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Sample records for factor infertility due

  1. Comparison of Levels of Antibodies against Chlamydia Trachomatis in Infertile Women Due to Tubal Factors and Fertile Women

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    F Ghalmbor

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Chlamydia trachomatis infection is a common pathogen in sexual transmitted disease, but most of female patients with this infection are asymptomatic. Sequealae include pelvic inflammatory disease, infertility and ectopic pregnancy. The aim of the study was to determine the association between Chlamydia trachomatis and tubal factor infertility, if significant. Methods: This prospective, case -control study was done in April 2005-April2006. The study group consisted of 125 patients with tubal factor infertility and the control group included 125 fertile women. The level of antibodies to Chlamydia trachomatis was determined in both groups by ELIZA method. Results: Antibody to Chlamydia trachomatis was present in 29 women in the study group (23.2% and in15 women in the control group ( 12%, respectively, (P< 0.005. The mean level of antibody in both groups was 0.76 and 0.49, respectively (P<0.0005. Conclusion: The study showed that the level of antibody against Chlamydia is significantly more in tubal factor infertile women. We therefore suggest the screening of Chlamydia antibody testing is necessary for tubal factor infertility workup.

  2. Infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... MALE INFERTILITY Male infertility may be due to: Decreased number of sperm Blockage that prevents the sperm ... from woman to woman. Infertility problems and miscarriage rates increase ... a successful pregnancy if childbearing is delayed until after age 35. ...

  3. Psychological Factors Affecting Infertile Women

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    Sati Unal

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available AIM: This study was performed to determine the psychological factors affecting infertile women presenting at the infertility outpatients department. METHOD: The sample of this cross-sectional study consisted of 344 women who presented at the IVF center of a special branch hospital or a university hospital, March 2008 through September 2008, as determined by the non-random sampling method. All participating women gave their informed consent. The data were collected using the Data Form that consisted of questions on socio-demographic features and the Infertility Distress Scale (IDS. In the results, percentages were provided along with the Kruskal-Wallis H, Mann-Whitney U and Spearman correlation tests. RESULTS: The mean IDS was 39.01±9.6. There was a statistically significant linear relationship between the mean IDS score and age (r=0.106, p=0.048, marriage duration (r=0.232, p<0.001 and duration of desire to have a child (r=0.217, p<0.001. Women who were primary school graduates (X²=13.03, p=0.004, did not work (p=0.007, had no social security benefits (p=0.021 or from low socioeconomic status (X²=24.85, p<0.001 had significantly higher mean IDS scores. CONCLUSION: The results of this study show women become more adversely affected by infertility as their age, duration of marriage, and duration of desire to have a child increase. Women who are primary school graduates, do not work, have no social security benefits or have lower income are affected more negatively. We believe that taking these features into account when evaluating and planning supportive approaches for women presenting at the infertility treatment center and determining the psychological state of the women using the IDS will increase treatment success. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2010; 9(5.000: 481-486

  4. Male factor infertility and ART

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Herman Tournaye

    2012-01-01

    For years,the management and treatment of male factor infertility has been ‘experience’ and not ‘evidence’ based.Although not evidence-based,current clinical practice involves extensive use of assisted reproductive techniques (ART).Where specific treatments are not indicated or have failed,ART have become popular adjunctive treatments for alleviating male factor infertility.According to the limited evidence available,intrauterine insemination (IUI) may be considered as a first-line treatment in a couple in which the female partner has a normal fertility status and at least 1x 106 progressively motile spermatozoa are recovered after sperm preparation.If no pregnancy is achieved after 3-6 cycles of IUI,optimized in vitro fertilization (IVF) can be proposed.When less than 0.5x 106 progressively motile spermatozoa are obtained after seminal fluid processing or sperm are recovered surgically from the testis or epididymis,intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) should be performed.Although the outcome of no other ART has ever been scrutinized as much before,no large-scale ‘macroproblems’ have as yet been observed after ICSI.Yet,ICSI candidates should be rigorously screened before embarking on IVF or ICSI,and thoroughly informed of the limitations of our knowledge on the hereditary aspects of male infertility and the safety aspects of ART.

  5. [Risk factors associated to female infertility].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero Ramos, Ricardo; Romero Gutiérrez, Gustavo; Abortes Monroy, Ignacio; Medina Sánchez, Héctor Gerardo

    2008-12-01

    Incidence of female infertility is growing worldwide and the its rate varies from 10 to 20%. It has been reported diverse risk factors associated with this medical complication. To identify the risk factors with significant association with female infertility. A case-control study was carried out. There were included 440 patients, divided into 220 women with primary or secondary female infertility (cases) and 220 women without infertility recruited at mediate postpartum (controls). Twenty sociodemographic and clinical risk factors for female infertility were analyzed. Statistical analysis was performed with percentages, arithmetic media, standard error, Student t test and chi squared. An alpha value was set at 0.05. There were 6 factors with statistical significance: advanced age (p < 0.001), elevated body mass index (p < 0.001), age of onset of sexual activity (p < 0.001), prior pelvic surgeries (p < 0.001), and presence of stress (p < 0.001). Other risk factors such as smoking, chemical and radiological treatments, pelvic inflammatory disease, exercise, contraceptive use, alcohol intake, drugs, coffee, solvents, glue and insecticides, were not significant. There are clinical and demographic risk factors associated with female infertility. Them identification in women at reproductive age could diminish the frequency of female infertility and, thus, avoid them consequences.

  6. Infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose-Miller, Alaina B; Boyden, Jennifer W; Frey, Keith A

    2007-03-15

    Infertility is defined as failure to achieve pregnancy during one year of frequent, unprotected intercourse. Evaluation generally begins after 12 months, but it can be initiated earlier if infertility is suspected based on history or if the female partner is older than 35 years. Major causes of infertility include male factors, ovarian dysfunction, tubal disease, endometriosis, and uterine or cervical factors. A careful history and physical examination of each partner can suggest a single or multifactorial etiology and can direct further investigation. Ovulation can be documented with a home urinary luteinizing hormone kit. Hysterosalpingography and pelvic ultrasonography can be used to screen for uterine and fallopian tube disease. Hysteroscopy and/or laparoscopy can be used if no abnormalities are found on initial screening. Women older than 35 years also may benefit from ovarian reserve testing of follicle-stimulating hormone and estradiol levels on day 3 of the menstrual cycle, the clomiphene citrate challenge test, or pelvic ultrasonography for antral follicle count to determine treatment options and the likelihood of success. Options for the treatment of male factor infertility include gonadotropin therapy, intrauterine insemination, or in vitro fertilization. Infertility attributed to ovulatory dysfunction often can be treated with oral ovulation-inducing agents in a primary care setting. Women with poor ovarian reserve have more success with oocyte donation. In certain cases, tubal disease may be treatable by surgical repair or by in vitro fertilization. Infertility attributed to endometriosis may be amenable to surgery, induction of ovulation with intrauterine insemination, or in vitro fertilization. Unexplained infertility may be managed with ovulation induction, intrauterine insemination, or both. The overall likelihood of successful pregnancy with treatment is nearly 50 percent.

  7. Diagnostic Testing for Male Factor Infertility

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    ... Home FAQs Frequently Asked Questions Quick Facts About Infertility FAQs About Infertility FAQs About the Psychological Component of Infertility FAQs About Cloning and Stem Cell Research SART's ...

  8. Infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infertility means not being able to become pregnant after a year of trying. If a woman can ... keeps having miscarriages or stillbirths, that's also called infertility. Infertility is fairly common. After one year of ...

  9. EVIDENCE BASED INCIDENCE OF TUBAL FACTOR IN SECONDARY INFERTILITY AS DETECTED BY HYSTEROSALPINGOGRAPHY IN WESTERN MAHARASHTRA

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    Anil

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND It is documented that 15% of all women experience primary or secondary infertility at one point in time in their reproductive life. Tubal causes of infertility account for 35 to 40% of causes of infertility. HSG is still a commonly used investigation in the evaluation of the female genital tract and the main indication for the HSG is infertility. AIMS  To find out incidence of tubal factor in secondary infertility in Western Maharashtra population.  To establish reliability of Hysterosalpingography in evaluating tubal status. MATERIALS AND METHOD A retrospective study of 464 hysterosalpingographies of women having secondary infertility was done over period of two years. The patients having tubal defects were further studied and statistically analysed. Statistical analysis was performed with the SPSS computer software, version 17.0. Results were presented in tables and graphs. RESULTS  Hysterosalpingography has proved to be an ideal (or ‘gold standard’ test to detect tubal abnormalities in infertile women.  The commonest structural cause of infertility in Western Maharashtra as per this study was bilateral tubal blockage and was commoner in patients with secondary infertility. CONCLUSIONS Evaluation of tubal patency and tubal integrity is a key component of the diagnostic work-up in infertile couples. In conclusion, bilateral tubal occlusion remains the major tubal pathology in female infertility in Western Maharashtra. Tubal blockages with subsequent tubal factor infertility are still common among infertile couples. This may probably be due to chronic pelvic inflammatory disease or pelvic infection following sexually transmitted infections, mismanaged pregnancies and septic abortions, since the majority of the women presented with secondary infertility. Measures to prevent the occurrence of these infections should be paramount.

  10. Risk factors for secondary infertility among women in Karachi, Pakistan.

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    Neelofar Sami

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Secondary infertility in developing countries is mostly attributable to blockage of the fallopian tubes due to adhesions caused by reproductive tract infections. There is a dearth of information on the prevalence and causes of secondary infertility from Pakistan. This paper presents results on factors associated with secondary infertility among married women in Karachi, Pakistan. METHODS: A matched case-control study was conducted. Cases were women aged 15-35 years with history of at least one previous conception and currently seeking treatment for secondary infertility. Controls were women residing in the neighborhood of cases with at least one live birth and not taking treatment for secondary infertility. The age of controls was matched by ±5 years to that of cases. Data was collected from June to August 2003. Conditional logistic regression was used to determine crude and adjusted odds ratios (OR with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI for factors associated with secondary infertility. RESULTS: The final multivariate logistic regression model revealed that after adjusting for age, cases were more likely to be the housewives (AOR = 2.6, 95% CI:1.5-4.4, had used inappropriate material to absorb blood during menstruation (AOR = 9.0, 95% CI: 5.0-16.4, and at their last delivery, had a birth attendant who did not wash hands with soap and water (AOR = 3.0, 95% CI: 1.4-5.7. Moreover, women with secondary infertility were more likely to report current or past history of having STI symptoms (AOR = 3.6, 95% CI: 2.4-5.6 and use of intra-vaginal indigenous medicines during their last post-partum period (AOR = 3.1, 95% CI: 1.6-5.7. CONCLUSION: We recommend health education and awareness messages for safe practices during menstruation, delivery, and the postpartum period for women in general. Additionally, sanitary napkins should be made available at an affordable cost, and safe delivery kits should contain

  11. Genetic risk factors in infertile men with severe oligozoospermia and azoospermia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.R. Dohle (Gert); D.J.J. Halley (Dicky); J.O. van Hemel; A.M. van den Ouwel; M.H. Pieters; R.F.A. Weber (Robert); L.C. Govaerts (Lutgarde)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: Male infertility due to severe oligozoospermia and azoospermia has been associated with a number of genetic risk factors. METHODS: In this study 150 men from couples requesting ICSI were investigated for genetic abnormalities, such as constitutive chromosome

  12. Genetic risk factors in infertile men with severe oligozoospermia and azoospermia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.R. Dohle (Gert); D.J.J. Halley (Dicky); J.O. van Hemel; A.M. van den Ouwel; M.H. Pieters; R.F.A. Weber (Robert); L.C. Govaerts (Lutgarde)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: Male infertility due to severe oligozoospermia and azoospermia has been associated with a number of genetic risk factors. METHODS: In this study 150 men from couples requesting ICSI were investigated for genetic abnormalities, such as constitutive chromosome

  13. Evaluation of Iranian College Students’ Awareness about Infertility Risk Factors

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    Alaee

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background With technological developments, creation of new industries, and changing human behavior and lifestyles, several new infertility risk factors (IRFs are discovered annually. Although many studies have been conducted on IRFs, no research has yet been carried out on the awareness of Iranian college students about the many IRFs. Objectives Since prevention of infertility in a society is directly related to awareness about infertility, in the present study the awareness of male and female college students about IRFs was evaluated and compared at Jami institute of technology. Patients and Methods For this purpose, a survey questionnaire containing 24 factors related to IRFs was developed and 123 college students from Jami institute of technology completed it. All data was extracted from these questionnaires and was statistically analyzed. Results The results showed that both male and female participants had moderate awareness (55.86% about IRFs. Female participants had significantly more awareness about the effects of cell phone radiation, fast food, and stress in comparison with their male counterparts. However, significantly higher numbers of male participants knew that smoking has negative effects on fertility. Generally, the awareness of females about IRFs was greater than that of males (59.46% vs. 52.27%. Conclusions College students have a considerable knowledge gap relating to infertility risk factors, which could be due to the lack of a suitable module on IRFs in the curricula of Iranian universities. Generally, females have more awareness than males. The greatest awareness about IRFs concerned smoking, which may result from widespread media coverage.

  14. Associations of Psychosocial Factors with the Stress of Infertility Treatment

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    Schneider, Myra G.; Forthofer, Melinda S.

    2005-01-01

    This study investigated psychosocial factors thought to be associated with perceived stress over the course of infertility treatment. The research was based on secondary analysis of data from the Study of Marriage, Family, and Life Quality with a sample of 128 people who completed an infertility-related stress instrument at all three measurement…

  15. Risk of diabetes according to male factor infertility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glazer, Clara Helene; Bonde, Jens Peter; Giwercman, Aleksander

    2017-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION: Is male factor infertility associated with an increased risk of developing diabetes? SUMMARY ANSWER: The study provides evidence that male factor infertility may predict later occurrence of diabetes mellitus with the risk being related to the severity of the underlying fertility...... problem. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY: Previous cross-sectional studies have shown an increased prevalence of comorbidities among infertile men when compared to controls. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION: In this prospective cohort study, 39 516 men who had since 1994 undergone fertility treatment with their female...... partner were identified from the Danish national IVF register, which includes data on assumed cause of couple infertility (male/female factor, mixed and unexplained infertility) and type of fertility treatment. With a median follow-up time of 5.6 years, each man was followed for diabetes occurrence from...

  16. Coital frequency and infertility: which male factors predict less frequent coitus among infertile couples?

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    Perlis, Nathan; Lo, Kirk C; Grober, Ethan D; Spencer, Leia; Jarvi, Keith

    2013-08-01

    To determine the coital frequency among infertile couples and which factors are associated with less frequent coitus. Cross-sectional study. Tertiary-level male infertility clinic. A total of 1,298 infertile men. Administration of computer-based survey, semen analysis, and serum hormone evaluation. Monthly coital frequency. A total of 1,298 patients presented to clinic for infertility consultation and completed the computer-based survey. The median male age was 35 years (interquartile range [IQR] 32-39 years) and the median duration of infertility was 2 years (IQR 1-4 years) before consultation. Median monthly coital frequency was seven (IQR 5-10; range 0-40); 24% of couples were having intercourse ≤ 4 times per month. Overall, 0.6%, 2.7%, 4.8%, 5.8%, and 10.8% of the men reported having intercourse 0, 1, 2, 3, and 4 times per month, respectively. When simultaneously taking into account the influence of age, libido, erectile function, and semen volume on coital frequency, older patients had 1.05 times higher odds (per year of age) of less frequent coitus (odds ratio 1.05, 95% confidence interval 1.03-1.08). In addition, patients with better erectile function had 1.12 times higher odds (per point on Sexual Health Inventory for Men scale) of more frequent coitus (odds ratio 1.12, 95% confidence interval 1.09-1.18). Similar to the general population, most infertile couples report having coitus more than four times per month. Older male age and erectile dysfunction are independent risk factors for less frequent coitus among infertile men, which could have an impact on fertility. Coital frequency should be considered in infertility assessments. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Tubal Factor Infertility and Perinatal Risk After Assisted Reproductive Technology

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    Kawwass, Jennifer F.; Crawford, Sara; Kissin, Dmitry M.; Session, Donna R.; Boulet, Sheree; Jamieson, Denise J.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess trends of tubal factor infertility and to evaluate risk of miscarriage and delivery of preterm or low birth weight (LBW) neonates among women with tubal factor infertility using assisted reproductive technology (ART). METHODS We assessed trends of tubal factor infertility among all fresh and frozen, donor, and nondonor ART cycles performed annually in the United States between 2000 and 2010 (N=1,418,774) using the National ART Surveillance System. The data set was then limited to fresh, nondonor in vitro fertilization cycles resulting in pregnancy to compare perinatal outcomes for cycles associated with tubal compared with male factor infertility. We performed bivariate and multivariable analyses controlling for maternal characteristics and calculated adjusted risk ratios (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). RESULTS The percentage of ART cycles associated with tubal factor infertility diagnoses decreased from 2000 to 2010 (26.02–14.81%). Compared with male factor infertility, tubal factor portended an increased risk of miscarriage (14.0% compared with 12.7%, adjusted RR 1.08, 95% CI 1.04–1.12); risk was increased for both early and late miscarriage. Singleton neonates born to women with tubal factor infertility had an increased risk of pre-term birth (15.8% compared with 11.6%, adjusted RR 1.27, 95% CI 1.20–1.34) and LBW (10.9% compared with 8.5%, adjusted RR 1.28, 95% CI 1.20–1.36). Significant increases in risk persisted for early and late preterm delivery and very low and moderately LBW delivery. A significantly elevated risk was also detected for twin, but not triplet, pregnancies. CONCLUSION Tubal factor infertility, which is decreasing in prevalence in the United States, is associated with an increased risk of miscarriage, preterm birth, and LBW delivery as compared with couples with male factor infertility using ART. PMID:23812461

  18. Knowledge of Men and Women about Infertility Risk Factors

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    Amirreza Talaiekhozani

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available With technological developments, creation of new industries and changing lifestyles, infertility risk factors (IRF increased. Therefore creation of suitable solutions in society is crucial for the prevention of infertility. Since prevention of infertility in a society is directly related to awareness about infertility, in the present study the awareness of people about infertility risk factors was assessed. In this study, a survey questionnaire containing 24 factors related to IRF was developed and 170 persons (62 men and 108 women from Fooladshahr, Najafabad and Mobarakeh participated and data were extracted from these questionnaires and were statistically analyzed. Our study showed that average infertility awareness for men and women is 38% and 49% respectively. Also overall awareness was 44%. Also results showed that women’s awareness about mobile radiation and fast foods is significantly higher than men. On the other hand men have significantly higher awareness about adverse effects of chlorine in swimming pool on fertility. Higher women awareness may be related to their higher sensitivity for fertility. Also, generally a higher level of awareness was observed relating to mobile, air pollution, stress, fast foods, smoking and alcohol. Women have a higher level of awareness about infertility risk factors. Higher awareness about some IRFs may be results from widespread media coverage.

  19. Causes and Risk Factors for Male-Factor Infertility in Nigeria: A Review

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJRH Managing Editor

    Keywords: Semen quality, Nigeria, Male infertility, etiology, men. Résumé ... review article on male factor infertility among. Nigeria males, the ...... Furthermore, global warming and increased ..... impact of air pollution in human health. Environ.

  20. Assessing infertility-related stress: the factor structure of the Fertility Problem Inventory in Italian couples undergoing infertility treatment.

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    Donarelli, Zaira; Gullo, Salvatore; Lo Coco, Gianluca; Marino, Angelo; Scaglione, Piero; Volpes, Aldo; Allegra, Adolfo

    2015-01-01

    The factor structure of the Fertility Problem Inventory (FPI) and its invariance across gender were examined in Italian couples undergoing infertility treatment. About 1000 subjects (both partners of 500 couples) completed two questionnaires prior to commencing infertility treatment at a private Clinic in Palermo, Italy. Confirmatory Factor Analysis demonstrated that the original factor structure of the FPI was partially confirmed. Two correlated factors (Infertility Life Domains and Importance of Parenthood) were obtained via a post hoc Exploratory Factor Analysis. Finally, the invariance of this factor structure across gender was confirmed. The study supported the relevance of two interrelated factors specific to infertility stress which could help clinicians to focus on the core infertility-related stress domains of infertile couples.

  1. A Case of Secondary Infertility Due to Retention of Fetal Bones in Cervix

    OpenAIRE

    Alev Ozer

    2014-01-01

    A case of secondary infertility related to prolonged retention of fetal bones in the cervix is presented. A 34-year-old nulliparous woman was admitted to the hospital with chronic pelvic pain, dyspareunia, and 12%u2013year-long secondary infertility following an induced abortion due to fetal demise. Transvaginal ultrasonography (USG) revealed a linear echogenic area around the posterior cervical wall. An hysteroscopic examination confirmed the existence of an irregular calcified mass embedded...

  2. Bacterial vaginosis among women with tubal factor infertility in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durugbo, Innocent I; Nyengidiki, Tamunomie K; Bassey, Goddy; Wariso, Kennedy T

    2015-11-01

    To determine the prevalence of bacterial vaginosis among women with tubal factor infertility. A cross-sectional prospective study of women with tubal factor infertility was conducted at a Nigerian teaching hospital between March and September 2014. An equal number of fertile women attending the family planning clinic were recruited as controls. Interviews were conducted to collect data on sociodemographic characteristics, history and characteristics of vaginal discharge, knowledge, and practices. Bacterial vaginosis was diagnosed using the Amsel criteria. Odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated to determine predisposing factors. Overall, 178 women with tubal factor infertility were recruited. Bacterial vaginosis was noted in 50 (28.1%) of these women, compared with 14 (7.9%) of 178 fertile women (P vaginosis when they were of low socioeconomic class (OR 11.89; 95% CI 5.20-27.69), practiced vaginal douching (OR 19.15; 95% CI 7.26-47.75), used vaginal drying agents (OR 17.04; 95% CI 6.91-43.24), had an early sexual debut (OR 32.08; 95% CI 12.02-88.89), and had a history of sexually transmitted infections (OR 12.42; 95% CI 5.36-29.35). The prevalence of bacterial vaginosis was high among patients with tubal factor infertility. Socioeconomic and cultural factors contribute to the risk of the condition. Copyright © 2015 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Genetic and epigenetic factors: Role in male infertility

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    M B Shamsi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetic factors contribute upto 15%-30% cases of male infertility. Formation of spermatozoa occurs in a sequential manner with mitotic, meiotic, and postmeiotic differentiation phases each of which is controlled by an intricate genetic program. Genes control a variety of physiologic processes, such as hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal axis, germ cell development, and differentiation. In the era of assisted reproduction technology, it is important to understand the genetic basis of infertility to provide maximum adapted therapeutics and counseling to the couple.

  4. Infertility factors at the Groote Schuur Hospital Fertility Clinic

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1989-07-15

    Jul 15, 1989 ... the rest between 2 and 5 factors contributed to the infertility of the couple. ... The selection criteria at the Fertility Clinic at Groote Schuur. Hospital .... explained by the fact that most of the patients were referred by private ...

  5. Male factor in infertility: study from a tertiary care hospital

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    Kalavathi D. Biradar

    2016-06-01

    Conclusions: High prevalence of male factor in infertility was noted in the present study. Refraining from addictions, certain life style changes including exercise and timely medical attention can address the issue. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2016; 5(6.000: 2022-2025

  6. Evaluation of Risk Factors Associated with Endometriosis in Infertile Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashrafi, Mahnaz; Sadatmahalleh, Shahideh Jahanian; Akhoond, Mohammad Reza; Talebi, Mehrak

    2016-01-01

    Background Endometriosis affects women’s physical and mental wellbeing. Symptoms include dyspareunia, dysmenorrhea, pelvic pain, and infertility. The purpose of this study is to assess the correlation between some relevant factors and symptoms and risk of an endometriosis diagnosis in infertile women. Materials and Methods A retrospective study of 1282 surgical patients in an infertility Institute, Iran between 2011 and 2013 were evaluated by laparoscopy. Of these, there were 341 infertile women with endometriosis (cases) and 332 infertile women with a normal pelvis (comparison group). Chi-square and t tests were used to compare these two groups. Logistic regression was done to build a prediction model for an endometriosis diagnosis. Results Gravidity [odds ratio (OR): 0.8, confidence interval (CI): 0.6-0.9, P=0.01], parity (OR: 0.7, CI: 0.6-0.9, P=0.01), family history of endometriosis (OR: 4.9, CI: 2.1-11.3, Pgalactorrhea (OR: 2.3, CI: 1.5-3.5, P=0.01), history of pelvic surgery (OR: 1.9, CI: 1.3-2.7, P0.05). Fatigue, diarrhea, constipation, dysmenorrhea, dyspareunia, pelvic pain and premenstrual spotting were more significant among late-stage endometriosis patients than in those with early-stage endometriosis and more prevalent among patients with endometriosis than that of the comparison group. In the logistic regression model, gravidity, family history of endometriosis, history of galactorrhea, history of pelvic surgery, dysmenorrhoea, pelvic pain, dysparaunia, premenstrual spotting, fatigue, and diarrhea were significantly associated with endometriosis. However, the number of pregnancies was negatively related to endometriosis. Conclusion Endometriosis is a considerable public health issue because it affects many women and is associated with the significant morbidity. In this study, we built a prediction model which can be used to predict the risk of endometriosis in infertile women. PMID:27123195

  7. Evaluation of Risk Factors Associated with Endometriosis in Infertile Women

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    Mahnaz Ashrafi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Endometriosis affects women’s physical and mental wellbeing. Symptoms include dyspareunia, dysmenorrhea, pelvic pain, and infertility. The purpose of this study is to assess the correlation between some relevant factors and symptoms and risk of an endometriosis diagnosis in infertile women. Materials and Methods: A retrospective study of 1282 surgical patients in an infertility Institute, Iran between 2011 and 2013 were evaluated by laparoscopy. Of these, there were 341 infertile women with endometriosis (cases and 332 infertile women with a normal pelvis (comparison group. Chi-square and t tests were used to compare these two groups. Logistic regression was done to build a prediction model for an endometriosis diagnosis. Results: Gravidity [odds ratio (OR: 0.8, confidence interval (CI: 0.6-0.9, P=0.01], parity (OR: 0.7, CI: 0.6-0.9, P=0.01, family history of endometriosis (OR: 4.9, CI: 2.1-11.3, P0.05. Fatigue, diarrhea, constipation, dysmenorrhea, dyspareunia, pelvic pain and premenstrual spotting were more significant among late-stage endometriosis patients than in those with early-stage endometriosis and more prevalent among patients with endometriosis than that of the comparison group. In the logistic regression model, gravidity, family history of endometriosis, history of galactorrhea, history of pelvic surgery, dysmenorrhoea, pelvic pain, dysparaunia, premenstrual spotting, fatigue, and diarrhea were significantly associated with endometriosis. However, the number of pregnancies was negatively related to endometriosis. Conclusion: Endometriosis is a considerable public health issue because it affects many women and is associated with the significant morbidity. In this study, we built a prediction model which can be used to predict the risk of endometriosis in infertile women.

  8. Infertility in the light of new scientific reports – focus on male factor

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    Piotr Szkodziak

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological data indicate that infertility is a problem of global proportions, affecting one- fifth of couples trying to conceive worldwide (60–80 mln. According to the trends observed, the problem is predicted to increase by another two million cases annually. In Poland, infertility-related issues are found in about 19% of couples, including 4% with infertility and 15% with limited fertility. Inability to conceive occurs equally in men and women (50%, irrespective of the direct cause. Although it is generally thought that reproductive issues concern women, infertility affects men and women equally. This study is an attempted to systematize knowledge about the role of the male factor in infertility, particularly current knowledge concerning the environmental factors of infertility. For this purpose, the Medline and CINAHL databases and the Cochrane Library was searched for articles published in English during the last 10 years, using the following keywords: infertility, male factor, semen examination and environmental factor of infertility.

  9. Infertility in the light of new scientific reports - focus on male factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szkodziak, Piotr; Wozniak, Slawomir; Czuczwar, Piotr; Wozniakowska, Ewa; Milart, Paweł; Mroczkowski, Artur; Paszkowski, Tomasz

    2016-06-02

    Epidemiological data indicate that infertility is a problem of global proportions, affecting one- fifth of couples trying to conceive worldwide (60-80 mln). According to the trends observed, the problem is predicted to increase by another two million cases annually. In Poland, infertility-related issues are found in about 19% of couples, including 4% with infertility and 15% with limited fertility. Inability to conceive occurs equally in men and women (50%), irrespective of the direct cause. Although it is generally thought that reproductive issues concern women, infertility affects men and women equally. This study is an attempted to systematize knowledge about the role of the male factor in infertility, particularly current knowledge concerning the environmental factors of infertility. For this purpose, the Medline and CINAHL databases and the Cochrane Library was searched for articles published in English during the last 10 years, using the following keywords: infertility, male factor, semen examination and environmental factor of infertility.

  10. A Case of Secondary Infertility Due to Retention of Fetal Bones in Cervix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alev Ozer

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A case of secondary infertility related to prolonged retention of fetal bones in the cervix is presented. A 34-year-old nulliparous woman was admitted to the hospital with chronic pelvic pain, dyspareunia, and 12%u2013year-long secondary infertility following an induced abortion due to fetal demise. Transvaginal ultrasonography (USG revealed a linear echogenic area around the posterior cervical wall. An hysteroscopic examination confirmed the existence of an irregular calcified mass embedded in the cervix. The mass turned out to be conglomerated fetal bone fragments which probably acted as an intrauterine device. After removal of the cervical mass, the patient conceived spontaneously within four months. The present case report emphasizes the significance of a detailed history and a thorough evaluation by transvaginal USG in the case of secondary infertility following an induced or spontaneous abortion.

  11. Infertility and Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with production or quality of sperm. What causes female infertility? About 25 percent of women with infertility have ... 40 percent of infertility cases are due to female infertility, but just as many cases are due to ...

  12. Anti-Müllerian hormone levels in salpingectomized compared with nonsalpingectomized women with tubal factor infertility and women with unexplained infertility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grynnerup, Anna Garcia-Alix Haugen; Lindhard, Anette; Sørensen, Steen

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the consequence of salpingectomy on ovarian reserve by measuring anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) levels before in vitro fertilization (IVF) treatment in salpingectomized women compared with nonsalpingectomized women with tubal factor infertility, women with unexplained infertility and...

  13. Is male factor infertility associated with midlife low-grade inflammation?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hærvig, Katia Keglberg; Kierkegaard, Lene; Lund, Rikke

    2017-01-01

    Male factor infertility is associated with an increased risk of disease and mortality, which has been related to markers of chronic systemic inflammation. The objective of this study was to investigate the association between male factor infertility and low-grade inflammation and furthermore...... to examine the lifetime prevalence of male factor infertility and overall infertility (also including female and couple infertility). The study population consisted of 2140 members of the Metropolit 1953 Danish Male Birth Cohort who had participated in the Copenhagen Aging and Midlife Biobank data collection...... in 2009-2011. Information on male factor infertility and overall infertility was obtained from a questionnaire, and low-grade inflammation was evaluated as the highest plasma levels of C-reactive protein, interleukin-6 and tumour necrosis factor-alpha in the population. The level of interleukin-6...

  14. Intrauterine insemination with husband's sperm: comparison of pregnancy rates in couples with cervical factor, male factor, immunological factor and idiopathic infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kossakowski, J; Stephenson, M; Smith, H

    1993-05-01

    Intrauterine insemination with husband's sperm (IUI) is offered to couples with infertility due to various causes although there is no general agreement on which of these causes should be so treated. In this report 77 couples were diagnosed as having either cervical factor, male factor, immunological factor or unexplained infertility. Insemination was performed 24-32 hours after a rapid rise in the serum LH level. Two of 16 pregnancies which resulted miscarried, 1 was ectopic and the remainder were full term. Eleven occurred in the cervical factor group, 3 in the immunological factor and only 1 in each of the male factor and unexplained infertility groups. The differences in the number of pregnancies between the cervical factor and male and unexplained infertility groups are significant but not between the groups with cervical and immunological factors. The majority of pregnancies (81%) were achieved in the first 4 cycles. Patients with the cervical factor as the cause of their subfertility are likely to benefit from the IUI with their husband's sperm. The small number of patients with the immunological factor in this study does not allow for a conclusion. In our experience the male factor and unexplained infertility patients are unlikely to benefit from intrauterine insemination with husband's sperm.

  15. AB28. Management of male factor infertility: present on the assisted reproductive technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Chan

    2014-01-01

    Infertility is a common yet complex problem affecting approximately 10-15% of couples attempting to conceive a baby. Especially, 40-50% of these factors are known as male-related disorders. Unlike female infertility, the cause of which is often easily identified, diagnosing male factors can be difficult. Male infertility is due to low sperm production, abnormal sperm function or blockages of sperm transport. Classical semen analysis in laboratory, which include sperm concentration, motility and morphology gives an approximate evaluation of the functional competence of spermatozoa, but does not always reflect the quality of sperm DNA. The fertilizing potential of sperm depends not only on the functional competence of spermatozoa but also on sperm DNA integrity. The most commonly used techniques to assess sperm DNA integrity are the TUNEL assay, Comet assay, SCSA assay and hallo sperm assay. Recent studies have highlighted the significance of sperm DNA integrity as an important factor which affects functional competence of the sperm. Sperm DNA damage has been closely associated with numerous indicators of reproductive health including fertilization, embryo quality, implantation, spontaneous abortion, congenital malformations. To overcome male infertility, there are variety of surgical and non-surgical urological procedures and medical-pharmacological interventions, and advanced assisted reproductive technologies (ART). Among the surgically retrieved methods, there are TESE, TFNA, PESA and MESA that is used with ICSI. The ART, augmented with ICSI in moderate to serve cases, efficiently treat a variety of male infertility disorders by constituting validated and successfully treatment methods. Also, this technique is employed because the limited numbers and functional capacity of motile sperm that can be obtained. Especially, there are technologies such as IMSI and PICSI that are used to select healthy sperms.

  16. Might uterus transplantation be an option for uterine factor infertility?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akar, Münire Erman

    2015-01-01

    Current data on uterus allotransplantation research has been reviewed and summarized. Over the past 15 years, progress in uterus transplantation research has increased dramatically. As a consequence, the first pregnancy and delivery following uterus allotransplantation in rats have been reported. The technique has been better defined. Although clinical pregnancy and delivery following uterus allotransplantation has been reported in humans, there are still many questions to be answered before clinical application. Gestational surrogacy still remains an important option for being a genetic parent in selected cases with uterine factor infertility.

  17. Treating Infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... by a number of factors. Both male and female factors can contribute to infertility. What treatment options are available for infertility? Treatment ... problems. A common problem that leads to male infertility, varicocele , sometimes can be ... are hormonal problems treated in women? Abnormal levels of hormones ...

  18. Hysterosalpingography in Infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masuda Islam Khan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infertility is a common medical problem. It can be due to problems in either partner, or both. Ovulatory dysfunction, tubal and peritoneal factors comprise the majority of female factor for infertility. Hysterosalpingography (HSG plays an important role in the evaluation of abnormalities related to the uterus and fallopian tubes. Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the hysterosalpingographic findings of women with infertility in our setting. Materials and method: This cross sectional study was carried out in the infertility centre at BIRDEM, Dhaka, Bangladesh during the period of September 2002 to February 2003. Out of 100 infertile patients 50 infertile women of reproductive age (21-40 years indicated for HSG were enrolled in this study. Results: Sixty percent patients had secondary infertility. Majority of the subjects of both primary and secondary infertility (55% and 60% were in 26-30 years age group. On HSG any sort of uterine pathology was found in 10% cases and unilateral and bilateral tubal block were present in 24% and 20% cases respectively. Conclusion: Hysterosalpingography, a safe, less invasive procedure, has an important role in diagnosing uterine and tubal factors of infertility.

  19. Outcomes for offspring of men having ICSI for male factor infertility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jane Halliday

    2012-01-01

    Since the introduction of intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) using single sperm isolated from testicular tissue in men with obstructive and non-obstructive azoospermia,or using ejaculated sperm in those with poor semen quality,there have been concerns that this might have adverse effects on the offspring compared to conventional in vitrofertilisation (IVF) and natural conceptions.ICSI is done for reasons other than male factor infertility,and on the whole has not been shown to have any more negative effects than those seen with IVF.There have however,been very few studies of ICSI with a focus on,or large enough numbers to examine,the specific outcomes associated with male factor infertility.From the limited information available in relation to the source of the sperm and aetiology of infertility in the presence of ICSI,there appears to be no increased risk of congenital malformations.There is,however,a small increase in both de novoand inherited chromosome abnormalities.In terms of growth and neurodevelopment,there are very few studies,and so far,no adverse outcomes have been found in young children whose fathers have a sperm defect.The origin of the sperm used in ICSI does not have a major influence on the early life outcomes for the offspring,but transgenerational and epigenetic effects remain unknown.When the male factor infertility is known or thought to be due to a Y-chromosome deletion,this information should be given to the voung male offspring at a time that will ensure his own reproductive health and plans are optimized.

  20. Outcomes for offspring of men having ICSI for male factor infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halliday, Jane

    2012-01-01

    Since the introduction of intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) using single sperm isolated from testicular tissue in men with obstructive and non-obstructive azoospermia, or using ejaculated sperm in those with poor semen quality, there have been concerns that this might have adverse effects on the offspring compared to conventional in vitro fertilisation (IVF) and natural conceptions. ICSI is done for reasons other than male factor infertility, and on the whole has not been shown to have any more negative effects than those seen with IVF. There have however, been very few studies of ICSI with a focus on, or large enough numbers to examine, the specific outcomes associated with male factor infertility. From the limited information available in relation to the source of the sperm and aetiology of infertility in the presence of ICSI, there appears to be no increased risk of congenital malformations. There is, however, a small increase in both de novo and inherited chromosome abnormalities. In terms of growth and neurodevelopment, there are very few studies, and so far, no adverse outcomes have been found in young children whose fathers have a sperm defect. The origin of the sperm used in ICSI does not have a major influence on the early life outcomes for the offspring, but transgenerational and epigenetic effects remain unknown. When the male factor infertility is known or thought to be due to a Y-chromosome deletion, this information should be given to the young male offspring at a time that will ensure his own reproductive health and plans are optimized. PMID:22157986

  1. Genetic aspects of human male infertility: the frequency of chromosomal abnormalities and Y chromosome microdeletions in severe male factor infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicdan, Arzu; Vicdan, Kubilay; Günalp, Serdar; Kence, Aykut; Akarsu, Cem; Işik, Ahmet Zeki; Sözen, Eran

    2004-11-10

    The main purpose of this study is to detect the frequency and type of both chromosomal abnormalities and Y chromosome microdeletions in patients with severe male factor infertility and fertile control subjects. The association between the genetic abnormality and clinical parameters was also evaluated. This study was carried out in 208 infertile and 20 fertile men. Results of 208 patients, 119 had non-obstructive azoospermia and 89 had severe oligoasthenoteratozoospermia (OAT). Seventeen out of 119 (14.3%) azoospermic patients and two out of 89 (2.2%) patients with OAT had Y chromosome microdeletions. In total, 19 cases with deletions were detected in 208 infertile men, with a frequency of 9.1%. The AZFc locus, mainly DAZ gene cluster was the most frequently deleted region. Five other cases with azoospermia (4.2%) and two cases with OAT (2.2%) had a chromosomal abnormality, with a total number of seven (3.4%). Including Y chromosome deletions and structural chromosome abnormalities, the rate of genetic abnormalities was 12.5% (26/208) in our patients. On the other hand, 20 men with proven fertility and fathers of five cases with microdeletions were genetically normal. Y chromosome deletions and chromosomal abnormalities were associated with various histological alterations in testis. Sertoli cell-only (SCO) syndrome and maturation arrest predominated in these cases, whereas hypospermatogenesis occurred more frequently in genetically normal patients. Various chromosomal abnormalities and deletions of Y chromosome can cause spermatogenic breakdown resulting in chromosomally derived infertility. All these findings strongly support the recommendation of genetic screening of infertile patients.

  2. Factor structure of the General Health Questionnaire-28 (GHQ-28 from infertile women attending the Yazd Research and Clinical Center for Infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Shayan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nowadays, infertility problems have become a social concern, and are associated with multiple psychological and social problems. Also, it affects the interpersonal communication between the individual, familial, and social characteristics. Since women are exposed to stressors of physical, mental, social factors, and treatment of infertility, providing a psychometric screening tool is necessary for disorders of this group. Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the factor structure of the general health questionnaire-28 to discover mental disorders in infertile women. Materials and Methods: In this study, 220 infertile women undergoing treatment of infertility were selected from the Yazd Research and Clinical Center for Infertility with convenience sampling in 2011. After completing the general health questionnaire by the project manager, validity and, reliability of the questionnaire were calculated by confirmatory factor structure and Cronbach's alpha, respectively. Results: Four factors, including anxiety and insomnia, social dysfunction, depression, and physical symptoms were extracted from the factor structure. 50.12% of the total variance was explained by four factors. The reliability coefficient of the questionnaire was obtained 0.90. Conclusion: Analysis of the factor structure and reliability of General Health Questionnaire-28 showed that it is suitable as a screening instrument for assessing general health of infertile women.

  3. Quality of life and its related factors in infertile couples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keramat, Afsaneh; Masoomi, Seyyedeh Zahra; Mousavi, Seyed Abbas; Poorolajal, Jalal; Shobeiri, Fatemeh; Hazavhei, Seyyed Mohammad Mehdi

    2014-01-01

    Health related quality of life (QoL) has now been considered as a main tool for outcome measurement in infertility. The present study aimed to determine the association between general and specified QoL with different psychological aspects of self-esteem, social support, sexual satisfaction, and marital satisfaction in a sample of Iranian infertile couples. This cross-sectional study was conducted on 385 infertile couples referred to the Fatemieh Hospital in Hamadan City, western Iran in 2012.To measure the self-esteem, the Iseng test was used. The social support scaling developed by Cassidy and Long was used for assessment of social support. The sexual satisfaction was also assessed by the Lindaberg questionnaire. For assessing the general QoL state, the WHO-QoL-BREF and FertiQoL tools were employed. Self-esteem scores were lower in the couples with longer infertility duration. The social support mean score was lower in low income couples. Those with higher educational level, shorter infertility duration, and higher income were more satisfied from their marital relationships. Besides, we revealed that the previous failed efforts for treatment of infertility were adversely associated with the lower social support and sexual satisfaction. The higher educational level, higher monthly income, living in urban area, shorter duration of marriage and infertility, and male gender were associated with better. QoL status in the most components.Associations between QoL and self-esteem, social support, sexual satisfaction, and marital satisfaction were significant (Pself-esteem, social support, sexual satisfaction, and marital satisfaction.

  4. Estimates of lifetime infertility from three states: the behavioral risk factor surveillance system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Sara; Fussman, Chris; Bailey, Marie; Bernson, Dana; Jamieson, Denise J; Murray-Jordan, Melissa; Kissin, Dmitry M

    2015-07-01

    Knowledge of state-specific infertility is limited. The objectives of this study were to explore state-specific estimates of lifetime prevalence of having ever experienced infertility, sought treatment for infertility, types of treatments sought, and treatment outcomes. Male and female adult residents aged 18-50 years from three states involved in the States Monitoring Assisted Reproductive Technology Collaborative (Florida, Massachusetts, and Michigan) were asked state-added infertility questions as part of the 2012 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, a state-based, health-related telephone survey. Analysis involved estimation of lifetime prevalence of infertility. The estimated lifetime prevalence of infertility among 1,285 adults in Florida, 1,302 in Massachusetts, and 3,360 in Michigan was 9.7%, 6.0%, and 4.2%, respectively. Among 736 adults in Florida, 1,246 in Massachusetts, and 2,742 in Michigan that have ever tried to get pregnant, the lifetime infertility prevalence was 25.3% in Florida, 9.9% in Massachusetts, and 5.8% in Michigan. Among those with a history of infertility, over half sought treatment (60.7% in Florida, 70.6% in Massachusetts, and 51.6% in Michigan), the most common being non-assisted reproductive technology fertility treatments (61.3% in Florida, 66.0% in Massachusetts, and 75.9% in Michigan). State-specific estimates of lifetime infertility prevalence in Florida, Massachusetts, and Michigan varied. Variations across states are difficult to interpret, as they likely reflect both true differences in prevalence and differences in data collection questionnaires. State-specific estimates are needed for the prevention, detection, and management of infertility, but estimates should be based on a common set of questions appropriate for these goals.

  5. Understanding Infertility and the Potential Role of Stem Cells in Infertility Treatment: A Short Communication

    OpenAIRE

    Chirputkar R; Vaidya A

    2015-01-01

    Infertility is increasing at a great rate across the globe. Various male as well as female factors are known to contribute to infertility. Although hormonal replacement therapy and assisted reproduction treatments like in vitro fertilization and intracytoplasmic sperm injection are well established clinical modalities to treat infertility, stem cells are now being considered as potentially new therapeutic agents for the treatment of infertility due to their high differentiation potential. Sev...

  6. Genetic factors contributing to human primary ciliary dyskinesia and male infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Zhi-Yong; Sha, Yan-Wei; Ding, Lu; Li, Ping

    2016-06-07

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is an autosomal-recessive disorder resulting from the loss of normal ciliary function. Symptoms include neonatal respiratory distress, chronic sinusitis, bronchiectasis, situs inversus, and infertility. However, only 15 PCD-associated genes have been identified to cause male infertility to date. Owing to the genetic heterogeneity of PCD, comprehensive molecular genetic testing is not considered the standard of care. Here, we provide an update of the progress on the identification of genetic factors related to PCD associated with male infertility, summarizing the underlying molecular mechanisms, and discuss the clinical implications of these findings. Further research in this field will impact the diagnostic strategy for male infertility, enabling clinicians to provide patients with informed genetic counseling, and help to adopt the best course of treatment for developing directly targeted personalized medicine.

  7. Prevalence and Risk Factors of Infertility for Han, Uygur, and Kazakh Ethnicities in Xinjiang Rural Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jing; Wang, Songfeng; Gao, Qi; Cai, Xia; La, Xiaolin

    2015-01-01

    To estimate the prevalence and associated factors of current infertility for Han, Uygur, and Kazakh ethnicities in Xinjiang rural residents. Chinese Uygur, Kazakh, and Han populations represent > 90% of the total population of the Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region, and their customs, culture, and food consumption are different. The effect of ethnic differences on infertility risk factors is rarely studied. A cross-sectional study of 5,086 married and common-law couples, with a female partner aged 18-49, living in Hami, Kuche, or Xinyuan counties in Xinjiang, China. General information for the study subjects, including demographic characteristics, life customs, sexual history, history of contraception use, and history of disease, was collected by questionnaire. General health, gynecologic examinations, and sociodemographic characteristics were also carried out. A total of 5,086 females from Xinjiang Province were surveyed, including 493 with infertility. The standardized prevalence rate of infertility was 9.7% (95% CI 8.9-10.5), and the prevalence of infertility in Han, Uygur, and Kazakh ethnicities was 6.8% (95% CI 5.7-7.9), 10.9% (95% CI 8.0-13.8), and 10.1% (95% CI 7.4-12.8), respectively. The present study suggests that the prevalence of infertility was lower in the Han as compared to the Kazakh and Uygur ethnicities.

  8. The Role of Infertility Etiology in Success Rate of Intrauterine Insemination Cycles: An Evaluation of Predictive Factors for Pregnancy Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashrafi, Mahnaz; Rashidi, Mandana; Ghasemi, Afsaneh; Arabipoor, Arezoo; Daghighi, Sara; Pourasghari, Parisa; Zolfaghari, Zahra

    2013-01-01

    Background: The objective of this study was to identify the prognostic factors that influence the outcome of ovarian stimulation with intrauterine insemination (IUI) cycles in couples with different infertility etiology. Materials and Methods: This retrospective study was performed in data of 1348 IUI cycles with ovarian stimulation by clomiphene citrate (CC) and/or gonadotropins in 632 women with five different infertility etiology subgroups at Akbarabbadi Hospital, Tehran, Iran. Results: The pregnancy rate (PR)/ cycle was highest (19.9%) among couples with unexplained infertility and lowest (10.6%) in couples with multiple factors infertility. In cases of unexplained infertility, the best PRs were seen after CC plus gonadotropins stimulation (26.3%) and with inseminated motile sperm count>30×106 (21.9%), but the tendency didn’t reach statistical significant. In the ovarian factor group, the best PRs were observed in women aged between 30 and 34 years (20.8%), with 2-3 preovulatory follicles (37.8%) and infertility duration between 1and 3 years (20.8%), while only infertility duration (p=0.03) and number of preovulatory follicles (p=0.01) were statistically significant. Multiple logistic regression analysis determined that number of preovulatory follicles (p=0.02), duration of infertility (p=0.015), age (p=0.019), infertility etiology (p=0.05) and stimulation regimen (p=0.01) were significant independent factors in order to predict overall clinical PR. Conclusion: The etiology of infertility is important to achieve remarkable IUI success. It is worth mentioning that within different etiologies of infertility, the demographic and cycles characteristics of couples did not show the same effect. Favorable variables for treatment success are as follows: age infertility ≤5 years and a cause of infertility except of multiple factors. PMID:24520471

  9. Role of female pelvic anatomy in infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris-Glocker, Miranda; McLaren, Janet F

    2013-01-01

    Infertility is defined as a couple's failure to achieve pregnancy after one year of regular, unprotected intercourse. The etiology of infertility can be due to female factors, male factors, combined male and female factors, or have an unknown etiology. This review focuses on the role of female pelvic anatomy in infertility. Normal anatomy and the physiology of reproduction will be discussed, as well as the anatomic and pathophysiologic processes that cause infertility including ovulatory disorders, endometriosis, pelvic adhesions, tubal blockage, mullerian anomalies, and abnormalities affecting the uterine cavity such as leiomyomata and endometrial polyps.

  10. Study of psychiatric disorders among fertile and infertile women and some predisposing factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Ali Noorbala

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study aimed to determine prevalence and predisposing factors of psychiatric disorders among infertile in comparison to fertile women. Materials and Methods:  By a descriptive- analytic study in Vali-e-asr Reproductive Health Research Center, 300 women entered the research.   Symptom Checklist -90 -Revised (SCL-90-R test and structured researcher questionnaires were applied for all patients. Demographic characteristics and predisposing psychological and personality factors were recorded and psychological symptoms were scaled. For data analysis, SPSS-11-5 software system, chi-square and T-test were used.  P-value <0.05 was considered significant.Results: Results showed that 44% of infertile and 28.7% of fertile women had psychiatric disorders. Using SCL-90-R test, the highest mean scores among infertile women were found for paranoid ideation, depression and interpersonal sensitivity scales and the lowest scores were related to psychoticism and phobic anxiety scales. Interpersonal sensitivity, depression, phobic anxiety, paranoid ideas and psychoticism scales were significantly different between infertile and fertile women (p<0.05. Housewives were at a statistically significant higher risk for psychiatric disorders as compared to working women (p<0.001. Conclusion: The significantly higher prevalence of psychiatric disorders among infertile women mandates a more serious attention from gynecologists, psychiatrists and psychologists regarding to diagnosis and treatment of these disorders.

  11. Male infertility: lifestyle factors and holistic, complementary, and alternative therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David F Yao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available While we may be comfortable with an allopathic approach to male infertility, we are also responsible for knowledge about lifestyle modifications and holistic, complementary, and alternative therapies that are used by many of our patients. This paper provides an evidence-based review separating fact from fiction for several of these therapies. There is sufficient literature to support weight reduction by diet and exercise, smoking cessation, and alcohol moderation. Supplements that have demonstrated positive effects on male fertility on small randomized controlled trial (RCT include aescin, coenzyme Q 10 , glutathione, Korean red ginseng, L-carnitine, nigella sativa, omega-3, selenium, a combination of zinc and folate, and the Menevit antioxidant. There is no support for the use of Vitamin C, Vitamin E, or saffron. The data for Chinese herbal medications, acupuncture, mind-body practice, scrotal cooling, and faith-based healing are sparse or inconclusive.

  12. A case-control study of risk factors for male infertility in Nigeria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Friday Okonofua; Uche Menakaya; S. O. Onemu; L. O. Omo-Aghoja; Staffan Bergstrom

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the association between selected potential socio-demographic and behavioral risk factors and infertility in Nigerian men. Methods: There were two groups in this study. One group consisted of 150 men with proven male infertility, and the other consisted of 150 fertile men with normal semen parameters. Both were matched for age,place of residence and key socio-demographic variables. They were compared for sexual history, past medical and surgical history, past exposures to sexually transmitted infections and treatment, past and current use of drugs as well as smoking and alcohol intake history. Results: Infertile men were significantly more likely than fertile men to report having experienced penile discharge, painful micturition and genital ulcers, less likely to seek treatment for these symptoms and more likely to seek treatment with informal sector providers. Multivariate analysis showed that male infertility was significantly associated with bacteria in semen cultures, self-reporting of previous use of traditional medications and moderate to heavy alcohol intake, but not with smoking and occupational types. Conclusion:Infertility is associated with various proxies of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and poor healthcare-seeking behavior for STIs in Nigerian men.

  13. Risk factors for atypical endometrial hyperplasia in infertile women:possible association with polycystic ovarv syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lu Qun; Shen Huan; Tian Li; Zhu Sainan; Chen Xi

    2008-01-01

    Objective:Endometrial hyperplasia is considered as a precursor of endometrial carcinoma,in which oncogenic potential is low in hyperplasia without atypia,but high in a-typical hyperplasia.The objective of this study was to identify the risk factors for atypical endo-metrial hyperplasia in infertile women.Methods:Fifty four infertile women with endometrial hy-perplasia,which were selected from a large cohort of 2 098 women who desired for the future childbearing in our center,were diagnosed by hysteroscopy with directed biopsies or dilation and curettage(D&C),including 44 with hyperplasia without atypia,10 with atypical hyperplasia.Clinical characteristics were recorded in terms of age,body mass index(BMI),parity,insulin resistance,polycystic ovary syndrome(PCOS).Statistical comparison was made between women with hyperplasia without atypia and atypical hyperplasia.Logistic regression analysis Was em-ployed to assess the contribution of PCOS,obesity and insulin resistance to atypical hyperplasia.Results:The incidence of endometrial hyperplasia in infertile women Was 2.57%(54/2098),which included 1 0 women(0.48%)were diagnosed as atypical hyperplasia.PCOS in women with atypical hyperplasia(70%,7/10)was significantly higher than those of hyperplasia with-out atypia(27.27%,12/44).Stepwise regression analysis showed that PCOS contributed maximally to atypical endometrial hyperplasia in infertile women.Conclusion:PCOS is an independent risk factor for atypical endometrial hyperplasia in women with infertility.The infertile women with PCOS are at an increased risk for atypical endometrial hyperplasia and endometrial cancer.

  14. Human and Pathogen Factors Associated with Chlamydia trachomatis-Related Infertility in Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, S.; Timms, P.; Allan, J. A.; Alexander, K.; Rombauts, L.; Horner, P.; Keltz, M.; Hocking, J.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Chlamydia trachomatis is the most common bacterial sexually transmitted pathogen worldwide. Infection can result in serious reproductive pathologies, including pelvic inflammatory disease, ectopic pregnancy, and infertility, in women. However, the processes that result in these reproductive pathologies have not been well defined. Here we review the evidence for the human disease burden of these chlamydial reproductive pathologies. We then review human-based evidence that links Chlamydia with reproductive pathologies in women. We present data supporting the idea that host, immunological, epidemiological, and pathogen factors may all contribute to the development of infertility. Specifically, we review the existing evidence that host and pathogen genotypes, host hormone status, age of sexual debut, sexual behavior, coinfections, and repeat infections are all likely to be contributory factors in development of infertility. Pathogen factors such as infectious burden, treatment failure, and tissue tropisms or ascension capacity are also potential contributory factors. We present four possible processes of pathology development and how these processes are supported by the published data. We highlight the limitations of the evidence and propose future studies that could improve our understanding of how chlamydial infertility in women occurs and possible future interventions to reduce this disease burden. PMID:26310245

  15. Evaluating Infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Evaluating Infertility Home For Patients Search FAQs Evaluating Infertility Page ... Evaluating Infertility FAQ136, June 2012 PDF Format Evaluating Infertility Gynecologic Problems What is an infertility evaluation? When ...

  16. Treating Infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Treating Infertility Home For Patients Search FAQs Treating Infertility Page ... Treating Infertility FAQ137, March 2015 PDF Format Treating Infertility Gynecologic Problems What is infertility? What treatment options ...

  17. Evaluating Infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Evaluating Infertility Home For Patients Search FAQs Evaluating Infertility Page ... Evaluating Infertility FAQ136, June 2012 PDF Format Evaluating Infertility Gynecologic Problems What is an infertility evaluation? When ...

  18. Cryptorchidism is not a risk factor for antisperm antibody production in post-orchidopexy males with infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Huan; Zhu, Wei-Jie

    2013-01-01

    Infertility in adulthood is a well-recognized consequence of cryptorchidism, even after successful orchidopexy. Autoimmune reactions against spermatozoa are associated with infertility and often found in cryptorchids. The purposes of this study were to evaluate the linkage between antisperm antibody (ASA) and cryptorchidism, and furthermore, to clarify whether ASA is involved in cryptorchidism-associated infertility. We investigated a total of 48 infertile males with a history of unilateral (n = 30) or bilateral (n = 18) cryptorchidism who had undergone successful orchidopexy in prepuberty, and 20 age-matched fertile and healthy males were collected as controls. ASA in sperm samples was detected by the direct immunobead test, and semen analysis was performed concomitantly. No infertile case satisfied the diagnostic criteria of ASA-mediated infertility set forth by the World Health Organization. Decreases in both sperm concentration and motility accompanied by increases in abnormal morphology were seen in infertile cryptorchids when compared with the healthy controls. Testicular heat exposure in prepuberty is not a risk factor for ASA production. It is evident that the mechanisms that underlie cryptorchidism-associated infertility do not involve ASA. Poor sperm characteristics in cryptorchids resulting from thermal damage to the testes seem to be responsible for their infertility, even after successful orchidopexy. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Study of Personality Disorders Among Fertile and Infertile Women and Some Predisposing Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Ali Noorbala

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study aimed to determine prevalence and predisposing factors of personality disorders among infertile in comparison to fertile women. Materials and Methods:  By a descriptive- analytic study in Vali-e-asr Reproductive Health Research Center, 300 women entered the research.  Eysenck personality (EPQ and structured researcher questionnaires were applied for all patients. Demographic characteristics and predisposing personality factors were recorded and personality symptoms were scaled. For data analysis, SPSS-11-5 software system, chi-square and T-test were used.  P-value <0.05 was considered significant.Results: Based on EPQ, personality instability was significantly more frequent in infertile women in comparison to fertile women (P<0.001. Housewives are at higher risk of developing personality instability as compared to working women. This finding was also statistically significant (P<0.001. Conclusion: Considering the high prevalence of personality disorders among infertile women, it seems that more serious attention is required from gynecologists, psychiatrists and psychologists for better treatment of these disorders. The use of psychotherapy, especially supportive methods, should be considered as part of the general therapeutic framework of infertility.

  20. Clinical Factors Associated with Sperm DNA Fragmentation in Male Patients with Infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komiya, Akira; Kato, Tomonori; Kawauchi, Yoko; Watanabe, Akihiko; Fuse, Hideki

    2014-01-01

    Objective. The clinical factors associated with sperm DNA fragmentation (SDF) were investigated in male patients with infertility. Materials and Methods. Fifty-four ejaculates from infertile Japanese males were used. Thirty-three and twenty-one were from the patients with varicoceles and idiopathic causes of infertility, respectively. We performed blood tests, including the serum sex hormone levels, and conventional and computer-assisted semen analyses. The sperm nuclear vacuolization (SNV) was evaluated using a high-magnification microscope. The SDF was evaluated using the sperm chromatin dispersion test (SCDt) to determine the SDF index (SDFI). The SDFI was compared with semen parameters and other clinical variables, including lifestyle factors. Results. The SDFI was 41.3 ± 22.2% (mean ± standard deviation) and did not depend on the cause of infertility. Chronic alcohol use increased the SDFI to 49.6 ± 23.3% compared with 33.9 ± 18.0% in nondrinkers. The SDFI was related to adverse conventional semen parameters and sperm motion characteristics and correlated with the serum FSH level. The SNV showed a tendency to increase with the SDFI. The multivariate analysis revealed that the sperm progressive motility and chronic alcohol use were significant predictors of the SDF. Conclusion. The SCDt should be offered to chronic alcohol users and those with decreased sperm progressive motility. PMID:25165747

  1. Defining Infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home FAQs Frequently Asked Questions Quick Facts About Infertility FAQs About Infertility FAQs About the Psychological Component of Infertility FAQs About Cloning and Stem Cell Research SART's ...

  2. Somatic cytogenetic and azoospermia factor gene microdeletion studies in infertile men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pina-Neto J.M.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to determine the frequency of somatic chromosomal anomalies and Y chromosomal microdeletions (azoospermia factor genes, AZF in infertile males who seek assisted reproduction. These studies are very important because the assisted reproduction techniques (mainly intracytoplasmic sperm injection bypass the natural selection process and some classical chromosomal abnormalities, microdeletions of AZF genes or some deleterious genic mutations could pass through generations. These genetic abnormalities can cause in the offspring of these patients male infertility, ambiguous external genitalia, mental retardation, and other birth defects. We studied 165 infertile men whose infertility was attributable to testicular problems (60 were azoospermic, 100 were oligospermic and 5 were asthenospermic. We studied 100 metaphases per patient with GTG banding obtained from temporary lymphocyte culture for chromosomal abnormality detection and performed a genomic DNA analysis using 28 Y chromosome-specific sequence-tagged sites for Y AZF microdeletion detection. Karyotyping revealed somatic anomalies in 16 subjects (16/165 = 9.6%. Of these 16, 12 were in the azoospermic group (12/60 = 20% and 4 were in the oligospermic group (4/100 = 4%. The most common chromosomal anomaly was Klinefelter syndrome (10/165 = 6%. Microdeletions of AZF genes were detected in 12 subjects (12/160 = 7.5%. The frequencies detected are similar to those described previously. These results show the importance of genetic evaluation of infertile males prior to assisted reproduction. Such evaluation can lead to genetic counseling and, consequently, to primary and secondary prevention of mental retardation and birth defects.

  3. Potential pathways of pesticide action on erectile function-a contributory factor in male infertility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RP Kaur; V Gupta; AF Christopher; P Bansal

    2015-01-01

    One of the important objectives of this manuscript is to focus on the place of erectile dysfunction as an important factor for infertility. The review is about correlating the indiscriminate use of pesticides and to find out and highlight the evidences for mechanism of action of these pesticides for erectile dysfunction and find out the most used and most dangerous pesticide from erectile dysfunction point of view. The review suggests that erectile dysfunction is having a significant place as a causal factor for infertility. Study infers that pesticides are having multiple mechanisms of action through which these cause erectile dysfunction. It also reflects that acetamiprid is having most devastating effect causing erectile dysfunction as it acts through multiple inhibitory pathways. The review successfully highlights the indiscriminate regional use of pesticides.

  4. Accurate Diagnosis as a Prognostic Factor in Intrauterine Insemination Treatment of Infertile Saudi Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Isa, Ahmed Mostafa; Abu-Rafea, Basim; Alasiri, Saleh Ahmed; Al-Mutawa, Johara; Binsaleh, Saleh; Al-Saif, Sameera; Al-Saqer, Aisha

    2014-01-01

    Background The study meant to define the prognostic factors that help in prescribing intrauterine insemination (IUI) for infertility treatment which remains an area of continuous improvements. Methods The diagnostic indications of a cohort of IUI-treated patients and their corresponding pregnancy rates (PRs) were randomly and prospectively studied among Saudi cohort of 303 patients for a period of 20 months. The indications of IUI cases were statistically analyzed for those eligible patients ...

  5. The risk factor profile of women with secondary infertility: an unmatched case-control study in Kigali, Rwanda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Naeyer Ludwig

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Secondary infertility is a common, preventable but neglected reproductive health problem in resource-poor countries. This study examines the association of past sexually transmitted infections (STIs including HIV, bacterial vaginosis (BV and factors in the obstetric history with secondary infertility and their relative contributions to secondary infertility. Methods Between November 2007 and May 2009 a research infertility clinic was set up at the Kigali University Teaching Hospital in Rwanda. Cases were defined as sexually-active women aged 21-45 years presenting with secondary infertility (n = 177, and controls as multiparous women in the same age groups who recently delivered (n = 219. Participants were interviewed about socio-demographic characteristics and obstetric history using structured questionnaires, and were tested for HIV and reproductive tract infections (RTIs. Results Risk factors in the obstetric history for secondary infertility were lack of prenatal care in the last pregnancy, the first pregnancy before the age of 21 years, a history of unwanted pregnancy, a pregnancy with other than current partner, an adverse pregnancy outcome, stillbirth, postpartum infection and curettage. Presence of HIV, herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2, or Treponema pallidum antibodies, and bacterial vaginosis (BV, were significantly more common in women in secondary infertile relationships than those in fertile relationships. The population attributable fractions (PAF% for obstetric events, HIV, other (STIs, and BV were 25%, 30%, 27%, and 14% respectively. Conclusions The main finding of this study is that obstetric events, HIV and other STIs contribute approximately equally to secondary infertility in Rwanda. Scaling up of HIV/STI prevention, increased access to family planning services, improvement of prenatal and obstetric care and reduction of stillbirth and infant mortality rates are all likely to decrease secondary

  6. General aspects of fertility and infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damario, Mark A

    2014-01-01

    Fertility rates have been declining in most Western nations over the past several decades, although it is not entirely clear if an increased rate of infertility substantially contributes to this. As compared to other species, the reproductive efficiency of humans is relatively low. Factors related to fertility include age, exposure to sexually transmitted diseases, frequency of intercourse, coital timing, as well as diet and lifestyle habits. Infertility is considered a disease due to its major disruption of major organ systems and life functions. An infertility evaluation is recommended after 12 months or more of regular, unprotected intercourse and may be considered after 6 months for those female patients over the age of 35 or with other known abnormalities. A proper infertility evaluation is a comprehensive examination of possibly identifiable infertility factors of both female and male partners, lending itself to the most appropriate and potentially effective treatment.

  7. LEUKEMIA INHIBITORY FACTOR IN FERTILE AND INFERTILE HUMAN REPRODUCTIVE TRACT IN VIVO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ghaffari

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Maternal leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF is required for successful implanta¬tion in mice, but little is known about its role and expression in human reproduc¬tion. Here we report on the pattern of LIF mRNA expression in 30 samples of previously fertile and 11 infertile human endometrium, 10 samples of previously fertile post-menopausal endometrium and 10 uterine (Fallopian tubes from pre¬viously fertile women using the reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. All samples were removed with informed patient consent and Ethical Sheffield university Committee approval. Pieces of each sample were processed for electron microscopy to confirm tissue normality and stage of cycle. LIF mRNA was expressed throughout most of the secretory phase (from about day 18 of the cycle and menstruation phase (days 1-4 of cycles in fertile women. However it was not expressed during the proliferative phase. In addition LIF mRNA was absent from the uterine tube at all stages of the cycle and from the postmeno¬pausal and infertile tissue. These results suggest that LIF is expressed in a men¬strual cycle-dependent manner in fertile human endometrium and its expression is likely to be under hormonal control and is not dependent on pregnancy. In addition, our results showed lack of LIF production in infertile women, which may suggest a role for LIF in fertility.

  8. Uniform deletion junctions of complete azoospermia factor region c deletion in infertile men in Taiwan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chao-Chin Hsu; Pao-Lin Kuo; Louise Chuang; Ying-Hung Lin; Yen-Ni Teng; Yung-Ming Lin

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To determine the deletion junctions of infertile men in Taiwan with azoospermia factor region c (AZFc) deletions and to evaluate the genotype/phenotype correlation. Methods: Genomic DNAs from 460 infertile men were examined. Bacterial artificial chromosome clones were used to verify the accuracy of polymerase chain reaction.Deletion junctions of the AZFc region were determined by analysis of sequence-tagged sites and gene-specific markers.Results: Complete AZFc deletions, including BPY2, CDY1 and DAZ genes, were identified in 24 men. The proximal breakpoints were clustered between sY1197 and sY1192, and the distal breakpoints were clustered between sY1054and sY1125 in all but one of the 24 men. The testicular phenotypes of men with complete AZFc deletion varied from oligozoospermia, to hypospermatogenesis, to maturation arrest. Conclusion: We identified a group of infertile men with uniform deletion junctions of AZFc in the Taiwan population. Despite this homogeneous genetic defect in the AZFc region, no clear genotype/phenotype correlation could be demonstrated.

  9. Female Reproductive Hormones and Biomarkers of Oxidative Stress in Genital Chlamydia Infection in Tubal Factor Infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nsonwu-Anyanwu, Augusta Chinyere; Charles-Davies, Mabel Ayebantoyo; Taiwo, Victor Olusegun; Li, Bin; Oni, Anthony Alabar; Bello, Folashade Adenike

    2015-01-01

    Background Genital Chlamydia infection (GCI) and the associated pathologies have been implicated in tubal infertility. Though the actual pathologic mechanisms are still uncertain, oxidative stress and other factors have been implicated. The purpose of the study was to determine the possible contribution of female reproductive hormones and biomarkers of oxidative stress in genital Chlamydial infection to tubal occlusion. Methods This prospective case control study was carried out by recruiting 150 age matched women grouped into infertile Chlamydia positive women (n = 50), fertile Chlamydia positive women (n = 50) and fertile Chlamydia negative women as controls (n = 50). High vaginal swabs and endocervical swabs were collected for screening Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Chlamydia trachomatis, Trichomonas vaginalis, Treponema pallidum, Staphylococcus aureus, and Candida albicans. Sera were collected for estimation of Chlamydia trachomatis antibody, female reproductive hormones [Follicle Stimulating Hormone (FSH), Luteinizing Hormone (LH), Oestradiol (E2), Progesterone (P4), Prolactin (PRL)] and biomarkers of oxidative stress [Total Antioxidant Capacity (TAC) and 8-hydroxyl-2-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG)] by enzyme immunoassay (EIA). Data were analyzed using chi square, analysis of variance and LSD Post hoc to determine mean differences at p = 0.05. Results Among women with GCI, higher levels of LH and 8-OHdG were observed in infertile Chlamydia positive women compared to fertile Chlamydia positive women (p < 0.05). Higher levels of LH and 8-OHdG and lower TAC levels were observed in infertile Chlamydia positive women compared to fertile Chlamydia negative controls (p < 0.05). Conclusion Mechanisms including oxidative DNA damage and reduced antioxidant capacity may be involved in the pathology of Chlamydia induced tubal damage. PMID:25927024

  10. Current medical management of endocrine-related male infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua D Ring

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Male factor contributes to 50%-60% of overall infertility but is solely responsible in only 20% of couples. Although most male factor infertility is ascertained from an abnormal semen analysis, other male factors can be contributory especially if the sample returns normal. Male infertility can be due to identifiable hormonal or anatomical etiologies that may be reversible or irreversible. This manuscript will highlight existing guidelines and our recommendations for hormone evaluation for male infertility and empiric therapies including multivitamins, estrogen receptor modulators (clomiphene, estrogen conversion blockers (anastrozole, and hormone replacement.

  11. Stem cell therapeutic possibilities: future therapeutic options for male-factor and female-factor infertility?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easley, Charles A.; Simerly, Calvin R.; Schatten, Gerald

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in assisted reproduction treatment have enabled some couples with severe infertility issues to conceive, but the methods are not successful in all cases. Notwithstanding the significant financial burden of assisted reproduction treatment, the emotional scars from an inability to conceive a child enacts a greater toll on affected couples. While methods have circumvented some root causes for male and female infertility, often the underlying causes cannot be treated, thus true cures for restoring a patient’s fertility are limited. Furthermore, the procedures are only available if the affected patients are able to produce gametes. Patients rendered sterile by medical interventions, exposure to toxicants or genetic causes are unable to utilize assisted reproduction to conceive a child – and often resort to donors, where permitted. Stem cells represent a future potential avenue for allowing these sterile patients to produce offspring. Advances in stem cell biology indicate that stem cell replacement therapies or in-vitro differentiation may be on the horizon to treat and could cure male and female infertility, although significant challenges need to be met before this technology can reach clinical practice. This article discusses these advances and describes the impact that these advances may have on treating infertility. PMID:23664220

  12. Female Infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infertility means not being able to get pregnant after at least one year of trying (or 6 ... woman keeps having miscarriages, it is also called infertility. Female infertility can result from age, physical problems, ...

  13. Infertility FAQ's

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 3286 After hours (404) 639-2888 Contact Media Infertility FAQs Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Frequently Asked Questions What is infertility? In general, infertility is defined as not being ...

  14. Analysis on Factors Related to Infection of Ureaplasma Urealyticum in Infertile Couples

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    戚其玮; 李强; 马守中; 万加华; 王雪倩

    1999-01-01

    Objective:To study the relationship between related factors and infection of Ureaplasma Urealyticum(UU).Design:A clinical abservational study.Methods:A total of 212 female and 338 male infertility patients were recruited.The statistic methods are chisqaure test and logistic regression analysis.Results:1) Age was related to the infection of UU:the older women's age,the higher the UU infection rate.As the women’s marrige age and husband age increased,the infection rate was reduced.2) Occupation is related to the infection of UU,the infection rate being highest in the peasants group.3)As husband smoked more cigarettes and drank more alcohol,the infection rate of UU was higher.4)The more sexual life,the higher the infection rate.5)The duration of infertility had nothing to do with the UU infection.Conclusion:The women's age,marriage age,husbands' age,occupution,sexual life frequency and husbands's smoking and alcoholism are factors related to UU infection.

  15. The indirect effect of contextual factors on the emotional distress of infertile couples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura-Ramos, M; Gameiro, S; Canavarro, M C; Soares, I; Santos, T A

    2012-01-01

    Few studies were dedicated to study the role of contextual factors, such as the socioeconomic status and urban or rural residence in emotional distress of infertile couples. This study aimed to explore the impact of contextual factors on emotional distress, either directly or by affecting the importance of parenthood in one's life, which in turn affects emotional distress. In this cross-sectional study, 70 couples recruited during hormonal stimulation phase prior to in vitro fertilisation completed clinical and sociodemographic forms and self-report questionnaires assessing representations about the importance of parenthood and emotional distress. Path analysis using structural equation modelling was used to examine direct and indirect effects among variables. Results indicated that socioeconomic status and place of residence had an impact in emotional distress by affecting the representations about the importance of parenthood in one's life. Gender differences were found regarding model paths, suggesting that the social context may have a stronger influence on women's emotional distress than on their partners' distress. When delineating psychological interventions, health care providers should consider that cultural values about children and parenthood contribute to shape the infertility experience.

  16. Factors Associated With Marital Satisfaction in Infertile Couple: A Comprehensive Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samadaee-Gelehkolaee, Keshvar; McCarthy, Barry W; Khalilian, Alireza; Hamzehgardeshi, Zeinab; Peyvandi, Sepideh; Elyasi, Forouza; Shahidi, Maryam

    2015-09-02

    Many factors impact on marital satisfaction. Related factors include demographic factors, assisted reproductive techniques, psychological health, quality of life, psychological, socioeconomic and family support, and sexual function. This study is a literature review of research studies conducted on factors associated with marital satisfaction in infertile couples. The current literature review search was undertaken using multiple databases selected from articles pertinent to the study. The selection of subjects was undertaken from1990 through 2015. The methodological quality was analyzed based on a checklist adopted from a systematic review. Quality assessment of full text studies was finally carried out by two reviewers. The initial search yielded a list of 445 papers, and then reviewers studied titles and abstracts. Thereafter, 69 papers were incorporated, and researchers reviewed summaries of all of the searched articles. Finally, the researchers utilized the data gained from 64 full articles so as to compile this review paper. Reviewing the studies conducted on marital satisfaction, they classified related findings into 6 categories: demographic factors, using fertility assisting methods, psychological health, life quality, economic, social, and family support, and sexual function. The results of this review article depicted that various factors play role in creating marriage life satisfaction in an infertile couple, so that paying attention to them can play an important role in continuing their treatment. Thus, to identify such factors is considered essential in their treatment protocol highly based on culture. Of the drawbacks of this research is that it has tried at best to employ the studies belonging to diverse countries with different cultures. Also, the number of the papers was considerably limited.

  17. Intracytoplasmic sperm injection in the treatment of male infertility due to obstructive or non-obstructive azoospermia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘伟信; 黄萍; 王丽; 罗孟军; 岳利民; 郑煜

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effects of intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) ontreatment of infertility due to obstructive and non-obstructive azoospermia..Methods: A retrospective analysis of fertilization, cleavage, embryo implantationand pregnancy rates was done in 158 ICSI cycles including 112 obstructive azoospermiaand 46 non-obstructive azoospermia. Ovarian hyperstimulation and ICSI procedureswere performed by conventional protocol. The sperm was collected by percutaneous epi-didymal sperm aspiration (PESA) or testicular sperm extraction (TESE).Results:The fertilization rate (73.1% vs. 67.0%), cleavage rate (88.6% vs. 86.3%), embryo implantation rate (20.7% vs. 11.4%), clinical pregnancy rate per trans-fer cycle (35.7% vs. 19.6%) were obtained for obstructive and non-obstructiveazoospermia, respectively.Conclusion: The results revealed that in the cases of obstructive azoospermia, ferti-lization rate, embryo implantation rate and clinical pregnancy rate were significantlyhigher than those of non-obstructive azoospermia. But there was no significant differ-ence of the cleavage rate between two groups.

  18. Prevalence and etiological factors of female infertility with spina bifida occulta%伴发隐性脊柱裂的女性不孕症发病率及其病因分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张笑春; 屈清华; 季冰; 黎海涛; 陈伟; 吴宗乾; 王健

    2013-01-01

    infertility (22, 1. 88% ) was lesser than secondary infertility(529, 45. 14% ) (P < 0. 01) in NSBO subgroup. There were multiple complicated etiological factors for SBO. Primary infertility was due to disorders of ovulation, immunity factors and endocrine factors. Secondary infertility was due to tubal and uterus infection, immunity factors and endocrine factors. Surgery and infection induced by surgery were major etiological factors for female infertility in NSBO group(P <0. 05). Conclusion Female infertility with SBO has higher prevalence than those without.

  19. Association of MDR1 C3435T and C1236T single nucleotide polymorphisms with male factor infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydos, S E; Karadağ, A; Özkan, T; Altınok, B; Bunsuz, M; Heidargholizadeh, S; Aydos, K; Sunguroğlu, A

    2015-06-11

    Infertility affects 1 in 6 couples and approximately 1 in 25 men. Male factor infertility is a major cause of spermatogenic anomalies, the causes of which are largely unknown. Impaired repro-ductive functions in men might result from physiological, genetic, and/or environmental factors such as xenobiotics. The multi-drug re-sistance1 (MDR1) gene encodes a P-glycoprotein which has a role in the active transport of various substrates providing protection of somatic cells from potentially toxic substances, including xenobi-otics. MDR1 is highly expressed at the luminal surface of capillary endothelial cells, and is expressed in Leydig cells, testicular mac-rophages, and Sertoli cells. We performed genotype and haplotype analyses of MDR1 in 192 infertile and 102 fertile Turkish men for the genetic markers C1236T and C3435T, using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. In the overall population, correlations were analyzed in all genotype mod-els. We found that the C3435T polymorphism TT vs CT genotypes showed statistically significant differences in their association with infertility (P = 0.045), and that the CT genotype was associated with high sperm DNA damage (P = 0.02), suggesting that the CT genotype might be a susceptibility factor for infertility. Additionally, the T-T haplotype was significantly more frequent in the control group (13.2 vs 6.5%; odds ratio = 0.459, 95%CI = 0.259-0.814, P = 0.006). This study showed that MDR1 might have a role in male infertility. Fur-ther research in large cohorts with different populations is required to clarify the role of MDR in male fertility.

  20. Incidence of infertility and risk factors of impaired fecundity among newly married couples in a Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Qinqin; Ren, Aiguo; Zhang, Le; Liu, Jufen; Li, Zhiwen; Yang, Yan; Li, Rong; Ma, Le

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this study were to obtain the incidence of infertility, to examine the causes of infertility and to explore risk factors for impaired fecundity in a rural region of northern China using a prospective follow-up design. A total of 2151 newly married couples planning to become pregnant within the next 12 months were enrolled between 2009 and 2012 from two counties of Shanxi Province in northern China. Couples were followed up for at least 1 year or until a clinical pregnancy occurred. Information about clinical pregnancy was obtained. The 12-month and 24-month infertility rates were 13.6% (95% CI 11.9 to 15.3) and 8.5% (95% CI 6.7 to 10.3), respectively. About 63% of women became pregnant within 6 months of follow up, and 86% did so within 12 months of follow up. The main causes of female infertility were ovulation disorders, fallopian tube problems and polycystic ovary syndrome. The primary cause of male infertility was sperm quality problems. Couples who used coal as cooking fuel, women with a higher body mass index, women with long-term health problems, and men who had married at later ages were more likely to have delayed pregnancies.

  1. Dicer1 depletion in male germ cells leads to infertility due to cumulative meiotic and spermiogenic defects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yannick Romero

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Spermatogenesis is a complex biological process that requires a highly specialized control of gene expression. In the past decade, small non-coding RNAs have emerged as critical regulators of gene expression both at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional level. DICER1, an RNAse III endonuclease, is essential for the biogenesis of several classes of small RNAs, including microRNAs (miRNAs and endogenous small interfering RNAs (endo-siRNAs, but is also critical for the degradation of toxic transposable elements. In this study, we investigated to which extent DICER1 is required for germ cell development and the progress of spermatogenesis in mice. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We show that the selective ablation of Dicer1 at the early onset of male germ cell development leads to infertility, due to multiple cumulative defects at the meiotic and post-meiotic stages culminating with the absence of functional spermatozoa. Alterations were observed in the first spermatogenic wave and include delayed progression of spermatocytes to prophase I and increased apoptosis, resulting in a reduced number of round spermatids. The transition from round to mature spermatozoa was also severely affected, since the few spermatozoa formed in mutant animals were immobile and misshapen, exhibiting morphological defects of the head and flagellum. We also found evidence that the expression of transposable elements of the SINE family is up-regulated in Dicer1-depleted spermatocytes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings indicate that DICER1 is dispensable for spermatogonial stem cell renewal and mitotic proliferation, but is required for germ cell differentiation through the meiotic and haploid phases of spermatogenesis.

  2. Expression profiles of NPHP1 in the germ cells in the semen of men with male factor infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi, A N; Anil Kumar, T R; Pillai, S M; Jayakrishnan, K; Kumar, P G

    2015-07-01

    NPHP1, the gene that encodes the protein nephrocystin-1 has been identified to be mutated in Juvenile Nephronophthisis, an autosomal recessive cystic kidney disorder which is the most frequent genetic cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in children and young adults. Nphp1-targeted mutant mice studies have shown that it did not express renal manifestations of nephronophthisis; instead male mice were infertile with oligoteratozoospermia signifying the crucial role of Nphp1 in relation to murine spermatogenesis. Whether an aberrant expression of NPHP1 in testis might lead to spermatogenic defects in human and ultimately male factor infertility is a possibility that have not been investigated so far. In this regard, characterization of NPHP1 in spermatozoa from fertile and infertile males was carried out by employing RT-PCR, western blotting, and immunofluorescence analysis. In all the 23 normozoospermic samples we screened, NPHP1 was significantly expressed at the target message and protein level and also prominent localization pattern of NPHP1 was observed at the head, midpiece, and tail segments of spermatozoa. Conversely, in majority of the 103 infertile samples we screened, aberrant pattern of NPHP1 expression was detected at the transcript and protein level and abnormal localization pattern of expression was observed in spermatozoa. Anomalies detected in infertile cases when compared with the normozoospermic controls points to the indispensable role of NPHP1 in relation to spermatogenesis. Thus, besides the decisive association with juvenile nephronophthisis, our study provides the first direct evidence that NPHP1 is associated with male factor infertility and also could be a possible biomarker for the assessment of male fertility status. GENBANK NM_000272.3 © 2015 American Society of Andrology and European Academy of Andrology.

  3. Chlamydia trachomatis and chlamydial heat shock protein 60-specific antibody and cell-mediated responses predict tubal factor infertility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tiitinen, A.; Surcel, H.-M.; Halttunen, M.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To evaluate the role of Chlamydia trachomatis-induced humoral and cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses in predicting tubal factor infertility (TFI). METHODS: Blood samples were taken from 88 women with TFI and 163 control women. C. trachomatis and chlamydial heat shock protein 60 (CHSP...

  4. Kisspeptin, unexplained infertility and embryo implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaida Mumtaz

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Kisspeptin (KP is a neuropeptide that causes the release of the gonadotropin releasing hormone, which controls hypothalamo pituitary ovarian axis and exerts a number of peripheral effects on reproductive organs. The primary objective of this study was to compare baseline KP levels in females with different types of infertility and identify possible correlations with risk of failure to conceive, preclinical abortion and pregnancy after intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI. Materials and Methods A longitudinal cohort study was carried out from August 2014 until May 2015 by recruiting 124 female patients undergoing ICSI, after obtaining ethical approval from the Australian Concept Infertility Medical Center. Cause of infertility due to male, female and unexplained factors was at a frequency of 32 (24%, 33 (31% and 59 (45% among the individuals respectively. KP levels were measured by ELISA assay before the initiation of the ICSI treatment protocol. Outcome of ICSI was categorized into three groups of non-pregnant with beta-human chorionic gonadotropin (β-hCG25 mIU/ml and no cardiac activity, and clinical pregnancy declared upon confirmation of cardiac activity. Results based on cause of infertility and outcome groups were analyzed by one-way ANOVA. Results Females with unexplained infertility had significantly lower levels of KP when compared with those with male factor infertility (176.69 ± 5.03 vs. 397.6 ± 58.2, P=0.001. Clinical pregnancy was observed in 28 (23% females of which 17 (71% had a female cause of infertility. In the non-pregnant group of 66 (53% females, common cause of infertility was unexplained 56(85%. A weak positive correlation of KP levels with fertilized oocytes and endometrial thickness was observed (P=0.04 and 0.01 respectively. Conclusion Deficiency of KP in females with unexplained infertility was associated with reduced chances of implantation after ICSI.

  5. Pseudo skin factor due to partial penetration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reynolds, A.C.; Chen, J.C.; Raghavan, R.

    1983-10-01

    In this study the authors examine the pseudo skin factor due to partial penetration in a two-layer reservoir when only one layer is open to flow. They show that the pseudo skin factor can be correlated as a unique function of three reservoir parameters and in some cases can be accurately correlated as a function of two reservoir parameters. They also present graphs and procedures for estimating the pseudo skin factor.

  6. Pseudo skin factor due to partial penetration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reynolds, A.C.; Chen, J.C.; Raghavan, R.

    1983-01-01

    This study examines the pseudo skin factor due to partial penetration in a 2-layer reservoir when only one layer is open to flow. The pseudo skin factor can be correlated as a unique function of 3 reservoir parameters and in some cases can be correlated accurately as a function of 2 reservoir parameters. Graphs and procedures for estimating the pseudo skin factor are presented. 17 references.

  7. Infertility with Testicular Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrowski, Kevin A; Walsh, Thomas J

    2015-08-01

    Testicular germ cell cancer is one of the most curable cancers. Most patients are treated during their reproductive years, making infertility a significant quality of life issue after successful treatment. This focused review evaluates the factors that contribute to infertility and specific fertility risks with the various testicular cancer treatments. Timing of patient discussions and current fertility treatments are reviewed.

  8. Double versus single homologous intrauterine insemination for male factor infertility: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Apostolos Zavos; Alexandros Daponte; Antonios Garas; Christina Verykouki; Evangelos Papanikolaou; Georgios Anifandis; Nikolaos P Polyzos

    2013-01-01

    Male factor infertility affects 30%-50% of infertile couples worldwide,and there is an increasing interest in the optimal management of these patients.In studies comparing double and single intrauterine insemination (IUI),a trend towards higher pregnancy rates in couples with male factor infertility was observed.Therefore,we set out to perform a meta-analysis to examine the superiority of double versus single IUI with the male partner's sperm in couples with male factor infertility.An odds ratio (OR) of 95% confidence intervals (Cls) was calculated for the pregnancy rate.Outcomes were analysed by using the ManteI-Haesel or DerSimonian-Laird model according to the heterogeneity of the results.Overall,five trials involving 1125 I UI cycles were included in the meta-analysis.There was a two-fold increase in pregnancies after a cycle with a double I UI compared with a cycle with a single IUI (OR:2.0; 95% CI:1.07-3.75;P<0.03).Nevertheless,this result was mainly attributed to the presence of a large trial that weighted as almost 50% in the overall analysis.Sensitivity analysis,excluding this large trial,revealed only a trend towards higher pregnancy rates among double IUI cycles (OR:1.58; 95% CI:0.59-4.21),but without statistical significance (P=-0.20).Our systematic review highlights that the available evidence regarding the use of double I UI in couples with male factor infertility is fragmentary and weak.Although there may be a trend towards higher pregnancy rates when the number of IUIs per cycle is increased,further large and well-designed randomized trials are needed to provide solid evidence to guide current clinical practice.

  9. Immunohistochemical Analysis of TNF-α and HSP-60 in Women with Tubal Factor Infertility Associated with Chlamydia Trachomatis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵海珍; 李红发

    2004-01-01

    To explore the roles of tumor necrosis factor-α(TNF-α) and heat shock protein 60(HSP-60) in women with tubal factor infertility (TFI) associated with Chlamydia trachomatis,and to determine the mechanisms of fallopian adhesions in Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) infections, the expressions of TNF-α and HSP-60 were quantitatively determined in 60 cases of TFI and 30controls by immunohistochemical technique. The patients with TFI were further divided into group A and group B according to the CT-DNA of cervical specimens of PCR. The quantitative analysis was conducted by employing computerized image analysis system. It is found that the expressions of TNF-α and HSP-60 were much higher in TFI patients than those of controls. Among CT-HSP responders, a stronger expression was correlated with more severe salpingeal pathology. It is concluded that TNF-α and HSP-60 play very important roles in fallopian tube adhesion and occlusion in TFI due to CT infection.

  10. Psychosocial Problems during Infertility Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurcan Kirca

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Infertility is a complex situation crisis which is often psychologically-threatening and emotionally stressful for both partners as well as economically expensive and causes physical pain due to the operations performed for diagnosis and treatment purposes. Infertility has physical, psychological, social, emotional and financial impacts. Infertile couples are under a great social pressure, and need to conceal the problem as it is exceptionally private for them. Infertile individuals are destitute of support when they do not share their pregnancy problems with their families and relatives. Couples define their infertility experience as the most stressful experience of their lives.

  11. Successful Pregnancy in a Couple with Severe Male Factor Infertility after Selection of Sperm with Cytoplasmic Droplets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenna Bellish

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We present live births resulting from two separate IVF cycles in a couple in which ICSI was performed with sperm specifically selected for presence of small cytoplasmic droplets. These cycles followed previous cycles using standard sperm selection methods in which very poor embryo development and no pregnancies ensued. The male partner was diagnosed with severe male factor infertility including elevated DNA fragmentation.

  12. Infertility and incident endometrial cancer risk: a pooled analysis from the epidemiology of endometrial cancer consortium (E2C2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, H P; Cook, L S; Weiderpass, E; Adami, H-O; Anderson, K E; Cai, H; Cerhan, J R; Clendenen, T V; Felix, A S; Friedenreich, C M; Garcia-Closas, M; Goodman, M T; Liang, X; Lissowska, J; Lu, L; Magliocco, A M; McCann, S E; Moysich, K B; Olson, S H; Petruzella, S; Pike, M C; Polidoro, S; Ricceri, F; Risch, H A; Sacerdote, C; Setiawan, V W; Shu, X O; Spurdle, A B; Trabert, B; Webb, P M; Wentzensen, N; Xiang, Y-B; Xu, Y; Yu, H; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, A; Brinton, L A

    2015-01-01

    Background: Nulliparity is an endometrial cancer risk factor, but whether or not this association is due to infertility is unclear. Although there are many underlying infertility causes, few studies have assessed risk relations by specific causes. Methods: We conducted a pooled analysis of 8153 cases and 11 713 controls from 2 cohort and 12 case-control studies. All studies provided self-reported infertility and its causes, except for one study that relied on data from national registries. Logistic regression was used to estimate adjusted odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results: Nulliparous women had an elevated endometrial cancer risk compared with parous women, even after adjusting for infertility (OR=1.76; 95% CI: 1.59–1.94). Women who reported infertility had an increased risk compared with those without infertility concerns, even after adjusting for nulliparity (OR=1.22; 95% CI: 1.13–1.33). Among women who reported infertility, none of the individual infertility causes were substantially related to endometrial cancer. Conclusions: Based on mainly self-reported infertility data that used study-specific definitions of infertility, nulliparity and infertility appeared to independently contribute to endometrial cancer risk. Understanding residual endometrial cancer risk related to infertility, its causes and its treatments may benefit from large studies involving detailed data on various infertility parameters. PMID:25688738

  13. Psychosocial Consequences of Infertility on Infertile Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatima, P; Rahman, D; Hossain, H B; Hossain, H N; Mughi, C R

    2015-10-01

    This study explores to find out the qualitative and quantitative psychosocial consequences of infertility in women coming for infertility treatment in tertiary infertility center. A total of 400 infertile couples who agreed to participate in the study were asked to fill up the questionnaires and later interviewed to access the psychosocial consequences of infertility on their personal life in a tertiary infertility clinic in Dhaka at Center for Assisted Reproduction (CARe Hospital), Dhaka from June 2011 to December 2011 and agreed to participate in the study were included in the study. The data was analyzed and the quantitative and qualitative psychosocial factors were evaluated. Four hundred infertile couple who filled the questionnaires was included in the study. Sixty three percent of the women belonged to age group >20 30 years at the time of interview. Regarding age at marriage 43.8% of the women were married by 20 years, 51.3% were married between 20 30 years. Mean±SD duration of present married life was 7.20±4.45 (range 1 to 28) years and 74.4% of the women were living with their husbands. Of them 75.5% women were housewife. When asked whether they knew what was the reason of infertility in the couple, 32.5% knew the cause was in the female partner, 14.5%, knew the cause was in the male partner, 10.3% knew the cause was in both partners, 21.5% knew cause of infertility was not in any of the partners, and 21.3% had no idea about the cause of infertility. The male partner's response about the issue of prognosis and outcome of couple's infertility revealed 37.3% believed their wives will conceive someday, 31.3% had no intention for a second marriage, 13% were indifferent, 11.3% blamed their wives for infertility and 4.8% threatened for a second marriage. Only 2.5% of the male partners were suggested on consulting and continuing treatment by specialist. The family pressure by in-laws and relatives towards their infertility was that 57.3% insisted on consulting

  14. Suicidal risk among infertile women undergoing in-vitro fertilization: Incidence and risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shani, Chen; Yelena, Stukalina; Reut, Ben Kimhy; Adrian, Shulman; Sami, Hamdan

    2016-06-30

    Despite the fact that depression and other emotional distress are well documented in infertile women, little is known about the relationship between infertility and suicidal risk. The aim of this cross sectional study was to examine the rate of suicide risk (suicidal ideation/suicidal attempts) among 106 infertile women visiting Infertility and In-Vitro Fertilization (IVF) Hospital Unit, and to identify the demographic, medical and clinical correlates to suicidal risk. The incidence of suicide risk was 9.4%. Suicidal women were more likely to be childless or had fewer children and experienced higher levels of depressive symptoms. In addition, they reported more frequently on denial, social withdrawal and self-blame coping strategies compared to participants without suicidal risk. A multiple logistic regression model revealed that being childless, using non-positive reappraisal and exhibiting depressive symptoms were significant predictors of suicide risk in the future. These results suggest that routine assessment of suicidal risk and depression should be provided for infertile women in the course of IVF. Furthermore, future interventions should focus on helping them acquire different emotions regulation strategies and provide alternative skills for positive coping.

  15. Medical Imaging and Infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Rebecca

    2016-11-01

    Infertility affects many couples, and medical imaging plays a vital role in its diagnosis and treatment. Radiologic technologists benefit from having a broad understanding of infertility risk factors and causes. This article describes the typical structure and function of the male and female reproductive systems, as well as congenital and acquired conditions that could lead to a couple's inability to conceive. Medical imaging procedures performed for infertility diagnosis are discussed, as well as common interventional options available to patients. © 2016 American Society of Radiologic Technologists.

  16. Factors predictive of abnormal semen parameters in male partners of couples attending the infertility clinic of a tertiary hospital in south-western Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Olusola Aduloju

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infertility is a common gynaecological problem and male factor contributes significantly in the aetiology of infertility. Semen analysis has remained a useful investigation in the search for male factor infertility. Aim: This study assessed the pattern of semen parameters and predictive factors associated with abnormal parameters in male partners of infertile couples attending a Nigerian tertiary hospital. Methods: A descriptive study of infertile couples presenting at the clinic between January 2012and December 2015 was done at Ekiti State University Teaching Hospital, Ado-Ekiti. Seminal fluid from the male partners were analysed in the laboratory using the WHO 2010 criteria for human semen characteristics. Data was analysed using SPSS 17 and logistic regression analysis was used to determine the predictive factors associated with abnormal semen parameters. Results: A total of 443 men participated in the study and 38.2% had abnormal sperm parameters. Oligozoospermia (34.8% and asthenozoospermia (26.9% are leading single factor abnormality found, astheno-oligozoospermia occurred in 14.2% and oligo-astheno-teratozoospermia in 3.6% of cases. The prevalence of azoospermia was 3.4%. Smoking habit, past infection with mumps and previous groin surgery significantly predicted abnormal semen parameters with p values of 0.025, 0.040 and 0.017 respectively. Positive cultures were recorded in 36.2% of cases and staph aureus was the commonest organism. Conclusion: Male factor abnormalities remain significant contributors to infertility and men should be encouraged through advocacy to participate in investigation of infertility to reduce the level of stigmatization and ostracizing of women with infertility especially in sub-Saharan Africa.

  17. Psychiatric Aspects of Infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hacer Sezgin

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Infertility can be defined as a crisis with cultural, religious, and class related aspects, which coexists with medical, psychiatric, psychological, and social problems. Relation between psychiatric and psychological factors stem from a mutual interaction of both. Family is an important institution in maintaining human existence and raising individuals in line with society's expectations. Fertility and reproduction are seen as universal functions unique to women with raising children as the expected result of the family institution. Incidence of infertility has increased recently and can become a life crisis for a couple. Even though not being able to have a child affects both sexes emotionally, women feel greater amounts of stress, pressure, anxiety, and depression.Consequences of infertility arise from short and long-term devastating effects on both individual's physical and mental health, and marital system. Many studies focus on infertility related psychological and psychiatric disorders (depression, anxiety, grief, marital conflict, gender differences, relation between the causes of infertility and psychopathology, the effects of psychiatric evaluation and intervention -when necessaryon the course of infertility treatment, pregnancy rates, and childbirth. The most important underlying causes of high levels of stress and anxiety that infertile women experience are the loss of maternity, reproduction, sense of self, and genetic continuity. In this review article is to investigate the relationship between medically unexplained symptoms and psychiatric symptoms. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2014; 6(2.000: 165-185

  18. Uterine transplantation: a future possibility to treat women with uterus factor infertility?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brännström, M

    2007-06-01

    Uterine transplantation is developed as a possible future treatment for patients with absolute uterus factor infertility. Patients with the Mayer-Rokitansky-Kuster-Hauser (MRKH) syndrome, patients having had hysterectomy for benign or malignant uterine/cervical diseases and patients with intrauterine adhesions are the major groups of patients, who could benefit from this procedure. There has been one attempt to transplant a human uterus, which however failed. Since then, several uterine transplantation animal models have been developed to examine various aspects of the uterus transplantation procedure and to optimize it for human use. In a mouse model, normal pregnancy rate and offspring were seen after syngeneic uterus transplantation. The tolerance for cold ischemia from the time the uterus is taken out from the donor until placed in the recipient is around 24 h, as shown in a mouse uterine transplantation model and on human uterine tissue. The rejection pattern of the transplanted uterus was tested in an allogeneic mouse model with signs of rejection after 5 to 10 days. High doses of cyclosporin A (CyA) could partly suppress rejection but pregnancies have not yet been achieved in allogeneic uterus transplants in any species. In the sheep and pig models, the vascular anastomosis technique and the tolerability to cold ischemia have been evaluated. Normal offspring have been delivered in the sheep model after autotransplantation and presently allogeneic uterine transplants in sheep treated with corticosteroids and CyA are tested. Initial studies on uterus transplantation is also now conducted in primates. It is predicted that uterus transplantation may reach a clinical stage within 2-3 years, in the event of a continuous high research activity within this field.

  19. Infertility: Inability or Disability?

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    Abha Khetarpal

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Disability is a complex phenomenon. It reflects an interaction between features of a person’s body and features of the society in which he or she lives. International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF, lays stress on the functional as well as the structural problem of a person. All the definitions of disability also include the disorders of the reproductive and endocrine system. So infertility and impotency should also be included in the category of disability. It affects the participation in areas of life and can have a disabling affect on an individual. Like any other disability the couple has to adapt and integrate infertility in their sense of self thus infertility comes as a major life crisis. Medically, infertility, in most cases, is considered to be the result of a physical impairment or a genetic abnormality. Socially, couples are incapable of their reproductive or parental roles. On social level, infertility in most cultures remains associated with social stigma and taboo just like the social model of disability. Couples who are unable to reproduce may be looked down upon due to social stigmatisation. Infertility can lead to divorces and separation leading to a broken family life. Without labelling infertility as a disability, it is difficult for the people to access services and welfare benefits offered by the government. Infertility treatments are highly sophisticated so they are very expensive and are even not covered by insurance and government aid.In the light of all this it becomes imperative to categorise infertility as disability.

  20. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor administration for infertile women with thin endometrium in frozen embryo transfer program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yu; Pan, Ping; Chen, Xiaoli; Li, Lin; Li, Yi; Yang, Dongzi

    2014-03-01

    We aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) administration for infertile women with thin endometrium in frozen embryo transfer program. Among 59 infertile patients with thin endometrium (≤7 mm), 34 patients received uterine infusion of recombinant human G-CSF (100 μg/0.6 mL) on the day of ovulation or administration of progesterone or human chorionic gonadotropin, with 40 cycles defined as G-CSF group and 49 previous cycles as self-controlled group, and 25 patients refused, with 80 cycles defined as the control group. Higher proportion of induced cycles and lower proportion of natural cycles were observed in the G-CSF group, when compared to the self-controlled group or control group (P transfer were similar in all the groups (P > .05). Our study fails to demonstrate that G-CSF has the potential to improve embryo implantation and clinical pregnancy rate of the infertile women with thin endometrium.

  1. Adenomyosis and Infertility Related Factors%子宫腺肌病及其不孕相关因素

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高艳; 宋静慧

    2014-01-01

    Adenomyosis (AM) is a common gynecological disease, in recent years, the incidence is rising. Studies on adenomyosis and infertility-related mechanisms has become a hot topic. Although there is no sufficient epidemiological data to prove that there is a genuine relationship between AM and infertility. However, with improved image and therapeutic levels in AM , indirect evidence shows AM with low fertility. There is no specific mechanism for the interpretation of adenomyosis cause of infertility, this article will combine basic pathological anatomy pathophysiology, and endometrial receptivity abnormalities, endocrine abnormalities and other aspects related to adenomyosis′s research progress, to discuss the relationship between AM and infertility factors.%子宫腺肌病(adenomyosis,AM)是妇科常见病,近年来其发病率呈上升趋势。有关AM与不孕相关机制的研究也成为近年的研究热点。虽然没有充分的流行病学数据表明AM与不孕有确切关系,但是随着AM影像水平及治疗水平的提高,间接证明AM与生殖能力低下有关。目前尚无具体诠释引起AM不孕的机制,结合AM发生的病理解剖学基础、病理生理学改变、子宫内膜容受性异常以及内分泌免疫学异常等方面的相关研究进展探讨AM与不孕的关系。

  2. Detection of virulence factors of Uropathoigenic Escherichia coli isolates from infertile women high vaginal swabs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhad Safarpourdehkourdi

    2014-03-01

    Conclusion: The high vaginal Escherichia coli harbored certain virulence genes of uropathogenic Escherichia coli strains. The urinary tract infections should be treated well to diminish its upstream transfer into vagina. Some more investigation should be perform for identifying the epidemiological aspects of uropathogenic Escherichia coli in high vaginal part of infertile women.

  3. Spontaneous pregnancy after pessary placement in a patient with infertility and advanced pelvic organ prolapse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsia-Shu Lo

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available To highlight possible association of advanced pelvic organ prolapse with infertility and its successful outcome following conservative management. We report herein a 38-year-old para 1, non-overweight woman who presented with secondary infertility without any factors for infertility except for an advanced POP. She had intrauterine insemination (IUI performed twice at a local clinic and in vitro fertilization-embryo transfer (IVF-ET program twice in our institute unsuccessfully. She conceived spontaneously after vaginal pessary placement and delivered, vaginally, a healthy female baby weighing 3,365 g at the 38th week of gestation. Advanced POP appears to be an important risk factor for infertility. After completing an infertility workup, pessary application can be the first-line treatment modality for women with unexplained infertility due to advanced POP.

  4. The Effects of Total Motile Sperm Count on Spontaneous Pregnancy Rate and Pregnancy After IUI Treatment in Couples with Male Factor and Unexplained Infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajder, Mithad; Hajder, Elmira; Husic, Amela

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Male infertility factor is defined if the total number of motile spermatozoa (TMSC) asthenozoospermia (A), teratozoospermia (T) or combination (O+A+T) and azoospermia (A). Although this classification indicates the accuracy of findings its relevance for prognosis in infertile couple and the choice of treatment is questionable. Materials and Methods: The study included 98 couples with male infertility factor (bad spermiogram) and couples with normospermia and normal female factor (unexplained infertility). Testing group is randomized at: group (A) with TMSC> 3,106 / ejaculate and a spontaneous pregnancy, group (B) with TMSCl 3 x 106 / ejaculate and couples who have not achieved pregnancy. Main results: From a total of 98 pairs of men’s and unexplained infertility, 42 of them (42.8%) achieved spontaneous pregnancy, while 56 (57.2%) pairs did not achieve spontaneous pregnancy. TMSC was significantly higher (42.4 ± 28.4 vs. 26.2 ± 24, p 20 x 106 / ejaculate (RR = 1.7, 95% CI: 1.56-1.82, 5 x 106 / ejaculate are indicated for treatment with IUI. TMSC can be used as the method of choice for diagnosis and treatment of male infertility. PMID:26980930

  5. Infertility, infertility treatment, and fetal growth restriction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Jin Liang; Obel, Carsten; Hammer Bech, Bodil

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the association between infertility, with or without treatment, and fetal growth, as well as perinatal and infant mortality. METHODS: From the Danish National Birth Cohort (1997-2003), we identified 51,041 singletons born of fertile couples (time to pregnancy 12 months or less......), 5,787 born of infertile couples conceiving naturally (time to pregnancy more than 12 months), and 4,317 born after treatment. We defined small for gestational age (SGA) as the lowest 5% of birth weight by sex and gestational age. RESULTS: Crude estimates suggested an increased risk of perinatal...... effect on fetal growth. A small-to-moderate increased risk of perinatal mortality in infertile couples cannot be ruled out due to the small number of cases. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: II. Udgivelsesdato: 2007-Dec...

  6. Fertility prognosis for infertile couples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bostofte, E; Bagger, P; Michael, A

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To develop a fertility prognosis model for infertile couples. DESIGN: Prospective follow-up study. PARTICIPANTS: In the period November 30, 1977 to June 1, 1985, 321 consecutive couples were investigated for infertility at Hvidovre University Hospital. Investigation of the female...... MEASURE: The Cox regression model was used to predict the time required to conceive based on informations provided by fertility investigations. RESULTS: Three of 16 prognostic variables (the period of infertility, the female infertility factor, and the P-test) possess significant prognostic information....... The period of infertility and the P-test are best scored as continuous variables, whereas the female infertility factor are best categorized in four classes, i.e., normal, ovulation or cervical disorder, anatomic disorder, or a combination of disorders. CONCLUSIONS: The three prognostic variables...

  7. CONTRIBUTION OF SOCIOECONOMIC FACTORS TO REPRODUCTIVE TRACT INFECTIONS AND INFERTILITY IN RURAL INDIA

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    Minakeshi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study was designed to find out how socioeconomic, cultural, educational and religious factors play a role in causation of RTI/STD. STUDY DESIGN: This study was conducted at Gynae, OPD of Dist. Hospital Samba, Jammu, J&K. 200 patients coming for infertility check u p and treatment between Feb. 2013 to Jan. 2014 were included in the study. It was an observational cross - sectional study. A pretested, semi - structured questionnaire was administered which included information about demographic, socioeconomic profile, menstrual and sexual practices, obstetrics treatment and family history. Complaints suggestive of RTI/STI were noted. RESULTS: Maximum incidence of RTI/STI was observed in th e age group 25 – 30 years. RTI/STI was more in illiterate patients (64 as compared to literate patients (53 % . A negative correlation between income and prevalence of RTI was found. Prevalence of RTI was slightly more in patients from joint families (67 % as compared to women from nuclear families ( 33%. Similarly people living in Kutcha houses showed more prevalence of RTI ( 66% as compared to pucca houses ( 48%. Correlation between RTI and housing was not significant (p > 0.005 . Tap water supplied residents showed less prevalence of RTI 50% as compared to hand pump using residents 65%, however, correlation was not statistically significant (p > 0.05 . The incidence of RTI was 54% in daily bathers and among irregular bathers, the incidence was 66%. The prevalence of RTI was 54%in regular wearers of underwear whereas in irregular wearers the prevalence was 75%. Genital hygiene correlation, the prevalence of RTI in pad users was 42.8% whereas the prevalence in non – pad users was 61%. There was statistically significant correlation between the use of rag during menses and the prevalence of RTI. RTI was more prevalent (64.8 % in women sharing toilets with others while same was 45.6% in women among having separate toilet facilities. CONCLUSION

  8. Cytogenetic and andrological status and ICSI-results in couples with severe male factor infertility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    G.Haidl; B.Peschka; G.Schwanitz; M.Montag; K.vanderVen; H.vanderVen

    2000-01-01

    Aim: To pursue whether cytogenetic aberrations correlate with specific spermatological or hormonal abnormalities.Methods: 305 infertile couples were investigated. All male partners were referred to a complete andrological workup with physical examination, determination of hormones, HIV testing and semen analysis. Cytogenetic analysis was carried out in both partners by means of standard techniques using cultured lymphocytes from peripheral blood. Results: Among the 305 couples, 10 men (3.2%) and 10 women (3.2%) showed constitutional chromosomal aberrations, including reciprocal translocations (n=7), Robertsonian translocations (n=3), inversions (n=3), other structural aberrations (n=4) and sex chromosome aberrations (n=3). In addition to the impaired sperm count in most of the patients, a tendency to an increased proportion of spermatozoa with acrosome defect was observed. Conclusion. Chromosomal aberrations may contribute to the low fertilization and pregnancy rates in the infertile couples.(Asian J Androl 2000 Dec;2:293-296)

  9. FABP9 Mutations Are Not Detected in Cases of Infertility due to Sperm Morphological Defects in Iranian Men

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    Javad Jamshidi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs are members of the intracellular lipid binding protein (iLBPs family and most of them show tissue specific expression. FABP9/PERF15 (Perforatorial15 is the male germ cell-specific fatty acid-binding protein. It was first identified as the major constituent of the murine sperm perforatorium and perinuclear theca. To date, investigations in mice have demonstrated that this protein has a role in the male reproductive system, especially in spermatogenesis. Also, it has been reported that FABP9 can protect sperm fatty acids from oxidative damage. Recently it was shown that it can affect sperm morphology in mice. Based on these findings, we designed a study to evaluate if mutations of this gene can affect sperm morphology in humans. Materials and Methods: In this case-control study, DNA was extracted from peripheral blood of 100 infertile males with normal sperm count but with a number of morphologically abnormal sperms in their semen that was above normal. Four exons and one intron of the FABP9 gene were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR, re-sequenced and then analyzed for mutation detection. Results: We did not detect any mutation in any area of the four exons, intron 3 and splice sites of FABP9 gene in any of the studied 100 samples. Conclusion: There was no mutation in the exonic regions and the poor sperm morphology. However, we didn’t analyze the promoter, intron 1 and 2 to establish conclusions regarding the association of these genic regions and sperm dysmorphology.

  10. Classical and Molecular Methods for Evaluation of Chlamydia trachomatis Infection in Women with Tubal Factor Infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajikhani, Bahareh; Motallebi, Tayebeh; Norouzi, Jamileh; Bahador, Abbas; Bagheri, Rezvan; Asgari, Soheila; Chamani-Tabriz, Leili

    2013-01-01

    Background Chlamydia trachomatis is the most reported bacterial sexually transmitted disease, especially among young women worldwide. The aim of this study was comparison the prevalence of Chlamydia trachomatis infection in woman with tubal infertility by means of PCR and cell culture techniques. Methods Fifty-one women with confirmed TFI were enrolled in this study in (avicenna infertility Clinic) between January 2010 and January 2011. Cervical swab and cytobrush specimens were collected from each patient by gynecologists and sent to laboratory in transport media. Detection of Chlamydia trachomatis in samples was performed using PCR and bacteria culture in MacCoy cell line. The data were analyzed by Fisher's exact test and independent t-test. Statistical significance was established at a p-value <0.05. Results A significant relation was observed between increased the age of first intercourse and chlamydial infection. Six (11.7%) samples had positive PCR result, whereas cell culture results were positive in only 2 (3.9%) samples. A significant relation was also identified between the duration of infertility and infection (p < 0.05) by PCR versus cell culture method. Conclusion The results showed that PCR is a rapid method, compared to cell culture for detecting Chlamydial organism. It also became clear that the age at first intercourse is important to predict the likelihood of Chlamydia trachomatis. PMID:23926558

  11. The social epidemiology of coping with infertility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, L; Christensen, Ulla; Holstein, B E

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To analyse the cross-sectional association between coping responses with infertility and occupational social class. Infertility is evenly distributed across social classes in Denmark, and there is free access to high-quality assisted reproduction technology. METHODS: Data were based...... passive-avoidance coping and significantly less active-avoidance coping. CONCLUSION: Due to the significant social differences in coping with infertility, the study suggested that elements of coping may be learned from one's social network and reference group....... was developed in four categories: active-avoidance coping; active-confronting coping; passive-avoidance coping; meaning-based coping. These subscales were later confirmed by factor analysis. Occupational social class was measured in a standardized way. RESULTS: Contrary to expectations, the logistic regression...

  12. Understanding Infertility - The Basics

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    ... Home FAQs Frequently Asked Questions Quick Facts About Infertility FAQs About Infertility FAQs About the Psychological Component of Infertility FAQs About Cloning and Stem Cell Research SART's ...

  13. Sexual Dysfunction and Infertility

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  14. Psychological Component of Infertility

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    ... Home FAQs Frequently Asked Questions Quick Facts About Infertility FAQs About Infertility FAQs About the Psychological Component of Infertility FAQs About Cloning and Stem Cell Research SART's ...

  15. Smoking and Infertility

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    ... Home FAQs Frequently Asked Questions Quick Facts About Infertility FAQs About Infertility FAQs About the Psychological Component of Infertility FAQs About Cloning and Stem Cell Research SART's ...

  16. Ovarian Drilling for Infertility

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    ... Home FAQs Frequently Asked Questions Quick Facts About Infertility FAQs About Infertility FAQs About the Psychological Component of Infertility FAQs About Cloning and Stem Cell Research SART's ...

  17. Stress and Infertility

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    ... Home FAQs Frequently Asked Questions Quick Facts About Infertility FAQs About Infertility FAQs About the Psychological Component of Infertility FAQs About Cloning and Stem Cell Research SART's ...

  18. Can intracytoplasmic sperm injection prevent total fertilization failure and enhance embryo quality in patients with non-male factor infertility?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ju Yeong; Kim, Jee Hyun; Jee, Byung Chul; Lee, Jung Ryeol; Suh, Chang Suk; Kim, Seok Hyun

    2014-07-01

    To determine whether intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) could prevent total fertilization failure (TFF) and enhance the embryo quality in patients with non-male factor infertility. A total of 296 in vitro fertilization (IVF) cycles performed in patients with non-male factor infertility between April 2009 and March 2013 were included in this retrospective study. During the period, ICSI and conventional IVF were performed in 142 and 154 cycles, respectively. The usual indications for ICSI were in the cycles of patients with (1) known low fertilization rate, (2) repetitive implantation failure, (3) advanced maternal age, (4) presence of endometrioma, (5) low oocyte yield (number of oocytes ≤3), or (6) poor quality oocytes. The rate of TFF, normal fertilization, abnormal pronuclei (PN) formation, embryo quality, and pregnancy outcomes between the patients treated with ICSI and conventional IVF cycles were compared. The patients treated with ICSI (ICSI group, n=142) presented fewer number of oocytes than patients treated with conventional IVF cycles (n=154). The TFF rate was not different (4.2% vs. 0.6%, P=0.059), but the ICSI group presented a significantly higher rate of normal fertilization (83.4% vs. 79.1%, P=0.04) and lower rate of abnormal PN formation (3.9% vs. 13.3%, Pfertilization rate and the embryo quality. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Clinical management and therapeutic outcome of infertile couples in southeast Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menuba IE

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Ifeanyi E Menuba,1 Emmanuel O Ugwu,1 Samuel N Obi,1 Lucky O Lawani,2 Chidinma I Onwuka11Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Ituku Ozalla Enugu, Enugu State, Nigeria; 2School of Postgraduate Studies, Department of Community Medicine, University of Nigeria, Enugu Campus, Enugu, Enugu State, NigeriaBackground: Infertility is highly prevalent in Nigeria and most infertile couples in southeast Nigeria are offered conventional forms of treatment, which consist mainly of ovulation induction and tubal surgery, due to limited availability and high cost of endoscopic and assisted reproductive technologies like laparoscopy and in vitro fertilization. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of infertility, outcome of infertility investigation, and the treatment outcome of infertile couples following therapeutic interventions in southeast Nigeria over a 12-month period.Methods: This was a prospective cross-sectional study of 218 consecutive infertile couples presenting for infertility management at the infertility clinics of two tertiary health institutions in Enugu, southeast Nigeria. Infertility investigations were carried out on these couples using the available conventional diagnostic facilities. Following the results of the investigations/diagnosis, conventional treatment was offered to the couples as appropriate. Data analysis was both descriptive and inferential at 95% confidence level.Results: The mean age of the women was 33.5±4.62 (range: 15–49 years. Most (58.3% [n=127] were nulliparous. The prevalence of infertility was 12.1%. Infertility was primary in 28.4% (n=62 and secondary in 71.6% (n=156. Female etiologic factors were responsible in 32.1% (n=70, male factors in 26.1% (n=57, and a combination of male/female factors in 29.4% (n=64. The etiology was unknown in 12.4% (n=27. Tubal factors 23.8 % (n=52 and ovulation failures 26.1% (n=57 are common female factors implicated

  20. Behaviours Of The Infertile Women with regard to Traditional InfertiHty Treatments And Influencing Factors.

    OpenAIRE

    KAYA, Dr. Mehmet Ali KURÇER Dr. Mücahit EĞRİ

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the behaviours of ınfertile women applying to Obstetric and Gynecology cünic at Turgut Özai Medicai Çenter in Malatya with regard to traditionai infertility treatments and relations with some demographic attribute. In this cross-sectionai study, 66 women applying to Obstetric and Gynecology cünic of Turgut Ozai Medicai Çenter between June and August 1997 were induded. The study was carried out using face to face questionnaire method. Nineteen women (28.7...

  1. Epigenetics of reproductive infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Laxmidhar; Parbin, Sabnam; Pradhan, Nibedita; Kausar, Chahat; Patra, Samir K

    2017-06-01

    Infertility is a complex pathophysiological condition. It may caused by specific or multiple physical and physiological factors, including abnormalities in homeostasis, hormonal imbalances and genetic alterations. In recent times various studies implicated that, aberrant epigenetic mechanisms are associated with reproductive infertility. There might be transgenerational effects associated with epigenetic modifications of gametes and studies suggest the importance of alterations in epigenetic modification at early and late stages of gametogenesis. To determine the causes of infertility it is necessary to understand the altered epigenetic modifications of associated gene and mechanisms involved therein. This review is devoted to elucidate the recent mechanistic advances in regulation of genes by epigenetic modification and emphasizes their possible role related to reproductive infertility. It includes environmental, nutritional, hormonal and physiological factors and influence of internal structural architecture of chromatin nucleosomes affecting DNA and histone modifications in both male and female gametes, early embryogenesis and offspring. Finally, we would like to emphasize that research on human infertility by gene knock out of epigenetic modifiers genes must be relied upon animal models.

  2. Oxidative stress & male infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makker, Kartikeya; Agarwal, Ashok; Sharma, Rakesh

    2009-04-01

    The male factor is considered a major contributory factor to infertility. Apart from the conventional causes for male infertility such as varicocoele, cryptorchidism, infections, obstructive lesions, cystic fibrosis, trauma, and tumours, a new and important cause has been identified: oxidative stress. Oxidative stress is a result of the imbalance between reactive oxygen species (ROS) and antioxidants in the body. It is a powerful mechanism that can lead to sperm damage, deformity and eventually, male infertility. This review discusses the physiological need for ROS and their role in normal sperm function. It also highlights the mechanism of production and the pathophysiology of ROS in relation to the male reproductive system and enumerate the benefits of incorporating antioxidants in clinical and experimental settings.

  3. Inhibin B is a better marker of spermatogenesis than other hormones in the evaluation of male factor infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumanov, Philip; Nandipati, Kalyana; Tomova, Analia; Agarwal, Ashok

    2006-08-01

    To assess the role of inhibin B in the evaluation of male factor infertility. Prospective study. Reproductive endocrinology clinic. Seventy-five patients with infertility problems (mean age 31.2 +/- 7.5 years) and 12 controls (32.1 +/- 8.8 years) with proven fertility. None. Semen analysis was performed according to World Health Organization guidelines. Testicular volume was assessed with the Prader's orchidometer. Serum levels of inhibin B (pg/mL), LH (mIU/mL), FSH (mIU/mL), prolactin (micro IU/mL), and testosterone (nmol/L) were assessed. The mean +/- SEM inhibin B and testosterone levels were significantly lower in the patients than in the controls (inhibin B: 116.4 +/- 11.7 vs. 181.2 +/- 20.9, P=.008; testosterone: 13.6 +/- 0.9 vs. 25.1 +/- 2.9, P=.008). In general, sperm count and testicular volume in the patients were significantly and positively correlated with inhibin B (sperm count: r = 0.476, Pinfertility may provide useful information on spermatogenesis and possibly serve as a more direct marker of spermatogenesis than FSH.

  4. Effect of granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF on IVF outcomes in infertile women: An RCT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Eftekhar

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Despite major advances in assisted reproductive techniques, the implantation rates remain relatively low. Some studies have demonstrated that intrauterine infusion of granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF improves implantation in infertile women. Objective: To assess the G-CSF effects on IVF outcomes in women with normal endometrial thickness. Materials and methods: In this randomized controlled clinical trial, 100 infertile women with normal endometrial thickness who were candidate for IVF were evaluated in two groups. Exclusion criteria were positive history of repeated implantation failure (RIF, endocrine disorders, severe endometriosis, congenital or acquired uterine anomaly and contraindication for G-CSF (renal disease, sickle cell disease, or malignancy. In G-CSF group (n=50, 300 μg trans cervical intrauterine of G-CSF was administered at the oocyte retrieval day. Controls (n=50 were treated with standard protocol. Chemical, clinical and ongoing pregnancy rates, implantation rate, and miscarriage rate were compared between groups. Results: Number of total and mature oocytes (MII, two pronuclei (2PN, total embryos, transferred embryos, quality of transferred embryos, and fertilization rate did not differ significantly between two groups. So there were no significant differences between groups in chemical, clinical and ongoing pregnancy rate, implantation rate, and miscarriage rate Conclusion: our result showed in normal IVF patients with normal endometrial thickness, the intrauterine infusion of G-CSF did not improve pregnancy outcomes.

  5. Effect of granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) on IVF outcomes in infertile women: An RCT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eftekhar, Maryam; Hosseinisadat, Robabe; Baradaran, Ramesh; Naghshineh, Elham

    2016-01-01

    Background: Despite major advances in assisted reproductive techniques, the implantation rates remain relatively low. Some studies have demonstrated that intrauterine infusion of granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) improves implantation in infertile women. Objective: To assess the G-CSF effects on IVF outcomes in women with normal endometrial thickness. Materials and methods: In this randomized controlled clinical trial, 100 infertile women with normal endometrial thickness who were candidate for IVF were evaluated in two groups. Exclusion criteria were positive history of repeated implantation failure (RIF), endocrine disorders, severe endometriosis, congenital or acquired uterine anomaly and contraindication for G-CSF (renal disease, sickle cell disease, or malignancy). In G-CSF group (n=50), 300 µg trans cervical intrauterine of G-CSF was administered at the oocyte retrieval day. Controls (n=50) were treated with standard protocol. Chemical, clinical and ongoing pregnancy rates, implantation rate, and miscarriage rate were compared between groups. Results: Number of total and mature oocytes (MII), two pronuclei (2PN), total embryos, transferred embryos, quality of transferred embryos, and fertilization rate did not differ significantly between two groups. So there were no significant differences between groups in chemical, clinical and ongoing pregnancy rate, implantation rate, and miscarriage rate Conclusion: our result showed in normal IVF patients with normal endometrial thickness, the intrauterine infusion of G-CSF did not improve pregnancy outcomes. PMID:27326420

  6. Surgical techniques for the management of male infertility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Natalya A Lopushnyan; Thomas J Walsh

    2012-01-01

    Evaluation and surgical treatment of male infertility has evolved and expanded,now leading to more precise diagnoses and tailored treatments with diminished morbidity and greater success.Surgeries for male infertility are divided into four major categories:(i)diagnostic surgery; (ii) surgery to improve sperm production; (iii) surgery to improve sperm delivery; and (iv) surgery to retrieve sperm for use with in vitrofertilization and intracytoplasmic sperm injection (IVF-ICSI).While today we are more successful than ever in treating male infertility,pregnancy is still not always achieved likely due to factors that remain poorly understood.Clinicians treating infertility should advocate for couple-based therapy,and require that both partners have a thorough evaluation and an informed discussion before undergoing specific surgical therapies.

  7. Prevalência dos fatores trombofílicos em mulheres com infertilidade Prevalence of thrombophilic factors in infertile women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana de Góes e Silva Soligo

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: determinar a prevalência dos fatores trombofílicos em mulheres inférteis. MÉTODOS: estudo de corte transversal, no qual foram admitidas mulheres inférteis atendidas em clínica privada e submetidas à investigação de trombofilia, conforme protocolo da referida clínica, no período de março de 2003 a março de 2005, após aprovação do Comitê de Ética e Pesquisa da Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP. Foram incluídas mulheres com história de infertilidade, definida como um ano de coito desprotegido sem concepção. Foram excluídas mulheres com hepatopatia e dados incompletos em prontuário, obtendo-se uma amostra de 144 mulheres. Os fatores trombofílicos avaliados foram: o anticorpo anticardiolipina (ACL, o anticoagulante lúpico (ACGL, a deficiência de proteína C (DPC, a deficiência de proteína S (DPS, a deficiência de antitrombina III (DAT, a presença do fator V de Leiden, uma mutação no gene da protrombina e a mutação do metileno tetrahidrofolato redutase (MTHFR. Resultados: os valores de prevalência obtidos para ACL e ACGL foram de 2%. A prevalência dos fatores trombofílicos hereditários foram: DPC=4%, DPS=6%, DAT=5%, fator V de Leiden=3%, mutação da protrombina=3% e mutação MTHFR=57%. CONCLUSÕES: das 144 pacientes selecionadas, 105 mulheres, ou seja, 72,9% apresentavam pelo menos um fator trombofílico presente. Isto reforça a importância e justifica a necessidade da investigação destes fatores neste grupo de mulheres.PURPOSE: to establish the prevalence of thrombophilic factors in infertile women. METHODS: a cross-sectional study was performed, in which infertile women, seen in a private clinic with investigation for thrombophilia were included, according to the protocol of the clinic, between March 2003 and March 2005, after the approval of the Research Ethics Committee of the Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP. One hundred and forty-four infertile women without any liver

  8. The prevalence of azoospermia factor microdeletion on the Y chromosome of Chinese infertile men detected by multi-analyte suspension array technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi-Jian Zhu; Si-Yao Liu; Huan Wang; Ping Wei; Xian-Ping Ding

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To develop a high-throughput multiplex, fast and simple assay to scan azoospermia factor (AZF) region microdeletions on the Y chromosome and establish the prevalence of Y chromosomal microdeletions in Chinese infertile males with azoospermia or oligozoospermia. Methods: In total, 178 infertile patients with azoospemua (non-obstructed), 134 infertile patients with oligozoospermia as well as 40 fertile man controls were included in the present study. The samples were screened for AZF microdeletion using optimized multi-analyte suspension array (MASA) technology. Results: Of the 312 patients, 36 (11.5%) were found to have deletions in the AZF region. The microdeletion frequency was 14% (25/178) in the azoospermia group and 8.2% (11/134) in the oligospennia group. Among 36 patients with microdeletions, 19 had deletions in the AZFc region, seven had deletions in AZFa and six had deletions in AZFb. In addition, four patients had both AZFb and AZFc deletions. No deletion in the AZF region was found in the 40 fertile controls. Conclusion: There is a high prevalence of Y chromosomal microdeletions in Chinese infertile males with azoospermia or oligozoospermia. The MASA technology, which has been established in the present study,provides a sensitive and high-throughput method for detecting the deletion of the Y chromosome. And the results suggest that genetic screening should be advised to infertile men before starting assisted reproductive treatments.

  9. Recurrent X chromosome-linked deletions: discovery of new genetic factors in male infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Giacco, D; Chianese, C; Ars, E; Ruiz-Castañé, E; Forti, G; Krausz, C

    2014-05-01

    The role of X-linked genes and copy-number variations (CNVs) in male infertility remains poorly explored. Our previous array-CGH analyses showed three recurrent deletions in Xq exclusively (CNV67) and prevalently (CNV64, CNV69) found in patients. Molecular and clinical characterisation of these CNVs was performed in this study. 627 idiopathic infertile patients and 628 controls were tested for each deletion with PCR+/-. We used PCR+/- to map deletion junctions and long-range PCR and direct sequencing to define breakpoints. CNV64 was found in 5.7% of patients and in 3.1% of controls (p=0.013; OR=1.89; 95% CI 1.1 to 3.3) and CNV69 was found in 3.5% of patients and 1.6% of controls (p=0.023; OR=2.204; 95% CI 1.05 to 4.62). For CNV69 we identified two breakpoints, types A and B, with the latter being significantly more frequent in patients than controls (p=0.011; OR=9.19; 95% CI 1.16 to 72.8). CNV67 was detected exclusively in patients (1.1%) and was maternally transmitted. The semen phenotype of one carrier (11-041) versus his normozoospermic non-carrier brother strongly indicates a pathogenic effect of the deletion on spermatogenesis. MAGEA9, an ampliconic gene reported as independently acquired on the human X chromosome with exclusive physiological expression in the testis, is likely to be involved in CNV67. We provide the first evidence for X chromosome-linked recurrent deletions associated with spermatogenic impairment. CNV67, specific to spermatogenic anomaly and with a frequency of 1.1% in oligo/azoospermic men, resembles the AZF regions on the Y chromosome with potential clinical implications.

  10. A Survey on Infertility in Royan Institute

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Kamali

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infertility is defined as failure in pregnancy after one year of unprotected intercourse.Several centers have reported different causes of infertility. The most common causes of infertility are:male factor such as sperm disturbance, female factor such as ovulation dysfunction and tubal factor,both male and female factor, and unexplained infertility .The aim of this study was to survey theepidemiology of infertility in Royan institute.Material and Methods: In this descriptive retrospective study, 2492 infertile couples were studied.These couples were selected by systematic sampling among couples referred to Royan institutebetween 1995 and 2001.All existing demographic data and diagnostic methods were recorded inquestionnaires .Results were analyzed using SPSS version 11.5.Results: In this study, the frequency of primary and secondary infertility was 90.1% and 9.9%,respectively. Among 2492 couples, 50.5% had male factor, 28.6% had female factor, 11.6% had bothmale and female factors and in 9.3% of couples, the cause of infertility was unknown .Results showedthat 32.3% of men had normal spermogram, 23.6% of couples had azoospermia, and 40.3% had spermdisturbance including oligospermia, asthenospermia, oligoasthenospermia and teratospermia .3.8%were not able to collect sample for semen analysis. Among women, different infertility factors included:ovarian factor (20.36%, tubal factor (12.64%, uterine factor (4.13%, endometriosis (1.28% andrecurrent abortion (0.68%. 50.48% of women were normal.Conclusion: Although male factor was the most common cause of infertility in Royan institute, we cannot conclude that this factor is the most common cause of infertility in Iran since this center isconsidered referral especially for male infertility. We suggest performance of similar researches inother centers to evaluate the most common causes of infertility in Iran.

  11. Infertile Factors Associated With Abortion-n Nonparous Women%女性不孕症相关因素分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李冬华; 杨玲; 冒韵东; 刘嘉茵; 吴洁

    2012-01-01

    Objective To study the difference between primary and postabortal (spontaneous, medical or artificial abortion) infertile women. Methods From January 2007 to December 2009,1753 women who underwent the treatment of in vitro fertilization and embryo transfer (IVF-ET) were included in the study, and were divided into postabortal infertile group (n=706) and primary infertile group (n=1047). The general characteristics and infertile factors were analyzed in both groups. The study protocol was approved by the Ethical Review Board of Investigation in Human Being of First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University. Informed consent was obtained from each patient. There had no significant difference in age between two groups (P>0. 05). Results The duration of infertility in postabortal infertile group was shorter than that in primary infertile group (P0. 05). The education level of patients in postabortal infertile group was significantly lower than that in primary infertile group (P0.05).结果 两组患者临床资料比较结果示:流产后不孕组的不孕年限较原发不孕组短,差异有统计学意义(P0.05);流产后不孕组文化程度比较,显著低于原发不孕组,差异有统计学意义(P<0.001).导致不孕病因比较,流产后不孕组输卵管因素明显高于原发不孕组,差异有统计学意义(P<0.001);而排卵障碍、子宫内膜异位症、子宫及不明原因等因素比较,流产后不孕组则显著少于原发不孕组,且差异有统计学意义(P<0.001).结论 未生育妇女自然、人工或药物终止妊娠后导致不孕的主要病因为输卵管因素,文化程度偏低对不孕也有影响,故应加强对未生育妇女,尤其对文化程度较低人群的生殖健康相关知识的宣教,降低由于意外妊娠行终止妊娠术所引起的不孕症发生率.

  12. Is hyperprolactinemia the main cause of infertility?

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    Mikaily J

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available Hyperprolactinemia probably is one of infertility causes. Its incidence is 20% in infertile patients. In this study importance of hyperprolactinema was studied. Importance of hyperprolactinemia as a primary factor of infertility, is uncertain. We studied 500 infertile women in infertility center of Shariati hospital. Prevalence of hyperprolactinemia was 19%. Hyperprolactinemia as a sole cause of infertility was found in only 0.8%. There was a good correlation between galactorrhea and hyperprolactinemia (P=0.00007. Galactorrhea is not a screening test for hyperprolactinemia (sensivity=25%, but its specifity is high (91%. If we omit prolactin assay for patients without galactorrhea, we will miss primary cause of infertility in probably 0.1% of patients, so we find that performing prolactin assay for patients without galactorrhea is under question. Subpopulation of infertile patients with hyperprolactinemia are not different with infertile population in mean age (P=0.09, mean duration of infertility (P=0.28 and type of infertility. We suggest that hyperprolactinemia is not a primary or sole factor of infertility

  13. Analysis of factors predicting success of metformin and clomiphene treatment for women with infertility owing to PCOS-related ovulation dysfunction in a randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.P. Johnson; S. Bontekoe; A.W. Stewart

    2011-01-01

    Background: Metformin has failed to gain wide acceptance as a first-line treatment option for women with anovulatory infertility related to polycystic ovary syndrome. This study aimed to ascertain factors that predict fertility success with treatment that included metformin compared to standard (non

  14. ROLE OF DIAGNOSTIC HYSTEROLAPAROSCOPY IN EVALUATION OF FEMALE INFERTILITY

    OpenAIRE

    Jayanthy; Suvarna; Nirmala

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the role of hysterolaparoscopy in female infertility. SETTINGS AND DESIGN Patients with female infertility presenting to outpatient Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology in Kempegowda Institute of Medical sciences, Bengaluru were evaluated for infertility by hysterolaparoscopy and chromopertubation. MATERIALS AND METHODS Seventy consenting subjects excluding male factor infertility with normal hormonal profile and no contraindication to ...

  15. Varicocele and Male Factor Infertility Treatment : A New Meta-analysis and Review of the Role of Varicocele Repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baazeem, Abdulaziz; Belzile, Eric; Ciampi, Antonio; Dohle, Gert; Jarvi, Keith; Salonia, Andrea; Weidner, Wolfgang; Zini, Armand

    2011-01-01

    Context: Varicocele is a common condition, found in many men who present for infertility evaluation. Objective: To assess the effect of varicocelectomy on male infertility. Evidence acquisition: A literature search was performed using Embase and Medline. Literature reviewed included meta-analyses an

  16. Expression of endometrial leukaemia inhibitory factor gene in patients with unexplained infertility%原因不明性原发不孕患者子宫内膜白血病抑制因子基因的表达

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭晓霞; 程绮馨; 王应雄

    2001-01-01

    Objective To investigate the expression of endometrial leukaemia inhibitory factor(LIF) gene in patients with unexplained infertility. Methods  By a quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR),the expression of LIF gene on endometrium during mid-luteal phase was detected in 35 unexplained infertility (infertility group) cases and 20 infertile cases due to tubal obstruction or male factor (control group). Results The level of LIF mRNA expression on endometrium during mid-luteal phase in infertility group was 0.448±0.239,significantly lower than those in the control group (1.093±0.761,P<0.01). Conclusions Our findings suggested LIF might play an important role in the process of implantation. The decreased expression of LIF gene might be one of the major causes of unexplained infertility.%目的探讨白血病抑制因子(LIF)基因在子宫内膜的表达与原因不明性原发不孕的关系。方法采用逆转录聚合酶链反应(RT-PCR)技术,对35例原因不明性原发不孕患者(病例组)和20例继发不孕患者(对组照)的黄体中期子宫内膜行LIF mRNA检测。结果对照组患者黄体中期LIF mRNA表达水平为1.093±0.761(±s,下同),病例组患者为0.448±0.239,两组相比,差异有极显著性(P<0.01)。结论 LIF可能参与了胚泡着床过程。LIF的基因表达缺陷或减弱,可能是导致原因不明性原发不孕的原因之一。

  17. Testicular adrenal rest tumors (TARTs) as a male infertility factor. Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedziela, Marek; Joanna, Talarczyk; Piotr, JedrzejczaK

    2012-09-01

    Since testes and adrenal cortex derive from the same urogenital ridge, adrenal tissue with descending gonads may migrate in early embryonic period. Although most often ectopic tissue undergoes atrophy in some cases, when adrenocorticotrophic (ACTH) overstimulation occurs, the adrenal remnants in the testes may become hypertrophic and form testicular adrenal rest tumors (TARTs). The growth of TARTs in the testes leads to obstruction of the seminiferous tubules which can mechanically impair the function of the gonads and cause irreversible azoospermia. We describe a patient suffering since neonatal period from congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH), disorder with defected pathway of cortisol production, which leads to increased ACTH production and to overstimulation of adrenal cortex. He had very poor disease control and therefore in late puberty he was diagnosed with TARTs. At the age of 19.5 he was diagnosed with azoospermia, most likely caused by TARTs. It is the first evidence of TARTs in Polish literature. Although not many cases have been published so far the incidence of TARTs seems to be highly underdiagnosed, so it seems reasonable to consider the disease in differential diagnosis of male infertility.

  18. Coping with infertility: a transcultural perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Liu, Botao; Li, Min

    2014-09-01

    To review the most important and interesting articles in infertility published in the last year. This systematic review covers 60 studies published in journals or dissertations in Science Direct and PubMed in the last year, including those related to prevention and treatment as well as related psychosocial services in infertility. We also propose some suggestions about coping with infertility in China. Infertility is a multidisciplinary problem that requires medical, social, and political efforts to prevent and offer infertile patients the best diagnostic, therapeutic, and psychosocial services. Cultural factors should be taken into consideration when designing coping strategies.

  19. Cognitive emotional consequences of male infertility in their female partners: a qualitative content analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Fatemeh Zahra; Taghipour, Ali; Roudsari, Robab Latifnejad; Kimiaei, Seyed Ali; Mazlom, Seyed Reza; Amirian, Maliheh

    2015-11-01

    Infertility, as a global phenomenon and one of the most important issues of reproductive health, affects women more often than men, even when the infertility is due to a male factor. The purpose of this study was to explore the cognitive emotional experiences of women faced with male infertility. This qualitative study was conducted in 2014-2015 in Mashhad, Iran. The perceptions and experiences of healthy women whose husbands were diagnosed with primary male factor infertility were investigated using a qualitative content analysis approach. Participants were selected through purposeful sampling, and data collection was conducted using in-depth semistructured interviews. Data were analyzed using conventional content analysis with MAXqda software. Study rigor was verified via criteria proposed by Lincoln and Guba. One main theme emerged through analysis entitled "cognitive emotional reactions confronting infertility diagnosis" with sub-themes of cognitive emotional reactions when confronted with male infertility diagnosis with subthemes of disbelief and denial, fear and apprehension, suffering and emotional distress, disappointment, frustration, confusion, and joy. The diagnosis of male infertility was associated with important emotional cognitive consequences for their female partners. Emotional support, providing new insights into how to treat the issue, and trying to shorten the process of diagnosis are necessary for these women. This kind of support could reduce the psychological effects of confrontation with the diagnosis of male infertility, including social insecurity for women.

  20. Unexplained infertility: association with inherited thrombophilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatini, Cinzia; Conti, Lucia; Turillazzi, Valentina; Sticchi, Elena; Romagnuolo, Ilaria; Milanini, Maria Novella; Cozzi, Cinzia; Abbate, Rosanna; Noci, Ivo

    2012-05-01

    Unexplained infertility represents one of the most common diagnoses in fertility care. Attention is being paid to the association between inherited thrombophilia and infertility causes. In this study we investigated the prevalence of inherited thrombophilia according to infertility causes. We studied Prothrombin gene G20210A mutation, Factor V Leiden, deficiencies in protein S and C and antithrombin in 930 Caucasian infertile women referred to Fertility Center of the Department of Sciences for Woman and Child's Health, University of Florence, of whom 230 with unexplained, 195 female and 283 male infertility, and in 240 women who have conceived naturally without hormonal stimulation therapy. A significant relationship between inherited thrombophilia [OR 95%CI 1.97 (1.05-3.68), p = 0.03] and unexplained infertility was observed, whereas no association between thrombophilia and female and male infertility was found. Significantly higher prevalence of prothrombin gene mutation in unexplained infertile women in comparison to that observed in fertile women was observed (5.7% vs 2.1% p = 0.04); the prevalence of the other thrombophilia determinants was higher, even if not significantly, in the unexplained infertile group. This study demonstrates the relationship between inherited thrombophilia and unexplained infertility, thus suggesting the contribution of genetic components in modulating unexplained infertility, behind anovulation, male and tubal factor. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Lycopene and male infertility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Damayanthi Durairajanayagam; Ashok Agarwal; Chloe Ong; Pallavi Prashast

    2014-01-01

    Excessive amounts of reactive oxygen species (ROS) cause a state of oxidative stress, which result in sperm membrane lipid peroxidation, DNA damage and apoptosis, leading to decreased sperm viability and motility. Elevated levels of ROS are a major cause of idiopathic male factor infertility, which is an increasingly common problem today. Lycopene, the most potent singlet oxygen quencher of all carotenoids, is a possible treatment option for male infertility because of its antioxidant properties. By reacting with and neutralizing free radicals, lycopene could reduce the incidence of oxidative stress and thus, lessen the damage that would otherwise be inlficted on spermatozoa. It is postulated that lycopene may have other beneifcial effects via nonoxidative mechanisms in the testis, such as gap junction communication, modulation of gene expression, regulation of the cell cycle and immunoenhancement. Various lycopene supplementation studies conducted on both humans and animals have shown promising results in alleviating male infertility-lipid peroxidation and DNA damage were decreased, while sperm count and viability, and general immunity were increased. Improvement of these parameters indicates a reduction in oxidative stress, and thus the spermatozoa is less vulnerable to oxidative damage, which increases the chances of a normal sperm fertilizing the egg. Human trials have reported improvement in sperm parameters and pregnancy rates with supplementation of 4-8 mg of lycopene daily for 3-12 months. However, further detailed and extensive research is still required to determine the dosage and the usefulness of lycopene as a treatment for male infertility.

  2. Lycopene and male infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damayanthi Durairajanayagam

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Excessive amounts of reactive oxygen species (ROS cause a state of oxidative stress, which result in sperm membrane lipid peroxidation, DNA damage and apoptosis, leading to decreased sperm viability and motility. Elevated levels of ROS are a major cause of idiopathic male factor infertility, which is an increasingly common problem today. Lycopene, the most potent singlet oxygen quencher of all carotenoids, is a possible treatment option for male infertility because of its antioxidant properties. By reacting with and neutralizing free radicals, lycopene could reduce the incidence of oxidative stress and thus, lessen the damage that would otherwise be inflicted on spermatozoa. It is postulated that lycopene may have other beneficial effects via nonoxidative mechanisms in the testis, such as gap junction communication, modulation of gene expression, regulation of the cell cycle and immunoenhancement. Various lycopene supplementation studies conducted on both humans and animals have shown promising results in alleviating male infertility-lipid peroxidation and DNA damage were decreased, while sperm count and viability, and general immunity were increased. Improvement of these parameters indicates a reduction in oxidative stress, and thus the spermatozoa is less vulnerable to oxidative damage, which increases the chances of a normal sperm fertilizing the egg. Human trials have reported improvement in sperm parameters and pregnancy rates with supplementation of 4-8 mg of lycopene daily for 3-12 months. However, further detailed and extensive research is still required to determine the dosage and the usefulness of lycopene as a treatment for male infertility.

  3. Understanding Infertility - The Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Facts About Infertility FAQs About Infertility FAQs About the Psychological Component of Infertility FAQs About Cloning and ... Page not found! Please click on one of the links in the navigation bar. FAQs Reproductive Health ...

  4. Understanding Infertility - The Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Home FAQs Frequently Asked Questions Quick Facts About Infertility FAQs About Infertility FAQs About the Psychological Component of Infertility FAQs About Cloning and Stem Cell Research SART's ...

  5. High risk genetic factor in Chinese patients with idiopathic male infertility:deletion of DAZ gene copy on Y chromosome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨元; 肖翠英; 张思仲; 张思孝; 黄明孔; 林立

    2004-01-01

    @@ Idiopathic azoospermia or oligozoospermia affects approximately 2%-4% of all married males. Recently studies have confirmed that the deletion of DAZ in AZFc region of Y chromosome may be one of the important genetic aetiologies of Caucasian male infertility. To determine the relationship between DAZ gene deletion and idiopathic male infertility in Chinese population, we analysed the DAZ gene copy number of AZFc region in patients with idiopathic azoospermia or oligozoospermia, as well as fertile Chinese men.

  6. Immunolocalisation of phosphorylated STAT3, interleukin 11 and leukaemia inhibitory factor in endometrium of women with unexplained infertility during the implantation window

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salamonsen Lois A

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Uterine receptivity and embryo implantation are critical in the establishment of pregnancy. The diagnosis of endometrial fertility requires more precise measurements of endometrial receptivity. Interleukin (IL-11 and leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF are essential for murine implantation and signal via intracellular phosphorylation (p of STAT3 in the endometrium. Both cytokines are present in the endometrium of women duiring the receptive window. Endometrial IL-11, IL-11 receptor alpha (IL-11Ralpha, LIF and pSTAT3 in women with primary unexplained infertility was compared to normal fertile women during the implantation window. Methods LH timed endometrial biopsies (LH+6 to LH+10 were collected from women with unexplained infertility and normal fertility. pSTAT3, IL-11, IL-11Ralpha and LIF production was determined by immunohistochemistry. Staining intensity was determoned by two independent observers blind to the fertility status of the patient from whom the biopsy was taken. Staining intensity and heterogeneity in each of the endometrial compartments (epithelium; stroma, including decidualized stromal cells; and vasculature was assessed. The Mann-Whitney U test was used to analyze IL-11, pSTAT3, IL-11Ralpha and LIF immunostaining intensities in the samples. Results IL-11, IL-11Ralpha and LIF were present predominantly in glandular epithelium, whilst luminal epithelium showed patchy staining. pSTAT3 was present in both glandular epithelium and stroma. IL-11 and pSTAT3 immunostaining was significantly lower in glandular epithelium in infertile women compared to controls (P Conclusion This is the first demonstration of reduced endometrial pSTAT3 and IL-11 in some women with unexplained infertility. This suggests IL-11 and pSTAT3 may be involved in the secretory transformation of glandular epithelium during receptivity. Reduced IL-11 production and STAT3 phosphorylation may contribute to unexplained infertility in some women.

  7. Antibodies to Chlamydia trachomatis heat shock proteins in women with tubal factor infertility are associated with prior infection by C. trachomatis but not by C. pneumoniae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, K; Osser, S; Birkelund, Svend

    1999-01-01

    proteins and to C. trachomatis but no independent influence of antibodies to C. pneumoniae. No interaction between C. trachomatis and C. pneumoniae suggesting a synergistic effect was found although the heat shock proteins from these two organisms are immunologically similar. Antibodies to the chlamydial......The antibody response to heat shock proteins 60 and 10 were studied in 163 patients with tubal factor infertility and in 163 age-matched pregnant women. The associations of these antibodies with specific antibodies to Chlamydia trachomatis and to Chlamydia pneumoniae as well as with antibodies...... to the common chlamydial lipopolysaccharide antigen were studied. Patients with tubal factor infertility had significantly higher frequencies and titres of all antibodies except to C. pneumoniae. In a logistic regression model an association was found between the prevalence of antibodies to the heat shock...

  8. ASSESSMENT OF INFERTILITY PROBLEMS AMONG FEMALE IN RAMANATHAPURAM, TAMILNADU

    OpenAIRE

    G. Veerarajeswari; L. Jeyapraba; R. Ajaz Haja Mohideen

    2017-01-01

    Infertility is the inability to conceive after one year of unprotected intercourse. Identifiable factors affecting female infertility include hormonal or endocrine disturbances (menstrual or ovulatory disturbances), tubal factors (occlusions, pelvic adhesions and other tubal abnormalities), acquired non-tubal factors (cervical or uterine disturbances), sexual dysfunction and congenital abnormalities. The present research work aimed to study the infertility problem according to demographic and...

  9. In vitro fertilization/intracytoplasmic sperm injection for male infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubina Merchant

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Progress in the field of assisted reproduction, and particularly micromanipulation, now heralds a new era in the management of severe male factor infertility, not amenable to medical or surgical correction. By overcoming natural barriers to conception, in vitro fertilization and embryo transfer (IVF-ET, subzonal sperm insemination, partial zona dissection, and intracytoplasmatic injection of sperm (ICSI now offer couples considered irreversibly infertile, the option of parenting a genetically related child. However, unlike IVF, which necessitates an optimal sperm number and function to successfully complete the sequence of events leading to fertilization, micromanipulation techniques, such as ICSI, involving the direct injection of a spermatozoon into the oocyte, obviate all these requirements and may be used to alleviate severe male factor infertility due to the lack of sperm in the ejaculate due to severely impaired spermatogenesis (non-obstructive azoospermia or non-reconstructable reproductive tract obstruction (obstructive azoospermia. ICSI may be performed with fresh or cryopreserved ejaculate sperm where available, microsurgically extracted epididymal or testicular sperm with satisfactory fertilization, clinical pregnancy, and ongoing pregnancy rates. However, despite a lack of consensus regarding the genetic implications of ICSI or the application and efficacy of preimplantation genetic diagnosis prior to assisted reproductive technology (ART, the widespread use of ICSI, increasing evidence of the involvement of genetic factors in male infertility and the potential risk of transmission of genetic disorders to the offspring, generate major concerns with regard to the safety of the technique, necessitating a thorough genetic evaluation of the couple, classification of infertility and adequate counseling of the implications and associated risks prior to embarking on the procedure. The objective of this review is to highlight the indications

  10. In vitro fertilization/intracytoplasmic sperm injection for male infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchant, Rubina; Gandhi, Goral; Allahbadia, Gautam N

    2011-01-01

    Progress in the field of assisted reproduction, and particularly micromanipulation, now heralds a new era in the management of severe male factor infertility, not amenable to medical or surgical correction. By overcoming natural barriers to conception, in vitro fertilization and embryo transfer (IVF-ET), subzonal sperm insemination, partial zona dissection, and intracytoplasmatic injection of sperm (ICSI) now offer couples considered irreversibly infertile, the option of parenting a genetically related child. However, unlike IVF, which necessitates an optimal sperm number and function to successfully complete the sequence of events leading to fertilization, micromanipulation techniques, such as ICSI, involving the direct injection of a spermatozoon into the oocyte, obviate all these requirements and may be used to alleviate severe male factor infertility due to the lack of sperm in the ejaculate due to severely impaired spermatogenesis (non-obstructive azoospermia) or non-reconstructable reproductive tract obstruction (obstructive azoospermia). ICSI may be performed with fresh or cryopreserved ejaculate sperm where available, microsurgically extracted epididymal or testicular sperm with satisfactory fertilization, clinical pregnancy, and ongoing pregnancy rates. However, despite a lack of consensus regarding the genetic implications of ICSI or the application and efficacy of preimplantation genetic diagnosis prior to assisted reproductive technology (ART), the widespread use of ICSI, increasing evidence of the involvement of genetic factors in male infertility and the potential risk of transmission of genetic disorders to the offspring, generate major concerns with regard to the safety of the technique, necessitating a thorough genetic evaluation of the couple, classification of infertility and adequate counseling of the implications and associated risks prior to embarking on the procedure. The objective of this review is to highlight the indications, advantages

  11. Infertility Infertilidad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Práxedes Rojas Quintana

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Literature review on the main issues related to infertile couples. It includes concept and classification, physiology of ovulation, causes in women and men, basic tests that are commonly performed evolution and prognosis, and health actions to provide appropriate orientation to the infertile couple. It is aimed at creating a teaching complementary material for Medicine and Nursing students, as well as for residents and specialists in general medicine and gynecology.Revisión bibliográfica sobre los principales temas referidos a la infertilidad de las parejas. Incluye concepto y clasificación, fisiología de la ovulación, causas en la mujer y en el hombre, exámenes complementarios básicos que se les realiza, evolución y pronóstico, así como acciones de salud para la orientación correcta de la pareja infértil. Tiene como objetivo crear un material de apoyo a la docencia, para estudiantes de la carrera de Medicina y de Enfermería, así como para residentes y especialistas en Medicina General Integral y Ginecoobstetricia.

  12. Mitochondrial DNA mutations and male infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar D

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Infertility can be defined as difficulty in conceiving a child after 1 year of unprotected intercourse. Infertility can arise either because of the male factor or female factor or both. According to the current estimates, 15% of couples attempting their first pregnancy could not succeed. Infertility is either primary or secondary. Mitochondria have profound effect on all biochemical pathways, including the one that drivessperm motility. Sperm motility is heavily dependent on the ATP generated by oxidative phosphorylation in the mitochondrial sheath. In this review, the very positive role of mitochondrial genome′s association with infertility is discussed

  13. Male Infertility and Its Causes in Human

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshinobu Miyamoto

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Infertility is one of the most serious social problems facing advanced nations. In general, approximate half of all cases of infertility are caused by factors related to the male partner. To date, various treatments have been developed for male infertility and are steadily producing results. However, there is no effective treatment for patients with nonobstructive azoospermia, in which there is an absence of mature sperm in the testes. Although evidence suggests that many patients with male infertility have a genetic predisposition to the condition, the cause has not been elucidated in the vast majority of cases. This paper discusses the environmental factors considered likely to be involved in male infertility and the genes that have been clearly shown to be involved in male infertility in humans, including our recent findings.

  14. Chromosomal disorders and male infertility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gary L Harton; Helen G Tempest

    2012-01-01

    infertility in humans is surprisingly common occurring in approximately 15% of the population wishing to start a family.Despite this,the molecular and genetic factors underlying the cause of infertility remain largely undiscovered.Nevertheless,more and more genetic factors associated with infertility are being identified.This review will focus on our current understanding of the chromosomal basis of male infertility specifically:chromosomal aneuploidy,structural and numerical karyotype abnormalities and Y chromosomal microdeletions.Chromosomal aneuploidy is the leading cause of pregnancy loss and developmental disabilities in humans.Aneuploidy is predominantly maternal in origin,but concerns have been raised regarding the safety of intracytoplasmic sperm injection as infertile men have significantly higher levels of sperm aneuploidy compared to their fertile counterparts.Males with numerical or structural karyotype abnormalities are also at an increased risk of producing aneuploid sperm.Our current understanding of how sperm aneuploidy translates to embryo aneuploidy will be reviewed,as well as the application of preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) in such cases.Clinical recommendations where possible will be made,as well as discussion of the use of emerging array technology in PGD and its potential applications in male infertility.

  15. Chromosomal disorders and male infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harton, Gary L; Tempest, Helen G

    2012-01-01

    Infertility in humans is surprisingly common occurring in approximately 15% of the population wishing to start a family. Despite this, the molecular and genetic factors underlying the cause of infertility remain largely undiscovered. Nevertheless, more and more genetic factors associated with infertility are being identified. This review will focus on our current understanding of the chromosomal basis of male infertility specifically: chromosomal aneuploidy, structural and numerical karyotype abnormalities and Y chromosomal microdeletions. Chromosomal aneuploidy is the leading cause of pregnancy loss and developmental disabilities in humans. Aneuploidy is predominantly maternal in origin, but concerns have been raised regarding the safety of intracytoplasmic sperm injection as infertile men have significantly higher levels of sperm aneuploidy compared to their fertile counterparts. Males with numerical or structural karyotype abnormalities are also at an increased risk of producing aneuploid sperm. Our current understanding of how sperm aneuploidy translates to embryo aneuploidy will be reviewed, as well as the application of preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) in such cases. Clinical recommendations where possible will be made, as well as discussion of the use of emerging array technology in PGD and its potential applications in male infertility.

  16. Chronic endometritis and infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyun Jong; Kim, You Shin; Yoon, Tae Ki; Lee, Woo Sik

    2016-12-01

    Chronic endometritis (CE) is a condition involving the breakdown of the peaceful co-existence between microorganisms and the host immune system in the endometrium. A majority of CE cases produce no noticeable signs or mild symptoms, and the prevalence rate of CE has been found to be approximately 10%. Gynecologists and pathologists often do not focus much clinical attention on CE due to the time-consuming microscopic examinations necessary to diagnose CE, its mild clinical manifestations, and the benign nature of the disease. However, the relationship between CE and infertility-related conditions such as repeated implantation failure and recurrent miscarriage has recently emerged as an area of inquiry. In this study, we reviewed the literature on the pathophysiology of CE and how it may be associated with infertility, as well as the literature regarding the diagnosis and treatment of CE. In addition, we discuss the value of hysteroscopic procedures in the diagnosis and treatment of CE.

  17. Chronic endometritis and infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyun Jong; Kim, You Shin; Yoon, Tae Ki

    2016-01-01

    Chronic endometritis (CE) is a condition involving the breakdown of the peaceful co-existence between microorganisms and the host immune system in the endometrium. A majority of CE cases produce no noticeable signs or mild symptoms, and the prevalence rate of CE has been found to be approximately 10%. Gynecologists and pathologists often do not focus much clinical attention on CE due to the time-consuming microscopic examinations necessary to diagnose CE, its mild clinical manifestations, and the benign nature of the disease. However, the relationship between CE and infertility-related conditions such as repeated implantation failure and recurrent miscarriage has recently emerged as an area of inquiry. In this study, we reviewed the literature on the pathophysiology of CE and how it may be associated with infertility, as well as the literature regarding the diagnosis and treatment of CE. In addition, we discuss the value of hysteroscopic procedures in the diagnosis and treatment of CE. PMID:28090456

  18. CHROMOSOME ABNORMALITIES IN INFERTILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateja Smogavec

    2009-08-01

    Conclusions Chromosomal analysis is an important method in diagnostic procedures of infertility, because chromosomal abnormalities could play the important role in etiology of infertility and are more frequently detected in this group of patients compared to general population. In the infertile couples balanced chromosomal abnormalities are the main cause of spontaneous abortions. Sex chromosome aneuploidies are highly correlated to infertility of females and males.

  19. Immunology and male infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumford, D M

    1978-10-01

    This article has attempted to review evidence that suggests that immune factors may be operative in a small but significant number of infertile men. Although our current understanding of the possible processes by which autosensitization to previously sequestered reproductive antigens occurs is incomplete, there are laboratory assays presently available that give an indication, but do not prove, that immune factors may be contributing to the infertile state. Continued research is needed to develop new assays and more purified sperm antigens, which might enhance our knowledge of the underlying immunoreproductive changes. Until these are available, the following procedures should be considered when investigating a patient with infertility of suspected immune origin. The patient's history should be taken, and a physical examination should be performed. A complete blood count, urinalysis, and complete semen analysis and culture should be taken. Next, in vivo cervical tests (Sims-Huhner) are performed, followed by sperm antibody assessment (serum, semen) and perhaps in vitro cervical mucus sperm assays (especially the crossed hostility test). After the tests have been completed, the following possibe treatments exist: 1. Treatment of underlying infections 2. Correction of obstructions 3. Corticosteroid (or testosterone?) therapy 4. Washed sperm insemination 5. First portion of fresh ejaculate insemination 6. Artificial insemination with homologous donor 7. Adoption.

  20. gr/gr-DAZ2-DAZ4-CDY1b deletion is a high-risk factor for male infertility in Tunisian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorbel, Myriam; Baklouti-Gargouri, Siwar; Keskes, Rim; Chakroun, Nozha; Sellami, Afifa; Fakhfakh, Faiza; Ammar-Keskes, Leila

    2016-10-30

    The azoospermia factor c (AZFc) region harbors multi-copy genes that are expressed in the testis. Deletions of this region lead to reduced copy numbers of these genes. In this present study we aimed to determine the frequency of AZFc subdeletion in infertile and fertile men from Tunisia and to identify whether deletions of DAZ and CDY1 gene copies are deleterious on spermatogenesis and on semen quality. We studied a group of 241 infertile men and 115 fertile healthy males using a sequence tagged site (STS)±method. To gain insight into the molecular basis of the heterogeneous phenotype observed in men with the deletion we defined the type of DAZ and CDY1 genes deleted. We reported in the present study and for the first time a new type of AZFc deletion (gr/gr-DAZ2-DAZ4-CDY1b) and hypothesis that this new deletion is the result of two successive events. We also demonstrated that this deletion constitutes a relative high-risk factor for male infertility in Tunisian population.

  1. Genetic aspects of male infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartosz Witczak

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, infertility affects up to 140 million people worldwide. It is considered that the male factor is responsible for nearly a half of problems in obtaining pregnancy. Increasingly, infertility treatment clinics, as well as standard examinations, also offer genetic tests in the diagnostics of the male infertility factor, such as: karyotype analysis, detection of Y chromosome microdeletions, and examination of the chromosome composition of sperm by the fluorescent in situ hybridisation method (FISH. Genetic factors, defined to date, which cover both chromosomal aberrations and monogenic disorders, are responsible for approximately 10–15% of cases of male infertility. Usually, their phenotypic manifestations are disorders in spermatogenesis, structural changes in the genital organs (e.g. reduced size of the testicles, or sperm dysfunction. Molecular studies intensively carried out in the area of diagnostics and treatment of infertility indicate an increasingly large number of relationships between genetic factors and fertility; however, many genes related with human fertility still remain unidentified.

  2. Direct effect of macrophage migration inhibitory factor on sperm function: possible involvement in endometriosis-associated infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carli, Cédric; Leclerc, Pierre; Metz, Christine N; Akoum, Ali

    2007-10-01

    To evaluate the effect of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) on sperm capacitation, a maturational process that occurs in the female reproductive tract and enables spermatozoa to become fully competent at fertilizing the oocyte. Incubation of Percoll-washed spermatozoa with varying concentrations of human recombinant MIF or fetal cord serum (positive control). Human reproduction research laboratories. Fresh semen samples obtained from healthy volunteers after a minimum of 2 days of sexual abstinence. Protein tyrosine phosphorylation by Western blotting, the acrosomal status upon binding to the Pisum sativum agglutinin conjugated to fluorescein isothiocyanate, and sperm motility by computer-assisted sperm analysis. MIF displayed a dose-dependent effect on the phosphotyrosine content of p105 and p81, the two major tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins associated with human sperm capacitation. A significant induction of tyrosine phosphorylation was seen at 2 ng/mL of MIF for both p105 and p81, but a trend for a down-regulation of the basal tyrosine phosphorylation level was noted at elevated concentrations (12-24 ng/mL). MIF pretreatment of spermatozoa resulted in a dose-dependent change in the acrosome reaction induced by the Ca(2+) ionophore A23187. After being increased at 1-4 ng/mL MIF with a statistically significant effect observed at 4 ng/mL, the acrosome reaction gradually decreased and fell below the control levels at higher concentrations. Furthermore, a significant decrease in the motility of spermatozoa was observed after exposure to an elevated concentration of MIF (12 ng/mL). The present data indicate that MIF may play a physiological role in sperm capacitation but may have deleterious effects on sperm function at abnormal pathophysiological levels, which suggests a role in endometriosis-associated infertility.

  3. Endometriosis: Does It Cause Infertility?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home FAQs Frequently Asked Questions Quick Facts About Infertility FAQs About Infertility FAQs About the Psychological Component of Infertility FAQs About Cloning and Stem Cell Research SART's ...

  4. Diagnostic Testing for Female Infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home FAQs Frequently Asked Questions Quick Facts About Infertility FAQs About Infertility FAQs About the Psychological Component of Infertility FAQs About Cloning and Stem Cell Research SART's ...

  5. Spermatozoal cell death-inducing DNA fragmentation factor-α-like effector A (CIDEA) gene expression and DNA fragmentation in infertile men with metabolic syndrome and normal seminogram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsamanoudy, Ayman Z; Abdalla, Hussein Abdelaziz; Hassanien, Mohammed; Gaballah, Mohammad A

    2016-01-01

    This is the first study to investigate spermatozoal cell death-inducing DNA fragmentation factor-α-like effector A (CIDEA) gene expression and DNA fragmentations in the spermatozoa of men diagnosed with metabolic syndrome (MS) who have normal seminograms with unexplained infertility, and to correlate these parameters with seminal glucose concentration. This study included 120 participants: 75 male subjects with MS (38 fertile and 37 infertile), and a control group of 45 fertile males without MS. HOMA-IR, semen analysis, and biochemical measurement of seminal plasma insulin and glucose levels were carried out. Spermatozoal insulin gene and CIDEA gene expressions were performed by the RT-PCR method. The percentage of spermatozoal DNA fragmentation was also estimated. The spermatozoal insulin and CIDEA gene expression, as well as the DNA fragmentation, were significantly higher in the infertile MS group than in the fertile MS group, and significantly higher in both the MS groups than in the control group. Seminal glucose concentration showed significant positive correlations with seminal insulin level, spermatozoa insulin, CIDEA gene expression, and DNA fragmentation. Moreover, there was a positive correlation between spermatozoa CIDEA gene expression and DNA fragmentation. It can be concluded that MS may affect male fertility at the molecular level, through its possible inducing effect of spermatozoa CIDEA and insulin gene expression, DNA fragmentation, and increased seminal glucose.

  6. REVIEW ARTICLE: Infertility and Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddhartha Chatterjee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Environment is coming up as one of the causative factors for many physical and mental diseases. Infertility is not only a medicalproblem; it is a social and psychological problem as well. Air and soil pollutions are disturbing the male and female reproductiveprocesses in various ways. Endocrine disruptors otherwise called Estrogen Mimics not only induce endometriosis, but can influence the reproductive process by competing with estrogen receptors. Insecticides and environmental toxicants also disrupt the reproductive process. Psychological stress is an important factor for infertility. This is also a stimulating factor for many gynecological conditions like Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS. In treating the infertile couples, psychological treatment & support areof equal importance as that of medical treatment.

  7. Serum and seminal plasma insulin-like growth factor-1 in male infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyo Serk; Park, Yong-Seog; Lee, Joong Shik; Seo, Ju Tae

    2016-06-01

    Growth hormone and its mediator, insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), have been suggested to exert gonadotropic actions in both humans and animals. The present study was conducted to assess the relationship between serum IGF-1 concentration, seminal plasma concentration, and sperm parameter abnormalities. A total of 79 men were enrolled in this study from December 2011 to July 2012 and were prospectively analyzed. Patient parameters analyzed included age, body mass index, smoking status, urological history, and fertility history. Patients were divided into four groups based on their semen parameters: normal (A, n=31), abnormal sperm motility (B, n=12), abnormal sperm morphology (C, n=20), and two or more abnormal parameters (D, n=16). Patient seminal plasma and serum IGF-1 concentrations were determined. Patient baseline characteristics were not significantly different between any of the groups. The serum IGF-1 levels in groups B, C, and D were significantly lower than the levels in group A; however, the seminal plasma IGF-1 levels were not significantly different between any of the groups. Men with abnormal sperm parameters had significantly lower levels of serum IGF-1 compared with men with normal sperm parameters. Seminal plasma IGF-1 levels, however, did not differ significantly between the groups investigated here. Further investigations will be required to determine the exact mechanisms by which growth hormone and IGF-1 affect sperm quality.

  8. Serum and seminal plasma insulin-like growth factor-1 in male infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyo Serk; Park, Yong-Seog; Lee, Joong Shik

    2016-01-01

    Objective Growth hormone and its mediator, insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), have been suggested to exert gonadotropic actions in both humans and animals. The present study was conducted to assess the relationship between serum IGF-1 concentration, seminal plasma concentration, and sperm parameter abnormalities. Methods A total of 79 men were enrolled in this study from December 2011 to July 2012 and were prospectively analyzed. Patient parameters analyzed included age, body mass index, smoking status, urological history, and fertility history. Patients were divided into four groups based on their semen parameters: normal (A, n=31), abnormal sperm motility (B, n=12), abnormal sperm morphology (C, n=20), and two or more abnormal parameters (D, n=16). Patient seminal plasma and serum IGF-1 concentrations were determined. Results Patient baseline characteristics were not significantly different between any of the groups. The serum IGF-1 levels in groups B, C, and D were significantly lower than the levels in group A; however, the seminal plasma IGF-1 levels were not significantly different between any of the groups. Conclusion Men with abnormal sperm parameters had significantly lower levels of serum IGF-1 compared with men with normal sperm parameters. Seminal plasma IGF-1 levels, however, did not differ significantly between the groups investigated here. Further investigations will be required to determine the exact mechanisms by which growth hormone and IGF-1 affect sperm quality. PMID:27358827

  9. 影响女性不孕症的环境相关因素研究%The Research about Environmental Impact Factors of Female Infertility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘敏

    2013-01-01

    目的:探讨研究女性不孕症的环境相关影响因素,为不孕症的预防和治疗提供临床参考资料。方法:选取2009年8月-2012年8月本院收治的215例不孕症患者作为研究对象,回顾性分析总结患者的相关临床资料,同时对所有患者的人际关系和心理健康状况进行调查。结果:影响不孕症患者的环境相关因素主要包括妇科炎症、月经不调、房屋装修、输卵管病变和人工流产等,且患者受单个或是多种相关因素影响,同时患者的心理健康状况与不孕症的发生也有密切关系。结论:多种环境相关因素会导致女性不孕症的发生,因此积极预防治疗妇科炎症、输卵管病变等妇科疾病,降低人工流产,避免接触有毒有害物质,进行有效的心理疏导等,这些都是女性不孕症防治的关键,同时应增加对女性进行生殖系统健康方面的宣教工作,做到防患于未然。%Objective:To investigate the factors of the environment related to female infertility,and to provide clinical references for the prevention and treatment of infertility.Method:The clinical data of 215 infertility patients were selected in our hospital from August 2009 to August 2012,and interpersonal and mental health of all patients were investigated.Result:The environment-related infertility factors included gynecological inflammation,irregular menstruation,home improvements,tubal disease and abortion,and the patients were impacted by a single or a variety of related factors,while the patient's mental health and mental closely related to the occurrence of infertility.Conclusion:A variety of environmental factors can cause female infertility,and the key to prevention of infertility is active prevention and treatment of gynecological inflammation,tubal disease and other gynecological diseases,reduce abortion,avoid contact with toxic and hazardous substances,effective psychological counseling and so on

  10. Genetics of human male infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poongothai, J; Gopenath, T S; Manonayaki, S

    2009-04-01

    Infertility is defined as a failure to conceive in a couple trying to reproduce for a period of two years without conception. Approximately 15 percent of couples are infertile, and among these couples, male factor infertility accounts for approximately 50 percent of causes. Male infertility is a multifactorial syndrome encompassing a wide variety of disorders. In more than half of infertile men, the cause of their infertility is unknown (idiopathic) and could be congenital or acquired. Infertility in men can be diagnosed initially by semen analysis. Seminograms of infertile men may reveal many abnormal conditions, which include azoospermia, oligozoospermia, teratozoospermia, asthenozoospermia, necrospermia and pyospermia. The current estimate is that about 30 percent of men seeking help at the infertility clinic are found to have oligozoospermia or azoospermia of unknown aetiology. Therefore, there is a need to find the cause of infertility. The causes are known in less than half of these cases, out of which genetic or inherited disease and specific abnormalities in the Y chromosome are major factors. About 10-20 percent of males presenting without sperm in the ejaculate carry a deletion of the Y chromosome. This deleted region includes the Azoospermia Factor (AZF) locus, located in the Yq11, which is divided into four recurrently deleted non-overlapping subregions designated as AZFa, AZFb, AZFc and AZFd. Each of these regions may be associated with a particular testicular histology, and several candidate genes have been found within these regions. The Deleted in Azoospermia (DAZ) gene family is reported to be the most frequently deleted AZF candidate gene and is located in the AZFc region. Recently, a partial, novel Y chromosome 1.6-Mb deletion, designated "gr/gr" deletion, has been described specifically in infertile men with varying degrees of spermatogenic failure. The DAZ gene has an autosomal homologue, DAZL (DAZ-Like), on the short arm of the chromosome 3 (3

  11. Is Infertility Associated with Childhood Autism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grether, Judith K.; Qian, Yinge; Croughan, Mary S.; Wu, Yvonne W.; Schembri, Michael; Camarano, Loretta; Croen, Lisa A.

    2013-01-01

    Concerns persist about a possible link between infertility and risk of autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Interpretation of existing studies is limited by racial/ethnic homogeneity of study populations and other factors. Using a case-control design, we evaluated infertility history and treatment documented in medical records of members of Kaiser…

  12. Genes Causing Male Infertility in Humans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lawrence C. Layman

    2002-01-01

    There are an accumulating number of identified gene mutations that cause infertility in humans. Most of the known gene mutations impair normal puberty and subsequently cause infertility by either hypothalamic /pituitary deficiency of important tropic factors to the gonad or by gonadal genes.

  13. Is Infertility Associated with Childhood Autism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grether, Judith K.; Qian, Yinge; Croughan, Mary S.; Wu, Yvonne W.; Schembri, Michael; Camarano, Loretta; Croen, Lisa A.

    2013-01-01

    Concerns persist about a possible link between infertility and risk of autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Interpretation of existing studies is limited by racial/ethnic homogeneity of study populations and other factors. Using a case-control design, we evaluated infertility history and treatment documented in medical records of members of Kaiser…

  14. Exploration of Infertile Couples’ Support Requirements: A Qualitative Study

    OpenAIRE

    Fatemeh Jafarzadeh-Kenarsari; Ataollah Ghahiri; Mojtaba Habibi; Ali Zargham-Boroujeni

    2015-01-01

    Background: Due to high prevalence of infertility, increasing demand for infertility treatment, and provision of high quality of fertility care, it is necessary for healthcare professionals to explore infertile couples’ expectations and needs. Identification of these needs can be a prerequisite to plan the effective supportive interventions. The current study was, therefore, conducted in an attempt to explore and to understand infertile couples’ experiences and needs. Materi...

  15. Women's beliefs about infertility and sexual behaviors: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokaie, Mahshid; Simbar, Masoumeh; Ardekani, Seyed Mojtaba Yassini; Majd, Hamid Alavi

    2016-01-01

    Infertility is a reproductive health problem and its prevalence is increasing in developing countries. This problem has some significant effects on the sexual behaviors of infertile women, especially during infertility treatment periods. Discovering the existing beliefs in the field of sexual and reproductive health and also determining the misconceptions would define the educational needs for providing sexual health programs for infertile women. Women should be able to distinguish risky behaviors from healthy behaviors that falsely have been marked as infertility-related behaviors. This qualitative study was conducted to determine women's beliefs about infertility and sexual behaviors among Iranian infertile women. The present study was a qualitative conventional content analysis study conducted on 15 infertile women and 8 key informants until reaching data saturation. Guba and Lincoln evaluative criteria were used for ensuring rigor of the study. Data analysis defined three classes of beliefs that directly or indirectly affected sexual behaviors in infertile women: 1) Cultural, religious, or ethnic beliefs, 2) believing in the effect of diet on infertility, and 3) effect of the type of intercourse on getting pregnant. Three themes of religious, cultural, and ethnic beliefs, believing in the effect of diet on infertility, and the effect of the type of intercourse were the most important factors indicating sexual behaviors among infertile women. It seems that cultural and social matters are the most effective factors on sexual behaviors of infertile Iranian women.

  16. Prevalent false positives of azoospermia factor a (AZFa) microdeletions caused by single-nucleotide polymorphism rs72609647 in the sY84 screening of male infertility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing Wu; Hui-Juan Shi; Guo-Wu Chen; Tao-Fei Yan; Hui Wang; Yu-Ling Liu; Zheng Li; Shi-Wei Duan; Fei Sun; Yun Feng

    2011-01-01

    Multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) has been widely used to detect Y-chromosome microdeletions,which is one of the major causes of male infertility.Both the European Academy of Andrology (EAA) and the European Molecular Genetics Quality Network (EMQN) have recommended the use of sY84 and sY86 markers for the detection of azoospermia factor a (AZFa) microdeletion during DNA testing for male infertility.In this study,a large-scale analysis of AZF microdeletion in a total of 630 Chinese males,including healthy semen donors (n=200),infertile males with normal sperm count (n=226) and patients with either nonobstructive azoospermia or severe oligozoospermia (n=204),was performed.A series of nine sequence-tagged site (STS) markers from the AZF region of the Y chromosome was used to detect microdeletions.All primers were designed based on the recommendations of the National Center for Biotechnology Information.An unusually high incidence (73/630,11.6%) of sY84-absent but sY86-present genotypes was observed in the AZFa microdeletion screening.Sequencing the sY84-flanking region revealed a total of 73 patients with sY84-absent but sY86-present genotypes have a T-to-G transversion at the fifth base from the 5' end of the reverse sY84 primer.These prevalent false positives,which were not only observed in infertile men,but also observed in donors,resulted from a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) named rs72609647 in the targeting sequence of the reverse sY84 primer.Our study suggests that a pre-screening of existence of rs72609647 polymorphism can prevent the frequent false positive results of AZFa microdeletions detection in the infertile Chinese males.Given the SNP rs72609647 was recently found in a deep sequencing of a Chinese individual,the current EAA and EMQN standards may need to be scrutinized among different populations to avoid the potential genetic variations in the primer binding sequences.

  17. Experiencing Male Infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esmée Hanna

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the qualitative research literature that exists in relation to men’s experiences of male infertility. Since men have often been marginalized in the realm of reproduction, including academic research on infertility, it is important to focus on any qualitative research that gives voices to male perspectives and concerns. Given the distress documented by studies of infertile women, we focus in particular on the emotive responses and lived experiences of men in relation to infertility. In this article then, we present an analysis of the core themes across 19 qualitative articles, which include “infertility as crisis”; “emoting infertility- men as “being strong”’ “infertility as a source of stigma”; and the “desire for fatherhood.” In light of these insights, we identify key areas for future research and development including men’s emotional responses to infertility, how men seek support for infertility, the intersection between masculinity and infertility, the relationship between the desire to father and infertility, and the outcomes of infertility for men in terms of other aspects of their lives. We suggest that such research would facilitate making the experiences of men more central within our understandings of infertility within a field that has primarily been female focused.

  18. Unveiling New Molecular Factors Useful for Detection of Pelvic Inflammatory Disease due to Chlamydia trachomatis Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Carmen Rodriguez-Cerdeira; Elena Sanchez-Blanco; Alberto Molares-Vila; Alfonso Alba

    2012-01-01

    Background. Untreated Chlamydia trachomatis infections in women can result in disease sequelae such as pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), ultimately culminating in tubal occlusion and infertility. While nucleic acid amplification tests can effectively diagnose uncomplicated lower genital tract infections, they are not suitable for diagnosing upper genital tract pathological sequelae. Objective. The purpose of this paper was to provide a comprehensive review of new molecular factors associated...

  19. Epigenetic regulatory mechanisms associated with infertility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minocherhomji, Sheroy; Madon, Prochi F; Parikh, Firuza R

    2010-01-01

    Infertility is a complex human condition and is known to be caused by numerous factors including genetic alterations and abnormalities. Increasing evidence from studies has associated perturbed epigenetic mechanisms with spermatogenesis and infertility. However, there has been no consensus...... on whether one or a collective of these altered states is responsible for the onset of infertility. Epigenetic alterations involve changes in factors that regulate gene expression without altering the physical sequence of DNA. Understanding these altered epigenetic states at the genomic level along...... with higher order organisation of chromatin in genes associated with infertility and pericentromeric regions of chromosomes, particularly 9 and Y, could further identify causes of idiopathic infertility. Determining the association between DNA methylation, chromatin state, and noncoding RNAs...

  20. Primary infertility (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primary infertility is a term used to describe a couple that has never been able to conceive a pregnancy ... to do so through unprotected intercourse. Causes of infertility include a wide range of physical as well ...

  1. Novel concepts in male infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandro C. Esteves

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Extraordinary advances have been achieved in the field of male infertility in the last decades. There are new concepts in sperm physiology and several modern tools for the assessment of spermatogenesis kinetics in vivo. New tests using molecular biology and DNA damage assays allow the clinician to correctly diagnose men so far classified as having idiopathic male infertility. In the field of treatment, microsurgery has increased success rates either for reconstruction of the reproductive tract or the retrieval of spermatozoa for assisted conception. Emerging evidence suggests that life-style and environmental conditions are of utmost importance in male fertility and subfertility. This review discusses several concepts that have changed over the last years, such as the duration of the spermatogenic cycle in humans, Y-chromosome infertility, the reproductive potential of non-mosaic Klinefelter syndrome men, the impact of paternal age and sperm DNA in male infertility, the role of antioxidants in the treatment of infertile men, the predictive factors and techniques for sperm retrieval in non-obstructive azoospermia, and the microsurgical treatment of clinical varicoceles. Whenever possible, levels of evidence are provided as suggested by the Oxford Center of Evidence-based Medicine.

  2. ROLE OF DIAGNOSTIC HYSTEROLAPAROSCOPY IN EVALUATION OF FEMALE INFERTILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayanthy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available AIM To evaluate the role of hysterolaparoscopy in female infertility. SETTINGS AND DESIGN Patients with female infertility presenting to outpatient Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology in Kempegowda Institute of Medical sciences, Bengaluru were evaluated for infertility by hysterolaparoscopy and chromopertubation. MATERIALS AND METHODS Seventy consenting subjects excluding male factor infertility with normal hormonal profile and no contraindication to laparoscopy underwent ultra-sonography. Then all patients were subjected to combined hysterolaparoscopy including chromopertubation and the results were recorded. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS USED T-test. RESULTS We studied 70 patients comprising of 40(57.1% cases of primary infertility and 30(42.9% patients of secondary infertility. In our study most commonly found pathologies were PCOD, endometriosis and tubal blockage. CONCLUSIONS Results show that hysterolaparoscopy has a promising role in diagnosing and treating infertility. hysterolaparoscopy has emerged as a new hope for infertile couples before they proceed to time-consuming and expensive assisted reproduction techniques.

  3. Mendelian genetics of male infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Kathleen; Yatsenko, Alexander N.; Jorgez, Carolina J.; Mukherjee, Sarmistha; Nalam, Roopa Lata; Matzuk, Martin M.; Lamb, Dolores J.

    2013-01-01

    Infertility is defined as the inability of a couple to conceive despite trying for a year, and it affects approximately 15% of the reproductive-age population. It is considered a genetically lethal factor, as the family lineage stops at that individual with no progeny produced. A genetic defect associated with an infertile individual cannot be transmitted to the offspring, ensuring the maintenance of reproductive fitness of the species. However, with the advent of assisted reproductive techniques (ART), we are now able to overcome sterility and bypass nature’s protective mechanisms that developed through evolution to prevent fertilization by defective or deficient sperm. PMID:21382200

  4. Early Marriage: a Policy for Infertility Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ali Karimzadeh

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Female fertility begins to decline many years prior to the onset of menopause despite continued regular ovulatory cycles. Age related infertility is due to oocyte abnormalities and decreased ovarian reserve. Treatment of infertility when the cause is limited to decreased ovarian reserve is empirical at present except for oocyte donation. This mini review of the literature covers all available English biomedical journals that have been published from 1995 to 2008. The search based on combination of the words age, fertility, infertility, and oocyte abnormalities. The important findings from this search strategy are summarized and presented in the sub headings including female age and fertility, miscarriage and in vitro fertilization. Regarding infertility prevention, this mini review suggested that early marriage is a primordial, effective, inexpensive and easy way to prevent infertility.

  5. Evaluation and treatment of infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Tammy J; Vitrikas, Kristen R

    2015-03-01

    Infertility is defined as the inability to achieve pregnancy after one year of regular, unprotected intercourse. Evaluation may be initiated sooner in patients who have risk factors for infertility or if the female partner is older than 35 years. Causes of infertility include male factors, ovulatory dysfunction, uterine abnormalities, tubal obstruction, peritoneal factors, or cervical factors. A history and physical examination can help direct the evaluation. Men should undergo evaluation with a semen analysis. Abnormalities of sperm may be treated with gonadotropin therapy, intrauterine insemination, or in vitro fertilization. Ovulation should be documented by serum progesterone level measurement at cycle day 21. Evaluation of the uterus and fallopian tubes can be performed by hysterosalpingography in women with no risk of obstruction. For patients with a history of endometriosis, pelvic infections, or ectopic pregnancy, evaluation with hysteroscopy or laparoscopy is recommended. Women with anovulation may be treated in the primary care setting with clomiphene to induce ovulation. Treatment of tubal obstruction generally requires referral for subspecialty care. Unexplained infertility in women or men may be managed with another year of unprotected intercourse, or may proceed to assisted reproductive technologies, such as intrauterine insemination or in vitro fertilization.

  6. Correlation between Chlamydia trachomatis infection and tubal factor infertility%沙眼衣原体感染与输卵管性不孕的相关性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢小惠

    2012-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is one of the most important pathogens which could cause sexual transmitted diseases and many other diseases in genital system, such as urethritis, cervicitis, chronic pelvic inflammatory disease, tuba] factor infertility, ectopic pregnancy. Chlamydia trachomatis will induce humoral immune response and cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses in human. To diagnose such chlamydia trachomatis infected diseases, the CT antibodies, cytokine genetic polymorphisms which are positive is the immunoreaction are studied. This paper reviews the advances in tubal factor infertility caused by chlamydia trachomatis.%沙眼衣原体是性传播疾病最主要的病原体之一,可使人体生殖道感染,引起女性尿道炎、宫颈炎、慢性盆腔炎、输卵管性不孕、异位妊娠等.沙眼衣原体感染人体后,宿主发生免疫反应,包括体液免疫和细胞免疫,产生一系列抗体,也有许多细胞因子参与其中,可以通过检测抗体与细胞因子及基因的多态性诊断沙眼衣原体感染性疾病.以下是对沙眼衣原体感染引起输卵管性不孕的阐述.

  7. Refractory Epistaxis due to Severe Factor V Deficiency with Inhibitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth S. John

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Factor V deficiency secondary to inhibitors is extremely rare and can be caused by a wide collection of exposures such as bovine thrombin and beta lactamase antibiotics. The management of factor V deficiency with inhibitor is a condition treated based on case reports due to the rarity of this condition. We describe a complicated case of an elderly patient with severe factor V deficiency with high inhibitor titer refractory to FEIBA (anti-inhibitor coagulation complex treated with NovoSeven concurrently with cyclosporine immunosuppression and Rituxan. Given that there are no consensus guidelines on treatment, this case offers important insight into the therapeutic approaches that can be used to treat such patients.

  8. Effect of the Modern Life on Infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keziban Amanak

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Infertility is defined as failing to become pregnant at the end of one year although unprotected sexual intercourse of the couples. Infertility affects 15 % of couples at the reproductive age according to data of the World Health Organization. It was stated that approximately 1,5-2 million individuals in our country face infertility problem and problem increases gradually. One of the most important factors of increasing infertility problem is the adverse effects of modern life on our existence. Adverse effects of modern life are the common problems of the whole World. Postponement of gestational age as the result of modern life, obesity, electromagnetic waves, hormone-injected and genetically modified foodstuffs, stress, smoking and using alcohol, sexually transmitted diseases are among the increasing infertility causes. Adverse effects of the modern life on infertility may be minimized if the midwives and nurses know the harmful effects of modern life on infertility and provide consultancy services to couples, wishing to have a child. Effects of modern life on infertility and consultancy role of the midwives-nurses are discussed in this article. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2014; 13(4.000: 345-350

  9. Infertility in Mazandaran province - north of Iran: an etiological study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimpour Malekshah, Abbasali; Esmailnejad Moghaddam, Amir; Moslemizadeh, Narges; Peivandi, Sepideh; Barzegarnejad, Ayyub; Musanejad, Nadali; Jursarayee, Gholamali

    2011-01-01

    Background: The prevalence and etiology of infertility are not similar in different parts of the world. There are only few reports of this topic in Iran. Objective: This study was conducted to determine the clinical patterns and major causes of infertility in Mazandaran province in north of Iran. Materials and Methods: The medical records of 3734 consecutive couples attending two infertility clinics in Mazandaran province, from 2003 to 2008, were reviewed. The couples had not had a viable birth after at least 1 year of unprotected intercourse and were fully investigated. Results: Of the entire samples, 78.7% had primary infertility and 21.3% had secondary infertility. The mean duration of infertility in couples was 5.7±4 years. The etiology of infertility in couples revealed; male factor in 38.9%, female factor in 34.7%, combined factors in 14.6% and undetermined cause in 11.8%. Conclusion: In this study, delayed attendance of infertile couples to the infertility clinic was found. Therefore, there is a need to revise public health program on infertility to focus on the education and prevention of infertility and its risk factors. PMID:25356077

  10. Exploration of Infertile Couples’ Support Requirements: A Qualitative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Jafarzadeh-Kenarsari

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Due to high prevalence of infertility, increasing demand for infertility treatment, and provision of high quality of fertility care, it is necessary for healthcare professionals to explore infertile couples’ expectations and needs. Identification of these needs can be a prerequisite to plan the effective supportive interventions. The current study was, therefore, conducted in an attempt to explore and to understand infertile couples’ experiences and needs. Materials and Methods: This is a qualitative study based on a content analysis approach. The participants included 26 infertile couples (17 men and 26 women and 7 members of medical personnel (3 gynecologists and 4 midwives as the key informants. The infertile couples were selected from patients attending public and private infertility treatment centers and private offices of infertility specialists in Isfahan and Rasht, Iran, during 2012-2013. They were selected through purposive sampling method with maximum variation. In-depth unstructured interviews and field notes were used for data gathering among infertile couples. The data from medical personnel was collected through semi-structured interviews. The interview data were analyzed using conventional content analysis method. Results: Data analysis revealed four main categories of infertile couples’ needs, including: i. Infertility and social support, ii. Infertility and financial support, iii. Infertility and spiritual support and iv. Infertility and informational support. The main theme of all these categories was assistance and support. Conclusion: The study showed that in addition to treatment and medical needs, infertile couples encounter various challenges in different emotional, psychosocial, communicative, cognitive, spiritual, and economic aspects that can affect various areas of their life and lead to new concerns, problems, and demands. Thus, addressing infertile couples’ needs and expectations alongside their

  11. Mortality due to Respiratory Syncytial Virus. Burden and Risk Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geoghegan, Sarah; Erviti, Anabella; Caballero, Mauricio T; Vallone, Fernando; Zanone, Stella M; Losada, Juan Ves; Bianchi, Alejandra; Acosta, Patricio L; Talarico, Laura B; Ferretti, Adrian; Grimaldi, Luciano Alva; Sancilio, Andrea; Dueñas, Karina; Sastre, Gustavo; Rodriguez, Andrea; Ferrero, Fernando; Barboza, Edgar; Gago, Guadalupe Fernández; Nocito, Celina; Flamenco, Edgardo; Perez, Alberto Rodriguez; Rebec, Beatriz; Ferolla, F Martin; Libster, Romina; Karron, Ruth A; Bergel, Eduardo; Polack, Fernando P

    2017-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most frequent cause of hospitalization and an important cause of death in infants in the developing world. The relative contribution of social, biologic, and clinical risk factors to RSV mortality in low-income regions is unclear. To determine the burden and risk factors for mortality due to RSV in a low-income population of 84,840 infants. This was a prospective, population-based, cross-sectional, multicenter study conducted between 2011 and 2013. Hospitalizations and deaths due to severe lower respiratory tract illness (LRTI) were recorded during the RSV season. All-cause hospital deaths and community deaths were monitored. Risk factors for respiratory failure (RF) and mortality due to RSV were assessed using a hierarchical, logistic regression model. A total of 2,588 (65.5%) infants with severe LRTI were infected with RSV. A total of 157 infants (148 postneonatal) experienced RF or died with RSV. RSV LRTI accounted for 57% fatal LRTI tested for the virus. A diagnosis of sepsis (odds ratio [OR], 17.03; 95% confidence interval [CI], 13.14-21.16 for RF) (OR, 119.39; 95% CI, 50.98-273.34 for death) and pneumothorax (OR, 17.15; 95% CI, 13.07-21.01 for RF) (OR, 65.49; 95% CI, 28.90-139.17 for death) were the main determinants of poor outcomes. RSV was the most frequent cause of mortality in low-income postneonatal infants. RF and death due to RSV LRTI, almost exclusively associated with prematurity and cardiopulmonary diseases in industrialized countries, primarily affect term infants in a developing world environment. Poor outcomes at hospitals are frequent and associated with the cooccurrence of bacterial sepsis and clinically significant pneumothoraxes.

  12. A case-control study on the risk factors of male infertility%男性不育影响因素的病例对照研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何晓; 侯倩; 黄河浪

    2011-01-01

    目的:探讨男性不育的影响因素.方法:对122对病例和对照以1∶2配对进行影响因素的面对面问卷调查,采用Epidata3.0软件建立数据库,SPSS11.5软件进行单因素和多因素条件Logistic回归分析.结果:多因素条件Logistic回归分析表明:泌尿生殖系统感染史(OR=11.248)、肝病史(OR=12.247)、高温作业(OR=1.743)、接触有害化学物质(OR=1.597)、精神压力(OR=1.382)及每月性交次数(OR=1.378)均可能是男性不育的危险因素,而文化程度(OR=0.379)可能为其保护因素.结论:男性不育可能是由多种因素长期反复作用的结果,其预防措施的重点应为整治环境污染、加强职业防护、提高文化知识和性健康教育水平、改变不良工作及生活习惯等.%Objective:To study the risk factors of male infertility.Methods :A hospital-based matched case-control study was carried out in Nanchang.Matched by age (±2 years old), 122 cases and 240 controls(1∶2) were recruited and studied.Database was established with Epidata3.0 software.Both cases and controls were face to face interviewed with a uniformed questionnaire.Conditional logistic regression model was used for univariate and multivariate analysis on SPSS 11.5 to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95 percent confidence internals (95%CI).Results :Data from multiple conditional logistic regression analysis showed that the risk factors of infertility were history of genitourinary infection (OR=11.248) ,history of liver disease(OR = 1.2.247) , high-temperature operation (OR = 1.743) , occupational exposure to chemical substances (OR = 1.597), mental stress (OR = 1.382)and the monthly frequency of sexual intercourse (OR= 1.378).However, level of education(OR=0.379) was the protective factor of male infertility.Conclusion :Male infertility is resulted from many factors repeatedly acting on men for a long time.In order to prevent male infertility,issues as environmental pollution,occupational protection and

  13. Society for Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... affiliated society to the American Society for Reproductive Medicine . Below are links to publications authored by ASRM and its affiliated societies. Latest Additions: Diagnostic Testing for Male Factor Infertility Robotic surgery The Intrauterine Device (IUD): A Long-acting ...

  14. Prevalence of Infertility Problems among Iranian Infertile Patients Referred to Royan Institute

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Sepidarkish

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Few studies have been conducted on the infertility problems in Iran. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of infertility problems and related factors in Iranian infertile patients. Materials and Methods: In this cross sectional study, 405 infertile patients referred to Royan Institute, Tehran, Iran, between 2014 and 2015, were selected by simple random sampling. Participants completed the Fertility Problem Inventory (FPI including 46 questions in five domains (social concern, sexual concern, relationship concern, rejection of parenthood, and need for parenthood. Mean difference between male and female was verified using independent-samples Student’s t test. A generalized linear model (GLM was also used for testing the effect of variables on the fertility problems. Data was analyzed using Stata software version 13. Results: The mean age (SD of participants was 31.28 (5.42. Our results showed that 160 infertile men (95.23% were classified as very high prevalence of infertility problems. Among infertile women, 83 patients (35.02% were as very high prevalence of infertility problems, and 154 patients (64.98% were as high prevalence. Age (P<0.001, sex (P<0.001, a history of abortion (P=0.009, failure of previous treatment (P<0.001, and education (P=0.014 had a significant relationship with FPI scores. Conclusion: Bases on the results of current study, an younger male with lower education level, history of abortion and history of previous treatments failure experienced more infertility problems.

  15. Infertility in Female Mice with a Gain-of-Function Mutation in the Luteinizing Hormone Receptor Is Due to Irregular Estrous Cyclicity, Anovulation, Hormonal Alterations, and Polycystic Ovaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hai, Lan; McGee, Stacey R; Rabideau, Amanda C; Paquet, Marilène; Narayan, Prema

    2015-07-01

    The luteinizing hormone receptor, LHCGR, is essential for fertility in males and females, and genetic mutations in the receptor have been identified that result in developmental and reproductive defects. We have previously generated and characterized a mouse model (KiLHR(D582G)) for familial male-limited precocious puberty caused by an activating mutation in the receptor. We demonstrated that the phenotype of the KiLHR(D582G) male mice is an accurate phenocopy of male patients with activating LHCGR mutations. In this study, we observed that unlike women with activating LHCGR mutations who are normal, female KiLHR(D582G) mice are infertile. Mice exhibit irregular estrous cyclicity, anovulation, and precocious puberty. A temporal study from 2-24 wk of age indicated elevated levels of progesterone, androstenedione, testosterone, and estradiol and upregulation of several steroidogenic enzyme genes. Ovaries of KiLHR(D582G) mice exhibited significant pathology with the development of large hemorrhagic cysts as early as 3 wk of age, extensive stromal cell hyperplasia and hypertrophy with luteinization, numerous atretic follicles, and granulosa cell tumors. Ovulation could not be rescued by the addition of exogenous gonadotropins. The body weights of the KiLHR(D582G) mice were higher than wild-type counterparts, but there was no increase in the body fat composition or metabolic abnormalities such as impaired glucose tolerance and insulin resistance. These studies demonstrate that activating LHCGR mutations do not produce the same phenotype in female mice as in humans and clearly illustrate species differences in the expression and regulation of LHCGR in the ovary, but not in the testis. © 2015 by the Society for the Study of Reproduction, Inc.

  16. Severe male infertility after failed ICSI treatment-a phenomenological study of men's experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hellström Anna-Lena

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Male-factor infertility underlies approximately 30% of infertility in couples seeking treatment; of which 10% is due to azoospermia. The development of assisted reproductive technology (ART, enabling the use of epididymal or testicular sperm for fertilization of the partner's oocytes, has made biological fatherhood possible for men with obstructive azoospermia. There is limited knowledge of men's experience of their own infertility. The aim of this study was to describe men's experiences of obstructive azoospermia infertility. Methods Eight men with obstructive azoospermia, who had terminated Swedish public health system ART treatment two years previously without subsequent childbirth, were interviewed using a descriptive phenomenological method. Results The essence of the phenomenon is expressed with a metaphor: climbing a mountain step by step with the aim of reaching the top, i.e. having a child and thus a family with a child. Four constituents are included (1 inadequacy followed by a feeling of redress (2 marginalisation, (3 chivalry (4 extension of life and starting a family as driving forces. Conclusions Knowledge of men's experiences of their own infertility is important as a supporting measure to increase the quality of care of infertile couples. By adopting this facet of gender perspective in fertility treatment guidelines, care can hopefully be optimized.

  17. Is there a place for nutritional supplements in the treatment of idiopathic male infertility?

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    Davide Arcaniolo

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Infertility affects 15% of couples in fertile age. Male factor is a cause of infertility in almost half of cases, mainly due to oligoasthenoteratozoospermia (OAT. The purpose of this study is to review the effects of nutritional supplements as medical treatment for idiopathic male infertility. Material and methods: A Pub Med and Medline review of the published studies utilizing nutritional supplements for the treatment of male infertility has been performed. Results: Clinical trials on Vitamin E, Vitamin A, Vitamin C. Arginine, Carnitine, N-Acetyl-Carnitine, Glutathione, Coenzyme Q10, Selenium and Zinc were reviewed. Although there is a wide variability in selected population, dose regimen and final outcomes, nutritional supplements both alone and in combination seems to be able to improve semen parameters (sperm count, sperm motility and morphology and pregnancy rate in infertile men. Conclusions: There are rising evidences from published randomized trials and systematic review suggesting that nutritional supplementation may improve semen parameters and the likelihood of pregnancy in men affected by OAT. This improvement, however, is not consistent and there is a wide variation in the treatment regimens used. Well designed and adequately powered RCTs are needed to better clarify the role of nutritional supplements as treatment for male infertility.

  18. Association of Positive History of Pulmonary Tuberculosis with Female Infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babak Eshrati

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The etiology of infertility has direct influence on the plan and outcome of its management.In this paper we showed the effect of history of tuberculosis (TB on female infertility among infertilecouples admitted to Royan infertility management center.Material and Methods: This case control study was performed on cases that were diagnosed withfemale infertility (308 women. Controls were women whose husbands were infertile due to some malefactor (314 women. Those who had both female and male infertility were excluded from the study. Theobserved variables were BMI>25 kg/m2, positive history of smoking, tuberculosis, sexually transmitteddisease and pelvic inflammatory diseases.Results: The age adjusted odds ratio of history of tuberculosis for female infertility was 6.21(95 CI:1.31-29.56.The attributable risk in exposed group was about 1%.Conclusion: According to our study, positive history of tuberculosis may be responsible for femaleinfertility.

  19. Psychological interactions with infertility among women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cwikel, J; Gidron, Y; Sheiner, E

    2004-12-01

    Despite the fact that various studies have demonstrated the importance of the mind-body connection and fertility, the psychosocial aspects of infertility have not been adequately addressed. Fertility treatments, ranging from medical monitoring, to hormonal remedies and in vitro fertilization (IVF), are both a physical and emotional burden on women and their partners. Psychological factors such as depression, state-anxiety, and stress-induced changes in heart rate and cortisol are predictive of a decreased probability of achieving a viable pregnancy. A couple that is trying to conceive will undoubtedly experience feelings of frustration and disappointment if a pregnancy is not easily achieved. However, if the difficulties progress and the man and or woman are labelled as having fertility problems, then this may result in a severe insult to self-esteem, body image, and self-assessed masculinity or femininity. Three types of relationships have been hypothesized between psychological factors and infertility. These include: (1) psychological factors are risk factors of subsequent infertility; (2) the experience of the diagnosis and treatment of infertility causes subsequent psychological distress; (3) a reciprocal relationship exists between psychological factors and infertility. The evidence for these three relationships is reviewed and an alternative approach to the treatment of infertility including stress evaluation that precedes or is concurrent to fertility treatment is suggested.

  20. Small Supernumerary Marker Chromosomes in Human Infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armanet, Narjes; Tosca, Lucie; Brisset, Sophie; Liehr, Thomas; Tachdjian, Gérard

    2015-01-01

    Small supernumerary marker chromosomes (sSMC) are structurally abnormal chromosomes that cannot be unambiguously identified by banding cytogenetics. The objective of this study was to provide an overview of sSMC frequency and characterization in a context of infertility and to review the literature describing sSMC in relation with male and female infertility. Therefore, a systematic literature review on sSMC associated with infertility was conducted by means of a PubMed literature and a sSMC database (http://ssmc-tl.com/sSMC.html) search. A total of 234 patients with infertility were identified as carriers of sSMC. All chromosomes, except chromosomes 10, 19 and the X, were involved in sSMC, and in 72% the sSMC originated from acrocentric chromosomes. Euchromatic imbalances were caused by the presence of sSMC in 30% of the cases. Putative genes have been identified in only 1.2% of sSMC associated with infertility. The implication of sSMC in infertility could be due to a partial trisomy of some genes but also to mechanical effects perturbing meiosis. Further precise molecular and interphase-architecture studies on sSMC are needed in the future to characterize the relationship between this chromosomal anomaly and human infertility.

  1. Parental infertility and cerebral palsy in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Jin Liang; Hvidtjørn, Dorte; Basso, Olga

    2010-01-01

    Children born after in vitro fertilization (IVF) or intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) have been reported to have a higher risk of cerebral palsy (CP), perhaps due to the higher frequency of preterm birth, multiple births or vanishing embryo in the pregnancies. However, it has been suggested...... that the underlying infertility may be part of the pathway. In this study, we examined whether untreated subfecundity (measured by time to pregnancy) or infertility treatment was associated with an increased risk of CP in the offspring....

  2. An epidemiologic survey on the causes of infertility in patients referred to infertility center in Fatemieh Hospital in Hamadan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyedeh Zahra Masoumi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infertility is considered as a major health care problem of different communities. The high prevalence of this issue doubled its importance. A significant proportion of infertility have been related to environmental conditions and also acquired risk factors. Different environmental conditions emphasized the need to study the different causes of infertility in each area. Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the frequency causes of infertility in infertile couples. Materials and Methods: In this cross sectional descriptive study 1200 infertile men and women that were referred to infertility clinic of Fatemieh Hospital during 2010 to 2011, were examined. This center is the only governmental center for infertility in Hamadan. Sampling was based on census method. Information about the patients was obtained from medical examinations and laboratory findings. To analyze the data, descriptive statistics such as frequencies and the mean were used. Results: The prevalence of primary and secondary infertility was 69.5% and 30.5% respectively. Among the various causes of infertility women factors (88.6% had the highest regard. In the causes of female infertility, menstrual disorders, diseases (obesity, thyroid diseases, and diabetes, ovulation dysfunction, uterine factor, fallopian tubes and cervical factor had the highest prevalence respectively. The causes of male infertility based on their frequency included semen fluid abnormalities, genetic factors, vascular abnormalities, and anti-spermatogenesis factors, respectively. Conclusion: Etiology pattern of infertility in our study is similar with the many other patterns that have been reported by the World Health Organization. However, frequency of menstrual disorders is much higher than other studies that require further consideration.

  3. Treatment of infertility in men with spinal cord injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brackett, N.L.; Lynne, C.M.; El Dib, Hussein Ibrahim El Desouki Hussein

    2010-01-01

    Most men with spinal cord injury (SCI) are infertile. Erectile dysfunction, ejaculatory dysfunction and semen abnormalities contribute to the problem. Treatments for erectile dysfunction include phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors, intracavernous injections of alprostadil, penile prostheses...... of intrauterine insemination increases as the total motile sperm count inseminated increases. In vitro fertilization and intracytoplasmic sperm injection are options in cases of extremely low total motile sperm count. Reproductive outcomes for SCI male factor infertility are similar to outcomes for general male...... factor infertility...

  4. Treatment of infertility in men with spinal cord injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brackett, N.L.; Lynne, C.M.; El Dib, Hussein Ibrahim El Desouki Hussein

    2010-01-01

    Most men with spinal cord injury (SCI) are infertile. Erectile dysfunction, ejaculatory dysfunction and semen abnormalities contribute to the problem. Treatments for erectile dysfunction include phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors, intracavernous injections of alprostadil, penile prostheses...... of intrauterine insemination increases as the total motile sperm count inseminated increases. In vitro fertilization and intracytoplasmic sperm injection are options in cases of extremely low total motile sperm count. Reproductive outcomes for SCI male factor infertility are similar to outcomes for general male...... factor infertility...

  5. Risk of adverse pregnancy and perinatal outcomes after high technology infertility treatment: a comprehensive systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomba, Stefano; Homburg, Roy; Santagni, Susanna; La Sala, Giovanni Battista; Orvieto, Raoul

    2016-11-04

    In the literature, there is growing evidence that subfertile patients who conceived after infertility treatments have an increased risk of pregnancy and perinatal complications and this is particularly true for patients who conceived through use of high technology infertility treatments. Moreover, high technology infertility treatments include many concomitant clinical and biological risk factors. This review aims to summarize in a systematic fashion the current evidence regarding the relative effect of the different procedures for high technology infertility treatments on the risk of adverse pregnancy and perinatal outcome. A literature search up to August 2016 was performed in IBSS, SocINDEX, Institute for Scientific Information, PubMed, Web of Science and Google Scholar and an evidence-based hierarchy was used to determine which articles to include and analyze. Data on prepregnancy maternal factors, low technology interventions, specific procedures for male factor, ovarian tissue/ovary and uterus transplantation, and chromosomal abnormalities and malformations of the offspring were excluded. The available evidences were analyzed assessing the level and the quality of evidence according to the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine guidelines and the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation system, respectively. Current review highlights that every single procedure of high technology infertility treatments can play a crucial role in increasing the risk of pregnancy and perinatal complications. Due to the suboptimal level and quality of the current evidence, further well-designed studies are needed.

  6. 育龄人群不孕不育影响因素分析%Analysis on the effect factors of infertility among the population of childbearing age

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于建春; 王苏梅; 刘秀丽; 林静; 宁鲁勇; 刘华强; 王平; 刘向东

    2012-01-01

    目的:探讨影响育龄人群不孕不育的因素.方法:使用问卷调查的方法,对山东省1 842对20 ~ 44岁育龄夫妇进行不孕不育影响因素调查.结果:①单因素分析结果显示,影响不孕不育的女性因素包括年龄、结婚年龄、民族、职业、文化程度、人均收入、身高、体重、月经规律情况、月经周期情况、月经量、痛经、继发性闭经情况、子宫疾病、卵巢疾病、输卵管疾病、宫颈疾病、阴道分泌物、阴道分泌物异味、盆腔感染情况、流引产次数、清宫术次数、药物流产次数、有无宫外孕、腹腔手术次数、精神病史、下腹疼痛史、长期服药史、两地分居、曾用避孕药、曾用IUD、有害物质接触史、重大不良生活史、精神压力等.影响不孕不育的男性因素包括职业、文化程度、人均收入、身高、体重、染色体情况、睾丸疾病、附睾疾病、输精管疾病、射精异常、高热史、精索静脉曲张、有害物质接触史、工作强度、高温作业、接触噪音、精神压力等.②多因素分析结果显示,育龄人群不孕不育的影响因素包括月经量、痛经、子宫疾病、输卵管疾病、清宫次数、分居、女方精神压力、男方职业、男方体重、男方睾丸情况等.结论:加强宣传,提高育龄群众自身素质;加强管理,为广大育龄群众提供优质服务;加强生殖健康教育,可降低不孕症的发病率.%Objective: To explore the effect factors of infertility among the population of childbearing age. Methods; A questionnaire survey method was used to investigate the effect factors of infertility among 1 842 couples aged 20-44 years old in Shandong province. Results: The results of univariate analysis showed that the effect factors of female infertility included age, marriage age, nationality , occupation, educational level, average per capita income, body height, body weight, regularity of menstruation

  7. Perspective in infertility: the ovarian stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestris, Erica; D'Oronzo, Stella; Cafforio, Paola; D'Amato, Giuseppe; Loverro, Giuseppe

    2015-08-07

    Infertility is a medical and social condition that affects millions of women worldwide and is today considered so far as a new disease. A considerable progress has been recently pursued in the field of the reproductive medicine and the infertility treatment may account for novel and modern procedures such as in vitro oocyte fertilization, egg donation, pregnancy surrogacy and preimplantation diagnosis. However, great interest has lately been reserved to the ovarian stem cells (OSCs) whose existence in woman ovaries has been proven. OSCs are thus suitable for developmental studies in infertility and in other clinical applications as endocrine derangements due to premature ovarian failure, or for infertility treatment after cancer chemotherapies, as well as in restoring the hormonal balance in postmenopausal age.

  8. Perfluoroalkyl substances and endometriosis-related infertility in Chinese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bin; Zhang, Rongrong; Jin, Fan; Lou, Hangying; Mao, Yuchan; Zhu, Wenting; Zhou, Wei; Zhang, Ping; Zhang, Jun

    2017-05-01

    Endometriosis is one of the main causes for female infertility. Previous studies suggested that perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs), a group of ubiquitous environmental chemicals with properties of endocrine disruption and reproductive toxicity, were risk factors for endometriosis but there lacks direct evidence on the possible role of PFASs in endometriosis-related infertility. To fill this gap, we examined the association between PFASs and endometriosis-related infertility among Chinese reproductive-age women in a case-control study, which comprised 157 surgically confirmed endometriosis cases and 178 controls seeking infertility treatment because of male reproductive dysfunction in 2014 and 2015. Blood specimens were collected at the enrollment and analyzed for ten PFASs. Logistic regression was utilized to estimate the adjusted odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for individual PFAS compound. Plasma concentrations of perfluorobutane sulfonic acid (PFBS) were associated with an increased risk of endometriosis-related infertility (second vs. lowest tertile: OR=3.74, 95% CI: 2.04, 6.84; highest vs. lowest tertile: OR=3.04, 95% CI: 1.65, 5.57). This association remained consistent when we restricted to subjects with no previous pregnancy (second vs. lowest tertile: OR=2.91, 95% CI: 1.28, 6.61; highest vs. lowest tertile: OR=3.41, 95% CI: 1.52, 7.65) or to subjects without other gynecologic pathology (second vs. lowest tertile: OR=4.65, 95% CI: 2.21, 9.82; highest vs. lowest tertile: OR=3.36, 95% CI: 1.58, 7.15). Plasma concentrations of perfluoroheptanoic acid (PFHpA), perfluorohexane sulfonic acid (PFHxS) and perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA) were inversely associated with endometriosis-related infertility, but the associations were attenuated in the sensitivity analyses. Our preliminary evidence suggests that exposure to PFBS may increase the risk of female infertility due to endometriosis. Future prospective studies are necessary to confirm these

  9. Cytogenetic of Male Infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lutfiye Ozpak

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Infertility by definition, is not to get pregnant within one year of regular sexual relationship without protection, affects 15-20% of reproductive age couples. Approximately 30% of infertility cases are male originated. Male infertility is caused by endocrine-related genetic defects affecting urogenital system function. These defects adversely affect subsequent spermatogenesis, sexual function, fertility, early embryonic stage of sexual maturation. Autosomal and gonosomal, numerical and structural chromosome abnormalities and related syndromes rank at the top causes of male infertility. Similar chromosome abnormalities are detected in male infertility and as the rate of these abnormalities increase, it was found to reduce sperm count especially in azospermic and oligozoospermic men. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2011; 20(4.000: 230-245

  10. Zeta Sperm Selection Improves Pregnancy Rate and Alters Sex Ratio in Male Factor Infertility Patients: A Double-Blind, Randomized Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasr Esfahani Mohammad Hossein

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Selection of sperm for intra-cytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI is usually considered as the ultimate technique to alleviate male-factor infertility. In routine ICSI, selection is based on morphology and viability which does not necessarily preclude the chance injection of DNA-damaged or apoptotic sperm into the oocyte. Sperm with high negative surface electrical charge, named “Zeta potential”, are mature and more likely to have intact chromatin. In addition, X-bearing spermatozoa carry more negative charge. Therefore, we aimed to compare the clinical outcomes of Zeta procedure with routine sperm selection in infertile men candidate for ICSI. Materials and Methods From a total of 203 ICSI cycles studied, 101 cycles were allocated to density gradient centrifugation (DGC/Zeta group and the remaining 102 were included in the DGC group in this prospective study. Clinical outcomes were com- pared between the two groups. The ratios of Xand Y bearing sperm were assessed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR methods in 17 independent semen samples. Results In the present double-blind randomized clinical trial, a significant increase in top quality embryos and pregnancy rate were observed in DGC/Zeta group compared to DGC group. Moreover, sex ratio (XY/XX at birth significantly was lower in the DGC/Zeta group compared to DGC group despite similar ratio of X/Y bearings sper- matozoa following Zeta selection. Conclusion Zeta method not only improves the percentage of top embryo quality and pregnancy outcome but also alters the sex ratio compared to the conventional DGC method, despite no significant change in the ratio of Xand Ybearing sperm population (Registration number: IRCT201108047223N1.

  11. The efficacy of intrauterine instillation of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in infertile women with a thin endometrium: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dayong; Jo, Jae Dong; Kim, Seul Ki; Jee, Byung Chul; Kim, Seok Hyun

    2016-12-01

    The study aimed to investigate the efficacy of intrauterine instillation of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) on the day of ovulation triggering or oocyte retrieval in infertile women with a thin endometrium. Fifty women whose endometrial thickness (EMT) was ≤8 mm at the time of triggering during at least one previous in vitro fertilization (IVF) cycle and an index IVF cycle were selected. On the day of triggering (n=12) or oocyte retrieval (n=38), 300 µg of G-CSF was instilled into the uterine cavity. In the 50 index IVF cycles, the mean EMT was 7.2±0.6 mm on the triggering day and increased to 8.5±1.5 mm on the embryo transfer day (p<0.001). The overall clinical pregnancy rate was 22.0%, the implantation rate was 15.9%, and the ongoing pregnancy rate was 20%. The clinical pregnancy rate (41.7% vs. 15.8%), the implantation rate (26.7% vs. 11.7%), and the ongoing pregnancy rate (41.7% vs. 13.2%) were higher when G-CSF was instilled on the triggering day than when it was instilled on the retrieval day, although this tendency was likewise not statistically significant. Aspects of the stimulation process and mean changes in EMT were similar in women who became pregnant and women who did not. Intrauterine instillation of G-CSF enhanced endometrial development and resulted in an acceptable pregnancy rate. Instillation of G-CSF on the triggering day showed better outcomes. G-CSF instillation should be considered as a strategy for inducing endometrial growth and good pregnancy results in infertile women with a thin endometrium.

  12. VARIABILITY OF HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY DUE TO MULTIPLE FACTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjit K. Deb

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Soil properties are greatly influenced by intrinsic factors of soil formation as well as extrinsic factors associated with land use and management and vary both in time and space. Intrinsic variability is caused by the pedogenesis and usually takes place at large time scales. The variability caused by extrinsic factors could take effect relatively quickly and could not be treated as regionalized. Saturated hydraulic conductivity is one of the most important soil properties for soil-water-plant interactions, water and contaminant movement and retention through the soil profile. It is a critically important parameter for estimation of various other soil hydrological parameters necessary for modeling flow through the naturally unsaturated vadose zone. Among different soil hydrological properties, saturated hydraulic conductivity is reported to have the greatest statistical variability, which is associated with soil types, land uses, positions on landscape, depths, instruments and methods of measurement and experimental errors. The variability of saturated hydraulic conductivity has a profound influence on the overall hydrology of the soil system. Therefore, focus of this review is centered on the variability of saturated/unsaturated hydraulic conductivity due to a large number of factors. This study reviews recent experimental and field studies addressing the measurements and variability of hydraulic conductivity. A synthesis of a large amount of data available in literature is presented and the possible sources of the variability and its implications are discussed. The variability of a soil hydraulic conductivity can be expressed by range, interquartile range, variance and standard deviation, coefficient of variation, skewness and kurtosis. The spatial and temporal variability of hydraulic conductivity and the influences of sample support, measurement devices/methods, soils, land uses and agricultural management on hydraulic conductivity are

  13. Environmental PAH exposure and male idiopathic infertility: a review on early life exposures and adult diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madeen, Erin P; Williams, David E

    2017-03-01

    The male reproductive system is acutely and uniquely sensitive to a variety of toxicities, including those induced by environmental pollutants throughout the lifespan. Early life hormonal and morphological development results in several especially sensitive critical windows of toxicity risk associated with lifelong decreased reproductive health and fitness. Male factor infertility can account for over 40% of infertility in couples seeking treatment, and 44% of infertile men are diagnosed with idiopathic male infertility. Human environmental exposures are poorly understood due to limited available data. The latency between maternal and in utero exposure and a diagnosis in adulthood complicates the correlation between environmental exposures and infertility. The results from this review include recommendations for more and region specific monitoring of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) exposure, longitudinal and clinical cohort considerations of exposure normalization, gene-environment interactions, in utero exposure studies, and controlled mechanistic animal experiments. Additionally, it is recommended that detailed semen analysis and male fertility data be included as endpoints in environmental exposure cohort studies due to the sensitivity of the male reproductive system to environmental pollutants, including PAHs.

  14. Unexplained male infertility: diagnosis and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamada, Alaa; Esteves, Sandro C; Nizza, Mark; Agarwal, Ashok

    2012-01-01

    Unexplained male infertility is a diagnosis reserved for men in whom routine semen analyses results are within normal values and physical as well as endocrine abnormalities were ruled out. In addition to erectile problems and coital factors, immunologic causes and sperm dysfunction may contribute to such condition. New etiologies of unexplained male infertility include low level leukocytospermia and mitochondrial DNA polymerase gene polymorphism. Contemporary andrology may reveal cellular and sub-cellular sperm dysfunctions which may explain subfertility in such cases, thus aiding the clinician to direct the further work-up, diagnosis and counseling of the infertile male. The objective of this article is to highlight the concept of unexplained male infertility and focuses on the diagnosis and treatment of this condition in the era of modern andrology and assisted reproductive techniques. Extensive literature review was performed using the search engines: Pubmed, Science-direct, Ovid and Scopus.

  15. Unexplained Male infertility: diagnosis and Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alaa Hamada

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Unexplained male infertility is a diagnosis reserved for men in whom routine semen analyses results are within normal values and physical as well as endocrine abnormalities were ruled out. In addition to erectile problems and coital factors, immunologic causes and sperm dysfunction may contribute to such condition. New etiologies of unexplained male infertility include low level leukocytospermia and mitochondrial DNA polymerase gene polymorphism. Contemporary andrology may reveal cellular and sub-cellular sperm dysfunctions which may explain subfertility in such cases, thus aiding the clinician to direct the further work-up, diagnosis and counseling of the infertile male. The objective of this article is to highlight the concept of unexplained male infertility and focuses on the diagnosis and treatment of this condition in the era of modern andrology and assisted reproductive techniques. Extensive literature review was performed using the search engines: Pubmed, Science-direct, Ovid and Scopus.

  16. Local Signaling Environments and Human Male Infertility: What Can Be Learned from Mouse Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalam, Roopa L.; Matzuk, Martin M.

    2011-01-01

    Infertility is one of the most prevalent public health problems facing young adult males in today’s society. A clear, treatable cause of infertility cannot be determined in a large number of these patients, and a growing body of evidence suggests that infertility in many of these men may be due to genetic causes. Studies utilizing animal models, and most importantly, mouse knockout technology, have been integral not only for the study of normal spermatogenesis but also for identifying proteins essential for this process, which in turn are candidate genes for causing human male infertility. Successful spermatogenesis depends on a delicate balance of local signaling factors, and this review focuses specifically on the genes that encode these factors. Normal functioning of all testicular cell types is not only essential for normal fertility but, as recently hypothesized, may also be crucial to prevent germ cell oncogenesis. Analysis of these processes using mouse models in vivo has provided investigators with an invaluable tool to effectively translate basic science research to the research of human disease and infertility. PMID:20456819

  17. Genetic causes of male infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stouffs, Katrien; Seneca, Sara; Lissens, Willy

    2014-05-01

    Male infertility, affecting around half of the couples with a problem to get pregnant, is a very heterogeneous condition. Part of patients are having a defect in spermatogenesis of which the underlying causes (including genetic ones) remain largely unknown. The only genetic tests routinely used in the diagnosis of male infertility are the analyses for the presence of Yq microdeletions and/or chromosomal abnormalities. Various other single gene or polygenic defects have been proposed to be involved in male fertility. Yet, their causative effect often remains to be proven. The recent evolution in the development of whole genome-based techniques may help in clarifying the role of genes and other genetic factors involved in spermatogenesis and spermatogenesis defects. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. [Genetic aspects of male infertility].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    We examined 118 men with infertility. Among them we identified phenotypic syndromes associated with infertility in 4 and chromosomal abnormalities in 16. Further molecular genetic study of 98 infertile men found that microdeletions in AZFc-locus had 3, pathological AR allele had 2, CFTR gene mutation had 4 of them. In 37 infertile men an increased DNA fragmentation index (>20%) was found.

  19. [Orchitis and male infertility].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuppe, H-C; Pilatz, A; Hossain, H; Meinhardt, A; Bergmann, M; Haidl, G; Weidner, W

    2010-05-01

    Infections and inflammations of the genital tract are considered the most frequent causes of reduced male fertility, but conclusive epidemiological data are not available. In view of the exposure of germ cells to pathogenic components as well as the cells and mediators involved in the inflammatory processes, irreversible damage to spermatogenesis and corresponding decline of ejaculate quality are to be expected, particularly in cases of chronic orchitis. While the consequences of orchitis and epididymo-orchitis that exhibit clinical symptoms due to systemic or local infections are well known, including testicular atrophy and complete loss of fertility, those cases of inflammatory reactions of the testicles that manifest an asymptomatic or subclinical course, or are not even due to an infection, have received little attention until now. However, systematic histopathological analyses have shown a high prevalence of asymptomatic inflammatory reactions in testicular biopsies from infertile men. The mostly focal lymphocytic infiltrates correlate with the degree of damage to spermatogenesis and corresponding clinical and endocrinological parameters of testicular function. Noninvasive diagnostic techniques are not yet available so that chronic asymptomatic inflammations of the testicles as the primary cause or cofactor of male fertility disorders are underestimated. Except for administration of pathogen-specific antibiotics, treatment recommendations are to a large extent still lacking.

  20. Clinically relevant known and candidate genes for obesity and their overlap with human infertility and reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Merlin G; McGuire, Austen; Manzardo, Ann M

    2015-04-01

    Obesity is a growing public health concern now reaching epidemic status worldwide for children and adults due to multiple problems impacting on energy intake and expenditure with influences on human reproduction and infertility. A positive family history and genetic factors are known to play a role in obesity by influencing eating behavior, weight and level of physical activity and also contributing to human reproduction and infertility. Recent advances in genetic technology have led to discoveries of new susceptibility genes for obesity and causation of infertility. The goal of our study was to provide an update of clinically relevant candidate and known genes for obesity and infertility using high resolution chromosome ideograms with gene symbols and tabular form. We used computer-based internet websites including PubMed to search for combinations of key words such as obesity, body mass index, infertility, reproduction, azoospermia, endometriosis, diminished ovarian reserve, estrogen along with genetics, gene mutations or variants to identify evidence for development of a master list of recognized obesity genes in humans and those involved with infertility and reproduction. Gene symbols for known and candidate genes for obesity were plotted on high resolution chromosome ideograms at the 850 band level. Both infertility and obesity genes were listed separately in alphabetical order in tabular form and those highlighted when involved with both conditions. By searching the medical literature and computer generated websites for key words, we found documented evidence for 370 genes playing a role in obesity and 153 genes for human reproduction or infertility. The obesity genes primarily affected common pathways in lipid metabolism, deposition or transport, eating behavior and food selection, physical activity or energy expenditure. Twenty-one of the obesity genes were also associated with human infertility and reproduction. Gene symbols were plotted on high resolution

  1. Iatrogenic causes of infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoysman, R; Segal, L

    1990-01-01

    The Authors review the list of the iatrogenic causes of infertility. In their opinion the more delicate the structure, the more heavy the price paid to clumsy or erroneous investigation. Such eventual incompetence may lead to further damage of the already existing situation. The Authors however look at the future with relative optimism: incidents become rarer, specialists in gynecology and infertility pay more attention to the delicacy of genital structures and there is an encouraging tendency to refer to infertility specialists those cases who need adequate work-up of their condition.

  2. Clinically relevant known and candidate genes for obesity and their overlap with human infertility and reproduction

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Butler, Merlin G; McGuire, Austen; Manzardo, Ann M

    2015-01-01

    ... reproduction and infertility. A positive family history and genetic factors are known to play a role in obesity by influencing eating behavior, weight and level of physical activity and also contributing to human reproduction and infertility...

  3. Infertility: an approach to management in a district hospital in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiander, A

    1990-07-01

    Up to 1/3 of women of child bearing age are infertile in certain African areas. Over 1000 patients registered at Bawku Hospital, Upper East Region, Ghana during an 18-month period, where a scheme for the investigation and treatment of infertile patients was established. The 5 main causes of infertility are: 1) tubal damage; 2) male factor; 3) anovulation; 4) uterine factor; and 5) unexplained. Special clinics are set up for infertility; outpatient staff are recruited. A preprinted questionnaire should be used for a uniform approach. The one used in Bawku is shown in the appendix. Health talks should be given. They should use the local language be at the right level, and use visual aids. In large clinics, numbers should be used to insure a 1st come, 1st served basis. A treatment protocol is important. When the patient 1st walks in, the infertility form is completed; appropriate investigations are done--hemoglobin, VDRL, seminal analysis, and cervical or high vagina swabs, and others--and the results are reviewed. The patient is encouraged to keep a menstrual calendar for 3 months. At the 2nd visit, the menstrual calendar is reviewed. A pelvic examination and a tubal patency test (TPT) are done. At the 3rd visit, abdominal and pelvic examinations are done and a TPT. Then patients can be diagnosed and counselled accordingly. At the last visit, further explanation is given, further TPTs are done if necessary, and anovulation is treated with clomiphene. The visits are spread out over 6 months. In unexplained fertility cases, the couple is told there is nothing wrong, they should keep trying. The idea that the man may be causing the infertility is foreign to many communities. This needs changing. 20% of infertility is due to male factor in Bawku. Male infertility is hard to cure. Cultural considerations prevent the clinician from telling the patient that her partner is infertile. They will tell her that there is nothing wrong with her. Approximately 15% become pregnant

  4. Extremely High Q-factor metamaterials due to Anapole Excitation

    CERN Document Server

    Basharin, Alexey A; Volsky, Nikita; Kafesaki, Maria; Economou, Eleftherios N

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate that ideal anapole metamaterials have infinite Q-factor. We have designed and fabricated a metamaterial consisting of planar metamolecules which exhibit anapole behavior in the sense that the electric dipole radiation is almost cancelled by the toroidal dipole one, producing thus an extremely high Q-factor at the resonance frequency. The size of the system, at the mm range, and the parasitic magnetic quadrupole radiation are the factors limiting the size of the Q-factor. In spite of the very low radiation losses the local fields at the metamolecules are extremely high, of the order of higher than the external incoming field.

  5. Chromosomal abnormalities and y chromosome microdeletions in infertile men with varicocele and idiopathic infertility of South Indian origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Lakshmi; Babu, Arvind; Kanakavalli, Murthy; Padmalatha, Venkata; Singh, Amarpal; Singh, Prashant Kumar; Deenadayal, Mamata; Singh, Lalji

    2004-01-01

    Various factors cause spermatogenesis arrest in men and, in a large number of cases, the underlying reason still remains unknown. Little attention is paid to determining the genetic defects of varicocele-related infertility. The objective of our present study was to investigate the chromosomal abnormalities and Y chromosome microdeletions in infertile men of South Indian origin with varicocele and idiopathic infertility. Metaphase chromosomes of 251 infertile men with varicocele and unexplained infertility were analyzed using Giemsa-Trypsin-Giemsa (GTG) banding and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). The microdeletions in 6 genes and 18 sequence-tagged-sites (STS) in the Yq region were screened using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) techniques. Out of 251 infertile men, 57 (22.7%) men were with varicocele, of which 8.77% were azoospermic, 26.31% were severely oligozoospermic, 21.05% were mildly oligozoospermic, and 43.85% were oligoasthenoteratozoospermic (OAT), and 194 (77.29%), with idiopathic infertility, of which 51% were azoospermic, 13.40% were severely oligozoospermic, 19.07% were mildly oligozoospermic, and 16.4% were with OAT. Genetic defects were observed in 38 (15.13%) infertile individuals, including 14 (24.56%) men with varicocele and 24 (12.37%) men with idiopathic infertility. The frequencies of chromosomal defects in varicocele and idiopathic infertility were 19.3% and 8.76%, respectively, whereas Y chromosome microdeletions were 5.26% and 3.60%, respectively. Overall rate of incidence of chromosomal anomalies and microdeletions in 251 infertile men were 11.5% and 3.98%, respectively, indicating a very significant higher association of genetic defects with varicocele than idiopathic male infertility. Our data also demonstrate that, among infertile men with varicocele, severely oligozoospermic and OAT men with varicocele have higher incidences of genetic defects than mildly oligozoospermic and azoospermic men.

  6. Male infertility due to ureaplasma urealyticum of semen analysis%男性不育患者解脲支原体感染对精液质量的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈翠婵; 龚兰; 彭慧敏; 朱晓丹

    2011-01-01

    目的 了解解脲支原体(Uu)感染对男性不育患者精子形态、存活率、运动参数的影响.方法 采用培养法对138例男性不育症患者精液进行Uu检测.同时,按WHO推荐的方法和标准进行精液常规检测和精子形态学分析;并采用计算机辅助精液分析(CASA)系统进行精子活动参数检测.结果 138例男性不育症患者中检出Uu阳性88例,占63.8%.Uu阳性组患者精液液化时间、pH值和精子畸形率明显高于阴性组(P0.05).CASA检测结果显示,Uu阳性组患者精子头部直线运动速度(VSL)和前向性(STR)明显低于Uu阴性组(P<0.05).结论 Uu感染是男性不育患者精液质量下降的原因之一.%Objective Realizing the functions (morphology of spermatozoa, survival rate of spermatozoa, spermatic motion parameter) of semen which were infected with ureaplasma urealyticum (Uu).Methods Using broth cultured 138 specimens of semen from the infertile patients. While cheek the survival rate of spermatozoa with eosiny intravital staining of spermatozoa. In accordance with WHO standard and analysis on morphology of spermatozoa (Papanicolaou's stain) to infertile patients of 138 cases. Get the locomotion parameter with CASA. Results The difference between infected and non-infected with Uu patients in malformed rate, VSL and STR was distinctly diversity (P<0.05). Conclusion Uu infection is one of factor which makes the bad functions of semen.

  7. Factores de riesgo y secuelas reproductivas asociados a la infección por Chlamydia trachomatis en mujeres infértiles Risk factors and reproductive sequelae associated with Chlamydia trachomatis infection in infertile women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Guerra-Infante

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Comparar la información clínica y el estilo de vida sexual en dos grupos de mujeres con y sin infección por Chlamydia trachomatis que asisten a la clínica de infertilidad del Instituto Nacional de Perinatología, de la Ciudad de México. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: De febrero a noviembre de 1998, se realizó un estudio prospectivo en pacientes con diagnóstico de infertilidad. En el estudio se incluyó a pacientes con diagnóstico de infertilidad, tratados en el Instituto Nacional de Perinatologia, de la Ciudad de México, durante 1988. Las muestras endocervicales de 309 mujeres, que incluyeron a 77 con infección y a 232 sin infección, fueron examinadas para Chlamydia trachomatis, usando inmunofluorescencia directa. Los cultivos vaginales fueron obtenidos antes de iniciar el tratamiento. También se investigó la presencia de otros agentes infecciosos de transmisión sexual y la información demográfica, de conducta sexual, histórica y clínica fue recopilada de cada paciente. Los datos clínicos y ginecológicos de ambos grupos fueron comparados por ji2. La magnitud de las asociaciones fueron establecidas por razón de momios en análisis bivariados. Se realizó un análisis de regresión logística para establecer los efectos confusores en relación con los factores analizados. Las diferencias fueron consideradas estadísticamente significativas si pOBJECTIVE: To assess the clinical and sexual lifestyle characteristics associated with Chlamydia trachomatis infection among women diagnosed with infertility. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Study subjects were women with an infertility diagnosis attending the infertility clinic at the National Institute of Perinatology. Endocervical specimens from 309 women were examined for Chlamydia trachomatis using the direct immunofluorescence method. Vaginal culture samples were taken before initiating treatment. The presence of other sexually-transmitted infections was also assessed. Demographic, sexual

  8. Diagnosis and prognosis of male infertility in mammal: the focusing of tyrosine phosphorylation and phosphotyrosine proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Woo-Sung; Rahman, Md Saidur; Pang, Myung-Geol

    2014-11-01

    Male infertility refers to the inability of a man to achieve a pregnancy in a fertile female. In more than one-third of cases, infertility arises due to the male factor. Therefore, developing strategies for the diagnosis and prognosis of male infertility is critical. Simultaneously, a satisfactory model for the cellular mechanisms that regulate normal sperm function must be established. In this regard, tyrosine phosphorylation is one of the most common mechanisms through which several signal transduction pathways are adjusted in spermatozoa. It regulates the various aspects of sperm function, for example, motility, hyperactivation, capacitation, the acrosome reaction, fertilization, and beyond. Several recent large-scale studies have identified the proteins that are phosphorylated in spermatozoa to acquire fertilization competence. However, most of these studies are basal and have not presented an overall mechanism through which tyrosine phosphorylation regulates male infertility. In this review, we focus of this mechanism, discussing most of the tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins in spermatozoa that have been identified to date. We categorized tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins in spermatozoa that regulate male infertility using MedScan Reader (v5.0) and Pathway Studio (v9.0).

  9. Letrozole in a low-cost in vitro fertilization protocol in intracytoplasmic sperm injection cycles for male factor infertility: A randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiuli Mukherjee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Letrozole, a selective aromatase inhibitor, reduces the total dose of gonadotrophin required for inducing follicular maturation. We evaluated if incorporation of letrozole could be an effective alternative for low-cost in vitro fertilization (IVF protocol particularly in intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI cycles where male factor infertility is the sole indication for IVF. Materials and Methods: It is a randomized controlled single-blind trial. 94 women with history of severe male factor infertility were selected. 42 women (study group received letrozole, 5 mg daily from day 3-7 and recombinant FSH (rFSH 75IU/day from day 5 continuously till hCG injection. 52 women (control group underwent continuous stimulation by rFSH (150-225IU/day from day 2. GnRH-antagonist (Inj. Orgalutran 0.25 ml sub-cutaneous was started at maximum follicle size of 14 in both groups. Ovulation was triggered by 10,000IU of hCG followed by IVF-ET. Main outcome measures were total dose of rFSH (IU/cycle, terminal E2 (pg/ml, number of mature follicles, number of oocyte retrieved, transferable embryo, endometrial thickness, pregnancy rate and mean expenditure. Statistical analysis is done by using SPSS11. Results :0 As compared to control group (1756 ± 75IU, the study group i.e., Let-rFSH received (625 ± 98IU significantly lower (P = 0.0001 total dose of rFSH. Terminal E2 was significantly lower (P = 0.0001 in study group than control (830 ± 36 vs. 1076 ± 41 pg/ml with significant increment in endometrial thickness (P = 0.0008 in study group, (9.1 ± 0.32 vs. 8.7 ± 0.69 which maintained an improved pregnancy rate though nonsignificant. The risk of hyperstimulation had significantly (P = 0.01 reduced in study group than control (0 vs. 7.Treatment outcome in all other aspects including pregnancy rate were statistically comparable. Per cycle mean expenditure was reduced by 34% in study group than control. Conclusion: Adjunctive use of letrozole may be an

  10. Endometriosis and Infertility: Can Surgery Help?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home FAQs Frequently Asked Questions Quick Facts About Infertility FAQs About Infertility FAQs About the Psychological Component of Infertility FAQs About Cloning and Stem Cell Research SART's ...

  11. Cryptic infertility and therapeutic options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Check, J H

    2001-01-01

    Too often infertile patients are given a "herd type" fertility investigation which ultimately leads to expensive, time consuming, and risky in vitro fertilization. However, attention to certain simple details available by non-invasive methods, e.g., checking for premature luteinization, luteinized unruptured follicle syndrome, or performing the post-coital test at the appropriate interval, can lead to a quick solution of the infertility problem. Caution about persistent infertility related to iatrogenic factors, e.g., development of poor post-coital tests or excessively thin endometrium from clomiphene citrate, or development of luteinized unruptured follicle syndrome or premature luteinization by taking follicle maturing drugs, or creating a hostile environment from taking follicle maturing drugs when the woman already made a mature follicle (and would have had a higher success rate with luteal phase support with progesterone) will help achieve pregnancies without necessarily proceeding to the most expensive and invasive procedure of in vitro fertilization. Finally, many wasted cycles of treatment could be avoided by including the simple but very important hypo-osmotic swelling test and measurement of sperm autoantibodies with the first initial semen analysis.

  12. Breast Cancer and Infertility

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy among women and may accompany infertility. The relationship between infertility treatment and breast cancer has not yet been proven. However, estrogen exposure is well known to cause breast cancer. Recent advances in treatment options have provided young patients with breast cancer a chance of being mother [Archives Medical Review Journal 2015; 24(3.000): 317-323

  13. Research progress of hysterosalpingo-contrast sonography in clinical diagnosis of infertility due to tubal blockage%子宫输卵管超声造影术对于临床诊断输卵管堵塞所致不孕症的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈欣(综述); 罗红(审校)

    2016-01-01

    Infertility is one of the common diseases in women of childbearing age .In China , The incidence of infertility in women of childbearing age is 7% to 10% . Infertility due to tubal diseases accounts for 30% to 50% in female infertility .Therefore ,it is very important to evaluate the tubal patency in the diagnosis of infertility . Hysterosalpingo‐contrast sonography (HyCoSy ) is a technique for diagnosis of tubal patency by observing contrast agent flowing through the uterine cavity ,fallopian tube lumen and pelvic cavity ,which is monitored by ultrasound .HyCoSy which is safe ,convenient and low cost is rapidly developed and becomes a new technique for diagnosing infertility due to tubal blockage in recent years .With the use of the new contrast agent ,real time three‐dimensional and four‐dimensional ultrasound in HyCoSy ,the diagnostic accuracy of HyCoSy in the diagnosis of tubal patency is improved in recent years .This research will focus on the research progress of HyCoSy in clinical diagnosis of infertility due to tubal blockage , especially the new contrast agent ,three‐dimensional and four‐dimensional ultrasound in the diagnosis of infertility due to tubal blockage ,in order to generalize the application of HyCoSy in infertility due to tubal blockage .%不孕症(infertility )是育龄妇女的常见疾病之一,我国育龄妇女不孕症发病率为7%~10%。输卵管疾病导致的不孕症占女性不孕症的30%~50%。因此,评估输卵管通畅性对不孕症的病因诊断十分重要。子宫输卵管超声造影术(HyCoSy )是在超声监测下,实时观察造影剂通过宫腔、输卵管的情况及进入盆腔后的分布情况,对输卵管通畅性进行诊断。 HyCoSy具有安全、操作简便、费用低等优势,成为近年快速发展的临床诊断输卵管堵塞所致不孕症的新技术。近年新型造影剂及三维、四维超声实时显像技术应用于HyCoSy ,提高了HyCoSy对输卵

  14. Endocrine disorders & female infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unuane, David; Tournaye, Herman; Velkeniers, Brigitte; Poppe, Kris

    2011-12-01

    Female infertility occurs in about 37% of all infertile couples and ovulatory disorders account for more than half of these. The ovaries are in continuous interaction with the other endocrine organs. The interplay may account for infertility occurring at different levels and may render the diagnosis of infertility a difficult exercise for the involved physician. A hypothalamic cause of female infertility should be considered in an appropriate clinical context, with tests pointing to a hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. It can be functional, physiological or related to organic causes. Hyperprolactinemia has well characterized effects on the normal gonadal function and treatment is well established. Acromegaly and Cushing's disease may impair fertility at different levels, mechanisms involved however remain ill defined. Thyroid disorders, both hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism, can interact with the ovaries, through a direct effect on ovarian function, but autoimmunity may be involved, as well as alterations of the sex hormone binding protein levels. Primary ovarian disorders, such as the polycystic ovary syndrome and primary ovarian insufficiency are frequent diseases, for which novel treatments are currently being developed and discussed. We will propose an algorithm for the diagnosis and approach of the female patient presenting with infertility on the basis of the available evidence in literature. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Extremely high Q -factor metamaterials due to anapole excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basharin, Alexey A.; Chuguevsky, Vitaly; Volsky, Nikita; Kafesaki, Maria; Economou, Eleftherios N.

    2017-01-01

    We have designed and fabricated a metamaterial consisting of planar metamolecules which exhibit unusual, almost perfect anapole behavior in the sense that the electric dipole radiation is almost canceled by the toroidal dipole one, producing thus an extremely high Q -factor at the resonance frequency. Thus we have demonstrated theoretically and experimentally that metamaterials approaching ideal anapole behavior have very high Q -factor. The size of the system, at the millimeter range, and the parasitic magnetic quadrupole radiation are the factors limiting the size of the Q -factor. In spite of the very low radiation losses the estimated local fields at the metamolecules are extremely high, of the order of 104 higher than the external incoming field.

  16. Counseling and diagnostic evaluation for the infertile couple.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshburn, Paul B

    2015-03-01

    Educating couples about natural means to improve fertility should include a discussion about appropriate timing to initiate a diagnostic evaluation for infertility. Complete infertility testing for both male and female factors allows directed care for all abnormalities to optimize chances for conception.

  17. The Sexual Impact of Infertility Among Women Seeking Fertility Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William D. Winkelman, MD

    2016-09-01

    Conclusion: In women seeking fertility treatment, younger age and female factor infertility were associated with increased sexual impact and thus these women are potentially at higher risk of sexual dysfunction. Providers should consider the role young age and an infertility diagnosis plays in a women’s sexual well-being.

  18. Mammographic breast density in infertile and parous women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letizia, Meggiorini Maria; Rita, Vestri Anna; Grazia, De Stefano Maria; Valentina, Cipolla; Filippo, Bellati; Diana, Maffucci; Paola, Nusiner Maria; Cesare, Aragona; Carlo, De Felice

    2016-02-09

    Mammographic breast density is a useful marker for breast cancer risk, as breast density is considered one of the strongest breast cancer risk factors. The study objective was to evaluate and compare mammographic breast density in infertile and parous women, as infertility may be associated with high breast density and cancer occurrence. This study evaluated mammographic breast density using two different systems, BIRADS and Boyd. A selected patient population of 151 women with primary infertility (case group) was compared to 154 parous women who had at least one previous pregnancy (control group). Both groups were premenopausal women aged ≥ 35. Evaluation of mammographic features showed that 66.9% of case group patients and 53.9% of control group patients were classified BIRADS-3/BIRADS-4; p BIRADS-3/BIRADS-4 was 1.78 (95% CI: 1.10-2.89). Using the Boyd classification system, 53.6% of case group patients and 31.8% of control group patients were classified E/F; p BIRADS classification systems indicate to what extend breast cancer lesions may be missed on mammography due to masking by dense tissue. Therefore, patients with a high BIRADS or Boyd score should undergo further investigation.

  19. The status of depression and anxiety in infertile Turkish couples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mert Kazandi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infertility is a major psychosocial crisis as well as being a medical problem. The factors that predict psychosocial consequences of infertility may vary in different gender and different infertile populations.Objective: The primary purpose of this study was to investigate whether Turkish infertile couples had higher levels of depression and anxiety when compared to non-infertile couples. Our secondary aim was to evaluate the relationship between sociodemographic characteristics and levels of depression and anxiety in Turkish infertile couples.Materials and Methods: We designed a descriptive cross sectional study of 248 infertile women and 96 infertile men with no psychiatric disturbance and 51 women and 40 men who have children to evaluate the depression and anxiety levels between infertile couples and fertile couples. A gynecologist evaluated participants for demographic data and then they were visited by a psychologist to perform questionnaire scales which were The Beck Depression Inventory and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory for the evaluation of the degree of psychopathology. The data were statistically analyzed, with p<0.05 as the level of statistical significance.Results: We observed significant differences between the infertile couples and fertile couples with respect to state and trait anxiety (p<0.0001 while no difference was regarding with depression, both of women and men. Anxiety and depression were observed as independent from gender when infertile women and men were compared (p=0.213.Conclusion: We believed that the psychological management at infertile couples must be individualized with cultural, religious, and class related aspects.

  20. Do alterations in follicular fluid proteases contribute to human infertility?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cookingham, Lisa Marii; Van Voorhis, Bradley J; Ascoli, Mario

    2015-05-01

    Cathepsin L and ADAMTS-1 are known to play critical roles in follicular rupture, ovulation, and fertility in mice. Similar studies in humans are limited; however, both are known to increase during the periovulatory period. No studies have examined either protease in the follicular fluid of women with unexplained infertility or infertility related to advanced maternal age (AMA). We sought to determine if alterations in cathepsin L and/or ADAMTS-1 existed in these infertile populations. Patients undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF) for unexplained infertility or AMA-related infertility were prospectively recruited for the study; patients with tubal or male factor infertility were recruited as controls. Follicular fluid was collected to determine gene expression (via quantitative polymerase chain reaction), enzyme concentrations (via enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays), and enzymatic activities (via fluorogenic enzyme cleavage assay or Western blot analysis) of cathepsin L and ADAMTS-1. The analysis included a total of 42 patients (14 per group). We found no statistically significant difference in gene expression, enzyme concentration, or enzymatic activity of cathepsin L or ADAMTS-1 in unexplained infertility or AMA-related infertility as compared to controls. We also found no statistically significant difference in expression or concentration with advancing age. Cathepsin L and ADAMTS-1 are not altered in women with unexplained infertility or AMA-related infertility undergoing IVF, and they do not decline with advancing age. It is possible that differences exist in natural cycles, contributing to infertility; however, our findings do not support a role for protease alterations as a common cause of infertility.

  1. Measuring male infertility: epidemiological aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasqualotto Fábio Firmbach

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Evidence suggests that human semen quality may have been deteriorating in recent years. Most of the evidence is retrospective, based on analysis of data sets collected for other purposes. Measures of male infertility are needed if we want to monitor the biological capacity for males to reproduce over time or between different populations. We also need these measures in analytical epidemiology if we want to identify risk indicators, risk factors, or even causes of an impaired male fecundity-that is, the male component in the biological ability to reproduce. The most direct evaluation of fecundity is to measure the time it takes to conceive. Since the time of conception may be missed in the case of an early abortion, time to get pregnant is often measured as the time it takes to obtain a conception that survives until a clinically recognized pregnancy or even a pregnancy that ends with a live born child occurs. A prolonged time required to produce pregnancy may therefore be due to a failure to conceive or a failure to maintain a pregnancy until clinical recognition. Studies that focus on quantitative changes in fecundity (that does not cause sterility should in principle be possible in a pregnancy sample. The most important limitation in fertility studies is that the design requires equal persistency in trying to become pregnant and rather similar fertility desires and family planning methods in the groups to be compared. This design is probably achievable in exposure studies that make comparisons with reasonable comparable groups concerning social conditions and use of contraceptive methods.

  2. What every gynecologist should know about male infertility: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteves, Sandro C; Hamada, Alaa; Kondray, Victor; Pitchika, Aruna; Agarwal, Ashok

    2012-07-01

    Our article reviews the evolving concepts in the field of male infertility for gynecologists and other health professionals involved in the care of men and women experiencing difficulty in having a child. The increased knowledge will help in the better management and treatment of infertile couples. Review of literature through Pubmed, Science Direct, Online Library. Gynecologists are often the first healthcare providers to assess an infertile couple. Because half of all infertility problems stem from male factors, it is crucial for the gynecologist to remain updated on the main conditions that cause male infertility as well as current diagnostic tools and treatment options, including conventional strategies and assisted reproductive techniques. Extraordinary advances have been achieved in the field of male infertility over the past several years and many old concepts are now challenged. Therefore, it is imperative that male infertility physicians should update the gynecologists about the recent advances in the work-up of infertile men in terms of diagnosis and management. Such convention will help improve the standards of care for the infertile couple and enhance the cooperation between male and female reproductive endocrinologists.

  3. Spin g -factor due to electronic interactions in graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menezes, Natália; Alves, Van Sérgio; Marino, E. C.; Nascimento, Leonardo; Nascimento, Leandro O.; Morais Smith, C.

    2017-06-01

    The gyromagnetic factor is an important physical quantity relating the magnetic-dipole moment of a particle to its spin. The electron spin g -factor in vacuo is one of the best model-based theoretical predictions ever made, showing agreement with the measured value up to ten parts per trillion [J. Schwinger, Phys. Rev. 73, 416 (1948), 10.1103/PhysRev.73.416; R. S. Van Dyck, Jr. et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 59, 26 (1987), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.59.26; D. Hanneke et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 120801 (2008), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.100.120801; T. Aoyama et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 111807 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.109.111807]. However, for electrons in a material the g -factor is modified with respect to its value in vacuo because of environment interactions. Here, we show how interaction effects lead to the spin g -factor correction in graphene by considering the full electromagnetic interaction in the framework of pseudo-QED [A. Kovner et al., Phys. Rev. B 42, 4748 (1990), 10.1103/PhysRevB.42.4748; N. Dorey et al., Nucl. Phys. B 386, 614 (1992), 10.1016/0550-3213(92)90632-L; S. Teber, Phys. Rev. D 86, 025005 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevD.86.025005; S. Teber, Phys. Rev. D 89, 067702 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevD.89.067702; E. C. Marino, Nucl. Phys. B 408, 551 (1993), 10.1016/0550-3213(93)90379-4]. We compare our theoretical prediction with experiments performed on graphene deposited on SiO2 and SiC, and we find a very good agreement between them.

  4. Epidemiology of infertility: social problems of the infertile couples

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Epidemiology of infertility: social problems of the infertile couples. Margaret .... imbalance in the power relations between men and women to such an .... India in 1993, the African Academy of Sciences issued a dissent- ..... York: Plenum Press.

  5. 甘肃省不孕症患病率及其影响因素分析%Analysis on Infertility Prevalence and Its Affecting Factors in Gansu Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张学红; 张瑞; 赵丽辉; 刘琨; 周燕; 杨婷; 赵金珠; 贾学玲

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To identify the prevalence and correlated risk factors of infertility in childbearing age couples of Gansu Province. Methods: Samples were selected from the couples at the age of childbearing in Gansu Province by stratified randomduster sampling. A face to face interview was conducted to fill the unified questionnaires by trained interviewers. Altogether 2 621 qualified questionnaires were used to calculate the incidence of infertility and to analyse the risk factors related to the infertility. Results: The incidence of primary infertility in Gansu Province was about 13.08%, and the incidence of secondary infertility in Gansu Province was about 35.25%. The occurrence of infertility was related to the age of childbearing women, the age of marriage, occupations, the education level and reproductive system inflammation. Conclusion: The incidence of primary infertility in Gansu Province was about 13.08%. To promote agricultural economic development, increase input in agriculture health care and strengthen public education will be of benefit to reduce the incidence of the infertility.%目的:了解甘肃省育龄夫妇不孕症(infertility)患病率现状及其可能的影响因素.方法:运用分层整群抽样法抽取自然人群中具有代表性的2 621个已婚育龄家庭为研究对象,采用问卷调查方式,对甘肃省育龄夫妇不孕症患病情况进行横断面调查,同时调查其有关的流行病学因素.采用EpiData软件建立数据库,双人录入法进行数据录入,数据采用SPSS 15.0软件进行统计学分析.结果:甘肃省原发不孕的患病率为13.08%,继发不孕的患病率为35.25%;调查结果显示,育龄妇女年龄、月经周期及男方的体质量指数(BMI)和吸烟情况均是原发不孕的危险因素;继发不孕除以上因素外,育龄夫妇的活产次数、死胎次数、自然流产数、人工流产数及药物流产史也是其危险因素.结论:甘肃省原发不孕患病率为13.08%,

  6. The Evaluation of the Relationship Between Obesity and Male Infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fikret Erdemir

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available   Infertility, defined as the inability to conceive after one year of unprotected intercourse, affects approximately 15% of couples. Male factor infertility is the sole cause of infertility in approximately 20% of infertile couples, with an additional 30% to 40% secondary to both male and female factors. Thus, male factor infertility is present in approximately half of all infertile couples. Known etiologies of male infertility include cryptorchidism, testicular torsion or trauma, varicocele, seminal tract infections, anti-sperm antibodies, hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, gonadal dysgenesis, and obstruction of the reproductive channels. Recently in some studies, it has been reported that increased body mass index negatively affect on male fertility or semen parameters.Overweight and obesity have become a major public health concern worldwide. The prevalence of male obesity or overweight in the united states was reported to be 71%. This ratio changes between 10% and 60% in the world. Negative effects of obesity on male fertility are postulated to occur through several mechanisms. Obese men have been shown to exhibit higher levels of circulating estradiol. Several studies reveal a direct correlation between a rise in BMI and a decline in both free and total blood testosterone levels. In addition, obesity may cause to oxidative stress. All these changes may affect to semen parameters in obese cases. However, the relationship between male obesity and fertility parameters has not been well established. The aim of this review is to evaluate the relationship between the obesity and male infertility.

  7. Management of the infertile couple: an evidence-based protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamel Remah M

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infertility is defined as inability of a couple to conceive naturally after one year of regular unprotected sexual intercourse. It remains a major clinical and social problem, affecting perhaps one couple in six. Evaluation usually starts after 12 months; however it may be indicated earlier. The most common causes of infertility are: male factor such as sperm abnormalities, female factor such as ovulation dysfunction and tubal pathology, combined male and female factors and unexplained infertility. Objectives The aim of this study is to provide the healthcare professionals an evidence-based management protocol for infertile couples away from medical information overload. Methods A comprehensive review where the literature was searched for "Management of infertility and/or infertile couples" at library website of University of Bristol (MetaLib by using a cross-search of different medical databases besides the relevant printed medical journals and periodicals. Guidelines and recommendations were retrieved from the best evidence reviews such as that from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (ACOG, American Society for Reproductive Medicine (ASRM, Canadian Fertility and Andrology Society (CFAS, and Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (RCOG. Results A simple guide for the clinicians to manage the infertile couples. Conclusions The study deploys a new strategy to translate the research findings and evidence-base recommendations into a simplified focused guide to be applied on routine daily practice. It is an approach to disseminate the recommended medical care for infertile couple to the practicing clinicians.

  8. Preliminary report on plasma homocysteine and hormonal variations in infertile women in Lagos, Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Vincent Oluseye Osunkalu; MAKWE, Christian C; Oluwatosin Jonadab Akinsola; Adediran Adewumi; Oluseun Funke Akomolafe

    2015-01-01

    Background: The relationship between infertility and hormonal variations has been variously documented, but little has been reported on the interactions between hormonal factors, homocysteine (Hcy), and female infertility. Objective: This study aimed to evaluate the relationship between plasma Hcy levels and hormonal variations in infertile women. Materials and Methods: This descriptive cross-sectional study was carried out among eligible infertile and fertile women seeking care at the Lagos ...

  9. Is premating isolation in Drosophila overestimated due to uncontrolled factors?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Pelayo Casares; Rafael Piñeiro; Maria C. Carracedo

    2005-12-01

    Sexual isolation in Drosophila is typically measured by multiple-choice mating tests. While many environmental variables during such tests are controlled by the researcher, there are some factors that are usually uncontrolled. We demonstrate, using Drosophila melanogaster and D. pseudoobscura flies, that the temperature of rearing, preadult density, and level of consanguinity, can all produce differences in mating propensity between genetically equivalent flies. These differences in mating propensity, in turn, can give rise to statistically significant results in multiple-choice mating tests, leading to positive isolation values and the artifactual inference of sexual isolation between populations. This fact agrees with a nonrandom excess of significant positive tests found in a review of the literature of Drosophila intraspecific mating choice. An overestimate of true cases of sexual isolation in Drosophila in the literature can, therefore, not be ruled out.

  10. Infertility Research at the NICHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources Interviews & Selected Staff Profiles Multimedia Focus on Infertility Research at the NICHD Skip sharing on social ... Unravel the Complex Causes of and Treatments for Infertility According to the Centers for Disease Control and ...

  11. Endometriosis: Does It Cause Infertility?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Society for Reproductive Medicine Endometriosis: Does It Cause Infertility? This fact sheet was developed in collaboration with ... a surgical procedure called laparoscopy. Does endometriosis cause infertility? If you have endometriosis, it may be more ...

  12. Infertility and the use of infertility treatments in Finland: prevalence and socio-demographic determinants 1992-2004.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terävä, Anna-Niina; Gissler, Mika; Hemminki, Elina; Luoto, Riitta

    2008-01-01

    To examine changes in the use of infertility treatments by time, the causes of infertility, lifetime prevalence of subfertility, and the use of infertility treatments by socio-demographic factors. Aggregate IVF statistics (1992-2004) and two nationally representative cross-sectional surveys (1997 and 2002). Total number of IVF, ICSI and FET treatments initiated more than tripled between 1992 and 2004. The proportion of tubal injury as a cause of infertility treatment decreased over time while other female factors, male factor and multiple causes became more common. Self-reported lifetime subfertility was 16.0% in 2002 among women aged 25-64 years. Subfertility differed notably by age and education: young less educated women and older more educated women more frequently reported subfertility. Use of hormone therapy to treat subfertility (1997 and 2002) and participation in infertility treatments or medical examinations (2002) was more common among urban, highly educated and affluent women. The use of infertility treatments increased and the proportions of causes of infertility have changed over time. Self-reported subfertility differed by age and education. There are socio-demographic differences in the use of infertility treatments.

  13. NEW! Better security due to multi-factor authentication

    CERN Multimedia

    Computer Security Team

    2013-01-01

    Have you ever worried about using your password for logging into critical applications (like accelerator or experiment control systems), as an administrator for computing services, or for authorising expensive orders in EDH? You are right to worry. If your password is lost or stolen, the lucky finder or malicious thief might misuse your access rights to wreak severe havoc on the operation of the Organization.   Rubén Santamarta, a well-known security researcher, discovered a near-miss in 2011. He reported how he had uncovered a password that provided read access to the LHC cryo controls. This is as close as it can get to disaster. Fortunately, the password only allowed read access (but had no modification rights). And, of course, Santamarta was nice enough to share his findings with us. In order to improve on that, the CERN Single Sign-On portal now provides the means for “Two-Factor Authentication”. "Authentication" is the process where you di...

  14. Infertility: psychotherapeutic issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, M B

    1992-01-01

    In supportive therapy with infertility patients, the clinician tries to relieve dysphoria and enhance self-esteem. Dynamically informed supportive interventions are designed to decrease guilt that may relate to past sexual activities, sexually related diseases, or abortions. These interventions should also be empathetic, promote optimism and reality testing, help with problem solving, allow catharsis and ventilation, decrease feelings of isolation and loneliness, educate and clarify, and praise and encourage where appropriate. Mental health clinicians have an important role to play in the treatment of these patients, provided they learn enough about the psychology of the experience of infertility and about the technology utilized in its treatment. As the number of people seeking treatment for infertility grows, the need for skilled therapists for this population will grow at a parallel rate.

  15. Sexually Transmitted Disease and Male Infertility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fode, Mikkel; Fusco, Ferdinando; Lipshultz, Larry

    2016-01-01

    CONTEXT: Theoretically, sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) have the potential to disrupt male fertility; however, the topic remains controversial. OBJECTIVE: To describe the possible association between STDs and male infertility and to explore possible pathophysiologic mechanisms. EVIDENCE...... ACQUISITION: We performed a systematic literature review in accordance with the PRISMA guidelines. PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Library were searched for articles published before January 1, 2016, using the MeSH terms for a variety of STDs and infertility. The search was restricted to human studies...... performed in men and published in English. Studies were included if they contained original data on a possible association or a cause-and-effect relationship between STD and male infertility. Studies were considered only if they included an appropriate control group and/or comprehensive laboratory data. Due...

  16. Parental Infertility, Fertility Treatment, and Childhood Epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kettner, Laura O.; Ramlau-Hansen, Cecilia H.; Kesmodel, Ulrik S.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A few studies have indicated an increased risk of epilepsy in children conceived by fertility treatment possibly due to characteristics of the infertile couple rather than the treatment. We therefore aimed to investigate the association between parental infertility, fertility treatment....... RESULTS: A total of 60 440 pregnancies were included, and 0.8% of the children developed epilepsy.The primary analyses showed no association between parental infertility or fertility treatment, and the overall risk of childhood epilepsy (hazard rate ratios (HRs); 95% confidence intervals (CIs): 1.08 (0......, and epilepsy in the offspring, including the subtypes of epilepsy; idiopathic generalised epilepsy and focal epilepsy. METHODS: This cohort included all pregnancies resulting in liveborn singletons from the Aarhus Birth Cohort, Denmark (1995-2013). Information on time to pregnancy and fertility treatment...

  17. Metabolic syndrome and male infertility (review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Tyuzikov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The literary review is devoted to one of the most actual problems of modern andrology – pathogenetic communication of metabolic syndrome components and male infertility. Now a steady growth of metabolic syndrome frequency in world men population is observed, and that is accompanied by progressing deterioration of fertility parameters at them. Negative influence of key metabolic syndrome components – obesity and insulin resistance – at male reproductive function is shown on the basis of modern clinical, epidemiological and experimental data, and known pathophysiological mechanisms of this influence are described also. Induced by a metabolic syndrome oxidative stress of spermatozoas, neuropathy and androgen deficiency are the most significant mechanisms of neuro-endocrinological and reproductive consequences realization. The imperative necessity of early revealing and pharmacological correction of obesity and insulin resistance in all infertility men is shown, as well as they are curable reasons of male infertility . However, they seldom come to light and even less often corrected in routine clinical practice owing to insufficient knowledge of urologists and andrologists about these system hormonal-metabolic factors of male infertility, which role in male infertility pathogenesis will increase only in the conditions of world epidemic of a metabolic syndrome.

  18. Metabolic syndrome and male infertility (review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Tyuzikov

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The literary review is devoted to one of the most actual problems of modern andrology – pathogenetic communication of metabolic syndrome components and male infertility. Now a steady growth of metabolic syndrome frequency in world men population is observed, and that is accompanied by progressing deterioration of fertility parameters at them. Negative influence of key metabolic syndrome components – obesity and insulin resistance – at male reproductive function is shown on the basis of modern clinical, epidemiological and experimental data, and known pathophysiological mechanisms of this influence are described also. Induced by a metabolic syndrome oxidative stress of spermatozoas, neuropathy and androgen deficiency are the most significant mechanisms of neuro-endocrinological and reproductive consequences realization. The imperative necessity of early revealing and pharmacological correction of obesity and insulin resistance in all infertility men is shown, as well as they are curable reasons of male infertility . However, they seldom come to light and even less often corrected in routine clinical practice owing to insufficient knowledge of urologists and andrologists about these system hormonal-metabolic factors of male infertility, which role in male infertility pathogenesis will increase only in the conditions of world epidemic of a metabolic syndrome.

  19. Infertility and uterine fibroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zepiridis, Leonidas I; Grimbizis, Grigoris F; Tarlatzis, Basil C

    2016-07-01

    Uterine fibroids are the most common tumors in women and their prevalence is higher in patients with infertility. At present, they are classified according to their anatomical location, as no classification system includes additional parameters such as their size or number. There is a general agreement that submucosal fibroids negatively affect fertility, when compared to women without fibroids. Intramural fibroids above a certain size (>4 cm), even without cavity distortion, may also negatively influence fertility. However, the presence of subserosal myomas has little or no effect on fertility. Many possible theories have been proposed to explain how fibroids impair fertility: mechanisms involving alteration of local anatomical location, others involving functional changes of the myometrium and endometrium, and finally endocrine and paracrine molecular mechanisms. Nevertheless, any of the above mentioned mechanisms can cause reduced reproductive potential, thereby leading to impaired gamete transport, reduced ability for embryo implantation, and creation of a hostile environment. The published experience defines the best practice strategy, as not many large, well-designed, and properly powered studies are available. Myomectomy appears to have an effect in fertility improvement in certain cases. Excision of submucosal myomas seems to restore fertility with pregnancy rates after surgery similar to normal controls. Removal of intramural myomas affecting pregnancy outcome seems to be associated with higher pregnancy rates when compared to non-operated controls, although evidence is still nοt sufficient. Treatment of subserosal myomas of reasonable size is not necessary for fertility reasons. The results of endoscopic and open myomectomy are similar; thus, endoscopic treatment is the recommended approach due to its advantages in patient's postoperative course.

  20. Imaging female infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadow, Cheryl A; Sahni, V Anik

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this pictorial review is to discuss causes of female infertility, in particular, those etiologies in which imaging plays a key role in detection. Included are disorders of cervical, ovarian, fallopian tube, and uterine origin. We also discuss the role of various imaging modalities including hysterosalpingography, pelvic ultrasonography, hysterosonography, and pelvic MR imaging in elucidating the cause of female infertility. Radiologists need to know the conditions to be aware of when these patients are sent for diagnostic imaging, as well as how to direct further management, if necessary, should an abnormality be detected.

  1. Male infertility microsurgical training

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Akanksha Mehta; Philip S Li

    2013-01-01

    Microsurgical training is imperative for urologists and clinical andrologists specializing in male infertility.Success in male infertility microsurgery is heavily dependent on the surgeon's microsurgical skills.Laboratory-based practice to enhance microsurgical skills improves the surgeon's confidence,and reduces stress and operating time,benefiting both the patient and the surgeon.This review provides guidelines for setting up a microsurgical laboratory to develop and enhance microsurgical skills using synthetic and animal models.The role of emerging techniques,such as robotic-assisted microsurgery,is also discussed.

  2. Infertility: Medical and Social Choices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Office of Technology Assessment.

    This report illustrates a range of options for Congressional action in nine principal areas of public policy related to infertility: (1) collecting data on reproductive health; (2) preventing infertility; (3) information to inform and protect consumers; (4) providing access to infertility services; (5) reproductive health of veterans; (6) transfer…

  3. 不孕症妇女子宫内膜异位症危险因素对照研究分析%Controlled Study and Analysis of the Risk Factors of Infertile Women with Endometriosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    方明珠; 丁书贵; 郭华峰

    2014-01-01

    目的:探讨不孕妇女子宫内膜异位症患病高危因素及变化情况。方法以病例对照研究方法,选取2007—2012年在该院就诊的不孕症妇女810例,经腹腔镜确诊的250例子宫内膜异位症患者及同期不孕症正常盆腔153例为对照研究,进行子宫内膜异位症患病危险因素的条件Logisitic回归分析。结果调查的不孕妇女中子宫内膜异位症的患病率30.86%;不孕病程、体重指数、经期长短、月经周期长短、月经形式、子宫内膜异位症家族史、痛经程度、经量、性交痛、口服避孕药、妊娠史、盆腔痛等因素,研究组与对照组间差异有统计学意义(P<0.05)。多因素Logisitic回归分析显示:年龄、不孕病程、体重指数、痛经、盆腔痛、性交痛、子宫内膜异位症家族史与子宫内膜异位症的风险因素有关。结论在不孕症妇女子宫内膜异位症发病因素中体重指数较低、子宫内膜异位症家族史、月经史、盆腔痛等相关因素起重要作用。妊娠次数多提示是子宫内膜异位症的保护因素。%Objective The aim of this study is to explore the risk factors related to endometriosis among infertile women and the varia-tion. Methods A case-control study was designed based on the data of 810 cases of infertile women admitted in Women&Infants Hos-pital of Zhengzhou from 2007 to 2012.According to the laparoscopy findings, 250 cases of women diagnosed with endometriosis and 153 cases of infertile women with normal pelvis were selected as the subjects for the controlled study.Logistic regression analysis was used to analyze the risk factors related to endometriosis. Results The prevalence of endometriosis in infertile women was 30.86%. There were statistically significant differences between the study group and the control group in infertility duration, body mass index, menstru-al length, the length of the menstrual cycle, menstrual form, the family history of

  4. REPRODUCTIVE FUNCTION INDICATORS COUPLES BRYANSK REGION, INFERTILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dekhnich Svetlana Nikolaevna

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of research - the study of the dynamics and trends of the major reproductive health Bryansk region. Novelty: established medical-social aspects of reproductive health at the regional level. The methodology of the work. Direct observation of the state of the reproductive health, clinical tools, functional methods, statistical methods, data from vykopirovka "outpatient medical card" applied to autonomous public institutions Bryansk Regional Health Center for Family Planning and Reproduction (Gause BOTSPSR from 2008 to 2012. Results. Revealed a high incidence of infertility, high frequency tube-peritoneal and endocrine factors of the disease. Among patients with infertility, most suffered various gynecological surgeries, which significantly reduced ovarian reserve and the quality of oocytes during IVF. Field of application of the results. The data obtained can be used in reproductive medicine clinics, which will allow a more considered approach to the appointment of surgical interventions in patients with infertility, greater use of assisted reproduction techniques.

  5. OVARIAN AGING AND INFERTILITY TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Meden Vrtovec

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Due to changes in the socio-economic environment the first pregnancy is being more often postponed to advanced age; an increasing number of women seek medical help for infertility in their late thirties. Degenerative processes in the ovary start as early as after 35 years of age. When the woman is over 38, the signs of hormonal changes occur (FSH, inhibin, the menstrual cycle changes, and fertility is being increasingly reduced. Infertility treatment by assisted reproduction technology (ART has proved less efficient in older than in younger women.Material and methods. In a retrospective analysis we evaluated the success rates achieved with homologous intrauterine insemination (IUI, in vitro fertilization and embryo-transfer (IVF-ET, intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI, and compared them in regard to the women > 38 years vs. < 38 years.Results. After IUI the pregnancy rate in the women over 38 was 3.7% per patient (1.5% per cycle and 28.0% (9.9% in the women younger than 38 years. After IVF-ET the pregnancy rate in the over 38-year group was 16% per patient (14% per cycle, and 28% per patient (25% per cycle in the less than 38-year group. After ICSI, the pregnancy rate in the group over 38 years was 11% per patient (9% per cycle, and 25% per patient (22% per cycle in the less than 38-year group. In the analysed population, the spontaneous abortion rate was 26.0% in the group of women aged over 38 years, and 14.0% in the group of women aged less than 38 years.Conclusions. Before introduction of an ART procedure the woman with advanced age should be properly counselled and well informed about poor success of their infertility treatment and high spontaneous abortion rate.

  6. Infertility, infertility treatment and behavioural problems in the offspring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Jin Liang; Obel, Carsten; Basso, Olga

    2011-01-01

    Behavioural patterns in children of infertile couples may be influenced by both the underlying causes of infertility and stress in the couples. Treatment procedures, such as culture media and manipulation of gametes and embryos, may also result in developmental problems. We examined behavioural...... problems in children as a function of infertility and infertility treatment, using data from three population-based birth cohorts in Denmark (Aalborg-Odense Birth Cohort, Aarhus Birth Cohort and Danish National Birth Cohort). Information on time to pregnancy and infertility treatment was collected during...... to pregnancy of >12 months and no infertility treatment had a behavioural pattern similar to children of fertile parents. Teachers reported a higher total difficulties score for children born after infertility treatment, but no significant differences were seen on any subscales of the teachers' report...

  7. Pregnancy complications in spontaneous and assisted conceptions of women with infertility and subfertility factors. A comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomba, Stefano; Santagni, Susanna; Gibbins, Karen; La Sala, Giovanni Battista; Silver, Robert M

    2016-11-01

    In the literature, there is growing evidence that assisted reproductive techniques increase the risk of pregnancy complications in subfertile couples. Moreover, many concomitant preconception risk factors for subfertility are frequently present in the same subject and increase the risk of pregnancy complications. This review aimed to summarize in a systematic fashion the best current evidence regarding the effects of preconception maternal factors on maternal and neonatal outcomes. A literature search up to March 2016 was performed in IBSS, SocINDEX, Institute for Scientific Information, PubMed, Web of Science and Google Scholar. An evidence-based hierarchy was used to determine which articles to include and analyse. Available data show that the risk of pregnancy complications in spontaneous and assisted conceptions is likely multifactorial, and the magnitude of this risk is probably very different according specific subgroups of patients. Notwithstanding the only moderate level and quality of the available evidence, available data suggest that the presence and the treatment of specific preconception cofactors of subfertility should be always taken into account both in clinical practice and for scientific purposes.

  8. Cultural Constructions of Infertility in Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJRH Managing Editor

    infertility in other cultural groups indicating the disruptive influence of missing motherhood (Afr J .... for all members of the group18, 19. .... When the girl grew up I started using my .... feel that you too should have had children, a ..... and has pain in his heart, he will not show it. I ... be influenced by factors such as class, race,.

  9. Treatment of Chinese Herbal Medicine for Female Infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Dan; Li, Lily; Zeng, Bai-Yun

    2017-01-01

    Female infertility is when a woman of reproductive age and sexual active, without contraception, cannot get pregnant after a year and more or keeps having miscarriages. Although conventional treatments for infertility such as hormone therapy, in vitro fertilization and many more, helped many female patients with infertility get pregnant during past a few decades, it is far from satisfactory with prolonging treatment time frames and emotional and financial burden. In recent years, more patients with infertile problems are seeking to alternative and complementary medicines to achieve a better outcome. In particular, Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) is increasingly popular for treating infertility due to its effectiveness and complimentary with conventional treatments. However, the mechanisms of action of CHM in treating female infertility are not well understood. In this chapter authors reviewed research development of CHM applied in many infertile models and CHM clinical studies in many conditions associated with female infertility, published in past 15 years. The data of review showed that CHM has either specific target mechanisms of action or multitarget mechanisms of action, via regulating relevant hormone levels in female reproductive system, improving ovary function, enhancing uterine receptivity. More studies are warranted to explore the new drugs from CHM and ensure safety, efficacy, and consistency of CHM. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Are repeated assisted reproductive technology treatments and an unsuccessful outcome risk factors for unipolar depression in infertile women?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sejbaek, Camilla S; Pinborg, Anja; Hageman, Ida

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Previous studies have shown conflicting results whether unsuccessful medically assisted reproduction is a risk factor for depression among women. This study therefore investigated if women with no live birth after assisted reproductive technology (ART) treatment had a higher risk...... of unipolar depression compared with women with a live birth after ART treatment. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The Danish National ART-Couple (DANAC) Cohort is a national register-based cohort study that consists of women who received ART treatment from 1 January 1994 to 30 September 2009, in Denmark (n = 41 050......). Information on unipolar depression was obtained from the Danish Psychiatric Central Research Register. The analyses were conducted in Cox regression analysis. RESULTS: During the 308 494 person-years of follow up, 552 women were diagnosed with unipolar depression. A Cox proportional hazards model showed...

  11. Infertility diagnosis in jaguar (Panthera onca: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Vieira de Barros

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This work reports one case of infertility in a male jaguar (Panthera onca aged 21 years and weighing 125 kg. Changes in sperm due to chronic stress, inadequate food handling and reproductive senescence are emphasized.

  12. Epigenetics, spermatogenesis and male infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajender, Singh; Avery, Kelsey; Agarwal, Ashok

    2011-01-01

    Epigenetic modifications characterized by DNA methylation, histone modifications, and chromatin remodeling are important regulators in a number of biological processes, including spermatogenesis. Several genes in the testes are regulated through epigenetic mechanisms, indicating a direct influence of epigenetic mechanisms on the process of spermatogenesis. In the present article, we have provided a comprehensive review of the epigenetic processes in the testes, correlation of epigenetic aberrations with male infertility, impact of environmental factors on the epigenome and male fertility, and significance of epigenetic changes/aberrations in assisted reproduction. The literature review suggested a significant impact of epigenetic aberrations (epimutations) on spermatogenesis, and this could lead to male infertility. Epimutations (often hypermethylation) in several genes, namely MTHFR, PAX8, NTF3, SFN, HRAS, JHM2DA, IGF2, H19, RASGRF1, GTL2, PLAG1, D1RAS3, MEST, KCNQ1, LIT1, and SNRPN, have been reported in association with poor semen parameters or male infertility. Environmental toxins/drugs may affect fertility via epigenetic modifications. For example, 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine, an anticancer agent, causes a decrease in global DNA methylation that leads to altered sperm morphology, decreased sperm motility, decreased fertilization capacity, and decreased embryo survival. Similarly, Endocrine disruptors, such as methoxychlor (an estrogenic pesticide) and vinclozolin (an anti-androgenic fungicide) have been found by experiments on animals to affect epigenetic modifications that may cause spermatogenic defects in subsequent generations. Assisted reproduction procedures that have been considered rather safe, are now being implicated in inducing epigenetic changes that could affect fertility in subsequent generations. Techniques such as intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) and round spermatid injection (ROSI) may increase the incidence of imprinting disorders and

  13. Varicocele and male infertility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuglesang Jensen, Christian S.; Østergren, Peter; Dupree, James M

    2017-01-01

    to explain the differential effect of varicoceles on infertility. As a consequence, careful patient selection for treatment based on couple fertility status, varicocele grade, and semen quality is critical for achieving a chance of a subsequent pregnancy. A substantial amount of data on the effects...

  14. Parenting after Infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olshansky, Ellen

    2009-01-01

    Becoming a parent after experiencing infertility can pose unique challenges to early parenthood. Parents may struggle with the normal anxiety and fatigue, as well as possible depression, that accompany new parenthood, but with added guilt or shame because of how much they wanted a child and how hard they worked to become parents. These feelings…

  15. Fertility and Infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orgebin-Crist, Marie-Claire; And Others

    In this report, emphasis is placed on major research developments in the reproductive sciences, their impact on the health of individuals as well as on that of society, and on current trends that may provide new opportunities for future research in fertility and infertility. In the first section, major developments in the reproductive sciences are…

  16. Fertility and Infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orgebin-Crist, Marie-Claire; And Others

    In this report, emphasis is placed on major research developments in the reproductive sciences, their impact on the health of individuals as well as on that of society, and on current trends that may provide new opportunities for future research in fertility and infertility. In the first section, major developments in the reproductive sciences are…

  17. Parenting after Infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olshansky, Ellen

    2009-01-01

    Becoming a parent after experiencing infertility can pose unique challenges to early parenthood. Parents may struggle with the normal anxiety and fatigue, as well as possible depression, that accompany new parenthood, but with added guilt or shame because of how much they wanted a child and how hard they worked to become parents. These feelings…

  18. Implications of immune dysfunction on endometriosis associated infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jessica E; Ahn, Soo Hyun; Monsanto, Stephany P; Khalaj, Kasra; Koti, Madhuri; Tayade, Chandrakant

    2017-01-24

    Endometriosis is a complex, inflammatory disease that affects 6-10% of reproductive-aged women. Almost half of the women with endometriosis experience infertility. Despite the excessive prevalence, the pathogenesis of endometriosis and its associated infertility is unknown and a cure is not available. While many theories have been suggested to link endometriosis and infertility, a consensus among investigators has not emerged. In this extensive review of the literature as well as research from our laboratory, we provide potential insights into the role of immune dysfunction in endometriosis associated infertility. We discuss the implication of the peritoneal inflammatory microenvironment on various factors that contribute to infertility such as hormonal imbalance, oxidative stress and how these could further lead to poor oocyte, sperm and embryo quality, impaired receptivity of the endometrium and implantation failure.

  19. Is There a Relationship between Ovarian Epithelial Dysplasia and Infertility?

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    Gautier Chene

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Ovarian epithelial dysplasia was initially described in material from prophylactic oophorectomies performed in patients at genetic risk of ovarian cancer. Similar histopathological abnormalities have been revealed after ovulation stimulation. Since infertility is also a risk factor for ovarian neoplasia, the aim of this study was to study the relationship between infertility and ovarian dysplasia. Methods. We blindly reviewed 127 histopathological slides of adnexectomies or ovarian cystectomies according to three groups—an exposed group to ovulation induction (n = 30, an infertile group without stimulation (n = 35, and a spontaneously fertile control group (n = 62—in order to design an eleven histopathological criteria scoring system. Results. The ovarian dysplasia score was significantly higher in exposed group whereas dysplasia score was low in infertile and control groups (resp., 8.21 in exposed group, 3.69 for infertile patients, and 3.62 for the controls. In the subgroup with refractory infertility there was a trend towards a more severe dysplasia score (8.53 in ovulation induction group and 5.1 in infertile group. Conclusion. These results raise questions as to the responsibility of drugs used to induce ovulation and/or infertility itself in the genesis of ovarian epithelial dysplasia.

  20. New insights into the genetic basis of infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatesh T

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Thejaswini Venkatesh,1 Padmanaban S Suresh,2 Rie Tsutsumi3 1Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, National Centre for Biological Sciences, Bangalore, 2Centre for Biomedical Research, VIT University, Vellore, India; 3University of Tokushima, Institute of Health Bioscience, Department of Public Health and Nutrition, Tokushima, Japan Abstract: Infertility is a disease of the reproductive system characterized by inability to achieve pregnancy after 12 or more months of regular unprotected sexual intercourse. A variety of factors, including ovulation defects, spermatogenic failure, parental age, obesity, and infections have been linked with infertility, in addition to specific karyotypes and genotypes. The study of genes associated with infertility in rodent models has expanded the field of translational genetics in identifying the underlying cause of human infertility problems. Many intriguing aspects of the molecular basis of infertility in humans remain poorly understood; however, application of genetic knowledge in this field looks promising. The growing literature on the genetics of human infertility disorders deserves attention and a critical concise summary is required. This paper provides information obtained from a systematic analysis of the literature related to current research into the genetics of infertility affecting both sexes. Keywords: infertility, genetics, polycystic ovary syndrome, premature ovarian failure, spermatogenic failure, cystic fibrosis

  1. Genomics: Tool to predict and prevent male infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halder, Ashutosh; Kumar, Prashant; Jain, Manish; Kalsi, Amanpreet Kaur

    2017-06-01

    A large number of human diseases arise as a result of genetic abnormalities. With the advent of improved molecular biology techniques, the genetic etiology of male infertility is increasing. The common genetic factors responsible for male infertility are chromosomal abnormalities, Yq microdeletion and cystic fibrosis. These are responsible for approximately 30 percent cases of male infertility. About 40 percent cases of male infertility are categorized as idiopathic. These cases may be associated with genetic and genomic abnormalities. During last few years more and more genes are implicated in male infertility leading to decline in prevalence of idiopathic etiology. In this review we will summarize up to date published works on genetic etiologies of male infertility including our own works. We also briefly describe reproductive technologies used to overcome male infertility, dangers of transmitting genetic disorders to offspring and ways to prevent transmission of genetic disorders during assisted reproduction. At the end we will provide our points on how genomic information can be utilized for prediction and prevention of male infertility in coming years.

  2. Infertility: Ongoing Global challenge of new millennium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kantibhai Naranbhai Sonaliya

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infertility tends to be the global challenge even in the second decade of the new millennium. Especially in developing countries like India, it is still one the most lethal social evil responsible for a big proportion of cases of psychological disturbances including suicide. Again, recently, few conditions other than communicable or Non-communicable diseases are given place among the categories of significant public health problems like Road Traffic Accidents, Burns, Poisoning, drowning and few more. But, for developing countries like India, the list is incomplete without inclusion of Infertility (there may be several others also. In public health, tuberculosis, leprosy and some other diseases are considered social diseases which produce social stigma for the patients and/or his family members.1 In same manner, Infertility is an important cause of social stigmatization since centuries for a couple suffering from, especially for woman involved. During a transitory phase of industrialization and socio-economic development, the situation is changed a minute smidgen at urban areas of India but at rural parts, sub-urban or even at urban slums (mainly among pockets of recent migrants the situation is as same as a few hundred years ago. A female of no religion, caste, social status or higher level of education are barred from some stringent mores related to infertility. Infertile females are still not allowed to take part in so many religious or social ceremonies; on the contrary, they have to face more harassment including domestic violence than their counterparts, who have given birth to the child. Due to social, psychological, economic disturbances, they are forced to take multiple sorts of treatments including religious quacks. So many infertile women are exploited physically and economically also in such weird ways of treatment to gain a pregnancy.

  3. Increasing trend of prevalence of infertility in Beijing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Hongxia; Wang Shuyu; Zhang Songwen; Wang Tao; Deng Xiaohong

    2014-01-01

    Background Infertility is one of the most important and underappreciated reproductive health problems in developing countries.However,epidemiological data in the Chinese population are still sparse.The aim of the present study was to determine the current prevalence and prevalence trend of infertility in Beijing,and to identify the risk factors associated with infertility.Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted in Beijing in 2012.A stratified cluster sampling method was used to select 12 448 couples of whom the female partners were born between 1955 and 1985.All subjects were interviewed face to face.Infertility was defined as the failure to achieve a clinical pregnancy after 12 months of regular unprotected sexual intercourse.Results Of the 12 448 couples,12 342 (99.1%) answered the questions appropriately.The prevalence of infertility was 4.2% (3.1% as primary and 1.1% as secondary infertility).An increase in the prevalence of infertility according to the age of the female partner was found:1.3% infertility for married females born in the 1950s and 11.4% for married females born in the 1980s.The increase was found in both urban and suburban areas.In addition,a Logistic regression showed that for the female partner,higher education levels,an older age at first marriage,adverse occupational conditions,mental labor and pre-pregnancy contraception after marriage were all significantly associated with a higher risk of infertility.Conclusion The prevalence of infertility has increased significantly among couples in Beijing,possibly because of an interaction among multiple factors.

  4. Increasing trend of prevalence of infertility in Beijing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongxia; Wang, Shuyu; Zhang, Songwen; Wang, Tao; Deng, Xiaohong

    2014-01-01

    Infertility is one of the most important and underappreciated reproductive health problems in developing countries. However, epidemiological data in the Chinese population are still sparse. The aim of the present study was to determine the current prevalence and prevalence trend of infertility in Beijing, and to identify the risk factors associated with infertility. This cross-sectional study was conducted in Beijing in 2012. A stratified cluster sampling method was used to select 12 448 couples of whom the female partners were born between 1955 and 1985. All subjects were interviewed face to face. Infertility was defined as the failure to achieve a clinical pregnancy after 12 months of regular unprotected sexual intercourse. Of the 12 448 couples, 12 342 (99.1%) answered the questions appropriately. The prevalence of infertility was 4.2% (3.1% as primary and 1.1% as secondary infertility). An increase in the prevalence of infertility according to the age of the female partner was found: 1.3% infertility for married females born in the 1950s and 11.4% for married females born in the 1980s. The increase was found in both urban and suburban areas. In addition, a Logistic regression showed that for the female partner, higher education levels, an older age at first marriage, adverse occupational conditions, mental labor and pre-pregnancy contraception after marriage were all significantly associated with a higher risk of infertility. The prevalence of infertility has increased significantly among couples in Beijing, possibly because of an interaction among multiple factors.

  5. Infertility Evaluation and Treatment among Women in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Lawrence M.; Craig, Benjamin M.; Plosker, Shayne M.; Reed, Damon R.; Quinn, Gwendolyn P.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine the characteristics of women seeking infertility evaluation and treatment. Design Cross-sectional survey based on in-person interviews, followed by two-step hurdle analysis. Participants 4,558 married or cohabitating women ages 25–44 Setting U.S. household population of women based on the 2006–2010 National Survey of Family Growth Intervention None Main Outcome Measure(s) Likelihood of seeking preliminary infertility evaluation. Likelihood of seeking infertility treatment once evaluated. Treatment type provided. Results 623 women (13.7%) reported seeking infertility evaluation, of which 328 reported undergoing subsequent infertility treatment. Age at marriage, marital status, education, health insurance status, race/ethnicity, and religion were associated with the likelihood of seeking infertility evaluation. For example, the predicted probability that a non-White woman who married at 25 will seek evaluation was 12%. This probability increased to 34% for White women with a graduate degree who married at age 30. Among women who are evaluated, income, employment status, and ethnicity correlated strongly with the likelihood of seeking infertility treatment. Infertility drug therapy was the most frequent treatment used. Reproductive surgery and in vitro fertilization (IVF) were used the least. Conclusions The use of infertility services is not random and understanding the socio-demographic factors correlated with use may assist new couples with family planning. Roughly 50% of the women evaluated for infertility progressed to treatment, and only a small proportion were treated with more advanced assisted reproductive technologies (ARTs) such as IVF therapy. Future research aimed at improving access to effective healthcare treatments within the boundaries of affordability is warranted. PMID:23849845

  6. Psychological determinants of life satisfaction in women undergoing infertility treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Anna Dembińska

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Infertility treatment is a long-term process, spread out over months, or even years, and carries no guarantee of success. It generates an incessant state of uncertainty which becomes a chronic state of psychological discomfort. Each stage of treatment may become a source of more trouble. Women deciding to undergo infertility treatment are exposed to many negative feelings concerning different aspects of their life. Participants and procedure The present study was an attempt to understand psychological determinants of life satisfaction in women undergoing infertility treatment. The study group included 470 women treated for infertility. Results Patients perceiving more social support in general, as well as more of the support types used in the study, i.e. emotional, instrumental, informational and institutional support, and support from family and friends, have better self-esteem, higher acceptance of their infertility, higher satisfaction with life, higher hope as an emotional state, and lower levels of anxiety and depression. Three negative emotional states, i.e. anxiety, depression and irritation, are predictors influencing (lowering life satisfaction of women struggling with infertility. The strongest of these predictors is depression, which is also a factor lowering the acceptance of one’s own infertility. The conducted analyses revealed that predictors influencing the life satisfaction of patients treated for infertility are self-esteem and acceptance of one’s own infertility (apart from the aforementioned emotional state – anxiety, depression, irritation. It was found that the higher the self-esteem and acceptance of one’s own infertility, the higher was the satisfaction with life. Conclusions Knowledge of these determinants is extremely valuable for medical personnel conducting treatments, because, according to many studies, the psychological state of women suffering from procreation problems is connected not only with

  7. Need for accessible infertility care in Ghana: the patients’ voice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osei, Nana Yaw

    2016-01-01

    Abstract According to the Ghana Statistical Service (GSS) infertility and childlessness are the most important reason for divorce in Ghana. The traditional Ghanaian society is pro-natal and voluntary childlessness is very uncommon. Patient groups are almost non-existent in Sub-Saharan Africa, aggravating the situation of childless couples. Due to the lack of enough and affordable high quality infertility services, many women resort to traditional healing, witchcraft and spiritual mediation. Considering the severe sociocultural and economic consequences of childlessness, especially for women, there is an urgent need for accessible and affordable high quality infertility care in Ghana. PMID:27909570

  8. Modulation of cytokines and transcription factors (T-Bet and GATA3 in CD4 enriched cervical cells of Chlamydia trachomatis infected fertile and infertile women upon stimulation with chlamydial inclusion membrane proteins B and C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salhan Sudha

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chlamydial Inclusion membrane proteins (Incs, are involved in biochemical interactions with host cells and infecting Chlamydiae. We have previously reported the role of two Chlamydia trachomatis (CT Incs, namely IncB and IncC in generating host immunity in CT infected women. Emerging data shows involvement of Inc stimulated CD4 positive T cells in aiding host immunity in infected fertile and infertile women through the secretion of interferon gamma. However the lack of data on the intra-cytokine interplay to these Incs in infected cell milieu prompted us to investigate further. Methods A total of 14 CT-positive fertile, 18 CT-positive infertile women and 25 uninfected controls were enrolled in this study. CD8 depleted, CD4 enriched cervical cells were isolated and upon stimulation with IncB and IncC, modulation of cytokines (Interleukin (IL-1 Beta, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-10, Interferon-gamma, IL-12, IL-23, Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha and Granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF and T cell lineage regulating transcription factors T-Bet and GATA3 was determined by real-time reverse-transcriptase (RT-PCR and ELISA. Results Significant higher expression (P Conclusion Overall our data shows that CT IncB and IncC are able to upregulate expression of cytokines, namely interferon-gamma, IL-12, IL-23 and GM-CSF in CT-positive fertile women while expression of IL-1 Beta, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6 and IL-10 were upregulated in CT-positive infertile women. Our study also suggests that Incs are able to modulate expression of T cell lineage determinants indicating their involvement in regulation of immune cells.

  9. Management of Unexplained Infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozgur Kan

    2014-06-01

    In the management of the unexplained infertility, the initial treatment must be observational approach and changing the life style. It is demonstrated that using only the clomiphene citrate or intrauterine insemination is not effective. For this reason, as the patients age and ovarian reserve considered, after the observational approach, the initial treatment must be the combination of clomiphene citrate and intrauterine insemination. With this approach, pregnancy rate is rises to 10 percent for a cycle. Management wise, choosing the cheapest effective treatment for increased fertilization should be the priority, before moving onto more expensive and aggresive approaches. Apart from the diagnostic work-up, which more or less the same for every patient, treatment protocol should be individualised for every infertile couple. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2014; 23(3.000: 506-518

  10. 'Mama and papa nothing': living with infertility among an urban population in Kigali, Rwanda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhont, N; van de Wijgert, J; Coene, G; Gasarabwe, A; Temmerman, M

    2011-03-01

    Not being able to procreate has severe social and economic repercussions in resource-poor countries. The purpose of this research was to explore the consequences of female and/or male factor infertility for men and women in Rwanda. Both quantitative and qualitative methods were used. Couples presenting with female and/or male factor infertility problems at the infertility clinic of the Kigali University Teaching Hospital (n = 312), and fertile controls who recently delivered (n = 312), were surveyed about domestic violence, current and past relationships and sexual functioning. In addition, five focus group discussions were held with a subsample of survey participants, who were either patients diagnosed with female- or male-factor fertility or their partners. Domestic violence, union dissolutions and sexual dysfunction were reported more frequently in the survey by infertile than fertile couples. The psycho-social consequences suffered by infertile couples in Rwanda are severe and similar to those reported in other resource-poor countries. Although women carry the largest burden of suffering, the negative repercussions of infertility for men, especially at the level of the community, are considerable. Whether the infertility was caused by a female factor or male factor was an important determinant for the type of psycho-social consequences suffered. In Rwanda, as in other resource-poor countries, infertility causes severe suffering. There is an urgent need to recognize infertility as a serious reproductive health problem and to put infertility care on the public health agenda.

  11. Infertility and Adenomyosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastiano Campo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Classically, the diagnosis of adenomyosis has only been possible on a hysterectomy specimen, usually in women in their late fourth and fifth decades, and, therefore, evaluating any relationship with infertility was simply not possible. As a consequence, to this day, no epidemiologic data exists linking adenomyosis to a state of subfertility. Today, new imaging techniques have enabled a noninvasive diagnosis at a much earlier time and a number of single-case or small series reports have appeared showing that medical, surgical, or combined treatment can restore fertility in women with adenomyosis, an indirect proof of an association. At the functional level, several anomalies found in the so-called junctional zone, or inner myometrium, in adenomyosis patients have been shown to be associated with poor reproductive performance, mainly through perturbed uterine peristalsis. Additional evidence for an association comes from experimental data: in baboons, adenomyosis is associated with lifelong primary infertility, as well as to endometriosis. Finally, indirect proof comes from studies of the eutopic and ectopic endometrium in women with adenomyosis proving the existence of an altered endometrial function and receptivity. In conclusion, sufficient indirect proof exists linking adenomyosis to infertility to warrant systematic clinical studies.

  12. Tarlov cyst and infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Pankaj Kumar; Singh, Vinay Kumar; Azam, Amir; Gupta, Sanjeev

    2009-01-01

    Tarlov cysts or spinal perineurial cysts are uncommon lesions. These are mostly incidental findings on magnetic resonance imaging or myelograms. The objectives of this study were to describe Tarlov cysts of the sacral region as a potential cause for retrograde ejaculations and review available management options. Case report and literature review. A 28-year-old man presented with back pain and retrograde ejaculations resulting in infertility. After microsurgical excision of large perineurial cysts, back pain resolved, but semen quality showed only marginal improvement. Later, the couple successfully conceived by intrauterine insemination. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of Tarlov cyst associated with retrograde ejaculation and infertility. Despite being mostly asymptomatic and an incidental finding, Tarlov cyst is an important clinical entity because of its tendency to increase in size with time. Tarlov cysts of the sacral and cauda equina region may be a rare underlying cause in otherwise unexplained retrograde ejaculations and infertility. Microsurgical excision may be a good option in a select group of patients.

  13. Male infertility in spinal cord trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiano Utida

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Every year there are 10 thousand new cases of patients victimized by spinal cord trauma (SCT in the United States and it is estimated that there are 7 thousand new cases in Brazil. Eighty percent of patients are fertile males. Infertility in this patient group is due to 3 main factors resulting from spinal cord lesions: erectile dysfunction, ejaculatory disorder and low sperm counts. Erectile dysfunction has been successfully treated with oral and injectable medications, use of vacuum devices and penile prosthesis implants. The technological improvement in penile vibratory stimulation devices (PVS and rectal probe electro-ejaculation (RPE has made such procedures safer and accessible to patients with ejaculatory dysfunction. Despite the normal number of spermatozoa found in semen of spinal cord-injured patients, their motility is abnormal. This change does not seem to be related to changes in scrotal thermal regulation, frequency of ejaculation or duration of spinal cord damage but to factors related to the seminal plasma. Despite the poor seminal quality, increasingly more men with SCT have become fathers through techniques ranging from simple homologous insemination to sophisticated assisted reproduction techniques such as intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI.

  14. Markers of genital tuberculosis in infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanna, A; Agrawal, A

    2011-12-01

    Although genital tuberculosis is a condition that is prevalent worldwide, it is still a diagnostic dilemma. This study aimed to find an effective diagnostic modality for the condition. A total of 100 infertile women were clinically evaluated with haemoglobin estimation, total and differential count, Mantoux test, tubercle bacilli enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (TB ELISA), hysterosalpingography, pelvic ultrasonography, laparohysteroscopy, premenstrual endometrial biopsy for histopathology, culture and tubercle bacilli polymerase chain reaction (TBPCR). The womens' Day 2 hormonal profile (luteinising, follicle-stimulating, prolactin and thyroidstimulating hormones) and their husbands' semen analysis were also conducted. A total of 58 women had primary infertility and 42 had secondary infertility. Female factor infertility was present in 63 percent of the cases (mostly tubal; 45.97 percent). 26 women tested positive for endometrial TBPCR. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate, Mantoux test, TB ELISA and hysterosalpingography were found to have high negative predictive value (greater than 80 percent), while the positive predictive value was 35-45 percent. Laparoscopy findings were suggestive of tuberculosis in 13 percent of the women, out of which 83.3 percent were positive for endometrial TBPCR. Hysteroscopy revealed intrauterine adhesions in 34.8 percent of the women, with 68.8 percent being positive for tubercular bacilli. Our study established that in cases of genital tuberculosis, the use of expensive endometrial TBPCR tests may be avoided with a detailed workup, which would also help in the institution of anti-tubercular treatment in early disease, thus enhancing the chance of pregnancy.

  15. Dermatoglyphic pattern in male infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sontakke, B R; Talhar, S; Ingole, I V; Shende, M R; Pal, A K; Bhattacharaya, T

    2013-06-01

    Dermatoglyphics in infertile male patients were studied and compared with that of age matched controls to see whether any specific dermatoglyphic pattern exists in infertile male patients. Infertile male patients with abnormal semen profile were referred to Cytogenetic Laboratory for karyotyping. We selected twenty-four infertile male patients with abnormal semen profile. Out of twenty-four infertile male patients, nineteen were with normal Karyotype and five patients were with abnormal Karyotype. Loop was the commonest pattern observed in the infertile male patients. All these fingertip and palmar dermatoglyphic findings were compared with that of result on finger and palmar dermatoglyphics of equal number of age matched controls. Statistical evaluation was done with software "EPI- info, version-6.04 d". Infertile males had reduced number of loops as compared to that of controls which was statistically significant. Total whorls were increased in infertile male patients as compared to that of controls which was statistically insignificant. Percentage of true palmar pattern in I 3 and I 4 areas was reduced in infertile male patients as compared to that of controls which was statistically insignificant.

  16. Influencing factors analysis of the postoperative pregnancy in patients with endometriosis-associated infertility%子宫内膜异位症合并不孕患者术后妊娠影响因素分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭晶; 郝敏; 王永红; 王伟

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the influencing factors of the postoperative pregnancy in patients with endometriosisassociated infertility.Methods 66 patients with endometriosis-associated infertility who underwent laparoscopic treatment in our hospital were followed up to assess fertility outcome.The clinical data was analyzed retrospectively.Results The overall postoperative pregnancy rate within 36 months was 56.1%.The postoperative pregnancy rate was 40.9%,13.6% and 1.5% in the first,the second and the third year respectively.There were significant differences among the three groups(P < 0.05).The ovarian stimulation treatment is protective factor of postoperative pregnancy (OR =0.191,P <0.05),and age,type of infertility,infertility time are risk factors (OR =6.281,5.427,7.890,P < 0.05).However,the postoperative pregnancy rate had no correlation with GnRHa treatment,r-AFS staging,EMT categories (P > 0.05).Conclusion Age,type of infertility,infertility time,ovarian stimulation treatment are proved to be very valuable in predicting the fertility outcome.%目的 探讨子宫内膜异位症(内异症)合并不孕患者腹腔镜术后妊娠的影响因素.方法 回顾性分析2007年1月至2011年12月在山西医科大学第二医院进行腹腔镜手术治疗的内异症合并不孕、随访资料完整的66例患者的临床资料,随访术后妊娠相关因素.结果 66例患者术后3年累积妊娠率为56.1%;术后第1、2、3年的妊娠率分别为40.9%、13.6%和1.5%,组间比较差异有统计学意义(P<0.05).使用促排卵治疗是术后妊娠的保护因素(OR =0.191,P<0.05),而年龄、不孕类型、不孕时间为危险因素(OR =6.281、5.427、7.890,P<0.05);是否使用促性腺激素释放激素激动剂(GnRHa)、不同r-AFS分期及不同临床病理类型术后妊娠率比较差异无统计学意义(P>0.05).结论 患者年龄、不孕时间、不孕类型、是否使用促排卵药物是影响内异症合并不

  17. Genetics Home Reference: Y chromosome infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Conditions Y chromosome infertility Y chromosome infertility Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... PDF Open All Close All Description Y chromosome infertility is a condition that affects the production of ...

  18. Analysis of Androgen Receptor Gene Mutations in female with infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soyar Sari

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background : Infertility is a multifactorial disease. Hormonal disorders and genetic factors are important in female infertility. Development and maturation of ovulation are depending on the molecular signaling pathways in response to androgens. Over hundreds of mutations leading to resistance gene function in androgen receptor (AR has been recorded. One of them is polymorphic region 5'UTR. Thus regarding to the role of androgen receptor in infertility, the aim of the present study was to investigate the association between gene mutations AR and infertility in Iranian women Materials and Methods: In this study of 50 infertile women and 80 healthy women as a control, blood samples were taken. After extraction of DNA, PCR method was used to determine the AR gene mutations. Results: In the present study in '5UTR area at position +25 androgen receptor gene a T nucleotide deletion was observed. , therefore single nucleotide mutations did not change in the androgen receptor gene expression, so indicates the lack of communication between the AR gene mutations in the promoter region of 23 to 214+ in women with infertility. According to the results of this study are significant differences between the two groups of patients and healthy women was not found (P=0.5. Conclusion: Results indicated no correlation between mutations in the promoter region of 23 to 214+ AR genes in the population studied women with infertility

  19. Investigation of male infertility using quantitative comparative proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Légaré, Christine; Droit, Arnaud; Fournier, Frédéric; Bourassa, Sylvie; Force, André; Cloutier, Francine; Tremblay, Roland; Sullivan, Robert

    2014-12-05

    Male factors account for 40% of infertility cases. The identification of differentially expressed proteins on spermatozoa from fertile and infertile men can help in the elucidation of the molecular basis of male infertility. The aim of this study was to compare sperm proteomes from 3 different groups: fertile men, normozoospermic men consulting for infertility, and normozoospermic men with an impaired capacity for fertilization (IVF-failure). We used differential proteomics with isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) labeling, and LC-MS analysis to identify proteins that are differentially expressed. A total of 348 unique proteins were identified and quantified. The analysis identified 33 proteins that were differentially expressed in the IVF-failure group vs the fertile group. Comparison of the infertile and fertile groups revealed that 18 proteins appeared to be differentially expressed. Four proteins were similarly altered in the IVF-failure and infertile groups: semenogelin 1 (SEMG1), prolactin-induced protein (PIP), glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDHS), and phosphoglycerate kinase 2 (PGK2). These protein markers were selected for validation using multiple reactions monitoring mass spectrometry (MRM-MS) and further confirmed by Western blot analysis. Overall, these results suggest that a panel of proteins may be used as biomarkers for future studies of infertility.

  20. [Stress and distress in infertility among women].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damti, Osnat Bloch; Sarid, Orly; Sheiner, Eyal; Zilberstein, Tali; Cwikel, Julie

    2008-03-01

    In the industrialized world, approximately 12% of couples suffer from infertility. As a result of its collective political and historical experience, Israel boasts one of the world's most progressive fertility policies ranging from hormonal treatment to In Vitro Fertilization (IVF). Approximately 40% of the causes of infertility are attributed to the woman. Among the factors contributing to reduced fertility are endocrine factors, immune factors and mechanical factors. Studies have accumulated information regarding the contribution of psychological factors to infertility in women. Among the identified risk factors are depression, anxiety and stress-dependent changes like altered heart rate and increased blood cortisol levels. The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA) has been shown to be an important mediator of infertility, involved in the excretion of CRH, ACTH and cortisol, respectively. Data gathered in the literature suggests the involvement of the HPA axis on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadotropic axis (HPG). Specifically, changes in diurnal excretion patterns of cortisol have been shown to accompany mental stress and to mediate the down-regulation of the HPG axis. This impact could possibly involve inhibitory mechanisms at the pituitary level, by reducing the release of FSH and LH by GnRH. Furthermore, research has shown that the effect of cortisol on the HPG axis is dependent on the endocrine status of the ovary in its different stages within the menstrual cycle. From the studies presented in this review it can be hypothesized that stress can induce altered cortisol-excretion patterns along the menstrual cycle, which ultimately affect the hormonal profile in critical stages of the fertilization process.

  1. Occupational risk for male infertility: a case-control study of 218 infertile and 227 fertile men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chia, S E; Tay, S K

    2001-11-01

    The aim of the study was to determine if certain occupations pose an increased risk for infertility (of no known cause) among a group of infertile men compared with a group of fertile men. A total of 640 consecutive men whose spouses were unable to conceive were recruited from an infertility clinic. Of these, 218 men (cases) were found to have no known cause for their infertility. A total of 227 men whose spouses were pregnant at the time of the study were recruited as controls. The Singapore Standard Occupational Classification was used to code the subjects' occupations. Semen parameters (density, total sperm counts, motility, viability, and normal morphology) in all of the cases were significantly poorer than those in the controls. The risk for infertility is associated with smoking adjusted odds ratio (OR) 2.85 and 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.91 to 4.24. Work, independently, is not a risk factor for infertility. Engineering technicians (adjusted OR, 2.75; 95% CI, 1.36 to 5.54), finance analysts (adjusted OR, 4.66; 95% CI, 1.90 to 11.40), corporate and computing managers (adjusted OR, 2.49; 95% CI, 1.04 to 5.98), and teachers (adjusted OR, 7.72; 95% CI, 1.86 to 32.10) were at a greater risk of infertility compared with "services and clerical workers." Using services and clerical workers as a reference group, certain occupations are at a higher risk for infertility. Higher work demands and possible electromagnetic field exposure could be contributory factors for infertility.

  2. Hijama (wet cupping) for female infertility treatment: a pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Hassan Abduljabbar; Anhar Gazzaz; Samiha Mourad; Ayman Oraif

    2016-01-01

    Background: To assess the effectiveness of wet cupping (Hijama) as a treatment of female factor infertility. The primary outcome measured was pregnancy rates after Hijama. The secondary outcome measured was the effect on the reproductive hormonal profile before and after Hijama. Methods: A pilot clinical study was conducted for the use of Hijama as treatment for female infertility at King Abdulaziz University Hospital from September 2013 to May 2015. Inclusion criteria included: patients w...

  3. Infertility, infertility treatment and twinning: the Danish National Birth Cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Jin Liang; Basso, Olga; Obel, Carsten

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We have previously observed that an increasing time to pregnancy (TTP) is associated with a reduced frequency of twin deliveries in couples not receiving infertility treatment. By using updated information, we assessed the frequencies of dizygotic (DZ) and monozygotic (MZ) twin...... deliveries as a function of infertility (TTP > 12 months), as well as infertility treatment. METHODS: From the Danish National Birth Cohort (1997-2003), we identified 51 730 fertile couples with TTP 12 months and 5163 infertile couples who conceived after treatment. Information on zygosity, available...... for part of the cohort (1997-2000), was based on standardized questions on the similarities between the twins at the age of 3-5 years. RESULTS: Compared with fertile couples, the frequency of DZ twin deliveries was lower for infertile couples conceiving naturally (odds ratio 0.4, 95% confidence interval 0...

  4. Male Infertility: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Retrograde ejaculation Semen analysis Sperm release pathway Testicular biopsy Related Health Topics Assisted Reproductive Technology Female Infertility Infertility National Institutes of Health The ...

  5. Male Infertility and Risk of Nonmalignant Chronic Diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glazer, Clara Helene; Bonde, Jens Peter; Eisenberg, Michael L.

    2017-01-01

    The association between male infertility and increased risk of certain cancers is well studied. Less is known about the long-term risk of nonmalignant diseases in men with decreased fertility. A systemic literature review was performed on the epidemiologic evidence of male infertility...... as a precursor for increased risk of diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and all-cause mortality. PubMed and Embase were searched from January 1, 1980, to September 1, 2016, to identify epidemiological studies reporting associations between male infertility and the outcomes of interest. Animal studies, case...... reports, reviews, studies not providing an accurate reference group, and studies including infertility due to vasectomy or malignancy were excluded. The literature search resulted in 2,485 references among which we identified seven articles fulfilling the eligibility criteria. Of these, four articles were...

  6. Analytical Assessment of the Q-Factor due to Cross-Phase Modulation (XPM)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Stephan; Pachnicke; Edgar; Voges

    2003-01-01

    The paper describes the impact of cross-phase modulation on NRZ modulated WDM systems. The impairments due to XPM will be related to a Q-factor and the effects of dispersion management will be covered.

  7. Ethical issues in infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serour, Gamal I; Serour, Ahmed G

    2017-03-01

    Infertility is a global medico-socio-cultural problem with gender-based suffering particularly in developing countries. Conventional methods of treatment for infertility do not usually raise ethical concerns. However, assisted reproductive technology (ART) has initiated considerable ethical debate, disagreement, and controversy. There are three ethical principles that provide an ethical basis for ART: the principle of liberty, principle of utility, and principle of justice. Medical ethics are based on the moral, religious, and philosophical ideas and principles of the society and are influenced by economics, policies, and law. This creates tension between the principles of justice and utility, which can result in disparity in the availability of and access to ART services between the rich and the poor. The moral status of the embryo is the key for all the ethical considerations and law regarding ART in different societies. This has resulted in cross-border ART. Conscientious objection of healthcare providers should not deprive couples from having access to a required ART service.

  8. Thyroid dysfunction in infertile women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S G Perminova

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To study the rate and structure of thyroid diseases in infertile women and to asses their reproductive system depending upon the thyroid pathology. Subjects and methods. The study was based on the results of screening of T status of 496 women with infertility (main group and 80 fertile women (control group. Traditional methods of diagnosis of infertility were used along with special methods of investigation including assessment of function and structure of T (TTH, fT4, fT3, AT-TPO, AT-rTTH, ultrasound examination of T, thin-niddle aspirational biopsy, scintigraphy of T. A complex evaluation of the reproductive system status in infertile women was done depending on the type of T pathology. Results. Infertile women were found to suffer from thyroid dysfunction 3.8 times as more often as fertile ones (48% and 12.5%, p <0.05. Its structure included mainly AT-TPO carrier phenomenon in combination with ultrasound markers of thyroid autoimmunity (24%, hypothyroidism following thyroid autoimmunity (9.4% demonstrating itself as clinical (0.8%, subclinical (8.6%, and euthyroid (7.8% goiters. The portion of women with infertility and hyperthyroidism was small (0.6%. An association of thyroid autoimmunity with idiopathic infertility, endometriosis, endocrine infertility was found. Conclusion. It is necessary to perform a screening assessment of the function and structure of T in infertile women within diagnostic search for the reasons of infertility and in-time correction of the revealed thyroid dysfunction.

  9. Local Signaling Environments and Human Male Infertility: What Can Be Learned from Mouse Models

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Infertility is one of the most prevalent public health problems facing young adult males in today’s society. A clear, treatable cause of infertility cannot be determined in a large number of these patients, and a growing body of evidence suggests that infertility in many of these men may be due to genetic causes. Studies utilizing animal models, and most importantly, mouse knockout technology, have been integral not only for the study of normal spermatogenesis but also for identifying protein...

  10. Effects of indoor air purification by an air cleaning system (Koala technology) on semen parameters in male factor infertility: results of a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradisi, R; Vanella, S; Barzanti, R; Cani, C; Battaglia, C; Seracchioli, R; Venturoli, S

    2009-06-01

    A number of studies indicated a clear decline in semen quality in the past 30-50 years and there is accumulating evidence that this decline might result from exposure to high levels of air pollution. To examine the impact of environment on male reproductive ability, we undertook for the first time a pilot study on semen quality of infertile men exposed to purification of indoor air. Ten subjects with a history of unexplained male infertility and poor semen quality were exposed for at least 1 year to a cleaning indoor air system (Koala technology). The key feature of this air purifier is the unique innovative multiple filtering system. The treatment of total purification of indoor air showed neither improvements in semen parameters nor variation in reproductive hormones (P = N.S.), but induced an evident increase (P indoor air does not seem enough to improve semen quality, although the increase in leucocytic concentrations could indicate an activation of the role of immunosurveillance in a purified indoor air environment.

  11. The effect of Chinese herbal medicine"heche assisted pregnancy recipe"on endometrial estrogen and progesterone receptor, proliferating cell nuclear antigen and vascular endothelial growth factor in the patients with infertility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘效群; 阚国英; 彭玉梅; 樊瑞琴; 齐惠敏; 焦妹芬; 李忠; 石彬; 尹桂然; 董锡月

    2003-01-01

    Objectives:To investigate the effect of Chinese herbal medicine"heche assisted preg-nancy recipe (HCAPR)" on estrogen receptor(ER), progesterone receptor (PR), pro-lifierating cell nuclear antigen(PCNA) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)in endometrium of infertile women.Methods: The S-P immunohistochemical assay was used to observe expression ofER, PR , PCNA and VEGF in late proliferative phase before and after the HCAPR treat-ment.Results: After the treatment, the expression of ER,PR,PCNA and VEGF in nucleiof glandular epithelium and stromal cells was significantly stronger (all P<0. 001) re-spectively than that before treatment , especially the expression of PCNA and VEGF.Conclusions: These results suggest that traditional Chinese medicine HCAPR oftonifying kidney and regulating menstruation increased the synthesis of ER,PR, PCNAand VEGF, which may promote normal growth and development of the endometrium ,improve the micro-environment of the endometrium, and enhance uterine receptivity.The evidence may provide theoretical basis for therapy infertility with Chinese herbalmedicine.

  12. Relative factors analysis of polycystic ovarian syndrome in infertile women%多囊卵巢综合征致不孕患者的相关因素分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈晓; 陈亚琼; 侯海燕

    2014-01-01

    目的 探讨多囊卵巢综合征(PCOS)致不孕患者的相关因素.方法 选择2008年1月至2012年12月因不孕症来我院就诊确诊为PCOS患者98例(PCOS组),在同期因不孕症就诊、无PCOS表现且腹腔镜检查卵巢组织结构正常的患者中随机选取280例作为对照组,回顾性分析两组患者的一般资料、生育相关因素、腹腔镜探查情况.结果 PCOS组初潮年龄在13岁以下者51例(52.0%),对照组113例(40.4%),组间比较差异有统计学意义(x2=4.03,P<0.05);PCOS组月经不规律11例(11.2%),对照组12例(4.3%),组间比较差异有统计学意义(x2 =6.12,P<0.05);PCOS组盆腔粘连60例(21.1%),对照组224例(40.4%),组间比较差异有统计学意义(x2 =13.70,P<0.05).月经不规律是不孕女性PCOS发生的危险因素(OR=1.770,95% CI为1.09~2.88,P=0.002).结论 临床应加强对青春期月经初潮提前及月经不规律且有PCOS相关症状人群的关注,早期筛查、早期发现,早期预防、早期治疗,从而降低PCOS致不孕的发生率,降低远期并发症.%Objective To explore the relative factors of polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) in infertile women.Methods Ninety-eight infertile women diagnosed PCOS at affiliated hospital of the Chinese People's Armed Force Logistic college from Jan.2008 to Dec.2012 were served as PCOS group.Two hundred and eighty infertile women with normal ovarian structure according to laparoscopic examination result were selected as control group.The general information,factors related infertile and laparoscopic examination of the two groups were recorded.Results Fifty-one cases (52.0%) in PCOS group were with menarche age earlier than 13 years old,higher than that of control group (113 (40.4%),x2 =4.03,P < 0.05).Eleven cases (11.2%) in PCOS group were with abnormal menstruation cycle,higher than that of control group (12 (4.3%),x2 =6.12,P < 0.05).The incidence of pelvic adhesions in PCOS group was lower than the

  13. Laparoscopy:As a First Line Diagnostic Tool for Infertility Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatuja, Ritu; Juneja, Atul; Mehta, Sumita

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The role of diagnostic and therapeutic hystero-laparoscopy in women with infertility is well established. It is helpful not only in the identification of the cause but also in the management of the same at that time. Materials and Methods: In this study, the aim was to analyse the results of 203 women on whom laparoscopy for the evaluation of infertility was done. This study was carried out at a tertiary level hospital from 2005 to 2012. The study group included 121 women with primary infertility and 82 women with secondary infertility. Women with incomplete medical records and isolated male factor infertility were excluded from the study. Results: It was observed that tubal disease was the responsible factor in 62.8% women with primary infertility and 54.8% women with secondary infertility followed by pelvic adhesions in 33% and 31.5%, ovarian factor in 14% and 8.5%, pelvic endometriosis in 9.9% and 6.1% women respectively. Thus tubal factor infertility is still a major cause of infertility in developing countries and its management at an early stage is important to prevent an irreversible damage. At the same time, it also directs which couples would be benefited from assisted reproductive technologies (ART). PMID:25478408

  14. Quality factor due to roughness scattering of shear horizontal surface acoustic waves in nanoresonators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palasantzas, G.

    2008-01-01

    In this work we study the quality factor associated with dissipation due to scattering of shear horizontal surface acoustic waves by random self-affine roughness. It is shown that the quality factor is strongly influenced by both the surface roughness exponent H and the roughness amplitude w to late

  15. Successful treatment of an acquired haemorrhagic diathesis due to factor X deficiency with chemotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jager, E; Bieger, R; Castel, A; Kluin, PM

    2001-01-01

    A 70-yr-old woman presented with a severe haemorrhagic diathesis due to an acquired factor X deficiency. A plasma infusion study showed that exogenous factor X was eliminated very effectively from the patient's circulation. A bone marrow biopsy was consistent with plasma cell dyscrasia. Neither an a

  16. Laparohysteroscopy in female infertility: A diagnostic cum therapeutic tool in Indian setting

    OpenAIRE

    Puri, Suman; Jain, Dinesh; Puri, Sandeep; Kaushal, Sandeep; Deol, Satjeet Kaur

    2015-01-01

    Aims: To evaluate the role of laparohysteroscopy in female infertility andto study the effect of therapeutic procedures in achieving fertility. Settings and Design: Patients with female infertility presenting to outpatient Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology were evaluated over a period of 18 months. Materials and Methods: Fifty consenting subjects excluding male factor infertility with normal hormonal profile and no contraindication to laparoscopy were subject to diagnostic laparoscopy a...

  17. Serum Levels of Melatonin and Oxidative Stress Markers and Correlation between Them in Infertile Men

    OpenAIRE

    Sara Soleimani Rad; Shamsi Abbasalizadeh; Amir Ghorbani Haghjo

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Infertility is the problem of 15% of young couples in different societies. One of the factors that could affect fertility is oxidative stress. Therefore, the aim of the present study is to investigate the level of Melatonin, a free radical scavenger, and its correlation with oxidative biomarkers in infertile men. Methods:For this purpose, fertile and infertile men in 2 groups, 30 people in each group, were studied. The fertile men were selected from husbands of patients admitted...

  18. Serum Levels of Melatonin and Oxidative Stress Markers and Correlation between Them in Infertile Men

    OpenAIRE

    Soleimani Rad, Sara; Abbasalizadeh, Shamsi; Ghorbani Haghjo, Amir; Sadagheyani, Mehzad; Montaseri, Azadeh; Soleimani Rad, Jafar

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Infertility is the problem of 15% of young couples in different societies. One of the factors that could affect fertility is oxidative stress. Therefore, the aim of the present study is to investigate the level of Melatonin, a free radical scavenger, and its correlation with oxidative biomarkers in infertile men. Methods: For this purpose, fertile and infertile men in 2 groups, 30 people in each group, were studied. The fertile men were selected from husbands o...

  19. [Treatment options for age-related infertility].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belaisch-Allart, Joëlle

    2010-06-20

    There has been a consistent trend towards delayed childbearing in most Western countries. Treatment options for age-related infertility includes controlled ovarian hyperstimulation with intrauterine insemination and in vitro fertilization (IVF). A sharp decline in pregnancy rate with advancing female age is noted with assisted reproductive technologies (ART) including IVF. Evaluation and treatment of infertility should not be delayed in women 35 years and older. No treatment other than oocyte donation has been shown to be effective for women over 40 and for those with compromised ovarian reserve, but its pratice is not easy in France hence the procreative tourism. As an increasing number of couples choose to postpone childbearing, they should be informed that maternal age is an important risk factor for failure to conceive.

  20. Patient evaluation of infertility management in an ISO 9001:2008-certified centre for reproductive medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Broeck, Uschi; Spiessens, Carl; Dancet, Eline; Bakelants, Els; Vrancken, Annelies; Demyttenaere, Koen; Enzlin, Paul; D'Hooghe, Thomas

    2012-03-01

    Quality management according to ISO 9001:2008 guidelines includes infertility care quality assessment and improvement. This study aimed to describe the development process of a questionnaire for infertility management. A literature review, qualitative interviews with experts and patients resulted in a content-valid and face-valid questionnaire. Three cross-sectional surveys were performed in 2004, 2007 and 2008 in a tertiary university infertility centre. First (2004), the questionnaire – measuring eight a-priori dimensions of infertility management – was tested. Second (2007), improvement projects for infertility management were evaluated. Third (2008), factor analysis was performed and internal consistency was documented. The developed patient questionnaire to evaluate infertility management and pre-set desired levels of agreement served to set targets for and assess quality improvement projects. The final patient questionnaire to evaluate infertility management within an ISO framework was valid and reliable and contained 14 items covering four dimensions of infertility management: Telephone Access, Reception, Information and Patient-centeredness. ISO 9001:2008-certified infertility centres can evaluate infertility management with this 14-item questionnaire. This top-down approach to evaluate the patients’ perspective on quality aspects selected by health professionals can be complementary to the bottom-up approach evaluating the patients’ complete experiences of quality of care.

  1. The Impact of Emotionally Focused Therapy on Emotional Distress in Infertile Couples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzieh Soltani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The present study investigated the effect of emotionally focused therapy (EFT on factors contributing to emotional distress among infertile couples. Materials and Methods: In this semi-experimental study, the subjects consisted of 12 Iranian couples: six infertile men and six infertile women. They were assessed as depressed, anxious and stressful individuals using depression, anxiety and stress scale (DASS. The subjects were randomly divided into control and experimental groups. The experimental group with six couples (i.e. three infertile men and three infertile women received EFT, while the control group with similar number of couples (i.e. three infertile men and three infertile women was deprived of the treatment. Results: There were no significant differences between the two groups regarding job, educational level, income, age, marriage and infertility duration. The pre- and post-test comparisons of DASS subscales showed that level of depression, anxiety and stress among couples with EFT instruction was significantly less than those without such instructions (p<0.0001. Conclusion: Emotionally focused therapy could reduce the rate of depression, anxiety and stress in infertile couples, regardless of the man or woman as the cause of infertility.

  2. Hysterosalpingographic findings in infertility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, M. S.; Kim, K. S.; Kim, J. S.; Bai, B. C. [Seoul Red Cross Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1981-12-15

    Four hundred and fifty four cases of H.S.G. in infertility were analyzed and following brief results were obtained. 1. Most frequent age group was 25-29 year old, and those number of patient were 188 (41.4%). 2. Most frequent abnormal uterine findings was intravasation (113 cases), and malposition (119), irregular margin (104), filling defect (37), and diverticulum (6) in decreasing order. 3. Most frequent abnormal tubal finding was obstruction (199 cases), and hydrosalpinx (99), diverticulosis (22), intravasation (17), peritubal adhesion (13), and beaded tube (10) in decreasing order. 4. Nagative findings was seen in 155 cases (34.1%) of uterus and in 227 cases (50.0%) of fallopian tubes. 5. Nagative findings in both uterus and fallopian tubes was seen only 87 cases (19.2%)

  3. Female infertility: role of vaginal hormonal cytology, endometrial biopsy and endocrinological evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afroz, Nishat; Singh, Mamta; Verma, Manju; Bansal, Vandana

    2006-03-01

    Female infertility can be categorised into those who fail to ovulate (anovulatory infertility) because of some defect at hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis and those who are ovulatory (ovulatory infertility), but are infertile because of some lesion present in genital tract. The role of vaginal hormonal cytology, endometrial biopsy and endocrinological evaluation in the detection of ovulation and various ovulatory dysfunction was studied in 42 infertile female patients. On the basis of cytological findings, of the 42 patients, 14 were found to be ovulatory, 26 anovulatory (which include 5 cases of atrophic changes) and 2 inconsistent due to inflammatory changes. Endometrial biopsy showed evidence of ovulation in 15, anovulation in 27 cases. Hormonal evaluation indicated some sort of endocrinological disorders in 15 patients, which may underlie anovulatory infertility in these patients, while results were within normal range in the rest 27 patients. Results of vaginal cytology and endometrial biopsy showed correlation in respect to ovulation in 93.33% of the cases.

  4. Increased incidence of infertility treatment among women working in the plastics industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, K.S.; Hannerz, H.; Feveile, H.

    2009-01-01

    Several plastic chemicals adversely affect reproductive ability. This study examined the possible association between employment in the plastics industry and infertility. Dynamic cohorts of economically active women and men were followed for hospital contacts due to infertility in the Danish...... infertility were observed among female plastic workers, as opposed to an expected 87.15 cases, i.e. relative risk was 1.23 (95% CI: 1.01-1.48). For male workers the numbers were 41 respectively 49.9 cases, with relative risk being 0.82 (95% CI: 0.59-1.11). The increased incidence of infertility treatment...

  5. NF kappaB expression increases and CFTR and MUC1 expression decreases in the endometrium of infertile patients with hydrosalpinx: a comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Yong

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hydrosalpinx are associated with infertility, due to reduced rates of implantation and increased abortion rates. The aims of this study were to investigate the expression of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR, nuclear factor kappa B (NF KappaB and mucin-1 (MUC-1, and analyze the correlation between the expression of CFTR and NF KappaB or MUC1, in the endometrium of infertile women with and without hydrosalpinx. Methods Thirty-one infertile women with laparoscopy-confirmed unilateral or bilateral hydrosalpinx and 20 infertile women without hydrosalpinx or pelvic inflammatory disease (control group were recruited. Endometrial biopsy samples were collected and the expression of CFTR, NF KappaB and MUC1 were analyzed using immunohistochemistry and quantitative real-time PCR. Results CFTR, NF KappaB and MUC1 mRNA and protein expression tended to increase in the secretory phase compared to the proliferative phase in both groups; however, these differences were not significantly different. The endometrium of infertile patients with hydrosalpinx had significantly higher NF KappaB mRNA and protein expression, and significantly lower CFTR and MUC1 mRNA and protein expression, compared to control infertile patients. A positive correlation was observed between CFTR and MUC1 mRNA expression (r = 0.65, P CFTR mRNA and NF KappaB mRNA expression (r = −0.59, P Conclusions Increased NF KappaB expression and decreased CFTR and MUC1 expression in the endometrium of infertile patients with hydrosalpinx reinforce the involvement of a molecular mechanism in the regulation of endometrial receptivity.

  6. Correlation between HPV sperm infection and male infertility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Yang; Chan-Wei Jia; Yan-Min Ma; Li-Ying Zhou; Shu-Yu Wang

    2013-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is one of the most common sexually transmitted diseases which comprises a group of small DNA viruses that intect both cutaneous and mucous squamous epithelia.Liquid bead microarray technology (LBMA) were used to evaluate 24 HPV genotypes in confirmed fertile and infertile males of North China so that the effects of HPV infection on semen parameters and relationship with male infertility could be discussed.A total of 1138 subjects were recruited in this study; 142 were HPV-pesitive (12.48%).Among 523 confirmed fertile males,only 35 were HPV-positive (6.70%),and two of them had multiple infections.Among 615 infertile males,107 were HPV-positive (17.4%),and 29 of them had multiple infections.Infertile males had a relatively high HPV infection rate compared with confirmed fertile males.Sperm progpessive motility (PR) and the normal morphology rate were significantly decreased in HPV-positive subjects.HPV-45,HPV-52,HPV-18,HPV-59 and HPV-16 infections were more frequently in infertile males.Hence,HPV infection is closely related to male infertility which will decrease sperm PR and rnorphology.HPV-45,HPV-52,HPV-18,HPV-59 and HPV-16 infection seems to be major risk factors.

  7. The role of intrauterine insemination in male infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akanji Tijani, Hammed; Bhattacharya, Siladitya

    2010-12-01

    Male infertility is a common condition and intrauterine insemination (IUI) is used to treat the mild to moderate forms. Male subfertility determination is usually based on routine semen analysis but recent publications have questioned its diagnostic and prognostic accuracy as well as the effectiveness of IUI itself, as a treatment modality. We carried out a structured review of the literature to assess the current evidence regarding the diagnosis of male infertility, the effectiveness and cost effectiveness of IUI in male infertility and factors that affect the outcome of IUI. There is still uncertainty regarding the criteria for diagnosing male infertility and predicting treatment outcome based on standard semen parameters. The presence of seminal defects compromises the outcome of IUI in comparison with unexplained infertility. The total motile sperm count (TMSC) appears to have a consistent, direct relationship with treatment outcome, but there is no definite predictive threshold for success. However, it is reasonable to offer IUI as first-line treatment if TMSC is greater than 10 million when balancing the risk and cost of alternate treatments, such as in vitro fertilization (IVF). Sperm DNA studies and sperm preparation techniques warrant further studies in order to establish their clinical relevance. There are limited data on the clinical and cost-effectiveness of IUI in male infertility and large high-quality randomized controlled trials are warranted. However the difficulties in organizing such a study, at the present time, are a matter for discussion.

  8. Male infertility: a critical review of pharmacologic management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamada, Alaa J; Montgomery, Brian; Agarwal, Ashok

    2012-12-01

    Male factor infertility contributes partially and solely to the problem of childlessness in around 50% of the cases. Unfortunately, 30 - 50% of the etiologies of male infertility are unknown and therefore, no specific therapy can be instituted. Evidence-based medical therapy for male infertility is an attractive research area where a large number of clinical trials, controlled and uncontrolled, using different types of medications have been conducted yielding variable results and outcomes. In this review, we summarize and evaluate the most important and most recent information pertaining to the use of different medications in male infertility and assign level of evidence to these medications. An extensive literature search was performed using the search engines: Pubmed, Science-direct, Ovid and Scopus. Male infertility represents a very challenging area of clinical medicine. Many different types of medications have been tried and very few have had satisfactory results. There is a huge need to advance and develop andrologic diagnostic techniques, focusing on the metabolomics and proteomics of the sperm, seminal plasma, and testicular tissue. Clarification of the causes of idiopathic male infertility and the discovery of novel molecular targets will help guide future innovative development of new pharmacologic agents.

  9. Induced Abortion and the Risk of Tubal Infertility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Objective To explore the association between induced abortion and tubal infertility in Chengdu, China.Methods A 1 :2 case-control study was designed. Infertile women with bilateral tubal occlusion in the case group compared with two control groups: infertile control group with bilateral tubal patency and pregnant control group with currently pregnancy. Data were collected using questionnaires through face-to-face interviews, covering the subjects' demographic details and histories of gynecology and obstetrics. Adjusted odds ratio was calculated as a measure of the association using stepwise multiple logistic regression analysis.Results Induced abortion was not found to be associated with tubal infertility in the analysis including either the infertile controls or the pregnant controls, but other risk factors were found, such as history of acute pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), lower abdominal surgeries, dysmenorrhea and pregnancy.Conclusion It is contended that facing an increasing trend of infertile cases with tubal occlusion in China, it is emphasized that special attention should paid to the long term impact of reproductive tract infection, especially, asymptomatic ones, rather than induced abortion.

  10. Laparohysteroscopy in female infertility: A diagnostic cum therapeutic tool in Indian setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puri, Suman; Jain, Dinesh; Puri, Sandeep; Kaushal, Sandeep; Deol, Satjeet Kaur

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the role of laparohysteroscopy in female infertility andto study the effect of therapeutic procedures in achieving fertility. Patients with female infertility presenting to outpatient Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology were evaluated over a period of 18 months. Fifty consenting subjects excluding male factor infertility with normal hormonal profile and no contraindication to laparoscopy were subject to diagnostic laparoscopy and hysteroscopy. T-test. We studied 50 patients comprising of 24 (48%) cases of primary infertility and 26 (52%) patients of secondary infertility. The average age of active married life for 50 patients was between 8 and 9 years. In our study, the most commonly found pathologies were PCOD, endometroisis and tubal blockage. 11 (28.2) patients conceived after laparohysteroscopy followed by artificial reproductive techniques. This study demonstrates the benefit of laparohysteroscopy for diagnosis and as a therapeutic tool in patients with primary and secondary infertility. We were able to achieve a higher conception rate of 28.2%.

  11. Metabolomics: a state-of-the-art technology for better understanding of male infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minai-Tehrani, A; Jafarzadeh, N; Gilany, K

    2016-08-01

    Male factor infertility affects approximately half of the infertile couples, in spite of many years of research on male infertility treatment and diagnosis; several outstanding questions remain to be addressed. In this regard, metabolomics as a novel field of omics has been suggested to be applied for male infertility problems. A variety of terms associated with metabolite quantity and quality have been established to demonstrate mixtures of metabolites. Despite metabolomics and metabolite analyses have been around more than decades, a limited number of studies concerning male infertility have been carried out. In this review, we summarised the latest finding in metabolomics techniques and metabolomics biomarkers correlated with male infertility. The rapid progress of a variety of metabolomics platforms, such as nonoptical and optical spectroscopy, could ease separation, recognition, classification and quantification of several metabolites and their metabolic pathways. Here, we recommend that the novel biomarkers determined in the course of metabolomics analysis may stand for potential application of treatment and future clinical practice.

  12. Major Disease Prevalence and Menstrual Characteristics in Infertile Female Korean Smokers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the prevalence of smoking and factors associated with smoking in infertile Korean women. Smoking status, education, occupation, personal habits, past medical history, current illness, stress level, and menstrual characteristics were collected from self-report questionnaires. The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) was used to assess the degree of depression. Data on the causes of infertility and levels of six reproductive hormones were collected from medical records. Among 785 women less than 42 years of age, the prevalence of current, secondhand, past, and never smokers were 12.7%, 45.7%, 0.9%, and 40.6%, respectively. Primary infertility was more frequent in secondhand smokers. Causes of infertility were similar among current, secondhand, and never smokers. Current smokers were less educated (P infertility and diabetes mellitus were significantly different according to smoking status among infertile women. PMID:28049245

  13. Infertility in male aquatic invertebrates: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Ceri; Ford, Alex T

    2012-09-15

    As a result of endocrine disruptor studies, there are numerous examples of male related reproductive abnormalities observed in vertebrates. Contrastingly, within the invertebrates there have been considerably less examples both from laboratory and field investigations. This has in part been due to a focus of female related endpoints, inadequate biomarkers and the low number of studies. Whether contaminant induced male infertility is an issue within aquatic invertebrates and their wider communities therefore remains largely unknown and represents a key knowledge gap in our understanding of pollutant impacts in aquatic wildlife. This paper reviews the current knowledge regarding pollutants impacting male infertility across several aquatic invertebrate phyla; which biomarkers are currently being used and where the science needs to be expanded. The limited studies conducted so far have revealed reductions in sperm numbers, examples of poor fertilisation success, DNA damage to spermatozoa and inhibition of sperm motility that can be induced by a range of environmental contaminants. This limited data is mainly comprised from laboratory studies with only a few studies of sperm toxicity in natural populations. Clearly, there is a need for further studies in this area, to include both laboratory and field studies from clean and reference sites, with a focus on broadcast spawners and those with direct fertilisation. Biomarkers developed for measuring sperm quantity and quality in vertebrates are easily transferable to invertebrates but require optimisation for particular species. We discuss how sperm tracking and techniques for measuring DNA strand breaks and sperm viability have been successfully transferred from human infertility clinics to aquatic invertebrate ecotoxicology. Linking sperm toxicity and male infertility effects to higher level impacts on the reproductive biology and dynamics of populations requires a much greater understanding of fertilisation dynamics and

  14. Predictive value of hormonal parameters for live birth in women with unexplained infertility and male infertility

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Murto, Tiina; Bjuresten, Kerstin; Landgren, Britt-Marie; Stavreus-Evers, Anneli

    2013-01-01

    ... for long-term possibility of live birth. In this cross-sectional study, with 71 infertile women with diagnosis unexplained infertility and male infertility, blood samples were obtained during the proliferative and secretory phases...

  15. Focus Issue on Male Infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideyuki Kobayashi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Male infertility problems can occur when sperms are limited in number or function. In this paper, we describe the clinical evaluation of male infertility. A detailed history, physical examination, and basic semen analysis are required. In addition, ultrasound, karyotyping, and hormonal studies are needed to determine specific causes of infertility. In addition, the World Health Organization (WHO, 2009 has developed a manual to provide guidance in performing a comprehensive semen analysis. Among the possible reasons for male infertility, nonobstructive azoospermia is the least treatable, because few or no mature sperm may be produced. In many cases, men with nonobstructive azoospermia typically have small-volume testes and elevated FSH. Although treatment may not completely restore the quality of semen from men with subnormal fertility, in some cases a successful pregnancy can still be achieved through assisted reproductive technology.

  16. Infertility Counseling and Support: When and Where to Find It

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home FAQs Frequently Asked Questions Quick Facts About Infertility FAQs About Infertility FAQs About the Psychological Component of Infertility FAQs About Cloning and Stem Cell Research SART's ...

  17. Pathogenic mechanisms in endometriosis-associated infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Sajal; Goldberg, Jeffrey M; Aziz, Nabil; Goldberg, Eric; Krajcir, Natalie; Agarwal, Ashok

    2008-08-01

    To review the mechanisms by which endometriosis may affect reproductive function. Review of the English literature from 1986 to 2007 after searching Medline, EMBASE, Cochrane, and BIOSIS, as well as relevant meeting abstracts. Fertility research center and obstetrics and gynecology department in a tertiary care hospital. There is compelling evidence in the literature that endometriosis has detrimental effects on ovarian and tubal function and uterine receptivity, resulting in female infertility. The mechanisms of infertility associated with endometriosis remain controversial and include abnormal folliculogenesis, elevated oxidative stress, altered immune function, and hormonal milieu in the follicular and peritoneal environments, and reduced endometrial receptivity. These factors lead to poor oocyte quality, impaired fertilization, and implantation. Through unraveling the mechanisms by which endometriosis leads to infertility, researchers are sure to find a nonsurgical means to diagnose endometriosis, most likely through serum and peritoneal markers. Cytokines, interleukins, oxidative stress markers, and soluble cellular adhesion molecules all show potential to be used as a reliable marker for diagnosing endometriosis. After analyzing the pathogenic mechanisms of endometriosis, it seems that the future treatment of this entity may include cyclo-oxygenase-2 inhibitors, immunomodulators, or hormonal suppressive therapy to eliminate the need for surgical treatment of endometriosis.

  18. Y chromosome microdeletions in Turkish infertile men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zamani Ayse

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available AIMS: To detect the frequency and types of both chromosomal abnormalities and Y chromosome microdeletions in infertile men attending to our university intracytoplasmic sperm injection ICSI/IVF centre and fertile control subjects in our patient population. SETTINGS AND DESIGN: A total of 50 infertile men who were referred to IVF center of Meram medical faculty were selected for the molecular azospermia factor (AZF screening program. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Karyotype analysis and polymerase chain reaction amplification using 15 Y-specific sequence-tagged sites of AZF region were done. RESULTS: The total prevalence of chromosomal abnormalities was found to be 10% (5/50, including 4 patients with numerical and 1 patient with structural abnormalities. Overall, 4 of the 50 patients tested (8% exhibited deletions of the Y chromosome, 3 of them being azospermic and 1 of them oligospermic men. The frequency of the microdeletions in subgroups with azospermia and oligozoospermia was found to be 10.7% (3/29 and 4.7% (1/21 respectively. Microdeletions of AZFb and AZFc regions were detected in all of the 4 patients. Neither AZFa nor AZFd microdeletions were indicated. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that one must know whether there is a genetic cause for male infertility before patients can be subjected to ISCI or testicular sperm extraction (TESE/ISCI treatment.

  19. Prognostic Factors of Long Term Disability Due to Mental Disorders: A Systematic Review

    OpenAIRE

    Cornelius, L. R.; van der Klink, J. J. L.; Groothoff, J. W.; Brouwer, S.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction In the past few decades, mental health problems have increasingly contributed to sickness absence and long-term disability. However, little is known about prognostic factors of return to work (RTW) and disability of persons already on sick leave due to mental health problems. Understanding these factors may help to develop effective prevention and intervention strategies to shorten the duration of disability and facilitate RTW. Method We reviewed systematically current scientific...

  20. A phytotherapic approach to reduce sperm DNA fragmentation in patients with male infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capece, Marco; Romeo, Giuseppe; Ruffo, Antonio; Romis, Leo; Mordente, Salvatore; Di Lauro, Giovanni

    2017-04-28

    Infertility affects 50 to 80 million (between 8 and 12% of couples). Male factor is a cause of infertility in almost half of the cases, mainly due to oligoasthenoteratozoospermia. DNA fragmentation is now considered an important factor in the aetiology of male infertility. We studied the effects on semen analysis and on DNA fragmentation of in vivo admnistration of Myo-Inositol and Tribulus Terrestris plus Alga Ecklonia plus Biovis (Tradafertil; Tradapharma Sagl, Swizerland) in men with previously diagnosed male infertility. Sixty patients were enrolled in the present study and were randomized into two subgroups: the group A who received Myo-inositol 1000 mg, Tribulus Terrestris 300 mg, Alga Ecklonia Bicyclis 200 mg and Biovis one tablet a day for 90 days, and the group B (placebo group) who received one placebo tablet a day for 90 days. The primary efficacy outcome was the improvement of semen characteristics after 3 months' therapy and the secondary outcome was the reduction of the DNA fragmentation after treatment. The groups were homogenous for age, hormonal levels, sperm concentration and all parameters of sperm analysis. Sperm concentration and progressive motility improved after treatment with Tradafertil (3.82 Mil/ml vs. 1.71 Mil/ml; p<0.05; 4.86% vs. 1.00%; p<0.05) as well as the DNA fragmentation (-1.64% vs -0.39%, p<0.001). No side effects were revealed. In conclusion, we can affirm that Tradafertil is safe and tolerable. It is a new phytotherapic approach to Oligoasthenoteratospermia (OAT) syndrome that could lead to good results without interacting with hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis.

  1. Meiotic abnormalities in infertile males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egozcue, J; Sarrate, Z; Codina-Pascual, M; Egozcue, S; Oliver-Bonet, M; Blanco, J; Navarro, J; Benet, J; Vidal, F

    2005-01-01

    Meiotic anomalies, as reviewed here, are synaptic chromosome abnormalities, limited to germ cells that cannot be detected through the study of the karyotype. Although the importance of synaptic errors has been underestimated for many years, their presence is related to many cases of human male infertility. Synaptic anomalies can be studied by immunostaining of synaptonemal complexes (SCs), but in this case their frequency is probably underestimated due to the phenomenon of synaptic adjustment. They can also be studied in classic meiotic preparations, which, from a clinical point of view, is still the best approach, especially if multiplex fluorescence in situ hybridization is at hand to solve difficult cases. Sperm chromosome FISH studies also provide indirect evidence of their presence. Synaptic anomalies can affect the rate of recombination of all bivalents, produce achiasmate small univalents, partially achiasmate medium-sized or large bivalents, or affect all bivalents in the cell. The frequency is variable, interindividually and intraindividually. The baseline incidence of synaptic anomalies is 6-8%, which may be increased to 17.6% in males with a severe oligozoospermia, and to 27% in normozoospermic males with one or more previous IVF failures. The clinical consequences are the production of abnormal spermatozoa that will produce a higher number of chromosomally abnormal embryos. The indications for a meiotic study in testicular biopsy are provided.

  2. Indonesian infertility patients’ health seeking behaviour and patterns of access to biomedical infertility care: an interviewer administered survey conducted in three clinics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bennett Linda Rae

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Indonesia has high levels of biological need for infertility treatment, great sociological and psychological demand for children, and yet existing infertility services are underutilized. Access to adequate comprehensive reproductive health services, including infertility care, is a basic reproductive right regardless of the economic circumstances in which individuals are born into. Thus, identifying and implementing strategies to improve access to assisted reproductive technology (ART in Indonesia is imperative. The principle objectives of this article are to improve our understanding of infertility patients’ patterns of health seeking behaviour and their patterns of access to infertility treatment in Indonesia, in order to highlight the possibilities for improving access. Methods An interviewer-administered survey was conducted with 212 female infertility patients recruited through three Indonesian infertility clinics between July and September 2011. Participants were self-selected and data was subject to descriptive statistical analysis. Results Patients identified a number of barriers to access, including: low confidence in infertility treatment and high rates of switching between providers due to perceived treatment failure; the number and location of clinics; the lack of a well established referral system; the cost of treatment; and patients also experienced fear of receiving a diagnosis of sterility, of vaginal examinations and of embarrassment. Women’s age of marriage and the timing of their initial presentation to gynaecologists were not found to be barriers to timely access to infertility care. Conclusions The findings based on the responses of 212 female infertility patients indicated four key areas of opportunity for improving access to infertility care. Firstly, greater patient education about the nature and progression of infertility care was required among this group of women. Secondly, increased resources

  3. Indonesian infertility patients’ health seeking behaviour and patterns of access to biomedical infertility care: an interviewer administered survey conducted in three clinics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Indonesia has high levels of biological need for infertility treatment, great sociological and psychological demand for children, and yet existing infertility services are underutilized. Access to adequate comprehensive reproductive health services, including infertility care, is a basic reproductive right regardless of the economic circumstances in which individuals are born into. Thus, identifying and implementing strategies to improve access to assisted reproductive technology (ART) in Indonesia is imperative. The principle objectives of this article are to improve our understanding of infertility patients’ patterns of health seeking behaviour and their patterns of access to infertility treatment in Indonesia, in order to highlight the possibilities for improving access. Methods An interviewer-administered survey was conducted with 212 female infertility patients recruited through three Indonesian infertility clinics between July and September 2011. Participants were self-selected and data was subject to descriptive statistical analysis. Results Patients identified a number of barriers to access, including: low confidence in infertility treatment and high rates of switching between providers due to perceived treatment failure; the number and location of clinics; the lack of a well established referral system; the cost of treatment; and patients also experienced fear of receiving a diagnosis of sterility, of vaginal examinations and of embarrassment. Women’s age of marriage and the timing of their initial presentation to gynaecologists were not found to be barriers to timely access to infertility care. Conclusions The findings based on the responses of 212 female infertility patients indicated four key areas of opportunity for improving access to infertility care. Firstly, greater patient education about the nature and progression of infertility care was required among this group of women. Secondly, increased resources in terms of the number and

  4. Partial AZFc duplications not deletions are associated with male infertility in the Yi population of Yunnan Province, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun-jie YE; Li MA; Li-juan YANG; Jin-huan WANG; Yue-li WANG; Hai GUO; Ning GONG

    2013-01-01

    There are many reports on associations between spermatogenesis and partial azoospermia factor c (AZFc) deletions as well as duplications; however,results are conflicting,possibly due to differences in methodology and ethnic background.The purpose of this study is to investigate the association of AZFc polymorphisms and male infertility in the Yi ethnic population,residents within Yunnan Province,China.Methods:A total of 224 infertile patients and 153 fertile subjects were selected in the Yi ethnic population.The study was performed by sequence-tagged site plus/minus (STS+/-) analysis followed by gene dosage and gone copy definition analysis.Y haplotypes of 215 cases and 115 controls were defined by 12 binary markers using single nucleotide polymorphism on Y chromosome (Y-SNP) multiplex assays based on single base primer extension technology.Results:The distribution of Y haplotypes was not significantly different between the case and control groups.The frequencies of both gr/gr (7.6% vs.8.5%) and b2/b3 (6.3% vs.8.5%) deletions do not show significant differences.Similarly,single nucleotide variant (SNV) analysis shows no significant difference of gene copy definition between the cases and controls.However,the frequency of partial duplications in the infertile group (4.0%) is significantly higher than that in the control group (0.7%).Further,we found a case with sY1206 deletion which had two CDY1 copies but removed half of DAZ genes.Conclusions:Our results show that male infertility is associated with partial AZFc duplications,but neither gr/gr nor b2/b3 deletions,suggesting that partial AZFc duplications rather than deletions are risk factors for male infertility in Chinese-Yi population.

  5. Prognostic factors of long term disability due to mental disorders : a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cornelius, L.R.; van der Klink, J.J.; Groothoff, J.W.; Brouwer, S.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction In the past few decades, mental health problems have increasingly contributed to sickness absence and long-term disability. However, little is known about prognostic factors of return to work (RTW) and disability of persons already on sick leave due to mental health problems. Understand

  6. Prognostic factors of long term disability due to mental disorders : a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cornelius, L.R.; van der Klink, J.J.; Groothoff, J.W.; Brouwer, S.

    Introduction In the past few decades, mental health problems have increasingly contributed to sickness absence and long-term disability. However, little is known about prognostic factors of return to work (RTW) and disability of persons already on sick leave due to mental health problems.

  7. Exposure to physical risk factors in Dutch agriculture : Effect on sick leave due to musculoskeletal disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartman, E; Vrielink, HHEO; Metz, JHM; Huirne, RBM

    2005-01-01

    A case-control study examined the association between Dutch farmers' exposure to single physical risk factors or combinations of them and sick leave due to back disorders and neck, shoulder or upper extremity disorders. The sick leave claims of an insurance company in the years 1998-2001 for back (S

  8. Exposure to physical risk factors in Dutch agriculture: Effect on sick leave due to musculoskeletal disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartman, E.; Oude Vrielink, H.H.E.; Metz, J.H.M.; Huirne, R.B.M.

    2005-01-01

    A case-control study examined the association between Dutch farmers¿ exposure to single physical risk factors or combinations of them and sick leave due to back disorders and neck, shoulder or upper extremity disorders. The sick leave claims of an insurance company in the years 1998¿2001 for back (S

  9. Outcome and influencing factors analysis of palace laparoscopy in treatment of infertile patients with fallopian tube%宫腹腔镜诊治输卵管性不孕患者结局及影响因素分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭汝娇; 刘姜伶; 郑诗丹; 梁红梅; 余红秀; 方云

    2016-01-01

    Objective By exploring natural pregnancy rate and its related influencing factors of after the operation of palace laparoscopy to infertile patients with fallopian tube, to provide basis for doctors to accurately assess the opportunity of natural pregnancy after tubal infertility and to select the appropriate pregnancy program. Methods 93 cases of infertile patients with fallopian tube using palace laparoscopy operation with 2 year complete follow-up records were selected as the study objects. Natural pregnancy rate after operation was analyzed. They were divided into pregnancy group and non-pregnancy group according to natural pregnancy or not after operation. The main factors influencing the pregnancy rate after operation were aimed to find out. Results Among the 93 cases of patients, there were 36 cases of natural pregnancy within 2 years after palace laparoscopy operation, and the total natural pregnancy rate was 38.71%(36/93). The total natural pregnancy rate within 6 months was 30.11%(28/93).There were 6 cases of the total natural pregnancy rate within 7-12 months after operation.The cumulative natural pregnancy rate was 36.56%within 1 year after operation, which was close to total pregnancy rate.There were 2 cases of the total natural pregnancy rate within 13-24 months after operation.Pregnancy rate 1 year after operation was decreased significantly (P<0.05). In the relevant influencing factors, history of infertility, abortion, history of pelvic surgery and pelvic inflammatory disease, combined pelvic endometriosis, moderate and severe pelvic adhesion 7 factors were significant impacted on the postoperative pregnancy rate of the patients (P<0.05). Conclusion Infertility diagnosis should be treated as soon as possible, once it is established. After the operation, doctors should provide the optimal and individualized follow-up conception for the patients with the infertility, the related history and the operation condition. For the patients, whose fallopian

  10. The pattern and challenges of infertility management in Lagos, Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EB

    Male factors only was the cause in 11.1%, female factor only in 37.8%, both male and female ... Conclusion: Infertility is still a public health problem in Lagos, Nigeria. Key words: .... seminal fluid analysis and hormonal assay). The others.

  11. Association of polymorphism in cell death pathway gene FASLG with human male infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepika Jaiswal

    2015-06-01

    Conclusions: Human male infertility is a complex disorder and thus other genetic or environmental factors may be contributing to the complex etiology, and further study in other region of Indian populations will verify whether it is associated with male infertility risk.

  12. Infertility in Women: Hysterosalpingographic Assessment of the Fallopian Tubes in Lagos, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinola, R. A.; Akinola, O. I.; Fabamwo, A. O.

    2009-01-01

    Tubal disease constitutes a major factor in infertility especially in developing countries. This study was undertaken to assess the hysterosalpingographic patterns seen in infertile patients in an urban centre in Lagos. Two hundred and twenty patients who reported from the gynaecology clinic to the radiology department of Lagos State University…

  13. Infertility in Women: Hysterosalpingographic Assessment of the Fallopian Tubes in Lagos, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinola, R. A.; Akinola, O. I.; Fabamwo, A. O.

    2009-01-01

    Tubal disease constitutes a major factor in infertility especially in developing countries. This study was undertaken to assess the hysterosalpingographic patterns seen in infertile patients in an urban centre in Lagos. Two hundred and twenty patients who reported from the gynaecology clinic to the radiology department of Lagos State University…

  14. Clinical relevance of oxidative stress and sperm chromatin damage in male infertility: an evidence based analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcello Cocuzza

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress (OS in the reproductive tract is now a real entity and concern due to the potential harmful effects of high levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS on sperm number, motility, quality, and function including damage to sperm nuclear DNA. Evaluation of OS related damage to non-functional sperm is highly relevant as intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI technique, an effective therapy for severe male factor infertility, bypasses the majority of reproductive tract deficiencies. Despite the controversial findings in the existing literature, there is now enough evidence to show that sperm DNA damage is detrimental to reproductive outcomes. In addition, spermatozoa of infertile men are suggested to carry more DNA damage than do the spermatozoa from fertile men. Besides impairment of fertility such damage is likely to increase the transmission of genetic diseases during the assisted reproductive procedures. Standardization of protocols to assess reactive oxygen species and DNA damage is very important in introducing these tests in such clinical practice. Thus evaluation of seminal ROS levels and extent of sperm DNA damage especially in an infertile male may help develop new therapeutic strategies and improve success of assisted reproductive techniques (ART.

  15. Seroevidence of Chlamydia Trachomatis Antibody in Infertile Women in University of Benin Teaching Hospital (Ubth Benin City, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibadin, K. O.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of Chlamydia trachomatis in the pathogenesis of Pelvic inflammatory disease and majority of cases of salpinigitis are well acknowledged in women. A total of 213 sera from infertile women were tested for antibodies to Chlamydia trachomatis by using an indirect solid phases enzyme Immuno absorbent commercial ELISA test. Women with confirmed Hysterosalpinographic report suggesting tubal occlusion (tubal factor infertility had 92 (43.2% followed by 63 (29.6% infertile women with infertile male partner and 58 (27.2% were having unexplained infertility. Out of the tubal factor (TF infertile women 40 (18.8% were seropositive for Chlamydia trachomatis antibodies, as against 19 (8.9% in the group of women with normal patent tubes and 10 (4.6% women with infertile male partner. In this study there was a statistical significant correlation between the infertile women with tubal factor infertility in relation to seroevidence of Chlamydia trachomatis infection with p<0.05. There was no age bias in the serodetection of Chlamydia trachomatis antibodies. The seropositivity of Chlamydia trachomatis is an indication that the organism may be an independent risk factor in the development of an inflammatory process leading to scaring of the uterine tubes in women and thereby causing infertility.

  16. Infertility in Female Mice with a Gain-of-Function Mutation in the Luteinizing Hormone Receptor Is Due to Irregular Estrous Cyclicity, Anovulation, Hormonal Alterations, and Polycystic Ovaries1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hai, Lan; McGee, Stacey R.; Rabideau, Amanda C.; Paquet, Marilène; Narayan, Prema

    2015-01-01

    The luteinizing hormone receptor, LHCGR, is essential for fertility in males and females, and genetic mutations in the receptor have been identified that result in developmental and reproductive defects. We have previously generated and characterized a mouse model (KiLHRD582G) for familial male-limited precocious puberty caused by an activating mutation in the receptor. We demonstrated that the phenotype of the KiLHRD582G male mice is an accurate phenocopy of male patients with activating LHCGR mutations. In this study, we observed that unlike women with activating LHCGR mutations who are normal, female KiLHRD582G mice are infertile. Mice exhibit irregular estrous cyclicity, anovulation, and precocious puberty. A temporal study from 2–24 wk of age indicated elevated levels of progesterone, androstenedione, testosterone, and estradiol and upregulation of several steroidogenic enzyme genes. Ovaries of KiLHRD582G mice exhibited significant pathology with the development of large hemorrhagic cysts as early as 3 wk of age, extensive stromal cell hyperplasia and hypertrophy with luteinization, numerous atretic follicles, and granulosa cell tumors. Ovulation could not be rescued by the addition of exogenous gonadotropins. The body weights of the KiLHRD582G mice were higher than wild-type counterparts, but there was no increase in the body fat composition or metabolic abnormalities such as impaired glucose tolerance and insulin resistance. These studies demonstrate that activating LHCGR mutations do not produce the same phenotype in female mice as in humans and clearly illustrate species differences in the expression and regulation of LHCGR in the ovary, but not in the testis. PMID:26040673

  17. Evaluation of the melatonin and oxidative stress markers level in serum of fertile and infertile women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Soleimani Rad

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infertility is defined as the inability to achieve the pregnancy within a year of unprotected intercourse. Infertility is a complex issue and different factors such as stress oxidative can be involved in this problem. So, any attempt to neutralize oxidative stress would be helpful in the treatment of infertility. Melatonin is a known scavenger of free radicals. Objective: The aim of our study was to evaluate the level of melatonin and its correlation with oxidative biomarkers in fertile and infertile women. Materials and Methods: The participants including fertile and infertile women were divided into two groups of 30 people. Blood sampling was performed and sera were collected. The level of Malondialdehyde (MDA, total antioxidant capacity (TAC and melatonin were detected. Data were analyzed using T-test and their correlation was assessed using Spearman test. Results: Serum melatonin from fertile women was higher than infertile women but the difference was not significant (p= 0.46. MDA level in fertile women was significantly lower than infertile women (p<0.001 and the level of TAC in fertile women was significantly higher than infertile women (p<0.001. Spearman test revealed a significant and direct correlation between melatonin and TAC in fertile and infertile women and a significant but reverse correlation between melatonin and MDA in infertile and fertile women. Conclusion: Differences in the level of oxidative stress biomarkers in fertile and infertile individuals have been reported. This study revealed a significant correlation between melatonin and oxidative stress biomarkers, concluding that melatonin level could be involved in infertility.

  18. Genetic susceptibility to male infertility: news from genome-wide association studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aston, K I

    2014-05-01

    A thorough understanding of the genetic basis of male infertility has eluded researchers in spite of significant efforts to identify novel genetic causes of the disease, particularly over the past decade. Approximately half of male factor infertility cases have no known cause; however, it is likely that the majority of idiopathic male factor infertility cases have some unidentified genetic basis. Well-established genetic causes of male infertility are limited to Y chromosome microdeletions and Klinefelter's syndrome, together accounting for 10-20% of cases of severe spermatogenic failure. In addition to these, several genetic polymorphisms have been demonstrated to be significantly associated with male infertility. The discovery of new genetic associations with male infertility has been hampered by two primary factors. First, most studies are underpowered because of insufficient sample size and ethnic and phenotypic heterogeneity. Second, most studies evaluate a single gene, an approach that is very inefficient in the context of male infertility, considering that many hundreds of genes are involved in the process of testicular development and spermatogenesis. Significant recent advances in microarray and next-generation sequencing technologies have enabled the application of whole-genome approaches to the study of male infertility. We recently performed a pilot genome-wide association study (GWAS) for severe spermatogenic failure, and several additional male infertility GWAS have since been published. More recently, genomic microarray tools have been applied to the association of copy number variants with male infertility. These studies are beginning to shed additional light on the genetic architecture of male infertility, and whole-genome studies have proven effective in identifying novel genetic causes of the disease. This review will discuss some of the recent findings of these whole-genome studies as well as future directions for this research that will likely

  19. Adjusting for unmeasured confounding due to either of two crossed factors with a logistic regression model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Brumback, Babette A; Weppelmann, Thomas A; Morris, J Glenn; Ali, Afsar

    2016-08-15

    Motivated by an investigation of the effect of surface water temperature on the presence of Vibrio cholerae in water samples collected from different fixed surface water monitoring sites in Haiti in different months, we investigated methods to adjust for unmeasured confounding due to either of the two crossed factors site and month. In the process, we extended previous methods that adjust for unmeasured confounding due to one nesting factor (such as site, which nests the water samples from different months) to the case of two crossed factors. First, we developed a conditional pseudolikelihood estimator that eliminates fixed effects for the levels of each of the crossed factors from the estimating equation. Using the theory of U-Statistics for independent but non-identically distributed vectors, we show that our estimator is consistent and asymptotically normal, but that its variance depends on the nuisance parameters and thus cannot be easily estimated. Consequently, we apply our estimator in conjunction with a permutation test, and we investigate use of the pigeonhole bootstrap and the jackknife for constructing confidence intervals. We also incorporate our estimator into a diagnostic test for a logistic mixed model with crossed random effects and no unmeasured confounding. For comparison, we investigate between-within models extended to two crossed factors. These generalized linear mixed models include covariate means for each level of each factor in order to adjust for the unmeasured confounding. We conduct simulation studies, and we apply the methods to the Haitian data. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. The prevalence of Y chromosome microdeletions in Pakistani infertile men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubina Tabassum Siddiqui

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Microdeletions of the azoospermia factor locus of the long arm of Y chromosome are an etiological factor of severe oligozoospermia or azoospermia. Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of Y-chromosome microdeletions in AZF region and their role in infertility in Pakistani population. Materials and Methods: The type of deletions in AZF locus were detected in infertile men (n=113 and the association of Y chromosome microdeletions with male infertility was assessed by including men (50 with normal karyotype and having children. Y chromosome microdeletions were detected by multiplex PCR using 10 sequence tagged sites namely sY81, sY130, sY141, sY142, sY155, sY157, sY160, sY182, sY231, and sY202 that covered all three regions of AZF. Results: Individuals with severe oligozoospermia showed 2.86% deletion frequency in AZFc region as compared to azoospermic males (5.5%. Conclusion: The results of our study showed that deletions in Y chromosome are not playing major part in male infertility. Moreover, multiplex-PCR strategy might preferably be employed for the detection of Y chromosome microdeletions allied to male infertility.

  1. Anatomical causes of female infertility and their management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrao, Mauricio S; Muzii, Ludovico; Marana, Riccardo

    2013-12-01

    The main female anatomical causes of infertility include post-infectious tubal damage, endometriosis, and congenital/acquired uterine anomalies. Congenital (septate uterus) and acquired (myomas and synechiae) diseases of the uterus may lead to infertility, pregnancy loss, and other obstetric complications. Pelvic inflammatory disease represents the most common cause of tubal damage. Surgery still remains an important option for tubal factor infertility, with results in terms of reproductive outcome that compare favorably with those of in vitro fertilization. Endometriosis is a common gynecologic condition affecting women of reproductive age, which can cause pain and infertility. The cause of infertility associated with endometriosis remains elusive, suggesting a multifactorial mechanism involving immunologic, genetic, and environmental factors. Despite the high prevalence of endometriosis, the exact mechanisms of its pathogenesis are unknown. Specific combinations of medical, surgical, and psychological treatments can ameliorate the quality of life of women with endometriosis. In the majority of cases, surgical treatment of endometriosis has promoted significant increases in fertilization rates. There are obvious associations between endometriosis and the immune system, and future strategies to treat endometriosis might be based on immunologic concepts.

  2. [L-arginine and male infertility].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scibona, M; Meschini, P; Capparelli, S; Pecori, C; Rossi, P; Menchini Fabris, G F

    1994-12-01

    The clinical efficacy and acceptance of L-arginina HCL was tested in 40 infertile men. All of these men had a normal number of spermatozoa (> 20 million/ml), but a decreased motility; this decreased motility was not due to infection or to immunological disorders. The treatment consisted of 80 ml of 10% L-arginine HCL administered daily per os for 6 months. L-arginine HCL showed to be able to improve the motility of spermatozoa without any side-effects.

  3. Epigenetic: A new approach to etiology of infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia W. Lestari

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Infertility is a complex disease which could be caused by male and female factors. The etiology from both factors needs further study. There are some approaches to understanding the etiology of infertility, one of them is epigenetic. Epigenetic modifications consist of DNA methylation, histone modifications, and chromatin remodelling. Male and female germinal cells undergo epigenetic modifications dynamically during differentiation into matured sperm and oocyte cells. In a male, the alteration of DNA methylation in spermatogenesis will cause oligo/asthenozoospermia. In addition, the histone methylation, acetylation, or other histone modification may lead sperm lose its ability to fertilize oocyte. Similarly, in a female, the alteration of DNA methylation and histone modification affects oogenesis, created aneuploidy in fertilized oocytes and resulted in embryonic death in the uterus. Alteration of these epigenetic modification patterns will cause infertility, both in male and female.

  4. Quality and quantity of infertility care in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatima, P; Ishrat, S; Rahman, D; Banu, J; Deeba, F; Begum, N; Anwary, S A; Hossain, H B

    2015-01-01

    Infertility is an important health issue which has been neglected in the developing countries. First test-tube babies (triplet) in Bangladesh were born on 30th May, 2001. Although there is no tertiary level infertility center in the public sector, several private centers have come up with the facilities. The objective of the study was to find i) the quality and quantity of infertility care in Bangladesh and ii) the cause of infertility in the attending patients iii) the treatment seeking behaviors iv) and the reasons for not taking treatment among the attending patients. There are now 10 tertiary level Infertility centers in Bangladesh. The information was collected in a preformed datasheet about the facilities and the profile of the patients and the treatment seeking behavior of the attending patients. Out of the ten centers two centers refused to respond and did not disclose their data. Around 16700 new patients are enrolled in a year in the responsive clinics. Five percent (5%) of the patients underwent ART, 7% of the patients gave only one visit, 84% of the patients completed their evaluation, 76% of the patients took treatment. Causes of infertility in the patients taking treatment were male factor in 36.4%, bilateral tubal block in 20.2%, PCOS and anovulation in 31.7%, endometriosis in 19.6%, unexplained in 10.95, combined in 3.5%, ovarian failure in 1.4%, testicular failure in 0.33%, congenital anomaly in 0.3%. The main reason for not taking treatment was financial constrainment. The quality and quantity of infertility care is dependent on the available resources and on the use of the resources by the patients. In developing countries the resources are merging and confined to specified areas which cannot meet the demand of their population. The study gives us the idea of the need and the demand of the services in the country.

  5. Causes of male infertility: a 9-year prospective monocentre study on 1737 patients with reduced total sperm counts

    OpenAIRE

    Punab, M.; Poolamets, O; Paju, P.; Vihljajev, V.; Pomm, K.; Ladva, R.; Korrovits, P.; Laan, M

    2016-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION What are the primary causes of severe male factor infertility? SUMMARY ANSWER Although 40% of all patients showed primary causes of infertility, which could be subdivided into three groups based on the severity of their effect, ~75% of oligozoospermia cases remained idiopathic. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY There are few large-scale epidemiological studies analyzing the causes of male factor infertility. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION A prospective clinical-epidemiological study was cond...

  6. Chromosomal aberrations, Yq microdeletion, and sperm DNA fragmentation in infertile men opting for assisted reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamsi, Monis B; Kumar, Rajeev; Malhotra, Neena; Singh, Nita; Mittal, Suneeta; Upadhyay, Ashish D; Dada, Rima

    2012-09-01

    Male infertility is a multi-factorial disorder, and identification of its etiology in an individual is critical for treatment. Systematically elucidating the underlying genetic causes (chromosomal and Yq microdeletion) and factors, such as reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and total antioxidant capacity (TAC), which contribute to sperm DNA damage, may help to reduce the number of men with idiopathic infertility and provide them with the most suitable therapeutics and counseling. This study was done to comprehensively investigate genetic and oxidative stress factors that might be the etiology of a large percentage of men with idiopathic infertility. One hundred twelve infertile men and 76 fertile controls were screened for chromosomal aberrations and Yq microdeletions. ROS, TAC, and sperm DNA damage were assessed in cytogenetically normal, non-azoospermic men with intact Y chromosome (n = 93). ROS was assessed in neat and washed semen by chemiluminescence; seminal TAC with a commercially available kit; and sperm DNA damage by the comet assay. Two men had cytogenetic abnormalities and seven men harbored Yq microdeletions. ROS levels in neat and washed semen of infertile men were significantly higher (P fragmentation in infertile men was significantly higher (P < 0.01) than controls. Genetic factors and oxidative stress cumulatively account for large number of idiopathic infertile cases. Unlike, genetic causes, which cannot be cured, timely identification and management of oxidative stress may help to reverse/reduce the effects on induced DNA damage, and improve the outcomes for infertile males.

  7. Risk of major congenital malformations associated with infertility and its treatment by extent of iatrogenic intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhi, Jacob; Fisch, Benjamin

    2007-06-01

    Cumulative evidence from large cohort studies, multicenter studies, and meta-analyses suggests that assisted reproductive technologies are associated with an elevated risk of congenital malformations. Theoretically, there are several putative factors in infertility treatments which may be related to the development of congenital malformations. These include, in part, the exposure to gonadotrophin stimulation and the exposure to supra-physiological levels of E2; the altered physiological environment of implantation; the in-vitro culture conditions at early stages of embryonic development; the artificial selection of sperm for fertilization and the sperm injection process in ICSI and the process of embryo cryopreservation. However, it is also possible that the culprit is not the infertility treatment that leads to the increased risk of congenital malformations but a factor or factors inherent to infertile patients. The aim of this review is to present the current data, summarize it and define the association between major congenital malformation and different types of infertility treatments as well as to infertility per se. We conducted an extensive search of the medical literature (Pubmed, 1985-2006) to identify all data relating major congenital malformations to infertile couples, infertility treatments or to characteristics of the infertile population. The rates of congenital malformations associated with infertility were analyzed by the degree of iatrogenic intervention to better define the relative risks. The findings confirmed the increased risk of congenital malformations in relation to in vitro fertilization even in singleton infants. There was no difference in the occurrence of major congenital malformations by either the laboratory maneuvers of sperm or embryos of varying complexity or by the specific medications used for ovarian stimulation or luteal support. Increased risk for congenital malformations was also found in infertile couples in relation to

  8. [Infertility over forty: Pros and cons of IVF].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belaisch-Allart, J; Maget, V; Mayenga, J-M; Grefenstette, I; Chouraqui, A; Belaid, Y; Kulski, O

    2015-09-01

    The population attempting pregnancy and having babies is ageing. The declining fertility potential and the late age of motherhood are increasing significantly the number of patients over forty consulting infertility specialists. Assisted reproductive technologies (ART) cannot compensate the natural decline in fertility with age. In France, in public hospital, ART is free of charge for women until 43 years, over 43, social insurance does not reimburse ART. Hence, 43 years is the usual limit, but between 40 and 42 is ART useful? The answer varies according to physicians, couples or society. On medical level, the etiology of the infertility must be taken into account. If there is an explanation to infertility (male or tubal infertility) ART is better than abstention. If the infertility is only due to age the question is raised. In France, the reimbursement by the society of a technique with very low results is discussed. However efficacy is not absolutely compulsory in Medicine. On the opposite to give false hopes may be discussed too. To obtain a reasonable consensus is rather difficult.

  9. 多囊卵巢综合征导致不孕的危险因素及治疗方案探讨%Exploring the risk factors causing infertility in women with polycystic ovary syndrome and its treatment programs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张建伟; 何泓

    2014-01-01

    目的:探讨多囊卵巢综合征(PCOS)导致不孕的危险因素,并评估不同的药物治疗方案的疗效。方法以152例PCOS患者为病例组,以正常分娩的152例孕产妇为对照组,回顾分析两组的基本特征、相关疾病家族史等指标与PCOS不孕的关联性及关联强度。采用单纯促排卵剂(单纯用药组,76例)和排卵剂联合炔雌醇环丙孕酮、二甲双胍(联合用药组,76例)对152例PCOS患者进行治疗,并评价两组的治疗效果。结果经单因素Logistic回归分析,BMI、肥胖、多毛、痤疮、糖尿病家族史、秃顶家族史、月经紊乱家族史是PCOS导致不孕的危险因素(P<0.05),危险度分别上升1.486倍、4.317倍、28.505倍、12.963倍、3.492倍、4.970倍、15.202倍;多因素Logistic回归分析,肥胖、有糖尿病家族史、有月经紊乱家族史是发生PCOS导致不孕的独立危险因素(P<0.05);经4个月经周期的治疗后,联合用药组的流产率(10.53%)明显低于单纯用药组(25.00%),联合用药组妊娠率(46.05%)明显高于单纯用药组(15.79%,P<0.05)。结论肥胖、有糖尿病家族史、有月经紊乱家族史,是PCOS导致不孕的独立危险因素;治疗时,患者在服用促排卵剂前,最好先服用二甲双胍、炔雌醇环丙孕酮治疗,以提高自然受孕率。%Objective To explore the risk factors causing infertility in women with polycystic ovary syn-drome (PCOS) and its treatment programs. Methods A retrospective study was carried out with 152 PCOS patients and 152 normal puerperal women. The risk factors associated with infertility in PCOS were analyzed. The PCOS pa-tients were divided into twp groups of 76 cases, stimulate ovulation agent only group and combined medication group (a combination of stimulate ovulation agent, ethinyl estradio-cyproterone and metformin). Results By univariate lo-gistic regression analysis, it was turned out that BMI, obesity, hirsutism, acne

  10. Treatments for Diseases That Cause Infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... its symptoms is available from the NICHD PCOS topic page . Treatments for infertility in women with PCOS include ... this topic can be found on the NICHD topic page on endometriosis . Treatments for the infertility that can ...

  11. Subclinical Pelvic Inflammatory Disease and Infertility

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wiesenfeld, Harold C; Hillier, Sharon L; Meyn, Leslie A; Amortegui, Antonio J; Sweet, Richard L

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE:The reported incidence of acute pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) has decreased but rates of tubal infertility have not, suggesting that a large proportion of PID leading to infertility may be undetected...

  12. Risk factors and outcome of community-acquired pneumonia due to Gram-negative bacilli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falguera, Miquel; Carratalà, Jordi; Ruiz-Gonzalez, Agustín; Garcia-Vidal, Carolina; Gazquez, Isabel; Dorca, Jordi; Gudiol, Francesc; Porcel, José M

    2009-01-01

    Several sets of guidelines have advocated initial antibiotic treatment for community-acquired pneumonia due to Gram-negative bacilli in patients with specific risk factors. However, evidence to support this recommendation is scarce. We sought to identify risk factors for community-acquired pneumonia due to Gram-negative bacilli, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and to assess outcomes. An observational analysis was carried out on prospectively collected data for immunocompetent adults hospitalized for community-acquired pneumonia in two acute-care hospitals. Cases of pneumonia due to Gram-negative bacilli were compared with those of non-Gram-negative bacilli causes. Sixty-one (2%) of 3272 episodes of community-acquired pneumonia were due to Gram-negative bacilli. COPD (odds ratio (OR) 2.4, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.2-5.1), current use of corticosteroids (OR 2.8, 95% CI: 1.2-6.3), prior antibiotic therapy (OR 2.6, 95% CI: 1.4-4.8), tachypnoea >or=30 cycles/min (OR 2.1, 95% CI: 1.1-4.2) and septic shock at presentation (OR 6.1, 95% CI: 2.5-14.6) were independently associated with Gram-negative bacilli pneumonia. Initial antibiotic therapy in patients with pneumonia due to Gram-negative bacilli was often inappropriate. These patients were also more likely to require admission to the intensive care unit, had longer hospital stays, and higher early (Gram-negative bacilli is uncommon, but is associated with a poor outcome. The risk factors identified in this study should be considered when selecting initial antibiotic therapy for patients with community-acquired pneumonia.

  13. Risk factors and outcomes for patients with bloodstream infection due to Acinetobacter baumannii-calcoaceticus complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopra, Teena; Marchaim, Dror; Johnson, Paul C; Awali, Reda A; Doshi, Hardik; Chalana, Indu; Davis, Naomi; Zhao, Jing J; Pogue, Jason M; Parmar, Sapna; Kaye, Keith S

    2014-08-01

    Identifying patients at risk for bloodstream infection (BSI) due to Acinetobacter baumannii-Acinetobacter calcoaceticus complex (ABC) and providing early appropriate therapy are critical for improving patient outcomes. A retrospective matched case-control study was conducted to investigate the risk factors for BSI due to ABC in patients admitted to the Detroit Medical Center (DMC) between January 2006 and April 2009. The cases were patients with BSI due to ABC; the controls were patients not infected with ABC. Potential risk factors were collected 30 days prior to the ABC-positive culture date for the cases and 30 days prior to admission for the controls. A total of 245 case patients were matched with 245 control patients. Independent risk factors associated with BSI due to ABC included a Charlson's comorbidity score of ≥ 3 (odds ratio [OR], 2.34; P = 0.001), a direct admission from another health care facility (OR, 4.63; P < 0.0001), a prior hospitalization (OR, 3.11; P < 0.0001), the presence of an indwelling central venous line (OR, 2.75; P = 0.011), the receipt of total parenteral nutrition (OR, 21.2; P < 0.0001), the prior receipt of β-lactams (OR, 3.58; P < 0.0001), the prior receipt of carbapenems (OR, 3.18; P = 0.006), and the prior receipt of chemotherapy (OR, 15.42; P < 0.0001). The median time from the ABC-positive culture date to the initiation of the appropriate antimicrobial therapy was 2 days (interquartile range [IQR], 1 to 3 days). The in-hospital mortality rate was significantly higher among case patients than among control patients (OR, 3.40; P < 0.0001). BSIs due to ABC are more common among critically ill and debilitated institutionalized patients, who are heavily exposed to health care settings and invasive devices.

  14. Immune Aspects of Female Infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Brazdova

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Immune infertility, in terms of reproductive failure, has become a serious health issue involving approximately 1 out of 5 couples at reproductive age. Semen that is defined as a complex fluid containing sperm, cellular vesicles and other cells and components, could sensitize the female genital tract. The immune rejection of male semen in the female reproductive tract is explained as the failure of natural tolerance leading to local and/or systemic immune response. Present active immune mechanism may induce high levels of anti-seminal/sperm antibodies. It has already been proven that iso-immunization is associated with infertility. Comprehensive studies with regards to the identification of antibody-targets and the determination of specific antibody class contribute to the development of effective immuno-therapy and, on the other hand, potential immuno-contraception, and then of course to complex patient diagnosis. This review summarizes the aspects of female immune infertility.

  15. A Review: Role of oxidative stress in male infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed Fanaei

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have shown that reactive oxygen species (ROS have a very important role in the intracellular signaling process in physiological conditions. On the other hand, during the recent decade it has been indicated that ROS play a role in various types of male infertility and it is due to the overproduction of ROS or decrease in the antioxidant defense system in the reproductive system and sperm. In pathological conditions, ROS via interferences in the spermatogenesis process, sperm function, and sperm structure (motility, viability, acrosome reaction, sperm-oocyte fusion, and damage to DNA and cell membrane as well as reduction in fertilization and implantation can lead to infertility. Knowledge of how ROS affect the physiological process of the reproductive system is crucial in the treatment of infertility. Thus, in this review article we will discuss experimental and clinical findings related to the effects of ROS on male fertility.

  16. Genotyping of Israeli infertile men with idiopathic oligozoospermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madgar, I; Green, L; Kent-First, M; Weissenberg, R; Gershoni-Baruch, R; Goldman, B; Friedman, E

    2002-09-01

    Microdeletions of the long arm of the Y chromosome involving the azoospermia factor (AZF) region are associated with severe oligo- or azoospermia. Abnormal androgen receptor (AR) structure or function has also been implicated in male infertility. To assess the contribution of these genetic defects to male infertility, 61 Israeli men with severe oligo- (n = 15) or azoospermia (n = 46), were screened for Y chromosome microdeletions, and the AR-(CAG)n repeat length. Fifty fertile Israeli men were similarly analyzed. PCR amplification of 20-54 simple tag sequences (STSs) located at Yq was used to determine the rate and extent of Y chromosome microdeletions. PCR with primers flanking the AR-(CAG)n region and subsequent size fractionation on gradient acrylamide gels were used to determine AR-(CAG)n length. Five azoospermic individuals (5/61-8.2% and 5/46-10.8% of azoospermic patients) displayed Y chromosome microdeletions. The mean CAG repeat number in infertile men was 18.6 +/- 3.0 compared with 16.6 + 2.7 in fertile men (n = 50), a statistically significant difference (p = 0.003). Y chromosome microdeletions contribute to male infertility in our azoospermic population, and the mean length of the AR-CAG is significantly longer in our infertile population than in fertile men.

  17. Chlamydia trachomatis urogenital infection in women with infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkowska-Trojniel, M; Zdrodowska-Stefanow, B; Ostaszewska-Puchalska, I; Zbucka, M; Wołczyński, S; Grygoruk, C; Kuczyński, W; Zdrodowski, M

    2009-01-01

    The study objective was to evaluate the prevalence of urogenital Chlamydia trachomatis (C.tr.) infection in women with diagnosed infertility. The study involved patients from the Department of Gynecological Endocrinology and from the Center for Reproductive Medicine "Kriobank" in Bialystok. Female patients (n=71), aged 23-41, were divided into two groups according to the main diagnosis: A--tubal infertility (23) and B--infertility of another origin (48). For direct testing, PCR method was used to detect C.tr. infection in cervical samples (Roche, Molecular Systems, N.J., USA). Specific IgA and IgG anti-chlamydial antibodies in the serum were determined by immunoenzymatic assay (medac, Hamburg, Germany). Diagnostic procedures were performed at the Centre for STD Research and Diagnostics in Bialystok. In group A, C.tr. infection was detected in: 8.7% patients, in group B--8.3%. Specific anti-C.tr. antibodies IgA were detected in: 13.0% in group A and 6.3% in group B, IgG respectively in 39.1% and in 10.4%. 1. C.tr. infection is very important etiological factor of female infertility. 2. The detection of specific antichlamydial antibodies is a valuable, noninvasive diagnostic procedure. 3. Infertile women should be routinely tested for C.tr. infection.

  18. The role of Tadalafil in treatment of infertility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Giorgio Cavallini; Giulio Biagiotti

    2012-01-01

    Objective: It was the aim of this research to assess whether Tadalafil 5 mg once daily can improves the sperm count of unexplained infertile males with erectile deficiency induced by the emotional stress of attempting to father children. Methods: Two groups, each made up of 30 unexplained infertile males with psychogenic erectile deficiency related to attempts to father children received Tadalafil 5 mg once daily (Group 1) or a placebo (Group 2) for one month. Unexplained infertile men are intended as normospermic men who could not father children over a one year period and whose female partner is free of factors causing infertility. The endpoints were:differences between the groups in restoring erectile response, modifying sperm count, side effects and modifications of sperm analyses with respect to resolution or not of the erectile deficiency irrespective of the substance (Tadalafil or placebo) used. The means were compared using analysis of variance and the percentages using the chi square test. Results:The patients who received Tadalafil had their sperm volume, concentration and motility increased, but not the percentage of typical forms. Patients who received a placebo had no significant improvement. Additional analyses indicated that sperm volume, concentration and motility (but not morphology) significantly increased only in the patients who restored erectile response to sexual stimulation, independently of Tadalafil or placebo administration. No significant side effects were present. Conclusions: It is thought that therapies aimed at removing emotional stress linked to the performance anxiety of fathering children might improve sperm count in unexplained infertile couples.

  19. Empirical medical therapy in idiopathic male infertility: Promise or panacea?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jae Hung; Seo, Ju Tae

    2014-09-01

    Male factors account for 20%-50% of cases of infertility and in 25% of cases, the etiology of male infertility is unknown. Effective treatments are well-established for hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, male accessory gland infection, retrograde ejaculation, and positive antisperm antibody. However, the appropriate treatment for idiopathic male infertility is unclear. Empirical medical treatment (EMT) has been used in men with idiopathic infertility and can be divided into two categories based on the mode of action: hormonal treatment and antioxidant supplementation. Hormonal medications consist of gonadotropins, androgens, estrogen receptor blockers, and aromatase inhibitors. Antioxidants such as vitamins, zinc, and carnitines have also been widely used to reduce oxidative stress-induced spermatozoa damage. Although scientifically acceptable evidence of EMT is limited because of the lack of large, randomized, controlled studies, recent systematic reviews with meta-analyses have shown that the administration of gonadotropins, anti-estrogens, and oral antioxidants results in a significant increase in the live birth rate compared with control treatments. Therefore, all physicians who treat infertility should bear in mind that EMT can improve semen parameters and subsequent fertility potential through natural intercourse.

  20. A CLINICO-EPIDEMIOLOGICAL STUDY OF INFERTILE COUPLES AMONG THE SUBURBAN/RURAL POPULATION OF BOKAKHAT, ASSAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranabika

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Infertility is a disease of the reproductive system defined by the failure to achieve a clinical pregnancy after 12 months or more of regular unprotected sexual intercourse (WHO-ICMART. Infertility is the inability of a sexually active, non-contraception couple to achieve pregnancy in one year. Infertility affects relatively large number of couples, both globally as well as in India. There are sparse data on the prevalence of infertility in India. This study describes the correlates and prevalence of infertility among couples in Bokakhat, Assam, India. MATERIALS AND METHODS This study is a cross-sectional study done in the suburban/rural field practice area of Bokakhat Subdivisional Civil Hospital, during August 2008 to July 2009. Couples having infertility were identified using WHO definition by house to house survey and interviewed to know various epidemiological correlates including demographic characteristics, aetiology and treatment if taken for the same. RESULTS There were total of 1755 eligible couples and 167 were found to be having primary or secondary infertility. The study showed that among eligible couple’s prevalence of primary infertility was 6.4%, while secondary infertility was 3.01%. Among couples with primary infertility, male factors were responsible in 18 (15.78%, female factors in 32 (28.07%, both partners were accountable in 27 (23.68%, while 37 (32.45% couple’s cause of infertility was unexplained. CONCLUSION It was concluded that this study has provided significant information concerning the prevalence of infertility in our area and also provided information about different demographical and aetiological factors associated with infertility.

  1. Prognostic factors for disability claim duration due to musculoskeletal symptoms among self-employed persons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richter JM

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Employees and self-employed persons have, among others, different personal characteristics and different working conditions, which may influence the prognosis of sick leave and the duration of a disability claim. The purpose of the current study is to identify prognostic factors for the duration of a disability claim due to non-specific musculoskeletal disorders (MSD among self-employed persons in the Netherlands. Methods The study population consisted of 276 self-employed persons, who all had a disability claim episode due to MSD with at least 75% work disability. The study was a cohort study with a follow-up period of 12 months. At baseline, participants filled in a questionnaire with possible individual, work-related and disease-related prognostic factors. Results The following prognostic factors significantly increased claim duration: age > 40 years (Hazard Ratio 0.54, no similar symptoms in the past (HR 0.46, having long-lasting symptoms of more than six months (HR 0.60, self-predicted return to work within more than one month or never (HR 0.24 and job dissatisfaction (HR 0.54. Conclusions The prognostic factors we found indicate that for self-employed persons, the duration of a disability claim not only depends on the (history of impairment of the insured, but also on age, self-predicted return to work and job satisfaction.

  2. Infertility and Life Satisfaction among Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuillan, Julia; Stone, Rosalie A. Torres; Greil, Arthur L.

    2007-01-01

    Using data from a random sample of 580 midwestern women, the authors explore the association between lifetime infertility and life satisfaction. Past research shows lower life satisfaction among those seeking help for infertility. The authors find no direct effects of lifetime infertility, regardless of perception of a problem, on life…

  3. Causes of infertility in men with Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanidis, K; Belitsos, P; Fotinos, A; Makris, N; Loutradis, D; Antsaklis, A

    2011-10-01

    Men with Down syndrome are considered as infertile although the causes of infertility are not known in detail yet. Although this constitutes a general rule there are three confirmed cases of parenting by fathers with Down syndrome. Many investigators have addressed the causes of infertility and their studies indicate that the causes may be hormonal deficits, morphological alterations of the gonads, abnormal spermatogenesis, psychological and social factors related to the mental retardation. It is obvious that the extra chromosome 21 has a detrimental direct and indirect effect on the reproductive capacity of the affected male patient. But the definite cause of the insufficient and inadequate spermatogenesis remains to be discovered. © 2011 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  4. Prognostic factors of long term disability due to mental disorders: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelius, L R; van der Klink, J J L; Groothoff, J W; Brouwer, S

    2011-06-01

    INTRODUCTION In the past few decades, mental health problems have increasingly contributed to sickness absence and long-term disability. However, little is known about prognostic factors of return to work (RTW) and disability of persons already on sick leave due to mental health problems. Understanding these factors may help to develop effective prevention and intervention strategies to shorten the duration of disability and facilitate RTW. METHOD We reviewed systematically current scientific evidence about prognostic factors for mental health related long term disability, RTW and symptom recovery. Searching PubMed, PsycINFO, Embase, Cinahl and Business Source Premier, we selected articles with a publication date from January 1990 to March 2009, describing longitudinal cohort studies with a follow-up period of at least 1 year. Participants were persons on sick leave or receiving disability benefit at baseline. We assessed the methodological quality of included studies using an established criteria list. Consistent findings in at least two high quality studies were defined as strong evidence and positive findings in one high quality study were defined as limited evidence. RESULTS Out of 796 studies, we included seven articles, all of high methodological quality describing a range of prognostic factors, according to the ICF-model categorized as health-related, personal and external factors. We found strong evidence that older age (>50 years) is associated with continuing disability and longer time to RTW. There is limited evidence for the association of other personal factors (gender, education, history of previous sickness absence, negative recovery expectation, socio-economic status), health related (stress-related and shoulder/back pain, depression/anxiety disorder) and external i.e., job-related factors (unemployment, quality and continuity of occupational care, supervisor behavior) with disability and RTW. We found limited evidence for the association of

  5. AZF deletions in infertile men from the Republic of Macedonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaseski, Toso; Novevski, Predrag; Kocevska, Borka; Dimitrovski, Cedomir; Efremov, Georgi D; Plaseska-Karanfilska, Dijana

    2006-07-01

    Y chromosome deletions in the three azoospermia factor (AZF) regions constitute the most common genetic cause of spermatogenic failure. The aim of this study was to estimate the length and boundaries of the AZF deletions and to correlate the AZF deletions with the sperm concentrations, testicular histology, Y haplogroups and the ethnic origin of the men with deletions. PCR analysis of STS loci in the three AZF regions was used to characterize the deletions. Y haplogroup was predicted from a set of 17 Y short tandem repeats (STR) marker values. A total of nine men out of 218 infertile/subfertile men showed the presence of Y microdeletions. In eight patients the results were consistent with the presence of AZFc deletions, while in one patient a larger deletion involving both AZFb and AZFc regions was detected. In two patients, the deletion, initially diagnosed as AZFc, involved part of the distal part of the AZFb region and in one of them the deletion also extended into the region distal to the AZFc. The 3.5 Mb AZFc deletion, due to homologous recombination between b2 and b4 amplicons, was detected in six men (66.7% of all Y deletions), thus being the most common type of AZF deletion among infertile men from the Republic of Macedonia. Patients with the 3.5 Mb AZFc deletion had azoospermia or severe oligozoospermia and variable histological results [Sertoly cell only syndrome (SCOS), maturity arrest (MA) and hypospermatogenesis (HSG)]. They were of different ethnic origin (Macedonian, Albanian and Romany) and belonged to different Y haplogroups (I1b, J2, E3b and G).

  6. MicroRNA and Male Infertility: A Potential for Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yahya Khazaie

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are small non-coding single stranded RNA molecules that are physiologically produced in eukaryotic cells to regulate or mostly down-regulate genes by pairing with their complementary base-sequence in related mRNA molecules in the cytoplasm. It has been reported that other than its function in many physiological cell processes, dysregulation of miRNAs plays a role in the development of many diseases. In this short review, the association between miRNAs and some male reproductive disorders is surveyed. Male factor Infertility is a devastating problem from which a notable percentage of couples suffer. However, the molecular mechanism of many infertility disorders has not been clearly elucidated. Since miRNAs have an important role in numerous biological cell processes and cellular dysfunctions, it is of interest to review the related literature on the role of miRNAs in the male reproductive organs. Aberrant expression of specific miRNAs is associated with certain male reproductive dysfunctions. For this reason, assessment of expression of such miRNAs may serve as a suitable molecular biomarker for diagnosis of those male infertility disorders. The presence of a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP at the miRNAs’ binding site in its targeted mRNA has been reported to have an association with idiopathic male infertility. Also, a relation with male infertility has been shown with SNP in the genes of the factors necessary for miRNA biogenesis. Therefore, focusing on the role of miRNAs in male reproductive disorders can further elucidate the molecular mechanisms of male infertility and generate the potential for locating efficient biomarkers and therapeutic agents for these disorders.

  7. Incorporating Ideological Context in Counseling Couples Experiencing Infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnett, Judith A.; Panchal, Krishna

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the influence of ideological values on couples' experience of infertility. Contextual issues are considered in terms of how they influence medical decision making as well as emotional factors. Strength-based counseling interventions that attend to couples' diverse values are described. Last, implications for counselors,…

  8. Incorporating Ideological Context in Counseling Couples Experiencing Infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnett, Judith A.; Panchal, Krishna

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the influence of ideological values on couples' experience of infertility. Contextual issues are considered in terms of how they influence medical decision making as well as emotional factors. Strength-based counseling interventions that attend to couples' diverse values are described. Last, implications for counselors,…

  9. Causes of infertility in view of Iranian traditional medicine: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Kazem Kazemeini

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Infertility is one of the most important reproductive health concerns in the conventional medicine. Iranian traditional medicine presents different viewpoints in this regard which they could be of benefit and a good guide for the society of medicine. This study sought to provide the comprehensive investigation on the causes of infertility according to Iranian traditional medicine for understanding of old sages' ideas and categorizing of the causes of infertility. In this narrative review, we searched causes of infertility in traditional medicine books and available articles in this field. Iranian traditional physicians have investigated the causes of infertility in couples and attributed them to male and female causes. They have divided the main causes of infertility in both sexes into structural and functional abnormalities, that both traditional medicine and conventional medicine have a lot of participations, but the traditional medicine believes holistic approach in the treatment of diseases and the involvement of all parts of the body particularly specialty board members (heart, liver, brain, ovary, and testicles in the proper conduct activities in different parts of the body such as reproduction system. There is also special attention to temperament Mizaj disorders. Given the numerous commonalities existing between traditional and conventional medicine in categorizing the causes of infertility, Iranian traditional medicine methods can be applied as a complementary solution in infertility. It could be also subject to further research and investigation due to its opposition to modern medicine in some regards.

  10. Causes of infertility in view of Iranian traditional medicine: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemeini, Seyed Kazem; Emtiazy, Majid; Owlia, Fatemeh; Khani, Parisa

    2017-01-01

    Infertility is one of the most important reproductive health concerns in the conventional medicine. Iranian traditional medicine presents different viewpoints in this regard which they could be of benefit and a good guide for the society of medicine. This study sought to provide the comprehensive investigation on the causes of infertility according to Iranian traditional medicine for understanding of old sages' ideas and categorizing of the causes of infertility. In this narrative review, we searched causes of infertility in traditional medicine books and available articles in this field. Iranian traditional physicians have investigated the causes of infertility in couples and attributed them to male and female causes. They have divided the main causes of infertility in both sexes into structural and functional abnormalities, that both traditional medicine and conventional medicine have a lot of participations, but the traditional medicine believes holistic approach in the treatment of diseases and the involvement of all parts of the body particularly specialty board members (heart, liver, brain, ovary, and testicles) in the proper conduct activities in different parts of the body such as reproduction system. There is also special attention to temperament Mizaj disorders. Given the numerous commonalities existing between traditional and conventional medicine in categorizing the causes of infertility, Iranian traditional medicine methods can be applied as a complementary solution in infertility. It could be also subject to further research and investigation due to its opposition to modern medicine in some regards. PMID:28835934

  11. Chromosomal abnormalities and Y chromosome microdeletions in infertile men from Morocco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naasse, Yassine; Charoute, Hicham; El Houate, Brahim; Elbekkay, Chadli; Razoki, Lunda; Malki, Abderrahim; Barakat, Abdelhamid; Rouba, Hassan

    2015-09-18

    Male infertility is responsible for 50% of infertile couples. Thirty percent of male infertility is due to cytogenetic and genetic abnormalities. In Arab and North African populations, several studies have shown the association of these chromosomal abnormalities with male infertility. Our objective is to evaluate the frequency of chromosomal abnormalities and Y chromosome microdeletions in infertile men from Morocco. A total of 573 Moroccan infertile men (444 azoospermic and 129 oligozoospermic men) referred for cytogenetic analysis to the Department of Cytogenetics of the Pasteur Institute of Morocco, were screened for the presence of chromosomal abnormalities and Y chromosome microdeletions. Chromosomal abnormalities accounted for approximately 10.5% (60/573). Fifty six cases among them have sex chromosome abnormalities (93.34%), including Klinefelter's syndrome in 41 patients (68.34%). Autosomal chromosome abnormalities (6.66%) were observed in 4 patients. Chromosomal abnormalities were more prevalent in azoospermic men (13.06%) than in oligospermic men (1.55%). Y microdeletions were detected in 16 of 85 patients (AZFc: 14.12%, AZFbc: 4.70%), most of them where azoospermic men with no chromosomal abnormality. These results highlighted the need for efficient molecular genetic testing in male infertility diagnosis. In addition, a genetic screening should be performed in infertile men before starting assisted reproductive treatments.

  12. Knowledge, attitude, and practices of infertility among Saudi couples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abolfotouh MA

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Mostafa A Abolfotouh,1 Abdullah A Alabdrabalnabi,2 Rehab B Albacker,3 Umar A Al-Jughaiman,4 Samar N Hassan5 1King Abdullah International Medical Research Center (KAIMRC, King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; 2University of Dammam, College of Medicine, Dammam, Saudi Arabia; 3King Saud University, College of Medicine, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; 4King Faisal University, College of Medicine, Dammam, Saudi Arabia; 5Division of Reproductive Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, King Abdulaziz Medical City, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia Introduction: Infertility places a huge psychological burden on infertile couples, especially for women. Greater knowledge of the factors affecting fertility may help to decrease the incidence of infertility by allowing couples to avoid certain risk factors. The aim of our study was (1 to assess the knowledge and attitudes of infertile and fertile Saudi participants on infertility, possible risk factors, and social consequences; and (2 to determine the practices of infertile Saudi couples to promote their fertility before having them attend an in vitro fertilization (IVF clinic. Methods and materials: We conducted a cross-sectional study on 277 fertile participants from outpatient clinics and 104 infertile patients from the IVF clinic at King Abdulaziz Medical City between June 24, 2012 and July 4, 2012, using a previously validated interview questionnaire. Descriptive and analytical statistics were applied with a significance threshold of P ≤ 0.05. Results: A generally poor level of knowledge (59% and a neutral attitude (76% toward infertility were reported by participants. Mistaken beliefs commonly held by the study participants regarding the causes of infertility were Djinns and supernatural causes (58.8%, black magic (67.5%, intrauterine devices (71.3%, and contraceptive pills (42.9%. The healer/Sheikh was reported as the primary and secondary preference for infertility

  13. Management of infertility in a patient presenting with ovarian dysfunction and McCune-Albright syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.S.E. Laven (Joop); S. Lumbroso; C. Sultan; B.C.J.M. Fauser (Bart)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractPersistent autonomous ovarian dysfunction in McCune-Albright syndrome (MAS) patients is associated with the development of multiple dominant follicles, premature luteinization, cyst formation, and anovulatory infertility. Due to the mosaic distribution of the mutation,

  14. Cigarette smoking and male infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taymour Mostafa

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Numerous studies have identified specific body systems affected by the hazardous effects of the cigarette smoking particularly the respiratory and cardiovascular systems. The effect of smoking on male reproduction has also been studied where semen quality was investigated in different cross-sectional studies including infertile patients with conflicting results. This article aimed to assess the relationship between smoking and male infertility. A review of published articles was carried out, using PubMed, medical subject heading (MSH databases and Scopus engine excluding the effects of smoking outside male infertility. Key words used to assess exposure, outcome, and estimates for the concerned associations were: smoking, semen, male infertility, sperm, humans, and fertility. Most of the reports showed that smoking reduces sperm production, sperm motility, sperm normal forms and sperm fertilising capacity through increased seminal oxidative stress and DNA damage. Few papers reported nonsignificant differences in semen parameters between smokers or non-smokers. It is concluded that although some smokers may not experience reduced fertility, men with marginal semen quality can benefit from quitting smoking.

  15. The relationship between body mass index and sexual function in infertile women: A cross-sectional survey

    OpenAIRE

    Safieh Jamali; Hossein Zarei; Athar Rasekh Jahromi

    2014-01-01

    Background: Infertility as the bitterest life experience can affect sexual function. Many studies have shown agitation, depression, marital dissatisfaction, and sexual dysfunction as the psychological outcomes resulting from infertility. Many factors, including body mass index, influence the female sexual function. Objective: This study aimed to assess the prevalence of female sexual dysfunction and the relationship between sexual function and body mass index in the Iranian infertile women wh...

  16. Preliminary report on plasma homocysteine and hormonal variations in infertile women in Lagos, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Oluseye Osunkalu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The relationship between infertility and hormonal variations has been variously documented, but little has been reported on the interactions between hormonal factors, homocysteine (Hcy, and female infertility. Objective: This study aimed to evaluate the relationship between plasma Hcy levels and hormonal variations in infertile women. Materials and Methods: This descriptive cross-sectional study was carried out among eligible infertile and fertile women seeking care at the Lagos University Teaching Hospital, Lagos, Nigeria. The subjects were 100 women referred for management of infertility, and the controls were 50 fertile women who had given birth within the past year. Fasting plasma levels of Hcy were estimated using enzyme immunoassay. Serum levels of luteinizing hormone (LH, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH, estradiol, prolactin, and progesterone were measured using  Access 2 (Immunoassay systems-beckman coulter, inc.250S.Kraemer blvd.Brea, ca 92821. U.S.A. Results: Mean plasma Hcy levels for subjects and controls were 9.50 ± 1.88 μmol/L and 9.44 ± 1.85 μmol/L, respectively, with no significant variation (P = 0.952. Plasma Hcy was not significantly associated with infertility and hormone levels. The mean serum levels of LH, FSH, and prolactin were significantly higher among subjects compared to controls. Conclusion: Hormonal variations observed in infertile women did not appear to significantly alter plasma Hcy levels, and hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy may not have significantly contributed to female infertility in our environment.

  17. Mental Health and Its Personal and Social Predictors in Infertile Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirin Hasanpour

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Infertility is considered a traumatic stressor for infertile couples, and it becomes a psychosocial crisis for that person. Considering the importance of fertility and based on the cultural and social aspects of it in Iran, the present study aimed to determine mental health and its individual and social predictors in infertile women referring to the infertility center of Al-Zahra hospital in Tabriz, Iran, during 2012-2013. Methods: This was a descriptive-correlational study on 345 infertile women referring to Al-Zahra hospital in Tabriz, Iran, via convenient sampling. Data was gathered by the perceived social support questionnaire and mental health questionnaire. To determine the relationship between social support and personal and social characteristics, and mental health, multivariate linear regression was used. Data were analyzed using SPSS software. Results: The mean (SD total score of mental health of women was 29.70 (11.50, the score ranged from 0 to 84. The best condition was below the depression scale, and the worst condition was below the social dysfunction scale. Social support from the family was also a predictor of the mental health of infertile women. Conclusion: The findings of this study showed that infertile women, in terms of mental health and its subscales, have unfavorable conditions. Moreover, social support from the family is an important factor influencing mental health. Therefore, strengthening the social support of the family to improve the mental health of infertile women seems necessary.

  18. Investigation of Power Factor on Harmonic Effect due to Types of Voltage Source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.B. Risnidar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discussed about power factor on harmonic effect due to types of voltage source. Usually, the voltage source is sinusoidal. But in actual condition the load that has voltage sources through the elements where the output voltage of element as input to load is not pure sinusoidal, for example at Power of Common Coupling (PCC between transformer and linear load and nonlinear load. The research has been done with Schhafner Power Quality Analyzer and was focused to power factor (p.f., Total Harmonic Distortion (THD, and harmonic energy losses cost from measurement where load is Induction motor and Adjustable Speed Drive (ASD. As voltage source in this research are sine wave, square wave and combinations of 3rd, 5th and 7th harmonic order like harmonic 313, and harmonic 357.

  19. Factors affecting disclosure among Israeli children in residential care due to domestic violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lev-Wiesel, Rachel; Gottfried, Ruth; Eisikovits, Zvi; First, Maya

    2014-04-01

    Disclosure of child abuse may enable initiating interventions to end maltreatment and mediate its negative physical and psychological consequences. The present study reviews the field of disclosure and examines factors affecting disclosure among a service population of abused children who were placed in residential care due to various forms of abuse (e.g., physical, sexual, emotional, neglect and witnessing domestic violence). The sample consisted of 286 Israeli (Hebrew and Arabic speaking) children aged 12-17 (mean=14±1). Following approval of the Ethics committee of the University and parents' written consent, participants were administered a self-report questionnaire that included the following measures: a Socio-Demographic Questionnaire, the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ), the Juvenile Victimization Questionnaire (JVQ), and the Disclosure of Trauma Questionnaire (DTQ). Results indicated that the three key factors enhancing the likelihood of disclosure were: moral factors, external initiatives and intolerable physical pain. The three key factors inhibiting disclosure were feelings of shame, fear of losing social support and uncertainty as to how and to whom to disclose. Results also showed that children preferred to disclose to their nuclear family members (parents and siblings) in comparison with professionals.

  20. Infertility among women working in horticulture. A follow-up study in the Danish Occupational Hospitalization Register

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Karin Sørig; Hannerz, Harald; Feveile, Helene

    2009-01-01

    The possible association between employment in horticulture with potential exposure to pesticides and female infertility was examined by identification of women with hospital contact due to infertility and working in horticulture through the Danish Occupational Hospitalization Register. This follow......-up study gave a standardized incidence ratio of 1.06 (95% confidence interval: 0.84-1.32) for treatment of infertility in women working in horticulture compared with the standard population and did not confirm that women working in the horticultural industry are at increased risk for infertility....

  1. Infertility among women working in horticulture. A follow-up study in the Danish Occupational Hospitalization Register.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hougaard, Karin Sørig; Hannerz, Harald; Feveile, Helene; Bonde, Jens Peter; Burr, Hermann

    2009-04-01

    The possible association between employment in horticulture with potential exposure to pesticides and female infertility was examined by identification of women with hospital contact due to infertility and working in horticulture through the Danish Occupational Hospitalization Register. This follow-up study gave a standardized incidence ratio of 1.06 (95% confidence interval: 0.84-1.32) for treatment of infertility in women working in horticulture compared with the standard population and did not confirm that women working in the horticultural industry are at increased risk for infertility.

  2. Prevalence and predictors of intimate partner violence among women attending infertility clinic in south-western Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aduloju, Peter O; Olagbuji, Nelson B; Olofinbiyi, Ajayi B; Awoleke, Jacob O

    2015-05-01

    The study evaluated the prevalence and predictors of intimate partner violence among infertile women attending infertility clinic of Ekiti State University Teaching Hospital, Ado-Ekiti. A cross sectional study of infertile women presenting at the clinic between 1st November 2012 and 31st October 2013 was done. A semi-structured questionnaire on violence was administered to 170 consecutive women who consented to participate. The data were analysed using SPSS 17 and significances test were performed on variables associated with violence with Student's t test and Chi square test. Logistic regression was done to determine predictive factors associated with intimate partner violence. The prevalence of intimate partner violence associated with infertility among the women was 31.2%. There were no significant differences in the age of the women, duration of marriage and duration of infertility between the women who had experienced violence and those who had not experienced it; p>0.05. Unemployment, polygamous marriage, husbands' social habits, primary infertility and prolonged duration of infertility were associated with violence in these women; pviolence; p>0.05. However with logistic regression, the unemployment status of the women and prolonged duration of infertility were the predictors of violence against women with infertility in this study, p valueviolence as the commonest form of violence experienced by them ever, since the diagnosis of infertility was made and in the past one year. All forms of violence experienced were aggravated by infertility in these women. Women with infertility are prone to intimate partner violence and this would further aggravate the challenges of infertility being faced by these women. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. [Association of socio-demographic factors with the age at death due to cardiovascular diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haase, Juan; Lavanderos, Sebastián; Riquelme, Camilo; Morales, Andrea

    2016-11-01

    The association of cardiovascular diseases with socio-demographic factors has not been fully explored. To analyze the association of socio-demographic features with the survival time of individuals who died due to cardiovascular diseases. The death registries published by the Ministry of Health were analyzed. All deaths due to cardiovascular diseases occurred between 2001 and 2013 in people aged over one year were considered. Using a principal component analysis, the age at death was associated with socio-demographic features such as sex, marital status, residence zone, schooling, work status and medical care prior to death. A total of 293,370 cardiovascular deaths were analyzed. The median age at death was 77 years. Not receiving medical care prior to death, was significantly associated with a lower age at the moment of the decease, mainly between 20 and 80 years of age. Among men, being occupationally active (hazard ratio (HR = 1.5 p Socio-demographic profiles are associated with the age at death due to cardiovascular diseases. The effect of not receiving medical care on the age at death is noteworthy and reflects social inequities in the access to health care.

  4. [Motives of requirement for health care consultations and factors associated to mortality due to poisoning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa-Manzano, Alberto Iram; Lamas-Flores, Sofía; Méndez-Cervantes, Diana; Villa-Manzano, Rebeca; Cabrera-Pivaral, Carlos E; Rojo-Contreras, Wendoline

    2009-01-01

    The poisoning is a public health problem. This problem requires continuous evaluation to decrease it. Our objective was to identify causes of requirement for health care consults and factors associated to mortality due to poisoning. We assessed the requirements for health care consults during one year and the outcomes of these consultations in a center of toxicology. Odds ratios (OR) were used as risk estimator. There were 3116 consultations due to poisons. From these 79% required hospitalization. The identified causes were: be bite and wound inflected by poisonous animals in 57 % (44 % of these were due to scorpions); medications in 15 %; agrochemicals in 5 % and in 4 % prohibit substances (marihuana or cocaine). A poisoning caused by suicidal attempt was observed in 28 %. Mortality rate was 3/1000, and the mortality rate for suicidal attempt was 0.7 % meaning an OR = 6 (95 % CI = 1.3 to 31) compared with the overall mortality rate. The most frequent cause of mortality was organophosphorates poisoning (OR = 30, 95 % CI = 2.86-759). The poisoning secondary to animals represented the most frequent cause for consultation. The suicidal attempt and organophosphorates intoxication were associated with higher mortality.

  5. [Predictive factors of functional decline at hospital discharge in elderly patients hospitalised due to acute illness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condorhuamán-Alvarado, Patricia Ysabel; Menéndez-Colino, Rocío; Mauleón-Ladrero, Coro; Díez-Sebastián, Jesús; Alarcón, Teresa; González-Montalvo, Juan Ignacio

    2017-06-03

    To compare baseline characteristics and those found during hospitalisation as predictors of functional decline at discharge (FDd) in elderly patients hospitalised due to acute illness. A review was made of the computerized records of patients admitted to a Geriatric Acute Unit of a tertiary hospital over a 10 year period. A record was made of demographic, clinical, functional and health-care variables. Functional decline at discharge (FDd) was defined by the difference between the previous Barthel Index (pBI) and the discharge Barthel Index (dBI). The percentage of FDd (%FDd=(pBI-dBI/pBI)×100) was calculated. The variables associated with greater %FDd in the bivariate analysis were included in multivariate logistic regression models. The predictive capacity of each model was assessed using the area under the ROC curve. The factors associated with greater %FDd were advanced age, female gender, to live in a nursing home, cognitive impairment, better baseline functional status and worse functional status at admission, number of diagnoses, and prolonged stay. The area under the ROC curve for the predictive models of %FDd was 0.638 (95% CI: 0.615-0.662) based on the previous situation, 0.756 (95% CI: 0.736-0.776) based on the situation during admission, and 0.952 (95% CI: 0.944-0.959) based on a combination of these factors. The overall assessment of patient characteristics, both during admission and baseline, may have greater value in prediction of FDd than analysis of factors separately in elderly patients hospitalised due to acute illness. Copyright © 2017. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  6. 女性不孕症影响因素的病例对照研究%A case-control study on the risk factors of female infertility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何晓; 侯倩; 姜红英; 黄河浪

    2009-01-01

    Objective Understanding the risk factors of female infertility among child-bearing aged women, in Nanchang area. Methods A hospital-based matched case-control study was carried out in Nanchang. Matched by age ( ±2 years old) , 383 pairs of cases and controls were recruited and studied. Database was established with EpiData 3.0 software. Both cases and controls were interviewed face to face, with a uniformed questionnaire. Conditional logistic regression model was used for univariate and multivariate analysis on SPSS 11.5 to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results Data from multiple conditional logistic regression analysis showed that the risk factors of infertility would include pelvic inflammatory diseases (0R=7.078, 95% Ch 3.462-14.467),post-abortion complications' history(0R=3.674, 95% CI: 1.690-7.986), drug treatment history (0R=23.576, 95% Ch 12.324-45.102), dysmenorrhea (0R=1.622, 95% CI: 1.161-2.266), pain from sexual intercourse (0R=2.447, 95% CI: 1.201-4.986), monthly frequency of sexual intercourse (0R=1.416,95% CI: 1.048-1.913)and mental stress (0R=2.146, 95% CI: 1.662-2.771). The protective factor of infertility, however, was level ofeducation(0R=0.522,95%Cl:0.391-0.696). Conclusion Prevention and treatment of pelvic infection, application of strictly controlled drugs, popularization of awareness on sexual and reproductive health and relief of mental stress would be important measures in decreasing the incidence of infertility.%目的 探讨已婚育龄妇女不孕症的影响因素及其变化情况.方法 采用以省级医院为基础的配对病例对照研究,按年龄(±2岁)配对,共收集383对病例和对照,进行统一的问卷调查.用EpiData 3.0软件建立数据库,应用SPSS 11.5软件进行单因素和多因素条件logistic回归分析.结果 多凶素条件logistie回归分析表明,盆腔感染性疾病史(0R=7.078,95%CI:3.462~14.467)、末次妊娠产后或流产后并发症史(0R=3.674,95%CI:1.690

  7. Evolution of psychology and counseling in infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boivin, Jacky; Gameiro, Sofia

    2015-08-01

    Five key paradigm shifts are described to illustrate the evolution of psychology and counseling in infertility. The first paradigm shift was in the 1930s when psychosomatic concepts were introduced in obstetrics and gynecology as causal factors to explain why some couples could not conceive despite the absence of organic pathology. In the second shift, the nurse advocacy movement of the 1970s stimulated the investigation of the psychosocial consequences of infertility and promoted counseling to help couples grieve childlessness when medical treatments often could not help them conceive. The third shift occurred with the advent of IVF, which created a demand for mental health professionals in fertility clinics. Mental health professionals assessed the ability of couples to withstand the demands of this new high technology treatment as well as their suitability as potential parents. The fourth shift, in the 1990s, saw reproductive medicine embrace the principles of evidence-based medicine, which introduced a much more rigorous approach to medical practice (effectiveness and safety) that extended to psychosocial interventions. The most recent paradigm shift, in the new millennium, occurred with the realization that compliance with protracted fertility treatment depended on the adoption of an integrated approach to fertility care. An integrated approach could reduce treatment burden arising from multiple sources (i.e., patient, clinic, and treatment). This review describes these paradigm shifts and reflects on future clinical and research directions for mental health professionals.

  8. Novel immunotherapeutic approaches for treatment of infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdolmohammadi-Vahid, Samaneh; Danaii, Shahla; Hamdi, Kobra; Jadidi-Niaragh, Farhad; Ahmadi, Majid; Yousefi, Mehdi

    2016-12-01

    One of the most important reasons of infertility and human reproductive failure is related to uncontrolled immunological response of maternal immune system to early embryo or fetus, that cause rejection of this semi-allograft. Therefore, a tolerance in the immune system is essential to modulate the reactions against the fetus to avoid rejection. The immune system imbalance during implantation or pregnancy may lead to implantation failure or miscarriage. So, use of immunosuppressive or immunomodulator agents can be helpful to prevent immunological attack. Initially, there was a focus on steroids like prednisolone or intralipids in treatment of miscarriage that suppressed the activity of most immune cells, Intravenous Immunoglobulin (IVIG) was then introduced with various mechanisms. Nowadays, novel and specific strategies are established such as monoclonal antibodies and cytokines. More recently, Tacrolimus and Cyclosporine, which were utilized in prevention of transplantation reject, are used as immunosuppressive factors in modulation of immune responses against the fetus. This review is focused on the main immunotherapeutic methods of infertility treatment.

  9. Study of semen parameters in male partners among infertile couples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheela N. Kulkarni

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Semen analysis provides valuable information about the etiology and fertility potential of an infertile male. The study was conducted to determine the abnormalities in semen parameters of male partners of infertile couples and to find out contribution of male factors. Methods: The descriptive study with cross sectional design was conducted in the department of Pathology at MIMSR medical college, Latur, Maharashtra, India, between January 2013 to December 2014. A total of 220 cases were analyzed during this period. Semen analysis was performed according to the methods and the standards defined by World Health Organisation (WHO 5th edition 2010. Results: Out of 220 male partners of infertile couples 96 (43.6% men had abnormal semen parameters. The male factor was responsible in 43.6% of cases. Asthenozoospermia constitutes maximum of 19.9%, followed by Oligozoospermia in 18.6%, Azoospermia in 10.9%, Oligoasthenoteratozoospermia in 7.3% and Oligoasthenozoospermia in 6.8% cases. Leucocytospermia was detected in 15.5% cases. Conclusions: Abnormal semen quality remains a significant contribution to overall infertility. Asthenozoospermia is the most common semen abnormality seen. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2015; 4(4.000: 1016-1019

  10. Chromosomal Abnormalities in Infertile Men from Southern India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suganya, Jaganathan; Kujur, Smita B; Selvaraj, Kamala; Suruli, Muthiah S; Haripriya, Geetha; Samuel, Chandra R

    2015-07-01

    Male infertility has been associated with aneuploidies and structural chromosomal abnormalities, Yq microdeletions and specific gene mutations and/or polymorphisms. Besides genetic factors, any block in sperm delivery, endocrine disorders, testicular tumours, infectious diseases, medications, lifestyle factors and environmental toxins can also play a causative role. This study aimed to determine the constitutional karyotype in infertile males having normal female partners in a south Indian population. A total of 180 men with a complaint of primary infertility ranging from 1 to 25 years were screened for chromosomal abnormalities through conventional analysis of GTG-banded metaphases from cultured lymphocytes. Four individuals were diagnosed to have Klinefelter syndrome. Two cases exhibited reciprocal translocations and one showed a maternally inherited insertion. Polymorphisms were seen in sixty-seven patients (37.2%). The occurrence of chromosomal abnormalities in 4.6% and variants involving the heterochromatic regions of Y, chromosome 9 and the acrocentric chromosomes in 38.2% of the infertile men with an abnormal seminogram strongly reiterates the inclusion of routine cytogenetic testing and counselling in the diagnostic work-up prior to the use of assisted reproduction technologies.

  11. Tuberculosis of the cervix and infertility: report of a rare case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guié, P; Iovenitti, P; N'guessan, K; Tegnan, J; Koffi, K; Carta, G; Anongba, S

    2008-01-01

    Tubercolosis is a frequent bacterial infection in less developed countries. Lung and lymph node localisations are common, while the genital apparatus is less involved. In this work a rare case of cervical tuberculosis followed by some lesions causing infertility in a 20-year-old woman is reported. The diagnosis was confirmed by a histological examination from a biopsy of the cervix. The patient was offered six-month antituberculosis therapy which eliminated the cervical lesions. A few years later she came under our care for infertility due to uterine adhesions diagnosed by hysterosalpingography. Now the patient is being treated for infertility complicated by amenorrhoea.

  12. Value of hysteroscopy in management of unexplained infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aisha M. Elbareg

    2014-12-01

    Conclusion: As a cause of unexplained infertility, subtle uterine abnormalities are diagnosed only during hysteroscopy and they are relatively common in infertility women. Although the presence of these abnormalities is not detected by the basic investigations for infertility, their correction seems to be necessary when infertility is desired and other infertility causes are excluded.

  13. Combined deficiency of factor V and factor VIII is due to mutations in either LMAN1 or MCFD2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bin; McGee, Beth; Yamaoka, Jennifer S.; Guglielmone, Hugo; Downes, Katharine A.; Minoldo, Salvador; Jarchum, Gustavo; Peyvandi, Flora; de Bosch, Norma B.; Ruiz-Saez, Arlette; Chatelain, Bernard; Olpinski, Marian; Bockenstedt, Paula; Sperl, Wolfgang; Kaufman, Randal J.; Nichols, William C.; Tuddenham, Edward G. D.; Ginsburg, David

    2006-01-01

    Mutations in LMAN1 (ERGIC-53) or MCFD2 cause combined deficiency of factor V and factor VIII (F5F8D). LMAN1 and MCFD2 form a protein complex that functions as a cargo receptor ferrying FV and FVIII from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi. In this study, we analyzed 10 previously reported and 10 new F5F8D families. Mutations in the LMAN1 or MCFD2 genes accounted for 15 of these families, including 3 alleles resulting in no LMAN1 mRNA accumulation. Combined with our previous reports, we have identified LMAN1 or MCFD2 mutations as the causes of F5F8D in 71 of 76 families. Among the 5 families in which no mutations were identified, 3 were due to misdiagnosis, with the remaining 2 likely carrying LMAN1 or MCFD2 mutations that were missed by direct sequencing. Our results suggest that mutations in LMAN1 and MCFD2 may account for all cases of F5F8D. Immunoprecipitation and Western blot analysis detected a low level of LMAN1-MCFD2 complex in lymphoblasts derived from patients with missense mutations in LMAN1 (C475R) or MCFD2 (I136T), suggesting that complete loss of the complex may not be required for clinically significant reduction in FV and FVIII. PMID:16304051

  14. Factors related to outcome of bloodstream infections due to Candida parapsilosis complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barchiesi, Francesco; Orsetti, Elena; Osimani, Patrizia; Catassi, Carlo; Santelli, Fabio; Manso, Esther

    2016-08-09

    Although Candida albicans is the most common cause of fungal blood stream infections (BSIs), infections due to Candida species other than C. albicans are rising. Candida parapsilosis complex has emerged as an important fungal pathogen and became one of the main causes of fungemia in specific geographical areas. We analyzed the factors related to outcome of candidemia due to C. parapsilosis in a single tertiary referral hospital over a five-year period. A retrospective observational study of all cases of candidemia was carried out at a 980-bedded University Hospital in Italy. Data regarding demographic characteristics and clinical risk factors were collected from the patient's medical records. Antifungal susceptibility testing was performed and MIC results were interpreted according to CLSI species-specific clinical breakpoints. Of 270 patients diagnosed with Candida BSIs during the study period, 63 (23 %) were infected with isolates of C. parapsilosis complex which represented the second most frequently isolated yeast after C. albicans. The overall incidence rate was 0.4 episodes/1000 hospital admissions. All the strains were in vitro susceptible to all antifungal agents. The overall crude mortality at 30 days was 27 % (17/63), which was significantly lower than that reported for C. albicans BSIs (42 % [61/146], p = 0.042). Being hospitalized in ICU resulted independently associated with a significant higher risk of mortality (HR 4.625 [CI95% 1.015-21.080], p = 0.048). Conversely, early CVC removal was confirmed to be significantly associated with a lower risk of mortality (HR 0.299 [CI95% 0.102-0.874], p = 0.027). Finally, the type of primary antifungal therapy did not influence the outcome of infection. Candidemia due to C. parapsilosis complex, the second most commonly causative agent of yeast BSIs in our center, is characterized by a non-negligible mortality at 30 days. An early CVC removal is associated with a significant reduced mortality.

  15. Testicular touch preparation cytology in the evaluation of male infertility

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    Isil Z Yildiz-Aktas

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Male infertility is traditionally evaluated by tissue core biopsies of the testes. Touch preparations (TP of these biopsies have been infrequently used. The aim of this study is to report our experience with using testicular biopsy TP for the evaluation of male infertility. Materials and Methods: A retrospective search was performed for cases of testes biopsies with concurrent TP. These cases were evaluated for clinical information, specimen adequacy, and cytological-histological correlation. Results: A total of 39 cases were identified from men with a mean age of 34 years (range 23 to 50 years. TP slides were satisfactory for evaluation in 31 (89% cases, and less than optimal in four due to low cellularity, obscuring blood or air drying artifact. Cytopathology showed concordance with the biopsy in almost all cases. In one discordant case where the biopsies showed no active spermatogenesis, a rare sperm were identified on the TP. Conclusions: TP of the testis is a helpful adjunct to biopsy because of its ability to clearly evaluate all stages of spermatogenesis. These data demonstrate that TP cytopathology of the testes in our experience has an excellent correlation with both normal testicular biopsies and those showing pathological spermatogenesis, and in rare cases may provide added benefit in evaluating the presence of spermatogenesis for male infertility. Albeit uncommon, cytopathologists may be required to identify and evaluate spermatogenic elements in cytology specimens being submitted from men with infertility.

  16. Predictive value of hormonal parameters for live birth in women with unexplained infertility and male infertility

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Murto, Tiina; Bjuresten, Kerstin; Landgren, Britt-Marie; Stavreus-Evers, Anneli

    2013-01-01

    .... The objective of the present study was to characterize hormone levels in an arbitrary menstrual cycle in women with unexplained infertility and male infertility, and to determine the predictive value...

  17. [Hysteroscopic evaluation in patients with infertility].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasmar, Ricardo Bassil; Barrozo, Paulo Roberto Mussel; Parente, Raphael Câmara Medeiros; Lasmar, Bernardo Portugal; da Rosa, Daniela Baltar; Penna, Ivan Araujo; Dias, Rogério

    2010-08-01

    to describe hysteroscopy findings in infertile patients. this was a retrospective series of 953 patients with diagnosis of infertility evaluated by hysteroscopy. A total of 957 patients investigated for infertility were subjected to hysteroscopy, preferentially during the first phase of the menstrual cycle. When necessary, directed biopsies (under direct visualization during the exam) or guided biopsies were obtained using a Novak curette after defining the site to be biopsied during the hysteroscopic examination. Outcome frequencies were determined as percentages, and the χ2 test was used for the correlations. The statistical software EpiInfo 2000 (CDC) was used for data analysis. a normal uterine cavity was detected in 436 cases (45.8%). This was the most frequent diagnosis for women with primary infertility and for women with one or no abortion (pinfertility. Patients with a history of abortion and infertility should be submitted to hysteroscopy in order to rule out intrauterine synechiae as a possible cause of infertility.

  18. Relevance of genetic investigation in male infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asero, P; Calogero, A E; Condorelli, R A; Mongioi', L; Vicari, E; Lanzafame, F; Crisci, R; La Vignera, S

    2014-05-01

    Genetic causes can be directly responsible for various clinical conditions of male infertility and spermatogenic impairment. With the increased use of assisted reproduction technologies our understanding of genetic basis of male infertility has large implications not only for understanding the causes of infertility but also in determining the prognosis and management of such couples. For these reasons, the genetic investigations represent today an essential and useful tool in the treatment of male infertility. Several evidences are available for the clinical practice regarding the diagnosis; however, there are less information relative to the treatment of the genetic causes of male infertility. Focus of this review is to discuss the main and more common genetic causes of male infertility to better direct the genetics investigation in the treatment of spermatogenic impairment.

  19. Clinical value of time-intensity curve analysis of hysterosalpingo-contrast-sonography in the diagnosis of women infertility due to tube obstruction%子宫输卵管超声造影时间-强度曲线分析在不孕女性中的应用价值

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    臧国礼; 黄品同; 张翔珍; 胡颖璐; 李沉思; 倪银莲

    2013-01-01

    目的 评价造影剂SonoVue高压恒速注射子宫输卵管超声造影(HyCoSy)检查及时间-强度曲线在女性不孕症诊断中的应用价值.方法 对56例女性输卵管不孕患者以SonoVue为造影剂采用球囊导管加压注射法进行HyCoSy检查并利用ACQ软件进行时间-强度曲线分析.超声造影后分别取得输卵管部分通畅组和正常对照组从宫腔到输卵管伞部周边盆腔的造影剂通过时间(AT),并对两组间进行统计学分析.结果 输卵管部分通畅组的AT为(3.49±1.70)s,正常通畅组为(1.14±0.37)s,两组比较差异有统计学意义(P=0.000).经ROC曲线分析得出,以AT 1.65 s作为诊断输卵管部分通畅输的最佳工作点,灵敏性为92.6%,特异性为93.3%,阳性预测值96.2%,阴性预测值87.5%.结论 利用高压注射器进行HyCoSy有利于规范化操作,显示高质量输卵管图像.ACQ曲线分析从宫腔到输卵管伞部周边盆腔的AT是检查输卵管通畅性的有效诊断指标.%Objective To investigate the clinical value of hysterosalpingo-contrast-sonography (HyCoSy) with high-pressure syringe injection and time-intensity curve analysis in the diagnosis of women infertility due to tube obstruction.Methods Fifty-six women with infertility underwent HyCoSy with compressive injection of SonoVue with a balloon catheter and high-pressure syringe.Time-intensity curve based on Autotracking Contrast Quatification (ACQ) software was analyzed in all patients.The arrival time (AT) of microbubbles from uterine cavity to tube fimbria was analyzed between partially obstructed tube group and control group.Results The AT in the group of partially obstructed tubes was (3.49 ± 1.70) s,while the AT in the group of freely patent tubes was (1.14-± 0.37)s,there was statistical difference of AT between the group of partially obstructed tubes and the group of freely patent tubes (P =0.000).According to ROC results,the optimization point of AT was 1.65 s,the sensitivity

  20. ROLE OF LAPAROSCOPY IN INVESTIGATION OF FEMALE INFERTILITY: A RETROSPECTIVE STUDY OF 50 CASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sailatha

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available : Infertility is not only a medical, but a serious social problem as well, especially in our country. Use of diagnostic and therapeutic laparoscopy in infertility has been a focus of attention in recent years and is found to be very effective method in evaluating these cases. Traditional way to assess the uterine cavity, tubal structures and tubal patency was hysterosalpingography, but it has now largely been superseded by hysteroscopy and laparoscopy. It is concluded that laparoscopy is useful in diagnosing cases with endometriosis, tubal factor infertility and exclusion of bilateral anatomical tubal pathology by diagnostic laparoscopy could avoid IVF treatment in these cases.

  1. British Pakistani Muslim Masculinity, (In)fertility, and the Clinical Encounter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blell, Mwenza

    2017-08-11

    The experiences of men facing fertility disruptions are understudied. For British Pakistanis, the impact of infertility is heightened for women because of normative pressures to bear children. But what of men? I present data from in-depth interviews in North East England with infertile British Pakistani Muslims and relevant health professionals. British Pakistani men's level of participation in clinical encounters and responses to diagnoses of male factor infertility must be understood in the context of kinship, the construction of Pakistani ethnicity in the UK, and the subordinated forms of masculinity which accompany this identity.

  2. Insight into the diagnosis and management of subclinical genital tuberculosis in women with infertility

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    Nalini Mahajan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Genital tuberculosis (GTB is an important cause of infertility in India. Lack of an accurate diagnostic test has led to an indiscriminate use of antitubercular treatment in infertile women. Apart from concerns of drug toxicity, this may be a contributing factor in the increasing incidence of multidrug-resistant TB reported in India. We conducted a study to analyze whether a combination of tests could help improve diagnostic accuracy. An algorithm for the management of GTB in infertile women based on the use of multiple tests is presented.

  3. Serum inhibin B values in infertile patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. A. Kadyrov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The increased interest in inhibin B generated by Sertoli cells is due to the fact that on the basis of findings, some authors recorded a relationship between the level of this hormone and infertility. The paper gives the results of an investigation of male sex hormones (inhibin B, follicle-stimulating and anti-Müllerian hormones in the serum of patients with azoospermia (Group 1, who had spermatogenesis, as evidenced by testicular biopsy, who had no spermatogenesis (Group 2, and who had oligoasthenozoospermia (Group 3. The investigation indicated that Group 1 had a normal inhibin B level that was more than twice lower in Group 2. In addition, the latter group was recorded to have elevated follicle-stimulating hormone levels and low anti-Müllerian hormone concentrations as compared to Group 1.

  4. Predictive value of hormonal parameters for live birth in women with unexplained infertility and male infertility

    OpenAIRE

    Murto, Tiina; Bjuresten, Kerstin; Landgren, Britt-Marie; Stavreus-Evers, Anneli

    2013-01-01

    Background: Infertile women might get pregnant sometime after fertility treatment, but today, there is no prediction model on who will eventually have children. The objective of the present study was to characterize hormone levels in an arbitrary menstrual cycle in women with unexplained infertility and male infertility, and to determine the predictive value for long-term possibility of live birth. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, with 71 infertile women with diagnosis unexplained infe...

  5. Domestic violence in Iranian infertile women

    OpenAIRE

    Sheikhan, Zohre; Ozgoli, Giti; Azar, Mahyar; AlaviMajd, Hamid

    2014-01-01

    Background: Millions of men and women suffer from infertility worldwide. In many cultures, infertile women are at risk of social and emotional problems. Infertility may affect the public health in many countries. Domestic violence is the intentional use of physical force, power or threat against oneself, another person or another group or community which leads to injury, death, mental harm, lack of development or deprivation. This study aimed to assess the prevalence of domestic violence agai...

  6. Role of Ultrasound in Male Infertility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Min Hoan; Sung, Chang Kyu [Dept. of Radiology, SMG-SNU Boramae Medical Center, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-06-15

    US evaluation is the mainstay of diagnostic imaging of infertile men. In this editorial, we review the spectrum of diseases responsible for male infertility, discuss the way in which US imaging studies can be used for evaluation of male infertility, and illustrate characteristic US imaging features that allow for specific diagnosis. The discussion will be divided into three main categories: obstruction in sperm passage, impairment of sperm function, and defect in sperm genesis.

  7. A new strategy for professional medical support couples with infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. B. Zhukov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available From our point of view, the problem of infertility in a pair of appropriately addressed jointly by the two related disciplines. This process has been actively helping set newsupplements Spematon and Pregnoton. The study included 50 couples planning to conceive: 25 couples with male factor infertility secretory type (group 1, 25 couples with infertility caused by varicocele in the postoperative period (group 2. The first group included patients with hyperprolactinemia relative to a second group – 25 somatically healthy patients. All groups patients takes Spematon and Pregnoton during 3 months. Terms of infertility in couples ranged from 1 to 4,5 years and an average reached 2,8 ± 1,6 years. According to the results of the comparative analysis the reproductive value of sperm had been enhanced, functional status of the female reproductive system had been improved, the menstrual cycle had been normalized and relatively elevated levels of prolactin had been decreased after co-application of these supplements. Five woman became pregnant.

  8. Screening for chromosomal abnormalities in 2650 infertile couples undergoing ICSI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayed, Hesham F; Mansour, Ragaa T; Aboulghar, Mohamed A; Serour, Gamal I; Amer, Alaa E; Abdrazik, Ashraf

    2006-03-01

    Chromosomal abnormalities are the major contributor to the genetic risks of infertility treatment associated with intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). The study objective was to assess prospectively the frequency of chromosomal aberrations in couples undergoing ICSI. A total of 2650 infertile couples (5300 patients) underwent chromosome analysis before undergoing ICSI in the Egyptian IVF-ET Centre. Heparinized blood samples were cultured, harvested and banded according to standard methods. Overall, 96.94% of the patients studied (5138/5300) had a normal karyotype, while the remaining 162 patients (3.06%) had an abnormal karyotype. Male patients constituted the majority of abnormalities; 138 males (85.19%) and 24 females (14.81%). These chromosomal aberrations included 117 cases (2.2%) of sex chromosome abnormalities; 113 males and four females. Forty-five patients (0.85%) had autosomal aberrations; 25 of them were males and 20 were females. The current data show that chromosomal abnormalities affect 3.06% of infertile patients, and occur in both sexes, but more predominantly in males undergoing ICSI for male factor infertility. It is recommended that chromosomal analysis be performed before undergoing ICSI, to identify patients who can be offered preimplantation genetic diagnosis.

  9. Dropout is a problem in lifestyle intervention programs for overweight and obese infertile women : a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mutsaerts, M. A. Q.; Kuchenbecker, W. K. H.; Mol, B. W.; Land, J. A.; Hoek, A.

    2013-01-01

    What are the dropout rates in lifestyle intervention programs (LIPs) for overweight and obese infertile women and can intervention- or patient-related baseline factors associated with dropout be identified in these women? The median dropout rate was 24 in overweight and obese infertile women who par

  10. Genome instability in AZFc region on Y chromosome in leukocytes of fertile and infertile individuals following exposure to gamma radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghbeli-Nejad, Sahar; Mozdarani, Hossein; Behmanesh, Mehrdad; Rezaiean, Zahra; Fallahi, Parvin

    2012-01-01

    Men are exposed to various doses of ionizing radiation due to living in regions with high natural background radiation, accidentally, occupationally or for cancer treatment. To study genomic instability of AZFc region to gamma radiation, blood samples from normal, oligozoospermia, and azoospermia individuals were irradiated by a Co-60 source. Irradiated cells were kept for 48 h in order to repair initial DNA damages. Real time PCR was performed for three markers (SY 1206, SY 1197, SY 579) for testing copy number variation before and after irradiation. Copy number variations were compared by calculation of cycle threshold comparative method. Copy number variations of studied markers in AZFc region (microdeletion and duplication) in all samples after exposure to radiation increased with a dose dependent fashion. The frequency of instability was significantly higher in samples from infertile men in comparison with fertile ones (p  0.05). This observation might be a possible explanation for induction of azoospermia and oligozoospermia after radiotherapy. Increased frequency of induced microdeletion and duplication in infertile men compared with normal might be attributed to the deficiency in repair systems and the genetic factors involved in incomplete spermatogenesis of infertile men.

  11. Double vs. single intrauterine insemination per cycle: use in gonadotropin cycles and in diagnostic categories of ovulatory dysfunction and male factor infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, Gary W; Gantt, Pickens A

    2008-03-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of offering double intrauterine insemination (IUI) to clients in our fertility program. In this prospective, nonrandomized study, 595 couples with ovulatory dysfunction, endometriosis, male factor, unexplained, tubal factor and combined diagnoses utilizing clomiphene citrate-hCG (CC-hCG), CC-gonadotropin-hCG (CC-Gn-hCG), Gn-hCG, lupron-Gn-hCG (L-Gn-hCG) or luteinizing hormone (LH) surge monitoring of natural cycles were offered single or double IUI in a total of 1276 cycles. Single IUIs were performed at 36 hours following hCG or the day following LH surge; double IUIs were performed 18 and 36 hours following hCG or the day of and day following LH surge. Single versus double IUI clinical pregnancy outcomes were compared between ovarian stimulation protocols and diagnostic categories. One hundred ten clinical pregnancies occurred for 508 couples in 999 single IUI cycles (fecundity, 11.0%); 45 clinical pregnancies for 174 couples occurred in 277 double IUI cycles (16.2%, p < 0.004). The single IUI group was younger than the double IUI group (32.8 vs. 33.7, p < 0.004). Differences for fecundity were noted regarding diagnostic categories between single and double IUI groups (ovulation dysfunction, 12.9% vs 19.5%, p < 0.048, and male factor, 7.9% vs. 17.5%, p < 0.030) and ovulation protocols (CC-Gn-hCG, 13.0% vs. 21.3%, p < 0.031, and L-Gn-hCG, 4.2% vs. 25.0%, p < 0.002). Double IUI is superior to single IUI overall, especially when comparing Gn-containing ovarian stimulation protocols or within the ovulatory dysfunction and male factor diagnostic categories.

  12. The Effect of Marital Violence on Infertility Distress among A Sample of Turkish Women

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    Aygül Akyüz

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between marital violence and distress level among women with a diagnosis of infertility. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study consisted of 139 married women diagnosed as primary infertile who applied to an in vitro fertilization (IVF center in Turkey, between September and December 2009. A descriptive information questionnaire developed by the researcher was used for data collection. In addition, an infertility distress scale (IDS for determining the severity effect of infertility and the scale for marital violence against women (SDVW for determining level of marital violence against the women were used. Results: The total IDS score of the study sample was 37.76 ± 10.53. There was no significant relationship between the age and education level of the women and the total IDS score. The total IDS score was higher in women who did not work and those being treated for infertility for more than three years. The total SDVW score of the study sample was 67.0 ± 8.26. The total SDVW score was higher in women who had been trying to have a child for more than six years and had received infertility treatment for longer than three years. The employment status of the women and physical, emotional, and sexual violence scores had a statistically significant relationship with the IDS scores. The emotional violence score was found to have the highest significance among the variables affecting total IDS score. Conclusion: Marital violence is a factor increasing the distress of infertile women. Healthcare staff serving infertile couples should consider the possibility of domestic violence against women as a factor affecting the psychological infertility distress level.

  13. Missing Motherhood: Jordanian Women's Experiences with Infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hala Mahmoud Obeidat

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim, Background, and Introduction. Bearing and rearing children are an important part of life in nearly all cultures and are a central role for Jordanian Muslim women. Infertility can create anxiety, stress, and depression for couples who are infertile. Women frequently bear the emotional stigma of a couple’s infertility. There is a paucity of literature focusing on Jordanian Muslim women experiencing infertility and failed assistive reproductive technology. Therefore, this study explored these women’s lived experience. Methods. Qualitative data were collected through interviews with 30 Jordanian Muslim women who experienced failed assistive reproductive technology for infertility. Perceptions of experiences with failed treatment of infertility were documented and analyzed. Results. Major themes were identified: missing out on motherhood and living with infertility, experiencing marital stressors, feeling social pressure, experiencing depression and disappointment, having treatment associated difficulties, appreciating support from family and friends, using coping strategies, and fear of an unknown future. Discussion, Conclusion, and Implications for Clinical Practice. Being infertile significantly influences the physical, emotional, social, and spiritual health of Jordanian Muslim women as well as their quality of life. Perceived social support and personal coping strategies were used by study participants to mediate failed attempts to conceive. Designing and implementing culturally appropriate interventions for Muslim women globally who are experiencing infertility are essential.

  14. Infertility trial outcomes: healthy moms and babies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Robert

    2014-05-01

    Traditionally, the primary outcome of infertility trials has been a positive pregnancy test or a clinically recognized pregnancy. However, parents desire a healthy baby that grows up to be a healthy adult, rather than a positive pregnancy test. Too often results of infertility trials are lacking in crucial obstetric details. This is problematic because treatments for infertility have the capacity to increase the risk for a variety of adverse obstetric outcomes. This review will outline important obstetric variables that should be included when reporting infertility research. The rationale for including these data, precise definitions of the variables, and cost-effective strategies for obtaining these obstetric details will be highlighted.

  15. The prognostic power of the post-coital test for natural conception depends on duration of infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glazener, C M; Ford, W C; Hull, M G

    2000-09-01

    Controversy about the value of the post-coital test (PCT) has prompted us to re-analyse data from 207 couples, originally studied between 1982 and 1983, with at least 12 months' infertility at presentation, complete diagnostic information and exclusion of female factors, to clarify the effect of duration of infertility on the prediction of conception. In couples with less than 3 years infertility and a positive PCT, 68% conceived within 2 years compared with 17% of those with a negative result. After 3 years, corresponding rates were 14% and 11%. The relative risks of conception [95% confidence interval (CI)] calculated using the Cox's proportional hazards model were 0.23 (0.12-0.43) for a negative PCT (reference positive PCT) and 0.25 (0.13-0.51) for more than 36 months infertility (reference 12-23 months). Semen analysis had no extra predictive power given the duration of infertility and the PCT. The PCT is an effective predictor of conception where defined female causes of infertility are absent and duration of infertility is less than 3 years. Once infertility is prolonged (beyond 3 years) the conception rate is low even with a positive test because a large proportion of couples remaining childless so long have true unexplained infertility. Use of the PCT will enable clinicians to allocate scarce, expensive and invasive resources effectively.

  16. Knowledge, perception and attitude of infertile women in Benin City ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Knowledge, perception and attitude of infertile women in Benin City, Nigeria to the ... has revolutionalized the management of couples with long standing infertility. ... METHODS: This was a questionnaire based survey of 178 infertile patients ...

  17. Genetics Home Reference: CATSPER1-related nonsyndromic male infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... related nonsyndromic male infertility CATSPER1-related nonsyndromic male infertility Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... All Close All Description CATSPER1 -related nonsyndromic male infertility is a condition that affects the function of ...

  18. Psychological Disturbances and Quality of Life in Obese and Infertile Women and Men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Kocełak

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Anovulatory cycles and endometriosis are the main causes of female infertility. The most frequently anovulatory cycles are related to polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS commonly associated with obesity and hormonal disturbances in the course of obesity. Recently published studies revealed that infertility affects about one in six couples during their lifetime and is more frequent in obese. Obesity is also associated with male infertility related to erectile dysfunction, hormonal disturbances and lower semen quality. Any of these above mentioned disorder is the important risk factor of psychological disturbances and poor quality of life among women and men in the reproductive age. On the other hand the mood disorders may exacerbate the hormonal disturbances and worsen the effectiveness of infertility management. Infertility, its therapy with accompanying psychological disturbances may also significantly affect the partners relationships. The review summarize the results described in the current literature on the association between obesity and infertility and psychological disturbances as well as their impact on quality of life and sexual functioning in women and men. Moreover, the impact of infertility and psychological disturbances on partners relationships is discussed.

  19. Genetic variants in TP53 and MDM2 associated with male infertility in Chinese population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cong Huang; Wei Liu; Gui-Xiang Ji; Ai-Hua Gu; Jian-Hua Qu; Ling Song; Xin-Ru Wang

    2012-01-01

    The TP53,a transcriptional regulator and tumor suppressor,is functionally important in spermatogenesis.MDM2 is a key regulator of the p53 pathway and modulates p53 activity.Both proteins have been functionally linked to germ cell apoptosis,which may affect human infertility,but very little is known on how common polymorphisms in these genes may influence germ cell apoptosis and the risk of male infertility.Thus,this study was designed to test whether three previously described polymorphisms 72Arg>Pro (rs1042522) and the Ex2+ 19C>T (rs2287498) in TP53,and the 5' untranslated region (5' UTR) 309T>G (rs937283) in MDM2,are associated with idiopathic male infertility in a Chinese population.The three polymorphisms were genotyped using OpenArray assay in a hospital-based case-control study,including 580 infertile patients and 580 fertile controls.Our analyses revealed that TP53 Ex2+ 19C>T and MDM2309T>G polymorphisms are associated with mate infertility.Furthermore,we detected a nearly statistically significant additive interaction between TP53 rs2287498 and MDM2 rs937283 for the development of male.infertility (Pinteraction=0.055).In summary,this study found preliminary evidence,demonstrating that genetic variants in genes of the TP53 pathway are risk factors for male infertility.

  20. Are superoxide dismutase 2 and nitric oxide synthase polymorphisms associated with idiopathic infertility?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faure, Celine; Leveille, Pauline; Dupont, Charlotte; Julia, Chantal; Chavatte-Palmer, Pascale; Sutton, Angela; Levy, Rachel

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate in a case-control study the associations between idiopathic infertility and antioxidant gene polymorphisms. One hundred ten infertile subjects (58 women and 52 men) with a history of idiopathic infertility and 69 fertile subjects (35 women and 34 men) with no history of infertility were included by three hospital departments of reproductive biology in the NCT01093378 French government clinical trial. Genotyping was assessed by real-time polymerase chain reaction with TaqMan assay. We examined genetic polymorphisms affecting five antioxidant enzymes: manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), myeloperoxidase (MPO), glutathione peroxidase 1 (GPx1), catalase (CAT), and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). The presence of at least 1 Ala-MnSOD allele (rs4880) increased significantly the risk of infertility (odds ratio [OR] 2.94; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.14, 7.60; p=0.03) in male subjects. Moreover, the presence of 2 G-eNOS allele (rs1799983) increased significantly the risk of infertility in both men and women (OR 1.91; 95% CI, 1.04, 3.54; p=0.04). Our observations lead to the hypothesis that the genetic susceptibility modulating oxidative stress may represent a risk factor for male idiopathic infertility.

  1. Role of genetic mutations in folate-related enzyme genes on Male Infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kang; Zhao, Ruizhe; Shen, Min; Ye, Jiaxin; Li, Xiao; Huang, Yuan; Hua, Lixin; Wang, Zengjun; Li, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Several studies showed that the genetic mutations in the folate-related enzyme genes might be associated with male infertility; however, the results were still inconsistent. We performed a meta-analysis with trial sequential analysis to investigate the associations between the MTHFR C677T, MTHFR A1298C, MTR A2756G, MTRR A66G mutations and the MTHFR haplotype with the risk of male infertility. Overall, a total of 37 studies were selected. Our meta-analysis showed that the MTHFR C677T mutation was a risk factor for male infertility in both azoospermia and oligoasthenoteratozoospermia patients, especially in Asian population. Men carrying the MTHFR TC haplotype were most liable to suffer infertility while those with CC haplotype had lowest risk. On the other hand, the MTHFR A1298C mutation was not related to male infertility. MTR A2756G and MTRR A66G were potential candidates in the pathogenesis of male infertility, but more case-control studies were required to avoid false-positive outcomes. All of these results were confirmed by the trial sequential analysis. Finally, our meta-analysis with trial sequential analysis proved that the genetic mutations in the folate-related enzyme genes played a significant role in male infertility. PMID:26549413

  2. Polymorphic variants in the dopamine receptor D2 in women with endometriosis-related infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczepańska, Malgorzata; Mostowska, Adrianna; Wirstlein, Przemyslaw; Skrzypczak, Jana; Misztal, Matthew; Jagodziński, Paweł P

    2015-08-01

    Data suggests that dopamine receptor DRD2 gene variants may contribute to hyperprolactinemia and that they may be risk factors for endometriosis-related infertility. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether nucleotide variants of the DRD2 gene may be associated with infertility related to endometriosis. Five DRD2 SNPs, rs1800497, rs6277, rs2283265, rs4245146 and rs4648317, which are located in different blocks of linkage disequilibrium, were studied in 151 cases and 381 controls. No significant differences between DRD2 rs1800497, rs6277, rs2283265, rs4245146 and rs4648317 genotype, allele nor haplotype frequencies were observed in women with endometriosis-related infertility compared with the control group. The present results did not confirm DRD2 gene variants to be genetic risk factors for endometriosis-related infertility.

  3. Effects of Carnitine on Sperm Parameters of Infertile Males with Idiopathic Asthenospermia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Amiri

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Introduction & Objective: Studies confirm that a number of nutritional and environmental factors may negatively affect spermatogenesis and cause male infertility. Carnitine is an important factor for sperm motility. Carnitine deficiency decreases sperm motility and may cause male infertility. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of carnitine on sperm parameters in infertile males with idiopathic asthenospermia. Materials & Methods: This study is a before and after clinical trial performed on 40 asthenospermia men who were treated with 750 mg per/day carnitine in Fatemieh infertility research center in years 2006-2007. Sperm parameters were assessed before and after treatment. The obtained data were analyzed using SPSS10 and paired T-test Results: The results showed a significant increase in sperm concentration, morphology, sperm total motility and rapid progressive motility after treatment by carnitine (p<0.05. Conclusion: Carnitine supplementation has a significant effect on sperm parameters in men with idiopathic asthenospermia.

  4. Development and evaluation of a multi-antigen peptide ELISA for the diagnosis of Chlamydia trachomatis related infertility in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Shruti; Stansfield, Scott H; Logan, Benignus; Hocking, Jane S; Timms, Peter; Rombauts, Luk; Allan, John; Huston, Wilhelmina May

    2016-07-17

    Chlamydia trachomatis results in tubal factor infertility in some women. Diagnosis of this tubal infertility is difficult and typically involves laparoscopy or hysterosalpingography to detect the tubal blockages. Numerous serological tests have been developed however are presently not used for diagnosis without subsequent surgical during the infertility investigation. This study aimed to develop a highly specific serological assay for chlamydial tubal factor infertility in women that could be used to recommend direct progression to IVF treatment for women who are positive. Women were recruited from a variety of settings including; women seeking fertility treatment, sexual health and GP consults, or antenatal care (n=259). The serological assay was developed using sera from a large group of women by using infertile MIF positive women with tubal damage as the positives compared to infertile, or acute infection, and/or fertile controls (negatives). The new multi-peptide ELISA was highly specific for the detection of tubal factor infertility (p=0.011) compared to another ELISA (p=0.022) and MIF (p=0.099). The sensitivity of the assay should be improved before clinical utility. Potentially a two-step testing protocol could be used during the initial infertility investigation where MIF followed by a highly specific ELISA could be used to recommend direct progression to IVF for women who are positive.

  5. Mitochondrial Genetic Variation in Iranian Infertile Men with Varicocele

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Mehdi Heidari

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Several recent studies have shown that mitochondrial DNA mutations lead to major disabilities and premature death in carriers. More than 150 mutations in human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA genes have been associated with a wide spectrum of disorders. Varicocele, one of the causes of infertility in men wherein abnormal inflexion and distension of veins of the pampiniform plexus is observed within spermatic cord, can increase reactive oxygen species (ROS production in semen and cause oxidative stress and sperm dysfunction in patients. Given that mitochondria are the source of ROS production in cells, the aim of this study was to scan nine mitochondrial genes (MT-COX2, MT-tRNALys, MT-ATP8, MT-ATP6, MT-COX3, MT-tRNAGly, MT-ND3, MT-tRNAArg and MT-ND4L for mutations in infertile patients with varicocele. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP and DNA sequencing were used to detect and identify point mutations respectively in 9 mitochondrial genes in 72 infertile men with varicocele and 159 fertile men. In brief, the samples showing altered electrophoretic patterns of DNA in the SSCP gel were sent for DNA sequencing to identify the exact nucleotide variation. Results: Ten type nucleotide variants were detected exclusively in mitochondrial DNA of infertile men. These include six novel nucleotide changes and four variants previously reported for other disorders. Conclusion: Mutations in mitochondrial genes may affect respiratory complexes in combination with environmental risk factors. Therefore these nucleotide variants probably lead to impaired ATP synthesis and mitochondrial function ultimately interfering with sperm motility and infertility.

  6. Comparison of Hysterosalpingography and Combined Laparohysteroscopy for the Evaluation of Primary Infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigam, A; Saxena, P; Mishra, A

    2015-01-01

    Background Hysterosalpingography (HSG) is a useful screening test for the evaluation of female infertility. Laparoscopy has proven role in routine infertility work up but role of hysteroscopy in an infertile patient with normal HSG for additional information is a subject of debate. Hysteroscopy permits direct visualization of the cervical canal and the uterine cavity and thereby helping in the evaluation of shape, and cavitary lesion. Objective To detect uterine abnormalities in infertile women by various approaches i.e. HSG and hysteroscopy and evaluating the role of combining hysteroscopy with laparoscopy for the evaluation of tubo-uterine factor for primary infertility. Method One twenty eight infertile women were evaluated and HSG was performed as a basic test for evaluation of tubes and uterine cavity. Women were subjected to combined laparoscopic and hysteroscopic examination on evidence of HSG abnormalities. In absence of any HSG abnormality, women were subjected to ovulation induction for three to six months and if they did not conceive during this period they were undertaken for combined laparo-hysteroscopic evaluation. Result The positive predictive value of HSG for detecting the intrauterine abnormalities was 70% among 126 patients where the hysteroscopy could be performed successfully. The diagnostic accuracy of HSG for intrauterine abnormalities revealed false negative rate of 12.96%. The most frequent pathologies encountered by laparoscopy were tubal and/or peritoneal and were found in 68% (87/128) of women. Total 64.06% infertile women had some abnormality on laparoscopy. This detection rate has been increased from 64.06% to 71.86% on including the concomitant hysteroscopy. Conclusion HSG is a good diagnostic modality to detect uterine as well as tubal abnormalities in infertile patient. HSG and hysteroscopy are complementary to each other and whenever the patient is undertaken for diagnostic laparoscopy for the infertility, hysteroscopy should be

  7. Serum Levels of Melatonin and Oxidative Stress Markers and Correlation between Them in Infertile Men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Soleimani Rad

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Infertility is the problem of 15% of young couples in different societies. One of the factors that could affect fertility is oxidative stress. Therefore, the aim of the present study is to investigate the level of Melatonin, a free radical scavenger, and its correlation with oxidative biomarkers in infertile men. Methods:For this purpose, fertile and infertile men in 2 groups, 30 people in each group, were studied. The fertile men were selected from husbands of patients admitted to Alzahra obstetric and gynecology hospital, according to WHO standards. The infertile men were selected from patients referred to infertility ward. Blood sampling from the participants carried out at a specific time, sera collected and the levels of malondialdehyde, total antioxidant capacity and Melatonin were detected in the sera. The data were analyzed using t-test and Sperman's correlation method. Results: Melatonin level in the sera from fertile men were 522 (39.32 ng/L and in infertile men were 511.78 (34.6 ng/L. MDA level in fertile and infertile men were 2.26 (0.34 vs 2.99 (0.44 nmol/ml which was significantly different. The level of TAC in the sera from fertile men were significantly higher than in infertile men. The result obtained for correlation coefficient Spearman's test revealed a significant, strong and direct correlation between Melatonin and TAC and a significant and reverse correlation between melatonin and MDA.Conclusion: It is concluded that melatonin could be involved in infertility. In other word, melatonin treatment and antioxidant-rich nutrition could help fertility by combating oxidative stress.

  8. Clinical, genetic, biochemical, and testicular biopsy findings among 1,213 men evaluated for infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olesen, Inge Ahlmann; Andersson, Anna-Maria; Aksglaede, Lise; Skakkebaek, Niels Erik; Rajpert-de Meyts, Ewa; Joergensen, Niels; Juul, Anders

    2017-01-01

    To study the pathologic findings among men evaluated for infertility. A retrospective, single-center, cross-sectional study. University hospital-based research center. We included data from 1,213 medical records from infertile men referred for diagnostic work-up from 2005 to 2009. None. Health history, clinical findings, chromosome/genetic aberrations, semen quality, reproductive hormones. In total, 64.4% of the infertile men had one or more reproductive disorders or factors influencing fertility, leaving 35.6% diagnosed as idiopathic infertile. In 244 patients (20%), including seven cases of testicular cancer and/or germ cell neoplasia in situ, a pathologic finding was first detected during diagnostic work-up. Two hundred four patients (16.8%) had a history of cryptorchidism and 154 (12.7%) of varicocele (grade 2 and 3). Thirty-three patients had chromosomal abnormalities, including 16 with sex chromosome abnormalities (11 with 47,XXY). Y-chromosome microdeletions were detected in 65 patients (5.4%). One hundred thirty-three had azoospermia, of which 58 had testicular biopsy findings (Sertoli cell-only syndrome: n = 23; spermatogenic arrest: n = 7; impaired spermatogenesis and atrophy: n = 28). Additionally, in idiopathic infertile men and infertile men with additional symptoms of testicular dysgenesis syndrome, 22.5% presented with a degree of Leydig cell insufficiency, with the highest frequency (33.1%) among patients with sperm concentration infertility in two-thirds of infertile men referred to our center. Thus, male infertility may be a sign of an underlying disease that warrants attention. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Fertilization of IVF/ICSI Using Sibling Oocytes from Couples with Subfertile Male or Unexplained Infertility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李志凌; 林虹; 肖婉芬; 王玉莲

    2004-01-01

    The significance of the performance of conventional in vitro fertilization and intracytoplasmic sperm injection (IVF/ICSI) using sibling oocytes from couples with subfertile male or unexplained infertility was evaluated. A total of 410 sibling oocyte cumulus-corona complexes (OCCC)from 21 couples with subfertile male (group A) and 11 unexplained infertile couples (group B) were randomly divided, in order of retrieval, into two groups inseminated either by conventional IVF or by ICSI. The treatment outcomes and the influence of infertility factors on fertilization in each group were compared. The results showed that although the two pronuclear (2PN) fertilization rate per injected sibling oocytes was significantly higher after ICSI (group A: 68.2 % ±28.8 %; group B: 66.2 %±24.9 %) than after conventional IVF (group A: 41.8 %±32.7 %; group B: 40. 1 %±22.1 %), the other variables studied included: the fertilization rates of per allocated sibling oocytes IVF/ICSI, the fertilization rates of sibling oocytes IVF/ICSI after excluding failed IVF fertilization cycles, as well as the cleavage rates of normal fertilization were not statistically significant (P>0.05). Similarly, though the total fertilization failure rate in the IVF group (group A: 42.9 %;group B: 36.4 %) was significantly higher than in the ICSI group (group A: 4.8 %; group B: 0),we did not cancel cycles due to the normal fertilization of sibling oocytes. Embryo transfer was possible in all 32 couples. There were 10 clinical pregnancies in the two groups. We also discovered a possible association between some semen parameters and sperm functions of group A, and women age and duration of infertility of group B and fertilization. It is suggested that adoption of the split IVF/ICSI technology in the above cases may help eliminate fertilization failures. This is also a useful method to investigate the effect of single factor on the employment of assisted reproductive tech nology.

  10. How does lead induce male infertility?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping-Chi Hsu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available An important part of male infertility of unknown etiology may be attributed to various environmental and occupational exposures to toxic substances, such as lead. The reproductive effects of lead are complex and appear to involve multiple pathways, not all of which are fully understood. It is still unclear, for example, if male reproductive issues in lead-exposed persons are mostly related to the disruption of reproductive hormones, whether the problems are due to the lead’s direct effects on the gonads, or both? This question has been difficult to answer, because lead, especially at high levels, may adversely affect many human organs. Although lead can potentially reduce male fertility by decreasing sperm count and motility, inducing abnormal morphology and affecting functional parameters; not all studies have been able to clearly demonstrate such findings. In addition, research has shown that the blood-testis barrier can protect testicular cells from direct exposure to high levels of blood lead. For these reasons and considering the wide spectrum of lead toxicity on reproductive hormones, the present review suggests that lead’s main influence on male reproduction probably occurs by altering the reproductive hormonal axis and the hormonal control on spermatogenesis, rather than by a direct toxic effect on the seminiferous tubules of the testes. As blood lead concentrations below the currently accepted worker protection standard may still adversely affect male fertility, future studies should aim to establish more concrete links between lead exposure (especially at low levels and subsequent male infertility. Research should also pay more attention to lead’s effects on reducing male fertility rates based on not only hormonal axis alteration, but also on the changes in sperm characteristic among exposed subjects.

  11. Detection of Y chromosome microdeletions and mitochondrial DNA mutations in male infertility patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güney, A I; Javadova, D; Kırac, D; Ulucan, K; Koc, G; Ergec, D; Tavukcu, H; Tarcan, T

    2012-04-27

    Infertility affects about 10-15% of all couples attempting pregnancy with infertility attributed to the male partner in approximately half of the cases. Proposed causes of male infertility include sperm motility disturbances, Y chromosome microdeletions, chromosomal abnormalities, single gene mutations, and sperm mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) rearrangements. To investigate the etiology of decreased sperm fertility and motility of sperm and to develop an appropriate therapeutic strategy, the molecular basis of these defects must be elucidated. In this study, we aimed to reveal the relationships between the genetic factors including sperm mtDNA mutations, Y chromosome microdeletions, and sperm parameters that can be regarded as candidate factors for male infertility. Thirty men with a history of infertility and 30 fertile men were recruited to the study. Y chromosome microdeletions were analyzed by multiplex PCR. Mitochondrial genes ATPase6, Cytb, and ND1, were amplified by PCR and then analyzed by direct sequencing. No Y chromosome microdeletions were detected in either group. However, a total of 38 different nucleotide substitutions were identified in the examined mitochondrial genes in both groups, all of which are statistically non-significant. Fifteen substitutions caused an amino acid change and 12 were considered novel mutations. As a conclusion, mtDNA mutations and Y chromosome microdeletions in male infertility should be examined in larger numbers in order to clarify the effect of genetic factors.

  12. Guideline-based management of male infertility: Why do we need it?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Landon W Trost

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The current clinical guidelines for the management of infertility as presented by the American Urologic Association and European Association of Urology represent consensus opinions for the management of male-factor infertility. The goal of the present study is to define the currently available guidelines for male-factor infertility, provide a rationale for why guidelines should be implemented, and review concerns and shortcomings towards their incorporation into clinical practice. Successfully integrating guidelines into clinical practice offers the potential benefit of creating a standardized, efficient, and cost-effective algorithm for the evaluation of infertility and facilitates future research. Despite their availability and ease of use, many clinicians fail to adopt clinical guidelines for numerous reasons including decreased awareness of available guidelines, insufficient time, lack of interest, and personal financial considerations. The current guidelines are limited by the inability to generalize recommendations to a heterogeneous patient sample, the lack of interdisciplinary adoption of guidelines, and the need for additional emphasis on prevention and lifestyle modifications. Future direction for the current guidelines will likely incorporate a multidisciplinary approach with increasing utilization of genetic analysis and novel treatment strategies. As the field of infertility continues to expand, the utility of guidelines combined with physician clinical judgment will remain prominent in the treatment of male-factor infertility.

  13. Chromosomal abnormalities and y chromosome microdeletions in infertile men with varicocele and idiopathic infertility of South Indian origin

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rao, Lakshmi; Babu, Arvind; Kanakavalli, Murthy; Padmalatha, Venkata; Singh, Amarpal; Singh, Prashant Kumar; Deenadayal, Mamata; Singh, Lalji

    2004-01-01

    .... The objective of our present study was to investigate the chromosomal abnormalities and Y chromosome microdeletions in infertile men of South Indian origin with varicocele and idiopathic infertility...

  14. Down's syndrome is a risk factor for severe lower respiratory tract infection due to respiratory syncytial virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galleguillos, Constanza; Galleguillos, Bárbara; Larios, Guillermo; Menchaca, Gonzalo; Bont, Louis; Castro-Rodriguez, Jose A

    2016-01-01

    AIM: Previous studies have suggested that Down's syndrome is an independent risk factor for severe respiratory infection due to respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). We compared the clinical characteristics of children with and without Down's syndrome hospitalised due to RSV. METHODS: This retrospectiv

  15. Predictive factors of hospital mortality due to myocardial infarction: A multilevel analysis of Iran′s National Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Ahmadi

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: Individual risk factors had independent effects on the hospital mortality due to MI. Variables in the province level had no significant effect on the outcome of MI. Increasing access and quality to treatment could reduce the mortality due to MI.

  16. Down's syndrome is a risk factor for severe lower respiratory tract infection due to respiratory syncytial virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galleguillos, Constanza; Galleguillos, Bárbara; Larios, Guillermo; Menchaca, Gonzalo; Bont, Louis|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304813370; Castro-Rodriguez, Jose A

    2016-01-01

    AIM: Previous studies have suggested that Down's syndrome is an independent risk factor for severe respiratory infection due to respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). We compared the clinical characteristics of children with and without Down's syndrome hospitalised due to RSV. METHODS: This retrospectiv

  17. Consequences of infertility in developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouchou, Brittany

    2013-05-01

    Infertility affects more than 10% of the world's population. In developing countries, there are severe social, psychological and economic consequences for infertile men and women. All of the cited references are compiled from primary peer-reviewed research articles that were conducted through one-to-one interviews or focus groups in countries of developing regions, such as Africa, Asia and the Middle East. The following paper seeks to raise awareness of the consequences of infertility in developing nations and identify infertility as an under-observed, but significant public health issue. It is proposed that education programmes tailored to each society's specific religious beliefs and grounded traditions must be implemented in order to reverse the social stigma, detrimental psychological effects, and loss of economic security that results from infertility.

  18. The treatment of infertility in polycystic ovary syndrome: a brief update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costello, Michael F; Misso, Marie L; Wong, Jennifer; Hart, Roger; Rombauts, Luk; Melder, Angela; Norman, Robert J; Teede, Helena J

    2012-08-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most common cause of anovulatory infertility. Lifestyle change alone is considered the first-line treatment for the management of infertile anovulatory PCOS women who are overweight or obese. First-line medical ovulation induction therapy to improve fertility outcomes is clomiphene citrate, whilst gonadotrophins, laparoscopic ovarian surgery or possibly metformin are second line in clomiphene citrate-resistant PCOS women. There is currently insufficient evidence to recommend aromatase inhibitors over that of clomiphene citrate in infertile anovulatory PCOS women in general or specifically in therapy naive or clomiphene citrate-resistant PCOS women. IVF/ICSI treatment is recommended either as a third-line treatment or in the presence of other infertility factors.

  19. Association of polymorphism in cell death pathway gene FASLG withhuman male infertility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Deepika Jaiswal; Sameer Trivedi; Neeraj K Agrawal; Kiran Singh

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate –844C>T single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) present in the promoter of cell death pathway gene FASLG with male infertile phenotype. Methods:Genotyping for SNP FASLG (rs763110) was done by polymerase chain reaction followed by analysis with specific endonuclease (PCR-RFLP). DNA sequencing was used to ascertain PCR-RFLP results. Results: FASLG –844C>T polymorphism, allele and genotype distribution did not differ significantly between patients and controls (OR: 1.03, 95% CI= 0.7638 to 1.3952, P=0.83). Thus SNP-844C>T of the FASLG gene is not associated with male infertility risk in the analyzed patients. Conclusion: Human male infertility is a complex disorder and thus other genetic or environmental factors may be contributing to the complex etiology, and further study in other region of Indian populations will verify whether it is associated with male infertility risk.

  20. Clinical, genetic, biochemical, and testicular biopsy findings among 1,213 men evaluated for infertility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Inge Ahlmann; Andersson, Anna-Maria; Aksglaede, Lise

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the pathologic findings among men evaluated for infertility. DESIGN: A retrospective, single-center, cross-sectional study. SETTING: University hospital-based research center. PARTICIPANT(S): We included data from 1,213 medical records from infertile men referred for diagnostic...... work-up from 2005 to 2009. INTERVENTIONS(S): None. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S): Health history, clinical findings, chromosome/genetic aberrations, semen quality, reproductive hormones. RESULT(S): In total, 64.4% of the infertile men had one or more reproductive disorders or factors influencing fertility......, leaving 35.6% diagnosed as idiopathic infertile. In 244 patients (20%), including seven cases of testicular cancer and/or germ cell neoplasia in situ, a pathologic finding was first detected during diagnostic work-up. Two hundred four patients (16.8%) had a history of cryptorchidism and 154 (12...

  1. Factors affecting oxidative peat decomposition due to land use in tropical peat swamp forests in Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Masayuki; Okimoto, Yosuke; Hirano, Takashi; Kusin, Kitso

    2017-12-31

    The increasing frequency of fire due to drainage of tropical peatland has become a major environmental problem in Southeast Asia. To clarify the effects of changes in land use on carbon dioxide emissions, we measured oxidative peat decomposition (PD) at different stages of disturbance at three sites in Central Kalimantan, Indonesia: an undrained peat swamp forest (UF), a heavily drained peat swamp forest (DF), and a drained and burned ex-forest (DB). PD exhibited seasonality, being less in the wet season and greater in the dry season. From February 2014 to December 2015, mean PD (±SE) were 1.90±0.19, 2.30±0.33, and 1.97±0.25μmolm(-2)s(-1) at UF, DF, and DB, respectively. The groundwater level (GWL) was a major controlling factor of PD at all sites. At UF and DF, PD and GWL showed significant quadratic relationships. At DB, PD and GWL showed significant positive and negative relationships during the dry and wet seasons, respectively. Using these relationships, we estimated annual PD from GWL data for 2014 and 2015 as 698 and 745gCm(-2)yr(-1) at UF (mean GWL: -0.23 and -0.39m), 775 and 825gCm(-2)yr(-1) at DF (-0.55 and -0.59m), and 646 and 748gCm(-2)yr(-1) at DB (-0.22 and -0.62m), respectively. The annual PD was significantly higher in DF than in UF or DB, in both years. Despite the very dry conditions, the annual PD values at these sites were much lower than those reported for tropical peat at plantations (e.g., oil palm, rubber, and acacia). The differences in the relationship between PD and GWL indicate that separate estimations are required for each type of land. Moreover, our results suggest that PD can be enhanced by drainage both in forests and at burned sites. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. [Bacterial infection as a cause of infertility in humans].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleha, Radek; Boštíková, Vanda; Salavec, Miloslav; Mosio, Petra; Kusáková, Eva; Kukla, Rudolf; Mazurová, Jaroslava; Spliňo, Miroslav

    2013-04-01

    Microorganisms which are present in the human urogenital tract may be involved in the development of inflammatory changes negatively affecting the genitals in both men and women. Pathological conditions due to inflammatory alterations may result in complete loss of fertility. Infections of the urogenital tract are responsible for 15% of all cases of infertility in couples. Negative impact on the human reproduction is mainly caused by direct damage to the genital tract mucosa by metabolic products of microorganisms or by induction of pro-inflammatory responses of the body. Another mechanism is indirect impact of microorganisms on the genital function. Moreover, the effect of bacteria on spermatogenesis and semen quality is important in men. Infections mainly caused by Chlamydia trachomatis or Neisseria gonorrhoeae represent the greatest risk in terms of permanent consequences for human reproduction. As for other sexually transmitted disorders, such as infections caused by Gardnerella vaginalis, urogenital mycoplasmas or ureaplasmas, the link between infection and infertility has been intensively researched.

  3. Treatment strategies for the infertile polycystic ovary syndrome patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tannus, Samer; Burke, Yechiel Z; Kol, Shahar

    2015-11-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most common endocrine disorder in women of reproductive age. Infertility is a prevalent presenting feature of PCOS, and approximately 75% of these women suffer infertility due to anovulation. Lifestyle modification is considered the first-line treatment and is associated with improved endocrine profile. Clomiphene citrate (CC) should be considered as the first line pharmacologic therapy for ovulation induction. In women who are CC resistant, second-line treatment should be considered, as adding metformin, laparoscopic ovarian drilling or treatment with gonadotropins. In CC treatment failure, Letrozole could be an alternative or treatment with gonadotropins. IVF is considered the third-line treatment; the 'short', antagonist-based protocol is the preferred option for PCOS patients, as it is associated with lower risk of developing ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (specifically by using a gonadotropin--releasing hormone agonist as ovulation trigger), but with comparable outcomes as the long protocol.

  4. Male infertility in long-term survivors of pediatric cancer: A report from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasilewski-Masker, K; Seidel, K D; Leisenring, W; Mertens, A C; Shnorhavorian, M; Ritenour, C W; Stovall, M; Green, D M; Sklar, C A; Armstrong, G T; Robison, L L; Meacham, L R

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of male infertility and treatment-related risk factors in childhood cancer survivors. Methods Within the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study, 1622 survivors and 274 siblings completed the Male Health Questionnaire. The analysis was restricted to survivors (938/1622; 57.8%) and siblings (174/274; 63.5%) who tried to become pregnant. Relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the prevalence of self-reported infertility were calculated using generalized linear models for demographic variables and treatment-related factors to account for correlation among survivors and siblings of the same family. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results Among those who provided self-report data, the prevalence of infertility was 46.0% in survivors versus 17.5% in siblings (RR=2.64, 95% CI 1.88-3.70, p < 0.001). Of survivors who met the definition for infertility, 37% had reported at least one pregnancy with a female partner that resulted in a live birth. In a multivariable analysis, risk factors for infertility included an alkylating agent dose score (AAD) ≥ 3 (RR= 2.13, 95% CI 1.69-2.68 for AAD ≥ 3 versus AAD<3), surgical excision of any organ of the genital tract (RR=1.63, 95% CI 1.20-2.21), testicular radiation ≥ 4Gy (RR=1.99, 95% CI 1.52-2.61), and exposure to bleomycin (RR=1.55, 95% CI 1.20-2.01). Conclusion Many survivors who experience infertility father their own children suggesting episodes of both fertility and infertility. This and the novel association of infertility with bleomycin warrant further investigation. Implications for Cancer Survivors Though infertility is common, male survivors reporting infertility often father their own children. Bleomycin may pose some fertility risk. PMID:24711092

  5. Infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... problems You've been diagnosed with endometriosis or pelvic inflammatory disease You've had multiple miscarriages You've undergone ... the fallopian tube (salpingitis). This can result from pelvic inflammatory disease, which is usually caused by a sexually transmitted ...

  6. Chinese Herbal Products for Female Infertility in Taiwan: A Population-Based Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Yu-Chiang; Kao, Chao-Wei; Lin, Che-Chen; Liao, Yen-Nung; Wu, Bei-Yu; Hung, I-Ling; Hu, Wen-Long

    2016-03-01

    Female infertility and low birth rate are significant public health issues with profound social, psychological, and economic consequences. Some infertile women resort to conventional, complementary, or alternative therapies to conceive. The aim of this study was to identify the Chinese herbal products (CHPs) most commonly used for female infertility in Taiwan. The usage of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) and the frequency of CHP prescriptions to infertile women were determined based on a nationwide 1-million randomly sampled cohort of National Health Insurance Research Database beneficiaries. Descriptive statistics and multiple logistic regression analysis were employed to estimate the adjusted odds ratio (aOR) for TCM usage and potential risk factors. In total, 8766 women with newly diagnosed infertility were included in this study. Of those, 8430 (96.17%) had sought TCM treatment in addition to visiting the gynecologist. We noted that female infertility patients with risk factors (e.g., endometriosis, uterine fibroids, or irregular menstrual cycle) were more likely to use TCM than those without TCM medication (aOR = 1.83, 1.87, and 1.79, respectively). The most commonly used formula and single CHP were Dang-Gui-Sha-Yao-San (17.25%) and Semen Cuscutae (27.40%), respectively. CHP formula combinations (e.g., Dang-Gui-Sha-Yao-San plus Wen-Jing-Tang 3.10%) or single Chinese herbal combinations (e.g., Semen Cuscutae plus Leonurus japonicus 6.31%) were also commonly used to treat female infertility. Further well-conducted, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled studies will be needed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of these CHP combinations for female infertility.

  7. Combined letrozole and clomiphene versus letrozole and clomiphene alone in infertile patients with polycystic ovary syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajishafiha M

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Masomeh Hajishafiha,1 Meisam Dehghan,2 Nazila Kiarang,1 Nahideh Sadegh-Asadi,1 Seyed Navid Shayegh,3 Mohammad Ghasemi-Rad2 1Department of Gynecology, Reproductive Health Research Center, Urmia University of Medical Sciences, 2Urmia University of Medical Sciences, 3Gulf Medical University, Ajman, United Arab Emirates Background: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS is the most common endocrine disorder in women of childbearing age (6.8%–18%, is among the most common causes of infertility due to ovulation factors, and accounts for 55%–70% of infertility cases caused by chronic anovulation. In this study, we used a combination of letrozole and clomiphene in patients resistant to both drugs individually, and studied the effects of this combination in ovulation and pregnancy in resistant PCOS patients. Methods: The study population included infertile couples diagnosed as PCOS in the wife. The women used clomiphene for at least six cycles in order to ovulate after failure to form the dominant follicle, and were then put on letrozole for four cycles. Patients who were unable to form the dominant follicle were enrolled on letrozole and clomiphene combination therapy. Results: One hundred enrolled patients underwent 257 cycles of a combination of letrozole and clomiphene, in which 213 were able to form the dominant follicle (82.9% and 44 were unable to do so (17.1%. The number of mature follicles was 2.3±1.1. The mean endometrial thickness in patients on the day of human chorionic gonadotropin administration was 8.17±1.3 mm. The pregnancy rate was 42%. Conclusion: According to the results of this study, it can be proposed that in PCOS patients resistant to clomiphene and letrozole used as single agents, a combination of the two drugs can be administered before using more aggressive treatment that may have severe complications or surgery. This combination may also be used as a first-line therapy to induce ovulation in severe cases of PCOS in order to

  8. The Potential Use of Intrauterine Insemination as a Basic Option for Infertility: A Review for Technology-Limited Medical Settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelrahman M. Abdelkader

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. There is an asymmetric allocation of technology and other resources for infertility services. Intrauterine insemination (IUI is a process of placing washed spermatozoa transcervically into the uterine cavity for treatment of infertility. This is a review of literature for the potential use of IUI as a basic infertility treatment in technology-limited settings. Study design. Review of articles on treatment of infertility using IUI. Results. Aspects regarding the use of IUI are reviewed, including ovarian stimulation, semen parameters associated with good outcomes, methods of sperm preparation, timing of IUI, and number of inseminations. Implications of the finding in light of the needs of low-technology medical settings are summarized. Conclusion. The reviewed evidence suggests that IUI is less expensive, less invasive, and comparably effective for selected patients as a first-line treatment for couples with unexplained or male factor infertility. Those couples may be offered three to six IUI cycles in technology-limited settings.

  9. The Mediational Role of Cognitive Emotion Regulation Strategies in the Relationship of Ego-strength and Adjustment to Infertility in Women

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Infertility is considered as an intense and prolonged stressful experience. Despite of high prevalence of infertility and its emotional burden for couples and especially for women, the knowledge regarding psychological factors influencing adjustment to it is limited. The aim of the present study was to investigate the mediational role of cognitive emotion regulation strategies in the relationship of ego-strength and adjustment to infertility in women. Materials and methods: A total...

  10. Definition and epidemiology of unexplained infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelbaya, Tarek A; Potdar, Neelam; Jeve, Yadava B; Nardo, Luciano G

    2014-02-01

    The diagnosis of unexplained infertility can be made only after excluding common causes of infertility using standard fertility investigations,which include semen analysis, assessment of ovulation, and tubal patency test. These tests have been selected as they have definitive correlation with pregnancy. It is estimated that a standard fertility evaluation will fail to identify an abnormality in approximately 15% to 30% of infertile couples. The reported incidence of such unexplained infertility varies according to the age and selection criteria in the study population. We conducted a review of the literature via MEDLINE. Articles were limited to English-language, human studies published between 1950 and 2013. Since first coined more than 50 years ago, the term unexplained infertility has been a subject of debate. Although additional investigations are reported to explain or define other causes of infertility, these have high false-positive results and therefore cannot be recommended for routine clinical practice. Couples with unexplained infertility might be reassured that even after 12 months of unsuccessful attempts, 50% will conceive in the following 12 months and another 12% in the year after.

  11. Infertility and pregnancy in women with polycystic ovary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nader, S

    2010-12-01

    Management of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) usually spans a woman's reproductive years. While treatment of androgenic symptoms is often a primary concern, periodically, the regimen has to be modified because of a desire for pregnancy. At this time the couple should be evaluated for factors that may contribute to infertility and this should include semen analysis. However, for many, anovulation is likely to be the cause of infertility and ovulation induction is generally required. The premise on which ovulation induction in PCOS is based is two-fold: increasing ovarian exposure to follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and/or correcting hormonal derangements. Potential differences in pathogenesis, evidenced clinically by phenotypic diversity, would suggest that treatment should be individualized. After a brief overview of factors relating to infertility, this paper outlines treatments available for ovulation induction in women with PCOS and provides a critical appraisal of management options. These options include the use of clomiphene citrate, insulin sensitizers, and the combination. Protocols for ovulation induction with FSH injections are outlined and the relative risks of multiple gestation and severe ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome of these various protocols discussed. The use of aromatase inhibitors and the occasional use of glucocorticoids are briefly reviewed, and indications for in vitro fertilization and laparoscopic ovarian diathermy outlined. Pregnancy outcome in this patient population is also discussed.

  12. Clinical evaluation of the infertile male: new options, new challenges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Robert I McLachlan; Csilla Krausz

    2012-01-01

    Male reproductive dysfunction is the sole or contributory cause of infertility in half of couples making the systematic clinical and laboratory evaluation of the male,and the application of costeffective management strategies tailored to the individual patient's need,vital parts of fertility practice.1,2 Male infertility has a wide range of etiologies and effective approaches to initiate,restore or preserve natural fertility are available in some settings.But the most striking development in the past 20 years has been in the area of assisted reproductive technologies (ART),especially intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI);the latter provides an extraordinarily effective bypass of the natural processes involved such that a single viable sperm,obtained from any part of the reproductive tract,will often successfully fertilize an oocyte and has allowed many previously sterile men to father healthy children.However,our understanding of the genetic and environmental factors causing male factor infertility has lagged behind these technological advances and still for a significant minority,no options exist other than adoption,donor sperm or abandonment of their aspirations for a family.

  13. Hysteroscopic evaluation of post abortive infertile females

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehab Elhelw

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To study the hysteroscopic findings in cases of secondary infertility following abortion compared to cases with primary infertility. Methods: This was a case control study of 200 selected infertile women undergoing diagnostic hysteroscopy as a part of their infertility work-up. These 200 patient were classified into the following: A – 100 patients in whom abortion has occurred whether evacuation and curettage (E.&C. was done or not and B – 100 patients complaining of primary infertility. Results: Hysteroscopy was normal in about 44% of patients group and 45% in control group. Observed abnormalities were septate uterus in 17 cases, intrauterine synechiae in 30 cases, submucus myoma in 10 cases, deformed cavity in 5 cases and endometrial polyp in 35 cases. Endometrial abnormalities (fibrosis, inflammation or atrophy were observed in 7 patients. No significance was found regarding the total number of intrauterine pathologies when comparing the groups of primary versus secondary infertility. Patients group showed higher prevalence of Intra Uterine Septum and Intra Uterine Adhesions. Control group showed higher prevalence of endometrial polyp, submucous myoma and Endometritis. Other findings showed nearly equal prevalence in the two groups. Conclusion: There is a direct correlation between the number of abortions, number of evacuations (E.&C. and degree of intra-uterine adhesion, and an increase in the number of abortions is associated with an increase in the degree of intra-uterine adhesions. However, in this study, there was no significant difference between degree of intra-uterine adhesions in the two groups (patient group and control group. Our data are an additional argument to suggest hysteroscopy as part of investigation in infertile woman. Routine diagnostic hysteroscopy should be part of an infertility work-up in primary and secondary infertility.

  14. Estimating the prevalence of infertility in Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushnik, Tracey; Cook, Jocelynn L.; Yuzpe, A. Albert; Tough, Suzanne; Collins, John

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Over the past 10 years, there has been a significant increase in the use of assisted reproductive technologies in Canada, however, little is known about the overall prevalence of infertility in the population. The purpose of the present study was to estimate the prevalence of current infertility in Canada according to three definitions of the risk of conception. METHODS Data from the infertility component of the 2009–2010 Canadian Community Health Survey were analyzed for married and common-law couples with a female partner aged 18–44. The three definitions of the risk of conception were derived sequentially starting with birth control use in the previous 12 months, adding reported sexual intercourse in the previous 12 months, then pregnancy intent. Prevalence and odds ratios of current infertility were estimated by selected characteristics. RESULTS Estimates of the prevalence of current infertility ranged from 11.5% (95% CI 10.2, 12.9) to 15.7% (95% CI 14.2, 17.4). Each estimate represented an increase in current infertility prevalence in Canada when compared with previous national estimates. Couples with lower parity (0 or 1 child) had significantly higher odds of experiencing current infertility when the female partner was aged 35–44 years versus 18–34 years. Lower odds of experiencing current infertility were observed for multiparous couples regardless of age group of the female partner, when compared with nulliparous couples. CONCLUSIONS The present study suggests that the prevalence of current infertility has increased since the last time it was measured in Canada, and is associated with the age of the female partner and parity. PMID:22258658

  15. Absence of in vitro Procoagulant Activity in Immunoglobulin Preparations due to Activated Coagulation Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oviedo, Adriana E.; Bernardi, María E.; Guglielmone, Hugo A.; Vitali, María S.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Immunoglobulin (IG) products, including intravenous (IVIG) or subcutaneous (SCIG) immunoglobulins are considered safe and effective for medical therapy; however, a sudden and unexpected increase in thromboembolic events (TE) after administration of certain batches of IVIG products has been attributed to the presence of activated coagulation factors, mainly factor XIa. Our aims were to examine the presence of enduring procoagulant activity during the manufacturing process of IGs, with special focus on monitoring factor XIa, and to evaluate the presence of in vitro procoagulant activity attributed to coagulation factors in different lots of IVIG and SCIG. Methods Samples of different steps of IG purification, 19 lots of IVIG and 9 of SCIG were analyzed and compared with 1 commercial preparation of IVIG and 2 of SCIG, respectively. Factors II, VII, IX, XI and XIa and non-activated partial thromboplastin time (NAPTT) were assayed. Results The levels of factors II, VII, IX, X and XI were non-quantifiable once fraction II had been re-dissolved and in all analyzed lots of IVIG and SCIG. The level of factor XIa at that point was under the detection limits of the assay, and NAPTT yielded values greater than the control during the purification process. In SCIG, we detected higher concentrations of factor XIa in the commercial products, which reached values up to 5 times higher than the average amounts found in the 9 batches produced by UNC-Hemoderivados. Factor XIa in commercial IVIG reached levels slightly higher than those of the 19 batches produced by UNC-Hemoderivados. Conclusion IVIG and SCIG manufactured by UNC-Hemoderivados showed a lack of thrombogenic potential, as demonstrated not only by the laboratory data obtained in this study but also by the absence of any reports of TE registered by the post marketing pharmacovigilance department. PMID:26733772

  16. Risk factors for sickness absence due to low back pain and prognostic factors for return to work in a cohort of shipyard workers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.C. Alexopoulos (Evangelos); E.C. Konstantinou (Eleni); G. Bakoyannis (Giorgos); D. Tanagra (Dimitra); A. Burdorf (Alex)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractThe purpose of this study was to determine risk factors for the occurrence of sickness absence due to low back pain (LBP) and to evaluate prognostic factors for return to work. A longitudinal study with 1-year follow-up was conducted among 853 shipyard workers. The cohort was drawn aroun

  17. Identification of male factor infertility using a novel semen quality score and reactive oxygen species levels Identificação de pacientes portadores do fator de infertilidade masculina através do cálculo de um novo escore de qualidade de sêmen e pela medida de espécies reativas de oxigênio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiran P. Nallella

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To determine whether patients with male factor infertility can be accurately identified by calculating a novel semen quality score and measuring levels of reactive oxygen species during routine infertility screening. METHODS: Semen samples from 133 patients and 91 healthy donors were evaluated with manual and computer-assisted semen analysis. A principal component analysis model was employed to calculate a semen quality score. In brief, this score was calculated by base 10 logarithms multiplied by varying weights given to 9 sperm parameters. Reactive oxygen species levels were measured using chemiluminescence assay. RESULTS: The semen quality score had a sensitivity of 80.45% and accuracy of 77% at a cutoff of 93.1 in identifying patients with male factor infertility. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curves for the semen quality score was 84.28% (95% CI: 65.22%-100%. Reactive oxygen species levels [log10 (reactive oxygen species +1] were significantly higher in male factor infertility patients. Reactive oxygen species had a sensitivity of 83.47% and specificity of 60.52% with an accuracy of 75% at a cutoff of 1.25 in identifying male factor infertility patients. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for reactive oxygen species levels was 78.92% (95% CI: 72.60%-85.23%. semen quality scores were significantly and negatively correlated with reactive oxygen species levels in the donors and the male factor infertility patients. CONCLUSIONS: The semen quality score and reactive oxygen species levels in semen samples appear to be strongly associated with male factor infertility. Because both of these parameters are more sensitive than individual sperm parameters in identifying male factor infertility, they should be included in routine infertility screening.OBJETIVO: Determinar se pacientes portadores do fator de infertilidade masculina podem ser precisamente identificados através do cálculo de um

  18. History of infertility and risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobias, Deirdre K; Gaskins, Audrey J; Missmer, Stacey A; Hu, Frank B; Manson, JoAnn E; Buck Louis, Germaine M; Zhang, Cuilin; Chavarro, Jorge E

    2015-04-01

    We sought to evaluate the relationship between delayed conception and type 2 diabetes risk, given that there are plausible underlying mechanisms linking the two, including inflammation and insulin resistance. Participants of the Nurses' Health Study II prospective cohort were included if they were free of chronic disease (cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, cancer) at baseline. Biennial questionnaires updated information on infertility status (>12 months attempted pregnancy), lifestyle characteristics and several health-related outcomes. Self-reported cases of diabetes were confirmed using a follow-up questionnaire. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards models were used to compute the HRs and 95% CIs. Incident type 2 diabetes occurred in 5,993 of the 112,106 participants over 24 years of follow-up (1989-2013). A history of infertility was reported in 27,774 (24.8%) women and was associated with a 20% greater risk of developing diabetes, compared with those never reporting infertility (HR 1.20 [95% CI 1.14, 1.28]), after adjusting for age, lifestyle factors, marital status, oral contraceptive use, family history of diabetes and BMI. Compared with women without a history of infertility, the causes of infertility associated with a higher diabetes risk were ovulation disorders (HR 1.43 [95% CI 1.29, 1.58]) and tubal factor (HR 1.34 [95% CI 1.13, 1.58]). Cervical factor (HR 1.06 [95% CI 0.81, 1.40]) and endometriosis (HR 1.06 [95% CI 0.89, 1.27]) were not associated, while male factor infertility was associated with a modestly higher diabetes risk (HR 1.15 [95% CI 1.00, 1.33]). These novel findings suggest a history of infertility, particularly that related to ovulation disorders and tubal blockage, is significantly associated with a higher risk of type 2 diabetes.

  19. A maternally inherited autosomal point mutation in human phospholipase C zeta (PLCζ) leads to male infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashir, Junaid; Konstantinidis, Michalis; Jones, Celine; Lemmon, Bernadette; Lee, Hoi Chang; Hamer, Rebecca; Heindryckx, Bjorn; Deane, Charlotte M; De Sutter, Petra; Fissore, Rafael A; Parrington, John; Wells, Dagan; Coward, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    Male factor and idiopathic infertility contribute significantly to global infertility, with abnormal testicular gene expression considered to be a major cause. Certain types of male infertility are caused by failure of the sperm to activate the oocyte, a process normally regulated by calcium oscillations, thought to be induced by a sperm-specific phospholipase C, PLCzeta (PLCζ). Previously, we identified a point mutation in an infertile male resulting in the substitution of histidine for proline at position 398 of the protein sequence (PLCζ(H398P)), leading to abnormal PLCζ function and infertility. Here, using a combination of direct-sequencing and mini-sequencing of the PLCζ gene from the patient and his family, we report the identification of a second PLCζ mutation in the same patient resulting in a histidine to leucine substitution at position 233 (PLCζ(H233L)), which is predicted to disrupt local protein interactions in a manner similar to PLCζ(H398P) and was shown to exhibit abnormal calcium oscillatory ability following predictive 3D modelling and cRNA injection in mouse oocytes respectively. We show that PLCζ(H233L) and PLCζ(H398P) exist on distinct parental chromosomes, the former inherited from the patient's mother and the latter from his father. Neither mutation was detected utilizing custom-made single-nucleotide polymorphism assays in 100 fertile males and females, or 8 infertile males with characterized oocyte activation deficiency. Collectively, our findings provide further evidence regarding the importance of PLCζ at oocyte activation and forms of male infertility where this is deficient. Additionally, we show that the inheritance patterns underlying male infertility are more complex than previously thought and may involve maternal mechanisms.

  20. The CAG repeat polymorphism of mitochondrial polymerase gamma (POLG) is associated with male infertility in Tunisia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baklouti-Gargouri, S; Ghorbel, M; Chakroun, N; Sellami, A; Fakhfakh, F; Ammar-Keskes, L

    2012-05-01

    Male fertility largely depends on sperm quality, which may be affected by environmental and genetic factors. Recent data emphasised the implication of the polymorphism of mitochondrial DNA polymerase gamma (POLG) CAG repeats in male infertility. In this report, we explored a possible role of the (POLG) gene polymorphism in male infertility in Tunisian men. The polymorphic CAG repeat in the nuclear POLG gene was studied in 339 male subjects (216 patients with infertility (69 azoospermic, 115 oligoasthenoteratospermic and 32 normospermic) and 123 fertile) after DNA amplification by PCR, followed by genotyping using an automatic sequencer. The heterozygous and the homozygous mutant genotypes (10/ ≠ 10 and ≠ 10/ ≠ 10) were significantly more frequent among infertile patients than among fertile controls (11.2% versus 1.6%, P = 1.3 × 10(-3) and 4.6% versus 0.8%, P = 4.2 × 10(-7) respectively). We also found a significant difference between the frequencies of 10/ ≠ 10 genotype in azoospermic (4.4%) and in oligoasthenoteratospermic (15.6%) infertile patients (P = 2.6 × 10(-2) ). However, the homozygous mutant genotype (≠ 10/ ≠ 10) was seen at similar frequencies in azoospermic, normospermic and oligoasthenospermic men (4.4%, 3.1% and 5.2% respectively). Under our conditions, the findings showed an association between POLG CAG repeat polymorphism and male infertility in Tunisian population.

  1. Endometriosis-associated infertility: GDF-9, AMH, and AMHR2 genes polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Conto, Emily; Matte, Úrsula; Bilibio, João Paolo; Genro, Vanessa Krebs; Souza, Carlos Augusto; Leão, Delva Pereira; Cunha-Filho, João Sabino

    2017-08-22

    The purpose of this paper is to determine whether there is a correlation between polymorphisms in the growth differentiation factor-9 (GDF-9) gene and anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) gene and its receptor, AMHR2, and endometriosis-associated infertility. This is a case-control study to evaluate whether there is a correlation between polymorphisms in the GDF-9 gene (SNPs determined by direct sequencing), AMH gene, AMHR2 (both SNPs determined by genotyping using TaqMan Allelic Discrimination), and endometriosis-associated infertility. The study included 74 infertile women with endometriosis and 70 fertile women (tubal ligation) as a control group. Patient age and the mean FSH levels were similar between the infertile with endometriosis and fertile without endometriosis groups. The frequency of genotypes between the groups for GDF-9 gene polymorphisms did not show statistical significance, nor did the AMHR2 gene polymorphism. However, the AMH gene polymorphism did show statistical significance, relating the polymorphic allele with infertility in endometriosis. We demonstrate that an SNP in the AMH gene is associated with infertility in endometriosis, whereas several SNPs in the GDF-9 gene and the - 482A G SNP in the AMHR2 gene were found to be unrelated.

  2. Single nucleotide polymorphisms of the heat shock protein 90 gene in varicocele-associated infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pericles A. Hassun Filho

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Varicoceles are associated with impaired testicular function and male infertility, but the molecular mechanisms by which fertility is affected have not been satisfactorily explained. Spermatogenesis might be affected by increased scrotal temperature, such as that caused by varicocele. HSP90 is a molecular chaperone expressed in germ cells and is related to spermatogenesis, motility, and both heat and oxidative stress. Possible correlations between coding single region nucleotide polymorphisms (cSNPs in the HSP90 gene in patients with varicocele associated with infertility were analyzed, and polymorphisms in these exons were characterized through DNA sequencing. MATERIALS AND METHODS: PCR-SSCP and DNA sequencing were used to search for mutations in 18 infertile patients with varicocele, 11 patients with idiopathic infertility and 12 fertile men. DNA was extracted from leucocytes for PCR amplification and SSCP analysis. DNA from samples with an altered band pattern in the SSCP was then sequenced to search for polymorphisms. RESULTS: Three silent polymorphisms that do not lead to amino acid substitutions were identified. CONCLUSION: Mutations in the HSP90 gene do not appear to be a common cause of male factor infertility. The low incidence of gene variation, or SNPs, in infertile men demonstrates that this gene is highly conserved and thus confirms its key role in spermatogenesis and response to heat stress.

  3. Obesity and female infertility: potential mediators of obesity's impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broughton, Darcy E; Moley, Kelle H

    2017-04-01

    The worldwide upward trend in obesity has been dramatic, now affecting more than 20% of American women of reproductive age. Obesity is associated with many adverse maternal and fetal effects prenatally, but it also exerts a negative influence on female fertility. Obese women are more likely to have ovulatory dysfunction due to dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis. Women with polycystic ovarian syndrome who are also obese demonstrate a more severe metabolic and reproductive phenotype. Obese women have reduced fecundity even when eumenorrheic and demonstrate poorer outcomes with the use of in vitro fertilization. Obesity appears to affect the oocyte and the preimplantation embryo, with disrupted meiotic spindle formation and mitochondrial dynamics. Excess free fatty acids may have a toxic effect in reproductive tissues, leading to cellular damage and a chronic low-grade inflammatory state. Altered levels of adipokines, such as leptin, in the obese state can affect steroidogenesis and directly affect the developing embryo. The endometrium is also susceptible, with evidence of impaired stromal decidualization in obese women. This may explain subfecundity due to impaired receptivity, and may lead to placental abnormalities as manifested by higher rates of miscarriage, stillbirth, and preeclampsia in the obese population. Many interventions have been explored to mitigate the effect of obesity on infertility, including weight loss, physical activity, dietary factors, and bariatric surgery. These data are largely mixed, with few high quality studies to guide us. As we improve our understanding of the pathophysiology of obesity in human reproduction we hope to identify novel treatment strategies. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. BUSINESS CAPABILITIES AND HR KNOWLEDGE’ AS THE CRITICAL FACTOR OF DUE DILIGENCE IN PRE-ACQUISITION PHASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alen Sacek

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Previous theoretical research has argued that due diligence in the pre-acquisition phase is traditionally oriented towards legal and financial matters. However, in the innovation-driven market environment, where firms need to maintain competitive strength, business skills and knowledge play important roles. Despite this difference, the due diligence research continues in traditional areas, e.g., financial history, legal and commercial liabilities, and tax issues. Hence, the problem may arise in acquirers overpaying or mistakenly rejecting a target firm. There is a need for assessing ‘Business Capabilities and Human Resources Knowledge’ for due diligence in the pre-acquisition phase. Based on a fundamental review of critical factors in mergers and acquisitions, this study seeks to examine the inclusion of this factor in due diligence during pre-acquisition. The research method includes a cross-sectional survey among firms with cross-border acquisition experience. The results of the empirical research provide reasonable support towards the organizational learning theory, suggesting that the more the acquirer learns about the critical factor, “Business Capabilities and Human Resources Knowledge”, the better the acquisition success. These results highlight the importance of expanding the traditional due diligence view by including this critical factor as the integral part of the pre-acquisition investigation.

  5. Episodic variations of prolactin, thyroid-stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone, melatonin and cortisol in infertile women with subclinical hypothyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bals-Pratsch, M; De Geyter, C; Müller, T; Frieling, U; Lerchl, A; Pirke, K M; Hanker, J P; Becker-Carus, C; Nieschlag, E

    1997-05-01

    Preliminary data have suggested that female infertility due to corpus luteum insufficiency may be caused by subclinical hypothyroidism [exaggerated thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) response to thyrotrophin-releasing hormone (TRH) stimulation]. L-Thyroxine supplementation has been recommended to achieve pregnancies in subclinical hypothyroid women. This controlled study was carried out in order to investigate the biochemical diagnosis of subclinical hypothyroidism as a possible infertility factor. Five infertile patients (aged 25-36 years) with subclinical hypothyroidism (n = 4, stimulated TSH >20 microU/ml) or primary hypothyroidism (n = 1) and five healthy controls (aged 22-39 years) with normal thyroid function (stimulated TSH infertility were studied in the early follicular phase. In the pre-study evaluation, eight of 23 volunteers (34.8%) had to be excluded because of subclinical hypothyroidism with stimulated TSH values (TSHs) >15 microU/ml. Cycle function of patients and controls was compared by the method of LH pulse pattern analysis. Therefore blood samples were drawn every 10 min during a 24 h period. Sleep was recorded from midnight to 7 a.m. Repetition of the TRH tests at the end of the 24 h blood sampling period confirmed the difference in stimulated TSH values of the two study groups. Pulse analysis for luteinizing hormone (LH), TSH and prolactin showed no differences between patients and controls for pulse frequency, amplitude, height, length, area under curve (AUC) and the 24 h mean. Even the hypothyroid patient had a normal LH pulse pattern. Additional measurement of melatonin in pooled sera every 30 min gave the well-documented diurnal profiles during day and night for both groups. Patients had significantly higher melatonin values at seven time points during the night. Peaks for LH, TSH, prolactin and cortisol were correlated with the sleep stages wake, rapid eye movement, 1 + 2 and 3 + 4. We concluded that corpus luteum insufficiency in female

  6. Selenium–vitamin E supplementation in infertile men: effects on semen parameters and pregnancy rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad K Moslemi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Mohammad K Moslemi1,2, Samaneh Tavanbakhsh31Highly Specialized Jihad Daneshgahi Infertility Center, Qom Branch (ACECR, Qom, Iran; 2Department of Urology, 3School of Medicine, Qom University of Medical Sciences, Qom, IranObjectives: Infertility is an important medical and social problem that has an impact on well-being. A significant development in the last 10 years in the study of human infertility has been the discovery that oxidative sperm DNA damage has a critical role in the etiology of poor semen quality and male infertility. Selenium (Se is an essential element for normal testicular development, spermatogenesis, and spermatozoa motility and function. The predominant biochemical action of Se in both humans and animals is to serve as an antioxidant via the Se-dependent enzyme glutathione peroxidase and thus protect cellular membranes and organelles from peroxidative damage. We explored the efficacy of Se in combination with vitamin E for improving semen parameters and pregnancy rates in infertile men.Materials and methods: The study included 690 infertile men with idiopathic asthenoteratospermia who received supplemental daily Se (200 µg in combination with vitamin E (400 units for at least 100 days. The mean age of cases was 28.5 years (range 20–45, and the median age was 30 years. These cases had presented with male factor infertility (primary or secondary for at least 1 year. The longest and shortest duration of infertility was 10 years and 1 year, respectively. The median time of diagnosis of infertility was 1 year with a mean of 2.5 years.Results: We observed 52.6% (362 cases total improvement in sperm motility, morphology, or both, and 10.8% (75 cases spontaneous pregnancy in comparison with no treatment (95% confidence interval: 3.08 to 5.52. No response to treatment occurred in 253 cases (36.6% after 14 weeks of combination therapy. Mean difference between semen analyses of cases before and after treatment was 4.3% with a standard

  7. Scale-factor variations due to wavelength-dependent optical losses in fiber optic gyros

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, James A.

    1996-11-01

    Most sources of optical loss in a fiber optic gyro (FOG) depend on wavelength. Because of the broadband sources used in interferometric FOGs, these losses result in an effective shift of mean wavelength of the light producing the interference signal. For some signal processing methods, these wavelength variations produce proportional changes in the IFOG scale factor. Using well documented approximations, losses are calculated and plotted versus wavelength. A discussion of the qualitative effects on scale factor is presented and expected mean wavelength variations are computed using a representative approximation of the spectrum of a FOG source. The types of losses considered include: fiber-fiber or fiber-wave guide misalignments; microbend losses, bending losses and mode diameter mismatches. Preliminary results indicate that scale factor variations caused by such losses will contribute significantly to the total scale factor thermal sensitivity for some FOG designs. While closed loop operation results in a scale factor with fundamentally low sensitivity to variations in optical losses, most implementations are sensitive to changes in mean wavelength, thus the effects discussed here should be considered when designing high performance IFOGs and their electronics.

  8. Hypothetical link between infertility and genetically modified food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Mingxia; Li, Bin; Yuan, Wenzhen; Zhao, Lihui; Zhang, Xuehong

    2014-01-01

    It is speculated that genetically modified food (GMF)/genetically modified organism (GMO) is responsible for infertility development. The risk linked with a wide use of GMFs/GMOs offers the basic elements for social criticism. However, to date, it has not been justified whether the bad effects are directly resulted from products of genetic modifications or trans-genesis process. Extensive experience with the risk assessment of whole foods has been applied recently on the safety and nutritional testing of GMFs/GMOs. Investigations have tested the safety of GMFs including sub-acute, chronic, reproductive, multi-generation and carcinogenicity studies. We extrapolated the potential risks associated with GMFs/GMOs on reproduction, and analyzed the multi-aspect linked between infertility and GMFs/GMOs. It could be conjectured that GMFs/GMOs could be potential hazard on reproduction, linking to the development of infertility through influencing the endocrine metabolism, endometriosis. However, little evidence shows the impaction on embryo or reproductive related tumor due to the limited literatures, and needs further research. The article presents some related patents on GMFs/GMOs, and some methods for tracking GMOs.

  9. Severe oligospermia associated with a unique balanced reciprocal translocation t(6;12)(q23;q24.3): male infertility related to t(6;12).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianco, B; Christofolini, D; Gava, M; Mafra, F; Moraes, E; Barbosa, C

    2011-04-01

    The prevalence of chromosome abnormalities is increased in infertile men, the incidence of a chromosomal factor being estimated to be about 8%. We report two brothers, a 38-year-old man with 10 years' primary infertility and severe oligospermia, but otherwise healthy, and a 35-year-old man with primary infertility and a history of mumps during puberty. Semen and karyotype analysis, and investigation of Y-chromosome microdeletions were performed. An apparently unique reciprocal translocation t(6;12)(q23;q24.3) was found in both infertile brothers. Semen analyses showed severe oligospermia. No Y-chromosome microdeletions were found. These two cases support the relationship between both environmental and chromosomal abnormalities, combined or separated, with male infertility. Investigation of genetic alterations in infertile males has to be performed prior to performing any assisted reproduction technique. © 2010 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  10. Sexual behavior of infertile women: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokaie, Mahshid; Simbar, Masoumeh; Yassini Ardekani, Seyed Mojtaba

    2015-10-01

    Infertility makes an essential challenge to the sexual life of couples, especially infertile women. When pregnancy does not happen, infertile women think that sexual intercourse is not fruitful and sexual desire became reduce gradually. Infertile women progressively forget that their sexual relationship is also a response to their natural need. This qualitative study was conducted to explore the infertility consequences in the sexual behavior of infertile women. This was a qualitative content analysis study; and it was part of a widespread study, used a sequential mixed-method and conducted from August 2014 until February 2015. A purposeful sampling was used to recruit infertile women who had referred to Yazd Research and Clinical Center for Infertility. Data gathering techniques employed in this research included in-depth semi structured open face-to-face interviews and field notes. Credibility, transferability, confirm ability, and dependability were assessed for the rigor of the data collection. Totally, 15 infertile women and 8 key informants were interviewed. Data analysis showed four themes about impact of infertility on female sexual behavior: 1/ Impact of infertility drugs on couple sexual behavior, 2/ Impact of assisted reproductive technologies on female sexual behavior, 3/ Timed intercourse during infertility and 4/ The psychological impact of infertility on sexual behavior. Some of Iranian infertile women could cope with their problems, but some of them were very affected by infertility drugs and assisted reproductive technologies procedures. Psychosexual counseling before medical treatment could help them to have a better sexual life.

  11. Complement factor H deficiency and endocapillary glomerulonephritis due to paternal isodisomy and a novel factor H mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schejbel, L; Schmidt, I M; Kirchhoff, Eva Maria;

    2011-01-01

    Complement factor H (CFH) is a regulator of the alternative complement activation pathway. Mutations in the CFH gene are associated with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome, membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis type II and C3 glomerulonephritis. Here, we report a 6-month-old CFH-deficient child...

  12. Validation of neutron flux redistribution factors in JSI TRIGA reactor due to control rod movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiba, Tanja; Žerovnik, Gašper; Jazbec, Anže; Štancar, Žiga; Barbot, Loïc; Fourmentel, Damien; Snoj, Luka

    2015-10-01

    For efficient utilization of research reactors, such as TRIGA Mark II reactor in Ljubljana, it is important to know neutron flux distribution in the reactor as accurately as possible. The focus of this study is on the neutron flux redistributions due to control rod movements. For analyzing neutron flux redistributions, Monte Carlo calculations of fission rate distributions with the JSI TRIGA reactor model at different control rod configurations have been performed. Sensitivity of the detector response due to control rod movement have been studied. Optimal radial and axial positions of the detector have been determined. Measurements of the axial neutron flux distribution using the CEA manufactured fission chambers have been performed. The experiments at different control rod positions were conducted and compared with the MCNP calculations for a fixed detector axial position. In the future, simultaneous on-line measurements with multiple fission chambers will be performed inside the reactor core for a more accurate on-line power monitoring system.

  13. Impaired Leydig cell function in infertile men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, A-M; Jørgensen, N; Frydelund-Larsen, L

    2004-01-01

    To investigate whether an impaired Leydig cell function is present in severely oligospermic men, serum testosterone (T), LH, estradiol (E(2)), and SHBG levels in 357 idiopathic infertile men were compared with levels in 318 proven fertile men. In addition, the T/LH ratio, E(2)/T ratio...... of the fertile levels.Thus, the group of infertile men showed significant signs of impaired Leydig cell function in parallel to their impaired spermatogenesis. The association of decreased spermatogenesis and impaired Leydig cell function might reflect a disturbed paracrine communication between the seminiferous......, and calculated free T index (cFT) were compared between the two groups.A shift toward lower serum T levels, cFT, and T/LH ratio and higher serum LH, E(2), and E(2)/T levels was observed in the group of infertile men. On average, the infertile men had 18, 26, and 34% lower serum T, cFT, and T/LH levels...

  14. Polycystic ovary syndrome: current infertility management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubuchon, Mira; Legro, Richard S

    2011-12-01

    This review summarizes the diagnosis of polycystic ovary syndrome and management of associated infertility. The goal is to guide clinicians through basic evaluation, initial treatment, and briefly describe more complex therapies.

  15. Basic infertility including polycystic ovary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brassard, Maryse; AinMelk, Youssef; Baillargeon, Jean-Patrice

    2008-09-01

    Infertility in women has many possible causes and must be approached systematically. The most common cause of medically treatable infertility is the polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). This syndrome is common in young women and is the cause of anovulatory infertility in 70% of cases. It is therefore an important condition to screen and manage in primary care medical settings. In the past 10 years, insulin sensitization with weight loss or metformin has been shown to be a safe and effective treatment for PCOS infertility that eliminates the risk of multiple pregnancy and may reduce the risk of early pregnancy loss as compared with ovulation-inductor drugs. The authors believe metformin should be considered as first-line therapy because it has the advantage to allow for normal single ovulation, for reduced early pregnancy loss, and, most importantly, lifestyle modifications and weight loss before pregnancy. Losing weight not only improves fertility but also reduces adverse pregnancy outcomes associated with obesity.

  16. Psychological and ethical implications related to infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minucci, Daria

    2013-12-01

    Being a parent is deeply demanding and one of the most important events in life; parents experience the deepening of human relationships with their partner, within their families, and in society, and moreover the fundamental relationship between parent and child. Every medical, social, and political effort must be made to prevent infertility but also to offer infertile couples the best diagnostic and therapeutic paths. Understanding the suffering of the couple and their families prevents and helps ease the possible psychological and social complications of infertility. Therefore, infertility concerns not only biomedical sciences but also psychological and social ones-ethics and law-in their combined efforts to identify areas of understanding and of research for solutions while respecting the dignity of the couple and unborn child. The Catholic Church offers an ongoing contribution through dialogue in looking for ethical principles guiding scientific and medical research respectful of the true life of human beings.

  17. Infertility Patients' Mental Health Problems Often Unaddressed

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... therapy on top of that. To Pasch, the solution is for clinics to have a mental health ... Services, or federal policy. More Health News on: Depression Infertility Recent Health News Related MedlinePlus Health Topics ...

  18. Risk Factors for Nosocomial Bacterremia Due to Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Pujol (Miquel); C. Pena; R. Pallares (Roman); J. Ayats (Josefina); J. Ariza (Javier); F. Gudiol (Francesc)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractIn a prospective surveillance study (February 1990–December 1991) performed at a 1000-bed teaching hospital to identify risk factors for nosocomial methicillin-resistantStaphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteremia, 309 patients were found to be colonized (n=103; 33 %) or infected (n=206; 67 %

  19. Short Interpregnancy Interval as a Risk Factor of Spontaneous Preterm Labor due to Low Cervical Collagen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sundtoft, Iben Blaabjerg; Uldbjerg, Niels; Sommer, Steffen

      OBJECTIVE: The incidence of preterm labor is increasing and continues to be a significant cause of neonatal mortality and morbidity. Various risk factors of preterm labor are known, among those a short interval between labor and a subsequent conception. The risk of spontaneous preterm labor inc...

  20. Experimental autoimmune orchitis as a model of immunological male infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naito, Munekazu; Terayama, Hayato; Hirai, Shuichi; Qu, Ning; Lustig, Livia; Itoh, Masahiro

    2012-12-01

    Clinically, 60-75% of male infertility cases are categorized as idiopathic spermatogenic disturbance. In previous studies of this condition, lymphocytic infiltration and immune deposits were present in several testis biopsy specimens, indicating that inflammatory or immunological factors contribute to the occurrence of the lesions. However, there is currently little evidence regarding immunological infertility in men. Previously, we established an immunological infertility model, experimental autoimmune orchitis (EAO), that can be induced in mice by two subcutaneous injections of viable syngeneic testicular germ cells without the use of any adjuvant. In this EAO model, lymphocytes surround the tubuli recti and then induce spermatogenic disturbance. In addition, after the active inflammation stage of this model, the seminiferous epithelium is damaged irreversibly, resembling the histopathology of human male idiopathic spermatogenic disturbance. In the majority of patients with testicular autoimmunity, there is a chronic and asymptomatic development of the inflammatory reaction. Therefore, this disease is very difficult to diagnose at the ongoing stage, and it is possible that the histopathology of idiopathic spermatogenic disturbance in the clinic is reported at the post-active inflammation stage of autoimmune orchitis. In this review, the histopathology of EAO before and after inflammation is discussed, comparing it with human orchitis.