formation, gliding motility or pathogenesis. The T9SS is poorly characterized but a number of proteins involved in the assembly of the secretion apparatus in the oral pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis have been identified based on genome substractive analyses. Among these proteins, PorY and PorX encode typical two-component system (TCS sensor and CheY-like response regulator respectively. Although the porX and porY genes do not localize at the same genetic locus, it has been proposed that PorXY form a bona fide TCS. Deletion of the porX in P. gingivalis causes a slight decrease of the expression of a number of other T9SS genes, including sov, porT, porP, porK, porL, porM, porN and porY. Here, we show that PorX and the soluble cytoplasmic domain of PorY interact. Using electrophoretic mobility shift, DNA-protein co-purification and heterologous host expression assays, we showed that PorX does not bind and does not directly regulate expression of the T9SS genes. Finally, we show that PorX interacts with the cytoplasmic domain of PorL, a component of the T9SS membrane core complex and propose that the CheY-like PorX protein might be involved in the dynamics of the T9SS.

  8. Soluble form of carbonic anhydrase IX (CA IX) in the serum and urine of renal carcinoma patients

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Závada, Jan; Závadová, Zuzana; Zaťovičová, M.; Hyršl, L.; Kawaciuk, I.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 89, - (2003), s. 1067-1071 ISSN 0007-0920 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA301/99/0356 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : carbonic anhydrase IX * tumor antigens * cancer diagnostics Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 3.894, year: 2003

  9. The CarERF genes in chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) and the identification of CarERF116 as abiotic stress responsive transcription factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deokar, Amit A; Kondawar, Vishwajith; Kohli, Deshika; Aslam, Mohammad; Jain, Pradeep K; Karuppayil, S Mohan; Varshney, Rajeev K; Srinivasan, Ramamurthy

    2015-01-01

    The AP2/ERF family is one of the largest transcription factor gene families that are involved in various plant processes, especially in response to biotic and abiotic stresses. Complete genome sequences of one of the world's most important pulse crops chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.), has provided an important opportunity to identify and characterize genome-wide ERF genes. In this study, we identified 120 putative ERF genes from chickpea. The genomic organization of the chickpea ERF genes suggested that the gene family might have been expanded through the segmental duplications. The 120 member ERF family was classified into eleven distinct groups (I-X and VI-L). Transcriptional factor CarERF116, which is differentially expressed between drought tolerant and susceptible chickpea cultivar under terminal drought stress has been identified and functionally characterized. The CarERF116 encodes a putative protein of 241 amino acids and classified into group IX of ERF family. An in vitro CarERF116 protein-DNA binding assay demonstrated that CarERF116 protein specifically interacts with GCC box. We demonstrate that CarERF116 is capable of transactivation activity of and show that the functional transcriptional domain lies at the C-terminal region of the CarERF116. In transgenic Arabidopsis plants overexpressing CarERF116, significant up-regulation of several stress related genes were observed. These plants also exhibit resistance to osmotic stress and reduced sensitivity to ABA during seed germination. Based on these findings, we conclude that CarERF116 is an abiotic stress responsive gene, which plays an important role in stress tolerance. In addition, the present study leads to genome-wide identification and evolutionary analyses of chickpea ERF gene family, which will facilitate further research on this important group of genes and provides valuable resources for comparative genomics among the grain legumes.

  10. Platelet Glycoprotein Ib-IX and Malignancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    whether adjunct anti-GP Ib-IX therapy could benefit the breast cancer patient with malignant disease. Body Below we list the 3 Specific Aims from our...Platelet Glycoprotein Ib-IX and Malignancy PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Jerry Ware, Ph.D...AND SUBTITLE Platelet Glycoprotein Ib-IX and Malignancy 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-08-1-0576 5c

  11. Nucleotide sequence of the gene coding for human factor VII, a vitamin K-dependent protein participating in blood coagulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Hara, P.J.; Grant, F.J.; Haldeman, B.A.; Gray, C.L.; Insley, M.Y.; Hagen, F.S.; Murray, M.J.

    1987-01-01

    Activated factor VII (factor VIIa) is a vitamin K-dependent plasma serine protease that participates in a cascade of reactions leading to the coagulation of blood. Two overlapping genomic clones containing sequences encoding human factor VII were isolated and characterized. The complete sequence of the gene was determined and found to span about 12.8 kilobases. The mRNA for factor VII as demonstrated by cDNA cloning is polyadenylylated at multiple sites but contains only one AAUAAA poly(A) signal sequence. The mRNA can undergo alternative splicing, forming one transcript containing eight segments as exons and another with an additional exon that encodes a larger prepro leader sequence. The latter transcript has no known counterpart in the other vitamin K-dependent proteins. The positions of the introns with respect to the amino acid sequence encoded by the eight essential exons of factor VII are the same as those present in factor IX, factor X, protein C, and the first three exons of prothrombin. These exons code for domains generally conserved among members of this gene family. The comparable introns in these genes, however, are dissimilar with respect to size and sequence, with the exception of intron C in factor VII and protein C. The gene for factor VII also contains five regions made up of tandem repeats of oligonucleotide monomer elements. More than a quarter of the intron sequences and more than a third of the 3' untranslated portion of the mRNA transcript consist of these minisatellite tandem repeats

  12. Lack of prognostic and predictive value of CA IX in radiotherapy of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck with known modifiable hypoxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Jesper Grau; Overgaard, Jens

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: CA IX is suggested to be an endogenous marker of hypoxia in tumours like squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck (HNSCC). The aim of the present study was to investigate whether CA IX served as a prognostic factor for outcome in a large population of HNSCC and if CA IX......+/-the hypoxic radiosensitizer nimorazole. CA IX was measured using immunohistochemistry and results were divided into four groups of CA IX expression: 30% of the tumour area with positive membrane staining. Locoregional control and disease-specific survival were used as endpoints...

  13. Synthesis of indium-111 mesoprotoporphyrin IX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, K.M.; Marshall, A.G.

    1981-01-01

    Indium-111 mesoprotoporphyrin IX has been prepared by refluxing suitable proportions of InCl 3 , sodium acetate, and mesoprotoporphyrin IX in glacial acetic acid. The labeled metalloporphyrin is sufficiently water-soluble for use as a scanning agent, and can also be incorporated into heme apoproteins for perturbed gamma-gamma angular correlation measurements. (author)

  14. DNA Damage and Cell Cycle Arrest Induced by Protoporphyrin IX in Sarcoma 180 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Li

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Porphyrin derivatives have been widely used in photodynamic therapy as effective sensitizers. Protoporphyrin IX (PpIX, a well-known hematoporphyrin derivative component, shows great potential to enhance light induced tumor cell damage. However, PpIX alone could also exert anti-tumor effects. The mechanisms underlying those direct effects are incompletely understood. This study thus investigated the putative mechanisms underlying the anti-tumor effects of PpIX on sarcoma 180 (S180 cells. Methods: S180 cells were treated with different concentrations of PpIX. Following the treatment, cell viability was evaluated by the 3-(4, 5- dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2, 5-diphenyltetrazoliumbromide (MTT assay; Disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential was measured by flow cytometry; The trans-location of apoptosis inducer factor (AIF from mitochondria to nucleus was visualized by confocal laser scanning microscopy; DNA damage was detected by single cell gel electrophoresis; Cell cycle distribution was analyzed by DNA content with flow cytometry; Cell cycle associated proteins were detected by western blotting. Results: PpIX (≥ 1 µg/ml significantly inhibited proliferation and reduced viability of S180 cells in a dose-dependent manner. PpIX rapidly and significantly triggered mitochondrial membrane depolarization, AIF (apoptosis inducer factor translocation from mitochondria to nucleus and DNA damage, effects partially relieved by the specific inhibitor of MPTP (mitochondrial permeability transition pore. Furthermore, S phase arrest and upregulation of the related proteins of P53 and P21 were observed following 12 and 24 h PpIX exposure. Conclusion: PpIX could inhibit tumor cell proliferation by induction of DNA damage and cell cycle arrest in the S phase.

  15. Thermodynamics of mixtures containing amines. IX. Application of the concentration-concentration structure factor to the study of binary mixtures containing pyridines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, Juan Antonio, E-mail: jagl@termo.uva.es [G.E.T.E.F. Dpto Termodinamica y Fisica Aplicada, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Valladolid, Valladolid 47071 (Spain); Cobos, Jose Carlos; Garcia de la Fuente, Isaias; Mozo, Ismael [G.E.T.E.F. Dpto Termodinamica y Fisica Aplicada, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Valladolid, Valladolid 47071 (Spain)

    2009-10-10

    Binary mixtures formed by a pyridine base and an alkane, or an aromatic hydrocarbon, or a 1-alkanol have been studied in the framework of the concentration-concentration structure factor, S{sub CC}(0), formalism. Deviations between experimental data and those provided by the DISQUAC model are discussed. Systems containing alkanes are characterized by homocoordination. In pyridine + alkane mixtures, S{sub CC}(0) decreases with the chain length of the longer alkanes, due to size effects. For a given alkane, S{sub CC}(0) also decreases with the number of CH{sub 3}- groups in the pyridine base. This has been interpreted assuming that the number of amine-amine interactions available to be broken upon mixing also decreases similarly, probably as steric hindrances exerted by the methyl groups of the aromatic amine increase with the number of these groups. Homocoordination is higher in mixtures with 3,5-dimethylpyridine than in those with 2,6-dimethylpyridine. That is, steric effects exerted by methyl groups in positions 3 and 5 are stronger than when they are in positions 2 and 6. Similarly, from the application of the DISQUAC (dispersive-quasichemical) model, it is possible to conclude that homocoordination is higher in systems with 3- or 4-methylpyridine than in those involving 2-methylpyridine. Systems including aromatic hydrocarbons are nearly ideal, which seems to indicate that there is no specific interaction in such solutions. Mixtures with 1-alkanols show heterocoordination. This reveals the existence of interactions between unlike molecules, characteristic of alkanol + amine mixtures. Methanol systems show the lowest S{sub CC}(0) values due, partially, to size effects. This explains the observed decrease of homocoordination in such solutions in the order: pyridine > 2-methylpyridine > 2,6-dimethylpyridine. Moreover, as the energies of the OH-N hydrogen bonds are practically independent of the pyridine base considered when mixed with methanol, it suggests that

  16. depolymerizing factor gene in Hevea brasiliensis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2010-11-08

    Nov 8, 2010 ... In Arabidopsis, the ancient subclasses of ADF genes exhibited novel and differential expression profiles. (Ruzicka et al., 2007). These data point to the differential regulation of plant ADFs, and also provide a framework for a model where the differentially expressed actins and. ABPs co-evolved in specific ...

  17. Spectral action for Bianchi type-IX cosmological models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan, Wentao; Fathizadeh, Farzad; Marcolli, Matilde

    2015-01-01

    A rationality result previously proved for Robertson-Walker metrics is extended to a homogeneous anisotropic cosmological model, namely the Bianchi type-IX minisuperspace. It is shown that the Seeley-de Witt coefficients appearing in the expansion of the spectral action for the Bianchi type-IX geometry are expressed in terms of polynomials with rational coefficients in the cosmic evolution factors w 1 (t),w 2 (t),w 3 (t), and their higher derivates with respect to time. We begin with the computation of the Dirac operator of this geometry and calculate the coefficients a 0 ,a 2 ,a 4 of the spectral action by using heat kernel methods and parametric pseudodifferential calculus. An efficient method is devised for computing the Seeley-de Witt coefficients of a geometry by making use of Wodzicki’s noncommutative residue, and it is confirmed that the method checks out for the cosmological model studied in this article. The advantages of the new method are discussed, which combined with symmetries of the Bianchi type-IX metric, yield an elegant proof of the rationality result.

  18. El Titulo IX y La Discriminacion por Sexo (Title IX and Sex Discrimination).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Office for Civil Rights (ED), Washington, DC.

    Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 protects people from discrimination based on sex in education programs or activities that receive Federal financial assistance. This brochure outlines the responsibilities of education programs and activities covered by Title IX, the responsibilities of the Office for Civil Rights (OCR) in enforcing…

  19. Protoporphyrin IX and oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afonso, S; Vanore, G; Batlle, A

    1999-09-01

    The short- and long-term pro-oxidant effect of protoporphyrin IX (PROTO) administration to mice was studied in liver. A peak of liver porphyrin accumulation was found 2 h after the injection of PROTO (3.5 mg/kg, i.p.); then the amount of porphyrins diminished due to biliar excretion. After several doses of PROTO (1 dose every 24 h up to 5 doses) a sustained enhancement of liver porphyrins was observed. The activity of delta-aminolevulinic acid synthetase was induced 70-90% over the control values 4 h after the first injection of PROTO and stayed at these high levels throughout the period of the assay. Administration of PROTO induced rapid liver damage, involving lipid peroxidation. Hepatic GSH content was increased 2h after the first injection of PROTO, but then decreased below the control values which were maintained after several doses of porphyrin. After a single dose of PROTO, Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD) was rapidly induced, suggesting that superoxide radicals had been generated. Increased levels of hydrogen peroxide coming from the reaction catalyzed by SOD and lipid peroxides as a consequence of membrane peroxidation, induced the activity of catalase and glutathione peroxidase (GPx), while decreased GSH levels induced glutathione reductase (GRed) activity. However after 5 doses of PROTO, the activity of SOD was reduced reaching control values. GPx and catalase activities slowly went down, while GRed continued increasing as long as the levels of GSH were kept very low. TBARS values, although lower than those observed after a single dose of PROTO, remained above control values; Glutathione S-transferase activity was instead greatly diminished, indicating sustained liver damage. Our findings would indicate that accumulation of PROTO in liver induces oxidative stress, leading to rapid increase in the activity of the antioxidant enzymes to avoid or revert liver damage. However, constant accumulation of porphyrins provokes a liver damage so severe that the

  20. Von Willebrand Factor Gene Variants Associate with Herpes simplex Encephalitis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Abdelmagid, N.; Bereczky-Veress, B.; Atanur, S.; Musilová, Alena; Zídek, Václav; Saba, L.; Warnecke, A.; Khademi, M.; Studahl, M.; Aurelius, E.; Hjalmarsson, A.; Garcia-Dias, A.; Denis, C. V.; Bergström, T.; Sköldenberg, B.; Kockum, I.; Aitman, T.; Hübner, N.; Olsson, T.; Pravenec, Michal; Diez, M.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 5 (2016), e0155832 E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 7E10067; GA MŠk(CZ) LL1204 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : Von Willebrand Factor gene * Herpes simplex encephalitis * rat * humans Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.806, year: 2016

  1. Association assessment of platelet derived growth factor B gene ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Shayesteh Rezayani

    2017-04-21

    Apr 21, 2017 ... Background: Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the most frequent cause of morbidity and mortality in the world and it is known as a multifactorial disorder which is influenced by both genetic and environmental factors. Based on different assays, the platelet derived growth factor B (PDGF-B) gene is shown to ...

  2. Genome Binding and Gene Regulation by Stem Cell Transcription Factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.H. Brandsma (Johan)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractNearly all cells of an individual organism contain the same genome. However, each cell type transcribes a different set of genes due to the presence of different sets of cell type-specific transcription factors. Such transcription factors bind to regulatory regions such as promoters

  3. Association assessment of platelet derived growth factor B gene ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the most frequent cause of morbidity and mortality in the world and it is known as a multifactorial disorder which is influenced by both genetic and environmental factors. Based on different assays, the platelet derived growth factor B (PDGF-B) gene is shown to be amongst the ...

  4. Blood cell gene expression profiling in rheumatoid arthritis. Discriminative genes and effect of rheumatoid factor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bovin, Lone Frier; Rieneck, Klaus; Workman, Christopher

    2004-01-01

    To study the pathogenic importance of the rheumatoid factor (RF) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and to identify genes differentially expressed in patients and healthy individuals, total RNA was isolated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from eight RF-positive and six RF-negative RA...... patients, and seven healthy controls. Gene expression of about 10,000 genes were examined using oligonucleotide-based DNA chip microarrays. The analyses showed no significant differences in PBMC expression patterns from RF-positive and RF-negative patients. However, comparisons of gene expression patterns...

  5. Protoporphyrin IX-induced structural and functional changes in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Protoporphyrin IX and its derivatives are used as photosensitizers in the photodynamic therapy of cancer. Protoporphyrin IX penetrates into human red blood cells and releases oxygen from them. This leads to a change in the morphology of the cells. Spectrophotometric studies reveal that protoporphyrin IX interacts with ...

  6. Title IX: With New Opportunities, Girls' Interest Rises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toporek, Bryan

    2012-01-01

    On June 23, 1972, President Richard M. Nixon signed into law Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, which prohibits gender discrimination in any federally financed education program or activity. Title IX is far-reaching, but the law is most often associated with school and college athletics. Title IX allows schools to prove their athletic…

  7. 77 FR 64401 - Order of Succession for HUD Region IX

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-19

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT [FR-5550-D-12] Order of Succession for HUD Region IX... Field Offices (Region IX). This Order of Succession supersedes all previous Orders of Succession for HUD Region IX. DATES: Effective Date: October 9, 2012. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Lawrence D. Reynolds...

  8. Title IX--A Modest Success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrams, Mary

    1982-01-01

    Title IX has helped bring change to discriminatory policies and practices including curriculum options, activities, sports, and changes in vocational education. It is argued that students need to see women and men in a broad range of positions in order to broaden their concept of potential careers for themselves. (MLW)

  9. Gene expression of transcription factor NFATc1 in periodontal diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Belibasakis, G N; Emingil, G; Saygan, B; Turkoglu, O; Atilla, G; Bostanci, N

    2011-01-01

    Belibasakis GN, Emingil G, Saygan B, Turkoglu O, Atilla G, Bostanci N. Gene expression of transcription factor NFATc1 in periodontal diseases. APMIS 2011; 119: 167-172. Periodontitis is a disease of infectious aetiology that causes inflammatory destruction of the tooth-supporting tissues. Activated T cells are central to the pathogenesis of the disease, by producing receptor activator of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) ligand (RANKL) that stimulates bone resorption. Antigenic activation of T cells ...

  10. Transcription factor trapping by RNA in gene regulatory elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigova, Alla A; Abraham, Brian J; Ji, Xiong; Molinie, Benoit; Hannett, Nancy M; Guo, Yang Eric; Jangi, Mohini; Giallourakis, Cosmas C; Sharp, Phillip A; Young, Richard A

    2015-11-20

    Transcription factors (TFs) bind specific sequences in promoter-proximal and -distal DNA elements to regulate gene transcription. RNA is transcribed from both of these DNA elements, and some DNA binding TFs bind RNA. Hence, RNA transcribed from regulatory elements may contribute to stable TF occupancy at these sites. We show that the ubiquitously expressed TF Yin-Yang 1 (YY1) binds to both gene regulatory elements and their associated RNA species across the entire genome. Reduced transcription of regulatory elements diminishes YY1 occupancy, whereas artificial tethering of RNA enhances YY1 occupancy at these elements. We propose that RNA makes a modest but important contribution to the maintenance of certain TFs at gene regulatory elements and suggest that transcription of regulatory elements produces a positive-feedback loop that contributes to the stability of gene expression programs. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  11. KIR gene content in amerindians indicates influence of demographic factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danillo Gardenal Augusto

    Full Text Available Although the KIR gene content polymorphism has been studied worldwide, only a few isolated or Amerindian populations have been analyzed. This extremely diverse gene family codifies receptors that are expressed mainly in NK cells and bind HLA class I molecules. KIR-HLA combinations have been associated to several diseases and population studies are important to comprehend their evolution and their role in immunity. Here we analyzed, by PCR-SSP (specific sequencing priming, 327 individuals from four isolated groups of two of the most important Brazilian Amerindian populations: Kaingang and Guarani. The pattern of KIR diversity among these and other ten Amerindian populations disclosed a wide range of variation for both KIR haplotypes and gene frequencies, indicating that demographic factors, such as bottleneck and founder effects, were the most important evolutionary factors in shaping the KIR polymorphism in these populations.

  12. Association between Insulin Like Growth Factor-1 (IGF-1) gene ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF1) is a key regulator of muscle development and metabolism in birds and other vertebrate. Our objective was to determine the association between IGF1 gene polymorphism and carcass traits in FUNAAB Alpha chicken. Genomic DNA was extracted from the blood of 50 normal feathered ...

  13. Genomewide analysis of TCP transcription factor gene family in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Genetics; Volume 93; Issue 3. Genomewide ... Teosinte branched1/cycloidea/proliferating cell factor1 (TCP) proteins are a large family of transcriptional regulators in angiosperms. They are ... To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study of a genomewide analysis of apple TCP gene family.

  14. Tumour necrosis factor-alpha gene polymorphisms in Iranian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... progressive inflammatory destructive process of the bile ducts. This study evaluated the relationship between single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the promoter region of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) gene and bilaiary atresia. Materials and Methods: Genomic deoxyribonucleic acid from 16 patients with established ...

  15. Growth differentiation factor 9 gene variants in Sudanese desert ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Certain variants in the growth differentiation factor 9 (GDF9) gene have major effects on the ovulation rate in sheep. The aim of this study was to analyse GDF9 variability in the Sudanese desert sheep ecotypes Ashgar, Dubasi and Watish, and to test identified variants for association with litter size. For this purpose, ewes of ...

  16. fibroblast growth factor, MTDH/Astrocyte elevated gene-1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-12-05

    Dec 5, 2012 ... Background: The etiopathogenesis of prostate cancer (PC) is still not clear, but hormonal, genetic, and environmental factors are thought to play a role in the tumor pathogenesis. Astrocyte elevated gene-1(AEG-1) as a novel transmembrane protein is predominantly located in the perinuclear region and ...

  17. Tumour necrosis factor alpha and interleukin 10 gene ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Tumour necrosis factor alpha and interleukin 10 gene polymorphisms and the risk of ischemic stroke in south Indian population. Shehnaz Sultana Venkata K. Kolla Yasovanthi Jeedigunta Pranay K. Penagaluru Sindhu Joshi P. Usha Rani P. P. Reddy. Research Note Volume 90 Issue 2 August 2011 pp 361-364 ...

  18. White light-informed optical properties improve ultrasound-guided fluorescence tomography of photoactive protoporphyrin IX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Brendan P.; DSouza, Alisha V.; Kanick, Stephen C.; Davis, Scott C.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2013-04-01

    Subsurface fluorescence imaging is desirable for medical applications, including protoporphyrin-IX (PpIX)-based skin tumor diagnosis, surgical guidance, and dosimetry in photodynamic therapy. While tissue optical properties and heterogeneities make true subsurface fluorescence mapping an ill-posed problem, ultrasound-guided fluorescence-tomography (USFT) provides regional fluorescence mapping. Here USFT is implemented with spectroscopic decoupling of fluorescence signals (auto-fluorescence, PpIX, photoproducts), and white light spectroscopy-determined bulk optical properties. Segmented US images provide a priori spatial information for fluorescence reconstruction using region-based, diffuse FT. The method was tested in simulations, tissue homogeneous and inclusion phantoms, and an injected-inclusion animal model. Reconstructed fluorescence yield was linear with PpIX concentration, including the lowest concentration used, 0.025 μg/ml. White light spectroscopy informed optical properties, which improved fluorescence reconstruction accuracy compared to the use of fixed, literature-based optical properties, reduced reconstruction error and reconstructed fluorescence standard deviation by factors of 8.9 and 2.0, respectively. Recovered contrast-to-background error was 25% and 74% for inclusion phantoms without and with a 2-mm skin-like layer, respectively. Preliminary mouse-model imaging demonstrated system feasibility for subsurface fluorescence measurement in vivo. These data suggest that this implementation of USFT is capable of regional PpIX mapping in human skin tumors during photodynamic therapy, to be used in dosimetric evaluations.

  19. Strain Specific Factors Control Effector Gene Silencing in Phytophthora sojae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirjana Devi Shrestha

    Full Text Available The Phytophthora sojae avirulence gene Avr3a encodes an effector that is capable of triggering immunity on soybean plants carrying the resistance gene Rps3a. P. sojae strains that express Avr3a are avirulent to Rps3a plants, while strains that do not are virulent. To study the inheritance of Avr3a expression and virulence towards Rps3a, genetic crosses and self-fertilizations were performed. A cross between P. sojae strains ACR10 X P7076 causes transgenerational gene silencing of Avr3a allele, and this effect is meiotically stable up to the F5 generation. However, test-crosses of F1 progeny (ACR10 X P7076 with strain P6497 result in the release of silencing of Avr3a. Expression of Avr3a in the progeny is variable and correlates with the phenotypic penetrance of the avirulence trait. The F1 progeny from a direct cross of P6497 X ACR10 segregate for inheritance for Avr3a expression, a result that could not be explained by parental imprinting or heterozygosity. Analysis of small RNA arising from the Avr3a gene sequence in the parental strains and hybrid progeny suggests that the presence of small RNA is necessary but not sufficient for gene silencing. Overall, we conclude that inheritance of the Avr3a gene silenced phenotype relies on factors that are variable among P. sojae strains.

  20. Transcription factor control of growth rate dependent genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: A three factor design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fazio, Alessandro; Jewett, Michael Christopher; Daran-Lapujade, Pascale

    2008-01-01

    transcription factor target sets, transcription factors that coordinate balanced growth were also identified. Our analysis shows that FhII, Rap1, and Sfp1, regulating protein biosynthesis, have significantly enriched target sets for genes up-regulated with increasing growth rate. Cell cycle regulators...

  1. Soluble form od carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX) in transtitional cell carcinoma of urinary tract

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hyršl, L.; Závada, Jan; Závadová, Zuzana; Kawaciuk, I.; Veselý, S.; Skapa, P.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 56, č. 4 (2009), s. 298-302 ISSN 0028-2685 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : carbonic anhydrase IX * diagnostic antigen * transitional cell carcinoma Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.192, year: 2009

  2. Suppression of carbonic anhydrase IX leads to aberrant focal adhesion and decreased invasion of tumor cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Radvak, P.; Repic, M.; Svastova, E.; Takacova, M.; Csaderova, L.; Strnad, Hynek; Pastorek, J.; Pastorekova, S.; Kopacek, J.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 29, č. 3 (2013), s. 1147-1153 ISSN 1021-335X Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : carbonic anhydrase IX * hypoxia * shRNA silencing * microarray * focal adhesion Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.191, year: 2013

  3. Cranial Nerves IX, X, XI, and XII

    OpenAIRE

    Gillig, Paulette Marie; Sanders, Richard D.

    2010-01-01

    This article concludes the series on cranial nerves, with review of the final four (IX–XII). To summarize briefly, the most important and common syndrome caused by a disorder of the glossopharyngeal nerve (craniel nerve IX) is glossopharyngeal neuralgia. Also, swallowing function occasionally is compromised in a rare but disabling form of tardive dyskinesia called tardive dystonia, because the upper motor portion of the glossopharyngel nerve projects to the basal ganglia and can be affected b...

  4. AAV5-Factor VIII Gene Transfer in Severe Hemophilia A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangarajan, Savita; Walsh, Liron; Lester, Will; Perry, David; Madan, Bella; Laffan, Michael; Yu, Hua; Vettermann, Christian; Pierce, Glenn F; Wong, Wing Y; Pasi, K John

    2017-12-28

    Patients with hemophilia A rely on exogenous factor VIII to prevent bleeding in joints, soft tissue, and the central nervous system. Although successful gene transfer has been reported in patients with hemophilia B, the large size of the factor VIII coding region has precluded improved outcomes with gene therapy in patients with hemophilia A. We infused a single intravenous dose of a codon-optimized adeno-associated virus serotype 5 (AAV5) vector encoding a B-domain-deleted human factor VIII (AAV5-hFVIII-SQ) in nine men with severe hemophilia A. Participants were enrolled sequentially into one of three dose cohorts (low dose [one participant], intermediate dose [one participant], and high dose [seven participants]) and were followed through 52 weeks. Factor VIII activity levels remained at 3 IU or less per deciliter in the recipients of the low or intermediate dose. In the high-dose cohort, the factor VIII activity level was more than 5 IU per deciliter between weeks 2 and 9 after gene transfer in all seven participants, and the level in six participants increased to a normal value (>50 IU per deciliter) that was maintained at 1 year after receipt of the dose. In the high-dose cohort, the median annualized bleeding rate among participants who had previously received prophylactic therapy decreased from 16 events before the study to 1 event after gene transfer, and factor VIII use for participant-reported bleeding ceased in all the participants in this cohort by week 22. The primary adverse event was an elevation in the serum alanine aminotransferase level to 1.5 times the upper limit of the normal range or less. Progression of preexisting chronic arthropathy in one participant was the only serious adverse event. No neutralizing antibodies to factor VIII were detected. The infusion of AAV5-hFVIII-SQ was associated with the sustained normalization of factor VIII activity level over a period of 1 year in six of seven participants who received a high dose, with

  5. Cranial Nerves IX, X, XI, and XII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillig, Paulette Marie; Sanders, Richard D

    2010-05-01

    This article concludes the series on cranial nerves, with review of the final four (IX-XII). To summarize briefly, the most important and common syndrome caused by a disorder of the glossopharyngeal nerve (craniel nerve IX) is glossopharyngeal neuralgia. Also, swallowing function occasionally is compromised in a rare but disabling form of tardive dyskinesia called tardive dystonia, because the upper motor portion of the glossopharyngel nerve projects to the basal ganglia and can be affected by lesions in the basal ganglia. Vagus nerve funtion (craniel nerve X) can be compromised in schizophrenia, bulimia, obesity, and major depression. A cervical lesion to the nerve roots of the spinal accessory nerve (craniel nerve XI) can cause a cervical dystonia, which sometimes is misdiagnosed as a dyskinesia related to neuroleptic use. Finally, unilateral hypoglossal (craniel nerve XII) nerve palsy is one of the most common mononeuropathies caused by brain metastases. Supranuclear lesions of cranial nerve XII are involved in pseudobulbar palsy and ALS, and lower motor neuron lesions of cranial nerve XII can also be present in bulbar palsy and in ALS patients who also have lower motor neuron involvement. This article reviews these and other syndromes related to cranial nerves IX through XII that might be seen by psychiatry.

  6. Characterization of five partial deletions of the factor VIII gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youssoufian, H.; Antonarakis, S.E.; Aronis, S.; Tsiftis, G.; Phillips, D.G.; Kazazian, H.H. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Hemophilia A is an X-linked disorder of coagulation caused by a deficiency of factor VIII. By using cloned DNA probes, the authors have characterized the following five different partial deletions of the factor VIII gene from a panel of 83 patients with hemophilia A: (i) a 7-kilobase (kb) deletion that eliminates exon 6; (ii) a 2.5-kb deletion that eliminates 5' sequences of exon 14; (iii) a deletion of at least 7 kb that eliminates exons 24 and 25; (iv) a deletion of at least 16 kb that eliminates exons 23-25; and (v) a 5.5-kb deletion that eliminates exon 22. The first four deletions are associated with severe hemophilia A. By contrast, the last deletion is associated with moderate disease, possibly because of in-frame splicing from adjacent exons. None of those patients with partial gene deletions had circulating inhibitors to factor VIII. One deletion occurred de novo in a germ cell of the maternal grandmother, while a second deletion occurred in a germ cell of the maternal grandfather. These observations demonstrate that de novo deletions of X-linked genes can occur in either male or female gametes

  7. Drug design studies of the novel antitumor targets carbonic anhydrase IX and XII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guler, O Ozensoy; De Simone, G; Supuran, C T

    2010-01-01

    The carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) isozymes IX and XII are predominantly found in tumor cells and show a restricted expression in normal tissues. By efficiently hydrating carbon dioxide to protons and bicarbonate, these CAs contribute significantly to the extracellular acidification of solid tumors. CA IX and XII are overexpressed in many such tumors in response to the hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) pathway, and research on the involvement of these isozymes in cancer has progressed in recent years. The report of the X-ray crystal structure of CA IX, which is a dimeric protein with a quaternary structure not evidenced earlier for this family of enzymes, allows for structure-based drug design campaigns of inhibitors against this novel antitumor target. Indeed, it has been known for some time that aromatic/ heterocyclic sulfonamides and sulfamates have good affinity for this isoform, but generally they do not show specificity for the inhibition of the tumor-associated isoform versus the remaining CA isozymes (CA I-VII, and XII-XV) found in mammals. Recently, we reported several classes of compounds with good selectivity for the tumor-associated CAs, being shown that CA IX/XII inhibition reverses the effect of tumor acidification, leading to inhibition of the cancer cells growth. CA IX/XII are now proposed as novel therapeutic antitumor targets. Furthermore, as some types of CA inhibitors (CAIs), such as the fluorescent sulfonamides accumulate only in hypoxic tumor cells overexpressing these enzymes, CAIs may be also used as diagnostic tools for imaging of hypoxic cancer cells. Work from several laboratories recently reported the proof-of-concept studies for the use of CA IX/XII inhibitors as well as antibodies both in the therapy and imaging of hypoxic tumors.

  8. eEF1A1 binds and enriches protoporphyrin IX in cancer cells in 5-aminolevulinic acid based photodynamic therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Zhichao; Cui, Xiaojun; Wei, Dan; Liu, Wei; Li, Buhong; He, Hao; Ye, Huamao; Zhu, Naishuo; Wei, Xunbin

    2016-05-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) with protoporphyrin IX (PpIX), which is endogenously derived from 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) or its derivatives, is a promising modality for the treatment of both pre-malignant and malignant lesions. However, the mechanisms of how ALA-induced PpIX selectively accumulated in the tumors are not fully elucidated. Here we discovered that eukaryotic translation elongation factor 1 alpha 1 (eEF1A1) interacted with PpIX (with an affinity constant of 2.96 × 106 M-1). Microscopy imaging showed that ALA-induced PpIX was co-localized with eEF1A1 in cancer cells. eEF1A1 was found to enrich ALA-induced PpIX in cells by competitively blocking the downstream bioavailability of PpIX. Taken together, our study discovered eEF1A1 as a novel photosensitizer binding protein, which may play an essential role in the enrichment of ALA-induced PpIX in cancer cells during PDT. These suggested eEF1A1 as a molecular marker to predict the selectivity and efficiency of 5-ALA based PDT in cancer therapy.

  9. A simple and rapid fluorimetric method for simultaneous determination of protoporphyrin IX and zinc protoporphyrin IX in whole blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Pei-Chen; Huang, Wei; Zhang, Rong-Bin; Zou, Zhe-Xiang; Luo, He-Dong; Falih, Ali Abbas; Li, Yao-Qun

    2008-11-01

    Derivative variable-angle synchronous fluorescence (DVASF) spectrometry improves the spectral resolution and selectivity of the fluorescence method. The feasibility of DVASF spectrometry for the simultaneous determination of protoporphyrin IX (PP) and zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPP) was investigated. PP and ZnPP were distinguished from each other simultaneously and rapidly by the DVASF method. The spectra were resolved well, and the two components were determined in a single scan, avoiding the spectral compensation factor for PP and chromatographic separation. The linear range of the calibration curve for PP was from 0.190 to 152 nmol/L and for ZnPP was from 0.383 to 230 nmol/L. The detection limits of PP and ZnPP were 0.098 nmol/L and 0.088 nmol/L, respectively. The within-run imprecision (RSD, n = 5) for PP was 4.1%, and for ZnPP was 4.2%. Mean recoveries (SD) of PP and ZnPP added to a blood sample were 86.4 (7.3)% and 72.9 (6.6)%, respectively. This method should be a potential tool in the rapid routine screening of large quantities of samples.

  10. The role of carbonic anhydrase IX in hypoxia control in OSCC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Sayáns, Mario; Supuran, Claudiu T; Pastorekova, Silvia; Suárez-Peñaranda, José Manuel; Pilar, Gayoso-Diz; Barros-Angueira, Francisco; Gándara-Rey, José Manuel; García-García, Abel

    2013-01-01

    Tumoral microenvironments play a key role in the evolution of solid tumors. Tumor hypoxia is actively involved in the promotion of genetic instability, the invasive capacity of tumor cells, metastasis, and a worsening of the clinical evolution. Endogenous hypoxia markers are controlled by hypoxia-related genes, formed by HIF-1, which is related to several target genes that involve the energy metabolism, angiogenesis, and transmembrane carbonic anhydrases (CAs), mainly CA-IX that is one of the tumor-related carbonic anhydrases. The goal of this paper is to establish the role of CA-IX as a hypoxia marker in OSCC, while analyzing its expression in this type of tumors and its relationship with several clinical and pathological parameters and prognosis, evaluating its relationship with angiogenesis, other hypoxia markers, and clarifying its role in chemotherapy and radiotherapy resistance. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  11. Protoporphyrin IX in the skin measured noninvasively predicts photosensitivity in patients with erythropoietic protoporphyria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heerfordt, I M; Wulf, H C

    2016-01-01

    and to investigate how skin PpIX relates to erythrocyte PpIX and photosensitivity. METHODS: Skin PpIX was measured in 25 patients with EPP by calculating the difference in PpIX fluorescence before and after complete photobleaching of PpIX using controlled illumination. The patients reported symptoms during...

  12. Von Willebrand Factor Gene Variants Associate with Herpes simplex Encephalitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nada Abdelmagid

    Full Text Available Herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE is a rare complication of Herpes simplex virus type-1 infection. It results in severe parenchymal damage in the brain. Although viral latency in neurons is very common in the population, it remains unclear why certain individuals develop HSE. Here we explore potential host genetic variants predisposing to HSE. In order to investigate this we used a rat HSE model comparing the HSE susceptible SHR (Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats with the asymptomatic infection of BN (Brown Norway. Notably, both strains have HSV-1 spread to the CNS at four days after infection. A genome wide linkage analysis of 29 infected HXB/BXH RILs (recombinant inbred lines-generated from the prior two strains, displayed variable susceptibility to HSE enabling the definition of a significant QTL (quantitative trait locus named Hse6 towards the end of chromosome 4 (160.89-174Mb containing the Vwf (von Willebrand factor gene. This was the only gene in the QTL with both cis-regulation in the brain and included several non-synonymous SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphism. Intriguingly, in human chromosome 12 several SNPs within the intronic region between exon 43 and 44 of the VWF gene were associated with human HSE pathogenesis. In particular, rs917859 is nominally associated with an odds ratio of 1.5 (95% CI 1.11-2.02; p-value = 0.008 after genotyping in 115 HSE cases and 428 controls. Although there are possibly several genetic and environmental factors involved in development of HSE, our study identifies variants of the VWF gene as candidates for susceptibility in experimental and human HSE.

  13. Cooperative binding of transcription factors promotes bimodal gene expression response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo S Gutierrez

    Full Text Available In the present work we extend and analyze the scope of our recently proposed stochastic model for transcriptional regulation, which considers an arbitrarily complex cis-regulatory system using only elementary reactions. Previously, we determined the role of cooperativity on the intrinsic fluctuations of gene expression for activating transcriptional switches, by means of master equation formalism and computer simulation. This model allowed us to distinguish between two cooperative binding mechanisms and, even though the mean expression levels were not affected differently by the acting mechanism, we showed that the associated fluctuations were different. In the present generalized model we include other regulatory functions in addition to those associated to an activator switch. Namely, we introduce repressive regulatory functions and two theoretical mechanisms that account for the biphasic response that some cis-regulatory systems show to the transcription factor concentration. We have also extended our previous master equation formalism in order to include protein production by stochastic translation of mRNA. Furthermore, we examine the graded/binary scenarios in the context of the interaction energy between transcription factors. In this sense, this is the first report to show that the cooperative binding of transcription factors to DNA promotes the "all-or-none" phenomenon observed in eukaryotic systems. In addition, we confirm that gene expression fluctuation levels associated with one of two cooperative binding mechanism never exceed the fluctuation levels of the other.

  14. Tissue Engineering Using Transfected Growth-Factor Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madry, Henning; Langer, Robert S.; Freed, Lisa E.; Trippel, Stephen; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2005-01-01

    A method of growing bioengineered tissues includes, as a major component, the use of mammalian cells that have been transfected with genes for secretion of regulator and growth-factor substances. In a typical application, one either seeds the cells onto an artificial matrix made of a synthetic or natural biocompatible material, or else one cultures the cells until they secrete a desired amount of an extracellular matrix. If such a bioengineered tissue construct is to be used for surgical replacement of injured tissue, then the cells should preferably be the patient s own cells or, if not, at least cells matched to the patient s cells according to a human-leucocyteantigen (HLA) test. The bioengineered tissue construct is typically implanted in the patient's injured natural tissue, wherein the growth-factor genes enhance metabolic functions that promote the in vitro development of functional tissue constructs and their integration with native tissues. If the matrix is biodegradable, then one of the results of metabolism could be absorption of the matrix and replacement of the matrix with tissue formed at least partly by the transfected cells. The method was developed for articular chondrocytes but can (at least in principle) be extended to a variety of cell types and biocompatible matrix materials, including ones that have been exploited in prior tissue-engineering methods. Examples of cell types include chondrocytes, hepatocytes, islet cells, nerve cells, muscle cells, other organ cells, bone- and cartilage-forming cells, epithelial and endothelial cells, connective- tissue stem cells, mesodermal stem cells, and cells of the liver and the pancreas. Cells can be obtained from cell-line cultures, biopsies, and tissue banks. Genes, molecules, or nucleic acids that secrete factors that influence the growth of cells, the production of extracellular matrix material, and other cell functions can be inserted in cells by any of a variety of standard transfection techniques.

  15. 34 CFR Subject Index to Title Ix... - Subject Index to Title IX Preamble and Regulation 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Procedures [Interim...) Physical education, [43, 56, 58]; Sex education, [43, 57]; 106.34(e) Coverage, [5]; 106.11 to 106.17... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Subject Index to Title IX Preamble and Regulation 1...

  16. The natural history of glycogen storage disease types VI and IX: Long-term outcome from the largest metabolic center in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roscher, Anne; Patel, Jaina; Hewson, Stacy; Nagy, Laura; Feigenbaum, Annette; Kronick, Jonathan; Raiman, Julian; Schulze, Andreas; Siriwardena, Komudi; Mercimek-Mahmutoglu, Saadet

    2014-11-01

    Glycogen storage disease (GSD) types VI and IX are caused by phosphorylase system deficiencies. To evaluate the natural history and long-term treatment outcome of the patients with GSD-VI and -IX, we performed an observational retrospective case study of 21 patients with confirmed diagnosis of GSD-VI or -IX. All patients with GSD-VI or -IX, diagnosed at The Hospital for Sick Children, were included. Electronic and paper charts were reviewed for clinical features, biochemical investigations, molecular genetic testing, diagnostic imaging, long-term outcome and treatment by two independent research team members. All information was entered into an Excel database. We report on the natural history and treatment outcomes of the 21 patients with GSD-VI and -IX and 16 novel pathogenic mutations in the PHKA2, PHKB, PHKG2 and PYGL genes. We report for the first time likely liver adenoma on liver ultrasound and liver fibrosis on liver biopsy specimens in patients with GSD-VI and mild cardiomyopathy on echocardiography in patients with GSD-VI and -IXb. We recommend close monitoring in all patients with GSD-VI and -IX for the long-term liver and cardiac complications. There is a need for future studies if uncooked cornstarch and high protein diet would be able to prevent long-term complications of GSD-VI and -IX. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Ares I-X Ground Diagnostic Prototype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwabacher, Mark A.; Martin, Rodney Alexander; Waterman, Robert D.; Oostdyk, Rebecca Lynn; Ossenfort, John P.; Matthews, Bryan

    2010-01-01

    The automation of pre-launch diagnostics for launch vehicles offers three potential benefits: improving safety, reducing cost, and reducing launch delays. The Ares I-X Ground Diagnostic Prototype demonstrated anomaly detection, fault detection, fault isolation, and diagnostics for the Ares I-X first-stage Thrust Vector Control and for the associated ground hydraulics while the vehicle was in the Vehicle Assembly Building at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and while it was on the launch pad. The prototype combines three existing tools. The first tool, TEAMS (Testability Engineering and Maintenance System), is a model-based tool from Qualtech Systems Inc. for fault isolation and diagnostics. The second tool, SHINE (Spacecraft Health Inference Engine), is a rule-based expert system that was developed at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory. We developed SHINE rules for fault detection and mode identification, and used the outputs of SHINE as inputs to TEAMS. The third tool, IMS (Inductive Monitoring System), is an anomaly detection tool that was developed at NASA Ames Research Center. The three tools were integrated and deployed to KSC, where they were interfaced with live data. This paper describes how the prototype performed during the period of time before the launch, including accuracy and computer resource usage. The paper concludes with some of the lessons that we learned from the experience of developing and deploying the prototype.

  18. Multi-factor dimensionality reduction applied to a large prospective investigation on gene-gene and gene-environment interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuguerra, M; Matullo, G; Veglia, F; Autrup, H; Dunning, A M; Garte, S; Gormally, E; Malaveille, C; Guarrera, S; Polidoro, S; Saletta, F; Peluso, M; Airoldi, L; Overvad, K; Raaschou-Nielsen, O; Clavel-Chapelon, F; Linseisen, J; Boeing, H; Trichopoulos, D; Kalandidi, A; Palli, D; Krogh, V; Tumino, R; Panico, S; Bueno-De-Mesquita, H B; Peeters, P H; Lund, E; Pera, G; Martinez, C; Amiano, P; Barricarte, A; Tormo, M J; Quiros, J R; Berglund, G; Janzon, L; Jarvholm, B; Day, N E; Allen, N E; Saracci, R; Kaaks, R; Ferrari, P; Riboli, E; Vineis, P

    2007-02-01

    It is becoming increasingly evident that single-locus effects cannot explain complex multifactorial human diseases like cancer. We applied the multi-factor dimensionality reduction (MDR) method to a large cohort study on gene-environment and gene-gene interactions. The study (case-control nested in the EPIC cohort) was established to investigate molecular changes and genetic susceptibility in relation to air pollution and environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) in non-smokers. We have analyzed 757 controls and 409 cases with bladder cancer (n=124), lung cancer (n=116) and myeloid leukemia (n=169). Thirty-six gene variants (DNA repair and metabolic genes) and three environmental exposure variables (measures of air pollution and ETS at home and at work) were analyzed. Interactions were assessed by prediction error percentage and cross-validation consistency (CVC) frequency. For lung cancer, the best model was given by a significant gene-environment association between the base excision repair (BER) XRCC1-Arg399Gln polymorphism, the double-strand break repair (DSBR) BRCA2-Asn372His polymorphism and the exposure variable 'distance from heavy traffic road', an indirect and robust indicator of air pollution (mean prediction error of 26%, PT (mean prediction error of 22%, PT, MnSOD-Ala9Val and CYP1A1-Ile462Val had a minimum prediction error of 31% (P<0.001) and a maximum CVC of 4.40 (P=0.086). The MDR method seems promising, because it provides a limited number of statistically stable interactions; however, the biological interpretation remains to be understood.

  19. Ares I-X Ground Diagnostic Prototype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwabacher, Mark; Martin, Rodney; Waterman, Robert; Oostdyk, Rebecca; Ossenfort, John; Matthews, Bryan

    2010-01-01

    Automating prelaunch diagnostics for launch vehicles offers three potential benefits. First, it potentially improves safety by detecting faults that might otherwise have been missed so that they can be corrected before launch. Second, it potentially reduces launch delays by more quickly diagnosing the cause of anomalies that occur during prelaunch processing. Reducing launch delays will be critical to the success of NASA's planned future missions that require in-orbit rendezvous. Third, it potentially reduces costs by reducing both launch delays and the number of people needed to monitor the prelaunch process. NASA is currently developing the Ares I launch vehicle to bring the Orion capsule and its crew of four astronauts to low-earth orbit on their way to the moon. Ares I-X will be the first unmanned test flight of Ares I. It is scheduled to launch on October 27, 2009. The Ares I-X Ground Diagnostic Prototype is a prototype ground diagnostic system that will provide anomaly detection, fault detection, fault isolation, and diagnostics for the Ares I-X first-stage thrust vector control (TVC) and for the associated ground hydraulics while it is in the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) at John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and on the launch pad. It will serve as a prototype for a future operational ground diagnostic system for Ares I. The prototype combines three existing diagnostic tools. The first tool, TEAMS (Testability Engineering and Maintenance System), is a model-based tool that is commercially produced by Qualtech Systems, Inc. It uses a qualitative model of failure propagation to perform fault isolation and diagnostics. We adapted an existing TEAMS model of the TVC to use for diagnostics and developed a TEAMS model of the ground hydraulics. The second tool, Spacecraft Health Inference Engine (SHINE), is a rule-based expert system developed at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory. We developed SHINE rules for fault detection and mode identification. The prototype

  20. Rape on College Campuses: Reform through Title IX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Terry Nicole

    1991-01-01

    This article first, analyzes the growing problem of campus rape; second, evaluates some college rape reduction programs; third, uses case law to demonstrate that rape should be considered sex discrimination under Title IX; and, fourth, suggests an amendment to Title IX, defining rape as sex discrimination. Appropriate implementation measures by…

  1. Title IX--Beyond Compliance to Personal Commitment and Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Barbara

    1976-01-01

    In order to move beyond legal compliance to real equality of opportunity, every educational leader must develop some systematic means of extending his or her personal knowledge and skills with respect to Title IX. Provides a check list for self evaluation of educational leaders and a guide for developing an implementation plan for Title IX.…

  2. A License for Bias: Sex Discrimination, Schools, and Title IX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, Susan Ed.

    This report discusses non-sports-related Title IX complaints filed with the Department of Education's Office for Civil Rights (OCR) from 1993-1997. Its purpose is to dispel the popular belief that Title IX is a sports-equity law and to determine the effectiveness of the legislation. The document examines the kinds of complaints filed, the status…

  3. Tissue-specific expression of type IX collagen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, I.; Muragaki, Y.; Ninomiya, Y.; Olsen, B.R.; Hayashi, M.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on the tissue-specific expression of type IX collagen, a major component of cartilage fibrils. It contains molecules with three genetically distinct subunits. The subunits form three triple-helical (CO) domains separated by non-triple-helical (NC) sequences. One of the subunits in cartilage, α1(IX), contains a large amino-terminal globular domain, NC4, while a second subunit, α2(IX), contains a covalently attached chondroitin sulfate chain. The site of attachment for this chain is located within the non-triple-helical sequence NC3, which separates the amino-terminal and central triple-helical domains of the type IX molecules. The NC3 region is 5 amino acid residues longer in the α2(IX) chain than in the α1(IX) and α3(IX) chains. This may explain why type IX molecules tend to show a sharp angle in the NC3 region, and why monoclonal antibody molecules that are specific for the stub left after chondroitinase ABC digestion of the chondroitin sulfate side chain always are located on the outside of the angle

  4. The History, Uses, and Abuses of Title IX. 2016 Bulletin

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Association of University Professors, 2016

    2016-01-01

    This report, an evaluation of the history and current uses of Title IX, is the result of a joint effort by a subcommittee that included members of the AAUP's Committee A on Academic Freedom and Tenure and the Committee on Women in the Academic Profession. The report identifies tensions between current interpretations of Title IX and the academic…

  5. Intrinsic thermodynamics of inhibitor binding to human carbonic anhydrase IX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linkuvienė, Vaida; Matulienė, Jurgita; Juozapaitienė, Vaida; Michailovienė, Vilma; Jachno, Jelena; Matulis, Daumantas

    2016-04-01

    Human carbonic anhydrase 9th isoform (CA IX) is an important marker of numerous cancers and is increasingly interesting as a potential anticancer drug target. Various synthetic aromatic sulfonamide-bearing compounds are being designed as potent inhibitors of CA IX. However, sulfonamide compound binding to CA IX is linked to several reactions, the deprotonation of the sulfonamide amino group and the protonation of the CA active site Zn(II)-bound hydroxide. These linked reactions significantly affect the affinities and other thermodynamic parameters such as enthalpies and entropies of binding. The observed and intrinsic affinities of compound binding to CA IX were determined by the fluorescent thermal shift assay. The enthalpies and entropies of binding were determined by the isothermal titration calorimetry. The pKa of CA IX was determined to be 6.8 and the enthalpy of CA IX-Zn(II)-bound hydroxide protonation was -24 kJ/mol. These values enabled the analysis of intrinsic thermodynamics of a library of compounds binding to CA IX. The most strongly binding compounds exhibited the intrinsic affinity of 0.01 nM and the observed affinity of 2 nM. The intrinsic thermodynamic parameters of compound binding to CA IX helped to draw the compound structure to thermodynamics relationship. It is important to distinguish the intrinsic from observed parameters of any disease target protein interaction with its inhibitors as drug candidates when drawing detailed compound structure to thermodynamics correlations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Glycogen storage disease type IX and growth hormone deficiency presenting as severe ketotic hypoglycemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodax, Juanita K; Uysal, Serife; Quintos, Jose Bernardo; Phornphutkul, Chanika

    2017-02-01

    Glycogen storage disease (GSD) type IX and growth hormone (GH) deficiency cause ketotic hypoglycemia via different mechanisms and are not known to be associated. We describe a patient presenting with severe ketotic hypoglycemia found to have both GSD IX and isolated GH deficiency. A 3-year-and-11-month-old boy with a history of prematurity, autism, developmental delay, seizures, and feeding difficulty was admitted for poor weight gain and symptomatic hypoglycemia. He was nondysmorphic, with a height of 93.8 cm (2%, -1.97 SDS), and has no hepatomegaly. He developed symptomatic hypoglycemia, with a serum glucose level of 37 mg/dL after 14 h of fasting challenge. Critical sample showed a GH of 0.24 ng/mL. GH provocative stimulation testing was done with a peak GH of 2.8 ng/mL. Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed a hypoplastic pituitary gland. Given the clinical symptoms, suspicion for mitochondrial disease was high. Dual Genome Panel by Massively Parallel Sequencing revealed a hemizygous variant c.721A>G (p1241V) in the X-linked PHKA2 gene, a causative gene for GSD IX. Red blood cell PhK enzyme activity testing was low, supporting the diagnosis. Given the patient's developmental delays that were not explained by GH deficiency alone, further investigation showed two unrelated conditions resulting in deranged metabolic adaptation to fasting leading to severe hypoglycemia.

  7. Retargeting of adenovirus vectors through genetic fusion of a single-chain or single-domain antibody to capsid protein IX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulin, Kathy L; Lanthier, Robert M; Smith, Adam C; Christou, Carin; Risco Quiroz, Milagros; Powell, Karen L; O'Meara, Ryan W; Kothary, Rashmi; Lorimer, Ian A; Parks, Robin J

    2010-10-01

    Adenovirus (Ad) vectors are the most commonly used system for gene therapy applications, due in part to their ability to infect a wide array of cell types and tissues. However, many therapies would benefit from the ability to target the Ad vector only to specific cells, such as tumor cells for cancer gene therapy. In this study, we investigated the utility of capsid protein IX (pIX) as a platform for the presentation of single-chain variable-fragment antibodies (scFv) and single-domain antibodies (sdAb) for virus retargeting. We show that scFv can be displayed on the capsid through genetic fusion to native pIX but that these molecules fail to retarget the virus, due to improper folding of the scFv. Redirecting expression of the fusion protein to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) results in correct folding of the scFv and allows it to recognize its epitope; however, ER-targeted pIX-scFv was incorporated into the Ad capsid at a very low level which was not sufficient to retarget virus infection. In contrast, a pIX-sdAb construct was efficiently incorporated into the Ad capsid and enhanced virus infection of cells expressing the targeted receptor. Taken together, our data indicate that pIX is an effective platform for presentation of large targeting polypeptides on the surface of the virus capsid, but the nature of the ligand can significantly affect its association with virions.

  8. Ares I-X USS Material Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawicke, David S.; Smith, Stephen W.; Raju, Ivatury S.

    2008-01-01

    An independent assessment was conducted to determine the critical initial flaw size (CIFS) for the flange-to-skin weld in the Ares I-X Upper Stage Simulator (USS). Material characterization tests were conducted to quantify the material behavior for use in the CIFS analyses. Fatigue crack growth rate, Charpy impact, and fracture tests were conducted on the parent and welded A516 Grade 70 steel. The crack growth rate tests confirmed that the material behaved in agreement with literature data and that a salt water environment would not significantly degrade the fatigue resistance. The Charpy impact tests confirmed that the fracture resistance of the material did not have a significant reduction for the expected operational temperatures of the vehicle.

  9. ETHYLENE RESPONSE FACTOR 96 positively regulates Arabidopsis resistance to necrotrophic pathogens by direct binding to GCC elements of jasmonate - and ethylene-responsive defence genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catinot, Jérémy; Huang, Jing-Bo; Huang, Pin-Yao; Tseng, Min-Yuan; Chen, Ying-Lan; Gu, Shin-Yuan; Lo, Wan-Sheng; Wang, Long-Chi; Chen, Yet-Ran; Zimmerli, Laurent

    2015-12-01

    The ERF (ethylene responsive factor) family is composed of transcription factors (TFs) that are critical for appropriate Arabidopsis thaliana responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. Here we identified and characterized a member of the ERF TF group IX, namely ERF96, that when overexpressed enhances Arabidopsis resistance to necrotrophic pathogens such as the fungus Botrytis cinerea and the bacterium Pectobacterium carotovorum. ERF96 is jasmonate (JA) and ethylene (ET) responsive and ERF96 transcripts accumulation was abolished in JA-insensitive coi1-16 and in ET-insensitive ein2-1 mutants. Protoplast transactivation and electrophoresis mobility shift analyses revealed that ERF96 is an activator of transcription that binds to GCC elements. In addition, ERF96 mainly localized to the nucleus. Microarray analysis coupled to chromatin immunoprecipitation-PCR of Arabidopsis overexpressing ERF96 revealed that ERF96 enhances the expression of the JA/ET defence genes PDF1.2a, PR-3 and PR-4 as well as the TF ORA59 by direct binding to GCC elements present in their promoters. While ERF96-RNAi plants demonstrated wild-type resistance to necrotrophic pathogens, basal PDF1.2 expression levels were reduced in ERF96-silenced plants. This work revealed ERF96 as a key player of the ERF network that positively regulates the Arabidopsis resistance response to necrotrophic pathogens. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. IBM PC/IX operating system evaluation plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominick, Wayne D. (Editor); Granier, Martin; Hall, Philip P.; Triantafyllopoulos, Spiros

    1984-01-01

    An evaluation plan for the IBM PC/IX Operating System designed for IBM PC/XT computers is discussed. The evaluation plan covers the areas of performance measurement and evaluation, software facilities available, man-machine interface considerations, networking, and the suitability of PC/IX as a development environment within the University of Southwestern Louisiana NASA PC Research and Development project. In order to compare and evaluate the PC/IX system, comparisons with other available UNIX-based systems are also included.

  11. Genomewide analysis of TCP transcription factor gene family in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-12-09

    Dec 9, 2014 ... this study, a total of 52 TCP genes were identified in apple (Malus domestica) genome. Bioinformatic methods were employed to predicate and analyse their relevant gene classification, gene structure, chromosome location, sequence alignment and con- served domains of MdTCP proteins. Expression ...

  12. Bianchi-IX string cosmological model in Lyra geometry

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. A class of cosmological solutions of massive strings for the Bianchi-IX space-time are obtained within the framework of Lyra geometry. Various physical and kinematical properties of the models are discussed.

  13. Legal Forum: Title IX: Does It Apply to Employees?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Martha

    1981-01-01

    Briefly reviews a number of Federal court cases that have dealt with Title IX, considering the issue of whether the 1974 regulations prohibiting sex discrimination in employment practices accurately reflect the intent of the 1972 law. (GC)

  14. Role of aryl hydrocarbon receptor in modulation of the expression of the hypoxia marker carbonic anhydrase IX

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Takáčová, M.; Holotňáková, T.; Vondráček, Jan; Machala, M.; Pěnčíková, K.; Gradin, K.; Poellinger, L.; Pastorek, J.; Pastoreková, S.; Kopáček, J.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 419, - (2009), s. 419-425 ISSN 0264-6021 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : AhR * carbonic anhydrase IX * dioxin Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 5.155, year: 2009

  15. Autism Spectrum Disorder and High Confidence Gene Factors

    OpenAIRE

    Mai, MOCHIZUKI

    2017-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a neurological developmental disorder whose mechanism isyet unclear. However, recent ASD studies, which employ exome- and genome-wide sequencing,have identified some high-confidence ASD genes. Those ASD studies have revealed that CHD8is likely associated with ASD. In this article, we highlight that CHD8 may regulate othercandidate ASD risk genes. Current research indicates that there exist some thousand autismsusceptibility candidate genes. Moreover, we sugge...

  16. Scaling of gene expression with transcription-factor fugacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinert, Franz M; Brewster, Robert C; Rydenfelt, Mattias; Phillips, Rob; Kegel, Willem K

    2014-12-19

    The proteins associated with gene regulation are often shared between multiple pathways simultaneously. By way of contrast, models in regulatory biology often assume these pathways act independently. We demonstrate a framework for calculating the change in gene expression for the interacting case by decoupling repressor occupancy across the cell from the gene of interest by way of a chemical potential. The details of the interacting regulatory architecture are encompassed in an effective concentration, and thus, a single scaling function describes a collection of gene expression data from diverse regulatory situations and collapses it onto a single master curve.

  17. Possible incorrect genotyping of heterozygous factor V Leiden and Prothrombin 20210 gene mutations by the GeneXpert assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marturano, Alessandro; Bury, Loredana; Gresele, Paolo

    2014-08-05

    The GeneXpert analyzer is a hands-off system for the detection of Factor V Leiden and of Prothrombin G20210A (GPRO) gene thrombophilic mutations. Although the system is efficient and easy to use, we report the rare possibility of incorrect genotyping. 1648 samples were evaluated using the GeneXpert HemosIL Factor II and Factor V assay: 1319 were freshly analyzed while 329 were frozen, thawed and diluted with saline prior to analysis to avoid clogging of the instrument syringe. Two samples, both heterozygous, one for the factor V Leiden and the other for the GPRO gene, were incorrectly genotyped as homozygous for the relative mutation. Inspection of the Ct values and amplification curves and genotyping with PCR revealed the correct genotype as heterozygous for factor V Leiden and GPRO mutation. The GeneXpert HemosIL Factor II and Factor V assay is an automated, fast genotyping assay requiring almost no sample manipulation, advantageous characteristics if compared with other PCR-based methods. However, an inattentive use of it can generate incorrect diagnosis. A careful handling of the sample, in particular correct dilution of frozen/thawed samples before analysis, and the inspection of the amplification curves and Ct values are required to avoid artifacts. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Scaling of gene expression with transcription-factor fugacity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weinert, Franz M; Brewster, Robert C; Rydenfelt, Mattias; Phillips, Rob; Kegel, Willem K

    2014-01-01

    The proteins associated with gene regulation are often shared between multiple pathways simultaneously. By way of contrast, models in regulatory biology often assume these pathways act independently. We demonstrate a framework for calculating the change in gene expression for the interacting case by

  19. Association of transforming growth factor-ß3 gene polymorphism ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genotyping for the TGF-β3 gene using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) method and BslI restriction endonuclease showed a mutation in 294-bp fragment located on the fourth intron of chromosome 5. Polymorphism in TGF-β3 gene was significantly (P < 0.1) associated with ...

  20. Identification of transcription-factor genes expressed in the Arabidopsis female gametophyte

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang Il-Ho

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In flowering plants, the female gametophyte is typically a seven-celled structure with four cell types: the egg cell, the central cell, the synergid cells, and the antipodal cells. These cells perform essential functions required for double fertilization and early seed development. Differentiation of these distinct cell types likely involves coordinated changes in gene expression regulated by transcription factors. Therefore, understanding female gametophyte cell differentiation and function will require dissection of the gene regulatory networks operating in each of the cell types. These efforts have been hampered because few transcription factor genes expressed in the female gametophyte have been identified. To identify such genes, we undertook a large-scale differential expression screen followed by promoter-fusion analysis to detect transcription-factor genes transcribed in the Arabidopsis female gametophyte. Results Using quantitative reverse-transcriptase PCR, we analyzed 1,482 Arabidopsis transcription-factor genes and identified 26 genes exhibiting reduced mRNA levels in determinate infertile 1 mutant ovaries, which lack female gametophytes, relative to ovaries containing female gametophytes. Spatial patterns of gene transcription within the mature female gametophyte were identified for 17 transcription-factor genes using promoter-fusion analysis. Of these, ten genes were predominantly expressed in a single cell type of the female gametophyte including the egg cell, central cell and the antipodal cells whereas the remaining seven genes were expressed in two or more cell types. After fertilization, 12 genes were transcriptionally active in the developing embryo and/or endosperm. Conclusions We have shown that our quantitative reverse-transcriptase PCR differential-expression screen is sufficiently sensitive to detect transcription-factor genes transcribed in the female gametophyte. Most of the genes identified in this

  1. Problem-Based Test: The Effect of Fibroblast Growth Factor on Gene Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2011-01-01

    This paper shows the results of an experiment in which the effects of fibroblast growth factor (FGF), actinomycin D (Act D; an inhibitor of transcription), and cycloheximide (CHX; an inhibitor of translation) were studied on the expression of two genes: a gene called "Fnk" and the gene coding for glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH).…

  2. Transcription factor binding site enrichment analysis predicts drivers of altered gene expression in nonalcoholic steatohepatitis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lake, A.D.; Chaput, A.L.; Novák, Petr; Cherrington, N.J.; Smith, C.L.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 122, December 15 (2016), s. 62-71 ISSN 0006-2952 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Transcription factor * Liver * Gene expression * Bioinformatics Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 4.581, year: 2016

  3. Homoclinic chaos in axisymmetric Bianchi IX cosmologies reexamined

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soares, I. Damiao; Stuchi, T.J.

    2005-01-01

    The dynamics of Bianchi IX models with two scale factors A(t) and B(t) is reexamined. The matter content of the model is assumed to be comoving dust plus a positive cosmological constant. We make a complete numerical construction of topological structures present in the phase space of the model, as the center manifold of periodic orbits and the stable and unstable cylinders of orbits that emerge from the center manifold, associated to a saddle-center critical point. We exhibit the homoclinic intersections of the unstable and stable cylinders that produce homoclinic chaos in the models. A=0 is not a singularity of the Hamiltonian dynamics and any truncation of the dynamics at A=0 is bound to a loss of information. We make an explicit construction of a set with a horseshoe structure in the A>0 region, of initial conditions corresponding to initially expanding universes. We show that the dynamics of this set is chaotic even if restricted to the region A>0 and has the Einstein universe configuration as a chaotic scatterer. The result however demands the information of the Hamiltonian dynamics in whole phase space, including the region A<0. This refutes recent claims that no homoclinic chaos is present in the dynamics of the model

  4. An Allele of an Ancestral Transcription Factor Dependent on a Horizontally Acquired Gene Product

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, H. Deborah; Jewett, Mollie W.; Groisman, Eduardo A.

    2012-01-01

    Changes in gene regulatory circuits often give rise to phenotypic differences among closely related organisms. In bacteria, these changes can result from alterations in the ancestral genome and/or be brought about by genes acquired by horizontal transfer. Here, we identify an allele of the ancestral transcription factor PmrA that requires the horizontally acquired pmrD gene product to promote gene expression. We determined that a single amino acid difference between the PmrA proteins from the...

  5. Action of the protoporphyrin-Ix (Pp-Ix) in the life period of Drosophila mutants deficient in endogenous antioxidants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vidal E, L. M.

    2012-01-01

    The human being is daily exposed to free radicals or reactive oxygen species (Ros), as a result of the breathing and the interactions with xenobiotics that can cause irreversible lesions in molecules and cellular structures and that they are associated to diseases like the cancer, neuro degenerative and to the acceleration of the normal process of aging. Fortunately, to reduce the damaging effect of the Ros the cell has endogenous antioxidant systems constituted by antioxidant enzymes as: the superoxide dismutase (Sod), the catalase (Cat), and the glutathione peroxidase and reductase. Even, when these systems are not enough, we find to the exogenous antioxidants that cooperate in the balance of the Ros, as the porphyrins that include to the chlorophyllin, the hemin and the bilirubin among others. The protoporphyrin-Ix (Pp-Ix) is a tetra pyrrole without metallic center with antimutagenic and antioxidant activity similar to that of the chlorophyllin. However, is also known that their over-expression has toxic effects, because induces Ros. In Drosophila melanogaster, recently was found that the Pp-Ix have dual action anti and persistent mutagenic. One of their possible mechanism to act like mutagen is through the Ros induction. To evaluate this possibility and based in that the increase in the Ros levels can accelerate the aging process, in the present work the Pp-Ix role was evaluated, in the life period of Drosophila melanogaster strains deficient in Sod and Cat, sensitive to radiation or oxidative stress (rad, whd and flr 3 ) and a wild one as control (C-S). Females and males of each strain were treated chronically for separate with sucrose or Pp-Ix and every 15 days a group of each sex was irradiated with 10 Gy of gamma rays. The results indicated that the chronic treatment with Pp-Ix and in combination with radiation, increased the life period of the C-S strain. The Sod strain had a contrary effect and this effect was pronounced with the combined treatment of Pp-Ix

  6. Co-factors necessary for PPAR mediated transactivation of endogenous target genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grøntved, Lars; Nielsen, Ronni; Stunnenberg, Henk

    of endogenous target gene in different cell types are elusive. To mutually compare the ability of the PPAR subtypes to activate endogenous target genes in a given cell, PPARa, PPARb/d and PPARg2 were HA tagged and rapidly, equally and synchronously expressed using adenoviral delivery. Within a few hours after...... subtype specific activation of target genes. Accumulating evidence suggests that transcriptional co-factors can function as master regulators for nuclear receptors and impose promoter selectivity. To study co-factor necessity for PPAR mediated transactivation of endogenous target genes, specific co...

  7. Exploring matrix factorization techniques for significant genes identification of Alzheimer’s disease microarray gene expression data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Xiaohua

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The wide use of high-throughput DNA microarray technology provide an increasingly detailed view of human transcriptome from hundreds to thousands of genes. Although biomedical researchers typically design microarray experiments to explore specific biological contexts, the relationships between genes are hard to identified because they are complex and noisy high-dimensional data and are often hindered by low statistical power. The main challenge now is to extract valuable biological information from the colossal amount of data to gain insight into biological processes and the mechanisms of human disease. To overcome the challenge requires mathematical and computational methods that are versatile enough to capture the underlying biological features and simple enough to be applied efficiently to large datasets. Methods Unsupervised machine learning approaches provide new and efficient analysis of gene expression profiles. In our study, two unsupervised knowledge-based matrix factorization methods, independent component analysis (ICA and nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF are integrated to identify significant genes and related pathways in microarray gene expression dataset of Alzheimer’s disease. The advantage of these two approaches is they can be performed as a biclustering method by which genes and conditions can be clustered simultaneously. Furthermore, they can group genes into different categories for identifying related diagnostic pathways and regulatory networks. The difference between these two method lies in ICA assume statistical independence of the expression modes, while NMF need positivity constrains to generate localized gene expression profiles. Results In our work, we performed FastICA and non-smooth NMF methods on DNA microarray gene expression data of Alzheimer’s disease respectively. The simulation results shows that both of the methods can clearly classify severe AD samples from control samples, and

  8. Improved murine glioma detection following modified diet and photobleaching of skin PpIX fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, Summer L.; O'Hara, Julia A.; Hoopes, P. Jack; Pogue, Brian W.

    2007-02-01

    The Aminolevulinic Acid (ALA) - Protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) system is unique in the world of photosensitizers in that the prodrug ALA is enzymatically transformed via the tissue of interest into fluorescently detectable levels of PpIX. This system can be used to monitor cellular metabolism of tumor tissue for applications such as therapy monitoring. Detecting PpIX fluorescence noninvasively has proven difficult due to the high levels of PpIX produced in the skin compared to other tissue both with and without ALA administration. In the current study, methods to decrease skin PpIX autofluorescence and skin PpIX fluorescence following ALA administration have been examined. Use of a purified diet is found to decrease both skin PpIX autofluorescence and skin PpIX fluorescence following ALA administration, while addition of a broad spectrum antibiotic to the water shows little effect. Following ALA administration, improved brain tumor detection is seen when skin PpIX fluorescence is photobleached via blue light prior to transmission spectroscopic measurements of tumor bearing and control animals. Both of these methods to decrease skin PpIX autofluorescence and skin PpIX fluorescence following ALA administration are shown to have a large effect on the ability to detect tumor tissue PpIX fluorescence noninvasively in vivo.

  9. Medusa structure of the gene regulatory network: dominance of transcription factors in cancer subtype classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yuchun; Feng, Ying; Trivedi, Niraj S; Huang, Sui

    2011-05-01

    Gene expression profiles consisting of ten thousands of transcripts are used for clustering of tissue, such as tumors, into subtypes, often without considering the underlying reason that the distinct patterns of expression arise because of constraints in the realization of gene expression profiles imposed by the gene regulatory network. The topology of this network has been suggested to consist of a regulatory core of genes represented most prominently by transcription factors (TFs) and microRNAs, that influence the expression of other genes, and of a periphery of 'enslaved' effector genes that are regulated but not regulating. This 'medusa' architecture implies that the core genes are much stronger determinants of the realized gene expression profiles. To test this hypothesis, we examined the clustering of gene expression profiles into known tumor types to quantitatively demonstrate that TFs, and even more pronounced, microRNAs, are much stronger discriminators of tumor type specific gene expression patterns than a same number of randomly selected or metabolic genes. These findings lend support to the hypothesis of a medusa architecture and of the canalizing nature of regulation by microRNAs. They also reveal the degree of freedom for the expression of peripheral genes that are less stringently associated with a tissue type specific global gene expression profile.

  10. Synthesis of [119mSn]-mesoporphyrin IX dichloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denissen, J.F.

    1990-01-01

    Tin mesoporphyrin IX dichloride (Sn-MPCl 2 ) is a heme oxygenase inhibitor of current clinical interest for the treatment of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia. The synthesis of [ 119m Sn]-MPCl 2 for drug metabolism and disposition studies is reported. [ 119m Sn]-MPCl 2 was prepared in 60% radiochemical yield by metalation of the porphyrin nucleus of mesoporphyrin IX dihydrochloride with tin(II)-119m acetate. The product had a specific activity of 43.4 mCi/mmol and a radiochemical purity of 99%, as determined by radio-HPLC analysis. (author)

  11. Lineage-specific transcription factors and the evolution of gene regulatory networks

    OpenAIRE

    Nowick, Katja; Stubbs, Lisa

    2010-01-01

    Nature is replete with examples of diverse cell types, tissues and body plans, forming very different creatures from genomes with similar gene complements. However, while the genes and the structures of proteins they encode can be highly conserved, the production of those proteins in specific cell types and at specific developmental time points might differ considerably between species. A full understanding of the factors that orchestrate gene expression will be essential to fully understand ...

  12. Analysis of the structural genes encoding M-factor in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe: identification of a third gene, mfm3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaerulff, S; Davey, William John; Nielsen, O

    1994-01-01

    that is not rescued by addition of exogenous M-factor. A mutational analysis reveals that all three mfm genes contribute to the production of M-factor. Their transcription is limited to M cells and requires the mat1-Mc and ste11 gene products. Each gene is induced when the cells are starved of nitrogen and further...

  13. Association of transforming growth factor-ß3 gene polymorphism ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2011-03-07

    ). Expression of transforming growth factor-beta s 1-4 in chicken embryo chondrocytes and myocytes. Dev. Biol. 143: 135-. 148. Javanrouh A, Banabazi MH, Esmaeilkhanian S, Amirinia C, Seyedabadi. HR, Emrani H (2006).

  14. Alternaria Toxins: Potential Virulence Factors and Genes Related to Pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukesh Meena

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Alternaria is an important fungus to study due to their different life style from saprophytes to endophytes and a very successful fungal pathogen that causes diseases to a number of economically important crops. Alternaria species have been well-characterized for the production of different host-specific toxins (HSTs and non-host specific toxins (nHSTs which depend upon their physiological and morphological stages. The pathogenicity of Alternaria species depends on host susceptibility or resistance as well as quantitative production of HSTs and nHSTs. These toxins are chemically low molecular weight secondary metabolites (SMs. The effects of toxins are mainly on different parts of cells like mitochondria, chloroplast, plasma membrane, Golgi complex, nucleus, etc. Alternaria species produce several nHSTs such as brefeldin A, tenuazonic acid, tentoxin, and zinniol. HSTs that act in very low concentrations affect only certain plant varieties or genotype and play a role in determining the host range of specificity of plant pathogens. The commonly known HSTs are AAL-, AK-, AM-, AF-, ACR-, and ACT-toxins which are named by their host specificity and these toxins are classified into different family groups. The HSTs are differentiated on the basis of bio-statistical and other molecular analyses. All these toxins have different mode of action, biochemical reactions and signaling mechanisms to cause diseases. Different species of Alternaria produced toxins which reveal its biochemical and genetic effects on itself as well as on its host cells tissues. The genes responsible for the production of HSTs are found on the conditionally dispensable chromosomes (CDCs which have been well characterized. Different bio-statistical methods like basic local alignment search tool (BLAST data analysis used for the annotation of gene prediction, pathogenicity-related genes may provide surprising knowledge in present and future.

  15. Alternaria Toxins: Potential Virulence Factors and Genes Related to Pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meena, Mukesh; Gupta, Sanjay K.; Swapnil, Prashant; Zehra, Andleeb; Dubey, Manish K.; Upadhyay, Ram S.

    2017-01-01

    Alternaria is an important fungus to study due to their different life style from saprophytes to endophytes and a very successful fungal pathogen that causes diseases to a number of economically important crops. Alternaria species have been well-characterized for the production of different host-specific toxins (HSTs) and non-host specific toxins (nHSTs) which depend upon their physiological and morphological stages. The pathogenicity of Alternaria species depends on host susceptibility or resistance as well as quantitative production of HSTs and nHSTs. These toxins are chemically low molecular weight secondary metabolites (SMs). The effects of toxins are mainly on different parts of cells like mitochondria, chloroplast, plasma membrane, Golgi complex, nucleus, etc. Alternaria species produce several nHSTs such as brefeldin A, tenuazonic acid, tentoxin, and zinniol. HSTs that act in very low concentrations affect only certain plant varieties or genotype and play a role in determining the host range of specificity of plant pathogens. The commonly known HSTs are AAL-, AK-, AM-, AF-, ACR-, and ACT-toxins which are named by their host specificity and these toxins are classified into different family groups. The HSTs are differentiated on the basis of bio-statistical and other molecular analyses. All these toxins have different mode of action, biochemical reactions and signaling mechanisms to cause diseases. Different species of Alternaria produced toxins which reveal its biochemical and genetic effects on itself as well as on its host cells tissues. The genes responsible for the production of HSTs are found on the conditionally dispensable chromosomes (CDCs) which have been well characterized. Different bio-statistical methods like basic local alignment search tool (BLAST) data analysis used for the annotation of gene prediction, pathogenicity-related genes may provide surprising knowledge in present and future. PMID:28848500

  16. Step out of the groove : Epigenetic gene control systems and engineered transcription factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verschure, Pernette J.; Visser, Astrid E.; Rots, Marianne G.; Hall, JC; Dunlap, JC; Friedmann, T; VanHeyningen,

    2006-01-01

    At the linear DNA level, gene activity is believed to be driven by binding of transcription factors, which subsequently recruit the RNA polymerase to the gene promoter region. However, it has become clear that transcriptional activation involves large complexes of many different proteins, which not

  17. Step out of the groove : epigenetic gene control systems and engineered transcription factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verschure, P.J.; Visser, A.E.; Rots, M.G.

    2006-01-01

    At the linear DNA level, gene activity is believed to be driven by binding of transcription factors, which subsequently recruit the RNA polymerase to the gene promoter region. However, it has become clear that transcriptional activation involves large complexes of many different proteins, which not

  18. Synergistic effect of electrical and chemical factors on endocytosis in micro-discharge plasma gene transfection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinno, M.; Ikeda, Y.; Motomura, H.; Isozaki, Y.; Kido, Y.; Satoh, S.

    2017-06-01

    We have developed a new micro-discharge plasma (MDP)-based gene transfection method, which transfers genes into cells with high efficiency and low cytotoxicity; however, the mechanism underlying the method is still unknown. Studies revealed that the N-acetylcysteine-mediated inhibition of reactive oxygen species (ROS) activity completely abolished gene transfer. In this study, we used laser-produced plasma to demonstrate that gene transfer does not occur in the absence of electrical factors. Our results show that both electrical and chemical factors are necessary for gene transfer inside cells by microplasma irradiation. This indicates that plasma-mediated gene transfection utilizes the synergy between electrical and chemical factors. The electric field threshold required for transfection was approximately 1 kV m-1 in our MDP system. This indicates that MDP irradiation supplies sufficient concentrations of ROS, and the stimulation intensity of the electric field determines the transfection efficiency in our system. Gene transfer by plasma irradiation depends mainly on endocytosis, which accounts for at least 80% of the transfer, and clathrin-mediated endocytosis is a dominant endocytosis. In plasma-mediated gene transfection, alterations in electrical and chemical factors can independently regulate plasmid DNA adhesion and triggering of endocytosis, respectively. This implies that plasma characteristics can be adjusted according to target cell requirements, and the transfection process can be optimized with minimum damage to cells and maximum efficiency. This may explain how MDP simultaneously achieves high transfection efficiency with minimal cell damage.

  19. The association of environmental, individual factors, and dopamine pathway gene variation with smoking cessation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Suyun; Wang, Qiang; Pan, Lulu; Yang, Xiaorong; Li, Huijie; Jiang, Fan; Zhang, Nan; Han, Mingkui; Jia, Chongqi

    2017-09-01

    This study aimed to examine whether dopamine (DA) pathway gene variation were associated with smoking cessation, and compare the relative importance of infulence factors on smoking cessation. Participants were recruited from 17 villages of Shandong Province, China. Twenty-five single nucleotide polymorphisms in 8 DA pathway genes were genotyped. Weighted gene score of each gene was used to analyze the whole gene effect. Logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios (OR) of the total gene score for smoking cessation. Dominance analysis was employed to compare the relative importance of individual, heaviness of smoking, psychological and genetic factors on smoking cessation. 415 successful spontaneous smoking quitters served as the cases, and 404 unsuccessful quitters served as the controls. A significant negative association of total DA pathway gene score and smoking cessation was observed (p smoking cessation was heaviness of smoking score (42%), following by individual (40%), genetic (10%) and psychological score (8%). In conclusion, although the DA pathway gene variation was significantly associated with successful smoking cessation, heaviness of smoking and individual factors had bigger effect than genetic factors on smoking cessation.

  20. TF Target Mapper: A BLAST search tool for the identification of Transcription Factor target genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van der Spek Peter

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the current era of high throughput genomics a major challenge is the genome-wide identification of target genes for specific transcription factors. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP allows the isolation of in vivo binding sites of transcription factors and provides a powerful tool for examining gene regulation. Crosslinked chromatin is immunoprecipitated with antibodies against specific transcription factors, thus enriching for sequences bound in vivo by these factors in the immunoprecipitated DNA. Cloning and sequencing the immunoprecipitated sequences allows identification of transcription factor target genes. Routinely, thousands of such sequenced clones are used in BLAST searches to map their exact location in the genome and the genes located in the vicinity. These genes represent potential targets of the transcription factor of interest. Such bioinformatics analysis is very laborious if performed manually and for this reason there is a need for developing bioinformatic tools to automate and facilitate it. Results In order to facilitate this analysis we generated TF Target Mapper (Transcription Factor Target Mapper. TF Target Mapper is a BLAST search tool allowing rapid extraction of annotated information on genes around each hit. It combines sequence cleaning/filtering, pattern searching and BLAST searches with extraction of information on genes located around each BLAST hit and comparisons of the output list of genes or gene ontology IDs with user-implemented lists. We successfully applied and tested TF Target Mapper to analyse sequences bound in vivo by the transcription factor GATA-1. We show that TF Target Mapper efficiently extracted information on genes around ChIPed sequences, thus identifying known (e.g. α-globin and ζ-globin and potentially novel GATA-1 gene targets. Conclusion TF Target Mapper is a very efficient BLAST search tool that allows the rapid extraction of annotated information on the genes

  1. Factors affecting the gene expression of in vitro cultured human preimplantation embryos

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mantikou, E.; Jonker, M.J.; Wong, K.M.; van Montfoort, A.P.A.; de Jong, M.; Breit, T.M.; Repping, S.; Mastenbroek, S.

    2016-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION: What is the relative effect of common environmental and biological factors on transcriptome changes during human preimplantation development? SUMMARY ANSWER: Developmental stage and maternal age had a larger effect on the global gene expression profile of human preimplantation

  2. Available nitrogen is the key factor influencing soil microbial functional gene diversity in tropical rainforest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Jing; Liu, Xueduan; Lu, Hui; Xu, Han; Li, Yide; Deng, Ye; Li, Diqiang; Zhang, Yuguang

    2015-08-20

    Tropical rainforests cover over 50% of all known plant and animal species and provide a variety of key resources and ecosystem services to humans, largely mediated by metabolic activities of soil microbial communities. A deep analysis of soil microbial communities and their roles in ecological processes would improve our understanding on biogeochemical elemental cycles. However, soil microbial functional gene diversity in tropical rainforests and causative factors remain unclear. GeoChip, contained almost all of the key functional genes related to biogeochemical cycles, could be used as a specific and sensitive tool for studying microbial gene diversity and metabolic potential. In this study, soil microbial functional gene diversity in tropical rainforest was analyzed by using GeoChip technology. Gene categories detected in the tropical rainforest soils were related to different biogeochemical processes, such as carbon (C), nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) cycling. The relative abundance of genes related to C and P cycling detected mostly derived from the cultured bacteria. C degradation gene categories for substrates ranging from labile C to recalcitrant C were all detected, and gene abundances involved in many recalcitrant C degradation gene categories were significantly (P The relative abundance of genes related to N cycling detected was significantly (P the uncultured bacteria. The gene categories related to ammonification had a high relative abundance. Both canonical correspondence analysis and multivariate regression tree analysis showed that soil available N was the most correlated with soil microbial functional gene structure. Overall high microbial functional gene diversity and different soil microbial metabolic potential for different biogeochemical processes were considered to exist in tropical rainforest. Soil available N could be the key factor in shaping the soil microbial functional gene structure and metabolic potential.

  3. Expression of CA-IX is associated with advanced stage tumors and poor survival in oral squamous cell carcinoma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Sayáns, Mario; Suárez-Peñaranda, José Manuel; Pilar, Gayoso-Diz; Supuran, Claudiu T; Pastorekova, Silvia; Barros-Angueira, Francisco; Gándara-Rey, José Manuel; García-García, Abel

    2012-10-01

    Carbonic anhydrases (CAs), a group of ubiquitously expressed metalloenzymes, are involved in numerous physiological and pathological processes, including tumorigenicity. Specifically, CA-IX has been primarily found in hypoxic tumor tissues. This is a retrospective study of tumors from the Tissue Bank of the Pathology Department of the University Hospital of Santiago de Compostela. We selected 50 oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCCs) using Tissue Microarray (TMA) technology. The immunohistochemical study was performed to determine CA-IX expression. The resulting data were subject to statistical analysis and survival curves. Of the 50 cases, 23 were detected in early stages (I and II) and 27 in advanced stages (III and IV). In the first year, almost 50% of patients in stages III-IV died, which contrasted with those patients in initial stages who registered a survival rate of 80% (P = 0.019). Regarding the expression of CA-IX, nine cases (18%) were negative, 18 cases (36%) were moderate, while 23 cases (46%) were intense. Tumors in stages I-II showed a positivity of 52.6%; however, in advanced stages, the percentage reached 95.5% (P = 0.002). Regarding CA-IX expression and survival, patients with tumors with strong staining had a lower average survival time (13.8 months) than patients with negative or weak-moderate staining (33.4 and 32.8 months, respectively), log-rank=6.1, P value=0.0484. Early diagnosis of these tumors is essential to improve patient survival. CA-IX expression augments with increasing tumor stage, probably related with the degree of hypoxia; thus, its measurement can be used as a prognostic factor. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  4. 46 CFR 57.02-2 - Adoption of section IX of the ASME Code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Adoption of section IX of the ASME Code. 57.02-2 Section... AND BRAZING General Requirements § 57.02-2 Adoption of section IX of the ASME Code. (a) The... accordance with section IX of the ASME (American Society of Mechanical Engineers) Code, as limited, modified...

  5. Real-World Analysis of Dispensed IUs of Coagulation Factor IX and Resultant Expenditures in Hemophilia B Patients Receiving Standard Half-life Versus Extended Half-life Products and Those Switching from Standard Half-life to Extended Half-life Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tortella, Bartholomew J; Alvir, José; McDonald, Margaret; Spurden, Dean; Fogarty, Patrick F; Chhabra, Amit; Pleil, Andreas M

    2018-01-24

    Hemophilia B requires replacement therapy with factor IX (FIX) coagulation products to treat and prevent bleeding episodes. A recently introduced extended half-life (EHL) recombinant FIX replacement product provided the opportunity to compare the amount of dispensed factor and expenditures for EHL treatment compared with a standard half-life (SHL) product. To determine factor international units (IUs) dispensed and expenditures associated with switching from nonacog alfa, the most commonly used SHL replacement product, to eftrenonacog alfa, an EHL FIX replacement product. Two U.S. claims databases were analyzed. A large national specialty pharmacy dispensation claims database was used to identify the number of IUs dispensed and monthly charges for all patients with hemophilia B from April 2015 to June 2016. Truven Health MarketScan Research Databases (January 2010-July 2016) were used to identify IUs and expenditures for patients with claims data for at least 3 months before and after switching from the SHL to the EHL product. Medians for IUs and expenditures are presented to accommodate for skewness of data distribution. The national specialty pharmacy database analysis included 296 patients with moderate or severe hemophilia B (233 on SHL; 94 on EHL). Median monthly factor dispensed was 11% lower (2,142 IU) in the EHL versus SHL cohort over the study period, while individual monthly reductions ranged from 32% to 47% (9,838 IU to 16,514 IU). Using the wholesale acquisition cost, the median per-patient monthly factor expenditures over the 15-month study period were 94% higher ($23,005) for the EHL than for the SHL product. Individual median monthly expenditure differences ranged from 15% ($6,562) to 49% ($19,624). In the Truven database, 14 patients switched from the SHL to the EHL product. The amount of factor dispensed was variable; in the 1-year period before and after the switch from the SHL to the EHL product, mean IUs dispensed decreased by 3,005 IU, while

  6. Ares I-X Malfunction Turn Range Safety Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaty, J. R.

    2011-01-01

    Ares I-X was the designation given to the flight test version of the Ares I rocket which was developed by NASA (also known as the Crew Launch Vehicle (CLV) component of the Constellation Program). The Ares I-X flight test vehicle achieved a successful flight test on October 28, 2009, from Pad LC-39B at Kennedy Space Center, Florida (KSC). As part of the flight plan approval for the test vehicle, a range safety malfunction turn analysis was performed to support the risk assessment and vehicle destruct criteria development processes. Several vehicle failure scenarios were identified which could have caused the vehicle trajectory to deviate from its normal flight path. The effects of these failures were evaluated with an Ares I-X 6 degrees-of-freedom (6-DOF) digital simulation, using the Program to Optimize Simulated Trajectories Version II (POST2) simulation tool. The Ares I-X simulation analysis provided output files containing vehicle trajectory state information. These were used by other risk assessment and vehicle debris trajectory simulation tools to determine the risk to personnel and facilities in the vicinity of the launch area at KSC, and to develop the vehicle destruct criteria used by the flight test range safety officer in the event of a flight test anomaly of the vehicle. The simulation analysis approach used for this study is described, including descriptions of the failure modes which were considered and the underlying assumptions and ground rules of the study.

  7. Title IX and Sexual Harassment of Student Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolohan, John T.

    1995-01-01

    This article reviews what constitutes sexual harassment in sports by examining Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 and the effect it has had on charges of sexual harrassment in educational institutions. Athletic administrators are provided with strategies and recommendations to help schools and athletic departments develop sexual…

  8. Proceedings of the IX International Conference on Particles, Strings ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Proceedings of the IX International Conference on Particles, Strings and Cosmology (PASCOS 2003) - Part I. pp 147-148. Preface · D P Roy Sunanda Banerjee K Sridhar · More Details Fulltext PDF. pp 149-161. Precision tests of the standard model, the Higgs, and new physics · Guido Altarelli · More Details Abstract Fulltext ...

  9. Phase-space dynamics of Bianchi IX cosmological models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soares, I.D.

    1985-01-01

    The complex phase-space dynamical behaviour of a class of Biachi IX cosmological models is discussed, as the chaotic gravitational collapse due Poincare's homoclinic phenomena, and the n-furcation of periodic orbits and tori in the phase space of the models. Poincare maps which show this behaviour are constructed merically and applications are discussed. (Author) [pt

  10. Secondary Athletic Administrators' Perceptions of Title IX Policy Changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, Gabriel Grawe

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate North Dakota's Normal Competitive Region (NDNCR) high school athletic administrators' perceptions of 2010 Title IX policy changes respective to their athletic programs. Quantitative and qualitative data were collected to investigate the perceptions. Quantitatively, perception data were gathered from a…

  11. Bianchi type IX string cosmological model in general relativity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. We have investigated Bianchi type IX string cosmological models in general relativity. To get a determinate solution, we have assumed a condition p = λ i.e. rest energy density for a cloud of strings is equal to the string tension density. The various physical and geometrical aspects of the models are also discussed.

  12. A Clash of Titans: College Football v. Title IX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieronek, Catherine

    1994-01-01

    Title IX of the Educational Amendments of 1972, Civil Rights Act of 1971, designed to ensure equal educational opportunity for men and women, is reviewed as it pertains to college athletics. Related litigation and National Collegiate Athletic Association efforts to promote compliance are examined, an argument for excluding revenue-producing sports…

  13. Bianchi type IX string cosmological model in general relativity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We have investigated Bianchi type IX string cosmological models in general relativity. To get a determinate solution, we have assumed a condition ρ= i.e. rest energy density for a cloud of strings is equal to the string tension density. The various physical and geometrical aspects of the models are also discussed.

  14. Counselor Education and Title IX: Current Perceptions and Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welfare, Laura E.; Wagstaff, Jennifer; Haynes, Jenna R.

    2017-01-01

    This national survey of counselor educator perceptions of the Title IX requirement to report student disclosures of gender-based discrimination revealed the need for greater clarity about faculty strategies for serving counseling program students while upholding the federal law. The authors describe the recent expansion of the requirements and…

  15. IX : An OS for datacenter applications with aggressive networking requirements

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2014-01-01

    The conventional wisdom is that aggressive networking requirements, such as high packet rates for small messages and microsecond-scale tail latency, are best addressed outside the kernel, in a user-level networking stack. We present IX, a dataplane operating system designed to support low-latency, high-throughput and high-connection count applications.  Like classic operating systems such as Linux, IX provides strong protection guarantees to the networking stack.  However, and unlike classic operating systems, IX is designed for the ground up to support applications with aggressive networking requirements on dense multi-core platforms with 10GbE and 40GbE Ethernet NICs.  IX outperforms Linux by an order of magnitude on micro benchmarks, and by up to 3.6x when running an unmodified memcached, a popular key-value store. The presentation is based on the joint work with Adam Belay, George Prekas, Ana Klimovic, Sam Grossman and Christos Kozyrakis, published at OSDI 2014; Best P...

  16. Study of primitive universe in the Bianchi IX model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsas, G.E.A.

    1988-03-01

    The theory of general relativity is used to study the homogeneous cosmological model Bianch IX with isometry group SO(3) near the cosmological singularity. The Bogoyavlenskii-Novikov formalism to explain the anusual behaviour of the Liapunov exponent associated with this chaotic system, is introduced. (author) [pt

  17. Dynamic of exact perturbations in Bianchi IX type cosmological models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mello Neto, J.R.T. de.

    1985-01-01

    The dynamic of Bianchi IX type cosmological models is studied, after reducing Einstein equations to Hamiltonian system. Using the Melnikov method, the existence of chaos in the dynamic of these models is proved, and some numerical experiments are carried out. (M.C.K.) [pt

  18. Protoporphyrin IX-induced structural and functional changes in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    SUSMITA SIL, TANIA BOSE, DIBYENDU ROY and ABHAY SANKAR CHAKRABORTI*. Department of Biophysics, Molecular Biology and Genetics, University College of Science,. 92, Acharyya Prafulla Chandra Road, Kolkata 700 009, India. *Corresponding author (Email, aschak@cubmb.ernet.in). Protoporphyrin IX and its ...

  19. Intersex (ix) mutations of Drosophila melanogaster cause ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In Drosophila, a hierarchy of regulatory genes control somatic sexual differences (Baker 1989; Burtis and ... also function independently of dsx to regulate other aspects of sexual differentiation in tissue-specific manner. .... bination, for facilitating the analysis of single and double mutant genotypes. Double homozygote males ...

  20. Ares I-X Flight Data Evaluation: Executive Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huebner, Lawrence D.; Waits, David A.; Lewis, Donny L.; Richards, James S.; Coates, R. H., Jr.; Cruit, Wendy D.; Bolte, Elizabeth J.; Bangham, Michal E.; Askins, Bruce R.; Trausch, Ann N.

    2011-01-01

    NASA's Constellation Program (CxP) successfully launched the Ares I-X flight test vehicle on October 28, 2009. The Ares I-X flight was a developmental flight test to demonstrate that this very large, long, and slender vehicle could be controlled successfully. The flight offered a unique opportunity for early engineering data to influence the design and development of the Ares I crew launch vehicle. As the primary customer for flight data from the Ares I-X mission, the Ares Projects Office (APO) established a set of 33 flight evaluation tasks to correlate flight results with prospective design assumptions and models. The flight evaluation tasks used Ares I-X data to partially validate tools and methodologies in technical disciplines that will ultimately influence the design and development of Ares I and future launch vehicles. Included within these tasks were direct comparisons of flight data with preflight predictions and post-flight assessments utilizing models and processes being applied to design and develop Ares I. The benefits of early development flight testing were made evident by results from these flight evaluation tasks. This overview provides summary information from assessment of the Ares I-X flight test data and represents a small subset of the detailed technical results. The Ares Projects Office published a 1,600-plus-page detailed technical report that documents the full set of results. This detailed report is subject to the International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR) and is available in the Ares Projects Office archives files.

  1. Robust Nonnegative Matrix Factorization via Joint Graph Laplacian and Discriminative Information for Identifying Differentially Expressed Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling-Yun Dai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Differential expression plays an important role in cancer diagnosis and classification. In recent years, many methods have been used to identify differentially expressed genes. However, the recognition rate and reliability of gene selection still need to be improved. In this paper, a novel constrained method named robust nonnegative matrix factorization via joint graph Laplacian and discriminative information (GLD-RNMF is proposed for identifying differentially expressed genes, in which manifold learning and the discriminative label information are incorporated into the traditional nonnegative matrix factorization model to train the objective matrix. Specifically, L2,1-norm minimization is enforced on both the error function and the regularization term which is robust to outliers and noise in gene data. Furthermore, the multiplicative update rules and the details of convergence proof are shown for the new model. The experimental results on two publicly available cancer datasets demonstrate that GLD-RNMF is an effective method for identifying differentially expressed genes.

  2. The effect of carbonic anhydrase IX on focal contacts during cell spreading and migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia eCsaderova

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Carbonic anhydrase IX is a hypoxia-induced transmembrane enzyme linked with solid tumors. It catalyzes the reversible hydration of CO2 providing bicarbonate ions for intracellular neutralization and protons for extracellular acidosis, thereby supporting tumor cell survival and invasiveness. CA IX is the only human CA isoform containing the proteoglycan (PG domain in its extracellular part. The PG domain appears to enhance the catalytic activity of CA IX and mediate its binding to the extracellular matrix. Moreover, manipulation of the CA IX level by siRNA or overexpression modulates cell adhesion pathway so that in the presence of CA IX, cells display an increased rate of adhesion and spreading. Here we show that deletion of the PG domain as well as treatment with the PG-binding monoclonal antibody M75 can impair this CA IX effect. Accordingly, CA IX-expressing cells show more prominent and elongated maturing paxillin-stained focal contacts (FC than CA IX-negative controls, proving the role of CA IX in cell spreading. However, during active cell movement, CA IX is relocalized to lamellipodia and improves migration via its catalytic domain. Thus, we examined the influence of CA IX on FC turnover in these structures. While the lamellipodial regions lacking CA IX display dash-like adhesions, the CA IX-enriched neighboring regions exhibit dynamic dot-like FCs. These results suggest that CA IX can promote initial adhesion through its PG domain, but at the same time it facilitates formation of nascent adhesions at the leading edge of moving cells. Thereby it may allow for transmission of large forces and enhanced migration rate, presumably through catalytic activity and impact of pHe on FC dynamics. Thus, we provide the first evidence that CA IX protein localizes directly in focal adhesion structures and propose its functional relationship with the proteins involved in the regulation of FC turnover and maturation.

  3. Inflammatory genes and psychological factors predict induced shoulder pain phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Steven Z; Parr, Jeffrey J; Wallace, Margaret R; Wu, Samuel S; Borsa, Paul A; Dai, Yunfeng; Fillingim, Roger B

    2014-10-01

    The pain experience has multiple influences, but little is known about how specific biological and psychological factors interact to influence pain responses. The current study investigated the combined influences of genetic (pro-inflammatory) and psychological factors on several preclinical shoulder pain phenotypes. An exercise-induced shoulder injury model was used, and a priori selected genetic (IL1B, TNF/LTA region, and IL6 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP)) and psychological (anxiety, depression symptoms, pain catastrophizing, fear of pain, and kinesiophobia) factors were included as the predictors of interest. The phenotypes were pain intensity (5-d average and peak reported on numerical rating scale), upper extremity disability (5-d average and peak reported on the Quick Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand instrument), and duration of shoulder pain (d). After controlling for age, sex, and race, the genetic and psychological predictors were entered separately as main effects and interaction terms in regression models for each pain phenotype. Results from the recruited cohort (n = 190) indicated strong statistical evidence for the interactions between 1) TNF/LTA SNP rs2229094 and depression symptoms for average pain intensity and duration and 2) IL1B two SNP diplotype and kinesiophobia for average shoulder pain intensity. Moderate statistical evidence for prediction of additional shoulder pain phenotypes included interactions of kinesiophobia, fear of pain, or depressive symptoms with TNF/LTA rs2229094 and IL1B. These findings support the combined predictive ability of specific genetic and psychological factors for shoulder pain phenotypes by revealing novel combinations that may merit further investigation in clinical cohorts to determine their involvement in the transition from acute to chronic pain conditions.

  4. PTTG Binding Factor – a New Gene in Breast Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Watkins, Rachel J; Read, Martin L; Smith, Vicki E; Sharma, Neil; Reynolds, Gary M; Buckley, Laura; Doig, Craig; Campbell, Moray J; Lewy, Greg; Eggo, Margaret C; Loubiere, Laurence S; Franklyn, Jayne A; Boelaert, Kristien; McCabe, Christopher J

    2010-01-01

    PTTG Binding Factor (PBF; PTTG1IP) is a relatively uncharacterized oncoprotein whose function remains obscure. Because of the presence of putative oestrogen response elements (ERE) in its promoter, we assessed PBF regulation by oestrogen. PBF mRNA and protein expression were induced by both diethylstilbestrol and 17ß-estradiol in oestrogen receptor alpha (ERα) positive MCF-7 cells. Detailed analysis of the PBF promoter showed that the region −399 to −291 relative to the translational start si...

  5. Genome-wide identification and expression profiling of auxin response factor (ARF gene family in maize

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Yirong

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Auxin signaling is vital for plant growth and development, and plays important role in apical dominance, tropic response, lateral root formation, vascular differentiation, embryo patterning and shoot elongation. Auxin Response Factors (ARFs are the transcription factors that regulate the expression of auxin responsive genes. The ARF genes are represented by a large multigene family in plants. The first draft of full maize genome assembly has recently been released, however, to our knowledge, the ARF gene family from maize (ZmARF genes has not been characterized in detail. Results In this study, 31 maize (Zea mays L. genes that encode ARF proteins were identified in maize genome. It was shown that maize ARF genes fall into related sister pairs and chromosomal mapping revealed that duplication of ZmARFs was associated with the chromosomal block duplications. As expected, duplication of some ZmARFs showed a conserved intron/exon structure, whereas some others were more divergent, suggesting the possibility of functional diversification for these genes. Out of these 31 ZmARF genes, 14 possess auxin-responsive element in their promoter region, among which 7 appear to show small or negligible response to exogenous auxin. The 18 ZmARF genes were predicted to be the potential targets of small RNAs. Transgenic analysis revealed that increased miR167 level could cause degradation of transcripts of six potential targets (ZmARF3, 9, 16, 18, 22 and 30. The expressions of maize ARF genes are responsive to exogenous auxin treatment. Dynamic expression patterns of ZmARF genes were observed in different stages of embryo development. Conclusions Maize ARF gene family is expanded (31 genes as compared to Arabidopsis (23 genes and rice (25 genes. The expression of these genes in maize is regulated by auxin and small RNAs. Dynamic expression patterns of ZmARF genes in embryo at different stages were detected which suggest that maize ARF genes may

  6. Factors influencing codon usage of mitochondrial ND1 gene in pisces, aves and mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uddin, Arif; Choudhury, Monisha Nath; Chakraborty, Supriyo

    2017-11-01

    Animal mitochondrial genome harbours 13 protein coding genes which regulate the process of respiration. The mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase 1 (MT-ND1) gene, one of the 13 protein-coding genes, encodes the NADH dehydrogenase 1 enzyme of the respiratory chain. Analysis of codon usage bias (CUB) acquires importance for better understanding of the molecular biology, new gene discovery, design of transgenes and gene evolution. The MT-ND1 gene seems to be a good candidate for analyzing codon usage pattern, since no work has yet been reported. Moreover, it is still not clear which factors significantly influence the codon usage pattern. In the present study, comparative analysis of codon usage pattern, expression level and influencing factors for MT-ND1 gene from 100 different species each of pisces, aves and mammals were used for CUB analysis. Our result suggests that the gene is AT rich in pisces, aves and mammals and most of the nucleotides significantly differ among them as revealed from t-test. CUB was not remarkable as reflected by high value of effective number of codons and it also significantly differs among pisces, aves and mammals. Although we found that CUB is mainly influenced by natural selection and mutation pressure for MT-ND1 gene as suggested by correlation and correspondence analysis but neutrality plot further revealed that natural selection played a major role and mutation pressure played a minor role in codon usage pattern. Additionally, t-test analysis showed that the MT-ND1 gene has a wide significant discrepancy in codon choices in pisces, aves and mammals. This study has contributed to boost our understanding about the mechanism of distribution of the codons and the factors that may influence the evolution of the MT-ND1 gene. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and Mitochondria Research Society. All rights reserved.

  7. The Schizosaccharomyces pombe mam1 gene encodes an ABC transporter mediating secretion of M-factor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, P U; Davey, William John; Nielsen, O

    1997-01-01

    In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, cells of opposite mating type communicate via diffusible peptide pheromones prior to mating. We have cloned the S. pombe mam1 gene, which encodes a 1336-amino acid protein belonging to the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) superfamily. The mam1 gene is only...... expressed in M cells and the gene product is responsible for the secretion of the mating pheromone. M-factor, a nonapeptide that is S-farnesylated and carboxy-methylated on its C-terminal cysteine residue. The predicted Mam1 protein is highly homologous to mammalian multiple drug-resistance proteins...... and to the Saccharomyces cerevisiae STE6 gene product, which mediates export of a-factor mating pheromone. We show that STE6 can also mediate secretion of M-factor in S. pombe....

  8. Exploring the role of sigma factor gene expression on production by Corynebacterium glutamicum: sigma factor H and FMN as example

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hironori eTaniguchi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria are known to cope with environmental changes by using alternative sigma factors binding to RNA polymerase core enzyme. Sigma factor is one of the targets to modify transcription regulation in bacteria and to influence production capacities. In this study, the effect of overexpressing each annotated sigma factor gene in C. glutamicum WT was assayed using an IPTG inducible plasmid system and different IPTG concentrations. It was revealed that growth was severely decreased when sigD or sigH were overexpressed with IPTG concentrations higher than 50 μM. Overexpression of sigH led to an obvious phenotypic change, a yellow-colored supernatant. HPLC analysis revealed that riboflavin was excreted to the medium when sigH was overexpressed and DNA microarray analysis confirmed increased expression of riboflavin biosynthesis genes. In addition, genes for enzymes related to the pentose phosphate pathway and for enzymes dependent on FMN, FAD or NADPH as cofactor were upregulated when sigH was overexpressed. To test if sigH overexpression can be exploited for production of riboflavin-derived FMN or FAD, the endogenous gene for bifunctional riboflavin kinase/FMN adenyltransferase was co-expressed with sigH from a plasmid. Balanced expression of sigH and ribF improved accumulation of riboflavin (19.8 ± 0.3 μM and allowed for its conversion to FMN (33.1 ± 1.8 μM in the supernatant. While a proof-of-concept was reached, conversion was not complete and titers were not high. This study revealed that inducible and gradable overexpression of sigma factor genes is an interesting approach to switch gene expression profiles and to discover untapped potential of bacteria for chemical production.

  9. TF Target Mapper: a BLAST search tool for the identification of Transcription Factor target genes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Horsman (Sebastiaan); M.J. Moorhouse (Michael); V. de Jager (Victor); P.J. van der Spek (Peter); F.G. Grosveld (Frank); J. Strouboulis (John); E. Katsantoni (Eleni)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: In the current era of high throughput genomics a major challenge is the genome-wide identification of target genes for specific transcription factors. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) allows the isolation of in vivo binding sites of transcription factors and provides a

  10. Differential expression and interaction of host factors augment HIV-1 gene expression in neonatal mononuclear cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundaravaradan, Vasudha; Mehta, Roshni; Harris, David T.; Zack, Jerome A.; Ahmad, Nafees

    2010-01-01

    We have previously shown a higher level of HIV-1 replication and gene expression in neonatal (cord) blood mononuclear cells (CBMC) compared with adult blood cells (PBMC), which could be due to differential expression of host factors. We performed the gene expression profile of CBMC and PBMC and found that 8013 genes were expressed at higher levels in CBMC than PBMC and 8028 genes in PBMC than CBMC, including 1181 and 1414 genes upregulated after HIV-1 infection in CBMC and PBMC, respectively. Several transcription factors (NF-κB, E2F, HAT-1, TFIIE, Cdk9, Cyclin T1), signal transducers (STAT3, STAT5A) and cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10) were upregulated in CBMC than PBMC, which are known to influence HIV-1 replication. In addition, a repressor of HIV-1 transcription, YY1, was down regulated in CBMC than PBMC and several matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-7, -12, -14) were significantly upregulated in HIV-1 infected CBMC than PBMC. Furthermore, we show that CBMC nuclear extracts interacted with a higher extent to HIV-1 LTR cis-acting sequences, including NF-κB, NFAT, AP1 and NF-IL6 compared with PBMC nuclear extracts and retroviral based short hairpin RNA (shRNA) for STAT3 and IL-6 down regulated their own and HIV-1 gene expression, signifying that these factors influenced differential HIV-1 gene expression in CBMC than PBMC.

  11. Dynamics of chromatin accessibility and gene regulation by MADS-domain transcription factors in flower development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajoro, Alice; Madrigal, Pedro; Muiño, Jose M; Matus, José Tomás; Jin, Jian; Mecchia, Martin A; Debernardi, Juan M; Palatnik, Javier F; Balazadeh, Salma; Arif, Muhammad; Ó'Maoiléidigh, Diarmuid S; Wellmer, Frank; Krajewski, Pawel; Riechmann, José-Luis; Angenent, Gerco C; Kaufmann, Kerstin

    2014-03-03

    Development of eukaryotic organisms is controlled by transcription factors that trigger specific and global changes in gene expression programs. In plants, MADS-domain transcription factors act as master regulators of developmental switches and organ specification. However, the mechanisms by which these factors dynamically regulate the expression of their target genes at different developmental stages are still poorly understood. We characterized the relationship of chromatin accessibility, gene expression, and DNA binding of two MADS-domain proteins at different stages of Arabidopsis flower development. Dynamic changes in APETALA1 and SEPALLATA3 DNA binding correlated with changes in gene expression, and many of the target genes could be associated with the developmental stage in which they are transcriptionally controlled. We also observe dynamic changes in chromatin accessibility during flower development. Remarkably, DNA binding of APETALA1 and SEPALLATA3 is largely independent of the accessibility status of their binding regions and it can precede increases in DNA accessibility. These results suggest that APETALA1 and SEPALLATA3 may modulate chromatin accessibility, thereby facilitating access of other transcriptional regulators to their target genes. Our findings indicate that different homeotic factors regulate partly overlapping, yet also distinctive sets of target genes in a partly stage-specific fashion. By combining the information from DNA-binding and gene expression data, we are able to propose models of stage-specific regulatory interactions, thereby addressing dynamics of regulatory networks throughout flower development. Furthermore, MADS-domain TFs may regulate gene expression by alternative strategies, one of which is modulation of chromatin accessibility.

  12. Transcription Factors Encoded on Core and Accessory Chromosomes of Fusarium oxysporum Induce Expression of Effector Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Does, H. Charlotte; Schmidt, Sarah M.; Langereis, Léon; Hughes, Timothy R.

    2016-01-01

    Proteins secreted by pathogens during host colonization largely determine the outcome of pathogen-host interactions and are commonly called ‘effectors’. In fungal plant pathogens, coordinated transcriptional up-regulation of effector genes is a key feature of pathogenesis and effectors are often encoded in genomic regions with distinct repeat content, histone code and rate of evolution. In the tomato pathogen Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici (Fol), effector genes reside on one of four accessory chromosomes, known as the ‘pathogenicity’ chromosome, which can be exchanged between strains through horizontal transfer. The three other accessory chromosomes in the Fol reference strain may also be important for virulence towards tomato. Expression of effector genes in Fol is highly up-regulated upon infection and requires Sge1, a transcription factor encoded on the core genome. Interestingly, the pathogenicity chromosome itself contains 13 predicted transcription factor genes and for all except one, there is a homolog on the core genome. We determined DNA binding specificity for nine transcription factors using oligonucleotide arrays. The binding sites for homologous transcription factors were highly similar, suggesting that extensive neofunctionalization of DNA binding specificity has not occurred. Several DNA binding sites are enriched on accessory chromosomes, and expression of FTF1, its core homolog FTF2 and SGE1 from a constitutive promoter can induce expression of effector genes. The DNA binding sites of only these three transcription factors are enriched among genes up-regulated during infection. We further show that Ftf1, Ftf2 and Sge1 can activate transcription from their binding sites in yeast. RNAseq analysis revealed that in strains with constitutive expression of FTF1, FTF2 or SGE1, expression of a similar set of plant-responsive genes on the pathogenicity chromosome is induced, including most effector genes. We conclude that the Fol

  13. Transcription factors and stress response gene alterations in human keratinocytes following Solar Simulated Ultra Violet Radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marais, Thomas L Des; Kluz, Thomas; Xu, Dazhong; Zhang, Xiaoru; Gesumaria, Lisa; Matsui, Mary S; Costa, Max; Sun, Hong

    2017-10-19

    Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) from sunlight is the major effector for skin aging and carcinogenesis. However, genes and pathways altered by solar-simulated UVR (ssUVR), a mixture of UVA and UVB, are not well characterized. Here we report global changes in gene expression as well as associated pathways and upstream transcription factors in human keratinocytes exposed to ssUVR. Human HaCaT keratinocytes were exposed to either a single dose or 5 repetitive doses of ssUVR. Comprehensive analyses of gene expression profiles as well as functional annotation were performed at 24 hours post irradiation. Our results revealed that ssUVR modulated genes with diverse cellular functions changed in a dose-dependent manner. Gene expression in cells exposed to a single dose of ssUVR differed significantly from those that underwent repetitive exposures. While single ssUVR caused a significant inhibition in genes involved in cell cycle progression, especially G2/M checkpoint and mitotic regulation, repetitive ssUVR led to extensive changes in genes related to cell signaling and metabolism. We have also identified a panel of ssUVR target genes that exhibited persistent changes in gene expression even at 1 week after irradiation. These results revealed a complex network of transcriptional regulators and pathways that orchestrate the cellular response to ssUVR.

  14. Undifferentiated embryonic cell transcription factor 1 regulates ESC chromatin organization and gene expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kooistra, Susanne M; van den Boom, Vincent; Thummer, Rajkumar P

    2010-01-01

    Previous reports showed that embryonic stem (ES) cells contain hyperdynamic and globally transcribed chromatin-properties that are important for ES cell pluripotency and differentiation. Here, we demonstrate a role for undifferentiated embryonic cell transcription factor 1 (UTF1) in regulating ES...... cell chromatin structure. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation-on-chip analysis, we identified >1,700 UTF1 target genes that significantly overlap with previously identified Nanog, Oct4, Klf-4, c-Myc, and Rex1 targets. Gene expression profiling showed that UTF1 knock down results in increased expression...... of a large set of genes, including a significant number of UTF1 targets. UTF1 knock down (KD) ES cells are, irrespective of the increased expression of several self-renewal genes, Leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) dependent. However, UTF1 KD ES cells are perturbed in their differentiation in response...

  15. Transcription activation of a UV-inducible Clostridium perfringens bacteriocin gene by a novel sigma factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupuy, Bruno; Mani, Nagraj; Katayama, Seiichi; Sonenshein, Abraham L

    2005-02-01

    Expression of the plasmid-encoded Clostridium perfringens gene for bacteriocin BCN5 was shown to depend in vivo and in vitro on the activity of UviA protein. UviA, also plasmid-encoded, proved to be an RNA polymerase sigma factor and was also partly autoregulatory. The uviA gene has two promoters; one provided a UviA-independent, basal level of gene expression while the stronger, UviA-dependent promoter was only utilized after the cell experienced DNA damage. As a result, BCN5 synthesis is induced by treatment with UV light or mitomycin C. UviA is related to a special class of sigma factors found to date only in Clostridium species and responsible for activating transcription of toxin genes in Clostridium difficile, Clostridium tetani, and Clostridium botulinum.

  16. [Experimental approach to the gene therapy of motor neuron disease with the use of genes hypoxia-inducible factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismailov, Sh M; Barykova, Iu A; Shmarov, M M; Tarantul, V Z; Barskov, I V; Kucherianu, V G; Brylev, L V; Logunov, D Iu; Tutykhina, I L; Bocharov, E V; Zakharova, M N; Naroditskiĭ, B S; Illarioshkin, S N

    2014-05-01

    Motor neuron disease (MND), or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder characterized by a progressive loss of motor neurons in the spinal cord and the brain. Several angiogenic and neurogenic growth factors, such as the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), angiogenin (ANG), insulin-like growth factor (IGF) and others, have been shown to promote survival of the spinal motor neurons during ischemia. We constructed recombinant vectors using human adenovirus 5 (Ad5) carrying the VEGF, ANG or IGF genes under the control of the cytomegalovirus promoter. As a model for MND, we employed a transgenic mice strain, B6SJL-Tg (SOD1*G93A)d11 Gur/J that develops a progressive degeneration of the spinal motor neurons caused by the expression of a mutated Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase gene SOD1. Delivery of the therapeutic genes to the spinal motor neurons was done using the effect of the retrograde axonal transport after multiple injections of the Ad5-VEGF, Ad5-ANG and Ad5-IGF vectors and their combinations into the limbs and back muscles of the SOD1(G93A) mice. Viral transgene expression in the spinal cord motor neurons was confirmed by immunocytochemistry and RT-RCR. We assessed the neurological status, motor activity and lifespan of experimental and control animal groups. We discovered that SOD1(G93A) mice injected with the Ad5-VEGF + Ad5-ANG combination showed a 2-3 week delay in manifestation of the disease, higher motor activity at the advanced stages of the disease, and at least a 10% increase in the lifespan compared to the control and other experimental groups. These results support the safety and therapeutic efficacy of the tested recombinant treatment. We propose that the developed experimental MND treatment based on viral delivery of VEGF + ANG can be used as a basis for gene therapy drug development and testing in the preclinical and clinical trials of the MND.

  17. Patterns of positive selection of the myogenic regulatory factor gene family in vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiao; Yu, Qi; Huang, Ling; Liu, Qing-Xin

    2014-01-01

    The functional divergence of transcriptional factors is critical in the evolution of transcriptional regulation. However, the mechanism of functional divergence among these factors remains unclear. Here, we performed an evolutionary analysis for positive selection in members of the myogenic regulatory factor (MRF) gene family of vertebrates. We selected 153 complete vertebrate MRF nucleotide sequences from our analyses, which revealed substantial evidence of positive selection. Here, we show that sites under positive selection were more frequently detected and identified from the genes encoding the myogenic differentiation factors (MyoG and Myf6) than the genes encoding myogenic determination factors (Myf5 and MyoD). Additionally, the functional divergence within the myogenic determination factors or differentiation factors was also under positive selection pressure. The positive selection sites were more frequently detected from MyoG and MyoD than Myf6 and Myf5, respectively. Amino acid residues under positive selection were identified mainly in their transcription activation domains and on the surface of protein three-dimensional structures. These data suggest that the functional gain and divergence of myogenic regulatory factors were driven by distinct positive selection of their transcription activation domains, whereas the function of the DNA binding domains was conserved in evolution. Our study evaluated the mechanism of functional divergence of the transcriptional regulation factors within a family, whereby the functions of their transcription activation domains diverged under positive selection during evolution.

  18. Aggressive therapy improves cirrhosis in glycogen storage disease type IX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsilianidis, Laurie A; Fiske, Laurie M; Siegel, Sara; Lumpkin, Chris; Hoyt, Kate; Wasserstein, Melissa; Weinstein, David A

    2013-06-01

    Glycogen storage disease type IX (GSD IX) is described as a benign condition that often does not require treatment. Most patients with the disease are thought to outgrow the childhood manifestations, which include hepatomegaly, poor growth, and ketosis with or without hypoglycemia. Long term complications including fibrosis and cirrhosis have seldom been reported in the most common subtype, GSD IXα. We present two cases of children with GSD IXα who had fibrosis at the time of diagnosis in addition to the commonly reported disease manifestations. Structured therapy with frequent doses of uncooked cornstarch and protein supplementation was initiated, and both children responded with improved growth velocity, increased energy, decreased hepatomegaly and improved well-being. Additionally, radiographic features of fibrosis improved. We propose that GSD IXα is not a benign condition. Even in patients with a less severe presentation, consideration of a structured treatment regimen to improve quality of life appears warranted. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Star formation rate in Holmberg IX dwarf galaxy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anđelić M.M.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we use previously determined Hα fluxes for dwarf galaxy Holmberg IX (Arbutina et al. 2009 to calculate star formation rate (SFR in this galaxy. We discuss possible contaminations of Hα flux and, for the first time, we take into account optical emission from supernova remnants (SNRs as a possible source of contamination of Hα flux. Derived SFR for Holmberg IX is 3:4 x 10-4M.yr-1. Our value is lower then in previous studies, due to luminous shock-heated source M&H 9-10, possible hypernova remnant, which we excluded from the total Hα flux in our calculation of SFR.

  20. Bianchi-IX, Darboux-Halphen and Chazy-Ramanujan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanda, Sumanto; Guha, Partha; Roychowdhury, Raju

    2016-02-01

    Bianchi-IX four metrics are SU(2) invariant solutions of vacuum Einstein equation, for which the connection-wise self-dual case describes the Euler top, while the curvature-wise self-dual case yields the Ricci flat classical Darboux-Halphen system. It is possible to see such a solution exhibiting Ricci flow. The classical Darboux-Halphen system is a special case of the generalized one that arises from a reduction of the self-dual Yang-Mills equation and the solutions to the related homogeneous quadratic differential equations provide the desired metric. A few integrable and near-integrable dynamical systems related to the Darboux-Halphen system and occurring in the study of Bianchi-IX gravitational instanton have been listed as well. We explore in details whether self-duality implies integrability.

  1. Environmental factors influencing gene transfer agent (GTA mediated transduction in the subtropical ocean.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren D McDaniel

    Full Text Available Microbial genomic sequence analyses have indicated widespread horizontal gene transfer (HGT. However, an adequate mechanism accounting for the ubiquity of HGT has been lacking. Recently, high frequencies of interspecific gene transfer have been documented, catalyzed by Gene Transfer Agents (GTAs of marine α-Proteobacteria. It has been proposed that the presence of bacterial genes in highly purified viral metagenomes may be due to GTAs. However, factors influencing GTA-mediated gene transfer in the environment have not yet been determined. Several genomically sequenced strains containing complete GTA sequences similar to Rhodobacter capsulatus (RcGTA, type strain were screened to ascertain if they produced putative GTAs, and at what abundance. Five of nine marine strains screened to date spontaneously produced virus-like particles (VLP's in stationary phase. Three of these strains have demonstrated gene transfer activity, two of which were documented by this lab. These two strains Roseovarius nubinhibens ISM and Nitratireductor 44B9s, were utilized to produce GTAs designated RnGTA and NrGTA and gene transfer activity was verified in culture. Cell-free preparations of purified RnGTA and NrGTA particles from marked donor strains were incubated with natural microbial assemblages to determine the level of GTA-mediated gene transfer. In conjunction, several ambient environmental parameters were measured including lysogeny indicated by prophage induction. GTA production in culture systems indicated that approximately half of the strains produced GTA-like particles and maximal GTA counts ranged from 10-30% of host abundance. Modeling of GTA-mediated gene transfer frequencies in natural samples, along with other measured environmental variables, indicated a strong relationship between GTA mediated gene transfer and the combined factors of salinity, multiplicity of infection (MOI and ambient bacterial abundance. These results indicate that GTA

  2. The Schizosaccharomyces pombe mam1 gene encodes an ABC transporter mediating secretion of M-factor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, P U; Davey, William John; Nielsen, O

    1997-01-01

    In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, cells of opposite mating type communicate via diffusible peptide pheromones prior to mating. We have cloned the S. pombe mam1 gene, which encodes a 1336-amino acid protein belonging to the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) superfamily. The mam1 gene is only...... expressed in M cells and the gene product is responsible for the secretion of the mating pheromone. M-factor, a nonapeptide that is S-farnesylated and carboxy-methylated on its C-terminal cysteine residue. The predicted Mam1 protein is highly homologous to mammalian multiple drug-resistance proteins...

  3. HPRT gene mutation frequency and the factor of influence in adult peripheral blood lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Jingyong; Zheng Siying; Cui Fengmei; Wang Liuyi; Lao Qinhua; Wu Hongliang

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To study the HPRT gene loci mutation frequencies and the factor of influence in peripheral blood lymphocytes of adult with ages ranging from 21-50. Methods: HPRT gene mutation frequency (GMf) were examined by the technique of multinuclear cell assay. Relation between GMf and years were fitted with a computer. Results: Relation could be described by the following equation: y = 0.7555 + 0.0440x, r = 0.9829. Smoking has influence on GMf and sex hasn't. Conclusion: HPRT gene mutation frequency increases with increasing of age. Increasing rate is 0.00440% per year

  4. Arabidopsis MAP Kinase 4 regulates gene expression via transcription factor release in the nucleus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qiu, Jin-Long; Fiil, Berthe Katrine; Petersen, Klaus

    2008-01-01

    Plant and animal perception of microbes through pathogen surveillance proteins leads to MAP kinase signalling and the expression of defence genes. However, little is known about how plant MAP kinases regulate specific gene expression. We report that, in the absence of pathogens, Arabidopsis MAP...... supported by the suppression of PAD3 expression in mpk4-wrky33 double mutant backgrounds. Our data establish direct links between MPK4 and innate immunity and provide an example of how a plant MAP kinase can regulate gene expression by releasing transcription factors in the nucleus upon activation....

  5. The RFC2 gene encoding a subunit of replication factor C of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    OpenAIRE

    Noskov, V; Maki, S; Kawasaki, Y; Leem, S H; Ono, B; Araki, H; Pavlov, Y; Sugino, A

    1994-01-01

    Replication Factor C (RF-C) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a complex that consists of several different polypeptides ranging from 120- to 37 kDa (Yoder and Burgers, 1991; Fien and Stillman, 1992), similar to human RF-C. We have isolated a gene, RFC2, that appears to be a component of the yeast RF-C. The RFC2 gene is located on chromosome X of S. cerevisiae and is essential for cell growth. Disruption of the RFC2 gene led to a dumbbell-shaped terminal morphology, common to mutants having a def...

  6. Copper-dependent and -independent hypoxia-inducible factor-1 regulation of gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhen; Qiu, Liying; Lin, Chen; Yang, Hong; Fu, Haiying; Li, Rui; Kang, Y James

    2014-10-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) regulates the expression of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a process requiring copper (Cu) participation. HIF-1 is also involved in the expression of more than a hundred of genes, but it is unknown how HIF-1 differentially controls the expression of these genes timely and spatially. The present study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that Cu is not required for the expression of all HIF-1-regulated genes, thus exploring mechanistic insights into the differential control of multiple gene expression by one transcription factor. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were treated with siRNA targeting HIF-1α to define the essential role of HIF-1 in the regulation of BCL2/adenovirus E1B 19 kDa protein-interacting protein 3 (BNIP3) and insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF-2) expression. A Cu chelator, tetraethylenepentamine (TEPA), was used to reduce intracellular availability of Cu. In comparison, a zinc chelator, N,N,N',N'-tetrakis(2-pyridylmethyl) ethylenediamine (TPEN), was used to reduce intracellular zinc concentration. The expression of both BNIP3 and IGF-2 was completely suppressed in the HIF-1α deficient cells. The removal of Cu suppressed the expression of BNIP3, but did not affect that of IGF-2. The reduction of intracellular zinc did not cause the same effect. Further screening identified a group of genes whose expression required Cu and the others did not need Cu. The present study thus demonstrates Cu-dependent and -independent HIF-1 regulation of gene expression, indicating a mechanism for differential control of multiple gene expression by one transcription factor.

  7. CONCEPT MAPPING IN TEACHING SCIENCE AMONG IX STD STUDENTS

    OpenAIRE

    R. Sangeetha; Mrs. T. Sangeetha

    2017-01-01

    Concept Map is a graphic device in which the concepts are linked by propositions leading to the precision and enhancement of meaning of the concept.” It is a schematic device for representing a set of concept meanings embedded in a hierarchy from most general concept to specific concepts of a learning unit. The study aimed to examine the concept mapping in teaching science among IX std students. The investigator adopted experimental method to study the concept mapping in teaching science amon...

  8. Loop quantum cosmology of Bianchi IX: effective dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corichi, Alejandro; Montoya, Edison

    2017-03-01

    We study solutions to the effective equations for the Bianchi IX class of spacetimes within loop quantum cosmology (LQC). We consider Bianchi IX models whose matter content is a massless scalar field, by numerically solving the loop quantum cosmology effective equations, with and without inverse triad corrections. The solutions are classified using certain geometrically motivated classical observables. We show that both effective theories—with lapse N  =  V and N  =  1—resolve the big bang singularity and reproduce the classical dynamics far from the bounce. Moreover, due to the positive spatial curvature, there is an infinite number of bounces and recollapses. We study the limit of large field momentum and show that both effective theories reproduce the same dynamics, thus recovering general relativity. We implement a procedure to identify amongst the Bianchi IX solutions, those that behave like k  =  0,1 FLRW as well as Bianchi I, II, and VII0 models. The effective solutions exhibit Bianchi I phases with Bianchi II transitions and also Bianchi VII0 phases, which had not been studied before. We comment on the possible implications of these results for a quantum modification to the classical BKL behaviour.

  9. Loop quantum cosmology of Bianchi IX: effective dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corichi, Alejandro; Montoya, Edison

    2017-01-01

    We study solutions to the effective equations for the Bianchi IX class of spacetimes within loop quantum cosmology (LQC). We consider Bianchi IX models whose matter content is a massless scalar field, by numerically solving the loop quantum cosmology effective equations, with and without inverse triad corrections. The solutions are classified using certain geometrically motivated classical observables. We show that both effective theories—with lapse N   =   V and N   =  1—resolve the big bang singularity and reproduce the classical dynamics far from the bounce. Moreover, due to the positive spatial curvature, there is an infinite number of bounces and recollapses. We study the limit of large field momentum and show that both effective theories reproduce the same dynamics, thus recovering general relativity. We implement a procedure to identify amongst the Bianchi IX solutions, those that behave like k   =  0,1 FLRW as well as Bianchi I, II, and VII 0 models. The effective solutions exhibit Bianchi I phases with Bianchi II transitions and also Bianchi VII 0 phases, which had not been studied before. We comment on the possible implications of these results for a quantum modification to the classical BKL behaviour. (paper)

  10. Somatic Mutational Landscape of Splicing Factor Genes and Their Functional Consequences across 33 Cancer Types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Seiler

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Hotspot mutations in splicing factor genes have been recently reported at high frequency in hematological malignancies, suggesting the importance of RNA splicing in cancer. We analyzed whole-exome sequencing data across 33 tumor types in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA, and we identified 119 splicing factor genes with significant non-silent mutation patterns, including mutation over-representation, recurrent loss of function (tumor suppressor-like, or hotspot mutation profile (oncogene-like. Furthermore, RNA sequencing analysis revealed altered splicing events associated with selected splicing factor mutations. In addition, we were able to identify common gene pathway profiles associated with the presence of these mutations. Our analysis suggests that somatic alteration of genes involved in the RNA-splicing process is common in cancer and may represent an underappreciated hallmark of tumorigenesis. : Seiler et al. report that 119 splicing factor genes carry putative driver mutations over 33 tumor types in TCGA. The most common mutations appear to be mutually exclusive and are associated with lineage-independent altered splicing. Samples with these mutations show deregulation of cell-autonomous pathways and immune infiltration. Keywords: splicing, SF3B1, U2AF1, SRSF2, RBM10, FUBP1, cancer, mutation

  11. Gene expression meta-analysis identifies metastatic pathways and transcription factors in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomassen, Mads; Tan, Qihua; Kruse, Torben A

    2008-01-01

    Metastasis is believed to progress in several steps including different pathways but the determination and understanding of these mechanisms is still fragmentary. Microarray analysis of gene expression patterns in breast tumors has been used to predict outcome in recent studies. Besides classification of outcome, these global expression patterns may reflect biological mechanisms involved in metastasis of breast cancer. Our purpose has been to investigate pathways and transcription factors involved in metastasis by use of gene expression data sets. We have analyzed 8 publicly available gene expression data sets. A global approach, 'gene set enrichment analysis' as well as an approach focusing on a subset of significantly differently regulated genes, GenMAPP, has been applied to rank pathway gene sets according to differential regulation in metastasizing tumors compared to non-metastasizing tumors. Meta-analysis has been used to determine overrepresentation of pathways and transcription factors targets, concordant deregulated in metastasizing breast tumors, in several data sets. The major findings are up-regulation of cell cycle pathways and a metabolic shift towards glucose metabolism reflected in several pathways in metastasizing tumors. Growth factor pathways seem to play dual roles; EGF and PDGF pathways are decreased, while VEGF and sex-hormone pathways are increased in tumors that metastasize. Furthermore, migration, proteasome, immune system, angiogenesis, DNA repair and several signal transduction pathways are associated to metastasis. Finally several transcription factors e.g. E2F, NFY, and YY1 are identified as being involved in metastasis. By pathway meta-analysis many biological mechanisms beyond major characteristics such as proliferation are identified. Transcription factor analysis identifies a number of key factors that support central pathways. Several previously proposed treatment targets are identified and several new pathways that may

  12. Analysis of the structural genes encoding M-factor in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe: identification of a third gene, mfm3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaerulff, S; Davey, William John; Nielsen, O

    1994-01-01

    We previously identified two genes, mfm1 and mfm2, with the potential to encode the M-factor mating pheromone of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe (J. Davey, EMBO J. 11:951-960, 1992), but further analysis revealed that a mutant strain lacking both genes still produced active M-factor. ...

  13. Transcription factor genes essential for cell proliferation and replicative lifespan in budding yeast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamei, Yuka; Tai, Akiko; Dakeyama, Shota; Yamamoto, Kaori; Inoue, Yamato; Kishimoto, Yoshifumi; Ohara, Hiroya; Mukai, Yukio, E-mail: y_mukai@nagahama-i-bio.ac.jp

    2015-07-31

    Many of the lifespan-related genes have been identified in eukaryotes ranging from the yeast to human. However, there is limited information available on the longevity genes that are essential for cell proliferation. Here, we investigated whether the essential genes encoding DNA-binding transcription factors modulated the replicative lifespan of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Heterozygous diploid knockout strains for FHL1, RAP1, REB1, and MCM1 genes showed significantly short lifespan. {sup 1}H-nuclear magnetic resonance analysis indicated a characteristic metabolic profile in the Δfhl1/FHL1 mutant. These results strongly suggest that FHL1 regulates the transcription of lifespan related metabolic genes. Thus, heterozygous knockout strains could be the potential materials for discovering further novel lifespan genes. - Highlights: • Involvement of yeast TF genes essential for cell growth in lifespan was evaluated. • The essential TF genes, FHL1, RAP1, REB1, and MCM1, regulate replicative lifespan. • Heterozygous deletion of FHL1 changes cellular metabolism related to lifespan.

  14. Phosphorylation of carbonic anhydrase IX controls its ability to mediate extracellular acidification in hypoxic tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ditte, Peter; Dequiedt, Franck; Svastova, Eliska; Hulikova, Alzbeta; Ohradanova-Repic, Anna; Zatovicova, Miriam; Csaderova, Lucia; Kopacek, Juraj; Supuran, Claudiu T; Pastorekova, Silvia; Pastorek, Jaromir

    2011-12-15

    In the hypoxic regions of a tumor, carbonic anhydrase IX (CA IX) is an important transmembrane component of the pH regulatory machinery that participates in bicarbonate transport. Because tumor pH has implications for growth, invasion, and therapy, determining the basis for the contributions of CA IX to the hypoxic tumor microenvironment could lead to new fundamental and practical insights. Here, we report that Thr443 phosphorylation at the intracellular domain of CA IX by protein kinase A (PKA) is critical for its activation in hypoxic cells, with the fullest activity of CA IX also requiring dephosphorylation of Ser448. PKA is activated by cAMP, which is elevated by hypoxia, and we found that attenuating PKA in cells disrupted CA IX-mediated extracellular acidification. Moreover, following hypoxia induction, CA IX colocalized with the sodium-bicarbonate cotransporter and other PKA substrates in the leading edge membranes of migrating tumor cells, in support of the concept that bicarbonate metabolism is spatially regulated at cell surface sites with high local ion transport and pH control. Using chimeric CA IX proteins containing heterologous catalytic domains derived from related CA enzymes, we showed that CA IX activity was modulated chiefly by the intracellular domain where Thr443 is located. Our findings indicate that CA IX is a pivotal mediator of the hypoxia-cAMP-PKA axis, which regulates pH in the hypoxic tumor microenvironment.

  15. Investigation of plasma induced electrical and chemical factors and their contribution processes to plasma gene transfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinno, Masafumi; Ikeda, Yoshihisa; Motomura, Hideki; Kido, Yugo; Satoh, Susumu

    2016-09-01

    This study has been done to know what kind of factors in plasmas and processes on cells induce plasma gene transfection. We evaluated the contribution weight of three groups of the effects and processes, i.e. electrical, chemical and biochemical ones, inducing gene transfection. First, the laser produced plasma (LPP) was employed to estimate the contribution of the chemical factors. Second, liposomes were fabricated and employed to evaluate the effects of plasma irradiation on membrane under the condition without biochemical reaction. Third, the clathrin-dependent endocytosis, one of the biochemical processes was suppressed. It becomes clear that chemical factors (radicals and reactive oxygen/nitrogen species) do not work by itself alone and electrical factors (electrical current, charge and field) are essential to plasma gene transfection. It turned out the clathrin-dependent endocytosis is the process of the transfection against the 60% in all the transfected cells. The endocytosis and electrical poration are dominant in plasma gene transfection, and neither permeation through ion channels nor chemical poration is dominant processes. The simultaneous achievement of high transfection efficiency and high cell survivability is attributed to the optimization of the contribution weight among three groups of processes by controlling the weight of electrical and chemical factors. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Preimplantation embryo-secreted factors modulate maternal gene expression in rat uterus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagami, Kazuki; Islam, M Rashedul; Yoshii, Yuka; Mori, Kazuki; Tashiro, Kosuke; Yamauchi, Nobuhiko

    2016-05-01

    In mammalian reproduction, embryo implantation into the uterus is spatiotemporally regulated by a complex process triggered by a number of factors. Although previous studies have suggested that uterine receptivity is mediated by blastocyst-derived factors, specific functions of embryos remain to be defined during preimplantation. Therefore, the present study was conducted to identify the maternal genes regulated by embryo-secreted factors in the rat uterus. RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) data revealed that 10 genes are up-regulated in the delayed implantation uterus compared with the pseudopregnancy uterus. The RNA-seq results were further verified by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Sulf1 expression is significantly (P uterus, although Areg, Calca, Fxyd4 and Lamc3 show a definite but non-statistically significant increase in their expression levels. During early pregnancy, the levels of Areg, Calca, Fxyd4, Lamc3 and Sulf1 expression at 3.5 days post coitus (dpc) are significantly (P < 0.05) higher than those at 1.5 dpc. Treatment with embryo-conditioned media revealed that Lamc3 and Sulf1 are up-regulated compared with the other genes studied. Thus, embryo-derived factors regulate maternal gene expression, with Lamc3 and Sulf1 possibly being suitable markers for a response study of embryo-secreted factors to improve our understanding of embryo-maternal communication.

  17. Novel Data Fusion Method and Exploration of Multiple Information Sources for Transcription Factor Target Gene Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Xiaofeng; Yli-Harja, Olli; Lähdesmäki, Harri

    2010-12-01

    Background. Revealing protein-DNA interactions is a key problem in understanding transcriptional regulation at mechanistic level. Computational methods have an important role in predicting transcription factor target gene genomewide. Multiple data fusion provides a natural way to improve transcription factor target gene predictions because sequence specificities alone are not sufficient to accurately predict transcription factor binding sites. Methods. Here we develop a new data fusion method to combine multiple genome-level data sources and study the extent to which DNA duplex stability and nucleosome positioning information, either alone or in combination with other data sources, can improve the prediction of transcription factor target gene. Results. Results on a carefully constructed test set of verified binding sites in mouse genome demonstrate that our new multiple data fusion method can reduce false positive rates, and that DNA duplex stability and nucleosome occupation data can improve the accuracy of transcription factor target gene predictions, especially when combined with other genome-level data sources. Cross-validation and other randomization tests confirm the predictive performance of our method. Our results also show that nonredundant data sources provide the most efficient data fusion.

  18. The transcription factor FoxK participates with Nup98 to regulate antiviral gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Debasis; Gold, Beth; Tartell, Michael A; Rausch, Keiko; Casas-Tinto, Sergio; Cherry, Sara

    2015-04-07

    Upon infection, pathogen recognition leads to a rapidly activated gene expression program that induces antimicrobial effectors to clear the invader. We recently found that Nup98 regulates the expression of a subset of rapidly activated antiviral genes to restrict disparate RNA virus infections in Drosophila by promoting RNA polymerase occupancy at the promoters of these antiviral genes. How Nup98 specifically targets these loci was unclear; however, it is known that Nup98 participates with transcription factors to regulate developmental-gene activation. We reasoned that additional transcription factors may facilitate the Nup98-dependent expression of antiviral genes. In a genome-wide RNA interference (RNAi) screen, we identified a relatively understudied forkhead transcription factor, FoxK, as active against Sindbis virus (SINV) in Drosophila. Here we find that FoxK is active against the panel of viruses that are restricted by Nup98, including SINV and vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV). Mechanistically, we show that FoxK coordinately regulates the Nup98-dependent expression of antiviral genes. Depletion of FoxK significantly reduces Nup98-dependent induction of antiviral genes and reduces the expression of a forkhead response element-containing luciferase reporter. Together, these data show that FoxK-mediated activation of gene expression is Nup98 dependent. We extended our studies to mammalian cells and found that the mammalian ortholog FOXK1 is antiviral against two disparate RNA viruses, SINV and VSV, in human cells. Interestingly, FOXK1 also plays a role in the expression of antiviral genes in mammals: depletion of FOXK1 attenuates virus-inducible interferon-stimulated response element (ISRE) reporter expression. Overall, our results demonstrate a novel role for FOXK1 in regulating the expression of antiviral genes, from insects to humans. Innate immunity is characterized by rapid gene expression programs, from insects to mammals. Furthermore, we find that Nup98

  19. miR-370 suppresses HBV gene expression and replication by targeting nuclear factor IA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Hongxia; Lv, Ping; Lv, Jing; Zhao, Xiaopei; Liu, Min; Zhang, Guangling; Tang, Hua

    2017-05-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a major health problem worldwide. The roles of microRNAs in the regulation of HBV expression are being increasingly recognized. In this study, we found that overexpression of miR-370 suppressed HBV gene expression and replication in Huh7 cells, whereas antisense knockdown of endogenous miR-370 enhanced HBV gene expression and replication in Huh7 cells and HepG2.2.15 cells. Further, we identified the transcription factor nuclear factor IA (NFIA) as a new host target of miR-370. Overexpression and knockdown studies showed that NFIA stimulated HBV gene expression and replication. Importantly, overexpression of NFIA counteracted the effect of miR-370 on HBV gene expression and replication. Further mechanistic studies showed that miR-370 suppressed HBV replication and gene expression by repressing HBV Enhancer I activity, and one of the NFIA binding site in the Enhancer I element was responsible for the repressive effect of miR-370 on HBV Enhancer I activity. Altogether, our results demonstrated that miR-370 suppressed HBV gene expression and replication through repressing NFIA expression, which stimulates HBV replication via direct regulation on HBV Enhancer I activities. Our findings may provide a new antiviral strategy for HBV infection. J. Med. Virol. 89:834-844, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Lineage-specific transcription factors and the evolution of gene regulatory networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowick, Katja; Stubbs, Lisa

    2010-01-01

    Nature is replete with examples of diverse cell types, tissues and body plans, forming very different creatures from genomes with similar gene complements. However, while the genes and the structures of proteins they encode can be highly conserved, the production of those proteins in specific cell types and at specific developmental time points might differ considerably between species. A full understanding of the factors that orchestrate gene expression will be essential to fully understand evolutionary variety. Transcription factor (TF) proteins, which form gene regulatory networks (GRNs) to act in cooperative or competitive partnerships to regulate gene expression, are key components of these unique regulatory programs. Although many TFs are conserved in structure and function, certain classes of TFs display extensive levels of species diversity. In this review, we highlight families of TFs that have expanded through gene duplication events to create species-unique repertoires in different evolutionary lineages. We discuss how the hierarchical structures of GRNs allow for flexible small to large-scale phenotypic changes. We survey evidence that explains how newly evolved TFs may be integrated into an existing GRN and how molecular changes in TFs might impact the GRNs. Finally, we review examples of traits that evolved due to lineage-specific TFs and species differences in GRNs.

  1. Genomic survey of bZIP transcription factor genes related to tanshinone biosynthesis in Salvia miltiorrhiza

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Zhang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Tanshinones are a class of bioactive components in the traditional Chinese medicine Salvia miltiorrhiza, and their biosynthesis and regulation have been widely studied. Current studies show that basic leucine zipper (bZIP proteins regulate plant secondary metabolism, growth and developmental processes. However, the bZIP transcription factors involved in tanshinone biosynthesis are unknown. Here, we conducted the first genome-wide survey of the bZIP gene family and analyzed the phylogeny, gene structure, additional conserved motifs and alternative splicing events in S. miltiorrhiza. A total of 70 SmbZIP transcription factors were identified and categorized into 11 subgroups based on their phylogenetic relationships with those in Arabidopsis. Moreover, seventeen SmbZIP genes underwent alternative splicing events. According to the transcriptomic data, the SmbZIP genes that were highly expressed in the Danshen root and periderm were selected. Based on the prediction of bZIP binding sites in the promoters and the co-expression analysis and co-induction patterns in response to Ag+ treatment via quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR, we concluded that SmbZIP7 and SmbZIP20 potentially participate in the regulation of tanshinone biosynthesis. These results provide a foundation for further functional characterization of the candidate SmbZIP genes, which have the potential to increase tanshinone production. KEY WORDS: bZIP genes, Salvia miltiorrhiza, Phylogenetic analysis, Expression pattern analysis, Tanshinone biosynthesis

  2. Characterization of Transcription Factor Gene OsDRAP1 Conferring Drought Tolerance in Rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liyu Huang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available HIGHLIGHTSOverexpressing and RNA interfering OsDRAP1 transgenic rice plants exhibited significantly improved and reduced drought tolerance, but accompanied with negative effects on development and yield.The dehydration responsive element binding (DREBs genes are important transcription factors which play a crucial role in plant abiotic stress tolerances. In this study, we functionally characterized a DREB2-like gene, OsDRAP1 conferring drought tolerance (DT in rice. OsDRAP1, containing many cis-elements in its promoter region, was expressed in all organs (mainly expressed in vascular tissues of rice, and induced by a variety of environmental stresses and plant hormones. Overexpressing OsDRAP1 transgenic plants exhibited significantly improved DT; while OsDRAP1 RNA interfering plants exhibited significantly reduced DT which also accompanied with significant negative effects on development and yield. Overexpression of OsDRAP1 has a positive impact on maintaining water balance, redox homeostasis and vascular development in transgenic rice plants under drought stress. OsDRAP1 interacted with many genes/proteins and could activate many downstream DT related genes, including important transcription factors such as OsCBSX3 to response drought stress, indicating the OsDRAP1-mediated pathways for DT involve complex genes networks. All these results provide a basis for further complete understanding of the OsDRAP1 mediated gene networks and their related phenotypic effects.

  3. Characterization of Transcription Factor GeneOsDRAP1Conferring Drought Tolerance in Rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Liyu; Wang, Yinxiao; Wang, Wensheng; Zhao, Xiuqin; Qin, Qiao; Sun, Fan; Hu, Fengyi; Zhao, Yan; Li, Zichao; Fu, Binying; Li, Zhikang

    2018-01-01

    HIGHLIGHTS Overexpressing and RNA interfering OsDRAP1 transgenic rice plants exhibited significantly improved and reduced drought tolerance, but accompanied with negative effects on development and yield. The dehydration responsive element binding (DREBs) genes are important transcription factors which play a crucial role in plant abiotic stress tolerances. In this study, we functionally characterized a DREB2-like gene, OsDRAP1 conferring drought tolerance (DT) in rice. OsDRAP1 , containing many cis -elements in its promoter region, was expressed in all organs (mainly expressed in vascular tissues) of rice, and induced by a variety of environmental stresses and plant hormones. Overexpressing OsDRAP1 transgenic plants exhibited significantly improved DT; while OsDRAP1 RNA interfering plants exhibited significantly reduced DT which also accompanied with significant negative effects on development and yield. Overexpression of OsDRAP1 has a positive impact on maintaining water balance, redox homeostasis and vascular development in transgenic rice plants under drought stress. OsDRAP1 interacted with many genes/proteins and could activate many downstream DT related genes, including important transcription factors such as OsCBSX3 to response drought stress, indicating the OsDRAP1 -mediated pathways for DT involve complex genes networks. All these results provide a basis for further complete understanding of the OsDRAP1 mediated gene networks and their related phenotypic effects.

  4. Type IX secretion system PorM and gliding machinery GldM form arches spanning the periplasmic space

    OpenAIRE

    Leone, Philippe; Roche, Jennifer; Vincent, Maxence S.; Tran, Quang Hieu; Desmyter, Aline; Cascales, Eric; Kellenberger, Christine; Cambillau, Christian; Roussel, Alain

    2018-01-01

    Type IX secretion system (T9SS), exclusively present in the Bacteroidetes phylum, has been studied mainly in Flavobacterium johnsoniae and Porphyromonas gingivalis. Among the 18 genes, essential for T9SS function, a group of four, porK-N (P. gingivalis) or gldK-N (F. johnsoniae) belongs to a co-transcribed operon that expresses the T9SS core membrane complex. The central component of this complex, PorM (or GldM), is anchored in the inner membrane by a trans-membrane helix and interacts throug...

  5. Members of the barley NAC transcription factor gene family show differential co-regulation with senescence-associated genes during senescence of flag leaves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Michael W; Gregersen, Per L.

    2014-01-01

    activation of degradation processes in senescing barley leaf tissues. This picture was confirmed in a detailed quantitative reverse transcription–PCR (qRT–PCR) experiment, which also showed distinct gene expression patterns for different members of the NAC gene family, suggesting a group of ~15 out of the 47...... in the NAC transcription factor family during senescence of barley flag leaves was studied. Several members of the NAC transcription factor gene family were up-regulated during senescence in a microarray experiment, together with a large range of senescence-associated genes, reflecting the coordinated...... studied NAC genes to be important for signalling processes and for the execution of degradation processes during leaf senescence in barley. Seven models for DNA-binding motifs for NAC transcription factors were designed based on published motifs, and available promoter sequences of barley genes were...

  6. Association analysis between polymorphisms in the conserved dopamine neurotrophic factor (CDNF) gene and cocaine dependence

    OpenAIRE

    Lohoff, Falk W.; Bloch, Paul J.; Ferraro, Thomas N.; Berrettini, Wade H.; Pettinati, Helen M.; Dackis, Charles A.; O’Brien, Charles P.; Kampman, Kyle M.; Oslin, David W.

    2009-01-01

    Cocaine induced neuroplasticity changes in the mesocorticolimbic dopamine systems are thought to be involved in the pathophysiology of cocaine dependence. Since neurotrophic factors have been observed to prevent/reverse and mimic cocaine-induced neurobiological changes in the brain, related genes are plausible candidates for susceptibility to cocaine dependence. The novel conserved dopamine neurotrophic factor protein (CDNF) promotes the survival, growth, and function of dopamine-specific neu...

  7. Promoter polymorphism of transforming growth factor-beta1 gene and ulcerative colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamizifar, B; Lankarani, K B; Naeimi, S; Rismankar Zadeh, M; Taghavi, A; Ghaderi, A

    2008-01-14

    To elucidate the possible difference in two promoter polymorphisms of the transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1) gene (-800G > A, -509C > T) between ulcerative colitis (UC) patients and normal subjects. A total of 155 patients with established ulcerative colitis and 139 normal subjects were selected as controls. Two single nucleotide polymorphisms within the promoter region of TGF-beta1 gene (-509C > T and -800G > A) were genotyped using PCR-RFLP. There was a statistically significant difference in genotype and allele frequency distributions between UC patients and controls for the -800G > A polymorphism of the TGF-beta1 gene (P A of TGF-beta1 gene promoter between Iranian patients with UC and normal subjects.

  8. Bookmarking target genes in mitosis: a shared epigenetic trait of phenotypic transcription factors and oncogenes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidi, Sayyed K; Grandy, Rodrigo A; Lopez-Camacho, Cesar; Montecino, Martin; van Wijnen, Andre J; Lian, Jane B; Stein, Janet L; Stein, Gary S

    2014-01-15

    The regulatory information for phenotype, proliferation, and growth of normal and tumor cells must be maintained through genome replication in the S phase and cell division during mitosis. Epigenetic mechanisms that include DNA methylation, posttranslational modifications of histones, selective utilization of histone variants, and inheritable RNA molecules play pivotal roles in maintaining cellular identity through mitotic divisions. Recent studies demonstrate that mitotic occupancy of genes, which are determinants of cell fate, growth, and proliferation, by lineage-restricted transcription factors is a key epigenetic mechanism for retention and transmission of cellular expression memory. Evidence is emerging for the presence of distinct transcriptional regulatory microenvironments in mitotic chromosomes in which the genes bookmarked for reactivation postmitotically reside. Importantly, some oncoproteins are present in mitotic microenvironments where they occupy target genes during mitosis and may contribute to perpetuating the transformed phenotype. We discuss emerging regulatory implications of epigenetically bookmarking genes during mitosis for physiologic control as well as for the onset and progression of cancer.

  9. [Factor analysis of interactions between alfalfa nodule bacteria (Sinorhizobium meliloti) genes that regulate symbiotic nitrogen fixation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provorov, N A; Chuklina, E; Vorob'ev, N I; Onishchuk, O P; Simarov, B V

    2013-04-01

    Factor analysis has been conducted for the data on the interaction between the genes of the root nodule bacteria (rhizobia), which influence the efficiency of symbiosis with leguminous plants, including dctA (encoding succinate permease), dctBD (activating the dctA gene due to binding its enhancer in the presence of succinate), rpoN (activating the promoters of dctA and nitrogenase genes nifHDK), and nifA (activating the nitrogenase genes due to binding their enhancers). The analysis of the alfalfa rhizobia (Sinorhizobium meliloti) recombinants that contain additional copies ofthese genes suggested the antagonistic (epistatic) interaction between nifA and rpoN. It may be associated either with the competition for C compounds imported into the nodules between the energy production and nitrogen assimilation processes or with the competition for redox potentials between the oxidative phosphorylation and nitrogen fixation processes. Since the phenotypic effects of the studied genes depend on the activity of nitrogen export into the aerial parts of plants, we suppose that its accumulation in bacteroids impairs the activation of the nifHDK genes by the NifA protein due to its interaction with the GlnB protein (the nitrogen metabolism regulator) or with the FixLJ and ActSR proteins (the redox potential regulators).

  10. Global transcriptional regulatory network for Escherichia coli robustly connects gene expression to transcription factor activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fang, Xin; Sastry, Anand; Mih, Nathan

    2017-01-01

    gene expression using this TRN; and (iii) how robust is our understanding of the TRN? First, we reconstructed a high-confidence TRN (hiTRN) consisting of 147 transcription factors (TFs) regulating 1,538 transcription units (TUs) encoding 1,764 genes. The 3,797 high-confidence regulatory interactions...... algorithms to predict the expression of 1,364 TUs given TF activities using 441 samples. The algorithms accurately predicted condition-specific expression for 86% (1,174 of 1,364) of the TUs, while 193 TUs (14%) were predicted better than random TRNs. Third, we identified 10 regulatory modules whose...... definitions were robust against changes to the TRN or expression compendium. Using surrogate variable analysis, we also identified three unmodeled factors that systematically influenced gene expression. Our computational workflow comprehensively characterizes the predictive capabilities and systems...

  11. Virulence factors genes of Staphylococcus spp. isolated from caprine subclinical mastitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salaberry, Sandra Renata Sampaio; Saidenberg, André Becker Simões; Zuniga, Eveline; Melville, Priscilla Anne; Santos, Franklin Gerônimo Bispo; Guimarães, Ednaldo Carvalho; Gregori, Fábio; Benites, Nilson Roberti

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate genes involved in adhesion expression, biofilm formation, and enterotoxin production in isolates of Staphylococcus spp. from goats with subclinical mastitis and associate these results with the staphylococcal species. One hundred and twenty-four isolates were identified and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was performed to detect the following genes: cna, ebpS, eno, fib, fnbA, fnbB, bap, sea, seb, sec, sed and see. The most commonly Staphylococcus species included S. epidermidis, S. lugdunensis, S. chromogenes, S. capitis ss capitis and S. intermedius. With the exception of fnbB, the genes were detected in different frequencies of occurrence in 86.3% of the Staphylococcus spp. isolates. Eno (73.2%) and bap (94.8%) were more frequently detected in coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS); ebpS (76%), fib (90.9%) and fnbA (87%) were the most frequent genes in coagulase-positive staphylococci (CPS). Regarding enterotoxins, genes sed (28.2%) and see (24.2%) had a higher frequency of occurrence; sec gene was more frequently detected in CPS (58.8%). There was no association between the presence of the genes and the Staphylococcus species. Different virulence factors genes can be detected in caprine subclinical mastitis caused by CNS and CPS. The knowledge of the occurrence of these virulence factors is important for the development of effective control and prevention measures of subclinical mastitis caused by CNS and CPS in goats. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Gene-Environment Interplay in Internalizing Disorders: Consistent Findings across Six Environmental Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Brian M.; Dirago, Ana C.; Iacono, William G.; McGue, Matt

    2009-01-01

    Background: Behavior genetic methods can help to elucidate gene-environment (G-E) interplay in the development of internalizing (INT) disorders (i.e., major depression and anxiety disorders). To date, however, no study has conducted a comprehensive analysis examining multiple environmental risk factors with the purpose of delineating general…

  13. A single gene target of an ETS-family transcription factor determines neuronal CO2-chemosensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Julia P; Aziz-Zaman, Sonya; Juozaityte, Vaida

    2012-01-01

    . We report here a mechanism that endows C. elegans neurons with the ability to detect CO(2). The ETS-5 transcription factor is necessary for the specification of CO(2)-sensing BAG neurons. Expression of a single ETS-5 target gene, gcy-9, which encodes a receptor-type guanylate cyclase, is sufficient...

  14. Factors affecting the gene expression of in vitro cultured human preimplantation embryos

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mantikou, E.; Jonker, M. J.; Wong, K. M.; van Montfoort, A. P. A.; de Jong, M.; Breit, T. M.; Repping, S.; Mastenbroek, S.

    2016-01-01

    What is the relative effect of common environmental and biological factors on transcriptome changes during human preimplantation development? Developmental stage and maternal age had a larger effect on the global gene expression profile of human preimplantation embryos than the culture medium or

  15. Amplification of epidermal growth factor receptor gene in renal cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El-Hariry, Iman; Powles, Thomas; Lau, Mike R

    2010-01-01

    Expression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) may be of prognostic value in renal cell cancer (RCC). Gene amplification of EGFR was investigated in a cohort of 315 patients with advanced RCC from a previously reported randomised study. Using fluorescent in situ hybridisation, only 2 patie...

  16. [From gene to disease; tumor necrosis factor receptor and a syndrome of familial periodic fever

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simon, A.; Drenth, J.P.H.; Meer, J.W.M. van der

    2001-01-01

    Familial Hibernian fever (FHF) is a rare hereditary syndrome that causes periodic attacks of fever and inflammation. It is an autosomal dominantly inherited disorder. The gene involved in FHF encodes for a receptor for tumour necrosis factor (TNFR1). These mutations are thought to result in impaired

  17. Structure and role of neutrophil cytosol factor 1 (NCF1) gene in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2010-12-27

    Dec 27, 2010 ... in innate immunity and produce reactive oxygen species and reduce the severity and duration of parasitic infection and autoimmune disease. NCF1 also has a role in T cell activation. Key words: Neutrophil cytosol factor 1 (NCF1) gene, exons, T cell activation. INTRODUCTION. An immune system is a ...

  18. Positive selection of HIV host factors and the evolution of lentivirus genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lengauer Thomas

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Positive selection of host proteins that interact with pathogens can indicate factors relevant for infection and potentially be a measure of pathogen driven evolution. Results Our analysis of 1439 primate genes and 175 lentivirus genomes points to specific host factors of high genetic variability that could account for differences in susceptibility to disease and indicate specific mechanisms of host defense and pathogen adaptation. We find that the largest amount of genetic change occurs in genes coding for cellular membrane proteins of the host as well as in the viral envelope genes suggesting cell entry and immune evasion as the primary evolutionary interface between host and pathogen. We additionally detect the innate immune response as a gene functional group harboring large differences among primates that could potentially account for the different levels of immune activation in the HIV/SIV primate infection. We find a significant correlation between the evolutionary rates of interacting host and viral proteins pointing to processes of the host-pathogen biology that are relatively conserved among species and to those undergoing accelerated genetic evolution. Conclusions These results indicate specific host factors and their functional groups experiencing pathogen driven evolutionary selection pressures. Individual host factors pointed to by our analysis might merit further study as potential targets of antiretroviral therapies.

  19. Construction of a mouse model of factor VIII deficiency by gene targeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bi, L.; Lawler, A.; Gearhart, J. [Univ. of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    To develop a small animal model of hemophilia A for gene therapy experiments, we set out to construct a mouse model for factor VIII deficiency by gene targeting. First, we screened a mouse liver cDNA library using a human FVIII cDNA probe. We cloned a 2.6 Kb partial mouse factor VIII cDNA which extends from 800 base pairs of the 3{prime} end of exon 14 to the 5{prime} end of exon 26. A mouse genomic library made from strain 129 was then screened to obtain genomic fragments covering the exons desired for homologous recombination. Two genomic clones were obtained, and one covering exon 15 through 22 was used for gene targeting. To make gene targeting constructs, a 5.8 Kb genomic DNA fragment covering exons 15 to 19 of the mouse FVIII gene was subcloned, and the neo expression cassette was inserted into exons 16 and 17 separately by different strategies. These two constructs were named MFVIIIC-16 and MFVIIIC-17. The constructs were linearized and transfected into strain 129 mouse ES cells by electroporation. Factor VIII gene-knockout ES cell lines were selected by G-418 and screened by genomic Southern blots. Eight exon 16 targeted cell lines and five exon 17 targeted cell lines were obtained. Three cell lines from each construct were injected into blastocysts and surgically transferred into foster mothers. Multiple chimeric mice with 70-90% hair color derived from the ES-cell genotype were seen with both constructs. Germ line transmission of the ES-cell genotype has been obtained for the MFVIIIC-16 construct, and multiple hemophilia A carrier females have been identified. Factor VIII-deficient males will be conceived soon.

  20. EGR3 Immediate Early Gene and the Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor in Bipolar Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca Pfaffenseller

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Bipolar disorder (BD is a severe psychiatric illness with a consistent genetic influence, involving complex interactions between numerous genes and environmental factors. Immediate early genes (IEGs are activated in the brain in response to environmental stimuli, such as stress. The potential to translate environmental stimuli into long-term changes in brain has led to increased interest in a potential role for these genes influencing risk for psychiatric disorders. Our recent finding using network-based approach has shown that the regulatory unit of early growth response gene 3 (EGR3 of IEGs family was robustly repressed in postmortem prefrontal cortex of BD patients. As a central transcription factor, EGR3 regulates an array of target genes that mediate critical neurobiological processes such as synaptic plasticity, memory and cognition. Considering that EGR3 expression is induced by brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF that has been consistently related to BD pathophysiology, we suggest a link between BDNF and EGR3 and their potential role in BD. A growing body of data from our group and others has shown that peripheral BDNF levels are reduced during mood episodes and also with illness progression. In this same vein, BDNF has been proposed as an important growth factor in the impaired cellular resilience related to BD. Taken together with the fact that EGR3 regulates the expression of the neurotrophin receptor p75NTR and may also indirectly induce BDNF expression, here we propose a feed-forward gene regulatory network involving EGR3 and BDNF and its potential role in BD.

  1. Myf-6, a new member of the human gene family of myogenic determination factors: evidence for a gene cluster on chromosome 12.

    OpenAIRE

    Braun, T; Bober, E; Winter, B; Rosenthal, N; Arnold, H H

    1990-01-01

    The Myf-6 gene, a novel member of the human gene family of muscle determination factors has been detected by its highly conserved sequence coding for a putative helix-loop-helix domain. This sequence motif is a common feature of all Myf factors and other regulatory proteins. The new Myf gene is located on human chromosome 12, approximately 6.5 Kb upstream of the Myf-5 locus in a closely linked cluster of myogenic determination genes. Myf-6 cDNAs were isolated from human and mouse skeletal mus...

  2. The precise regulation of different COR genes by individual CBF transcription factors in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yihao; Huang, Jiaying; Sun, Tianshu; Wang, Xuefei; Zhu, Chenqi; Ai, Yuxi; Gu, Hongya

    2017-02-01

    The transcription factors CBF1/2/3 are reported to play a dominant role in the cold responsive network of Arabidopsis by directly regulating the expression levels of cold responsive (COR) genes. In this study, we obtained CRISPR/Cas9-mediated loss-of-function mutants of cbf1∼3. Over 3,000 COR genes identified by RNA-seq analysis showed a slight but significant change in their expression levels in the mutants compared to the wild-type plants after being treated at 4 °C for 12 h. The C-repeat (CRT) motif (5'-CCGAC-3') was enriched in promoters of genes that were up-regulated by CBF2 and CBF3 but not in promoters of genes up-regulated by CBF1. These data suggest that CBF2 and CBF3 play a more important role in directing the cold response by regulating different sets of downstream COR genes. More than 2/3 of COR genes were co-regulated by two or three CBFs and were involved mainly in cellular signal transduction and metabolic processes; less than 1/3 of the genes were regulated by one CBF, and those genes up-regulated were enriched in cold-related abiotic stress responses. Our results indicate that CBFs play an important role in the trade-off between cold tolerance and plant growth through the precise regulation of COR genes in the complicated transcriptional network. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Integrative Plant Biology Published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  3. Association between Factor V Gene Polymorphism and Risk of Ischemic Stroke: An Updated Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhazzani, Adel Ali; Kumar, Amit; Selim, Magdy

    2018-02-22

    Ischemic stroke is a complex, multifactorial, and polygenic disease. Reports on relationship between Factor V G1691A single nucleotide gene polymorphism and ischemic stroke have revealed inconsistent results. We conducted an updated meta-analysis to determine the role of Factor V single nucleotide gene polymorphism in ischemic stroke. We searched the literature using academic electronic databases that is, PubMed, Trip Data Base, EBSCO, and Google Scholar, last search up to September 2017. Pooled odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated from fixed or random effects models whichever applicable using software STATA version 13 (StataCorp LP, College Station, TX). Forty case-control studies met the inclusion criteria, which included 6860 cases and 18,025 controls. Altogether, 19 studies in young adults (age  40). Four studies did not report the mean age at recruitment. Significant association between Factor V G1691A gene polymorphism and risk of ischemic stroke were observed under dominant model (OR 1.40; 95% CI: 1.22 to 1.62, P value analysis suggested substantial association of Factor V gene polymorphism and risk of ischemic stroke in cases with onset at young age (OR 1.84; 95% CI: 1.47 to 2.30), but was not statistical significant in cases at old age (>40 years). Factor V G1691A single nucleotide gene polymorphism was associated with risk of ischemic stroke mainly in young adults. Further research with adequately powered prospective studies in homogenous subjects are required to determine the nature of association in young stroke. Copyright © 2018 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Noninvasive murine glioma detection improved following photobleaching of skin PpIX fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs-Strauss, Summer L.; Davis, Scott C.; O'Hara, Julia A.; Hoopes, P. Jack; Hasan, Tayyaba; Pogue, Brian W.

    2008-02-01

    Aminolevulinic Acid (ALA) is a prodrug which can be administered to cells, animals or patients after which it is transformed via the Heme synthesis pathway into the fluorescent molecule Protoporphyrin IX (PpIX). PpIX has been shown to be useful as both a photosensitizer for photodynamic therapy (PDT) and as a fluorescence imaging contrast agent. The ALA-PpIX system not only provides contrast for fluorescence imaging but also gives information about the metabolic activity of the imaged tissue and thus could be useful for monitoring cancer therapy. In the current study skin photobleaching was examined to determine if PpIX fluorescence contrast in malignant brain tumors could be better visualized noninvasively. Red light photobleaching decreased skin PpIX fluorescence and increased the ability to noninvasively quantify PpIX fluorescence in murine gliomas, as in vivo measurements of mean PpIX fluorescence more closely matched ex vivo quantification following skin photobleaching. Three doses of blue light photobleaching (4 J/cm2, 8 J/cm2 and 12 J/cm2) were tested and determined to give similar levels of skin photobleaching as well as a similar window of decreased skin PpIX fluorescence for noninvasive fluorescence imaging following the photobleaching dose administration.

  5. Embryonic chicken cornea and cartilage synthesize type IX collagen molecules with different amino-terminal domains.

    OpenAIRE

    Svoboda, K K; Nishimura, I; Sugrue, S P; Ninomiya, Y; Olsen, B R

    1988-01-01

    We have analyzed embryonic chicken cornea for the presence of type IX collagen mRNA and protein. Using RNA transfer blot analysis, we demonstrate that alpha 1(IX) and alpha 2(IX) mRNAs are expressed by corneal epithelial cells at the time that the primary stromal components are synthesized. The levels of the mRNAs decrease with increasing developmental age and are barely detectable at day 11 of development. In contrast, type IX collagen protein is detectable by immunofluorescence at days 5 an...

  6. Saccharin: a lead compound for structure-based drug design of carbonic anhydrase IX inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahon, Brian P; Hendon, Alex M; Driscoll, Jenna M; Rankin, Gregory M; Poulsen, Sally-Ann; Supuran, Claudiu T; McKenna, Robert

    2015-02-15

    Carbonic anhydrase IX (CA IX) is a key modulator of aggressive tumor behavior and a prognostic marker and target for several cancers. Saccharin (SAC) based compounds may provide an avenue to overcome CA isoform specificity, as they display both nanomolar affinity and preferential binding, for CA IX compared to CA II (>50-fold for SAC and >1000-fold when SAC is conjugated to a carbohydrate moiety). The X-ray crystal structures of SAC and a SAC-carbohydrate conjugate bound to a CA IX-mimic are presented and compared to CA II. The structures provide substantial new insight into the mechanism of SAC selective CA isoform inhibition. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Transcription factor CREB is involved in CaSR-mediated cytoskeleton gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shuaishuai; Ren, Yu; Wang, Ping; Li, Yanyuan; Wang, Xue; Zhuang, Haihui; Fang, Rong; Wang, Yuduo; Liu, Ningsheng; Hehir, Michael; Zhou, Jeff X

    2015-03-01

    Our previous studies illustrated that a steady increase of intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) was important for maintaining microtubules (MTs) rearrangement in apoptotic cells. However, little is known about the effect of calcium sensing receptor (CaSR)-mediated increase in [Ca2+]i on cytoskeleton gene expression. We examined the impact of taxol or CaSR agonist/antagonist on the regulation of [Ca2+]i concentration, cytoskeleton arrangement, phosphorylated CREB and cytoskeleton gene expressions in HeLa cells with dominant negative plasmid of CREB (PM). This study demonstrated that Gdcl3 (a specific CaSR agonist) evoked a rapid increase of [Ca2+]i, formed a rigid bundle of MTs which surrounded the nucleus and decreased the cytoskeleton gene expressions in HeLa cells. These effects were rescued by addition of NPS2390 (a specific CaSR antagonist). Moreover, CaSR activity affected cytoskeleton gene expression through transcription factor CREB. Histoscores of pCREB immunoreactivity in tissues of cervical adenocarcinoma, renal clear cell carcinoma, and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma were markedly increased compared with non malignant tissue. These data demonstrate, for the first time, that CaSR-mediated increase in [Ca2+]i probably modulate cytoskeleton organization and gene expression via transcription factor. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Vascular endothelial growth factor A protein level and gene expression in intracranial meningiomas with brain edema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nassehi, Damoun; Dyrbye, Henrik; Andresen, Morten

    2011-01-01

    Meningiomas are the second most common primary intracranial tumors in adults. Although meningiomas are mostly benign, more than 50% of patients with meningioma develop peritumoral brain edema (PTBE), which may be fatal because of increased intracranial pressure. Vascular endothelial growth factor...... (VEGF) is an endothelial cell-specific mitogen and angiogen. VEGF-A protein, which is identical to vascular permeability factor, is a regulator of angiogenesis. In this study, 101 patients with meningiomas, and possible co-factors to PTBE, such as meningioma subtypes and tumor location, were examined....... Forty-three patients had primary, solitary, supratentorial meningiomas with PTBE. In these, correlations in PTBE, edema index, VEGF-A protein, VEGF gene expression, capillary length, and tumor water content were investigated. DNA-branched hybridization was used for measuring VEGF gene expression...

  9. Pulmonary artery hypertension in childhood: The transforming growth factor-β superfamily-related genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Min Yuan

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary artery hypertension (PAH is very rare in childhood, and it can be divided into heritable, idiopathic drug- and toxin-induced and other disease (connective tissue disease, human immunodeficiency virus infection, portal hypertension, congenital heart disease, or schistosomiasis-associated types. PAH could not be interpreted solely by pathophysiological theories. The impact of the transforming growth factor-β superfamily-related genes on the development of PAH in children remains to be clarified. Pertinent literature on the transforming growth factor-β superfamily-related genes in relation to PAH in children published after the year 2000 was reviewed and analyzed. Bone morphogenetic protein receptor type II gene mutation promotes cell division or prevents cell death, resulting in an overgrowth of cells in small arteries throughout the lungs. About 20% of individuals with a bone morphogenetic protein receptor type II gene mutation develop symptomatic PAH. In heritable PAH, bone morphogenetic protein receptor type II mutations may be absent; while mutations of other genes, such as type I receptor activin receptor-like kinase 1 and the type III receptor endoglin (both associated with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, caveolin-1 and KCNK3, the gene encoding potassium channel subfamily K, member 3, can be detected, instead. Gene mutations, environmental changes and acquired adjustment, etc. may explain the development of PAH. The researches on PAH rat model and familial PAH members may facilitate the elucidations of the mechanisms and further provide theories for prophylaxis and treatment of PAH. Key Words: bone morphogenetic proteins, mutation, pulmonary hypertension

  10. Identification of genes encoding critical factors regulating B-cell terminal differentiation in torafugu (Takifugu rubripes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtani, Maki; Miyadai, Toshiaki; Hiroishi, Shingo

    2006-03-01

    Many transcription factors, and associated co-factors, are involved in the regulation of B-cell terminal differentiation in mammals. In the teleost and cartilaginous fish, although evidence has strongly suggested the existence of B-cell like lymphocytes, the mechanism of terminal differentiation of B-cells remains to be elucidated. In the present study, we searched for the nucleotide and amino acid sequences similar to the critical regulatory factors facilitating the terminal differentiation of B-cells using the fugu BLAST server. We cloned the following cDNAs from Takifugu rubripes: (1) B-lymphocyte-induced maturation protein-1 (Blimp-1), which plays a major role in promoting plasma cell differentiation by repressing the transcription of many genes that participate in maintaining the differentiation of mature B-cells; (2) Bcl-6, which facilitates germinal center formation and represses Blimp-1 expression; (3) X-box binding protein-1 (XBP-1), which operates Ig secretion by activating transcription of the ER-stress responsible genes; (4) Pax-5, which suppresses XBP-1 and enhances the expression of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), an inducer of somatic hypermutation and class-switch recombination of the immunoglobulin gene; and (5) TLE-3, one of the Groucho family proteins, a co-factor for Blimp-1. We also identified other co-factors and many target genes of Blimp-1 by in silico and/or cDNA cloning. These finding indicates that the basal process of B-cell terminal differentiation in fish is controlled by factors identical to those in mammals.

  11. Extracellular Matrix-Regulated Gene Expression RequiresCooperation of SWI/SNF and Transcription Factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Ren; Spencer, Virginia A.; Bissell, Mina J.

    2006-05-25

    Extracellular cues play crucial roles in the transcriptional regulation of tissue-specific genes, but whether and how these signals lead to chromatin remodeling is not understood and subject to debate. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays and mammary-specific genes as models, we show here that extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules and prolactin cooperate to induce histone acetylation and binding of transcription factors and the SWI/SNF complex to the {beta}- and ?-casein promoters. Introduction of a dominant negative Brg1, an ATPase subunit of SWI/SNF complex, significantly reduced both {beta}- and ?-casein expression, suggesting that SWI/SNF-dependent chromatin remodeling is required for transcription of mammary-specific genes. ChIP analyses demonstrated that the ATPase activity of SWI/SNF is necessary for recruitment of RNA transcriptional machinery, but not for binding of transcription factors or for histone acetylation. Coimmunoprecipitation analyses showed that the SWI/SNF complex is associated with STAT5, C/EBP{beta}, and glucocorticoid receptor (GR). Thus, ECM- and prolactin-regulated transcription of the mammary-specific casein genes requires the concerted action of chromatin remodeling enzymes and transcription factors.

  12. Resveratrol regulates gene transcription via activation of stimulus-responsive transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiel, Gerald; Rössler, Oliver G

    2017-03-01

    Resveratrol (trans-3,4',5-trihydroxystilbene), a polyphenolic phytoalexin of grapes and other fruits and plants, is a common constituent of our diet and of dietary supplements. Many health-promoting benefits have been connected with resveratrol in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases, cancer, diabetes, inflammation, neurodegeneration, and diseases connected with aging. To explain the pleiotropic effects of resveratrol, the molecular targets of this compound have to be identified on the cellular level. Resveratrol induces intracellular signal transduction pathways which ultimately lead to changes in the gene expression pattern of the cells. Here, we review the effect of resveratrol on the activation of the stimulus-responsive transcription factors CREB, AP-1, Egr-1, Elk-1, and Nrf2. Following activation, these transcription factors induce transcription of delayed response genes. The gene products of these delayed response genes are ultimately responsible for the changes in the biochemistry and physiology of resveratrol-treated cells. The activation of stimulus-responsive transcription factors may explain many of the intracellular activities of resveratrol. However, results obtained in vitro may not easily be transferred to in vivo systems. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Serum response factor MADS box serine -162 phosphorylation switches proliferation and myogenic gene programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Dinakar; Chang, David; Marx, Joe; Wei, Lei; Olson, Eric N.; Parmacek, Michael S.; Balasubramanyam, Ashok; Schwartz, Robert J.

    2006-01-01

    Phosphorylation of a cluster of amino acids in the serum response factor (SRF) “MADS box” αI coil DNA binding domain regulated the transcription of genes associated with proliferation or terminal muscle differentiation. Mimicking phosphorylation of serine-162, a target of protein kinase C-α, with an aspartic acid substitution (SRF-S162D) completely inhibited SRF–DNA binding and blocked α-actin gene transcription even in the presence of potent myogenic cofactors, while preserving c-fos promoter activity because of stabilization of the ternary complex via Elk-1. Introduction of SRF-S162D into SRF null ES cells permitted transcription of the c-fos gene but was unable to rescue expression of myogenic contractile genes. Transition of proliferating C2C12 myoblasts to postfusion myocytes after serum withdrawal was associated with a progressive decline in SRF-S162 phosphorylation and an increase in α-actin gene expression. Hence, the phosphorylation status of serine-162 in the αI coil may constitute a novel switch that directs target gene expression into proliferation or differentiation programs. PMID:16537394

  14. Identification of target genes of transcription factor activator protein 2 gamma in breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ailan, He; Shuanglin, Xiang; Xiangwen, Xiao; Daolong, Ren; Lu, Gan; Xiaofeng, Ding; Xi, Qiao; Xingwang, Hu; Rushi, Liu; Jian, Zhang

    2009-01-01

    Activator protein 2 gamma (AP-2γ) is a member of the transcription factor activator protein-2 (AP-2) family, which is developmentally regulated and plays a role in human neoplasia. AP-2γ has been found to be overexpressed in most breast cancers, and have a dual role to inhibit tumor initiation and promote tumor progression afterwards during mammary tumorigensis. To identify the gene targets that mediate its effects, we performed chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) to isolate AP-2γ binding sites on genomic DNA from human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-453. 20 novel DNA fragments proximal to potential AP-2γ targets were obtained. They are categorized into functional groups of carcinogenesis, metabolism and others. A combination of sequence analysis, reporter gene assays, quantitative real-time PCR, electrophoretic gel mobility shift assays and immunoblot analysis further confirmed the four AP-2γ target genes in carcinogenesis group: ErbB2, CDH2, HPSE and IGSF11. Our results were consistent with the previous reports that ErbB2 was the target gene of AP-2γ. Decreased expression and overexpression of AP-2γ in human breast cancer cells significantly altered the expression of these four genes, indicating that AP-2γ directly regulates them. This suggested that AP-2γ can coordinate the expression of a network of genes, involving in carcinogenesis, especially in breast cancer. They could serve as therapeutic targets against breast cancers in the future

  15. Identification of the Drosophila Mes4 gene as a novel target of the transcription factor DREF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suyari, Osamu; Ida, Hiroyuki [Department of Applied Biology, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan); Insect Biomedical Research Center, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan); Yoshioka, Yasuhide; Kato, Yasuko; Hashimoto, Reina [Department of Applied Biology, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan); Insect Biomedical Research Center, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan); Venture Laboratory, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan); Yamaguchi, Masamitsu, E-mail: myamaguc@kit.ac.jp [Department of Applied Biology, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan); Insect Biomedical Research Center, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan)

    2009-05-01

    The Mes4 gene has been identified as one of the maternal Dorsal target genes in Drosophila. In the present study, we found a DNA replication-related element (DRE, 5'-TATCGATA) in the Mes4 promoter recognized by the DRE-binding factor (DREF). Luciferase transient expression assays in S2 cells using Mes4 promoter-luciferase fusion plasmids revealed that the DRE sequence is essential for Mes4 promoter activity. Requirement of DRE for Mes4 promoter activity was further confirmed by anti-{beta}-galactosidase antibody-staining of various tissues from transgenic flies carrying Mes4 promoter-lacZ fusion genes. Furthermore, wild type Mes4 promoter activity was decreased by 40% in DREF-depleted S2 cells. These results indicate that DREF positively regulates Mes4 gene expression. Band mobility shift analyses using Kc cell nuclear extracts further indicated that the DRE sequence in the Mes4 promoter is especially important for binding to DREF. Moreover, specific binding of DREF to the involved genomic region could be demonstrated by chromatin immunoprecipitation assays using anti-DREF antibodies. These results, taken together, indicate that the DRE/DREF system activates transcription of the Mes4 gene. In addition, knockdown of the Mes4 gene in wing imaginal discs using the GAL4-UAS system caused an atrophied wing phenotype, suggesting that Mes4 is required for wing morphogenesis.

  16. Hessian regularization based non-negative matrix factorization for gene expression data clustering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao; Shi, Jun; Wang, Congzhi

    2015-01-01

    Since a key step in the analysis of gene expression data is to detect groups of genes that have similar expression patterns, clustering technique is then commonly used to analyze gene expression data. Data representation plays an important role in clustering analysis. The non-negative matrix factorization (NMF) is a widely used data representation method with great success in machine learning. Although the traditional manifold regularization method, Laplacian regularization (LR), can improve the performance of NMF, LR still suffers from the problem of its weak extrapolating power. Hessian regularization (HR) is a newly developed manifold regularization method, whose natural properties make it more extrapolating, especially for small sample data. In this work, we propose the HR-based NMF (HR-NMF) algorithm, and then apply it to represent gene expression data for further clustering task. The clustering experiments are conducted on five commonly used gene datasets, and the results indicate that the proposed HR-NMF outperforms LR-based NMM and original NMF, which suggests the potential application of HR-NMF for gene expression data.

  17. Localization of the gene for the ciliary neutrotrophic factor receptor (CNTFR) to human chromosome 9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donaldson, D.H.; Jones, C.; Patterson, D. (Eleanor Roosevelt Institute, Denver, CO (United States) Univ. of Colorado Health Science Center, Denver, CO (United States)); Britt, D.E.; Jackson, C.L. (Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States))

    1993-09-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) has recently been found to be important for the survival of motor neurons and has shown activity in animal models of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). CNTF therefore holds promise as a treatment for ALS, and it and its receptor (CNTFR) are candidates for a gene involved in familial ALS. The CNTFR gene was mapped to chromosome 9 by PCR on a panel of human/CHO somatic cell hybrids and localized to 9p13 by PCR on a panel of radiation hybrids. 18 ref., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  18. DMPD: Type I interferon [corrected] gene induction by the interferon regulatory factorfamily of transcription factors. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 16979567 Type I interferon [corrected] gene induction by the interferon regulatory factorfamily...ng) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Type I interferon [corrected] gene induction by the interferon regulatory factorfamily...orrected] gene induction by the interferon regulatory factorfamily of transcription factors. Authors Honda K

  19. Analysis of mutations in the entire coding sequence of the factor VIII gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bidichadani, S.I.; Lanyon, W.G.; Connor, J.M. [Glascow Univ. (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Hemophilia A is a common X-linked recessive disorder of bleeding caused by deleterious mutations in the gene for clotting factor VIII. The large size of the factor VIII gene, the high frequency of de novo mutations and its tissue-specific expression complicate the detection of mutations. We have used a combination of RT-PCR of ectopic factor VIII transcripts and genomic DNA-PCRs to amplify the entire essential sequence of the factor VIII gene. This is followed by chemical mismatch cleavage analysis and direct sequencing in order to facilitate a comprehensive search for mutations. We describe the characterization of nine potentially pathogenic mutations, six of which are novel. In each case, a correlation of the genotype with the observed phenotype is presented. In order to evaluate the pathogenicity of the five missense mutations detected, we have analyzed them for evolutionary sequence conservation and for their involvement of sequence motifs catalogued in the PROSITE database of protein sites and patterns.

  20. Effect of IX dosing on polypropylene and PVDF membrane fouling control

    KAUST Repository

    Myat, Darli Theint

    2013-07-01

    The performance of ion exchange (IX) resin for organics removal from wastewater was assessed using advanced characterisation techniques for varying doses of IX. Organic characterisation using liquid chromatography with a photodiode array (PDA) and fluorescence spectroscopy (Method A), and UV254, organic carbon and organic nitrogen detectors (Method B), was undertaken on wastewater before and after magnetic IX treatment. Results showed partial removal of the biopolymer fraction at high IX doses. With increasing concentration of IX, evidence for nitrogen-containing compounds such as proteins and amino acids disappeared from the LC-OND chromatogram, complementary to the fluorescence response. A greater fluorescence response of tryptophan-like proteins (278nm/343nm) for low IX concentrations was consistent with aggregation of tryptophan-like compounds into larger aggregates, either by self-aggregation or with polysaccharides. Recycling of IX resin through multiple adsorption steps without regeneration maintained the high level of humics removal but there was no continued removal of biopolymer. Subsequent membrane filtration of the IX treated waters resulted in complex fouling trends. Filtration tests with either polypropylene (PP) or polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membranes showed higher rates of initial fouling following treatment with high IX doses (10mL/L) compared to filtration of untreated water, while treatment with lower IX doses resulted in decreased fouling rates relative to the untreated water. However, at longer filtration times the rate of fouling of IX treated waters was lower than untreated water and the relative fouling rates corresponded to the amount of biopolymer material in the feed. It was proposed that the mode of fouling changed from pore constriction during the initial filtration period to filter cake build up at longer filtration times. The organic composition strongly influenced the rate of fouling during the initial filtration period due to

  1. Overexpression of transcription factor Sp1 leads to gene expression perturbations and cell cycle inhibition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuelle Deniaud

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The ubiquitous transcription factor Sp1 regulates the expression of a vast number of genes involved in many cellular functions ranging from differentiation to proliferation and apoptosis. Sp1 expression levels show a dramatic increase during transformation and this could play a critical role for tumour development or maintenance. Although Sp1 deregulation might be beneficial for tumour cells, its overexpression induces apoptosis of untransformed cells. Here we further characterised the functional and transcriptional responses of untransformed cells following Sp1 overexpression. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We made use of wild-type and DNA-binding-deficient Sp1 to demonstrate that the induction of apoptosis by Sp1 is dependent on its capacity to bind DNA. Genome-wide expression profiling identified genes involved in cancer, cell death and cell cycle as being enriched among differentially expressed genes following Sp1 overexpression. In silico search to determine the presence of Sp1 binding sites in the promoter region of modulated genes was conducted. Genes that contained Sp1 binding sites in their promoters were enriched among down-regulated genes. The endogenous sp1 gene is one of the most down-regulated suggesting a negative feedback loop induced by overexpressed Sp1. In contrast, genes containing Sp1 binding sites in their promoters were not enriched among up-regulated genes. These results suggest that the transcriptional response involves both direct Sp1-driven transcription and indirect mechanisms. Finally, we show that Sp1 overexpression led to a modified expression of G1/S transition regulatory genes such as the down-regulation of cyclin D2 and the up-regulation of cyclin G2 and cdkn2c/p18 expression. The biological significance of these modifications was confirmed by showing that the cells accumulated in the G1 phase of the cell cycle before the onset of apoptosis. CONCLUSION: This study shows that the binding to DNA

  2. ATAF1 transcription factor directly regulates abscisic acid biosynthetic gene NCED3 in Arabidopsis thaliana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Michael Krogh; Lindemose, Søren; De Masi, Federico

    2013-01-01

    ATAF1, an Arabidopsis thaliana NAC transcription factor, plays important roles in plant adaptation to environmental stress and development. To search for ATAF1 target genes, we used protein binding microarrays and chromatin-immunoprecipitation (ChIP). This identified T[A,C,G]CGT[A,G] and TT......[A,C,G]CGT as ATAF1 consensus binding sequences. Co-expression analysis across publicly available microarray experiments identified 25 genes co-expressed with ATAF1. The promoter regions of ATAF1 co-expressors were significantly enriched for ATAF1 binding sites, and TTGCGTA was identified in the promoter of the key...... abscisic acid (ABA) phytohormone biosynthetic gene NCED3. ChIP-qPCR and expression analysis showed that ATAF1 binding to the NCED3 promoter correlated with increased NCED3 expression and ABA hormone levels. These results indicate that ATAF1 regulates ABA biosynthesis....

  3. Hepatocyte nuclear factor 1alpha is an accessory factor required for activation of glucose-6-phosphatase gene transcription by glucocorticoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, B; Morris, D W; Chou, J Y

    1998-11-01

    Deficiency of glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase), a key enzyme in glucose homeostasis, causes glycogen storage disease type 1a (GSD-1a), also know as von Gierke disease. Expression of the G6Pase gene is regulated by multiple hormones, including glucocorticoids. The synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone increased G6Pase mRNA abundance and gene transcription in H4-IIE hepatoma cells. Transient transfection assays demonstrated that the G6Pase promoter was active in H4-IIE cells only in the presence of dexamethasone. The minimal G6Pase promoter was contained within nucleotides -234/+3, which has two putative glucocorticoid response elements (GREs) at nucleotides -178/-164 (site 1) and -154/-140 (site 2). Electromobility shift and transient transfection assays showed that only GRE site 1 was required for glucocorticoid-activated transcription from the G6Pase promoter. Deletion analysis demonstrated that the DNA elements absolutely essential for glucocorticoid-stimulated transcription from the G6Pase promoter were contained within nucleotides -234/-212, encompassing binding motifs for hepatocyte nuclear factors (HNFs) 1 (-226/-212) and 4 (-231/-220). Electromobility shift and cotransfection assays showed that HNF1alpha bound to its cognate site and mediated transcription activation of the G6Pase gene by glucocorticoids.

  4. Topical glycerol monooleate/propylene glycol formulations enhance 5-aminolevulinic acid in vitro skin delivery and in vivo protophorphyrin IX accumulation in hairless mouse skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steluti, Regilene; De Rosa, Fernanda Scarmato; Collett, John; Tedesco, Antônio Cláudio; Bentley, Maria Vitória Lopes Badra

    2005-08-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT), a potential therapy for cancer treatment, utilizes exogenously applied or endogenously formed photosensitizers, further activated by light in an appropriate wavelength and dose to induce cell death through free radical formation. 5-Aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) is a pro-drug which can be converted to the effective photosensitizer, protoporphyrin IX (PpIX). However, the use of 5-ALA in PDT is limited by the low penetration capacity of this highly hydrophilic molecule into appropriate skin layers. In the present study, we propose to increase 5-ALA penetration by using formulations containing glycerol monooleate (GMO), an interesting and useful component of pharmaceutical formulations. Propylene glycol solutions containing different concentrations of GMO significantly increased the in vitro skin permeation/retention of 5-ALA in comparison to control solutions. In vivo studies also showed increased PpIX accumulation in mouse hairless skin, after the use of topical 5-ALA formulations containing GMO in a concentration-dependent manner. The results show that skin 5-ALA penetration and PpIX accumulation, important factors for the success of topical 5-ALA-PDT in skin cancer, are optimized by GMO/propylene glycol formulations.

  5. Arrangement of the Clostridium baratii F7 toxin gene cluster with identification of a σ factor that recognizes the botulinum toxin gene cluster promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dover, Nir; Barash, Jason R; Burke, Julianne N; Hill, Karen K; Detter, John C; Arnon, Stephen S

    2014-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) is the most poisonous substances known and its eight toxin types (A to H) are distinguished by the inability of polyclonal antibodies that neutralize one toxin type to neutralize any of the other seven toxin types. Infant botulism, an intestinal toxemia orphan disease, is the most common form of human botulism in the United States. It results from swallowed spores of Clostridium botulinum (or rarely, neurotoxigenic Clostridium butyricum or Clostridium baratii) that germinate and temporarily colonize the lumen of the large intestine, where, as vegetative cells, they produce botulinum toxin. Botulinum neurotoxin is encoded by the bont gene that is part of a toxin gene cluster that includes several accessory genes. We sequenced for the first time the complete botulinum neurotoxin gene cluster of nonproteolytic C. baratii type F7. Like the type E and the nonproteolytic type F6 botulinum toxin gene clusters, the C. baratii type F7 had an orfX toxin gene cluster that lacked the regulatory botR gene which is found in proteolytic C. botulinum strains and codes for an alternative σ factor. In the absence of botR, we identified a putative alternative regulatory gene located upstream of the C. baratii type F7 toxin gene cluster. This putative regulatory gene codes for a predicted σ factor that contains DNA-binding-domain homologues to the DNA-binding domains both of BotR and of other members of the TcdR-related group 5 of the σ70 family that are involved in the regulation of toxin gene expression in clostridia. We showed that this TcdR-related protein in association with RNA polymerase core enzyme specifically binds to the C. baratii type F7 botulinum toxin gene cluster promoters. This TcdR-related protein may therefore be involved in regulating the expression of the genes of the botulinum toxin gene cluster in neurotoxigenic C. baratii.

  6. Adipose tissue gene expression of factors related to lipid processing in obesity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercedes Clemente-Postigo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Adipose tissue lipid storage and processing capacity can be a key factor for obesity-related metabolic disorders such as insulin resistance and diabetes. Lipid uptake is the first step to adipose tissue lipid storage. The aim of this study was to analyze the gene expression of factors involved in lipid uptake and processing in subcutaneous (SAT and visceral (VAT adipose tissue according to body mass index (BMI and the degree of insulin resistance (IR. METHODS AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: VLDL receptor (VLDLR, lipoprotein lipase (LPL, acylation stimulating protein (ASP, LDL receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1 and fatty acid binding protein 4 (FABP4 gene expression was measured in VAT and SAT from 28 morbidly obese patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM or high IR, 10 morbidly obese patients with low IR, 10 obese patients with low IR and 12 lean healthy controls. LPL, FABP4, LRP1 and ASP expression in VAT was higher in lean controls. In SAT, LPL and FABP4 expression were also higher in lean controls. BMI, plasma insulin levels and HOMA-IR correlated negatively with LPL expression in both VAT and SAT as well as with FABP4 expression in VAT. FABP4 gene expression in SAT correlated inversely with BMI and HOMA-IR. However, multiple regression analysis showed that BMI was the main variable contributing to LPL and FABP4 gene expression in both VAT and SAT. CONCLUSIONS: Morbidly obese patients have a lower gene expression of factors related with lipid uptake and processing in comparison with healthy lean persons.

  7. Diversification of the insulin-like growth factor 1 gene in mammals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Rotwein

    Full Text Available Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1, a small, secreted peptide growth factor, is involved in a variety of physiological and patho-physiological processes, including somatic growth, tissue repair, and metabolism of carbohydrates, proteins, and lipids. IGF1 gene expression appears to be controlled by several different signaling cascades in the few species in which it has been evaluated, with growth hormone playing a major role by activating a pathway involving the Stat5b transcription factor. Here, genes encoding IGF1 have been evaluated in 25 different mammalian species representing 15 different orders and ranging over ~180 million years of evolutionary diversification. Parts of the IGF1 gene have been fairly well conserved. Like rat Igf1 and human IGF1, 21 of 23 other genes are composed of 6 exons and 5 introns, and all 23 also contain recognizable tandem promoters, each with a unique leader exon. Exon and intron lengths are similar in most species, and DNA sequence conservation is moderately high in orthologous exons and proximal promoter regions. In contrast, putative growth hormone-activated Stat5b-binding enhancers found in analogous locations in rodent Igf1 and in human IGF1 loci, have undergone substantial variation in other mammals, and a processed retro-transposed IGF1 pseudogene is found in the sloth locus, but not in other mammalian genomes. Taken together, the fairly high level of organizational and nucleotide sequence similarity in the IGF1 gene among these 25 species supports the contention that some common regulatory pathways had existed prior to the beginning of mammalian speciation.

  8. Carbonization-cementation process for treatment of spent IX resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sathi Sasidharan, N.; Deshingkar, D.S.; Wattal, P.K.

    2004-08-01

    The spent IX resins containing radioactive fission and activation products of reactor structural materials are highly active solid wastes generated during operations of nuclear reactors. Feasibility tests were conducted for carbonization of IX resins to achieve weight and volume reduction and destruction of functional groups so as to make them compatible for immobilization in cement matrix. Carbonization of non-radioactive resins was studied at 250 to 350 degC. Carbonization residues were 20 to 32 wt% depending upon the type of resin and temperature of carbonization. The release of 137 Cs activity to off-gases was 0.004% at 300 degC and 0.05 % at 350 degC. Based on these tests, a 50 liter/batch capacity inactive resin carbonization pilot plant was set up. Carbonization residues could be immobilized into cement matrix with 60 wt % loading using vermiculite and precipitated silica as admixtures. The cumulative fraction of 137 Cs leached from the selected cement matrix was 0.0066 in 200 days. Based on pilot plant studies and cementation tests, the swollen spent resins waste volume could be minimized by 2.7 times. (author)

  9. Association of Polymorphisms in Connective Tissue Growth Factor and Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Genes With Human Longevity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donlon, Timothy A; Morris, Brian J; He, Qimei; Chen, Randi; Masaki, Kamal H; Allsopp, Richard C; Willcox, D Craig; Tranah, Gregory J; Parimi, Neeta; Evans, Daniel S; Flachsbart, Friederike; Nebel, Almut; Kim, Duk-Hwan; Park, Joobae; Willcox, Bradley J

    2017-08-01

    Growth pathways play key roles in longevity. The present study tested single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the connective tissue growth factor gene (CTGF) and the epidermal growth factor receptor gene (EGFR) for association with longevity. Comparison of allele and genotype frequencies of 12 CTGF SNPs and 41 EGFR SNPs between 440 American men of Japanese ancestry aged ≥95 years and 374 men of average life span revealed association with longevity at the p cases, consistent with heterozygote advantage in living to extreme old age. No associations of the most significant SNPs were observed in whites or Koreans. In conclusion, the present findings indicate that genetic variation in CTGF and EGFR may contribute to the attainment of extreme old age in Japanese. More research is needed to confirm that genetic variation in CTGF and EGFR contributes to the attainment of extreme old age across human populations. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Genome-wide identification and characterization of TCP transcription factor genes in upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wen; Li, Deng-Di; Han, Li-Hong; Tao, Miao; Hu, Qian-Qian; Wu, Wen-Ying; Zhang, Jing-Bo; Li, Xue-Bao; Huang, Geng-Qing

    2017-08-31

    TCP proteins are plant-specific transcription factors (TFs), and perform a variety of physiological functions in plant growth and development. In this study, 74 non-redundant TCP genes were identified in upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) genome. Cotton TCP family can be classified into two classes (class I and class II) that can be further divided into 11 types (groups) based on their motif composition. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis indicated that GhTCPs display different expression patterns in cotton tissues. The majority of these genes are preferentially or specifically expressed in cotton leaves, while some GhTCP genes are highly expressed in initiating fibers and/or elongating fibers of cotton. Yeast two-hybrid results indicated that GhTCPs can interact with each other to form homodimers or heterodimers. In addition, GhTCP14a and GhTCP22 can interact with some transcription factors which are involved in fiber development. These results lay solid foundation for further study on the functions of TCP genes during cotton fiber development.

  11. Effects of transforming growth factor-beta1 and vascular endothelial growth factor 165 gene transfer on Achilles tendon healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Yu; Mao, ZeBin; Wei, XueLei; Lin, Lin; Chen, LianXu; Wang, HaiJun; Fu, Xin; Zhang, JiYing; Yu, Changlong

    2009-07-01

    Repaired Achilles tendons typically take weeks before they are strong enough to handle physiological loads. Gene therapy is a promising treatment for Achilles tendon defects. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the histological/biomechanical effects of Transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1) and vascular endothelial growth factor 165 (VEGF(165)) gene transfer on Achilles tendon healing in rabbits. Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells (BMSCs) were transduced with adenovirus carrying human TGF-beta1 cDNA (Ad-TGF-beta1), human VEGF(165) cDNA (Ad-VEGF(165)), or both (PIRES-TGF-beta1/VEGF(165)) Viruses, no cDNA (Ad-GFP), and the BMSCs without gene transfer and the intact tendon were used as control. BMSCs were surgically implanted into the experimentally injured Achilles tendons. TGF-beta1 distribution, cellularity, nuclear aspect ratio, nuclear orientation angle, vascular number, collagen synthesis, and biomechanical features were measured at 1, 2, 4, and 8 weeks after surgery. The TGF-beta1 and TGF beta 1/VEGF(165) co-expression groups exhibited improved parameters compared with other groups, while the VEGF(165) expression group had a negative impact. In the co-expression group, the angiogenesis effects of VEGF(165) were diminished by TGF-beta1, while the collagen synthesis effects of TGF-beta1 were unaltered by VEGF(165). Thus treatment with TGF-beta1 cDNA-transduced BMSCs grafts is a promising therapy for acceleration and improvement of tendon healing, leading to quicker recovery and improved biomechanical properties of Achilles tendons.

  12. MTHFR , prothrombin and Factor V gene variants in Turkish patients with coronary artery stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Müge Caner

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Many epidemiological studies have reported an association between hemostatic factors and risk of both coronary and peripheral artery diseases. Using polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP analysis, we investigated the association between coronary artery disease and polymorphisms in the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase ( MTHFR C677T and A1298C, prothrombin (G20210A, and factor V (A4070G genes. We screened these gene variants in 174 subjects who had undergone coronary angiography - 115 patients with patent coronary artery disease (grade 3 vessel disease, i.e. , significant coronary stenosis, and 59 healthy controls with grade 0 vessel disease. The analysis of our data did not show any statistically significant association between coronary artery disease (CAD and the investigated polymorphisms.

  13. Amplification of the E2F1 transcription factor gene in the HEL erythroleukemia cell line

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saito, M; Helin, K; Valentine, M B

    1995-01-01

    The E2F transcription factor plays an important regulatory role in cell proliferation, mediating the expression of genes whose products are essential for inducing resting cells to enter the cell cycle and synthesize DNA. To investigate the possible involvement of E2F in hematopoietic malignancies...... and overexpressed in HEL erythroleukemia cells and translocated to other chromosomes in several established human leukemia cell lines. This study provides the first evidence of gene amplification involving a member of the E2F family of transcription factors. We propose that E2F1 overexpression in erythroid...... progenitors may stimulate abnormal cell proliferation by overriding negative regulatory signals mediated by tumor suppressor proteins such as pRb....

  14. Gene expression meta-analysis identifies metastatic pathways and transcription factors in breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomassen, Mads; Tan, Qihua; Kruse, Torben

    2008-01-01

    studies. Besides classification of outcome, these global expression patterns may reflect biological mechanisms involved in metastasis of breast cancer. Our purpose has been to investigate pathways and transcription factors involved in metastasis by use of gene expression data sets. METHODS: We have......ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Metastasis is believed to progress in several steps including different pathways but the determination and understanding of these mechanisms is still fragmentary. Microarray analysis of gene expression patterns in breast tumors has been used to predict outcome in recent...... tumors compared to non-metastasizing tumors. Meta-analysis has been used to determine overrepresentation of pathways and transcription factors targets, concordant deregulated in metastasizing breast tumors, in several data sets. RESULTS: The major findings are upregulation of cell cycle pathways...

  15. A Consensus Network of Gene Regulatory Factors in the Human Frontal Lobe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berto, Stefano; Perdomo-Sabogal, Alvaro; Gerighausen, Daniel; Qin, Jing; Nowick, Katja

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive abilities, such as memory, learning, language, problem solving, and planning, involve the frontal lobe and other brain areas. Not much is known yet about the molecular basis of cognitive abilities, but it seems clear that cognitive abilities are determined by the interplay of many genes. One approach for analyzing the genetic networks involved in cognitive functions is to study the coexpression networks of genes with known importance for proper cognitive functions, such as genes that have been associated with cognitive disorders like intellectual disability (ID) or autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Because many of these genes are gene regulatory factors (GRFs) we aimed to provide insights into the gene regulatory networks active in the human frontal lobe. Using genome wide human frontal lobe expression data from 10 independent data sets, we first derived 10 individual coexpression networks for all GRFs including their potential target genes. We observed a high level of variability among these 10 independently derived networks, pointing out that relying on results from a single study can only provide limited biological insights. To instead focus on the most confident information from these 10 networks we developed a method for integrating such independently derived networks into a consensus network. This consensus network revealed robust GRF interactions that are conserved across the frontal lobes of different healthy human individuals. Within this network, we detected a strong central module that is enriched for 166 GRFs known to be involved in brain development and/or cognitive disorders. Interestingly, several hubs of the consensus network encode for GRFs that have not yet been associated with brain functions. Their central role in the network suggests them as excellent new candidates for playing an essential role in the regulatory network of the human frontal lobe, which should be investigated in future studies. PMID:27014338

  16. Transcription factor SP4 is a susceptibility gene for bipolar disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianjin Zhou

    Full Text Available The Sp4 transcription factor plays a critical role for both development and function of mouse hippocampus. Reduced expression of the mouse Sp4 gene results in a variety of behavioral abnormalities relevant to human psychiatric disorders. The human SP4 gene is therefore examined for its association with both bipolar disorder and schizophrenia in European Caucasian and Chinese populations respectively. Out of ten SNPs selected from human SP4 genomic locus, four displayed significant association with bipolar disorder in European Caucasian families (rs12668354, p = 0.022; rs12673091, p = 0.0005; rs3735440, p = 0.019; rs11974306, p = 0.018. To replicate the genetic association, the same set of SNPs was examined in a Chinese bipolar case control sample. Four SNPs displayed significant association (rs40245, p = 0.009; rs12673091, p = 0.002; rs1018954, p = 0.001; rs3735440, p = 0.029, and two of them (rs12673091, rs3735440 were shared with positive SNPs from European Caucasian families. Considering the genetic overlap between bipolar disorder and schizophrenia, we extended our studies in Chinese trios families for schizophrenia. The SNP7 (rs12673091, p = 0.012 also displayed a significant association. The SNP7 (rs12673091 was therefore significantly associated in all three samples, and shared the same susceptibility allele (A across all three samples. On the other hand, we found a gene dosage effect for mouse Sp4 gene in the modulation of sensorimotor gating, a putative endophenotype for both schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. The deficient sensorimotor gating in Sp4 hypomorphic mice was partially reversed by the administration of dopamine D2 antagonist or mood stabilizers. Both human genetic and mouse pharmacogenetic studies support Sp4 gene as a susceptibility gene for bipolar disorder or schizophrenia. The studies on the role of Sp4 gene in hippocampal development may provide novel insights for the contribution of hippocampal abnormalities in these

  17. Orthologous transcription factors in bacteria have different functions and regulate different genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgan N Price

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Transcription factors (TFs form large paralogous gene families and have complex evolutionary histories. Here, we ask whether putative orthologs of TFs, from bidirectional best BLAST hits (BBHs, are evolutionary orthologs with conserved functions. We show that BBHs of TFs from distantly related bacteria are usually not evolutionary orthologs. Furthermore, the false orthologs usually respond to different signals and regulate distinct pathways, while the few BBHs that are evolutionary orthologs do have conserved functions. To test the conservation of regulatory interactions, we analyze expression patterns. We find that regulatory relationships between TFs and their regulated genes are usually not conserved for BBHs in Escherichia coli K12 and Bacillus subtilis. Even in the much more closely related bacteria Vibrio cholerae and Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, predicting regulation from E. coli BBHs has high error rates. Using gene-regulon correlations, we identify genes whose expression pattern differs between E. coli and S. oneidensis. Using literature searches and sequence analysis, we show that these changes in expression patterns reflect changes in gene regulation, even for evolutionary orthologs. We conclude that the evolution of bacterial regulation should be analyzed with phylogenetic trees, rather than BBHs, and that bacterial regulatory networks evolve more rapidly than previously thought.

  18. Factors affecting interactome-based prediction of human genes associated with clinical signs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Pérez, Sara; Pazos, Florencio; Chagoyen, Mónica

    2017-07-17

    Clinical signs are a fundamental aspect of human pathologies. While disease diagnosis is problematic or impossible in many cases, signs are easier to perceive and categorize. Clinical signs are increasingly used, together with molecular networks, to prioritize detected variants in clinical genomics pipelines, even if the patient is still undiagnosed. Here we analyze the ability of these network-based methods to predict genes that underlie clinical signs from the human interactome. Our analysis reveals that these approaches can locate genes associated with clinical signs with variable performance that depends on the sign and associated disease. We analyzed several clinical and biological factors that explain these variable results, including number of genes involved (mono- vs. oligogenic diseases), mode of inheritance, type of clinical sign and gene product function. Our results indicate that the characteristics of the clinical signs and their related diseases should be considered for interpreting the results of network-prediction methods, such as those aimed at discovering disease-related genes and variants. These results are important due the increasing use of clinical signs as an alternative to diseases for studying the molecular basis of human pathologies.

  19. Global Developmental Gene Programing Involves a Nuclear Form of Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor-1 (FGFR1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Terranova

    Full Text Available Genetic studies have placed the Fgfr1 gene at the top of major ontogenic pathways that enable gastrulation, tissue development and organogenesis. Using genome-wide sequencing and loss and gain of function experiments the present investigation reveals a mechanism that underlies global and direct gene regulation by the nuclear form of FGFR1, ensuring that pluripotent Embryonic Stem Cells differentiate into Neuronal Cells in response to Retinoic Acid. Nuclear FGFR1, both alone and with its partner nuclear receptors RXR and Nur77, targets thousands of active genes and controls the expression of pluripotency, homeobox, neuronal and mesodermal genes. Nuclear FGFR1 targets genes in developmental pathways represented by Wnt/β-catenin, CREB, BMP, the cell cycle and cancer-related TP53 pathway, neuroectodermal and mesodermal programing networks, axonal growth and synaptic plasticity pathways. Nuclear FGFR1 targets the consensus sequences of transcription factors known to engage CREB-binding protein, a common coregulator of transcription and established binding partner of nuclear FGFR1. This investigation reveals the role of nuclear FGFR1 as a global genomic programmer of cell, neural and muscle development.

  20. Global Developmental Gene Programing Involves a Nuclear Form of Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor-1 (FGFR1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terranova, Christopher; Narla, Sridhar T; Lee, Yu-Wei; Bard, Jonathan; Parikh, Abhirath; Stachowiak, Ewa K; Tzanakakis, Emmanuel S; Buck, Michael J; Birkaya, Barbara; Stachowiak, Michal K

    2015-01-01

    Genetic studies have placed the Fgfr1 gene at the top of major ontogenic pathways that enable gastrulation, tissue development and organogenesis. Using genome-wide sequencing and loss and gain of function experiments the present investigation reveals a mechanism that underlies global and direct gene regulation by the nuclear form of FGFR1, ensuring that pluripotent Embryonic Stem Cells differentiate into Neuronal Cells in response to Retinoic Acid. Nuclear FGFR1, both alone and with its partner nuclear receptors RXR and Nur77, targets thousands of active genes and controls the expression of pluripotency, homeobox, neuronal and mesodermal genes. Nuclear FGFR1 targets genes in developmental pathways represented by Wnt/β-catenin, CREB, BMP, the cell cycle and cancer-related TP53 pathway, neuroectodermal and mesodermal programing networks, axonal growth and synaptic plasticity pathways. Nuclear FGFR1 targets the consensus sequences of transcription factors known to engage CREB-binding protein, a common coregulator of transcription and established binding partner of nuclear FGFR1. This investigation reveals the role of nuclear FGFR1 as a global genomic programmer of cell, neural and muscle development.

  1. Transcriptional Regulatory Network Analysis of MYB Transcription Factor Family Genes in Rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smita, Shuchi; Katiyar, Amit; Chinnusamy, Viswanathan; Pandey, Dev M; Bansal, Kailash C

    2015-01-01

    MYB transcription factor (TF) is one of the largest TF families and regulates defense responses to various stresses, hormone signaling as well as many metabolic and developmental processes in plants. Understanding these regulatory hierarchies of gene expression networks in response to developmental and environmental cues is a major challenge due to the complex interactions between the genetic elements. Correlation analyses are useful to unravel co-regulated gene pairs governing biological process as well as identification of new candidate hub genes in response to these complex processes. High throughput expression profiling data are highly useful for construction of co-expression networks. In the present study, we utilized transcriptome data for comprehensive regulatory network studies of MYB TFs by "top-down" and "guide-gene" approaches. More than 50% of OsMYBs were strongly correlated under 50 experimental conditions with 51 hub genes via "top-down" approach. Further, clusters were identified using Markov Clustering (MCL). To maximize the clustering performance, parameter evaluation of the MCL inflation score (I) was performed in terms of enriched GO categories by measuring F-score. Comparison of co-expressed cluster and clads analyzed from phylogenetic analysis signifies their evolutionarily conserved co-regulatory role. We utilized compendium of known interaction and biological role with Gene Ontology enrichment analysis to hypothesize function of coexpressed OsMYBs. In the other part, the transcriptional regulatory network analysis by "guide-gene" approach revealed 40 putative targets of 26 OsMYB TF hubs with high correlation value utilizing 815 microarray data. The putative targets with MYB-binding cis-elements enrichment in their promoter region, functional co-occurrence as well as nuclear localization supports our finding. Specially, enrichment of MYB binding regions involved in drought-inducibility implying their regulatory role in drought response in rice

  2. Transcriptional Regulatory Network Analysis of MYB Transcription Factor Family Genes in Rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuchi eSmita

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available MYB transcription factor (TF is one of the largest TF families and regulates defense responses to various stresses, hormone signaling as well as many metabolic and developmental processes in plants. Understanding these regulatory hierarchies of gene expression networks in response to developmental and environmental cues is a major challenge due to the complex interactions between the genetic elements. Correlation analyses are useful to unravel co-regulated gene pairs governing biological process as well as identification of new candidate hub genes in response to these complex processes. High throughput expression profiling data are highly useful for construction of co-expression networks. In the present study, we utilized transcriptome data for comprehensive regulatory network studies of MYB TFs by top down and guide gene approaches. More than 50% of OsMYBs were strongly correlated under fifty experimental conditions with 51 hub genes via top down approach. Further, clusters were identified using Markov Clustering (MCL. To maximize the clustering performance, parameter evaluation of the MCL inflation score (I was performed in terms of enriched GO categories by measuring F-score. Comparison of co-expressed cluster and clads analyzed from phylogenetic analysis signifies their evolutionarily conserved co-regulatory role. We utilized compendium of known interaction and biological role with Gene Ontology enrichment analysis to hypothesize function of coexpressed OsMYBs. In the other part, the transcriptional regulatory network analysis by guide gene approach revealed 40 putative targets of 26 OsMYB TF hubs with high correlation value utilizing 815 microarray data. The putative targets with MYB-binding cis-elements enrichment in their promoter region, functional co-occurrence as well as nuclear localization supports our finding. Specially, enrichment of MYB binding regions involved in drought-inducibility implying their regulatory role in drought

  3. Histamine suppresses gene expression and synthesis of tumor necrosis factor alpha via histamine H2 receptors

    OpenAIRE

    1991-01-01

    Histamine and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) can each contribute to the pathogenesis of allergic reactions and chronic inflammatory diseases. We now report the effect of histamine on gene expression and total cellular synthesis of TNF-alpha. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced synthesis of TNF-alpha in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from 18 healthy donors was suppressed by histamine concentrations from 10(-6) to 10(-4) M, levels comparable with those measured in tissues after...

  4. Prevalence of Genes Encoding Outer Membrane Virulence Factors Among Fecal Escherichia coli Isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Rashki

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Escherichia coli is commensal bacterium of human intestine. The gut is a common pool of E. coli isolates causing urinary tract infections (UTIs. Some of fecal E. coli (FeEC by the possession of certain virulence factors is able to cause diseases in human and other mammalian models. To evaluate the health threats coordinated with a given fecal source of E. coli strains, we determined the frequency of genes expressing virulence determinants in fecal E. coli isolates collected from human feces in Zabol, southeast of Iran. Methods: Escherichia coli isolates (n = 94 were separated from the feces of patients attending teaching hospitals, and screened for various virulence genes: fimH, his, hlyA, ompT, irp2, iucD, iroN, and cnf1 by using the multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR method. Results: The prevalence of virulence genes was as follows: adhesins (fimH, 98% and iha, 26%, alpha-hemolysins (hlyA, 10%, outer membrane protease (ompT, 67%, aerobactin (iucD, 67%, iron-repressible protein (irp2, 91% and salmochelin (iroN, 33% and cytotoxic necrotizing factor 1 (cnf1. According to the diversity of different virulence genes, the examined isolates exhibited 29 different patterns. Conclusion: Our results demonstrated that most of the assessed isolates harbored several virulence factors. Our findings propose possibility of human feces serving as a source for pathogenic organisms, supporting the notion that fecal materials of humans play a role in the epidemiological chain of extra-intestinal pathogenic E. coli. This is the first report of the frequency of virulence factors among E. coli isolates collected from human feces in Iran.

  5. An environmental analysis of genes associated with schizophrenia: hypoxia and vascular factors as interacting elements in the neurodevelopmental model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt-Kastner, R; van Os, J; Esquivel, G; Steinbusch, H W M; Rutten, B P F

    2012-12-01

    Investigating and understanding gene-environment interaction (G × E) in a neurodevelopmentally and biologically plausible manner is a major challenge for schizophrenia research. Hypoxia during neurodevelopment is one of several environmental factors related to the risk of schizophrenia, and links between schizophrenia candidate genes and hypoxia regulation or vascular expression have been proposed. Given the availability of a wealth of complex genetic information on schizophrenia in the literature without knowledge on the connections to environmental factors, we now systematically collected genes from candidate studies (using SzGene), genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and copy number variation (CNV) analyses, and then applied four criteria to test for a (theoretical) link to ischemia-hypoxia and/or vascular factors. In all, 55% of the schizophrenia candidate genes (n=42 genes) met the criteria for a link to ischemia-hypoxia and/or vascular factors. Genes associated with schizophrenia showed a significant, threefold enrichment among genes that were derived from microarray studies of the ischemia-hypoxia response (IHR) in the brain. Thus, the finding of a considerable match between genes associated with the risk of schizophrenia and IHR and/or vascular factors is reproducible. An additional survey of genes identified by GWAS and CNV analyses suggested novel genes that match the criteria. Findings for interactions between specific variants of genes proposed to be IHR and/or vascular factors with obstetric complications in patients with schizophrenia have been reported in the literature. Therefore, the extended gene set defined here may form a reasonable and evidence-based starting point for hypothesis-based testing of G × E interactions in clinical genetic and translational neuroscience studies.

  6. Modelling topical photodynamic therapy treatment including the continuous production of Protoporphyrin IX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, C. L.; Brown, C. T. A.; Wood, K.; Moseley, H.

    2016-11-01

    Most existing theoretical models of photodynamic therapy (PDT) assume a uniform initial distribution of the photosensitive molecule, Protoporphyrin IX (PpIX). This is an adequate assumption when the prodrug is systematically administered; however for topical PDT this is no longer a valid assumption. Topical application and subsequent diffusion of the prodrug results in an inhomogeneous distribution of PpIX, especially after short incubation times, prior to light illumination. In this work a theoretical simulation of PDT where the PpIX distribution depends on the incubation time and the treatment modality is described. Three steps of the PpIX production are considered. The first is the distribution of the topically applied prodrug, the second in the conversion from the prodrug to PpIX and the third is the light distribution which affects the PpIX distribution through photobleaching. The light distribution is modelled using a Monte Carlo radiation transfer model and indicates treatment depths of around 2 mm during daylight PDT and approximately 3 mm during conventional PDT. The results suggest that treatment depths are not only limited by the light penetration but also by the PpIX distribution.

  7. Increased protoporphyrin IX accumulation does not improve the effect of photodynamic therapy for actinic keratosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, C V; Heerfordt, I M; Wiegell, S R

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Photodynamic therapy (PDT) with methyl aminolaevulinate (MAL) is highly effective for treating actinic keratosis (AK) on the face/scalp, but less effective on the extremities. Insufficient accumulation of protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) may cause these inferior efficacy rates. However...

  8. "What Do I Think about Title IX?" Voices from a University Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paule-Koba, Amanda L.; Harris, Othello; Freysinger, Valeria J.

    2013-01-01

    Despite the apparent benefits of Title IX, the implementation of the law remains controversial, and there are divergent beliefs regarding its impact on collegiate sport. The purpose of this study was to examine how members of a university community, whose intercollegiate sport programs have changed, perceive and make sense of Title IX and the…

  9. An update on anticancer drug development and delivery targeting carbonic anhydrase IX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justina Kazokaitė

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The expression of carbonic anhydrase (CA IX is up-regulated in many types of solid tumors in humans under hypoxic and acidic microenvironment. Inhibition of CA IX enzymatic activity with selective inhibitors, antibodies or labeled probes has been shown to reverse the acidic environment of solid tumors and reduce the tumor growth establishing the significant role of CA IX in tumorigenesis. Thus, the development of potent antitumor drugs targeting CA IX with minimal toxic effects is important for the target-specific tumor therapy. Recently, several promising antitumor agents against CA IX have been developed to treat certain types of cancers in combination with radiation and chemotherapy. Here we review the inhibition of CA IX by small molecule compounds and monoclonal antibodies. The methods of enzymatic assays, biophysical methods, animal models including zebrafish and Xenopus oocytes, and techniques of diagnostic imaging to detect hypoxic tumors using CA IX-targeted conjugates are discussed with the aim to overview the recent progress related to novel therapeutic agents that target CA IX in hypoxic tumors.

  10. Not Second-Class: Title IX, Equity, and Girls' High School Sports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stader, David L.; Surface, Jeanne L.

    2014-01-01

    Title IX is designed to protect students from discrimination based on sex in any educational institution that receives financial assistance. This article focuses on Title IX as it applies to high school athletic programs by considering the trial of a high school district in California. A federal court found considerable inequalities between boys…

  11. 4p-5s transitions in YVII, VIII, ZrVIII, IX, NbIX, X and MoX, XI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahimullah, K.; Chaghtai, M.S.Z.; Khatoon, S.

    1976-01-01

    The spectra of Y VII, VIII, Zr VIII, IX, Nb X and Mo X, XI are studied for the first time and the 1971 analysis of Nb IX is improved. By analyses of the transitions 4s 2 4psup(k)-4s 2 4psup(k-1)5s all the levels of the configurations 4p 3 , 4p 2 5s, 4p 2 and 4p5s are established in the spectra concerned. (Auth.)

  12. On the role of type IX collagen in the extracellular matrix of cartilage: type IX collagen is localized to intersections of collagen fibrils

    OpenAIRE

    1986-01-01

    The tissue distribution of type II and type IX collagen in 17-d-old chicken embryo was studied by immunofluorescence using polyclonal antibodies against type II collagen and a peptic fragment of type IX collagen (HMW), respectively. Both proteins were found only in cartilage where they were co-distributed. They occurred uniformly throughout the extracellular matrix, i.e., without distinction between pericellular, territorial, and interterritorial matrices. Tissues that undergo endochondral bo...

  13. The Synergistic Effect between Electrical and Chemical Factors in Plasma Gene/Molecule-Transfection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinno, Masafumi

    2016-09-01

    This study has been done to know what kind of factors in plasma and processes on cells promote plasma gene/molecule transfection. We have discovered a new plasma source using a microcapillary electrode which enables high transfection efficiency and high cell survivability simultaneously. However, the mechanism of the transfection by plasma was not clear. To clarify the transfection mechanisms by micro plasma, we focused on the effects of electrical (current, charge, field, etc.) and chemical (radicals, RONS, etc.) factors generated by the micro plasma and evaluated the contribution weight of three groups of the effects and processes, i.e. electrical, chemical and biochemical ones. At first, the necessity of the electrical factors was estimated by the laser produced plasma (LPP). Mouse L-929 fibroblast cell was cultured on a 96-well plate or 12-well micro slide chamber. Plasmids pCX-EGFP in Tris-EDTA buffer was dropped on the cells and they were exposed to the capillary discharge plasma (CDP) or the LPP. In the case of the CDP, the plasma was generated between the tip of the capillary electrode and the cells so that both electrical and chemical factors were supplied to the cells. In this setup, about 20% of average transfection efficiency was obtained. In the case of the LPP, the plasma was generated apart from the cells so that electrical factors were not supplied to the cells. In this setup, no transfection was observed. These results show that the electrical factors are necessary for the plasma gene transfection. Next, the necessity of the chemical factors was estimated the effect of catalase to remove H2O2 in CDP. The transfection efficiency decreased to 0.4 by scavenging H2O2 with catalase. However, only the solution of H2O2 caused no gene transfection in cells. These results shows that H2O2 is important species to cause gene/molecule transfection but still needs a synergistic effect with electrical or other chemical factors. This work was partly supported by

  14. The Drosophila stonewall gene encodes a putative transcription factor essential for germ cell development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, K A; McKearin, D M

    1996-03-01

    The differentiation of Drosophila germ cells is a useful model for studying mechanisms of cell specification. We report the identification of a gene, stonewall, that is required for germ cell development. Mutations in stonewall block proper oocyte differentiation and frequently cause the presumptive oocyte to develop as a nurse cell. Eventually, germ cells degenerate apoptotically. Stonewall is a germ cell nuclear protein; Stonewall has a DNA binding domain that shows similarities to the Myb and Adf-1 transcription factors and has other features that suggest that it is a transcription activating factor. We suggest that Stonewall transcriptional regulation is essential in cystocytes for maturation into specialized nurse cells and oocyte.

  15. Recessive Resistance to Plant Viruses: Potential Resistance Genes Beyond Translation Initiation Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masayoshi Hashimoto

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The ability of plant viruses to propagate their genomes in host cells depends on many host factors. In the absence of an agrochemical that specifically targets plant viral infection cycles, one of the most effective methods for controlling viral diseases in plants is taking advantage of the host plant’s resistance machinery. Recessive resistance is conferred by a recessive gene mutation that encodes a host factor critical for viral infection. It is a branch of the resistance machinery and, as an inherited characteristic, is very durable. Moreover, recessive resistance may be acquired by a deficiency in a negative regulator of plant defense responses, possibly due to the autoactivation of defense signaling. Eukaryotic translation initiation factor (eIF 4E and eIF4G and their isoforms are the most widely exploited recessive resistance genes in several crop species, and they are effective against a subset of viral species. However, the establishment of efficient, recessive resistance-type antiviral control strategies against a wider range of plant viral diseases requires genetic resources other than eIF4Es. In this review, we focus on recent advances related to antiviral recessive resistance genes evaluated in model plants and several crop species. We also address the roles of next-generation sequencing and genome editing technologies in improving plant genetic resources for recessive resistance-based antiviral breeding in various crop species.

  16. Changing Paradigm of Hemophilia Management: Extended Half-Life Factor Concentrates and Gene Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Riten; Dunn, Amy; Carcao, Manuel

    2016-02-01

    Management of hemophilia has evolved significantly in the last century-from recognition of the causative mechanism in the 1950s to commercially available clotting factor concentrates in the 1960s. Availability of lyophilized concentrates in the 1970s set the stage for home-based therapy, followed by introduction of virally attenuated plasma-derived, and then recombinant factor concentrates in the 1980s and 1990s, respectively. The subsequent years saw a paradigm shift in treatment goals from on-demand therapy to prophylactic factor replacement starting at an early age, to prevent hemarthrosis becoming the standard of care for patients with severe hemophilia. In the developed world, the increasing use of home-based prophylactic regimens has significantly improved the quality of life, and life expectancy of patients with severe hemophilia. Seminal developments in the past 5 years, including the commercial availability of extended half-life factor concentrates and the publication of successful results of gene therapy for patients with hemophilia B, promise to further revolutionize hemophilia care over the next few decades. In this review, we summarize the evolution of management for hemophilia, with a focus on extended half-life factor concentrates and gene therapy. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  17. Probing transcription factor binding activity and downstream gene silencing in living cells with a DNA nanoswitch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertucci, Alessandro; Guo, Junling; Oppmann, Nicolas; Glab, Agata; Ricci, Francesco; Caruso, Frank; Cavalieri, Francesca

    2018-01-25

    Transcription factor DNA binding activity is of pivotal importance in living systems because of its primary involvement in the regulation of genetic machinery. The analysis of transient expression levels of transcription factors in response to a certain cell status is a powerful means for investigating cellular dynamics at the biomolecular level. Herein, a DNA-based molecular switch that enables probing of transcription factor DNA binding activity is directly used in living cells. We demonstrate that the DNA nanoswitch allows for dynamic fluorescence imaging of NF-κB and quantification of downstream gene silencing in real time. The present strategy is based on a functional DNA nanodevice that transduces, through a binding-induced conformational change, the recognition of a specific transcription factor into a fluorescent signal. In addition, stochastic optical resolution microscopy, a super-resolution microscopy technique, is used to track the internalization and intracellular trafficking of the DNA nanodevice with high spatial resolution. Overall, it has been shown that a rationally designed DNA nanodevice can be used to achieve rapid, simple, and cost-effective real-time determination of transcription factor binding activity and downstream gene silencing.

  18. Lansoprazole and carbonic anhydrase IX inhibitors sinergize against human melanoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federici, Cristina; Lugini, Luana; Marino, Maria Lucia; Carta, Fabrizio; Iessi, Elisabetta; Azzarito, Tommaso; Supuran, Claudiu T; Fais, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Proton Pump Inhibitors (PPIs) reduce tumor acidity and therefore resistance of tumors to drugs. Carbonic Anhydrase IX (CA IX) inhibitors have proven to be effective against tumors, while tumor acidity might impair their full effectiveness. To analyze the effect of PPI/CA IX inhibitors combined treatment against human melanoma cells. The combination of Lansoprazole (LAN) and CA IX inhibitors (FC9-399A and S4) has been investigated in terms of cell proliferation inhibition and cell death in human melanoma cells. The combination of these inhibitors was more effective than the single treatments in both inhibiting cell proliferation and in inducing cell death in human melanoma cells. These results represent the first successful attempt in combining two different proton exchanger inhibitors. This is the first evidence on the effectiveness of a new approach against tumors based on the combination of PPI and CA IX inhibitors, thus providing an alternative strategy against tumors.

  19. The importance of protoporphyrin IX efflux for ALA-PDT dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milanetto, M C; Imasato, H; Perussi, J R

    2009-01-01

    One of the major advances in PDT is the use of 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) to induce the production of an endogenous photosensitizer inside the cells using intracellular enzymatic pathways. ALA is the first intermediate in heme biosynthesis and a precursor of the protoporphyrin IX (PpIX). When activated by light, this efficient photosensitizer accumulated in the target cells can produce cytotoxicity. The aim of this study was to find the best conditions for cell killing using ALA to temporarily increase the concentration of PpIX in two cell lines. It was shown that a considerable efflux of synthesized PpIX occurs. Since this efflux is time-dependent, it is essential to know the optimum time for irradiation after ALA administration. So, the efflux of PpIX from the cells is an important parameter to be considered for ALA-PDT dosimetry

  20. Urothelial conversion of 5-aminolevulinic acid to protoporphyrin IX following oral or intravesical administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Ronald B.; Miller, Gerald G.; Brown, Kevin; Bhatnagar, Rakesh; Tulip, John; McPhee, Malcolm S.

    1995-03-01

    Preferential conversion of 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) to protoporphyrin-IX (Pp-IX) occurs in malignant tissue, with accumulation to diagnostic and therapeutic levels. Recent studies have suggested selective conversion in epithelial tissue following oral or intravenous administration. Topical application avoids systemic photosensitization. However, the glycosaminoglycan (GAG) layer lining the urinary bladder is believed to be a protective barrier generally limiting mucosal absorption. Our objective was to evaluate uptake and conversion of 5-ALA following intravesical or oral administration. Using a rat model, Pp-IX content within epithelial and muscularis layers was quantitated by fluorescence confocal microscopy. Following intravesical administration, Pp-IX accumulated predominantly in the urothelium; whereas following oral administration, Pp-IX accumulated in both the urothelium and muscularis. Intravesical 5-ALA administration is feasible and may afford selective photosensitization of the urothelium for treatment of carcinoma in situ.

  1. Dual-wavelength excitation for fluorescence-based quantification of zinc protoporphyrin IX and protoporphyrin IX in whole blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennig, Georg; Gruber, Christian; Vogeser, Michael; Stepp, Herbert; Dittmar, Stephan; Sroka, Ronald; Brittenham, Gary M

    2014-07-01

    Quantification of erythrocyte zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPP) and protoporphyrin IX (PPIX), individually or jointly, is useful for the diagnostic evaluation of iron deficiency, iron-restricted erythropoiesis, lead exposure, and porphyrias. A method for simultaneous quantification of ZnPP and PPIX in unwashed blood samples is described, using dual-wavelength excitation to effectively eliminate background fluorescence from other blood constituents. In blood samples from 35 subjects, the results of the dual-wavelength excitation method and a reference high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) assay were closely correlated both for ZnPP (rs = 0.943, p ZnPP/mol heme, 84-1238 nmol/L) and for PPIX (rs = 0.959, p ZnPP, the proposed method is compared with conventional single-wavelength excitation and with commercial front-face fluorimetry of washed erythrocytes and whole blood. We hypothesize that dual-wavelength excitation fluorimetry will provide a new approach to the suppression of background fluorescence in blood and tissue measurements of ZnPP and PPIX. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Inactivation of Dengue and Yellow Fever viruses by heme, cobalt-protoporphyrin IX and tin-protoporphyrin IX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assunção-Miranda, I; Cruz-Oliveira, C; Neris, R L S; Figueiredo, C M; Pereira, L P S; Rodrigues, D; Araujo, D F F; Da Poian, A T; Bozza, M T

    2016-03-01

    To investigate the effect of heme, cobalt-protoporphyrin IX and tin-protoporphyrin IX (CoPPIX and SnPPIX), macrocyclic structures composed by a tetrapyrrole ring with a central metallic ion, on Dengue Virus (DENV) and Yellow Fever Virus (YFV) infection. Treatment of HepG2 cells with heme, CoPPIX and SnPPIX after DENV infection reduced infectious particles without affecting viral RNA contents in infected cells. The reduction of viral load occurs only with the direct contact of DENV with porphyrins, suggesting a direct effect on viral particles. Previously incubation of DENV and YFV with heme, CoPPIX and SnPPIX resulted in viral particles inactivation in a dose-dependent manner. Biliverdin, a noncyclical porphyrin, was unable to inactivate the viruses tested. Infection of HepG2 cells with porphyrin-pretreated DENV2 results in a reduced or abolished viral protein synthesis, RNA replication and cell death. Treatment of HepG2 or THP-1 cell lineage with heme or CoPPIX after DENV infection with a very low MOI resulted in a decreased DENV replication and protection from death. Heme, CoPPIX and SnPPIX possess a marked ability to inactivate DENV and YFV, impairing its ability to infect and induce cytopathic effects on target cells. These results open the possibility of therapeutic application of porphyrins or their use as models to design new antiviral drugs against DENV and YFV. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  3. COX-2 gene expression in colon cancer tissue related to regulating factors and promoter methylation status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asting, Annika Gustafsson; Carén, Helena; Andersson, Marianne; Lönnroth, Christina; Lagerstedt, Kristina; Lundholm, Kent

    2011-01-01

    Increased cyclooxygenase activity promotes progression of colorectal cancer, but the mechanisms behind COX-2 induction remain elusive. This study was therefore aimed to define external cell signaling and transcription factors relating to high COX-2 expression in colon cancer tissue. Tumor and normal colon tissue were collected at primary curative operation in 48 unselected patients. COX-2 expression in tumor and normal colon tissue was quantified including microarray analyses on tumor mRNA accounting for high and low tumor COX-2 expression. Cross hybridization was performed between tumor and normal colon tissue. Methylation status of up-stream COX-2 promoter region was evaluated. Tumors with high COX-2 expression displayed large differences in gene expression compared to normal colon. Numerous genes with altered expression appeared in tumors of high COX-2 expression compared to tumors of low COX-2. COX-2 expression in normal colon was increased in patients with tumors of high COX-2 compared to normal colon from patients with tumors of low COX-2. IL1β, IL6 and iNOS transcripts were up-regulated among external cell signaling factors; nine transcription factors (ATF3, C/EBP, c-Fos, Fos-B, JDP2, JunB, c-Maf, NF-κB, TCF4) showed increased expression and 5 (AP-2, CBP, Elk-1, p53, PEA3) were decreased in tumors with high COX-2. The promoter region of COX-2 gene did not show consistent methylation in tumor or normal colon tissue. Transcription and external cell signaling factors are altered as covariates to COX-2 expression in colon cancer tissue, but DNA methylation of the COX-2 promoter region was not a significant factor behind COX-2 expression in tumor and normal colon tissue

  4. Relationship between CDX2 gene methylation and dietary factors in gastric cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuasa, Yasuhito; Nagasaki, Hiromi; Akiyama, Yoshimitsu; Sakai, Hidekazu; Nakajima, Tomoko; Ohkura, Yasuo; Takizawa, Touichirou; Koike, Morio; Tani, Masao; Iwai, Takehisa; Sugihara, Kenichi; Imai, Kazue; Nakachi, Kei

    2005-01-01

    Epigenetic gene silencing through DNA methylation is one of the important steps in the mechanism underlying tumorigenesis, including in the stomach. Past lifestyle factors of cancer patients, such as intake of vegetables, are very important in affecting gastric carcinogenesis. However, the relationship between DNA methylation and past dietary habits in cancer patients remains largely unknown. The CDX2 homeobox transcription factor plays a key role in intestinal development, but CDX2 is also expressed in most of the intestinal metaplasia and part of the carcinomas of the stomach. We analyzed the methylation status of the CDX2 5' CpG island in gastric cancer cell lines by methylation-specific PCR (MSP), and then CDX2 mRNA was found to be activated after 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine treatment of the methylation-positive cells. We further examined the methylation status of CDX2 in primary gastric carcinomas by MSP and compared it with the past lifestyle of the patients, including dietary habits. Methylation of CDX2 was found in 20 (34.5%) of the 58 male patients and one (6.7%) of the 15 female patients. Since the methylation frequency was low in the female patients, the analysis was performed only on the male cases. CDX2 methylation was correlated with the decreased intake of green tea and cruciferous vegetables, and also with full or overeating habits. These findings are consistent with epidemiological observations on gastric cancer. We also analyzed the methylation status of p16/INK4a and hMLH1, but their frequencies were not associated with dietary factors or other lifestyle factors. Thus, diet could be an important factor determining the methylation status of genes such as CDX2 and the resultant aberrant expression of genes involved in carcinogenesis.

  5. Vitamin D inhibits the growth of and virulence factor gene expression by Porphyromonas gingivalis and blocks activation of the nuclear factor kappa B transcription factor in monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenier, D; Morin, M-P; Fournier-Larente, J; Chen, H

    2016-06-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2 D3 ), a fat-soluble secosteroid hormone, has a positive impact on periodontal health through diverse mechanisms. The present study was aimed at investigating the effect of 1,25(OH)2 D3 on the growth of and virulence factor gene expression by the periodontopathogenic bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis. The effect of 1,25(OH)2 D3 on P. gingivalis-mediated activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) transcription factor in monocytes was also assessed. A broth microdilution assay was used to determine the antibacterial activity of 1,25(OH)2 D3 . The modulation of virulence factor gene expression in P. gingivalis was assessed by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. NF-κB activation was assessed using a human monocytic cell line stably transfected with a luciferase reporter containing NF-κB binding sites. Minimal inhibitory concentrations of 1,25(OH)2 D3 against P. gingivalis ranged from 3.125 to 6.25 μg/mL. Moreover, a partial synergistic effect was observed when 1,25(OH)2 D3 was used in association with metronidazole. 1,25(OH)2 D3 attenuated the virulence of P. gingivalis by reducing the expression of genes coding for important virulence factors, including adhesins (fimA, hagA and hagB) and proteinases (rgpA, rgpB and kgp). 1,25(OH)2 D3 dose-dependently prevented P. gingivalis-induced NF-κB activation in a monocyte model. Our study suggested that 1,25(OH)2 D3 selectively inhibits the growth of and virulence factor gene expression by P. gingivalis, in addition to attenuating NF-κB activation by this periodontopathogen. This dual action on P. gingivalis and the inflammatory response of host cells may be of particular interest with a view to developing a novel and inexpensive preventive/therapeutic strategy. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Control of stochastic gene expression by host factors at the HIV promoter.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John C Burnett

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The HIV promoter within the viral long terminal repeat (LTR orchestrates many aspects of the viral life cycle, from the dynamics of viral gene expression and replication to the establishment of a latent state. In particular, after viral integration into the host genome, stochastic fluctuations in viral gene expression amplified by the Tat positive feedback loop can contribute to the formation of either a productive, transactivated state or an inactive state. In a significant fraction of cells harboring an integrated copy of the HIV-1 model provirus (LTR-GFP-IRES-Tat, this bimodal gene expression profile is dynamic, as cells spontaneously and continuously flip between active (Bright and inactive (Off expression modes. Furthermore, these switching dynamics may contribute to the establishment and maintenance of proviral latency, because after viral integration long delays in gene expression can occur before viral transactivation. The HIV-1 promoter contains cis-acting Sp1 and NF-kappaB elements that regulate gene expression via the recruitment of both activating and repressing complexes. We hypothesized that interplay in the recruitment of such positive and negative factors could modulate the stability of the Bright and Off modes and thereby alter the sensitivity of viral gene expression to stochastic fluctuations in the Tat feedback loop. Using model lentivirus variants with mutations introduced in the Sp1 and NF-kappaB elements, we employed flow cytometry, mRNA quantification, pharmacological perturbations, and chromatin immunoprecipitation to reveal significant functional differences in contributions of each site to viral gene regulation. Specifically, the Sp1 sites apparently stabilize both the Bright and the Off states, such that their mutation promotes noisy gene expression and reduction in the regulation of histone acetylation and deacetylation. Furthermore, the NF-kappaB sites exhibit distinct properties, with kappaB site I serving a

  7. Evaluating Transcription Factor Activity Changes by Scoring Unexplained Target Genes in Expression Data.

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    Evi Berchtold

    Full Text Available Several methods predict activity changes of transcription factors (TFs from a given regulatory network and measured expression data. But available gene regulatory networks are incomplete and contain many condition-dependent regulations that are not relevant for the specific expression measurement. It is not known which combination of active TFs is needed to cause a change in the expression of a target gene. A method to systematically evaluate the inferred activity changes is missing. We present such an evaluation strategy that indicates for how many target genes the observed expression changes can be explained by a given set of active TFs. To overcome the problem that the exact combination of active TFs needed to activate a gene is typically not known, we assume a gene to be explained if there exists any combination for which the predicted active TFs can possibly explain the observed change of the gene. We introduce the i-score (inconsistency score, which quantifies how many genes could not be explained by the set of activity changes of TFs. We observe that, even for these minimal requirements, published methods yield many unexplained target genes, i.e. large i-scores. This holds for all methods and all expression datasets we evaluated. We provide new optimization methods to calculate the best possible (minimal i-score given the network and measured expression data. The evaluation of this optimized i-score on a large data compendium yields many unexplained target genes for almost every case. This indicates that currently available regulatory networks are still far from being complete. Both the presented Act-SAT and Act-A* methods produce optimal sets of TF activity changes, which can be used to investigate the difficult interplay of expression and network data. A web server and a command line tool to calculate our i-score and to find the active TFs associated with the minimal i-score is available from https://services.bio.ifi.lmu.de/i-score.

  8. Differential expression of anti-angiogenic factors and guidance genes in the developing macula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozulin, Peter; Natoli, Riccardo; O'Brien, Keely M Bumsted; Madigan, Michele C; Provis, Jan M

    2009-01-01

    The primate retina contains a specialized, cone-rich macula, which mediates high acuity and color vision. The spatial resolution provided by the neural retina at the macula is optimized by stereotyped retinal blood vessel and ganglion cell axon patterning, which radiate away from the macula and reduce shadowing of macular photoreceptors. However, the genes that mediate these specializations, and the reasons for the vulnerability of the macula to degenerative disease, remain obscure. The aim of this study was to identify novel genes that may influence retinal vascular patterning and definition of the foveal avascular area. We used RNA from human fetal retinas at 19-20 weeks of gestation (WG; n=4) to measure differential gene expression in the macula, a region nasal to disc (nasal) and in the surrounding retina (surround) by hybridization to 12 GeneChip microarrays (HG-U133 Plus 2.0). The raw data was subjected to quality control assessment and preprocessing, using GC-RMA. We then used ANOVA analysis (Partek) Genomic Suite 6.3) and clustering (DAVID website) to identify the most highly represented genes clustered according to "biological process." The neural retina is fully differentiated at the macula at 19-20 WG, while neuronal progenitor cells are present throughout the rest of the retina. We therefore excluded genes associated with the cell cycle, and markers of differentiated neurons, from further analyses. Significantly regulated genes (pmacula versus surround" and "macula versus nasal." KEGG pathway clustering of the filtered gene lists identified 25 axon guidance-related genes that are differentially regulated in the macula. Furthermore, we found significant upregulation of three anti-angiogenic factors in the macula: pigment epithelium derived factor (PEDF), natriuretic peptide precurusor B (NPPB), and collagen type IValpha2. Differential expression of several members of the ephrin and semaphorin axon guidance gene families, PEDF, and NPPB was verified by

  9. Mutagenesis of RpoE-like sigma factor genes in Bdellovibrio reveals differential control of groEL and two groES genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lambert Carey

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus HD100 must regulate genes in response to a variety of environmental conditions as it enters, preys upon and leaves other bacteria, or grows axenically without prey. In addition to “housekeeping” sigma factors, its genome encodes several alternate sigma factors, including 2 Group IV-RpoE-like proteins, which may be involved in the complex regulation of its predatory lifestyle. Results We find that one sigma factor gene, bd3314, cannot be deleted from Bdellovibrio in either predatory or prey-independent growth states, and is therefore possibly essential, likely being an alternate sigma 70. Deletion of one of two Group IV-like sigma factor genes, bd0881, affects flagellar gene regulation and results in less efficient predation, although not due to motility changes; deletion of the second, bd0743, showed that it normally represses chaperone gene expression and intriguingly we find an alternative groES gene is expressed at timepoints in the predatory cycle where intensive protein synthesis at Bdellovibrio septation, prior to prey lysis, will be occurring. Conclusions We have taken the first step in understanding how alternate sigma factors regulate different processes in the predatory lifecycle of Bdellovibrio and discovered that alternate chaperones regulated by one of them are expressed at different stages of the lifecycle.

  10. NOTCH4 gene polymorphisms as potential risk factors for brain arteriovenous malformation development and hemorrhagic presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delev, Daniel; Pavlova, Anna; Grote, Alexander; Boström, Azize; Höllig, Anke; Schramm, Johannes; Fimmers, Rolf; Oldenburg, Johannes; Simon, Matthias

    2017-05-01

    OBJECTIVE Arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) of the brain are a frequent and important cause of intracranial hemorrhage in young adults. Little is known about the molecular-genetic pathomechanisms underlying AVM development. Genes of the NOTCH family control the normal development of vessels and proper arteriovenous specification. Transgenic mice with constitutive expression of active NOTCH4 frequently develop AVMs. Here, the authors report a genetic association study investigating possible associations between NOTCH4 gene polymorphisms and formation and clinical presentation of AVMs. METHODS After PCR amplification and direct DNA sequencing or restriction digests, 10 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the NOTCH4 gene were used for genotyping 153 AVM patients and 192 healthy controls (i.e., blood donors). Pertinent clinical data were available for 129 patients. Uni- and multivariate single-marker and explorative haplotype analyses were performed to identify potential genetic risk factors for AVM development and for hemorrhagic or epileptic presentation. RESULTS Eleven calculated haplotypes consisting of 3-4 SNPs (most of which were located in the epidermal growth factor-like domain of the NOTCH4 gene) were observed significantly more often among AVM patients than among controls. Univariate analysis indicated that rs443198_TT and rs915895_AA genotypes both were significantly associated with hemorrhage and that an rs1109771_GG genotype was associated with epilepsy. The association between rs443198_TT and AVM bleeding remained significant in the multivariate regression analysis. CONCLUSIONS The authors' results suggest NOTCH4 SNPs as possible genetic risk factors for the development and clinical presentation of AVMs and a role of NOTCH4 in the pathogenesis of this disease.

  11. Tumour necrosis factor gene complex polymorphisms in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruse, Charlotte E; Hill, Maureen C; Tobin, Martin; Neale, Natalie; Connolly, Martin J; Parker, Stuart G; Wardlaw, Andrew J

    2007-02-01

    We aimed to examine the role of tumour necrosis factor gene complex polymorphisms in subjects with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We hypothesized that individuals possessing polymorphic variants associated with higher tumour necrosis factor (TNF) secretion would be more susceptible to and/or have more severe disease. Patients with COPD and population controls underwent detailed clinical phenotyping. Genotyping for the tumour necrosis factor-308 and the lymphotoxin alpha NcoI (LTalpha polymorphisms was carried out by 'blinded' laboratory staff. Three hundred and sixty one individuals (220 cases and 141 controls) were recruited. We showed an association between the LTalphaNcol polymorphism and forced vital capacity (FVC) in a population of older adults with and without COPD. The LTalphaNcol*2 allele was associated with poorer lung function, under a codominant model, with a fall in FVC (expressed as a percentage of its predicted value) of 3.7% for each copy of the LTalphaNcol*2 allele possessed (for FVC, regression coefficient (95% CI)=-3.73(-7.01 to -0.44), P=0.026; for FEV(1) regression coefficient=-3.56(-7.80 to 0.70), P=0.101. However, there was no difference in genotype distribution between the case and control populations. This study adds weight to the suggestion that the TNF gene complex is involved in physiological alterations (FVC) that may affect the development and severity of COPD. The absence of a significant association between the TNF gene-complex polymorphisms in this study does not rule out a modest effect of these polymorphisms on the risk of COPD, as much larger studies are needed to detect modest gene effects on binary disease endpoints.

  12. Identification of transcription factor AML-1 binding site upstream of human cytomegalovirus UL111A gene.

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    Xiaoqun Zheng

    Full Text Available Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV interleukin-10 (hcmvIL-10, encoded by HCMV UL111A gene, is a homolog of human IL-10. It exerts immunomodulatory effects that allow HCMV to evade host defense mechanisms. However, the exact mechanism underlying the regulation of hcmvIL-10 expression is not well understood. The transcription factor acute myeloid leukemia 1 (AML-1 plays an important role in the regulation of various genes involved in the differentiation of hematopoietic lineages. A putative AML-1 binding site is present within the upstream regulatory region (URR of UL111A gene. To provide evidence that AML-1 is involved in regulating UL111A gene expression, we examined the interaction of AML-1 with the URR of UL111A in HCMV-infected human monocytic THP-1 cells using a chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. HcmvIL-10 transcription was detected in differentiated THP-1 cells, but not in undifferentiated ones. Furthermore, the URR of UL111A showed a higher intensity of AML-1 binding, a higher level of histone H3 acetyl-K9, but a lower level of histone H3 dimethyl-K9 in differentiated THP-1 cells than undifferentiated cells. Down-regulation of AML1 by RNA interference decreased the expression of the UL111A gene. Our results suggest that AML-1 may contribute to the epigenetic regulation of UL111A gene via histone modification in HCMV-infected differentiated THP-1 cells. This finding could be useful for the development of new anti-viral therapies.

  13. [Biological characteristics of cleft palate relevant gene thyroid transcription factor-2 transgenic mice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lei; Shi, Bing; Qian, Zheng; Meng, Tian; Wang, Yan

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study is to establish a transgenic mouse model for cleft palate relevant gene thyroid transcription factor-2 (TTF-2), which can be used to study palatal shelf development when the expression pattern and regular activation of TTF-2 is altered. The C57BL/6J mouse TTF-2 gene was cloned through polymerase chain reaction (PCR) from the mouse genomic DNA. The TTF-2 gene was inserted into the expression vector pBROAD3-mcs to construct the recombinant expression vector pBROAD3-TTF-2. This expression vector was then microinjected into the male pronuclei of the fertilized mouse ovum. Thus, the TTF-2 transgenic mice model was established. The genotype of the transgenic mice was identified by PCR and Southern blot analysis. Immunohistochemistry identified the consistent expression of TTF-2 gene during its palatal shelf development. TTF-2 genes were microinjected into 982 fertilized ova. A total of 580 two-cell-stage embryos cultured and transplanted into the oviducts of 48 pseudopregnant female mice. Overall, 68 embryos were obtained for analysis. The genotype of the mice was determined through PCR and Southern blot analysis using genomic DNA extracted from tail biopsies of the transgenic fetus. A total of 13 TTF-2 transgenic mice were detected. The expression of TTF-2 gene during the palatal shelf development of the transgenic mice was consistently detected by immunohistochemistry. The recombinant expression vector pBROAD3-TTF-2 was integrated into mouse genome through microinjection. The transgenic mouse in the palatal shelf that consistently expressed TTF-2 was successfully established and displayed a cleft palate phenotype.

  14. Monitoring ALA-induced PpIX Photodynamic Therapy in the Rat Esophagus Using Fluorescence and Reflectance Spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruijt, Bastiaan; de Bruijn, Henriette S.; van der Ploeg-van den Heuvel, Angelique; de Bruin, Ron W. F.; Sterenborg, Henricus J. C. M.; Amelink, Arjen; Robinson, Dominic J.

    2008-01-01

    The presence of phased protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) bleach kinetics has been shown to correlate with esophageal response to 5-aminolevulinic acid-based photodynamic therapy (ALA-PDT) in animal models. Here we confirm the existence of phased PpIX photobleaching by increasing the temporal resolution of

  15. Induction of protoporphyrin IX by aminolaevulinic acid in actinic keratosis, psoriasis and normal skin: preferential porphyrin enrichment in differentiated cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, T.; Laarhoven, A.I.M. van; Staassen, A.; Kerkhof, P.C.M. van de; Erp, P.E.J. van; Gerritsen, M.J.P.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In photodynamic therapy the endogenous photosensitizer protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) is synthesized following topical application of aminolaevulinic acid (ALA). However, different tissues have distinct PpIX-accumulating properties, due to differences in penetration of ALA through the stratum

  16. Anti-vascular agent Combretastatin A-4-P modulates Hypoxia Inducible Factor-1 and gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Currie Margaret J

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A functional vascular network is essential for the survival, growth and spread of solid tumours, making blood vessels a key target for therapeutic strategies. Combretastatin A-4 phosphate (CA-4-P is a tubulin-depolymerising agent in Phase II clinical trials as a vascular disrupting agent. Not much is known of the molecular effect of CA-4-P under tumour conditions. The tumour microenvironment differs markedly from that in normal tissue, specifically with respect to oxygenation (hypoxia. Gene regulation under tumour conditions is governed by hypoxia inducible factor 1 (HIF-1, controlling angiogenic and metastatic pathways. Methods We investigated the effect of CA-4-P on factors of the upstream and downstream signalling pathway of HIF-1 in vitro. Results CA-4-P treatment under hypoxia tended to reduce HIF-1 accumulation in a concentration-dependent manner, an effect which was more prominent in endothelial cells than in cancer cell lines. Conversely, CA-4-P increased HIF-1 accumulation under aerobic conditions in vitro. At these concentrations of CA-4-P under aerobic conditions, nuclear factor κB was activated via the small GTPase RhoA, and expression of the HIF-1 downstream angiogenic effector gene, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF-A, was increased. Conclusion Our findings advance the understanding of signal transduction pathways involved in the actions of the anti-vascular agent CA-4-P.

  17. Beyond genes: A systematic review of environmental risk factors in specific reading disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascheretti, Sara; Andreola, Chiara; Scaini, Simona; Sulpizio, Simone

    2018-03-19

    While an understanding of the genetic contributions to specific reading disorder (RD) is emerging, there is no agreement about which putative hazard factors are clearly involved in the aetiology of this disorder. A literature review looking at the impact of environmental risk variables implicated in RD either per se or when interacting with the genes. We performed a systematic literature review using the following keywords: dyslexia OR reading disability AND environmental risk factors OR environmental hazard factors, in the following electronic databases: PubMed, Scopus and PsycINFO, without any time restrictions. Gestational weeks and birth weight are among the pre- and peri-natal risk factors shown to reliably predict reading readiness and the odds of having RD. Inconclusive findings have been reported for maternal cigarette smoking, family history of psychiatric and medical diseases, and risk of miscarriage. A broad definition of familial socio-economic status and home literacy environment have been identified as good life-long risk predictors of reading skills. We highlighted the need to consider environmental hazards, their interactions and interactions with RD-candidate genes in the study of the aetiology of RD in order to provide much-needed insight into how these variables influence reading skills. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Screening for key genes and transcription factors in ankylosing spondylitis by RNA-Seq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhongyang; Wang, Xiuyu; Zheng, Yanping

    2018-02-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic inflammatory arthritis and autoimmune disease, the etiology and pathogenesis of which remain largely unknown. In the present study, blood samples were harvested from patients with AS and from healthy volunteers as a normal control (NC) for RNA-sequencing. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in the AS group compared with the NC group were identified, and gene ontology (GO) term and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway enrichment analyses were subsequently performed. Protein-protein interaction (PPI) network and AS-specific transcriptional regulatory network construction was performed for the DEGs. A total of 503 DEGs, including 338 upregulated and 165 downregulated DEGs, were identified in patients with AS compared with the NC group. Three upregulated DEGs identified, interferon-induced protein with tetratricopeptide repeats (IFIT)1, IFIT3 and radical S-adenosyl methionine domain containing (RSAD)2, are interferon (IFN)-stimulated genes that serve a role in the IFN signaling pathway. The most significantly enriched GO term was response to other organisms. Osteoclast differentiation was a significantly enriched pathway for eight DEGs [High affinity immunoglobulin gamma Fc receptor (FCGR)1A, FCGR2B, four and a half LIM domains 2, integrin β3, signal transducer and activator of transcription 2 (STAT2), suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3), leukocyte immunoglobulin like receptor (LILR)A4 and LILRA6]. The six hub genes in the PPI network constructed were interferon-stimulated gene 15, heat shock protein β1, microtubule-associated proteins 1A/1B light chain 3A, IFIT1, IFIT3 and SOCS3. POU domain class 2 transcription factor 1 (1-Oct) and ecotropic virus integration site-1 (Evi-1) were identified as two important transcription factors (TFs) in AS according to the AS-specific transcriptional regulatory network constructed. In addition, IFIT1 and IFIT3 were identified as targets of 1-Oct. The results of the

  19. [Quantitative analysis of gene expression for vascular endothelial growth factor and its application].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Xia; Fu, Jian-Xin; Ding, Kai-Yang; Cen, Jian-Nong; Wang, Wei; Ruan, Chang-Geng

    2005-08-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a central mediator of angiogenesis, not only plays an important role in the pathogenesis of leukemia, but also is an independent prognostic factor in patients with hematologic malignancies, like those in solid tumors. However, the importance of VEGF during differentiation or apoptosis of leukemia cells remains to be elucidated. In order to assess the alternation of VEGF gene expression in the process of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA)-induced differentiation of NB4 acute promyelocytic leukemia cell line, and a competitor DNA fragment, VEGF gene competative template (T-VEGFDelta) was constructed by using gene recombinant technologies, and a competitive quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (cQRT-PCR) method was developed. A standard curve was obtained by co-amplification of serial dilutions of the target nulecules with constant amount of competitive template and this curve was used to detect molecular number of target gene in measuring sample. The surface expression of CD11b antigen and nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT) reduction rate of NB4 cells were also assayed at different time points. The results showed that cQRT-PCR was a sensitive, reliable tool for analysis of VEGF gene expression with a detectable range from 1 x 10(4) to 2 x 10(5) molecules. The number of VEGF gene transcripts detected by means of cQRT-PCR assay was 42.3 x 10(5), 12.6 x 10(5), 3.6 x 10(5), and less than 1.0 x 10(5)/microg total RNA at 0, 12, 24 and 48 hours after ATRA treatment, respectively. This rapid down-regulation of VEGF gene expression, during ATRA-induced NB4 cell differentiation, was accompanied by the up-regulation of CD11b expression and an increased NBT reduction rate. In conclusion, cQRT-PCR method was successtully constructed, confirming that ATRA efficiently repressed VEGF, at the same time, the ATRA might exert an antileukemic effect, other than induction of differentiation via inhibition of angiogenesis.

  20. Genetically engineered Rice with transcription factor DREB genes for abiotic stress tolerance(abstract)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Datta, S.K.; Datta, K.

    2005-01-01

    Water stress (drought and Salinity) is the most severe limitation to rice productivity. Several breeding approaches (MAS, QTL) applied to suitable genotypes are in place at IRRI and elsewhere. Phenotyping of water stress tolerance is in progress with potential predictability. Dr. Shinozaki's group has cloned a number of transcription factor genes, which have been shown to work in Arabidopsis to achieve drought, cold, and salinity tolerant plants. None of these genes have as yet displayed their potential functioning in rice. Genetic engineering aims at cross talk between different stress signaling pathways leading to stress tolerance. Osmotic Adjustment (OA) is an effective component of abiotic stress (drought and salinity) tolerance in many plants including rice. When plant experiences water stress, OA contributes to turgor maintenance of both shoots and roots. Conventional breeding could not achieve the OA in rice excepting a few rice cultivars, which are partially adapted to water-stress conditions. Several stress-related genes have now been cloned and transferred in to enhance the osmolytes and some transgenic lines showed increased tolerance to osmotic stress. A few strategies could be effectively deployed for a better understanding of water-stress tolerance in rice and to develop transgenic rice, which can survive for a critical period of water-stress conditions: 1) Switching on of transcription factor regulating the expression of several genes related to abiotic stress, 2) Use of a suitable stress inducible promoter driving the target gene for an efficient and directed expression in plants, 3) Understanding of phenotyping and GxE in a given environment, 4) Selection of a few adaptive rice cultivars suitable in drought/salinity prone areas, 5) Microarray, proteomics, QTL and MAS may expedite the cloning and characterizing the stress induced genes, and 6) Finally, the efficient transformation system for generating a large number of transgenic rice of different

  1. Global characterization of interferon regulatory factor (IRF genes in vertebrates: Glimpse of the diversification in evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Zhen

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interferon regulatory factors (IRFs, which can be identified based on a unique helix-turn-helix DNA-binding domain (DBD are a large family of transcription factors involved in host immune response, haemotopoietic differentiation and immunomodulation. Despite the identification of ten IRF family members in mammals, and some recent effort to identify these members in fish, relatively little is known in the composition of these members in other classes of vertebrates, and the evolution and probably the origin of the IRF family have not been investigated in vertebrates. Results Genome data mining has been performed to identify any possible IRF family members in human, mouse, dog, chicken, anole lizard, frog, and some teleost fish, mainly zebrafish and stickleback, and also in non-vertebrate deuterostomes including the hemichordate, cephalochordate, urochordate and echinoderm. In vertebrates, all ten IRF family members, i.e. IRF-1 to IRF-10 were identified, with two genes of IRF-4 and IRF-6 identified in fish and frog, respectively, except that in zebrafish exist three IRF-4 genes. Surprisingly, an additional member in the IRF family, IRF-11 was found in teleost fish. A range of two to ten IRF-like genes were detected in the non-vertebrate deuterostomes, and they had little similarity to those IRF family members in vertebrates as revealed in genomic structure and in phylogenetic analysis. However, the ten IRF family members, IRF-1 to IRF-10 showed certain degrees of conservation in terms of genomic structure and gene synteny. In particular, IRF-1, IRF-2, IRF-6, IRF-8 are quite conserved in their genomic structure in all vertebrates, and to a less degree, some IRF family members, such as IRF-5 and IRF-9 are comparable in the structure. Synteny analysis revealed that the gene loci for the ten IRF family members in vertebrates were also quite conservative, but in zebrafish conserved genes were distributed in a much longer distance in

  2. Combined congenital dysfibrinogenemia and factor VII deficiency from mutations in the FGB and F7 genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Hye In; Park, In-Ae; Lee, Ki-O; Kim, Sun-Hee; Kim, Hee-Jin

    2012-07-01

    Dysfibrinogenemia and factor VII (FVII) deficiency are rare congenital coagulopathies. In this report, the authors describe a man with both defects confirmed by molecular genetic tests. The patient was a 51-year-old man referred for prolonged prothrombin time (PT) that had been accidentally detected on preoperative screening. He had no history of bleeding tendency even on occasions of surgery. Routine coagulation studies revealed prolonged PT (1.53 INR) and thrombin time (42.2 s), and decreased fibrinogen level (57 mg/dl) and FVII activity (44%). Direct sequencing analyses were performed on FGA, FGB, and FGG genes to confirm dysfibrinogenemia and on the F7 gene to confirm FVII deficiency. As a result, the patient was shown to be heterozygous for a point mutation in exon 8 of the FGB gene (c.1475A > G, p.*492Trpext*12; Fibrinogen Magdeburg II) and for a missense mutation in exon 6 of the F7 gene (c.466G  > A, p.Gly156Ser). To our knowledge, this is the first report on a case of combined dysfibrinogenemia and FVII deficiency confirmed by molecular genetic tests.

  3. Analysis of Relationship between Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha Gene (G308A Polymorphism) with Preterm Labor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafarzadeh, Lobat; Danesh, Azar; Sadeghi, Marzieh; Heybati, Fateme; Hashemzadeh, Morteza

    2013-08-01

    Increased concentrations of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) in blood and amniotic fluid are observed in women with preterm delivery (PTD) and TNF-α mutations at -308 position are associated with higher expression of this gene. Therefore, we compared the frequency of G308A transition in the promoter region of TNF-α gene of women and neonates delivered preterm with the normal subjects. This cross-sectional study was performed on 135 mothers who were referred for delivery. According to the gestational age, mothers and their neonates were allocated to the case (preterm, 64 subjects) and control (term, 71 subjects) groups. Using the polymerase chain reaction, restrictive fragment length polymorphism (RFLP), genotyping was performed on both maternal peripheral blood and cord blood samples to determine single nucleotide polymorphism in the promoter region of TNF-α gene at -308. Two mothers in the case group, one mother in the control group and one neonate in the case group had genotyping assays (GA) mutation. All other subjects had normal GG genotype. Frequency of GA mutation was not significantly different between two groups (P = 0.47). There is no significant association between PTD and either maternal or fetal TNF-α -308 polymorphism and frequency ofGAmutation is not significantly increased in mothers and neonates delivered preterm. It means that the presence of this mutation by itself does not modify the overall risk of PTD. Investigations on the combination of various polymorphisms indifferent genes are recommended to achieve more accurate results.

  4. Effects of ultrasound on Transforming Growth Factor-beta genes in bone cells

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    J Harle

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Therapeutic ultrasound (US is a widely used form of biophysical stimulation that is increasingly applied to promote fracture healing. Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta, which is encoded by three related but different genes, is known to play a major part in bone growth and repair. However, the effects of US on the expression of the TGF-beta genes and the physical acoustic mechanisms involved in initiating changes in gene expression in vitro, are not yet known. The present study demonstrates that US had a differential effect on these TGF-beta isoforms in a human osteoblast cell line, with the highest dose eliciting the most pronounced up-regulation of both TGF-beta1 and TGF-beta3 at 1 hour after treatment and thereafter declining. In contrast, US had no effect on TGF-beta2 expression. Fluid streaming rather than thermal effects or cavitation was found to be the most likely explanation for the gene responses observed in vitro.

  5. Identification and expression analyses of MYB and WRKY transcription factor genes in Papaver somniferum L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakeshpour, Tayebeh; Nayebi, Shadi; Rashidi Monfared, Sajad; Moieni, Ahmad; Karimzadeh, Ghasem

    2015-10-01

    Papaver somniferum L. is an herbaceous, annual and diploid plant that is important from pharmacological and strategic point of view. The cDNA clones of two putative MYB and WRKY genes were isolated (GeneBank accession numbers KP411870 and KP203854, respectively) from this plant, via the nested-PCR method, and characterized. The MYB transcription factor (TF) comprises 342 amino acids, and exhibits the structural features of the R2R3MYB protein family. The WRKY TF, a 326 amino acid-long polypeptide, falls structurally into the group II of WRKY protein family. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) analyses indicate the presence of these TFs in all organs of P. somniferum L. and Papaver bracteatum L. Highest expression levels of these two TFs were observed in the leaf tissues of P. somniferum L. while in P. bracteatum L. the espression levels were highest in the root tissues. Promoter analysis of the 10 co-expressed gene clustered involved in noscapine biosynthesis pathway in P. somniferum L. suggested that not only these 10 genes are co-expressed, but also share common regulatory motifs and TFs including MYB and WRKY TFs, and that may explain their common regulation.

  6. The Impact of the Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Gene on Trauma and Spatial Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica K. Miller

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The influence of genes and the environment on the development of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD continues to motivate neuropsychological research, with one consistent focus being the Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF gene, given its impact on the integrity of the hippocampal memory system. Research into human navigation also considers the BDNF gene in relation to hippocampal dependent spatial processing. This speculative paper brings together trauma and spatial processing for the first time and presents exploratory research into their interactions with BDNF. We propose that quantifying the impact of BDNF on trauma and spatial processing is critical and may well explain individual differences in clinical trauma treatment outcomes and in navigation performance. Research has already shown that the BDNF gene influences PTSD severity and prevalence as well as navigation behaviour. However, more data are required to demonstrate the precise hippocampal dependent processing mechanisms behind these influences in different populations and environmental conditions. This paper provides insight from recent studies and calls for further research into the relationship between allocentric processing, trauma processing and BDNF. We argue that research into these neural mechanisms could transform PTSD clinical practice and professional support for individuals in trauma-exposing occupations such as emergency response, law enforcement and the military.

  7. Transcription-factor-dependent enhancer transcription defines a gene regulatory network for cardiac rhythm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xinan H; Nadadur, Rangarajan D; Hilvering, Catharina Re; Bianchi, Valerio; Werner, Michael; Mazurek, Stefan R; Gadek, Margaret; Shen, Kaitlyn M; Goldman, Joseph Aaron; Tyan, Leonid; Bekeny, Jenna; Hall, Johnathon M; Lee, Nutishia; Perez-Cervantes, Carlos; Burnicka-Turek, Ozanna; Poss, Kenneth D; Weber, Christopher R; de Laat, Wouter; Ruthenburg, Alexander J; Moskowitz, Ivan P

    2017-12-27

    The noncoding genome is pervasively transcribed. Noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) generated from enhancers have been proposed as a general facet of enhancer function and some have been shown to be required for enhancer activity. Here we examine the transcription-factor-(TF)-dependence of ncRNA expression to define enhancers and enhancer-associated ncRNAs that are involved in a TF-dependent regulatory network. TBX5, a cardiac TF, regulates a network of cardiac channel genes to maintain cardiac rhythm. We deep sequenced wildtype and Tbx5 -mutant mouse atria, identifying ~2600 novel Tbx5 -dependent ncRNAs. Tbx5-dependent ncRNAs were enriched for tissue-specific marks of active enhancers genome-wide. Tbx5-dependent ncRNAs emanated from regions that are enriched for TBX5-binding and that demonstrated Tbx5-dependent enhancer activity. Tbx5 -dependent ncRNA transcription provided a quantitative metric of Tbx5 -dependent enhancer activity, correlating with target gene expression. We identified RACER , a novel Tbx5 -dependent long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) required for the expression of the calcium-handling gene Ryr2 . We illustrate that TF-dependent enhancer transcription can illuminate components of TF-dependent gene regulatory networks.

  8. Discovery and functional assessment of gene variants in the vascular endothelial growth factor pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paré-Brunet, Laia; Glubb, Dylan; Evans, Patrick; Berenguer-Llergo, Antoni; Etheridge, Amy S; Skol, Andrew D; Di Rienzo, Anna; Duan, Shiwei; Gamazon, Eric R; Innocenti, Federico

    2014-02-01

    Angiogenesis is a host-mediated mechanism in disease pathophysiology. The vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) pathway is a major determinant of angiogenesis, and a comprehensive annotation of the functional variation in this pathway is essential to understand the genetic basis of angiogenesis-related diseases. We assessed the allelic heterogeneity of gene expression, population specificity of cis expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs), and eQTL function in luciferase assays in CEU and Yoruba people of Ibadan, Nigeria (YRI) HapMap lymphoblastoid cell lines in 23 resequenced genes. Among 356 cis-eQTLs, 155 and 174 were unique to CEU and YRI, respectively, and 27 were shared between CEU and YRI. Two cis-eQTLs provided mechanistic evidence for two genome-wide association study findings. Five eQTLs were tested for function in luciferase assays and the effect of two KRAS variants was concordant with the eQTL effect. Two eQTLs found in each of PRKCE, PIK3C2A, and MAP2K6 could predict 44%, 37%, and 45% of the variance in gene expression, respectively. This is the first analysis focusing on the pattern of functional genetic variation of the VEGF pathway genes in CEU and YRI populations and providing mechanistic evidence for genetic association studies of diseases for which angiogenesis plays a pathophysiologic role. © 2013 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  9. Arabidopsis MAP kinase 4 regulates gene expression through transcription factor release in the nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Jin-Long; Fiil, Berthe Katrine; Petersen, Klaus; Nielsen, Henrik Bjørn; Botanga, Christopher J; Thorgrimsen, Stephan; Palma, Kristoffer; Suarez-Rodriguez, Maria Cristina; Sandbech-Clausen, Signe; Lichota, Jacek; Brodersen, Peter; Grasser, Klaus D; Mattsson, Ole; Glazebrook, Jane; Mundy, John; Petersen, Morten

    2008-01-01

    Plant and animal perception of microbes through pathogen surveillance proteins leads to MAP kinase signalling and the expression of defence genes. However, little is known about how plant MAP kinases regulate specific gene expression. We report that, in the absence of pathogens, Arabidopsis MAP kinase 4 (MPK4) exists in nuclear complexes with the WRKY33 transcription factor. This complex depends on the MPK4 substrate MKS1. Challenge with Pseudomonas syringae or flagellin leads to the activation of MPK4 and phosphorylation of MKS1. Subsequently, complexes with MKS1 and WRKY33 are released from MPK4, and WRKY33 targets the promoter of PHYTOALEXIN DEFICIENT3 (PAD3) encoding an enzyme required for the synthesis of antimicrobial camalexin. Hence, wrky33 mutants are impaired in the accumulation of PAD3 mRNA and camalexin production upon infection. That WRKY33 is an effector of MPK4 is further supported by the suppression of PAD3 expression in mpk4–wrky33 double mutant backgrounds. Our data establish direct links between MPK4 and innate immunity and provide an example of how a plant MAP kinase can regulate gene expression by releasing transcription factors in the nucleus upon activation. PMID:18650934

  10. Genomic organization of the mouse fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (Fgfr3) gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez-Castro, A.V.; Wilson, J.; Altherr, M.R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1995-11-20

    The fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (Fgfr3) protein is a tyrosine kinase receptor involved in the signal transduction of various fibroblast growth factors. Recent studies suggest its important role in normal development. In humans, mutation in Fgfr3 is responsible for growth disorders such as achondroplasia, hypoachondroplasia, and thanatophoric dysplasia. Here, we report the complete genomic organization of the mouse Fgfr3 gene. The murine gene spans approximately 15 kb and consists of 19 exons and 18 introns. One major and one minor transcription initiation site were identified. Position +1 is located 614 nucleotides upstream from the ATG initiation codon. The translation initiation and termination sites are located in exons 2 and 19, respectively. Five Sp1 sites, two AP2 sites, one Zeste site, and one Krox 24 site were observed in the 5{prime}-flanking region. The Fgfr3 promoter appears to be contained within a CpG island and, as is common in genes having multiple Sp1-binding sites, lacks a TATA box. 35 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Hypoxia-Inducible Factor Directs POMC Gene to Mediate Hypothalamic Glucose Sensing and Energy Balance Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hai; Zhang, Guo; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Park, Sung-min; Cai, Dongsheng

    2011-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) is a nuclear transcription factor that responds to environmental and pathological hypoxia to induce metabolic adaptation, vascular growth, and cell survival. Here we found that HIF subunits and HIF2α in particular were normally expressed in the mediobasal hypothalamus of mice. Hypothalamic HIF was up-regulated by glucose to mediate the feeding control of hypothalamic glucose sensing. Two underlying molecular pathways were identified, including suppression of PHDs by glucose metabolites to prevent HIF2α degradation and the recruitment of AMPK and mTOR/S6K to regulate HIF2α protein synthesis. HIF activation was found to directly control the transcription of POMC gene. Genetic approach was then employed to develop conditional knockout mice with HIF inhibition in POMC neurons, revealing that HIF loss-of-function in POMC neurons impaired hypothalamic glucose sensing and caused energy imbalance to promote obesity development. The metabolic effects of HIF in hypothalamic POMC neurons were independent of leptin signaling or pituitary ACTH pathway. Hypothalamic gene delivery of HIF counteracted overeating and obesity under conditions of nutritional excess. In conclusion, HIF controls hypothalamic POMC gene to direct the central nutrient sensing in regulation of energy and body weight balance. PMID:21814490

  12. Hypoxia-inducible factor directs POMC gene to mediate hypothalamic glucose sensing and energy balance regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai Zhang

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF is a nuclear transcription factor that responds to environmental and pathological hypoxia to induce metabolic adaptation, vascular growth, and cell survival. Here we found that HIF subunits and HIF2α in particular were normally expressed in the mediobasal hypothalamus of mice. Hypothalamic HIF was up-regulated by glucose to mediate the feeding control of hypothalamic glucose sensing. Two underlying molecular pathways were identified, including suppression of PHDs by glucose metabolites to prevent HIF2α degradation and the recruitment of AMPK and mTOR/S6K to regulate HIF2α protein synthesis. HIF activation was found to directly control the transcription of POMC gene. Genetic approach was then employed to develop conditional knockout mice with HIF inhibition in POMC neurons, revealing that HIF loss-of-function in POMC neurons impaired hypothalamic glucose sensing and caused energy imbalance to promote obesity development. The metabolic effects of HIF in hypothalamic POMC neurons were independent of leptin signaling or pituitary ACTH pathway. Hypothalamic gene delivery of HIF counteracted overeating and obesity under conditions of nutritional excess. In conclusion, HIF controls hypothalamic POMC gene to direct the central nutrient sensing in regulation of energy and body weight balance.

  13. The Neurospora crassa colonial temperature-sensitive 3 (cot-3) gene encodes protein elongation factor 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Propheta, O; Vierula, J; Toporowski, P; Gorovits, R; Yarden, O

    2001-02-01

    At elevated temperatures, the Neurospora crassa mutant colonial, temperature-sensitive 3 (cot-3) forms compact, highly branched colonies. Growth of the cot-3 strain under these conditions also results in the loss of the lower molecular weight (LMW) isoform of the Ser/Thr protein kinase encoded by the unlinked cot-1 gene, whose function is also involved in hyphal elongation. The unique cot-3 gene has been cloned by complementation and shown to encode translation elongation factor 2 (EF-2). As expected for a gene with a general role in protein synthesis, cot-3 mRNA is abundantly expressed throughout all asexual phases of the N. crassa life cycle. The molecular basis of the cot-3 mutation was determined to be an ATT to AAT transversion, which causes an Ile to Asn substitution at residue 278. Treatment with fusidic acid (a specific inhibitor of EF-2) inhibits hyphal elongation and induces hyperbranching in a manner which mimics the cot-3 phenotype, and also leads to a decrease in the abundance of the LMW isoform of COT1. This supports our conclusion that the mutation in cot-3 which results in abnormal hyphal elongation/branching impairs EF-2 function and confirms that the abundance of a LMW isoform of COT1 kinase is dependent on the function of this general translation factor.

  14. Role of Dicer1-Dependent Factors in the Paracrine Regulation of Epididymal Gene Expression.

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    Olivia Jerczynski

    Full Text Available Dicer1 is an endoribonuclease involved in the biogenesis of functional molecules such as microRNAs (miRNAs and endogenous small interfering RNAs (endo-siRNAs. These small non-coding RNAs are important regulators of post-transcriptional gene expression and participate in the control of male fertility. With the knowledge that 1 Dicer1-dependent factors are required for proper sperm maturation in the epididymis, and that 2 miRNAs are potent mediators of intercellular communication in most biological systems, we investigated the role of Dicer1-dependent factors produced by the proximal epididymis (initial segment/caput- including miRNAs- on the regulation of epididymal gene expression in the distal epididymis regions (i.e. corpus and cauda. To this end, we performed comparative microarray and ANOVA analyses on control vs. Defb41iCre/wt;Dicer1fl/fl mice in which functional Dicer1 is absent from the principal cells of the proximal epididymis. We identified 35 and 33 transcripts that displayed significant expression level changes in the corpus and cauda regions (Fold change > 2 or 2 or < -2; p < 0.01. These miRNAs are secreted via extracellular vesicles (EVs derived from the DC2 epididymal principal cell line, and their expression correlates with target transcripts involved in distinct biological pathways, as evidenced by in silico analysis. Albeit correlative and based on in silico approach, our study proposes that Dicer1-dependent factors trigger- directly or not-significant genes expression changes in distinct regions of this organ. The paracrine control of functions important to post-testicular sperm maturation by Dicer1-dependent factors may open new avenues for the identification of molecular targets important to male fertility control.

  15. The Composition and Spatial Patterns of Bacterial Virulence Factors and Antibiotic Resistance Genes in 19 Wastewater Treatment Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bing; Xia, Yu; Wen, Xianghua; Wang, Xiaohui; Yang, Yunfeng; Zhou, Jizhong; Zhang, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial pathogenicity and antibiotic resistance are of concern for environmental safety and public health. Accumulating evidence suggests that wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) are as an important sink and source of pathogens and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs). Virulence genes (encoding virulence factors) are good indicators for bacterial pathogenic potentials. To achieve a comprehensive understanding of bacterial pathogenic potentials and antibiotic resistance in WWTPs, bacterial virulence genes and ARGs in 19 WWTPs covering a majority of latitudinal zones of China were surveyed by using GeoChip 4.2. A total of 1610 genes covering 13 virulence factors and 1903 genes belonging to 11 ARG families were detected respectively. The bacterial virulence genes exhibited significant spatial distribution patterns of a latitudinal biodiversity gradient and a distance-decay relationship across China. Moreover, virulence genes tended to coexist with ARGs as shown by their strongly positive associations. In addition, key environmental factors shaping the overall virulence gene structure were identified. This study profiles the occurrence, composition and distribution of virulence genes and ARGs in current WWTPs in China, and uncovers spatial patterns and important environmental variables shaping their structure, which may provide the basis for further studies of bacterial virulence factors and antibiotic resistance in WWTPs.

  16. THE IX EUROPEAN FORUM ON ANTIPHOSPHOLIPID ANTIBODIES. A BRIEF REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataliya V Seredavkina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a brief review of the proceedings of the IX European Forum on antiphospholipid antibodies held in May 2013 in Krakow (Poland. The aim of the Forum is to coordinate multicenter projects focused on antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL, both clinical and fundamental research, based on cooperation between the European countries. The main purpose is to stimulate research into all aspects of aPL, to facilitate the exchange of information between institutions, and to involve many centers in different countries into scientific research on this issue. The issues of standardization of the diagnostic criteria for antiphospholipid syndrome (APS, primarily serological markers (their specificity, sensitivity and correlation with clinical manifestations, as well as non-criterial manifestations of APS, were considered at the meeting. In addition, the therapy problems were discussed.

  17. Electrochemical properties of protoporphyrin IX zinc(II) films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Chisato; Imae, Toyoko

    2004-12-15

    The electrochemical properties of protoporphyrin IX zinc(II) (ZnPP) films on indium-tin oxide (ITO) substrate have been studied for three types of films with different arrangements, which were an adsorbed film of ZnPP and LB films of ZnPP and its hybrid with hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) measurement showed that, as the adsorbed amount of ZnPP increases, an irreversible oxidation peak of ZnPP film is intensified. This reveals that electrochemical properties depend on the adsorbed amount rather than the orientation of porphyrin molecules. It was also supported from CV measurement and ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy that porphyrins adsorbed on ITO substrate were desorbed after the single scan of potential. Additionally, photoresponse of these ZnPP films was investigated by photocurrent measurement. The photocurrent generation is due to carboxylic acid moieties but not ZnPP macrocycles.

  18. Protoporphyrin IX: the Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachar, Madhav; Anderson, Karl E.

    2016-01-01

    Protoporphyrin IX (PPIX) is ubiquitously present in all living cells in small amounts as a precursor of heme. PPIX has some biologic functions of its own, and PPIX-based strategies have been used for cancer diagnosis and treatment (the good). PPIX serves as the substrate for ferrochelatase, the final enzyme in heme biosynthesis, and its homeostasis is tightly regulated during heme synthesis. Accumulation of PPIX in human porphyrias can cause skin photosensitivity, biliary stones, hepatobiliary damage, and even liver failure (the bad and the ugly). In this work, we review the mechanisms that are associated with the broad aspects of PPIX. Because PPIX is a hydrophobic molecule, its disposition is by hepatic rather than renal excretion. Large amounts of PPIX are toxic to the liver and can cause cholestatic liver injury. Application of PPIX in cancer diagnosis and treatment is based on its photodynamic effects. PMID:26588930

  19. Regulation of toxin and bacteriocin gene expression in Clostridium by interchangeable RNA polymerase sigma factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupuy, Bruno; Raffestin, Stéphanie; Matamouros, Susana; Mani, Nagraj; Popoff, Michel R; Sonenshein, Abraham L

    2006-05-01

    The production of major extracellular toxins by pathogenic strains of Clostridium botulinum, Clostridium tetani and Clostridium difficile, and a bacteriocin by Clostridium perfringens is dependent on a related group of RNA polymerase sigma-factors. These sigma-factors (BotR, TetR, TcdR and UviA) were shown to be sufficiently similar that they could substitute for one another in in vitro DNA binding and run-off transcription experiments. In cells, however, the sigma-factors fell into two subclasses. BotR and TetR were able to direct transcription of their target genes in a fully reciprocal manner. Similarly, UviA and TcdR were fully interchangeable. Neither BotR nor TetR could substitute for UviA or TcdR, however, and neither UviA nor TcdR could direct transcription of the natural targets of BotR or TetR. The extent of functional interchangeability of the sigma-factors was attributed to the strong conservation of their subregion 4.2 sequences and the conserved -35 sequences of their target promoters, while restrictions on interchangeability were attributed to variations in their subregion 2.4 sequences and the target site -10 sequences. The four sigma-factors have been assigned to group 5 of the sigma(70) family and seem to have arisen from a common ancestral protein that may have co-evolved with the genes whose transcription they direct. A fifth Clostridiumsigma-factor, sigma(Y) of Clostridium acetobutylicum, resembles the TcdR family, but was not functionally interchangeable with members of this family.

  20. Ares I-X Range Safety Flight Envelope Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starr, Brett R.; Olds, Aaron D.; Craig, Anthony S.

    2011-01-01

    Ares I-X was the first test flight of NASA's Constellation Program's Ares I Crew Launch Vehicle designed to provide manned access to low Earth orbit. As a one-time test flight, the Air Force's 45th Space Wing required a series of Range Safety analysis data products to be developed for the specified launch date and mission trajectory prior to granting flight approval on the Eastern Range. The range safety data package is required to ensure that the public, launch area, and launch complex personnel and resources are provided with an acceptable level of safety and that all aspects of prelaunch and launch operations adhere to applicable public laws. The analysis data products, defined in the Air Force Space Command Manual 91-710, Volume 2, consisted of a nominal trajectory, three sigma trajectory envelopes, stage impact footprints, acoustic intensity contours, trajectory turn angles resulting from potential vehicle malfunctions (including flight software failures), characterization of potential debris, and debris impact footprints. These data products were developed under the auspices of the Constellation's Program Launch Constellation Range Safety Panel and its Range Safety Trajectory Working Group with the intent of beginning the framework for the operational vehicle data products and providing programmatic review and oversight. A multi-center NASA team in conjunction with the 45th Space Wing, collaborated within the Trajectory Working Group forum to define the data product development processes, performed the analyses necessary to generate the data products, and performed independent verification and validation of the data products. This paper outlines the Range Safety data requirements and provides an overview of the processes established to develop both the data products and the individual analyses used to develop the data products, and it summarizes the results of the analyses required for the Ares I-X launch.

  1. Ares I-X Range Safety Analyses Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starr, Brett R.; Gowan, John W., Jr.; Thompson, Brian G.; Tarpley, Ashley W.

    2011-01-01

    Ares I-X was the first test flight of NASA's Constellation Program's Ares I Crew Launch Vehicle designed to provide manned access to low Earth orbit. As a one-time test flight, the Air Force's 45th Space Wing required a series of Range Safety analysis data products to be developed for the specified launch date and mission trajectory prior to granting flight approval on the Eastern Range. The range safety data package is required to ensure that the public, launch area, and launch complex personnel and resources are provided with an acceptable level of safety and that all aspects of prelaunch and launch operations adhere to applicable public laws. The analysis data products, defined in the Air Force Space Command Manual 91-710, Volume 2, consisted of a nominal trajectory, three sigma trajectory envelopes, stage impact footprints, acoustic intensity contours, trajectory turn angles resulting from potential vehicle malfunctions (including flight software failures), characterization of potential debris, and debris impact footprints. These data products were developed under the auspices of the Constellation's Program Launch Constellation Range Safety Panel and its Range Safety Trajectory Working Group with the intent of beginning the framework for the operational vehicle data products and providing programmatic review and oversight. A multi-center NASA team in conjunction with the 45th Space Wing, collaborated within the Trajectory Working Group forum to define the data product development processes, performed the analyses necessary to generate the data products, and performed independent verification and validation of the data products. This paper outlines the Range Safety data requirements and provides an overview of the processes established to develop both the data products and the individual analyses used to develop the data products, and it summarizes the results of the analyses required for the Ares I-X launch.

  2. A single gene target of an ETS-family transcription factor determines neuronal CO2-chemosensitivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia P Brandt

    Full Text Available Many animals possess neurons specialized for the detection of carbon dioxide (CO(2, which acts as a cue to elicit behavioral responses and is also an internally generated product of respiration that regulates animal physiology. In many organisms how such neurons detect CO(2 is poorly understood. We report here a mechanism that endows C. elegans neurons with the ability to detect CO(2. The ETS-5 transcription factor is necessary for the specification of CO(2-sensing BAG neurons. Expression of a single ETS-5 target gene, gcy-9, which encodes a receptor-type guanylate cyclase, is sufficient to bypass a requirement for ets-5 in CO(2-detection and transforms neurons into CO(2-sensing neurons. Because ETS-5 and GCY-9 are members of gene families that are conserved between nematodes and vertebrates, a similar mechanism might act in the specification of CO(2-sensing neurons in other phyla.

  3. Irrepressible, truncated auxin response factors: natural roles and applications in dissecting auxin gene regulation pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ckurshumova, Wenzislava; Krogan, Naden T; Marcos, Danielle; Caragea, Adriana E; Berleth, Thomas

    2012-08-01

    The molecularly well-characterized auxin signal transduction pathway involves two evolutionarily conserved families interacting through their C-terminal domains III and IV: the Auxin Response Factors (ARFs) and their repressors the Aux/IAAs, to control auxin-responsive genes, among them genes involved in auxin transport. ( 1) (,) ( 2) We have developed a new genetic tool to study ARF function. Using MONOPTEROS (MP)/ARF5, we have generated a truncated version of MP (MPΔ), ( 3) which has lost the target domains for repression by Aux/IAA proteins. Besides exploring genetic interactions between MP and Aux/IAAs, we used this construct to trace MP's role in vascular patterning, a previously characterized auxin dependent process. ( 4) (,) ( 5) Here we summarize examples of naturally occurring truncated ARFs and summarize potential applications of truncated ARFs as analytical tools.

  4. Gene-specific factors determine mitotic expression and bookmarking via alternate regulatory elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arampatzi, Panagiota; Gialitakis, Manolis; Makatounakis, Takis; Papamatheakis, Joseph

    2013-02-01

    Transcriptional silencing during mitosis is caused by inactivation of critical transcriptional regulators and/or chromatin condensation. Inheritance of gene expression patterns through cell division involves various bookmarking mechanisms. In this report, we have examined the mitotic and post-mitotic expression of the DRA major histocompatibility class II (MHCII) gene in different cell types. During mitosis the constitutively MHCII-expressing B lymphoblastoid cells showed sustained occupancy of the proximal promoter by the cognate enhanceosome and general transcription factors. In contrast, although mitotic epithelial cells were depleted of these proteins irrespectively of their MHCII transcriptional activity, a distal enhancer selectively recruited the PP2A phosphatase via NFY and maintained chromatin accessibility. Based on our data, we propose a novel chromatin anti-condensation role for this element in mitotic bookmarking and timing of post-mitotic transcriptional reactivation.

  5. [Polymorphism of 5,10-methylenetetrahydropholate reductase, prothrombin, and coagulation factor V genes in young patients with ischemic stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrynina, L A; Kalashnikova, L A; Patrusheva, N L; Kovalenko, T F; Patrushev, L I

    2012-01-01

    The study included 142 patients (87 women, 55 men) (mean age 36.2 +/- 8.3 yr) after ischemic stroke caused by dissection of cerebral arteries (D) (n = 37), anti-phospholipid syndrome (APS) (n = 55) or cardiogenic embolism (CE) (n = 11). Stroke of unknown origin (cryptogenic) was diagnosed in 39 patients. Mutations of 5,10-methylenetetrahydropholate reductase (MTGPR), prothrombin, and coagulation factor V genes were documented by PCR in 38, 0, 3% of D cases, 55.9, 9, 13% of APS cases, 73, 9, 0 CE cases, 57, 5, 0% of cases with cryptogenic stroke compared with 43, 0, 0% in controls. Mutations in MTGPR gene in CE cases, prothrombin gene in APS and CE cases, coagulation factor V gene in APS cases occurred more frequently than in control (p p p V genes may enhance the thrombogenic potential in APS and CE patients. The role of MTGPR gene mutation in pathogenesis of cardiogenic stroke needs clarification.

  6. Transcriptional regulation of mouse PXR gene: an interplay of transregulatory factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangeeta Kumari

    Full Text Available Pregnane X Receptor (PXR is an important ligand-activated nuclear receptor functioning as a 'master regulator' of expression of phase I, phase II drug metabolizing enzymes, and members of the drug transporters. PXR is primarily expressed in hepatic tissues and to lesser extent in other non-hepatic tissues both in human and in mice. Although its expression profile is well studied but little is known about the regulatory mechanisms that govern PXR gene expression in these cells. In the present study, we have cloned and characterized over 5 kb (-4963 to +54 region lying upstream of mouse PXR transcription start site. Promoter-reporter assays revealed that the proximal promoter region of up to 1 kb is sufficient to support the expression of PXR in the mouse liver cell lines. It was evident that the 500 bp proximal promoter region contains active binding sites for Ets, Tcf, Ikarose and nuclear factor families of transcription factors. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays demonstrated that the minimal region of 134 bp PXR promoter was able to bind Ets-1 and β-catenin proteins. This result was further confirmed by chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis. In summary, the present study identified a promoter region of mouse PXR gene and the transregulatory factors responsible for PXR promoter activity. The results presented herein are expected to provide important cues to gain further insight into the regulatory mechanisms of PXR function.

  7. Differentiation-inducing factor-1 suppresses gene expression of cyclin D1 in tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasmin, Tania; Takahashi-Yanaga, Fumi; Mori, Jun; Miwa, Yoshikazu; Hirata, Masato; Watanabe, Yutaka; Morimoto, Sachio; Sasaguri, Toshiyuki

    2005-01-01

    To determine the mechanism by which differentiation-inducing factor-1 (DIF-1), a morphogen of Dictyostelium discoideum, inhibits tumor cell proliferation, we examined the effect of DIF-1 on the gene expression of cyclin D1. DIF-1 strongly reduced the expression of cyclin D1 mRNA and correspondingly decreased the amount of β-catenin in HeLa cells and squamous cell carcinoma cells. DIF-1 activated glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) and inhibition of GSK-3β attenuated the DIF-1-induced β-catenin degradation, indicating the involvement of GSK-3β in this effect. Moreover, DIF-1 reduced the activities of T-cell factor (TCF)/lymphoid enhancer factor (LEF) reporter plasmid and a reporter gene driven by the human cyclin D1 promoter. Eliminating the TCF/LEF consensus site from the cyclin D1 promoter diminished the effect of DIF-1. These results suggest that DIF-1 inhibits Wnt/β-catenin signaling, resulting in the suppression of cyclin D1 promoter activity

  8. Glucose availability is a decisive factor for Nrf2-mediated gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elke H. Heiss

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Activation of the transcription factor Nrf2 (nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 is one of the major cellular defense lines against oxidative and xenobiotic stress, but also influences genes involved in lipid and glucose metabolism. It is unresolved whether the cytoprotective and metabolic responses mediated by Nrf2 are connected or separable events in non-malignant cells. In this study we show that activation of Nrf2, either by the small molecule sulforaphane or knockout of the Nrf2 inhibitor Keap1, leads to increased cellular glucose uptake and increased glucose addiction in fibroblasts. Upon Nrf2 activation glucose is preferentially metabolized through the pentose phosphate pathway with increased production of NADPH. Interference with the supply of glucose or the pentose phosphate pathway and NADPH generation not only hampers Nrf2-mediated detoxification of reactive oxygen species on the enzyme level but also Nrf2-initiated expression of antioxidant defense proteins, such as glutathione reductase and heme-oxygenase1. We conclude that the Nrf2-dependent protection against oxidative stress relies on an intact pentose phosphate pathway and that there is crosstalk between metabolism and detoxification already at the level of gene expression in mammalian cells.

  9. Title IX and Pregnancy Discrimination in Higher Education: The New Frontier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Mary Ann; Younger, Jaclyn

    2014-01-01

    Pregnancy discrimination is a little known area covered by Title IX. According to the Title IX regulations, areas of prohibited discrimination include: admissions; hiring; coursework accommodations and completion; pregnancy leave policies and status protection upon return from leave; and health insurance coverage. These regulations will soon get more attention as the Obama Administration insists on Title IX dissemination and compliance in an effort to stop the leaky pipeline for women in the STEM fields. Research shows that pregnancy and childbirth are the major reasons why women drop out of research science in much greater numbers than men; this dropout is most likely to occur among graduate students and postdoctoral fellows who are in their peak childbearing years. A similar pattern of dropout can be seen in all fields, including related professional schools. Research also reveals that there are currently few established policies in higher education which adequately address pregnancy and childbirth in formal policies for students. This article will address new efforts by the United States Department of Education and the federal agencies to begin to seek compliance relating to Title IX and pregnancy discrimination in educational institutions. It will discuss the recent successful efforts of the U.S. Department of Education's Office for Civil Rights in investigating and settling pregnancy discrimination claims as well as the lessons learned in private action lawsuits under Title IX. Title IX private action suits have transformed athletics for women, and more recently Title IX has been applied in sexual harassment cases. Pregnancy discrimination is now the new frontier.

  10. Syntheses of carbon-13 labeled protoporphyrin-IX for spectroscopic studies of heme proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujinari, E.M.

    1985-01-01

    The development of various methodologies for synthesis of selectively tailored protoporphyrin-IX dimethyl ester are presented. The iron(II) complex of protoporphyrin-IX is the heme, the prosthetic group for Hb, Mb, cytochromes and peroxidases. The significance of this research is to provide direct means to establish definitive carbon-13 NMR assignments of heme proteins in order to study not only the structure-function relationships, but also protein dynamics of these vital systems. Carbon-13 labeling at the beta-vinyl position was first achieved by ozonolysis of protoporphyrin-IX dimethyl ester. Column LC method were used to first isolate 2,4-diformyldeuteroporphyrin-IX dimethyl ester. Concomitantly, monofomyl-monovinyl porphyrins were obtained as a mixture of two isomers. This mixture was separated by MPLC or prep HPLC to afford the isomerically pure products, Spirographis porphyrin dimethyl ester and Iso-Spirographis porphyrin dimethyl ester. A Wittig reaction to each of these porphyrins with 13 C-methyltriphenylphosphonium iodide gave 2,4-bis[ 13 C 2 ]-vinyl protoporphyrin-IX dimethyl ester, 2-[ 13 C 2 ]-vinyl protoporphyrin-IX dimethyl ester, and the 4-[ 13 C 2 ]-vinyl protoporphyrin-IX dimethyl ester, respectively

  11. The use of CA-IX as a diagnostic method for oral leukoplakia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Sayáns, M; Suárez-Peñaranda, J M; Torres-López, M; Supuran, C T; Gándara-Vila, P; Gayoso-Diz, P; Barros-Angueira, F; Gallas-Torreira, M; García-García, A

    2015-02-01

    The presence and degree of dysplasia are important diagnostic and prognostic criteria for oral leukoplakia, but evaluation of dysplasia is difficult and subjective. Carbonic anhydrase-IX (CA-IX) is expressed primarily in tumor cells and is considered a specific hypoxia marker. We investigated the role of CA-IX in oral leukoplakia. We investigated 30 specimens of oral leukoplakia and 35 dysplasia specimens adjacent to the tumor margin. We analyzed clinical variables including age, sex, degree of dysplasia, and smoking, clinical appearance of leukoplakia, number of lesions, location, size, clinical monitoring, malignant transformation and recurrence. For the immunohistochemical study, we used a noncommercial monoclonal antibody against human CA-IX MAb M75. We found greater CA-IX positivity in nonsmokers, erythroplakia and mottled leukoplakia, those located on the tongue, patients with multiple lesions, 2-4 cm leukoplakias and in recurrent cases, although differences were not statistically significant. All lesions in all samples without dysplasia were negative for CA-IX; however, for all other categories of dysplasia, the percentages of positivity and negativity varied. Regarding the diagnostic index values, we found a sensitivity of 32%, specificity of 100%, a positive predictive value of 100% and a negative predictive value of 13%. Leukoplakias appear mainly in females and potentially are malignant; more than 90% have some degree of dysplasia, and therefore require close clinical and histopathological monitoring. The CA-IX immunohistochemical marker may be useful for screening samples without dysplasia owing to its high specificity.

  12. Evaluation of common genetic variants in 82 candidate genes as risk factors for neural tube defects

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Pangilinan, Faith

    2012-08-02

    AbstractBackgroundNeural tube defects (NTDs) are common birth defects (~1 in 1000 pregnancies in the US and Europe) that have complex origins, including environmental and genetic factors. A low level of maternal folate is one well-established risk factor, with maternal periconceptional folic acid supplementation reducing the occurrence of NTD pregnancies by 50-70%. Gene variants in the folate metabolic pathway (e.g., MTHFR rs1801133 (677 C > T) and MTHFD1 rs2236225 (R653Q)) have been found to increase NTD risk. We hypothesized that variants in additional folate\\/B12 pathway genes contribute to NTD risk.MethodsA tagSNP approach was used to screen common variation in 82 candidate genes selected from the folate\\/B12 pathway and NTD mouse models. We initially genotyped polymorphisms in 320 Irish triads (NTD cases and their parents), including 301 cases and 341 Irish controls to perform case–control and family based association tests. Significantly associated polymorphisms were genotyped in a secondary set of 250 families that included 229 cases and 658 controls. The combined results for 1441 SNPs were used in a joint analysis to test for case and maternal effects.ResultsNearly 70 SNPs in 30 genes were found to be associated with NTDs at the p < 0.01 level. The ten strongest association signals (p-value range: 0.0003–0.0023) were found in nine genes (MFTC, CDKN2A, ADA, PEMT, CUBN, GART, DNMT3A, MTHFD1 and T (Brachyury)) and included the known NTD risk factor MTHFD1 R653Q (rs2236225). The single strongest signal was observed in a new candidate, MFTC rs17803441 (OR = 1.61 [1.23-2.08], p = 0.0003 for the minor allele). Though nominally significant, these associations did not remain significant after correction for multiple hypothesis testing.ConclusionsTo our knowledge, with respect to sample size and scope of evaluation of candidate polymorphisms, this is the largest NTD genetic association study reported to date. The scale of the study and the

  13. Analysis of inversions in the factor VIII gene in Spanish hemophilia A patients and families

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domenech, M.; Tizzano, E.; Baiget, M. [Hospital de Sant Pau, Barcelona (Spain); Altisent, C. [Hospital Vall d`Hebron, Barcelona (Spain)

    1994-09-01

    Intron 22 is the largest intron of the factor VIII gene and contains a CpG island from which two additional transcripts originate. One of these transcripts corresponds to the F8A gene which have telomeric extragenic copies in the X chromosome. An inversion involving homologous recombination between the intragenic and the distal or proximal copies of the F8A gene has been recently described as a common cause of severe hemophilia A (HA). We analyzed intron 22 rearrangements in 195 HA patients (123 familial and 72 sporadic cases). According to factor VIII levels, our sample was classified as severe in 114 cases, moderate in 29 cases and mild in 52 cases. An intron 22 (F8A) probe was hybridized to Southern blots of BcII digested DNA obtained from peripheral blood. A clear pattern of altered bands identifies distal or proximal inversions. We detected an abnormal pattern identifying an inversion in 49 (25%) of the analyzed cases. 43% of severe HA patients (49 cases) showed an inversion. As expected, no inversion was found in the moderate and mild group of patients. We found a high proportion (78%) of the distal rearrangement. From 49 identified inversions, 33 were found in familial cases (27%), while the remaining 15 were detected in sporadic patients (22%) in support that this mutational event occurs with a similar frequency in familial or sporadic cases. In addition, we detected a significant tendency of distal inversion to occur more frequently in familial cases than in sporadic cases. Inhibitor development to factor VIII was documented in approximately 1/3 of the patients with inversion. The identification of such a frequent molecular event in severe hemophilia A patients has been applied in our families to carrier and prenatal diagnosis, to determine the origin of the mutation in the sporadic cases and to detect the presence of germinal mosaicism.

  14. Advanced Glycation End-Products affect transcription factors regulating insulin gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puddu, A.; Storace, D.; Odetti, P.; Viviani, G.L.

    2010-01-01

    Advanced Glycation End-Products (AGEs) are generated by the covalent interaction of reducing sugars with proteins, lipids or nucleic acids. AGEs are implicated in diabetic complications and pancreatic β-cell dysfunction. We previously demonstrated that exposure of the pancreatic islet cell line HIT-T15 to high concentrations of AGEs leads to a significant decrease of insulin secretion and content. Insulin gene transcription is positively regulated by the beta cell specific transcription factor PDX-1 (Pancreatic and Duodenal Homeobox-1). On the contrary, the forkhead transcription factor FoxO1 inhibits PDX-1 gene transcription. Activity of FoxO1 is regulated by post-translational modifications: phosphorylation deactivates FoxO1, and acetylation prevents FoxO1 ubiquitination. In this work we investigated whether AGEs affect expression and subcellular localization of PDX-1 and FoxO1. HIT-T15 cells were cultured for 5 days in presence of AGEs. Cells were then lysed and processed for subcellular fractionation. We determined intracellular insulin content, then we assessed the expression and subcellular localization of PDX-1, FoxO1, phosphoFoxO1 and acetylFoxO1. As expected intracellular insulin content was lower in HIT-T15 cells cultured with AGEs. The results showed that AGEs decreased expression and nuclear localization of PDX-1, reduced phosphorylation of FoxO1, and increased expression and acetylation of FoxO1. These results suggest that AGEs decrease insulin content unbalancing transcription factors regulating insulin gene expression.

  15. Analysis of factor VIII gene inversions in 164 unrelated hemophilia A families

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vnencak-Jones, L.; Phillips, J.A. III; Janco, R.L. [Vanderbilt Univ. School of Medicine, Nashville, TN (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Hemophilia A is an X-linked recessive disease with variable phenotype and both heterogeneous and wide spread mutations in the factor VIII (F8) gene. As a result, diagnostic carrier or prenatal testing often relies upon laborious DNA linkage analysis. Recently, inversion mutations resulting from an intrachromosomal recombination between DNA sequences in one of two A genes {approximately}500 kb upstream from the F8 gene and a homologous A gene in intron 22 of the F8 gene were identified and found in 45% of severe hemophiliacs. We have analyzed banked DNA collected since 1986 from affected males or obligate carrier females representing 164 unrelated hemophilia A families. The disease was sporadic in 37%, familial in 54% and in 10% of families incomplete information was given. A unique deletion was identified in 1/164, a normal pattern was observed in 110/164 (67%), and 53/164 (32%) families had inversion mutations with 43/53 (81%) involving the distal A gene (R3 pattern) and 10/53 (19%) involving the proximal A gene (R2 pattern). While 19% of all rearrangements were R2, in 35 families with severe disease (< 1% VIII:C activity) all 16 rearrangements seen were R3. In 18 families with the R3 pattern and known activities, 16 (89%) had levels < 1%, with the remaining 2 families having {le} 2.4% activity. Further, 18 referrals specifically noted the production of inhibitors and 8/18 (45%) had the R3 pattern. Our findings demonstrate that the R3 inversion mutation patterns is (1) only seen with VIII:C activity levels of {le} 2.4%, (2) seen in 46% of families with severe hemophilia, (3) seen in 45% of hemophiliacs known to have inhibitors, (4) not correlated with sporadic or familial disease and (5) not in disequilibrium with the Bcl I or Taq I intron 18 or ST14 polymorphisms. Finally, in families positive for an inversion mutation, direct testing offers a highly accurate and less expensive alternative to DNA linkage analysis.

  16. The H IX galaxy survey - II. H I kinematics of H I eXtreme galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, K. A.; Kilborn, V. A.; Koribalski, B. S.; Catinella, B.; Józsa, G. I. G.; Wong, O. I.; Stevens, A. R. H.; Obreschkow, D.; Dénes, H.

    2018-05-01

    By analysing a sample of galaxies selected from the H I Parkes All Sky Survey (HIPASS) to contain more than 2.5 times their expected H I content based on their optical properties, we investigate what drives these H I eXtreme (H IX) galaxies to be so H I-rich. We model the H I kinematics with the Tilted Ring Fitting Code TiRiFiC and compare the observed H IX galaxies to a control sample of galaxies from HIPASS as well as simulated galaxies built with the semi-analytic model DARK SAGE. We find that (1) H I discs in H IX galaxies are more likely to be warped and more likely to host H I arms and tails than in the control galaxies, (2) the average H I and average stellar column density of H IX galaxies is comparable to the control sample, (3) H IX galaxies have higher H I and baryonic specific angular momenta than control galaxies, (4) most H IX galaxies live in higher spin haloes than most control galaxies. These results suggest that H IX galaxies are H I-rich because they can support more H I against gravitational instability due to their high specific angular momentum. The majority of the H IX galaxies inherits their high specific angular momentum from their halo. The H I content of H IX galaxies might be further increased by gas-rich minor mergers. This paper is based on data obtained with the Australia Telescope Compact Array through the large program C 2705.

  17. Modulation of the endogenous production of protoporphyrin IX in a yeast-based model organism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joniová, Jaroslava; Gerelli, Emmanuel; Wagnières, Georges

    2017-02-01

    The main aim of this study was to assess conditions at which simple yeast-based model organism produces maximal levels of protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) after an exogenous administration of its precursor, 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA), and the ferrous-ion chelator 2,2'-bipyridyl. We observed that the fluorescing porphyrin, produced after these administrations, was likely to be PpIX since fluorescence spectroscopy of the porphyrins produced endogenously in yeast cells resembles that of PpIX in DMSO and in vivo in the chick's chorioallantoic membrane model. Also, fluorescence lifetimes of these porphyrins are very similar to that of PpIX in vitro and in vivo. This suggests that PpIX is the main fluorescent compound produced by yeast in our conditions. We found that the conditions at which yeast produces the maximal PpIX were a synchronous administration of 5 μM ALA and 1 mM 2,2'-bipyridyl for yeast incubated in aqueous glucose and 1 mM 2,2'-bipyridyl in the presence of YPD medium. Such a simple model is of high interest to study basic mechanisms involved in the mitochondrial respiration since PpIX, which is produced in this organelle, can be used as an oxygen sensor, or to perform photodynamic therapy and photodiagnosis. Since the absorption and scattering coefficients of this model are much smaller than those of soft tissues over the visible part of the spectrum, a version of this model loaded with appropriated amounts of light absorbing and scattering particles could be designed as a phantom to mimic tumors containing PpIX, a useful tool to optimize certain cancer photodetection set-ups.

  18. Genetic Transformation of Transcription Factor (35S-oshox4 Gene into Rice Genome and Transformant Analysis of hpt Gene by PCR and Hygromycin Resistance Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    INEZ HORTENZE SLAMET-LOEDIN

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Global warming, climate change and crop extensification in marginal dryland areas are related to long dry season and water deficit. The water availability is an important factor in improving plant production. Application of drought tolerant rice cultivars is one of several options that might be used. Genetic engineering at the level of transcription factors is particularly promising strategy to develop drought tolerant rice varieties. Transcription factors regulate a wide range of target genes in which of them contribute to stress tolerance. HD Zip genes are transcription factor that potential in the adaptation of plants to some environment stresses including water deficit. HD-ZIP oshox4 (oryza sativa homeobox gene controlled by 35S promotor is inserted into pCAMBIA 1300 vector with hpt (hygromycin gene as a selectable marker. The aim of this research is to obtain transgenic rice plant from transformation with 35S-oshox4 plasmid, segregation analysis of marker gene (hpt by PCR method at T0 and T1 generation, and hygromycin resistance analysis of seeds. Recombinant plasmid was transformed into rice genome of IRAT 112 and rojolele cultivars using Agrobacterium tumefaciens. The results showed that transformation efficiency of IRAT 112 is 5.7-13.6% and 26-66,7% for rojolele. While regeneration efficiency for IRAT 112 is 4.7-43.7% and 23-44.1% for rojolele. The result of hygromycin resistance test at T1 seeds were obtained 14 lines cv. rojolele segregation Mendelian for hpt gene. The PCR analysis using specific primers for hpt gene at the parent (T0 from 14 lines showed that 7 lines contain the gene. At the second generation (T1, PCR analysis using hpt primers showed that 3 from 4 lines were followed Mendelian segregation pattern by the presence of specific band.

  19. The Composition and Spatial Patterns of Bacterial Virulence Factors and Antibiotic Resistance Genes in 19 Wastewater Treatment Plants

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Bing; Xia, Yu; Wen, Xianghua; Wang, Xiaohui; Yang, Yunfeng; Zhou, Jizhong; Zhang, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial pathogenicity and antibiotic resistance are of concern for environmental safety and public health. Accumulating evidence suggests that wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) are as an important sink and source of pathogens and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs). Virulence genes (encoding virulence factors) are good indicators for bacterial pathogenic potentials. To achieve a comprehensive understanding of bacterial pathogenic potentials and antibiotic resistance in WWTPs, bacterial vir...

  20. Developmental, genetic and environmental factors affect the expression of flavonoid genes, enzymes and metabolites in strawberry fruits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carbone, F.; Preuss, A.; Vos, de C.H.; Amico, d' E.; Perrotta, G.; Bovy, A.G.; Martens, S.; Rosati, C.

    2009-01-01

    The influence of internal (genetic and developmental) and external (environmental) factors on levels of flavonoid gene transcripts, enzyme activity and metabolites was studied in fruit of six cultivated strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa Duch.) genotypes grown at two Italian locations. Gene expression

  1. Tagging target genes of the mat1-2-1 transcription factor in Fusarium verticillioides (Gibberella fujikuroi MP-A)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keszthelyi, A.; Jeney, A.; Kerenyi, Z.; Mendes, O.; Waalwijk, C.; Hornok, L.

    2007-01-01

    Mating type in filamentous ascomycetes is controlled by idiomorphic alleles, named MAT1-1 and MAT1-2, which contain 1-3 genes. Of these genes MAT1-1-1 and MAT1-2-1 encode putative transcription factors and are thus considered to be the major regulators of sexual communication and mating. Fungi with

  2. Lipid peroxidation, oxidative stress genes and dietary factors in breast cancer protection: a hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gago-Dominguez, Manuela; Jiang, Xuejuan; Castelao, J Esteban

    2007-01-01

    We have recently proposed that lipid peroxidation may be a common mechanistic pathway by which obesity and hypertension lead to increased renal cell cancer risk. During this exercise, we noted a risk factor swap between breast and kidney cancer (oophorectomy and increased parity, detrimental for kidney, beneficial for breast; high blood pressure, detrimental for kidney, beneficial for breast when it occurs during pregnancy; alcohol, beneficial for kidney, detrimental for breast, and so on). We have subsequently proposed the hypothesis that lipid peroxidation represents a protective mechanism in breast cancer, and reviewed the evidence of the role of lipid peroxidation on established hormonal and non-hormonal factors for breast cancer. Here, we review the evidence in support of lipid peroxidation playing a role in the relationships between dietary factors and breast cancer. Available evidence implicates increased lipid peroxidation products in the anti-carcinogenic effect of suspected protective factors for breast cancer, including soy, marine n-3 fatty acids, green tea, isothiocyanates, and vitamin D and calcium. We also review the epidemiological evidence supporting a modifying effect of oxidative stress genes in dietary factor-breast cancer relationships.

  3. Evaluation of the potential inhibitor of Ix (Pp-Ix) protoporphyrin of the genetic damage induced by gamma rays administered to different dose reasons in Drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flores A, J. A.

    2016-01-01

    Ionizing radiation can damage in DNA directly or indirectly by free radicals (Rl), characterized by unstable and highly reactive. To avoid damage by Rl the cell has endogenous antioxidants such as Sod, Cat, GSH or exogenous as some vitamins, but if with these mechanisms does not reach the cell homeostasis, the consequence may be the generation of chronic-disease degenerative such as cancer. This study was conducted in order to test the inhibitory role of Rl protoporphyrin Ix (Pp-Ix), induced by 20 Gy of gamma rays administered at different dose ratios using the assay of somatic mutation and recombination in the Drosophila wing. The results indicated that 20 Gy delivered at a rate of low dose (6.659 Gy/h), caused elevated frequencies of genetic damage (p <0.001), compared with those that induced a high dose reason (1111.42 Gy/h) in larvae of 48 h old. The difference is probably due to an indirect damage by Rl; when this hypothesis was approved with the possible inhibitor role of Pp-Ix (0.69 m M), damage was increased with the two reasons of tested doses. This result may be due to: 1) the Pp-Ix is not a good inhibitor of Rl, 2) the difference in the frequency of mutation found with both dose reasons, not due to Rl so that this compound did not reduce the genetic damage, and 3) that Pp-Ix acts as pro oxidant. (Author)

  4. Combining transcription factor binding affinities with open-chromatin data for accurate gene expression prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Florian; Gasparoni, Nina; Gasparoni, Gilles; Gianmoena, Kathrin; Cadenas, Cristina; Polansky, Julia K; Ebert, Peter; Nordström, Karl; Barann, Matthias; Sinha, Anupam; Fröhler, Sebastian; Xiong, Jieyi; Dehghani Amirabad, Azim; Behjati Ardakani, Fatemeh; Hutter, Barbara; Zipprich, Gideon; Felder, Bärbel; Eils, Jürgen; Brors, Benedikt; Chen, Wei; Hengstler, Jan G; Hamann, Alf; Lengauer, Thomas; Rosenstiel, Philip; Walter, Jörn; Schulz, Marcel H

    2017-01-09

    The binding and contribution of transcription factors (TF) to cell specific gene expression is often deduced from open-chromatin measurements to avoid costly TF ChIP-seq assays. Thus, it is important to develop computational methods for accurate TF binding prediction in open-chromatin regions (OCRs). Here, we report a novel segmentation-based method, TEPIC, to predict TF binding by combining sets of OCRs with position weight matrices. TEPIC can be applied to various open-chromatin data, e.g. DNaseI-seq and NOMe-seq. Additionally, Histone-Marks (HMs) can be used to identify candidate TF binding sites. TEPIC computes TF affinities and uses open-chromatin/HM signal intensity as quantitative measures of TF binding strength. Using machine learning, we find low affinity binding sites to improve our ability to explain gene expression variability compared to the standard presence/absence classification of binding sites. Further, we show that both footprints and peaks capture essential TF binding events and lead to a good prediction performance. In our application, gene-based scores computed by TEPIC with one open-chromatin assay nearly reach the quality of several TF ChIP-seq data sets. Finally, these scores correctly predict known transcriptional regulators as illustrated by the application to novel DNaseI-seq and NOMe-seq data for primary human hepatocytes and CD4+ T-cells, respectively. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  5. Platelet-derived growth factor receptors (PDGFRs) fusion genes involvement in hematological malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appiah-Kubi, Kwaku; Lan, Ting; Wang, Ying; Qian, Hai; Wu, Min; Yao, Xiaoyuan; Wu, Yan; Chen, Yongchang

    2017-01-01

    To investigate oncogenic platelet-derived growth factor receptor(PDGFR) fusion genes involvement in hematological malignancies, the advances in the PDGFR fusion genes diagnosis and development of PDGFR fusions inhibitors. Literature search was done using terms "PDGFR and Fusion" or "PDGFR and Myeloid neoplasm" or 'PDGFR and Lymphoid neoplasm' or "PDGFR Fusion Diagnosis" or "PDGFR Fusion Targets" in databases including PubMed, ASCO.org, and Medscape. Out of the 36 fusions detected, ETV6(TEL)-PDGFRB and FIP1L1-PDGFRA fusions were frequently detected, 33 are as a result of chromosomal translocation, FIP1L1-PDGFRA and EBF1-PDGFRB are the result of chromosomal deletion and CDK5RAP2- PDGFRΑ is the result of chromosomal insertion. Seven of the 34 rare fusions have detectable reciprocals. RNA aptamers are promising therapeutic target of PDGFRs and diagnostic tools of PDGFRs fusion genes. Also, PDGFRs have variable prospective therapeutic strategies including small molecules, RNA aptamers, and interference therapeutics as well as development of adaptor protein Lnk mimetic drugs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. DNA replication factor C1 mediates genomic stability and transcriptional gene silencing in Arabidopsis

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Qian

    2010-07-01

    Genetic screening identified a suppressor of ros1-1, a mutant of REPRESSOR OF SILENCING1 (ROS1; encoding a DNA demethylation protein). The suppressor is a mutation in the gene encoding the largest subunit of replication factor C (RFC1). This mutation of RFC1 reactivates the unlinked 35S-NPTII transgene, which is silenced in ros1 and also increases expression of the pericentromeric Athila retrotransposons named transcriptional silent information in a DNA methylationindependent manner. rfc1 is more sensitive than the wild type to the DNA-damaging agent methylmethane sulphonate and to the DNA inter- and intra- cross-linking agent cisplatin. The rfc1 mutant constitutively expresses the G2/M-specific cyclin CycB1;1 and other DNA repair-related genes. Treatment with DNA-damaging agents mimics the rfc1 mutation in releasing the silenced 35S-NPTII, suggesting that spontaneously induced genomic instability caused by the rfc1 mutation might partially contribute to the released transcriptional gene silencing (TGS). The frequency of somatic homologous recombination is significantly increased in the rfc1 mutant. Interestingly, ros1 mutants show increased telomere length, but rfc1 mutants show decreased telomere length and reduced expression of telomerase. Our results suggest that RFC1 helps mediate genomic stability and TGS in Arabidopsis thaliana. © 2010 American Society of Plant Biologists.

  7. Association of transforming growth-factor alpha gene polymorphisms with nonsyndromic cleft palate only (CPO)

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    Shiang, R. (Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States)); Lidral, A.C.; Ardinger, H.H.; Murray, J.C.; Romitti, P.A.; Munger, R.G.; Buetow, K.H.

    1993-10-01

    Genetic analysis and tissue-specific expression studies support a role for transforming growth-factor alpha (TGFA) in craniofacial development. Previous studies have confirmed an association of alleles for TGFA with nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL/P) in humans. The authors carried out a retrospective association study to determine whether specific allelic variants of the TGFA gene are also associated with cleft palate only (CPO). The PCR products from 12 overlapping sets of primers to the TGFA cDNA were examined by using single-strand conformational polymorphism analysis. Four DNA polymorphic sites for TGFA were identified in the 3[prime] untranslated region of the TGFA gene. These variants, as well as previously identified RFLPs for TGFA, were characterized in case and control populations for CPO by using X[sup 2] analysis. A significant association between alleles of TGFA and CPO was identified which further supports a role for this gene as one of the genetic determinants of craniofacial development. Sequence analysis of the variants disclosed a cluster of three variable sites within 30 bp of each other in the 3[prime] untranslated region previously associated with an antisense transcript. These studies extend the role for TGFA in craniofacial morphogenesis and support an interrelated mechanism underlying nonsyndromic forms of CL/P. 46 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Association of interleukin 10 and transforming growth factor β gene polymorphisms with chronic idiopathic urticaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavakol, Marzieh; Movahedi, Masoud; Amirzargar, Ali Akbar; Aryan, Zahra; Bidoki, Alireza Zare; Heidari, Kimia; Soltani, Samaneh; Gharagozlou, Mohammad; Aghamohammadi, Asghar; Nabavi, Mohammad; Nasiri, Rasoul; Ahmadvand, Alireza; Rezaei, Nima

    2014-01-01

    Transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) and interleukin 10 (IL-10) are two anti-inflammatory cytokines that are implicated in the pathogenesis of urticaria. The goal of this study was to examine the possible association of polymorphisms of TGF-β and IL-10 genes with susceptibility to chronic idiopathic urticaria (CIU). This study was conducted on 90 patients with CIU. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was done to determine the genotype at 5 polymorphic sites; TGF-β (codon10C/T and codon25G/C) and IL-10 (-1082G/A, -819C/T, and -592C/A). The C allele at codon 25 of TGF-β was more prevalent in CIU patients compared to controls (OR = 9.5, 95% CI = 5.4-16.8, P<0.001). Genotypes of CT and CG at 10 and 25 codons of TGF-β gene, respectively, and AG, CT, and CA for loci of -1082, -819, and -592 of IL-10 gene were significantly higher in CIU patients (P<0.001). In haplotype analysis, frequency of TGF-β haplotypes differed between patients with CIU and controls; CC haplotype was overrepresented, while CG and TG haplotypes were underrepresented (P<0.001). These results suggest that TGF-β and IL-10 genetic variability could contribute to susceptibility to CIU. Additionally, patients with CIU seem to have genotypes leading to high production of TGF-β and IL-10.

  9. Involvement of Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor Genes in Benign Prostate Hyperplasia in a Korean Population

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    Hae Jeong Park

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs and their receptors (FGFRs have been implicated in prostate growth and are overexpressed in benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH. In this study, we investigated whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs of the FGFR genes (FGFR1 and FGFR2 were associated with BPH and its clinical phenotypes in a population of Korean men. We genotyped four SNPs in the exons of FGFR1 and FGFR2 (rs13317 in FGFR1; rs755793, rs1047100, and rs3135831 in FGFR2 using direct sequencing in 218 BPH patients and 213 control subjects. No SNPs of FGFR1 or FGFR2 genes were associated with BPH. However, analysis according to clinical phenotypes showed that rs1047100 of FGFR2 was associated with prostate volume in BPH in the dominant model (GA/AA versus GG, P = 0.010. In addition, a significant association was observed between rs13317 of FGFR1 and international prostate symptom score (IPSS in the additive (TC versus CC versus TT, P = 0.0022 and dominant models (TC/CC versus TT, P = 0.005. Allele frequency analysis also showed significant association between rs13317 and IPSS (P = 0.005. These results suggested that FGFR genes could be related to progression of BPH.

  10. Association between leukaemia inhibitory factor gene polymorphism and pregnancy outcomes after assisted reproduction techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Joao Batista A; Vagnini, Laura D; Petersen, Claudia G; Renzi, Adriana; Oliveira-Pelegrin, Gabriela R; Mauri, Ana L; Ricci, Juliana; Massaro, Fabiana C; Dieamant, Felipe; Cavagna, Mario; Baruffi, Ricardo L R; Franco, Jose G

    2016-01-01

    Certain gene polymorphisms are associated with implantation failure and pregnancy loss. Studies of leukaemia inhibitory factor (LIF) gene polymorphisms are scarce. The LIF single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) thymine (T)/guanine (G) (rs929271) was studied in women to determine whether an association existed with pregnancy outcomes after intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI); 411 women who underwent ICSI were recruited. DNA was extracted from the peripheral blood, and the LIF gene SNP T/G (rs929271) was genotyped using real-time polymerase chain reaction. Participants were divided into three groups according to their LIF genotype: T/T (n = 168), T/G (n = 202) and G/G (n = 41). All IVF and ICSI procedures were carried out under the same clinical and laboratory conditions. The ICSI cumulative results (from fresh plus frozen cycles) of each genotype group were analysed. The G/G genotype in women was associated with a higher implantation rate (T/T: 15.9%, T/G: 16.2%, G/G: 27.0%; P Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. An immunohistochemical study of the expression of the hypoxia markers Glut-1 and Ca-IX in canine sarcomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbondati, E; Del-Pozo, J; Hoather, T M; Constantino-Casas, F; Dobson, J M

    2013-11-01

    Tumor hypoxia has been associated with increased malignancy, likelihood of metastasis, and increased resistance to radiotherapy and chemotherapy in human medicine. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) is a key transcription factor that is induced by tumor hypoxia and regulates the pathways involved in cellular response and adaptation to the hostile tumor microenvironment. HIF-1 induces transcription of different proteins, including Ca-IX and Glut-1, which are considered endogenous markers of chronic hypoxia in solid tumors in humans. In this study, sections from 40 canine sarcomas (20 histiocytic sarcomas and 20 low-grade soft-tissue sarcomas) were immunostained for these markers. Expression of Glut-1 was scored based on percentage of positive staining cells (0 = 50%) and intensity of cellular staining (1 = weak; 2 = strong); Ca-IX was scored based on percentage of positive cells (0 = 30%). Intratumoral microvessel density was measured using CD31 to assess intratumoral neoangiogenesis. Histiocytic sarcomas showed statistically significant higher Glut-1 immunoreactivity and angiogenesis than did low-grade soft-tissue sarcomas. Intratumoral microvessel density in histiocytic sarcomas was positively associated with Glut-1 immunoreactivity score. These findings suggest a potential role of hypoxia in the biology of these tumors and may provide a base for investigation of the potential prognostic use of these markers in naturally occurring canine tumors.

  12. The F7 gene and clotting factor VII levels: dissection of a human quantitative trait locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soria, Jose Manuel; Almasy, Laura; Souto, Juan Carlos; Sabater-Lleal, Maria; Fontcuberta, Jordi; Blangero, John

    2005-10-01

    Localization of human quantitative trait loci (QTLs) is now routine. However, identifying their functional DNA variants is still a formidable challenge. We present a complete dissection of a human QTL using novel statistical techniques to infer the most likely functional polymorphisms of a QTL that influence plasma levels of clotting factor VII (FVII), a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Resequencing of 15 kb in and around the F7 gene identified 49 polymorphisms, which were then genotyped in 398 people. Using a Bayesian quantitative trait nucleotide (BQTN) method, we identified four to seven functional variants that completely account for this QTL. These variants include both rare coding variants and more common, potentially regulatory polymorphisms in intronic and promoter regions.

  13. Isoxanthohumol, a constituent of hop (Humulus lupulus L.), increases stress resistance in Caenorhabditis elegans dependent on the transcription factor DAF-16.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büchter, Christian; Havermann, Susannah; Koch, Karoline; Wätjen, Wim

    2016-02-01

    The flavanone isoxanthohumol (IX) has gained attention as antioxidative and chemopreventive agent, but the molecular mechanism of action remains unclear. We investigated effects of this secondary plant compound in vivo using the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans. Adult C. elegans nematodes were incubated with IX, and then, the stress resistance was analysed in the SYTOX assay; lifespan was monitored by touch-provoked movement method, the amount of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was measured in the DCF assay, and the nuclear localisation of the transcription factor DAF-16 was analysed by using a transgenic strain. By the use of a DAF-16 loss-of-function strain, we analysed whether the effects are dependent on DAF-16. IX increases the resistance of the nematode against thermal stress. Additionally, a reduction in ROS in vivo was caused by IX. Since the flavanone only has a marginal radical-scavenging capacity (TEAC assay), we suggest that IX mediates its antioxidative effects indirectly via activation of DAF-16 (homologue to mammalian FOXO proteins). The nuclear translocation of this transcription factor is increased by IX. In the DAF-16-mutated strain, the IX-mediated increase in stress resistance was completely abolished; furthermore, an increased formation of ROS and a reduced lifespan was mediated by IX. IX or a bacterial metabolite of IX causes antioxidative effects as well as an increased stress resistance in C. elegans via activation of DAF-16. The homologous pathway may have implications in the molecular mechanism of IX in mammals.

  14. Insulin-Like Growth Factor-1 Inscribes a Gene Expression Profile for Angiogenic Factors and Cancer Progression in Breast Epithelial Cells

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    J.S. Oh

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Activation of the insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-11R by IGF-1 is associated with the risk and progression of many types of cancer, although despite this it remains unclear how activated IGF-1 R contributes to cancer progression. In this study, gene expression changes elicited by IGF-1 were profiled in breast epithelial cells. We noted that many genes are functionally linked to cancer progression and angiogenesis. To validate some of the changes observed, the RNA and/or protein was confirmed for c-fos, cytochrome P4501Al, cytochrome P450 1131, interleukin-1 beta, fas ligand, vascular endothelial growth factor, and urokinase plasminogen activator. Nuclear proteins were also temporally monitored to address how gene expression changes were regulated. We found that IGF-1 stimulated the nuclear translocation of phosphorylated AKT, hypoxic-inducible factor-1 alpha, and phosphorylated cAMP-responsive element-binding protein, which correlated with temporal changes in gene expression. Next, the promoter regions of IGF-1-regulated genes were searched in silico. The promoters of genes that clustered together had similar regulatory regions. In summary, IGF-1 inscribes a gene expression profile relevant to cancer progression, and this study provides insight into the mechanism(s whereby some of these changes occur.

  15. Interferon regulatory factor 5 gene polymorphism in Egyptian children with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammad, A; Mossad, Y M; Nasef, N; Eid, R

    2017-07-01

    Background Increased expression of interferon-inducible genes is implicated in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Interferon regulatory factor 5 (IRF5) is one of the transcription factors regulating interferon and was proved to be implicated in the pathogenesis of SLE in different populations. Objectives The objective of this study was to investigate the correlation between polymorphisms of the IRF5 gene and SLE susceptibility in a cohort of Egyptian children and to investigate their association with clinico-pathological features, especially lupus nephritis. Subjects and methods Typing of interferon regulatory factor 5 rs10954213, rs2004640 and rs2280714 polymorphisms were done using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism for 100 children with SLE and 100 matched healthy controls. Results Children with SLE had more frequent T allele and TT genotype of rs2004640 ( P c  = 0.003 and 0.024, respectively) compared to controls. Patients with nephritis had more frequent T allele of rs2004640 compared to controls ( P c  = 0.003). However the allele and genotype frequencies of the three studied polymorphisms did not show any difference in patients with nephritis in comparison to those without nephritis. Haplotype GTA of rs10954213, rs2004640 and rs2280714, respectively, was more frequent in lupus patients in comparison to controls ( p = 0.01) while the haplotype GGG was more frequent in controls than lupus patients ( p = 0.011). Conclusion The rs2004640 T allele and TT genotype and GTA haplotype of rs rs10954213, rs2004640, and rs2280714, respectively, can be considered as risk factors for the development of SLE. The presence of the rs2004640 T allele increases the risk of nephritis development in Egyptian children with SLE.

  16. The rules of gene expression in plants: Organ identity and gene body methylation are key factors for regulation of gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana

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    Gutiérrez Rodrigo A

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microarray technology is a widely used approach for monitoring genome-wide gene expression. For Arabidopsis, there are over 1,800 microarray hybridizations representing many different experimental conditions on Affymetrix™ ATH1 gene chips alone. This huge amount of data offers a unique opportunity to infer the principles that govern the regulation of gene expression in plants. Results We used bioinformatics methods to analyze publicly available data obtained using the ATH1 chip from Affymetrix. A total of 1887 ATH1 hybridizations were normalized and filtered to eliminate low-quality hybridizations. We classified and compared control and treatment hybridizations and determined differential gene expression. The largest differences in gene expression were observed when comparing samples obtained from different organs. On average, ten-fold more genes were differentially expressed between organs as compared to any other experimental variable. We defined "gene responsiveness" as the number of comparisons in which a gene changed its expression significantly. We defined genes with the highest and lowest responsiveness levels as hypervariable and housekeeping genes, respectively. Remarkably, housekeeping genes were best distinguished from hypervariable genes by differences in methylation status in their transcribed regions. Moreover, methylation in the transcribed region was inversely correlated (R2 = 0.8 with gene responsiveness on a genome-wide scale. We provide an example of this negative relationship using genes encoding TCA cycle enzymes, by contrasting their regulatory responsiveness to nitrate and methylation status in their transcribed regions. Conclusion Our results indicate that the Arabidopsis transcriptome is largely established during development and is comparatively stable when faced with external perturbations. We suggest a novel functional role for DNA methylation in the transcribed region as a key determinant

  17. Origins of immunity: transcription factors and homologues of effector genes of the vertebrate immune system expressed in sea urchin coelomocytes.

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    Pancer, Z; Rast, J P; Davidson, E H

    1999-08-01

    Echinoderms share common ancestry with the chordates within the deuterostome clade. Molecular features that are shared between their immune systems and that of mammals thus illuminate the basal genetic framework on which these immune systems have been constructed during evolution. The immune effector cells of sea urchins are the coelomocytes, whose primary function is protection against invasive marine pathogens; here we identify six genes expressed in coelomocytes, homologues of which are also expressed in cells of the mammalian immune system. Three coelomocyte genes reported here encode transcription factors. These are an NFKB homologue (SpNFKB); a GATA-2/3 homologue (SpGATAc); and a runt domain factor (SpRunt-1). All three of these coelomocyte genes respond sharply to bacterial challenge: SpNFKB and SpRunt-1 genes are rapidly up-regulated, while transcripts of SpGATAc factor disappear within hours of injection of bacteria. Sham injection also activates SpNFKB and SpRunt, though with slower kinetics, but does not affect SpGATAc levels. Another gene, SpHS, encodes a protein related to the signal transduction intermediate HS1 of lymphoid cells. Two other newly discovered genes, SpSRCR1 and SpSRCR5, encode proteins featuring SRCR repeats. These genes are members of a complex family of SRCR genes all expressed specifically in coelomocytes. The SRCR repeats most closely resemble those of mammalian macrophage scavenger receptors. Remarkably, each individual sea urchin expresses a specific pattern of SRCR genes. Our results imply some shared immune functions and more generally, a shared regulatory architecture which underlies immune system gene expression in all deuterostomes. We conclude that the vertebrate immune system has evolved by inserting new genes into old gene regulatory networks dedicated to immunity.

  18. Elongation Factor-Tu (EF-Tu) proteins structural stability and bioinformatics in ancestral gene reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehipawala, Sunil; Nguyen, A.; Tremberger, G.; Cheung, E.; Schneider, P.; Lieberman, D.; Holden, T.; Cheung, T.

    2013-09-01

    A paleo-experimental evolution report on elongation factor EF-Tu structural stability results has provided an opportunity to rewind the tape of life using the ancestral protein sequence reconstruction modeling approach; consistent with the book of life dogma in current biology and being an important component in the astrobiology community. Fractal dimension via the Higuchi fractal method and Shannon entropy of the DNA sequence classification could be used in a diagram that serves as a simple summary. Results from biomedical gene research provide examples on the diagram methodology. Comparisons between biomedical genes such as EEF2 (elongation factor 2 human, mouse, etc), WDR85 in epigenetics, HAR1 in human specificity, DLG1 in cognitive skill, and HLA-C in mosquito bite immunology with EF Tu DNA sequences have accounted for the reported circular dichroism thermo-stability data systematically; the results also infer a relatively less volatility geologic time period from 2 to 3 Gyr from adaptation viewpoint. Comparison to Thermotoga maritima MSB8 and Psychrobacter shows that Thermus thermophilus HB8 EF-Tu calibration sequence could be an outlier, consistent with free energy calculation by NUPACK. Diagram methodology allows computer simulation studies and HAR1 shows about 0.5% probability from chimp to human in terms of diagram location, and SNP simulation results such as amoebic meningoencephalitis NAF1 suggest correlation. Extensions to the studies of the translation and transcription elongation factor sequences in Megavirus Chiliensis, Megavirus Lba and Pandoravirus show that the studied Pandoravirus sequence could be an outlier with the highest fractal dimension and lowest entropy, as compared to chicken as a deviant in the DNMT3A DNA methylation gene sequences from zebrafish to human and to the less than one percent probability in computer simulation using the HAR1 0.5% probability as reference. The diagram methodology would be useful in ancestral gene

  19. Evaluation of common genetic variants in 82 candidate genes as risk factors for neural tube defects

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    Pangilinan Faith

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neural tube defects (NTDs are common birth defects (~1 in 1000 pregnancies in the US and Europe that have complex origins, including environmental and genetic factors. A low level of maternal folate is one well-established risk factor, with maternal periconceptional folic acid supplementation reducing the occurrence of NTD pregnancies by 50-70%. Gene variants in the folate metabolic pathway (e.g., MTHFR rs1801133 (677 C > T and MTHFD1 rs2236225 (R653Q have been found to increase NTD risk. We hypothesized that variants in additional folate/B12 pathway genes contribute to NTD risk. Methods A tagSNP approach was used to screen common variation in 82 candidate genes selected from the folate/B12 pathway and NTD mouse models. We initially genotyped polymorphisms in 320 Irish triads (NTD cases and their parents, including 301 cases and 341 Irish controls to perform case–control and family based association tests. Significantly associated polymorphisms were genotyped in a secondary set of 250 families that included 229 cases and 658 controls. The combined results for 1441 SNPs were used in a joint analysis to test for case and maternal effects. Results Nearly 70 SNPs in 30 genes were found to be associated with NTDs at the p MFTC, CDKN2A, ADA, PEMT, CUBN, GART, DNMT3A, MTHFD1 and T (Brachyury and included the known NTD risk factor MTHFD1 R653Q (rs2236225. The single strongest signal was observed in a new candidate, MFTC rs17803441 (OR = 1.61 [1.23-2.08], p = 0.0003 for the minor allele. Though nominally significant, these associations did not remain significant after correction for multiple hypothesis testing. Conclusions To our knowledge, with respect to sample size and scope of evaluation of candidate polymorphisms, this is the largest NTD genetic association study reported to date. The scale of the study and the stringency of correction are likely to have contributed to real associations failing to survive

  20. Association of cytokine gene polymorphisms and risk factors with otitis media proneness in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miljanović, Olivera; Cikota-Aleksić, Bojana; Likić, Dragan; Vojvodić, Danilo; Jovićević, Ognjen; Magić, Zvonko

    2016-06-01

    In order to assess the association between gene polymorphisms and otitis media (OM) proneness, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFA) -308, interleukin (IL) 10-1082 and -3575, IL6 -597, IL2 -330, and CD14 -159 genotyping was performed in 58 OM-prone children and 85 controls who were exposed to similar number and frequency of environmental and host risk factors. The frequencies of genotypes (wild type vs. genotypes containing at least one polymorphic allele) were not significantly different between groups, except for IL10 -1082. Polymorphic genotypes IL10 -1082 GA and GG were more frequent in OM-prone children than in control group (RR 1.145, 95 % CI 1.011-1.298; p = 0.047). However, logistic regression did not confirm IL10 -1082 polymorphic genotypes as an independent risk factor for OM proneness. The present study indicates that high-producing IL10 -1082 GA/GG genotypes may increase the risk for OM proneness in its carriers when exposed to other environmental/host risk factors (day care attendance, passive smoking, male sex, respiratory infections, and atopic manifestations). This study revealed no significant independent genetic association, but the lack of breastfeeding in infancy was found to be the only independent risk factor for development of OM-prone phenotype, implying that breastfeeding had a protective role in development of susceptibility to OM. • The pathogenesis of OM is of multifactorial nature, dependent on infection, environmental factors, and immune response of the child. • Cytokines and CD14 play an important role in the presentation and clinical course of otitis media, but a clear link with otitis media proneness was not established. What is new: • This is the first clinical and genetic study on Montenegrin children with the otitis media-prone phenotype. • The study revealed that high-producing IL10 -1082 genotypes may influence otitis media proneness in children exposed to other environmental/host risk factors.

  1. Exploration and Exploitation of Novel SSR Markers for Candidate Transcription Factor Genes in Lilium Species

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    Manosh Kumar Biswas

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Lilies (Lilium sp. are commercially important horticultural crops widely cultivated for their flowers and bulbs. Here, we conducted large-scale data mining of the lily transcriptome to develop transcription factor (TF-associated microsatellite markers (TFSSRs. Among 216,768 unigenes extracted from our sequence data, 6966 unigenes harbored simple sequence repeats (SSRs. Seventy-one SSRs were associated with TF genes, and these were used to design primers and validate their potential as markers. These 71 SSRs were accomplished with 31 transcription factor families; including bHLH, MYB, C2H2, ERF, C3H, NAC, bZIP, and so on. Fourteen highly polymorphic SSRs were selected based on Polymorphic Information Content (PIC values and used to study genetic diversity and population structure in lily accessions. Higher genetic diversity was observed in Longiflorum compared to Oriental and Asiatic populations. Lily accessions were divided into three sub-populations based in our structure analysis, and an un-rooted neighbor-joining tree effectively separated the accessions according to Asiatic, Oriental, and Longiflorum subgroups. Finally, we showed that 46 of the SSR-associated genes were differentially expressed in response to Botrytis elliptica infection. Thus, our newly developed TFSSR markers represent a powerful tool for large-scale genotyping, high-density and comparative mapping, marker-aided backcrossing, and molecular diversity analysis of Lilium sp.

  2. Codon 129 polymorphism of prion protein gene in is not a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease

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    Jerusa Smid

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Interaction of prion protein and amyloid-b oligomers has been demonstrated recently. Homozygosity at prion protein gene (PRNP codon 129 is associated with higher risk for Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. This polymorphism has been addressed as a possible risk factor in Alzheimer disease (AD. Objective To describe the association between codon 129 polymorphisms and AD. Methods We investigated the association of codon 129 polymorphism of PRNP in 99 AD patients and 111 controls, and the association between this polymorphism and cognitive performance. Other polymorphisms of PRNP and additive effect of apolipoprotein E gene (ApoE were evaluated. Results Codon 129 genotype distribution in AD 45.5% methionine (MM, 42.2% methionine valine (MV, 12.1% valine (VV; and 39.6% MM, 50.5% MV, 9.9% VV among controls (p>0.05. There were no differences of cognitive performance concerning codon 129. Stratification according to ApoE genotype did not reveal difference between groups. Conclusion Codon 129 polymorphism is not a risk factor for AD in Brazilian patients.

  3. PAX9 and MSX1 transcription factor genes in non-syndromic dental agenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paixão-Côrtes, Vanessa Rodrigues; Braga, Tatiana; Salzano, Francisco Mauro; Mundstock, Karina; Mundstock, Carlos Alberto; Bortolini, Maria Cátira

    2011-04-01

    The molecular variation of paired domain box gene 9 (PAX9) was previously investigated by our research group and a high degree of evolutionary conservation in coding and non-coding regions was observed except in exon 3. PAX9 is a transcription factor important in tooth development, and we wanted to verify its role in dental agenesis in detail. Since dental development is a complex trait we also decided to examine the influence of another transcription factor, muscle segment homeodomain-homeobox 1 (MSX1) on it. A total of 360 consecutively ascertained patients seeking orthodontic treatment were screened for tooth agenesis and 33% of them were found to have it. Thirty-five of those with agenesis and 15 controls had their DNA studied for PAX9 exons 2, 3, 4 and adjacent regions (total of 1476 base pairs, bp) as well as MSX1 exon 2 (698bp). A trio (a proband and her parents) was also studied. Six polymorphic sites were found, three in PAX9 exon 3 and three in MSX1 exon2. MSX1 rs1095 derived allele occurred in individuals with agenesis only, and two other mutations in this gene had been earlier associated with tooth agenesis. Homozygosity for the PAX9 Ala240Pro mutation was studied in a family (proband and her parents), suggesting recessive inheritance with variable expressivity for the dental agenesis found. Common variants located out of the DNA binding domain of the two PAX9 and MSX1 genes can also be related to tooth agenesis. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Identification of Heat Shock Transcription Factor Genes Involved in Thermotolerance of Octoploid Cultivated Strawberry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Wan-Yu; Lin, Lee-Fong; Jheng, Jing-Lian; Wang, Chun-Chung; Yang, Jui-Hung; Chou, Ming-Lun

    2016-12-17

    Heat shock transcription factors (HSFs) are mainly involved in the activation of genes in response to heat stress as well as other abiotic and biotic stresses. The growth, development, reproduction, and yield of strawberry are strongly limited by extreme temperatures and droughts. In this study, we used Illumina sequencing and obtained transcriptome data set from Fragaria × ananassa Duchessne cv. Toyonoka. Six contigs and three unigenes were confirmed to encode HSF proteins (FaTHSFs). Subsequently, we characterized the biological functions of two particularly selected unigenes, FaTHSFA2a and FaTHSFB1a , which were classified into class A2 and B HSFs, respectively. Expression assays revealed that FaTHSFA2a and FaTHSFB1a expression was induced by heat shock and correlated well with elevated ambient temperatures. Overexpression of FaTHSFA2a and FaTHSFB1a resulted in the activation of their downstream stress-associated genes, and notably enhanced the thermotolerance of transgenic Arabidopsis plants. Besides, both FaTHSFA2a and FaTHSFB1a fusion proteins localized in the nucleus, indicating their similar subcellular distributions as transcription factors. Our yeast one-hybrid assay suggested that FaTHSFA2a has trans-activation activity, whereas FaTHSFB1a expresses trans-repression function. Altogether, our annotated transcriptome sequences provide a beneficial resource for identifying most genes expressed in octoploid strawberry. Furthermore, HSF studies revealed the possible insights into the molecular mechanisms of thermotolerance, thus rendering valuable molecular breeding to improve the tolerance of strawberry in response to high-temperature stress.

  5. Factor H Competitor Generated by Gene Conversion Events Associates with Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goicoechea de Jorge, Elena; Tortajada, Agustín; García, Sheila Pinto; Gastoldi, Sara; Merinero, Héctor Martín; García-Fernández, Jesús; Arjona, Emilia; Cao, Mercedes; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Noris, Marina; Rodríguez de Córdoba, Santiago

    2018-01-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS), a rare form of thrombotic microangiopathy caused by complement pathogenic variants, mainly affects the kidney microvasculature. A retrospective genetic analysis in our aHUS cohort ( n =513) using multiple ligation probe amplification uncovered nine unrelated patients carrying a genetic abnormality in the complement factor H related 1 gene ( CFHR1 ) that originates by recurrent gene conversion events between the CFH and CFHR1 genes. The novel CFHR1 mutants encode an FHR-1 protein with two amino acid substitutions, L290S and A296V, converting the FHR-1 C terminus into that of factor H (FH). Next-generation massive-parallel DNA sequencing (NGS) analysis did not detect these genetic abnormalities. In addition to the CFHR1 mutant, six patients carried the previously uncharacterized CFH-411T variant. In functional analyses, the mutant FHR-1 protein strongly competed the binding of FH to cell surfaces, impairing complement regulation, whereas the CFH-411T polymorphism lacked functional consequences. Carriers of the CFHR1 mutation presented with severe aHUS during adulthood; 57% of affected women in this cohort presented during the postpartum period. Analyses in patients and unaffected carriers showed that FH plasma levels determined by the nonmutated chromosome modulate disease penetrance. Crucially, in the activated endothelial (HMEC-1) cell assay, reduced FH plasma levels produced by the nonmutated chromosome correlated inversely with impairment of complement regulation, measured as C5b-9 deposition. Our data advance understanding of the genetic complexities underlying aHUS, illustrate the importance of performing functional analysis, and support the use of complementary assays to disclose genetic abnormalities not revealed by current NGS analysis. Copyright © 2018 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  6. Responsiveness of genes to manipulation of transcription factors in ES cells is associated with histone modifications and tissue specificity

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    Thomas Marshall

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In addition to determining static states of gene expression (high vs. low, it is important to characterize their dynamic status. For example, genes with H3K27me3 chromatin marks are not only suppressed but also poised for activation. However, the responsiveness of genes to perturbations has never been studied systematically. To distinguish gene responses to specific factors from responsiveness in general, it is necessary to analyze gene expression profiles of cells responding to a large variety of disturbances, and such databases did not exist before. Results We estimated the responsiveness of all genes in mouse ES cells using our recently published database on expression change after controlled induction of 53 transcription factors (TFs and other genes. Responsive genes (N = 4746, which were readily upregulated or downregulated depending on the kind of perturbation, mostly have regulatory functions and a propensity to become tissue-specific upon differentiation. Tissue-specific expression was evaluated on the basis of published (GNF and our new data for 15 organs and tissues. Non-responsive genes (N = 9562, which did not change their expression much following any perturbation, were enriched in housekeeping functions. We found that TF-responsiveness in ES cells is the best predictor known for tissue-specificity in gene expression. Among genes with CpG islands, high responsiveness is associated with H3K27me3 chromatin marks, and low responsiveness is associated with H3K36me3 chromatin, stronger tri-methylation of H3K4, binding of E2F1, and GABP binding motifs in promoters. Conclusions We thus propose the responsiveness of expression to perturbations as a new way to define the dynamic status of genes, which brings new insights into mechanisms of regulation of gene expression and tissue specificity.

  7. Efficacy of Selenium Supplement on Gene Expression of Inflammatory Cytokines and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor in Gestational Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehri Jamilian

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Selenium supplement has multiple important effects, including anti-inflammatory effect. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of selenium supplement on gene expression of inflammatory cytokines and vascular endothelial growth factor in gestational diabetes. Materials and Methods: This randomized double blind placebo control trial was performed on 40 patients suffering from GDM aged 18–40 years old. Participants were randomly divided into interventional group receiving 200mg/day selenium supplements (n=20 and control group receiving placebo (n=20 for 6 weeks. Primary outcome was gene expression of inflammatory cytokines and VEGF which were assessed in lymphocyte of GDM patients by RT-PCR method. Results: After 6 weeks intervention, in comparison with the control group, interventional group showed down regulation of gene expression of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF–α (p=0.02 and transforming growth factor beta (TGF–β (p=0.01 and up-regulation of gene expression of vascular endothelial (VEGF (p = 0.03 in lymphocytes of GDM. There was not any significant change following intervention with selenium regarding gene expression of interleukin IL-1 β and IL-8 in lymphocytes of GDM patients. Conclusion: 6 weeks supplementation with selenium in patients with GDM can cause down regulated gene expression of TNF-α and TGF–β, and up regulated gene expression of VEGF. Selenium supplement had not any effect on gene expression of IL-1 β and IL-8.

  8. Serum Response Factor (SRF mediated gene activity in physiological and pathological processes of neuronal motility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernd eKnoll

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the transcription factor SRF (serum response factor was shown to contribute to various physiological processes linked to neuronal motility. The latter include cell migration, axon guidance and e.g. synapse function relying on cytoskeletal dynamics, neurite outgrowth, axonal and dendritic differentiation, growth cone motility and neurite branching. SRF teams up with MRTFs (myocardin related transcription factors and TCFs (ternary complex factors to mediate cellular actin cytoskeletal dynamics and the immediate-early gene (IEG response, a bona fide indicator of neuronal activation. Herein, I will discuss how SRF and cofactors might modulate physiological processes of neuronal motility. Further, potential mechanisms engaged by neurite growth promoting molecules and axon guidance cues to target SRF’s transcriptional machinery in physiological neuronal motility will be presented. Of note, altered cytoskeletal dynamics and rapid initiation of an IEG response are a hallmark of injured neurons in various neurological disorders. Thus, SRF and its MRTF and TCF cofactors might emerge as a novel trio modulating peripheral and central axon regeneration.

  9. Prothrombotic gene variants as risk factors of acute myocardial infarction in young women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomaiuolo Rossella

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute myocardial infarction (AMI in young women represent an extreme phenotype associated with a higher mortality compared with similarly aged men. Prothrombotic gene variants could play a role as risk factors for AMI at young age. Methods We studied Factor V Leiden, FII G20210A, MTHFR C677T and beta-fibrinogen -455G>A variants by real-time PCR in 955 young AMI (362 females and in 698 AMI (245 females patients. The data were compared to those obtained in 909 unrelated subjects (458 females from the general population of the same geographical area (southern Italy. Results In young AMI females, the allelic frequency of either FV Leiden and of FII G20210A was significantly higher versus the general population (O.R.: 3.67 for FV Leiden and O.R.: 3.84 for FII G20210A; p Discussion and conclusion Our data confirm that young AMI in females is a peculiar phenotype with specific risk factors as the increased plasma procoagulant activity of FV and FII. On the contrary, the homozygous state for the 677T MTHFR variant may cause increased levels of homocysteine and/or an altered folate status and thus an increased risk for AMI, particularly in males. The knowledge of such risk factors (that may be easily identified by molecular analysis may help to improve prevention strategies for acute coronary diseases in specific risk-group subjects.

  10. Complexity of CNC transcription factors as revealed by gene targeting of the Nrf3 locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derjuga, Anna; Gourley, Tania S; Holm, Teresa M; Heng, Henry H Q; Shivdasani, Ramesh A; Ahmed, Rafi; Andrews, Nancy C; Blank, Volker

    2004-04-01

    Cap'n'collar (CNC) family basic leucine zipper transcription factors play crucial roles in the regulation of mammalian gene expression and development. To determine the in vivo function of the CNC protein Nrf3 (NF-E2-related factor 3), we generated mice deficient in this transcription factor. We performed targeted disruption of two Nrf3 exons coding for CNC homology, basic DNA-binding, and leucine zipper dimerization domains. Nrf3 null mice developed normally and revealed no obvious phenotypic differences compared to wild-type animals. Nrf3(-/-) mice were fertile, and gross anatomy as well as behavior appeared normal. The mice showed normal age progression and did not show any apparent additional phenotype during their life span. We observed no differences in various blood parameters and chemistry values. We infected wild-type and Nrf3(-/-) mice with acute lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus and found no differences in these animals with respect to their number of virus-specific CD8 and CD4 T cells as well as their B-lymphocyte response. To determine whether the mild phenotype of Nrf3 null animals is due to functional redundancy, we generated mice deficient in multiple CNC factors. Contrary to our expectations, an absence of Nrf3 does not seem to cause additional lethality in compound Nrf3(-/-)/Nrf2(-/-) and Nrf3(-/-)/p45(-/-) mice. We hypothesize that the role of Nrf3 in vivo may become apparent only after appropriate challenge to the mice.

  11. Negative elongation factor NELF controls transcription of immediate early genes in a stimulus-specific manner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, Toshitsugu; Piuz, Isabelle; Schlegel, Werner

    2009-01-01

    The transcription rate of immediate early genes (IEGs) is controlled directly by transcription elongation factors at the transcription elongation step. Negative elongation factor (NELF) and 5,6-dichloro-1-β-D-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole (DRB) sensitivity-inducing factor (DSIF) stall RNA polymerase II (pol II) soon after transcription initiation. Upon induction of IEG transcription, DSIF is converted into an accelerator for pol II elongation. To address whether and how NELF as well as DSIF controls overall IEG transcription, its expression was reduced using stable RNA interference in GH4C1 cells. NELF knock-down reduced thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH)-induced transcription of the IEGs c-fos, MKP-1, and junB. In contrast, epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced transcription of these IEGs was unaltered or even slightly increased by NELF knock-down. Thus, stable knock-down of NELF affects IEG transcription stimulation-specifically. Conversely, DSIF knock-down reduced both TRH- and EGF-induced transcription of the three IEGs. Interestingly, TRH-induced activation of the MAP kinase pathway, a pathway essential for transcription of the three IEGs, was down-regulated by NELF knock-down. Thus, stable knock-down of NELF, by modulating intracellular signaling pathways, caused stimulation-specific loss of IEG transcription. These observations indicate that NELF controls overall IEG transcription via multiple mechanisms both directly and indirectly

  12. Protoporphyrin IX fluorescence as potential indicator of psoriasis severity and progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bo; Xu, Yu-Ting; Zhang, Li; Zheng, Jie; Sroka, Ronald; Wang, Hong-Wei; Wang, Xiu-Li

    2017-09-01

    In psoriatic lesions, fluorescence diagnosis with blue light can detect protoporphyrin IX accumulation, especially after topical 5-aminolaevulinic acid (ALA) application. However, variable fluorescence distributions, interpersonal variations and long incubation time limit its wide application in clinic. This study is aimed to identify a consistent and convenient method to facilitate diagnosis and evaluation of psoriatic lesions. 104 psoriatic lesions from 30 patients were evaluated. Single lesion PSI scoring and fluorescence by macrospectrofluorometry were recorded on each lesion before and after treatment with narrow-band UVB. Punctate red fluorescence, emitted mainly by protoporphyrin IX, is observed in some psoriatic lesions. According to psoriasis severity index, fluorescence-positive lesions are more severe than lesions without fluorescence. We found a significant positive correlation between psoriasis severity and fluorescence intensity from protoporphyrin IX. Protoporphyrin IX-induced red fluorescence can be used as a novel and convenient approach for psoriasis diagnosis and progression evaluation. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. 11. IX toimus Rotermanni soolalaos happening "Olematute bändide festival"

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2002-01-01

    Kiwa raamatu "Lastehaiglast põgenenud mänguasjad" (koostaja Hasso Krull, kujundaja Peeter Laurits, kaanel modell Eleonora Kampe ja Kiwa) ja sound-art-projektide esitlus. 12. IX Kiwa ja Andres Lõo loeng

  14. Special Section Guest Editorial: Nanostructured Thin Films IX: Design, Fabrication, Characterization, and Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakhtakia, Akhlesh; Mackay, Tom G.; Suzuki, Motofumi

    2017-10-01

    This guest editorial introduces the special section on Nanostructured Thin Films IX: Design, Fabrication, Characterization, and Modeling, which appears in the October-December 2017 issue of the Journal of Nanophotonics.

  15. Pain during photodynamic therapy is associated with protoporphyrin IX fluorescence and fluence rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiegell, S.R.; Skiveren, J.; Philipsen, P.A.

    2008-01-01

    and protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) fluorescence, lesion type, lesion preparation and lesion localization. Methods Twenty-six patients with actinic keratoses (AKs) in different localizations and 34 patients with facial acne vulgaris were treated with methyl aminolaevulinate-PDT. Patients with acne were illuminated using......) patients with acne had a pain score of 6 [interquartile range (IQR) 5-7] compared with 8 (IQR 6-10) when using a fluence rate of 68 mW cm(-2) (P = 0.018). After correcting the pain score for PpIX fluorescence no differences in pain scores were found between first and second acne treatment, locations of AK...... lesions or between the two types of lesions. Conclusions Pain during PDT was correlated with the PpIX fluorescence in the treatment area prior to illumination. Pain was reduced using a lower fluence rate during PDT of acne Udgivelsesdato: 2008/4...

  16. Biodistribution and pharmacokinetics of 125I-labeled monoclonal antibody M75 specific for carbonic anhydrase IX, an intrinsic marker of hypoxia, in nude mice xenografted with human colorectal carcinoma

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chrastina, A.; Závada, Jan; Parkkila, S.; Kaluz, Š.; Kaluzová, M.; Rajcani, J.; Pastorek, J.; Pastorekova, S.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 105, č. 4 (2003), s. 873-881 ISSN 0020-7136 R&D Projects: GA MZd 45362 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : carbonic anhydrase IX Subject RIV: FD - Oncology ; Hematology Impact factor: 4.375, year: 2003

  17. Gene Expression Factor Analysis to Differentiate Pathways Linked to Fibromyalgia, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, and Depression in a Diverse Patient Sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacob, Eli; Light, Alan R; Donaldson, Gary W; Okifuji, Akiko; Hughen, Ronald W; White, Andrea T; Light, Kathleen C

    2016-01-01

    To determine if independent candidate genes can be grouped into meaningful biologic factors, and whether these factors are associated with the diagnosis of chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) and fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS), while controlling for comorbid depression, sex, and age. We included leukocyte messenger RNA gene expression from a total of 261 individuals, including healthy controls (n = 61), patients with FMS only (n = 15), with CFS only (n = 33), with comorbid CFS and FMS (n = 79), and with medication-resistant (n = 42) or medication-responsive (n = 31) depression. We used exploratory factor analysis (EFA) on 34 candidate genes to determine factor scores and regression analysis to examine whether these factors were associated with specific diagnoses. EFA resulted in 4 independent factors with minimal overlap of genes between factors, explaining 51% of the variance. We labeled these factors by function as 1) purinergic and cellular modulators, 2) neuronal growth and immune function, 3) nociception and stress mediators, and 4) energy and mitochondrial function. Regression analysis predicting these biologic factors using FMS, CFS, depression severity, age, and sex revealed that greater expression in factors 1 and 3 was positively associated with CFS and negatively associated with depression severity (Quick Inventory for Depression Symptomatology score), but not associated with FMS. Expression of candidate genes can be grouped into meaningful clusters, and CFS and depression are associated with the same 2 clusters, but in opposite directions, when controlling for comorbid FMS. Given high comorbid disease and interrelationships between biomarkers, EFA may help determine patient subgroups in this population based on gene expression. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  18. Neuronal target genes of the neuron-restrictive silencer factor in neurospheres derived from fetuses with Down's syndrome: a gene expression study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahn, Sabine; Mimmack, Michael; Ryan, Margaret; Caldwell, Maeve A; Jauniaux, Eric; Starkey, Michael; Svendsen, Clive N; Emson, Piers

    2002-01-26

    Identification of genes and characterisation of their function is an essential step towards understanding complex pathophysiological abnormalities in Down's syndrome. We did a study to investigate abnormalities in gene expression in human neuronal stem cells and progenitor cells from Down's syndrome and control post-mortem human fetal tissue. Indexing-based differential display PCR was done on neuronal precursor cells derived from the cortex of a fetus with Down's syndrome, and findings were compared with those of two control samples. Findings were validated against neurosphere preparations from three independent Down's syndrome fetuses and five independent controls by real-time quantitative PCR. Results of differential display PCR analysis showed that SCG10--a neuron--specific growth-associated protein regulated by the neuron-restrictive silencer factor REST-was almost undetectable in the Down's syndrome sample. This finding was validated by real-time PCR. We also found that other genes regulated by the REST transcription factor were selectively repressed, whereas non-REST-regulated genes with similar functions were unaffected. Changes in expression of several key developmental genes in the Down's syndrome stem-cell and progenitor-cell pool correlated with striking changes in neuron morphology after differentiation. Our findings suggest a link between dysregulation of the REST transcription factor and some of the neurological deficits seen in Down's syndrome. Experimental REST downregulation has been shown to trigger apoptosis, which could account for the striking and selective loss of neurons in the differentiated Down's syndrome cell preparations.

  19. Analysis of cell line variation in biochemical production of protoporphyrin IX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, Summer L.; Chen, Bin; O'Hara, Julia A.; Hoopes, P. Jack; Hasan, Tayyaba; Pogue, Brian W.

    2006-02-01

    Protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) is produced via the heme synthesis pathway by the cell following administration of aminolevulinic acid (ALA). ALA synthase, the enzyme that produces ALA in the cell from glycine and succinyl-coenzyme A, is inhibited in a feedback mechanism by heme and thus is the rate limiting enzyme in the heme synthesis pathway. Since ALA is administered systemically, the rate limiting step that naturally exists in the cells is bypassed, however it is currently unclear why cells have different rate limiting steps in the ALA-PpIX synthesis pathway, and more specifically which types of cancer cells are most productive. It has been determined that when the same amount of ALA is administered to a wide panel of cancer cells in vitro that vastly differing amounts of PpIX are produced. The steps for the ALA-PpIX pathway occur in and around the mitochondria of the cell, but interestingly no correlation is seen between PpIX production and mitochondrial content of the cell, following ALA administration. However, total cell area shows positive correlation with PpIX production. Administration of the iron chelator, 1,2-dimethyl-3-hydroxy-4-pyridone (L1) in combination with ALA allows the final step in the heme synthesis pathway, conversion of PpIX to heme, to be delayed and thus increases the detectable amount of PpIX in each cell line. The cell lines that have the lowest PpIX production following administration of ALA alone show the largest increase in production following the combined administration of ALA and L1. PpIX fluorescence is thought to be a measure of cellular activity and the goal of the current study was to determine which cell lines would be the most promising targets for fluorescence detection or monitoring response to therapy. The results indicate that the cells with larger size and larger numbers of mitochondria may be good potential targets for this therapy. While this conclusion may appear obvious, it is not universally true, and cellular specific

  20. Effect of IX dosing on polypropylene and PVDF membrane fouling control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myat, Darli Theint; Mergen, Max; Zhao, Oliver; Stewart, Matthew B; Orbell, John D; Merle, Tony; Croué, Jean-Philippe; Gray, Stephen

    2013-07-01

    The performance of ion exchange (IX) resin for organics removal from wastewater was assessed using advanced characterisation techniques for varying doses of IX. Organic characterisation using liquid chromatography with a photodiode array (PDA) and fluorescence spectroscopy (Method A), and UV254, organic carbon and organic nitrogen detectors (Method B), was undertaken on wastewater before and after magnetic IX treatment. Results showed partial removal of the biopolymer fraction at high IX doses. With increasing concentration of IX, evidence for nitrogen-containing compounds such as proteins and amino acids disappeared from the LC-OND chromatogram, complementary to the fluorescence response. A greater fluorescence response of tryptophan-like proteins (278 nm/343 nm) for low IX concentrations was consistent with aggregation of tryptophan-like compounds into larger aggregates, either by self-aggregation or with polysaccharides. Recycling of IX resin through multiple adsorption steps without regeneration maintained the high level of humics removal but there was no continued removal of biopolymer. Subsequent membrane filtration of the IX treated waters resulted in complex fouling trends. Filtration tests with either polypropylene (PP) or polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membranes showed higher rates of initial fouling following treatment with high IX doses (10 mL/L) compared to filtration of untreated water, while treatment with lower IX doses resulted in decreased fouling rates relative to the untreated water. However, at longer filtration times the rate of fouling of IX treated waters was lower than untreated water and the relative fouling rates corresponded to the amount of biopolymer material in the feed. It was proposed that the mode of fouling changed from pore constriction during the initial filtration period to filter cake build up at longer filtration times. The organic composition strongly influenced the rate of fouling during the initial filtration period due to

  1. The FOUR LIPS and MYB88 transcription factor genes are widely expressed in Arabidopsis thaliana during development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Qin; Lee, EunKyoung; Keerthisinghe, Sandra; Lai, Lien; Li, Meng; Lucas, Jessica R; Wen, Xiaohong; Ren, Xiaolin; Sack, Fred D

    2015-09-01

    The FOUR LIPS (FLP) and MYB88 transcription factors, which are closely related in structure and function, control the development of stomata, as well as entry into megasporogenesis in Arabidopsis thaliana. However, other locations where these transcription factors are expressed are poorly described. Documenting additional locations where these genes are expressed might define new functions for these genes. Expression patterns were examined throughout vegetative and reproductive development. The expression from two transcriptional-reporter fusions were visualized with either β-glucuronidase (GUS) or green fluorescence protein (GFP). Both flp and myb88 genes were expressed in many, previously unreported locations, consistent with the possibility of additional functions for FLP and MYB88. Moreover, expression domains especially of FLP display sharp cutoffs or boundaries. In addition to stomatal and reproductive development, FLP and MYB88, which are R2R3 MYB transcription factor genes, are expressed in many locations in cells, tissues, and organs. © 2015 Botanical Society of America.

  2. Sequencing and transcriptional analysis of the Streptococcus thermophilus histamine biosynthesis gene cluster: factors that affect differential hdcA expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calles-Enríquez, Marina; Hjort, Benjamin Benn; Andersen, Pia Skov

    2010-01-01

    to produce histamine. The hdc clusters of S. thermophilus CHCC1524 and CHCC6483 were sequenced, and the factors that affect histamine biosynthesis and histidine-decarboxylating gene (hdcA) expression were studied. The hdc cluster began with the hdcA gene, was followed by a transporter (hdcP), and ended...... with the hdcB gene, which is of unknown function. The three genes were orientated in the same direction. The genetic organization of the hdc cluster showed a unique organization among the lactic acid bacterial group and resembled those of Staphylococcus and Clostridium species, thus indicating possible...... acquisition through a horizontal transfer mechanism. Transcriptional analysis of the hdc cluster revealed the existence of a polycistronic mRNA covering the three genes. The histidine-decarboxylating gene (hdcA) of S. thermophilus demonstrated maximum expression during the stationary growth phase, with high...

  3. Evaluation of Sonochemiluminescence in a Phantom in the Presence of Protoporphyrin IX Conjugated to Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Shanei

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction When a liquid is irradiated with high-intensity and low-frequency ultrasound, acoustic cavitation occurs and there are some methods to determine and quantify this phenomenon. The existing methods for performing these experiments include sonochemiluminescence (SCL and chemical dosimetric methods. The particles in a liquid decrease the ultrasonic intensity threshold needed for cavitation onset. In this study, a new nanoconjugate made up of Protoporphyrin IX (PpIX and gold nanoparticles (GNP, i.e., Au-PpIX was used to provide nucleation sites for cavitation. The nonradiative relaxation time of PpIX in the presence of GNPs is longer than the similar time for PpIX without GNPs. This effect can be used in medical diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Materials and Methods The acoustic cavitation activity was investigated studying integrated SCL signal in the wavelength range of 400-500 nm in polyacrylamide gel phantom containing luminol using a cooled CCD spectrometer at different intensities of 1 MHz ultrasound. In order to confirm these results, a chemical dosimetric method was utilized, too. Results SCL signal level in gel phantom containing Au-PpIX was higher than the other phantoms. These results have been confirmed by the chemical dosimetric data. Conclusion This finding can be related to the existence of PpIX as a sensitizer and GNPs as cavitation nuclei. In other words, nanoparticles have acted as the sites for cavitation and have increased the cavitation rate. Another theory is that activation of PpIX has produced more free radicals and has enhanced the SCL signal level.

  4. Development and characterisation of a brain tumour mimicking protoporphyrin IX fluorescence phantom (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yijing; Tisca, Cristiana; Peveler, William; Noimark, Sacha; Desjardins, Adrien E.; Parkin, Ivan P.; Ourselin, Sebastien; Vercauteren, Tom

    2017-02-01

    5-ALA-PpIX fluorescence-guided brain tumour resection can increase the accuracy at which cancerous tissue is removed and thereby improve patient outcomes, as compared with standard white light imaging. Novel optical devices that aim to increase the specificity and sensitivity of PpIX detection are typically assessed by measurements in tissue-mimicking optical phantoms of which all optical properties are defined. Current existing optical phantoms specified for PpIX lack consistency in their optical properties, and stability with respect to photobleaching, thus yielding an unstable correspondence between PpIX concentration and the fluorescence intensity. In this study, we developed a set of aqueous-based phantoms with different compositions, using deionised water or PBS buffer as background medium, intralipid as scattering material, bovine haemoglobin as background absorber, and either PpIX dissolved in DMSO or a novel nanoparticle with similar absorption and emission spectrum to PpIX as the fluorophore. We investigated the phantom stability in terms of aggregation and photobleaching by comparing with different background medium and fluorophores, respectively. We characterised the fluorescence intensity of the fluorescent nanoparticle in different concentration of intralipid and haemoglobin and its time-dependent stability, as compared to the PpIX-induced fluorescence. We corroborated that the background medium was essential to prepare a stable aqueous phantom. The novel fluorescent nanoparticle used as surrogate fluorophore of PpIX presented an improved temporal stability and a reliable correspondence between concentration and emission intensity. We proposed an optimised phantom composition and recipe to produce reliable and repeatable phantom for validation of imaging device.

  5. Influence of the experimental design of gene expression studies on the inference of gene regulatory networks: environmental factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Emmert-Streib

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The inference of gene regulatory networks gained within recent years a considerable interest in the biology and biomedical community. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the influence that environmental conditions can exhibit on the inference performance of network inference algorithms. Specifically, we study five network inference methods, Aracne, BC3NET, CLR, C3NET and MRNET, and compare the results for three different conditions: (I observational gene expression data: normal environmental condition, (II interventional gene expression data: growth in rich media, (III interventional gene expression data: normal environmental condition interrupted by a positive spike-in stimulation. Overall, we find that different statistical inference methods lead to comparable, but condition-specific results. Further, our results suggest that non-steady-state data enhance the inferability of regulatory networks.

  6. Keratinocyte Growth Factor Gene Electroporation into Skeletal Muscle as a Novel Gene Therapeutic Approach for Elastase-Induced Pulmonary Emphysema in Mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobinaga, Shuichi; Matsumoto, Keitaro; Nagayasu, Takeshi; Furukawa, Katsuro; Abo, Takafumi; Yamasaki, Naoya; Tsuchiya, Tomoshi; Miyazaki, Takuro; Koji, Takehiko

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary emphysema is a progressive disease with airspace destruction and an effective therapy is needed. Keratinocyte growth factor (KGF) promotes pulmonary epithelial proliferation and has the potential to induce lung regeneration. The aim of this study was to determine the possibility of using KGF gene therapy for treatment of a mouse emphysema model induced by porcine pancreatic elastase (PPE). Eight-week-old BALB/c male mice treated with intra-tracheal PPE administration were transfected with 80 μg of a recombinant human KGF (rhKGF)-expressing FLAG-CMV14 plasmid (pKGF-FLAG gene), or with the pFLAG gene expressing plasmid as a control, into the quadriceps muscle by electroporation. In the lung, the expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) was augmented, and surfactant protein A (SP-A) and KGF receptor (KGFR) were co-expressed in PCNA-positive cells. Moreover, endogenous KGF and KGFR gene expression increased significantly by pKGF-FLAG gene transfection. Arterial blood gas analysis revealed that the PaO 2 level was not significantly reduced on day 14 after PPE instillation with pKGF-FLAG gene transfection compared to that of normal mice. These results indicated that KGF gene therapy with electroporation stimulated lung epithelial proliferation and protected depression of pulmonary function in a mouse emphysema model, suggesting a possible method of treating pulmonary emphysema

  7. Tissue and cell-type co-expression networks of transcription factors and wood component genes in Populus trichocarpa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Rui; Wang, Jack P; Lin, Ying-Chung; Li, Quanzi; Sun, Ying-Hsuan; Chen, Hao; Sederoff, Ronald R; Chiang, Vincent L

    2017-05-01

    Co-expression networks based on transcriptomes of Populus trichocarpa major tissues and specific cell types suggest redundant control of cell wall component biosynthetic genes by transcription factors in wood formation. We analyzed the transcriptomes of five tissues (xylem, phloem, shoot, leaf, and root) and two wood forming cell types (fiber and vessel) of Populus trichocarpa to assemble gene co-expression subnetworks associated with wood formation. We identified 165 transcription factors (TFs) that showed xylem-, fiber-, and vessel-specific expression. Of these 165 TFs, 101 co-expressed (correlation coefficient, r > 0.7) with the 45 secondary cell wall cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin biosynthetic genes. Each cell wall component gene co-expressed on average with 34 TFs, suggesting redundant control of the cell wall component gene expression. Co-expression analysis showed that the 101 TFs and the 45 cell wall component genes each has two distinct groups (groups 1 and 2), based on their co-expression patterns. The group 1 TFs (44 members) are predominantly xylem and fiber specific, and are all highly positively co-expressed with the group 1 cell wall component genes (30 members), suggesting their roles as major wood formation regulators. Group 1 TFs include a lateral organ boundary domain gene (LBD) that has the highest number of positively correlated cell wall component genes (36) and TFs (47). The group 2 TFs have 57 members, including 14 vessel-specific TFs, and are generally less correlated with the cell wall component genes. An exception is a vessel-specific basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) gene that negatively correlates with 20 cell wall component genes, and may function as a key transcriptional suppressor. The co-expression networks revealed here suggest a well-structured transcriptional homeostasis for cell wall component biosynthesis during wood formation.

  8. Expression of tumor necrosis factor-alpha-mediated genes predicts recurrence-free survival in lung cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baohua Wang

    Full Text Available In this study, we conducted a meta-analysis on high-throughput gene expression data to identify TNF-α-mediated genes implicated in lung cancer. We first investigated the gene expression profiles of two independent TNF-α/TNFR KO murine models. The EGF receptor signaling pathway was the top pathway associated with genes mediated by TNF-α. After matching the TNF-α-mediated mouse genes to their human orthologs, we compared the expression patterns of the TNF-α-mediated genes in normal and tumor lung tissues obtained from humans. Based on the TNF-α-mediated genes that were dysregulated in lung tumors, we developed a prognostic gene signature that effectively predicted recurrence-free survival in lung cancer in two validation cohorts. Resampling tests suggested that the prognostic power of the gene signature was not by chance, and multivariate analysis suggested that this gene signature was independent of the traditional clinical factors and enhanced the identification of lung cancer patients at greater risk for recurrence.

  9. Gene

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Gene integrates information from a wide range of species. A record may include nomenclature, Reference Sequences (RefSeqs), maps, pathways, variations, phenotypes,...

  10. Influence of protoporphyrin IX loaded phloroglucinol succinic acid dendrimer in photodynamic therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, M. Suresh; Aruna, P.; Ganesan, S.

    2018-03-01

    One of the major problems reported clinically for photosensitizers (PS) in Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is, the cause of side-effects to normal tissue due to dark toxicity. The usefulness of photosensitizers can be made possible by reducing its dark toxicity nature. In such scenario, biocompatible carriers can be used as a drug delivery system to evade the problems that arises while using free (dark toxic) drugs. So in this study, we have developed a nano drug delivery system called Phloroglucinol Succinic acid (PGSA) dendrimer, entrapped a photosensitizer, protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) inside the system and investigated whether the photodynamic efficacy of the anionic surface charged dendrimer-PpIX nano formulation is enhanced than achieved by the free PpIX in HeLa cancer cell lines. Moreover, the Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was monitored using 2‧,7‧-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (H2DCF-DA)- ROS Marker with phase contrast microscopy for the IC50 values of free and dendrimer-PpIX nano formulation. Similarly, the mode of cell death has been confirmed by cell cycle analysis for the same. For the in vitro PDT application, we have used a simple light source (Light Emitting Diode) with a power of 30-50 mW for 20 min irradiation. Hence, in this study we have taken steps to report this anionic drug delivery system is good to consider for the photodynamic therapy applications with the photosensitizer, PpIX which satisfied the prime requirement of PDT.

  11. A Perspective on Development Flight Instrumentation and Flight Test Analysis Plans for Ares I-X

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huebner, Lawrence D.; Richards, James S.; Brunty, Joseph A.; Smith, R. Marshall; Trombetta, Dominic R.

    2009-01-01

    NASA. s Constellation Program will take a significant step toward completion of the Ares I crew launch vehicle with the flight test of Ares I-X and completion of the Ares I-X post-flight evaluation. The Ares I-X flight test vehicle is an ascent development flight test that will acquire flight data early enough to impact the design and development of the Ares I. As the primary customer for flight data from the Ares I-X mission, Ares I has been the major driver in the definition of the Development Flight Instrumentation (DFI). This paper focuses on the DFI development process and the plans for post-flight evaluation of the resulting data to impact the Ares I design. Efforts for determining the DFI for Ares I-X began in the fall of 2005, and significant effort to refine and implement the Ares I-X DFI has been expended since that time. This paper will present a perspective in the development and implementation of the DFI. Emphasis will be placed on the process by which the list was established and changes were made to that list due to imposed constraints. The paper will also discuss the plans for the analysis of the DFI data following the flight and a summary of flight evaluation tasks to be performed in support of tools and models validation for design and development.

  12. Role of Zinc in Catalytic Activity of Carbonic Anhydrase IX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Chingkuang; Foster, Lauren; Alvarado, Andrea; McKenna, Robert; Silverman, David N.; Frost, Susan C.

    2012-01-01

    The carbonic anhydrases (CAs) in the α class are zinc-dependent metalloenzymes. Previous studies have reported that recombinant forms of carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX), a membrane-bound form of CA expressed in solid tumors, appear to be activated by low levels of zinc independent of its well-studied role at the catalytic site. In this study, we sought to determine if CAIX is stimulated by zinc in its native environment. MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells express CAIX in response to hypoxia. We compared CAIX activity associated with membrane ghosts isolated from hypoxic cells with that in intact hypoxic cells. We measured CA activity directly using 18O exchange from 13CO2 into water determined by membrane inlet mass spectrometry. In membrane ghosts, there was little effect of zinc at low concentrations on CAIX activity, although at high concentration zinc was inhibitory. In intact cells, zinc had no significant effect on CAIX activity. This suggests that there is an appreciable decrease in sensitivity to zinc when CAIX is in its natural membrane milieu compared to the purified forms. PMID:22465027

  13. Oscillating Bianchi IX universe in Horava-Lifshitz gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misonoh, Yosuke; Maeda, Kei-ichi; Kobayashi, Tsutomu

    2011-01-01

    We study a vacuum Bianchi IX universe in the context of Horava-Lifshitz gravity. In particular, we focus on the classical dynamics of the universe and analyze how anisotropy changes the history of the universe. For small anisotropy, we find an oscillating universe as well as a bounce universe just as the case of the Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker spacetime. However, if the initial anisotropy is large, we find the universe which ends up with a big crunch after oscillations if a cosmological constant Λ is zero or negative. For Λ>0, we find a variety of histories of the universe, that is a de Sitter expanding universe after oscillations in addition to the oscillating solution and the previous big crunch solution. This fate of the universe shows sensitive dependence of initial conditions, which is one of the typical properties of a chaotic system. If the initial anisotropy is near the upper bound, we find the universe starting from a big bang and ending up with a big crunch for Λ≤0, and a de Sitter expanding universe starting from a big bang for Λ>0.

  14. Bayesian inference of the number of factors in gene-expression analysis: application to human virus challenge studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hero Alfred

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nonparametric Bayesian techniques have been developed recently to extend the sophistication of factor models, allowing one to infer the number of appropriate factors from the observed data. We consider such techniques for sparse factor analysis, with application to gene-expression data from three virus challenge studies. Particular attention is placed on employing the Beta Process (BP, the Indian Buffet Process (IBP, and related sparseness-promoting techniques to infer a proper number of factors. The posterior density function on the model parameters is computed using Gibbs sampling and variational Bayesian (VB analysis. Results Time-evolving gene-expression data are considered for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV, Rhino virus, and influenza, using blood samples from healthy human subjects. These data were acquired in three challenge studies, each executed after receiving institutional review board (IRB approval from Duke University. Comparisons are made between several alternative means of per-forming nonparametric factor analysis on these data, with comparisons as well to sparse-PCA and Penalized Matrix Decomposition (PMD, closely related non-Bayesian approaches. Conclusions Applying the Beta Process to the factor scores, or to the singular values of a pseudo-SVD construction, the proposed algorithms infer the number of factors in gene-expression data. For real data the "true" number of factors is unknown; in our simulations we consider a range of noise variances, and the proposed Bayesian models inferred the number of factors accurately relative to other methods in the literature, such as sparse-PCA and PMD. We have also identified a "pan-viral" factor of importance for each of the three viruses considered in this study. We have identified a set of genes associated with this pan-viral factor, of interest for early detection of such viruses based upon the host response, as quantified via gene-expression data.

  15. Age-dependent role of pre- and perinatal factors in interaction with genes on ADHD symptoms across adolescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brinksma, Djûke M.; Hoekstra, Pieter J.; van den Hoofdakker, Barbara; de Bildt, Annelies; Buitelaar, Jan K.; Hartman, Catharina A.; Dietrich, Andrea

    Little is known about the effects of risk factors on attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptom over time. Here, we longitudinally studied the role of candidate genes, pre- and perinatal factors, and their interactions on ADHD symptoms between ages 10 and 18 years. Subjects were part of

  16. The zebrafish moonshine gene encodes transcriptional intermediary factor 1gamma, an essential regulator of hematopoiesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David G Ransom

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoiesis is precisely orchestrated by lineage-specific DNA-binding proteins that regulate transcription in concert with coactivators and corepressors. Mutations in the zebrafish moonshine (mon gene specifically disrupt both embryonic and adult hematopoiesis, resulting in severe red blood cell aplasia. We report that mon encodes the zebrafish ortholog of mammalian transcriptional intermediary factor 1gamma (TIF1gamma (or TRIM33, a member of the TIF1 family of coactivators and corepressors. During development, hematopoietic progenitor cells in mon mutants fail to express normal levels of hematopoietic transcription factors, including gata1, and undergo apoptosis. Three different mon mutant alleles each encode premature stop codons, and enforced expression of wild-type tif1gamma mRNA rescues embryonic hematopoiesis in homozygous mon mutants. Surprisingly, a high level of zygotic tif1gamma mRNA expression delineates ventral mesoderm during hematopoietic stem cell and progenitor formation prior to gata1 expression. Transplantation studies reveal that tif1gamma functions in a cell-autonomous manner during the differentiation of erythroid precursors. Studies in murine erythroid cell lines demonstrate that Tif1gamma protein is localized within novel nuclear foci, and expression decreases during erythroid cell maturation. Our results establish a major role for this transcriptional intermediary factor in the differentiation of hematopoietic cells in vertebrates.

  17. Genome-scale study of the importance of binding site context for transcription factor binding and gene regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronne Hans

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The rate of mRNA transcription is controlled by transcription factors that bind to specific DNA motifs in promoter regions upstream of protein coding genes. Recent results indicate that not only the presence of a motif but also motif context (for example the orientation of a motif or its location relative to the coding sequence is important for gene regulation. Results In this study we present ContextFinder, a tool that is specifically aimed at identifying cases where motif context is likely to affect gene regulation. We used ContextFinder to examine the role of motif context in S. cerevisiae both for DNA binding by transcription factors and for effects on gene expression. For DNA binding we found significant patterns of motif location bias, whereas motif orientations did not seem to matter. Motif context appears to affect gene expression even more than it affects DNA binding, as biases in both motif location and orientation were more frequent in promoters of co-expressed genes. We validated our results against data on nucleosome positioning, and found a negative correlation between preferred motif locations and nucleosome occupancy. Conclusion We conclude that the requirement for stable binding of transcription factors to DNA and their subsequent function in gene regulation can impose constraints on motif context.

  18. Mutagenesis in sequence encoding of human factor VII for gene therapy of hemophilia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Kazemi

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: Current treatment of hemophilia which is one of the most common bleeding disorders, involves replacement therapy using concentrates of FVIII and FIX .However, these concentrates have been associated with viral infections and thromboembolic complications and development of antibodies. "nThe use of recombinant human factor VII (rhFVII is effective  for the treatment of patients with  hemophilia A or B, who develop antibodies ( referred as inhibitors against  replacement therapy , because it induces coagulation independent of FVIII and FIX. However, its short half-life and high cost have limited its use. One potential solution to this problem may be the use of FVIIa gene transfer, which would attain continuing therapeutic levels of expression from a single injection. The aim of this study was to engineer a novel hFVII (human FVII gene containing a cleavage site for the intracellular protease and furin, by PCR mutagenesis "nMethods: The sequence encoding light and heavy chains of hFVII, were amplified by using hFVII/pTZ57R and specific primers, separately. The PCR products were cloned in pTZ57R vector. "nResults and discussion: Cloning was confirmed by restriction analysis or PCR amplification using specific primers and plasmid universal primers. Mutagenesis of sequence encoding light and heavy chain was confirmed by restriction enzyme. "nConclusion: In the present study, it was provided recombinant plasmids based on mutant form of DNA encoding light and heavy chains.  Joining mutant form of DNA encoding light chain with mutant heavy chain led to a new variant of hFVII. This variant can be activated by furin and an increase in the proportion of activated form of FVII. This mutant form of hFVII may be used for gene therapy of hemophilia.

  19. ZBP-99 defines a conserved family of transcription factors and regulates ornithine decarboxylase gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, D J; Du, M; Law, G L; Merchant, J L

    1999-08-19

    Among transcription factors that regulate ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) gene expression are those that interact with GC-rich promoters, including Sp1 and ZBP-89. Sp1 functions as a transactivator and ZBP-89 as a transrepressor of both the ODC and gastrin promoters. This study reports the cloning and characterization of a second member of the ZBP family that also binds GC boxes. ZBP-99 contains four Krüppel-type zinc fingers that collectively share 91% amino acid sequence similarity and 79% sequence identity with those found in ZBP-89. In addition, there are highly conserved amino acid sequences in the carboxy-terminal segments of the two genes. In spite of their structural similarities, the two proteins are encoded at distinct loci, ZBP-89 on chromosome 3q21 and ZBP-99 on 1q32.1. The predicted open reading frame of ZBP-99 cDNA encodes a 99-kDa protein. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that ZBP-99 protein specifically binds to the GC-rich promoter elements of gastrin and ODC genes. Northern blot analysis showed that a major ZBP-99 transcript of 5.6 kb is expressed ubiquitously at low levels, with elevated expression levels in placenta and in adult kidney, liver, and lymphocytes. Cotransfection of AGS gastric adenocarcinoma and HT-29 colon adenocarcinoma cells with a ZBP-99 expression construct and with an ODC reporter construct show that ZBP-99 repressed basal expression in the two cell lines by 80 and 60%, respectively. Collectively, the data suggest that ZBP-99 binds GC-rich promoters and may complement the activities mediated by ZBP-89. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  20. Transcriptional responses of metallothionein gene to different stress factors in Pacific abalone (Haliotis discus hannai).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Yoon; Nam, Yoon Kwon

    2016-11-01

    A novel metallothionein (MT) gene from the Pacific abalone H. discus hannai was characterized and its mRNA expression patterns (tissue distribution, developmental expression and differential expression in responsive to various in vivo stimulatory treatments) were examined. Abalone MT shares conserved structural features with previously known gastropod orthologs at both genomic (i.e., tripartite organization) and amino acid (conserved Cys motifs) levels. The 5'-flanking regulatory region of abalone MT gene displayed various transcription factor binding motifs particularly including ones related with metal regulation and stress/immune responses. Tissue distribution and basal expression patterns of MT mRNAs indicated a potential association between ovarian MT expression and sexual maturation. Developmental expression pattern suggested the maternal contribution of MT mRNAs to embryonic and early larval developments. Abalone MT mRNAs could be significantly induced by various heavy metals in different tissues (gill, hepatopancreas, muscle and hemocyte) in a tissue- and/or metal-dependent fashion. In addition, the abalone MT gene was highly modulated in responsive to other non-metal, stimulatory treatments such as immune challenge (LPS, polyI:C and bacterial injections), hypoxia (decrease from normoxia 8 ppm-2 ppm), thermal elevation (increase from 20 °C to 30 °C), and xenobiotic exposure (250 ppb of 17α-ethynylestradiol and 0.25 ppb of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzodioxin) where differential expression patterns were toward either up- or down-regulation depending on types of stimulations and tissues examined. Taken together, our results highlight that MT is a multifunctional effector playing in wide criteria of cellular pathways especially associated with development and stress responses in this abalone species. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Fibroblast growth factor 23 inhibits osteoblastic gene expression and induces osteoprotegerin in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakahara, Takehiro; Kawai-Kowase, Keiko; Matsui, Hiroki; Sunaga, Hiroaki; Utsugi, Toshihiro; Iso, Tatsuya; Arai, Masashi; Tomono, Shouichi; Kurabayashi, Masahiko

    2016-10-01

    Elevated fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) levels are associated with cardiovascular mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease. However, both clinical and basic research have demonstrated conflicting evidence regarding the pathophysiological role of FGF23 in vascular calcification. The aim of this study was to determine the role of FGF23 in the osteoblastic gene expression in vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs). We transduce human aortic SMCs (HASMCs) expressing klotho and FGF receptors with the adenovirus expressing human FGF23 (Ad-FGF23). We observed significant decreases in the expression of osteoblast-marker genes including BMP2, BMP4, MSX2, RUNX2 and ALP, as well as reduced calcification. Notably, Ad-FGF23 increased mRNA and protein levels of osteoprotegerin (OPG), and human OPG promoter was activated by FGF23. Moreover, in HASMCs overexpressing klotho, FGF23 upregulated OPG expression, whereas depletion of klotho by siRNA attenuated FGF23-induced OPG expression. Furthermore, in 73 consecutive patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus undergoing cardiac computed tomography to determine coronary calcium scores (CCSs), serum FGF23 levels were positively correlated with OPG independent of phosphate and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR, r = 0.65, p < 0.01). Serum FGF23 levels were significantly elevated in patients with high CCSs (≧100) compared to those with low CCSs (<100). Our in vitro results indicate that FGF23 suppresses osteoblastic gene expression and induces OPG expression in HASMCs. Together with our cross-sectional clinical assessment, the present study lends support to our hypothesis that FGF23 counteracts osteogenic conversion of vascular SMCs as a part of a compensatory mechanism to mitigate vascular calcification. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Association of Polymorphisms in the Hepatocyte Growth Factor Gene Promoter with Keratoconus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macgregor, Stuart; Bykhovskaya, Yelena; Javadiyan, Sharhbanou; Li, Xiaohui; Laurie, Kate J.; Muszynska, Dorota; Lindsay, Richard; Lechner, Judith; Haritunians, Talin; Henders, Anjali K.; Dash, Durga; Siscovick, David; Anand, Seema; Aldave, Anthony; Coster, Douglas J.; Szczotka-Flynn, Loretta; Mills, Richard A.; Iyengar, Sudha K.; Taylor, Kent D.; Phillips, Tony; Montgomery, Grant W.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Hewitt, Alex W.; Sharma, Shiwani; Rabinowitz, Yaron S.; Willoughby, Colin; Craig, Jamie E.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. Keratoconus is a progressive disorder of the cornea that can lead to severe visual impairment or blindness. Although several genomic regions have been linked to rare familial forms of keratoconus, no genes have yet been definitively identified for common forms of the disease. Methods. Two genome-wide association scans were undertaken in parallel. The first used pooled DNA from an Australian cohort, followed by typing of top-ranked single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in individual DNA samples. The second was conducted in individually genotyped patients, and controls from the USA. Tag SNPs around the hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) gene were typed in three additional replication cohorts. Serum levels of HGF protein in normal individuals were assessed with ELISA and correlated with genotype. Results. The only SNP observed to be associated in both the pooled discovery and primary replication cohort was rs1014091, located upstream of the HGF gene. The nearby SNP rs3735520 was found to be associated in the individually typed discovery cohort (P = 6.1 × 10−7). Genotyping of tag SNPs around HGF revealed association at rs3735520 and rs17501108/rs1014091 in four of the five cohorts. Meta-analysis of all five datasets together yielded suggestive P values for rs3735520 (P = 9.9 × 10−7) and rs17501108 (P = 9.9 × 10−5). In addition, SNP rs3735520 was found to be associated with serum HGF level in normal individuals (P = 0.036). Conclusions. Taken together, these results implicate genetic variation at the HGF locus with keratoconus susceptibility. PMID:22003120

  3. Somatic cytogenetic and azoospermia factor gene microdeletion studies in infertile men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pina-Neto J.M.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to determine the frequency of somatic chromosomal anomalies and Y chromosomal microdeletions (azoospermia factor genes, AZF in infertile males who seek assisted reproduction. These studies are very important because the assisted reproduction techniques (mainly intracytoplasmic sperm injection bypass the natural selection process and some classical chromosomal abnormalities, microdeletions of AZF genes or some deleterious genic mutations could pass through generations. These genetic abnormalities can cause in the offspring of these patients male infertility, ambiguous external genitalia, mental retardation, and other birth defects. We studied 165 infertile men whose infertility was attributable to testicular problems (60 were azoospermic, 100 were oligospermic and 5 were asthenospermic. We studied 100 metaphases per patient with GTG banding obtained from temporary lymphocyte culture for chromosomal abnormality detection and performed a genomic DNA analysis using 28 Y chromosome-specific sequence-tagged sites for Y AZF microdeletion detection. Karyotyping revealed somatic anomalies in 16 subjects (16/165 = 9.6%. Of these 16, 12 were in the azoospermic group (12/60 = 20% and 4 were in the oligospermic group (4/100 = 4%. The most common chromosomal anomaly was Klinefelter syndrome (10/165 = 6%. Microdeletions of AZF genes were detected in 12 subjects (12/160 = 7.5%. The frequencies detected are similar to those described previously. These results show the importance of genetic evaluation of infertile males prior to assisted reproduction. Such evaluation can lead to genetic counseling and, consequently, to primary and secondary prevention of mental retardation and birth defects.

  4. Impact of CCL4 gene polymorphisms and environmental factors on oral cancer development and clinical characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lien, Ming-Yu; Lin, Chiao-Wen; Tsai, Hsiao-Chi; Chen, Yng-Tay; Tsai, Ming-Hsui; Hua, Chun-Hung; Yang, Shun-Fa; Tang, Chih-Hsin

    2017-05-09

    In Taiwan, oral cancer has causally been associated with environmental carcinogens. CCL4 (C-C chemokine ligand 4), a macrophage inflammatory protein with a key role in inflammation and immune-regulation, was implicated in carcinogenesis by facilitating instability in the tumor environment. The purpose of this study was to identify gene polymorphisms of CCL4 specific to patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) susceptibility and clinicopathological characteristics. A total of 2,053 participants, including 1192 healthy people and 861 patients with oral cancer, were recruited for this study. Three single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the CCL4 gene were analyzed by a real-time PCR. We found that the T/T homozygotes of CCL4 rs1634507 G/T polymorphism and the GG haplotype of 2 CCL4 SNPs (rs1634507 and rs10491121) combined were associated with oral-cancer susceptibility. In addition, TA haplotype significantly decreased the risks for oral cancer by 0.118 fold. Among 1420 smokers, CCL4 polymorphisms carriers with the betel-nut chewing habit had a 15.476-20.247-fold greater risk of having oral cancer compared to CCL4 wild-type (WT) carriers without the betel-nut chewing habit. Finally, patients with oral cancer who had A/G heterozygotes of CCL4 rs10491121 A/G polymorphism showed a lower risk for an advanced tumor size (> T2) (p=0.046), compared to those patients with AA homozygotes. Our results suggest that the CCL4 rs1634507 SNP have potential predictive significance in oral carcinogenesis. Gene-environment interactions of CCL4 polymorphisms might influence oral-cancer susceptibility. CCL4 rs10491121 may be a factor to predict the tumor size in OSCC patients.

  5. Osteoblast-specific transcription factor Osterix increases vitamin D receptor gene expression in osteoblasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi Zhang

    Full Text Available Osterix (Osx is an osteoblast-specific transcription factor required for osteoblast differentiation from mesenchymal stem cells. In Osx knock-out mice, no bone formation occurs. The vitamin D receptor (VDR is a member of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily that regulates target gene transcription to ensure appropriate control of calcium homeostasis and bone development. Here, we provide several lines of evidence that show that the VDR gene is a target for transcriptional regulation by Osx in osteoblasts. For example, calvaria obtained from Osx-null embryos displayed dramatic reductions in VDR expression compared to wild-type calvaria. Stable overexpression of Osx stimulated VDR expression in C2C12 mesenchymal cells. Inhibition of Osx expression by siRNA led to downregulation of VDR. In contrast, Osx levels remained unchanged in osteoblasts in VDR-null mice. Mechanistic approaches using transient transfection assays showed that Osx directly activated a 1 kb fragment of the VDR promoter in a dose-dependent manner. To define the region of the VDR promoter that was responsive to Osx, a series of VDR promoter deletion mutants were examined and the minimal Osx-responsive region was refined to the proximal 120 bp of the VDR promoter. Additional point mutants were used to identify two GC-rich regions that were responsible for VDR promoter activation by Osx. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that endogenous Osx was associated with the native VDR promoter in primary osteoblasts in vivo. Cumulatively, these data strongly support a direct regulatory role for Osx in VDR gene expression. They further provide new insight into potential mechanisms and pathways that Osx controls in osteoblasts and during the process of osteoblastic cell differentiation.

  6. [Correlation between epigenetic alterations in the insulin growth factor-II gene and hepatocellular carcinoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Zhi-zhen; Yao, Deng-fu; Wu, Wei; Qiu, Li-wei; Yao, Ning-hua; Yan, Xiao-di; Yu, Dan-dan; Chen, Jie

    2012-08-01

    To investigate whether epigenetic alterations in the insulin-like growth factor-II (IGF-II) gene that cause differential transcription or expression are correlated with onset and severity of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Patient-matched specimens of HCC, paracancerous, and non-cancerous tissues were collected from 40 primary liver cancer patients. Epigenetic alterations in the promoter (P3) sequence of the IGF-II gene were analyzed by methylation-specific PCR (MSP) and IGF-II transcription was measured by RT-PCR. IGF-II protein expression and clinicopathological features were assessed by immunohistochemistry and microscopic observation. The rate of IGF-II P3 methylation was significantly lower in HCC tissues (0%) than in paracancerous tissues (vs. 47.5%; x2 = 24.918, P less than 0.001) and non-cancerous tissues (vs. 100%; x2 = 80.000, P less than 0.001). IGF-II mRNA expression was significantly higher in HCC tissues (100%) than in paracancerous tissues (vs. 52.5%; x2 = 24.918, P less than 0.001) and non-cancerous tissues (vs. 0%; x2 = 80.000, P less than 0.001). IGF-II protein expression was significantly higher in HCC tissues (82.5%) than in paracancerous tissues (vs. 45.0%; x2 = 12.170, P less than 0.001) and non-cancerous tissues (vs. 0%; x2 = 56.170, P less than 0.001). IGF-II overexpression in HCC was significantly associated with degree of differentiation, extent of infiltrated serosa, size of tumor, and HBV-positive infection status. Epigenetic alterations in the IGF-II gene regulate its transcription and expression and are closely associated with HCC development and progression.

  7. Effects of circadian clock genes and environmental factors on cognitive aging in old adults in a Taiwanese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Eugene; Kuo, Po-Hsiu; Liu, Yu-Li; Yang, Albert C; Kao, Chung-Feng; Tsai, Shih-Jen

    2017-04-11

    Previous animal studies have indicated associations between circadian clock genes and cognitive impairment . In this study, we assessed whether 11 circadian clockgenes are associated with cognitive aging independently and/or through complex interactions in an old Taiwanese population. We also analyzed the interactions between environmental factors and these genes in influencing cognitive aging. A total of 634 Taiwanese subjects aged over 60 years from the Taiwan Biobank were analyzed. Mini-Mental State Examinations (MMSE) were administered to all subjects, and MMSE scores were used to evaluate cognitive function. Our data showed associations between cognitive aging and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 4 key circadian clock genes, CLOCK rs3749473 (p = 0.0017), NPAS2 rs17655330 (p = 0.0013), RORA rs13329238 (p = 0.0009), and RORB rs10781247 (p = 7.9 x 10-5). We also found that interactions between CLOCK rs3749473, NPAS2 rs17655330, RORA rs13329238, and RORB rs10781247 affected cognitive aging (p = 0.007). Finally, we investigated the influence of interactions between CLOCK rs3749473, RORA rs13329238, and RORB rs10781247 with environmental factors such as alcohol consumption, smoking status, physical activity, and social support on cognitive aging (p = 0.002 ~ 0.01). Our study indicates that circadian clock genes such as the CLOCK, NPAS2, RORA, and RORB genes may contribute to the risk of cognitive aging independently as well as through gene-gene and gene-environment interactions.

  8. Transcriptional regulation of defence genes and involvement of the WRKY transcription factor in arbuscular mycorrhizal potato root colonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallou, Adrien; Declerck, Stéphane; Cranenbrouck, Sylvie

    2012-03-01

    The establishment of arbuscular mycorrhizal associations causes major changes in plant roots and affects significantly the host in term of plant nutrition and resistance against biotic and abiotic stresses. As a consequence, major changes in root transcriptome, especially in plant genes related to biotic stresses, are expected. Potato microarray analysis, followed by real-time quantitative PCR, was performed to detect the wide transcriptome changes induced during the pre-, early and late stages of potato root colonization by Glomus sp. MUCL 41833. The microarray analysis revealed 526 up-regulated and 132 down-regulated genes during the pre-stage, 272 up-regulated and 109 down-regulated genes during the early stage and 734 up-regulated and 122 down-regulated genes during the late stage of root colonization. The most important class of regulated genes was associated to plant stress and in particular to the WRKY transcription factors genes during the pre-stage of root colonization. The expression profiling clearly demonstrated a wide transcriptional change during the pre-, early and late stages of root colonization. It further suggested that the WRKY transcription factor genes are involved in the mechanisms controlling the arbuscular mycorrhizal establishment by the regulation of plant defence genes.

  9. Genome-wide survey of the soybean GATA transcription factor gene family and expression analysis under low nitrogen stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chanjuan Zhang

    Full Text Available GATA transcription factors are transcriptional regulatory proteins that contain a characteristic type-IV zinc finger DNA-binding domain and recognize the conserved GATA motif in the promoter sequence of target genes. Previous studies demonstrated that plant GATA factors possess critical functions in developmental control and responses to the environment. To date, the GATA factors in soybean (Glycine max have yet to be characterized. Thus, this study identified 64 putative GATA factors from the entire soybean genomic sequence. The chromosomal distributions, gene structures, duplication patterns, phylogenetic tree, tissue expression patterns, and response to low nitrogen stress of the 64 GATA factors in soybean were analyzed to further investigate the functions of these factors. Results indicated that segmental duplication predominantly contributed to the expansion of the GATA factor gene family in soybean. These GATA proteins were phylogenetically clustered into four distinct subfamilies, wherein their gene structure and motif compositions were considerably conserved. A comparative phylogenetic analysis of the GATA factor zinc finger domain sequences in soybean, Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana, and rice (Oryza sativa revealed four major classes. The GATA factors in soybean exhibited expression diversity among different tissues; some of these factors showed tissue-specific expression patterns. Numerous GATA factors displayed upregulation or downregulation in soybean leaf in response to low nitrogen stress, and two GATA factors GATA44 and GATA58 were likely to be involved in the regulation of nitrogen metabolism in soybean. Overexpression of GmGATA44 complemented the reduced chlorophyll phenotype of the Arabidopsis ortholog AtGATA21 mutant, implying that GmGATA44 played an important role in modulating chlorophyll biosynthesis. Overall, our study provides useful information for the further analysis of the biological functions of GATA factors in

  10. Derepression of the Iroquois Homeodomain Transcription Factor Gene IRX3 Confers Differentiation Block in Acute Leukemia

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    Tim D.D. Somerville

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The Iroquois homeodomain transcription factor gene IRX3 is expressed in the developing nervous system, limb buds, and heart, and transcript levels specify obesity risk in humans. We now report a functional role for IRX3 in human acute leukemia. Although transcript levels are very low in normal human bone marrow cells, high IRX3 expression is found in ∼30% of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML, ∼50% with T-acute lymphoblastic leukemia, and ∼20% with B-acute lymphoblastic leukemia, frequently in association with high-level HOXA gene expression. Expression of IRX3 alone was sufficient to immortalize hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs in myeloid culture and induce lymphoid leukemias in vivo. IRX3 knockdown induced terminal differentiation of AML cells. Combined IRX3 and Hoxa9 expression in murine HSPCs impeded normal T-progenitor differentiation in lymphoid culture and substantially enhanced the morphologic and phenotypic differentiation block of AML in myeloid leukemia transplantation experiments through suppression of a terminal myelomonocytic program. Likewise, in cases of primary human AML, high IRX3 expression is strongly associated with reduced myelomonocytic differentiation. Thus, tissue-inappropriate derepression of IRX3 contributes significantly to the block in differentiation, which is the pathognomonic feature of human acute leukemias.

  11. Effects of molecular size and chemical factor on plasma gene transfection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Yoshihisa; Motomura, Hideki; Kido, Yugo; Satoh, Susumu; Jinno, Masafumi

    2016-07-01

    In order to clarify the mechanism of plasma gene transfection, the relationship between transfection efficiency and transferred molecular size was investigated. Molecules with low molecular mass (less than 50 kDa; dye or dye-labeled oligonucleotide) and high molecular mass (more than 1 MDa; plasmid DNA or fragment of plasmid DNA) were transferred to L-929 cells. It was found that the transfection efficiency decreases with increasing in transferred molecular size and also depends on the tertiary structure of transferred molecules. Moreover, it was suggested the transfection mechanism is different between the molecules with low (less than 50 kDa) and high molecular mass (higher than 1 MDa). For the amount of gene transfection after plasma irradiation, which is comparable to that during plasma irradiation, it is shown that H2O2 molecules are the main contributor. The transfection efficiency decreased to 0.40 ± 0.22 upon scavenging the H2O2 generated by plasma irradiation using the catalase. On the other hand, when the H2O2 solution is dropped into the cell suspension without plasma irradiation, the transfection efficiency is almost 0%. In these results, it is also suggested that there is a synergetic effect of H2O2 with electrical factors or other reactive species generated by plasma irradiation.

  12. Vascular endothelial growth factor gene polymorphisms in age-related macular degeneration in a Turkish population

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    Yunus Bulgu

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To assess the association between age-related macular degeneration (AMD and three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs related to the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF gene.METHODS: The patients who were diagnosed with AMD were included in this prospective study. Three SNPs (rs1413711, rs2146323, and rs3025033 of the VEGF gene were genotyped by real-time polymerase chain reaction in the genomic DNA isolated from peripheral blood samples of the 82 patients and 80 controls.RESULTS: The genotype frequencies of rs1413711 and rs2146323 were not significantly different between the study group and the control group (P=0.072 and P=0.058. However, there was a significant difference in the genotype frequencies of these SNPs between the wet type AMD and dry type AMD (P=0.005 and P=0.010, respectively. One of the SNPs (rs1413711 was also found to be associated with the severity of AMD (P=0.001 with significant genotype distribution between early, intermediate, and advanced stages of the disease. The ancestral alleles were protective for both SNPs while the polymorphic alleles increased the risk for dry AMD.CONCLUSION: VEGF SNPs rs1413711 and rs2146323 polymorphisms are significantly associated with AMD subtypes in our population.

  13. Sequence-based identification of Japanese Armillaria species using the elongation factor-1 alpha gene.

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    Hasegawa, Eri; Ota, Yuko; Hattori, Tsutomu; Kikuchi, Taisei

    2010-01-01

    We analyzed the sequences of three DNA regions-the translation elongation factor-1 alpha (EF-1 alpha) gene and the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) and intergenic spacer (IGS) regions of ribosomal DNA-to compare their accuracy in identifying species of Japanese Armillaria. We studied 49 isolates of eight Armillaria species, A. mellea, A. ostoyae, A. nabsnona, A. cepistipes, A. gallica, A. sinapina, A. tabescens and the biological species Nagasawa E (Nag. E). Phylogenetic analyses of the ITS and IGS data helped in identifying A. mellea, A. ostoyae, A. nabsnona, A. tabescens and Nag. E but could not be used to identify A. gallica, A. cepistipes and A. sinapina. Nevertheless our analysis showed that the EF-1 alpha gene was clearly different in the eight examined species. Restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLP) of the IGS-1 region could be used to distinguish most species, but the RFLP profiles of some isolates of A. cepistipes and A. sinapina were the same even with four different restriction enzymes. In conclusion, among the techniques examined in this study, analyzing the EF-1 alpha sequence was found to be the most suitable method for identifying different species of Japanese Armillaria.

  14. Gene blaCTX-M Mutation as Risk Factor of Antibiotic Resistance

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    Devinna Kang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Currently there are more than half from all antibiotics used in the world which is belong to β lactam group, but clinical effectiveness of the antibiotics are limited by antibiotic resistance of microorganisms as causative agents from infectious diseases. Several resistance mechanisms for Enterobacteriaceae are mostly caused by enzymatic hydrolysis of antibiotics specific enzymes, called β lactamases. β lactamases represent a large group of enzyme which is genetically and functionally different as extended‑spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL and known as greatest threat of resistence. Plasmid localization from the encoded gene and enzyme distribution among the pathogen increases every year. Most widespread and clinically relevant ESBL are class A ESBL of Temoniera (TEM, Sulphydryl variable (SHV and Cefotaxime (CTX-M types. The purpose of this review was to analyze variant of blaCTX-M gene which cause the most increase incidence of antibiotic resistance. The methods of this review were data-based searching based on Pubmed, Scopus and Google Scholar, without limitation of index factor by using the keyword “blaCTX-M”, “Extended-spectrum β-lactamase”, and “antibiotic resistance”. The conclusion of the review is CTX-M type ESBL have replaced TEM and SHV type as dominant enzyme in last decade. ESBL produced by Klebsiella pneumoniae have emerged as one of major nosocomial pathogens. Nosocomial infection caused by CTX-M-15 in Klebsiella pneumoniae dramatically increased in recent years.

  15. Real-time PCR expression profiling of genes encoding potential virulence factors in Candida albicans biofilms: identification of model-dependent and -independent gene expression

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    Řičicová Markéta

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Candida albicans infections are often associated with biofilm formation. Previous work demonstrated that the expression of HWP1 (hyphal wall protein and of genes belonging to the ALS (agglutinin-like sequence, SAP (secreted aspartyl protease, PLB (phospholipase B and LIP (lipase gene families is associated with biofilm growth on mucosal surfaces. We investigated using real-time PCR whether genes encoding potential virulence factors are also highly expressed in biofilms associated with abiotic surfaces. For this, C. albicans biofilms were grown on silicone in microtiter plates (MTP or in the Centres for Disease Control (CDC reactor, on polyurethane in an in vivo subcutaneous catheter rat (SCR model, and on mucosal surfaces in the reconstituted human epithelium (RHE model. Results HWP1 and genes belonging to the ALS, SAP, PLB and LIP gene families were constitutively expressed in C. albicans biofilms. ALS1-5 were upregulated in all model systems, while ALS9 was mostly downregulated. ALS6 and HWP1 were overexpressed in all models except in the RHE and MTP, respectively. The expression levels of SAP1 were more pronounced in both in vitro models, while those of SAP2, SAP4 and SAP6 were higher in the in vivo model. Furthermore, SAP5 was highly upregulated in the in vivo and RHE models. For SAP9 and SAP10 similar gene expression levels were observed in all model systems. PLB genes were not considerably upregulated in biofilms, while LIP1-3, LIP5-7 and LIP9-10 were highly overexpressed in both in vitro models. Furthermore, an elevated lipase activity was detected in supernatans of biofilms grown in the MTP and RHE model. Conclusions Our findings show that HWP1 and most of the genes belonging to the ALS, SAP and LIP gene families are upregulated in C. albicans biofilms. Comparison of the fold expression between the various model systems revealed similar expression levels for some genes, while for others model-dependent expression

  16. Genome-wide analysis of the Dof transcription factor gene family reveals soybean-specific duplicable and functional characteristics.

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    Yong Guo

    Full Text Available The Dof domain protein family is a classic plant-specific zinc-finger transcription factor family involved in a variety of biological processes. There is great diversity in the number of Dof genes in different plants. However, there are only very limited reports on the characterization of Dof transcription factors in soybean (Glycine max. In the present study, 78 putative Dof genes were identified from the whole-genome sequence of soybean. The predicted GmDof genes were non-randomly distributed within and across 19 out of 20 chromosomes and 97.4% (38 pairs were preferentially retained duplicate paralogous genes located in duplicated regions of the genome. Soybean-specific segmental duplications contributed significantly to the expansion of the soybean Dof gene family. These Dof proteins were phylogenetically clustered into nine distinct subgroups among which the gene structure and motif compositions were considerably conserved. Comparative phylogenetic analysis of these Dof proteins revealed four major groups, similar to those reported for Arabidopsis and rice. Most of the GmDofs showed specific expression patterns based on RNA-seq data analyses. The expression patterns of some duplicate genes were partially redundant while others showed functional diversity, suggesting the occurrence of sub-functionalization during subsequent evolution. Comprehensive expression profile analysis also provided insights into the soybean-specific functional divergence among members of the Dof gene family. Cis-regulatory element analysis of these GmDof genes suggested diverse functions associated with different processes. Taken together, our results provide useful information for the functional characterization of soybean Dof genes by combining phylogenetic analysis with global gene-expression profiling.

  17. Genome-wide analysis of the Dof transcription factor gene family reveals soybean-specific duplicable and functional characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yong; Qiu, Li-Juan

    2013-01-01

    The Dof domain protein family is a classic plant-specific zinc-finger transcription factor family involved in a variety of biological processes. There is great diversity in the number of Dof genes in different plants. However, there are only very limited reports on the characterization of Dof transcription factors in soybean (Glycine max). In the present study, 78 putative Dof genes were identified from the whole-genome sequence of soybean. The predicted GmDof genes were non-randomly distributed within and across 19 out of 20 chromosomes and 97.4% (38 pairs) were preferentially retained duplicate paralogous genes located in duplicated regions of the genome. Soybean-specific segmental duplications contributed significantly to the expansion of the soybean Dof gene family. These Dof proteins were phylogenetically clustered into nine distinct subgroups among which the gene structure and motif compositions were considerably conserved. Comparative phylogenetic analysis of these Dof proteins revealed four major groups, similar to those reported for Arabidopsis and rice. Most of the GmDofs showed specific expression patterns based on RNA-seq data analyses. The expression patterns of some duplicate genes were partially redundant while others showed functional diversity, suggesting the occurrence of sub-functionalization during subsequent evolution. Comprehensive expression profile analysis also provided insights into the soybean-specific functional divergence among members of the Dof gene family. Cis-regulatory element analysis of these GmDof genes suggested diverse functions associated with different processes. Taken together, our results provide useful information for the functional characterization of soybean Dof genes by combining phylogenetic analysis with global gene-expression profiling.

  18. Baculovirus p35 gene is oppositely regulated by P53 and AP-1 like factors in Spodoptera frugiperda

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    Mohareer, Krishnaveni [Laboratory of Molecular and Cell Biology, Center for DNA Fingerprinting and Diagnostics, Hyderabad 500001 (India); Institute of Life Sciences, University of Hyderabad Campus, Prof. C.R. Rao Road, Gachibowli, Hyderabad 500046 (India); Sahdev, Sudhir [Laboratory of Molecular and Cell Biology, Center for DNA Fingerprinting and Diagnostics, Hyderabad 500001 (India); Ranbaxy Pharmaceuticals, Gurgaon, New Delhi (India); Hasnain, Seyed E., E-mail: seh@bioschool.iitd.ac.in [Institute of Life Sciences, University of Hyderabad Campus, Prof. C.R. Rao Road, Gachibowli, Hyderabad 500046 (India); Kusuma School of Biological Sciences, IIT Delhi, New Delhi 110016 (India); ILBS, Vasant Kunj, New Delhi (India); King Saud University, Riyadh, KSA (Saudi Arabia)

    2011-11-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Baculovirus p35 is regulated by both viral and host factors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Baculovirus p35 is negatively regulated by SfP53-like factor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Baculovirus p35 is positively regulated by SfAP-1-like factor. -- Abstract: Baculovirus p35 belongs to the early class of genes of AcMNPV and requires viral factors like Immediate Early protein-1 for its transcription. To investigate the role of host factors in regulating p35 gene expression, the putative transcription factor binding sites were examined in silico and the role of these factors in influencing the transcription of p35 gene was assessed. We focused our studies on AP-1 and P53-like factors, which are activated under oxidative stress conditions. The AP-1 motif is located at -1401 while P53 motif is at -1912 relative to p35 translation start site. The predicted AP-1 and P53 elements formed specific complexes with Spodoptera frugiperda nuclear extracts. Both AP-1 and P53 motif binding proteins were down regulated as a function of AcMNPV infection in Spodoptera cells. To address the question whether during an oxidative outburst, the p35 transcription is enhanced; we investigated the role of these oxidative stress induced host transcription factors in influencing p35 gene transcription. Reporter assays revealed that AP-1 element enhances the transcription of p35 by a factor of two. Interestingly, P53 element appears to repress the transcription of p35 gene.

  19. Evidence of new risk genetic factor to systemic lupus erythematosus: the UBASH3A gene.

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    Lina-Marcela Diaz-Gallo

    Full Text Available The ubiquitin associated and Src-homology 3 (SH3 domain containing A (UBASH3a is a suppressor of T-cell receptor signaling, underscoring antigen presentation to T-cells as a critical shared mechanism of diseases pathogenesis. The aim of the present study was to determine whether the UBASH3a gene influence the susceptibility to systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE in Caucasian populations. We evaluated five UBASH3a polymorphisms (rs2277798, rs2277800, rs9976767, rs13048049 and rs17114930, using TaqMan® allelic discrimination assays, in a discovery cohort that included 906 SLE patients and 1165 healthy controls from Spain. The SNPs that exhibit statistical significance difference were evaluated in a German replication cohort of 360 SLE patients and 379 healthy controls. The case-control analysis in the Spanish population showed a significant association between the rs9976767 and SLE (Pc = 9.9E-03 OR = 1.21 95%CI = 1.07-1.37 and a trend of association for the rs2277798 analysis (P = 0.09 OR = 0.9 95%CI = 0.79-1.02. The replication in a German cohort and the meta-analysis confirmed that the rs9976767 (Pc = 0.02; Pc = 2.4E-04, for German cohort and meta-analysis, respectively and rs2277798 (Pc = 0.013; Pc = 4.7E-03, for German cohort and meta-analysis, respectively UBASH3a variants are susceptibility factors for SLE. Finally, a conditional regression analysis suggested that the most likely genetic variation responsible for the association was the rs9976767 polymorphism. Our results suggest that UBASH3a gene plays a role in the susceptibility to SLE. Moreover, our study indicates that UBASH3a can be considered as a common genetic factor in autoimmune diseases.

  20. Hořava-Lifshitz bouncing Bianchi IX universes: A dynamical system analysis

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    Maier, Rodrigo; Soares, Ivano Damião

    2017-11-01

    We examine the Hamiltonian dynamics of bouncing Bianchi IX cosmologies with three scale factors in Hořava-Lifshitz (HL) gravity. We assume a positive cosmological constant plus noninteracting dust and radiation as the matter content of the models. In this framework the modified field equations contain additional terms which turn the dynamics nonsingular. The six-dimensional phase space presents (i) two critical points in a finite region of the phase space, (ii) one asymptotic de Sitter attractor at infinity and (iii) a two-dimensional invariant plane containing the critical points; together they organize the dynamics of the phase space. We identify four distinct parameter domains A , B , C and D for which the pair of critical points engenders distinct features in the dynamics, connected to the presence of centers of multiplicity 2 and saddles of multiplicity 2. In the domain A the dynamics consists basically of periodic bouncing orbits, or oscillatory orbits with a finite number of bounces before escaping to the de Sitter attractor. The center with multiplicity 2 engenders in its neighborhood the topology of stable and unstable cylinders R ×S3 of orbits, where R is a saddle direction and S3 is the center manifold of unstable periodic orbits. We show that the stable and unstable cylinders coalesce, realizing a smooth homoclinic connection to the center manifold, a rare event of regular/nonchaotic dynamics in bouncing Bianchi IX cosmologies. The presence of a saddle of multiplicity 2 in the domain B engenders a high instability in the dynamics so that the cylinders emerging from the center manifold about P2 towards the bounce have four distinct attractors: the center manifold itself, the de Sitter attractor at infinity and two further momentum-dominated attractors with infinite anisotropy. In the domain C we examine the features of invariant manifolds of orbits about a saddle of multiplicity 2 P2. The presence of the saddle of multiplicity 2 engenders bifurcations

  1. Genome-Wide Identification and Structural Analysis of bZIP Transcription Factor Genes in Brassica napus

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    Yan Zhou

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The basic region/leucine zipper motif (bZIP transcription factor family is one of the largest families of transcriptional regulators in plants. bZIP genes have been systematically characterized in some plants, but not in rapeseed (Brassica napus. In this study, we identified 247 BnbZIP genes in the rapeseed genome, which we classified into 10 subfamilies based on phylogenetic analysis of their deduced protein sequences. The BnbZIP genes were grouped into functional clades with Arabidopsis genes with similar putative functions, indicating functional conservation. Genome mapping analysis revealed that the BnbZIPs are distributed unevenly across all 19 chromosomes, and that some of these genes arose through whole-genome duplication and dispersed duplication events. All expression profiles of 247 bZIP genes were extracted from RNA-sequencing data obtained from 17 different B. napus ZS11 tissues with 42 various developmental stages. These genes exhibited different expression patterns in various tissues, revealing that these genes are differentially regulated. Our results provide a valuable foundation for functional dissection of the different BnbZIP homologs in B. napus and its parental lines and for molecular breeding studies of bZIP genes in B. napus.

  2. Genome-Wide Identification and Structural Analysis of bZIP Transcription Factor Genes in Brassica napus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yan; Xu, Daixiang; Jia, Ledong; Huang, Xiaohu; Ma, Guoqiang; Wang, Shuxian; Zhu, Meichen; Zhang, Aoxiang; Guan, Mingwei; Lu, Kun; Xu, Xinfu; Wang, Rui; Li, Jiana; Qu, Cunmin

    2017-10-24

    The basic region/leucine zipper motif (bZIP) transcription factor family is one of the largest families of transcriptional regulators in plants. bZIP genes have been systematically characterized in some plants, but not in rapeseed ( Brassica napus ). In this study, we identified 247 BnbZIP genes in the rapeseed genome, which we classified into 10 subfamilies based on phylogenetic analysis of their deduced protein sequences. The BnbZIP genes were grouped into functional clades with Arabidopsis genes with similar putative functions, indicating functional conservation. Genome mapping analysis revealed that the BnbZIPs are distributed unevenly across all 19 chromosomes, and that some of these genes arose through whole-genome duplication and dispersed duplication events. All expression profiles of 247 bZIP genes were extracted from RNA-sequencing data obtained from 17 different B . napus ZS11 tissues with 42 various developmental stages. These genes exhibited different expression patterns in various tissues, revealing that these genes are differentially regulated. Our results provide a valuable foundation for functional dissection of the different BnbZIP homologs in B . napus and its parental lines and for molecular breeding studies of bZIP genes in B . napus .

  3. Phenylpropanoids accumulation in eggplant fruit: characterization of biosynthetic genes and regulation by a MYB transcription factor

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    Teresa eDocimo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Phenylpropanoids are major secondary metabolites in eggplant (Solanum melongena fruits. Chlorogenic acid (CGA accounts for 70 to 90% of total phenolics in flesh tissues, while anthocyanins are mainly present in the fruit skin. As a contribution to the understanding of the peculiar accumulation of these health-promoting metabolites in eggplant, we report on metabolite abundance, regulation of CGA and anthocyanin biosynthesis, and characterization of candidate CGA biosynthetic genes in S. melongena.Higher contents of CGA, Delphinidin 3-rutinoside and rutin were found in eggplant fruits compared to other tissues, associated to an elevated transcript abundance of structural genes such as PAL, HQT, DFR and ANS, suggesting that active in situ biosynthesis contributes to anthocyanin and CGA accumulation in fruit tissues. Putative orthologs of the two CGA biosynthetic genes PAL and HQT, as well as a variant of a MYB1 transcription factor showing identity with group 6 MYBs, were isolated from an Occidental S. melongena traditional variety and demonstrated to differ from published sequences from Asiatic varieties.In silico analysis of the isolated SmPAL1, SmHQT1, SmANS, and SmMyb1 promoters revealed the presence of several Myb regulatory elements for the biosynthetic genes and unique elements for the TF, suggesting its involvement in other physiological roles beside phenylpropanoid biosynthesis regulation.Transient overexpression in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves of SmMyb1 and of a C-terminal SmMyb1 truncated form (SmMyb1Δ9 resulted in anthocyanin accumulation only of SmMyb1 agro-infiltrated leaves. A yeast two-hybrid assay confirmed the interaction of both SmMyb1 and SmMyb1Δ9 with an anthocyanin-related potato bHLH1 TF. Interestingly, a doubled amount of CGA was detected in both SmMyb1 and SmMyb1Δ9 agro-infiltrated leaves, thus suggesting that the N-terminal region of SmMyb1 is sufficient to activate its synthesis. These data suggest that a deletion of

  4. Exposure to Early Life Stress Results in Epigenetic Changes in Neurotrophic Factor Gene Expression in a Parkinsonian Rat Model

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    Thabisile Mpofana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Early life adversity increases the risk of mental disorders later in life. Chronic early life stress may alter neurotrophic factor gene expression including those for brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF and glial cell derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF that are important in neuronal growth, survival, and maintenance. Maternal separation was used in this study to model early life stress. Following unilateral injection of a mild dose of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA, we measured corticosterone (CORT in the blood and striatum of stressed and nonstressed rats; we also measured DNA methylation and BDNF and GDNF gene expression in the striatum using real time PCR. In the presence of stress, we found that there was increased corticosterone concentration in both blood and striatal tissue. Further to this, we found higher DNA methylation and decreased neurotrophic factor gene expression. 6-OHDA lesion increased neurotrophic factor gene expression in both stressed and nonstressed rats but this increase was higher in the nonstressed rats. Our results suggest that exposure to early postnatal stress increases corticosterone concentration which leads to increased DNA methylation. This effect results in decreased BDNF and GDNF gene expression in the striatum leading to decreased protection against subsequent insults later in life.

  5. Matrix metalloproteinase-3, vitamin D receptor gene polymorphisms, and occupational risk factors in lumbar disc degeneration.

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    Zawilla, N H; Darweesh, H; Mansour, N; Helal, S; Taha, F M; Awadallah, M; El Shazly, R

    2014-06-01

    Lumbar disc degeneration (LDD) is a process that begins early in life, contributing to the development of low back pain. LDD is a consequence of a variety of factors, and its etiology remains poorly understood. Objectives to investigate occupational and genetic risk factors inducing lumbar disc degeneration, and to evaluate the possible association of genetic polymorphisms of matrix metalloproteinase 3 (MMP-3) and vitamin D receptor (VDR) with the severity of LDD in an Egyptian population. A case control study involving 84 LDD and 60 controls was carried out. Five types of work related factors were investigated by questionnaire, complete neurological examination for all subjects and MRI for the cases. Polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism methods were applied to detect polymorphisms in MMP-3 Promoter (-1,171 6A/5A) (rs 731236) and VDR-Apa (rs 35068180). We found that family history, back injury, smoking, high level of sitting, bending/twisting, physical workload, lifting, whole body vibration, mutant allele 5A of MMP-3 and mutant allele T of VDR were significantly associated with LDD (OR = 2.9, 3.1, 2.1, 11.1, 15.9, 11.7, 8.2, 12.6, 2.5 and 3.1 respectively, p < 0.05). Cases that carry allele 5A and/or allele T were associated with LDD severity. LDD is closely associated in occurrence and severity with occupational, environmental risk factors and susceptibility genes namely MMP-3, and VDR (ApaI). This study throws light on the importance of screening for early detection of susceptible individuals and disease prevention.

  6. Protoporphyrin IX fluorescence for enhanced photodynamic diagnosis and photodynamic therapy in murine models of skin and breast cancer

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    Rollakanti, Kishore Reddy

    Protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) is a photosensitizing agent derived from aminolevulinic acid. PpIX accumulates specifically within target cancer cells, where it fluoresces and produces cytotoxic reactive oxygen species. Our aims were to employ PpIX fluorescence to detect squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the skin (Photodynamic diagnosis, PDD), and to improve treatment efficacy (Photodynamic therapy, PDT) for basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and cutaneous breast cancer. Hyperspectral imaging and a spectrometer based dosimeter system were used to detect very early SCC in UVB-irradiated murine skin, using PpIX fluorescence. Regarding PDT, we showed that low non-toxic doses of vitamin D, given before ALA application, increase tumor specific PpIX accumulation and sensitize BCC and breast cancer cells to ALA-PDT. These optical imaging methods and the combination therapy regimen (vitamin D and ALA-PDT) are promising tools for effective management of skin and breast cancer.

  7. Bioinformatics analysis of the factors controlling type I IFN gene expression in autoimmune disease and virus-induced immunity

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    Di eFeng

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE and Sjögren's syndrome (SS display increased levels of type I IFN-induced genes. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (PDCs are natural interferon producing cells and considered to be a primary source of IFN-α in these two diseases. Differential expression patterns of type I IFN inducible transcripts can be found in different immune cell subsets and in patients with both active and inactive autoimmune disease. A type I IFN gene signature generally consists of three groups of IFN-induced genes - those regulated in response to virus-induced type I IFN, those regulated by the IFN-induced mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular-regulated kinase (MAPK/ERK pathway, and those by the IFN-induced phosphoinositide-3 kinase (PI-3K pathway. These three groups of type I IFN-regulated genes control important cellular processes such as apoptosis, survival, adhesion, and chemotaxis, that when dysregulated, contribute to autoimmunity. With the recent generation of large datasets in the public domain from next-generation sequencing and DNA microarray experiments, one can perform detailed analyses of cell type-specific gene signatures as well as identify distinct transcription factors that differentially regulate these gene signatures. We have performed bioinformatics analysis of data in the public domain and experimental data from our lab to gain insight into the regulation of type I IFN gene expression. We have found that the genetic landscape of the IFNA and IFNB genes are occupied by transcription factors, such as insulators CTCF and cohesin, that negatively regulate transcription, as well as IRF5 and IRF7, that positively and distinctly regulate IFNA subtypes. A detailed understanding of the factors controlling type I IFN gene transcription will significantly aid in the identification and development of new therapeutic strategies targeting the IFN pathway in autoimmune disease.

  8. Probing strong optical fields in compact aggregates of silver nanoparticles by SERRS of protoporphyrin IX.

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    Sládkova, Magdalena; Vlcková, Blanka; Mojzes, Peter; Slouf, Miroslav; Naudin, Coralie; Le Bourdon, Gwenelle

    2006-01-01

    TEM images and measurements of SERRS (surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering) spectra as a function of the porphyrin concentrations in systems with unmodified and chloride-modified Ag nanoparticles and protoporphyrin IX (PPIX) are reported. TEM images have shown formation of compact aggregates in systems with chloride modified Ag nanoparticles, as opposed to systems with the unmodified particles constituted by isolated particles. SERRS spectra of PPIX as a function of PPIX concentration were measured and subjected to factor analysis. Two spectral components were identified and tentatively attributed to unperturbed PPIX and to Ag+ -PPIX surface species. Concentration value of the SERRS spectral detection limit of the latter species was determined to be nearly three orders of magnitude lower in the system with the compact aggregates than in the system with separated nanoparticles and achieves the value of 1 x 10(-10) M in a macrosampling Raman experiment. TEM images and SERRS-micro-Raman spectra of single compact aggregates of chloride-modified Ag nanoparticles incorporating PPIX molecules were acquired from a sample prepared by attachment of the aggregates to amine groups of derivatized, SiOx/formvar coated copper grids for TEM. The SERRS signal has shown large temporal fluctuations as well as variations from one aggregate to another. Within the signal fluctuations, a SERRS spectrum showing the characteristic bands of both SERRS spectral forms of PPIX and originating most probably from a few PPIX molecules located in hot spots in the interstices between the Ag nanoparticles, was obtained.

  9. The lower cranial nerves: IX, X, XI, XII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarrazin, J-L; Toulgoat, F; Benoudiba, F

    2013-10-01

    The lower cranial nerves innervate the pharynx and larynx by the glossopharyngeal (CN IX) and vagus (CN X) (mixed) nerves, and provide motor innervation of the muscles of the neck by the accessory nerve (CN XI) and the tongue by the hypoglossal nerve (CN XII). The symptomatology provoked by an anomaly is often discrete and rarely in the forefront. As with all cranial nerves, the context and clinical examinations, in case of suspicion of impairment of the lower cranial nerves, are determinant in guiding the imaging. In fact, the impairment may be located in the brain stem, in the peribulbar cisterns, in the foramens or even in the deep spaces of the face. The clinical localization of the probable seat of the lesion helps in choosing the adapted protocol in MRI and eventually completes it with a CT-scan. In the bulb, the intra-axial pathology is dominated by brain ischemia (in particular, with Wallenberg syndrome) and multiple sclerosis. Cisternal pathology is tumoral with two tumors, schwannoma and meningioma. The occurrence is much lower than in the cochleovestibular nerves as well as the leptomeningeal nerves (infectious, inflammatory or tumoral). Finally, foramen pathology is tumoral with, outside of the usual schwannomas and meningiomas, paragangliomas. For radiologists, fairly hesitant to explore these lower cranial pairs, it is necessary to be familiar with (or relearn) the anatomy, master the exploratory technique and be aware of the diagnostic possibilities. Copyright © 2013 Éditions françaises de radiologie. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Auxin signal transcription factor regulates expression of the brassinosteroid receptor gene in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Tomoaki; Morinaka, Yoichi; Inukai, Yoshiaki; Kitano, Hidemi; Fujioka, Shozo

    2013-02-01

    The phytohormones auxins and brassinosteroids are both essential regulators of physiological and developmental processes, and it has been suggested that they act inter-dependently and synergistically. In rice (Oryza sativa), auxin co-application improves the brassinosteroid response in the rice lamina inclination bioassay. Here, we showed that auxins stimulate brassinosteroid perception by regulating the level of brassinosteroid receptor. Auxin treatment increased expression of the rice brassinosteroid receptor gene OsBRI1. The promoter of OsBRI1 contains an auxin-response element (AuxRE) that is targeted by auxin-response factor (ARF) transcription factors. An AuxRE mutation abolished the induction of OsBRI1 expression by auxins, and OsBRI1 expression was down-regulated in an arf mutant. The AuxRE motif in the OsBRI1 promoter, and thus the transient up-regulation of OsBRI1 expression caused by treatment with indole-3-acetic acid, is essential for the indole-3-acetic acid-induced increase in sensitivity to brassinosteroids. These findings demonstrate that some ARFs control the degree of brassinosteroid perception required for normal growth and development in rice. Although multi-level interactions between auxins and brassinosteroids have previously been reported, our findings suggest a mechanism by which auxins control cellular sensitivity to brassinosteroids, and further support the notion that interactions between auxins and brassinosteroids are extensive and complex. © 2012 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. Transcription factor organic cation transporter 1 (OCT-1 affects the expression of porcine Klotho (KL gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Li

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Klotho (KL, originally discovered as an aging suppressor, is a membrane protein that shares sequence similarity with the β-glucosidase enzymes. Recent reports showed Klotho might play a role in adipocyte maturation and systemic glucose metabolism. However, little is known about the transcription factors involved in regulating the expression of porcine KL gene. Deletion fragment analysis identified KL-D2 (−418 bp to −3 bp as the porcine KL core promoter. MARC0022311SNP (A or G in KL intron 1 was detected in Landrace × DIV pigs using the Porcine SNP60 BeadChip. The pGL-D2-A and pGL-D2-G were constructed with KL-D2 and the intron fragment of different alleles and relative luciferase activity of pGL3-D2-G was significantly higher than that of pGL3-D2-A in the PK cells and ST cells. This was possibly the result of a change in KL binding ability with transcription factor organic cation transporter 1 (OCT-1, which was confirmed using electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA and chromatin immune-precipitation (ChIP. Moreover, OCT-1 regulated endogenous KL expression by RNA interference experiments. Our study indicates SNP MARC0022311 affects porcine KL expression by regulating its promoter activity via OCT-1.

  12. Hessian regularization based symmetric nonnegative matrix factorization for clustering gene expression and microbiome data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yuanyuan; Hu, Xiaohua; He, Tingting; Jiang, Xingpeng

    2016-12-01

    Nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF) has received considerable attention due to its interpretation of observed samples as combinations of different components, and has been successfully used as a clustering method. As an extension of NMF, Symmetric NMF (SNMF) inherits the advantages of NMF. Unlike NMF, however, SNMF takes a nonnegative similarity matrix as an input, and two lower rank nonnegative matrices (H, H T ) are computed as an output to approximate the original similarity matrix. Laplacian regularization has improved the clustering performance of NMF and SNMF. However, Laplacian regularization (LR), as a classic manifold regularization method, suffers some problems because of its weak extrapolating ability. In this paper, we propose a novel variant of SNMF, called Hessian regularization based symmetric nonnegative matrix factorization (HSNMF), for this purpose. In contrast to Laplacian regularization, Hessian regularization fits the data perfectly and extrapolates nicely to unseen data. We conduct extensive experiments on several datasets including text data, gene expression data and HMP (Human Microbiome Project) data. The results show that the proposed method outperforms other methods, which suggests the potential application of HSNMF in biological data clustering. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Effects of dietary intake and genetic factors on hypermethylation of the hMLH1 gene promoter in gastric cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nan, Hong-Mei; Song, Young-Jin; Yun, Hyo-Yung; Park, Joo-Seung; Kim, Heon

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Hypermethylation of the promoter of the hMLH1 gene, which plays an important role in mismatch repair during DNA replication, occurs in more than 30% of human gastric cancer tissues. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of environmental factors, genetic polymorphisms of major metabolic enzymes, and microsatellite instability on hypermethylation of the promoter of the hMLH1 gene in gastric cancer. METHODS: Data were obtained from a hospital-based, case-control study of gastric cancer. One hundred and ten gastric cancer patients and 220 age- and sex-matched control patients completed a structured questionnaire regarding their exposure to environmental risk factors. Hypermethylation of the hMLH1 gene promoter, polymorphisms of the GSTM1, GSTT1, CYP1A1, CYP2E1, ALDH2 and L-myc genes, microsatellite instability and mutations of p53 and Ki-ras genes were investigated. RESULTS: Both smoking and alcohol consumption were associated with a higher risk of gastric cancer with hypermethylation of the hMLH1 gene promoter. High intake of vegetables and low intake of potato were associated with increased likelihood of gastric cancer with hypermethylation of the hMLH1 gene promoter. Genetic polymorphisms of the GSTM1, GSTT1, CYP1A1, CYP2E1, ALDH2, and L-myc genes were not significantly associated with the risk of gastric cancer either with or without hypermethylation in the promoter of the hMLH1 gene. Hypermethylation of the hMLH1 promoter was significantly associated with microsatellite instability (MSI): 10 of the 14 (71.4%) MSI-positive tumors showed hypermethylation, whereas 28 of 94 (29.8%) the MSI-negative tumors were hypermethylated at the hMLH1 promoter region. Hypermethylation of the hMLH1 gene promoter was significantly inversely correlated with mutation of the p53 gene. CONCLUSION: These results suggest that cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption may influence the development of hMLH1-positive gastric cancer. Most dietary factors and

  14. Molecular cloning and expression of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae RFC3 gene, an essential component of replication factor C.

    OpenAIRE

    Li, X; Burgers, P M

    1994-01-01

    Yeast replication factor C (RF-C) is a multi-polypeptide complex required for processive DNA replication by DNA polymerases delta and epsilon. The gene encoding the 40-kDa subunit of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae RF-C (RFC3) has been cloned. The RFC3 gene is required for yeast cell growth and has been mapped to the left arm of chromosome XIV. The deduced amino acid sequence of the RFC3 gene shows a high homology to the 36-, 37-, and 40-kDa subunits of human RF-C (also called activator 1), with...

  15. Estrogen induced concentration dependent differential gene expression in human breast cancer (MCF7) cells: Role of transcription factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandrasekharan, Sabarinath, E-mail: csab@bio.psgtech.ac.in [Department of Biotechnology, PSG College of Technology, Coimbatore 641004 (India); Kandasamy, Krishna Kumar [Max Planck Institute for Biology of Ageing, Cologne (Germany); Dayalan, Pavithra; Ramamurthy, Viraragavan [Department of Biotechnology, PSG College of Technology, Coimbatore 641004 (India)

    2013-08-02

    Highlights: •Estradiol (E2) at low dose induced cell proliferation in breast cancer cells. •E2 at high concentration induced cell stress in breast cancer cells. •Estrogen receptor physically interacts only with a few transcription factors. •Differential expression of genes with Oct-1 binding sites increased under stress. •Transcription factor binding sites showed distinct spatial distribution on genes. -- Abstract: Background: Breast cancer cells respond to estrogen in a concentration dependent fashion, resulting in proliferation or apoptosis. The mechanism of this concentration dependent differential outcome is not well understood yet. Methodology: Meta-analysis of the expression data of MCF7 cells treated with low (1 nM) or high (100 nM) dose of estradiol (E2) was performed. We identified genes differentially expressed at the low or the high dose, and examined the nature of regulatory elements in the vicinity of these genes. Specifically, we looked for the difference in the presence, abundance and spatial distribution of binding sites for estrogen receptor (ER) and selected transcription factors (TFs) in the genomic region up to 25 kb upstream and downstream from the transcription start site (TSS) of these genes. Results: It was observed that at high dose E2 induced the expression of stress responsive genes, while at low dose, genes involved in cell cycle were induced. We found that the occurrence of transcription factor binding regions (TFBRs) for certain factors such as Sp1 and SREBP1 were higher on regulatory regions of genes expressed at low dose. At high concentration of E2, genes with a higher frequency of Oct-1 binding regions were predominantly involved. In addition, there were differences in the spatial distribution pattern of the TFBRs in the genomic regions among the two sets of genes. Discussion: E2 induced predominantly proliferative/metabolic response at low concentrations; but at high concentration, stress–rescue responses were induced

  16. Estrogen induced concentration dependent differential gene expression in human breast cancer (MCF7) cells: Role of transcription factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandrasekharan, Sabarinath; Kandasamy, Krishna Kumar; Dayalan, Pavithra; Ramamurthy, Viraragavan

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Estradiol (E2) at low dose induced cell proliferation in breast cancer cells. •E2 at high concentration induced cell stress in breast cancer cells. •Estrogen receptor physically interacts only with a few transcription factors. •Differential expression of genes with Oct-1 binding sites increased under stress. •Transcription factor binding sites showed distinct spatial distribution on genes. -- Abstract: Background: Breast cancer cells respond to estrogen in a concentration dependent fashion, resulting in proliferation or apoptosis. The mechanism of this concentration dependent differential outcome is not well understood yet. Methodology: Meta-analysis of the expression data of MCF7 cells treated with low (1 nM) or high (100 nM) dose of estradiol (E2) was performed. We identified genes differentially expressed at the low or the high dose, and examined the nature of regulatory elements in the vicinity of these genes. Specifically, we looked for the difference in the presence, abundance and spatial distribution of binding sites for estrogen receptor (ER) and selected transcription factors (TFs) in the genomic region up to 25 kb upstream and downstream from the transcription start site (TSS) of these genes. Results: It was observed that at high dose E2 induced the expression of stress responsive genes, while at low dose, genes involved in cell cycle were induced. We found that the occurrence of transcription factor binding regions (TFBRs) for certain factors such as Sp1 and SREBP1 were higher on regulatory regions of genes expressed at low dose. At high concentration of E2, genes with a higher frequency of Oct-1 binding regions were predominantly involved. In addition, there were differences in the spatial distribution pattern of the TFBRs in the genomic regions among the two sets of genes. Discussion: E2 induced predominantly proliferative/metabolic response at low concentrations; but at high concentration, stress–rescue responses were induced

  17. Identification of the Drosophila eIF4A gene as a target of the DREF transcription factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ida, Hiroyuki; Yoshida, Hideki; Nakamura, Kumi; Yamaguchi, Masamitsu

    2007-01-01

    The DNA replication-related element-binding factor (DREF) regulates cell proliferation-related gene expression in Drosophila. We have carried out a genetic screening, taking advantage of the rough eye phenotype of transgenic flies that express full-length DREF in the eye imaginal discs and identified the eukaryotic initiation factor 4A (eIF4A) gene as a dominant suppressor of the DREF-induced rough eye phenotype. The eIF4A gene was here found to carry three DRE sequences, DRE1 (- 40 to - 47), DRE2 (- 48 to - 55), and DRE3 (- 267 to - 274) in its promoter region, these all being important for the eIF4A gene promoter activity in cultured Drosophila Kc cells and in living flies. Knockdown of DREF in Drosophila S2 cells decreased the eIF4A mRNA level and the eIF4A gene promoter activity. Furthermore, specific binding of DREF to genomic regions containing DRE sequences was demonstrated by chromatin immunoprecipitation assays using anti-DREF antibodies. Band mobility shift assays using Kc cell nuclear extracts revealed that DREF could bind to DRE1 and DRE3 sequences in the eIF4A gene promoter in vitro, but not to the DRE2 sequence. The results suggest that the eIF4A gene is under the control of the DREF pathway and DREF is therefore involved in the regulation of protein synthesis

  18. Glycoprotein Ib and glycoprotein IX in human platelets are acylated with palmitic acid through thioester linkages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muszbek, L.; Laposata, M.

    1989-01-01

    The glycoprotein (GP) Ib-IX complex is a major component of the platelet membrane which mediates adhesion of platelets to exposed subendothelium. GP Ib is a heterodimer with a large alpha chain (Mr = 135,000-145,000) and small beta chain (Mr = 22,000-27,000) linked by a disulfide bond(s). GP Ib is bound in a noncovalent 1:1 complex with GP IX (Mr = 17,000-22,000). We labeled isolated human platelets with [3H] palmitate or surface-labeled platelet membrane glycoproteins with sodium periodate-[3H]sodium borohydride and immunoprecipitated the GP Ib-IX complex from radiolabeled platelet lysates using a mouse monoclonal antibody (SZ.1) which recognizes the intact complex. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and fluorography of immunoprecipitates from [3H]palmitate-labeled platelets revealed two radiolabeled bands under reducing conditions at 24 and 19 kDa and two bands under nonreducing conditions at 170 and 19 kDa. As demonstrated by the parallel analysis of immunoprecipitates from periodate-[3H]sodium borohydride-labeled platelets, the [3H]palmitate-labeled bands obtained under reducing conditions corresponded to GP Ib beta and GP IX and the ones obtained under nonreducing conditions to intact GP Ib and GP IX, respectively. Using alkaline methanolysis followed by high pressure liquid chromatography analysis of the methanolysis products, we demonstrated that the radioactivity associated with the GP Ib-IX complex from [3H]palmitate-labeled platelets was, in fact, covalently bound [3H]palmitate in ester linkage to protein. The protein-fatty acid linkage was also disrupted by hydroxylamine at neutral pH. Thus, this study demonstrates that GP Ib beta and GP IX in human platelets are both fatty acid-acylated with palmitate through thioester linkages

  19. A new peptide ligand for targeting human carbonic anhydrase IX, identified through the phage display technology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasileios Askoxylakis

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX is a transmembrane enzyme found to be overexpressed in various tumors and associated with tumor hypoxia. Ligands binding this target may be used to visualize hypoxia, tumor manifestation or treat tumors by endoradiotherapy.Phage display was performed with a 12 amino acid phage display library by panning against a recombinant extracellular domain of human carbonic anhydrase IX. The identified peptide CaIX-P1 was chemically synthesized and tested in vitro on various cell lines and in vivo in Balb/c nu/nu mice carrying subcutaneously transplanted tumors. Binding, kinetic and competition studies were performed on the CAIX positive human renal cell carcinoma cell line SKRC 52, the CAIX negative human renal cell carcinoma cell line CaKi 2, the human colorectal carcinoma cell line HCT 116 and on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC. Organ distribution studies were carried out in mice, carrying SKRC 52 tumors. RNA expression of CAIX in HCT 116 and HUVEC cells was investigated by quantitative real time PCR.In vitro binding experiments of (125I-labeled-CaIX-P1 revealed an increased uptake of the radioligand in the CAIX positive renal cell carcinoma cell line SKRC 52. Binding of the radioligand in the colorectal carcinoma cell line HCT 116 increased with increasing cell density and correlated with the mRNA expression of CAIX. Radioligand uptake was inhibited up to 90% by the unlabeled CaIX-P1 peptide, but not by the negative control peptide octreotide at the same concentration. No binding was demonstrated in CAIX negative CaKi 2 and HUVEC cells. Organ distribution studies revealed a higher accumulation in SKRC 52 tumors than in heart, spleen, liver, muscle, intestinum and brain, but a lower uptake compared to blood and kidney.These data indicate that CaIX-P1 is a promising candidate for the development of new ligands targeting human carbonic anhydrase IX.

  20. Assessment of the inflammatory factor as well as invasion and apoptosis gene expression in endometriosis model rats after mifepristone intervention

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    Yan Xu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the effect of mifepristone intervention on the inflammatory factor as well as invasion and apoptosis gene expression in endometriosis lesions of endometriosis model rats. Method: SD female rats were selected as experimental animals, divided into model group (EMs group and mifepristone group (RU486 group and made into endometriosis models, then the EMs group received saline intervention and RU486 group received 2.6 mg/kg/d RU486 intervention. 4 weeks after intervention, endometriosis lesions were anatomized to determine the expression of inflammatory factors (COX-2, PGE2, TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6, invasion genes (OPN, MMP2, MMP9, uPA and S100A6 as well as apoptosis genes (Bcl-2, Livin, Smac and PTEN. Results: COX-2, PGE2, TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, OPN, MMP2, MMP9, uPA, S100A6, Bcl-2 and Livin protein expression in endometriosis lesions of Ru486 group were significantly lower than those of EMs group while Smac and PTEN protein expression were higher than those of EMs group. Conclusion: Mifepristone for endometriosis model rats can inhibit the expression of inflammatory factors, invasion genes and anti-apoptosis genes, and increase the expression of pro-apoptosis genes.

  1. Catalase overexpression prevents nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 stimulation of renal angiotensinogen gene expression, hypertension, and kidney injury in diabetic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdo, Shaaban; Shi, Yixuan; Otoukesh, Abouzar; Ghosh, Anindya; Lo, Chao-Sheng; Chenier, Isabelle; Filep, Janos G; Ingelfinger, Julie R; Zhang, Shao Ling; Chan, John S D

    2014-10-01

    This study investigated the impact of catalase (Cat) overexpression in renal proximal tubule cells (RPTCs) on nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) stimulation of angiotensinogen (Agt) gene expression and the development of hypertension and renal injury in diabetic Akita transgenic mice. Additionally, adult male mice were treated with the Nrf2 activator oltipraz with or without the inhibitor trigonelline. Rat RPTCs, stably transfected with plasmid containing either rat Agt or Nrf2 gene promoter, were also studied. Cat overexpression normalized systolic BP, attenuated renal injury, and inhibited RPTC Nrf2, Agt, and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) gene expression in Akita Cat transgenic mice compared with Akita mice. In vitro, high glucose level, hydrogen peroxide, and oltipraz stimulated Nrf2 and Agt gene expression; these changes were blocked by trigonelline, small interfering RNAs of Nrf2, antioxidants, or pharmacological inhibitors of nuclear factor-κB and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase. The deletion of Nrf2-responsive elements in the rat Agt gene promoter abolished the stimulatory effect of oltipraz. Oltipraz administration also augmented Agt, HO-1, and Nrf2 gene expression in mouse RPTCs and was reversed by trigonelline. These data identify a novel mechanism, Nrf2-mediated stimulation of intrarenal Agt gene expression and activation of the renin-angiotensin system, by which hyperglycemia induces hypertension and renal injury in diabetic mice. © 2014 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  2. Cloning and functional characterization of the gene encoding the transcription factor Acel in the basidiomycete Phanerochaete chrysosporium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RUBÉN POLANCO

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In this report we describe the isolation and characterization of a gene encoding the transcription factor Acel (Activation protein of cup 1 Expression in the white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium. Pc-acel encodes a predicted protein of 633 amino acids containing the copper-fist DNA binding domain typically found in fungal transcription factors such as Acel, Macl and Haal from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The Pc-acel gene is localized in Scaffold 5, between coordinates 220841 and 222983. A S. cerevisiae acel null mutant strain unable to grow in high-copper medium was fully complemented by transformation with the cDNA of Pc-acel. Moreover, Northern blot hybridization studies indicated that Pc-acel cDNA restores copper inducibility of the yeast cup 1 gene, which encodes the metal-binding protein metallothionein implicated in copper resistance. To our knowledge, this is first report describing an Acel transcription factor in basidiomycetes

  3. Ciliary dyslexia candidate genes DYX1C1 and DCDC2 are regulated by Regulatory Factor X (RFX) transcription factors through X-box promoter motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tammimies, Kristiina; Bieder, Andrea; Lauter, Gilbert; Sugiaman-Trapman, Debora; Torchet, Rachel; Hokkanen, Marie-Estelle; Burghoorn, Jan; Castrén, Eero; Kere, Juha; Tapia-Páez, Isabel; Swoboda, Peter

    2016-10-01

    DYX1C1, DCDC2, and KIAA0319 are three of the most replicated dyslexia candidate genes (DCGs). Recently, these DCGs were implicated in functions at the cilium. Here, we investigate the regulation of these DCGs by Regulatory Factor X transcription factors (RFX TFs), a gene family known for transcriptionally regulating ciliary genes. We identify conserved X-box motifs in the promoter regions of DYX1C1, DCDC2, and KIAA0319 and demonstrate their functionality, as well as the ability to recruit RFX TFs using reporter gene and electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Furthermore, we uncover a complex regulation pattern between RFX1, RFX2, and RFX3 and their significant effect on modifying the endogenous expression of DYX1C1 and DCDC2 in a human retinal pigmented epithelial cell line immortalized with hTERT (hTERT-RPE1). In addition, induction of ciliogenesis increases the expression of RFX TFs and DCGs. At the protein level, we show that endogenous DYX1C1 localizes to the base of the cilium, whereas DCDC2 localizes along the entire axoneme of the cilium, thereby validating earlier localization studies using overexpression models. Our results corroborate the emerging role of DCGs in ciliary function and characterize functional noncoding elements, X-box promoter motifs, in DCG promoter regions, which thus can be targeted for mutation screening in dyslexia and ciliopathies associated with these genes.-Tammimies, K., Bieder, A., Lauter, G., Sugiaman-Trapman, D., Torchet, R., Hokkanen, M.-E., Burghoorn, J., Castrén, E., Kere, J., Tapia-Páez, I., Swoboda, P. Ciliary dyslexia candidate genes DYX1C1 and DCDC2 are regulated by Regulatory Factor (RF) X transcription factors through X-box promoter motifs. © The Author(s).

  4. Genome-wide identification and expression analysis of SBP-like transcription factor genes in Moso Bamboo (Phyllostachys edulis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Feng; Wang, Yue; Liu, Huanglong; Wu, Min; Chu, Wenyuan; Chen, Danmei; Xiang, Yan

    2017-06-27

    The SQUAMOSA promoter binding protein-like (SPL) proteins are plant-specific transcription factors (TFs) that function in a variety of developmental processes including growth, flower development, and signal transduction. SPL proteins are encoded by a gene family, and these genes have been characterized in two model grass species, Zea mays and Oryza sativa. The SPL gene family has not been well studied in moso bamboo (Phyllostachys edulis), a woody grass species. We identified 32 putative PeSPL genes in the P. edulis genome. Phylogenetic analysis arranged the PeSPL protein sequences in eight groups. Similarly, phylogenetic analysis of the SBP-like and SBP proteins from rice and maize clustered them into eight groups analogous to those from P. edulis. Furthermore, the deduced PeSPL proteins in each group contained very similar conserved sequence motifs. Our analyses indicate that the PeSPL genes experienced a large-scale duplication event ~15 million years ago (MYA), and that divergence between the PeSPL and OsSPL genes occurred 34 MYA. The stress-response expression profiles and tissue-specificity of the putative PeSPL gene promoter regions showed that SPL genes in moso bamboo have potential biological functions in stress resistance as well as in growth and development. We therefore examined PeSPL gene expression in response to different plant hormone and drought (polyethylene glycol-6000; PEG) treatments to mimic biotic and abiotic stresses. Expression of three (PeSPL10, -12, -17), six (PeSPL1, -10, -12, -17, -20, -31), and nine (PeSPL5, -8, -9, -14, -15, -19, -20, -31, -32) genes remained relatively stable after treating with salicylic acid (SA), gibberellic acid (GA), and PEG, respectively, while the expression patterns of other genes changed. In addition, analysis of tissue-specific expression of the moso bamboo SPL genes during development showed differences in their spatiotemporal expression patterns, and many were expressed at high levels in flowers and

  5. Loss of transcription factor early growth response gene 1 results in impaired endochondral bone repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reumann, Marie K; Strachna, Olga; Yagerman, Sarah; Torrecilla, Daniel; Kim, Jihye; Doty, Stephen B; Lukashova, Lyudmila; Boskey, Adele L; Mayer-Kuckuk, Philipp

    2011-10-01

    Transcription factors that play a role in ossification during development are expected to participate in postnatal fracture repair since the endochondral bone formation that occurs in embryos is recapitulated during fracture repair. However, inherent differences exist between bone development and fracture repair, including a sudden disruption of tissue integrity followed by an inflammatory response. This raises the possibility that repair-specific transcription factors participate in bone healing. Here, we assessed the consequence of loss of early growth response gene 1 (EGR-1) on endochondral bone healing because this transcription factor has been shown to modulate repair in vascularized tissues. Model fractures were created in ribs of wild type (wt) and EGR-1(-/-) mice. Differences in tissue morphology and composition between these two animal groups were followed over 28 post fracture days (PFDs). In wt mice, bone healing occurred in healing phases characteristic of endochondral bone repair. A similar healing sequence was observed in EGR-1(-/-) mice but was impaired by alterations. A persistent accumulation of fibrin between the disconnected bones was observed on PFD7 and remained pronounced in the callus on PFD14. Additionally, the PFD14 callus was abnormally enlarged and showed increased deposition of mineralized tissue. Cartilage ossification in the callus was associated with hyper-vascularity and -proliferation. Moreover, cell deposits located in proximity to the callus within skeletal muscle were detected on PFD14. Despite these impairments, repair in EGR-1(-/-) callus advanced on PFD28, suggesting EGR-1 is not essential for healing. Together, this study provides genetic evidence that EGR-1 is a pleiotropic regulator of endochondral fracture repair. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Association of genetic variants in complement factor H and factor H-related genes with systemic lupus erythematosus susceptibility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Zhao

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, a complex polygenic autoimmune disease, is associated with increased complement activation. Variants of genes encoding complement regulator factor H (CFH and five CFH-related proteins (CFHR1-CFHR5 within the chromosome 1q32 locus linked to SLE, have been associated with multiple human diseases and may contribute to dysregulated complement activation predisposing to SLE. We assessed 60 SNPs covering the CFH-CFHRs region for association with SLE in 15,864 case-control subjects derived from four ethnic groups. Significant allelic associations with SLE were detected in European Americans (EA and African Americans (AA, which could be attributed to an intronic CFH SNP (rs6677604, in intron 11, P(meta = 6.6×10(-8, OR = 1.18 and an intergenic SNP between CFHR1 and CFHR4 (rs16840639, P(meta = 2.9×10(-7, OR = 1.17 rather than to previously identified disease-associated CFH exonic SNPs, including I62V, Y402H, A474A, and D936E. In addition, allelic association of rs6677604 with SLE was subsequently confirmed in Asians (AS. Haplotype analysis revealed that the underlying causal variant, tagged by rs6677604 and rs16840639, was localized to a ~146 kb block extending from intron 9 of CFH to downstream of CFHR1. Within this block, the deletion of CFHR3 and CFHR1 (CFHR3-1Δ, a likely causal variant measured using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification, was tagged by rs6677604 in EA and AS and rs16840639 in AA, respectively. Deduced from genotypic associations of tag SNPs in EA, AA, and AS, homozygous deletion of CFHR3-1Δ (P(meta = 3.2×10(-7, OR = 1.47 conferred a higher risk of SLE than heterozygous deletion (P(meta = 3.5×10(-4, OR = 1.14. These results suggested that the CFHR3-1Δ deletion within the SLE-associated block, but not the previously described exonic SNPs of CFH, might contribute to the development of SLE in EA, AA, and AS, providing new insights into the role of

  7. Monitoring the non-radiative relaxation time of PpIX solution with Au nanoparticles using Photoacoustic Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez-Perez, J.L. [CICATA-IPN, Legaria 694, Mexico D.F. 11500 (Mexico)], E-mail: jimenezp@fis.cinvestav.mx; Cruz-Orea, A. [Departamento de Fisica, CINVESTAV-IPN, A.P. 14-740, Mexico D.F. 07360 (Mexico); Alvarado, E. Maldonado [Environment Citopathology Laboratory, Morphology Departament, Escuela Nacional de Ciencias Biologicas del IPN, Carpio y Plan de Ayala S/N, Col. Sto. Tomas, C.P. 11340, Mexico D.F. Mexico (Mexico); Ramirez, J.F. Sanchez [CICATA-IPN, Legaria 694, Mexico D.F. 11500 (Mexico); Departamento de Fisica, CINVESTAV-IPN, A.P. 14-740, Mexico D.F. 07360 (Mexico); Ramon-Gallegos, E. [Environment Citopathology Laboratory, Morphology Departament, Escuela Nacional de Ciencias Biologicas del IPN, Carpio y Plan de Ayala S/N, Col. Sto. Tomas, C.P. 11340, Mexico D.F. Mexico (Mexico); Mendoza-Alvarez, J.G. [Departamento de Fisica, CINVESTAV-IPN, A.P. 14-740, Mexico D.F. 07360 (Mexico)

    2008-11-30

    In this work we have used the Photoacoustic Spectroscopy (PAS) to determine in vitro the non-radiative relaxation time (NRRT) of a protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) standard solution and samples of PpIX(1), PpIX(2) and PpIX(3) with Au nanoparticle concentrations of 0.001008, 0.00504 and 0.01008 mmol in 25 mL of water respectively. We have used PpIX disodium salt (DS) solution of 25% HCl. The results show that the NRRT average values, obtained for each one of the solution were: {tau} = 29 {+-} 0.001, 84 {+-} 0.001 and 62 {+-} 0.009 ms for PpIX(1), PpIX(2) and PpIX(3), respectively. These values were compared with some NRRT of triplet states reported in the literature for molecules with tetrapyrrolic structure, increasing the NRRT considerably. From each solution it was obtained its PAS signal phase as a function of the light modulation frequency from 17 to 80 Hz. UV-vis spectrophotometer, photoluminescence spectroscopy and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) were used in order to obtain the optical absorption spectra, the photoluminescence intensities, and the gold nanoparticle sizes respectively. Our investigations are devoted to improve the thermal treatments of drugs the porphyrins as photosensitizers used in image photodynamic therapy.

  8. Ciliary neurotrophic factor induces genes associated with inflammation and gliosis in the retina: a gene profiling study of flow-sorted, Müller cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Xue

    Full Text Available Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF, a member of the interleukin-6 cytokine family, has been implicated in the development, differentiation and survival of retinal neurons. The mechanisms of CNTF action as well as its cellular targets in the retina are poorly understood. It has been postulated that some of the biological effects of CNTF are mediated through its action via retinal glial cells; however, molecular changes in retinal glia induced by CNTF have not been elucidated. We have, therefore, examined gene expression dynamics of purified Müller (glial cells exposed to CNTF in vivo.Müller cells were flow-sorted from mgfap-egfp transgenic mice one or three days after intravitreal injection of CNTF. Microarray analysis using RNA from purified Müller cells showed differential expression of almost 1,000 transcripts with two- to seventeen-fold change in response to CNTF. A comparison of transcriptional profiles from Müller cells at one or three days after CNTF treatment showed an increase in the number of transcribed genes as well as a change in the expression pattern. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis showed that the differentially regulated genes belong to distinct functional types such as cytokines, growth factors, G-protein coupled receptors, transporters and ion channels. Interestingly, many genes induced by CNTF were also highly expressed in reactive Müller cells from mice with inherited or experimentally induced retinal degeneration. Further analysis of gene profiles revealed 20-30% overlap in the transcription pattern among Müller cells, astrocytes and the RPE.Our studies provide novel molecular insights into biological functions of Müller glial cells in mediating cytokine response. We suggest that CNTF remodels the gene expression profile of Müller cells leading to induction of networks associated with transcription, cell cycle regulation and inflammatory response. CNTF also appears to function as an inducer of gliosis in the retina.

  9. Ciliary neurotrophic factor induces genes associated with inflammation and gliosis in the retina: a gene profiling study of flow-sorted, Müller cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Wei; Cojocaru, Radu I; Dudley, V Joseph; Brooks, Matthew; Swaroop, Anand; Sarthy, Vijay P

    2011-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF), a member of the interleukin-6 cytokine family, has been implicated in the development, differentiation and survival of retinal neurons. The mechanisms of CNTF action as well as its cellular targets in the retina are poorly understood. It has been postulated that some of the biological effects of CNTF are mediated through its action via retinal glial cells; however, molecular changes in retinal glia induced by CNTF have not been elucidated. We have, therefore, examined gene expression dynamics of purified Müller (glial) cells exposed to CNTF in vivo. Müller cells were flow-sorted from mgfap-egfp transgenic mice one or three days after intravitreal injection of CNTF. Microarray analysis using RNA from purified Müller cells showed differential expression of almost 1,000 transcripts with two- to seventeen-fold change in response to CNTF. A comparison of transcriptional profiles from Müller cells at one or three days after CNTF treatment showed an increase in the number of transcribed genes as well as a change in the expression pattern. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis showed that the differentially regulated genes belong to distinct functional types such as cytokines, growth factors, G-protein coupled receptors, transporters and ion channels. Interestingly, many genes induced by CNTF were also highly expressed in reactive Müller cells from mice with inherited or experimentally induced retinal degeneration. Further analysis of gene profiles revealed 20-30% overlap in the transcription pattern among Müller cells, astrocytes and the RPE. Our studies provide novel molecular insights into biological functions of Müller glial cells in mediating cytokine response. We suggest that CNTF remodels the gene expression profile of Müller cells leading to induction of networks associated with transcription, cell cycle regulation and inflammatory response. CNTF also appears to function as an inducer of gliosis in the retina.

  10. Evolutionary expansion and divergence in a large family of primate-specific zinc finger transcription factor genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamilton, A T; Huntley, S; Tran-Gyamfi, M; Baggott, D; Gordon, L; Stubbs, L

    2005-09-28

    Although most genes are conserved as one-to-one orthologs in different mammalian orders, certain gene families have evolved to comprise different numbers and types of protein-coding genes through independent series of gene duplications, divergence and gene loss in each evolutionary lineage. One such family encodes KRAB-zinc finger (KRAB-ZNF) genes, which are likely to function as transcriptional repressors. One KRAB-ZNF subfamily, the ZNF91 clade, has expanded specifically in primates to comprise more than 110 loci in the human genome, yielding large gene clusters in human chromosomes 19 and 7 and smaller clusters or isolated copies at other chromosomal locations. Although phylogenetic analysis indicates that many of these genes arose before the split between old world monkeys and new world monkeys, the ZNF91 subfamily has continued to expand and diversify throughout the evolution of apes and humans. The paralogous loci are distinguished by sequence divergence within their zinc finger arrays indicating a selection for proteins with different DNA binding specificities. RT-PCR and in situ hybridization data show that some of these ZNF genes can have tissue-specific expression patterns, however many KRAB-ZNFs that are near-ubiquitous could also be playing very specific roles in halting target pathways in all tissues except for a few, where the target is released by the absence of its repressor. The number of variant KRAB-ZNF proteins is increased not only because of the large number of loci, but also because many loci can produce multiple splice variants, which because of the modular structure of these genes may have separate and perhaps even conflicting regulatory roles. The lineage-specific duplication and rapid divergence of this family of transcription factor genes suggests a role in determining species-specific biological differences and the evolution of novel primate traits.

  11. Pressure load: the main factor for altered gene expression in right ventricular hypertrophy in chronic hypoxic rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas D Baandrup

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The present study investigated whether changes in gene expression in the right ventricle following pulmonary hypertension can be attributed to hypoxia or pressure loading. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To distinguish hypoxia from pressure-induced alterations, a group of rats underwent banding of the pulmonary trunk (PTB, sham operation, or the rats were exposed to normoxia or chronic, hypobaric hypoxia. Pressure measurements were performed and the right ventricle was analyzed by Affymetrix GeneChip, and selected genes were confirmed by quantitative PCR and immunoblotting. Right ventricular systolic blood pressure and right ventricle to body weight ratio were elevated in the PTB and the hypoxic rats. Expression of the same 172 genes was altered in the chronic hypoxic and PTB rats. Thus, gene expression of enzymes participating in fatty acid oxidation and the glycerol channel were downregulated. mRNA expression of aquaporin 7 was downregulated, but this was not the case for the protein expression. In contrast, monoamine oxidase A and tissue transglutaminase were upregulated both at gene and protein levels. 11 genes (e.g. insulin-like growth factor binding protein were upregulated in the PTB experiment and downregulated in the hypoxic experiment, and 3 genes (e.g. c-kit tyrosine kinase were downregulated in the PTB and upregulated in the hypoxic experiment. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Pressure load of the right ventricle induces a marked shift in the gene expression, which in case of the metabolic genes appears compensated at the protein level, while both expression of genes and proteins of importance for myocardial function and remodelling are altered by the increased pressure load of the right ventricle. These findings imply that treatment of pulmonary hypertension should also aim at reducing right ventricular pressure.

  12. Interleukin-6 Gene Promoter Polymorphisms and Cardiovascular Risk Factors. A family study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iris Paola Guzmán-Guzmán

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Interleukin-6 (IL-6 is a cytokine involved in inflammatory process, as well as in glucose and lipid metabolism. Several studies of the biological relevance of IL-6 gene polymorphisms have indicated a relationship with cardiovascular disease. The aim of this study was to assess whether the –174 G/C and –572 G/C of IL-6 gene polymorphisms are associated with cardiovascular risk factors in Mexican families. Ninety members of 30 Mexican families, in which an index case (proband had obesity, were included in the study. We evaluated the body composition by bioelectrical impedance. Peripheral blood samples were collected to determine biochemical and hematological parameters. High sensitivity C- reactive protein levels were measurement for nephelometric analysis. Screening for both polymorphisms studied was performed by PCR-RFLP. In the parents, both polymorphisms were in Hardy-Weinberg's equilibrium. The genotypes –174 GC/CC were associated with T2D (OR = 1.23, IC95% 1.01–1.5 and highest levels of hsCRP (p = 0.02, whereas genotype –572 GG was associated with T2D (OR = 1.24, IC95% 1.04–1.47 with an inflammatory state determined by the increase in the leukocyte count (OR = 1.24, IC95% 1.02–1.51. The genotypes –174 GC/CC and –572 GG may confer susceptibility for the development of subclinical inflammation and type 2 diabetes in Mexican families.

  13. Expression profiling of AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR genes during somatic embryogenesis induction in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wójcikowska, Barbara; Gaj, Małgorzata D

    2017-06-01

    Extensive modulation of numerous ARF transcripts in the embryogenic culture of Arabidopsis indicates a substantial role of auxin signaling in the mechanism of somatic embryogenesis induction. Somatic embryogenesis (SE) is induced by auxin in plants and auxin signaling is considered to play a key role in the molecular mechanism that controls the embryogenic transition of plant somatic cells. Accordingly, the expression of AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR (ARF) genes in embryogenic culture of Arabidopsis was analyzed. The study revealed that 14 of the 22 ARFs were transcribed during SE in Arabidopsis. RT-qPCR analysis indicated that the expression of six ARFs (ARF5, ARF6, ARF8, ARF10, ARF16, and ARF17) was significantly up-regulated, whereas five other genes (ARF1, ARF2, ARF3, ARF11, and ARF18) were substantially down-regulated in the SE-induced explants. The activity of ARFs during SE was also monitored with GFP reporter lines and the ARFs that were expressed in areas of the explants engaged in SE induction were detected. A functional test of ARFs transcribed during SE was performed and the embryogenic potential of the arf mutants and overexpressor lines was evaluated. ARFs with a significantly modulated expression during SE coupled with an impaired embryogenic response of the relevant mutant and/or overexpressor line, including ARF1, ARF2, ARF3, ARF5, ARF6, ARF8, and ARF11 were indicated as possibly being involved in SE induction. The study provides evidence that embryogenic induction strongly depends on ARFs, which are key regulators of the auxin signaling. Some clues on the possible functions of the candidate ARFs, especially ARF5, in the mechanism of embryogenic transition are discussed. The results provide guidelines for further research on the auxin-related functional genomics of SE and the developmental plasticity of somatic cells.

  14. Orofacial clefts, parental cigarette smoking, and transforming growth factor-alpha gene variants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaw, G.M.; Wasserman, C.R.; O`Malley, C.D. [California Birth Defects Monitoring Program, Emeryville, CA (United States)] [and others

    1996-03-01

    Results of studies determine whether women who smoke during early pregnancy are at increased risk of delivering infants with orofacial clefts have been mixed, and recently a gene-environment interaction between maternal smoking, transforming growth factor-alpha (TGFa), and clefting has been reported. Using a large population-based case-control study, we investigated whether parental periconceptional cigarette smoking was associated with an increased risk for having offspring with orofacial clefts. We also investigated the influence of genetic variation of the TGFa locus on the relation between smoking and clefting. Parental smoking information was obtained from telephone interviews with mothers of 731 (84.7% of eligible) orofacial cleft case infants and with mothers of 734 (78.2%) nonmalformed control infants. DNA was obtained from newborn screening blood spots and genotyped for the allelic variants of TGFa. We found that risks associated with maternal smoking were most elevated for isolated cleft lip with or without cleft palate, (odds ratio 2.1 [95% confidence interval 1.3-3.6]) and for isolated cleft palate (odds ratio 2.2 [1.1-4.5]) when mothers smoked {ge} 20 cigarrettes/d. These risks for white infants ranged from 3-fold to 11-fold across phenotypic groups. Paternal smoking was not associated with clefting among the offspring of nonsmoking mothers, and passive smoke exposures were associated with at most slightly increased risks. This study offers evidence that the risk for orofacial clefting in infants may be influenced by maternal smoke exposures alone as well as in combination (gene-environment interaction) with the presence of the uncommon TGFa allele. 56 refs., 5 tabs.

  15. MNS16A tandem repeats minisatellite of human telomerase gene: a risk factor for colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofer, Philipp; Baierl, Andreas; Feik, Elisabeth; Führlinger, Gerhard; Leeb, Gernot; Mach, Karl; Holzmann, Klaus; Micksche, Michael; Gsur, Andrea

    2011-06-01

    Telomerase reactivation and expression of human telomerase gene [human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT)] are hallmarks of unlimited proliferation potential of cancer cells. A polymorphic tandem repeats minisatellite of hTERT gene, termed MNS16A was reported to influence hTERT expression. To assess the role of MNS16A as potential biomarker for colorectal cancer (CRC), we investigated for the first time the association of MNS16A genotypes with risk of colorectal polyps and CRC. In the ongoing colorectal cancer study of Austria (CORSA), 3842 Caucasian participants were recruited within a large screening project in the province Burgenland including 90 CRC cases, 308 high-risk polyps, 1022 low-risk polyps and 1822 polyp free controls verified by colonoscopy. MNS16A genotypes were determined by polymerase chain reaction from genomic DNA. Associations of MNS16A genotypes with CRC risk were estimated by logistic regression analysis computing odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). We identified five different variable number of tandem repeats (VNTRs) of MNS16A including VNTR-364, a newly discovered rare variant. VNTR-274 allele was associated with a 2.7-fold significantly increased risk of CRC compared with the VNTR-302 wild-type (OR = 2.69; 95% CI = 1.11-6.50; P = 0.028). In our CORSA study, the medium length VNTR-274 was identified as risk factor for CRC. Although, this population-based study herewith reports the largest cohort size concerning MNS16A thus far, further large-scale studies in diverse populations are warranted to confirm hTERT MNS16A genotype as potential biomarker for assessment of CRC risk.

  16. Specific interactions between transcription factors and the promoter-regulatory region of the human cytomegalovirus major immediate-early gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghazal, P.; Lubon, H.; Hennighausen, L.

    1988-01-01

    Repeat sequence motifs as well as unique sequences between nucleotides -150 and -22 of the human cytomegalovirus immediate-early 1 gene interact in vitro with nuclear proteins. The authors show that a transcription