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Sample records for factor ii mutation

  1. Customized chemotherapy based on epidermal growth factor receptor mutation status for elderly patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer: a phase II trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, Shiro; Mio, Tadashi; Katakami, Nobuyuki; Masago, Katsuhiro; Yoshioka, Hiroshige; Tomii, Keisuke; Kaneda, Toshihiko; Hirabayashi, Masataka; Kunimasa, Kei; Morizane, Toshio

    2012-01-01

    Elderly patients are more vulnerable to toxicity from chemotherapy. Activating epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are associated with enhanced response to EGFR tyrosine-kinase inhibitors. We studied patients with advanced NSCLC for whom treatment was customized based on EGFR mutation status. We screened 57 chemotherapy-naïve patients with histologically or cytologically confirmed NSCLC, stage IIIB or IV, aged 70 years or older, and with an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status 0 or 1, for EGFR exon 19 codon 746–750 deletion and exon 21 L858R mutation. Twenty-two patients with EGFR mutations received gefitinib; 32 patients without mutations received vinorelbine or gemcitabine. The primary endpoint was the response rate. The response rate was 45.5% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 24.4%, 67.8%) in patients with EGFR mutations and 18.8% (95% CI: 7.2%, 36.4%) in patients without EGFR mutations. The median overall survival was 27.9 months (95%CI: 24.4 months, undeterminable months) in patients with EGFR mutations and 14.9 months (95%CI: 11.0 months, 22.4 months) in patients without EGFR mutations. In the gefitinib group, grade 3/4 hepatic dysfunction and dermatitis occurred in 23% and 5% of patients, respectively. In patients treated with vinorelbine or gemcitabine, the most common grade 3 or 4 adverse events were neutropenia (47%; four had febrile neutropenia), anemia (13%), and anorexia (9%). No treatment-related deaths occurred. Treatment customization based on EGFR mutation status deserves consideration, particularly for elderly patients who often cannot receive second-line chemotherapy due to poor organ function or comorbidities. This trial is registered at University hospital Medical Information Network-clinical trial registration (http://www.umin.ac.jp/ctr/index/htm) with the registration identification number C000000436

  2. Factor II assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003674.htm Factor II assay To use the sharing features on ... M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health ...

  3. Factor II deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000549.htm Factor II deficiency To use the sharing features on ... M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health ...

  4. Factor V Leiden mutation in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Susan Murphy

    2004-01-01

    Normal maternal adaptation to pregnancy significantly increases the risk for thrombus formation. Inherited thrombophilias further increase risk for deep venous thrombosis and adverse outcome in pregnancy. Factor V Leiden mutation is the most common inherited thrombophilia, occurring in approximately 5% of the White and 1% of the Black populations. Nurses should be knowledgeable about screening for and diagnosis of factor V Leiden mutation, risk reduction counseling, recommended care of the affected patient, and implications of anticoagulant therapy during the perinatal period.

  5. Mutation and biochemical analysis in carnitine palmitoyltransferase type II (CPT II) deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olpin, S E; Afifi, A; Clark, S

    2003-01-01

    Carnitine palmitoyltransferase type II (CPT II) deficiency has three basic phenotypes, late-onset muscular (mild), infantile/juvenile hepatic (intermediate) and severe neonatal. We have measured fatty acid oxidation and CPT II activity and performed mutation studies in 24 symptomatic patients...

  6. Factor V Leiden Mutation and PT 20210 Mutation Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disorders Fibromyalgia Food and Waterborne Illness Fungal Infections Gout Graves Disease Guillain-Barré Syndrome Hashimoto Thyroiditis Heart ... Tested? To determine whether you have an inherited gene mutation that increases your risk of developing a ...

  7. Developmental and transcriptional consequences of mutations in Drosophila TAF(II)60.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoyagi, N; Wassarman, D A

    2001-10-01

    In vitro, the TAF(II)60 component of the TFIID complex contributes to RNA polymerase II transcription initiation by serving as a coactivator that interacts with specific activator proteins and possibly as a promoter selectivity factor that interacts with the downstream promoter element. In vivo roles for TAF(II)60 in metazoan transcription are not as clear. Here we have investigated the developmental and transcriptional requirements for TAF(II)60 by analyzing four independent Drosophila melanogaster TAF(II)60 mutants. Loss-of-function mutations in Drosophila TAF(II)60 result in lethality, indicating that TAF(II)60 provides a nonredundant function in vivo. Molecular analysis of TAF(II)60 alleles revealed that essential TAF(II)60 functions are provided by two evolutionarily conserved regions located in the N-terminal half of the protein. TAF(II)60 is required at all stages of Drosophila development, in both germ cells and somatic cells. Expression of TAF(II)60 from a transgene rescued the lethality of TAF(II)60 mutants and exposed requirements for TAF(II)60 during imaginal development, spermatogenesis, and oogenesis. Phenotypes of rescued TAF(II)60 mutant flies implicate TAF(II)60 in transcriptional mechanisms that regulate cell growth and cell fate specification and suggest that TAF(II)60 is a limiting component of the machinery that regulates the transcription of dosage-sensitive genes. Finally, TAF(II)60 plays roles in developmental regulation of gene expression that are distinct from those of other TAF(II) proteins.

  8. Phase I/II trial of vorinostat (SAHA) and erlotinib for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations after erlotinib progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reguart, Noemi; Rosell, Rafael; Cardenal, Felipe; Cardona, Andres F; Isla, Dolores; Palmero, Ramon; Moran, Teresa; Rolfo, Christian; Pallarès, M Cinta; Insa, Amelia; Carcereny, Enric; Majem, Margarita; De Castro, Javier; Queralt, Cristina; Molina, Miguel A; Taron, Miquel

    2014-05-01

    Vorinostat or suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) is a novel histone deacetylase inhibitor with demonstrated antiproliferative effects due to drug-induced accumulation of acetylated proteins, including the heat shock protein 90. We prospectively studied the activity of vorinostat plus erlotinib in EGFR-mutated NSCLC patients with progression to tyrosine kinase inhibitors. We conducted this prospective, non-randomized, multicenter, phase I/II trial to evaluate the maximum tolerated dose, toxicity profile and efficacy of erlotinib and vorinostat. Patients with advanced NSCLC harboring EGFR mutations and progressive disease after a minimum of 12 weeks on erlotinib were included. The maximum tolerated dose of vorinostat plus erlotinib was used as recommended dose for the phase II (RDP2) to assess the efficacy of the combination. The primary end point was progression-free-survival rate at 12 weeks (PFSR12w). Pre-treatment plasma samples were required to assess T790M resistant mutation. A total of 33 patients were enrolled in the phase I-II trial. The maximum tolerated dose was erlotinib 150 mg p.o., QD, and 400mg p.o., QD, on days 1-7 and 15-21 in a 28-day cycle. Among the 25 patients treated at the RDP2, the most common toxicities included anemia, fatigue and diarrhea. No responses were observed. PFSR12w was 28% (IC 95%: 18.0-37.2); median progression-free survival (PFS) was 8 weeks (IC 95%: 7.43-8.45) and overall survival (OS) 10.3 months (95% CI: 2.4-18.1). Full dose of continuous erlotinib with vorinostat 400mg p.o., QD on alternative weeks can be safely administered. Still, the combination has no meaningful activity in EGFR-mutated NSCLC patients after TKI progression. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Frequency of factor V Leiden mutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasiruddin; Ali, W.; Rehman, Z.; Anwar, M.; Ayyub, M.; Ali, W.; Ahmed, S.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To determine the frequency of factor V Leiden mutation. Design: Observational study. Patients and Methods: Two hundred subjects each of apparently healthy and unrelated Punjabi and Pathan origins were included in the study. Peripheral blood samples were collected in EDTA and DNA extracted by phenol- chloroform extraction method. DNA analysis was done by PCR for restriction fragment length polymorphism. The product was digested overnight with Mn/1 and electrophoresed on acrylamide gel to detect 67 and 153 base pair fragments of factor V Leiden against 37, 67 and 116 base pair fragments of normal factor V. Results: In the 400 subjects studied, only 5 cases of heterozygotes for factor V Leiden were detected. The overall carrier rate was 1.3% (95% CI 0.2-2.2%). The carrier rate in Punjabis and Pathans was 1 % and 1.5% respectively. Conclusion: This study confirms that the prevalence of factor V Leiden is low in Asians and Africans as compared to the European population. (author)

  10. Risk Factors Associated with Colorectal Cancer in a Subset of Patients with Mutations in MLH1 and MSH2 in Taiwan Fulfilling the Amsterdam II Criteria for Lynch Syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abram Bunya Kamiza

    Full Text Available Lynch syndrome, caused by germline mutations in mismatch repair genes, is a predisposing factor for colorectal cancer (CRC. This retrospective cohort study investigated the risk factors associated with the development of CRC in patients with MLH1 and MSH2 germline mutations.In total, 301 MLH1 and MSH2 germline mutation carriers were identified from the Amsterdam criteria family registry provided by the Taiwan Hereditary Nonpolyposis Colorectal Cancer Consortium. A Cox proportional hazard model was used to calculate the hazard ratios (HRs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs to determine the association between the risk factors and CRC development. A robust sandwich covariance estimation model was used to evaluate family dependence.Among the total cohort, subjects of the Hakka ethnicity exhibited an increased CRC risk (HR = 1.62, 95% CI = 1.09-2.34; however, those who performed regular physical activity exhibited a decreased CRC risk (HR = 0.62, 95% CI = 0.41-0.88. The CRC risk was enhanced in MLH1 germline mutation carriers, with corresponding HRs of 1.72 (95% CI = 1.16-2.55 and 0.54 (95% CI = 0.34-0.83 among subjects of the Hakka ethnicity and those who performed regular physical activity, respectively. In addition, the total cohort with a manual occupation had a 1.56 times higher CRC risk (95% CI = 1.07-2.27 than did that with a skilled occupation. Moreover, MSH2 germline mutation carriers with blood group type B exhibited an increased risk of CRC development (HR = 2.64, 95% CI = 1.06-6.58 compared with those with blood group type O.The present study revealed that Hakka ethnicity, manual occupation, and blood group type B were associated with an increased CRC risk, whereas regular physical activity was associated with a decreased CRC risk in MLH1 and MSH2 germline mutation carriers.

  11. Dietary factors and Truncating APC Mutations in Sporadic Colorectal Adenomas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diergaarde, B.; Tiemersma, E.W.; Braam, H.; Muijen, van G.N.P.; Nagengast, F.M.; Kok, F.J.; Kampman, E.

    2005-01-01

    Inactivating mutations in APC are thought to be early, initiating events in colorectal carcinogenesis. To gain insight into the relationship between diet and inactivating APC mutations, we evaluated associations between dietary factors and the occurrence of these mutations in a Dutch case-control

  12. Dietary factors and truncating APC mutations in sporadic colorectal adenomas.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diergaarde, B.; Tiemersma, E.W.; Braam, H.; Muijen, G.N.P. van; Nagengast, F.M.; Kok, F.J.; Kampman, E.

    2005-01-01

    Inactivating mutations in APC are thought to be early, initiating events in colorectal carcinogenesis. To gain insight into the relationship between diet and inactivating APC mutations, we evaluated associations between dietary factors and the occurrence of these mutations in a Dutch case-control

  13. Complement factor H deficiency and endocapillary glomerulonephritis due to paternal isodisomy and a novel factor H mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schejbel, L; Schmidt, I M; Kirchhoff, Eva Maria

    2011-01-01

    Complement factor H (CFH) is a regulator of the alternative complement activation pathway. Mutations in the CFH gene are associated with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome, membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis type II and C3 glomerulonephritis. Here, we report a 6-month-old CFH-deficient child...

  14. A novel mutation in the MITF may be digenic with GJB2 mutations in a large Chinese family of Waardenburg syndrome type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xukun; Zhang, Tianyu; Wang, Zhengmin; Jiang, Yi; Chen, Yan; Wang, Hongyan; Ma, Duan; Wang, Lei; Li, Huawei

    2011-12-20

    Waardenburg syndrome type II (WS2) is associated with syndromic deafness. A subset of WS2, WS2A, accounting for approximately 15% of patients, is attributed to mutations in the microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) gene. We examined the genetic basis of WS2 in a large Chinese family. All 9 exons of the MITF gene, the single coding exon (exon 2) of the most common hereditary deafness gene GJB2 and the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) 12S rRNA were sequenced. A novel heterozygous mutation c.[742_743delAAinsT;746_747delCA] in exon 8 of the MITF gene co-segregates with WS2 in the family. The MITF mutation results in a premature termination codon and a truncated MITF protein with only 247 of the 419 wild type amino acids. The deaf proband had this MITF gene heterozygous mutation as well as a c.[109G>A]+[235delC] compound heterozygous pathogenic mutation in the GJB2 gene. No pathogenic mutation was found in mtDNA 12S rRNA in this family. Thus, a novel compound heterozygous mutation, c.[742_743delAAinsT;746_747delCA] in MITF exon 8 was the key genetic reason for WS2 in this family, and a digenic effect of MITF and GJB2 genes may contribute to deafness of the proband. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Epidermal growth factor receptor mutation in gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhimin; Liu, Lina; Li, Mei; Wang, Zhaohui; Feng, Lu; Zhang, Qiuping; Cheng, Shihua; Lu, Shen

    2011-04-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and Kirsten-RAS (KRAS) mutations have been identified as predictors of response to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) in non-small cell lung cancer. We aimed to screen the mutations of both genes in gastric carcinoma to detect the suitability of EGFR TKIs for patients with gastric carcinoma. We screened EGFR mutation in exons 19-21 and KRAS mutation in exon 2 in 58 gastric adenocarcinomas from China using high resolution melting analysis (HRMA). Positive samples were confirmed by DNA sequencing. Three EGFR missense mutations (5.2%) and 22 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP, Q787Q, 37.9%) were identified. To our knowledge, we report for the first time three mutation patterns of EGFR, Y801C, L858R and G863D, in gastric carcinoma. Two samples with EGFR mutation were mucinous adenocarcinoma. These three samples were collected from male patients aged over 75 years old. The frequency of KRAS mutation was 10.3% (6/58). The exclusiveness of EGFR and KRAS mutations was proven for the first time in gastric cancer. Gastric carcinoma of the mucinous adenocarcinoma type collected from older male patients may harbour EGFR mutations. The small subset of gastric adenocarcinoma patients may respond to EGFR TKIs.

  16. Mutations and binding sites of human transcription factors

    KAUST Repository

    Kamanu, Frederick Kinyua

    2012-06-01

    Mutations in any genome may lead to phenotype characteristics that determine ability of an individual to cope with adaptation to environmental challenges. In studies of human biology, among the most interesting ones are phenotype characteristics that determine responses to drug treatments, response to infections, or predisposition to specific inherited diseases. Most of the research in this field has been focused on the studies of mutation effects on the final gene products, peptides, and their alterations. Considerably less attention was given to the mutations that may affect regulatory mechanism(s) of gene expression, although these may also affect the phenotype characteristics. In this study we make a pilot analysis of mutations observed in the regulatory regions of 24,667 human RefSeq genes. Our study reveals that out of eight studied mutation types, insertions are the only one that in a statistically significant manner alters predicted transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs). We also find that 25 families of TFBSs have been altered by mutations in a statistically significant manner in the promoter regions we considered. Moreover, we find that the related transcription factors are, for example, prominent in processes related to intracellular signaling; cell fate; morphogenesis of organs and epithelium; development of urogenital system, epithelium, and tube; neuron fate commitment. Our study highlights the significance of studying mutations within the genes regulatory regions and opens way for further detailed investigations on this topic, particularly on the downstream affected pathways. 2012 Kamanu, Medvedeva, Schaefer, Jankovic, Archer and Bajic.

  17. Distinct mutations in yeast TAF(II)25 differentially affect the composition of TFIID and SAGA complexes as well as global gene expression patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschner, Doris B; vom Baur, Elmar; Thibault, Christelle; Sanders, Steven L; Gangloff, Yann-Gaël; Davidson, Irwin; Weil, P Anthony; Tora, Làszlò

    2002-05-01

    The RNA polymerase II transcription factor TFIID, composed of the TATA-binding protein (TBP) and TBP-associated factors (TAF(II)s), nucleates preinitiation complex formation at protein-coding gene promoters. SAGA, a second TAF(II)-containing multiprotein complex, is involved in transcription regulation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. One of the essential protein components common to SAGA and TFIID is yTAF(II)25. We define a minimal evolutionarily conserved 91-amino-acid region of TAF(II)25 containing a histone fold domain that is necessary and sufficient for growth in vivo. Different temperature-sensitive mutations of yTAF(II)25 or chimeras with the human homologue TAF(II)30 arrested cell growth at either the G(1) or G(2)/M cell cycle phase and displayed distinct phenotypic changes and gene expression patterns. Immunoprecipitation studies revealed that TAF(II)25 mutation-dependent gene expression and phenotypic changes correlated at least partially with the integrity of SAGA and TFIID. Genome-wide expression analysis revealed that the five TAF(II)25 temperature-sensitive mutant alleles individually affect the expression of between 18 and 33% of genes, whereas taken together they affect 64% of all class II genes. Thus, different yTAF(II)25 mutations induce distinct phenotypes and affect the regulation of different subsets of genes, demonstrating that no individual TAF(II) mutant allele reflects the full range of its normal functions.

  18. Progranulin mutations as risk factors for Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, David C; Lehmann, Manja; Yokoyama, Jennifer S; Karydas, Anna; Lee, Jason Jiyong; Coppola, Giovanni; Grinberg, Lea T; Geschwind, Dan; Seeley, William W; Miller, Bruce L; Rosen, Howard; Rabinovici, Gil

    2013-06-01

    Mutations in the progranulin gene are known to cause diverse clinical syndromes, all attributed to frontotemporal lobar degeneration. We describe 2 patients with progranulin gene mutations and evidence of Alzheimer disease (AD) pathology. We also conducted a literature review. This study focused on case reports of 2 unrelated patients with progranulin mutations at the University of California, San Francisco, Memory and Aging Center. One patient presented at age 65 years with a clinical syndrome suggestive of AD and showed evidence of amyloid aggregation on positron emission tomography. Another patient presented at age 54 years with logopenic progressive aphasia and, at autopsy, showed both frontotemporal lobar degeneration with TDP-43 inclusions and AD. In addition to autosomal-dominant frontotemporal lobar degeneration, mutations in the progranulin gene may be a risk factor for AD clinical phenotypes and neuropathology.

  19. Induced mutations for improvement of grain legume production II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-02-01

    Out of 18 papers presented, 15 fall within the INIS subject scope. Other topics covered were: mutagenic efficiency of ethylmethane sulphonate in soybean; induced mutations for rust resistance in soybean; and nitrogen fixation-potentials for improvement in legumes

  20. Comprehensive mutational profiling of core binding factor acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duployez, Nicolas; Marceau-Renaut, Alice; Boissel, Nicolas; Petit, Arnaud; Bucci, Maxime; Geffroy, Sandrine; Lapillonne, Hélène; Renneville, Aline; Ragu, Christine; Figeac, Martin; Celli-Lebras, Karine; Lacombe, Catherine; Micol, Jean-Baptiste; Abdel-Wahab, Omar; Cornillet, Pascale; Ifrah, Norbert; Dombret, Hervé; Leverger, Guy; Jourdan, Eric; Preudhomme, Claude

    2016-05-19

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with t(8;21) or inv(16) have been recognized as unique entities within AML and are usually reported together as core binding factor AML (CBF-AML). However, there is considerable clinical and biological heterogeneity within this group of diseases, and relapse incidence reaches up to 40%. Moreover, translocations involving CBFs are not sufficient to induce AML on its own and the full spectrum of mutations coexisting with CBF translocations has not been elucidated. To address these issues, we performed extensive mutational analysis by high-throughput sequencing in 215 patients with CBF-AML enrolled in the Phase 3 Trial of Systematic Versus Response-adapted Timed-Sequential Induction in Patients With Core Binding Factor Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Treating Patients with Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia with Interleukin-2 trials (age, 1-60 years). Mutations in genes activating tyrosine kinase signaling (including KIT, N/KRAS, and FLT3) were frequent in both subtypes of CBF-AML. In contrast, mutations in genes that regulate chromatin conformation or encode members of the cohesin complex were observed with high frequencies in t(8;21) AML (42% and 18%, respectively), whereas they were nearly absent in inv(16) AML. High KIT mutant allele ratios defined a group of t(8;21) AML patients with poor prognosis, whereas high N/KRAS mutant allele ratios were associated with the lack of KIT or FLT3 mutations and a favorable outcome. In addition, mutations in epigenetic modifying or cohesin genes were associated with a poor prognosis in patients with tyrosine kinase pathway mutations, suggesting synergic cooperation between these events. These data suggest that diverse cooperating mutations may influence CBF-AML pathophysiology as well as clinical behavior and point to potential unique pathogenesis of t(8;21) vs inv(16) AML. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology.

  1. Factors affecting the spontaneous mutational spectra in somatic mammalian cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    О.А. Ковальова

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available  In our survey of references we are discussed the influence of factors biological origin on the spontaneous mutation specters in mammalian. Seasonal and age components influence on the frequence of cytogenetic anomalies. The immune and endocrinous systems are take part in control of the alteration of the spontaneous mutation specters. Genetical difference of sensibility in animal and human at the alteration of factors enviroment as and  genetical differences of repair systems activity are may influence on individual variation of spontaneous destabilization characters of chromosomal apparatus.

  2. MHC class II deficiency: Report of a novel mutation and special review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrokhi, S; Shabani, M; Aryan, Z; Zoghi, S; Krolo, A; Boztug, K; Rezaei, N

    The MHC II deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive primary immunodeficiency syndrome with increased susceptibility to respiratory and gastrointestinal infections, failure to thrive and early mortality. This syndrome is caused by mutations in transcription regulators of the MHC II gene and results in development of blind lymphocytes due to the lack of indicatory MHC II molecules. Despite homogeneity of clinical manifestations of patients with MHC II deficiency, the genetic defects underlying this disease are heterogeneous. Herein, we report an Iranian patient with MHC II deficiency harbouring a novel mutation in RFXANK and novel misleading clinical features. He had ataxic gait and dysarthria from 30 months of age. Epidemiology, clinical and immunological features, therapeutic options and prognosis of patients with MHC II are reviewed in this paper. Copyright © 2017 SEICAP. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Induced mutations in chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) II. frequency and spectrum of chlorophyll mutations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kharkwal, M.C.

    1998-01-01

    A comparative study of frequency and spectrum of chlorophyll mutations induced by two physical (gamma rays, fast neutrons) and two chemical mutagens (NMU, EMS) in relation to the effects in M1 plants and induction of mutations in M2 was made in four chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) varieties, two desi (G 130 & H 214) one Kabuli (C 104) and one green seeded (L 345). The treatments included three doses each of gamma rays (400, 500 & 600 Gy) and fast neutrons (5, 10 & 15 Gy) and two concentrations with two different durations of two chemical mutagens, NMU [0.01% (20h), & 0.02% (8h)] and EMS [0.1% (20h) & 0.2% (8h)]. The frequencies and spectrum of three different kinds of induced chlorophyll mutations in the order albina (43.5%), chlorina (27.3%) and xantha (24.2%) were recorded. Chemical mutagens were found to be efficient in inducing chlorophyll mutations in chickpea. Highest frequency of mutations was observed in green seeded var. L 345 (83% of M1 families and 19.9/1000 M2 plants). Kabuli var. C 104 was least responsive for chlorophyll mutations

  4. The Effect of Reproductive Factors on Breast Cancer Presentation in Women Who Are BRCA Mutation Carrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ju-Yeon; Moon, Hyeong-Gon; Kang, Young-Joon; Han, Wonshik; Noh, Woo-Chul; Jung, Yongsik; Moon, Byung-In; Kang, Eunyoung; Park, Sung-Shin; Lee, Min Hyuk; Park, Bo Young; Lee, Jong Won; Noh, Dong-Young

    2017-09-01

    Germline mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes confer increased risks for breast cancers. However, the clinical presentation of breast cancer among women who are carriers of the BRCA1 or BRCA2 ( BRCA1/2 carriers) mutations is heterogenous. We aimed to identify the effects of the reproductive histories of women with the BRCA1/2 mutations on the clinical presentation of breast cancer. We retrospectively analyzed clinical data on women with proven BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations who were recruited to the Korean Hereditary Breast Cancer study, from 2007 to 2014. Among the 736 women who were BRCA1/2 mutation carriers, a total of 483 women had breast cancers. Breast cancer diagnosis occurred at significantly younger ages in women who experienced menarche at ≤14 years of age, compared to those who experienced menarche at >14 years of age (37.38±7.60 and 43.30±10.11, respectively, p women with the BRCA2 mutation. The prevalence of advanced stages (stage II or III vs. stage I) of disease in parous women was higher than in nulliparous women (68.5% vs. 55.2%, p =0.043). This association was more pronounced in women with the BRCA2 mutation (hazard ratio, 2.67; p =0.014). Our results suggest that reproductive factors, such as the age of onset of menarche and the presence of parity, are associated with the clinical presentation patterns of breast cancer in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers.

  5. Mitochondrial leukoencephalopathy and complex II deficiency associated with a recessive SDHB mutation with reduced penetrance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Ardissone

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial disease involving complex II is rare among respiratory chain deficiencies and its genetic cause remains often unknown. Two main clinical presentations are associated with this biochemical defect: mitochondrial encephalomyopathy and susceptibility to tumors. Only one homozygous SDHB mutation has been described in a patient with mitochondrial disorder. We report here two sisters, who presented highly different phenotypes (neurological impairment with leukoencephalopathy vs. asymptomatic status and harbored the same homozygous SDHB mutation, suggesting reduced penetrance.

  6. Two novel mutations of CLCN7 gene in Chinese families with autosomal dominant osteopetrosis (type II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Hui; Shao, Chong; Zheng, Yan; He, Jin-Wei; Fu, Wen-Zhen; Wang, Chun; Zhang, Zhen-Lin

    2016-07-01

    Autosomal dominant osteopetrosis type II (ADO-II) is a heritable bone disorder characterized by osteosclerosis, predominantly involving the spine (vertebral end-plate thickening, or rugger-jersey spine), the pelvis ("bone-within-bone" structures) and the skull base. Chloride channel 7 (CLCN7) has been reported to be the causative gene. In this study, we aimed to identify the pathogenic mutation in four Chinese families with ADO-II. All 25 exons of the CLCN7 gene, including the exon-intron boundaries, were amplified and sequenced directly in four probands from the Chinese families with ADO-II. The mutation site was then identified in other family members and 250 healthy controls. In family 1, a known missense mutation c.296A>G in exon 4 of CLCN7 was identified in the proband, resulting in a tyrosine (UAU) to cysteine (UGU) substitution at p.99 (Y99C); the mutation was also identified in his affected father. In family 2, a novel missense mutation c.865G>C in exon 10 was identified in the proband, resulting in a valine (GUC) to leucine (CUC) substitution at p.289 (V289L); the mutation was also identified in her healthy mother and sister. In family 3, a novel missense mutation c.1625C>T in exon 17 of CLCN7 was identified in the proband, resulting in an alanine (GCG) to valine (GUG) substitution at p.542 (A542V); the mutation was also identified in her father. In family 4, a hot spot, R767W (c.2299C>T, CGG>TGG), in exon 24 was found in the proband which once again proved the susceptibility of the site or the similar genetic background in different races. Moreover, two novel mutations, V289L and A542V, occurred at a highly conserved position, found by a comparison of the protein sequences from eight vertebrates, and were predicted to have a pathogenic effect by PolyPhen-2 software, which showed "probably damaging" with a score of approximately 1. These mutation sites were not identified in 250 healthy controls. Our present findings suggest that the novel missense

  7. SPAK deficiency corrects pseudohypoaldosteronism II caused by WNK4 mutation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Yi Chu

    Full Text Available Stimulation of the OSR1 (Oxidative stress-responsive kinase-1/SPAK [STE20 (sterile 20/SPS1-related proline/alanine-rich kinase]-NCC (Na(+-Cl(- cotransporter signaling cascade plays an important role in the WNK [With-No-Lysine (K] kinase 4 D561A knock-in mouse model of pseudohypoaldosteronism type II (PHA II characterized by salt-sensitive hypertension and hyperkalemia. The aim of this study was to investigate the respective roles of Osr1 and Spak in the pathogenesis of PHA II in vivo. Wnk4 (D561A/+ mice were crossed with kidney tubule-specific (KSP Osr1 knockout (KSP-Osr1 (-/- and Spak knockout (Spak (-/- mice. Blood pressure, plasma and urine biochemistries, and the relevant protein expression in the kidneys were examined. Wnk4 (D561A/+, KSP-Osr1 (-/-, and Spak (-/- mice recapitulated the phenotypes of PHA II, Bartter-like syndrome, and Gitelman syndrome, respectively. Wnk4 (D561A/+.KSP-Osr1 (-/- remained phenotypically PHA II while Wnk4 (D561A/+.Spak (-/- mice became normotensive and lacked the PHA II phenotype. Phosphorylated Spak and Ncc were similarly increased in both Wnk4 (D561A/+ and Wnk4 (D561A/+.KSP-Osr1 (-/- mice while phosphorylated Ncc normalized in Wnk4 (D561A/+.Spak (-/- mice. Furthermore, Wnk4 (D561A/+.KSP-Osr1 (-/- mice exhibited exaggerated salt excretion in response to thiazide diuretics while Wnk4 (D561A/+.Spak (-/- mice exhibited normal responses. Wnk4(D561A/+.Spak (-/-.KSP-Osr1 (-/- triple mutant mice had low blood pressure and diminished phosphorylated Ncc. Both SPAK and OSR1 are important in the maintenance of blood pressure but activation of SPAK-NCC plays the dominant role in PHA II. SPAK may be a therapeutic target for disorders with salt-sensitive hypertension related to WNK4 activation.

  8. Influence of the factor V Leiden mutation on infectious disease susceptibility and outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benfield, Thomas L; Dahl, Mortens; Nordestgaard, Borge G

    2005-01-01

    The effect of the coagulation factor V Leiden mutation on infectious disease susceptibility and outcome is controversial.......The effect of the coagulation factor V Leiden mutation on infectious disease susceptibility and outcome is controversial....

  9. EDNRB mutations cause Waardenburg syndrome type II in the heterozygous state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issa, Sarah; Bondurand, Nadege; Faubert, Emmanuelle; Poisson, Sylvain; Lecerf, Laure; Nitschke, Patrick; Deggouj, Naima; Loundon, Natalie; Jonard, Laurence; David, Albert; Sznajer, Yves; Blanchet, Patricia; Marlin, Sandrine; Pingault, Veronique

    2017-05-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is a genetic disorder characterized by sensorineural hearing loss and pigmentation anomalies. The clinical definition of four WS types is based on additional features due to defects in structures mostly arising from the neural crest, with type I and type II being the most frequent. While type I is tightly associated to PAX3 mutations, WS type II (WS2) remains partly enigmatic with mutations in known genes (MITF, SOX10) accounting for only 30% of the cases. We performed exome sequencing in a WS2 index case and identified a heterozygous missense variation in EDNRB. Interestingly, homozygous (and very rare heterozygous) EDNRB mutations are already described in type IV WS (i.e., in association with Hirschsprung disease [HD]) and heterozygous mutations in isolated HD. Screening of a WS2 cohort led to the identification of an overall of six heterozygous EDNRB variations. Clinical phenotypes, pedigrees and molecular segregation investigations unraveled a dominant mode of inheritance with incomplete penetrance. In parallel, cellular and functional studies showed that each of the mutations impairs the subcellular localization of the receptor or induces a defective downstream signaling pathway. Based on our results, we now estimate EDNRB mutations to be responsible for 5%-6% of WS2. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. USH2A mutation analysis in 70 Dutch families with Usher syndrome type II.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pennings, R.J.E.; Brinke, H. te; Weston, M.D.; Claassen, A.M.W.; Orten, D.J.; Weekamp, H.; Aarem, A. van; Huygen, P.L.M.; Deutman, A.F.; Hoefsloot, L.H.; Cremers, F.P.M.; Cremers, C.W.R.J.; Kimberling, W.J.; Kremer, J.M.J.

    2004-01-01

    Usher syndrome type II (USH2) is characterised by moderate to severe high-frequency hearing impairment, progressive visual loss due to retinitis pigmentosa and intact vestibular responses. Three loci are known for USH2, however, only the gene for USH2a (USH2A) has been identified. Mutation analysis

  11. [Clinical classification and genetic mutation study of two pedigrees with type II Waardenburg syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yong; Yang, Fuwei; Zheng, Hexin; Zhu, Ganghua; Hu, Peng; Wu, Weijing

    2015-12-01

    To explore the molecular etiology of two pedigrees affected with type II Waardenburg syndrome (WS2) and to provide genetic diagnosis and counseling. Blood samples were collected from the proband and his family members. Following extraction of genomic DNA, the coding sequences of PAX3, MITF, SOX10 and SNAI2 genes were amplified with PCR and subjected to DNA sequencing to detect potential mutations. A heterozygous deletional mutation c.649_651delAGA in exon 7 of the MITF gene has been identified in all patients from the first family, while no mutation was found in the other WS2 related genes including PAX3, MITF, SOX10 and SNAI2. The heterozygous deletion mutation c.649_651delAGA in exon 7 of the MITF gene probably underlies the disease in the first family. It is expected that other genes may also underlie WS2.

  12. [Analysis of SOX10 gene mutation in a family affected with Waardenburg syndrome type II].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Lei; Yan, Yousheng; Chen, Xue; Zhang, Chuan; Zhang, Qinghua; Feng, Xuan; Hao, Shen

    2018-02-10

    OBJECTIVE To detect potential mutation of SOX10 gene in a pedigree affected with Warrdenburg syndrome type II. METHODS Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood samples of the proband and his family members. Exons and flanking sequences of MITF, PAX3, SOX10, SNAI2, END3 and ENDRB genes were analyzed by chip capturing and high throughput sequencing. Suspected mutations were verified with Sanger sequencing. RESULTS A c.127C>T (p.R43X) mutation of the SOX10 gene was detected in the proband, for which both parents showed a wild-type genotype. CONCLUSION The c.127C>T (p.R43X) mutation of SOX10 gene probably underlies the ocular symptoms and hearing loss of the proband.

  13. 21 CFR 864.7280 - Factor V Leiden DNA mutation detection systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Factor V Leiden DNA mutation detection systems....7280 Factor V Leiden DNA mutation detection systems. (a) Identification. Factor V Leiden deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) mutation detection systems are devices that consist of different reagents and...

  14. Expanding the spectrum of genetic mutations in antenatal Bartter syndrome type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fretzayas, Andreas; Gole, Evangelia; Attilakos, Achilleas; Daskalaki, Anna; Nicolaidou, Polyxeni; Papadopoulou, Anna

    2013-06-01

    Bartter syndrome (BS) is a group of genetic disorders characterized by hypokalemic metabolic alkalosis, hyponatremia and elevated renin and aldosterone plasma concentrations. BS type II is caused by mutations in the KCNJ1 gene and usually presents with transient hyperkalemia. We report here a novel KCNJ1 mutation in a male neonate, prematurely born after a pregnancy complicated by polyhydramnios. The infant presented with typical clinical and laboratory findings of BS type II, such as hyponatremia, hypochloremic metabolic alkalosis, severe weight loss, elevated renin and aldosterone levels and transient hyperkalemia in the early postnatal period, which were later normalized. Molecular analysis revealed a compound heterozygous mutation in the KCNJ1 gene, consisting of a novel K76E and an already described V315G mutation, both affecting functional domains of the channel protein. Typical manifestations of antenatal BS in combination with hyperkalemia should prompt the clinician to search for mutations in the KCNJ1 gene first. © 2013 The Authors. Pediatrics International © 2013 Japan Pediatric Society.

  15. Common mutations in the fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR 3) gene account for achondroplasia, hypochondroplasia, and thanatophoric dwarfism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonaventure, J.; Rousseau, F.; Legeai-Mallet, L.; LeMerrer, M.; Munnich, A.; Maroteaux, P. [INSERM, Paris (France)

    1996-05-03

    The mapping of the achondroplasia locus to the short arm of chromosome 4 and the subsequent identification of a recurrent missense mutation (G380R) in the fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR-3) gene has been followed by the detection of common FGFR-3 mutations in two clinically related disorders: thanatophoric dwarfism (types I and II) and hypochondroplasia. The relative clinical homogeneity of achondroplasia was substantiated by demonstration of its genetic homogeneity as more than 98% of all patients hitherto reported exhibit mutations in the transmembrane receptor domain. Although most hypochondroplasia cases were accounted for by a recurrent missense substitution (N540K) in the first tyrosine kinase (TK 1) domain of the receptor, a significant proportion (40%) of our patients did not harbor the N540K mutation and three hypochondroplasia families were not linked to the FGFR-3 locus, thus supporting clinical heterogeneity of this condition. In thanatophoric dwarfism (TD), a recurrent FGFR-3 mutation located in the second tyrosine kinase (TK 2) domain of the receptor was originally detected in 100% of TD II cases; in our series, seven distinct mutations in three different protein domains were identified in 25 of 26 TD I patients, suggesting that TD, like achondroplasia, is a genetically homogenous skeletal disorder. 31 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. A Novel Mouse Model of a Patient Mucolipidosis II Mutation Recapitulates Disease Pathology*

    OpenAIRE

    Paton, Leigh; Bitoun, Emmanuelle; Kenyon, Janet; Priestman, David A.; Oliver, Peter L.; Edwards, Benjamin; Platt, Frances M.; Davies, Kay E.

    2014-01-01

    Mucolipidosis II (MLII) is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by loss of N-acetylglucosamine-1-phosphotransferase, which tags lysosomal enzymes with a mannose 6-phosphate marker for transport to the lysosome. In MLII, the loss of this marker leads to deficiency of multiple enzymes and non-enzymatic proteins in the lysosome, leading to the storage of multiple substrates. Here we present a novel mouse model of MLII homozygous for a patient mutation in the GNPTAB gene. Whereas the current gene ...

  17. Mutation analysis in the long isoform of USH2A in American patients with Usher Syndrome type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Denise; Ouyang, Xiaomei; Patterson, D Michael; Du, Li Lin; Jacobson, Samuel G; Liu, Xue-Zhong

    2009-12-01

    Usher syndrome type II (USH2) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by moderate to severe hearing impairment and progressive visual loss due to retinitis pigmentosa (RP). To identify novel mutations and determine the frequency of USH2A mutations as a cause of USH2, we have carried out mutation screening of all 72 coding exons and exon-intron splice sites of the USH2A gene. A total of 20 USH2 American probands of European descent were analyzed using single strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP) and direct sequencing methods. Ten different USH2A mutations were identified in 55% of the probands, five of which were novel mutations. The detected mutations include three missense, three frameshifts and four nonsense mutations, with c.2299delG/p.E767fs mutation, accounting for 38.9% of the pathological alleles. Two cases were homozygotes, two cases were compound heterozygotes and one case had complex allele with three variants. In seven probands, only one USH2A mutation was detected and no pathological mutation was found in the remaining eight individuals. Altogether, our data support the fact that c.2299delG/p.E767fs is indeed the most common USH2A mutation found in USH2 patients of European Caucasian background. Thus, if screening for mutations in USH2A is considered, it is reasonable to screen for the c.2299delG mutation first.

  18. Importance of sigma factor mutations in increased triclosan resistance in Salmonella Typhimurium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gantzhorn, Mette Rørbæk; Olsen, John Elmerdahl; Thomsen, Line Elnif

    2015-01-01

    towards the antibiotics enrofloxacin and sulphamethoxazole/trimethoprim. CONCLUSIONS: Medium level triclosan resistance could be obtained by fabI mutations in S. Typhimurium, however, high level resistance was found to require sigma factor mutations in addition to a fabI mutation. Reduced antibiotic...

  19. Four Gaucher disease type II patients with three novel mutations: a single centre experience from Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulut, Fatma Derya; Kör, Deniz; Şeker-Yılmaz, Berna; Hergüner, Özlem; Ceylaner, Serdar; Özkınay, Ferda; Kılavuz, Sebile; Önenli-Mungan, Neslihan

    2018-04-14

    Gaucher disease is the most common lysosomal storage disorder due to glucosylceramidase enzyme deficiency. There are three subtypes of the disease. Neurological involvement accompanies visceral and haematological findings only in type II and type III Gaucher patients. Type II is the acute progressive neuronopathic form which is the most severe and rare subtype. Clinical findings are recognized prenatally or in the first months of life and followed by death within the first two years of age. Among our 81 Gaucher patients, we identified 4 (4,9%) type II patients in our metabolic centre. This rate is significantly higher than the rate reported in the literature (Gaucher patients with three novel mutations and one perinatal lethal form with generalized ichthyosis which is a very rare disorder. Additionally, we would like to highlight the phenotypic heterogeneity not only between the subtypes, also even in the same type.

  20. Condensin II mutation causes T-cell lymphoma through tissue-specific genome instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, Jessica; Taylor, Gillian C.; Soares, Dinesh C.; Boyle, Shelagh; Sie, Daoud; Read, David; Chathoth, Keerthi; Vukovic, Milica; Tarrats, Nuria; Jamieson, David; Campbell, Kirsteen J.; Blyth, Karen; Acosta, Juan Carlos; Ylstra, Bauke; Arends, Mark J.; Kranc, Kamil R.; Jackson, Andrew P.; Bickmore, Wendy A.

    2016-01-01

    Chromosomal instability is a hallmark of cancer, but mitotic regulators are rarely mutated in tumors. Mutations in the condensin complexes, which restructure chromosomes to facilitate segregation during mitosis, are significantly enriched in cancer genomes, but experimental evidence implicating condensin dysfunction in tumorigenesis is lacking. We report that mice inheriting missense mutations in a condensin II subunit (Caph2nes) develop T-cell lymphoma. Before tumors develop, we found that the same Caph2 mutation impairs ploidy maintenance to a different extent in different hematopoietic cell types, with ploidy most severely perturbed at the CD4+CD8+ T-cell stage from which tumors initiate. Premalignant CD4+CD8+ T cells show persistent catenations during chromosome segregation, triggering DNA damage in diploid daughter cells and elevated ploidy. Genome sequencing revealed that Caph2 single-mutant tumors are near diploid but carry deletions spanning tumor suppressor genes, whereas P53 inactivation allowed Caph2 mutant cells with whole-chromosome gains and structural rearrangements to form highly aggressive disease. Together, our data challenge the view that mitotic chromosome formation is an invariant process during development and provide evidence that defective mitotic chromosome structure can promote tumorigenesis. PMID:27737961

  1. Mutational studies reveal a complex set of positive and negative control elements within the chicken vitellogenin II promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seal, S N; Davis, D L; Burch, J B

    1991-05-01

    The endogenous chicken vitellogenin II (VTGII) gene is transcribed exclusively in hepatocytes in response to estrogen. We previously identified two estrogen response elements (EREs) upstream of this gene. We now present an analysis of the VTGII promoter activated by these EREs in response to estrogen. Chimeric VTGII-CAT genes were cotransfected into LMH chicken hepatoma cells along with an estrogen receptor expression vector, and transient CAT expression was assayed after culturing the cells in the absence or presence of estrogen. An analysis of constructs bearing deletions downstream of the more proximal ERE indicated that promoter elements relevant to transcription in LMH cells extend to between -113 and -96. The relative importance of sequences within the VTGII promoter was examined by using 10 contiguous linker scanner mutations spanning the region from -117 to -24. Although most of these mutations compromised VTGII promoter function, one dramatically increased expression in LMH cells and also rendered the VTGII promoter capable of being activated by cis-linked EREs in fibroblasts cotransfected with an estrogen receptor expression vector. Gel retardation and DNase I footprinting assays revealed four factor-binding sites within this promoter. We demonstrate that three of these sites bind C/EBP, SP1, and USF (or related factors), respectively; the fourth site binds a factor that we denote TF-V beta. The biological relevance of these findings is suggested by the fact that three of these binding sites map to sites previously shown to be occupied in vivo in response to estrogen.

  2. Growth in individuals with Majewski osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II caused by pericentrin mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bober, Michael B; Niiler, Tim; Duker, Angela L; Murray, Jennie E; Ketterer, Tara; Harley, Margaret E; Alvi, Sabah; Flora, Christina; Rustad, Cecilie; Bongers, Ernie M H F; Bicknell, Louise S; Wise, Carol; Jackson, Andrew P

    2012-11-01

    Microcephalic primordial dwarfism (MPD) is a class of disorders characterized by intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), impaired postnatal growth and microcephaly. Majewski osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II (MOPD II) is one of the more common conditions within this group. MOPD II is caused by truncating mutations in pericentrin (PCNT) and is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner. Detailed growth curves for length, weight, and OFC are presented here and derived from retrospective data from 26 individuals with MOPD II confirmed by molecular or functional studies. Severe pre- and postnatal growth failure is evident in MOPD II patients. The length, weight, and OFC at term (when corrected for gestational age) were -7.0, -3.9, and -4.6 standard deviation (SD) below the population mean and equivalent to the 50th centile of a 28-29-, 31-32-, and 30-31-week neonate, respectively. While at skeletal maturity, the height, weight, and OFC were -10.3, -14.3, and -8.5 SD below the population mean and equivalent to the size of 3-year 10- to 11-month-old, a 5-year 2- to 3-month-old, and 5- to 6-month-old, respectively. During childhood, MOPD II patients grow with slowed, but fairly constant growth velocities and show no evidence of any pubertal growth spurt. Treatment with human growth hormone (n = 11) did not lead to any significant improvement in final stature. The growth charts presented here will be of assistance with diagnosis and management of MOPD II, and should have particular utility in nutritional management of MOPD II during infancy. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Mutation in the factor VII hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α-binding site contributes to factor VII deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xing-Wu; Kudaravalli, Rama; Russell, Theresa T; DiMichele, Donna M; Gibb, Constance; Russell, J Eric; Margaritis, Paris; Pollak, Eleanor S

    2011-10-01

    Severe coagulant factor VII (FVII) deficiency in postpubertal dizygotic twin males results from two point mutations in the FVII gene, a promoter region T→C transition at -60 and a His-to-Arg substitution at amino acid 348; both mutations prevent persistence of plasma functional FVII. This report documents longitudinal laboratory measurements from infancy to adulthood of FVII coagulant activity (FVII:C) in the twin FVII-deficient patients; it also details specific biochemical analyses of the -60 T→C mutation. The results revealed FVII:C levels of less than 1% in infancy that remain severely decreased through puberty and into adulthood. In-vitro analyses utilizing hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α (HNF4α) co-transfection and a chromatin immunoprecipitation assay indicate that the -60 T→C mutation severely diminishes functional interaction between the FVII promoter and transcription factor HNF4α. The importance of interaction between the FVII gene and HNF4α in normal FVII expression provides an in-vivo illustration of the regulated expression of an autosomal gene encoding a coagulation protein. The constancy of FVII:C and peripubertal patient symptomatology reported here illustrates androgen-independent expression in contrast to expression with an analogous mutation in the promoter region of the gene encoding coagulation FIX.

  4. Somatic Mutational Landscape of Splicing Factor Genes and Their Functional Consequences across 33 Cancer Types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Seiler

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Hotspot mutations in splicing factor genes have been recently reported at high frequency in hematological malignancies, suggesting the importance of RNA splicing in cancer. We analyzed whole-exome sequencing data across 33 tumor types in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA, and we identified 119 splicing factor genes with significant non-silent mutation patterns, including mutation over-representation, recurrent loss of function (tumor suppressor-like, or hotspot mutation profile (oncogene-like. Furthermore, RNA sequencing analysis revealed altered splicing events associated with selected splicing factor mutations. In addition, we were able to identify common gene pathway profiles associated with the presence of these mutations. Our analysis suggests that somatic alteration of genes involved in the RNA-splicing process is common in cancer and may represent an underappreciated hallmark of tumorigenesis. : Seiler et al. report that 119 splicing factor genes carry putative driver mutations over 33 tumor types in TCGA. The most common mutations appear to be mutually exclusive and are associated with lineage-independent altered splicing. Samples with these mutations show deregulation of cell-autonomous pathways and immune infiltration. Keywords: splicing, SF3B1, U2AF1, SRSF2, RBM10, FUBP1, cancer, mutation

  5. Napsin A and Thyroid Transcription Factor-1-Positive Cerebellar Tumor with Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taiji Kuwata

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available We present a very rare case of cerebellar metastasis of unknown origin, in which a primary lung adenocarcinoma was diagnosed by pathological examination of a cerebellar metastatic tumor, using immunohistochemical markers and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR mutation of primary lung cancer. A 69-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital because of a hemorrhagic cerebellar tumor and multiple small brain tumors. She underwent cerebellar tumor resection. On pathological examination, the tumor was diagnosed as adenocarcinoma. However, the primary tumor site was unidentifiable even with several imaging inspections. On immunohistochemical analysis, the resected tumor was positive for napsin A and thyroid transcription factor-1. In addition, an EGFR mutation was detected in the tumor. Therefore, primary lung cancer was diagnosed and the patient was started on gefitinib (250 mg/day therapy.

  6. Matched-pair analysis of a multi-institutional cohort reveals that epidermal growth factor receptor mutation is not a risk factor for postoperative recurrence of lung adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumura, Yuki; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Ohira, Tetsuya; Shiono, Satoshi; Abe, Jiro; Sagawa, Motoyasu; Sakurada, Akira; Katahira, Masato; Machida, Yuichiro; Takahashi, Satomi; Okada, Yoshinori

    2017-12-01

    It is unclear whether epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation status is a risk factor for postoperative recurrence of surgically resected lung adenocarcinoma (ADC). Therefore, we conducted a multi-institutional study employing matched-pair analysis to compare recurrence-free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS) of patients with lung ADC according to EGFR mutation status. We collected the records of 909 patients who underwent surgical resection for lung ADC between 2005 and 2012 at five participating institutions and were also examined their EGFR mutation status. For each patient with an EGFR mutation, we selected one with the wild-type EGFR sequence and matched them according to institution, age, gender, smoking history, pathological stage (pStage), and adjuvant treatment. We compared RFS and OS of the matched cohort. The patients were allocated into groups (n=181 each) with mutated or wild-type EGFR sequences. Both cohorts had identical characteristics as follows: institution, median age (68 years), men (85, 47%), ever smokers (77, 43%), and pStage (IA, 108, 60%; IB, 48, 27%; II, 14, 8%; III, 11, 6%). The 3- and 5-year RFS rates of patients with mutated or wild-type EGFR sequence were 79%, 68% and 77%, 68%, respectively (p=0.557). The respective OS rates were 92%, 81%, and 89%, 79% (p=0.574). Matched-pair and multi-institutional analysis reveals that an EGFR mutation was not a significant risk factor for recurrence of patients with surgically resected lung adenocarcinoma. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. De novo dominant mutation of SOX10 gene in a Chinese family with Waardenburg syndrome type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kaitian; Zong, Ling; Liu, Min; Zhan, Yuan; Wu, Xuan; Zou, Wenting; Jiang, Hongyan

    2014-06-01

    Waardenburg syndrome is a rare genetic disorder, inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. The condition is characterized by sensorineural hearing loss and pigment disturbances of the hair, skin, and iris. The de novo mutation in the SOX10 gene, responsible for Waardenburg syndrome type II, is rarely seen. The present study aimed to identify the genetic causes of Waardenburg syndrome type II in a Chinese family. Clinical and molecular evaluations were conducted in a Chinese family with Waardenburg syndrome type II. A novel SOX10 heterozygous c.259-260delCT mutation was identified. Heterozygosity was not observed in the parents and sister of the proband, indicating that the mutation has arisen de novo. The novel frameshift mutation, located in exon 3 of the SOX10 gene, disrupted normal amino acid coding from Leu87, leading to premature termination at nucleotide 396 (TGA). The high mobility group domain of SOX10 was inferred to be partially impaired. The novel heterozygous c.259-260delCT mutation in the SOX10 gene was considered to be the cause of Waardenburg syndrome in the proband. The clinical and genetic characterization of this family would help elucidate the genetic heterogeneity of SOX10 in Waardenburg syndrome type II. Moreover, the de novo pattern expanded the mutation data of SOX10. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Mutations and binding sites of human transcription factors

    KAUST Repository

    Kamanu, Frederick Kinyua; Medvedeva, Yulia A.; Schaefer, Ulf; Jankovic, Boris R.; Archer, John A.C.; Bajic, Vladimir B.

    2012-01-01

    signaling; cell fate; morphogenesis of organs and epithelium; development of urogenital system, epithelium, and tube; neuron fate commitment. Our study highlights the significance of studying mutations within the genes regulatory regions and opens way

  9. Case reports of juvenile GM1 gangliosidosisis type II caused by mutation in GLB1 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimzadeh, Parvaneh; Naderi, Samaneh; Modarresi, Farzaneh; Dastsooz, Hassan; Nemati, Hamid; Farokhashtiani, Tayebeh; Shamsian, Bibi Shahin; Inaloo, Soroor; Faghihi, Mohammad Ali

    2017-07-17

    Type II or juvenile GM1-gangliosidosis is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder, which is clinically distinct from infantile form of the disease by the lack of characteristic cherry-red spot and hepatosplenomegaly. The disease is characterized by slowly progressive neurodegeneration and mild skeletal changes. Due to the later age of onset and uncharacteristic presentation, diagnosis is frequently puzzled with other ataxic and purely neurological disorders. Up to now, 3-4 types of GM1-gangliosidosis have been reported and among them type I is the most common phenotype with the age of onset around 6 months. Various forms of GM1-gangliosidosis are caused by GLB1 gene mutations but severity of the disease and age of onset are directly related to the position and the nature of deleterious mutations. However, due to its unique genetic cause and overlapping clinical features, some researchers believe that GM1 gangliosidosis represents an overlapped disease spectrum instead of four distinct types. Here, we report a less frequent type of autosomal recessive GM1 gangliosidosis with perplexing clinical presentation in three families in the southwest part of Iran, who are unrelated but all from "Lurs" ethnic background. To identify disease-causing mutations, Whole Exome Sequencing (WES) utilizing next generation sequencing was performed. Four patients from three families were investigated with the age of onset around 3 years old. Clinical presentations were ataxia, gate disturbances and dystonia leading to wheelchair-dependent disability, regression of intellectual abilities, and general developmental regression. They all were born in consanguineous families with no previous documented similar disease in their parents. A homozygote missense mutation in GLB1 gene (c. 601 G > A, p.R201C) was found in all patients. Using Sanger sequencing this identified mutation was confirmed in the proband, their parents, grandparents, and extended family members, confirming

  10. Mutation spectrum of fork-head transcriptional factor gene (FOXL2) in Indian Blepharophimosis Ptosis Epicanthus Inversus Syndrome (BPES) patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Inderjeet; Hussain, Avid; Naik, Milind N; Murthy, Ramesh; Honavar, Santosh G

    2011-06-01

    The fork-head transcription factor gene (FOXL2) gene has been implicated in Blepharophimosis Ptosis Epicanthus Inversus Syndrome (BPES) type I and type II. The authors aimed to evaluate the involvement of FOXL2 in familial and sporadic cases of BPES in an Indian cohort. The present cohort comprised clinically well-characterised BPES cases that included six affected families, two sporadic cases and 60 unaffected normal controls. The 5' untranslated and coding region of FOXL2 was screened by resequencing and confirmed by restriction digestion. Further, genotype-phenotype correlations were done to understand the implications of the observed mutation. Six mutations were observed in eight cases (87.5%). These included a novel deletion (c.860delC), three previously reported duplications (c.663-692dup 30, c.672-701dup30 and c.843-859dup17), a frame shift (c.804dupC) and a homozygous missense mutation (p.E69K). The p.E69k mutation was seen in both heterozygous and homozygous form in a large four-generational family, and disease severity was found to be directly linked to the allelic dosage. Two SNPs (c.501C→T, c.536C→G) were also noted. An unusual coexistence of polycystic ovarian disease (PCOD) with BPES was also seen in one of the families. Mutations in the region downstream of the fork-head domain were predominantly responsible for BPES among Indian patients.

  11. Loeys-Dietz syndrome type I and type II: clinical findings and novel mutations in two Italian patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calzavara-Pinton Pier

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS is a rare autosomal dominant disorder showing the involvement of cutaneous, cardiovascular, craniofacial, and skeletal systems. In particular, LDS patients show arterial tortuosity with widespread vascular aneurysm and dissection, and have a high risk of aortic dissection or rupture at an early age and at aortic diameters that ordinarily are not predictive of these events. Recently, LDS has been subdivided in LDS type I (LDSI and type II (LDSII on the basis of the presence or the absence of cranio-facial involvement, respectively. Furthermore, LDSII patients display at least two of the major signs of vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. LDS is caused by mutations in the transforming growth factor (TGF beta-receptor I (TGFBR1 and II (TGFBR2 genes. The aim of this study was the clinical and molecular characterization of two LDS patients. Methods The exons and intronic flanking regions of TGFBR1 and TGFBR2 genes were amplified and sequence analysis was performed. Results Patient 1 was a boy showing dysmorphic signs, blue sclerae, high-arched palate, bifid uvula; skeletal system involvement, joint hypermobility, velvety and translucent skin, aortic root dilatation, tortuosity and elongation of the carotid arteries. These signs are consistent with an LDSI phenotype. The sequencing analysis disclosed the novel TGFBR1 p.Asp351Gly de novo mutation falling in the kinase domain of the receptor. Patient 2 was an adult woman showing ascending aorta aneurysm, with vascular complications following surgery intervention. Velvety and translucent skin, venous varicosities and wrist dislocation were present. These signs are consistent with an LDSII phenotype. In this patient and in her daughter, TGFBR2 genotyping disclosed in the kinase domain of the protein the novel p.Ile510Ser missense mutation. Conclusion We report two novel mutations in the TGFBR1 and TGFBR2 genes in two patients affected with LDS and showing marked

  12. Prothrombin 20210 G: a mutation and Factor V Leiden mutation in women with a history of severe preeclampsia and (H)ELLP syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Pampus, M. G.; Wolf, H.; Koopman, M. M.; van den Ende, A.; Buller, H. R.; Reitsma, P. H.

    2001-01-01

    The 20210 G-A prothrombin gene variant and the Factor V Leiden mutation are mutations associated with venous thrombotic risk. The aim of our study was to assess the prevalence of these specific mutations in women with a history of preeclampsia or hemolysis elevated liver enzymes, and low platelet

  13. A phase II trial of regorafenib in patients with metastatic and/or a unresectable gastrointestinal stromal tumor harboring secondary mutations of exon 17.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Chun-Nan; Chen, Ming-Huang; Chen, Yen-Yang; Yang, Ching-Yao; Yen, Chueh-Chuan; Tzen, Chin-Yuan; Chen, Li-Tzong; Chen, Jen-Shi

    2017-07-04

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are caused by the constitutive activation of KIT or platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha (PDGFRA) mutations. Imatinib selectively inhibits KIT and PDGFR, leading to disease control for 80%-90% of patients with metastatic GIST. Imatinib resistance can occur within a median of 2-3 years due to secondary mutations in KIT. According to preclinical studies, both imatinib and sunitinib are ineffective against exon 17 mutations. However, the treatment efficacy of regorafenib for patients with GIST with exon 17 mutations is still unknown. Documented patients with GIST with exon 17 mutations were enrolled in this study. Patients received 160 mg of oral regorafenib daily on days 1-21 of a 28-day cycle. The primary end point of this trial was the clinical benefit rate (CBR; i.e., complete or partial response [PR], as well as stable disease [SD]) at 16 weeks. The secondary end points of this study included progression free survival (PFS), overall survival, and safety. Between June 2014 to May 2016, 18 patients were enrolled (15 of which were eligible for response evaluation). The CBR at 16 weeks was 93.3% (14 of 15; 6 PR and 8 SD). The median PFS was 22.1 months. The most common grade 3 toxicities were hand-and-foot skin reactions (10 of 18; 55.6%), followed by hypertension (5 of 18; 27.8%). Regorafenib significantly prolonged PFS in patients with advanced GIST harboring secondary mutations of exon 17. A phase III trial of regorafenib versus placebo is warranted. This trial is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov in November 2015, number NCT02606097.Key message: This phase II trial was conducted to assess the efficacy and safety of regorafenib in patients with GIST with exon 17 mutations. The results provide strong evidence that regorafenib significantly prolonged PFS in patients with advanced GIST harboring secondary mutations of exon 17.

  14. Epidermal growth factor receptor mutations in lung adenocarcinoma in Malaysian patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liam, Chong-Kin; Wahid, Mohamed Ibrahim A; Rajadurai, Pathmanathan; Cheah, Yoke-Kqueen; Ng, Tiffany Shi-Yeen

    2013-06-01

    Despite available data from other Asian countries, the prevalence of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations among lung adenocarcinoma patients has not been reported in Malaysia. This study sought to determine the frequency of EGFR mutations among multiethnic Malaysian patients diagnosed with lung adenocarcinoma. Demographic and clinical information of patients whose lung adenocarcinoma biopsy specimens were submitted for EGFR mutation testing at Sime Darby Medical Center from 2009 to 2011 were analyzed. EGFR mutations at exons 18, 19, 20, and 21 were detected either through bidirectional sequencing or real-time polymerase chain reaction. Among 812 patients in the study, 49% were female, 63.7% were ethnic Chinese, 29.4% Malay, 4.8% Indian, and 2.1% other ethnic groups. Mutations were present in the tumors of 321 patients (39.5%), with mutations at exons 19 (23.5%) and 21 (14.9%) being the most common. Mutations were significantly more frequent among women than in men (52.5% versus 27.8%, p < 0.001). Although mutations were more common among Chinese (40.8%) compared with Malay (37.2%) or Indian (33.3%) patients, the difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.591). Of 211 patients with smoking history records, never-smokers had a higher mutation rate compared with ever-smokers (54.8% versus 20.7%, p < 0.001). EGFR mutations were present in 39.5% of patients. Mutations were more common in women and never-smokers with no differences in mutation frequency between different ethnicities. Because of the high mutation rates, reflex testing for EGFR mutation should be a routine practice for advanced lung adenocarcinoma patients in Malaysia.

  15. [Mutational frequencies in usherin(USH2A gene) in 26 Colombian individuals with Usher syndrome type II].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Greizy; Gelvez, Nancy Yaneth; Tamayo, Martalucía

    2011-03-01

    Usher syndrome is a disorder characterized by progressive retinitis pigmentosa, prelingual sensory hearing loss and vestibular dysfunction. It is the most frequent cause of deaf-blindness in humans. Three clinical types and twelve genetic subtypes have been characterized. Type II is the most common, and among these cases, nearly 80% have mutations in the USH2A gene. The aim of the study was to establish the mutational frequencies for the short isoform of USH2A gene in Usher syndrome type II. Twenty-six Colombian individuals with Usher syndrome type II were included. SSCP analysis for 20 exons of the short isoform was performed and abnormal patterns were sequenced. Sequencing of exon 13 of the USH2A gene was performed for all the individuals because the most frequent mutation is located in this exon. The most frequent mutation was c.2299delG, identified in the 27% (n=8) of the sample. The second mutation, p.R334W, showed a frequency of 15%. A new variant identified in the 5’UTR region, g.129G>T, was present in 1 individual (4%). Four polymorphisms were identified; one of them is a new deletion in exon 20, first reported in this study. Mutations in the usherin short isoform were identified in 38% of a sample of 26 USH2 cases. Molecular diagnosis was established in 7 of the 26.

  16. Glutaric acidemia type II: gene structure and mutations of the electron transfer flavoprotein:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (ETF:QO) gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Stephen I; Binard, Robert J; Woontner, Michael R; Frerman, Frank E

    2002-01-01

    Glutaric acidemia type II is a human inborn error of metabolism which can be due to defects in either subunit of electron transfer flavoprotein (ETF) or in ETF:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (ETF:QO), but few disease-causing mutations have been described. The ETF:QO gene is located on 4q33, and contains 13 exons. Primers to amplify these exons are presented, together with mutations identified by molecular analysis of 20 ETF:QO-deficient patients. Twenty-one different disease-causing mutations were identified on 36 of the 40 chromosomes.

  17. IDH mutation is paradoxically associated with higher {sup 18}F-FDOPA PET uptake in diffuse grade II and grade III gliomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verger, A. [APHM, La Timone Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Marseille (France); Lorraine University, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Nancyclotep Imaging Platform, CHRU Nancy, Nancy (France); Lorraine University, IADI, INSERM, UMR 947, Nancy (France); Metellus, P. [Centre Hospitalier Prive Clairval, Department of Neurosurgery, Marseille (France); Aix-Marseille University, INSERM, UMR 911, Marseille (France); Sala, Q. [APHM, La Timone Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Marseille (France); Colin, C. [Aix-Marseille University, INSERM, UMR 911, Marseille (France); Bialecki, E. [Centre Hospitalier Prive Clairval, Department of Neurosurgery, Marseille (France); Taieb, D. [APHM, La Timone Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Marseille (France); Aix-Marseille University, CERIMED, Marseille (France); Chinot, O. [Aix-Marseille University, INSERM, UMR 911, Marseille (France); APHM, La Timone Hospital, Department of Neuro-Oncology, Marseille (France); Figarella-Branger, D. [Aix-Marseille University, INSERM, UMR 911, Marseille (France); APHM, La Timone Hospital, Department of Anatomopathology, Marseille (France); Guedj, E. [APHM, La Timone Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Marseille (France); Aix-Marseille University, CERIMED, Marseille (France); Aix-Marseille University, Institut de Neurosciences de la Timone, CNRS, UMR 7289, Marseille (France); Hopital de la Timone, Service Central de Biophysique et Medecine Nucleaire, Marseille (France)

    2017-08-15

    The World Health Organization Classification of Tumors of the Central Nervous System has recently been updated by the integration of diagnostic and prognostic molecular parameters, giving pivotal attention to IDH mutation as a favourable factor. Amino acid PET is increasingly used in the management of gliomas, but its prognostic value is a matter of debate. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between IDH mutation and {sup 18}F-FDOPA uptake on PET in newly diagnosed gliomas. A total of 43 patients, presenting with diffuse astrocytic and oligodendroglial grade II and III gliomas, reclassified according to the 2016 WHO classification of tumours of the CNS, were retrospectively included. They had all undergone {sup 18}F-FDOPA PET at an initial stage before surgery and histological diagnosis. {sup 18}F-FDOPA uptake values were compared between patients with and without IDH mutation in terms of maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) ratios between tumour and normal contralateral brain (T/N), and between tumour and striatum (T/S). Patients with IDH mutation showed higher {sup 18}F-FDOPA T/N SUVmax ratios (1.6 vs. 1.2) and T/S SUVmax ratios (0.9 vs. 0.6) than patients without IDH mutation (p < 0.05). This study showed paradoxically higher {sup 18}F-FDOPA uptake in diffuse grade II and III gliomas with IDH mutation. Despite evident interest in the management of gliomas, and especially in relation to posttherapy evaluation, our findings raise the question of the prognostic value of {sup 18}F-FDOPA uptake on PET uptake in this group of patients. This may be related to differences in amino acid integration, metabolism, or cell differentiation. (orig.)

  18. Serum insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) in chronic heart failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tong Lijun; Chen Donghai; Ji Naijun; Fan Bifu; Wang Chengyao; Mei Yibin; Li Fuyuan; Kao Yan

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the clinical significance of changes of serum insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) levels in patients with chronic heart failure. Methods: Serum IGF-II levels were measured with RIA in 132 cases of chronic heart failure and 45 controls. Results: Serum IGF-II levels were significantly higher in patients with chronic heart failure than those in the controls (t=0.033, P<0.001). IGF-II levels were highest in grade IV CHF patients (vs grade II t=3.963, P<0.01; vs grade III, t=3.578, P<0.01). In the twelve patients died in hospital, the serum IGF-II levels were significantly higher than those patients recovered (t=7.141, P<0.01). Conclusion: Serum IGF-II levels were increased in CHF patients and were highest in the most severe cases. (authors)

  19. Factors influencing electric utility expansion. Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masud, E. [ed.

    1977-01-01

    This report, Vol. 2, submitted by the General Electric Co., identifies factors that should be considered in planning interconnected systems and discusses how these factors relate to one another. The objective is to identify all the factors and classify them by their use and importance in arriving at a decision. Chapter 2 discusses the utility system and its system behavior characteristics, emphasizing behavior that affects the planning of the bulk-power generation and transmission system. Chapter 3 introduces interconnection planning by discussing the new system characteristics brought to operation and planning. Forty-two factors associated with cost, reliability, constraints, and coordination are related to each other by factor trees. Factor trees display the relationship of one factor such as reliability to more-detailed factors which in turn are further related to individual characteristics of facilities. These factor trees provide a structure to the presentation. A questionnaire including the 42 factors was completed by 52 system planners from utility companies and government authorities. The results of these questionnaires are tabulated and presented with pertinent discussion of each factor. Chapter 4 deals with generation planning, recognizing the existence of interconnections. Chapter 5 addresses transmission planning, questions related to reliability and cost measures and constraints, and factors related to both analytical techniques and planning procedures. The chapter ends with a discussion of combined generation-transmission planning. (MCW)

  20. Radiogenomic correlation in lung adenocarcinoma with epidermal growth factor receptor mutations: Imaging features and histological subtypes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Su Jin [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Hanyang University, Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Tae Jung [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Samsung Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Yo Won [Hanyang University, Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jeong-Soo [Dankook Universicity, Department of Biochemistry, College of Medicine, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Jin-Haeng [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Pathology, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyung Won [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    To correlate imaging features of resected lung adenocarcinoma with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation and the IASLC/ATS/ERS classification histological subtypes. In 250 consecutive patients with resected lung adenocarcinoma, EGFR mutation status was correlated with demographics, imaging features including ground-glass opacity (GGO) proportion and the IASLC/ATS/ERS classification histological subtypes. EGFR mutations were significantly more frequent in women (54.5 % vs. 38.1 %, p = 0.011) and in never-smokers (54.7 % vs. 35.3 %, p = 0.003). GGO proportion was significantly higher in tumours with EGFR mutation than in those without (30.3 ± 33.8 % vs. 19.0 ± 29.3 %, p = 0.005). EGFR mutation was significantly more frequent in tumours with GGO ≥ 50 % and tumours with any GGO (p = 0.026 and 0.008, respectively). Adenocarcinomas with exon 19 or 21 mutation showed significantly higher GGO proportion than that in EGFR wild-type tumours (p = 0.009 and 0.029, respectively). Absence of GGO was an independent predictor of negative EGFR mutation (odds ratio, 1.81; 95 % confidence interval, 1.16-3.04; p = 0.018). GGO proportion in adenocarcinomas with EGFR mutation was significantly higher than that in EGFR wild-type tumours, and the absence of GGO on CT was an independent predictor of negative EGFR mutation. (orig.)

  1. Prevalence of 2314delG mutation in Spanish patients with Usher syndrome type II (USH2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beneyto, M M; Cuevas, J M; Millán, J M; Espinós, C; Mateu, E; González-Cabo, P; Baiget, M; Doménech, M; Bernal, S; Ayuso, C; García-Sandoval, B; Trujillo, M J; Borrego, S; Antiñolo, G; Carballo, M; Nájera, C

    2000-06-01

    The Usher syndrome (USH) is a group of autosomal recessive diseases characterized by congenital sensorineural hearing loss and retinitis pigmentosa. Three clinically distinct forms of Usher syndrome have so far been recognized and can be distinguished from one another by assessing auditory and vestibular function. Usher syndrome type II (USH2) patients have congenital moderate-to-severe nonprogressive hearing loss, retinitis pigmentosa, and normal vestibular function. Genetic linkage studies have revealed genetic heterogeneity among the three types of USH, with the majority of USH2 families showing linkage to the USH2A locus in 1q41. The USH2A gene (MIM 276901) has been identified: three mutations, 2314delG, 2913delG, and 4353-54delC, were initially reported in USH2A patients, the most frequent of which is the 2314delG mutation. It has been reported that this mutation can give rise to typical and atypical USH2 phenotypes. USH2 cases represent 62% of all USH cases in the Spanish population, and 95% of these cases have provided evidence of linkage to the USH2A locus. In the present study, the three reported mutations were analyzed in 59 Spanish families with a diagnosis of USH type II. The 2314delG was the only mutation identified in our population: it was detected in 25% of families and 16% of USH2 chromosomes analyzed. This study attempts to estimate the prevalence of this common mutation in a homogeneous Spanish population.

  2. Functional analysis of Waardenburg syndrome-associated PAX3 and SOX10 mutations: report of a dominant-negative SOX10 mutation in Waardenburg syndrome type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hua; Chen, Hongsheng; Luo, Hunjin; An, Jing; Sun, Lin; Mei, Lingyun; He, Chufeng; Jiang, Lu; Jiang, Wen; Xia, Kun; Li, Jia-Da; Feng, Yong

    2012-03-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is an auditory-pigmentary disorder resulting from melanocyte defects, with varying combinations of sensorineural hearing loss and abnormal pigmentation of the hair, skin, and inner ear. WS is classified into four subtypes (WS1-WS4) based on additional symptoms. PAX3 and SOX10 are two transcription factors that can activate the expression of microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF), a critical transcription factor for melanocyte development. Mutations of PAX3 are associated with WS1 and WS3, while mutations of SOX10 cause WS2 and WS4. Recently, we identified some novel WS-associated mutations in PAX3 and SOX10 in a cohort of Chinese WS patients. Here, we further identified an E248fsX30 SOX10 mutation in a family of WS2. We analyzed the subcellular distribution, expression and in vitro activity of two PAX3 mutations (p.H80D, p.H186fsX5) and four SOX10 mutations (p.E248fsX30, p.G37fsX58, p.G38fsX69 and p.R43X). Except H80D PAX3, which retained partial activity, the other mutants were unable to activate MITF promoter. The H80D PAX3 and E248fsX30 SOX10 were localized in the nucleus as wild type (WT) proteins, whereas the other mutant proteins were distributed in both cytoplasm and nucleus. Furthermore, E248fsX30 SOX10 protein retained the DNA-binding activity and showed dominant-negative effect on WT SOX10. However, E248fsX30 SOX10 protein seems to decay faster than the WT one, which may underlie the mild WS2 phenotype caused by this mutation.

  3. Growth factors II: insuline-like growth binging proteins (GFBPs Factores de crecimiento II: factores insulinoides de crecimiento

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilda Norha Jaramillo Londoño

    1996-03-01

    Full Text Available This review summarizes recent knowledge concerning Insulin.like growth factors I and II, with emphasis on their biochemical structure, concentrations, binding proteins, receptors, mechanisms of action, biological effects, and alterations of their concentrations in biological fluids. Se revisan los Factores Insulinoides de Crecimiento, también denominados ";Factores de Crecimiento Similares a la Insulina";, sobre los cuales se dispone de abundante información. Se sintetizan conocimientos recientes sobre dichos factores con énfasis en los siguientes aspectos: estructura bioquímica, concentraciones y sus cambios en los líquidos biológicos, proteínas fijadoras, receptores, mecanismos de acción y efectos biológicos.

  4. Noninvasive IDH1 mutation estimation based on a quantitative radiomics approach for grade II glioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Jinhua [Fudan University, Department of Electronic Engineering, Shanghai (China); Computing and Computer-Assisted Intervention, Key Laboratory of Medical Imaging, Shanghai (China); Shi, Zhifeng; Chen, Liang; Mao, Ying [Fudan University, Department of Neurosurgery, Huashan Hospital, Shanghai (China); Lian, Yuxi; Li, Zeju; Liu, Tongtong; Gao, Yuan; Wang, Yuanyuan [Fudan University, Department of Electronic Engineering, Shanghai (China)

    2017-08-15

    The status of isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) is highly correlated with the development, treatment and prognosis of glioma. We explored a noninvasive method to reveal IDH1 status by using a quantitative radiomics approach for grade II glioma. A primary cohort consisting of 110 patients pathologically diagnosed with grade II glioma was retrospectively studied. The radiomics method developed in this paper includes image segmentation, high-throughput feature extraction, radiomics sequencing, feature selection and classification. Using the leave-one-out cross-validation (LOOCV) method, the classification result was compared with the real IDH1 situation from Sanger sequencing. Another independent validation cohort containing 30 patients was utilised to further test the method. A total of 671 high-throughput features were extracted and quantized. 110 features were selected by improved genetic algorithm. In LOOCV, the noninvasive IDH1 status estimation based on the proposed approach presented an estimation accuracy of 0.80, sensitivity of 0.83 and specificity of 0.74. Area under the receiver operating characteristic curve reached 0.86. Further validation on the independent cohort of 30 patients produced similar results. Radiomics is a potentially useful approach for estimating IDH1 mutation status noninvasively using conventional T2-FLAIR MRI images. The estimation accuracy could potentially be improved by using multiple imaging modalities. (orig.)

  5. Familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus due to a novel mutation in the arginine vasopressin-neurophysin II gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Fost, M.; van Trotsenburg, A. S. P.; van Santen, H. M.; Endert, E.; van den Elzen, C.; Kamsteeg, E. J.; Swaab, D. F.; Fliers, E.

    2011-01-01

    Familial neurohypophyseal (central) diabetes insipidus (DI) is caused by mutations in the arginine vasopressin-neurophysin II (AVP-NPII) gene. The majority of cases is inherited in an autosomal dominant way. In this study, we present the clinical features of a mother and her son with autosomal

  6. Familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus due to a novel mutation in the arginine vasopressin-neurophysin II gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fost, M. de; Trotsenburg, A.S. van; Santen, H.M. van; Endert, E.; Elzen, C. van den; Kamsteeg, E.J.; Swaab, D.F.; Fliers, E.A.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Familial neurohypophyseal (central) diabetes insipidus (DI) is caused by mutations in the arginine vasopressin-neurophysin II (AVP-NPII) gene. The majority of cases is inherited in an autosomal dominant way. In this study, we present the clinical features of a mother and her son with

  7. Functional characterization of two novel splicing mutations in the OCA2 gene associated with oculocutaneous albinism type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimoldi, Valeria; Straniero, Letizia; Asselta, Rosanna; Mauri, Lucia; Manfredini, Emanuela; Penco, Silvana; Gesu, Giovanni P; Del Longo, Alessandra; Piozzi, Elena; Soldà, Giulia; Primignani, Paola

    2014-03-01

    Oculocutaneous albinism (OCA) is characterized by hypopigmentation of the skin, hair and eye, and by ophthalmologic abnormalities caused by a deficiency in melanin biosynthesis. OCA type II (OCA2) is one of the four commonly-recognized forms of albinism, and is determined by mutation in the OCA2 gene. In the present study, we investigated the molecular basis of OCA2 in two siblings and one unrelated patient. The mutational screening of the OCA2 gene identified two hitherto-unknown putative splicing mutations. The first one (c.1503+5G>A), identified in an Italian proband and her affected sibling, lies in the consensus sequence of the donor splice site of OCA2 intron 14 (IVS14+5G>A), in compound heterozygosity with a frameshift mutation, c.1450_1451insCTGCCCTGACA, which is predicted to determine the premature termination of the polypeptide chain (p.I484Tfs*19). In-silico prediction of the effect of the IVS14+5G>A mutation on splicing showed a score reduction for the mutant splice site and indicated the possible activation of a newly-created deep-intronic acceptor splice site. The second mutation is a synonymous transition (c.2139G>A, p.K713K) involving the last nucleotide of exon 20. This mutation was found in a young African albino patient in compound heterozygosity with a previously-reported OCA2 missense mutation (p.T404M). In-silico analysis predicted that the mutant c.2139G>A allele would result in the abolition of the splice donor site. The effects on splicing of these two novel mutations were investigated using an in-vitro hybrid-minigene approach that led to the demonstration of the causal role of the two mutations and to the identification of aberrant transcript variants. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. A novel splice site mutation in the dentin sialophosphoprotein gene in a Chinese family with dentinogenesis imperfecta type II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Haoyang; Hou Yanning; Cui Yingxia; Huang Yufeng; Shi Yichao; Xia Xinyi; Lu Hongyong; Wang Yunhua; Li Xiaojun

    2009-01-01

    Twenty-four individuals were investigated that spanned six generations in a Chinese family affected with an apparently autosomal dominant form of dentinogenesis imperfecta type II (DGI-II, OMIM 125490). All affected individuals presented with typical, clinical and radiographic features of DGI-II, but without bilateral progressive high-frequency sensorineural hearing loss. To investigate the mutated molecule, a positional candidate approach was used to determine the mutated gene in this family. Genomic DNA was obtained from 24 affected individuals, 18 unaffected relatives of the family and 50 controls. Haplotype analysis was performed using leukocyte DNA for 6 short tandem repeat (STR) markers present in chromosome 4 (D4S1534, GATA62A11, DSPP, DMP1, SPP1 and D4S1563). In the critical region between D4S1534 and DMP1, the dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) gene (OMIM *125485) was considered as the strongest candidate gene. The first four exons and exon/intron boundaries of the gene were analyzed using DNA from 24 affected individuals and 18 unaffected relatives of the same family. DNA sequencing revealed a heterozygous deletion mutation in intron 2 (at positions -3 to -25), which resulted in a frameshift mutation, that changed the acceptor site sequence from CAG to AAG (IVS2-3C→A) and may also have disrupted the branch point consensus sequence in intron 2. The mutation was found in the 24 affected individuals, but not in the 18 unaffected relatives and 50 controls. The deletion was identified by allele-specific sequencing and denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC) analysis. We conclude that the heterozygous deletion mutation contributed to the pathogenesis of DGI-II

  9. De novo activating epidermal growth factor mutations (EGFR) in small-cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thai, Alesha; Chia, Puey L; Russell, Prudence A; Do, Hongdo; Dobrovic, Alex; Mitchell, Paul; John, Thomas

    2017-09-01

    In Australia, mutations in epidermal growth factor mutations (EGFR) occur in 15% of patients diagnosed with non-small-cell lung cancer and are found with higher frequency in female, non-smokers of Asian ethnicity. Activating mutations in the EGFR gene are rarely described in SCLC. We present two cases of de novo EGFR mutations in patients with SCLC detected in tissue and in plasma cell free DNA, both of whom were of Asian ethnicity and never-smokers. These two cases add to the growing body of evidence suggesting that screening for EGFR mutations in SCLC should be considered in patients with specific clinical features. © 2017 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  10. Correlation between 18F Fluorodeoxyglucose uptake and epidermal growth factor receptor mutations in advanced lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Yun Jung; Cho, Byoung Chul; Jeong, Youg Hyu; Seo, Hyo Jung; Kim, Hyun Jeong; Cho, Arthur; Lee, Jae Hoon; Yun, Mi Jin; Jeon, Tae Joo; Lee, Jong Doo; Kang, Won Jun

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)gene have been identified as potential targets for the treatment and prognostic factors for non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We assessed the correlation between fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake and EGFR mutations, as well as their prognostic implications. A total of 163 patients with pathologically confirmed NSCLC were enrolled (99 males and 64 females; median age, 60 years). All patients underwent FDG positron emission tomography before treatment, and genetic studies of EGFR mutations were performed. The maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax)of the primary lung cancer was measured and normalized with regard to liver uptake. The SUVmax between the wild type and EGFR mutant groups was compared. Survival was evaluated according to SUVmax and EGFR mutation status. EGFR mutations were found in 57 patients (60.8%). The SUVmax tended to be higher in wild type than mutant tumors, but was not significantly different (11.1±5.7 vs. 9.8±4.4, P=0.103). The SUVmax was significantly lower in patients with an exon 19 mutation than in those with either an exon 21 mutation or wild type (P=0.003 and 0.009, respectively). The EGFR mutation showed prolonged overall survival (OS) compared to wild type tumors (P=0.004). There was no significant difference in survival according to SUVmax. Both OS and progression free survival of patients with a mutation in exon 19 were significant longer than in patients with wild type tumors. In patients with NSCLC, a mutation in exon 19 was associated with a lower SUVmax and is a reliable predictor for good survival

  11. Factoring handedness data: II. Geschwind's multidimensional hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messinger, H B; Messinger, M I

    1996-06-01

    The challenge in this journal by Peters and Murphy to the validity of two published factor analyses of handedness data because of bimodality was dealt with in Part I by identifying measures to normalize the handedness item distributions. A new survey using Oldfield's questionnaire format had 38 bell-shaped (unimodal) handedness-item distributions and 11 that were only marginally bimodal out of the 55 items used in Geschwind's 1986 study. Yet they were still non-normal and the factor analysis was unsatisfactory; bimodality is not the only problem. By choosing a transformation for each item that was optimal as assessed by D'Agostino's K2 statistic, all but two items could be normalized. Seven factors were derived that showed high congruence between maximum likelihood and principal components extractions before and after varimax rotation. Geschwind's assertion that handedness is not unidimensional is therefore supported.

  12. [Molecular pathogenesis of Waardenburg syndrome type II resulting from SOX10 gene mutation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hua; Chen, Hongsheng; Feng, Yong; Qian, Minfei; Li, Jiping; Liu, Jun; Zhang, Chun

    2016-08-01

    To explore the molecular mechanism of Waardenburg syndrome type II (WS2) resulting from SOX10 gene mutation E248fs through in vitro experiment. 293T cells were transiently transfected with wild type (WT) SOX10 and mutant type (MT) E248fs plasmids. The regulatory effect of WT/MT SOX10 on the transcriptional activity of MITF gene and influence of E248fs on WT SOX10 function were determined with a luciferase activity assay. The DNA binding capacity of the WT/MT SOX10 with the promoter of the MITF gene was determined with a biotinylated double-stranded oligonucleotide probe containing the SOX10 binding sequence cattgtc to precipitate MITF and E248fs, respectively. The stability of SOX10 and E248fs were also analyzed. As a loss-of-function mutation, the E248fs mutant failed to transactivate the MITF promoter as compared with the WT SOX10 (P<0.01), which also showed a dominant-negative effect on WT SOX10. The WT SOX10 and E248fs mutant were also able to bind specifically to the cattgtc motif in the MITF promoter, whereas E248fs had degraded faster than WT SOX10. Despite the fact that the E248fs has a dominant-negative effect on SOX10, its reduced stability may down-regulate the transcription of MITF and decrease the synthesis of melanin, which may result in haploinsufficiency of SOX10 protein and cause the milder WS2 phenotype.

  13. Analysis of mutations in the entire coding sequence of the factor VIII gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bidichadani, S.I.; Lanyon, W.G.; Connor, J.M. [Glascow Univ. (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Hemophilia A is a common X-linked recessive disorder of bleeding caused by deleterious mutations in the gene for clotting factor VIII. The large size of the factor VIII gene, the high frequency of de novo mutations and its tissue-specific expression complicate the detection of mutations. We have used a combination of RT-PCR of ectopic factor VIII transcripts and genomic DNA-PCRs to amplify the entire essential sequence of the factor VIII gene. This is followed by chemical mismatch cleavage analysis and direct sequencing in order to facilitate a comprehensive search for mutations. We describe the characterization of nine potentially pathogenic mutations, six of which are novel. In each case, a correlation of the genotype with the observed phenotype is presented. In order to evaluate the pathogenicity of the five missense mutations detected, we have analyzed them for evolutionary sequence conservation and for their involvement of sequence motifs catalogued in the PROSITE database of protein sites and patterns.

  14. The Association of Factor V Leiden Mutation with Recurrent Pregnancy Loss

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kashif, M.; Saeed, A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the association of factor V Leiden mutation with recurrent pregnancy loss. Methods: The case-control study was conducted at the Department of Haematology, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan, from January to June 2012, and comprised women of 18 to 45 years of age who had a history of recurrent pregnancy loss, and controls with no history of pregnancy loss. All the subjects belonged to Punjabi ethnic group. Three ml blood was taken from cases and controls and deoxyribonucleic acid was extracted. In order to identify Factor V Leiden mutation, polymerase chain reaction method was utilised combined with the amplification refractory mutation system. Data was analysed using SPSS 17. Results: Of the 112 subjects, 56(50 percent) were in each of the two groups. The presence of factor V Leiden mutation among the cases was 3(5.4 percent) while it was absent among the controls. The mutation was significantly associated with recurrent pregnancy loss (p=0.017).Recurrent pregnancy loss was higher in cases than controls (p=0.001). Conclusion: Factor V Leiden mutation was significantly associated with recurrent pregnancy loss. It should be considered one of the causes of recurrent pregnancy loss. (author)

  15. HPRT gene mutation frequency and the factor of influence in adult peripheral blood lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Jingyong; Zheng Siying; Cui Fengmei; Wang Liuyi; Lao Qinhua; Wu Hongliang

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To study the HPRT gene loci mutation frequencies and the factor of influence in peripheral blood lymphocytes of adult with ages ranging from 21-50. Methods: HPRT gene mutation frequency (GMf) were examined by the technique of multinuclear cell assay. Relation between GMf and years were fitted with a computer. Results: Relation could be described by the following equation: y = 0.7555 + 0.0440x, r = 0.9829. Smoking has influence on GMf and sex hasn't. Conclusion: HPRT gene mutation frequency increases with increasing of age. Increasing rate is 0.00440% per year

  16. Identification of eight novel coagulation factor XIII subunit A mutations: implied consequences for structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivaskevicius, Vytautas; Biswas, Arijit; Bevans, Carville; Schroeder, Verena; Kohler, Hans Peter; Rott, Hannelore; Halimeh, Susan; Petrides, Petro E; Lenk, Harald; Krause, Manuele; Miterski, Bruno; Harbrecht, Ursula; Oldenburg, Johannes

    2010-06-01

    Severe hereditary coagulation factor XIII deficiency is a rare homozygous bleeding disorder affecting one person in every two million individuals. In contrast, heterozygous factor XIII deficiency is more common, but usually not associated with severe hemorrhage such as intracranial bleeding or hemarthrosis. In most cases, the disease is caused by F13A gene mutations. Causative mutations associated with the F13B gene are rarer. We analyzed ten index patients and three relatives for factor XIII activity using a photometric assay and sequenced their F13A and F13B genes. Additionally, structural analysis of the wild-type protein structure from a previously reported X-ray crystallographic model identified potential structural and functional effects of the missense mutations. All individuals except one were heterozygous for factor XIIIA mutations (average factor XIII activity 51%), while the remaining homozygous individual was found to have severe factor XIII deficiency (<5% of normal factor XIII activity). Eight of the 12 heterozygous patients exhibited a bleeding tendency upon provocation. The identified missense (Pro289Arg, Arg611His, Asp668Gly) and nonsense (Gly390X, Trp664X) mutations are causative for factor XIII deficiency. A Gly592Ser variant identified in three unrelated index patients, as well as in 200 healthy controls (minor allele frequency 0.005), and two further Tyr167Cys and Arg540Gln variants, represent possible candidates for rare F13A gene polymorphisms since they apparently do not have a significant influence on the structure of the factor XIIIA protein. Future in vitro expression studies of the factor XIII mutations are required to confirm their pathological mechanisms.

  17. The SDH mutation database: an online resource for succinate dehydrogenase sequence variants involved in pheochromocytoma, paraganglioma and mitochondrial complex II deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devilee Peter

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The SDHA, SDHB, SDHC and SDHD genes encode the subunits of succinate dehydrogenase (succinate: ubiquinone oxidoreductase, a component of both the Krebs cycle and the mitochondrial respiratory chain. SDHA, a flavoprotein and SDHB, an iron-sulfur protein together constitute the catalytic domain, while SDHC and SDHD encode membrane anchors that allow the complex to participate in the respiratory chain as complex II. Germline mutations of SDHD and SDHB are a major cause of the hereditary forms of the tumors paraganglioma and pheochromocytoma. The largest subunit, SDHA, is mutated in patients with Leigh syndrome and late-onset optic atrophy, but has not as yet been identified as a factor in hereditary cancer. Description The SDH mutation database is based on the recently described Leiden Open (source Variation Database (LOVD system. The variants currently described in the database were extracted from the published literature and in some cases annotated to conform to current mutation nomenclature. Researchers can also directly submit new sequence variants online. Since the identification of SDHD, SDHC, and SDHB as classic tumor suppressor genes in 2000 and 2001, studies from research groups around the world have identified a total of 120 variants. Here we introduce all reported paraganglioma and pheochromocytoma related sequence variations in these genes, in addition to all reported mutations of SDHA. The database is now accessible online. Conclusion The SDH mutation database offers a valuable tool and resource for clinicians involved in the treatment of patients with paraganglioma-pheochromocytoma, clinical geneticists needing an overview of current knowledge, and geneticists and other researchers needing a solid foundation for further exploration of both these tumor syndromes and SDHA-related phenotypes.

  18. Mutation Analysis of 16 Mucolipidosis II and III Alpha/Beta Chinese Children Revealed Genotype-Phenotype Correlations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuang Liu

    Full Text Available Mucolipidosis II and III alpha/beta are autosomal recessive diseases caused by mutations in the GNPTAB gene which encodes the α and β subunits of the N-acetylglucosamine-1-phosphotransferase. Clinically, mucolipidosis II (MLII is characterized by severe developmental delay, coarse facial features, skeletal deformities, and other systemic involvement. In contrast, MLIII alpha/beta is a much milder disorder, the symptoms of which include progressive joint stiffness, short stature, and scoliosis. To study the relationship between the genotypes and phenotypes of the MLII and MLIII alpha/beta patients, we analyzed the GNPTAB gene in 16 Chinese MLII and MLIII alpha/beta patients. We collected and analyzed the patients' available clinical data and all showed clinical features typical of MLII or MLIII alpha/beta. Moreover, the activity of several lysosomal enzymes was measured in the plasma and finally the GNPTAB gene was sequenced. We detected 30 mutant alleles out of 32 alleles in our patients. These include 10 new mutations (c.99delC, c.118-1G>A, c.523_524delAAinsG, c.1212C>G, c.2213C>A, c.2345C>T, c.2356C>T, c.2455G>T, c.2821dupA, and c.3136-2A>G and 5 previously reported mutations (c.1071G>A, c.1090C>T, c.2715+1G>A, c.2550_2554delGAAA, and c.3613C>T. The most frequent mutation was the splicing mutation c.2715+1G>A, which accounted for 28% of the mutations. The majority of the mutations reported in the Chinese patients (57% were located on exon 13 or in its intronic flanking regions.

  19. HFE gene mutation is a risk factor for tissue iron accumulation in hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkmen, Ercan; Yildirim, Tolga; Yilmaz, Rahmi; Hazirolan, Tuncay; Eldem, Gonca; Yilmaz, Engin; Aybal Kutlugun, Aysun; Altindal, Mahmut; Altun, Bulent

    2017-07-01

    HFE gene mutations are responsible from iron overload in general population. Studies in hemodialysis patients investigated the effect of presence of HFE gene mutations on serum ferritin and transferrin saturation (TSAT) with conflicting results. However effect of HFE mutations on iron overload in hemodialysis patients was not previously extensively studied. 36 hemodialysis patients (age 51.3 ± 15.6, (18/18) male/female) and 44 healthy control subjects included in this cross sectional study. Hemoglobin, ferritin, TSAT in the preceding 2 years were recorded. Iron and erythropoietin (EPO) administered during this period were calculated. Iron accumulation in heart and liver was detected by MRI. Relationship between HFE gene mutation, hemoglobin, iron parameters and EPO doses, and tissue iron accumulation were determined. Iron overload was detected in nine (25%) patients. Hemoglobin, iron parameters, weekly EPO doses, and monthly iron doses of patients with and without iron overload were similar. There was no difference between control group and hemodialysis patients with respect to the prevalence of HFE gene mutations. Iron overload was detected in five of eight patients who had HFE gene mutations, but iron overload was present in 4 of 28 patients who had no mutations (P = 0.01). Hemoglobin, iron parameters, erythropoietin, and iron doses were similar in patients with and without gene mutations. HFE gene mutations remained the main determinant of iron overload after multivariate logistic regression analysis (P = 0.02; OR, 11.6). Serum iron parameters were not adequate to detect iron overload and HFE gene mutation was found to be an important risk factor for iron accumulation. © 2017 International Society for Hemodialysis.

  20. [Identification of novel compound heterozygous mutations of USH2A gene in a family with Usher syndrome type II].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Haiou; Ge, Chuanqin; Wang, Yiwang; Tang, Genyun; Quan, Qingli

    2015-06-01

    To identify potential mutations in a Chinese family with Usher syndrome type II. Genomic DNA was obtained from two affected and four unaffected members of the family and subjected to amplification of the entire coding sequence and splicing sites of USH2A gene. Mutation detection was conducted by direct sequencing of the PCR products. A total of 100 normal unrelated individuals were used as controls. The patients were identified to be a compound heterozygote for two mutations: c.8272G>T (p.E2758X) in exon 42 from his mother and c.12376-12378ACT>TAA(p.T4126X) in exon 63 of the USH2A gene from his father. Both mutations were not found in either of the two unaffected family members or 100 unrelated controls, and had completely co-segregated with the disease phenotype in the family. Neither mutation has been reported in the HGMD database. The novel compound heterozygous mutations c.8272G>T and c.12376-12378ACT>TAA within the USH2A gene may be responsible for the disease. This result may provide new clues for molecular diagnosis of this disease.

  1. Study protocol of a phase IB/II clinical trial of metformin and chloroquine in patients with IDH1-mutated or IDH2-mutated solid tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molenaar, Remco J; Coelen, Robert J S; Khurshed, Mohammed; Roos, Eva; Caan, Matthan W A; van Linde, Myra E; Kouwenhoven, Mathilde; Bramer, Jos A M; Bovée, Judith V M G; Mathôt, Ron A; Klümpen, Heinz-Josef; van Laarhoven, Hanneke W M; van Noorden, Cornelis J F; Vandertop, W Peter; Gelderblom, Hans; van Gulik, Thomas M; Wilmink, Johanna W

    2017-06-10

    High-grade chondrosarcoma, high-grade glioma and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma are aggressive types of cancer with a dismal outcome. This is due to the lack of effective treatment options, emphasising the need for novel therapies. Mutations in the genes IDH1 and IDH2 (isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2) occur in 60% of chondrosarcoma, 80% of WHO grade II-IV glioma and 20% of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma. IDH1/2 -mutated cancer cells produce the oncometabolite D -2-hydroxyglutarate ( D -2HG) and are metabolically vulnerable to treatment with the oral antidiabetic metformin and the oral antimalarial drug chloroquine. We describe a dose-finding phase Ib/II clinical trial, in which patients with IDH1/2 -mutated chondrosarcoma, glioma and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma are treated with a combination of metformin and chloroquine. Dose escalation is performed according to a 3+3 dose-escalation scheme. The primary objective is to determine the maximum tolerated dose to establish the recommended dose for a phase II clinical trial. Secondary objectives of the study include (1) determination of pharmacokinetics and toxic effects of the study therapy, for which metformin and chloroquine serum levels will be determined over time; (2) investigation of tumour responses to metformin plus chloroquine in IDH1/2 -mutated cancers using CT/MRI scans; and (3) whether tumour responses can be measured by non-invasive D -2HG measurements (mass spectrometry and magnetic resonance spectroscopy) of tumour tissue, serum, urine, and/or bile or next-generation sequencing of circulating tumour DNA (liquid biopsies). This study may open a novel treatment avenue for IDH1/2 -mutated high-grade chondrosarcoma, glioma and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma by repurposing the combination of two inexpensive drugs that are already approved for other indications. This study has been approved by the medical-ethical review committee of the Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. The report

  2. Noninvasive IDH1 mutation estimation based on a quantitative radiomics approach for grade II glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jinhua; Shi, Zhifeng; Lian, Yuxi; Li, Zeju; Liu, Tongtong; Gao, Yuan; Wang, Yuanyuan; Chen, Liang; Mao, Ying

    2017-08-01

    The status of isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) is highly correlated with the development, treatment and prognosis of glioma. We explored a noninvasive method to reveal IDH1 status by using a quantitative radiomics approach for grade II glioma. A primary cohort consisting of 110 patients pathologically diagnosed with grade II glioma was retrospectively studied. The radiomics method developed in this paper includes image segmentation, high-throughput feature extraction, radiomics sequencing, feature selection and classification. Using the leave-one-out cross-validation (LOOCV) method, the classification result was compared with the real IDH1 situation from Sanger sequencing. Another independent validation cohort containing 30 patients was utilised to further test the method. A total of 671 high-throughput features were extracted and quantized. 110 features were selected by improved genetic algorithm. In LOOCV, the noninvasive IDH1 status estimation based on the proposed approach presented an estimation accuracy of 0.80, sensitivity of 0.83 and specificity of 0.74. Area under the receiver operating characteristic curve reached 0.86. Further validation on the independent cohort of 30 patients produced similar results. Radiomics is a potentially useful approach for estimating IDH1 mutation status noninvasively using conventional T2-FLAIR MRI images. The estimation accuracy could potentially be improved by using multiple imaging modalities. • Noninvasive IDH1 status estimation can be obtained with a radiomics approach. • Automatic and quantitative processes were established for noninvasive biomarker estimation. • High-throughput MRI features are highly correlated to IDH1 states. • Area under the ROC curve of the proposed estimation method reached 0.86.

  3. Mutations in domain II of 23 S rRNA facilitate translation of a 23 S rRNA-encoded pentapeptide conferring erythromycin resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam, M; Douthwaite, S; Tenson, T

    1996-01-01

    Mutations in domain II of Escherichia coli 23 S rRNA that cause resistance to erythromycin do so in a manner fundamentally different from mutations at the drug binding site in domain V of the 23 S rRNA. The domain II mutations are located in a hairpin structure between nucleotides 1198 and 1247...... this hypothesis, a range of point mutations was generated in domain II of 23 S rRNA in the vicinity of the E-peptide open reading frame. We find a correlation between erythromycin resistance of the mutant clones and increased accessibility of the ribosome binding site of the E-peptide gene. Furthermore......, the erythromycin resistance determinant in the mutants was shown to be confined to a small 23 S rRNA segment containing the coding region and the ribosome binding site of the E-peptide open reading frame. It thus appears that the domain II mutations mediate erythromycin resistance by increasing expression...

  4. Characterization of the factor VIII defect in 147 patients with sporadic hemophilia A: Family studies indicate a mutation type-dependent sex ratio of mutation frequencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, J.; Schmidt, W.; Olek, K. [Univ. of Bonn (Germany)] [and others

    1996-04-01

    The clinical manifestation of hemophilia A is caused by a wide range of different mutations. In this study the factor VIII genes of 147 severe hemophilia A patients-all exclusively from sporadic families-were screened for mutations by use of the complete panel of modern DNA techniques. The pathogenous defect could be characterized in 126 patients (85.7%). Fifty-five patients (37.4%) showed a F8A-gene inversion, 47 (32.0%) a point mutation, 14 (9.5%) a small deletion, 8 (5.4%) a large deletion, and 2 (1.4%) a small insertion. Further, four (2.7%) mutations were localized but could not be sequenced yet. No mutation could be identified in 17 patients (11.6%). Sixteen (10.9%) of the P identified mutations occurred in the B domain. Four of these were located in an adenosine nucleotide stretch at codon 1192, indicating a mutation hotspot. Somatic mosaicisms were detected in 3 (3.9%) of 76 patients` mothers, comprising 3 of 16 de novo mutations in the patients` mothers. Investigation of family relatives allowed detection of a de novo mutation in 16 of 76 two-generation and 28 of 34 three-generation families. On the basis of these data, the male:female ratio of mutation frequencies (k) was estimated as k = 3.6. By use of the quotients of mutation origin in maternal grandfather to patient`s mother or to maternal grandmother, k was directly estimated as k = 15 and k = 7.5, respectively. Considering each mutation type separately, we revealed a mutation type-specific sex ratio of mutation frequencies. Point mutations showed a 5-to-10-fold-higher and inversions a >10-fold- higher mutation rate in male germ cells, whereas deletions showed a >5-fold-higher mutation rate in female germ cells. Consequently, and in accordance with the data of other diseases like Duchenne muscular dystrophy, our results indicate that at least for X-chromosomal disorders the male:female mutation rate of a disease is determined by its proportion of the different mutation types. 68 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  5. Violence against radiologists. II: Psychosocial factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnavita, N; Fileni, A

    2012-09-01

    Violence against radiologists is a growing problem. This study evaluated the psychosocial factors associated with this phenomenon. A questionnaire was administered to 992 Italian radiologists. Physical violence experienced in the previous 12-month period was associated with the radiologist's poor mental health [odds ratio (OR) 1.11] and overcommitment to work (OR 1.06), whereas radiologists in good physical health (OR 0.64), with job satisfaction (OR 0.96) and with overall happiness (OR 0.67) were less exposed. Nonphysical abuse was equally associated with the radiologist's poor mental health (OR 1.10) and overcommitment (OR 1.14) and negatively associated with physical health (OR 0.54), job satisfaction (OR 0.96), happiness (OR 0.81), organisational justice (OR 0.94) and social support (OR 0.80). Preventive intervention against violence in the workplace should improve workplace organisation and relationships between workers.

  6. A novel intergenic ETnII-β insertion mutation causes multiple malformations in polypodia mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica A Lehoczky

    Full Text Available Mouse early transposon insertions are responsible for ~10% of spontaneous mutant phenotypes. We previously reported the phenotypes and genetic mapping of Polypodia, (Ppd, a spontaneous, X-linked dominant mutation with profound effects on body plan morphogenesis. Our new data shows that mutant mice are not born in expected Mendelian ratios secondary to loss after E9.5. In addition, we refined the Ppd genetic interval and discovered a novel ETnII-β early transposon insertion between the genes for Dusp9 and Pnck. The ETn inserted 1.6 kb downstream and antisense to Dusp9 and does not disrupt polyadenylation or splicing of either gene. Knock-in mice engineered to carry the ETn display Ppd characteristic ectopic caudal limb phenotypes, showing that the ETn insertion is the Ppd molecular lesion. Early transposons are actively expressed in the early blastocyst. To explore the consequences of the ETn on the genomic landscape at an early stage of development, we compared interval gene expression between wild-type and mutant ES cells. Mutant ES cell expression analysis revealed marked upregulation of Dusp9 mRNA and protein expression. Evaluation of the 5' LTR CpG methylation state in adult mice revealed no correlation with the occurrence or severity of Ppd phenotypes at birth. Thus, the broad range of phenotypes observed in this mutant is secondary to a novel intergenic ETn insertion whose effects include dysregulation of nearby interval gene expression at early stages of development.

  7. Divergent epidermal growth factor receptor mutation patterns between smokers and non-smokers with lung adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Jeng-Sen; Wang, Chih-Liang; Yang, Tsung-Ying; Chen, Chih-Yi; Yang, Cheng-Ta; Chen, Kun-Chieh; Hsu, Kuo-Hsuan; Tsai, Chi-Ren; Chang, Gee-Chen

    2015-12-01

    Smoking status is an important determinant of the prevalence of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations in lung cancer patients. However, it is unclear whether smoking status could also influence the spectrum of EGFR mutations. We enrolled patients with lung adenocarcinoma from three medical centers in Taiwan. EGFR mutations were assessed by Sanger direct sequencing. The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of smoking status on both the frequency and patterns of EGFR mutations. From 2001 to 2013, a total of 1175 patients with lung adenocarcinoma were enrolled for EGFR mutation analysis. The overall EGFR mutation rate was 59.6%, which was significantly higher in females than males (69.1% vs. 49.8%) and in non-smokers than current/former smokers (73.8% vs. 29.8%) (both Psmokers expressed L858R mutation less frequently (35.2% vs. 50.2%, P=0.005) and exon 19 deletions more frequently (52.8% vs 38.8%, P=0.008) than non-smokers. Smokers and non-smokers also had divergent exon 19 deletions subtypes (Del E746-A750 82.5% vs. 57.6%, respectively, Psmokers were associated with a higher rate of complex mutations than non-smokers (34.2% vs. 8.4%, P<0.001). Our results suggested that smoking status could influence not only the frequency but also the spectrum of EGFR mutations. These findings provide a clue for further investigation of EGFR mutagenesis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Activating Mutations in Squamous Histology of Lung Cancer Patients of Southern Bulgaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genova Silvia N.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available There is only limited data on the prevalence of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR activating mutations in squamous cell carcinomas and adenosquamous carcinomas of the lung in patients of the Southern Bulgarian region and the efficacy of EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors. AIM: Previous reports for Bulgarian population showed high incidence of EGFR mutations in the squamous cell carcinomas, so we set the goal to investigate their frequency in Southern Bulgaria, after precise immunohistochemical verification of lung cancers. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Two hundred and thirty-six lung carcinomas were included in this prospective study. All biopsies were initially analysed with p63, TTF1, Napsin A, CK7, CK34βE12, synaptophysin, CK20 and CDX2. Two hundred and twenty-five non-small cell lung carcinomas were studied with real-time PCR technology to assess the status of the EGFR gene. RESULTS: We detected 132 adenocarcinomas (58.7%, 89 squamous cell carcinomas (39.2%, 4 adenosquamous carcinomas (1.8%, 9 large cell neuroendocrine carcinomas (3.8% and 2 metastatic colorectal adenocarcinomas (0.8%. Activating mutations in the EGF receptor had 3 out of 89 squamous cell carcinomas (3.37%. We have established mutations in L858R, deletion in exon 19 and rare mutation in S7681. One out of four adenosquamous carcinomas had a point mutation in the L858R (25%. CONCLUSIONS: The frequency of EGFR mutations we found in lung squamous cell carcinomas in a Southern Bulgarian region is lower than that in European countries. Ethnic diversity in the region does not play role of an independent predictive factor in terms of mutation frequency.

  9. Phase II trial of veliparib in patients with previously treated BRCA-mutated pancreas ductal adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowery, Maeve A; Kelsen, David P; Capanu, Marinela; Smith, Sloane C; Lee, Jonathan W; Stadler, Zsofia K; Moore, Malcolm J; Kindler, Hedy L; Golan, Talia; Segal, Amiel; Maynard, Hannah; Hollywood, Ellen; Moynahan, MaryEllen; Salo-Mullen, Erin E; Do, Richard Kinh Gian; Chen, Alice P; Yu, Kenneth H; Tang, Laura H; O'Reilly, Eileen M

    2018-01-01

    BRCA-associated cancers have increased sensitivity to poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitors (PARPis). This single arm, non-randomised, multicentre phase II trial evaluated the response rate of veliparib in patients with previously treated BRCA1/2- or PALB2-mutant pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Patients with stage III/IV PDAC and known germline BRCA1/2 or PALB2 mutation, 1-2 lines of treatment, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group 0-2, were enrolled. Veliparib was dosed at a volume of 300 mg twice-daily (N = 3), then 400 mg twice-daily (N = 15) days 1-28. The primary end-point was to determine the response rate of veliparib; secondary end-points included progression-free survival (PFS), duration of response, overall survival (OS) and safety. Sixteen patients were enrolled; male N = 8 (50%). Median age was 52 years (range 43-77). Five (31%) had a BRCA1 and 11 (69%) had a BRCA2 mutation. Fourteen (88%) patients had received prior platinum-based therapy. No confirmed partial responses (PRs) were seen: one (6%) unconfirmed PR was observed at 4 months with disease progression (PD) at 6 months; four (25%) had stable disease (SD), whereas 11 (69%) had PD as best response including one with clinical PD. Median PFS was 1.7 months (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.57-1.83) and median OS was 3.1 months (95% CI 1.9-4.1). Six (38%) patients had grade III toxicity, including fatigue (N = 3), haematology (N = 2) and nausea (N = 1). Veliparib was well tolerated, but no confirmed response was observed although four (25%) patients remained on study with SD for ≥ 4 months. Additional strategies in this population are needed, and ongoing trials are evaluating PARPis combined with chemotherapy (NCT01585805) and as a maintenance strategy (NCT02184195). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Receptors for insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) in the rat kidney glomerulus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haskell, J.F.; Pillion, D.J.; Meezan, E.

    1986-01-01

    Renal glomeruli were isolated by a technique involving renal perfusion with a solution containing magnetic iron oxide particles, followed by homogenization, sieving and isolation over a strong magnet. Isolated glomeruli were treated with 1% Triton X-100 to solubilize plasma membrane components while insoluble basement membrane components were removed by centrifugation. [ 125 I]Insulin-like growth factor-II (IGF-II) binding to this preparation was competitively inhibited by increasing amounts of unlabelled IGF-II, with 50% inhibition of binding observed at an IGF-II concentration of 1 ng/ml. [ 125 I]IGF-II was covalently cross-linked to its receptor with disuccinimidyl suberate in two tissues known to contain IGF-II receptors, the rat chondrosarcoma chondrocyte and the rat kidney tubule, as well as in rat renal glomeruli. In all three cases, a specific high-molecular weight (Mr = 255,000) band could be identified on autoradiograms of dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gels. These results indicate that the rat glomerulus contains a high-affinity receptor for IGF-II. This finding is consistent with the hypothesis that IGF-II plays a role in glomerular growth and differentiation

  11. Insulin-like growth factor II messenger RNA-binding protein-3 is an independent prognostic factor in uterine leiomyosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasutake, Nobuko; Ohishi, Yoshihiro; Taguchi, Kenichi; Hiraki, Yuka; Oya, Masafumi; Oshiro, Yumi; Mine, Mari; Iwasaki, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Hidetaka; Kohashi, Kenichi; Sonoda, Kenzo; Kato, Kiyoko; Oda, Yoshinao

    2018-04-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the prognostic factors of uterine leiomyosarcoma (ULMS). We reviewed 60 cases of surgically resected ULMSs and investigated conventional clinicopathological factors, together with the expression of insulin-like growth factor II messenger RNA-binding protein-3 (IMP3), hormone receptors and cell cycle regulatory markers by immunohistochemistry. Mediator complex subunit 12 (MED12) mutation analysis was also performed. Univariate analyses revealed that advanced stage (P < 0.0001), older age (P = 0.0244) and IMP3 expression (P = 0.0011) were significant predictors of a poor outcome. Multivariate analysis revealed advanced stage (P < 0.0001) and IMP3 (P = 0.0373) as independent predictors of a poor prognosis. Expressions of cell cycle markers and hormone receptors, and MED12 mutations (12% in ULMSs) were not identified as prognostic markers in this study. IMP3 expression in ULMS could be a marker of a poor prognosis. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. A Novel Frameshift Mutation of the USH2A Gene in a Korean Patient with Usher Syndrome Type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boo, Sung Hyun; Song, Min-Jung; Kim, Hee-Jin; Cho, Yang-Sun; Chu, Hosuk; Ko, Moon-Hee; Chung, Won-Ho; Kim, Jong-Won; Hong, Sung Hwa

    2013-03-01

    Usher syndrome type II (USH2) is the most common form of Usher syndrome, characterized by moderate to severe hearing impairment and progressive visual loss due to retinitis pigmentosa. It has been shown that mutations in the USH2A gene are responsible for USH2. The authors herein describe a 34-year-old Korean woman with the typical clinical manifestation of USH2; she had bilateral hearing disturbance and progressive visual deterioration, without vestibular dysfunction. Molecular genetic study of the USH2A gene revealed a novel frameshift mutation (c.2310delA; Glu771LysfsX17). She was heterozygous for this mutation, and no other mutation was found in USH2A, suggesting the possibility of an intronic or large genomic rearrangement mutation. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a genetically confirmed case of USH2 in Korea. More investigations are needed to delineate genotype-phenotype correlations and ethnicity-specific genetic background of Usher syndrome.

  13. Generation and analysis of knock-in mice carrying pseudohypoaldosteronism type II-causing mutations in the cullin 3 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araki, Yuya; Rai, Tatemitsu; Sohara, Eisei; Mori, Takayasu; Inoue, Yuichi; Isobe, Kiyoshi; Kikuchi, Eriko; Ohta, Akihito; Sasaki, Sei; Uchida, Shinichi

    2015-10-21

    Pseudohypoaldosteronism type II (PHAII) is a hereditary hypertensive disease caused by mutations in four different genes: with-no-lysine kinases (WNK) 1 and 4, Kelch-like family member 3 (KLHL3), and cullin 3 (Cul3). Cul3 and KLHL3 form an E3 ligase complex that ubiquitinates and reduces the expression level of WNK4. PHAII-causing mutations in WNK4 and KLHL3 impair WNK4 ubiquitination. However, the molecular pathogenesis of PHAII caused by Cul3 mutations is unclear. In cultured cells and human leukocytes, PHAII-causing Cul3 mutations result in the skipping of exon 9, producing mutant Cul3 protein lacking 57 amino acids. However, whether this phenomenon occurs in the kidneys and is responsible for the pathogenesis of PHAII in vivo is unknown. We generated knock-in mice carrying a mutation in the C-terminus of intron 8 of Cul3, c.1207-1G>A, which corresponds to a PHAII-causing mutation in the human Cul3 gene. Heterozygous Cul3(G(-1)A/+) knock-in mice did not exhibit PHAII phenotypes, and the skipping of exon 9 was not evident in their kidneys. However, the level of Cul3 mRNA expression in the kidneys of heterozygous knock-in mice was approximately half that of wild-type mice. Furthermore, homozygous knock-in mice were nonviable. It suggested that the mutant allele behaved like a knockout allele and did not produce Cul3 mRNA lacking exon 9. A reduction in Cul3 expression alone was not sufficient to develop PHAII in the knock-in mice. Our findings highlighted the pathogenic role of mutant Cul3 protein and provided insight to explain why PHAII-causing mutations in Cul3 cause kidney-predominant PHAII phenotypes. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  14. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations in lung cancer: preclinical and clinical data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jorge, S.E.D.C.; Kobayashi, S.S.; Costa, D.B. [Harvard Medical School, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology/Oncology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2014-09-05

    Lung cancer leads cancer-related mortality worldwide. Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), the most prevalent subtype of this recalcitrant cancer, is usually diagnosed at advanced stages, and available systemic therapies are mostly palliative. The probing of the NSCLC kinome has identified numerous nonoverlapping driver genomic events, including epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene mutations. This review provides a synopsis of preclinical and clinical data on EGFR mutated NSCLC and EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). Classic somatic EGFR kinase domain mutations (such as L858R and exon 19 deletions) make tumors addicted to their signaling cascades and generate a therapeutic window for the use of ATP-mimetic EGFR TKIs. The latter inhibit these kinases and their downstream effectors, and induce apoptosis in preclinical models. The aforementioned EGFR mutations are stout predictors of response and augmentation of progression-free survival when gefitinib, erlotinib, and afatinib are used for patients with advanced NSCLC. The benefits associated with these EGFR TKIs are limited by the mechanisms of tumor resistance, such as the gatekeeper EGFR-T790M mutation, and bypass activation of signaling cascades. Ongoing preclinical efforts for treating resistance have started to translate into patient care (including clinical trials of the covalent EGFR-T790M TKIs AZD9291 and CO-1686) and hold promise to further boost the median survival of patients with EGFR mutated NSCLC.

  15. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations in lung cancer: preclinical and clinical data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jorge, S.E.D.C.; Kobayashi, S.S.; Costa, D.B.

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer leads cancer-related mortality worldwide. Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), the most prevalent subtype of this recalcitrant cancer, is usually diagnosed at advanced stages, and available systemic therapies are mostly palliative. The probing of the NSCLC kinome has identified numerous nonoverlapping driver genomic events, including epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene mutations. This review provides a synopsis of preclinical and clinical data on EGFR mutated NSCLC and EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). Classic somatic EGFR kinase domain mutations (such as L858R and exon 19 deletions) make tumors addicted to their signaling cascades and generate a therapeutic window for the use of ATP-mimetic EGFR TKIs. The latter inhibit these kinases and their downstream effectors, and induce apoptosis in preclinical models. The aforementioned EGFR mutations are stout predictors of response and augmentation of progression-free survival when gefitinib, erlotinib, and afatinib are used for patients with advanced NSCLC. The benefits associated with these EGFR TKIs are limited by the mechanisms of tumor resistance, such as the gatekeeper EGFR-T790M mutation, and bypass activation of signaling cascades. Ongoing preclinical efforts for treating resistance have started to translate into patient care (including clinical trials of the covalent EGFR-T790M TKIs AZD9291 and CO-1686) and hold promise to further boost the median survival of patients with EGFR mutated NSCLC

  16. DETECTION OF RECESSIVE MUTATIONS (CVM, BLAD AND RED FACTOR INHOLSTEIN BULLS IN SLOVENIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betka LOGAR

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Detection of recessive mutations that causes complex vertebral malformation (CVM and bovine leukocyte adhesion defi ciency (BLAD in Holstein cattle is especially required for bulls, which are used for artifi cial insemination (A.I.; these enable elimination of carriers from the A.I. programs and therefore prevent transmission of unwanted mutations to a large number of offspring. Some breeders are also interested in the identifi cation of carriers of recessive allele for red and white coat colour (Red factor. Here, we performed genetic tests for detection of mutations associated with CVM, BLAD and Red factor using methods previously reported or modifi ed methods. Analysis of Holstein bulls, which were recommended for A.I in Slovenia in the years 2007 and 2008, revealed four (10 % carriers of CVM, and two (5.4 % carriers of red gene, while all bulls were non-carriers of BLAD.

  17. Analysis of factors affecting the development of food crop varieties bred by mutation method in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhidong; Hu Ruifa

    2002-01-01

    The research developed a production function on crop varieties developed by mutation method in order to explore factors affecting the development of new varieties. It is found that the research investment, human capital and radiation facilities were the most important factors that affected the development and cultivation area of new varieties through the mutation method. It is concluded that not all institutions involved in the breeding activities using mutation method must have radiation facilities and the national government only needed to invest in those key research institutes, which had strong research capacities. The saved research budgets can be used in the entrusting the institutes that have stronger research capacities with irradiating more breeding materials developed by the institutes that have weak research capacities, by which more opportunities to breed better varieties can be created

  18. Majewski osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II (MOPD II) syndrome previously diagnosed as Seckel syndrome: report of a novel mutation of the PCNT gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piane, Maria; Della Monica, Matteo; Piatelli, Gianluca; Lulli, Patrizia; Lonardo, Fortunato; Chessa, Luciana; Scarano, Gioacchino

    2009-11-01

    We report on a 3-year-old boy with prenatal onset of proportionate dwarfism, postnatal severe microcephaly, high forehead with receded hairline, sparse scalp hair, beaked nose, mild retrognathia and hypotonia diagnosed at birth as Seckel syndrome. At age 3 years, he became paralyzed due to a cerebrovascular malformation. Based on the clinical and radiological features showing evidence of skeletal dysplasia, the diagnosis was revised to Majewski osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II (MOPD II) syndrome. Western blot analysis of the patient's lymphoblastoid cell line lysate showed the absence of the protein pericentrin. Subsequent molecular analysis identified a novel homozygous single base insertion (c.1527_1528insA) in exon 10 of the PCNT gene, which leads to a frameshift (Treo510fs) and to premature protein truncation. PCNT mutations must be considered diagnostic of MOPD II syndrome. A possible role of pericentrin in the development of cerebral vessels is suggested. Copyright 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. Subacute Budd-Chiari syndrome associated with polycythemia vera and factor V Leiden mutation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simsek, S; Verheesen, RV; Haagsma, EB; Lourens, J

    We describe a 48-year-old caucasian woman with a subacute Budd-Chiari syndrome attributed to the presence of polycythaemia vera, heterozygosity for the factor V Leiden mutation and the use of an oral contraceptive pill. Two diagnostic pitfalls were encountered. First, on CT scanning of the abdomen

  20. Efficient detection of factor IX mutations by denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography in Taiwanese hemophilia B patients, and the identification of two novel mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Chin Lin

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Hemophilia B (HB is an X-linked recessive disorder characterized by mutations in the clotting factor IX (FIX gene that result in FIX deficiency. Previous studies have shown a wide variation of FIX gene mutations in HB. Although the quality of life in HB has greatly improved mainly because of prophylactic replacement therapy with FIX concentrates, there exists a significant burden on affected families and the medical care system. Accurate detection of FIX gene mutations is critical for genetic counseling and disease prevention in HB. In this study, we used denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC, which has proved to be a highly informative and practical means of detecting mutations, for the molecular diagnosis of our patients with HB. Ten Taiwanese families affected by HB were enrolled. We used the DHPLC technique followed by direct sequencing of suspected segments to detect FIX gene mutations. In all, 11 FIX gene mutations (8 point mutations, 2 small deletions/insertions, and 1 large deletion, including two novel mutations (exon6 c.687–695, del 9 mer and c.460–461, ins T were found. According to the HB pedigrees, 25% and 75% of our patients were defined as familial and sporadic HB cases, respectively. We show that DHPLC is a highly sensitive and cost-effective method for FIX gene analysis and can be used as a convenient system for disease prevention.

  1. A nonsense mutation in cGMP-dependent type II protein kinase (PRKG2) causes dwarfism in American Angus cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koltes, James E; Mishra, Bishnu P; Kumar, Dinesh; Kataria, Ranjit S; Totir, Liviu R; Fernando, Rohan L; Cobbold, Rowland; Steffen, David; Coppieters, Wouter; Georges, Michel; Reecy, James M

    2009-11-17

    Historically, dwarfism was the major genetic defect in U.S. beef cattle. Aggressive culling and sire testing were used to minimize its prevalence; however, neither of these practices can eliminate a recessive genetic defect. We assembled a 4-generation pedigree to identify the mutation underlying dwarfism in American Angus cattle. An adaptation of the Elston-Steward algorithm was used to overcome small pedigree size and missing genotypes. The dwarfism locus was fine-mapped to BTA6 between markers AFR227 and BM4311. Four candidate genes were sequenced, revealing a nonsense mutation in exon 15 of cGMP-dependant type II protein kinase (PRKG2). This C/T transition introduced a stop codon (R678X) that truncated 85 C-terminal amino acids, including a large portion of the kinase domain. Of the 75 mutations discovered in this region, only this mutation was 100% concordant with the recessive pattern of inheritance in affected and carrier individuals (log of odds score = 6.63). Previous research has shown that PRKG2 regulates SRY (sex-determining region Y) box 9 (SOX9)-mediated transcription of collagen 2 (COL2). We evaluated the ability of wild-type (WT) or R678X PRKG2 to regulate COL2 expression in cell culture. Real-time PCR results confirmed that COL2 is overexpressed in cells that overexpressed R678X PRKG2 as compared with WT PRKG2. Furthermore, COL2 and COL10 mRNA expression was increased in dwarf cattle compared with unaffected cattle. These experiments indicate that the R678X mutation is functional, resulting in a loss of PRKG2 regulation of COL2 and COL10 mRNA expression. Therefore, we present PRKG2 R678X as a causative mutation for dwarfism cattle.

  2. Compound heterozygous mutations in electron transfer flavoprotein dehydrogenase identified in a young Chinese woman with late-onset glutaric aciduria type II

    OpenAIRE

    Xue, Ying; Zhou, Yun; Zhang, Keqin; Li, Ling; Kayoumu, Abudurexiti; Chen, Liye; Wang, Yuhui; Lu, Zhiqiang

    2017-01-01

    Background Glutaric aciduria type II (GA II) is an autosomal recessive disorder affecting fatty acid and amino acid metabolism. The late-onset form of GA II disorder is almost exclusively associated with mutations in the electron transfer flavoprotein dehydrogenase (ETFDH) gene. Till now, the clinical features of late-onset GA II vary widely and pose a great challenge for diagnosis. The aim of the current study is to characterize the clinical phenotypes and genetic basis of a late-onset GAII ...

  3. Radial multipliers on amalgamated free products of II-factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Möller, Sören

    2014-01-01

    Let ℳi be a family of II1-factors, containing a common II1-subfactor 풩, such that [ℳi : 풩] ∈ ℕ0 for all i. Furthermore, let ϕ: ℕ0 → ℂ. We show that if a Hankel matrix related to ϕ is trace-class, then there exists a unique completely bounded map Mϕ on the amalgamated free product of the ℳi...... with amalgamation over 풩, which acts as a radial multiplier. Hereby, we extend a result of Haagerup and the author for radial multipliers on reduced free products of unital C*- and von Neumann algebras....

  4. The role of classic risk factors and prothrombotic factor gene mutations in ischemic stroke risk development in young and middle-aged individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supanc, Visnja; Sonicki, Zdenko; Vukasovic, Ines; Solter, Vesna V; Zavoreo, Iris; Kes, Vanja B

    2014-03-01

    In young individuals, a genetically predisposing hypercoagulability and classic modifying risk factors can act synergistically on the ischemic stroke risk development. The aim of the study was to compare the prevalence of classic vascular risk factors and polymorphisms of the G20210A coagulation factor II (prothrombin), Arg506Glu coagulation factor V Leiden, C677T methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), and 4G/5G plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) and the impact of these gene mutations and classic vascular risk factors on the overall stroke risk in individuals aged 55 years or younger. The study included 155 stroke patients aged 55 years or younger and 150 control subjects. Stroke prevalence and odds ratio (OR) were assessed for the following parameters: G20210A prothrombin, Arg506Glu factor V Leiden, C677T MTHFR, and 4G/5G PAI-1 polymorphisms; total number of study polymorphisms in a particular subject (genetic sum); and classic vascular risk factors of hypertension, obesity, diabetes mellitus, cigarette smoking, hypercholesterolemia, hypertriglyceridemia, and elevated levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and very low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. The prevalence of hypertension (P stroke patients. The following parameters were found to act as independent risk factors for ischemic stroke: decreased HDL cholesterol level (P ischemic stroke in young and middle-aged individuals. Copyright © 2014 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. HELLP Syndrome and Cerebral Venous Sinus Thrombosis Associated with Factor V Leiden Mutation during Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeynep Ozcan Dag

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Preeclampsia is a leading cause of maternal mortality and morbidity worldwide. The neurological complications of preeclampsia and eclampsia are responsible for a major proportion of the morbidity and mortality for women and their infants alike. Hormonal changes during pregnancy and the puerperium carry an increased risk of venous thromboembolism including cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST. Factor 5 leiden (FVL is a procoagulant mutation associated primarily with venous thrombosis and pregnancy complications. We report a patient with FVL mutation who presented with CVST at 24th week of pregnancy and was diagnosed as HELLP syndrome at 34th week of pregnancy.

  6. Mutation of Gly195 of the ChlH subunit of Mg-chelatase reduces chlorophyll and further disrupts PS II assembly in a Ycf48-deficient strain of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Crawford

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Biogenesis of the photosystems in oxygenic phototrophs requires co-translational insertion of chlorophyll a. The first committed step of chlorophyll a biosynthesis is the insertion of a Mg2+ ion into the tetrapyrrole intermediate protoporphyrin IX, catalyzed by Mg-chelatase. We have identified a Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 strain with a spontaneous mutation in chlH that results in a Gly195 to Glu substitution in a conserved region of the catalytic subunit of Mg-chelatase. Mutant strains containing the ChlH Gly195 to Glu mutation were generated using a two-step protocol that introduced the chlH gene into a putative neutral site in the chromosome prior to deletion of the native gene. The Gly195 to Glu mutation resulted in strains with decreased chlorophyll a. Deletion of the PS II assembly factor Ycf48 in a strain carrying the ChlH Gly195 to Glu mutation did not grow photoautotrophically. In addition, the ChlH-G195E:ΔYcf48 strain showed impaired PS II activity and decreased assembly of PS II centers in comparison to a ΔYcf48 strain. We suggest decreased chlorophyll in the ChlH-G195E mutant provides a background to screen for the role of assembly factors that are not essential under optimal growth conditions.

  7. Frequency of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Mutation in Smokers with Lung Cancer Without Pulmonary Emphysema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Kenichi; Yamasaki, Akira; Igishi, Tadashi; Kawasaki, Yuji; Ito-Nishii, Shizuka; Izumi, Hiroki; Sakamoto, Tomohiro; Touge, Hirokazu; Kodani, Masahiro; Makino, Haruhiko; Yanai, Masaaki; Tanaka, Natsumi; Matsumoto, Shingo; Araki, Kunio; Nakamura, Hiroshige; Shimizu, Eiji

    2017-02-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is a smoking-related disease, and is categorized into the emphysema and airway dominant phenotypes. We examined the relationship between emphysematous changes and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation status in patients with lung adenocarcinoma. The medical records for 250 patients with lung adenocarcinoma were retrospectively reviewed. All patients were categorized into the emphysema or non-emphysema group. Wild-type EGFR was detected in 136 (54%) and mutant EGFR in 48 (19%). Emphysematous changes were observed in 87 (36%) patients. EGFR mutation was highly frequent in the non-emphysema group (p=0.0014). Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that emphysema was an independent risk factor for reduced frequency of EGFR mutation (Odds Ratio=3.47, p=0.005). Our data showed a relationship between emphysematous changes and EGFR mutation status. There might be mutually exclusive genetic risk factors for carcinogenesis and development of emphysematous changes. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  8. The F309S mutation increases factor VIII secretion in human cell line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daianne Maciely Carvalho Fantacini

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVES: The capacity of a human cell line to secrete recombinant factor VIII with a F309S point mutation was investigated, as was the effect of the addition of chemical chaperones (betaine and sodium-4-phenylbutyrate on the secretion of factor VIII. METHODS: This work used a vector with a F309S mutation in the A1 domain to investigate FVIII production in the HEK 293 human cell line. Factor VIII activity was measured by chromogenic assay. Furthermore, the effects of chemical drugs on the culture were evaluated. RESULTS: The addition of the F309S mutation to a previously described FVIII variant increased FVIII secretion by 4.5 fold. Moreover, the addition of betaine or sodium-4-phenylbutyrate increased the secretion rate of FVIIIΔB proteins in HEK 293 cells, but the same effect was not seen for FVIIIΔB-F309S indicating that all the recombinant protein produced had been efficiently secreted. CONCLUSION: Bioengineering factor VIII expressed in human cells may lead to an efficient production of recombinant factor VIII and contribute toward low-cost coagulation factor replacement therapy for hemophilia A. FVIII-F309S produced in human cells can be effective in vivo.

  9. Molecular genetics and phenotypic characteristics of MODY caused by hepatocyte nuclear factor 4alpha mutations in a large European collection.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pearson, E.R.; Pruhova, S.; Tack, C.J.J.; Johansen, A.; Castleden, H.A.; Lumb, P.J.; Wierzbicki, A.S.; Clark, P.M.; Lebl, J.; Pedersen, O.; Ellard, S.; Hansen, T.; Hattersley, A.T.

    2005-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Heterozygous mutations in the gene of the transcription factor hepatocyte nuclear factor 4alpha (HNF-4alpha) are considered a rare cause of MODY with only 14 mutations reported to date. The description of the phenotype is limited to single families. We investigated the genetics and

  10. Epidermal growth factor receptor activation in glioblastoma through novel missense mutations in the extracellular domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey C Lee

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Protein tyrosine kinases are important regulators of cellular homeostasis with tightly controlled catalytic activity. Mutations in kinase-encoding genes can relieve the autoinhibitory constraints on kinase activity, can promote malignant transformation, and appear to be a major determinant of response to kinase inhibitor therapy. Missense mutations in the EGFR kinase domain, for example, have recently been identified in patients who showed clinical responses to EGFR kinase inhibitor therapy.Encouraged by the promising clinical activity of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR kinase inhibitors in treating glioblastoma in humans, we have sequenced the complete EGFR coding sequence in glioma tumor samples and cell lines. We identified novel missense mutations in the extracellular domain of EGFR in 13.6% (18/132 of glioblastomas and 12.5% (1/8 of glioblastoma cell lines. These EGFR mutations were associated with increased EGFR gene dosage and conferred anchorage-independent growth and tumorigenicity to NIH-3T3 cells. Cells transformed by expression of these EGFR mutants were sensitive to small-molecule EGFR kinase inhibitors.Our results suggest extracellular missense mutations as a novel mechanism for oncogenic EGFR activation and may help identify patients who can benefit from EGFR kinase inhibitors for treatment of glioblastoma.

  11. Haemophilia B caused by mutation of a potential thrombin cleavage site in factor IX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winship, P.R. (Univ. of Oxford (England))

    1990-03-11

    Haemophilia B is a blood coagulation disorder caused by mutations in the factor IX gene giving functionally defective or reduced levels of factor IX protein circulating in the plasma. The mutation in the Caucasian patient under investigation, Haemophilia B Oxford h5 (Oxh5), was characterized at the DNA level by constructing a genomic library using leucocyte-derived DNA from the patient. Overlapping recombinant clones spanning the entire factor IX locus were isolated which then allowed the generation of a series of sub-clones across all eight exons (a-h) plus the 5{prime} and 3{prime} flanking sequences known to be important in regulation of the gene and polyadenylation of the mRNA species.

  12. Mutations in the nervous system--specific HSN2 exon of WNK1 cause hereditary sensory neuropathy type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shekarabi, Masoud; Girard, Nathalie; Rivière, Jean-Baptiste; Dion, Patrick; Houle, Martin; Toulouse, André; Lafrenière, Ronald G; Vercauteren, Freya; Hince, Pascale; Laganiere, Janet; Rochefort, Daniel; Faivre, Laurence; Samuels, Mark; Rouleau, Guy A

    2008-07-01

    Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type II (HSANII) is an early-onset autosomal recessive disorder characterized by loss of perception to pain, touch, and heat due to a loss of peripheral sensory nerves. Mutations in hereditary sensory neuropathy type II (HSN2), a single-exon ORF originally identified in affected families in Quebec and Newfoundland, Canada, were found to cause HSANII. We report here that HSN2 is a nervous system-specific exon of the with-no-lysine(K)-1 (WNK1) gene. WNK1 mutations have previously been reported to cause pseudohypoaldosteronism type II but have not been studied in the nervous system. Given the high degree of conservation of WNK1 between mice and humans, we characterized the structure and expression patterns of this isoform in mice. Immunodetections indicated that this Wnk1/Hsn2 isoform was expressed in sensory components of the peripheral nervous system and CNS associated with relaying sensory and nociceptive signals, including satellite cells, Schwann cells, and sensory neurons. We also demonstrate that the novel protein product of Wnk1/Hsn2 was more abundant in sensory neurons than motor neurons. The characteristics of WNK1/HSN2 point to a possible role for this gene in the peripheral sensory perception deficits characterizing HSANII.

  13. Mutations in the nervous system–specific HSN2 exon of WNK1 cause hereditary sensory neuropathy type II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shekarabi, Masoud; Girard, Nathalie; Rivière, Jean-Baptiste; Dion, Patrick; Houle, Martin; Toulouse, André; Lafrenière, Ronald G.; Vercauteren, Freya; Hince, Pascale; Laganiere, Janet; Rochefort, Daniel; Faivre, Laurence; Samuels, Mark; Rouleau, Guy A.

    2008-01-01

    Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type II (HSANII) is an early-onset autosomal recessive disorder characterized by loss of perception to pain, touch, and heat due to a loss of peripheral sensory nerves. Mutations in hereditary sensory neuropathy type II (HSN2), a single-exon ORF originally identified in affected families in Quebec and Newfoundland, Canada, were found to cause HSANII. We report here that HSN2 is a nervous system–specific exon of the with-no-lysine(K)–1 (WNK1) gene. WNK1 mutations have previously been reported to cause pseudohypoaldosteronism type II but have not been studied in the nervous system. Given the high degree of conservation of WNK1 between mice and humans, we characterized the structure and expression patterns of this isoform in mice. Immunodetections indicated that this Wnk1/Hsn2 isoform was expressed in sensory components of the peripheral nervous system and CNS associated with relaying sensory and nociceptive signals, including satellite cells, Schwann cells, and sensory neurons. We also demonstrate that the novel protein product of Wnk1/Hsn2 was more abundant in sensory neurons than motor neurons. The characteristics of WNK1/HSN2 point to a possible role for this gene in the peripheral sensory perception deficits characterizing HSANII. PMID:18521183

  14. Point mutation in the MITF gene causing Waardenburg syndrome type II in a three-generation Indian family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalwani, A K; Attaie, A; Randolph, F T; Deshmukh, D; Wang, C; Mhatre, A; Wilcox, E

    1998-12-04

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is an autosomal-dominant neural crest cell disorder phenotypically characterized by hearing impairment and disturbance of pigmentation. A presence of dystopia canthorum is indicative of WS type 1, caused by loss of function mutation in the PAX3 gene. In contrast, type 2 WS (WS2) is characterized by normally placed medial canthi and is genetically heterogeneous; mutations in MITF (microphthalmia associated transcription factor) associated with WS2 have been identified in some but not all affected families. Here, we report on a three-generation Indian family with a point mutation in the MITF gene causing WS2. This mutation, initially reported in a Northern European family, creates a stop codon in exon 7 and is predicted to result in a truncated protein lacking the HLH-Zip or Zip structure necessary for normal interaction with its target DNA motif. Comparison of the phenotype between the two families demonstrates a significant difference in pigmentary disturbance of the eye. This family, with the first documented case of two unrelated WS2 families harboring identical mutations, provides additional evidence for the importance of genetic background on the clinical phenotype.

  15. Mutational analysis of divalent metal ion binding in the active site of class II α-mannosidase from sulfolobus solfataricus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Dennis K.; Webb, Helen; Nielsen, Jonas Willum

    2015-01-01

    Mutational analysis of Sulfolobus solfataricus class II α-mannosidase was focused on side chains that interact with the hydroxyls of the-1 mannosyl of the substrate (Asp-534) or form ligands to the active site divalent metal ion (His-228 and His-533) judged from crystal structures of homologous e......, although less dramatically with some activating metal ions. No major differences in the pH dependence between wild-type and mutant enzymes were found in the presence of different metal ions. The pH optimum was 5, but enzyme instability was observed at pH...

  16. Novel splice mutation in microthalmia-associated transcription factor in Waardenburg Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, Laura; Burke, Kelly; Leduc, Charles A; Guha, Saurav; Guo, Jiancheng; Chung, Wendy K

    2011-01-01

    Waardenburg Syndrome (WS) is a syndromic form of hearing loss associated with mutations in six different genes. We identified a large family with WS that had previously undergone clinical testing, with no reported pathogenic mutation. Using linkage analysis, a region on 3p14.1 with an LOD score of 6.6 was identified. Microthalmia-Associated Transcription Factor, a gene known to cause WS, is located within this region of linkage. Sequencing of Microthalmia-Associated Transcription Factor demonstrated a c.1212 G>A synonymous variant that segregated with the WS in the family and was predicted to cause a novel splicing site that was confirmed with expression analysis of the mRNA. This case illustrates the need to computationally analyze novel synonymous sequence variants for possible effects on splicing to maximize the clinical sensitivity of sequence-based genetic testing.

  17. Functional consequences of an arginine180 to glutamine mutation in factor IX Hilo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monroe, D M; McCord, D M; Huang, M N; High, K A; Lundblad, R L; Kasper, C K; Roberts, H R

    1989-05-01

    Factor IX Hilo is a variant factor IX molecule that has no detectable coagulant activity. The defect in factor IX Hilo arises from a point mutation in the gene such that in the protein Arg180 is converted to a Gln. Activation of factor IX Hilo by factor Xla was monitored using the fluorescent active site probe p-aminobenzamidine. Normal factor IX showed complete activation in one hour as determined by measuring the increase in fluorescence when p-aminobenzamidine bound to activated factor IX. Factor IX Hilo showed no increase in fluorescence even after 24 hours, indicating that the active site was not exposed. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed that factor IX Hilo was cleaved to a light chain plus a larger peptide with a molecular weight equivalent to a heavy chain covalently linked to an activation peptide. Amino terminal amino acid sequencing of factor IX Hilo cleaved by factor Xla showed cleavage only at Arg145-Ala146, indicating that the Gln180-Val181 bond was not cleaved and that the active site was thus not exposed. The presence of factor IX Hilo in patient plasma was responsible for the patient having a very long ox brain prothrombin time characteristic of severe hemophilia Bm. Patient plasma had an ox brain prothrombin time of 100 seconds using a Thrombotest kit, significantly prolonged over the normal control value of 45 seconds. When factor IX Hilo was depleted from patient plasma using an immunoaffinity column, the ox brain prothrombin time decreased to 41 seconds. When factor IX Hilo was added back to depleted patient plasma, to normal plasma depleted of factor IX by the same affinity column, or to plasma from a CRM- hemophilia B patient, the ox brain prothrombin time was significantly prolonged. We conclude that the Arg180 to Gln mutation in factor IX Hilo results in a molecule that cannot be activated by factor Xla. Further, our data suggest that the mutation results in a molecule that interacts with components of the extrinsic pathway to give

  18. Research progress in mutational effects of aerospace on crop and ground simulation on aerospace environment factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Luxiang; Wang Jing; Zhao Linshu; Guo Huijun; Zhao Shirong; Zheng Qicheng; Yang Juncheng

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, the current status of aerospace botany research in aboard was briefly introduced. The research progress of mutational effects of aerospace on crop seed and its application in germplasm enhancement and new variety development by using recoverable satellite techniques in China has been reviewed. The approaches and its experimental advances of ground simulation on aerospace environmental factors were analyzed at different angles of particle biology, physical field biology and gravity biology

  19. Optimal Therapeutic Strategy for Non-small Cell Lung Cancer with Mutated Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor

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    Zhong SHI

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Although epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs have been widely used in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients, it is still controversial about how to combine EGFR-TKI with chemotherapy and other targeted drugs. We have made a summary on the current therapeutic models of EGFR-TKI combined with chemotherapy/bevacizumab in this review and aimed to find the optimal therapeutic strategy for NSCLC patients with EGFR mutation.

  20. De novo frameshift mutation in fibroblast growth factor 8 in a male patient with gonadotropin deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Erina; Yatsuga, Shuichi; Igarashi, Maki; Miyado, Mami; Nakabayashi, Kazuhiko; Hayashi, Keiko; Hata, Kenichirou; Umezawa, Akihiro; Yamada, Gen; Ogata, Tsutomu; Fukami, Maki

    2014-01-01

    Missense, nonsense, and splice mutations in the Fibroblast Growth Factor 8(FGF8) have recently been identified in patients with hypothalamo-pituitary dysfunction and craniofacial anomalies. Here, we report a male patient with a frameshift mutation in FGF8. The patient exhibited micropenis, craniofacial anomalies, and ventricular septal defect at birth. Clinical evaluation at 16 years and 8 months of age revealed delayed puberty, hyposmia, borderline mental retardation, and mild hearing difficulty. Endocrine findings included gonadotropin deficiency and primary hypothyroidism. Molecular analysis identified a de novo heterozygous p.S192fsX204 mutation in the last exon of FGF8. RT-PCR analysis of normal human tissues detected FGF8 expression in the genital skin, and whole-mount in situ hybridization analysis of mouse embryos revealed Fgf8 expression in the anlage of the penis. The results indicate that frameshift mutations in FGF8 account for a part of the etiology of hypothalamo-pituitary dysfunction. Micropenis in patients with FGF8 abnormalities appears to be caused by gonadotropin deficiency and defective outgrowth of the anlage of the penis.

  1. Characterization of an apparently synonymous F5 mutation causing aberrant splicing and factor V deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuzzo, F; Bulato, C; Nielsen, B I; Lee, K; Wielders, S J; Simioni, P; Key, N S; Castoldi, E

    2015-03-01

    Coagulation factor V (FV) deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive bleeding disorder. We investigated a patient with severe FV deficiency (FV:C mutation in exon 4 (c.578G>C, p.Cys193Ser), predicting the abolition of a conserved disulphide bridge, and an apparently synonymous variant in exon 8 (c.1281C>G). The observation that half of the patient's F5 mRNA lacked the last 18 nucleotides of exon 8 prompted us to re-evaluate the c.1281C>G variant for its possible effects on splicing. Bioinformatics sequence analysis predicted that this transversion would activate a cryptic donor splice site and abolish an exonic splicing enhancer. Characterization in a F5 minigene model confirmed that the c.1281C>G variant was responsible for the patient's splicing defect, which could be partially corrected by a mutation-specific morpholino antisense oligonucleotide. The aberrantly spliced F5 mRNA, whose stability was similar to that of the normal mRNA, encoded a putative FV mutant lacking amino acids 427-432. Expression in COS-1 cells indicated that the mutant protein is poorly secreted and not functional. In conclusion, the c.1281C>G mutation, which was predicted to be translationally silent and hence neutral, causes FV deficiency by impairing pre-mRNA splicing. This finding underscores the importance of cDNA analysis for the correct assessment of exonic mutations. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Late-Onset Glycogen Storage Disease Type II (Pompe's Disease) with a Novel Mutation: A Malaysian Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu Liong, Hiew; Abdul Wahab, Siti Aishah; Yakob, Yusnita; Lock Hock, Ngu; Thong, Wong Kum; Viswanathan, Shanthi

    2014-01-01

    Pompe's disease (acid maltase deficiency, glycogen storage disease type II) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by a deficiency of lysosomal acid α-1,4-glucosidase, resulting in excessive accumulation of glycogen in the lysosomes and cytoplasm of all tissues, most notably in skeletal muscles. We present a case of adult-onset Pompe's disease with progressive proximal muscles weakness over 5 years and respiratory failure on admission, requiring prolonged mechanical ventilation. Electromyography showed evidence of myopathic process with small amplitudes, polyphasic motor unit action potentials, and presence of pseudomyotonic discharges. Muscle biopsy showed glycogen-containing vacuoles in the muscle fibers consistent with glycogen storage disease. Genetic analysis revealed two compound heterozygous mutations at c.444C>G (p.Tyr148∗) in exon 2 and c.2238G>C (p.Trp746Cys) in exon 16, with the former being a novel mutation. This mutation has not been reported before, to our knowledge. The patient was treated with high protein diet during the admission and subsequently showed good clinical response to enzyme replacement therapy with survival now to the eighth year. Conclusion. In patients with late-onset adult Pompe's disease, careful evaluation and early identification of the disease and its treatment with high protein diet and enzyme replacement therapy improve muscle function and have beneficial impact on long term survival.

  3. Late-Onset Glycogen Storage Disease Type II (Pompe’s Disease with a Novel Mutation: A Malaysian Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiew Fu Liong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pompe’s disease (acid maltase deficiency, glycogen storage disease type II is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by a deficiency of lysosomal acid α-1,4-glucosidase, resulting in excessive accumulation of glycogen in the lysosomes and cytoplasm of all tissues, most notably in skeletal muscles. We present a case of adult-onset Pompe’s disease with progressive proximal muscles weakness over 5 years and respiratory failure on admission, requiring prolonged mechanical ventilation. Electromyography showed evidence of myopathic process with small amplitudes, polyphasic motor unit action potentials, and presence of pseudomyotonic discharges. Muscle biopsy showed glycogen-containing vacuoles in the muscle fibers consistent with glycogen storage disease. Genetic analysis revealed two compound heterozygous mutations at c.444C>G (p.Tyr148* in exon 2 and c.2238G>C (p.Trp746Cys in exon 16, with the former being a novel mutation. This mutation has not been reported before, to our knowledge. The patient was treated with high protein diet during the admission and subsequently showed good clinical response to enzyme replacement therapy with survival now to the eighth year. Conclusion. In patients with late-onset adult Pompe’s disease, careful evaluation and early identification of the disease and its treatment with high protein diet and enzyme replacement therapy improve muscle function and have beneficial impact on long term survival.

  4. Mutations in the VLGR1 Gene Implicate G-Protein Signaling in the Pathogenesis of Usher Syndrome Type II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weston, Michael D.; Luijendijk, Mirjam W. J.; Humphrey, Kurt D.; Möller, Claes; Kimberling, William J.

    2004-01-01

    Usher syndrome type II (USH2) is a genetically heterogeneous autosomal recessive disorder with at least three genetic subtypes (USH2A, USH2B, and USH2C) and is classified phenotypically as congenital hearing loss and progressive retinitis pigmentosa. The VLGR1 (MASS1) gene in the 5q14.3-q21.1 USH2C locus was considered a likely candidate on the basis of its protein motif structure and expressed-sequence-tag representation from both cochlear and retinal subtracted libraries. Denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography and direct sequencing of polymerase-chain-reaction products amplified from 10 genetically independent patients with USH2C and 156 other patients with USH2 identified four isoform-specific VLGR1 mutations (Q2301X, I2906FS, M2931FS, and T6244X) from three families with USH2C, as well as two sporadic cases. All patients with VLGR1 mutations are female, a significant deviation from random expectations. The ligand(s) for the VLGR1 protein is unknown, but on the basis of its potential extracellular and intracellular protein-protein interaction domains and its wide mRNA expression profile, it is probable that VLGR1 serves diverse cellular and signaling processes. VLGR1 mutations have been previously identified in both humans and mice and are associated with a reflex-seizure phenotype in both species. The identification of additional VLGR1 mutations to test whether a phenotype/genotype correlation exists, akin to that shown for other Usher syndrome disease genes, is warranted. PMID:14740321

  5. Novel ETF dehydrogenase mutations in a patient with mild glutaric aciduria type II and complex II-III deficiency in liver and muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Lynne A; He, Miao; Vockley, Jerry; Payne, Nicole; Rhead, William; Hoppel, Charles; Spector, Elaine; Gernert, Kim; Gibson, K Michael

    2010-12-01

    We describe a 22-year-old male who developed severe hypoglycemia and lethargy during an acute illness at 4 months of age and subsequently grew and developed normally. At age 4 years he developed recurrent vomiting with mild hyperammonemia and dehydration requiring frequent hospitalizations. Glutaric aciduria Type II was suspected based upon biochemical findings and managed with cornstarch, carnitine and riboflavin supplements. He did not experience metabolic crises between ages 4-12 years. He experienced recurrent vomiting, mild hyperammonemia, and generalized weakness associated with acute illnesses and growth spurts. At age 18 years, he developed exercise intolerance and proximal muscle weakness leading to the identification of multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenase and complex II/III deficiencies in both skeletal muscle and liver. Subsequent molecular characterization of the ETFDH gene revealed novel heterozygous mutations, p.G274X:c.820 G > T (exon 7) and p.P534L: c.1601 C > T (exon 12), the latter within the iron sulfur-cluster and predicted to affect ubiquinone reductase activity of ETFDH and the docking of ETF to ETFDH. Our case supports the concept of a structural interaction between ETFDH and other enzyme partners, and suggests that the conformational change upon ETF binding to ETFDH may play a key role in linking ETFDH to II/III super-complex formation.

  6. Mutations in Splicing Factor Genes Are a Major Cause of Autosomal Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa in Belgian Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppieters, Frauke; Roels, Dimitri; De Jaegere, Sarah; Flipts, Helena; De Zaeytijd, Julie; Walraedt, Sophie; Claes, Charlotte; Fransen, Erik; Van Camp, Guy; Depasse, Fanny; Casteels, Ingele; de Ravel, Thomy

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP) is characterized by an extensive genetic heterogeneity, implicating 27 genes, which account for 50 to 70% of cases. Here 86 Belgian probands with possible adRP underwent genetic testing to unravel the molecular basis and to assess the contribution of the genes underlying their condition. Methods Mutation detection methods evolved over the past ten years, including mutation specific methods (APEX chip analysis), linkage analysis, gene panel analysis (Sanger sequencing, targeted next-generation sequencing or whole exome sequencing), high-resolution copy number screening (customized microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization). Identified variants were classified following American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics (ACMG) recommendations. Results Molecular genetic screening revealed mutations in 48/86 cases (56%). In total, 17 novel pathogenic mutations were identified: four missense mutations in RHO, five frameshift mutations in RP1, six mutations in genes encoding spliceosome components (SNRNP200, PRPF8, and PRPF31), one frameshift mutation in PRPH2, and one frameshift mutation in TOPORS. The proportion of RHO mutations in our cohort (14%) is higher than reported in a French adRP population (10.3%), but lower than reported elsewhere (16.5–30%). The prevalence of RP1 mutations (10.5%) is comparable to other populations (3.5%-10%). The mutation frequency in genes encoding splicing factors is unexpectedly high (altogether 19.8%), with PRPF31 the second most prevalent mutated gene (10.5%). PRPH2 mutations were found in 4.7% of the Belgian cohort. Two families (2.3%) have the recurrent NR2E3 mutation p.(Gly56Arg). The prevalence of the recurrent PROM1 mutation p.(Arg373Cys) was higher than anticipated (3.5%). Conclusions Overall, we identified mutations in 48 of 86 Belgian adRP cases (56%), with the highest prevalence in RHO (14%), RP1 (10.5%) and PRPF31 (10.5%). Finally, we expanded the molecular

  7. Risk scaling factors from inactivation to chromosome aberrations, mutations and oncogenic transformations in mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alkaharam, A.S.; Watt, D.E.

    1997-01-01

    Analyses of bio-effect mechanisms of damage to mammalian cells in terms of the quality parameter 'mean free path for primary ionisation', for heavy charged particles, strongly suggests that there is a common mechanism for the biological endpoints of chromosome aberrations, mutations and oncogenic transformation. The lethal lesions are identified as unrepaired double-strand breaks in the intracellular DNA. As data for the various endpoints studied can be represented in a unified scheme, for any radiation type, it follows that radiation risk factors can be determined on the basis of simple ratios to the inactivation cross sections. There are intrinsic physical reasons why neutrons can never reach the saturation level of heavier particles for equal fluences. The probabilities of risk with respect to inactivation, for chromosome dicentrics, mutation of the HPRT gene and of oncogenic transformation are respectively 0.24, 5.8 x 10 -5 , and 4.1 x 10 -3 . (author)

  8. N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea-induced null mutation at the mouse Car-2 locus: An animal model for human carbonic anhydrase II deficiency syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, S.E.; Barnett, L.B.; Erickson, R.P.; Venta, P.J.; Tashian, R.E.

    1988-01-01

    Electrophoretic screening of (C57BL/6J x DBA/2J)F 1 progeny of male mice treated with N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea revealed a mouse that lacked the paternal carbonic anhydrase II (Ca II). Breeding tests showed that this trait was heritable and due to a null mutation at the Car-2 locus on chromosome 3. Like humans with the same inherited enzyme defect, animals homozygous for the new null allele are runted and have renal tubular acidosis. However, the prominent osteopetrosis found in humans with CA II deficiency could be detected even in very old homozygous null mice. A molecular analysis of the deficient mice shows that the mutant gene is not deleted and is transcribed. The CA II protein, which is normally expressed in most tissues, could not be detected by immunodiffusion analysis in any tissues of the CA II-deficient mice, suggesting a nonsense or a missense mutation at the Car-2 locus

  9. Mutations in the Lactococcus lactis Ll.LtrB group II intron that retain mobility in vivo

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    D'Souza Lisa M

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Group II introns are mobile genetic elements that form conserved secondary and tertiary structures. In order to determine which of the conserved structural elements are required for mobility, a series of domain and sub-domain deletions were made in the Lactococcus lactis group II intron (Ll.LtrB and tested for mobility in a genetic assay. Point mutations in domains V and VI were also tested. Results The largest deletion that could be made without severely compromising mobility was 158 nucleotides in DIVb(1–2. This mutant had a mobility frequency comparable to the wild-type Ll.LtrB intron (ΔORF construct. Hence, all subsequent mutations were done in this mutant background. Deletion of DIIb reduced mobility to approximately 18% of wild-type, while another deletion in domain II (nts 404–459 was mobile to a minor extent. Only two deletions in DI and none in DIII were tolerated. Some mobility was also observed for a DIVa deletion mutant. Of the three point mutants at position G3 in DV, only G3A retained mobility. In DVI, deletion of the branch-point nucleotide abolished mobility, but the presence of any nucleotide at the branch-point position restored mobility to some extent. Conclusions The smallest intron capable of efficient retrohoming was 725 nucleotides, comprising the DIVb(1–2 and DII(iia,b deletions. The tertiary elements found to be nonessential for mobility were alpha, kappa and eta. In DV, only the G3A mutant was mobile. A branch-point residue is required for intron mobility.

  10. Occurrence of mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor gene in X-ray-induced rat lung tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitahashi, Tsukasa; Takahashi, Mami; Yamada, Yutaka

    2008-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene alterations have been found in human lung cancers. However, there is no information on the factors inducing EGFR mutations. In rodents, K-ras mutations are frequently found in many lung carcinogenesis models, but hitherto, Egfr mutations have not been reported. Their presence was therefore investigated in representative lung carcinogenesis models with 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK), N-nitrosobis(2-hydroxypropyl)amine (BHP), 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline (MelQx) and ethyl carbamate (urethane), as well as X-ray irradiation. With the chemical carcinogenesis models, no mutations were detected in Egfr, which is in clear contrast to the high rates observed in either codon 12 or 61 of K-ras (21/23 of the lung tumors induced with NNK, 4/5 with MelQx, 1/4 with urethane and 7/18 with BHP). However, in the X-ray-induced lung tumors, Egfr mutations with amino acid substitution were observed in exons 18 and 21 (4/12, 33%), but no activating mutation of K-ras was detected. In addition, one and four silent mutations were identified in K-ras (exon 1) and Egfr (exons 18, 20 and 21), respectively. Most mutations in both Egfr and K-ras were G/C→A/T transitions (7/8, 88% and 31/34, 91%, respectively). Although, the mutational patterns in equivalent human lesions were not completely coincident, this first report of Egfr mutations in an experimental lung tumor model suggests that X-rays or other factors producing oxygen radicals could cause EGFR mutations in some proportion of lung cancers in humans. (author)

  11. Retrospective study of adjuvant icotinib in postoperative lung cancer patients harboring epidermal growth factor receptor mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Shuyang; Zhi, Xiuyi; Wang, Ruotian; Qian, Kun; Hu, Mu; Zhang, Yi

    2016-09-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations occur in about 50% of Asian patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients with advanced NSCLC and EGFR mutations derive clinical benefit from treatment with EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). This study assessed the efficacy and safety of adjuvant icotinib without chemotherapy in EGFR-mutated NSCLC patients undergoing resection of stage IB-IIIA. Our retrospective study enrolled 20 patients treated with icotinib as adjuvant therapy. Survival factors were evaluated by univariate and Cox regression analysis. The median follow-up time was 30 months (range 24-41). At the data cut-off, five patients (25%) had recurrence or metastasis and one patient had died of the disease. The two-year disease-free survival (DFS) rate was 85%. No recurrence occurred in the high-risk stage IB subgroup during the follow-up period. In univariate analysis, the micropapillary pattern had a statistically significant effect on DFS ( P = 0.040). Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that there was no independent predictor. Drug related adverse events (AEs) occurred in nine patients (45.0%). The most common AEs were skin-related events and diarrhea, but were relatively mild. No grade 3 AEs or occurrences of intolerable toxicity were observed. Icotinib as adjuvant therapy is effective in patients harboring EGFR mutations after complete resection, with an acceptable AE profile. Further trials with larger sample sizes might confirm the efficiency of adjuvant TKI in selected patients. © 2016 The Authors. Thoracic Cancer published by China Lung Oncology Group and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  12. Novel Point Mutations and A8027G Polymorphism in Mitochondrial-DNA-Encoded Cytochrome c Oxidase II Gene in Mexican Patients with Probable Alzheimer Disease

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    Verónica Loera-Castañeda

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial dysfunction has been thought to contribute to Alzheimer disease (AD pathogenesis through the accumulation of mitochondrial DNA mutations and net production of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Mitochondrial cytochrome c-oxidase plays a key role in the regulation of aerobic production of energy and is composed of 13 subunits. The 3 largest subunits (I, II, and III forming the catalytic core are encoded by mitochondrial DNA. The aim of this work was to look for mutations in mitochondrial cytochrome c-oxidase gene II (MTCO II in blood samples from probable AD Mexican patients. MTCO II gene was sequenced in 33 patients with diagnosis of probable AD. Four patients (12% harbored the A8027G polymorphism and three of them were early onset (EO AD cases with familial history of the disease. In addition, other four patients with EOAD had only one of the following point mutations: A8003C, T8082C, C8201T, or G7603A. Neither of the point mutations found in this work has been described previously for AD patients, and the A8027G polymorphism has been described previously; however, it hasn’t been related to AD. We will need further investigation to demonstrate the role of the point mutations of mitochondrial DNA in the pathogenesis of AD.

  13. Hemophilia B with mutations at glycine-48 of factor IX exhibited delayed activation by the factor VIIa-tissue factor complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, P C; Hamaguchi, N; Yu, Y S; Shen, M C; Lin, S W

    2000-10-01

    Gly-48 is in the conserved DGDQC sequence (residues 47-51 of human factor IX) of the first EGF (EGF-1)-like domain of factor IX. The importance of the Gly-48 is manifested by two hemophilia B patients; factor IXTainan and factor IXMalmo27, with Gly-48 replaced by arginine (designated IXG48R) and valine (IXG48V), respectively. Both patients were CRM+ exhibiting mild hemophilic episodes with 25% (former) and 19% (latter) normal clotting activities. We characterize both factor IX variants to show the roles of Gly-48 and the conservation of the DGDQC sequence in factor IX. Purified plasma and recombinant factor IX variants exhibited approximately 26%-27% normal factor IX's clotting activities with G48R or G48V mutation. Both variants depicted normal quenching of the intrinsic fluorescence by increasing concentrations of calcium ions and Tb3+, indicating that arginine and valine substitution for Gly-48 did not perturb the calcium site in the EGF-1 domain. Activation of both mutants by factor XIa appeared normal. The reduced clotting activity of factors IXG48R and IXG48V was attributed to the failure of both mutants to cleavage factor X: in the presence of only phospholipids and calcium ions, both mutants showed a 4 to approximately 7-fold elevation in Km, and by adding factor VIIIa to the system, although factor VIIIa potentiated the activation of factor X by the mutants factor IXaG48R and factor IXaG48V, a 2 to approximately 3-fold decrease in the catalytic function was observed with the mutant factor IXa's, despite that they bound factor VIIIa on the phospholipid vesicles with only slightly reduced affinity when compared to wild-type factor IXa. The apparent Kd for factor VIIIa binding was 0.83 nM for normal factor IXa, 1.74 nM for IXaG48R and 1.4 nM for IXaG48V. Strikingly, when interaction with the factor VIIa-TF complex was examined, both mutations were barely activated by the VIIa-TF complex and they also showed abnormal interaction with VIIa-TF in bovine

  14. Mutations in the Primary Sigma Factor σA and Termination Factor Rho That Reduce Susceptibility to Cell Wall Antibiotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong Heon

    2014-01-01

    Combinations of glycopeptides and β-lactams exert synergistic antibacterial activity, but the evolutionary mechanisms driving resistance to both antibiotics remain largely unexplored. By repeated subculturing with increasing vancomycin (VAN) and cefuroxime (CEF) concentrations, we isolated an evolved strain of the model bacterium Bacillus subtilis with reduced susceptibility to both antibiotics. Whole-genome sequencing revealed point mutations in genes encoding the major σ factor of RNA polymerase (sigA), a cell shape-determining protein (mreB), and the ρ termination factor (rho). Genetic-reconstruction experiments demonstrated that the G-to-C substitution at position 336 encoded by sigA (sigAG336C), in the domain that recognizes the −35 promoter region, is sufficient to reduce susceptibility to VAN and works cooperatively with the rhoG56C substitution to increase CEF resistance. Transcriptome analyses revealed that the sigAG336C substitution has wide-ranging effects, including elevated expression of the general stress σ factor (σB) regulon, which is required for CEF resistance, and decreased expression of the glpTQ genes, which leads to fosfomycin (FOS) resistance. Our findings suggest that mutations in the core transcriptional machinery may facilitate the evolution of resistance to multiple cell wall antibiotics. PMID:25112476

  15. An activating mutation of interferon regulatory factor 4 (IRF4) in adult T cell leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherian, Mathew A; Olson, Sydney; Sundaramoorthi, Hemalatha; Cates, Kitra; Cheng, Xiaogang; Harding, John; Martens, Andrew; Challen, Grant A; Tyagi, Manoj; Ratner, Lee; Rauch, Daniel

    2018-03-14

    The human T cell leukemia virus-1 (HTLV-1) oncoprotein Tax drives cell proliferation and resistance to apoptosis early in the pathogenesis of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL). Subsequently, likely as a result of specific immuno-editing, Tax expression is downregulated and functionally replaced by somatic driver mutations of the host genome. Both amplification and point mutations of interferon regulatory factor 4 (IRF4) have been previously detected in ATL, and the K59R mutation is the most common single-nucleotide variation in IRF4 and is found exclusively in ATL. Here high throughput whole-exome sequencing revealed recurrent activating genetic alterations in the T cell receptor, CD28, and NF-kB pathways. Moreover, we found that IRF4, which is transcriptionally activated downstream of these pathways, is frequently mutated in ATL. IRF4 RNA, protein, and IRF4 transcriptional targets are uniformly elevated in HTLV transformed cells and ATL cell lines, and IRF4 was bound to genomic regulatory DNA of many of these transcriptional targets in HTLV-1 transformed cell lines. We further noted that the K59R IRF4 mutant is expressed at higher levels in the nucleus than is wild-type IRF4, and is transcriptionally more active. Expression of both wild-type and the K59R mutant of IRF4 from a constitutive promoter in retrovirally transduced murine bone marrow cells increased the abundance of T lymphocytes but not myeloid cells or B lymphocytes in mice. IRF4 may represent a therapeutic target in ATL since ATL cells select for a mutant of IRF4 with higher nuclear expression and transcriptional activity, and over-expression of IRF4 induces the expansion of T lymphocytes in vivo. Published under license by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. Heterogeneous Pulmonary Phenotypes Associated With Mutations in the Thyroid Transcription Factor Gene NKX2-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deterding, Robin R.; Wert, Susan E.; White, Frances V.; Dishop, Megan K.; Alfano, Danielle N.; Halbower, Ann C.; Planer, Benjamin; Stephan, Mark J.; Uchida, Derek A.; Williames, Lee D.; Rosenfeld, Jill A.; Lebel, Robert Roger; Young, Lisa R.; Cole, F. Sessions; Nogee, Lawrence M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Mutations in the gene encoding thyroid transcription factor, NKX2-1, result in neurologic abnormalities, hypothyroidism, and neonatal respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) that together are known as the brain-thyroid-lung syndrome. To characterize the spectrum of associated pulmonary phenotypes, we identified individuals with mutations in NKX2-1 whose primary manifestation was respiratory disease. Methods: Retrospective and prospective approaches identified infants and children with unexplained diffuse lung disease for NKX2-1 sequencing. Histopathologic results and electron micrographs were assessed, and immunohistochemical analysis for surfactant-associated proteins was performed in a subset of 10 children for whom lung tissue was available. Results: We identified 16 individuals with heterozygous missense, nonsense, and frameshift mutations and five individuals with heterozygous, whole-gene deletions of NKX2-1. Neonatal RDS was the presenting pulmonary phenotype in 16 individuals (76%), interstitial lung disease in four (19%), and pulmonary fibrosis in one adult family member. Altogether, 12 individuals (57%) had the full triad of neurologic, thyroid, and respiratory manifestations, but five (24%) had only pulmonary symptoms at the time of presentation. Recurrent respiratory infections were a prominent feature in nine subjects. Lung histopathology demonstrated evidence of disrupted surfactant homeostasis in the majority of cases, and at least five cases had evidence of disrupted lung growth. Conclusions: Patients with mutations in NKX2-1 may present with pulmonary manifestations in the newborn period or during childhood when thyroid or neurologic abnormalities are not apparent. Surfactant dysfunction and, in more severe cases, disrupted lung development are likely mechanisms for the respiratory disease. PMID:23430038

  17. Usefulness of BCOR gene mutation as a prognostic factor in acute myeloid leukemia with intermediate cytogenetic prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terada, Kazuki; Yamaguchi, Hiroki; Ueki, Toshimitsu; Usuki, Kensuke; Kobayashi, Yutaka; Tajika, Kenji; Gomi, Seiji; Kurosawa, Saiko; Saito, Riho; Furuta, Yutaka; Miyadera, Keiki; Tokura, Taichiro; Marumo, Atushi; Omori, Ikuko; Sakaguchi, Masahiro; Fujiwara, Yusuke; Yui, Shunsuke; Ryotokuji, Takeshi; Arai, Kunihito; Kitano, Tomoaki; Wakita, Satoshi; Fukuda, Takahiro; Inokuchi, Koiti

    2018-04-16

    BCOR gene is a transcription regulatory factor that plays an essential role in normal hematopoiesis. The wider introduction of next-generation sequencing technology has led to reports in recent years of mutations in the BCOR gene in acute myeloid leukemia (AML), but the related clinical characteristics and prognosis are not sufficiently understood. We investigated the clinical characteristics and prognosis of 377 de novo AML cases with BCOR or BCORL1 mutation. BCOR or BCORL1 gene mutations were found in 28 cases (7.4%). Among cases aged 65 years or below that were also FLT3-ITD-negative and in the intermediate cytogenetic prognosis group, BCOR or BCORL1 gene mutations were observed in 11% of cases (12 of 111 cases), and this group had significantly lower 5-year overall survival (OS) (13.6% vs. 55.0%, P=0.0021) and relapse-free survival (RFS) (14.3% vs. 44.5%, P=0.0168) compared to cases without BCOR or BCORL1 gene mutations. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that BCOR mutations were an independent unfavorable prognostic factor (P=0.0038, P=0.0463) for both OS and RFS. In cases of AML that are FLT3-ITD-negative, aged 65 years or below, and in the intermediate cytogenetic prognosis group, which are considered to have relatively favorable prognosis, BCOR gene mutations appear to be an important prognostic factor. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Albuminuria and associated risk factors in type II diabetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashim, R.; Ahmed, T.A.; Mushtaq, S.; Zafar, L.; Attique, M.; Khalil-ur-Rehman

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To determine the frequency of microalbuminuria (MA) and its associated medical risk factors in type II diabetic patients. Materials and Methods: Study population included 150 type II diabetic patients (70 women, 80 men) attending outpatient department of the hospital. Patients having clinical albuminuria and with other causes of proteinuria were excluded. Results: Women and men were of comparable ages. Women (26.4 kg/m/sup 2/) had higher body mass index (BMI) than men 24.3 kg/m/sup 2/). The frequency of MA was 46.7%, higher in males (50.6%) than females (41.5%). Fasting plasma glucose HbA/sub 1c/ levels were significantly higher in patients with MA compared to those with normo albuminuria (p < 0.001). The microalbuminuria patients had significantly decreased HDL-c levels compared to normoalbuminuric subjects (p< 0.001). However, no relation of MA with age, gender, known duration of diabetes, BMI, history of smoking, hypertension and serum: total cholesterol, LDL-c, triglyceride, urea and creatinine was found. Conclusion: There is a strong association of poor glycaemic control and decreased HDL-c levels with the presence of micro albuminuria. (author)

  19. Evolutionary pattern of mutation in the factor IX genes of great apes: How does it compare to the pattern of recent germline mutation in patients with hemophilia B?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grouse, L.H.; Ketterling, R.P.; Sommer, S.S. [Mayo Clinic/Foundation, Rochester, MN (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Most mutations causing hemophilia B have arisen within the past 150 years. By correcting for multiple biases, the underlying rates of spontaneous germline mutation have been estimated in the factor IX gene. From these rates, an underlying pattern of mutation has emerged. To determine if this pattern compares to a underlying pattern found in the great apes, sequence changes were determined in intronic regions of the factor IX gene. The following species were studied: Gorilla gorilla, Pan troglodytes (chimpanzee), Pongo pygmacus (orangutan) and Homo sapiens. Intronic sequences at least 200 bp from a splice junction were randomly chosen, amplified by cross-species PCR, and sequenced. These regions are expected to be subject to little if any selective pressure. Early diverged species of Old World monkeys were also studied to help determine the direction of mutational changes. A total of 62 sequence changes were observed. Initial data suggest that the average pattern since evolution of the great apes has a paucity of transitions at CpG dinucleotides and an excess of microinsertions to microdeletions when compared to the pattern observed in humans during the past 150 years (p<.05). A larger study is in progress to confirm these results.

  20. Detection of epidermal growth factor receptor mutation in lung cancer by droplet digital polymerase chain reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Q

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Qing Xu,1,* Yazhen Zhu,2,* Yali Bai,1 Xiumin Wei,1 Xirun Zheng,2 Mao Mao,1 Guangjuan Zheng21Translational Bioscience and Diagnostics, WuXi AppTec, Shanghai, 2Department of Pathology, Guangdong Provincial Hospital of TCM, Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, Guangdong Provincial Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China*These authors contributed equally to this workBackground: Two types of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR mutations in exon 19 and exon 21 (ex19del and L858R are prevalent in lung cancer patients and sensitive to targeted EGFR inhibition. A resistance mutation in exon 20 (T790M has been found to accompany drug treatment when patients relapse. These three mutations are valuable companion diagnostic biomarkers for guiding personalized treatment. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR-based methods have been widely used in the clinic by physicians to guide treatment decisions. The aim of this study was to evaluate the technical and clinical sensitivity and specificity of the droplet digital polymerase chain reaction (ddPCR method in detecting the three EGFR mutations in patients with lung cancer.Methods: Genomic DNA from H1975 and PC-9 cells, as well as 92 normal human blood specimens, was used to determine the technical sensitivity and specificity of the ddPCR assays. Genomic DNA of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded specimens from 78 Chinese patients with lung adenocarcinoma were assayed using both qPCR and ddPCR.Results: The three ddPCR assays had a limit of detection of 0.02% and a wide dynamic range from 1 to 20,000 copies measurement. The L858R and ex19del assays had a 0% background level in the technical and clinical settings. The T790M assay appeared to have a 0.03% technical background. The ddPCR assays were robust for correct determination of EGFR mutation status in patients, and the dynamic range appeared to be better than qPCR methods. The ddPCR assay for T790M could detect

  1. Correlation between {sup 18}F Fluorodeoxyglucose uptake and epidermal growth factor receptor mutations in advanced lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Yun Jung; Cho, Byoung Chul; Jeong, Youg Hyu; Seo, Hyo Jung; Kim, Hyun Jeong; Cho, Arthur; Lee, Jae Hoon; Yun, Mi Jin; Jeon, Tae Joo; Lee, Jong Doo; Kang, Won Jun [Yonsei Univ., Health System, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-15

    Mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)gene have been identified as potential targets for the treatment and prognostic factors for non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We assessed the correlation between fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake and EGFR mutations, as well as their prognostic implications. A total of 163 patients with pathologically confirmed NSCLC were enrolled (99 males and 64 females; median age, 60 years). All patients underwent FDG positron emission tomography before treatment, and genetic studies of EGFR mutations were performed. The maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax)of the primary lung cancer was measured and normalized with regard to liver uptake. The SUVmax between the wild type and EGFR mutant groups was compared. Survival was evaluated according to SUVmax and EGFR mutation status. EGFR mutations were found in 57 patients (60.8%). The SUVmax tended to be higher in wild type than mutant tumors, but was not significantly different (11.1{+-}5.7 vs. 9.8{+-}4.4, P=0.103). The SUVmax was significantly lower in patients with an exon 19 mutation than in those with either an exon 21 mutation or wild type (P=0.003 and 0.009, respectively). The EGFR mutation showed prolonged overall survival (OS) compared to wild type tumors (P=0.004). There was no significant difference in survival according to SUVmax. Both OS and progression free survival of patients with a mutation in exon 19 were significant longer than in patients with wild type tumors. In patients with NSCLC, a mutation in exon 19 was associated with a lower SUVmax and is a reliable predictor for good survival.

  2. Functional analysis of a SOX10 gene mutation associated with Waardenburg syndrome II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xue-Ping; Hao, Zi-Qi; Liu, Ya-Lan; Mei, Ling-Yun; He, Chu-Feng; Niu, Zhi-Jie; Sun, Jie; Zhao, Yu-Lin; Feng, Yong

    2017-11-04

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is an autosomal dominant inherited non-syndromic type of hereditary hearing loss characterized by varying combinations of sensorineural hearing loss and abnormal pigmentation of the hair, skin, and inner ear. WS is classified into four subtypes (WS1-WS4) based on additional symptoms. WS2 is characterized by the absence of additional symptoms. Recently, we identified a SOX10 missense mutation c.422T > C (p.L141P) associated with WS2. We performed functional assays and found the mutant loses DNA-binding capacity, shows aberrant cytoplasmic and nuclear localization, and fails to interact with PAX3. Therefore, the mutant cannot transactivate the MITF promoter effectively, inhibiting melanin synthesis and leading to WS2. Our study confirmed haploinsufficiency as the underlying pathogenesis for WS2. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Human insulin-like growth factor II leader 2 mediates internal initiation of translation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Susanne; Christiansen, Jan; Hansen, T.O.

    2002-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) is a fetal growth factor, which belongs to the family of insulin-like peptides. During fetal life, the IGF-II gene generates three mRNAs with different 5' untranslated regions (UTRs), but identical coding regions and 3' UTRs. We have shown previously that IG...

  4. Identification of two novel critical mutations in PCNT gene resulting in microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II associated with multiple intracranial aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fei-Feng; Wang, Xu-Dong; Zhu, Min-Wei; Lou, Zhi-Hong; Zhang, Qiong; Zhu, Chun-Yu; Feng, Hong-Lin; Lin, Zhi-Guo; Liu, Shu-Lin

    2015-12-01

    Microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II (MOPD II) is a highly detrimental human autosomal inherited recessive disorder. The hallmark characteristics of this disease are intrauterine and postnatal growth restrictions, with some patients also having cerebrovascular problems such as cerebral aneurysms. The genomic basis behind most clinical features of MOPD II remains largely unclear. The aim of this work was to identify the genetic defects in a Chinese family with MOPD II associated with multiple intracranial aneurysms. The patient had typical MOPD II syndrome, with subarachnoid hemorrhage and multiple intracranial aneurysms. We identified three novel mutations in the PCNT gene, including one single base alteration (9842A>C in exon 45) and two deletions (Del-C in exon 30 and Del-16 in exon 41). The deletions were co-segregated with the affected individual in the family and were not present in the control population. Computer modeling demonstrated that the deletions may cause drastic changes on the secondary and tertiary structures, affecting the hydrophilicity and hydrophobicity of the mutant proteins. In conclusion, we identified two novel mutations in the PCNT gene associated with MOPD II and intracranial aneurysms, and the mutations were expected to alter the stability and functioning of the protein by computer modeling.

  5. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations and expression in squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus in central Asia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abedi-Ardekani, Behnoush; Malekzadeh, Reza; Hainaut, Pierre; Dar, Nazir Ahmad; Mir, Mohammad Muzaffar; Zargar, Showkat Ahmad; Lone, M Muqbool; Martel-Planche, Ghyslaine; Villar, Stéphanie; Mounawar, Mounia; Saidi, Farrokh

    2012-01-01

    Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) shows geographic variations in incidence, with high incidences (>50/10 5 person-years) in central Asia, including North Eastern Iran (Golestan) and Northern India (Kashmir). In contrast to Western countries, smoking does not appear to be a significant risk factor for ESCC in central Asia. In lung adenocarcinoma, activating mutations in the gene encoding epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) are frequent in tumors of never smokers of Asian origin, predicting therapeutic sensitivity to Egfr-targeting drugs. In this study 152 cases of histologically confirmed ESCC from Iran (Tehran and Golestan Province) and North India (Kashmir Valley) have been analyzed for EGFR mutation by direct sequencing of exons 18–21. Egfr protein expression was evaluated by immunohistochemistry in 34 samples from Tehran and HER2 mutations were analyzed in 54 cases from Kashmir. A total of 14 (9.2%) EGFR variations were detected, including seven variations in exons. Among those, four (2.6%) were already documented in lung cancers, two were reported as polymorphisms and one was a potentially new activating mutation. All but one variation in introns were previously identified as polymorphisms. Over-expression of Egfr was detected in 22/34 (65%) of tested cases whereas no HER2 mutation was found in 54 cases from Kashmir. Overall, EGFR mutations appear to be a rare event in ESCC in high incidence areas of central Asia, although a very small proportion of cases may harbor mutations predicting sensitivity to anti-Egfr drugs

  6. Overall survival and clinical characteristics of BRCA mutation carriers with stage I/II pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golan, Talia; Sella, Tal; O'Reilly, Eileen M; Katz, Matthew H G; Epelbaum, Ron; Kelsen, David P; Borgida, Ayelet; Maynard, Hannah; Kindler, Hedy; Friedmen, Eitan; Javle, Milind; Gallinger, Steven

    2017-03-14

    BRCA1/BRCA2 germ line (GL) mutation carriers with pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC) may have distinct outcomes. We recently described an apparent more favourable prognosis of surgically resected BRCA-associated PDAC patients in a single-arm, uncontrolled, retrospective study. However, the prognostic impact of GL BRCA1/2 mutations in surgically resected PDAC has not been compared with a matched control population. A larger multi-centre, case-control retrospective analysis was performed. Cases were patients with surgically resected, BRCA1/2-associated PDAC from 2004 to 2013. Controls included surgically resected PDAC cases treated during the same time period that were either BRCA non-carriers, or had no family history of breast, ovarian or pancreatic cancers. Cases and controls were matched by: age at diagnosis (within ±5-year period) and institution. Demographics, clinical history, overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) were abstracted from patient records. Statistical comparisons were assessed using χ 2 - and Fisher's exact test, and median DFS/OS using Kaplan-Meier method and log-rank testing. Twenty-five patients with BRCA1-(n=4) or BRCA2 (N=21)-associated resectable PDAC were identified. Mean age was 55.7 years (range, 34-78 years), 48% (n=12) were females and 76% (n=19) were Jewish. Cases were compared (1 : 2) with 49 resectable PDAC controls, and were balanced for age, ethnicity and other relevant clinical and pathological features. BRCA-associated PDAC patients received neoadjuvant, or adjuvant platinum-based treatment more frequently than controls (7 out of 8 vs 6 out of 14) and (7 out of 21 vs 3 out of 44), respectively. No significant difference in median OS (37.06 vs 38.77 months, P=0.838) and in DFS (14.3 vs 12.0 months, P=0.303) could be demonstrated between cases and controls. A trend to increased DFS was observed among BRCA-positive cases treated with neoadjuvant/adjuvant platinum-containing regimens (n=10) compared with similarly

  7. [The mutations of the D-loop hypervariable region II and hypervariable region III of mitochondrial DNA in oral squamous cell carcinoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yao-Zhong; Jia, Mu-Yun; Yuan, Rong-Tao; Han, Guo-Dong; Bu, Ling-Xue

    2010-06-01

    To investigate the frequency of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) D-loop hypervariable region II (HVR II) and hypervariable region III (HVR III) mutations in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and their correlation to provide the new targets for the prevention and treatment of OSCC. The D-loop HVR II and HVR III regions of mtDNA in seven cases with OSCC tissues, matched with paracancerous tissues and normal mucosa tissues from the same case, were amplified by polymerase chain raction (PCR), then were detected by direct sequencing to find the mutantsites after the comparison of all sequencing results with the mtDNA Cambridge sequence in the GenBank database. 82 (56 species) nucleotide changes, with 51(26 species) nucleotide polymorphism, were found after the comparison of all sequencing results with the mtDNA Cambridge sequence in the GenBank database. 31(30 species) mutations, with 21 located within the HVR II and HVR III regions, were found in 3 tumor tissue samples, their paracancerous and normal mucosa tissue were found more polymorphic changes but no mutation. The mtDNA D-loop HVR II and HVR III regions mutation rate was 42.9% (3/7) in OSCC. The mtDNA D-loop HVR II and HVR III regions were highly polymorphic and mutable regions in OSCC. It suggested that the D-loop HVR II and HVR III regions of mtDNA might play a significant role in the tumorigenesis of OSCC. It may become new targets for the gene therapy of OSCC by regulating the above indexes.

  8. Systemic mastocytosis uncommon in KIT D816V mutation positive core-binding factor acute myeloid leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Thomas; Preiss, Birgitte; Broesby-Olsen, Sigurd

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The KIT D816V mutation is detected in the vast majority of adult cases of systemic mastocytosis (SM). The mutation is also frequently detected in core-binding factor acute myeloid leukemia (CBF-AML) defined by the presence of t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1 or inv(16)(p13.1;q22)/t(16;16)(p...

  9. Not all epidermal growth factor receptor mutations in lung cancer are created equal: Perspectives for individualized treatment strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Yoshihisa; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya

    2016-09-01

    Somatic mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene are present in approximately 20% (in Caucasians) to 40% (in East Asians) of adenocarcinomas of the lung. Targeted therapy for these lung cancers has been established based on evidence regarding mainly common mutations; that is, exon 19 deletions (Del19) and L858R. EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI), gefitinib, erlotinib or afatinib showed high objective response rates (ORR) of approximately 60%. Several studies suggested that Del19 might be more sensitive to EGFR-TKI than L858R. On the other hand, it has been difficult to establish evidence for other less common mutations, accounting for 12% of all EGFR mutations, because there are many variants and many studies have excluded patients with these uncommon mutations. However, recent studies revealed that these rare genotypes could be targetable if appropriate TKI are selected. For example, G719X (X denotes A, S, C and so on), Del18, E709K, insertions in exon 19 (Ins19), S768I or L861Q showed moderate sensitivities to gefitinib or erlotinb with ORR of 30%-50%. However, afatinib appeared to be especially effective for these tumors. Although Ins20s (except for insFQEA) have been regarded as resistant mutations, osimertinib may be effective for rare subtypes of them and nazartinib (EGF816) is promising for the majority of them. For the further development of targeted therapy in all EGFR mutations, it is important to precisely detect targetable mutations, to select the most appropriate TKI for each mutation, and to continue investigating in vitro studies and collecting clinical data on even rare mutations. © 2016 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  10. Insulin-like growth factor II: complexity of biosynthesis and receptor binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammeltoft, S; Christiansen, Jan; Nielsen, F C

    1991-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) belongs to the insulin family of peptides and acts as a growth factor in many fetal tissues and tumors. The gene expression of IGF-II is initiated at three different promoters which gives rise to multiple transcripts. In a human rhabdomyosarcoma cell line......, Man-6-P induces cellular responses. We have studied rat brain neuronal precursor cells where Man-6-P acted as a mitogen suggesting that phosphomannosylated proteins may act as growth factors via the Man-6-P/IGF-II receptor. In conclusion, the gene expression and mechanism of action of IGF-II is very...

  11. Precipitating factors of porphyria cutanea tarda in Brazil with emphasis on hemochromatosis gene (HFE) mutations. Study of 60 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Fatima Mendonça Jorge; Nakhle, Maria Cristina; Abrantes-Lemos, Clarice Pires; Cançado, Eduardo Luiz Rachid; Reis, Vitor Manoel Silva dos

    2013-01-01

    Porphyria cutanea tarda is the most common form of porphyria, characterized by the decreased activity of the uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase enzyme. Several reports associated HFE gene mutations of hereditary hemochromatosis with porphyria cutanea tarda worldwide, although up to date only one study has been conducted in Brazil. Investigation of porphyria cutanea tarda association with C282Y and H63D mutations in the HFE gene. Identification of precipitating factors (hepatitis C, HIV, alcoholism and estrogen) and their link with HFE mutations. An ambispective study of 60 patients with PCT was conducted during the period from 2003 to 2012. Serological tests for hepatitis C and HIV were performed and histories of alcohol abuse and estrogen intake were investigated. HFE mutations were identified with real-time PCR. Porphyria cutanea tarda predominated in males and alcohol abuse was the main precipitating factor. Estrogen intake was the sole precipitating factor present in 25% of female patients. Hepatitis C was present in 41.7%. All HIV-positive patients (15.3%) had a history of alcohol abuse. Allele frequency for HFE mutations, i.e., C282Y (p = 0.0001) and H63D (p = 0.0004), were significantly higher in porphyria cutanea tarda patients, compared to control group. HFE mutations had no association with the other precipitating factors. Alcohol abuse, hepatitis C and estrogen intake are prevalent precipitating factors in our porphyria cutanea tarda population; however, hemochromatosis in itself can also contribute to the outbreak of porphyria cutanea tarda, which makes the research for HFE mutations necessary in these patients.

  12. Novel CFI mutation in a patient with leukocytoclastic vasculitis may redefine the clinical spectrum of Complement Factor I deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Jakob Thaning; Katzenstein, Terese Lea; Kofoed, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    presentation of Factor I deficiency varies and includes severe recurrent bacterial infections, glomerulonephritis and autoimmune diseases. The patient, a 28-years old woman with consanguineous parents, presented with recurrent leukocytoclastic vasculitis in the lower extremities with no associated systemic...... mutations vary among patients sole association with leukocytoclastic vasculitis redefines the clinical spectrum of complete Factor I deficiency....

  13. Novel mutations in the long isoform of the USH2A gene in patients with Usher syndrome type II or non-syndromic retinitis pigmentosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee, Terri L; Seyedahmadi, Babak Jian; Sweeney, Meredith O; Dryja, Thaddeus P; Berson, Eliot L

    2010-07-01

    Usher syndrome type II (USH2) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterised by retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and mild to moderate sensorineural hearing loss. Mutations in the USH2A gene are the most common cause of USH2 and are also a cause of some forms of RP without hearing loss (ie, non-syndromic RP). The USH2A gene was initially identified as a transcript comprised of 21 exons but subsequently a longer isoform containing 72 exons was identified. The 51 exons unique to the long isoform of USH2A were screened for mutations among a core set of 108 patients diagnosed with USH2 and 80 patients with non-syndromic RP who were all included in a previously reported screen of the short isoform of USH2A. For several exons, additional patients were screened. In total, 35 deleterious mutations were identified including 17 nonsense mutations, 9 frameshift mutations, 5 splice-site mutations, and 4 small in-frame deletions or insertions. Twenty-seven mutations were novel. In addition, 65 rare missense changes were identified. A method of classifying the deleterious effect of the missense changes was developed using the summed results of four different mutation assessment algorithms, SIFT, pMUT, PolyPhen, and AGVGD. This system classified 8 of the 65 changes as 'likely deleterious' and 9 as 'possibly deleterious'. At least one mutation was identified in 57-63% of USH2 cases and 19-23% of cases of non-syndromic recessive RP (calculated without and including probable/possible deleterious changes) thus supporting that USH2A is the most common known cause of RP in the USA.

  14. Mutations in fibroblast growth-factor receptor 3 in sporadic cases of achondroplasia occur exclusively on the paternally derived chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkin, D J; Szabo, J K; Cameron, R; Henderson, S; Bellus, G A; Mack, M L; Kaitila, I; Loughlin, J; Munnich, A; Sykes, B; Bonaventure, J; Francomano, C A

    1998-01-01

    More than 97% of achondroplasia cases are caused by one of two mutations (G1138A and G1138C) in the fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) gene, which results in a specific amino acid substitution, G380R. Sporadic cases of achondroplasia have been associated with advanced paternal age, suggesting that these mutations occur preferentially during spermatogenesis. We have determined the parental origin of the achondroplasia mutation in 40 sporadic cases. Three distinct 1-bp polymorphisms were identified in the FGFR3 gene, within close proximity to the achondroplasia mutation site. Ninety-nine families, each with a sporadic case of achondroplasia in a child, were analyzed in this study. In this population, the achondroplasia mutation occurred on the paternal chromosome in all 40 cases in which parental origin was unambiguous. This observation is consistent with the clinical observation of advanced paternal age resulting in new cases of achondroplasia and suggests that factors influencing DNA replication or repair during spermatogenesis, but not during oogenesis, may predispose to the occurrence of the G1138 FGFR3 mutations. PMID:9718331

  15. An immuno-wall microdevice exhibits rapid and sensitive detection of IDH1-R132H mutation specific to grade II and III gliomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamichi, Akane; Kasama, Toshihiro; Ohka, Fumiharu; Suzuki, Hiromichi; Kato, Akira; Motomura, Kazuya; Hirano, Masaki; Ranjit, Melissa; Chalise, Lushun; Kurimoto, Michihiro; Kondo, Goro; Aoki, Kosuke; Kaji, Noritada; Tokeshi, Manabu; Matsubara, Toshio; Senga, Takeshi; Kaneko, Mika K.; Suzuki, Hidenori; Hara, Masahito; Wakabayashi, Toshihiko; Baba, Yoshinobu; Kato, Yukinari; Natsume, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    World Health Organization grade II and III gliomas most frequently occur in the central nervous system (CNS) in adults. Gliomas are not circumscribed; tumor edges are irregular and consist of tumor cells, normal brain tissue, and hyperplastic reactive glial cells. Therefore, the tumors are not fully resectable, resulting in recurrence, malignant progression, and eventual death. Approximately 69-80% of grade II and III gliomas harbor mutations in the isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 gene (IDH1), of which 83-90% are found to be the IDH1-R132H mutation. Detection of the IDH1-R132H mutation should help in the differential diagnosis of grade II and III gliomas from other types of CNS tumors and help determine the boundary between the tumor and normal brain tissue. In this study, we established a highly sensitive antibody-based device, referred to as the immuno-wall, to detect the IDH1-R132H mutation in gliomas. The immuno-wall causes an immunoreaction in microchannels fabricated using a photo-polymerizing polymer. This microdevice enables the analysis of the IDH1 status with a small sample within 15 min with substantially high sensitivity. Our results suggested that 10% content of the IDH1-R132H mutation in a sample of 0.33 μl volume, with 500 ng protein, or from 500 cells is theoretically sufficient for the analysis. The immuno-wall device will enable the rapid and highly sensitive detection of the IDH1-R132H mutation in routine clinical practice.

  16. Autosomal dominant familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus caused by a mutation in the arginine-vasopressin II gene in four generations of a Korean family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myo-Jing Kim

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Autosomal dominant neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus is a rare form of central diabetes insipidus that is caused by mutations in the vasopressin-neurophysin II (AVP-NPII gene. It is characterized by persistent polydipsia and polyuria induced by deficient or absent secretion of arginine vasopressin (AVP. Here we report a case of familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus in four generations of a Korean family, caused by heterozygous missense mutation in exon 2 of the AVP-NPII gene (c.286G>T. This is the first report of such a case in Korea.

  17. Evaluation the frequency of factor V Leiden mutation in pregnant women with preeclampsia syndrome in an Iranian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azadeh Azinfar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Role of genetic factors in etiology of preeclampsia is not confirmed yet.Objective: Gene defect frequency varies in different geographic areas as well as ethnic groups. In this study, the role of factor V Leiden mutation in the pathogenesis of preeclampsia syndrome among the pregnant population of northern shore of Persian Gulf in Iran, were considered.Materials and Methods: Between Jan. 2008 and Dec. 2009, in a nested case control study, pregnant women with preeclampsia (N=198 as cases and healthy (N=201 as controls were enrolled in the study. DNA were extracted from 10 CC peripheral blood and analyzed for presence of factor V Leiden mutation in these subjects. The maternal and neonatal outcomes of pregnancy according to the distribution of factor V Leiden were also compared among cases.Results: In total, 17(8.6% of cases and 2(1% of controls showed the factor V Leiden mutation. The incidence of factor V Leiden was typically higher in preeclamptic women than control group (OR: 9.34 %95 CI: 2.12-41.01. There was no difference in incidence rate of preterm delivery< 37 weeks (OR: 1.23 %95 CI: 0.38-4.02, very early preterm delivery<32 weeks (OR: 1.00 %95 CI: 0.12-8.46, intra uterine fetal growth restriction (IUGR (OR: 1.32 %95 CI: 0.15-11.30 ,and the rate of cesarean section (OR: 0.88 %95 CI: 0.29-2.62 among cases based on the prevalence of factor V Leiden mutation.Conclusion: The pregnant women with factor V Leiden mutation are prone for preeclampsia syndrome during pregnancy, but this risk factor was not correlated to pregnancy complications in the studied women

  18. Serum insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) and adrenomedullin (ADM) in coronary heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tong Lijun; Ji Naijun; Fan Bifu; Wang Chengyao; Mei Yibin; Chen Donghai; Li Fuyuan

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the changes of serum insulin-like growth factor (IGF-II) and adrenomedullin (ADM) levels in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD). Methods: Serum IGF-II and ADM levels were measured with RIA in 90 CHD patients and 40 controls. Results: Serum IGF-II and ADM levels were significantly higher in CHD patients than those in controls (P 0.05). Serum IGF-II and ADM levels were significantly higher in the patients complicated with myocardial infarction (MI) than those in patients without this complication (t=2.831, t=2.328, both P 0.05). Conclusion: Serum IGF-II and ADM levels were increased in CHD patients, most markedly in those complicated with MI. (authors)

  19. Naturally occurring mutations in the human 5-lipoxygenase gene promoter that modify transcription factor binding and reporter gene transcription.

    OpenAIRE

    In, K H; Asano, K; Beier, D; Grobholz, J; Finn, P W; Silverman, E K; Silverman, E S; Collins, T; Fischer, A R; Keith, T P; Serino, K; Kim, S W; De Sanctis, G T; Yandava, C; Pillari, A

    1997-01-01

    Five lipoxygenase (5-LO) is the first committed enzyme in the metabolic pathway leading to the synthesis of the leukotrienes. We examined genomic DNA isolated from 25 normal subjects and 31 patients with asthma (6 of whom had aspirin-sensitive asthma) for mutations in the known transcription factor binding regions and the protein encoding region of the 5-LO gene. A family of mutations in the G + C-rich transcription factor binding region was identified consisting of the deletion of one, delet...

  20. A novel inherited mutation of the transcription factor RUNX1 causes thrombocytopenia and may predispose to acute myeloid leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Logan C; Stevens, Jane; Campbell, Hamish; Corbett, Rob; Spearing, Ruth; Heaton, David; Macdonald, Donald H; Morris, Christine M; Ganly, Peter

    2002-06-01

    The RUNX1 (AML1, CBFA2) gene is a member of the runt transcription factor family, responsible for DNA binding and heterodimerization of other non-DNA binding transcription factors. RUNX1 plays an important part in regulating haematopoiesis and it is frequently disrupted by illegitimate somatic recombination in both acute myeloid and lymphoblastic leukaemia. Germline mutations of RUNX1 have also recently been described and are dominantly associated with inherited leukaemic conditions. We have identified a unique point mutation of the RUNX1 gene (A107P) in members of a family with autosomal dominant inheritance of thrombocytopenia. One member has developed acute myeloid leukaemia (AML).

  1. Genetic counseling for a three-generation Chinese family with Waardenburg syndrome type II associated with a rare SOX10 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kaitian; Zong, Ling; Zhan, Yuan; Wu, Xuan; Liu, Min; Jiang, Hongyan

    2015-05-01

    Waardenburg syndrome is clinically and genetically heterogeneous. The SOX10 mutation related with Waardenburg syndrome type II is rare in Chinese. This study aimed to uncover the genetic causes of Waardenburg syndrome type II in a three-generation family to improve genetic counseling. Complete clinical and molecular evaluations were conducted in a three-generation Han Chinese family with Waardenburg syndrome type II. Targeted genetic counseling was provided to this family. We identified a rare heterozygous dominant mutation c.621C>A (p.Y207X) in SOX10 gene in this family. The premature termination codon occurs in exon 4, 27 residues downstream of the carboxyl end of the high mobility group box. Bioinformatics prediction suggested this variant to be disease-causing, probably due to nonsense-mediated mRNA decay. Useful genetic counseling was given to the family for prenatal guidance. Identification of a rare dominant heterozygous SOX10 mutation c.621C>A in this family provided an efficient way to understand the causes of Waardenburg syndrome type II and improved genetic counseling. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Studies on chlorophyll and viable mutations in green gram (Vigna radiata L. Wilczek) II: Response to mutagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishnaswami, S; Rathinam, M [Tamil Nadu Agricultural Univ., Coimbatore (India). Dept. of Agricultural Botany

    1980-09-01

    The frequency and spectrum of chlorophyll and viable mutations in relation to type and dose of mutagen and cluster progenies were studied in four green gram cultivars viz., Kopergaon, Pusa Baisakhi, L. 24/2 and Sel. 122 subjected to two levels of EMS and gamma irradiation, severally and in conjunction. While chlorophyll mutations did not vary with the mutagen dose, viable mutations exhibited a direct relationship. Combinations of the mutagens were more effective in mutation induction. While no difference was manifested between the cluster families in respect of chlorophyll mutations, progenies of the second cluster recorded less viable mutations than either the first or the third. Viridis and xanthoviridis among chlorophyll mutations, and those affecting plant duration and stature among viable were more predominant.

  3. Bipolar II disorder as a risk factor for postpartum depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandelli, Laura; Souery, Daniel; Bartova, Lucie; Kasper, Siegfried; Montgomery, Stuart; Zohar, Joseph; Mendlewicz, Julien; Serretti, Alessandro

    2016-11-01

    There is evidence for a bipolar diathesis in postpartum depression (PPD) and women presenting with a first PPD frequently receive a diagnosis of bipolar type II disorder (BD-II). However formal evidence for an association between BD-II and PPD has not yet been reported. In the present study we tested a potential association between BD-II and PPD. Parous women with a diagnosis of bipolar type I disorder (BD-I) (n=93), BD-II (n=36) or major depressive disorder (MDD) (n=444) were considered in the present study. All women were retrospectively evaluated for history of PPD (DSM-IV criteria) and other clinical and socio-demographic features. Women with a history of PDD (n=139, 24%) were younger, younger at illness onset and had more family history for BD compared to women without history of PPD (n=436, 75.9%). Half of BD-II women reported PPD (50%), compared to less than one-third of BD-I and MDD women (respectively 27.5% and 21.6%) (p=0.004). Limitations include the retrospective assessment of PPD and no available data about the timing of postpartum episodes, illness onset or psychiatric care before or after childbirth, and the number of postpartum episodes. BD-II may confer a remarkable risk for PPD, which may be even higher than that of women affected by BD-I disorder. Careful monitoring of BD-II women during the pregnancy and postpartum period, as well as assessment of bipolar features in women with a PPD without a current diagnosis of BD are recommended. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR mutations and expression in squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus in central Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abedi-Ardekani Behnoush

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC shows geographic variations in incidence, with high incidences (>50/105 person-years in central Asia, including North Eastern Iran (Golestan and Northern India (Kashmir. In contrast to Western countries, smoking does not appear to be a significant risk factor for ESCC in central Asia. In lung adenocarcinoma, activating mutations in the gene encoding epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR are frequent in tumors of never smokers of Asian origin, predicting therapeutic sensitivity to Egfr-targeting drugs. Methods In this study 152 cases of histologically confirmed ESCC from Iran (Tehran and Golestan Province and North India (Kashmir Valley have been analyzed for EGFR mutation by direct sequencing of exons 18–21. Egfr protein expression was evaluated by immunohistochemistry in 34 samples from Tehran and HER2 mutations were analyzed in 54 cases from Kashmir. Results A total of 14 (9.2% EGFR variations were detected, including seven variations in exons. Among those, four (2.6% were already documented in lung cancers, two were reported as polymorphisms and one was a potentially new activating mutation. All but one variation in introns were previously identified as polymorphisms. Over-expression of Egfr was detected in 22/34 (65% of tested cases whereas no HER2 mutation was found in 54 cases from Kashmir. Conclusion Overall, EGFR mutations appear to be a rare event in ESCC in high incidence areas of central Asia, although a very small proportion of cases may harbor mutations predicting sensitivity to anti-Egfr drugs.

  5. Factors affecting the loss of MED12-mutated leiomyoma cells during in vitro growth

    OpenAIRE

    Bloch, Jeannine; Holzmann, Carsten; Koczan, Dirk; Helmke, Burkhard Maria; Bullerdiek, J?rn

    2017-01-01

    Uterine leiomyomas (UL) are the most prevalent symptomatic human tumors at all and somatic mutations of the gene encoding mediator subcomplex 12 (MED12) constitute the most frequent driver mutations in UL. Recently, a rapid loss of mutated cells during in vitro growth of UL-derived cell cultures was reported, resulting in doubts about the benefits of UL-derived cell cultures. To evaluate if the rapid loss of MED12-mutated cells in UL cell cultures depends on in vitro passaging, we set up cell...

  6. Endogenous estrogen status, but not genistein supplementation, modulates 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene-induced mutation in the liver cII gene of transgenic big blue rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tao; Hutts, Robert C; Mei, Nan; Liu, Xiaoli; Bishop, Michelle E; Shelton, Sharon; Manjanatha, Mugimane G; Aidoo, Anane

    2005-06-01

    A growing number of studies suggest that isoflavones found in soybeans have estrogenic activity and may safely alleviate the symptoms of menopause. One of these isoflavones, genistein, is commonly used by postmenopausal women as an alternative to hormone replacement therapy. Although sex hormones have been implicated as an important risk factor for the development of hepatocellular carcinoma, there are limited data on the potential effects of the estrogens, including phytoestrogens, on chemical mutagenesis in liver. Because of the association between mutation induction and the carcinogenesis process, we investigated whether endogenous estrogen and supplemental genistein affect 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA)-induced mutagenesis in rat liver. Intact and ovariectomized female Big Blue rats were treated with 80 mg DMBA/kg body weight. Some of the rats also received a supplement of 1,000 ppm genistein. Sixteen weeks after the carcinogen treatment, the rats were sacrificed, their livers were removed, and mutant frequencies (MFs) and types of mutations were determined in the liver cII gene. DMBA significantly increased the MFs in liver for both the intact and ovariectomized rats. While there was no significant difference in MF between the ovariectomized and intact control animals, the mutation induction by DMBA in the ovariectomized groups was significantly higher than that in the intact groups. Dietary genistein did not alter these responses. Molecular analysis of the mutants showed that DMBA induced chemical-specific types of mutations in the liver cII gene. These results suggest that endogenous ovarian hormones have an inhibitory effect on liver mutagenesis by DMBA, whereas dietary genistein does not modulate spontaneous or DMBA-induced mutagenesis in either intact or ovariectomized rats.

  7. Association of the leukemia inhibitory factor gene mutation and the antiphospholipid antibodies in the peripheral blood of infertile women

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Králíčková, M.; Ulčová-Gallová, Z.; Šíma, R.; Vaněček, T.; Šíma, Petr; Křižan, Jiří; Suchá, J.; Uher, P.; Hes, O.; Novotný, Z.; Rokyta, Z.; Větvička, E.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 52, č. 5 (2007), s. 543-548 ISSN 0015-5632 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA301/05/0078 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : leukemia inhibitory faktor * lif gene mutation * antiphospholipid antibodies Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 0.989, year: 2007

  8. Risk of venous thromboembolism and myocardial infarction associated with factor V Leiden and prothrombin mutations and blood type

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sode, Birgitte F; Allin, Kristine H; Dahl, Morten

    2013-01-01

    ABO blood type locus has been reported to be an important genetic determinant of venous and arterial thrombosis in genome-wide association studies. We tested the hypothesis that ABO blood type alone and in combination with mutations in factor V Leiden R506Q and prothrombin G20210A is associated...

  9. A novel phenotype of a hepatocyte nuclear factor homeobox A (HNF1A) gene mutation, presenting with neonatal cholestasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Aleida G. M.; Bakker-van Waarde, Willie M.; Dassel, Anne C. M.; Losekoot, Monique; Duiker, Evelien W.; Gouw, Annette S. H.; Bodewes, Frank A. J. A.

    We report a novel phenotype of a hepatocyte nuclear factor homeobox A (HNF1A) mutation (heterozygote c.130dup, p.Leu44fs) presenting with transient neonatal cholestasis, subsequently followed by persistent elevation of transaminases, maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY) type 3 and

  10. [From gene to disease; achondroplasia and other skeletal dysplasias due to an activating mutation in the fibroblast growth factor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ravenswaaij-Arts, C.M.A. van; Losekoot, M.

    2001-01-01

    Achondroplasia, the most common and best known skeletal dysplasia, is inherited in an autosomal dominant fashion. Like a number of other skeletal dysplasias, among which hypochondroplasia and thanatophoric dysplasia, achondroplasia is caused by mutations in the fibroblast growth factor receptor 3

  11. Preserved fertility in a non-mosaic Klinefelter patient with a mutation in the fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, A; Aksglaede, L; Lund, A M

    2007-01-01

    Patients with Klinefelter syndrome (47,XXY) are characterized by eunuchoid body proportions, gynaecomastia, small firm testes and azoospermia. We describe a Klinefelter patient (non-mosaic 47,XXY karyotype) who was heterozygous for the classical 1138G>A mutation in the fibroblast growth factor...

  12. Impact of the factor V Leiden mutation on the outcome of pneumococcal pneumonia: a controlled laboratory study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten, Marcel; van 't Veer, Cornelis; Roelofs, Joris Jth; Levi, Marcel; van der Poll, Tom

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Streptococcus (S.) pneumoniae is the most common cause of community-acquired pneumonia. The factor V Leiden (FVL) mutation results in resistance of activated FV to inactivation by activated protein C and thereby in a prothrombotic phenotype. Human heterozygous FVL carriers have been

  13. Factor V Leiden mutation, prothrombin gene mutation, and deficiencies in coagulation inhibitors associated with Budd-Chiari syndrome and portal vein thrombosis: results of a case-control study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, H. L.; Meinardi, J. R.; Vleggaar, F. P.; van Uum, S. H.; Haagsma, E. B.; van der Meer, F. J.; van Hattum, J.; Chamuleau, R. A.; Adang, R. P.; Vandenbroucke, J. P.; van Hoek, B.; Rosendaal, F. R.

    2000-01-01

    In a collaborative multicenter case-control study, we investigated the effect of factor V Leiden mutation, prothrombin gene mutation, and inherited deficiencies of protein C, protein S, and antithrombin on the risk of Budd-Chiari syndrome (BCS) and portal vein thrombosis (PVT). We compared 43 BCS

  14. Factor V Leiden mutation, prothrombin gene mutation, and deficiencies in coagulation inhibitors associated with Budd-Chiari syndrome and portal vein thrombosis : results of a case-control study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, HLA; Meinardi, [No Value; Vleggaar, FP; van Uum, SHM; Haagsma, EB; van der Meer, FJM; van Hattum, J; Chamuleau, RAFM; Adang, RP; Vandenbroucke, JP; van Hoek, B; Rosendaal, FR

    2000-01-01

    In a collaborative multicenter case-control study, we investigated the effect of factor V Leiden mutation, prothrombin gene mutation, and inherited deficiencies of protein C, protein S, and antithrombin on the risk of Budd-Chiari syndrome (BCS) and portal vein thrombosis (PVT), We compared 43 BCS

  15. Hypercholesterolemia Induced by a PCSK9 Gain-of-Function Mutation Augments Angiotensin II-Induced Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms in C57BL/6 Mice-Brief Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hong; Howatt, Deborah A; Balakrishnan, Anju; Graham, Mark J; Mullick, Adam E; Daugherty, Alan

    2016-09-01

    Gain-of-function mutations of PCSK9 (proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9) lead to hypercholesterolemia. This study was to determine whether infection of normocholesterolemic mice with an adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector expressing a gain-of-function mutation of mouse PCSK9 increased angiotensin II (AngII)-induced abdominal aortic aneurysms. In an initial study, male C57BL/6 mice were injected intraperitoneally with either an empty vector or PCSK9 gain-of-function mutation (D377Y). AAV at 3 doses and fed a saturated fat-enriched diet for 6 weeks. Two weeks after AAV injection, mice were infused with AngII for 4 weeks. Plasma PCSK9 concentrations were increased dose dependently in mice injected with AAV containing PCSK9D377Y mutation and positively associated with elevations of plasma cholesterol concentrations. Infection with intermediate and high doses of PCSK9D377Y.AAV led to equivalent increases of maximal width of abdominal aortas in C57BL/6 mice infused with AngII. Therefore, the intermediate dose was used in subsequent experiments. We then determined effects of PCSK9D377Y.AAV infection on 5 normolipidemic mouse strains, demonstrating that C57BL/6 mice were the most susceptible to this AAV infection. PCSK9D377Y.AAV infected male C57BL/6 mice were also compared with age-matched male low-density lipoprotein receptor(-/-) mice. Although plasma cholesterol concentrations were lower in mice infected with PCSK9D377Y.AAV, these mice had equivalent abdominal aortic aneurysmal formation, compared to low-density lipoprotein receptor(-/-) mice. In a separate study, reduced plasma PCSK9 concentrations by PCSK9 antisense oligonucleotides in male low-density lipoprotein receptor(-/-) mice did not influence AngII-induced abdominal aortic aneurysms. AAV-mediated infection with a mouse PCSK9 gain-of-function mutation is a rapid, easy, and efficient approach for inducing hypercholesterolemia and promoting abdominal aortic aneurysms in C57BL/6 mice infused with AngII

  16. Identification of five novel mutations in the long isoform of the USH2A gene in Chinese families with Usher syndrome type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Hanjun; Zhang, Xiaohui; Zhao, Xin; Deng, Ting; Dong, Bing; Wang, Jingzhao; Li, Yang

    2008-01-01

    Usher syndrome type II (USH2) is the most common form of Usher syndrome, an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by moderate to severe hearing loss, postpuberal onset of retinitis pigmentosa (RP), and normal vestibular function. Mutations in the USH2A gene have been shown to be responsible for most cases of USH2. To further elucidate the role of USH2A in USH2, mutation screening was undertaken in three Chinese families with USH2. Three unrelated Chinese families, consisting of six patients and 10 unaffected relatives, were examined clinically, and 100 normal Chinese individuals served as controls. Genomic DNA was extracted from the venous blood of all participants. The coding region (exons 2-72), including the intron-exon boundary of USH2A, was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The PCR products amplified from the three probands were analyzed using direct sequencing to screen sequence variants. Whenever substitutions were identified in a patient, restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis, or single strand conformation polymorphism analysis was performed on all available family members and the control group. Fundus examination revealed typical fundus features of RP, including narrowing of the vessels, bone-speckle pigmentation, and waxy optic discs. The ERG wave amplitudes of three probands were undetectable. Audiometric tests indicated moderate to severe sensorineural hearing impairment. Vestibular function was normal. Five novel mutations (one small insertion, one small deletion, one nonsense, one missense, and one splice site) were detected in three families after sequence analysis of USH2A. Of the five mutations, four were located in exons 22-72, specific to the long isoform of USH2A. The mutations found in our study broaden the spectrum of USH2A mutations. Our results further indicate that the long isoform of USH2A may harbor even more mutations of the USH2A gene.

  17. Study of modifiers factors associated to mitochondrial mutations in individuals with hearing impairment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sousa de Moraes, Vanessa Cristine; Alexandrino, Fabiana; Andrade, Paula Baloni; Camara, Marilia Fontenele; Sartorato, Edi Lucia

    2009-01-01

    Hearing impairment is the most prevalent sensorial deficit in the general population. Congenital deafness occurs in about 1 in 1000 live births, of which approximately 50% has hereditary cause in development countries. Non-syndromic deafness can be caused by mutations in both nuclear and mitochondrial genes. Mutations in mtDNA have been associated with aminoglycoside-induced and non-syndromic deafness in many families worldwide. However, the nuclear background influences the phenotypic expression of these pathogenic mutations. Indeed, it has been proposed that nuclear modifier genes modulate the phenotypic manifestation of the mitochondrial A1555G mutation in the MTRNR1 gene. The both putative nuclear modifiers genes TRMU and MTO1 encoding a highly conserved mitochondrial related to tRNA modification. It has been hypothesizes that human TRMU and also MTO1 nuclear genes may modulate the phenotypic manifestation of deafness-associated mitochondrial mutations. The aim of this work was to elucidate the contribution of mitochondrial mutations, nuclear modifier genes mutations and aminoglycoside exposure in the deafness phenotype. Our findings suggest that the genetic background of individuals may play an important role in the pathogenesis of deafness-associated with mitochondrial mutation and aminoglycoside-induced.

  18. Characterization of a novel mutation in the von Willebrand factor propeptide in a distinct subtype of recessive von Willebrand disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lanke, Elsa; Kristoffersson, Ann-Charlotte; Philips, Malou

    2008-01-01

    von Willebrand factor (VWF) is a plasma protein that consists of a series of multimers of which the high-molecular-weight VWF multimers are the most potent in platelet adhesion and aggregation. The propeptide of the VWF (VWFpp) is known to be essential in the process of multimer assembly. Genetic...... mutation in the VWFpp abolishes multimerization of VWF. The mutation probably disrupts the normal configuration of the VWFpp, which is essential for correct orientation of the protomers and ultimately multimerization. The mutant amino acid is located in a region that is highly conserved across several...

  19. Novel GALNT3 mutations causing hyperostosis-hyperphosphatemia syndrome result in low intact fibroblast growth factor 23 concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichikawa, Shoji; Guigonis, Vincent; Imel, Erik A; Courouble, Mélanie; Heissat, Sophie; Henley, John D; Sorenson, Andrea H; Petit, Barbara; Lienhardt, Anne; Econs, Michael J

    2007-05-01

    Hyperostosis-hyperphosphatemia syndrome (HHS) is a rare metabolic disorder characterized by hyperphosphatemia and localized hyperostosis. HHS is caused by mutations in GALNT3, which encodes UDP-N-acetyl-alpha-D-galactosamine:polypeptide N- acetylgalactosaminyltransferase 3. Familial tumoral calcinosis (TC), characterized by ectopic calcifications and hyperphosphatemia, is caused by mutations in the GALNT3 or fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) genes. Our objective was to identify mutations in FGF23 or GALNT3 and determine serum FGF23 levels in an HHS patient. Mutation detection in FGF23 and GALNT3 was performed by DNA sequencing, and serum FGF23 concentrations were measured by ELISA. A 5-year-old French boy with HHS and his family members participated. The patient presented with painful cortical lesions in his leg. Radiographs of the affected bone showed diaphyseal hyperostosis. The lesional tissue comprised trabeculae of immature, woven bone surrounded by fibrous tissue. Biochemistry revealed elevated phosphate, tubular maximum rate for phosphate reabsorption per deciliter of glomerular filtrate, and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D levels. The patient was a compound heterozygote for two novel GALNT3 mutations. His parents and brother were heterozygous for one of the mutations and had no biochemical abnormalities. Intact FGF23 level in the patient was low normal, whereas C-terminal FGF23 was elevated, a pattern similar to TC. The presence of GALNT3 mutations and elevated C-terminal, but low intact serum FGF23, levels in HHS resemble those seen in TC, suggesting that HHS and TC are different manifestations of the same disorder. The absence of biochemical abnormalities in the heterozygous individuals suggests that one normal allele is sufficient for secretion of intact FGF23.

  20. Severe coagulation factor VII deficiency caused by a novel homozygous mutation (p. Trp284Gly) in loop 140s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Xiuping; Cheng, XiaoLi; Ye, Jiajia; Wang, Yingyu; Yang, LiHong; Wang, Mingshan; Jin, Yanhui

    2016-06-01

    Congenital coagulation factor VII (FVII) deficiency is a rare disorder caused by mutation in F7 gene. Herein, we reported a patient who had unexplained hematuria and vertigo with consanguineous parents. He has been diagnosed as having FVII deficiency based on the results of reduced FVII activity (2.0%) and antigen (12.8%). The thrombin generation tests verified that the proband has obstacles in producing thrombin. Direct sequencing analysis revealed a novel homozygous missense mutation p.Trp284Gly. Also noteworthy is the fact that the mutational residue belongs to structurally conserved loop 140s, which majorly undergo rearrangement after FVII activation. Model analysis indicated that the substitution disrupts these native hydrophobic interactions, which are of great importance to the conformation in the activation domain of FVIIa.

  1. Prognostic value of BRAF and KRAS mutation status in stage II and III microsatellite instable colon cancers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Cuba, E. M. V.; Snaebjornsson, P.; Heideman, D. A. M.; van Grieken, N. C. T.; Bosch, L. J. W.; Fijneman, R. J. A.; Belt, E.; Bril, H.; Stockmann, H. B. A. C.; Hooijberg, E.; Punt, C. J. A.; Koopman, M.; Nagtegaal, I. D.; Coupé, V. H. M.; Carvalho, B.; Meijer, G. A.

    2016-01-01

    Microsatellite instability (MSI) has been associated with favourable survival in early stage colorectal cancer (CRC) compared to microsatellite stable (MSS) CRC. The BRAF V600E mutation has been associated with worse survival in MSS CRC. This mutation occurs in 40% of MSI CRC and it is unclear

  2. New prognostic factor telomerase reverse transcriptase promotor mutation presents without MR imaging biomarkers in primary glioblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ersoy, Tunc F.; Simon, Matthias [University Hospital Bonn, Department of Neurosurgery and Stereotaxy, Bonn (Germany); Ev. Krankenhaus Bielefeld, Department of Neurosurgery, Bielefeld (Germany); Keil, Vera C.; Hadizadeh, Dariusch R.; Schild, Hans H. [University Hospital Bonn, Department of Radiology, Bonn (Germany); Gielen, Gerrit H.; Waha, Andreas [University Hospital Bonn, Institute of Neuropathology, Bonn (Germany); Fimmers, Rolf [IMBIE, University Hospital Bonn, Bonn (Germany); Heidenreich, Barbara; Kumar, Rajiv [DFKZ, Department of Molecular Genetic Epidemiology, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2017-12-15

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging biomarkers can assist in the non-invasive assessment of the genetic status in glioblastomas (GBMs). Telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) promoter mutations are associated with a negative prognosis. This study was performed to identify MR imaging biomarkers to forecast the TERT mutation status. Pre-operative MRIs of 64/67 genetically confirmed primary GBM patients (51/67 TERT-mutated with rs2853669 polymorphism) were analyzed according to Visually AcceSAble Rembrandt Images (VASARI) (https: //wiki.cancerimagingarchive.net/display/Public/VASARI+Research+Project) imaging criteria by three radiological raters. TERT mutation and O{sup 6}-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) hypermethylation data were obtained through direct and pyrosequencing as described in a previous study. Clinical data were derived from a prospectively maintained electronic database. Associations of potential imaging biomarkers and genetic status were assessed by Fisher and Mann-Whitney U tests and stepwise linear regression. No imaging biomarkers could be identified to predict TERT mutational status (alone or in conjunction with TERT promoter polymorphism rs2853669 AA-allele). TERT promoter mutations were more common in patients with tumor-associated seizures as first symptom (26/30 vs. 25/37, p = 0.07); these showed significantly smaller tumors [13.1 (9.0-19.0) vs. 24.0 (16.6-37.5) all cm{sup 3}; p = 0.007] and prolonged median overall survival [17.0 (11.5-28.0) vs. 9.0 (4.0-12.0) all months; p = 0.02]. TERT-mutated GBMs were underrepresented in the extended angularis region (p = 0.03), whereas MGMT-methylated GBMs were overrepresented in the corpus callosum (p = 0.03) and underrepresented temporomesially (p = 0.01). Imaging biomarkers for prediction of TERT mutation status remain weak and cannot be derived from the VASARI protocol. Tumor-associated seizures are less common in TERT mutated glioblastomas. (orig.)

  3. Naturally occurring mutations in the human 5-lipoxygenase gene promoter that modify transcription factor binding and reporter gene transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    In, K H; Asano, K; Beier, D; Grobholz, J; Finn, P W; Silverman, E K; Silverman, E S; Collins, T; Fischer, A R; Keith, T P; Serino, K; Kim, S W; De Sanctis, G T; Yandava, C; Pillari, A; Rubin, P; Kemp, J; Israel, E; Busse, W; Ledford, D; Murray, J J; Segal, A; Tinkleman, D; Drazen, J M

    1997-03-01

    Five lipoxygenase (5-LO) is the first committed enzyme in the metabolic pathway leading to the synthesis of the leukotrienes. We examined genomic DNA isolated from 25 normal subjects and 31 patients with asthma (6 of whom had aspirin-sensitive asthma) for mutations in the known transcription factor binding regions and the protein encoding region of the 5-LO gene. A family of mutations in the G + C-rich transcription factor binding region was identified consisting of the deletion of one, deletion of two, or addition of one zinc finger (Sp1/Egr-1) binding sites in the region 176 to 147 bp upstream from the ATG translation start site where there are normally 5 Sp1 binding motifs in tandem. Reporter gene activity directed by any of the mutant forms of the transcription factor binding region was significantly (P < 0.05) less effective than the activity driven by the wild type transcription factor binding region. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs) demonstrated the capacity of wild type and mutant transcription factor binding regions to bind nuclear extracts from human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). These data are consistent with a family of mutations in the 5-LO gene that can modify reporter gene transcription possibly through differences in Sp1 and Egr-1 transactivation.

  4. Type II1 factors satisfying the spatial isomorphism conjecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cameron, Jan; Christensen, Erik; Sinclair, Allan M.

    2012-01-01

    Det vises at hvis et par af von Neumann algebraer er tilstrækkeligt tæt på hinanden i Hausdorff-metrikken, og den ene er en II1 faktor, som er et krydset produkt af en abelsk von Neumann algebra med en gruuppvirkning af en gruppe men triviel begrænset kohomologi, så er de to algebraer unitært...

  5. ICECREAM: randomised phase II study of cetuximab alone or in combination with irinotecan in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer with either KRAS, NRAS, BRAF and PI3KCA wild type, or G13D mutated tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segelov, Eva; Waring, Paul; Desai, Jayesh; Wilson, Kate; Gebski, Val

    2016-01-01

    Patients with metastatic colorectal cancer whose disease has progressed on oxaliplatin- and irinotecan-containing regimens may benefit from EGFR-inhibiting monoclonal antibodies if they do not contain mutations in the KRAS gene (are “wild type”). It is unknown whether these antibodies, such as cetuximab, are more efficacious in refractory metastatic colorectal cancer as monotherapy, or in combination with irinotecan. Lack of mutation in KRAS, BRAF and PIK3CA predicts response to EFGR-inhibitors. The ICECREAM trial examines the question of monotherapy versus combination with chemotherapy in two groups of patients: those with a “quadruple wild type” tumour genotype (no mutations in KRAS, NRAS, PI3KCA or BRAF genes) and those with the specific KRAS mutation in codon G13D, for whom possibly EGFR-inhibitor efficacy may be equivalent. ICECREAM is a randomised, phase II, open-label, controlled trial comparing the efficacy of cetuximab alone or with irinotecan in patients with “quadruple wild type” or G13D-mutated metastatic colorectal cancer, whose disease has progressed on, or who are intolerant of oxaliplatin- and fluoropyrimidine-based chemotherapy. The primary endpoint is the 6-month progression-free survival benefit of the treatment regimen. Secondary endpoints are response rate, overall survival, and quality of life. The tertiary endpoint is prediction of outcome with further biological markers. International collaboration has facilitated recruitment in this prospective trial of treatment in these infrequently found molecular subsets of colorectal cancer. This unique trial will yield prospective information on the efficacy of cetuximab and whether this is further enhanced with chemotherapy in two distinct populations of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer: the “quadruple wild type”, which may ‘superselect’ for tumours sensitive to EGFR-inhibition, and the rare KRAS G13D mutated tumours, which are also postulated to be sensitive to the drug

  6. KDF1, encoding keratinocyte differentiation factor 1, is mutated in a multigenerational family with ectodermal dysplasia

    KAUST Repository

    Shamseldin, Hanan E.; Khalifa, Ola; Binamer, Yousef M.; Almutawa, Abdulmonem; Arold, Stefan T.; Zaidan, Hamad; Alkuraya, Fowzan S.

    2016-01-01

    Ectodermal dysplasia is a highly heterogeneous group of disorders that variably affect the derivatives of the ectoderm, primarily skin, hair, nails and teeth. TP63, itself mutated in ectodermal dysplasia, links many other ectodermal dysplasia

  7. Effect of hepatocyte growth factor and angiotensin II on rat cardiomyocyte hypertrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Ai-Lan [Department of Cardiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou (China); Ou, Cai-Wen [The Fourth Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou (China); He, Zhao-Chu [Department of Cardiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou (China); Liu, Qi-Cai [Experimental Medical Research Center, Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou (China); Dong, Qi [Department of Physiology, Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou (China); Chen, Min-Sheng [Guangzhou Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Disease, Guangzhou Institute of Cardiovascular Disease, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou (China)

    2012-10-15

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) plays an important role in cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. The combined effect of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and Ang II on cardiomyocytes is unknown. The present study was designed to determine the effect of HGF on cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and to explore the combined effect of HGF and Ang II on cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. Primary cardiomyocytes were isolated from neonatal rat hearts and cultured in vitro. Cells were treated with Ang II (1 µM) alone, HGF (10 ng/mL) alone, and Ang II (1 µM) plus HGF (10 ng/mL) for 24, 48, and 72 h. The amount of [{sup 3}H]-leucine incorporation was then measured to evaluate protein synthesis. The mRNA levels of β-myosin heavy chain and atrial natriuretic factor were determined by real-time PCR to evaluate the presence of fetal phenotypes of gene expression. The cell size of cardiomyocytes was also studied. Ang II (1 µM) increased cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. Similar to Ang II, treatment with 1 µM HGF promoted cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. Moreover, the combination of 1 µM Ang II and 10 ng/mL HGF clearly induced a combined pro-hypertrophy effect on cardiomyocytes. The present study demonstrates for the first time a novel, combined effect of HGF and Ang II in promoting cardiomyocyte hypertrophy.

  8. Molecular genetic analysis of the F11 gene in 14 Turkish patients with factor XI deficiency: identification of novel and recurrent mutations and their inheritance within families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colakoglu, Seyma; Bayhan, Turan; Tavil, Betül; Keskin, Ebru Yılmaz; Cakir, Volkan; Gümrük, Fatma; Çetin, Mualla; Aytaç, Selin; Berber, Ergul

    2018-01-01

    Factor XI (FXI) deficiency is an autosomal bleeding disease associated with genetic defects in the F11 gene which cause decreased FXI levels or impaired FXI function. An increasing number of mutations has been reported in the FXI mutation database, most of which affect the serine protease domain of the protein. FXI is a heterogeneous disorder associated with a variable bleeding tendency and a variety of causative F11 gene mutations. The molecular basis of FXI deficiency in 14 patients from ten unrelated families in Turkey was analysed to establish genotype-phenotype correlations and inheritance of the mutations in the patients' families. Fourteen index cases with a diagnosis of FXI deficiency and family members of these patients were enrolled into the study. The patients' F11 genes were amplified by polymerase chain reaction and subjected to direct DNA sequencing analysis. The findings were analysed statistically using bivariate correlations, Pearson's correlation coefficient and the nonparametric Mann-Whitney test. Direct DNA sequencing analysis of the F11 genes revealed that all of the 14 patients had a F11 gene mutation. Eight different mutations were identified in the apple 1, apple 2 or serine protease domains, except one which was a splice site mutation. Six of the mutations were recurrent. Two of the mutations were novel missense mutations, p.Val522Gly and p.Cys581Arg, within the catalytic domain. The p.Trp519Stop mutation was observed in two families whereas all the other mutations were specific to a single family. Identification of mutations confirmed the genetic heterogeneity of FXI deficiency. Most of the patients with mutations did not have any bleeding complications, whereas some had severe bleeding symptoms. Genetic screening for F11 gene mutations is important to decrease the mortality and morbidity rate associated with FXI deficiency, which can be life-threatening if bleeding occurs in tissues with high fibrinolytic activity.

  9. Neurodevelopmental disease-associated de novo mutations and rare sequence variants affect TRIO GDP/GTP exchange factor activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katrancha, Sara M; Wu, Yi; Zhu, Minsheng; Eipper, Betty A; Koleske, Anthony J; Mains, Richard E

    2017-12-01

    Bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, autism and intellectual disability are complex neurodevelopmental disorders, debilitating millions of people. Therapeutic progress is limited by poor understanding of underlying molecular pathways. Using a targeted search, we identified an enrichment of de novo mutations in the gene encoding the 330-kDa triple functional domain (TRIO) protein associated with neurodevelopmental disorders. By generating multiple TRIO antibodies, we show that the smaller TRIO9 isoform is the major brain protein product, and its levels decrease after birth. TRIO9 contains two guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) domains with distinct specificities: GEF1 activates both Rac1 and RhoG; GEF2 activates RhoA. To understand the impact of disease-associated de novo mutations and other rare sequence variants on TRIO function, we utilized two FRET-based biosensors: a Rac1 biosensor to study mutations in TRIO (T)GEF1, and a RhoA biosensor to study mutations in TGEF2. We discovered that one autism-associated de novo mutation in TGEF1 (K1431M), at the TGEF1/Rac1 interface, markedly decreased its overall activity toward Rac1. A schizophrenia-associated rare sequence variant in TGEF1 (F1538Intron) was substantially less active, normalized to protein level and expressed poorly. Overall, mutations in TGEF1 decreased GEF1 activity toward Rac1. One bipolar disorder-associated rare variant (M2145T) in TGEF2 impaired inhibition by the TGEF2 pleckstrin-homology domain, resulting in dramatically increased TGEF2 activity. Overall, genetic damage to both TGEF domains altered TRIO catalytic activity, decreasing TGEF1 activity and increasing TGEF2 activity. Importantly, both GEF changes are expected to decrease neurite outgrowth, perhaps consistent with their association with neurodevelopmental disorders. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. A familial case of achondrogenesis type II caused by a dominant COL2A1 mutation and "patchy" expression in the mosaic father.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forzano, F; Lituania, M; Viassolo, A; Superti-Furga, V; Wildhardt, G; Zabel, B; Faravelli, F

    2007-12-01

    Achondrogenesis type II (ACG2) is the most severe disorder that can be produced by dominant mutations in COL2A1. We report on four pregnancies of an apparently healthy, nonconsanguineous young couple. The father had scoliosis as a child, and has slight body disproportion with short trunk. The first child was born at 32 weeks and died neonatally. In the second pregnancy, short limbs and fetal hygroma were noted on ultrasound at 17 weeks' gestation. Similar findings were observed in the third fetus. Clinical, radiological, and histological evaluation of the fetuses after termination of the pregnancies showed findings consistent with ACG2. Molecular analysis of genomic DNA extracted from amniotic cells of the second and third fetuses revealed heterozygosity for a 10370G > T missense mutation (G346V) in the COL2A1 gene. This mutation was also found in the father, as a mosaic. The couple had a fourth pregnancy, and at 11 weeks fetal hydrops with a septated cystic hygroma were obvious. DNA from CVS demonstrated the same COL2A1 mutation. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. Endonucleolysis in the turnover of insulin-like growth factor II mRNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, F C; Christiansen, Jan

    1992-01-01

    The overlapping transcription units constituting the rat insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) locus generate multiple mRNAs by using different promoters. Three promoters have been identified, giving rise to 4.6-, 3.8-, and 3.6-kilobase mRNAs. The latter, originating from promoter P3, is the most...

  12. Mutations in the coding regions of the hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 alpha in Iranian families with maturity onset diabetes of the young

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tavakolafshari Jalil

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α (HNF4α is a nuclear receptor involved in glucose homeostasis and is required for normal β cell function. Mutations in the HNF4α gene are associated with maturity onset diabetes of the young type 1 (MODY1. The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence and nature of mutations in HNF4α gene in Iranian patients with a clinical diagnosis of MODY and their family members. Twelve families including 30 patients with clinically MODY diagnosis and 21 members of their family were examined using PCR-RFLP method and in case of mutation confirmed by sequencing techniques. Fifty age and sex matched subjects with normal fasting blood sugar (FBS and Glucose tolerance test (GTT were constituted the control group and investigated in the similar pattern. Single mutation of V255M in the HNF4α gene was detected. This known mutation was found in 8 of 30 patients and 3 of 21 individuals in relatives. Fifty healthy control subjects did not show any mutation. Here, it is indicated that the prevalence of HNF4α mutation among Iranian patients with clinical MODY is considerable. This mutation was present in 26.6% of our patients, but nothing was found in control group. In the family members, 3 subjects with the age of ≤25 years old carried this mutation. Therefore, holding this mutation in this range of age could be a predisposing factor for developing diabetes in future.

  13. Neuroprotective Effect of Insulin-like Growth Factor-II on 1- Methyl-4 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tropical Journal of Pharmaceutical Research July 2015; 14 (7): 1191-1197 ... Abstract. Purpose: To evaluate the receptor-mediated neuroprotective effect of insulin-like growth factor-II (IGF- ... catecholamines, reduces levels of dopamine and.

  14. Waardenburg syndrome type II in a Chinese patient caused by a novel nonsense mutation in the SOX10 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jing; Zhang, Tie-Song; Lin, Ken; Sun, Hao; Jiang, Hong-Chao; Yang, Yan-Li; Low, Fan; Gao, Ying-Qin; Ruan, Biao

    2016-06-01

    Waardenburg syndrome is a congenital genetic disorder. It is the most common type of syndromic hearing impairment with highly genetic heterogeneity and proved to be related by 6 genes as follows: PAX3, MITF, SNAI2, EDN3, EDNRB and SOX10. This article aims to identify the genetic causes of a Chinese WS child patient. A Chinese WS child was collected for clinical data collection by questionnaire survey. DNA samples of proband and his parents were extracted from peripheral blood samples. Six candidate genes were sequenced by the Trusight One sequencing panel on the illumina NextSeq 500 platform. A novel nonsense heterozygous mutation was found in the coding region of exon 2 in the SOX10 gene of proband. The novel nonsense heterozygous mutation could cause the replacement of the 55th lysine codon by stop codon (484T > C, C142R) and further more possibly cause terminating the protein translation in advance. However, both proband's parents had no mutation of genes above mentioned. The gene mutation of SOX10 [NM_006941.3 c.163A > T] is a novel nonsense mutation. No record of this mutation has been found in dbSNP, HGMD, 1000 Genomes Project, ClinVar and ESP6500 databases. It meets the condition of PS2 of strong evidence in 2015 ACMG Standards and Guidelines. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Novel point mutations and mutational complexes in the enhancer II, core promoter and precore regions of hepatitis B virus genotype D1 associated with hepatocellular carcinoma in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Anis; Al Balwi, Mohammed A; Tanaka, Yasuhito; Hajeer, Ali; Sanai, Faisal M; Al Abdulkarim, Ibrahim; Al Ayyar, Latifah; Badri, Motasim; Saudi, Dib; Tamimi, Waleed; Mizokami, Masashi; Al Knawy, Bandar

    2013-12-15

    In this study, a cohort of 182 patients [55 hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and 127 non-HCC] infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV) in Saudi Arabia was investigated to study the relationship between sequence variation in the enhancer II (EnhII), basal core promoter (BCP) and precore regions of HBV genotype D (HBV/D) and the risk of HCC. HBV genotypes were determined by sequencing analysis and/or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Variations in the EnhII, BCP and precore regions were compared between 107 non-HCC and 45 HCC patients infected with HBV/D, followed by age-matched analysis of 40 cases versus equal number of controls. Age and male gender were significantly associated with HCC (p = 0.0001 and p = 0.03, respectively). Serological markers such as aspartate aminotransferase, albumin and anti-HBe were significantly associated with HCC (p = 0.0001 for all), whereas HBeAg positivity was associated with non-HCC (p = 0.0001). The most prevalent HBV genotype was HBV/D (94%), followed by HBV/E (4%), HBV/A (1.6%) and HBV/C (0.5%). For HBV/D1, genomic mutations associated with HCC were T1673/G1679, G1727, C1741, C1761, A1757/T1764/G1766, T1773, T1773/G1775 and C1909. Age- and gender-adjusted stepwise logistic regression analysis indicated that mutations G1727 [odds ratio (OR) = 18.3; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 2.8-118.4; p = 0.002], A1757/T1764/G1766 (OR = 4.7; 95% CI = 1.3-17.2; p = 0.01) and T1773 (OR = 14.06; 95% CI = 2.3-84.8; p = 0.004) are independent predictors of HCC development. These results implicate novel individual and combination patterns of mutations in the X/precore region of HBV/D1 as predictors of HCC. Risk stratification based on these mutation complexes would be useful in determining high-risk patients and improving diagnostic and treatment strategies for HBV/D1. Copyright © 2013 UICC.

  16. A novel nine base deletion mutation in NADH-cytochrome b5 reductase gene in an Indian family with recessive congenital methemoglobinemia-type-II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant Warang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Recessive hereditary methemoglobinemia (RCM associated with severe neurological abnormalities is a very rare disorder caused by NADH- cytochrome b5 reductase (cb5r deficiency (Type II. We report a case of 11 month old male child who had severe mental retardation, microcephaly and gross global developmental delay with methemoglobin level of 61.1%. The diagnosis of NADH-CYB5R3 deficiency was made by the demonstration of significantly reduced NADH-CYB5R3 activity in the patient and intermediate enzyme activity in both the parents. Mutation analysis of the CYB5R gene revealed a novel nine nucleotide deletion in exon 6 leading to the elimination of 3 amino acid residues (Lys173, Ser174 and Val 175. To confirm that this mutation was not an artifact, we performed PCR-RFLP analysis using the restriction enzyme Drd I. As the normal sequence has a restriction recognition site for Drd I which was eliminated by the deletion, a single band of 603-bp was seen in the presence of the homozygous mutation. Molecular modeling analysis showed a significant effect of these 3 amino acids deletion on the protein structure and stability leading to a severe clinical presentation. A novel homozygous 9 nucleotide deletion (p.K173–p.V175del3 is shown to be segregated with the disease in this family. Knowing the profile of mutations would allow us to offer prenatal diagnosis in families with severe neurological disorders associated with RCM — Type II.

  17. Development of human factors design review guidelines(II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jung Woon; Oh, In Suk; Suh, Sang Moon; Lee, Hyun Chul [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1998-06-01

    The objective of this study is to develop human factors engineering program review guidelines and alarm system review guidelines in order to resolve the two major technical issues: 25. Human Factors Engineering Program Review Model and 26. Review Criteria for Human Factors Aspects of Advanced Controls and Instrumentation, which are related to the development of human factors safety regulation guides being performed by KINS. For the development of human factors program review guidelines, we made a Korean version of NUREG-0711 and added our comments by considering Korean regulatory situation and reviewing the reference documents of NUREG-0711. We also computerized the Korean version of NUREG-0711, additional comments, and selected portion of the reference documents for the developer of safety regulation guides in KINS to see the contents comparatively at a glance and use them easily. For the development of alarm system review guidelines, we made a Korean version of NUREG/CR-6105, which was published by NRC in 1994 as a guideline document for the human factors review of alarm systems. Then we will update the guidelines by reviewing the literature related to alarm design published after 1994. (author). 11 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Development of human factors design review guidelines(II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jung Woon; Oh, In Suk; Suh, Sang Moon; Lee, Hyun Chul

    1998-06-01

    The objective of this study is to develop human factors engineering program review guidelines and alarm system review guidelines in order to resolve the two major technical issues: '25, human factors engineering program review model' and '26, review criteria for human factors aspects of advanced controls and instrumentation', which are related to the development of human factors safety regulation guides being performed by KINS. For the development of human factors program review guidelines, we made a Korean version of NUREG-0711 and added our comments by considering Korean regulatory situation and reviewing the reference documents NUREG--0711, additional comments, and selected portion of the reference documents for the developer of safety regulation guides in KINS to see the contents comparatively at a glance and use them easily. For the development of alarm system review guides in KINS to see the contents comparatively at a glance and use them easily. For the development of alarm system review guidelines, we made a Korean version of NUREG/CR-6105, which was published by NRC in 1994 as a guideline document for the human factors review of alarm system. Then we will update the guidelines by reviewing the literature related to alarm design published after 1994

  19. An RNA-splicing mutation (G{sup +51VS20}) in the Type II collagen gene (COL2A1) in a family with spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiller, G.E.; Polumbo, P.A. [Vanderbilt Univ. School of Medicine, Nashville, TN (United States); Weis, M.A.; Eyre, D.R. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Gruber, H.E.; Rimoin, D.L.; Cohn, D.H. [Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States)]|[Univ. of California School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1995-02-01

    Defects in type II collagen have been demonstrated in a phenotypic continuum of chondrodysplasias that includes achondrogenesis II, hypochondrogenesis, spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita (SEDC), Kniest dysplasia, and Stickler syndrome. We have determined that cartilage from a terminated fetus with an inherited form of SEDC contained both normal {alpha}1(II) collagen chains and chains that lacked amino acids 256-273 of the triple-helical domain. PCR amplification of this region of COL2A1, from genomic DNA, yielded products of normal size, while amplification of cDNA yielded a normal sized species and a shorter fragment missing exon 20. Sequence analysis of genomic DNA from the fetus revealed a G{yields}T transversion at position +5 of intron 20; the affected father was also heterozygous for the mutation. Allele-specific PCR and heteroduplex analysis of a VNTR in COL2A1 independently confirmed the unaffected status of a fetus in a subsequent pregnancy. Thermodynamic calculations suggest that the mutation prevents normal splicing of exon 20 by interfering with binding of U{sub 1} small-nuclear RNA to pre-mRNA, thus leading to skipping of exon 20 in transcripts from the mutant allele. Electron micrographs of diseased cartilage showed intracellular inclusion bodies, which were stained by an antibody to {alpha}1(II) procollagen. Our findings support the hypothesis that {alpha}-chain length alterations that preserve the Gly-X-Y repeat motif of the triple helix result in partial intracellular retention of {alpha}1(II) procollagen and produce mild to moderate chondrodysplasia phenotypes. 50 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Impact of active smoking on survival of patients with metastatic lung adenocarcinoma harboring an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bulent Erdogan

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer in smokers and non-smokers demonstrates distinct genetic profiles, and cigarette smoking affects epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR function and causes secondary EGFR tyrosine kinase resistance. We evaluated the effect of active smoking in patients with metastatic lung adenocarcinoma. A total of 132 metastatic lung adenocarcinoma patients, diagnosed between 2008 and 2013, with known EGFR mutation status, were evaluated retrospectively. Among these patients, 40 had an activating EGFR mutation. Patients who continued smoking during the treatment were defined as active smokers. Former smokers and never smokers were together defined as non-smokers. The outcomes of the treatment in relation to the EGFR mutation and smoking status were evaluated. The median follow-up time was 10.5 months. The overall response rate for the first-line therapy was significantly higher among the EGFR-mutant patients (p = 0.01, however, smoking status had no impact on the response rate (p = 0.1. The EGFR-mutant active smokers progressed earlier than the non-smokers (p < 0.01. The overall survival (OS of the non-smokers and patients treated with erlotinib was significantly longer (p = 0.02 and p = 0.01, respectively. Smoking status did not affect the OS in EGFR wild type tumors (p = 0.49 but EGFR-mutant non-smokers had a longer OS than the active smokers (p = 0.01.The active smokers treated with erlotinib had poorer survival than the non-smokers (p = 0.03. Multivariate analysis of EGFR-mutant patients showed that erlotinib treatment at any line and non-smoking were independent prognostic factors for the OS (p = 0.04 and p = 0.01, respectively. Smoking during treatment is a negative prognostic factor in metastatic lung adenocarcinoma with an EGFR mutation.

  1. Impact of active smoking on survival of patients with metastatic lung adenocarcinoma harboring an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdogan, Bulent; Kodaz, Hilmi; Karabulut, Senem; Cinkaya, Ahmet; Tozkir, Hilmi; Tanriverdi, Ozgur; Cabuk, Devrim; Hacioglu, Muhammed Bekir; Turkmen, Esma; Hacibekiroglu, Ilhan; Uzunoglu, Sernaz; Cicin, Irfan

    2016-11-10

    Lung cancer in smokers and non-smokers demonstrates distinct genetic profiles, and cigarette smoking affects epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) function and causes secondary EGFR tyrosine kinase resistance. We evaluated the effect of active smoking in patients with metastatic lung adenocarcinoma. A total of 132 metastatic lung adenocarcinoma patients, diagnosed between 2008 and 2013, with known EGFR mutation status, were evaluated retrospectively. Among these patients, 40 had an activating EGFR mutation. Patients who continued smoking during the treatment were defined as active smokers. Former smokers and never smokers were together defined as non-smokers. The outcomes of the treatment in relation to the EGFR mutation and smoking status were evaluated. The median follow-up time was 10.5 months. The overall response rate for the first-line therapy was significantly higher among the EGFR-mutant patients (p = 0.01), however, smoking status had no impact on the response rate (p = 0.1). The EGFR-mutant active smokers progressed earlier than the non-smokers (p non-smokers and patients treated with erlotinib was significantly longer (p = 0.02 and p = 0.01, respectively). Smoking status did not affect the OS in EGFR wild type tumors (p = 0.49) but EGFR-mutant non-smokers had a longer OS than the active smokers (p = 0.01).The active smokers treated with erlotinib had poorer survival than the non-smokers (p = 0.03). Multivariate analysis of EGFR-mutant patients showed that erlotinib treatment at any line and non-smoking were independent prognostic factors for the OS (p = 0.04 and p = 0.01, respectively). Smoking during treatment is a negative prognostic factor in metastatic lung adenocarcinoma with an EGFR mutation.

  2. Krüppel-like factor 1 mutations and expression of hemoglobins F and A2 in homozygous hemoglobin E syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tepakhan, Wanicha; Yamsri, Supawadee; Fucharoen, Goonnapa; Sanchaisuriya, Kanokwan; Fucharoen, Supan

    2015-07-01

    The basis for variability of hemoglobin (Hb) F in homozygous Hb E disease is not well understood. We have examined multiple mutations of the Krüppel-like factor 1 (KLF1) gene; an erythroid specific transcription factor and determined their associations with Hbs F and A2 expression in homozygous Hb E. Four KLF1 mutations including G176AfsX179, T334R, R238H, and -154 (C-T) were screened using specific PCR assays on 461 subjects with homozygous Hb E and 100 normal controls. None of these four mutations were observed in 100 normal controls. Among 461 subjects with homozygous Hb E, 306 had high (≥5 %) and 155 had low (<5 %) Hb F. DNA analysis identified the KLF1 mutations in 35 cases of the former group with high Hb F, including the G176AfsX179 mutation (17/306 = 5.6 %), T334R mutation (9/306 = 2.9 %), -154 (C-T) mutation (7/306 = 2.3 %), and R328H mutation (2/306 = 0.7 %). Only two subjects in the latter group with low Hb F carried the G176AfsX179 and -154 (C-T) mutations. Significant higher Hb A2 level was observed in those of homozygous Hb E with the G176AfsX179 mutation as compared to those without KLF1 mutations. These results indicate that KLF1 is among the genetic factors associated with increased Hbs F and A2, and in combination with other factors could explain the variabilities of these Hb expression in Hb E syndrome.

  3. Use of CT-guided fine needle aspiration biopsy in epidermal growth factor receptor mutation analysis in patients with advanced lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhuang, Yi-Ping; Wang, Hai-Yan; Zhang, Jin; Feng, Yong (Dept. of Radiology, Jiangsu Cancer Inst. and Hospital, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China)), email: yipingzhuang2010@sina.com; Shi, Mei-Qi (Dept. of Chemotherapy, Jiangsu Cancer Inst. and Hospital, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China))

    2011-12-15

    Background. The safety of using a cutting needle when performing a core-needle biopsy is of major concern, in particular for small lung tumors or tumors near the hilum. Purpose. To investigate the usefulness of CT-guided fine needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) of the lung in obtaining tumor tissue for epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation analysis in advanced lung cancer patients. Material and Methods. Forty-three patients with stage IIIB-IV lung cancer were enrolled. In all patients, CT-guided FNAB was performed using an 18-gauge or 20-gauge Chiba aspiration needle for histology diagnosis and EGFR mutation analysis. Complications associated with CT-guided FNAB were observed, and the specimen mutational assessments were recorded. Results. The obtained tumor samples ranged from 0.5-1.5 cm in length and were adequate for histological and DNA analyses in all patients. No patient had a pneumothorax or hemoptysis. Minor needle tract bleeding appeared in eight patients. Mutation analysis was satisfactorily demonstrated in 23 mutations and 20 non-mutations. Ten and 13 mutations were identified by 18-gauge and 20-gauge needle biopsies, respectively. EFGR mutations, including 12 cases of EGFR exon 19 deletion and 11 cases of exon 21 point mutation, were present in 21 patients with adenocarcinomas, one with squamous cell carcinoma, and one with undifferentiated carcinoma. Conclusion. CT-guided FNAB is a feasible and safe technique for obtaining lung tumor tissues for EGFR gene mutation analysis

  4. International preferences for pork appearance: II. Factors influencing consumer choice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ngapo, T.M.; Martin, J.F.; Dransfield, E.

    2007-01-01

    The preference for pork varying in its fat cover, lean colour, marbling and drip differs among countries, but the influence of socio-demographic factors is unknown. In this study of 11,717 consumers from 22 countries, more than 80% of consumers liked pork, thought that pork quality was at least

  5. Fixation effect of SurePath preservative fluids using epidermal growth factor receptor mutation-specific antibodies for immunocytochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawahara, Akihiko; Taira, Tomoki; Abe, Hideyuki; Watari, Kosuke; Murakami, Yuichi; Fukumitsu, Chihiro; Takase, Yorihiko; Yamaguchi, Tomohiko; Azuma, Koichi; Akiba, Jun; Ono, Mayumi; Kage, Masayoshi

    2014-02-01

    Cytological diagnosis of respiratory disease has become important, not only for histological typing using immunocytochemistry (ICC) but also for molecular DNA analysis of cytological material. The aim of this study was to investigate the fixation effect of SurePath preservative fluids. Human lung cancer PC9 and 11-18 cell lines, and lung adenocarcinoma cells in pleural effusion, were fixed in CytoRich Blue, CytoRich Red, 15% neutral-buffered formalin, and 95% ethanol, respectively. PC9 and 11-18 cell lines were examined by ICC with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation-specific antibodies, the EGFR mutation DNA assay, and fluorescence in situ hybridization. The effect of antigenic storage time was investigated in lung adenocarcinoma cells in pleural effusion by ICC using the lung cancer detection markers. PC9 and 11-18 cell lines in formalin-based fixatives showed strong staining of EGFR mutation-specific antibodies and lung cancer detection markers by ICC as compared with ethanol-based fixatives. DNA preservation with CytoRich Blue and CytoRich Red was superior to that achieved with 95% ethanol and 15% neutral-buffered formalin fixatives, whereas EGFR mutations by DNA assay and EGFR gene amplification by fluorescence in situ hybridization were successfully identified in all fixative samples. Although cytoplasmic antigens maintained high expression levels, expression levels in nuclear antigens fell as storage time increased. These results indicate that CytoRich Red is not only suitable for ICC with EGFR mutation-specific antibodies, but also for DNA analysis of cytological material, and is useful in molecular testing of lung cancer, for which various types of analyses will be needed in future. © 2013 American Cancer Society.

  6. Direct demonstration of rapid insulin-like growth factor II receptor internalization and recycling in rat adipocytes. Insulin stimulates 125I-insulin-like growth factor II degradation by modulating the IGF-II receptor recycling process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oka, Y.; Rozek, L.M.; Czech, M.P.

    1985-01-01

    The photoactive insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-II analogue 4-azidobenzoyl- 125 I-IGF-II was synthesized and used to label specifically and covalently the Mr = 250,000 Type II IGF receptor. When rat adipocytes are irradiated after a 10-min incubation with 4-azidobenzoyl- 125 I-IGF-II at 10 degrees C and immediately homogenized, most of the labeled IGF-II receptors are associated with the plasma membrane fraction, indicating that receptors accessible to the labeling reagent at low temperature are on the cell surface. However, when the photolabeled cells are incubated at 37 degrees C for various times before homogenization, labeled IGF-II receptors are rapidly internalized with a half-time of 3.5 min as evidenced by a loss from the plasma membrane fraction and a concomitant appearance in the low density microsome fraction. The steady state level of cell surface IGF-II receptors in the presence or absence of IGF-II remains constant under these conditions, demonstrating that IGF-II receptors rapidly recycle back to the cell surface at the same rate as receptor internalization. Using the above methodology, it is shown that acute insulin action: 1) increases the steady state number of cell surface IGF-II receptors; 2) increases the number of ligand-bound IGF-II receptors that are internalized per unit of time; and 3) increases the rate of cellular 125 I-IGF-II degradation by a process that is blocked by anti-IGF-II receptor antibody

  7. Frequency of epidermal growth factor receptor mutations in Jordanian lung adenocarcinoma patients at diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natheir Obeidat

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: The present study revealed that the EGFR mutations rate in Jordanian patients with adenocarcinoma of the lung was higher than in African-American, and some white Caucasian patients, and was lower than in patients in East Asia, and other countries of South Asia.

  8. Reproductive and hormonal factors, and ovarian cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antoniou, Antonis C; Rookus, Matti; Andrieu, Nadine

    2009-01-01

    carriers seemed to be greater among more recent users. Tubal ligation was associated with a reduced risk of ovarian cancer for BRCA1 carriers (hazard ratio, 0.42; 95% confidence intervals, 0.22-0.80; P = 0.008). The number of ovarian cancer cases in BRCA2 mutation carriers was too small to draw definitive...

  9. Haemochromatosis gene mutation H63D is a risk factor for iron ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Iron overload is the main cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with β-thalassemia. The Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of genetic markers (HFE mutations C282Y and H63D) among Egyptian β-thalassemic. Children and its effect on their iron status. Patients and Methods: 59 ...

  10. Prevalence and factors associated with darunavir resistance mutations in multi-experienced HIV-1-infected patients failing other protease inhibitors in a referral teaching center in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose E Vidal

    Full Text Available Information about resistance profile of darunavir (DRV is scarce in Brazil. Our objectives were to estimate the prevalence of DRV resistance mutations in patients failing protease inhibitors (PI and to identify factors associated with having more DRV resistance mutations. All HIV-infected patients failing PI-based regimens with genotyping performed between 2007 and 2008 in a referral teaching center in São Paulo, Brazil, were included. DRV-specific resistance mutations listed by December 2008 IAS-USA panel update were considered. Two Poisson regression models were constructed to assess factors related to the presence of more DRV resistance mutations. A total of 171 HIV-infected patients with available genotyping were included. The number of patients with lopinavir, saquinavir, and amprenavir used in previous regimen were 130 (76%, 83 (49%, and 35 (20%, respectively. The prevalence of major DRV resistance mutations was 50V: 5%; 54M: 1%; 76V: 4%; 84V: 15%. For minor mutations, the rates were 11I: 3%; 32I: 7%; 33F: 23%; 47V: 6%; 54L: 6%; 74P: 3%; 89V: 6%. Only 11 (6% of the genotypes had > 3 DRV resistance mutations. In the clinical model, time of HIV infection of > 10 years and use of amprenavir were independently associated with having more DRV resistance mutations. In the genotyping-based model, only total number of PI resistance mutations was associated with our outcome. In conclusion, the prevalence of DRV mutations was low. Time of HIV infection, use of amprenavir and total number of PI resistance mutations were associated with having more DRV mutations.

  11. Analysis of P gene mutations in patients with type II (tyrosinase-positive) oculocutaneous albinism (OCA2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S.T.; Nicholls, R.D.; Schnur, R. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)]|[Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States)]|[Children`s Hospital of Philadelphia, PA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    OCA2 is an autosomal recessive disorder in which the biosynthesis of melanin pigment is greatly reduced in the skin, hair, and eyes. Recently, we showed that OCA2 results from mutations of the P gene, in chromosome segment 15q11-q13. In addition to OCA2, mutations of P account for OCA associated with the Prader-Willi syndrome and some cases of {open_quotes}autosomal recessive ocular albinism{close_quotes} (AROA). We have now studied 38 unrelated patients with various forms of OCA2 or AROA from a variety of different ethnic groups. None of these patients had detectable abnormalities of the tyrosinase (TYR) gene. Among 8 African-American patients with OCA2 we observed apparent locus homogeneity. We detected abnormalities of the P gene in all 8 patients, including 12 different mutations and deletions, most of which are unique to this group and none of which is predominant. In contrast, OCA2 in other populations appears to be genetically heterogeneous. Among 21 Caucasian patients we detected abnormalities of the P gene in only 8, comprising 9 different point mutations and deletions, some of which also occurred among the African-American patients. Among 3 Middle-Eastern, 3 Indo-Pakistani, and 3 Asian patients we detected mutations of the P gene in only one from each group. In a large Indo-Pakistani kindred with OCA2 we have excluded both the TYR and P genes on the basis of genetic linkage. The prevalence of mutations of the P gene thus appears to be much higher among African-Americans with OCA2 than among patients from other ethnic groups. The incidence of OCA2 in some parts of equatorial Africa is extremely high, as frequent as 1 per 1100, and the disease has been linked to P in South African Bantu. The eventual characterization of P gene mutations in Africans will be informative with regard to the origins of P gene mutations in African-American patients.

  12. Differential functional readthrough over homozygous nonsense mutations contributes to the bleeding phenotype in coagulation factor VII deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branchini, A; Ferrarese, M; Lombardi, S; Mari, R; Bernardi, F; Pinotti, M

    2016-10-01

    Essentials Potentially null homozygous Factor(F)7 nonsense mutations are associated to variable bleeding symptoms. Readthrough of p.Ser112X (life-threatening) and p.Cys132X (moderate) stop codons was investigated. Readthrough-mediated insertion of wild-type or tolerated residues produce functional proteins. Functional readthrough over homozygous F7 nonsense mutations contributes to the bleeding phenotype. Background Whereas the rare homozygous nonsense mutations causing factor (F)VII deficiency may predict null conditions that are almost completely incompatible with life, they are associated with appreciable differences in hemorrhagic symptoms. The misrecognition of premature stop codons (readthrough) may account for variable levels of functional full-length proteins. Objectives To experimentally evaluate the basal and drug-induced levels of FVII resulting from the homozygous p.Cys132X and p.Ser112X nonsense mutations that are associated with moderate (132X) or life-threatening (112X) symptoms, and that are predicted to undergo readthrough with (132X) or without (112X) production of wild-type FVII. Methods We transiently expressed recombinant FVII (rFVII) nonsense and missense variants in human embryonic kidney 293 cells, and evaluated secreted FVII protein and functional levels by ELISA, activated FX generation, and coagulation assays. Results The levels of functional FVII produced by p.Cys132X and p.Ser112X mutants (rFVII-132X, 1.1% ± 0.2% of wild-type rFVII; rFVII-112X, 0.5% ± 0.1% of wild-type rFVII) were compatible with the occurrence of spontaneous readthrough, which was magnified by the addition of G418 - up to 12% of the wild-type value for the rFVII-132X nonsense variant. The predicted missense variants arising from readthrough abolished (rFVII-132Trp/Arg) or reduced (rFVII-112Trp/Cys/Arg, 22-45% of wild-type levels) secretion and function. These data suggest that the appreciable rescue of p.Cys132X function was driven by reinsertion of the wild

  13. A retrospective study to rule out possible association of genetic and non-genetic risk factors with specific brca mutation positive breast cancers is some Pakistani females

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malik, S.; Imran, M.; Hanif, A.; Bilal, M.

    2009-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy among Asian women including Pakistan where recurrent mutations among certain sub-ethnic groups predisposing to breast cancer have recently been established. Study Design: The current retrospective study involves identification of genetic and non-genetic risk factors in 27 specific mutation positive females out of a. total of 100 females diagnosed with breast cancer, representing a sample from the Punjabi ethnic population of the city of Lahore. The study has been carried out by telephonic communication with the mutation positive patients or their relatives. Results: Out of the total 27% patients positive for specific BRCA mutations, 23% were positive for BRCAI mutations and 4% for BRCA2. Among a total of 100 breast cancer patients the BRCAI-IVS14, lG>A mutation was identified in 5 Punjabi ethnic females with Rajput sub ethnicity, BRCAI-3889delAG in 10 (8 with Mughal and 2 with Khan sub ethnicity), BRCAI-2080insA in 8 (Rajput sub ethnics) and BRCA2-3337C>T in 4 (Minhas sub ethnic) subjects. Two BRCAI mutations, namely 3889delAG and 2080insA were found to coexist in only one study case (with Mughal sub ethnicity). All the mutation positive breast cancers had unilateral ductal carcinoma. Of the 23 cases positive for screened BRCAI mutations, 17 were diagnosed for breast cancer at a relatively early age (age<40) and 6 were diagnosed at late age (age<41) whereas all cases positive for single BRCA2 mutation under consideration were diagnosed at late age. Furthermore, 24 of 27 patients with specific BRCA mutations had a positive family history of breast cancer. The high prevalence of the screened BRCA mutations in certain Punjabi sub-ethnicities indicates the importance of counseling. It is suggested that consanguinity may be a risk factor for recurrent population specific mutations. Hormonal factors including use of oral contraceptives, polycystic ovaries, central obesity, nulliparity, late age at first pregnancy, lack of

  14. Determination of serum insulinlike growth factor II levels in coronary heart disease patient and its significance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Bifu; Ji Naijun; Mei Yibin; Wang Chengyao; Zhao Junfei; Guan Lihua; Gao Meiying; Li Jiangao

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To explore the changes and clinical significance of serum insulinlike growth factor II (IGF II) levels in coronary heart disease (CHD) patients. Methods: The serum IGF II levels were determined by radioimmunoassay in 68 patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) and 30 controls with only mild non-cardiac diseases. Results: Compared with the controls, the serum IGF II level in CHD patients were increased significantly (0.66 ± 0.13 μg/L vs 0.51 ± 0.11 μg/L; t = 5.506, p 0.05). Level in patients dies in hospital (n = 9) were much higher than those in patients recovered (n = 59) (t = 2.402, p < 0.05). Conclusion: Serum IGF II levels seems to be related to the seriousness of CHD; the actual mechanism remains to be defined

  15. Factor VIII S373L: mutation at P1' site confers thrombin cleavage resistance, causing mild haemophilia A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, D J; Pemberton, S; Acquila, M; Mori, P G; Tuddenham, E G; O'Brien, D P

    1994-04-01

    A novel CRM+ mutation, factor VIII position 373 serine to leucine substitution (FVIII 373-Leu) was identified during a survey of Factor VIII (FVIII) mutations. We have purified the variant protein from the patient's plasma in order to allow further characterisation of the molecule. The CRM+ plasma contained 120% Factor VIII antigen (FVIII:Ag) and 6% Factor VIII coagulant activity (FVIII:C). After purification the mutant FVIII was subjected to thrombin proteolysis, and was thereby activated 5.6-fold compared with 7-fold for wild type molecule. Subsequently, spontaneous inactivation of the mutant was much slower than noted for wild type FVIII. Western blot analysis using monoclonal antibodies demonstrated that thrombin cleavage of FVIII 373-Leu at positions 740 and 1689 were normal but that cleavage at position 372 was completely absent. Crystallographic coordinates of the active site of thrombin complexed to fibrinopeptide A were used to explore possible mechanistic reasons for the failure of thrombin to cleave the mutant FVIII at position 372. Steric hindrance between the mutant side chain and the side chain of the P1 residue was apparent. We conclude that the functional defect of FVIII 373-Leu results from the inability of thrombin to cleave the mutant at position 372-373, and propose that this is due to steric hindrance by the side chain of leucine 373, preventing correct formation of the enzyme substrate complex.

  16. Discordance of Mutation Statuses of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor and K-ras between Primary Adenocarcinoma of Lung and Brain Metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun-Ming Rau

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Mutations on epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR of adenocarcinomas of lung have been found to be associated with increased sensitivity to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors and K-ras mutations may correlate with primary resistance. We aimed to explore the discordant mutation statuses of EGFR and K-ras between primary tumors and matched brain metastases in adenocarcinomas of lung. We used a sensitive Scorpion ARMS method to analyze EGFR mutation, and Sanger sequencing followed by allele-specific real-time polymerase chain reaction to analyze K-ras mutation. Forty-nine paired tissues with both primary adenocarcinoma of lung and matched brain metastasis were collected. Thirteen patients (26.5% were discordant for the status of EGFR between primary and metastatic sites. K-ras gene could be checked in paired specimens from 33 patients, thirteen patients (39.6% were discordant for the status of K-ras. In primary lung adenocarcinoma, there were 14 patients of mutant EGFR had mutant K-ras synchronously. This study revealed that the status of EGFR mutation in lung adenocarcinomas is relatively consistent between primary and metastatic sites compared to K-ras mutation. However, there are still a few cases of adenocarcinoma of lung showing discordance for the status of EGFR mutation. Repeated analysis of EGFR mutation is highly recommended if tissue from metastatic or recurrent site is available for the evaluation of target therapy.

  17. An engineered tale-transcription factor rescues transcription of factor VII impaired by promoter mutations and enhances its endogenous expression in hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbon, Elena; Pignani, Silvia; Branchini, Alessio; Bernardi, Francesco; Pinotti, Mirko; Bovolenta, Matteo

    2016-06-24

    Tailored approaches to restore defective transcription responsible for severe diseases have been poorly explored. We tested transcription activator-like effectors fused to an activation domain (TALE-TFs) in a coagulation factor VII (FVII) deficiency model. In this model, the deficiency is caused by the -94C > G or -61T > G mutation, which abrogate the binding of Sp1 or HNF-4 transcription factors. Reporter assays in hepatoma HepG2 cells naturally expressing FVII identified a single TALE-TF (TF4) that, by targeting the region between mutations, specifically trans-activated both the variant (>100-fold) and wild-type (20-40-fold) F7 promoters. Importantly, in the genomic context of transfected HepG2 and transduced primary hepatocytes, TF4 increased F7 mRNA and protein levels (2- to 3-fold) without detectable off-target effects, even for the homologous F10 gene. The ectopic F7 expression in renal HEK293 cells was modestly affected by TF4 or by TALE-TF combinations. These results provide experimental evidence for TALE-TFs as gene-specific tools useful to counteract disease-causing promoter mutations.

  18. Insulin-like growth factor II (IGF II) in human brain: regional distribution of IGF II and of higher molecular mass forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haselbacher, G.K.; Schwab, M.E.; Pasi, A.; Humbel, R.E.

    1985-01-01

    Twenty-four distinct areas of human brain were analyzed for the presence of insulin-like growth factor (IGF). As reported for cerebrospinal fluid, only IGF II-like immunoreactivity, but no significant amounts of IGF I-like immunoreactivity, could be found. Upon gel permeation chromatography, two to five distinct size classes were separated on the basis of their immunoreactivity. Radioimmunoassays and a bioassay also gave results indistinguishable from those of serum IGF II. The highest amounts of IGF II-like immunoreactivity occur in the anterior pituitary. This is up to 100 times more than in most other brain regions analyzed. The higher molecular mass immunoreactive species were partially characterized. After immunoaffinity purification, the 38- and 26-kDa species are active in a bioassay. Specific IGF-binding protein activity could be shown after purification of the 38- and 26-kDa species on an IGF-affinity column. The 13-kDa species released significant amounts of 7.5-kDa material. The results are interpreted as evidence for the presence of IGF II synthesized locally in human brain

  19. Specific, high affinity receptors for insulin-like growth factor II in the rat kidney glomerulus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haskell, J.F.; Pillion, D.J.; Meezan, E.

    1988-01-01

    Rat renal glomeruli were isolated by a technique involving kidney perfusion with a solution containing magnetic iron oxide particles, followed by homogenization, sieving, and concentration over a strong magnet. Isolated glomeruli were treated with 1% Triton X-100 to solubilize plasma membrane components, while insoluble basement membrane components were removed by centrifugation. [ 125 I]Insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) binding to this preparation was competitively inhibited by increasing amounts of unlabeled IGF-II, with 50% inhibition at an IGF-II concentration of 1 ng/ml. [ 125 I]IGF-II was covalently cross-linked with disuccinimidyl suberate to its receptor in rat renal glomeruli and a specific high mol wt (255,000) band could be identified on autoradiograms of dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels. [ 125 I]IGF-II binding and cross-linking to this band was inhibited by a polyclonal antibody against the type II IGF receptor. These results demonstrate for the first time that the isolated rat renal glomerulus contains a high affinity receptor for IGF-II

  20. Rapid and Simple Detection of Hot Spot Point Mutations of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor, BRAF, and NRAS in Cancers Using the Loop-Hybrid Mobility Shift Assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsukuma, Shoichi; Yoshihara, Mitsuyo; Kasai, Fumio; Kato, Akinori; Yoshida, Akira; Akaike, Makoto; Kobayashi, Osamu; Nakayama, Haruhiko; Sakuma, Yuji; Yoshida, Tsutomu; Kameda, Yoichi; Tsuchiya, Eiju; Miyagi, Yohei

    2006-01-01

    A simple and rapid method to detect the epidermal growth factor receptor hot spot mutation L858R in lung adenocarcinoma was developed based on principles similar to the universal heteroduplex generator technology. A single-stranded oligonucleotide with an internal deletion was used to generate heteroduplexes (loop-hybrids) bearing a loop in the complementary strand derived from the polymerase chain reaction product of the normal or mutant allele. By placing deletion in the oligonucleotide adjacent to the mutational site, difference in electrophoretic mobility between loop-hybrids with normal and mutated DNA was distinguishable in a native polyacrylamide gel. The method was also modified to detect in-frame deletion mutations of epidermal growth factor receptor in lung adenocarcinomas. In addition, the method was adapted to detect hot spot mutations in the B-type Raf kinase (BRAF) at V600 and in a Ras-oncogene (NRAS) at Q61, the mutations commonly found in thyroid carcinomas. Our mutation detection system, designated the loop-hybrid mobility shift assay was sensitive enough to detect mutant DNA comprising 7.5% of the total DNA. As a simple and straightforward mutation detection technique, loop-hybrid mobility shift assay may be useful for the molecular diagnosis of certain types of clinical cancers. Other applications are also discussed. PMID:16931592

  1. Novel mutation identified in severe early-onset tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakrishna, Suhas M; Grimm, Amy; Broderick, Lori

    2017-04-20

    Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor-Associated Periodic Syndrome (TRAPS) is the second most common heritable autoinflammatory disease, typically presenting in pre-school aged children with fever episodes lasting 1-3 weeks. Systemic symptoms can include rash, myalgia, ocular inflammation, and serositis. Here we report an unusual presentation of TRAPS in a 7 month old girl who presented with only persistent fever. She was initially diagnosed with incomplete Kawasaki Disease and received IVIG and infliximab; however, her fevers quickly recurred. Subsequent testing revealed a urinary tract infection, but she did not improve despite appropriate therapy. As fever continued, she developed significant abdominal distension with imaging concerning for appendicitis, followed by hyperthermia and hemodynamic instability. Given her protracted clinical course and maternal history of a poorly defined inflammatory condition, an autoinflammatory disease was considered. Therapy with anakinra was initiated, resulting in rapid resolution of fever and normalization of inflammatory markers. She was found to have a previously unreported mutation, Thr90Pro, in the TNFRSF1A gene associated with TRAPS. This novel mutation was also confirmed in the patient's mother and maternal uncle. This report reviews a severe case of TRAPS in infancy associated with a novel mutation, Thr90Pro, in the TNFRSF1A gene, and emphasizes that autoinflammatory disease should be considered in the differential of infants with fever of unknown origin.

  2. Identification and Genetic Analysis of a Factor IX Gene Intron 3 Mutation in a Hemophilia B Pedigree in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Hua Cao

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Hemophilia B is caused by coagulation defects in the factor IX gene located in Xq27.1 on the X chromosome. A wide range of mutations, showing extensive molecular heterogeneity, have been described in hemophilia B patients. Our study was aimed at genetic analysis and prenatal diagnosis of hemophilia B in order to further elucidate the pathogenesis of the hemophilia B pedigree in China. METHODS: Polymerase chain reaction amplification and direct sequencing of all the coding regions was conducted in hemophilia B patients and carriers. Prenatal diagnosis of the proband was conducted at 20 weeks. RESULTS: We identified the novel point mutation 10.389 A>G, located upstream of the intron 3 acceptor site in hemophilia B patients. The fetus of the proband’s cousin was identified as a carrier. CONCLUSION: Our identification of a novel mutation in the F9 gene associated with hemophilia B provides novel insight into the pathogenesis of this genetically inherited disorder and also represents the basis of prenatal diagnosis.

  3. Prevalence and risk factors of type II endoleaks after endovascular aneurysm repair: A meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Guo

    Full Text Available This systematic review and meta-analysis aims to determine the current evidence on risk factors for type II endoleaks after endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR.A systematic literature search was carried out for studies that evaluated the association of demographic, co-morbidity, and other patient-determined factors with the onset of type II endoleaks. Pooled prevalence of type II endoleaks after EVAR was updated.Among the 504 studies screened, 45 studies with a total of 36,588 participants were included in this review. The pooled prevalence of type II endoleaks after EVAR was 22% [95% confidence interval (CI, 19%-25%]. The main factors consistently associated with type II endoleaks included age [pooled odds ratio (OR, 0.37; 95% CI, 0.31-0.43; P<0.001], smoking (pooled OR, 0.71; 95% CI, 0.55-0.92; P<0.001, patent inferior mesenteric artery (pooled OR, 1.98; 95% CI, 1.06-3.71; P = 0.012, maximum aneurysm diameter (pooled OR, 0.23; 95% CI, 0.17-0.30; P<0.001, and number of patent lumbar arteries (pooled OR, 3.07; 95% CI, 2.81-3.33; P<0.001. Sex, diabetes, hypertension, anticoagulants, antiplatelet, hyperlipidemia, chronic renal insufficiency, types of graft material, and chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD did not show any association with the onset of type II endoleaks.Clinicians can use the identified risk factors to detect and manage patients at risk of developing type II endoleaks after EVAR. However, further studies are needed to analyze a number of potential risk factors.

  4. A novel missense mutation close to the charge-stabilizing system in a patient with congenital factor VII deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Minghua; Wang, Zhaoyue; Yu, Ziqiang; Bai, Xia; Su, Jian; Cao, Lijuan; Zhang, Wei; Ruan, Changgeng

    2011-06-01

    Congenital factor VII (FVII) deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive bleeding disorder. Its clinical manifestation and mutational spectrum are highly variable. The purpose of this study was to identify and characterize the mutation causing the FVII deficiency in a Chinese patient and his family. The FVII gene was analyzed by genomic DNA sequencing, and the FVII levels in patient's plasma were measured with an enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay (ELISA) and one-stage prothrombin time based method. In addition, the FVII-Phe190 mutant identified in the pedigree was expressed in the HEK293 cells, and the subcellular localization experiments in the Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells were performed. The patient had a prolonged prothrombin time and low levels of both FVII antigen and activity, and two heterozygous mutations were identified in F7 gene (NG-009262.1): a g.15975 G>A in the splice receptor site of intron 6 and a novel g.16750 C>T in exon 8 resulting in Ser190 to Phe190 replacement. In expression experiments, the reduced antigen and activity levels of FVII-Phe190 in the culture medium were found, whereas an ELISA and Western blotting analysis of FVII revealed that mutant FVII-Phe190 was synthesized in the cells as the wild-type FVII-Ser190. And FVII-Phe190 was found in endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus. Compound heterozygous mutations in F7 gene should be responsible for the FVII deficiency in this patient. The FVII-Phe190 can normally be synthesized and transported from endoplasmic reticulum to Golgi apparatus, but degraded or inefficiently secreted.

  5. PAP-1, the mutated gene underlying the RP9 form of dominant retinitis pigmentosa, is a splicing factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maita, Hiroshi; Kitaura, Hirotake; Keen, T. Jeffrey; Inglehearn, Chris F.; Ariga, Hiroyoshi; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M.M.

    2004-01-01

    PAP-1 is an in vitro phosphorylation target of the Pim-1 oncogene. Although PAP-1 binds to Pim-1, it is not a substrate for phosphorylation by Pim-1 in vivo. PAP-1 has recently been implicated as the defective gene in RP9, one type of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP). However, RP9 is a rare disease and only two missense mutations have been described, so the report of a link between PAP-1 and RP9 was tentative. The precise cellular role of PAP-1 was also unknown at that time. We now report that PAP-1 localizes in nuclear speckles containing the splicing factor SC35 and interacts directly with another splicing factor, U2AF35. Furthermore, we used in vitro and in vivo splicing assays to show that PAP-1 has an activity, which alters the pattern of pre-mRNA splicing and that this activity is dependent on the phosphorylation state of PAP-1. We used the same splicing assay to examine the activities of two mutant forms of PAP-1 found in RP9 patients. The results showed that while one of the mutations, H137L, had no effect on splicing activity compared with that of wild-type PAP-1, the other, D170G, resulted in both a defect in splicing activity and a decreased proportion of phosphorylated PAP-1. The D170G mutation may therefore cause RP by altering splicing of retinal genes through a decrease in PAP-1 phosphorylation. These results demonstrate that PAP-1 has a role in pre-mRNA splicing and, given that three other splicing factors have been implicated in adRP, this finding provides compelling further evidence that PAP-1 is indeed the RP9 gene

  6. Phenotype of Usher syndrome type II assosiated with compound missense mutations of c.721 C>T and c.1969 C>T in MYO7A in a Chinese Usher syndrome family

    OpenAIRE

    Zhai, Wei; Jin, Xin; Gong, Yan; Qu, Ling-Hui; Zhao, Chen; Li, Zhao-Hui

    2015-01-01

    AIM:To identify the pathogenic mutations in a Chinese pedigree affected with Usher syndrome type II (USH2).METHODS:The ophthalmic examinations and audiometric tests were performed to ascertain the phenotype of the family. To detect the genetic defect, exons of 103 known RDs -associated genes including 12 Usher syndrome (USH) genes of the proband were captured and sequencing analysis was performed to exclude known genetic defects and find potential pathogenic mutations. Subsequently, candidate...

  7. Predictable Phenotypes of Antibiotic Resistance Mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knopp, M; Andersson, D I

    2018-05-15

    Antibiotic-resistant bacteria represent a major threat to our ability to treat bacterial infections. Two factors that determine the evolutionary success of antibiotic resistance mutations are their impact on resistance level and the fitness cost. Recent studies suggest that resistance mutations commonly show epistatic interactions, which would complicate predictions of their stability in bacterial populations. We analyzed 13 different chromosomal resistance mutations and 10 host strains of Salmonella enterica and Escherichia coli to address two main questions. (i) Are there epistatic interactions between different chromosomal resistance mutations? (ii) How does the strain background and genetic distance influence the effect of chromosomal resistance mutations on resistance and fitness? Our results show that the effects of combined resistance mutations on resistance and fitness are largely predictable and that epistasis remains rare even when up to four mutations were combined. Furthermore, a majority of the mutations, especially target alteration mutations, demonstrate strain-independent phenotypes across different species. This study extends our understanding of epistasis among resistance mutations and shows that interactions between different resistance mutations are often predictable from the characteristics of the individual mutations. IMPORTANCE The spread of antibiotic-resistant bacteria imposes an urgent threat to public health. The ability to forecast the evolutionary success of resistant mutants would help to combat dissemination of antibiotic resistance. Previous studies have shown that the phenotypic effects (fitness and resistance level) of resistance mutations can vary substantially depending on the genetic context in which they occur. We conducted a broad screen using many different resistance mutations and host strains to identify potential epistatic interactions between various types of resistance mutations and to determine the effect of strain

  8. The Frequency of Factor V Leiden, Prothrombin G20210A and Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase C677T Mutations in Migraine Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruhsen Öcal

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Migraine is an independent risk factor for ischemic stroke, but its pathophysiology is still unclear. Genetic factors that predispose patients to thrombosis have been studied in patients with migraine to highlight the pathogenesis, but the results remain controversial. In this study, the frequencies of factor V Leiden (FVL, prothrombin (Pt G20210A and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR C677T mutations were investigated. METHODS: One hundred and sixty patients aged of 15 to 55 years with no history of systemic disease and who had been diagnosed as migraine according to the International Headache Society (IHS diagnostic criteria at Baskent University Hospital Neurology Outpatient Clinics were investigated for FVL, Pt G20210A and MTHFR C677T mutations from their genomic DNA, and the results were compared with those of healthy controls. RESULTS: One hundred and fifty five (96.9% of 160 migraine patients were homozygote normal, 5 (3.1% were heterozygote and none of them were homozygote mutant for FVL. The control group had 9.8% heterozygote individuals but the difference between the percentages was not statistically significant (p> 0.05. There were no homozygote mutant individuals in the Turkish population study in normal subjects like our study. Thirty nine (24.4% of 160 migraine patients were heterozygote and 8 (5% were homozygote mutant for MTHFR C677T. The control group had 37 (34.9% heterozygote and 6 (5.6% homozygote mutant individuals. The difference between the percentages was not statistically significant (p= 0.15. Three (1.9% of 160 migraine patients were heterozygote and 5 (2.9% of the control group were heterozygote mutant for Pt G20210A mutation. The control group had 37 (34.9% heterozygote and 6 (5.6% homozygote mutant individuals. The difference between the percentages was not statistically significant (p= 0.420. CONCLUSION: Our study indicates that FVL, Pt G20210A and MTHFR C677T gene mutations, which are considered

  9. The Frequency of Factor V Leiden, Prothrombin G20210A and Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase C677T Mutations in Migraine Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruhsen Öcal

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Migraine is an independent risk factor for ischemic stroke, but its pathophysiology is still unclear. Genetic factors that predispose patients to thrombosis have been studied in patients with migraine to highlight the pathogenesis, but the results remain controversial. In this study, the frequencies of factor V Leiden (FVL, prothrombin (Pt G20210A and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR C677T mutations were investigated. METHODS: One hundred and sixty patients aged of 15 to 55 years with no history of systemic disease and who had been diagnosed as migraine according to the International Headache Society (IHS diagnostic criteria at Baskent University Hospital Neurology Outpatient Clinics were investigated for FVL, Pt G20210A and MTHFR C677T mutations from their genomic DNA, and the results were compared with those of healthy controls. RESULTS: One hundred and fifty five (96.9% of 160 migraine patients were homozygote normal, 5 (3.1% were heterozygote and none of them were homozygote mutant for FVL. The control group had 9.8% heterozygote individuals but the difference between the percentages was not statistically significant (p> 0.05. There were no homozygote mutant individuals in the Turkish population study in normal subjects like our study. Thirty nine (24.4% of 160 migraine patients were heterozygote and 8 (5% were homozygote mutant for MTHFR C677T. The control group had 37 (34.9% heterozygote and 6 (5.6% homozygote mutant individuals. The difference between the percentages was not statistically significant (p= 0.15. Three (1.9% of 160 migraine patients were heterozygote and 5 (2.9% of the control group were heterozygote mutant for Pt G20210A mutation. The control group had 37 (34.9% heterozygote and 6 (5.6% homozygote mutant individuals. The difference between the percentages was not statistically significant (p= 0.420. CONCLUSION: Our study indicates that FVL, Pt G20210A and MTHFR C677T gene mutations, which are considered

  10. Hepatocyte nuclear factor 1-alpha mutation in normal glucose-tolerant subjects and early-onset type 2 diabetic patients

    OpenAIRE

    Lim, Dong Mee; Huh, Nam; Park, Keun Yong

    2008-01-01

    Background/Aims The prevalence of diabetes in Korea is reported to be approximately 10%, but cases of maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY) are rare in Korea. A diagnostic technique for autosomal dominant MODY is being actively sought. In this regard, we used a DNA chip to investigate the frequency of mutations of the MODY3 gene (hepatocyte nuclear factor-1?) in Korean patients with early-onset type 2 diabetes. Methods The genomic DNA of 30 normal individuals [age, 24.9?8.6 years] and 2...

  11. Mutational analysis of Escherichia coli elongation factor Tu in search of a role for the N-terminal region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mansilla, Francisco; Knudsen, Charlotte Rohde; Laurberg, M

    1998-01-01

    We have mutated lysine 2 and arginine 7 in elongation factor Tu from Escherichia coli separately either to alanine or glutamic acid. The aim of the work was to reveal the possible interactions between the conserved N-terminal part of the molecule, which is rich in basic residues and aminoacyl...... this activity. Furthermore, arginine 7 seems to play a role in regulating the binding of GTP. The three-dimensional structure of the ternary complex, EF-Tu:GTP:Phe-tRNAPhe, involving Thermus aquaticus EF-Tu and yeast Phe-tRNA(Phe), shows that Arg7 is in a position which permits salt bridge formation with Asp284...

  12. Comparison of the efficacy of icotinib in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer according to the type of epidermal growth factor receptor mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Zhang Xiao; Wen, Wang Xiu; Zhuang, Yu; Hua, Zang Jian; Xia, Yang Ni

    2016-09-01

    Icotinib hydrochloride is a novel epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) with preclinical and clinical activity in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Exon 19 deletion and L858R point mutation are the most commonly encountered EGFR mutations in NSCLC, and they predict improved clinical outcomes following treatment with icotinib. The objective of this study was to evaluate the differential clinical efficacy of icotinib in patients with exon 19 deletion or L858R point mutation of the EGFR gene. A total of 104 patients with advanced NSCLC, who harbored exon 19 deletion or L858R point mutation of EGFR and were treated with icotinib, were enrolled in this study. The tumor response and progression-free survival were evaluated. There were no significant differences between patients with EGFR exon 19 deletion and those with L858R point mutation who received treatment with icotinib.

  13. Phenotypic presentation of thrombophilia in double heterozygote for factor v leiden and prothrombin 20210 G>A mutations: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagorni-Obradović Ljudmila

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Physicians usually do not suspect pulmonary thromboembolism in younger patients except in those who have thrombophilia. In those latter patients some special conditions such as trauma or surgery may provoke the disease. In some adult persons, thrombophilia may still remain unrecognized, until appearance of additional conditions influence development of thrombosis. A 55-year-old Caucasian female, non-smoker, experienced sudden chest pain and hemoptysis without chest trauma. History taking revealed type 2 diabetes mellitus and hypothyroidism. She was overweight with body mass index 29.0. The review of the family history revealed that her father and mother died of brain infarction, while her 22-year-old son and 24-year-old daughter were healthy. Due to suspicion for thrombosis, multi-slice computerized tomography thorax scan was done and pulmonary embolism was diagnosed. Although without clear risk factor for thrombosis in our patient, we performed laboratory investigation for congenital thrombophilia. Genetic analysis showed double heterozygous for factor V Leiden and prothrombin 20210 G>A mutations. Congenital thrombophilia was risk factor for thrombosis in our patient but haemostatic imbalance was not previously clinically recognized. She had two pregnancies without complications. Appearance of other associative factors such as endocrine disorders - hypothyroidism and metabolic syndrome with diabetes type 2, and overweigh were additional potential triggers for clinical manifestation of pulmonary thromboembolism in her adult age. Her children underwent genetic analysis, too. The son was also double heterozygous for factor V Leiden and prothrombin 20210 G>A mutations, while daughter was heterozygous for factor V Leiden, and none had clinical signs of thrombosis. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. ON175081 i br. ON 175091

  14. Utility of bronchial lavage fluids for epithelial growth factor receptor mutation assay in lung cancer patients: Comparison between cell pellets, cell blocks and matching tissue specimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asaka, Shiho; Yoshizawa, Akihiko; Nakata, Rie; Negishi, Tatsuya; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Shiina, Takayuki; Shigeto, Shohei; Matsuda, Kazuyuki; Kobayashi, Yukihiro; Honda, Takayuki

    2018-01-01

    The detection of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations is necessary for the selection of suitable patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) for treatment with EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Cytology specimens are known to be suitable for EGFR mutation detection, although tissue specimens should be prioritized; however, there are limited studies that examine the utility of bronchial lavage fluid (BLF) in mutation detection. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the utility of BLF specimens for the detection of EGFR mutations using a conventional quantitative EGFR polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay. Initially, quantification cycle (Cq) values of cell pellets, cell-free supernatants and cell blocks obtained from three series of 1% EGFR mutation-positive lung cancer cell line samples were compared for mutation detection. In addition, PCR analysis of BLF specimens obtained from 77 consecutive NSCLC patients, detecting EGFR mutations was validated, and these results were compared with those for the corresponding formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue specimens obtained by surgical resection or biopsy of 49 of these patients. The Cq values for mutation detection were significantly lower in the cell pellet group (average, 29.58) compared with the other groups, followed by those in cell-free supernatants (average, 34.15) and in cell blocks (average, 37.12) for all three series (P<0.05). Mutational status was successfully analyzed in 77 BLF specimens, and the results obtained were concordant with those of the 49 matching FFPE tissue specimens. Notably, EGFR mutations were even detected in 10 cytological specimens that contained insufficient tumor cells. EGFR mutation testing with BLF specimens is therefore a useful and reliable method, particularly when sufficient cancer cells are not obtained. PMID:29399190

  15. Value of {sup 18}F-FDG uptake on PET/CT and CEA level to predict epidermal growth factor receptor mutations in pulmonary adenocarcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Kai-Hsiung; Hsu, Hsian-He; Chang, Wei-Chou; Hsu, Yi-Chih; Chang, Tsun-Hou [Tri-Service General Hospital and National Defense Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Taipei 114 (China); Huang, Tsai-Wang; Chang, Hung [Tri-Service General Hospital and National Defense Medical Center, Department of Thoracic Surgery, Taipei (China); Gao, Hong-Wei [Tri-Service General Hospital and National Defense Medical Center, Department of Pathology, Taipei (China); Shen, Daniel H.Y. [Tri-Service General Hospital and National Defense Medical Center, Department of Nuclear medicine, Taipei (China); Chu, Chi-Ming [Institute of Public Health, National Defense Medical Center and University, Section of Health Informatics, Taipei (China); Ho, Ching-Liang [Tri-Service General Hospital and National Defense Medical Center, Division of Hematology-Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, Taipei (China)

    2014-10-15

    The identification of the mutation status of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is important for the optimization of treatment in patients with pulmonary adenocarcinoma. The acquisition of adequate tissues for EGFR mutational analysis is sometimes not feasible, especially in advanced-stage patients. The aim of this study was to predict EGFR mutation status in patients with pulmonary adenocarcinoma based on {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake and imaging features in positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT), as well as on the serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) level. We retrospectively reviewed 132 pulmonary adenocarcinoma patients who underwent EGFR mutation testing, pretreatment FDG PET/CT and serum CEA analysis. The associations between EGFR mutations and patient characteristics, maximal standard uptake value (SUVmax) of primary tumors, serum CEA level and CT imaging features were analyzed. Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was performed to quantify the predictive value of these factors. EGFR mutations were identified in 69 patients (52.2 %). Patients with SUVmax ≥6 (p = 0.002) and CEA level ≥5 (p = 0.013) were more likely to have EGFR mutations. The CT characteristics of larger tumors (≥3 cm) (p = 0.023) and tumors with a nonspiculated margin (p = 0.026) were also associated with EGFR mutations. Multivariate analysis showed that higher SUVmax and CEA level, never smoking and a nonspiculated tumor margin were the most significant predictors of EGFR mutation. The combined use of these four criteria yielded a higher area under the ROC curve (0.82), suggesting a good discrimination. The combined evaluation of FDG uptake, CEA level, smoking status and tumor margins may be helpful in predicting EGFR mutation status in patients with pulmonary adenocarcinoma, especially when the tumor sample is inadequate for genetic analysis or genetic testing is not available. Further large-scale prospective studies are

  16. Overexpressed connective tissue growth factor in cardiomyocytes attenuates left ventricular remodeling induced by angiotensin II perfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Yan, Hua; Guang, Gong-Chang; Deng, Zheng-Rong

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the improving effects of specifically overexpressed connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) in cardiomyocytes on mice with hypertension induced by angiotensin II (AngII) perfusion, 24 transgenic mice with cardiac-restricted overexpression of CTGF (Tg-CTGF) were divided into two equal groups that were perfused with acetic acid and AngII, respectively, for 7 days. Another 24 cage-control wild-type C57BL/6 mice (NLC) were divided and treated identically. Blood pressure was detected by caudal artery cannulation. Cardiac structural and functional changes were observed by echocardiography. Cardiac fibrosis was detected by Masson staining. After AngII perfusion, blood pressures of NLC and Tg-CTGF mice, especially those of the formers, significantly increased. Compared with NLC + AngII group, Tg-CTGF + AngII group had significantly lower left ventricular posterior wall thickness at end-diastole and left ventricular posterior wall thickness at end-systole as well as significantly higher left ventricular end-systolic diameter and left ventricular end-diastolic diameter (P tissues (P < 0.05). Tg-CTGF can protect AngII-induced cardiac remodeling of mice with hypertension by mitigating inflammatory response. CTGF may be a therapy target for hypertension-induced myocardial fibrosis, but the detailed mechanism still needs in-depth studies.

  17. CNTN6 mutations are risk factors for abnormal auditory sensory perception in autism spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercati, O; Huguet, G; Danckaert, A; André-Leroux, G; Maruani, A; Bellinzoni, M; Rolland, T; Gouder, L; Mathieu, A; Buratti, J; Amsellem, F; Benabou, M; Van-Gils, J; Beggiato, A; Konyukh, M; Bourgeois, J-P; Gazzellone, M J; Yuen, R K C; Walker, S; Delépine, M; Boland, A; Régnault, B; Francois, M; Van Den Abbeele, T; Mosca-Boidron, A L; Faivre, L; Shimoda, Y; Watanabe, K; Bonneau, D; Rastam, M; Leboyer, M; Scherer, S W; Gillberg, C; Delorme, R; Cloëz-Tayarani, I; Bourgeron, T

    2017-04-01

    Contactin genes CNTN5 and CNTN6 code for neuronal cell adhesion molecules that promote neurite outgrowth in sensory-motor neuronal pathways. Mutations of CNTN5 and CNTN6 have previously been reported in individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs), but very little is known on their prevalence and clinical impact. In this study, we identified CNTN5 and CNTN6 deleterious variants in individuals with ASD. Among the carriers, a girl with ASD and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder was carrying five copies of CNTN5. For CNTN6, both deletions (6/1534 ASD vs 1/8936 controls; P=0.00006) and private coding sequence variants (18/501 ASD vs 535/33480 controls; P=0.0005) were enriched in individuals with ASD. Among the rare CNTN6 variants, two deletions were transmitted by fathers diagnosed with ASD, one stop mutation CNTN6 W923X was transmitted by a mother to her two sons with ASD and one variant CNTN6 P770L was found de novo in a boy with ASD. Clinical investigations of the patients carrying CNTN5 or CNTN6 variants showed that they were hypersensitive to sounds (a condition called hyperacusis) and displayed changes in wave latency within the auditory pathway. These results reinforce the hypothesis of abnormal neuronal connectivity in the pathophysiology of ASD and shed new light on the genes that increase risk for abnormal sensory perception in ASD.

  18. The Impact of EuroSCORE II Risk Factors on Prediction of Long-Term Mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barili, Fabio; Pacini, Davide; D'Ovidio, Mariangela; Dang, Nicholas C; Alamanni, Francesco; Di Bartolomeo, Roberto; Grossi, Claudio; Davoli, Marina; Fusco, Danilo; Parolari, Alessandro

    2016-10-01

    The European System for Cardiac Operation Risk Evaluation (EuroSCORE) II has not been tested yet for predicting long-term mortality. This study was undertaken to evaluate the relationship between EuroSCORE II and long-term mortality and to develop a new algorithm based on EuroSCORE II factors to predict long-term survival after cardiac surgery. Complete data on 10,033 patients who underwent major cardiac surgery during a 7-year period were retrieved from three prospective institutional databases and linked with the Italian Tax Register Information System. Mortality at follow-up was analyzed with time-to-event analysis. The Kaplan-Meier estimates of survival at 1 and 5 were, respectively, 95.0% ± 0.2% and 84.7% ± 0.4%. Both discrimination and calibration of EuroSCORE II decreased in the prediction of 1-year and 5-year mortality. Nonetheless, EuroSCORE II was confirmed to be an independent predictor of long-term mortality with a nonlinear trend. Several EuroSCORE II variables were independent risk factors for long-term mortality in a regression model, most of all very low ejection fraction (less than 20%), salvage operation, and dialysis. In the final model, isolated mitral valve surgery and isolated coronary artery bypass graft surgery were associated with improved long-term survival. The EuroSCORE II cannot be considered a direct estimator of long-term risk of death, as its performance fades for mortality at follow-up longer than 30 days. Nonetheless, it is nonlinearly associated with long-term mortality, and most of its variables are risk factors for long-term mortality. Hence, they can be used in a different algorithm to stratify the risk of long-term mortality after surgery. Copyright © 2016 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Chemokine Receptor-5Δ32 Mutation is No Risk Factor for Ischemic-Type Biliary Lesion in Liver Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Heidenhain

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been shown that certain chemokine receptor polymorphisms may correspond to certain complications after organ transplantation. Ischemic-type biliary lesion (ITBL encounters for major morbidity and mortality in liver transplant recipients. So far, the exact cause for ITBL remains unclear. Certain risk factors for the development of ITBL like donor age and cold ischemic time are well described. In a previous study, a 32-nucleotide deletion of the chemokine receptor-5Δ32 (CCR-5Δ32 was strongly associated with the incidence of ITBL in adult liver transplantation. This study re-evaluates the association of CCR-5Δ32 gene polymorphism and the incidence of ITBL. 169 patients were included into this retrospective analysis. 134 patients were homozygous for wild-type CCR-5, 33 patients heterozygous, and 2 patients were homozygous for CCR-5Δ32 mutation. There were no major differences in donor or recipients demographics. No association was found between CCR-5Δ32 mutation and the development of ITBL. We conclude that CCR-5Δ32 is no risk factor for the development of ITBL in our patient cohort.

  20. Effects of icotinib, a novel epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor, in EGFR-mutated non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guangdie; Yao, Yinan; Zhou, Jianya; Zhao, Qiong

    2012-06-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is one of the most promising targets for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Our study demonstrated the antitumor effects of icotinib hydrochloride, a highly selective epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor (EGFR TKI), in two EGFR-mutated lung cancer cell lines compared to A549, a cell line without EGFR mutations. We incubated PC-9 and HCC827 human lung cancer cell lines both with (E746-A750) mutations with various concentrations of icotinib and gefitinib for 48 h. Cell proliferation and migration were determined using a real-time cell invasion and migration assay and cytotoxicity assay. Apoptosis was assessed by measuring Annexin V staining using flow cytometry. The antitumor effects of icotinib compared to gefitinib were similar and were most effective in reducing the proliferation of EGFR-mutated cells compared to non-mutated controls. Our results suggest the possibility of icotinib as a new therapeutic agent of EGFR-mutated cancer cells, which has the potential to be used in the first-line treatment of EGFR-mutated NSCLC.

  1. The in vitro transcription of a rainbow trout (Salmo gairdnerii) protamine gene. II. Controlled mutation of the cap site region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankowski, J M; Dixon, G H

    1985-02-01

    A series of plasmids containing new fusion genes in which the trout protamine gene is placed under the control of the complete herpes virus (HSV-1) tk promoter Pvu II-Bgl II fragment (pM8), or a shortened thymidine kinase (tk) promoter in which the region between the TATA box and the cap site is altered by using the Pvu II-Mlu I fragment (pM7), have been constructed. An additional recombinant plasmid was constructed in which the Bgl II-Ava II fragment of the protamine gene containing the entire protamine promoter but missing the protamine coding region was cloned into pBR322 between the Xho II 1666 and Hind III sites (pP5). For in vitro transcription, a HeLa cell lysate system was prepared and the RNA transcription products, after glyoxalation, were electrophoretically analyzed on 5% polyacrylamide gels. In constructing pM8 the DNA sequence between the tk promoter and the cap site was present while in pM7 it was deleted. Similar multiple transcripts were seen in both cases, indicating that the region between the promoter and the cap site has no effect upon transcription in vitro. The multiple transcripts appear to be due to the presence of a cryptic promoter in the complementary strand of the protamine gene. The activity of this cryptic promoter has been confirmed by comparison of the transcription of plasmid pP5, in which the protamine mRNA coding region has been deleted, with a previously described plasmid, pJBRP (Jankowski JM and Dixon GH (1984) Can. J. Biochem. Cell. Biol. 62, 291-300), containing the intact protamine gene.

  2. AB072. Novel mutation in the hepatocyte nuclear factor 1b/maturity-onset diabetes of the young type 5 gene—unreported Vietnamese case

    OpenAIRE

    Dung, Vu Chi; Thao, Bui Phuong; Ngoc, Can Thi Bich; Khanh, Nguyen Ngoc; Ellard, Sian

    2015-01-01

    Maturity-onset diabetes of the young type 5 (MODY5), a type of dominantly inherited diabetes mellitus and nephropathy, has been associated with mutations of the hepatocyte nuclear factor-1 (HNF-1β) gene, mostly generating truncated protein. Various phenotypes are related to HNF-1β mutations. Our aim to describe clinical and genetic findings in the unreported Vietnamese case identified with HNF-1β mutations. The proband with kidney failure from 7.5 years of age and diabetes diagnosed at 13.5 y...

  3. Analysis of Transcription Factors Key for Mouse Pancreatic Development Establishes NKX2-2 and MNX1 Mutations as Causes of Neonatal Diabetes in Man

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagan, Sarah E.; De Franco, Elisa; Lango Allen, Hana; Zerah, Michele; Abdul-Rasoul, Majedah M.; Edge, Julie A.; Stewart, Helen; Alamiri, Elham; Hussain, Khalid; Wallis, Sam; de Vries, Liat; Rubio-Cabezas, Oscar; Houghton, Jayne A.L.; Edghill, Emma L.; Patch, Ann-Marie; Ellard, Sian; Hattersley, Andrew T.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Understanding transcriptional regulation of pancreatic development is required to advance current efforts in developing beta cell replacement therapies for patients with diabetes. Current knowledge of key transcriptional regulators has predominantly come from mouse studies, with rare, naturally occurring mutations establishing their relevance in man. This study used a combination of homozygosity analysis and Sanger sequencing in 37 consanguineous patients with permanent neonatal diabetes to search for homozygous mutations in 29 transcription factor genes important for murine pancreatic development. We identified homozygous mutations in 7 different genes in 11 unrelated patients and show that NKX2-2 and MNX1 are etiological genes for neonatal diabetes, thus confirming their key role in development of the human pancreas. The similar phenotype of the patients with recessive mutations and mice with inactivation of a transcription factor gene support there being common steps critical for pancreatic development and validate the use of rodent models for beta cell development. PMID:24411943

  4. Neuroprotective Effect of Insulin-like Growth Factor-II on 1- Methyl-4 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate the receptor-mediated neuroprotective effect of insulin-like growth factor-II (IGFII) on 1-methyl-4-phenyl pyridinium (MPP) induced oxidative damage in adult cortical neuronal cultures. Methods: Adult rats were randomly divided into 5 groups. Cortical neurons were prepared from rats. The cells were ...

  5. Rice breeding with induced mutations II. Report of an FAO/IAEA research co-ordination meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1970-03-01

    This report contains the proceedings of the fourth meeting of participants in the FAO/IAEA Co-ordinated Program of Research on the Use of Induced Mutations in Rice Breeding, a program which was initiated in 1964. The three previous meetings were reported as follows: First: proceedings published in the International Rice Commission Newsletter, Vol. XV, No. 1 (1966). Second: report presented to the IRC Working Party meeting at Lake Charles, Louisiana, 18-30 July 1966. Third: proceedings published by the IAEA as Technical Reports Series No. 86 under the title 'Rice breeding with induced mutations'. The fourth meeting was held at Oiso, Japan, on 12-14 August 1968. Co-operators from nine countries attended, together with scientists from five other countries, the International Rice Research Institute, the Rockefeller Foundation, the International Rice Commission, and the FAO and IAEA. In addition, a number of scientists from the host country were present. The purpose of the meeting was to present reports on research related to or carried out under the co-ordinated program in 1967/68, to review and co-ordinate research plans for 1968/69, and to draw up technical recommendations for future work.

  6. Phenotype of Usher syndrome type II assosiated with compound missense mutations of c.721 C>T and c.1969 C>T in MYO7A in a Chinese Usher syndrome family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Wei; Jin, Xin; Gong, Yan; Qu, Ling-Hui; Zhao, Chen; Li, Zhao-Hui

    2015-01-01

    To identify the pathogenic mutations in a Chinese pedigree affected with Usher syndrome type II (USH2). The ophthalmic examinations and audiometric tests were performed to ascertain the phenotype of the family. To detect the genetic defect, exons of 103 known RDs -associated genes including 12 Usher syndrome (USH) genes of the proband were captured and sequencing analysis was performed to exclude known genetic defects and find potential pathogenic mutations. Subsequently, candidate mutations were validated in his pedigree and 100 normal controls using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Sanger sequencing. The patient in the family occurred hearing loss (HL) and retinitis pigmentosa (RP) without vestibular dysfunction, which were consistent with standards of classification for USH2. He carried the compound heterozygous mutations, c.721 C>T and c.1969 C>T, in the MYO7A gene and the unaffected members carried only one of the two mutations. The mutations were not present in the 100 normal controls. We suggested that the compound heterozygous mutations of the MYO7A could lead to USH2, which had revealed distinguished clinical phenotypes associated with MYO7A and expanded the spectrum of clinical phenotypes of the MYO7A mutations.

  7. Phenotype of Usher syndrome type II assosiated with compound missense mutations of c.721 C>T and c.1969 C>T in MYO7A in a Chinese Usher syndrome family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhai

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To identify the pathogenic mutations in a Chinese pedigree affected with Usher syndrome type II (USH2.METHODS:The ophthalmic examinations and audiometric tests were performed to ascertain the phenotype of the family. To detect the genetic defect, exons of 103 known RDs -associated genes including 12 Usher syndrome (USH genes of the proband were captured and sequencing analysis was performed to exclude known genetic defects and find potential pathogenic mutations. Subsequently, candidate mutations were validated in his pedigree and 100 normal controls using polymerase chain reaction (PCR and Sanger sequencing.RESULTS:The patient in the family occurred hearing loss (HL and retinitis pigmentosa (RP without vestibular dysfunction, which were consistent with standards of classification for USH2. He carried the compound heterozygous mutations, c.721 C>T and c.1969 C>T, in the MYO7A gene and the unaffected members carried only one of the two mutations. The mutations were not present in the 100 normal controls.CONCLUSION:We suggested that the compound heterozygous mutations of the MYO7A could lead to USH2, which had revealed distinguished clinical phenotypes associated with MYO7A and expanded the spectrum of clinical phenotypes of the MYO7A mutations.

  8. A new mutation of the PCNT gene in a Colombian patient with microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pachajoa, Harry; Ruiz-Botero, Felipe; Isaza, Carolina

    2014-06-13

    Microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism is a syndrome characterized by the presence of intrauterine growth restriction, post-natal growth deficiency and microcephaly. Microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II is the most distinctive syndrome in this group of entities. Individuals affected by this disease present at an adult height of less than 100 cm, a post-pubertal head circumference of 40 cm or less, mild mental retardation, an outgoing personality and bone dysplasia. We report the first case of a five-year-old Colombian boy of mixed race ancestry (mestizo), with clinical features of microcephaly, prominent and narrow nose, arched palate, amelogenesis imperfecta, short stature, tall and narrow pelvis, disproportionate shortening of fore-arms and legs, and mild coxa vara. Analysis of the PCNT gene by sequencing showed the presence of a nucleotide change in exon 10, c. 1468C>T, evidencing a new mutation not reported in the literature for microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism. The new mutation identified in this case could be associated with the severity of the phenotypic expression of the disease, resulting in the extreme short stature of the patient. Further studies are required to reach an explanation that can justify such findings, and it is vital to emphasize the importance of detection and follow-up by the epidemiological surveillance groups in birth defects and rare diseases.

  9. Dilatative uropathy as a manifestation of neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus due to a novel mutation in the arginine vasopressin-neurophysin-II gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindenthal, V; Mainberger, A; Morris-Rosendahl, D J; Löning, L; Mayer, W; Müller, H L

    2013-12-01

    Polydypsia and polyuria are frequent symptoms in patients with sellar masses caused by neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus. Autosomal dominant familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus (adFNDI), a disorder caused by mutations in the arginine vasopressin (AVP) -neurophysin II (NPII) gene, should be considered as a rare differential diagnosis. A delayed diagnosis bears the risk of life-threatening electrolyte imbalances and permanent urinary tract damage, leading to impaired quality of life.We present a Caucasian kindred of at least 4 generations with FNDI.Clinical histories, endocrine para-meters, and results of molecular analyses of the AVP gene are presented with a review of the literature on diabetes insipidus (DI) related urinary tract dilatation.Polyuria and polydipsia were only reported based on explicit and thorough interrogation after more than 4 years of clinical follow-up. A novel heterozygous mutation in the AVP gene was found in all examined symptomatic subjects (c.1-33_c.4del37nt). A literature review revealed that non-obstructive hydronephrosis (NOH) is a rare but known complication of DI.Since increased fluid intake is often a typical familial pattern in adFNDI, it is frequently missed as being pathologic in affected patients, therefore a detailed clinical history of drinking volumes is of critical importance. AVP gene testing is an important component in the confirmation of the diagnosis. Otherwise unexplainable NOH should lead to further investigations and evaluation of rare diseases like FNDI. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  10. Limited clinical efficacy of azacitidine in transfusion-dependent, growth factor-resistant, low- and Int-1-risk MDS: Results from the nordic NMDSG08A phase II trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobiasson, M; Dybedahl, I; Holm, M S; Karimi, M; Brandefors, L; Garelius, H; Grövdal, M; Högh-Dufva, I; Grønbæk, K; Jansson, M; Marcher, C; Nilsson, L; Kittang, A O; Porwit, A; Saft, L; Möllgård, L; Hellström-Lindberg, E

    2014-01-01

    This prospective phase II study evaluated the efficacy of azacitidine (Aza)+erythropoietin (Epo) in transfusion-dependent patients with lower-risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Patients ineligible for or refractory to full-dose Epo+granulocyte colony stimulation factors for >8 weeks and a transfusion need of ⩾4 units over 8 weeks were included. Aza 75 mg m −2 d −1 , 5/28 days, was given for six cycles; non-responding patients received another three cycles combined with Epo 60 000 units per week. Primary end point was transfusion independence (TI). All patients underwent targeted mutational screen for 42 candidate genes. Thirty enrolled patients received ⩾one cycle of Aza. Ten patients discontinued the study early, 7 due to adverse events including 2 deaths. Thirty-eight serious adverse events were reported, the most common being infection. Five patients achieved TI after six cycles and one after Aza+Epo, giving a total response rate of 20%. Mutational screening revealed a high frequency of recurrent mutations. Although no single mutation predicted for response, SF3A1 (n=3) and DNMT3A (n=4) were only observed in non-responders. We conclude that Aza can induce TI in severely anemic MDS patients, but efficacy is limited, toxicity substantial and most responses of short duration. This treatment cannot be generally recommended in lower-risk MDS. Mutational screening revealed a high frequency of mutations

  11. Increased expression of pro-angiogenic factors and vascularization in thyroid hyperfunctioning adenomas with and without TSH receptor activating mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celano, Marilena; Sponziello, Marialuisa; Tallini, Giovanni; Maggisano, Valentina; Bruno, Rocco; Dima, Mariavittoria; Di Oto, Enrico; Redler, Adriano; Durante, Cosimo; Sacco, Rosario; Filetti, Sebastiano; Russo, Diego

    2013-02-01

    Autonomously functioning thyroid nodules (AFTN) are known to receive an increased blood influx necessary to sustain their high rate of growth and hormone production. Here, we investigated the expression of hematic and lymphatic vases in a series of 20 AFTN compared with the contralateral non-tumor tissues of the same patients, and the transcript levels of proteins involved in the control of vascular proliferation, including the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and platelet-derived growth factors (PDGF) and their receptors and the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). In parallel, the expression of the differentiation markers sodium/iodide symporter (NIS), thyroperoxidase (TPO), thyroglobulin (Tg), and TSH receptor (TSHR) was also investigated. The data were further analyzed comparing subgroups of tumors with or without mutations in the TSHR gene. Analysis by means of CD31 and D2-40 immunostaining showed in AFTN an increased number of hematic, but not lymphatic, vessels in parallel with an enhanced proliferation rate shown by increased Ki67 staining. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed an increase of VEGF, VEGFR1 and 2, PDGF-A, PDGF-B, and eNOS expression in tumor versus normal tissues. Also, higher transcript levels of NIS, TPO, and Tg were detected. Comparison of the two subgroups of samples revealed only few differences in the expression of the genes examined. In conclusion, these data demonstrate an increased expression of angiogenesis-related factors associated with an enhanced proliferation of hematic, but not lymphatic, vessels in AFTNs. In this context, the presence of TSHR mutations may only slightly influence the expression of pro-angiogenic growth factors.

  12. Mutations in the VLGR1 gene implicate G-protein signaling in the pathogenesis of Usher syndrome type II.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weston, M.D.; Luijendijk, M.W.J.; Humphrey, K.D.; Moller, C.G.; Kimberling, W.J.

    2004-01-01

    Usher syndrome type II (USH2) is a genetically heterogeneous autosomal recessive disorder with at least three genetic subtypes (USH2A, USH2B, and USH2C) and is classified phenotypically as congenital hearing loss and progressive retinitis pigmentosa. The VLGR1 (MASS1) gene in the 5q14.3-q21.1 USH2C

  13. Factors affecting buccal corridor space in Angle′s Class II Division 1 malocclusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashmi Bhat

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Buccal corridor space has been thought of primarily in terms of maxillary width, but there is also evidence that they are heavily influenced by the antero-posterior position of maxilla. The present study was undertaken with an aim of evaluating and comparing the dental and skeletal factors related to buccal corridor space in individuals having Class I and Class II Division 1 malocclusions. Materials and Methods: A total of 80 subjects of which 40 were males and 40 were females in the age group of 20-30 years were selected as per inclusion criteria and were grouped as Group I having Class I malocclusion and as Group II having Class II malocclusions based on angle ANB. 12 linear and 2 angular cephalometric measurements and 4 study cast measurements were used to correlate with the buccal corridor linear ratio (BCLR, calculated on smile photograph using the Adobe Photoshop 7.0 software (Adobe Systems Inc., San Jose, California, USA. The data obtained was statistically evaluated using independent t-test and multiple linear regression analysis. Result: Buccal corridor space is larger in individuals with Class II Division 1 malocclusion when compared with individuals with Class I malocclusions. There exists a significant difference in buccal corridor space between males and females. Conclusion: The present study helps in establishing the correlation between certain factors and the amount of buccal corridor space in individuals having skeletal Class II pattern.

  14. Genetic modifiers of comatose mutations in Drosophila: insights into neuronal NSF (N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion factor) functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanyal, Subhabrata; Krishnan, K S

    2012-09-01

    By the middle of the 20th century, development of powerful genetic approaches had ensured that the fruit fly would remain a model organism of choice for genetic and developmental studies. But in the 1970s, a few pioneering groups turned their attention to the prospect of using the fly for neurophysiological experiments. They proposed that in a poikilothermic organism such as Drosophila, temperature-sensitive or "ts" mutations in proteins that controlled nerve function would translate to a "ts" paralytic phenotype. This was by no means an obvious or even a likely assumption. However, following directed screens these groups soon reported dramatic demonstrations of reversible ts paralysis in fly mutants. Resultantly, these "simple" experiments led to the isolation of a number of conditional mutations including shibire, paralytic, and comatose. All have since been cloned and have enabled deep mechanistic insights into synaptic transmission and nerve conduction. comatose (comt) mutations, for example, were found to map to missense changes in dNSF1, a neuron-specific fly homolog of mammalian NSF (N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion factor). Studies on comt were also some of the first to discriminate between nuanced models of NSF function during presynaptic transmitter release that have since been borne out by experiments in multiple preparations. Here, the authors present an overview of NSF function as it is understood today, with an emphasis on contributions from Drosophila beginning with experiments carried out by Obaid Siddiqi in the Benzer laboratory. The authors also outline initial results from a genetic screen for phenotypic modifiers of comt that hold the promise of further elucidating NSF function at the synapse. Over the years, the neuromuscular system of Drosophila has served as a uniquely accessible model to unravel mechanisms underlying synaptic transmission. To this day, ts paralysis remains one of the most emphatic demonstrations of nerve function in an

  15. Insulin-like growth factors I and II in healthy women with and without established osteoporosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Pernille; Spencer, E M; Christiansen, C

    1995-01-01

    .05) was seen in the nandrolone decanoate-treated group. The same tendency was seen for hormone replacement therapy, although it was not significant. In conclusion, the serum level of IGF-I is high in young women, when peak bone mass is attained, and low in postmenopausal women with established osteoporosis.......We measured serum concentrations of insulin-like growth factors I and II (IGF-I and IGF-II) by radioimmunoassay in 107 healthy women aged 28-78 years and in 116 women with established osteoporosis. The women with established osteoporosis were randomized to a 1-year double-blind, placebo...

  16. Relationship between serum carcinoembryonic antigen level and epidermal growth factor receptor mutations with the influence on the prognosis of non-small-cell lung cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cai ZX

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Zuxun Cai Department of Thoracic Surgery, Henan Provincial Chest Hospital, Zhengzhou City, People’s Republic of China Objective: To investigate the relationship between serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA level and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR gene mutations in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients and to analyze the influence of CEA level on postoperative survival time in lung cancer patients. Methods: A total of 296 patients who were treated in Thoracic Surgery Department of Henan Provincial Chest Hospital from September 2011 to September 2013 were recruited. The level of tumor markers, such as CEA, was determined before the surgery, and EGFR gene mutations were detected after surgery. Thereby, the relationship between tumor makers, including CEA, and EGFR mutation and its influence on prognosis could be investigated. Results: Among 296 patients, the positive rate of EGFR gene mutation was 37.84% (112/296; the mutation occurred more frequently in nonsmokers, adenocarcinoma patients, women, and patients aged <60 years (P<0.05. Both tumor markers and chemosensitivity indicators were related to the profile of EGFR mutations. Elevated squamous cell carcinoma and Cyfra21-1 as well as positively expressed ERCC1 were more common in patients with wild-type EGFR (P<0.05, whereas increased CEA level was observed more frequently in patients with EGFR gene mutation (P=0.012. The positive rate of EGFR gene mutations was higher as the serum CEA level increased, that is, the positive rate in patients with serum CEA level <5, 5–20, and >20 µg/L was 39.81%, 45.32%, and 65.47%, respectively (P=0.004. Logistic regression analysis showed that CEA level was an independent factor in predicting EGFR gene mutations, and serum CEA level was also an independent factor in affecting the prognosis of NSCLC patients, as the overall 2-year survival rate was 73.86% in elevated CEA group and 86.43% in normal group (P<0.01. Conclusion: The prognosis of

  17. Hemochromatosis C282Y gene mutation as a potential susceptibility factor for iron-overload in Egyptian beta-thalassemia patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.M. Mokhtar

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hereditary hemochromatosis is the most frequent cause of primary iron overload that is associated with HFE gene’s mutation especially the C282Y mutation. The interaction between hemoglobin chain synthesis’ disorders and the C282Y mutation may worsen the clinical picture of beta-thalassemia major (β-TM. Aim: To establish the prevalence of the C282Y mutations in Egyptian β-TM patients and to address its adverse effects. Methods: Two-hundred and five β-TM patients were recruited and divided into two groups based on their serum ferritin (SF; group I (N = 125 (SF ≤ 2500 ng/dl and group II (N = 80 (SF > 2500 ng/dl. All patients were subjected to clinical and laboratory assessment with special emphasis on iron overload complications. Genotyping was assessed by polymerase chain reaction for detection of C282Y mutation in HFE gene. Results: The C282Y mutation was not detected in the studied β-TM neither in homozygous nor heterozygous state. There were several iron overload complications including cardiac complication (9.1%, liver disease (36.6%, delayed puberty (56.6%, primary (35.71% and secondary amenorrhea (21.42%, short stature (27.3%, diabetes (3.4%, neutropenia (9.7%, arthralgia (10.2%, gastrointestinal (21.1%, depression (2.9% and others (12.05%. Group I showed a statistically significant lower rate of taking iron-rich diet when compared to group II. Group II showed significant longer mean duration of disease, higher total transfusion rate per life, lower mean HbF% level, higher mean HbA% level, and higher rate of elevated liver enzymes than patients with SF ≤ 2500 ng/dl. Conclusion: The C282Y mutation was not detected in the studied cohort of Egyptian β-TM patients neither in homozygous nor heterozygous state in spite of manifestations of iron overload complications. Keywords: Beta-thalassemia major, Hereditary hemochromatosis, The C282Y mutation, Iron overload complications, Egyptian

  18. An Immunohistochemical Study of Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase and Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Mutation in Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Sonal; Kumar, Madhu; Kumari, Malti; Mehrotra, Raj; Kushwaha, R A S; Goel, Madhumati; Kumar, Ashutosh; Kant, Surya

    2017-07-01

    Lung cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer related death. Targeted treatment for specific markers may help in reducing the cancer related morbidity and mortality. To study expression of Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK)and Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) mutations in patients of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer NSCLC, that are the targets for specific ALK inhibitors and EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Total 69 cases of histologically diagnosed NSCLC were examined retrospectively for immunohistochemical expression of EGFR and ALK, along with positive control of normal placental tissue and anaplastic large cell lymphoma respectively. Of the NSCLC, Squamous Cell Carcinoma (SCC) accounted for 71.0% and adenocarcinoma was 26.1%. ALK expression was seen in single case of 60-year-old female, non-smoker with adenocarcinoma histology. EGFR expression was seen in both SCC (59.18%) and adenocarcinoma in (77.78%) accounting for 63.77% of all cases. Both ALK and EGFR mutation were mutually exclusive. EGFR expression was seen in 63.77% of cases, highlighting the importance of its use in routine analysis, for targeted therapy and better treatment results. Although, ALK expression was seen in 1.45% of all cases, it is an important biomarker in targeted cancer therapy. Also, the mutually exclusive expression of these two markers need further studies to develop a diagnostic algorithm for NSCLC patients.

  19. Leukaemia inhibitory factor (LIF) gene mutations in women diagnosed with unexplained infertility and endometriosis have a negative impact on the IVF outcome a pilot study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Novotný, Z.; Křižan, Jiří; Šíma, R.; Šíma, Petr; Uher, P.; Zech, N.; Huttelová, R.; Baborová, P.; Ulčová-Gallová, Z.; Šubrt, I.; Ulmanová, E.; Houdek, Z.; Rokyta, Z.; Babuška, V.; Králíčková, M.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 3 (2009), s. 92-97 ISSN 0015-5500 R&D Projects: GA MZd NR9135 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : leukaemia inhibitory factor * infertility * mutation Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 0.924, year: 2009

  20. KDF1, encoding keratinocyte differentiation factor 1, is mutated in a multigenerational family with ectodermal dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamseldin, Hanan E; Khalifa, Ola; Binamer, Yousef M; Almutawa, Abdulmonem; Arold, Stefan T; Zaidan, Hamad; Alkuraya, Fowzan S

    2017-01-01

    Ectodermal dysplasia is a highly heterogeneous group of disorders that variably affect the derivatives of the ectoderm, primarily skin, hair, nails and teeth. TP63, itself mutated in ectodermal dysplasia, links many other ectodermal dysplasia disease genes through a regulatory network that maintains the balance between proliferation and differentiation of the epidermis and other ectodermal derivatives. The ectodermal knockout phenotype of five mouse genes that regulate and/or are regulated by TP63 (Irf6, Ikkα, Ripk4, Stratifin, and Kdf1) is strikingly similar and involves abnormal balance towards proliferation at the expense of differentiation, but only the first three have corresponding ectodermal phenotypes in humans. We describe a multigenerational Saudi family with an autosomal dominant form of hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia in which positional mapping and exome sequencing identified a novel variant in KDF1 that fully segregates with the phenotype. The recapitulation of the phenotype we observe in this family by the Kdf1-/- mouse suggests a causal role played by the KDF1 variant.

  1. KDF1, encoding keratinocyte differentiation factor 1, is mutated in a multigenerational family with ectodermal dysplasia

    KAUST Repository

    Shamseldin, Hanan E.

    2016-11-12

    Ectodermal dysplasia is a highly heterogeneous group of disorders that variably affect the derivatives of the ectoderm, primarily skin, hair, nails and teeth. TP63, itself mutated in ectodermal dysplasia, links many other ectodermal dysplasia disease genes through a regulatory network that maintains the balance between proliferation and differentiation of the epidermis and other ectodermal derivatives. The ectodermal knockout phenotype of five mouse genes that regulate and/or are regulated by TP63 (Irf6, Ikkα, Ripk4, Stratifin, and Kdf1) is strikingly similar and involves abnormal balance towards proliferation at the expense of differentiation, but only the first three have corresponding ectodermal phenotypes in humans. We describe a multigenerational Saudi family with an autosomal dominant form of hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia in which positional mapping and exome sequencing identified a novel variant in KDF1 that fully segregates with the phenotype. The recapitulation of the phenotype we observe in this family by the Kdf1−/− mouse suggests a causal role played by the KDF1 variant.

  2. Factor VIII gene (F8) mutation and risk of inhibitor development in nonsevere hemophilia a

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.L. Eckhardt (Corien); A.S. van Velzen (Alice); M.A.D. Peters (Marjolein); J. Astermark (Jan); P.P. Brons; G. Castaman (Giancarlo); M.H. Cnossen (Marjon); N. Dors (N.); C. Escuriola-Ettingshausen (Carmen); K. Hamulyák (K.); D.P. Hart (Daniel); C.R.M. Hay (Charles R.); S. Haya (Saturnino); W.L. van Heerde; C. Hermans (Cédric); M. Holmström (Margareta); V. Jimenez-Yuste (Victor); R.D. Keenan (Russell); R. Klamroth (Robert); B.A.P. Laros-Van Gorkom (Britta); F.W.G. Leebeek (Frank); R. Liesner (Ri); A. Mäkipernaa (Anne); C. Male (Christoph); E.P. Mauser-Bunschoten (Eveline); M.G. Mazzucconi (Maria); S. McRae (Simon); K. Meijer (K.); M. Mitchell (Michael); M. Morfini (Massimo); M.R. Nijziel (Marten); J. Oldenburg (Jan); K. Peerlinck; P. Petrini (Pia); H. Platokouki (Helena); S.E. Reitter-Pfoertner (Sylvia); E. Santagostino (Elena); P. Schinco (Piercarla); F.J.W. Smiers (Frans); K.D. Siegmund (Kimberly); A. Tagliaferri (Annarita); T.T. Yee (Thynn); P.W. Kamphuisen (Pieter Willem); J.G. van der Bom (Anske); K. Fijnvandraat

    2013-01-01

    textabstractNeutralizing antibodies (inhibitors) toward factor VIII form a severe complication in nonsevere hemophilia A, profoundly aggravating the bleeding pattern. Identification of high-risk patients is hampered by lack of data that take exposure days to therapeutic factor VIII concentrates into

  3. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and EGFR mutations, function and possible role in clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voldborg, B R; Damstrup, L; Spang-Thomsen, M

    1997-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a growth factor receptor that induces cell differentiation and proliferation upon activation through the binding of one of its ligands. The receptor is located at the cell surface, where the binding of a ligand activates a tyrosine kinase in the intr...... aspects of therapeutic targeting of EGFR....

  4. The group II intron maturase: a reverse transcriptase and splicing factor go hand in hand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chen; Pyle, Anna Marie

    2017-12-01

    The splicing of group II introns in vivo requires the assistance of a multifunctional intron encoded protein (IEP, or maturase). Each IEP is also a reverse-transcriptase enzyme that enables group II introns to behave as mobile genetic elements. During splicing or retro-transposition, each group II intron forms a tight, specific complex with its own encoded IEP, resulting in a highly reactive holoenzyme. This review focuses on the structural basis for IEP function, as revealed by recent crystal structures of an IEP reverse transcriptase domain and cryo-EM structures of an IEP-intron complex. These structures explain how the same IEP scaffold is utilized for intron recognition, splicing and reverse transcription, while providing a physical basis for understanding the evolutionary transformation of the IEP into the eukaryotic splicing factor Prp8. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Detection of Copper (II) and Cadmium (II) binding to dissolved organic matter from macrophyte decomposition by fluorescence excitation-emission matrix spectra combined with parallel factor analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan, Dong-hai; Guo, Xu-jing; Wen, Li; He, Lian-sheng; Wang, Jing-gang; Li, Jun-qi

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectra coupled with parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) was used to characterize dissolved organic matter (DOM) derived from macrophyte decomposition, and to study its complexation with Cu (II) and Cd (II). Both the protein-like and the humic-like components showed a marked quenching effect by Cu (II). Negligible quenching effects were found for Cd (II) by components 1, 5 and 6. The stability constants and the fraction of the binding fluorophores for humic-like components and Cu (II) can be influenced by macrophyte decomposition of various weight gradients in aquatic plants. Macrophyte decomposition within the scope of the appropriate aquatic phytomass can maximize the stability constant of DOM-metal complexes. A large amount of organic matter was introduced into the aquatic environment by macrophyte decomposition, suggesting that the potential risk of DOM as a carrier of heavy metal contamination in macrophytic lakes should not be ignored. - Highlights: • Macrophyte decomposition increases fluorescent DOM components in the upper sediment. • Protein-like components are quenched or enhanced by adding Cu (II) and Cd (II). • Macrophyte decomposition DOM can impact the affinity of Cu (II) and Cd (II). • The log K M and f values showed a marked change due to macrophyte decomposition. • Macrophyte decomposition can maximize the stability constant of DOM-Cu (II) complexes. - Macrophyte decomposition DOM can influence on the binding affinity of metal ions in macrophytic lakes

  6. The transcription factor ETS-1 regulates angiotensin II-stimulated fibronectin production in mesangial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Ping; Feng, Wenguang; Rezonzew, Gabriel; Chumley, Phillip; Jaimes, Edgar A

    2012-06-01

    Angiotensin II (ANG II) produced as result of activation of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of chronic kidney disease via its hemodynamic effects on the renal microcirculation as well as by its nonhemodynamic actions including the production of extracellular matrix proteins such as fibronectin, a multifunctional extracellular matrix protein that plays a major role in cell adhesion and migration as well as in the development of glomerulosclerosis. ETS-1 is an important transcription factor essential for normal kidney development and glomerular integrity. We previously showed that ANG II increases ETS-1 expression and is required for fibronectin production in mesangial cells. In these studies, we determined that ANG II induces phosphorylation of ETS-1 via activation of the type 1 ANG II receptor and that Erk1/2 and Akt/PKB phosphorylation are required for these effects. In addition, we characterized the role of ETS-1 on the transcriptional activation of fibronectin production in mesangial cells. We determined that ETS-1 directly activates the fibronectin promoter and by utilizing gel shift assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays identified two different ETS-1 binding sites that promote the transcriptional activation of fibronectin in response to ANG II. In addition, we identified the essential role of CREB and its coactivator p300 on the transcriptional activation of fibronectin by ETS-1. These studies unveil novel mechanisms involved in RAS-induced production of the extracellular matrix protein fibronectin in mesangial cells and establish the role of the transcription factor ETS-1 as a direct mediator of these effects.

  7. Identification of Factors Interacting with hMSH2 and hMLH1 in the Fetal Liver and Investigations of how Mitochondrial Dysfunction Creates a Mutator Phenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Anne Karin

    mutations. Mutations in MMR genes cause hereditary non-polyposis colon cancer. In an effort to identify unidentified genes involved in MMR and tissue-specific MMRassociated factors, we employed the yeast two-hybrid system, using the human hMSH2 as bait and a human fetal liver cDNA library as prey. We...... between mitochondrial activity and genomic instability. Mitochondrial dysfunction and genetic instability are characteristic features of cancer cells. Furthermore, mitochondrial dysfunction is a key feature of aging due to accumulation of mutations in mtDNA. Our studies in a yeast model system suggest......Increased spontaneous mutation frequency is associated with increased cancer risk. However, the relative contribution of spontaneous endogenous mutagenesis to carcinogenesis is not known today. Defects in the postreplication DNA mismatch repair (MMR) pathway are recognized to increase spontaneous...

  8. Insulin-like growth factor-II (IGF II) receptor from rat brain is of lower apparent molecular weight than the IGF II receptor from rat liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McElduff, A.; Poronnik, P.; Baxter, R.C.

    1987-01-01

    The binding subunits of the insulin and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF I) receptors from rat brain are of lower molecular weight than the corresponding receptor in rat liver, possibly due to variations in sialic acid content. We have compared the IGF II receptor from rat brain and rat liver. The brain receptor is of smaller apparent mol wt (about 10 K) on sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. This size difference is independent of ligand binding as it persists in iodinated and specifically immunoprecipitated receptors. From studies of wheat germ agglutinin binding and the effect of neuraminidase on receptor mobility, we conclude that this difference is not simply due to variations in sialic acid content. Treatment with endoglycosidase F results in reduction in the molecular size of both liver and brain receptors and after this treatment the aglycoreceptors are of similar size. We conclude that in rat brain tissue the IGF II receptor like the binding subunits of the insulin and IGF I receptors is of lower molecular size than the corresponding receptors in rat liver. This difference is due to differences in N-linked glycosylation

  9. Acquired resistance L747S mutation in an epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitor-naïve patient: A report of three cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Fumihiro; Fukuchi, Kunihiko; Yamazaki, Yohei; Takayasu, Hiromi; Tazawa, Sakiko; Tateno, Hidetsugu; Kato, Eisuke; Wakabayashi, Aya; Fujimori, Mami; Iwasaki, Takuya; Hayashi, Makoto; Tsuchiya, Yutaka; Yamashita, Jun; Takeda, Norikazu; Kokubu, Fumio

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of the present study was to report cases of epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitor (EGFR-TKI)-naïve patients carrying a mutation associated with acquired resistance to the drug. Gene alterations in 77 lung carcinoma patients were analyzed by collecting and studying curette lavage fluid at the time of diagnosis. PCRs were performed to amplify mutation hotspot regions in EGFR genes. The PCR products were direct-sequenced and the mutations confirmed by resequencing using different primers. Case 1 was a 78-year-old Japanese male diagnosed with stage IB lung adenocarcinoma who was found to have two EGFR mutations, G719S and L747S. Case 2 was a 73-year-old Japanese male diagnosed with stage IV squamous cell lung carcinoma and bone metastasis who had the EGFR mutation, L747S. Case 3 was an 82-year-old Japanese male diagnosed with hyponatremia due to inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone and stage IIIB small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC) who had the EGFR mutation, L747S. Thus, the EGFR mutation L747S associated with acquired EGFR-TKI resistance was detected in two non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) patients and one SCLC patient, none of whom had ever received EGFR-TKI. The patients were current smokers with stages at diagnosis ranging from IB to IV, and their initial tumors contained resistant clones carrying L747S. L747S may be associated with primary resistance. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first report of an EGFR mutation associated with resistance to EGFR-TKI in SCLC patients. The early detection of EGFR-TKI resistance mutations may be beneficial in making treatment decisions for lung carcinoma patients, including those with SCLC.

  10. Complete remission of liver metastasis in a lung cancer patient with epidermal growth factor mutation achieved with Icotinib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhouyu; Chai, Ying

    2016-11-01

    A 65-year-old Chinese male was referred to our hospital for epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-mutated advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Aggressive combined therapy with surgical resection of the right upper lung lesion and chemotherapy was performed. One month later, continued Icotinib treatment was used as magnetic resonance imaging revealed liver metastasis (LM). Interestingly, complete remission of the patient's LM lesions was achieved in six months. To our knowledge, this is the first report documenting a successful case of an NSCLC patient with LM treated with Icotinib after receiving a radical resection for pulmonary carcinoma. Our experience could provide a treatment strategy for patients with similar disease. © 2016 The Authors. Thoracic Cancer published by China Lung Oncology Group and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  11. Somatic loss of function mutations in neurofibromin 1 and MYC associated factor X genes identified by exome-wide sequencing in a wild-type GIST case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belinsky, Martin G.; Rink, Lori; Cai, Kathy Q.; Capuzzi, Stephen J.; Hoang, Yen; Chien, Jeremy; Godwin, Andrew K.; Mehren, Margaret von

    2015-01-01

    Approximately 10–15 % of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) lack gain of function mutations in the KIT and platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha (PDGFRA) genes. An alternate mechanism of oncogenesis through loss of function of the succinate-dehydrogenase (SDH) enzyme complex has been identified for a subset of these “wild type” GISTs. Paired tumor and normal DNA from an SDH-intact wild-type GIST case was subjected to whole exome sequencing to identify the pathogenic mechanism(s) in this tumor. Selected findings were further investigated in panels of GIST tumors through Sanger DNA sequencing, quantitative real-time PCR, and immunohistochemical approaches. A hemizygous frameshift mutation (p.His2261Leufs*4), in the neurofibromin 1 (NF1) gene was identified in the patient’s GIST; however, no germline NF1 mutation was found. A somatic frameshift mutation (p.Lys54Argfs*31) in the MYC associated factor X (MAX) gene was also identified. Immunohistochemical analysis for MAX on a large panel of GISTs identified loss of MAX expression in the MAX-mutated GIST and in a subset of mainly KIT-mutated tumors. This study suggests that inactivating NF1 mutations outside the context of neurofibromatosis may be the oncogenic mechanism for a subset of sporadic GIST. In addition, loss of function mutation of the MAX gene was identified for the first time in GIST, and a broader role for MAX in GIST progression was suggested. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12885-015-1872-y) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users

  12. Mutations in a plastid-localized elongation factor G alter early stages of plastid development in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hangarter Roger P

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proper development of plastids in embryo and seedling tissues is critical for plant development. During germination, plastids develop to perform many critical functions that are necessary to establish the seedling for further growth. A growing body of work has demonstrated that components of the plastid transcription and translation machinery must be present and functional to establish the organelle upon germination. Results We have identified Arabidopsis thaliana mutants in a gene that encodes a plastid-targeted elongation factor G (SCO1 that is essential for plastid development during embryogenesis since two T-DNA insertion mutations in the coding sequence (sco1-2 and sco1-3 result in an embryo-lethal phenotype. In addition, a point mutation allele (sco1-1 and an allele with a T-DNA insertion in the promoter (sco1-4 of SCO1 display conditional seedling-lethal phenotypes. Seedlings of these alleles exhibit cotyledon and hypocotyl albinism due to improper chloroplast development, and normally die shortly after germination. However, when germinated on media supplemented with sucrose, the mutant plants can produce photosynthetically-active green leaves from the apical meristem. Conclusion The developmental stage-specific phenotype of the conditional-lethal sco1 alleles reveals differences in chloroplast formation during seedling germination compared to chloroplast differentiation in cells derived from the shoot apical meristem. Our identification of embryo-lethal mutant alleles in the Arabidopsis elongation factor G indicates that SCO1 is essential for plant growth, consistent with its predicted role in chloroplast protein translation.

  13. Comparison of Diabetes Type II Patients Life Style Effective Factors With That of Healthy People.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Mostafaei

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction:Diabetes is a significant and expensive health problem which had influenced all the ages in almost all the countries. Increasing prevalence of this disease has been caused by continued changes in lifestyle such as unsuitable nutrition, lack of physical activities and fatness which is often related to modern city life, mechanization and industrialization. It is an expensive disease, both for patients and the health and hygienic care systems. This research tried to examine the relationship between lifestyle risk factors and type II diabetes. Methods: This research was a case-control type by random sampling and studying140 diabetes type II patients as case group and 140 healthy people accompanying some other patients as the control group at Tonekabon Shahid Rajaei hospital. People were of both sexes, between 30 and 64 years of age and Tonekabon residents. The questionnaire used included demographic, nutritional, physical activities, stress tolerance and smoking status information. The SPSS 11.5 and excel software were used for statistic calculation and for analysis of data, T and Chi-Square tests were applied. Results: By analyzing the data collected, there was a meaningful statistical relationship between physical activities, stress residence, nutrition, smoking and the diabetes type II disease (P-value0.05. Conclusion: Results imply that some risk factors important in diabetes type II include unsuitable nutrition such as having too much of sweets and sugar,lack of fruits, vegetables, fish, proteins and also lack of physical activities, stress tolerance and control.

  14. Copper(II) complexes of alloferon 1 with point mutations (H1A) and (H9A) stability structure and biological activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matusiak, Agnieszka; Kuczer, Mariola; Czarniewska, Elżbieta; Rosiński, Grzegorz; Kowalik-Jankowska, Teresa

    2014-09-01

    Mono- and polynuclear copper(II) complexes of the alloferon 1 with point mutations (H1A) A(1)GVSGH(6)GQH(9)GVH(12)G (Allo1A) and (H9A) H(1)GVSGH(6)GQA(9)GVH(12)G (Allo9A) have been studied by potentiometric, UV-visible, CD, EPR spectroscopic and mass spectrometry (MS) methods. To obtain a complete complex speciation different metal-to-ligand molar ratios ranging from 1:1 to 4:1 for Allo1A and to 3:1 for Allo9A were studied. The presence of the His residue in first position of the peptide chain changes the coordination abilities of the Allo9A peptide in comparison to that of the Allo1A. Imidazole-N3 atom of N-terminal His residue of the Allo9A peptide forms stable 6-membered chelate with the terminal amino group. Furthermore, the presence of two additional histidine residues in the Allo9A peptide (H(6),H(12)) leads to the formation of the CuL complex with 4N {NH2,NIm-H(1),NIm-H(6),NIm-H(12)} binding site in wide pH range (5-8). For the Cu(II)-Allo1A system, the results demonstrated that at physiological pH7.4 the predominant complex the CuH-1L consists of the 3N {NH2,N(-),CO,NIm} coordination mode. The inductions of phenoloxidase activity and apoptosis in vivo in Tenebrio molitor cells by the ligands and their copper(II) complexes at pH7.4 were studied. The Allo1A, Allo1K peptides and their copper(II) complexes displayed the lowest hemocytotoxic activity while the most active was the Cu(II)-Allo9A complex formed at pH7.4. The results may suggest that the N-terminal-His(1) and His(6) residues may be more important for their proapoptotic properties in insects than those at positions 9 and 12 in the peptide chain. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Biochemical characterization of individual human glycosylated pro-insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-II and big-IGF-II isoforms associated with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenall, Sameer A; Bentley, John D; Pearce, Lesley A; Scoble, Judith A; Sparrow, Lindsay G; Bartone, Nicola A; Xiao, Xiaowen; Baxter, Robert C; Cosgrove, Leah J; Adams, Timothy E

    2013-01-04

    Insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) is a major embryonic growth factor belonging to the insulin-like growth factor family, which includes insulin and IGF-I. Its expression in humans is tightly controlled by maternal imprinting, a genetic restraint that is lost in many cancers, resulting in up-regulation of both mature IGF-II mRNA and protein expression. Additionally, increased expression of several longer isoforms of IGF-II, termed "pro" and "big" IGF-II, has been observed. To date, it is ambiguous as to what role these IGF-II isoforms have in initiating and sustaining tumorigenesis and whether they are bioavailable. We have expressed each individual IGF-II isoform in their proper O-glycosylated format and established that all bind to the IGF-I receptor and both insulin receptors A and B, resulting in their activation and subsequent stimulation of fibroblast proliferation. We also confirmed that all isoforms are able to be sequestered into binary complexes with several IGF-binding proteins (IGFBP-2, IGFBP-3, and IGFBP-5). In contrast to this, ternary complex formation with IGFBP-3 or IGFBP-5 and the auxillary protein, acid labile subunit, was severely diminished. Furthermore, big-IGF-II isoforms bound much more weakly to purified ectodomain of the natural IGF-II scavenging receptor, IGF-IIR. IGF-II isoforms thus possess unique biological properties that may enable them to escape normal sequestration avenues and remain bioavailable in vivo to sustain oncogenic signaling.

  16. Biochemical Characterization of Individual Human Glycosylated pro-Insulin-like Growth Factor (IGF)-II and big-IGF-II Isoforms Associated with Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenall, Sameer A.; Bentley, John D.; Pearce, Lesley A.; Scoble, Judith A.; Sparrow, Lindsay G.; Bartone, Nicola A.; Xiao, Xiaowen; Baxter, Robert C.; Cosgrove, Leah J.; Adams, Timothy E.

    2013-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) is a major embryonic growth factor belonging to the insulin-like growth factor family, which includes insulin and IGF-I. Its expression in humans is tightly controlled by maternal imprinting, a genetic restraint that is lost in many cancers, resulting in up-regulation of both mature IGF-II mRNA and protein expression. Additionally, increased expression of several longer isoforms of IGF-II, termed “pro” and “big” IGF-II, has been observed. To date, it is ambiguous as to what role these IGF-II isoforms have in initiating and sustaining tumorigenesis and whether they are bioavailable. We have expressed each individual IGF-II isoform in their proper O-glycosylated format and established that all bind to the IGF-I receptor and both insulin receptors A and B, resulting in their activation and subsequent stimulation of fibroblast proliferation. We also confirmed that all isoforms are able to be sequestered into binary complexes with several IGF-binding proteins (IGFBP-2, IGFBP-3, and IGFBP-5). In contrast to this, ternary complex formation with IGFBP-3 or IGFBP-5 and the auxillary protein, acid labile subunit, was severely diminished. Furthermore, big-IGF-II isoforms bound much more weakly to purified ectodomain of the natural IGF-II scavenging receptor, IGF-IIR. IGF-II isoforms thus possess unique biological properties that may enable them to escape normal sequestration avenues and remain bioavailable in vivo to sustain oncogenic signaling. PMID:23166326

  17. A family of insulin-like growth factor II mRNA-binding proteins represses translation in late development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, J; Christiansen, J; Lykke-Andersen, J

    1999-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) is a major fetal growth factor. The IGF-II gene generates multiple mRNAs with different 5' untranslated regions (5' UTRs) that are translated in a differential manner during development. We have identified a human family of three IGF-II mRNA-binding proteins.......5 followed by a decline towards birth, and, similar to IGF-II, IMPs are especially expressed in developing epithelia, muscle, and placenta in both mouse and human embryos. The results imply that cytoplasmic 5' UTR-binding proteins control IGF-II biosynthesis during late mammalian development....... and are homologous to the Xenopus Vera and chicken zipcode-binding proteins. IMP localizes to subcytoplasmic domains in a growth-dependent and cell-specific manner and causes a dose-dependent translational repression of IGF-II leader 3 -luciferase mRNA. Mouse IMPs are produced in a burst at embryonic day 12...

  18. MHC Class II and Non-MHC Class II Genes Differentially Influence Humoral Immunity to Bacillus anthracis Lethal Factor and Protective Antigen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith A. James

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Anthrax Lethal Toxin consists of Protective Antigen (PA and Lethal Factor (LF, and current vaccination strategies focus on eliciting antibodies to PA. In human vaccination, the response to PA can vary greatly, and the response is often directed toward non-neutralizing epitopes. Variable vaccine responses have been shown to be due in part to genetic differences in individuals, with both MHC class II and other genes playing roles. Here, we investigated the relative contribution of MHC class II versus non-MHC class II genes in the humoral response to PA and LF immunization using three immunized strains of inbred mice: A/J (H-2k at the MHC class II locus, B6 (H-2b, and B6.H2k (H-2k. IgG antibody titers to LF were controlled primarily by the MHC class II locus, whereas IgG titers to PA were strongly influenced by the non-MHC class II genetic background. Conversely, the humoral fine specificity of reactivity to LF appeared to be controlled primarily through non-MHC class II genes, while the specificity of reactivity to PA was more dependent on MHC class II. Common epitopes, reactive in all strains, occurred in both LF and PA responses. These results demonstrate that MHC class II differentially influences humoral immune responses to LF and PA.

  19. Mutations in AXIN2 gene as a risk factor for tooth agenesis and cancer: A review

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hloušková, A.; Bielik, P.; Bonczek, O.; Balcar, V. J.; Šerý, Omar

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 38, č. 3 (2017), s. 131-137 ISSN 0172-780X R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NT11420 Institutional support: RVO:67985904 Keywords : hypodontia * oligodontia * Wnt signal pathway Subject RIV: FF - HEENT, Dentistry OBOR OECD: Dentistry, oral surgery and medicine Impact factor: 0.918, year: 2016

  20. Mutational analysis of Glu272 in elongation factor 1A of E. coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mansilla, Francisco; Knudsen, Charlotte Rohde; Clark, Brian F. C.

    1998-01-01

    In our previous work (Mansilla et al. (1997) Protein Eng. 10, 927-934) we showed that Arg7 of Escherichia coli elongation factor Tu (EF1A) plays an essential role in aminoacyl-tRNA (aa-tRNA) binding. Substitution of Arg7 by Ala or Glu lost this activity. We proposed that Arg7 forms a salt bridge...

  1. Mutational analysis of Glu272 in elongation factor 1A of E. coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mansilla, Francisco; Knudsen, Charlotte Rohde; Clark, Brian F. C.

    1998-01-01

    In our previous work (Mansilla et al. (1997) Protein Eng. 10, 927-934) we showed that Arg7 of Escherichia coli elongation factor Tu (EF1A) plays an essential role in aminoacyl-tRNA (aa-tRNA) binding. Substitution of Arg7 by Ala or Glu lost this activity. We proposed that Arg7 forms a salt bridge ...

  2. A temperature-dependent theory for HeII: Application to the liquid structure factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chela-Flores, J.; Ghassib, H.B.

    1981-08-01

    A temperature-dependent theory is presented for HeII, which is based on both a gauge-theoretic formulation as well as a mean-field (Hartree) approach. A simple model calculation is then performed within this framework for the liquid structure factor of the system. In particular, explicit expressions are obtained for the low-momentum-transfer and low-temperature limits, which seem to conform with the available experimental data. Further, the curvature of the structure factor is predicted, under these circumstances, to be only mildly dependent on temperature. Throughout, we compare and contrast with other theoretical attempts, including Feynman's. (author)

  3. Insulin-like growth factor-II receptors in cultured rat hepatocytes: regulation by cell density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, C.D.; Baxter, R.C.

    1987-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-II (IGF-II) receptors in primary cultures of adult rat hepatocytes were characterized and their regulation by cell density examined. In hepatocytes cultured at 5 X 10(5) cells per 3.8 cm2 plate [ 125 I]IGF-II bound to specific, high affinity receptors (Ka = 4.4 +/- 0.5 X 10(9) l/mol). Less than 1% cross-reactivity by IGF-I and no cross-reactivity by insulin were observed. IGF-II binding increased when cells were permeabilized with 0.01% digitonin, suggesting the presence of an intracellular receptor pool. Determined by Scatchard analysis and by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis after affinity labeling, the higher binding was due solely to an increase in binding sites present on 220 kDa type II IGF receptors. In hepatocytes cultured at low densities, the number of cell surface receptors increased markedly, from 10-20,000 receptors per cell at a culture density of 6 X 10(5) cells/well to 70-80,000 receptors per cell at 0.38 X 10(5) cells/well. The increase was not due simply to the exposure of receptors from the intracellular pool, as a density-related increase in receptors was also seen in cells permeabilized with digitonin. There was no evidence that IGF binding proteins, either secreted by hepatocytes or present in fetal calf serum, had any effect on the measurement of receptor concentration or affinity. We conclude that rat hepatocytes in primary culture contain specific IGF-II receptors and that both cell surface and intracellular receptors are regulated by cell density

  4. Seven novel mutations in the long isoform of the USH2A gene in Chinese families with nonsyndromic retinitis pigmentosa and Usher syndrome Type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wenjun; Dai, Hanjun; Lu, Tingting; Zhang, Xiaohui; Dong, Bing; Li, Yang

    2011-01-01

    To describe the clinical and genetic findings in one Chinese family with autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (arRP) and in three unrelated Chinese families with Usher syndrome type II (USH2). One family (FR1) with arRP and three unrelated families (F6, F7, and F8) with Usher syndrome (USH), including eight affected members and seven unaffected family individuals were examined clinically. The study included 100 normal Chinese individuals as normal controls. After obtaining informed consent, peripheral blood samples from all participants were collected and genomic DNA was extracted. Genotyping and haplotyping analyses were performed on the known genetic loci for arRP with a panel of polymorphic markers in family FR1. In all four families, the coding region (exons 2-72), including the intron-exon boundary of the USH2A (Usher syndrome type -2A protein) gene, was screened by PCR and direct DNA sequencing. Whenever substitutions were identified in a patient, a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis, single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis, or high resolution melt curve analysis (HRM) was performed on all available family members and on the 100 normal controls. The affected individuals presented with typical fundus features of retinitis pigmentosa (RP), including narrowing of the vessels, bone-spicule pigmentation, and waxy optic discs. The electroretinogram (ERG) wave amplitudes of the available probands were undetectable. Audiometric tests in the affected individuals in family FR1 were normal, while indicating moderate to severe sensorineural hearing impairment in the affected individuals in families F6, F7, and F8. Vestibular function was normal in all patients from all four families. The disease-causing gene in family FR1 was mapped to the USH2A locus on chromosome 1q41. Seven novel mutations (two missenses, one 7-bp deletion, two small deletions, and two nonsenses) were detected in the four families after sequencing analysis of

  5. A single mutation in the 15S rRNA gene confers nonsense suppressor activity and interacts with mRF1 the release factor in yeast mitochondria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Gargouri

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available We have determined the nucleotide sequence of the mim3-1 mitochondrial ribosomal suppressor, acting on ochre mitochondrial mutations and one frameshift mutation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The 15s rRNA suppressor gene contains a G633 to C transversion. Yeast mitochondrial G633 corresponds to G517 of the E.coli 15S rRNA, which is occupied by an invariant G in all known small rRNA sequences. Interestingly, this mutation has occurred at the same position as the known MSU1 mitochondrial suppressor which changes G633 to A. The suppressor mutation lies in a highly conserved region of the rRNA, known in E.coli as the 530-loop, interacting with the S4, S5 and S12 ribosomal proteins. We also show an interesting interaction between the mitochondrial mim3-1 and the nuclear nam3-1 suppressors, both of which have the same action spectrum on mitochondrial mutations: nam3-1 abolishes the suppressor effect when present with mim3-1 in the same haploid cell. We discuss these results in the light of the nature of Nam3, identified by [1] as the yeast mitochondrial translation release factor. A hypothetical mechanism of suppression by "ribosome shifting" is also discussed in view of the nature of mutations suppressed and not suppressed.

  6. Significance of determination of the serum levels of homocysteine (Hcy) and insulin-like growth factor-II (IGF-II) in patients with cerebrovascular diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tong Haijiang; Wang Yaling; Wang Lin; Xia Weiren; Shi Min; Lu Yaling

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the clinical significance of the changes of homocysteine (Hcy) and insulin-like growth factor H (IGF-II) in patients with cerebrovascular diseases (CVD). Methods: The serum Hcy (with CLIA) and IGF-II (with RIA) levels were measured in 123 patients with CVD (cerebral infarction 69 and cerebral hemorrhage 54) and 43 controls. Results: The levels of Hcy and IGF-II in patients with CVD were significantly higher than those in the controls (P 0.05). Conclusion: The serum Hcy and IGF-II levels in patients with CVD are elevated, Hcy and IGF-II may be involved in the development and pathogenesis of CVD. (authors)

  7. H19 RNA binds four molecules of insulin-like growth factor II mRNA-binding protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Runge, Steffen; Nielsen, Finn Cilius; Nielsen, Jacob

    2000-01-01

    H19 RNA is a major oncofetal 2.5-kilobase untranslated RNA of unknown function. The maternally expressed H19 gene is located 90 kilobase pairs downstream from the paternally expressed insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) gene on human chromosome 11 and mouse chromosome 7; and due to their recip......H19 RNA is a major oncofetal 2.5-kilobase untranslated RNA of unknown function. The maternally expressed H19 gene is located 90 kilobase pairs downstream from the paternally expressed insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) gene on human chromosome 11 and mouse chromosome 7; and due...

  8. Clinicopathological Features and Prognosis of Papillary Thyroid Microcarcinoma for Surgery and Relationships with the BRAFV600E Mutational Status and Expression of Angiogenic Factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenlei Shi

    Full Text Available To investigate the clinicopathological characteristics of papillary thyroid microcarcinoma (PTMC for surgery by comparing the difference between PTMC and larger papillary thyroid carcinoma (LPTC.We analyzed the differences in the clinicopathological characteristics, prognosis, B-type RAF kinase (BRAFV600E mutational status and expression of angiogenic factors, including pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF, Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF, and hypoxia-inducible factor alpha subunit (HIF-1α, between PTMC and LPTC by retrospectively reviewing the records of 251 patients with papillary thyroid carcinoma, 169 with PTMC, and 82 with LPTC (diameter >1 cm.There were no significant differences in the gender, age, multifocality, Hashimoto's thyroiditis, TNM stage, PEDF protein expression, rate of recurrence, or mean follow-up duration between patients with PTMC or LPTC. The prevalence of extrathyroidal invasion (EI, lymph node metastasis (LNM, and BRAF mutation in patients with PTMC was significantly lower than in patients with LPTC. In addition, in PTMC patients with EI and/or LNM and/or positive BRAF (high-risk PTMC patients, the prevalence of extrathyroidal invasion, Hashimoto's disease, lymph node metastasis, tumor TNM stage, PEDF positive protein expression, the rate of recurrent disease, and the mRNA expression of anti-angiogenic factors was almost as high as in patients with larger PTC, but with no significant difference.Extrathyroid invasion, lymph node metastases, and BRAFV600E mutation were the high risk factors of PTMC. PTMC should be considered for the same treatment strategy as LPTC when any of these factors is found. Particularly, PTMC with BRAFV600E gene mutations needed earlier surgical treatment. In addition, the high cell subtype of PTMC with BRAFV600E gene mutation is recommended for total thyroidectomy in primary surgery to reduce the risk of recurrence.

  9. Variation in breast cancer risk associated with factors related to pregnancies according to truncating mutation location, in the French National BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations carrier cohort (GENEPSO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecarpentier, Julie; Noguès, Catherine; Mouret-Fourme, Emmanuelle; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Lasset, Christine; Fricker, Jean-Pierre; Caron, Olivier; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Berthet, Pascaline; Faivre, Laurence; Bonadona, Valérie; Buecher, Bruno; Coupier, Isabelle; Gladieff, Laurence; Gesta, Paul; Eisinger, François; Frénay, Marc; Luporsi, Elisabeth; Lortholary, Alain; Colas, Chrystelle; Dugast, Catherine; Longy, Michel; Pujol, Pascal; Tinat, Julie; Lidereau, Rosette; Andrieu, Nadine

    2012-07-03

    Mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 confer a high risk of breast cancer (BC), but the magnitude of this risk seems to vary according to the study and various factors. Although controversial, there are data to support the hypothesis of allelic risk heterogeneity. We assessed variation in BC risk according to factors related to pregnancies by location of mutation in the homogeneous risk region of BRCA1 and BRCA2 in 990 women in the French study GENEPSO by using a weighted Cox regression model. Our results confirm the existence of the protective effect of an increasing number of full-term pregnancies (FTPs) toward BC among BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers (≥3 versus 0 FTPs: hazard ratio (HR) = 0.51, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.33 to 0.81). Additionally, the HR shows an association between incomplete pregnancies and a higher BC risk, which reached 2.39 (95% CI = 1.28 to 4.45) among women who had at least three incomplete pregnancies when compared with women with zero incomplete pregnancies. This increased risk appeared to be restricted to incomplete pregnancies occurring before the first FTP (HR = 1.77, 95% CI = 1.19 to 2.63). We defined the TMAP score (defined as the Time of Breast Mitotic Activity during Pregnancies) to take into account simultaneously the opposite effect of full-term and interrupted pregnancies. Compared with women with a TMAP score of less than 0.35, an increasing TMAP score was associated with a statistically significant increase in the risk of BC (P trend = 0.02) which reached 1.97 (95% CI = 1.19 to 3.29) for a TMAP score >0.5 (versus TMAP ≤0.35). All these results appeared to be similar in BRCA1 and BRCA2. Nevertheless, our results suggest a variation in BC risk associated with parity according to the location of the mutation in BRCA1. Indeed, parity seems to be associated with a significantly decreased risk of BC only among women with a mutation in the central region of BRCA1 (low-risk region) (≥1 versus 0 FTP: HR = 0.27, 95% CI = 0.13 to

  10. Evaluation and identification of factors related to KRAS and BRAF gene mutations in colorectal cancer: A meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Lin

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: The meta-analysis reveals that KRAS has a slightly higher mutation rate in MSI-L/MSS tumors. Moreover, BRAF mutations have higher detection rates in right-sided colorectal cancer, which suggests that BRAF mutations are likely in CIMP-H tumors. Therefore, based on these findings, the molecular diagnostic tests to be conducted in colorectal cancer patients can be determined according to the location/clinical features of the tumor.

  11. A high ratio of insulin-like growth factor II/insulin-like growth factor binding protein 2 messenger RNA as a marker for anaplasia in meningiomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordqvist, A C; Peyrard, M; Pettersson, H; Mathiesen, T; Collins, V P; Dumanski, J P; Schalling, M

    1997-07-01

    Insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) I and II have been implicated as autocrine or paracrine growth promoters. These growth factors bind to specific receptors, and the response is modulated by interaction with IGF-binding proteins (IGFBPs). We observed a strong correlation between anaplastic/atypical histopathology and a high IGF-II/IGFBP-2 mRNA ratio in a set of 68 sporadic meningiomas. A strong correlation was also found between clinical outcome and IGF-II/IGFBP-2 ratio, whereas previously used histochemical markers were less correlated to outcome. We suggest that a high IGF-II/IGFBP-2 mRNA ratio may be a sign of biologically aggressive behavior in meningiomas that can influence treatment strategies. We propose that low IGFBP-2 levels in combination with increased levels of IGF-II would result in more free IGF-II and consequently greater stimulation of proliferation.

  12. A genetic study of Factor V Leiden (G1691A) mutation in young ischemic strokes with large vessel disease in a South Indian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anadure, Ravi; Christopher, Rita; Nagaraja, Dindagur; Narayanan, Coimbatore

    2017-10-01

    Factor V Leiden (FVL) has been, by far, the most investigated gene mutation, with 26 studies to date, on its role in arterial strokes. Overall, a meta-analysis of all these studies taken together showed that carriers of the Factor V Leiden allele were 1.33times more likely to develop arterial strokes when compared to controls. We subjected a highly select subset of young strokes, with large vessel infarcts, to genetic analysis for FVL mutation and compared them with matched healthy controls to look for a statistically significant association. In this prospective study, 6/120 cases (5%) and 2/120 controls (1.6%) were positive for heterozygous FVL (G1691A) mutation. The higher prevalence of FVL mutation in cases (5%) compared to controls (1.6%) did not show statistical significance with a Pearson's Chi square P value of 0.15. The Odds Ratio (OR) for risk of large vessel disease in FVL positive cases was 3.10 (95% CI of 0.61-15.7). FVL mutation (G1691A) in young Indian subjects with ischemic strokes does not seem to be significantly associated with large vessel disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Risk Factors Accompanied with Nephropathy in Patients with Type II Diabetes; Test of the Biopsychosocial Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Rahimian Boogar

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: The study of biopsychosocial factors influencing nephropathy as a most serious complication of type II diabetes is important. This study aimed to investigate risk factors accompanied with nephropathy in patients with type II diabetes based on the biopsychosocial model. Materials & Methods: In a cross-sectional descriptive study, 295 patients with type II diabetes were selected by convenience sampling in Tehran Shariati hospital outpatient clinics. The data were collected by demographical information questionnaire along with disease characteristics and depression anxiety stress scales (dass, quality of life scale (who- qol- bref, diabetes self-management scale (dsms, and diabetes knowledge scale (dks, then analyzed by chi-square, independent t-test and logistic regression with pasw software. Results: Hypertension (OR=3.841 & P0.05.Conclusion: It is important to pay attention to hypertension, glycated hemoglobin, body mass index, diabetes self-management, depression, quality of life, and diabetes knowledge for therapeutic intervention programming and diabetes complications control protocols for diabetic patients.(Sci J Hamadan Univ Med Sci 2012;19(2:44-53

  14. Nutritional status in the era of target therapy: poor nutrition is a prognostic factor in non-small cell lung cancer with activating epidermal growth factor receptor mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sehhoon; Park, Seongyeol; Lee, Se-Hoon; Suh, Beomseok; Keam, Bhumsuk; Kim, Tae Min; Kim, Dong-Wan; Kim, Young Whan; Heo, Dae Seog

    2016-11-01

    Pretreatment nutritional status is an important prognostic factor in patients treated with conventional cytotoxic chemotherapy. In the era of target therapies, its value is overlooked and has not been investigated. The aim of our study is to evaluate the value of nutritional status in targeted therapy. A total of 2012 patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) were reviewed and 630 patients with activating epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation treated with EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) were enrolled for the final analysis. Anemia, body mass index (BMI), and prognostic nutritional index (PNI) were considered as nutritional factors. Hazard ratio (HR), progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) for each group were calculated by Cox proportional analysis. In addition, scores were applied for each category and the sum of scores was used for survival analysis. In univariable analysis, anemia (HR, 1.29; p = 0.015), BMI lower than 18.5 (HR, 1.98; p = 0.002), and PNI lower than 45 (HR, 1.57; p nutritional status is a prognostic marker in NSCLC patients treated with EGFR TKI. Hence, baseline nutritional status should be more carefully evaluated and adequate nutrition should be supplied to these patients.

  15. Combined cytotoxic effects of tumor necrosis factor-alpha with various cytotoxic agents in tumor cell lines that are drug resistant due to mutated p53

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sleijfer, S; Le, T. K. P.; de Jong, S.; Timmer-Bosscha, H; Withoff, S; Mulder, NH

    Several studies suggest that tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF) is able to overcome drug resistance in tumors. Whether TNF is able to do so in tumor cell lines that are drug resistant due to a mutation in the tumor suppressor gene p53 is unclear. Therefore, we studied the in vitro cytotoxic effects

  16. Effects of mutation and some environmental factors on the physiology and pathogenicity of selected bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decicco, B. T.

    1974-01-01

    Studies with mutants of Staphylococcus aureus lacking some virulence factors suggest that the presence of deoxyribonuclease correlates with mouse pathogenicity of S. aureus, while the ability to ferment mannitol or the possession of coagulases are not required for virulence. Autotrophy investigations on mycobacteria demonstrate a complete correlation between the ability to grow with hydrogen and the species of scotochromogenic mycobacterium tested. All tested strains of M. gordonae, a saprophyte, could grow autotrophically while none of the tested strains of M. scrofulaceum, a clinically important species, possessed this ability. A series of heat tolerant mutants of Pseudomonas fluorescences were obtained which can grow at temperatures up to 54 C, in contrast to a maximum growth temperature of 37 C for the wild type.

  17. Risk factors for periodontal diseases among Yemeni type II diabetic patients. A case-control study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anas Shamala

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic periodontal diseases are one of diabetes mellitus complications. The present study aims to compare the periodontal status of type II diabetic patients to a control group and assess the role of risk factors in both groups. Materials and methods: A case-control study was conducted of 270 individuals (132 type II diabetics and 138 non-diabetics. Full mouth periodontal examination including plaque index, gingival bleeding, gingival recession, clinical attachment loss (CAL, tooth mobility, furcation involvement and the number of missing teeth. The case group was subdivided according to glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c status (poorly controlled HbA1c >8 and well controlled HbA1c≤8 Likewise, the duration of diabetes mellitus as short or long duration (DM≤10 or >10. The diabetic group was also subdivided according to smoking and Khat chewing habits. Result: The severity of periodontal disease among type II diabetic patients were significantly higher compared to the control group regarding the plaque index 2.6 (1.6-4.3, bleeding on probing 3.5 (2.3-13.0, gingival recession 2.0 (1.2-3.4, furcation involvement 4.0 (2.3-6.7, clinical attachment loss 5.7 (3.1-10.5, tooth mobility 2.0 (1.2-3.4, and number of missing teeth 4.4 (2.3-8.5. In addition, poorly controlled type II DM and long duration had higher CAL and number of missing teeth than well-controlled DM and short duration. No significant differences were found between smokers/nonsmokers and Khat chewers/non-chewers among the diabetic group. Conclusion: Type II diabetic patients have severe periodontal destruction and tooth loss compared to non-diabetic people and there were no differences within the diabetic group in regards to smoking and Khat chewing habits.

  18. Angiotensin II upregulates the expression of placental growth factor in human vascular endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo Yingqiang

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Atherosclerosis is now recognized as a chronic inflammatory disease. Angiotensin II (Ang II is a critical factor in inflammatory responses, which promotes the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Placental growth factor (PlGF is a member of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF family cytokines and is associated with inflammatory progress of atherosclerosis. However, the potential link between PlGF and Ang II has not been investigated. In the current study, whether Ang II could regulate PlGF expression, and the effect of PlGF on cell proliferation, was investigated in human vascular endothelial cells (VECs and smooth muscle cells (VSMCs. Results In growth-arrested human VECs and VSMCs, Ang II induced PlGF mRNA expression after 4 hour treatment, and peaked at 24 hours. 10-6 mol/L Ang II increased PlGF protein production after 8 hour treatment, and peaked at 24 hours. Stimulation with Ang II also induced mRNA expression of VEGF receptor-1 and -2(VEGFR-1 and -2 in these cells. The Ang II type I receptor (AT1R antagonist blocked Ang II-induced PlGF gene expression and protein production. Several intracellular signals elicited by Ang II were involved in PlGF synthesis, including activation of protein kinase C, extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2 and PI3-kinase. A neutralizing antibody against PlGF partially inhibited the Ang II-induced proliferation of VECs and VSMCs. However, this antibody showed little effect on the basal proliferation in these cells, whereas blocking antibody of VEGF could suppress both basal and Ang II-induced proliferation in VECs and VSMCs. Conclusion Our results showed for the first time that Ang II could induce the gene expression and protein production of PlGF in VECs and VSMCs, which might play an important role in the pathogenesis of vascular inflammation and atherosclerosis.

  19. Nucleon form factors in dispersively improved chiral effective field theory. II. Electromagnetic form factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alarcón, J. M.; Weiss, C.

    2018-05-01

    We study the nucleon electromagnetic form factors (EM FFs) using a recently developed method combining chiral effective field theory (χ EFT ) and dispersion analysis. The spectral functions on the two-pion cut at t >4 Mπ2 are constructed using the elastic unitarity relation and an N /D representation. χ EFT is used to calculate the real functions J±1(t ) =f±1(t ) /Fπ(t ) (ratios of the complex π π →N N ¯ partial-wave amplitudes and the timelike pion FF), which are free of π π rescattering. Rescattering effects are included through the empirical timelike pion FF | Fπ(t) | 2 . The method allows us to compute the isovector EM spectral functions up to t ˜1 GeV2 with controlled accuracy (leading order, next-to-leading order, and partial next-to-next-to-leading order). With the spectral functions we calculate the isovector nucleon EM FFs and their derivatives at t =0 (EM radii, moments) using subtracted dispersion relations. We predict the values of higher FF derivatives, which are not affected by higher-order chiral corrections and are obtained almost parameter-free in our approach, and explain their collective behavior. We estimate the individual proton and neutron FFs by adding an empirical parametrization of the isoscalar sector. Excellent agreement with the present low-Q2 FF data is achieved up to ˜0.5 GeV2 for GE, and up to ˜0.2 GeV2 for GM. Our results can be used to guide the analysis of low-Q2 elastic scattering data and the extraction of the proton charge radius.

  20. Allogeneic Transplant in ELANE and MEFV Mutation Positive Severe Cyclic Neutropenia: Review of Prognostic Factors for Secondary Severe Events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onyemaechi N. Okolo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective and Importance. Cyclic neutropenia (CyN is a rare autosomal dominant inherited disorder due to the mutation ELANE primarily affecting bone marrow stem cells and is characterized by recurrent neutropenia every 2 to 4 weeks. Symptoms vary from benign to severe, including death. Postulations on the cause of wide spectrum in symptom presentation include the possibility of other genetic mutations, such as MEFV. Recommended treatment for CyN is G-CSF to keep ANC higher to minimize risk of infection. Case. A 25-year-old male diagnosed with CyN, on G-CSF but worsening quality of life. Pretransplant investigations revealed ELANE mutation positive severe CyN along with familial Mediterranean fever (MEFV mutation. Intervention. Bone marrow transplantation as treatment for dual mutation (ELANE and MEFV mutation positive severe CyN. Conclusion. BMT may be considered as an alternative treatment for severe CyN in patients who are refractory to G-CSF. It is postulated that in our patient the combined mutations (CyN and MEFV may have contributed to the severity of this individual’s symptoms. We suggest CyN patients who present with severe symptoms have evaluation with ELANE mutation testing, Periodic Fever Syndromes Panel, and routine marrow assessment with FISH, conventional cytogenetics, and morphological evaluation for MDS/AML.

  1. Bacteriophage Resistance Mechanisms in the Fish Pathogen Flavobacterium psychrophilum: Linking Genomic Mutations to Changes in Bacterial Virulence Factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castillo, Daniel; Christiansen, Rói Hammershaimb; Dalsgaard, Inger

    2015-01-01

    -resistant strains had all obtained unique insertions and/or deletions and point mutations distributed among intergenic and genic regions. Mutations in genes related to cell surface properties, gliding motility, and biosynthesis of lipopolysaccharides and cell wall were found. The observed links between phage...

  2. Computational Analysis of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Mutations Predicts Differential Drug Sensitivity Profiles toward Kinase Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akula, Sravani; Kamasani, Swapna; Sivan, Sree Kanth; Manga, Vijjulatha; Vudem, Dashavantha Reddy; Kancha, Rama Krishna

    2018-05-01

    A significant proportion of patients with lung cancer carry mutations in the EGFR kinase domain. The presence of a deletion mutation in exon 19 or L858R point mutation in the EGFR kinase domain has been shown to cause enhanced efficacy of inhibitor treatment in patients with NSCLC. Several less frequent (uncommon) mutations in the EGFR kinase domain with potential implications in treatment response have also been reported. The role of a limited number of uncommon mutations in drug sensitivity was experimentally verified. However, a huge number of these mutations remain uncharacterized for inhibitor sensitivity or resistance. A large-scale computational analysis of clinically reported 298 point mutants of EGFR kinase domain has been performed, and drug sensitivity profiles for each mutant toward seven kinase inhibitors has been determined by molecular docking. In addition, the relative inhibitor binding affinity toward each drug as compared with that of adenosine triphosphate was calculated for each mutant. The inhibitor sensitivity profiles predicted in this study for a set of previously characterized mutants correlated well with the published clinical, experimental, and computational data. Both the single and compound mutations displayed differential inhibitor sensitivity toward first- and next-generation kinase inhibitors. The present study provides predicted drug sensitivity profiles for a large panel of uncommon EGFR mutations toward multiple inhibitors, which may help clinicians in deciding mutant-specific treatment strategies. Copyright © 2018 International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Cubilin P1297L mutation associated with hereditary megaloblastic anemia 1 causes impaired recognition of intrinsic factor-vitamin B(12) by cubilin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, M; Aminoff, M; Jacobsen, Christian

    2000-01-01

    Megaloblastic anemia 1 (MGA1) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by the selective intestinal malabsorption of intrinsic factor (IF) and vitamin B(12)/cobalamin (Cbl) in complex. Most Finnish patients with MGA1 carry the disease-specific P1297L mutation (FM1) in the IF-B(12) receptor, cubilin......-IF-Cbl in cubilin-expressing epithelial cells. In conclusion, the data presented show a substantial loss in affinity of the FM1 mutant form of the IF-Cbl binding region of cubilin. This now explains the malabsorption of Cbl and Cbl-dependent anemia in MGA1 patients with the FM1 mutation. (Blood. 2000...

  4. Gene blaCTX-M Mutation as Risk Factor of Antibiotic Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devinna Kang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Currently there are more than half from all antibiotics used in the world which is belong to β lactam group, but clinical effectiveness of the antibiotics are limited by antibiotic resistance of microorganisms as causative agents from infectious diseases. Several resistance mechanisms for Enterobacteriaceae are mostly caused by enzymatic hydrolysis of antibiotics specific enzymes, called β lactamases. β lactamases represent a large group of enzyme which is genetically and functionally different as extended‑spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL and known as greatest threat of resistence. Plasmid localization from the encoded gene and enzyme distribution among the pathogen increases every year. Most widespread and clinically relevant ESBL are class A ESBL of Temoniera (TEM, Sulphydryl variable (SHV and Cefotaxime (CTX-M types. The purpose of this review was to analyze variant of blaCTX-M gene which cause the most increase incidence of antibiotic resistance. The methods of this review were data-based searching based on Pubmed, Scopus and Google Scholar, without limitation of index factor by using the keyword “blaCTX-M”, “Extended-spectrum β-lactamase”, and “antibiotic resistance”. The conclusion of the review is CTX-M type ESBL have replaced TEM and SHV type as dominant enzyme in last decade. ESBL produced by Klebsiella pneumoniae have emerged as one of major nosocomial pathogens. Nosocomial infection caused by CTX-M-15 in Klebsiella pneumoniae dramatically increased in recent years.

  5. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 4G/5G polymorphism, factor V Leiden, prothrombin mutations and the risk of VTE recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundquist, Kristina; Wang, Xiao; Svensson, Peter J; Sundquist, Jan; Hedelius, Anna; Larsson Lönn, Sara; Zöller, Bengt; Memon, Ashfaque A

    2015-11-25

    Plasminogen-activator inhibitor (PAI)-1 is an important inhibitor of the plasminogen/plasmin system. PAI-1 levels are influenced by the 4G/5G polymorphism in the PAI-1 promoter. We investigated the relationship between the PAI-1 polymorphism and VTE recurrence, and its possible modification by factor V Leiden (FVL) and prothrombin (PTM) mutations. Patients (n=1,069) from the Malmö Thrombophilia Study were followed from discontinuation of anticoagulant treatment until diagnosis of VTE recurrence or the end of the study (maximum follow-up 9.8 years). One hundred twenty-seven patients (11.9 %) had VTE recurrence. PAI-1 was genotyped by TaqMan PCR. Cox regression analysis adjusted for age, sex and acquired risk factors of VTE showed no evidence of an association between PAI-1 genotype and risk of VTE recurrence in the study population as a whole. However, by including an interaction term in the analysis we showed that FVL but not PTM modified the effect of PAI-1 genotype: patients with the 4G allele plus FVL had a higher risk of VTE recurrence [hazard ratio (HR) =2.3, 95 % confidence interval (CI) =1.5-3.3] compared to patients with the 4G allele but no FVL (reference group) or FVL irrespective of PAI-1 genotype (HR=1.8, 95 % CI=1.3-2.5). Compared to reference group, 5G allele irrespective of FVL was associated with lower risk of VTE recurrence only when compared with 4G allele together with FVL. In conclusion, FVL has a modifying effect on PAI-1 polymorphism in relation to risk of VTE recurrence. The role of PAI-1 polymorphism as a risk factor of recurrent VTE may be FVL dependent.

  6. Tumor heterogeneity of fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) mutations in invasive bladder cancer: implications for perioperative anti-FGFR3 treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouessel, D; Neuzillet, Y; Mertens, L S; van der Heijden, M S; de Jong, J; Sanders, J; Peters, D; Leroy, K; Manceau, A; Maille, P; Soyeux, P; Moktefi, A; Semprez, F; Vordos, D; de la Taille, A; Hurst, C D; Tomlinson, D C; Harnden, P; Bostrom, P J; Mirtti, T; Horenblas, S; Loriot, Y; Houédé, N; Chevreau, C; Beuzeboc, P; Shariat, S F; Sagalowsky, A I; Ashfaq, R; Burger, M; Jewett, M A S; Zlotta, A R; Broeks, A; Bapat, B; Knowles, M A; Lotan, Y; van der Kwast, T H; Culine, S; Allory, Y; van Rhijn, B W G

    2016-07-01

    Fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) is an actionable target in bladder cancer. Preclinical studies show that anti-FGFR3 treatment slows down tumor growth, suggesting that this tyrosine kinase receptor is a candidate for personalized bladder cancer treatment, particularly in patients with mutated FGFR3. We addressed tumor heterogeneity in a large multicenter, multi-laboratory study, as this may have significant impact on therapeutic response. We evaluated possible FGFR3 heterogeneity by the PCR-SNaPshot method in the superficial and deep compartments of tumors obtained by transurethral resection (TUR, n = 61) and in radical cystectomy (RC, n = 614) specimens and corresponding cancer-positive lymph nodes (LN+, n = 201). We found FGFR3 mutations in 13/34 (38%) T1 and 8/27 (30%) ≥T2-TUR samples, with 100% concordance between superficial and deeper parts in T1-TUR samples. Of eight FGFR3 mutant ≥T2-TUR samples, only 4 (50%) displayed the mutation in the deeper part. We found 67/614 (11%) FGFR3 mutations in RC specimens. FGFR3 mutation was associated with pN0 (P < 0.001) at RC. In 10/201 (5%) LN+, an FGFR3 mutation was found, all concordant with the corresponding RC specimen. In the remaining 191 cases, RC and LN+ were both wild type. FGFR3 mutation status seems promising to guide decision-making on adjuvant anti-FGFR3 therapy as it appeared homogeneous in RC and LN+. Based on the results of TUR, the deep part of the tumor needs to be assessed if neoadjuvant anti-FGFR3 treatment is considered. We conclude that studies on the heterogeneity of actionable molecular targets should precede clinical trials with these drugs in the perioperative setting. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Inactivation of the transforming growth factor beta type II receptor in human small cell lung cancer cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, S; Nørgaard, P; Abrahamsen, N

    1999-01-01

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) exerts a growth inhibitory effect on many cell types through binding to two types of receptors, the type I and II receptors. Resistance to TGF-beta due to lack of type II receptor (RII) has been described in some cancer types including small cell lung...

  8. Development of DNA affinity techniques for the functional characterization of purified RNA polymerase II transcription factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garfinkel, S.; Thompson, J.A.; Cohen, R.B.; Brendler, T.; Safer, B.

    1987-01-01

    Affinity adsorption, precipitation, and partitioning techniques have been developed to purify and characterize RNA Pol II transcription components from whole cell extracts (WCE) (HeLa) and nuclear extracts (K562). The titration of these extracts with multicopy constructs of the Ad2 MLP but not pUC8, inhibits transcriptional activity. DNA-binding factors precipitated by this technique are greatly enriched by centrifugation. Using this approach, factors binding to the upstream promoter sequence (UPS) of the Ad2 MLP have been rapidly isolated by Mono Q, Mono S, and DNA affinity chromatography. By U.V. crosslinking to nucleotides containing specific 32 P-phosphodiester bonds within the recognition sequence, this factor is identified as a M/sub r/ = 45,000 polypeptide. To generate an assay system for the functional evaluation of single transcription components, a similar approach using synthetic oligonucleotide sequences spanning single promoter binding sites has been developed. The addition of a synthetic 63-mer containing the UPS element of the Ad2 MLP to HeLa WCE inhibited transcription by 60%. The addition of partially purified UPS binding protein, but not RNA Pol II, restored transcriptional activity. The addition of synthetic oligonucleotides containing other regulatory sequences not present in the Ad2 MLP was without effect

  9. Two novel cases of cerebral haemorrhages at the neonatal period associated with inherited factor VII deficiency, one of them revealing a new nonsense mutation (Ser52Stop).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giansily-Blaizot, Muriel; Aguilar-Martinez, Patricia; Briquel, Marie-Elisabeth; d'Oiron, Roseline; De Maistre, Emmanuel; Epelbaum, Serge; Schved, Jean-François

    2003-02-01

    Factor VII (FVII) is a plasma glycoprotein that plays a key role in the initiation of blood coagulation cascade. Inherited FVII deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive disorder with a wide heterogeneous clinical pattern. The severe form may be associated with intracranial haemorrhages occurring closely to birth with a high mortality rate. In the present article, we report two novel cases of neonatal intracerebral bleeding associated with FVII activity levels below 1% of normal. FVII genotyping investigations revealed particular genotypes including the deleterious Cys135Arg mutation and a novel Ser52Stop nonsense mutation at the homozygous state. Both mutations, through different mechanisms, are expected to be inconsistent with the production of functional FVII. These putative mechanisms are discussed through a review of the literature on phenotypic and genotypic characteristics of cerebral haemorrhages in severe inherited FVII deficiency.

  10. Nonmuscle Myosin II Is Required for Internalization of the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor and Modulation of Downstream Signaling*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong Hyun; Wang, Aibing; Conti, Mary Anne; Adelstein, Robert S.

    2012-01-01

    Ligand-induced internalization of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is an important process for regulating signal transduction, cellular dynamics, and cell-cell communication. Here, we demonstrate that nonmuscle myosin II (NM II) is required for the internalization of the EGFR and to trigger the EGFR-dependent activation of ERK and AKT. The EGFR was identified as a protein that interacts with NM II by co-immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry analysis. This interaction requires both the regulatory light chain 20 (RLC20) of NM II and the kinase domain of the EGFR. Two paralogs of NM II, NM II-A, and NM II-B can act to internalize the EGFR, depending on the cell type and paralog content of the cell line. Loss (siRNA) or inhibition (25 μm blebbistatin) of NM II attenuates the internalization of the EGFR and impairs EGFR-dependent activation of ERK and AKT. Both internalization of the EGFR and downstream signaling to ERK and AKT can be partially restored in siRNA-treated cells by introduction of wild type (WT) GFP-NM II, but cannot be restored by motor mutant NM II. Taken together, these results suggest that NM II plays a role in the internalization of the EGFR and EGFR-mediated signaling pathways. PMID:22718763

  11. IDH Mutations: Genotype-Phenotype Correlation and Prognostic Impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Wei Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available IDH1/2 mutation is the most frequent genomic alteration found in gliomas, affecting 40% of these tumors and is one of the earliest alterations occurring in gliomagenesis. We investigated a series of 1305 gliomas and showed that IDH mutation is almost constant in 1p19q codeleted tumors. We found that the distribution of IDH1R132H, IDH1nonR132H, and IDH2 mutations differed between astrocytic, mixed, and oligodendroglial tumors, with an overrepresentation of IDH2 mutations in oligodendroglial phenotype and an overrepresentation of IDH1nonR132H in astrocytic tumors. We stratified grade II and grade III gliomas according to the codeletion of 1p19q and IDH mutation to define three distinct prognostic subgroups: 1p19q and IDH mutated, IDH mutated—which contains mostly TP53 mutated tumors, and none of these alterations. We confirmed that IDH mutation with a hazard ratio = 0.358 is an independent prognostic factor of good outcome. These data refine current knowledge on IDH mutation prognostic impact and genotype-phenotype associations.

  12. Icotinib combined whole brain radiotherapy for patients with brain metastasis from lung adenocarcinoma harboring epidermal growth factor receptor mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jin-Rui; Zhang, Ye; Zheng, Jia-Lian

    2016-07-01

    The brain is a metastatic organ that is most prone to lung adenocarcinoma (LAC). However, the prognosis of patients with brain metastasis remains very poor. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of icotinib plus whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT) for treating patients with brain metastasis from epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-mutated LAC. All patients received standard WBRT administered to the whole brain in 30 Gy in 10 daily fractions. Each patient was also instructed to take 125 mg icotinib thrice per day beginning from the first day of the WBRT. After completing the WBRT, maintenance icotinib was administered until the disease progressed or intolerable adverse effects were observed. Cranial progression-free survival (CPFS) and overall survival (OS) times were the primary endpoints. A total of 43 patients were enrolled in this study. Two patients (4.7%) presented a complete response (CR), whereas 20 patients (46.5%) presented a partial response (PR). The median CPFS and OS times were 11.0 and 15.0 months, respectively. The one-year CPFS rate was 40.0% for the patients harboring EGFR exon 19 deletion and 16.7% for the patients with EGFR exon 21 L858R (P=0.027). The concurrent administration of icotinib and WBRT exhibited favorable effects on the patients with brain metastasis. EGFR exon 19 deletion was predictive of a long CPFS following icotinib plus WBRT.

  13. BLOC-3 mutated in Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome is a Rab32/38 guanine nucleotide exchange factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerondopoulos, Andreas; Langemeyer, Lars; Liang, Jin-Rui; Linford, Andrea; Barr, Francis A

    2012-11-20

    Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome (HPS) is a human disease characterized by partial loss of pigmentation and impaired blood clotting. These symptoms are caused by defects in the biogenesis of melanosomes and platelet dense granules, often referred to as lysosome-related organelles. Genes mutated in HPS encode subunits of the biogenesis of lysosome-related organelles complexes (BLOCs). BLOC-1 and BLOC-2, together with the AP-3 clathrin adaptor complex, act at early endosomes to sort components required for melanin formation and melanosome biogenesis away from the degradative lysosomal pathway toward early stage melanosomes. However the molecular functions of the Hps1-Hps4 complex BLOC-3 remain mysterious. Like other trafficking pathways, melanosome biogenesis and transport of enzymes involved in pigmentation involves specific Rab GTPases, in this instance Rab32 and Rab38. We now demonstrate that BLOC-3 is a Rab32 and Rab38 guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF). Silencing of the BLOC-3 subunits Hps1 and Hps4 results in the mislocalization of Rab32 and Rab38 and reduction in pigmentation. In addition, we show that BLOC-3 can promote specific membrane recruitment of Rab32/38. BLOC-3 therefore defines a novel Rab GEF family with a specific function in the biogenesis of lysosome-related organelles. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Intravenous Remifentanil Analgaesia for an Obstetric Patient with Type I Neurofibromatosis and a Factor V Leiden Mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José L. Gálvez

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Type I neurofibromatosis is characterised by altered skin pigmentation and the growth of benign tumours, particularly along the peripheral nerves and central nervous system. We report a 36-year-old primigravida woman in labour who was admitted to the obstetric suite of the Hospital Sant Joan de Déu, Barcelona, Spain, in 2007 with hypothyroidism, type I neurofibromatosis and a factor V Leiden mutation. Due to a lack of cranial and spinal imaging data, an epidural was not indicated; instead, continuous intravenous remifentanil analgaesia was administered. The remifentanil infusion was self-titrated by the patient using a visual analogue scale, with the dosage ranging from 0.01 to 0.25 μg/kg/minute. Due to rotational dystocia, Kjelland-type forceps were used during the delivery. After birth, the infant was found to have Apgar scores of 9 and 10, with no maternal or neonatal adverse effects observed. Although still controversial, remifentanil may be a successful alternative for analgaesia in similar cases; however, the specific risks and benefits for each patient should be considered prior to administration.

  15. Medication Adherence and its Related Factors in Patients with Type II Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behzad Gholamaliei

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Low levels of medication adherence in patients with type 2 diabetes is one of the greatest challenges in the treatment and control of diabetes. This study was designed to determine medication adherence and its related factors in patients with type II diabetes. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, a total of 300patients with type 2diabetes records in the health centers of Tuyserkan city were randomly selected in 2015. Data collection instrument was a self-made questionnaire, which consisted of factors related to the medication adherence. Questionnaires were completed after confirmation of validity and reliability, by interviews. To analyze the data, descriptive and inferential statistics (T-test, AnOVA, Simple and multiple linear regression were applied, using SPSS software, version 19. Results: Overall, %26.3 of patients were male and %73.7 were female. Also, %65 of patients were illiterate, %24 had some degree of symptoms, and %59.4 had poor medication adherence. There was a significant relationship between age, education, patient care and treatment expenditure, health care team and health system, therapy-related factors and condition-related factors, beliefs about illness, efficacy, and concerns about drugs and medication adherence (P < 0.05. Conclusions: This study showed that medication adherence in patients with diabetes was not suitable and individual, economical and social factors were influential.Therefore, the role of these factors must be considered when designing intervention programs.

  16. Steroidogenic factor-1 (SF-1 gene mutation as a frequent cause of primary amenorrhea in 46,XY female adolescents with low testosterone concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Servant Nadège

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Primary amenorrhea due to 46,XY disorders of sex differentiation (DSD is a frequent reason for consultation in endocrine and gynecology clinics. Among the genetic causes of low-testosterone primary amenorrhea due to 46,XY DSD, SRY gene is reported to be frequently involved, but other genes, such as SF1 and WT1, have never been studied for their prevalence. Methods We directly sequenced SRY, SF1 and WT1 genes in 15 adolescent girls with primary amenorrhea, low testosterone concentration, and XY karyotype, to determine the prevalence of mutations. We also analyzed the LH receptor gene in patients with high LH and normal FSH concentrations. Results Among the 15 adolescents with primary amenorrhea and low testosterone concentration, we identified two new SRY mutations, five new SF1 mutations and one new LH receptor gene mutation. Our study confirms the 10-15% prevalence of SRY mutations and shows the high prevalence (33% of SF1 abnormalities in primary amenorrhea due to 46,XY DSD with low plasma testosterone concentration. Conclusions The genetic analysis of low-testosterone primary amenorrhea is complex as several factors may be involved. This work underlines the need to systematically analyze the SF1 sequence in girls with primary amenorrhea due to 46,XY DSD and low testosterone, as well as in newborns with 46,XY DSD.

  17. Clinical features and treatment outcome of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with uncommon or complex epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassan, Matteo; Indraccolo, Stefano; Calabrese, Fiorella; Favaretto, Adolfo; Bonanno, Laura; Polo, Valentina; Zago, Giulia; Lunardi, Francesca; Attili, Ilaria; Pavan, Alberto; Rugge, Massimo; Guarneri, Valentina; Conte, PierFranco; Pasello, Giulia

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Tyrosine-kinase inhibitors (TKIs) represent the best treatment for advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with common exon 19 deletion or exon 21 epidermal growth factor receptor mutation (EGFRm). This is an observational study investigating epidemiology, clinical features and treatment outcome of NSCLC cases harbouring rare/complex EGFRm. Results Among 764 non-squamous NSCLC cases with known EGFRm status, 26(3.4%) harboured rare/complex EGFRm. Patients receiving first-line TKIs (N = 17) achieved median Progression Free Survival (PFS) and Overall Survival (OS) of 53 (IC 95%, 2–105) and 84 (CI 95%, 27–141) weeks respectively, without significant covariate impact. Response Rate and Disease Control Rate (DCR) were 47% and 65%, respectively. Uncommon exon 19 mutations achieved longer OS and PFS and higher DCR compared with exon 18 and 20 mutations. No additional gene mutation was discovered by MassARRAY analysis. TKIs were globally well tolerated. Materials and methods A retrospective review of advanced non-squamous NSCLC harbouring rare/complex EGFRm referred to our Center between 2010 and 2015 was performed. Additional molecular pathways disregulation was explored in selected cases, through MassARRAY analysis. Conclusions Peculiar clinical features and lower TKIs sensitivity of uncommon/complex compared with common EGFRm were shown. Exon 19 EGFRm achieved the best TKIs treatment outcome, while the optimal treatment of exon 18 and 20 mutations should be further clarified. PMID:28427238

  18. Correlation between familial cancer history and epidermal growth factor receptor mutations in Taiwanese never smokers with non-small cell lung cancer: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Po-Chung; Cheng, Yun-Chung

    2015-03-01

    Lung cancer is a leading cause of cancer deaths in the world. Cigarette smoking remains a prominent risk factor, but lung cancer incidence has been increasing in never smokers. Genetic abnormalities including epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations predominate in never smoking lung cancer patients. Furthermore, familial aggregations of patients with these mutations reflect heritable susceptibility to lung cancer. The correlation between familial cancer history and EGFR mutations in never smokers with lung cancer requires investigation. This was a retrospective case-control study that evaluated the prevalence of EGFR mutations in lung cancer patients with familial cancer history. Never smokers with lung cancer treated at a hospital in Taiwan between April 2012 and May 2014 were evaluated. Inclusion criteria were never smokers with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Exclusion criteria involved patients without records of familial cancer history or tumor genotype. This study included 246 never smokers with lung cancer. The study population mainly involved never smoking women with a mean age of 60 years, and the predominant tumor histology was adenocarcinoma. Lung cancer patients with familial cancer history had an increased prevalence of EGFR mutations compared to patients without family history [odds ratio (OR): 5.9; 95% confidence interval (CI): 3.3-10.6; Pnon-pulmonary cancers (OR: 5.0; 95% CI: 2.5-10.0; Pnever smoking lung cancer patients with familial cancer history. Moreover, a sizable proportion of never smoking cancer patients harbored these mutations. These observations have implications for the treatment of lung cancer in never smokers.

  19. Mutation Screening of the Krüppel-like Factor 1 Gene in Individuals With Increased Fetal Hemoglobin Referred for Hemoglobinopathy Investigation in South of Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamid, Mohammad; Ershadi Oskouei, Sanaz; Shariati, Gholamreza; Babaei, Esmaeil; Galehdari, Hamid; Saberi, Alihossein; Sedaghat, Alireza

    2018-04-01

    Any mutation in the Krüppel-like factor 1 (KLF1) gene may interfere with its proper related function in the erythropoiesis process and lead to alterations in proper activation of its downstream protein through globin switching, which results in an increase in fetal hemoglobin (HbF). This study aimed to investigate whether KLF1 mutation can associate with high level of HbF in individuals with increased fetal hemoglobin referred for screening of hemoglobinopathies in south of Iran. The human KLF1 gene was amplified via the polymerase chain reaction procedure, and sequencing was used to determine any mutation in these patients. Moreover, XmnI polymorphisms in the position of -158 of γ-globin gene promoter were analyzed in all patients by polymerase chain reaction restriction fragment length polymorphism. Analysis of sequencing revealed a missense mutation in the KLF1 gene, p.Ser102Pro (c.304T>C), which was detectable in 10 of 23 cases with elevated HbF level. This mutation was only detected in individuals who had a HbF level between 3.1% and 25.6%. Statistical analysis showed that the frequency of C allele is significantly correlated with a high level of HbF (PC) in the KLF1 gene in β-thalassemia patients with increased level of fetal hemoglobin. According to statistical results of p.Ser102Pro mutation and XmnI polymorphism, it has been strongly suggested that both polymorphisms have an association with increased HbF samples. These nucleotide changes alone may not be the only elements raising the level of HbF, and other regulatory and modifying factors also play a role in HbF production.

  20. Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1/2 inhibition and angiotensin II converting inhibition in mice with cardiomyopathy caused by lamin A/C gene mutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muchir, Antoine; Wu, Wei; Sera, Fusako; Homma, Shunichi; Worman, Howard J.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Both ACE and MEK1/2 inhibition are beneficial on cardiac function in Lmna cardiomyopathy. • MEK1/2 inhibitor has beneficial effects beyond ACE inhibition for Lmna cardiomyopathy. • These results provide further preclinical rationale for a clinical trial of a MEK1/2 inhibitor. - Abstract: Background: Mutations in the LMNA gene encoding A-type nuclear lamins can cause dilated cardiomyopathy with or without skeletal muscular dystrophy. Previous studies have shown abnormally increased extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 activity in hearts of Lmna H222P/H222P mice, a small animal model. Inhibition of this abnormal signaling activity with a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1/2 (MEK1/2) inhibitor has beneficial effects on heart function and survival in these mice. However, such treatment has not been examined relative to any standard of care intervention for dilated cardiomyopathy or heart failure. We therefore examined the effects of an angiotensin II converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor on left ventricular function in Lmna H222P/H222P mice and assessed if adding a MEK1/2 inhibitor would provide added benefit. Methods: Male Lmna H222P/H222P mice were treated with the ACE inhibitor benazepril, the MEK1/2 inhibitor selumetinib or both. Transthoracic echocardiography was used to measure left ventricular diameters and fractional shortening was calculated. Results: Treatment of Lmna H222P/H222P mice with either benazepril or selumetinib started at 8 weeks of age, before the onset of detectable left ventricular dysfunction, lead to statistically significantly increased fractional shortening compared to placebo at 16 weeks of age. There was a trend towards a great value for fractional shortening in the selumetinib-treated mice. When treatment was started at 16 weeks of age, after the onset of left ventricular dysfunction, the addition of selumetinib treatment to benazepril lead to a statistically significant increase in left ventricular fractional

  1. Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1/2 inhibition and angiotensin II converting inhibition in mice with cardiomyopathy caused by lamin A/C gene mutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muchir, Antoine, E-mail: a.muchir@institut-myologie.org [Department of Medicine, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY (United States); Department of Pathology and Cell Biology, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY (United States); Wu, Wei [Department of Medicine, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY (United States); Department of Pathology and Cell Biology, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY (United States); Sera, Fusako; Homma, Shunichi [Department of Medicine, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY (United States); Worman, Howard J., E-mail: hjw14@columbia.edu [Department of Medicine, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY (United States); Department of Pathology and Cell Biology, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY (United States)

    2014-10-03

    Highlights: • Both ACE and MEK1/2 inhibition are beneficial on cardiac function in Lmna cardiomyopathy. • MEK1/2 inhibitor has beneficial effects beyond ACE inhibition for Lmna cardiomyopathy. • These results provide further preclinical rationale for a clinical trial of a MEK1/2 inhibitor. - Abstract: Background: Mutations in the LMNA gene encoding A-type nuclear lamins can cause dilated cardiomyopathy with or without skeletal muscular dystrophy. Previous studies have shown abnormally increased extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 activity in hearts of Lmna{sup H222P/H222P} mice, a small animal model. Inhibition of this abnormal signaling activity with a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1/2 (MEK1/2) inhibitor has beneficial effects on heart function and survival in these mice. However, such treatment has not been examined relative to any standard of care intervention for dilated cardiomyopathy or heart failure. We therefore examined the effects of an angiotensin II converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor on left ventricular function in Lmna{sup H222P/H222P} mice and assessed if adding a MEK1/2 inhibitor would provide added benefit. Methods: Male Lmna{sup H222P/H222P} mice were treated with the ACE inhibitor benazepril, the MEK1/2 inhibitor selumetinib or both. Transthoracic echocardiography was used to measure left ventricular diameters and fractional shortening was calculated. Results: Treatment of Lmna{sup H222P/H222P} mice with either benazepril or selumetinib started at 8 weeks of age, before the onset of detectable left ventricular dysfunction, lead to statistically significantly increased fractional shortening compared to placebo at 16 weeks of age. There was a trend towards a great value for fractional shortening in the selumetinib-treated mice. When treatment was started at 16 weeks of age, after the onset of left ventricular dysfunction, the addition of selumetinib treatment to benazepril lead to a statistically significant increase in left

  2. KRAS Mutation Status and Clinical Outcome of Preoperative Chemoradiation With Cetuximab in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer: A Pooled Analysis of 2 Phase II Trials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sun Young; Shim, Eun Kyung [Center for Colorectal Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Yeo, Hyun Yang [Division of Translational and Clinical Research I, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Baek, Ji Yeon [Center for Colorectal Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Yong Sang [Department of Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dae Yong [Center for Colorectal Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Division of Translational and Clinical Research I, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Tae Won [Department of Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jee Hyun [Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Im, Seock-Ah [Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Kyung Hae [Department of Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Hee Jin, E-mail: heejincmd@yahoo.com [Center for Colorectal Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Division of Translational and Clinical Research I, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Cetuximab-containing chemotherapy is known to be effective for KRAS wild-type metastatic colorectal cancer; however, it is not clear whether cetuximab-based preoperative chemoradiation confers an additional benefit compared with chemoradiation without cetuximab in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: We analyzed EGFR, KRAS, BRAF, and PIK3CA mutation status with direct sequencing and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and Phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) expression status with immunohistochemistry in tumor samples of 82 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer who were enrolled in the IRIX trial (preoperative chemoradiation with irinotecan and capecitabine; n=44) or the ERBIRIX trial (preoperative chemoradiation with irinotecan and capecitabine plus cetuximab; n=38). Both trials were similarly designed except for the administration of cetuximab; radiation therapy was administered at a dose of 50.4 Gy/28 fractions and irinotecan and capecitabine were given at doses of 40 mg/m{sup 2} weekly and 1650 mg/m{sup 2}/day, respectively, for 5 days per week. In the ERBIRIX trial, cetuximab was additionally given with a loading dose of 400 mg/m{sup 2} on 1 week before radiation, and 250 mg/m{sup 2} weekly thereafter. Results: Baseline characteristics before chemoradiation were similar between the 2 trial cohorts. A KRAS mutation in codon 12, 13, and 61 was noted in 15 (34%) patients in the IRIX cohort and 5 (13%) in the ERBIRIX cohort (P=.028). Among 62 KRAS wild-type cancer patients, major pathologic response rate, disease-free survival and pathologic stage did not differ significantly between the 2 cohorts. No mutations were detected in BRAF exon 11 and 15, PIK3CA exon 9 and 20, or EGFR exon 18-24 in any of the 82 patients, and PTEN and EGFR expression were not predictive of clinical outcome. Conclusions: In patients with KRAS wild-type locally advanced rectal cancer, the addition of cetuximab to the chemoradiation with

  3. KRAS Mutation Status and Clinical Outcome of Preoperative Chemoradiation With Cetuximab in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer: A Pooled Analysis of 2 Phase II Trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sun Young; Shim, Eun Kyung; Yeo, Hyun Yang; Baek, Ji Yeon; Hong, Yong Sang; Kim, Dae Yong; Kim, Tae Won; Kim, Jee Hyun; Im, Seock-Ah; Jung, Kyung Hae; Chang, Hee Jin

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Cetuximab-containing chemotherapy is known to be effective for KRAS wild-type metastatic colorectal cancer; however, it is not clear whether cetuximab-based preoperative chemoradiation confers an additional benefit compared with chemoradiation without cetuximab in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: We analyzed EGFR, KRAS, BRAF, and PIK3CA mutation status with direct sequencing and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and Phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) expression status with immunohistochemistry in tumor samples of 82 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer who were enrolled in the IRIX trial (preoperative chemoradiation with irinotecan and capecitabine; n=44) or the ERBIRIX trial (preoperative chemoradiation with irinotecan and capecitabine plus cetuximab; n=38). Both trials were similarly designed except for the administration of cetuximab; radiation therapy was administered at a dose of 50.4 Gy/28 fractions and irinotecan and capecitabine were given at doses of 40 mg/m 2 weekly and 1650 mg/m 2 /day, respectively, for 5 days per week. In the ERBIRIX trial, cetuximab was additionally given with a loading dose of 400 mg/m 2 on 1 week before radiation, and 250 mg/m 2 weekly thereafter. Results: Baseline characteristics before chemoradiation were similar between the 2 trial cohorts. A KRAS mutation in codon 12, 13, and 61 was noted in 15 (34%) patients in the IRIX cohort and 5 (13%) in the ERBIRIX cohort (P=.028). Among 62 KRAS wild-type cancer patients, major pathologic response rate, disease-free survival and pathologic stage did not differ significantly between the 2 cohorts. No mutations were detected in BRAF exon 11 and 15, PIK3CA exon 9 and 20, or EGFR exon 18-24 in any of the 82 patients, and PTEN and EGFR expression were not predictive of clinical outcome. Conclusions: In patients with KRAS wild-type locally advanced rectal cancer, the addition of cetuximab to the chemoradiation with irinotecan plus

  4. Study on the Imprinting Status of Insulin-Like Growth Factor II (IGF-II Gene in Villus during 6–10 Gestational Weeks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhong Chen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To compare the difference of imprinting status of insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II gene in villus between normal embryo development group and abnormal embryo development group and to investigate the relationship between karyotype and the imprinting status of IGF-II gene. Methods. A total of 85 pregnant women with singleton pregnancy were divided into two groups: one with abnormal embryo development (n=38 and the other with normal embryo development (n=47. Apa I polymorphism of IGF-II gene in chorionic villus was assayed with reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP. The relationship between chromosomal abnormal karyotype and IGF-II gene imprinting status was analyzed by primary cell culture and G-banding chromosomal karyotype analysis. Results. IGF-II imprinting loss rate was higher in the abnormal embryo development group than the normal embryo development group (44.7% versus 31.6%, but without significant difference (P>.05. The percentage of abnormal chromosomes of chorionic villus in the abnormal embryo development group was 42.5%, in which IGF-II imprinting loss rate reached 64.7%. No abnormal karyotypes were found in the normal embryo development group. However, there was significant difference in IGF-II imprinting loss rate between two groups (P>.05. Conclusion. During weeks 6–10 of gestation, abnormal embryonic development is correlated with chromosomal abnormalities. The imprinting status of IGF-II gene played important roles in embryonic development, and imprinting loss might be related to chromosomal abnormalities.

  5. Mutations in myosin VIIA (MYO7A) and usherin (USH2A) in Spanish patients with Usher syndrome types I and II, respectively.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nájera, Carmen; Beneyto, Magdalena; Blanca, José; Aller, Elena; Fontcuberta, Ana; Millán, José María; Ayuso, Carmen

    2002-07-01

    Usher syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by congenital hearing impairment and retinitis pigmentosa. Three clinical types are known (USH1, USH2 and USH3), and there is an extensive genetic heterogeneity, with at least ten genes implicated. The most frequently mutated genes are MYO7A, which causes USH1B, and usherin, which causes USH2A. We carried out a mutation analysis of these two genes in the Spanish population. Analysis of the MYO7A gene in patients from 30 USH1 families and sporadic cases identified 32% of disease alleles, with mutation Q821X being the most frequent. Most of the remaining variants are private mutations. With regard to USH2, mutation 2299delG was detected in 25% of the Spanish patients. Altogether the mutations detected in USH2A families account for 23% of the disease alleles. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. Exploratory Factor Analysis of the Beck Anxiety Inventory and the Beck Depression Inventory-II in a Psychiatric Outpatient Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    Background To further understand the relationship between anxiety and depression, this study examined the factor structure of the combined items from two validated measures for anxiety and depression. Methods The participants were 406 patients with mixed psychiatric diagnoses including anxiety and depressive disorders from a psychiatric outpatient unit at a university-affiliated medical center. Responses of the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI)-II, and Symptom Checklist-90-Revised (SCL-90-R) were analyzed. We conducted an exploratory factor analysis of 42 items from the BAI and BDI-II. Correlational analyses were performed between subscale scores of the SCL-90-R and factors derived from the factor analysis. Scores of individual items of the BAI and BDI-II were also compared between groups of anxiety disorder (n = 185) and depressive disorder (n = 123). Results Exploratory factor analysis revealed the following five factors explaining 56.2% of the total variance: somatic anxiety (factor 1), cognitive depression (factor 2), somatic depression (factor 3), subjective anxiety (factor 4), and autonomic anxiety (factor 5). The depression group had significantly higher scores for 12 items on the BDI while the anxiety group demonstrated higher scores for six items on the BAI. Conclusion Our results suggest that anxiety and depressive symptoms as measured by the BAI and BDI-II can be empirically differentiated and that particularly items of the cognitive domain in depression and those of physical domain in anxiety are noteworthy. PMID:29651821

  7. A Single Base Pair Mutation Encoding a Premature Stop Codon in the MIS type II receptor is Responsible for Canine Persistent Müllerian Duct Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiufeng; Wan, Shengqin; Pujar, Shashikant; Haskins, Mark E.; Schlafer, Donald H.; Lee, Mary M.; Meyers-Wallen, Vicki N.

    2008-01-01

    Müllerian Inhibiting Substance (MIS), a secreted glycoprotein in the Transforming Growth Factor-beta (TGF-beta) family of growth factors, mediates regression of the Müllerian ducts during embryonic sex differentiation in males. In Persistent Müllerian Duct Syndrome (PMDS), rather than undergoing involution, the Müllerian ducts persist in males, giving rise to the uterus, Fallopian tubes, and upper vagina. Genetic defects in MIS or its receptor (MISRII) have been identified in patients with PMDS. The phenotype in the canine model of PMDS derived from the miniature schnauzer breed is strikingly similar to that of human patients. In this model, PMDS is inherited as a sex-limited autosomal recessive trait. Previous studies indicated that a defect in the MIS receptor or its downstream signaling pathway was likely to be causative of the canine syndrome. In this study the canine PMDS phenotype and clinical sequelae are described in detail. Affected and unaffected members of this pedigree are genotyped, identifying a single base pair substitution in MISRII that introduces a stop codon in exon 3. The homozygous mutation terminates translation at 80 amino acids, eliminating much of the extracellular domain and the entire transmembrane and intracellular signaling domains. Findings in this model may enable insights to be garnered from correlation of detailed clinical descriptions with molecular defects, which are not otherwise possible in the human syndrome. PMID:18723470

  8. Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 3 (FGFR3–Analyses of the S249C Mutation and Protein Expression in Primary Cervical Carcinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiyan Dai

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3 seems to play an inhibitory role in bone development, as activating mutations in the gene underlie disorders such as achondroplasia and thanatophoric dysplasia. Findings from multiple myeloma (MM indicate that FGFR3 also can act as an oncogene, and mutation of codon 249 in the fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3 gene was recently detected in 3/12 primary cervical carcinomas. We have analysed 91 cervical carcinomas for this specific S249C mutation using amplification created restriction site methodology (ACRS, and detected no mutations. Immunohistochemistry was performed on 73 of the tumours. Reduced protein staining was seen in 43 (58.8% samples. Six of the tumours (8.2% revealed increased protein staining compared with normal cervical tissue. These patients had a better prognosis than those with reduced or normal levels, although not statistically significant. This report weakens the hypothesis of FGFR3 as an oncogene of importance in cervical carcinomas.

  9. A dominant mutation in the gene encoding the erythroid transcription factor KLF1 causes a congenital dyserythropoietic anemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnaud, Lionel; Saison, Carole; Helias, Virginie

    2010-01-01

    The congenital dyserythropoietic anemias (CDAs) are inherited red blood cell disorders whose hallmarks are ineffective erythropoiesis, hemolysis, and morphological abnormalities of erythroblasts in bone marrow. We have identified a missense mutation in KLF1 of patients with a hitherto unclassified...

  10. Allogeneic Transplant in ELANE and MEFV Mutation Positive Severe Cyclic Neutropenia: Review of Prognostic Factors for Secondary Severe Events

    OpenAIRE

    Okolo, Onyemaechi N.; Katsanis, Emmanuel; Yun, Seongseok; Reveles, Candace Y.; Anwer, Faiz

    2017-01-01

    Objective and Importance. Cyclic neutropenia (CyN) is a rare autosomal dominant inherited disorder due to the mutation ELANE primarily affecting bone marrow stem cells and is characterized by recurrent neutropenia every 2 to 4 weeks. Symptoms vary from benign to severe, including death. Postulations on the cause of wide spectrum in symptom presentation include the possibility of other genetic mutations, such as MEFV. Recommended treatment for CyN is G-CSF to keep ANC higher to minimize risk o...

  11. Insulin-Like growth factor-II (IGF-II) prevents proinflammatory cytokine-induced apoptosis and significantly improves islet survival after transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Amy; Mohanasundaram, Daisy; Kireta, Svjetlana; Jessup, Claire F; Drogemuller, Chris J; Coates, P Toby H

    2013-03-15

    The early loss of functional islet mass (50-70%) due to apoptosis after clinical transplantation contributes to islet allograft failure. Insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-II is an antiapoptotic protein that is highly expressed in β-cells during development but rapidly decreases in postnatal life. We used an adenoviral (Ad) vector to overexpress IGF-II in isolated rat islets and investigated its antiapoptotic action against exogenous cytokines interleukin-1β- and interferon-γ-induced islet cell death in vitro. Using an immunocompromised marginal mass islet transplant model, the ability of Ad-IGF-II-transduced rat islets to restore euglycemia in nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient diabetic recipients was assessed. Ad-IGF-II transduction did not affect islet viability or function. Ad-IGF-II cytokine-treated islets exhibited decreased cell death (40% ± 2.8%) versus Ad-GFP and untransduced control islets (63.2% ± 2.5% and 53.6% ± 2.3%, respectively). Ad-IGF-II overexpression during cytokine treatment resulted in a marked reduction in terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling-positive apoptotic cells (8.3% ± 1.4%) versus Ad-GFP control (41% ± 4.2%) and untransduced control islets (46.5% ± 6.2%). Western blot analysis confirmed that IGF-II inhibits apoptosis via activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt signaling pathway. Transplantation of IGF-II overexpressing islets under the kidney capsule of diabetic mice restored euglycemia in 77.8% of recipients compared with 18.2% and 47.5% of Ad-GFP and untransduced control islet recipients, respectively (Pislet transplant outcomes in vivo. Antiapoptotic gene transfer is a potentially powerful tool to improve islet survival after transplantation.

  12. Clinical significance of measurement of serum insulin-like growth factor II and adrenomedulion levels in patients with essential hypertension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Bifu; Ji Naijun; Mei Yibin; Wang Chengyao; Chen Donghai; Li Fuyuan; Guan Lihua; Gao Meiying

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the changes of serum levels of insulin-like growth factor II (IGF II) and adrenomedullin (ADM) in patients with essential hypertension. Methods: Serum IGF II and ADM levels were measured in 62 cases of hypertension and 40 controls with RIA. Results: Serum IGF II and ADM levels were significantly bigger in hypertensive patients than those in the controls (t = 4.454, p < 0.01; t = 3.992, p < 0.01). The serum IGF II level was significantly positively correlated to the serum ADM levels (r = 0.379, p < 0.05) and both were significantly positively correlated to the mean arterial pressure (r = 0.346, r = 0.353, p < 0.05) but not with BMI. Serum ADM levels increased gradually as the disease progressed from stage I to stage III (p < 0.05) with levels in stage III markedly higher than those in stage I (p < 0.01). In EH patients with heart and/or brain and/or renal complications the serum ADM levels were significantly higher than those in EH patients without complications (t = 2.050, p < 0.05). Such differences did not exist in the case of IGF II. Conclusion: Serum IGF II and ADM levels were increased markedly in hypertensive patients. These two factors were mutually positively correlated and both were positively correlated to mean arterial pressure. ADM levels increased gradually as the disease progressing but IGF II levels remained stable

  13. Epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase (EGFR-TK) mutation testing in adults with locally advanced or metastatic non-small cell lung cancer: A systematic review and cost-effectiveness analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Westwood, Marie; Joore, Manuela; Whiting, Penny; Asselt, Thea; Ramaekers, Bram; Armstrong, Nigel; Misso, Kate; Severens, Hans; Kleijnen, Jos

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Background: Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the most common form of lung cancer. Some epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase (EGFR-TK) mutations make tumours responsive to treatment with EGFR-TK inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs) but less responsive to treatment with standard chemotherapy. Patients with NSCLC are therefore tested for EGFR-TK tumour gene mutations to inform treatment decisions. There are a variety of tests available to detect these mutations. T...

  14. Mutation of the conserved Gly94 and Gly126 in elongation factor Tu from Escherichia coli. Elucidation of their structural and functional roles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Charlotte Rohde; Kjaersgård, I V; Wiborg, O

    1995-01-01

    All guanine-nucleotide-binding proteins cycle between an inactive, GDP-bound and an active, GTP-bound conformation whereby they function as molecular switches. Elongation factor Tu from Escherichia coli is used as a model for defining residues important in the switch mechanism. Gly94 and Gly126...... were separately mutated to alanine residues to study their role in the switch mechanism. The mutant proteins are denoted [G94A]EF-Tu and [G126A]EF-Tu, respectively. Both mutations affect the affinities for guanine nucleotides considerably, resulting in a decrease in the characteristic preference...... for GDP over GTP. Furthermore the [G94A]EF-Tu mutant possesses an increased GTPase activity. The aminoacyl-tRNA affinity is much reduced for [G94A]EF-Tu, as reflected in an increase of the dissociation rate constant for the ternary complex by a factor of 40. Surprisingly, however, both mutants...

  15. Insulin-like growth factor II messenger ribonucleic acids are synthesized in the choroid plexus of the rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hynes, M.A.; Brooks, P.J.; Van Wyk, J.J.; Lund, P.K.

    1988-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrating the presence of immunoreactive insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) and their receptors in the brain suggest a role of the IGFs in the central nervous system. IGF-II has been implicated as the predominant IGF in brain of mature animals based on studies of immunoreactive peptide and of IGF-II mRNAs. To obtain information about the sites of synthesis of IGF-II in adult rat brain, a 32 P-labeled 31 base long synthetic oligodeoxyribonucleotide complementary in sequence to trailer peptide coding sequences in rat IGF-II mRNA (IGF-II 31 mer) was hybridized with coronal sections of fixed rat brain. The IGF-II 31 mer showed specific hybridization with the choroid plexus throughout rat brain, whereas in other brain regions, structures or cells, hybridization was not discernibly above background. These findings suggest that the choroid plexus is a primary site of synthesis of IGF-II, a probable source of IGF-II in cerebrospinal fluid, and a potential source of IGF-II for actions on target cells within the adult rat brain

  16. Acadian variant of Fanconi syndrome is caused by mitochondrial respiratory chain complex I deficiency due to a non-coding mutation in complex I assembly factor NDUFAF6

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hartmannová, H.; Piherová, L.; Tauchmannová, Kateřina; Kidd, K.; Acott, P. D.; Crocker, J. F. S.; Oussedik, Y.; Mallet, M.; Hodaňová, K.; Stránecký, V.; Přistoupilová, A.; Barešová, V.; Jedličková, I.; Živná, M.; Sovová, J.; Hůlková, H.; Robins, V.; Vrbacký, Marek; Pecina, Petr; Kaplanová, Vilma; Houštěk, Josef; Mráček, Tomáš; Thibeault, Y.; Bleyer, A. J.; Kmoch, S.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 25, č. 18 (2016), s. 4062-4079 ISSN 0964-6906 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GB14-36804G; GA MŠk(CZ) LL1204 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : Acadian variant of Fanconi syndrome * mitochondrial complex I deficiency * NDUFAF6 * C8ORF38 * non-coding mutation * alternative splicing variant * protein isoforms Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.340, year: 2016

  17. Resveratrol prevents angiotensin II-induced hypertrophy of vascular smooth muscle cells through the transactivation of growth factor receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Ekhtear; Anand-Srivastava, Madhu B

    2017-08-01

    We previously showed that augmented levels of endogenous angiotensin II (AngII) contribute to vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) hypertrophy through the transactivation of growth factor receptors in spontaneously hypertensive rats. Resveratrol (RV), a polyphenolic component of red wine, has also been shown to attenuate AngII-evoked VSMC hypertrophy; however, the molecular mechanism mediating this response is obscure. The present study was therefore undertaken to examine whether RV could prevent AngII-induced VSMC hypertrophy through the transactivation of growth factor receptor and associated signaling pathways. AngII treatment of VSMC enhanced the protein synthesis that was attenuated towards control levels by RV pretreatment as well as by the inhibitors of NADPH oxidase, c-Src, and growth factor receptors. Furthermore, RV pretreatment also inhibited enhanced levels of superoxide anion, NADPH oxidase activity, increased expression of NADPH oxidase subunits, and phosphorylation of c-Src, EGF-R, PDGE-R, ERK1/2, and AKT1/2. In conclusion, these results indicate that RV attenuates AngII-induced VSMC hypertrophy through the inhibition of enhanced oxidative stress and activation of c-Src, growth factor receptors, and MAPK/AKT signaling. We suggest that RV could be used as a therapeutic agent in the treatment of vascular complications associated with hypertension and hypertrophy.

  18. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Mutation (EGFR) Testing for Prediction of Response to EGFR-Targeting Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor (TKI) Drugs in Patients with Advanced Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: An Evidence-Based Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    , 2010 using the following terms: Non-Small-Cell Lung CarcinomaEpidermal Growth Factor ReceptorAn automatic literature update program also extracted all papers published from February 2010 until August 2010. Abstracts were reviewed by a single reviewer and for those studies meeting the eligibility criteria full-text articles were obtained. Reference lists were also examined for any additional relevant studies not identified through the search. Articles with unknown eligibility were reviewed with a second clinical epidemiologist, and then a group of epidemiologists, until consensus was established. The quality of evidence was assessed as high, moderate, low or very low according to GRADE methodology. The inclusion criteria were as follows: patients with locally advanced or metastatic NSCLC (stage IIIB or IV)PROCEDURE: EGFR mutation testing before treatment with gefitinib or erlotinibLANGUAGE: publication in EnglishPublished health technology assessments, guidelines, and peer-reviewed literature (abstracts, full text, conference abstract) progression-free survival (PFS), Objective response rate (ORR), overall survival (OS), quality of life (QoL).The exclusion criteria were as follows: Studies lacking outcomes specific to those of interestStudies focused on erlotinib maintenance therapyStudies focused on gefitinib or erlotinib use in combination with cytotoxic agents or any other drugGrey literature, where relevant, was also reviewed. PFSORR determined by means of the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumours (RECIST)OSQoL QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: The quality of the Phase II trials and observational studies was based on the method of subject recruitment and sampling, possibility of selection bias, and generalizability to the source population. The overall quality of evidence was assessed as high, moderate, low or very low according to the GRADE Working Group criteria. Since the last published health technology assessment by Blue Cross Blue Shield Association in 2007 there

  19. Computed Tomography-Guided Core-Needle Biopsy Specimens Demonstrate Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Mutations in Patients with Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, C.M.; Chang, J.W.C.; Cheung, Y.C.; Lin, G.; Hsieh, J.J.; Hsu, T.; Huang, S.F.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Target therapy with a new class of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors shows improved clinical response in EGFR gene-mutated lung cancers. Purpose: To evaluate the use of computed tomography (CT)-guided core-needle biopsy specimens for the assessment of EGFR gene mutation in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Material and Methods: Seventeen (nine males, eight females) patients with advanced NSCLC were enrolled in this study. All patients underwent CT-guided core-needle biopsy of the lung tumor prior to treatment with the EGFR inhibitor gefitinib. There were no life-threatening complications of biopsy. The specimens were sent fresh-frozen for EGFR mutation analysis and histopathological study. Results: There were 12 (70.6%) EGFR gene mutants and five (29.4%) nonmutants. The objective response rate to gefitinib therapy was 73.3% (11 of 15 patients), with 91.7% (11 of 12 mutants) for the mutant group and 0% for the nonmutant group. Conclusion: CT-guided core-needle biopsy of advanced NSCLC enables the acquisition of sufficient tissue for EGFR gene mutation analysis

  20. Acquired resistance mechanisms to tyrosine kinase inhibitors in lung cancer with activating epidermal growth factor receptor mutation--diversity, ductility, and destiny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suda, Kenichi; Mizuuchi, Hiroshi; Maehara, Yoshihiko; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya

    2012-12-01

    Lung cancers that harbor somatic activating mutations in the gene for the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) depend on mutant EGFR for their proliferation and survival; therefore, lung cancer patients with EGFR mutations often dramatically respond to orally available EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). However, emergence of acquired resistance is virtually inevitable, thus limiting improvement in patient outcomes. To elucidate and overcome this acquired resistance, multidisciplinary basic and clinical investigational approaches have been applied, using in vitro cell line models or samples obtained from lung cancer patients treated with EGFR-TKIs. These efforts have revealed several acquired resistance mechanisms and candidates, including EGFR secondary mutations (T790M and other rare mutations), MET amplification, PTEN downregulation, CRKL amplification, high-level HGF expression, FAS-NFκB pathway activation, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and conversion to small cell lung cancer. Interestingly, cancer cells harbor potential destiny and ductility together in acquiring resistance to EGFR-TKIs, as shown in in vitro acquired resistance models. Molecular mechanisms of "reversible EGFR-TKI tolerance" that occur in early phase EGFR-TKI exposure have been identified in cell line models. Furthermore, others have reported molecular markers that can predict response to EGFR-TKIs in clinical settings. Deeper understanding of acquired resistance mechanisms to EGFR-TKIs, followed by the development of molecular target drugs that can overcome the resistance, might turn this fatal disease into a chronic disorder.

  1. Early changes of serum insulin-like growth factor-II (IGF-II) levels in patients with acute brain injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Cegang; Zhang Xinlu; Tao Jin; Xu Anding; Xu Shanshui; Huang Zhenpeng

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the early changes and clinical significance of serum Insulin-like growth factor-II (IGF-II) levels in patients with acute brain injury. Methods: Radioimmunoassay was used for measurement of the serum IGF-II concentration in 30 controls and 29 acute brain injury patients before and after treatment (within 1 day, at 3 and 7 days). Results: The serum IGF-II levels in brain injury patients at 1 day, 3 day 7 days after injury were 0.131 ± 0.047 ng/ml, 0.117 ± 0.046 ng/ml and 0.123 ±0.050 ng/ml respectively and were significantly lower than those in controls 0.44 ± 0.014 ng/ml, p<0.01. Differences among the values of the three days were not significant. Conclusion: IGF-II might play important role in the pathophysiological process of early acute brain injury

  2. Novel mutations of PAX3, MITF, and SOX10 genes in Chinese patients with type I or type II Waardenburg syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hongsheng; Jiang, Lu; Xie, Zhiguo; Mei, Lingyun; He, Chufeng; Hu, Zhengmao; Xia, Kun; Feng, Yong

    2010-06-18

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is a rare disorder characterized by distinctive facial features, pigment disturbances, and sensorineural deafness. There are four WS subtypes. WS1 is mostly caused by PAX3 mutations, while MITF, SNAI2, and SOX10 mutations are associated with WS2. More than 100 different disease-causing mutations have been reported in many ethnic groups, but the data from Chinese patients with WS remains poor. Herein we report 18 patients from 15 Chinese WS families, in which five cases were diagnosed as WS1 and the remaining as WS2. Clinical evaluation revealed intense phenotypic variability in Chinese WS patients. Heterochromia iridis and sensorineural hearing loss were the most frequent features (100% and 88.9%, respectively) of the two subtypes. Many brown freckles on normal skin could be a special subtype of cutaneous pigment disturbances in Chinese WS patients. PAX3, MITF, SNAI2, and SOX10 genes mutations were screened for in all the patients. A total of nine mutations in 11 families were identified and seven of them were novel. The SOX10 mutations in WS2 were first discovered in the Chinese population, with an estimated frequency similar to that of MITF mutations, implying SOX10 is an important pathogenic gene in Chinese WS2 cases and should be considered for first-step analysis in WS2, as well as MITF. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Whole-Tumor Histogram and Texture Analyses of DTI for Evaluation of IDH1-Mutation and 1p/19q-Codeletion Status in World Health Organization Grade II Gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Y W; Han, K; Ahn, S S; Choi, Y S; Chang, J H; Kim, S H; Kang, S-G; Kim, E H; Lee, S-K

    2018-04-01

    Prediction of the isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1)-mutation and 1p/19q-codeletion status of World Health Organization grade ll gliomas preoperatively may assist in predicting prognosis and planning treatment strategies. Our aim was to characterize the histogram and texture analyses of apparent diffusion coefficient and fractional anisotropy maps to determine IDH1 -mutation and 1p/19q-codeletion status in World Health Organization grade II gliomas. Ninety-three patients with World Health Organization grade II gliomas with known IDH1- mutation and 1p/19q-codeletion status (18 IDH1 wild-type, 45 IDH1 mutant and no 1p/19q codeletion, 30 IDH1- mutant and 1p/19q codeleted tumors) underwent DTI. ROIs were drawn on every section of the T2-weighted images and transferred to the ADC and the fractional anisotropy maps to derive volume-based data of the entire tumor. Histogram and texture analyses were correlated with the IDH1 -mutation and 1p/19q-codeletion status. The predictive powers of imaging features for IDH1 wild-type tumors and 1p/19q-codeletion status in IDH1 -mutant subgroups were evaluated using the least absolute shrinkage and selection operator. Various histogram and texture parameters differed significantly according to IDH1 -mutation and 1p/19q-codeletion status. The skewness and energy of ADC, 10th and 25th percentiles, and correlation of fractional anisotropy were independent predictors of an IDH1 wild-type in the least absolute shrinkage and selection operator. The area under the receiver operating curve for the prediction model was 0.853. The skewness and cluster shade of ADC, energy, and correlation of fractional anisotropy were independent predictors of a 1p/19q codeletion in IDH1 -mutant tumors in the least absolute shrinkage and selection operator. The area under the receiver operating curve was 0.807. Whole-tumor histogram and texture features of the ADC and fractional anisotropy maps are useful for predicting the IDH1 -mutation and 1p/19q

  4. BRAF mutation and anaplasia may be predictive factors of progression-free survival in adult pleomorphic xanthoastrocytoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabouret, E; Bequet, C; Denicolaï, E; Barrié, M; Nanni, I; Metellus, P; Dufour, Henri; Chinot, O; Figarella-Branger, D

    2015-12-01

    Pleomorphic xanthoastrocytoma (PXA) is a rare, low-grade glioma that frequently occurs in pediatric patients. To analyze adult patients diagnosed with PXA and to search for pathological and molecular markers of diagnosis and prognosis. We retrospectively included patients older than 16 years with PXA who were referred to our institution between October 2003 and September 2013. All pathological diagnoses were reviewed by a neuropathologist. Histological characteristics and immunostaining of GFAP, OLIG2, neurofilament, CD34, Ki67, p53, p16, and IDH1 R132H were analyzed. The following molecular alterations were analyzed: mutations of IDH1/2, BRAF and the histone H3.3 and the EGFR amplification. Clinical data, treatment modalities, and patient outcome were recorded. We identified 16 adult patients with reviewed PXA diagnosis. No IDH neither histone H3.3 mutations were found; BRAF V600E mutation was recorded in six patients. Ten patients presented with anaplastic features. BRAF mutations were associated with lower Ki67, OLIG2 expression, and lack of p16 expression. Median PFS and OS were 41.5 months (95% CI: 11.4-71.6) and 71.4 months (95% CI: 15.5-127.3), respectively. BRAF mutation tended to be associated with greater PFS (p = 0.051), whereas anaplastic features were associated with minimal PFS (p = 0.042). PXA in adults PXA may present features distinct from pediatric PXA. Anaplastic features and BRAF mutation may potentially identify specific subgroups with distinct prognoses. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Mitochondrial C4375T mutation might be a molecular risk factor in a maternal Chinese hypertensive family under haplotype C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hong; Sun, Min; Fan, Zhen; Tong, Maoqing; Chen, Guodong; Li, Danhui; Ye, Jihui; Yang, Yumin; Zhu, Yongding; Zhu, Jianhua

    2017-12-04

    Here, we reported a Han Chinese essential hypertensive pedigree based on clinical hereditary and molecular data. To know the molecular basis on this family, mitochondrial genome of one proband from the family was identified through direct sequencing analysis. The age of onset year and affected degree of patients are different in this family. And matrilineal family members carrying C4375T mutation and belong to Eastern Asian halopgroup C. Phylogenetic analysis shows 4375C is highly conservative in 17 species. It is suggested that these mutations might participate in the development of hypertension in this family. And halopgroup C might play a modifying role on the phenotype in this Chinese hypertensive family.

  6. Similarities and discrepancies in homozygous factor VII defects due to mutations in the region of residues Met298 to Cys310 (exon 8) in the catalytic domain of factor VII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girolami, A; Berti de Marinis, G; Bonamigo, E; Vettore, S

    2011-06-01

    Patients with the Arg304Gln mutation in factor VII Padua (FVII Padua) show discrepant activity levels that depend on the thromboplastin used in the assay system. This report investigates the possibility that residues close to Arg304 (exon 8) show the same discrepant behavior. All available homozygous patients with a mutation in a 13-residue region (preceding and following Arg304) have been evaluated. Only the Arg304Trp mutation showed a discrepancy similar to that shown by the Arg304Gln mutation. Other homozygotes failed to show differences, despite their all being positive for cross-reacting material. Another FVII amino acid residue involved in tissue factor binding and activation is Arg79 (exon 4). No comparison could be carried out because no homozygotes for deficiency in this region have ever been described. The relationship between these 2 residues involved in tissue factor binding and activation has not yet been completely clarified; however, Arg residues 79 and 304 are the only 2 residues definitely shown thus far to be involved in this important function.

  7. Role of epidermal growth factor receptor and endoplasmic reticulum stress in vascular remodeling induced by angiotensin II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayanagi, Takehiko; Kawai, Tatsuo; Forrester, Steven J; Obama, Takashi; Tsuji, Toshiyuki; Fukuda, Yamato; Elliott, Katherine J; Tilley, Douglas G; Davisson, Robin L; Park, Joon-Young; Eguchi, Satoru

    2015-06-01

    The mechanisms by which angiotensin II (AngII) elevates blood pressure and enhances end-organ damage seem to be distinct. However, the signal transduction cascade by which AngII specifically mediates vascular remodeling such as medial hypertrophy and perivascular fibrosis remains incomplete. We have previously shown that AngII-induced epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) transactivation is mediated by disintegrin and metalloproteinase domain 17 (ADAM17), and that this signaling is required for vascular smooth muscle cell hypertrophy but not for contractile signaling in response to AngII. Recent studies have implicated endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in hypertension. Interestingly, EGFR is capable of inducing ER stress. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that activation of EGFR and ER stress are critical components required for vascular remodeling but not hypertension induced by AngII. Mice were infused with AngII for 2 weeks with or without treatment of EGFR inhibitor, erlotinib, or ER chaperone, 4-phenylbutyrate. AngII infusion induced vascular medial hypertrophy in the heart, kidney and aorta, and perivascular fibrosis in heart and kidney, cardiac hypertrophy, and hypertension. Treatment with erlotinib as well as 4-phenylbutyrate attenuated vascular remodeling and cardiac hypertrophy but not hypertension. In addition, AngII infusion enhanced ADAM17 expression, EGFR activation, and ER/oxidative stress in the vasculature, which were diminished in both erlotinib-treated and 4-phenylbutyrate-treated mice. ADAM17 induction and EGFR activation by AngII in vascular cells were also prevented by inhibition of EGFR or ER stress. In conclusion, AngII induces vascular remodeling by EGFR activation and ER stress via a signaling mechanism involving ADAM17 induction independent of hypertension. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  8. Human pituitary and placental hormones control human insulin-like growth factor II secretion in human granulosa cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramasharma, K.; Li, C.H.

    1987-01-01

    Human granulosa cells cultured with calf serum actively proliferated for 18-20 generations and secreted progesterone into the medium; progesterone levels appeared to decline with increase in generation number. Cells cultured under serum-free conditions secreted significant amounts of progesterone and insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II). The progesterone secretion was enhanced by the addition of human follitropin, lutropin, and chorionic gonadotropin but not by growth hormone. These cells, when challenged to varying concentrations of human growth hormone, human chorionic somatomammotropin, human prolactin, chorionic gonadotropin, follitropin, and lutropin, secreted IGF-II into the medium as measured by specific IGF-II RIA. Among these human hormones, chorionic gonadotropin, follitropin, and lutropin were most effective in inducing IGF-II secretion from these cells. When synthetic lutropin-releasing hormone and α-inhibin-92 were tested, only lutropin-releasing hormone was effective in releasing IGF-II. The results described suggest that cultured human granulosa cells can proliferate and actively secrete progesterone and IGF-II into the medium. IGF-II production in human granulosa cells was influenced by a multi-hormonal complex including human growth hormone, human chorionic somatomammotropin, and prolactin

  9. Complete response in gallbladder cancer to erlotinib plus gemcitabine does not require mutation of the epidermal growth factor receptor gene: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lincer Robert

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gallbladder cancer typically follows an aggressive course, with chemotherapy the standard of care for advanced disease; complete remissions are rarely encountered. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR is a promising therapeutic target but the activity of single agent oral EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors is low. There have been no previous reports of chemotherapy plus an EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI to treat gallbladder cancer or correlations of response with the mutation status of the tyrosine kinase domain of the EGFR gene. Case presentation A 67 year old man with metastatic gallbladder cancer involving the liver and abdominal lymph nodes was treated with gemcitabine (1000 mg/m2 on day 1 and 8 every 21 days as well as daily erlotinib (100 mg. After four cycles of therapy, the CA 19-9 normalized and a PET/CT showed a complete remission; this response was maintained by the end of 12 cycles of therapy. Gemcitabine was then discontinued and single agent erlotinib was continued as maintenance therapy. The disease remains in good control 18 months after initiation of therapy, including 6 months on maintenance erlotinib. The only grade 3 toxicity was a typical EGFR-related skin rash. Because of the remarkable response to erlotinib plus gemcitabine, we performed tumor genotyping of the EGFR gene for response predicting mutations in exons 18, 19 and 21. This disclosed the wild-type genotype with no mutations found. Conclusion This case report demonstrates a patient with stage IV gallbladder cancer who experienced a rarely encountered complete, prolonged response after treatment with an oral EGFR-TKI plus chemotherapy. This response occurred in the absence of an EGFR gene mutation. These observations should inform the design of clinical trials using EGFR-TKIs to treat gallbladder and other biliary tract cancers; such trials should not select patients based on EGFR mutation status.

  10. Complete response in gallbladder cancer to erlotinib plus gemcitabine does not require mutation of the epidermal growth factor receptor gene: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mody, Kabir; Strauss, Edward; Lincer, Robert; Frank, Richard C

    2010-01-01

    Gallbladder cancer typically follows an aggressive course, with chemotherapy the standard of care for advanced disease; complete remissions are rarely encountered. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a promising therapeutic target but the activity of single agent oral EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors is low. There have been no previous reports of chemotherapy plus an EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) to treat gallbladder cancer or correlations of response with the mutation status of the tyrosine kinase domain of the EGFR gene. A 67 year old man with metastatic gallbladder cancer involving the liver and abdominal lymph nodes was treated with gemcitabine (1000 mg/m2) on day 1 and 8 every 21 days as well as daily erlotinib (100 mg). After four cycles of therapy, the CA 19-9 normalized and a PET/CT showed a complete remission; this response was maintained by the end of 12 cycles of therapy. Gemcitabine was then discontinued and single agent erlotinib was continued as maintenance therapy. The disease remains in good control 18 months after initiation of therapy, including 6 months on maintenance erlotinib. The only grade 3 toxicity was a typical EGFR-related skin rash. Because of the remarkable response to erlotinib plus gemcitabine, we performed tumor genotyping of the EGFR gene for response predicting mutations in exons 18, 19 and 21. This disclosed the wild-type genotype with no mutations found. This case report demonstrates a patient with stage IV gallbladder cancer who experienced a rarely encountered complete, prolonged response after treatment with an oral EGFR-TKI plus chemotherapy. This response occurred in the absence of an EGFR gene mutation. These observations should inform the design of clinical trials using EGFR-TKIs to treat gallbladder and other biliary tract cancers; such trials should not select patients based on EGFR mutation status

  11. Complete response in gallbladder cancer to erlotinib plus gemcitabine does not require mutation of the epidermal growth factor receptor gene: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mody, Kabir; Strauss, Edward; Lincer, Robert; Frank, Richard C

    2010-10-20

    Gallbladder cancer typically follows an aggressive course, with chemotherapy the standard of care for advanced disease; complete remissions are rarely encountered. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a promising therapeutic target but the activity of single agent oral EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors is low. There have been no previous reports of chemotherapy plus an EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) to treat gallbladder cancer or correlations of response with the mutation status of the tyrosine kinase domain of the EGFR gene. A 67 year old man with metastatic gallbladder cancer involving the liver and abdominal lymph nodes was treated with gemcitabine (1000 mg/m2) on day 1 and 8 every 21 days as well as daily erlotinib (100 mg). After four cycles of therapy, the CA 19-9 normalized and a PET/CT showed a complete remission; this response was maintained by the end of 12 cycles of therapy. Gemcitabine was then discontinued and single agent erlotinib was continued as maintenance therapy. The disease remains in good control 18 months after initiation of therapy, including 6 months on maintenance erlotinib. The only grade 3 toxicity was a typical EGFR-related skin rash. Because of the remarkable response to erlotinib plus gemcitabine, we performed tumor genotyping of the EGFR gene for response predicting mutations in exons 18, 19 and 21. This disclosed the wild-type genotype with no mutations found. This case report demonstrates a patient with stage IV gallbladder cancer who experienced a rarely encountered complete, prolonged response after treatment with an oral EGFR-TKI plus chemotherapy. This response occurred in the absence of an EGFR gene mutation. These observations should inform the design of clinical trials using EGFR-TKIs to treat gallbladder and other biliary tract cancers; such trials should not select patients based on EGFR mutation status.

  12. MHC Class II and Non-MHC Class II Genes Differentially Influence Humoral Immunity to Bacillus anthracis Lethal Factor and Protective Antigen

    OpenAIRE

    Garman, Lori; Dumas, Eric K.; Kurella, Sridevi; Hunt, Jonathan J.; Crowe, Sherry R.; Nguyen, Melissa L.; Cox, Philip M.; James, Judith A.; Farris, A. Darise

    2012-01-01

    Anthrax Lethal Toxin consists of Protective Antigen (PA) and Lethal Factor (LF), and current vaccination strategies focus on eliciting antibodies to PA. In human vaccination, the response to PA can vary greatly, and the response is often directed toward non-neutralizing epitopes. Variable vaccine responses have been shown to be due in part to genetic differences in individuals, with both MHC class II and other genes playing roles. Here, we investigated the relative contribution of MHC class I...

  13. Epidermal Growth Factor Recetor mutation study for 5 years, in a population of patients with non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.S. Castro

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In 2006, the Vila Nova de Gaia/Espinho Hospital Centre Pulmonary Oncology Unit started performing EGFR (Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor mutation sequencing in selected patients with NSCLC and systematically in all patients since 2010, regardless of histology, smoking habits, age or sex. The aim of this study was to characterize the group of patients that carried out the sequencing between 2006-2010, to determine EGFR mutation frequency, to evaluate the overall survival and the survival after the use of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI, in patients who performed this therapy in second and third line, knowing the EGFR mutation status. Methods: Descriptive statistical analysis of patients who did EGFR sequencing in 2006-2010 and of overall survival in patients treated with TKI as 2nd and 3rd line therapy. Record of the material available for analysis and average delay of exam results, according to the material submitted. Results: The sequencing was performed in 374 patients, 71,1% males, 67,1% non/ex-smokers, 32,9% smokers, 57,8% adenocarcinoma and 23,5% squamous cell carcinoma (SCC. The mutation was detected in 49 patients (13,1%. In all studied patients, the mutation rate was 9% in males and 23% in females. Median overall survival after erlotinib use of was 14 months for patients with positive EGFR mutation versus 6 months in not mutated patients (p = 0.003. Conclusion: Our group had an overall mutation rate of 13.1% with female, non-smokers, adenocarcinoma histology predominance. In selected patients (2006/2009, the mutation rate was 16%, in not selected patients (2010 the mutation rate was 10.4%. This study has permitted a better understanding of the EGFR mutation rate in the Portuguese population as welll as an evaluation of the patients survival after the use of of tyrosine kinase inhibitors, in second and third line therapy with previous knowledge of the EGFR mutational status. Statistical significant differences in survival

  14. Factors affecting mutational specificity in mammalian cells: Informal [technical] progress report, February 1, 1987-January 31, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strauss, B.S.

    1986-01-01

    We analyzed the different c-H-ras mutations produced in cells after treatment with chemical carcinogens. The overall goal of this work is an understanding of the changes produced by environmental mutagens and carcinogens to learn how closely the results obtained with bacterial and cellular assay systems apply to the in vivo situation

  15. Preserved fertility in a non-mosaic Klinefelter patient with a mutation in the fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, A; Aksglaede, L; Lund, A M

    2007-01-01

    receptor 3 (FGFR3) gene, which is a gain-of-function mutation resulting in achondroplasia. The patient had phenotypic characteristics of achondroplasia (e.g. short limbed dwarfism and frontal bossing). Testicular volume was 8 ml at 27 years of age and repeated semen samples showed sperm concentrations of 0...

  16. Complete remission through icotinib treatment in Non-small cell lung cancer epidermal growth factor receptor mutation patient with brain metastasis: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Tao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain metastasis (BM has been universally recognized as a poor prognostic factor in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs have shown efficacy in treating BM with an EGFR mutation. This paper reports a case of BM patient with EGFR-mutated NSCLC. According to the findings, a complete remission (CR of the BM was achieved by icotinib treatment without conducting a radiotherapy, which was followed by a resection of the primary lung cancer lesion and lymph nodes. After one-year follow-up, the disease progressed to liver metastasis and liver lesion biopsy showed a T790M mutation. The patient responded well to the combination treatment of AZD9291 and icotinib after the failure of transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE. This case report suggests that icotinib has a sustainable anticancer response to BM and the combination with icotinib and AZD9291 is effective for liver metastasis with T790M.

  17. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Beck Depression Inventory-II in Bariatric Surgery Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Brian J.; Hood, Megan M.; Nackers, Lisa M.; Azarbad, Leila; Ivan, Iulia; Corsica, Joyce

    2013-01-01

    Screening for depression is an integral part of psychological evaluations conducted prior to bariatric surgery. The Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) is the most commonly used measure of depression in these treatment evaluations. The reliability and validity of the BDI-II has not yet been evaluated within bariatric surgery-seeking samples,…

  18. Mutation Analysis of COL1A1 and COL1A2 in Fetuses with Osteogenesis Imperfecta Type II/III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenbo; Wu, Qichang; Cao, Lin; Sun, Li; Xu, Yasong; Guo, Qiwei

    2015-01-27

    Aim: To analyze COL1A1/2 mutations in prenatal-onset OI for determine the proportion of mutations in type I collagen genes among prenatal onset OI and to provide additional data for genotype-phenotype analyses. Material and Methods: Ten cases of severe fetal short-limb dwarfism detected by antenatal ultrasonography were referred to our center. Before the termination of pregnancy, cordocentesis was performed for fetal karyotype and COL1A1/2 gene sequencing analysis. Postmortem radiographic examination was performed at all instances for definitive diagnosis. Results: COL1A1 and COL1A2 SNP and mutations were identified in all the cases. Among these, one synonymous SNP and four synonymous SNPs were recognized in COL1A1/2, respectively, seven cases have distinct heterozygous mutations and six new COL1A1/2 gene mutations were identified. Conclusion: There has been substantial progress in the identification of the molecular defects responsible for skeletal dysplasias. With the constant increase in the number of identified mutations in COL1A1 and COL1A2, genotype-phenotype correlation is becoming increasingly pertinent. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Radiation treatment of glottic squamous cell carcinoma, Stage I and II: analysis of factors affecting prognosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franchin, Giovanni; Minatel, Emilio; Gobitti, Carlo; Talamini, Renato; Sartor, Giovanna; Caruso, Giuseppe; Grando, Giuseppe; Politi, Doriano; Gigante, Marco; Toffoli, Giuseppe; Trovo, Mauro G.; Barzan, Luigi

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: At least in some European Countries, there is still considerable controversy regarding the choice between surgery and radiotherapy for the treatment of patients with early laryngeal-glottic carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Two hundred and forty-six patients with laryngeal-glottic neoplasms, Stage I-II, were treated with radical radiotherapy. Before radiotherapy the patients were evaluated to determine the surgical procedure of choice. Either 66-68.4 Gy (33-38 fractions) or 63-65 Gy (28-29 fractions) of radiation therapy (RT) were administered. The overall disease free survival was determined for each subgroup of patients. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to determine significant prognostic variables. Results: Five- and 10-year overall survival rates were 83 and 72%, respectively. At a median follow-up of 6 years 204 patients are alive and disease free. No patient developed distant metastases. One patient died of a large local recurrence, 38 patients died of causes unrelated to their tumor, and 3 patients were lost to follow-up. The multivariate analysis confirmed that performance status (PS), macroscopic presentation of the lesion, and persistence of dysphonia after radiotherapy are significant prognostic factors. Conclusions: According to the multivariate analysis, the patients with PS >80 and with exophytic lesions are eligible for radical RT. The surgical procedure proposed for each patient was not found to be an independent prognostic factor

  20. Subdiaphragmatic stage I and II Hodgkin's disease - long-term follow-up and prognostic factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao Zhongxing; Ha, Chul S.; Fuller, Lillian M.; Hagemeister, Fredrick B.; Cabanillas, Fernando; Tucker, Susan L.; Hess, Mark A.; Cox, James D.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To report long term follow-up results and analyze prognostic factors for overall and disease-free survival in patients with subdiaphragmatic stage I and II Hodgkin's disease. Methods and Materials: From September 1962 to April 1995, 109 patients presented to the M. D. Anderson Cancer Center with subdiaphragmatic Hodgkin's disease. The medical records of these patients were retrospectively reviewed. Twenty-two patients who received no treatment at M. D. Anderson Cancer Center or who had radiation therapy at other institutions were excluded. The remaining 87 patients formed the basis of this study. The median age of our group was 33 years with a male:female ratio of 3.3:1. The histological subtypes were nodular sclerosis in 21 (24.1%) patients, mixed cellularity in 31 (35.6%), lymphocyte predominence in 33 (37.9%), lymphocyte depletion in 1 (1.1%) and unclassified histology in 1 (1.1%). Thirty three (37%) patients underwent laparotomy, 74 (85.1%) had lymphangiography, and 35 (40.2%) had computerized tomography of the abdomen. Twenty two (25%) patients had more than three sites of nodal involvement at presentation, 56 (64.4%) had pelvic or abdominal disease, and 14 (18.4%) had bulky disease which was defined as disease with largest dimension ≥ 7 cm. Stage distribution was IA in 33.3%, IIA in 39.1%, and IIB in 27.6%. Sixty (69%) patients were treated with radiotherapy alone, 23 (26.4%) with chemotherapy and radiation, and 4 (4.6%) with chemotherapy alone. Results: The 10 and 20 year actuarial overall survival rates for all the patients were 74.6% and 55.3%, and the corresponding disease free survival rates were 72.4% and 67.5%, respectively. On univariate analysis, age, B symptoms, nodular sclerosis or mixed cellularity histology, and decreased albumin and hemoglobin level were statistically significant adverse pretreatment factors for overall survival. B symptoms, decreased albumin level, more than 3 sites of disease at presentation, and stage were

  1. Molecular dynamics simulation analysis of the effect of T790M mutation on epidermal growth factor receptor protein architecture in non-small cell lung carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Xiao-Nu; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Wei

    2017-08-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer etiology and its treatment failure are due to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) kinase domain mutations at amino acid position 790. The mutational change from threonine to methionine at position 790 (T790M) is responsible for tyrosine kinase inhibition failure. Using molecular dynamic simulation, the present study investigated the architectural changes occurring at the atomic scale. The 50-nsec runs using a GROMOS force field for wild-type and mutant EGFR's kinase domains were investigated for contrasting variations using Gromacs inbuilt tools. The adenosine triphosphate binding domain and the active site of EGFR were studied extensively in order to understand the structural changes. All the parameters investigated in the present study revealed considerable changes in the studied structures, and the knowledge gained from this may be used to develop novel kinase inhibitors that will be effective irrespective of the structural alterations in kinase domain.

  2. Factors affecting marginal integrity of class II bulk-fill composite resin restorations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savadi Oskoee, Siavash; Bahari, Mahmoud; Jafari Navimipour, Elmira; Ajami, Amir Ahmad; Ghiasvand, Negar; Savadi Oskoee, Ayda

    2017-01-01

    Background. Bulk-fill composite resins are a new type of resin-based composite resins, claimed to have the capacity to be placed in thick layers, up to 4 mm. This study was carried out to evaluate factors affecting gap formation in Cl II cavities restored using the bulk-fill technique. Methods. A total of 60 third molars were used in this study. Two Cl II cavities were prepared in each tooth, one on the mesial aspect 1 mm coronal to the CEJ and one on the distal aspect 1 mm apical to the CEJ. The teeth were divided into 4 groups: A: The cavities were restored using the bulk-fill technique with Filtek P90 composite resin and its adhesive system and light-cured with quartz tungsten halogen (QTH) light-curing unit. B: The cavities were restored similar to that in group A but light-cured with an LED light-curing unit. C: The cavities were restored using the bulk-fill technique with X-tra Fil composite resin and Clearfil SE Bond adhesive system and light-cured with a QTH curing unit. D: The cavities were restored similar to that in group C but light-cured with an LED light-curing unit. The gaps were examined under a stereomicroscope at ×60. Data were analyzed with General Linear Model test. In cases of statistical significance (Pcomposite resin type and margin location (Pcomposite resin type were not significant; however, the cumulative effect of composite rein type*gingival margin was significant (P=0.04) Conclusion. X-tra Fil composite exhibited smaller gaps compared with Filtek P90 composite with both light-curing units. Both composite resins exhibited smaller gaps at enamel margins. PMID:28748051

  3. The relationship between thrombophilic mutations and preeclampsia: a prospective case-control study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yalinkaya, A.; Erdemoglu, M.; Akdeniz, N.; Kale, A.; Kale, E.

    2006-01-01

    Preeclampsia and its association with thrombophillia remain controversial, due to inconsistent results in different studies, which different ethnic groups, selection criteria, and patient numbers. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between thrombophillia and preeclamptic patients in our region. In a prospective case-control study, we compared 100 consecutive women with preeclampsia and eclampsia (group 1) with 100 normal pregnant women (group 2). All women were tested two months after delivery for mutations of factor V Leiden, methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), and prothrombin gene mutation mutataion as well as for deficiencies of protein C, protein S, and antithrmbin III. A thrombophilic mutation was found in 42 (42%) and 28(28%) women in group I and group II, respectively (P+0.27, OR 1.5, 95% CI 1.0-2.2). The incidence of Factor V Leiden mutation (heterozygous), prothrombin mutation (heterozygous), prothrombin mutation (homozygous), MTHFR mutation (homozygous) was not statistically significant in group 1 compared with group 2 (P>0.05). Also, deficiencies of protein S, protein c and antithrombin III were not statistically significant in group I com pared with group II (P>0.05). There was no difference in thrombophilic mutations between preeclamptic patients and normal pregnant women in our region. Therefore, we suggest that preeclamptic patients should not be tested for thrombophilia. (author)

  4. Somatomedin-C/insulin-like growth factor-I and Insulin-like growth factor-II mRNAs in rate fetal and adult tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lund, P.K.; Moats-Staats, B.M.; Hynes, M.A.; Simmons, J.G.; Jansen, M.; D'ercole, A.J.; Van Wyk, J.J.

    1986-01-01

    Somatomedin-C or insulin-like growth factor I (Sm-C/IGF-I) and insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) have been implicated in the regulation of fetal growth and development. In the present study 32 P-labeled complementary DNA probes encoding human and mouse Sm-C/IGF-I and human IGF-II were used in Northern blot hybridizations to analyze rat Sm-C/IGF-I and IGF-II mRNAs in poly(A + ) RNAs from intestine, liver, lung, and brain of adult rats and fetal rats between day 14 and 17 of gestation. In fetal rats, all four tissues contained a major mRNA of 1.7 kilobase (kb) that hybridized with the human Sm-C/IGF-I cDNA and mRNAs of 7.5, 4.7, 1.7, and 1.2 kb that hybridized with the mouse Sm-C/IGF-I cDNA. Adult rat intestine, liver, and lung also contained these mRNAs but Sm-C/IGF-I mRNAs were not detected in adult rat brain. These findings provide direct support for prior observations that multiple tissues in the fetus synthesize immunoreactive Sm-C/IGF-I and imply a role for Sm-C/IGF-I in fetal development as well as postnatally. Multiple IGF-II mRNAs of estimated sizes 4.7, 3.9, 2.2, 1.75, and 1.2 kb were observed in fetal rat intestine, liver, lung, and brain. The 4.7- and 3.9-kb mRNAs were the major hybridizing IGF-II mRNAs in all fetal tissues. Higher abundance of IGF-II mRNAs in rat fetal tissues compared with adult tissues supports prior hypotheses, based on serum IGF-II concentrations, that IGF-II is predominantly a fetal somatomedin. IGF-II mRNAs are present, however, in some poly(A + ) RNAs from adult rat tissues. The brain was the only tissue in the adult rat where the 4.7- and 3.9-kb IGF-II mRNAs were consistently detected. These findings suggest that a role for IGF-II in the adult rat, particularly in the central nervous system, cannot be excluded

  5. Regulation of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α expression by interleukin-1β (IL-1 β, insulin-like growth factors I (IGF-I and II (IGF-II in human osteoarthritic chondrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelica Rossi Sartori-Cintra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha regulates genes related to cellular survival under hypoxia. This factor is present in osteroarthritic chondrocytes, and cytokines, such as interleukin-1 beta, participate in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis, thereby increasing the activities of proteolytic enzymes, such as matrix metalloproteinases, and accelerating cartilage destruction. We hypothesize that Hypoxia Inducible Factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α can regulate cytokines (catabolic action and/or growth factors (anabolic action in osteoarthritis. The purpose of this study was to investigate the modulation of HIF-1α in human osteoarthritic chondrocytes by interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β and insulin-like growth factors I (IGF-I and II (IGF-II and to determine the involvement of the phosphatidylinositol-3kinase (PI-3K pathway in this process. METHODS: Human osteroarthritic chondrocytes were stimulated with IL-1β, IGF-I and IGF-II and LY294002, a specific inhibitor of PI-3K. Nuclear protein levels and gene expression were analyzed by western blot and quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analyses, respectively. RESULTS: HIF-1α expression was upregulated by IL-1β at the protein level but not at the gene level. IGF-I treatment resulted in increases in both the protein and mRNA levels of HIF-1α , whereas IGF-II had no effect on its expression. However, all of these stimuli exploited the PI-3K pathway. CONCLUSION: IL-1β upregulated the levels of HIF-1α protein post-transcriptionally, whereas IGF-I increased HIF-1α at the transcript level. In contrast, IGF-II did not affect the protein or gene expression levels of HIF-1α . Furthermore, all of the tested stimuli exploited the PI-3K pathway to some degree. Based on these findings, we are able to suggest that Hypoxia inducible Factor-1 exhibits protective activity in chondrocytes during osteoarthritis.

  6. Double heterozygous mutations Gln100Leu and His348Gln of the F7 gene in a patient with factor VII deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min; Zheng, Fangxiu; Jin, Yanhui; Wang, Mingshan; Zhu, Liqing; Yang, Lihong

    2013-03-01

    A 25-year-old Chinese woman who had a history of easy bruising was admitted to hospital due to uncontrolled epistaxis. She showed factor VII activity level of 2% and factor VII antigen level of 4% of the normal value. We detected a novel missense mutation g.8355 A>T (p.Gln100Leu) in the second epidermal growth factor-like (EGF) domain and a g.11482 T>G (p.His348Gln) in the catalytic domain. Although the Gln100 residue is close to the junction of EGF-2 domain with the serine protease domain, we infer that the substitution of polar negatively charged Gln residue at the position 100 with introduction of nonpolar Leu residue may be likely to perturb proper folding, resulting in decreasing factor VII activity.

  7. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Mutation Is Associated With Longer Local Control After Definitive Chemoradiotherapy in Patients With Stage III Nonsquamous Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yagishita, Shigehiro; Horinouchi, Hidehito; Katsui Taniyama, Tomoko; Nakamichi, Shinji; Kitazono, Satoru; Mizugaki, Hidenori; Kanda, Shintaro; Fujiwara, Yutaka; Nokihara, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Noboru; Sumi, Minako; Shiraishi, Kouya; Kohno, Takashi; Furuta, Koh; Tsuta, Koji; Tamura, Tomohide

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the frequency and clinical significance of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations in patients with potentially curable stage III non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who are eligible for definitive chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Patients and Methods: Between January 2001 and December 2010, we analyzed the EGFR mutational status in consecutive NSCLC patients who were treated by CRT. The response rate, relapse-free survival, 2-year relapse-free rate, initial relapse sites, and overall survival of the patients were investigated. Results: A total of 528 patients received CRT at our hospital during the study period. Of these, 274 were diagnosed as having nonsquamous NSCLC. Sufficient specimens for mutational analyses could be obtained from 198 of these patients. The proportion of patients with EGFR activating mutations was 17%. In addition to the well-known characteristics of patients carrying EGFR mutations (female, adenocarcinoma, and never/light smoker), the proportion of cases with smaller primary lesions (T1/2) was found to be higher in patients with EGFR mutations than in those with wild-type EGFR. Patients with EGFR mutations showed similar response rate, relapse-free survival, and 2-year relapse-free rates as compared to patients with wild-type EGFR. Local relapses as the site of initial relapse occurred significantly less frequently in patients with EGFR mutation (4% vs 21%; P=.045). Patients with EGFR mutations showed longer local control (adjusted hazard ratio 0.49; P=.043). After disease progression, a majority of the patients with EGFR mutations received EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (62%), and these patients showed longer postprogression survival than those with wild-type EGFR. Conclusions: Our study is the first to show radiosensitive biology of EGFR-mutated tumors in definitive CRT with curative intent. This finding could serve as a credible baseline estimate of EGFR-mutated population in stage III nonsquamous NSCLC

  8. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Mutation Is Associated With Longer Local Control After Definitive Chemoradiotherapy in Patients With Stage III Nonsquamous Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yagishita, Shigehiro [Department of Thoracic Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Horinouchi, Hidehito, E-mail: hhorinou@ncc.go.jp [Department of Thoracic Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Katsui Taniyama, Tomoko; Nakamichi, Shinji; Kitazono, Satoru; Mizugaki, Hidenori; Kanda, Shintaro; Fujiwara, Yutaka; Nokihara, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Noboru [Department of Thoracic Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Sumi, Minako [Department of Radiation Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Shiraishi, Kouya; Kohno, Takashi [Division of Genome Biology, National Cancer Center Research Institute, Tokyo (Japan); Furuta, Koh [Department of Clinical Laboratories, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Tsuta, Koji [Department of Pathology, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Tamura, Tomohide [Department of Thoracic Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo (Japan)

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the frequency and clinical significance of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations in patients with potentially curable stage III non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who are eligible for definitive chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Patients and Methods: Between January 2001 and December 2010, we analyzed the EGFR mutational status in consecutive NSCLC patients who were treated by CRT. The response rate, relapse-free survival, 2-year relapse-free rate, initial relapse sites, and overall survival of the patients were investigated. Results: A total of 528 patients received CRT at our hospital during the study period. Of these, 274 were diagnosed as having nonsquamous NSCLC. Sufficient specimens for mutational analyses could be obtained from 198 of these patients. The proportion of patients with EGFR activating mutations was 17%. In addition to the well-known characteristics of patients carrying EGFR mutations (female, adenocarcinoma, and never/light smoker), the proportion of cases with smaller primary lesions (T1/2) was found to be higher in patients with EGFR mutations than in those with wild-type EGFR. Patients with EGFR mutations showed similar response rate, relapse-free survival, and 2-year relapse-free rates as compared to patients with wild-type EGFR. Local relapses as the site of initial relapse occurred significantly less frequently in patients with EGFR mutation (4% vs 21%; P=.045). Patients with EGFR mutations showed longer local control (adjusted hazard ratio 0.49; P=.043). After disease progression, a majority of the patients with EGFR mutations received EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (62%), and these patients showed longer postprogression survival than those with wild-type EGFR. Conclusions: Our study is the first to show radiosensitive biology of EGFR-mutated tumors in definitive CRT with curative intent. This finding could serve as a credible baseline estimate of EGFR-mutated population in stage III nonsquamous NSCLC.

  9. Rapid point-of-care testing for epidermal growth factor receptor gene mutations in patients with lung cancer using cell-free DNA from cytology specimen supernatants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asaka, Shiho; Yoshizawa, Akihiko; Saito, Kazusa; Kobayashi, Yukihiro; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Negishi, Tatsuya; Nakata, Rie; Matsuda, Kazuyuki; Yamaguchi, Akemi; Honda, Takayuki

    2018-06-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations are associated with responses to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs) in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Our previous study revealed a rapid point-of-care system for detecting EGFR mutations. This system analyzes cell pellets from cytology specimens using droplet-polymerase chain reaction (d-PCR), and has a reaction time of 10 min. The present study aimed to validate the performance of the EGFR d-PCR assay using cell-free DNA (cfDNA) from supernatants obtained from cytology specimens. Assay results from cfDNA supernatant analyses were compared with those from cell pellets for 90 patients who were clinically diagnosed with, or suspected of having, lung cancer (80 bronchial lavage fluid samples, nine pleural effusion samples and one spinal fluid sample). EGFR mutations were identified in 12 and 15 cases using cfDNA supernatants and cell pellets, respectively. The concordance rates between cfDNA-supernatant and cell‑pellet assay results were 96.7% [kappa coefficient (K)=0.87], 98.9% (K=0.94), 98.9% (K=0.79) and 98.9% (K=0.79) for total EGFR mutations, L858R, E746_A750del and T790M, respectively. All 15 patients with EGFR mutation-positive results, as determined by EGFR d-PCR assay using cfDNA supernatants or cell pellets, also displayed positive results by conventional EGFR assays using tumor tissue or cytology specimens. Notably, EGFR mutations were even detected in five cfDNA supernatants for which the cytological diagnoses of the corresponding cell pellets were 'suspicious for malignancy', 'atypical' or 'negative for malignancy.' In conclusion, this rapid point-of-care system may be considered a promising novel screening method that may enable patients with NSCLC to receive EGFR-TKI therapy more rapidly, whilst also reserving cell pellets for additional morphological and molecular analyses.

  10. Identification of a point mutation in growth factor repeat C of the low density lipoprotein-receptor gene in a patient with homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soutar, A.K.; Knight, B.L.; Patel, D.D.

    1989-01-01

    The coding region of the low density lipoprotein (LDL)-receptor gene from a patient (MM) with homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) has been sequenced from six overlapping 500-base-pair amplified fragments of the cDNA from cultured skin fibroblasts. Two separate single nucleotide base changes from the normal sequence were detected. The first involved substitution of guanine for adenine in the third position of the codon for amino acid residue Cys-27 and did not affect the protein sequence. The second mutation was substitution of thymine for cytosine in the DNA for the codon for amino acid residue 664, changing the codon from CCG (proline) to CTG (leucine) and introducing a new site for the restriction enzyme PstI. MM is a true homozygote with two identical genes, and the mutation cosegregated with clinically diagnosed FH in his family in which first cousin marriages occurred frequently. LDL receptors in MM's skin fibroblasts bind less LDL than normal and with reduced affinity. Thus this naturally occurring single point mutation affects both intracellular transport of the protein and ligand binding and occurs in growth factor-like repeat C, a region that has not previously been found to influence LDL binding

  11. Phase II trial of epidermal growth factor ointment for patients with Erlotinib-related skin effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, In Gyu; Kang, Jung Hun; Oh, Sung Yong; Lee, Suee; Kim, Sung-Hyun; Song, Ki-Hoon; Son, Choonhee; Park, Min Jae; Kang, Myung Hee; Kim, Hoon Gu; Lee, Jeeyun; Park, Young Suk; Sun, Jong Mu; Kim, Hyun Jung; Kim, Chan Kyu; Yi, Seong Yoon; Jang, Joung-Soon; Park, Keunchil; Kim, Hyo-Jin

    2016-01-01

    The efficacy of erlotinib, the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor, has been demonstrated in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and pancreatic cancer (PC). In the present study, we evaluated the effect of epidermal growth factor (EGF) ointment on erlotinib-related skin effects (ERSEs). This was an open-label, non-comparative, multicenter, phase II trial. The patients included those diagnosed with NSCLC or PC who were treated with erlotinib. The effectiveness of the ointment was defined as follows: (1) grade 2, 3, or 4 ERSEs downgraded to ≤ grade 1 or (2) grade 3 or 4 ERSEs downgraded to grade 2 and persisted for at least 2 weeks. Fifty-two patients from seven institutes in Korea were enrolled with informed consent. The final assessment included 46 patients (30 males, 16 females). According to the definition of effectiveness, the EGF ointment was effective in 36 (69.2%) intention to treat patients. There were no statistically significant differences in the effectiveness of the EGF ointment by gender (p = 0.465), age (p = 0.547), tumor type (p = 0.085), erlotinib dosage (p = 0.117), and number of prior chemotherapy sessions (p = 0.547). The grading for the average National Cancer Institute's Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (NCI-CTCAE) rating of rash/acne and itching improved from 2.02 ± 0.83 to 1.13 ± 0.89 and 1.52 ± 0.84 to 0.67 ± 0.90, respectively (p reason for discontinuing the study was progression of cancer (37%). Based on the results, the EGF ointment is effective for ERSEs, regardless of gender, age, type of tumor, and dosage of erlotinib. The EGF ointment evenly improved all kinds of symptoms of ERSEs. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01593995.

  12. Mutation induction in haploid yeast after split-dose radiation exposure. II. Combination of UV-irradiation and X-rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, B; Zölzer, F; Kiefer, J

    2004-01-01

    Split-dose protocols can be used to investigate the kinetics of recovery from radiation damage and to elucidate the mechanisms of cell inactivation and mutation induction. In this study, a haploid strain of the yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, wild-type with regard to radiation sensitivity, was irradiated with 254-nm ultraviolet (UV) light and then exposed to X-rays after incubation for 0-6 hr. The cells were incubated either on nutrient medium or salt agar between the treatments. Loss of reproductive ability and mutation to canavanine resistance were measured. When the X-ray exposure immediately followed UV-irradiation, the X-ray survival curves had the same slope irrespective of the pretreatment, while the X-ray mutation induction curves were changed from linear to linear quadratic with increasing UV fluence. Incubations up to about 3 hr on nutrient medium between the treatments led to synergism with respect to cell inactivation and antagonism with respect to mutation, but after 4-6 hr the two treatments acted independently. Incubation on salt agar did not cause any change in the survival curves, but there was a strong suppression of X-ray-induced mutation with increasing UV fluence. On the basis of these results, we suggest that mutation after combined UV and X-ray exposure is affected not only by the induction and suppression of DNA repair processes, but also by radiation-induced modifications of cell-cycle progression and changes in the expression of the mutant phenotype. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Characterization of the human nasal embryonic LHRH factor gene, NELF, and a mutation screening among 65 patients with idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (IHH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Kiyonori; Acierno, James S; Seminara, Stephanie B

    2004-01-01

    As the mouse nasal embryonic LHRH factor gene (Nelf) encodes a guidance molecule for the migration of the olfactory axon and gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons, its human homolog, NELF, is a candidate gene for Kallmann syndrome, a disease of idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (IHH) with anosmia or hyposmia. We report here characterization of NELF and results of mutation analysis in 65 IHH patients. Assembling EST clones, RACE, and sequencing showed that NELF mapped to 9q34.3 is composed of 16 exons and 15 introns with a 1,590-bp ORF encoding 530 amino acids. RT-PCR on a fetal brain cDNA library revealed five alternatively spliced variants. Among them, NELF-v1 has 93-94% identity at the amino acid level to mouse/rat Nelf, and four other transcripts are also highly conserved among the three species. A 3.0-kb transcript is expressed most highly in the adult and fetal brain, testis, and kidney, indicating that NELF plays a role in the function of these tissues. Mutation screening detected in a patient with IHH one novel heterozygous missense mutation (1438A>G, T480A) at the donor-splice site in exon 15 of NELF. As this mutation was not found in 100 normal control individuals, T480A may be associated with IHH. Four other novel SNPs (102C > T and 1029C > T within the coding region, and two IVS14+47C > T and IVS15+41G > A) were also identified in NELF.

  14. Dwarfism and impaired gut development in insulin-like growth factor II mRNA-binding protein 1-deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas V O; Hammer, Niels A; Nielsen, Jacob

    2004-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor II mRNA-binding protein 1 (IMP1) belongs to a family of RNA-binding proteins implicated in mRNA localization, turnover, and translational control. Mouse IMP1 is expressed during early development, and an increase in expression occurs around embryonic day 12.5 (E12.5). T...

  15. Insulin and Insulin-like Growth Factor II Differentially Regulate Endocytic Sorting and Stability of Insulin Receptor Isoform A

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Morcavallo, A.; Genua, M.; Palummo, A.; Kletvíková, Emília; Jiráček, Jiří; Brzozowski, A. M.; Lozzo, R. V.; Belfiore, A.; Morrione, A.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 287, č. 14 (2012), s. 11422-11436 ISSN 0021-9258 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : insulin * IGF -II * mitogenic response * IR-A Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 4.651, year: 2012

  16. Crosslinking of tRNA containing a long extra arm to elongation factor Tu by trans-diamminedichloroplatinum(II)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Nils-Jørgen; Wikman, Friedrik; Clark, Brian F. C.

    1990-01-01

    A tRNA containing a long extra arm, namely E. coli tRNA1Leu has been crosslinked to elongation factor Tu, with the crosslinking reagent trans-diamminedichloroplatinum(II). The nucleotide involved in the crosslinking was identified to be a guanosine in the variable region at position 47F or 47G....

  17. The association of TP53 mutations with the resistance of colorectal carcinoma to the insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor inhibitor picropodophyllin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Quan; Wei, Feng; Lv, Guoyue; Li, Chunsheng; Liu, Tongjun; Hadjipanayis, Costas G; Zhang, Guikai; Hao, Chunhai; Bellail, Anita C

    2013-01-01

    There is growing evidence indicating the insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF-1R) plays a critical role in the progression of human colorectal carcinomas. IGF-1R is an attractive drug target for the treatment of colon cancer. Picropodophyllin (PPP), of the cyclolignan family, has recently been identified as an IGF-1R inhibitor. The aim of this study is to determine the therapeutic response and mechanism after colorectal carcinoma treatment with PPP. Seven colorectal carcinoma cell lines were treated with PPP. Following treatment, cells were analyzed for growth by a cell viability assay, sub-G1 apoptosis by flow cytometry, caspase cleavage and activation of AKT and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) by western blot analysis. To examine the in vivo therapeutic efficacy of PPP, mice implanted with human colorectal carcinoma xenografts underwent PPP treatment. PPP treatment blocked the phosphorylation of IGF-1R, AKT and ERK and inhibited the growth of TP53 wild-type but not mutated colorectal carcinoma cell lines. The treatment of PPP also induced apoptosis in TP53 wild-type cells as evident by the presence of sub-G1 cells and the cleavage of caspase-9, caspase-3, DNA fragmentation factor-45 (DFF45), poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), and X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP). The loss of BAD phosphorylation in the PPP-treated TP53 wild type cells further suggested that the treatment induced apoptosis through the BAD-mediated mitochondrial pathway. In contrast, PPP treatment failed to induce the phosphorylation of AKT and ERK and caspase cleavage in TP53 mutated colorectal carcinoma cell lines. Finally, PPP treatment suppressed the growth of xenografts derived from TP53 wild type but not mutated colorectal carcinoma cells. We report the association of TP53 mutations with the resistance of treatment of colorectal carcinoma cells in culture and in a xenograft mouse model with the IGF-1R inhibitor PPP. TP53 mutations often occur in colorectal

  18. The relationship of the factor V Leiden mutation or the deletion-deletion polymorphism of the angiotensin converting enzyme to postoperative thromboembolic events following total joint arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Carrie

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although all patients undergoing total joint arthroplasty are subjected to similar risk factors that predispose to thromboembolism, only a subset of patients develop this complication. The objective of this study was to determine whether a specific genetic profile is associated with a higher risk of developing a postoperative thromboembolic complication. Specifically, we examined if the Factor V Leiden (FVL mutation or the deletion polymorphism of the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE gene increased a patient's risk for postoperative thromboembolic events. The FVL mutation has been associated with an increased risk of idiopathic thromboembolism and the deletion polymorphism of the ACE gene has been associated with increased vascular tone, attenuated fibrinolysis and increased platelet aggregation. Methods The presence of these genetic profiles was determined for 38 patients who had a postoperative symptomatic pulmonary embolus or proximal deep venous thrombosis and 241 control patients without thrombosis using molecular biological techniques. Results The Factor V Leiden mutation was present in none of the 38 experimental patients and in 3% or 8 of the 241 controls (p = 0.26. Similarly there was no difference detected in the distribution of polymorphisms for the ACE gene with the deletion-deletion genotype present in 36% or 13 of the 38 experimental patients and in 31% or 74 of the 241 controls (p = 0.32. Conclusions Our results suggest that neither of these potentially hypercoaguable states are associated with an increased risk of symptomatic thromboembolic events following total hip or knee arthroplasty in patients receiving pharmacological thromboprophylaxis.

  19. N1421K mutation in the glycoprotein Ib binding domain impairs ristocetin- and botrocetin-mediated binding of von Willebrand factor to platelets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lanke, E.; Kristoffersson, A.C.; Isaksson, C.

    2008-01-01

    , moderately decreased plasma factor VIII (FVIII) and VWF levels, and disproportionately low-plasma VWF:RCo levels. The patients were found to be heterozygous for the novel N1421K mutation, caused by a 4263C > G transversion in exon 28 of the VWF gene coding for the A1 domain. Botrocetin- and ristocetin-mediated...... binding of plasma VWF to GPIb were reduced in the patients. In vitro mutagenesis and expression in COS-7 cells confirmed the impairment of the mutant in botrocetin- and ristocetin-mediated VWF binding to GPIb. VWF collagen binding capacity was unaffected in plasma from the heterozygous individuals as well...

  20. Deuteron form factors and e-d polarization observables for the Paris and Graz-II potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarz, K.; Plessas, W.; Mathelitsch, L.

    1983-01-01

    Elastic e-d scattering is studied employing the meson-theoretical Paris potential and the non-local separable Graz-II potential. Electric and magnetic form factors are calculated with inclusion of meson-exchange currents and compared to existing experimental data. Deuteron vector and tensor polarizations are predicted and discussed in relation to the deuteron wave functions of the potential models considered. Thereby the off-shell behaviour of the Graz-II interaction is found to be close to that one of the Paris potential over the most important domain of low and moderate off-shell moments. (Author)

  1. Autoradiographic visualization of insulin-like growth factor-II receptors in rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendelsohn, L.G.; Kerchner, G.A.; Clemens, J.A.; Smith, M.C.

    1986-01-01

    The documented presence of IGF-II in brain and CSF prompted us to investigate the distribution of receptors for IGF-II in rat brain slices. Human 125 -I-IGF-II (10 pM) was incubated for 16 hrs at 4 0 C with slide-mounted rat brain slices in the absence and presence of unlabeled human IGF-II (67 nM) or human insulin (86 nM). Slides were washed, dried, and exposed to X-ray film for 4-7 days. The results showed dense labeling in the granular layers of the olfactory bulbs, deep layers of the cerebral cortex, pineal gland, anterior pituitary, hippocampus (pyramidal cells CA 1 -CA 2 and dentate gyrus), and the granule cell layers of the cerebellum. Unlabeled IGF-II eliminated most of the binding of these brain regions while insulin produced only a minimal reduction in the amount of 125 I-IGF-II bound. These results indicate that a specific neural receptor for IGS-II is uniquely distributed in rat brain tissue and supports the notion that this peptide might play an important role in normal neuronal functioning

  2. Factors affecting mutational specificity in mammalian cells: [Informal technical progress report], February 1, 1986-January 31, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strauss, B.S.

    1987-01-01

    We analyzed the different c-H-ras mutations produced in cells after treatment with chemical carcinogens. The overall goal of this work is an understanding of the changes produced by environmental mutagens and carcinogens to learn how closely the results obtained with bacterial and cellular assay systems apply to the in vivo situation. Our work continues to utilize the technique for the study of DNA synthesis termination in vitro developed in this laboraory and utilized for the past several years. This technology can be characterized as a Sanger dideoxy sequencing technique with mutation induced lesions in the template strand serving as chain terminators instead of the dideoxynucleotides used in the Sanger technique to terminate the growing strand. We have added to this technique a modification for the study of termination on double stranded templates as possibly modeling more closely the natural situation. For this modification, double stranded M13 DNA is split once with a restriction enzyme which makes a unique cut and the linearized DNA is hybridized with single stranded circular DNA to make a uniquely nicked double stranded circle with a single 3'OH to serve as a primer for DNA synthesis which can occur by either strand displacement or nick translation

  3. Characterization of insulin-like-growth factor II (IGF II mRNA positive hepatic altered foci and IGF II expression in hepatocellular carcinoma during diethylnitrosamine-induced hepatocarcinogenesis in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukherjee Biswajit

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Insulin-like-growth factor II (IGF II has been implicated in the pathogenesis of neoplasm of different tissues, including liver of rats and men. This growth factor is believed to exert its effect during cellular proliferation. During the process of development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC, different hepatic altered foci appear. They are believed to be the putative precursors of HCC in rats and in men. Thus, to study the role of the gene in a defined model of hepatocarcinogenesis was the target to elucidate its role in various cancer phenotypes during the entire development stage of cancer, right from earlier preneoplastic lesions to HCC Methods Antisense in situ hybridization technique was used here to characterize the type(s of foci in which IGF II mRNA had expressed during the development of hepatocarcinogenesis-induced by diethylnitrosamine and promoted by phenobarbital in rats. Various focal lesions have been categorized depending on the stages and sizes along with IGF II expression patterns in them. Immunohistochemical detection for proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA was made to detect the role of the gene in preneoplastic and neoplastic cellular proliferation. Results IGF II expression was located in the glycogen-storage acidophilic cell foci maximally followed by mixed cell lesions and the least in basophilic lesions. The expression of IGF II was found to be predominant in the HCC. The expression of gene was also located at the peripheral cells of spongiosis hepatis which are believed to be the precursor of ito cell carcinoma. It was noted that there is a direct correlation between IGF II expression and Immunohistochemical detection for PCNA. Conclusion It may be concluded that IGF II gene expression plays an important role during the development of neoplasia and the gene expresses in the sequence of events leading from glycogen-rich-acidophilic lesions to glycogen poor basophilic lesions to HCC with an

  4. Mutation update of transcription factor genes FOXE3, HSF4, MAF, and PITX3 causing cataracts and other developmental ocular defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Deepti; Agrawal, Smriti A; Slavotinek, Anne; Lachke, Salil A

    2018-04-01

    Mutations in the transcription factor genes FOXE3, HSF4, MAF, and PITX3 cause congenital lens defects including cataracts that may be accompanied by defects in other components of the eye or in nonocular tissues. We comprehensively describe here all the variants in FOXE3, HSF4, MAF, and PITX3 genes linked to human developmental defects. A total of 52 variants for FOXE3, 18 variants for HSF4, 20 variants for MAF, and 19 variants for PITX3 identified so far in isolated cases or within families are documented. This effort reveals FOXE3, HSF4, MAF, and PITX3 to have 33, 16, 18, and 7 unique causal mutations, respectively. Loss-of-function mutant animals for these genes have served to model the pathobiology of the associated human defects, and we discuss the currently known molecular function of these genes, particularly with emphasis on their role in ocular development. Finally, we make the detailed FOXE3, HSF4, MAF, and PITX3 variant information available in the Leiden Online Variation Database (LOVD) platform at https://www.LOVD.nl/FOXE3, https://www.LOVD.nl/HSF4, https://www.LOVD.nl/MAF, and https://www.LOVD.nl/PITX3. Thus, this article informs on key variants in transcription factor genes linked to cataract, aphakia, corneal opacity, glaucoma, microcornea, microphthalmia, anterior segment mesenchymal dysgenesis, and Ayme-Gripp syndrome, and facilitates their access through Web-based databases. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. MUTATION ON WD DIPEPTIDE MOTIFS OF THE p48 SUBUNIT OF CHROMATIN ASSEMBLY FACTOR-1 CAUSING VIABILITY AND GROWTH OF DT40 CHICKEN B CELL LINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahyar Ahmad

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Chromatin assembly factor-1 (CAF-1, a protein complex consisting of three subunits, p150, p60, and p48, is highly conserved from yeast to humans and facilitated nucleosome assembly of newly replicated DNA. The p48 subunit, CAF-1p48 (p48, with seven WD (Trp-Asp repeat motifs, is a member of the WD protein family. The immunoprecipitation experiment revealed that ß-propeller structure of p48 was less stringent for it's binding to HDAC-1, but more stringent for its binding to both histones H4 and CAF-1p60 but not to ASF-1, indicating that the proper ß-propeller structure of p48 is essential for the binding to these two proteins histone H4 and CAF-1p60. Complementation experiments, involving missense and truncated mutants of FLAG-tagged p48, revealed that mutations of every of seven WD dipeptide motifs, like both the N-terminal and C-terminal truncated mutations, could not rescue for the tet-induced lethality. These results indicate not only that p48 is essential for the viability of vertebrate cells, although the yeast p48 homolog is nonessential, but also that all the seven WD dipeptide motifs are necessary for the maintenance of the proper structure of p48 that is fundamentally important for cell viability.   Keywords: Chromatin assembly factor-1, complementation experiments, viability

  6. Autosomal Dominant Growth Hormone Deficiency (Type II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alatzoglou, Kyriaki S; Kular, Dalvir; Dattani, Mehul T

    2015-06-01

    Isolated growth hormone deficiency (IGHD) is the commonest pituitary hormone deficiency resulting from congenital or acquired causes, although for most patients its etiology remains unknown. Among the known factors, heterozygous mutations in the growth hormone gene (GH1) lead to the autosomal dominant form of GHD, also known as type II GHD. In many cohorts this is the commonest form of congenital isolated GHD and is mainly caused by mutations that affect the correct splicing of GH-1. These mutations cause skipping of the third exon and lead to the production of a 17.5-kDa GH isoform that exerts a dominant negative effect on the secretion of the wild type GH. The identification of these mutations has clinical implications for the management of patients, as there is a well-documented correlation between the severity of the phenotype and the increased expression of the 17.5-kDa isoform. Patients with type II GHD have a variable height deficit and severity of GHD and may develop additional pituitary hormone defiencies over time, including ACTH, TSH and gonadotropin deficiencies. Therefore, their lifelong follow-up is recommended. Detailed studies on the effect of heterozygous GH1 mutations on the trafficking, secretion and action of growth hormone can elucidate their mechanism on a cellular level and may influence future treatment options for GHD type II.

  7. Insight on Mutation-Induced Resistance from Molecular Dynamics Simulations of the Native and Mutated CSF-1R and KIT.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila Da Silva Figueiredo Celestino Gomes

    Full Text Available The receptors tyrosine kinases (RTKs for the colony stimulating factor-1, CSF-1R, and for the stem cell factor, SCFR or KIT, are important mediators of signal transduction. The abnormal function of these receptors, promoted by gain-of-function mutations, leads to their constitutive activation, associated with cancer or other proliferative diseases. A secondary effect of the mutations is the alteration of receptors' sensitivity to tyrosine kinase inhibitors, compromising effectiveness of these molecules in clinical treatment. In particular, the mutation V560G in KIT increases its sensitivity to Imatinib, while the D816V in KIT, and D802V in CSF-1R, triggers resistance to the drug. We analyzed the Imatinib binding affinity to the native and mutated KIT (mutations V560G, S628N and D816V and CSF-1R (mutation D802V by using molecular dynamics simulations and energy calculations of Imatinib•target complexes. Further, we evaluated the sensitivity of the studied KIT receptors to Imatinib by measuring the inhibition of KIT phosphorylation. Our study showed that (i the binding free energy of Imatinib to the targets is highly correlated with their experimentally measured sensitivity; (ii the electrostatic interactions are a decisive factor affecting the binding energy; (iii the most deleterious impact to the Imatinib sensitivity is promoted by D802V (CSF-1R and D816V (KIT mutations; (iv the role of the juxtamembrane region, JMR, in the imatinib binding is accessory. These findings contribute to a better description of the mutation-induced effects alternating the targets sensitivity to Imatinib.

  8. Correlation of reactivity with structural factors in a series of Fe(II) substituted cobalt ferrites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sileo, Elsa E.; Garcia Rodenas, Luis; Paiva-Santos, Carlos O.; Stephens, Peter W.; Morando, Pedro J.; Blesa, Miguel A.

    2006-01-01

    A series of powdered cobalt ferrites, Co x Fe 3- x O 4 with 0.66≤x II , were synthesized by a mild procedure, and their Fe and Co site occupancies and structural characteristics were explored using X-ray anomalous scattering and the Rietveld refinement method. The dissolution kinetics, measured in 0.1 M oxalic acid aqueous solution at 70 deg. C, indicate in all cases the operation of a contracting volume rate law. The specific rates increased with the Fe II content following approximately a second-order polynomial expression. This result suggests that the transfer of Fe III controls the dissolution rate, and that the leaching of a first layer of ions Co II and Fe II leaves exposed a surface enriched in slower dissolving octahedral Fe III ions. Within this model, inner vicinal lattice Fe II accelerates the rate of Fe III transfer via internal electron hopping. A chain mechanism, involving successive electron transfers, fits the data very well. - Graphical abstract: The electron exchange between octahedral Fe II and Fe III ions has important consequences on the specific dissolution rates. Display Omitted

  9. The relative influence of individual risk factors for attempted suicide in patients with bipolar I versus bipolar II disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobo, William V; Na, Peter J; Geske, Jennifer R; McElroy, Susan L; Frye, Mark A; Biernacka, Joanna M

    2018-01-01

    To compare the relative influence (RI) of individual predictors for lifetime attempted suicide between adults with bipolar I (BDBD-I) and bipolar II disorder (BDBD-II). We conducted an analysis of data from 1465 enrollees in the Mayo Clinic Bipolar Disorder Biobank. Demographic and clinical variables and history of attempted suicide were ascertained using standardized questionnaires. Height and weight were assessed to determine body mass index (BMI); obesity was defined as BMI ≥30kg/m 2 . The frequencies of these variables were compared between persons with and without self-reported lifetime suicide attempts both overall, and within BD-I and BD-II subgroups. Gradient boosting machine (GBM) models were used to quantify the RI of study variables on the risk of lifetime attempted suicide. Nearly one-third of patients reported having a lifetime suicide attempt. Attempted suicide rates were higher in patients with BD-I than BD-II, but absolute differences were small. Lifetime attempted suicide was associated with female sex, BD-I subtype, psychiatric and substance use comorbidities, binge eating behavior, lifetime history of rapid cycling, other indicators of adverse illness course, and early age of bipolar illness onset in the entire cohort. Differences in the rank-ordering of RI for predictors of attempted suicide between BD-I and BD-II patients were modest. Rapid cycling was a strong risk factor for attempted suicide, particularly in men with BD-I. Actively psychotic or suicidal patients needing psychiatric hospitalization were initially excluded, but were approached after these acute psychiatric problems resolved. The prevalence of lifetime attempted suicide was significantly higher in BD-I than BD-II in this large, cross-sectional cohort. Predictors of attempted suicide were similar in BD-I and BD-II subgroups. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Isolation of a cDNA for a Growth Factor of Vascular Endothelial Cells from Human Lung Cancer Cells: Its Identity with Insulin‐like Growth Factor II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagiwara, Koichi; Kobayashi, Tatsuo; Tobita, Masato; Kikyo, Nobuaki; Yazaki, Yoshio

    1995-01-01

    We have found growth‐promoting activity for vascular endothelial cells in the conditioned medium of a human lung cancer cell line, T3M‐11. Purification and characterization of the growth‐promoting activity have been carried out using ammonium sulfate precipitation and gel‐exclusion chromatography. The activity migrated as a single peak just after ribonuclease. It did not bind to a heparin affinity column. These results suggest that the activity is not a heparin‐binding growth factor (including fibroblast growth factors) or a vascular endothelial growth factor. To identify the molecule exhibiting the growth‐promoting activity, a cDNA encoding the growth factor was isolated through functional expression cloning in COS‐1 cells from a cDNA library prepared from T3M‐11 cells. The nucleotide sequence encoded by the cDNA proved to be identical with that of insulin‐like growth factor II. PMID:7730145

  11. Tissue-specific expression of insulin-like growth factor II mRNAs with distinct 5' untranslated regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irminger, J.C.; Rosen, K.M.; Humble, R.E.; Villa-Komaroff, L.

    1987-01-01

    The authors have used RNA from human hypothalamus as template for the production of cDNAs encoding insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II). The prohormone coding sequence of brain IGF-II RNA is identical to that found in liver; however, the 5' untranslated sequence of the brain cDNA has no homology to the 5' untranslated sequence of the previously reported liver cDNAs. By using hybridization to specific probes as well as a method based on the properties of RNase H, they found that the human IGF-II gene has at least three exons that encode alternative 5' untranslated regions and that are expressed in a tissue-specific manner. A probe specific to the brain cDNA 5' untranslated region hybridizes to a 6.0-kilobase transcript present in placenta, hypothalamus, adrenal gland, kidney, Wilms tumor, and a pheochromocytoma. The 5' untranslated sequence of the brain cDNA does not hybridize to a 5.3-kilobase transcript found in liver or to a 5.0-kb transcript found in pheochromocytoma. By using RNase H to specifically fragment the IGF-II transcripts into 3' and 5' fragments, they found that the RNAs vary in size due to differences in the 5' end but not the 3' end

  12. Mutation of the conserved Gly83 and Gly94 in Escherichia coli elongation factor Tu. Indication of structural pivots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaersgård, I V; Knudsen, Charlotte Rohde; Wiborg, O

    1995-01-01

    Elongation factor Tu from Escherichia coli cycles between an active conformation where GTP is bound, and an inactive conformation where GDP is bound. Between the two conformations, elongation factor Tu undergoes major structural changes. The aim of this work has been to reveal the role of two ver...... is an important pivot point in elongation factor-Tu. Udgivelsesdato: 1995-Feb-15...

  13. Mutation analysis of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator-1 (PGC-1) and relationships of identified amino acid polymorphisms to Type II diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ek, J; Andersen, G; Urhammer, S A

    2001-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate if variability in the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator-1 (PGC-1) gene is associated with Type II (non-insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus.......This study aimed to investigate if variability in the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator-1 (PGC-1) gene is associated with Type II (non-insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus....

  14. Clinical and functional characterization of a patient carrying a compound heterozygous pericentrin mutation and a heterozygous IGF1 receptor mutation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Müller

    Full Text Available Intrauterine and postnatal longitudinal growth is controlled by a strong genetic component that regulates a complex network of endocrine factors integrating them with cellular proliferation, differentiation and apoptotic processes in target tissues, particularly the growth centers of the long bones. Here we report on a patient born small for gestational age (SGA with severe, proportionate postnatal growth retardation, discreet signs of skeletal dysplasia, microcephaly and moyamoya disease. Initial genetic evaluation revealed a novel heterozygous IGF1R p.Leu1361Arg mutation affecting a highly conserved residue with the insulin-like growth factor type 1 receptor suggestive for a disturbance within the somatotropic axis. However, because the mutation did not co-segregate with the phenotype and functional characterization did not reveal an obvious impairment of the ligand depending major IGF1R signaling capabilities a second-site mutation was assumed. Mutational screening of components of the somatotropic axis, constituents of the IGF signaling system and factors involved in cellular proliferation, which are described or suggested to provoke syndromic dwarfism phenotypes, was performed. Two compound heterozygous PCNT mutations (p.[Arg585X];[Glu1774X] were identified leading to the specification of the diagnosis to MOPD II. These investigations underline the need for careful assessment of all available information to derive a firm diagnosis from a sequence aberration.

  15. Clinical and functional characterization of a patient carrying a compound heterozygous pericentrin mutation and a heterozygous IGF1 receptor mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Eva; Dunstheimer, Desiree; Klammt, Jürgen; Friebe, Daniela; Kiess, Wieland; Kratzsch, Jürgen; Kruis, Tassilo; Laue, Sandy; Pfäffle, Roland; Wallborn, Tillmann; Heidemann, Peter H

    2012-01-01

    Intrauterine and postnatal longitudinal growth is controlled by a strong genetic component that regulates a complex network of endocrine factors integrating them with cellular proliferation, differentiation and apoptotic processes in target tissues, particularly the growth centers of the long bones. Here we report on a patient born small for gestational age (SGA) with severe, proportionate postnatal growth retardation, discreet signs of skeletal dysplasia, microcephaly and moyamoya disease. Initial genetic evaluation revealed a novel heterozygous IGF1R p.Leu1361Arg mutation affecting a highly conserved residue with the insulin-like growth factor type 1 receptor suggestive for a disturbance within the somatotropic axis. However, because the mutation did not co-segregate with the phenotype and functional characterization did not reveal an obvious impairment of the ligand depending major IGF1R signaling capabilities a second-site mutation was assumed. Mutational screening of components of the somatotropic axis, constituents of the IGF signaling system and factors involved in cellular proliferation, which are described or suggested to provoke syndromic dwarfism phenotypes, was performed. Two compound heterozygous PCNT mutations (p.[Arg585X];[Glu1774X]) were identified leading to the specification of the diagnosis to MOPD II. These investigations underline the need for careful assessment of all available information to derive a firm diagnosis from a sequence aberration.

  16. [Analysis of prognostic factors after radical resection in 628 patients with stage II or III colon cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Qiong; Yang, Lin; Zhou, Ai-ping; Sun, Yong-kun; Song, Yan; DU, Feng; Wang, Jin-wan

    2013-03-01

    To analyze the clinicopathologic factors related to recurrence and metastasis of stage II or III colon cancer after radical resection. The clinical and pathological data of 628 patients with stage II or III colon cancer after radical resection from Jan. 2005 to Dec. 2008 in our hospital were retrospectively reviewed and analyzed. The overall recurrence and metastasis rate was 28.5% (179/628). The 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) rate was 70.3% and 5-year overall survival (OS) rate was 78.5%. Univariate analysis showed that age, smoking intensity, depth of tumor invasion, lymph node metastasis, TNM stage, gross classification, histological differentiation, blood vessel tumor embolus, tumor gross pathology, multiple primary tumors, preoperative and postoperative serum concentration of CEA and CA19-9, and the regimen of adjuvant chemotherapy were correlated to recurrence and metastasis of colon cancer after radical resection. Multivariate analysis showed that regional lymph node metastasis, TNM stage, the regimen of postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy, and preoperative serum concentration of CEA and CA19-9 were independent factors affecting the prognosis of colon cancer patients. Regional lymph node metastasis, TNM stage, elevated preoperative serum concentration of CEA and CA19-9, the regimen of postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy with single fluorouracil type drug are independent risk factors of recurrence and metastasis in patients with stage II-III colon cancer after radical resection.

  17. Prognostic value of the stromal cell-derived factor 1 3'A mutation in pediatric human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tresoldi, Eleonora; Romiti, Maria Luisa; Boniotto, Michele; Crovella, Sergio; Salvatori, Francesca; Palomba, Elvia; Pastore, Angela; Cancrini, Caterina; de Martino, Maurizio; Plebani, Anna; Castelli, Guido; Rossi, Paolo; Tovo, Pier Angelo; Amoroso, Antonio; Scarlatti, Gabriella

    2002-03-01

    A mutation of the stromal cell-derived factor 1 gene (SDF-1 3'A) was shown to protect adults exposed to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) from infection and to affect HIV disease progression in adults. The presence of this mutation in HIV-1-infected Kenyan children did not predict mother-to-child virus transmission. The SDF-1 3'A polymorphism was studied in 256 HIV-1-infected, 118 HIV-1-exposed but uninfected, and 170 unexposed and uninfected children of Italian origin, and the frequency of SDF-1 3'A heterozygosity and homozygosity in each of the 3 groups was similar. Of the 256 HIV-1-infected children, 194 were regularly followed up and were assigned to groups according to disease progression. The frequency of the SDF-1 3'A allele was substantially lower among children with long-term nonprogression than among children with rapid (P =.0329) or delayed (P =.0375) progression. We show that the presence of the SDF-1 3'A gene correlates with accelerated disease progression in HIV-1-infected children born to seropositive mothers but does not protect against mother-to-child HIV-1 transmission.

  18. Synthesis of 3-alkyl enol mimics inhibitors of type II dehydroquinase: factors influencing their inhibition potency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Beatriz; Sedes, Antía; Peón, Antonio; Lamb, Heather; Hawkins, Alastair R; Castedo, Luis; González-Bello, Concepción

    2012-05-14

    Several 3-alkylaryl mimics of the enol intermediate in the reaction catalyzed by type II dehydroquinase were synthesized to investigate the effect on the inhibition potency of replacing the oxygen atom in the side chain by a carbon atom. The length and the rigidity of the spacer was also studied. The inhibitory properties of the reported compounds against type II dehydroquinase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Helicobacter pylori are also reported. The binding modes of these analogs in the active site of both enzymes were studied by molecular docking using GOLD 5.0 and dynamic simulations studies.

  19. Mapping and characterization of vicriviroc resistance mutations from HIV-1 isolated from treatment-experienced subjects enrolled in a phase II study (VICTOR-E1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNicholas, Paul M; Mann, Paul A; Wojcik, Lisa; Qiu, Ping; Lee, Erin; McCarthy, Michael; Shen, Junwu; Black, Todd A; Strizki, Julie M

    2011-03-01

    In the phase 2 VICTOR-E1 study, treatment-experienced subjects receiving 20 mg or 30 mg of the CCR5 antagonist vicriviroc (VCV), with a boosted protease containing optimized background regimen, experienced significantly greater reductions in HIV-1 viral load compared with control subjects. Among the 79 VCV-treated subjects, 15 experienced virologic failure, and of these 5 had VCV-resistant virus. This study investigated the molecular basis for the changes in susceptibility to VCV in these subjects. Sequence analysis and phenotypic susceptibility testing was performed on envelope clones from VCV-resistant virus. For select clones, an exchange of mutations in the V3 loop was performed between phenotypically resistant clones and the corresponding susceptible clones. Phenotypic resistance was manifest by reductions in the maximum percent inhibition. Clonal analysis of envelopes from the 5 subjects identified multiple amino acid changes in gp160 that were exclusive to the resistant clones, however, none of the changes were conserved between subjects. Introduction of V3 loop substitutions from the resistant clones into the matched susceptible clones was not sufficient to reproduce the resistant phenotype. Likewise, changing the substitutions in the V3 loops from resistant clones to match susceptible clones only restored susceptibility in 1 clone. There were no clearly conserved patterns of mutations in gp160 associated with phenotypic resistance to VCV and mutations both within and outside of the V3 loop contributed to the resistance phenotype. These data suggest that genotypic tests for VCV susceptibility may require larger training sets and additional information beyond V3 sequences.

  20. Mutation of a Nicotiana tabacum L. eukaryotic translation-initiation factor gene reduces susceptibility to a resistance-breaking strain of Potato Virus Y.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takakura, Yoshimitsu; Udagawa, Hisashi; Shinjo, Akira; Koga, Kazuharu

    2018-04-06

    Eukaryotic translation-initiation factors eIF4E and eIF(iso)4E in plants play key roles in infection by potyviruses and other plant RNA viruses. Mutations in the genes encoding these factors reduce susceptibility to the viruses, and are the basis of several recessive virus-resistance genes widely used in plant breeding. Because virus variants occasionally break such resistance, the molecular basis for this process must be elucidated. Although deletion mutants of eIF4E1-S of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) resist Potato virus Y (PVY; the type member of the genus Potyvirus), resistance-breaking strains of PVY threaten tobacco production worldwide. Here, we used RNA interference technology to knock down tobacco eIF4E2-S and eIF4E2-T genes or eIF(iso)4E-S and eIF(iso)4E-T genes. Transgenic plants with reduced transcript levels of both eIF(iso)4E-S and eIF(iso)4E-T showed reduced susceptibility to a resistance-breaking PVY strain with a K105E mutation in the viral genome-associated protein (VPg). By screening a population of chemically-induced mutants of eIF(iso)4E-S and eIF(iso)4E-T, we showed that plants with a nonsense mutation in eIF(iso)4E-T, but not eIF(iso)4E-S, showed reduced susceptibility to the resistance-breaking PVY strain. In a yeast two-hybrid assay, VPg of the resistance-breaking strain, but not wild-type PVY, physically interacted with the eIF(iso)4E-T protein. Thus, eIF4E1-S is required for infection by PVY, but eIF(iso)4E-T is required for infection by the resistance-breaking strain. Our study provides the first evidence for the involvement of a host eukaryotic translation-initiation factor in the infection cycle of a resistance-breaking virus strain. The eIF(iso)4E-T mutants will be useful in tobacco breeding to introduce resistance against resistance-breaking PVY strains. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2018 BSPP and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Mutagenic DNA repair in Escherichia coli. Pt. 2. Factors affecting loss of photoreversibility of UV induced mutations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doubleday, O P; Bridges, B A; Green, M H.L. [Medical Research Council, Brighton (UK). Cell Mutation Unit

    1975-01-01

    The photoreversibility of UV-induced mutations to Trp/sup +/ in strain Escherichia coli WP2 uvr A trp (unable to excise pyrimidine dimers) was lost at different rates during incubation in different media. In Casamino acids medium after a short initial lag, photoreversibility was lost over about one generation time; in minimal medium with tryptophan, photoreversibility persisted for more than two generations; in Casamino acids medium with pantoyl lactone photoreversibility was lost extremely slowly. The rate of loss of photoreversibility was unaffected by UV dose in either Casamino acids medium or in minimal medium. The same eventual number of induced mutants was obtained when cells were incubated for two generations in any of the three media before being transferred to selective plates supplemented with Casamino acids. Thus in each the proportion of cells capable of giving rise to a mutant was the same and only the rate at which these cells did so during post-irradiation growth varied, suggesting that there might be a specific fraction of pyrimidine dimers at a given site capable of initiating a mutagenic repair event, and that the size of this fraction is dose dependent. Segregation experiments have shown that error-prone repair appears to occur once only and is not repeated in subsequent replication cycles, in contrast to (presumed error-free) recombination repair. The results are discussed in the light of current models of UV mutagenesis.

  2. Dietary factors and the occurence of truncating APC mutations in sporadic colon carcinomas: a Dutch population-based study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diergaarde, B.; Geloof, van W.L.; Muijen, van G.N.P.; Kok, F.J.; Kampman, E.

    2003-01-01

    The interactions between environmental factors and the genetic and epigenetic changes that drive colon carcinogenesis are not clear. Dietary factors reported previously to be associated with colon cancer risk may well influence the occurrence of specific somatic alterations in colon tumors. To

  3. Dietary factors and the occurrence of truncating APC mutations in sporadic colon carcinomas: a Dutch population-based study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diergaarde, B.; Geloof, W. van; Muijen, G.N.P. van; Kok, F.J.; Kampman, E.

    2003-01-01

    The interactions between environmental factors and the genetic and epigenetic changes that drive colon carcinogenesis are not clear. Dietary factors reported previously to be associated with colon cancer risk may well influence the occurrence of specific somatic alterations in colon tumors. To

  4. K-Ras and β-catenin mutations cooperate with Fgfr3 mutations in mice to promote tumorigenesis in the skin and lung, but not in the bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imran Ahmad

    2011-07-01

    The human fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3 gene is frequently mutated in superficial urothelial cell carcinoma (UCC. To test the functional significance of FGFR3 activating mutations as a ‘driver’ of UCC, we targeted the expression of mutated Fgfr3 to the murine urothelium using Cre-loxP recombination driven by the uroplakin II promoter. The introduction of the Fgfr3 mutations resulted in no obvious effect on tumorigenesis up to 18 months of age. Furthermore, even when the Fgfr3 mutations were introduced together with K-Ras or β-catenin (Ctnnb1 activating mutations, no urothelial dysplasia or UCC was observed. Interestingly, however, owing to a sporadic ectopic Cre recombinase expression in the skin and lung of these mice, Fgfr3 mutation caused papilloma and promoted lung tumorigenesis in cooperation with K-Ras and β-catenin activation, respectively. These results indicate that activation of FGFR3 can cooperate with other mutations to drive tumorigenesis in a context-dependent manner, and support the hypothesis that activation of FGFR3 signaling contributes to human cancer.

  5. Resistivity Correction Factor for the Four-Probe Method: Experiment II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Masato; Yamaguchi, Shoji; Nishii, Toshifumi; Kurihara, Hiroshi; Enjoji, Hideo

    1989-05-01

    Experimental verification of the theoretically derived resistivity correction factor F is presented. Factor F can be applied to a system consisting of a disk sample and a four-probe array. Measurements are made on isotropic graphite disks and crystalline ITO films. Factor F can correct the apparent variations of the data and lead to reasonable resistivities and sheet resistances. Here factor F is compared to other correction factors; i.e. FASTM and FJIS.

  6. SLC26A4 mutations are associated with a specific inner ear malformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitoz, Suat; Sennaroğlu, Levent; Incesulu, Armağan; Cengiz, Filiz Başak; Koç, Yasemin; Tekin, Mustafa

    2007-03-01

    Inner ear anomalies have been reported in approximately 30% of children with early onset deafness. Identification of causative genetic factors in a large proportion of these patients was not successful. Mutations in the SLC26A4 gene have been detected in individuals with enlarged vestibular aqueduct (EVA) or Mondini dysplasia. We aimed to characterize the inner ear anomalies associated with SLC26A4 mutations. The SLC26A4 gene has been screened for mutations in 16 subjects from 14 unrelated Turkish families with a variety of inner ear anomalies ranging from Michel aplasia to incomplete partition-II and EVA. None of the patients was diagnosed to have a recognizable genetic syndrome. Additional four patients with Pendred syndrome from three families were included. Only one patient with EVA was found to have a heterozygous mutation (c.1586delT) in SLC26A4. All patients with Pendred syndrome had homozygous mutations and were noted to have either EVA or EVA associated with incomplete partition-II on the computed tomography of the temporal bone. SLC26A4 mutations are not associated with a large spectrum of inner ear anomalies. They, instead, result in a specific morphological appearance consistent with EVA or incomplete partition-II.

  7. Autosomal recessive hypophosphataemic rickets with hypercalciuria is not caused by mutations in the type II renal sodium/phosphate cotransporter gene.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heuvel, L.P.W.J. van den; Koul, K. Op de; Knots, E.; Knoers, N.V.A.M.; Monnens, L.A.H.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: At present the genetic defect for autosomal recessive and autosomal dominant hypophosphataemic rickets with hypercalciuria (HHRH) is unknown. Type II sodium/phosphate cotransporter (NPT2) gene is a serious candidate for being the causative gene in either or both autosomal recessive and

  8. Starting a hospital-based home health agency: Part II--Key success factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, P

    1993-09-01

    In Part II of a three-part series, the financial, technological and legislative issues of a hospital-based home health-agency are discussed. Beginning a home healthcare service requires intensive research to answer key environmental and operational questions--need, competition, financial projections, initial start-up costs and the impact of delayed depreciation. Assessments involving technology, staffing, legislative and regulatory issues can help project service volume, productivity and cost-control.

  9. The same ELA class II risk factors confer equine insect bite hypersensitivity in two distinct populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Lisa S; Swinburne, June E; Meadows, Jennifer R S; Broström, Hans; Eriksson, Susanne; Fikse, W Freddy; Frey, Rebecka; Sundquist, Marie; Tseng, Chia T; Mikko, Sofia; Lindgren, Gabriella

    2012-03-01

    Insect bite hypersensitivity (IBH) is a chronic allergic dermatitis common in horses. Affected horses mainly react against antigens present in the saliva from the biting midges, Culicoides ssp, and occasionally black flies, Simulium ssp. Because of this insect dependency, the disease is clearly seasonal and prevalence varies between geographical locations. For two distinct horse breeds, we genotyped four microsatellite markers positioned within the MHC class II region and sequenced the highly polymorphic exons two from DRA and DRB3, respectively. Initially, 94 IBH-affected and 93 unaffected Swedish born Icelandic horses were tested for genetic association. These horses had previously been genotyped on the Illumina Equine SNP50 BeadChip, which made it possible to ensure that our study did not suffer from the effects of stratification. The second population consisted of 106 unaffected and 80 IBH-affected Exmoor ponies. We show that variants in the MHC class II region are associated with disease susceptibility (p (raw) = 2.34 × 10(-5)), with the same allele (COR112:274) associated in two separate populations. In addition, we combined microsatellite and sequencing data in order to investigate the pattern of homozygosity and show that homozygosity across the entire MHC class II region is associated with a higher risk of developing IBH (p = 0.0013). To our knowledge this is the first time in any atopic dermatitis suffering species, including man, where the same risk allele has been identified in two distinct populations.

  10. Clinical significance of determination of serum insulin-like growth factor II levels in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Changming

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To explore the clinical significance of the changes of serum insulinlike growth factor II (IGF-II) levels in patients with chronic obstruive pulmonary diseases (COPD). Methods: The serum IGF-II levels was determined with radioimmunoassay in 60 patients with COPD and 30 controls. Results: The serum IGF-II levels in patients with COPD were significantly higher than those in controls (0.65 ± 0.22μg/L vs 0.51±0.18μg/L, P<0.01). There were no significant differences among the levels in patients of different stages (stages I, II, III). Levels of IGF-II were significantly higher in patients succumbed to the dis- ease than those in patients recoverd (P<0.05). Conclusion: Serum IGF-II levels were significantly increased in patients with COPD, especially in those succumbed. (authors)

  11. Low temperature modification of gamma-irradiation effect on peas. II.Low temperature effect on the radio-sensitivity and the chlorophyll mutations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Najdenova, N.; Vasileva, M.

    1976-01-01

    Dry pea seeds of cv.Ramonskii 77 with 11-12% moisture were γ-irradiated by 60 Co in doses 5, 15, 20 and 30 krad. Low temperature (-78 deg C) was effected in the form of dry ice for a 24 h period prior to, at the time of and post irradiation. As control were used: (a) dry non-irradiated seeds, stored at room temperature; (b) non-irradiated seeds subjected to low temperature (-78 deg C) for a 24 h period. and (c) seeds irradiated by the named doses, stored at room temperature until the time of irradiation. Treated and control seeds were sown in the field. Germination, survival rate and sterility were recorded in M 1 , while in M 2 chlorophyll mutations were scored. Results obtained showed that low temperature modification effect on the various irradiation doses depended on the time of its application; low temperature (-78 deg C) treatment prior to seed irradiation with doses 15, 20 and 30 krad increased germination percentage, plant survival and yield components in M 1 . The post-irradiation treatment did not have a significant effect on gamma-rays; highest protection effect was obtained in case seeds were irradiated at low temperature and then received supplementary treatment at high temperature. In this way the damaging effect of radiation was reduced to a maximum degree; low temperature treatment prior to irradiation with doses of 15 and 20 krad or at the time of irradiation with doses of 15, 20 and 30 krad resulted in a considerably wider chlorophyll mutation spectrum. (author)

  12. p53 Over-expression and p53 mutations in colon carcinomas: Relation to dietary risk factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voskuil, D.W.; Kampman, E.; Kraats, A.A. van; Balder, H.F.; Muijen, G.N.P. van; Goldbohm, R.A.; Veer, P. van 't

    1999-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have suggested that dietary factors may differently affect p53-dependent and p53-independent pathways to colon cancer. Results of such studies may depend on the method used to assess p53 status. This case-control study of 185 colon-cancer cases and 259 controls examines this

  13. [Therapeutic use of hematopoietic growth factors. II. GM-CSF and G-CSF].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royer, B; Arock, M

    1998-01-01

    The second part of this review on haematopoietic growth factors is focused on the therapeutic use of GM-CSF and G-CSF. Such therapeutic applications have raised very great hopes for clinical haematology. However, it should not be forgotten that these haematopoietic growth factors, which are very costly, are powerful two-edged weapons capable of triggering a cascade of reactions, and have a field of activity that often goes beyond the single highly specific property which it is hoped they possess. The risks and costs of their use are currently being evaluated. Waited developments concerning these molecules focus on three axes: a best use of factors already commercialized, especially concerning adaptation of posologies and new indications, the development of hybrid molecules from already known haematopoietic growth factors, possessing the advantages of respective factors, but not their disadvantages, the discovery of new haematopoietic growth factors with potential therapeutic application.

  14. Decreased plasma levels of factor II + VII + X correlate with increased levels of soluble cytokine receptors in patients with malaria and meningococcal infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bygbjerg, I C; Hansen, M B; Rønn, A M

    1997-01-01

    The levels of coagulation factors II + VII + X and of blood platelets (thrombocytes) as well as of cytokines and soluble cytokine receptors were studied in the patients with malaria or meningococcal infections. The coagulation factors were decreased particularly in the meningococcal patients, while...... thrombocytes were lowest in the Plasmodium falciparum malaria patients. There was no correlation between factors II + VII + X and thrombocytes, but plasma levels of coagulation factors II + VII + X were found to correlate inversely with levels of soluble interleukin-2 receptor (sIL-2R) and soluble tumour...... necrosis factor-I (sTNF-RI) in patients with malaria and meningococcal infections. Elevated sIL-2R and sTNF-RI levels and decreased coagulation factors reverted to normal within 3-5 days after initiation of therapy in P. falciparum patients followed consecutively. Estimation of coagulation factors may...

  15. Characterization of O-glycosylated precursors of insulin-like growth factor II by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jespersen, S.; Koedam, J.A.; Hoogerbrugge, C.M.; Tjaden, U.R.; Greef, J. van der; Brande, J.L. van den

    1996-01-01

    High molecular weight precursors of insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) were isolated from Cohn fraction IV of human plasma by ultrafiltration, affinity chromatography and reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. Molecular weight determination by matrix-assisted laser

  16. Chromogranin B and Secretogranin II in transgenic mice overexpressing human APP751 with the London (V717I) and Swedish (K670M/N671L) mutations and in Alzheimer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Michael; Prokesch, Manuela; Hutter-Paier, Birgit; Windisch, Manfred; Stridsberg, Mats; Mahata, Sushil K; Kirchmair, Rudolf; Wietzorrek, Georg; Knaus, Hans-Günther; Jellinger, Kurt; Humpel, Christian; Marksteiner, Josef

    2008-03-01

    Chromogranin B and secretogranin II are major soluble constituents of large dense core vesicles of presynaptic structures and have been found in neuritic plaques of Alzheimer patients. We examined the distribution and expression of these peptides in both transgenic mice over expressing human amyloid-beta protein precursor APP751 with the London (V717I) and Swedish (K670M/N671L) mutations and in human post-mortem brain. In transgenic mice, the number of amyloid-beta plaques and chromogranin immunopositive plaques increased from 6 to 12 months. About 60% of amyloid-beta plaques were associated with chromogranin B and about 40% with secretogranin II. Chromogranin immunoreactivity appeared mainly as swollen dystrophic neurites. Neither synaptophysin- nor glial fibrillary acidic protein- immunoreactivity was expressed in chromogranin immunoreactive structures at any timepoint. Density of chromogranin peptides in hippocampal structures did not change in transgenic animals at any timepoint, even though animals had a poorer performance in the Morris water maze task. In conclusion, our findings in transgenic animals partly resembled findings in Alzheimer patients. Chromogranin peptides were associated with amyloid-beta plaques, but were not reduced in specific brain areas as previously reported by our group. Therefore specific changes of chromogranin peptides observed in Alzheimer patients can be related to amyloid-beta pathology only.

  17. A new manufacturing process to remove thrombogenic factors (II, VII, IX, X, and XI) from intravenous immunoglobulin gamma preparations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Dong Hwarn; Kang, Gil Bu; Kang, Dae Eun; Hong, Jeung Woon; Lee, Min Gyu; Kim, Ki Yong; Han, Jeung Whan

    2017-01-01

    Coagulation factors (II, VII, IX, X, and particularly XIa) remaining in high concentrations in intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) preparations can form thrombi, causing thromboembolic events, and in serious cases, result in death. Therefore, manufacturers of biological products must investigate the ability of their production processes to remove procoagulant activities. Previously, we were able to remove coagulation factors II, VII, IX, and X from our IVIG preparation through ethanol precipitation, but factor XIa, which plays an important role in thrombosis, remained in the intermediate products. Here, we used a chromatographic process using a new resin that binds with high capacity to IgG and removes procoagulant activities. The procoagulant activities were reduced to low levels as determined by the thrombin generation assay: 250 s, FXI/FXIa ELISA: <0.31 ng/mL. Even after spiking with FXIa at a concentration 32.5 times higher than the concentration in normal specimens, the procoagulant activities were below the detection limit (<0.31 ng/mL). These results demonstrate the ability of our manufacturing process to remove procoagulant activities to below the detection limit (except by NaPTT), suggesting a reduced risk of thromboembolic events that maybe potentially caused by our IVIG preparation. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  18. Isolation of an insulin-like growth factor II cDNA with a unique 5' untranslated region from human placenta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, Shujane; Daimon, Makoto; Wang, Chunyeh; Ilan, J.; Jansen, M.

    1988-01-01

    Human insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) cDNA from a placental library was isolated and sequenced. The 5' untranslated region (5'-UTR) sequence of this cDNA differs completely from that of adult human liver and has considerable base sequence identity to the same region of an IGF-II cDNA of a rat liver cell line, BRL-3A. Human placental poly(A) + RNA was probed with either the 5'-UTR of the isolated human placental IGF-II cDNA or the 5'-UTR of the IGF-II cDNA obtained from adult human liver. No transcripts were detected by using the 5'-UTR of the adult liver IGF-II as the probe. In contrast, three transcripts of 6.0, 3.2, and 2.2 kilobases were detected by using the 5'-UTR of the placental IGF-II cDNA as the probe or the probe from the coding sequence. A fourth IGF-II transcript of 4.9 kilobases presumably containing a 5'-UTR consisting of a base sequence dissimilar to that of either IGF-II 5'-UTR was apparent. Therefore, IGF-II transcripts detected may be products of alternative splicing as their 5'-UTR sequence is contained within the human IGF-II gene or they may be a consequence of alternative promoter utilization in placenta

  19. Investigation about selecting strong type of melons by using melon paleness factor fusarium oxysporum f.sp.melonis and mutation techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kantoglu, Y.; Secer, E.; Kunter, B.; Erzurum, K.; Maden, S.; Yanmaz, R.

    2009-01-01

    Fusarium wilt is a vascular disease of the Cucurbitaceae family, especially in muskmelon (Cucumis melo L.), caused by the soil fungus Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. melonis (FOM). This pathogen persists in the soil for extended periods of time, and the only effective control is the use of resistant varieties. Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. melonis is a very serious disease factor for farmers in Turkey. In this research, we show a method for mass-selection of melon mutants resistant to Fusarium wilt. In vitro selection of resistant cells, which are come from irradiated and non-irradiated explants, is done using culture filtrates of different FOM races. According to our results we determined effective irradiation doses and filtrate treatment dose by Linear Regression Analysis. According to our results 21.75 Gy is effective dose for in vitro Yuva cv. explants to induce mutation and for filtrate treatment 6.73% is the proper dose to select survive calluses and plantlets. We recommended using 10 and 20 Gy gamma ray doses for in vitro melon plantlets to induce mutation by our results. We succeed to regenerate 6% plantlets which were obtained and selected from irradiated plantlets and regenerated in in vitro medias which were include 6.73 % filtrate. Although 16.7% of resistant or tolerant plantlets can continue their viability in greenhouse conditions after disease inoculation treatment, we observed 4 plants had a surviving capability in a limited time. That is very important for breeding cycle and this research can lead to the development of new melon cultivars that will be resistant to Fusarium wilt.

  20. Human factors analysis and design methods for nuclear waste retrieval systems. Volume II. A compendium of human factors design data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casey, S.M.

    1980-04-01

    This document is a compilation of human factors engineering design recommendations and data, selected and organized to assist in the design of a nuclear waste retrieval system. Design guidelines from a variety of sources have been evaluated, edited, and expanded for inclusion in this document, and, where appropriate, portions of text from selected sources have been included in their entirety. A number of human factors engineering guidelines for equipment designers have been written over the past three decades, each tailored to the needs of the specific system being designed. In the case of this particular document, a review of the preliminary human operator functions involved in each phase of the retrieval process was performed, resulting in the identification of areas of design emphasis upon which this document should be based. Documents containing information and design data on each of these areas were acquired, and data and design guidelines related to the previously identified areas of emphasis were extracted and reorganized. For each system function, actions were first assigned to operator and/or machine, and the operator functions were then described. Separate lists of operator functions were developed for each of the areas of retrieval activities - survey and mapping, remining, floor flange emplacement, plug and canister overcoring, plug and canister removal and transport, and CWSRS activity. These functions and the associated man-machine interface were grouped into categories based on task similarity, and the principal topics of human factors design emphasis were extracted. These topic areas are reflected in the contents of the 12 sections of this document

  1. Double-stranded DNA translocase activity of transcription factor TFIIH and the mechanism of RNA polymerase II open complex formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishburn, James; Tomko, Eric; Galburt, Eric; Hahn, Steven

    2015-03-31

    Formation of the RNA polymerase II (Pol II) open complex (OC) requires DNA unwinding mediated by the transcription factor TFIIH helicase-related subunit XPB/Ssl2. Because XPB/Ssl2 binds DNA downstream from the location of DNA unwinding, it cannot function using a conventional helicase mechanism. Here we show that yeast TFIIH contains an Ssl2-dependent double-stranded DNA translocase activity. Ssl2 tracks along one DNA strand in the 5' → 3' direction, implying it uses the nontemplate promoter strand to reel downstream DNA into the Pol II cleft, creating torsional strain and leading to DNA unwinding. Analysis of the Ssl2 and DNA-dependent ATPase activity of TFIIH suggests that Ssl2 has a processivity of approximately one DNA turn, consistent with the length of DNA unwound during transcription initiation. Our results can explain why maintaining the OC requires continuous ATP hydrolysis and the function of TFIIH in promoter escape. Our results also suggest that XPB/Ssl2 uses this translocase mechanism during DNA repair rather than physically wedging open damaged DNA.

  2. Compound heterozygous mutations (p.Leu13Pro and p.Tyr294*) associated with factor VII deficiency cause impaired secretion through ineffective translocation and extensive intracellular degradation of factor VII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Keijiro; Sugawara, Takeshi; Ishida, Yoji; Suwabe, Akira

    2013-02-01

    Congenital coagulation factor VII (FVII) deficiency is a rare coagulation disease. We investigated the molecular mechanisms of this FVII deficiency in a patient with compound heterozygous mutations. A 22-year-old Japanese female was diagnosed with asymptomatic FVII deficiency. The FVII activity and antigen were greatly reduced (activity, 13.0%; antigen, 10.8%). We analyzed the F7 gene of this patient and characterized mutant FVII proteins using in vitro expression studies. Sequence analysis revealed that the patient was compound heterozygous with a point mutation (p.Leu13Pro) in the central hydrophobic core of the signal peptides and a novel non-sense mutation (p.Tyr294*) in the catalytic domain. Expression studies revealed that mutant FVII with p.Leu13Pro (FVII13P) showed less accumulation in the cells (17.5%) and less secretion into the medium (64.8%) than wild type showed. Truncated FVII resulting from p.Tyr294* (FVII294X) was also decreased in the cells (32.0%), but was not secreted into the medium. Pulse-chase experiments revealed that both mutants were extensively degraded intracellularly compared to wild type. The majority of FVII13P cannot translocate into endoplasmic reticulum (ER). However, a small amount of FVII13P was processed normally with post-translational modifications and was secreted into the medium. The fact that FVII294X was observed only in ER suggests that it is retained in ER. Proteasome apparently plays a central role in these degradations. These findings demonstrate that both mutant FVIIs impaired secretion through ineffective translocation to and retention in ER with extensive intracellular degradation, resulting in an insufficient phenotype. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Experimental diabetes increases insulin-like growth factor I and II receptor concentration and gene expression in kidney

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werner, H.; Shen-Orr, Z.; Stannard, B.; Burguera, B.; Roberts, C.T. Jr.; LeRoith, D.

    1990-01-01

    Insulinlike growth factor I (IGF-I) is a mitogenic hormone with important regulatory roles in growth and development. One of the target organs for IGF-I action is the kidney, which synthesizes abundant IGF-I receptors and IGF-I itself. To study the involvement of IGF-I and the IGF-I receptor in the development of nephropathy, one of the major complications of diabetes mellitus, we measured the expression of these genes in the kidney and in other tissues of the streptozocin-induced diabetic rat. The binding of 125I-labeled IGF-I to crude membranes was measured in the same tissues. We observed a 2.5-fold increase in the steady-state level of IGF-I-receptor mRNA in the diabetic kidney, which was accompanied by a 2.3-fold increase in IGF-I binding. In addition to this increase in IGF-I binding to the IGF-I receptor, there was also binding to a lower-molecular-weight material that may represent an IGF-binding protein. No change was detected in the level of IGF-I-peptide mRNA. Similarly, IGF-II-receptor mRNA levels and IGF-II binding were significantly increased in the diabetic kidney. IGF-I- and IGF-II-receptor mRNA levels and IGF-I and IGF-II binding returned to control values after insulin treatment. Because the IGF-I receptor is able to transduce mitogenic signals on activation of its tyrosine kinase domain, we hypothesize that, among other factors, high levels of receptor in the diabetic kidney may also be involved in the development of diabetic nephropathy. Increased IGF-II-receptor expression in the diabetic kidney may be important for the intracellular transport and packaging of lysosomal enzymes, although a role for this receptor in signal transduction cannot be excluded. Finally, the possible role of IGF-binding proteins requires further study

  4. Splicing factor SR34b mutation reduces cadmium tolerance in Arabidopsis by regulating iron-regulated transporter 1 gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Wentao; Du, Bojing; Liu, Di; Qi, Xiaoting

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Arabidopsis splicing factor SR34b gene is cadmium-inducible. • SR34b T-DNA insertion mutant is sensitive to cadmium due to high cadmium uptake. • SR34b is a regulator of cadmium transporter IRT1 at the posttranscription level. • These results highlight the roles of splicing factors in cadmium tolerance of plant. - Abstract: Serine/arginine-rich (SR) proteins are important splicing factors. However, the biological functions of plant SR proteins remain unclear especially in abiotic stresses. Cadmium (Cd) is a non-essential element that negatively affects plant growth and development. In this study, we provided clear evidence for SR gene involved in Cd tolerance in planta. Systemic expression analysis of 17 Arabidopsis SR genes revealed that SR34b is the only SR gene upregulated by Cd, suggesting its potential roles in Arabidopsis Cd tolerance. Consistent with this, a SR34b T-DNA insertion mutant (sr34b) was moderately sensitive to Cd, which had higher Cd 2+ uptake rate and accumulated Cd in greater amounts than wild-type. This was due to the altered expression of iron-regulated transporter 1 (IRT1) gene in sr34b mutant. Under normal growth conditions, IRT1 mRNAs highly accumulated in sr34b mutant, which was a result of increased stability of IRT1 mRNA. Under Cd stress, however, sr34b mutant plants had a splicing defect in IRT1 gene, thus reducing the IRT1 mRNA accumulation. Despite of this, sr34b mutant plants still constitutively expressed IRT1 proteins under Cd stress, thereby resulting in Cd stress-sensitive phenotype. We therefore propose the essential roles of SR34b in posttranscriptional regulation of IRT1 expression and identify it as a regulator of Arabidopsis Cd tolerance

  5. Splicing factor SR34b mutation reduces cadmium tolerance in Arabidopsis by regulating iron-regulated transporter 1 gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Wentao; Du, Bojing; Liu, Di; Qi, Xiaoting, E-mail: qixiaoting@cnu.edu.cn

    2014-12-12

    Highlights: • Arabidopsis splicing factor SR34b gene is cadmium-inducible. • SR34b T-DNA insertion mutant is sensitive to cadmium due to high cadmium uptake. • SR34b is a regulator of cadmium transporter IRT1 at the posttranscription level. • These results highlight the roles of splicing factors in cadmium tolerance of plant. - Abstract: Serine/arginine-rich (SR) proteins are important splicing factors. However, the biological functions of plant SR proteins remain unclear especially in abiotic stresses. Cadmium (Cd) is a non-essential element that negatively affects plant growth and development. In this study, we provided clear evidence for SR gene involved in Cd tolerance in planta. Systemic expression analysis of 17 Arabidopsis SR genes revealed that SR34b is the only SR gene upregulated by Cd, suggesting its potential roles in Arabidopsis Cd tolerance. Consistent with this, a SR34b T-DNA insertion mutant (sr34b) was moderately sensitive to Cd, which had higher Cd{sup 2+} uptake rate and accumulated Cd in greater amounts than wild-type. This was due to the altered expression of iron-regulated transporter 1 (IRT1) gene in sr34b mutant. Under normal growth conditions, IRT1 mRNAs highly accumulated in sr34b mutant, which was a result of increased stability of IRT1 mRNA. Under Cd stress, however, sr34b mutant plants had a splicing defect in IRT1 gene, thus reducing the IRT1 mRNA accumulation. Despite of this, sr34b mutant plants still constitutively expressed IRT1 proteins under Cd stress, thereby resulting in Cd stress-sensitive phenotype. We therefore propose the essential roles of SR34b in posttranscriptional regulation of IRT1 expression and identify it as a regulator of Arabidopsis Cd tolerance.

  6. Flipped script for gefitinib: A reapproved tyrosine kinase inhibitor for first-line treatment of epidermal growth factor receptor mutation positive metastatic nonsmall cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanowicz, Brian S; Hoch, Matthew A; Hartranft, Megan E

    2017-04-01

    Purpose The approval history, pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, clinical trials, efficacy, dosing recommendations, drug interactions, safety, place in therapy, and economic considerations of gefitinib are reviewed. Summary Lung cancer is one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers and is the leading cause of cancer death. Platinum-based chemotherapy and tyrosine kinase inhibitors, such as erlotinib and afatinib, are recommended therapies for nonsmall cell lung cancer. The European Medicines Association based their approval of gefitinib on the randomized, multicenter Iressa Pan-Asia Study (IPASS, NCT00322452) and a single-arm study showing effectiveness in Caucasians (IFUM, NCT01203917). Both studies were recently referenced by the United States Food & Drug Administration to reapprove gefitinib for the first-line treatment of advanced nonsmall cell lung cancer with epidermal growth factor receptor exon 19 deletions or exon 21 substitution. Diarrhea, acneiform rash, and interstitial lung disease are known side effects of gefitinib. Conclusion Use of gefitinib for the first-line therapy of metastatic nonsmall cell lung cancer with epidermal growth factor receptor exon 19 deletions (residues 747-750) or exon 21 substitution mutation (L858R) is well-documented and supported.

  7. NATURAL MUTATION IN THE GENE OF RESPONSE REGULATOR BgrR RESULTING IN REPRESSION OF Bac PROTEIN SYNTHESIS, A PATHOGENICITY FACTOR OF STREPTOCOCCUS AGALACTIAE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Rozhdestvenskaya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Streptococcus agalactiae can cause variety of diseases of newborns and adults. For successful colonization of different human tissues and organs as well as for suppression of the host immune system S. agalactiae expresses numerous virulence factors. For coordinated expression of the virulence genes S. agalactiae employs regulatory molecules including regulatory proteins of two-component systems. Results of the present study demonstrated that in S. agalactiae strain A49V the natural mutation in the brgR gene encoding for BgrR regulatory protein, which is component of regulatory system BgrRS, resulted in the repression of Bac protein synthesis, a virulence factor of S. agalactiae. A single nucleotide deletion in the bgrR gene has caused a shift of the reading frame and the changes in the primary, secondary and tertiary structures of the BgrR protein. The loss of functional activity of BgrR protein in A49V strain and repression of Bac protein synthesis have increased virulence of the strain in experimental animal streptococcal infection.

  8. Syndromes, Disorders and Maternal Risk Factors Associated with Neural Tube Defects (II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Ping Chen

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Fetuses with neural tube defects (NTDs maybe associated with syndromes, disorders, and maternal risk factors. This article provides a comprehensive review of syndromes, disorders, and maternal risk factors associated with NTDs, such as Currarino syndrome, sacral defect with anterior meningocele, Jarcho-Levin syndrome (spondylo-costal dysostosis, lateral meningocele syndrome, neurofibromatosis type I, Marfan syndrome, and hyperthermia. The recurrence risk and the preventive effect of maternal folic acid intake in NTDs associated with syndromes, disorders, and maternal risk factors may be different from those of non-syndromic multifactorial NTDs. Perinatal identification of NTDs should alert one to the syndromes, disorders, and maternal risk factors associated with NTDs, and prompt a thorough etiologic investigation and genetic counseling.

  9. Load and resistance factor rating (LRFR) in New York State : volume II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    This report develops a Load and Resistance Factor Rating (NYS-LRFR) methodology : for New York bridges. The methodology is applicable for the rating of existing : bridges, the posting of under-strength bridges, and checking Permit trucks. The : propo...

  10. Epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase (EGFR-TK) mutation testing in adults with locally advanced or metastatic non-small cell lung cancer : a systematic review and cost-effectiveness analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westwood, Marie; Joore, Manuela; Whiting, Penny; van Asselt, Thea; Ramaekers, Bram; Armstrong, Nigel; Misso, Kate; Severens, Johan; Kleijnen, Jos

    BACKGROUND: Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the most common form of lung cancer. Some epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase (EGFR-TK) mutations make tumours responsive to treatment with EGFR-TK inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs) but less responsive to treatment with standard chemotherapy.

  11. Epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase (EGFR-TK) mutation testing in adults with locally advanced or metastatic non-small cell lung cancer: A systematic review and cost-effectiveness analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Westwood (Marie); M.A. Joore (Manuela); P. Whiting (Penny); T. van Asselt (Thea); B.L.T. Ramaekers (Bram); N. Armstrong (Nigel); K. Misso (Kate); J.L. Severens (Hans); J. Kleijnen (Jos)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Background: Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the most common form of lung cancer. Some epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase (EGFR-TK) mutations make tumours responsive to treatment with EGFR-TK inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs) but less responsive to treatment

  12. Bg1II polymorphism of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF-R) gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biunno, I; Pozzi, M R; Radice, P; Mondini, P; Pierotti, M A; Porta, G D [Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milan (Italy); Haley, J; Waterfield, M D [Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, London (England)

    1988-08-11

    A 770 bp cDNA fragment was derived from the cytoplasmic portion of the EGF-R (ref. Libermann et al., 1985). Bg1II identifies 4 invariant bands of 7.0, 5.0, 3.5 and 1.2 kb and a two allele polymorphism with a band of either 10.6 kb (lane 1) or 9.4 kb (lane 3). An heterozygote individual is represented. The frequency was analyzed in 78 unrelated European Caucasians. Its chromosomal location was determined. Co-dominant segregation was demonstrated in three families of 12 individuals. A rare variant of 8.3 kb was seen in one chromosome out of the 144 examined. This allelic form has not yet been fully characterized.

  13. Mutations in galactosemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reichardt, J.K.V. [Univ. of Southern California School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1995-10-01

    This Letter raises four issues concerning two papers on galactosemia published in the March 1995 of the Journal. First, table 2 in the paper by Elsas et al. incorrectly attributes seven galactose-l-phosphate uridyl transferase (GALT) mutations (S135L, L195P, K285N, N314D, R333W, R333G, and K334R). The table also fails to mention that others have reported the same two findings attributed to {open_quotes}Leslie et al.; Elsas et al. and in press{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}Leslie et al.; Elsas et al.{close_quotes} The first finding on the prevalence of the Q188R galactosemia mutation in the G/G Caucasian population has also been described by Ng et al., and the second finding on the correlation of the N314D GALT mutation with the Duarte variant was reported by Lin et al. Second, Elsas et al. suggest that the E203K and N314D mutations may {open_quotes}produce intra-allelic complementation when in cis{close_quotes}. This speculation is supported by the activity data of individual III-2 but is inconsistent with the activities of three other individuals I-1, II-1, and III-1 of the same pedigree. The GALT activity measured in these three individuals suggests a dominant negative effect of E203K in E203K-N314D chromosomes, since they all have less than normal activity. Thus, the preponderance of the data in this paper is at odds with the authors speculation. It is worth recalling that Lin et al. also identified four N314D GALT mutations on 95 galactosemic chromosomes examined. A similar situation also appears to be the case in proband III-1 (with genotype E203K-N314D/IVSC) in the Elsas et al. paper. 9 refs.

  14. Genetic factors and multiple sclerosis in the Moroccan population: a role for HLA class II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouadghiri, S; El Alaoui Toussi, K; Brick, C; Ait Benhaddou, E H; Benseffaj, N; Benomar, A; El Yahyaoui, M; Essakalli, M

    2013-12-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system that mainly affects young adults. The association between susceptibility to MS and HLA class II genes, in particular the DRB1*15 allele, has been reported in diverse ethnic groups. The aim of our study was to investigate the distribution of HLA-DRB1* and -DQB1* alleles in Moroccan population and their implication in the susceptibility to the disease. Fifty-seven MS patients were compared to 172 healthy controls unrelated to one another and matched by age, sex and ethnic origin. HLA class II (DRB1* and DQB1*) typing was performed by PCR-SSP and/or Luminex (PCR-SSO). Allelic and haplotypic frequencies, P-values, odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated using the software SPSS. A significant increase of DRB1*15 allele frequency (17.6% vs 8.4%, OR=2.67, 95% CI=1.36-5.23, P=0.004) and HLA-DRB1*15-DQB1*06 haplotype (8.8% vs 4.08%, OR=2.78, 95% CI=1.41-5.48, P=0.002) were observed in Moroccan MS patients. No association of the DR15 allele with sex or age at onset was appreciated. Concerning HLA-DQB1* alleles, no significant difference between patients and controls was found. Our results reveal a role for HLA-DRB1*15 allele molecules in the predisposition of Moroccan patients to MS. Although this study should be confirmed on a larger sample size, it analyzes for the first time the possible role of a genetic marker for susceptibility to MS in Moroccan population. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. nalyot, a mutation of the Drosophila myb-related Adf1 transcription factor, disrupts synapse formation and olfactory memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeZazzo, J; Sandstrom, D; de Belle, S; Velinzon, K; Smith, P; Grady, L; DelVecchio, M; Ramaswami, M; Tully, T

    2000-07-01

    nalyot (nal) is a novel olfactory memory mutant of Drosophila, encoding Adf1, a myb-related transcription factor. Following extended training sessions, Adf1 mutants show normal early memory but defective longterm memory. Adf1 shows widespread spatiotemporal expression, yet mutant alleles reveal no discernible disruptions in gross morphology of the nervous system. Studies at the larval neuromuscular junction, however, reveal a role for Adf1 in the modulation of synaptic growth-in contrast to the role established for dCREB2 in the control of synaptic function (Davis et al., 1996). These findings suggest that Adf1 and dCREB2 regulate distinct transcriptional cascades involved in terminal stages of synapse maturation. More generally, Adf1 provides a novel link between molecular mechanisms of developmental and behavioral plasticity.

  16. Biosynthesis of 10 kDa and 7.5 kDa insulin-like growth factor II in a human rhabdomyosarcoma cell line

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, F C; Haselbacher, G; Christiansen, Jan

    1993-01-01

    In the present study we have analysed the expression of insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) in the human rhabdomyosarcoma cell line IN157.IN157 cells express high levels of three IGF-II mRNAs of 6.0 kb, 4.8 kb and 4.2 kb. In contrast, normal skeletal muscle expresses a negligible amount of IGF......-II mRNA. Two forms of IGF-II with molecular masses of 7.5 kDa and 10 kDa, corresponding to the mature IGF-II and IGF-II with a C-terminal extension of 21 amino acids (IGF-IIE21), were secreted into the culture medium at amounts of 17 ng/ml (2.3 nM) and 15 ng/ml (1.5 nM), respectively. IN157 cells also......-II and IGF-IIE21 with Kd values of 0.5 nM and 2 nM, respectively, and IGF-I with about 500 times lower affinity. IGF-II and IGF-IIE21 stimulated DNA synthesis via the IGF-I receptor, whereas the IGF-II/Man 6-P receptor mediated their rapid internalization and inactivation. During culture of IN157 cells about...

  17. Physics Metacognition Inventory Part II: Confirmatory factor analysis and Rasch analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taasoobshirazi, Gita; Bailey, MarLynn; Farley, John

    2015-11-01

    The Physics Metacognition Inventory was developed to measure physics students' metacognition for problem solving. In one of our earlier studies, an exploratory factor analysis provided evidence of preliminary construct validity, revealing six components of students' metacognition when solving physics problems including knowledge of cognition, planning, monitoring, evaluation, debugging, and information management. The college students' scores on the inventory were found to be reliable and related to students' physics motivation and physics grade. However, the results of the exploratory factor analysis indicated that the questionnaire could be revised to improve its construct validity. The goal of this study was to revise the questionnaire and establish its construct validity through a confirmatory factor analysis. In addition, a Rasch analysis was applied to the data to better understand the psychometric properties of the inventory and to further evaluate the construct validity. Results indicated that the final, revised inventory is a valid, reliable, and efficient tool for assessing student metacognition for physics problem solving.

  18. Oncolytic viruses for cancer therapy II. Cell-internal factors for conditional growth in neoplastic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Stephanie A; Gromeier, Matthias

    2005-04-01

    Recent advances in our understanding of virus-host interactions have fueled new studies in the field of oncolytic viruses. The first part of this review explained how cell-external factors, such as cellular receptors, influence tumor tropism and specificity of oncolytic virus candidates. In the second part of this review, we focus on cellinternal factors that mediate tumor-specific virus growth. An oncolytic virus must be able to replicate within cancerous cells and kill them without collateral damage to healthy surrounding cells. This desirable property is inherent to some proposed oncolytic viral agents or has been achieved by genetic manipulation in others.

  19. Mutations in zebrafish lrp2 result in adult-onset ocular pathogenesis that models myopia and other risk factors for glaucoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerry N Veth

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The glaucomas comprise a genetically complex group of retinal neuropathies that typically occur late in life and are characterized by progressive pathology of the optic nerve head and degeneration of retinal ganglion cells. In addition to age and family history, other significant risk factors for glaucoma include elevated intraocular pressure (IOP and myopia. The complexity of glaucoma has made it difficult to model in animals, but also challenging to identify responsible genes. We have used zebrafish to identify a genetically complex, recessive mutant that shows risk factors for glaucoma including adult onset severe myopia, elevated IOP, and progressive retinal ganglion cell pathology. Positional cloning and analysis of a non-complementing allele indicated that non-sense mutations in low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 2 (lrp2 underlie the mutant phenotype. Lrp2, previously named Megalin, functions as an endocytic receptor for a wide-variety of bioactive molecules including Sonic hedgehog, bone morphogenic protein 4, retinol-binding protein, vitamin D-binding protein, and apolipoprotein E, among others. Detailed phenotype analyses indicated that as lrp2 mutant fish age, many individuals--but not all--develop high IOP and severe myopia with obviously enlarged eye globes. This results in retinal stretch and prolonged stress to retinal ganglion cells, which ultimately show signs of pathogenesis. Our studies implicate altered Lrp2-mediated homeostasis as important for myopia and other risk factors for glaucoma in humans and establish a new genetic model for further study of phenotypes associated with this disease.

  20. Analytic performance studies and clinical reproducibility of a real-time PCR assay for the detection of epidermal growth factor receptor gene mutations in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue specimens of non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O’Donnell, Patrick; Shieh, Felice; Wei, Wen; Lawrence, H Jeffrey; Wu, Lin; Schilling, Robert; Bloom, Kenneth; Maltzman, Warren; Anderson, Steven; Soviero, Stephen; Ferguson, Jane; Shyu, Johnny; Current, Robert; Rehage, Taraneh; Tsai, Julie; Christensen, Mari; Tran, Ha Bich; Chien, Sean Shih-Chang

    2013-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene mutations identify patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who have a high likelihood of benefiting from treatment with anti-EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Sanger sequencing is widely used for mutation detection but can be technically challenging, resulting in longer turn-around-time, with limited sensitivity for low levels of mutations. This manuscript details the technical performance verification studies and external clinical reproducibility studies of the cobas EGFR Mutation Test, a rapid multiplex real-time PCR assay designed to detect 41 mutations in exons 18, 19, 20 and 21. The assay’s limit of detection was determined using 25 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue (FFPET)-derived and plasmid DNA blends. Assay performance for a panel of 201 specimens was compared against Sanger sequencing with resolution of discordant specimens by quantitative massively parallel pyrosequencing (MPP). Internal and external reproducibility was assessed using specimens tested in duplicate by different operators, using different reagent lots, instruments and at different sites. The effects on the performance of the cobas EGFR test of endogenous substances and nine therapeutic drugs were evaluated in ten FFPET specimens. Other tests included an evaluation of the effects of necrosis, micro-organisms and homologous DNA sequences on assay performance, and the inclusivity of the assay for less frequent mutations. A >95% hit rate was obtained in blends with >5% mutant alleles, as determined by MPP analysis, at a total DNA input of 150 ng. The overall percent agreement between Sanger sequencing and the cobas test was 96.7% (negative percent agreement 97.5%; positive percent agreement 95.8%). Assay repeatability was 98% when tested with two operators, instruments, and reagent lots. In the external reproducibility study, the agreement was > 99% across all sites, all operators and all reagent lots for 11/12 tumors tested. Test

  1. FACTORS CONTRIBUTING TO FACULTY AND STUDENT ACCEPTANCE OF INSTRUCTIONAL TELEVISION, TEMP II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    SANFORD, FILLMORE H.

    PERTINENT FACTORS WERE DELINEATED IN THE ACCEPTANCE OR REJECTION OF TELEVISED INSTRUCTIONAL PROGRAMS USED WITH THE TEXAS EDUCATIONAL MICROWAVE PROJECT (TEMP)--AN EFFORT LINKING 11 COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES BY MICROWAVE TRANSMITTERS TO PROVIDE AN INTEGRATED CLOSED-CIRCUIT TELEVISION SYSTEM. DATA-GATHERING INSTRUMENTS WERE INTERVIEWS,…

  2. Trends in lumber processing in the Western United States. Part II: Overrun and lumber recovery factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles E. Keegan; Todd A. Morgan; Keith A. Blatner; Jean M. Daniels

    2010-01-01

    This article describes trends in three measures of lumber recovery for sawmills in the western United States: lumber overrun (LO), lumber recovery factor (LRF), and cubic lumber recovery (CLR). All states and regions showed increased LO during the last three decades. Oregon and Montana had the highest LO at 107 and 100 percent, respectively. Alaska had the lowest LO at...

  3. Null mutation for Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor (MIF is associated with less aggressive bladder cancer in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsimikas John

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inflammatory cytokines may promote tumorigenesis. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF is a proinflammatory cytokine with regulatory properties over tumor suppressor proteins involved in bladder cancer. We studied the development of bladder cancer in wild type (WT and MIF knockout (KO mice given N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl-nitrosamine (BBN, a known carcinogen, to determine the role of MIF in bladder cancer initiation and progression. Methods 5-month old male C57Bl/6 MIF WT and KO mice were treated with and without BBN. Animals were sacrificed at intervals up to 23 weeks of treatment. Bladder tumor stage and grade were evaluated by H&E. Immunohistochemical (IHC analysis was performed for MIF and platelet/endothelial cell adhesion molecule 1 (PECAM-1, a measure of vascularization. MIF mRNA was analyzed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Results Poorly differentiated carcinoma developed in all BBN treated mice by week 20. MIF WT animals developed T2 disease, while KO animals developed only T1 disease. MIF IHC revealed predominantly urothelial cytoplasmic staining in the WT control animals and a shift toward nuclear staining in WT BBN treated animals. MIF mRNA levels were 3-fold higher in BBN treated animals relative to controls when invasive cancer was present. PECAM-1 staining revealed significantly more stromal vessels in the tumors in WT animals when compared to KOs. Conclusion Muscle invasive bladder cancer with increased stromal vascularity was associated with increased MIF mRNA levels and nuclear redistribution. Consistently lower stage tumors were seen in MIF KO compared to WT mice. These data suggest that MIF may play a role in the progression to invasive bladder cancer.

  4. Factorization and resummation: A new paradigm to improve gravitational wave amplitudes. II. The higher multipolar modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messina, Francesco; Maldarella, Alberto; Nagar, Alessandro

    2018-04-01

    The factorization and resummation approach of Nagar and Shah [Phys. Rev. D 94, 104017 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevD.94.104017], designed to improve the strong-field behavior of the post-Newtonian (PN) residual waveform amplitudes fℓm's entering the effective-one-body, circularized, gravitational waveform for spinning coalescing binaries, is improved and generalized here to all multipoles up to ℓ=6 . For a test particle orbiting a Kerr black hole, each multipolar amplitude is truncated at relative 6 PN order, both for the orbital (nonspinning) and spin factors. By taking a certain Padé approximant (typically the P24 one) of the orbital factor in conjunction with the inverse Taylor (iResum) representation of the spin factor, it is possible to push the analytical/numerical agreement of the energy flux at the level of 5% at the last-stable orbit for a quasimaximally spinning black hole with dimensionless spin parameter +0.99 . When the procedure is generalized to comparable-mass binaries, each orbital factor is kept at relative 3+3 PN order; i.e., the globally 3 PN-accurate comparable-mass terms are hybridized with higher-PN test-particle terms up to 6 PN relative order in each mode. The same Padé resummation is used for continuity. By contrast, the spin factor is only kept at the highest comparable-mass PN order currently available. We illustrate that the consistency between different truncations in the spin content of the waveform amplitudes is more marked in the resummed case than when using the standard Taylor-expanded form of Pan et al. [Phys. Rev. D 83, 064003 (2011), 10.1103/PhysRevD.83.064003]. We finally introduce a method to consistently hybridize comparable-mass and test-particle information also in the presence of spin (including the spin of the particle), discussing it explicitly for the ℓ=m =2 spin-orbit and spin-square terms. The improved, factorized and resummed, multipolar waveform amplitudes presented here are expected to set a new standard for

  5. Patient size and x-ray technique factors in head computed tomography examinations. II. Image quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huda, Walter; Lieberman, Kristin A.; Chang, Jack; Roskopf, Marsha L.

    2004-01-01

    We investigated how patient head characteristics, as well as the choice of x-ray technique factors, affect lesion contrast and noise values in computed tomography (CT) images. Head sizes and mean Hounsfield unit (HU) values were obtained from head CT images for five classes of patients ranging from the newborn to adults. X-ray spectra with tube voltages ranging from 80 to 140 kV were used to compute the average photon energy, and energy fluence, transmitted through the heads of patients of varying size. Image contrast, and the corresponding contrast to noise ratios (CNRs), were determined for lesions of fat, muscle, and iodine relative to a uniform water background. Maintaining a constant image CNR for each lesion, the patient energy imparted was also computed to identify the x-ray tube voltage that minimized the radiation dose. For adults, increasing the tube voltage from 80 to 140 kV changed the iodine HU from 2.62x10 5 to 1.27x10 5 , the fat HU from -138 to -108, and the muscle HU from 37.1 to 33.0. Increasing the x-ray tube voltage from 80 to 140 kV increased the percentage energy fluence transmission by up to a factor of 2. For a fixed x-ray tube voltage, the percentage transmitted energy fluence in adults was more than a factor of 4 lower than for newborns. For adults, increasing the x-ray tube voltage from 80 to 140 kV improved the CNR for muscle lesions by 130%, for fat lesions by a factor of 2, and for iodine lesions by 25%. As the size of the patient increased from newborn to adults, lesion CNR was reduced by about a factor of 2. The mAs value can be reduced by 80% when scanning newborns while maintaining the same lesion CNR as for adults. Maintaining the CNR of an iodine lesion at a constant level, use of 140 kV increases the energy imparted to an adult patient by nearly a factor of 3.5 in comparison to 80 kV. For fat and muscle lesions, raising the x-ray tube voltage from 80 to 140 kV at a constant CNR increased the patient dose by 37% and 7

  6. [Haplotype Analysis of Coagulation Factor VII Gene in a Patient with Congenital Coagulation Factor VII Deficiency with Heterozygous p.Arg337Cys Mutation and o.Aro413Gin Polymorphism..

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Keijiro; Yoshioka, Tomoko; Obara, Takehiro; Suwabe, Akira

    2016-05-01

    Congenital coagulation factor VII (FVII) deficiency is a rare hemorrhagic disease with an autosomal reces- sive inheritance pattern. We analyzed coagulation factor VII gene (F7) of a patient with FVII deficiency and used expression studies to investigate the effect of a missense mutation on FVII secretion. The proband, a 69-year-old Japanese woman, had a history of postpartum bleeding and excessive bleeding after dental extrac- tion. She was found to have mildly increased PT-INR (1.17) before an ophthalmic operation. FVII activity and antigen were reduced (29.0% and 32.8%). Suspecting that the proband was FVII deficient, we analyzed F7 of the patient. Sequence analysis revealed that the patient was heterozygous for a point mutation (p.Arg337Cys) in the catalytic domain and polymorphisms: the decanucleotide insertion at the promoter re- gion, dimorphism (c.525C >T) in exon 5, and p.Arg413Gln in exon 8. Haplotype analysis clarified that p.Arg337Cys was located on the p.Arg413 allele (Ml allele). The other allele had the p.Arg413Gln polymor- phism(M2 allele) which is known to produce less FVII. Expression studies revealed that p.Arg337Cys causes impairment of FVII secretion. Insufficient secretion of FVII arising from both the p.Arg337Cys/M1 allele and the p.Arg337/M2 allele might lower the FVII level of this patient(<50%). The FVII level in a heterozygous FVII deficient patient might be influenced by F7 polymorphisms on the normal allele. There- fore, genetic analyses are important for the diagnosis of heterozygous FVII deficiency.

  7. Heterozygous congenital Factor VII deficiency with the 9729del4 mutation, associated with severe spontaneous intracranial bleeding in an adolescent male.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, Thomas J; Anderson, Kristin; Navaz, Karanjia; Brown, Justin M; Mosnier, Laurent O; von Drygalski, Annette

    2016-03-01

    In congenital Factor (F) VII deficiency bleeding phenotype and intrinsic FVII activity levels don't always correlate. Patients with FVII activity levels <30% appear to have a higher bleeding propensity, but bleeding can also occur at higher FVII activity levels. Reasons for bleeding at higher FVII activity levels are unknown, and it remains challenging to manage such patients clinically. A 19year old male with spontaneous intracranial hemorrhage and FVII activity levels of 44%, requiring emergent surgical intervention and a strategy for FVII replacement. Genotyping showed the rare heterozygous FVII 9729del4 mutation. Bleed evacuation was complicated by epidural abscess requiring craniectomy, bone graft procedures, and prolonged administration of recombinant human (rh) activated FVII (FVIIa). The patient recovered without neurological deficits, and remains on prophylactic low dose treatment with rhFVIIa in relation to risky athletic activities. For clinicians, it is important to recognize that effects of rhFVIIa within these pathways are independent of its contribution to blood clot formation and cannot be assessed by clotting assays. Reduced FVII levels should therefore not be dismissed, as even a mild reduction may result in spontaneous bleeding. Treatment of mild FVII deficiency requires a careful case-by-case approach, based on the clinical scenario. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Profile of differentially expressed genes mediated by the type III epidermal growth factor receptor mutation expressed in a small-cell lung cancer cell line

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, M.W.; Andersen, Thomas Thykjær; Ørntoft, Torben Falck

    2001-01-01

    Previous studies have shown a correlation between expression of the EGF receptor type III mutation (EGFRvIII) and a more malignant phenotype of various cancers including: non-small-cell lung cancer, glioblastoma multiforme, prostate cancer and breast cancer. Thus, a detailed molecular genetic...... understanding of how the EGFRvIII contributes to the malignant phenotype is of major importance for future therapy. The GeneChip Hu6800Set developed by Affymetrix was used to identify changes in gene expression caused by the expression of EGFRvIII. The cell line selected for the study was an EGF receptor...... negative small-cell-lung cancer cell line, GLC3, stably transfected with the EGFRvIII gene in a Tet-On system. By comparison of mRNA levels in EGFRvIII-GLC3 with those of Tet-On-GLC3, it was found that the levels of mRNAs encoding several transcription factors (ATF-3, JunD, and c-Myb), cell adhesion...

  9. Deep vein thrombosis, ecythyma gangrenosum and heparin-induced thrombocytopenia occurring in a man with a heterozygous Factor V Leiden mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariya Apostolova

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Skin necrosis and limb gangrene are occasional thrombotic manifestations of anticoagulation therapy. We report a man heterozygous for the Factor V Leiden (FVL mutation, and with a history of recurrent deep venous thrombosis, who initially presented with a necrotic skin lesion of the right flank while on warfarin therapy with a therapeutic international normalized ratio. Warfarin was discontinued and he received intravenous heparin. Thereafter he developed thrombocytopenia and pedal erythema and was diagnosed with heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT. Heparin was replaced with argatroban. He ultimately underwent bilateral below-knee amputations for the thrombotic complications of the HIT. The initial necrotic lesion healed with antibiotics and wound care. Pathologic examination of multiple biopsy specimens revealed two separate lesions. One was necrotic tissue infiltrated with methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus having features of ecthyma gangrenosum. The second showed thrombotic changes consistent with HIT. The case illustrates the differential diagnosis of skin necrosis and limb gangrene in patients on warfarin and heparin, and also the clinical complexities that can occur in a FVL heterozygote.

  10. Synergistic effect of pacritinib with erlotinib on JAK2-mediated resistance in epidermal gowth factor receptor mutation-positive non-small cell lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochi, Nobuaki; Isozaki, Hideko; Takeyama, Masami; Singer, Jack W; Yamane, Hiromichi; Honda, Yoshihiro; Kiura, Katsuyuki; Takigawa, Nagio

    2016-06-10

    The combination effect of pacritinib, a novel JAK2/FLT3 inhibitor, with erlotinib, the epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitor (EGFR-TKI), on non-small cell lung cancer cells with EGFR activating mutations was investigated. The combination showed synergistic effects on JAK2-mediated EGFR TKI-resistant PC-9/ER3 cells in some cases. The combination markedly suppressed pAKT and pERK although pSTAT3 expression was similar regardless of treatment with the pacritinib, pacritinib + erlotinib, or control in PC-9/ER3 cells. Receptor tyrosine kinase array profiling demonstrated that pacritinib suppressed MET in the PC-9/ER3 cells. The combined treatment of pacritinib and erlotinib in PC-9/ER3 xenografts showed more tumor shrinkage compared with each drug as monotherapy. Western blotting revealed that pMET in tumor samples was inhibited. These results suggest MET suppression by pacritinib may play a role in overcoming the EGFR-TKI resistance mediated by JAK2 in the PC-9/ER3 cells. In conclusion, pacritinib combined with EGFR-TKI might be a potent strategy against JAK2-mediated EGFR-TKI resistance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Analysing the Structural Effect of Point Mutations of Cytotoxic Necrotizing Factor 1 (CNF1 on Lu/BCAM Adhesion Glycoprotein Association

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre G. de Brevern

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Cytotoxic Necrotizing Factor 1 (CNF1 was identified in 1983 as a protein toxin produced by certain pathogenic strains of Escherichia coli. Since then, numerous studies have investigated its particularities. For instance, it is associated with the single chain AB-toxin family, and can be divided into different functional and structural domains, e.g., catalytic and transmembrane domain and interaction sites. A few years ago, the identification of the Lutheran (Lu adhesion glycoprotein/basal cell adhesion molecule (BCAM as a cellular receptor for CNF1 provided new insights into the adhesion process of CNF1. Very recently, the Ig-like domain 2 of Lu/BCAM was confirmed as the main interaction site using protein-protein interaction and competition studies with various different mutants. Here, I present in silico approaches that precisely explain the impact of these mutations, leading to a better explanation of these experimental studies. These results can be used in the development of future antitoxin strategies.

  12. A novel -192c/g mutation in the proximal P2 promoter of the hepatocyte nuclear factor-4 alpha gene (HNF4A) associates with late-onset diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ek, Jakob; Hansen, Sara P; Lajer, Maria

    2006-01-01

    Recently, it has been shown that mutations in the P2 promoter of the hepatocyte nuclear factor (HNF)-4 alpha gene (HNF4A) cause maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY), while single nucleotide polymorphisms in this locus are associated with type 2 diabetes. In this study, we examined 1,189 bp...... of the P2 promoter and the associated exon 1D of HNF4A for variations associated with diabetes in 114 patients with type 2 diabetes, 72 MODYX probands, and 85 women with previous gestational diabetes mellitus. A -192c/g mutation was found in five patients. We screened 1,587 diabetic subjects and 4......,812 glucose-tolerant subjects for the -192c/g mutation and identified 5 diabetic and 1 glucose-tolerant mutation carriers (P=0.004). Examination of the families showed that carriers of the -192c/g mutation had a significantly impaired glucose-stimulated insulin release and lower levels of serum total...

  13. A family with a novel termination mutation in hepatic nuclear factor 1α in maturity-onset diabetes of the young type 3 which is unresponsive to sulphonylurea therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demol, S; Lebenthal, Y; Bar-Meisels, M; Phillip, M; Gat-Yablonski, G; Gozlan, Y

    2014-01-01

    Maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY) is a monogenic form of diabetes mellitus. To identify the genetic basis in a family with 3 generations of diabetes and to assess the concordance between the genotype and phenotype. A molecular analysis was performed on genomic DNA using polymerase chain reaction, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, and sequencing. A mixed-meal tolerance test (MMTT) was performed with/without glibenclamide. Abdominal ultrasonography was performed on all family members with diabetes due to the location of the mutation. A novel c.618G>A, p.W206X termination mutation was identified in the hepatic nuclear factor 1α (HNF1α) gene. The mutation was identified in the proband and 8 of the 14 family members tested. An MMTT stimulus (±2.5 and 5 mg glibenclamide) produced a similar glucose profile and C-peptide graph in both the obese proband and her nonobese mother, showing no effect of the glibenclamide. No evidence of liver adenomas was found in the abdominal ultrasonography. We described a novel c.618G>A, p.W206X mutation in HNF1α associated with MODY 3 but not with hepatocellular adenoma. In contradistinction to most MODY 3 mutations, treatment with sulphonylurea was found to be a clinically ineffective alternative to insulin therapy.

  14. Energy analysis of batteries in photovoltaic systems. Part II: Energy return factors and overall battery efficiencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rydh, Carl Johan; Sanden, Bjoern A.

    2005-01-01

    Energy return factors and overall energy efficiencies are calculated for a stand-alone photovoltaic (PV)-battery system. Eight battery technologies are evaluated: lithium-ion (nickel), sodium-sulphur, nickel-cadmium, nickel-metal hydride, lead-acid, vanadium-redox, zinc-bromine and polysulphide-bromide. With a battery energy storage capacity three times higher than the daily energy output, the energy return factor for the PV-battery system ranges from 2.2 to 10 in our reference case. For a PV-battery system with a service life of 30 yr, this corresponds to energy payback times between 2.5 and 13 yr. The energy payback time is 1.8-3.3 yr for the PV array and 0.72-10 yr for the battery, showing the energy related significance of batteries and the large variation between different technologies. In extreme cases, energy return factors below one occur, implying no net energy output. The overall battery efficiency, including not only direct energy losses during operation but also energy requirements for production and transport of the charger, the battery and the inverter, is 0.41-0.80. For some batteries, the overall battery efficiency is significantly lower than the direct efficiency of the charger, the battery and the inverter (0.50-0.85). The ranking order of batteries in terms of energy efficiency, the relative importance of different battery parameters and the optimal system design and operation (e.g. the use of air conditioning) are, in many cases, dependent on the characterisation of the energy background system and on which type of energy efficiency measure is used (energy return factor or overall battery efficiency)

  15. Brucella abortus down-regulates MHC class II by the IL-6-dependent inhibition of CIITA through the downmodulation of IFN regulatory factor-1 (IRF-1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velásquez, Lis N; Milillo, M Ayelén; Delpino, M Victoria; Trotta, Aldana; Fernández, Pablo; Pozner, Roberto G; Lang, Roland; Balboa, Luciana; Giambartolomei, Guillermo H; Barrionuevo, Paula

    2017-03-01

    Brucella abortus is an intracellular pathogen capable of surviving inside of macrophages. The success of B. abortus as a chronic pathogen relies on its ability to orchestrate different strategies to evade the adaptive CD4 + T cell responses that it elicits. Previously, we demonstrated that B. abortus inhibits the IFN-γ-induced surface expression of MHC class II (MHC-II) molecules on human monocytes, and this phenomenon correlated with a reduction in antigen presentation. However, the molecular mechanisms, whereby B. abortus is able to down-regulate the expression of MHC-II, remained to be elucidated. In this study, we demonstrated that B. abortus infection inhibits the IFN-γ-induced transcription of MHC-II, transactivator (CIITA) and MHC-II genes. Accordingly, we observed that the synthesis of MHC-II proteins was also diminished. B. abortus was not only able to reduce the expression of mature MHC-II, but it also inhibited the expression of invariant chain (Ii)-associated immature MHC-II molecules. Outer membrane protein 19 (Omp19), a prototypical B. abortus lipoprotein, diminished the expression of MHC-II and CIITA transcripts to the same extent as B. abortus infection. IL-6 contributes to these down-regulatory phenomena. In addition, B. abortus and its lipoproteins, through IL-6 secretion, induced the transcription of the negative regulators of IFN-γ signaling, suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS)-1 and -3, without interfering with STAT1 activation. Yet, B. abortus lipoproteins via IL-6 inhibit the expression of IFN regulatory factor 1 (IRF-1), a critical regulatory transcription factor for CIITA induction. Overall, these results indicate that B. abortus inhibits the expression of MHC-II molecules at very early points in their synthesis and in this way, may prevent recognition by T cells establishing a chronic infection. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  16. Polypharmacy as a Risk Factor for Clinically Relevant Sarcopenia: Results From the Berlin Aging Study II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, Maximilian; Spira, Dominik; Demuth, Ilja; Steinhagen-Thiessen, Elisabeth; Norman, Kristina

    2017-12-12

    Sarcopenia affects more than 10% of older adults. Next to age-associated physiologic changes, diseases like diabetes or inflammatory, neurological, malignant and endocrine disorders may contribute to the development of sarcopenia. Likewise, polypharmacy, i.e., multiple drug use, is common among older adults. Although the two conditions frequently co-occur, the association of polypharmacy with sarcopenia has not yet been examined. We investigated the association of polypharmacy and sarcopenia in a large cohort of community-dwelling older adults (60-84 years). Thousand five hundred and two participants from the Berlin Aging Study II were included. Polypharmacy was defined as concurrent use of 5 or more drugs (prescription and nonprescription). Body composition was assessed with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, and appendicular lean mass (ALM) was calculated as sum of the four limbs' lean mass. Sarcopenia was defined as low ALM-to-body mass index (BMI)-ratio using validated sex-specific cutoffs. Mean age was 68.7 ± 3.7 years, 50.7% were female. The median (interquartile range) number of drugs was 2 (1-4); 21.1% of subjects reported regular use of ≥5 drugs. Subjects with polypharmacy were more often sarcopenic according to the applied ALM/BMI-cutoffs (16.3% vs 6.9%, p sarcopenia (odds ratio = 2.24, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.33-3.75). Polypharmacy is associated with clinically relevant sarcopenia, as assessed by a low ALM/BMI. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Identification of 51 novel exons of the Usher syndrome type 2A (USH2A) gene that encode multiple conserved functional domains and that are mutated in patients with Usher syndrome type II.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijk, E. van; Pennings, R.J.E.; Brinke, H. te; Claassen, A.M.W.; Yntema, H.G.; Hoefsloot, L.H.; Cremers, F.P.M.; Cremers, C.W.R.J.; Kremer, J.M.J.

    2004-01-01

    The USH2A gene is mutated in patients with Usher syndrome type IIa, which is the most common subtype of Usher syndrome and is characterized by hearing loss and retinitis pigmentosa. Since mutation analysis by DNA sequencing of exons 1-21 revealed only ~63% of the expected USH2A mutations, we

  18. Prognostic implication of serum hepatocyte growth factor in stage II/III breast cancer patients who received neoadjuvant chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyori; Youk, Jeonghwan; Yang, Yaewon; Kim, Tae-Yong; Min, Ahrum; Ham, Hye-Seon; Cho, Seongcheol; Lee, Kyung-Hun; Keam, Bhumsuk; Han, Sae-Won; Oh, Do-Youn; Ryu, Han Suk; Han, Wonshik; Park, In Ae; Kim, Tae-You; Noh, Dong-Young; Im, Seock-Ah

    2016-03-01

    In stage II/III breast cancer, neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) is a standard treatment. Although several biomarkers are used to predict prognosis in breast cancer, there is no reliable predictive biomarker for NAC success. Recently, the hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and cMet signaling pathway demonstrated to be involved in breast cancer tumor progression, and its potential as a biomarker is under active investigation. In this study, we assessed the potential of serum HGF as a prognostic biomarker for NAC efficacy. Venous blood samples were drawn from patients diagnosed with stage II/III breast cancer and treated with NAC in Seoul National University Hospital from August 2004 to November 2009. Serum HGF level was determined using an ELISA system. We reviewed the medical records of the patients and investigated the association of HGF level with patients' clinicopathologic characteristics. A total of 121 female patients (median age = 45 years old) were included. Median level of HGF was 934 pg/ml (lower quartile: 772, upper quartile: 1145 pg/ml). Patients with higher HGF level than median value were significantly more likely to have clinically detectable regional node metastasis (p = 0.017, Fisher's exact test). Patients with complete and partial response according to the American Joint Committee on Cancer 7th Edition criteria tended to have higher HGF level (p = 0.105 by t test). Patients with an HGF level higher than the upper quartile value had longer relapse-free survival than the other patients (106 vs. 85 months, p = 0.008). High serum HGF levels in breast cancer patients are associated with clinically detectable regional node metastasis and, paradoxically, with longer relapse-free survival in stage II/III breast cancer.

  19. Pro region engineering of nerve growth factor by deep mutational scanning enables a yeast platform for conformational epitope mapping of anti-NGF monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina-Cucurella, Angélica V; Zhu, Yaqi; Bowen, Scott J; Bergeron, Lisa M; Whitehead, Timothy A

    2018-04-12

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) plays a central role in multiple chronic pain conditions. As such, anti-NGF monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that function by antagonizing NGF downstream signaling are leading drug candidates for non-opioid pain relief. To evaluate anti-canine NGF (cNGF) mAbs we sought a yeast surface display platform of cNGF. Both mature cNGF and pro-cNGF displayed on the yeast surface but bound conformationally sensitive mAbs at most 2.5-fold in mean fluorescence intensity above background, suggesting that cNGF was mostly misfolded. To improve the amount of folded, displayed cNGF, we used comprehensive mutagenesis, FACS, and deep sequencing to identify point mutants in the pro-region of canine NGF that properly enhance the folded protein displayed on the yeast surface. Out of 1,737 tested single point mutants in the pro region, 49 increased the amount of NGF recognized by conformationally sensitive mAbs. These gain-of-function mutations cluster around residues A-61-P-26. Gain-of-function mutants were additive, and a construct containing three mutations increased amount of folded cNGF to 23- fold above background. Using this new cNGF construct, fine conformational epitopes for tanezumab and three anti-cNGF mAbs were evaluated. The epitope revealed by the yeast experiments largely overlapped with the tanezumab epitope previously determined by X-ray crystallography. The other mAbs showed site-specific differences with tanezumab. As the number of binding epitopes of functionally neutralizing anti-NGF mAbs on NGF are limited, subtle differences in the individual interacting residues on NGF that bind each mAb contribute to the understanding of each antibody and variations in its neutralizing activity. These results demonstrate the potential of deep sequencing-guided protein engineering to improve the production of folded surface-displayed protein, and the resulting cNGF construct provides a platform to map conformational epitopes for other anti-neurotrophin m

  20. The risk of extinction - the mutational meltdown or the overpopulation

    OpenAIRE

    Malarz, K.

    2006-01-01

    The phase diagrams survival-extinction for the Penna model with parameters: (mutations rate)-(birth rate), (mutation rate)-(harmful mutations threshold), (harmful mutation threshold)-(minimal reproduction age) are presented. The extinction phase may be caused by either mutational meltdown or overpopulation. When the Verhulst factor is responsible for removing only newly born babies and does not act on adults the overpopulation is avoided and only genetic factors may lead to species extinction.

  1. The risk of extinction - the mutational meltdown or the overpopulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malarz, Krzysztof

    2007-04-01

    The phase diagrams survival-extinction for the Penna model with parameters: (mutations rate)-(birth rate), (mutation rate)-(harmful mutations threshold), (harmful mutation threshold)-(minimal reproduction age) are presented. The extinction phase may be caused by either mutational meltdown or overpopulation. When the Verhulst factor is responsible for removing only newly born babies and does not act on adults the overpopulation is avoided and only genetic factors may lead to species extinction.

  2. Digestion and Interaction of Starches with α-Amylases: I. Mutational analysis of Carbohydrate Binding Sites in barley. II. In Vitro Starch Digestion of Legumes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten Munch

    2006-01-01

    the hydrolysis of internal 1,4-α-D-glucosidic bonds in starch and related polysaccharides. The present thesis concerns studies of two α-amylases: 1) secondary substrate binding sites in barley α-amylase 1 (AMY1), and 2) the involvement of anti-nutrients in in vitro digestion of starch in legumes by porcine...... in morphology between high amylose starch granules and normal starch granules. Legumes (beans, peas, and lentils) are characterised by low blood glucose raising potential, which is proportional to the in vitro starch digestion rates. The high amount of anti-nutritional factors (phytate, proteinaceous inhibitors......, tannins, and lectins) in legumes has been associated with the slow starch digestion. However, it is still debated in literature to which extent the legume starch digestibility is affected by anti-nutritional factors. The in vitro starch digestion (hydrolytic index, HI) of pea (Pisum sativum) and mixtures...

  3. Using a minigene approach to characterize a novel splice site mutation in human F7 gene causing inherited factor VII deficiency in a Chinese pedigree.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, T; Wang, X; Ding, Q; Fu, Q; Dai, J; Lu, Y; Xi, X; Wang, H

    2009-11-01

    Factor VII deficiency which transmitted as an autosomal recessive disorder is a rare haemorrhagic condition. The aim of this study was to identify the molecular genetic defect and determine its functional consequences in a Chinese pedigree with FVII deficiency. The proband was diagnosed as inherited coagulation FVII deficiency by reduced plasma levels of FVII activity (4.4%) and antigen (38.5%). All nine exons and their flanking sequence of F7 gene were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the proband and the PCR products were directly sequenced. The compound heterozygous mutations of F7 (NM_000131.3) c.572-1G>A and F7 (NM_000131.3) c.1165T>G; p.Cys389Gly were identified in the proband's F7 gene. To investigate the splicing patterns associated with F7 c.572-1G>A, ectopic transcripts in leucocytes of the proband were analyzed. F7 minigenes, spanning from intron 4 to intron 7 and carrying either an A or a G at position -1 of intron 5, were constructed and transiently transfected into human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293T cells, followed by RT-PCR analysis. The aberrant transcripts from the F7 c.572-1G>A mutant allele were not detected by ectopic transcription study. Sequencing of the RT-PCR products from the mutant transfectant demonstrated the production of an erroneously spliced mRNA with exon 6 skipping, whereas a normal splicing occurred in the wide type transfectant. The aberrant mRNA produced from the F7 c.572-1G>A mutant allele is responsible for the factor VII deficiency in this pedigree.

  4. Manual on mutation breeding. 2. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    The manual is a compilation of work done on the use of induced mutations in plant breeding, and presents general methods and techniques in this field. The use of chemical mutagens and ionizing radiations (X-rays, gamma rays, α- and β-particles, protons, neutrons) are described as well as the effects of these mutagens. The different types of mutations achieved can be divided into genome mutations, chromosome mutations and extra nuclear mutations. Separate chapters deal with mutation techniques in breeding seed-propagated species and asexually propagated plants (examples of development of cultivars given). Plant characters which can be improved by mutation breeding include yield, ripening time, growth habit, disease resistance and tolerance to environmental factors (temperature, salinity etc.). The use of mutagens for some specific plant breeding problems is discussed and attention is also paid to somatic cell genetics in connection with induced mutations. The manual contains a comprehensive bibliography (60 p. references) and a subject index

  5. Evidence for modulation of pericryptal sheath myofibroblasts in rat descending colon by Transforming Growth Factor β and Angiotensin II.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedley Kevin C

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Absorption of water and Na+ in descending colonic crypts is dependent on the barrier function of the surrounding myofibroblastic pericryptal sheath. Here the effects of high and low Na+ diets and exposure to whole body ionising radiation on the growth and activation of the descending colonic pericryptal myofibroblasts are evaluated. In addition the effect of a post-irradiation treatment with the angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor Captopril was investigated. Methods The levels of Angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1, ACE, collagen type IV, transforming growth factor-β type 1 receptor (TGF-βR1, OB cadherin and α-smooth muscle actin in both descending colon and caecum were evaluated, using immunocytochemistry and confocal microscopy, in rats fed on high and low Na+ diets (LS. These parameters were also determined during 3 months post-irradiation with 8Gy from a 60Co source in the presence and absence of the angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor, Captopril. Results Increases in AT1 receptor (135.6% ± 18.3, P Conclusions These results demonstrate an activation of descending colonic myofibroblasts to trophic stimuli, or irradiation, which can be attenuated by Captopril, indicative of local trophic control by angiotensin II and TGF-β release.

  6. Temperature factor for magnetic instability conditions of type – II superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romanovskii, V.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Electrodynamics and thermal diffusion phenomena in superconductors have the fission-chain-reaction nature. • There exist nontrivial relations between stability conditions, allowable losses and stable superconductor’s overheating. • The magnetic stability conditions are direct consequence of the states when the heat releases exceeds the critical energy. • The critical energy of magnetic instability depends on the nature of an external disturbance. • The non-isothermal magnetic instability conditions of the critical state are formulated. - Abstract: The macroscopic development of interrelated electrodynamics and thermal states taking place both before and after instability onset in type-II superconductors are studied using the critical state and the flux creep concepts. The physical mechanisms of the non-isothermal formation of the critical state are discussed solving the set of unsteady thermo-electrodynamics equations taking into consideration the unknown moving penetration boundary of the magnetic flux. To make it, the numerical method, which allows to study diffusion phenomena with unknown moving phase-two boundary, is developed. The corresponding non-isothermal flux jump criteria are written. It is proved for the first time that, first, the diffusion phenomena in superconductors have the fission-chain-reaction nature, second, the stability conditions, losses in supercondu