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Sample records for factor ii mutation

  1. Venous thrombosis with both heterozygous factor V Leiden (R507Q) and factor II (G20210A) mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhaijee, Feriyl; Jordan, Brenda; Pepper, Dominique J; Leacock, Rodney; Rock, William A

    2012-01-01

    Both hereditary and acquired factors increase the risk of venous thromboembolism, thus the clinical management of affected patients involves evaluation of genetic factors that predispose to hypercoagulability. Factor V Leiden (R507Q) and factor II (prothrombin) mutation (G20210A) are the two most common inherited hypercoagulability disorders among populations of European origin. Both factor V Leiden and factor II mutation (G20210A) represent gain-of-function mutations: factor V Leiden causes resistance to activated protein C, and factor II mutation (G20210A) results in higher levels of plasma prothrombin. Herein, we present an uncommon case of combined factor V Leiden mutation (R507Q) and factor II mutation (G20210A), and discuss the prevalence and features of each entity, as well as their role in the clinical management of affected patients.

  2. Case control study of the factor V Leiden and factor II G20210A mutation frequency in women with recurrent pregnancy loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teremmahi Ardestani, Majid; Nodushan, Hossein Hadi; Aflatoonian, Abbas; Ghasemi, Nasrin; Sheikhha, Mohammad Hasan

    2013-01-01

    Recurrent pregnancy loss (RPL) caused by various genetic and non-genetic factors. After chromosome abnormality, thrombophilia is one of the most important genetic factors that could cause RPL. Factor V Leiden and factor II G20210A mutation were the most common mutations cause thrombophilia in the world. The purpose of this study was to determine the frequency of factor V Leiden and prothrombine gene mutations in women with RPL compared with women who had uneventful pregnancies. This case control study evaluates the frequency of factor V-Leiden and factor II G20210 genotypes in 80 women with two or more pregnancy losses, compared with 80 women without adverse pregnancy outcome. The mutations were assessed by PCR-RFLP. Frequency of the factor V Leiden among cases was 2.5%, which was higher than controls (1.25%), but the difference was not significant. No factor II G20210 mutation was found among cases and controls. These data did not confirm that factor V Leiden and factor II G20210 mutation might play a role in recurrent pregnancy loss in Iranian women.

  3. Vertebral Artery Aneurysm Mimicking as Left Subclavian Artery Aneurysm in a Patient with Transforming Growth Factor Beta Receptor II Mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afifi, Rana O; Dhillon, Baltej Singh; Sandhu, Harleen K; Charlton-Ouw, Kristofer M; Estrera, Anthony L; Azizzadeh, Ali

    2015-10-01

    We report successful endovascular repair of a left vertebral artery aneurysm in a patient with transforming growth factor beta receptor II mutation. The patient was initially diagnosed with a left subclavian artery aneurysm on computed tomography angiography. The patient consented to publication of this report.

  4. MYH11 mutations result in a distinct vascular pathology driven by insulin-like growth factor 1 and angiotensin II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pannu, Hariyadarshi; Tran-Fadulu, Van; Papke, Christina L.; Scherer, Steve; Liu, Yaozhong; Presley, Caroline; Guo, Dongchuan; Estrera, Anthony L.; Safi, Hazim J.; Brasier, Allan R.; Vick, G. Wesley; Marian, A.J.; Raman, C.S.; Buja, L. Maximilian; Milewicz, Dianna M.

    2010-01-01

    Non-syndromic thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections (TAADs) are inherited in an autosomal dominant manner in ~20% of cases. Familial TAAD is genetically heterogeneous and four loci have been mapped for this disease to date, including a locus at 16p for TAAD associated with patent ductus arteriosus (PDA). The defective gene at the 16p locus has recently been identified as the smooth muscle cell (SMC)-specific myosin heavy chain gene (MYH11). On sequencing MYH11 in 93 families with TAAD alone and three families with TAAD/PDA, we identified novel mutations in two families with TAAD/PDA, but none in families with TAAD alone. Histopathological analysis of aortic sections from two individuals with MYH11 mutations revealed SMC disarray and focal hyperplasia of SMCs in the aortic media. SMC hyperplasia leading to significant lumen narrowing in some of the vessels of the adventitia was also observed. Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) was upregulated in mutant aortas as well as explanted SMCs, but no increase in transforming growth factor-β expression or downstream targets was observed. Enhanced expression of angiotensin-converting enzyme and markers of Angiotensin II (Ang II) vascular inflammation (macrophage inflammatory protein-1α and β) were also found. These data suggest that MYH11 mutations are likely to be specific to the phenotype of TAAD/PDA and result in a distinct aortic and occlusive vascular pathology potentially driven by IGF-1 and Ang II. PMID:17666408

  5. Factor II deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... if one or more of these factors are missing or are not functioning like they should. Factor II is one such coagulation factor. Factor II deficiency runs in families (inherited) and is very rare. Both parents must ...

  6. Molecular analysis of G202010A mutation in factor II of blood coagulation and its relationship with polymorphism rs5030737 of MBL gene in recurrent pregnancy loss

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    Neda Mohammad Rafiee

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Miscarriage means ending a pregnancy at any stage of the fetus. Recurrent pregnancy loss is defined as two or more loss of pregnancy to be detected continuous or discontinuous before the twentieth week of pregnancy.Mutations in the gene for coagulation factor IIand MBL gene can be involved in miscarriage. Hence, according to importance of this issue, the purpose of this study is to investigate G20210A mutation of coagulation factor IIand its relationship with polymorphism rs5030737 of MBL gene to evaluate on-time diagnosis and treatment of miscarriage. Method: in order to conduct the study, 41 patients with history of miscarriage and 48 healthy women with successful delivery were selected. A questionnaire was fulfilled by them to insert comprehensive information including history of miscarriage, history of miscarriage among relatives, age, weight, blood type, type of marriage and smoking. Then, blood sample of every one was taken. The blood samples were transferred to the laboratory and after extraction of DNA from each of samples, G20210A mutation in coagulation factor IIandtype of polymorphism rs5030737 in MBL gene was determined using PCR method. Finally, analysis of the results and assessment of other important and effective factors in them was done using Epi Info software and using chi square (X2 test. Results: among the patients, frequency of patients with one miscarriage was determined to 29.25%; frequency of patients with two miscarriages to 58.85% and frequency of patients with 3 miscarriages was obtained to 4.9%. In regard with assessing G20210A mutation in coagulation factor II, frequency percent ofheterozygous or carriers were equal to 7.3% among patients and to 2.1% for healthy individuals. Among them, frequency of available genotypes included GG: 92.6%; GA: 7.3%, AA: 0 in patient group and GG: 97.9%, GA: 2.1% and AA: 0 in healthy individuals. On the other hand, frequency of types of polymorphism of MBL included BB: 17%; AB

  7. BRCA-mutated Invasive Breast Carcinomas: Immunohistochemical Analysis of Insulin-like Growth Factor II mRNA-binding Protein (IMP3), Cytokeratin 8/18, and Cytokeratin 14.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, Sambit K; Lai, Jin-Ping; Gordon, Ora K; Pradhan, Dinesh; Bose, Shikha; Dadmanesh, Farnaz

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the expression of insulin-like growth factor II mRNA-binding protein (IMP3), CK8/18, and CK14 in BRCA mutated and sporadic invasive breast carcinoma. Immunohistochemistry for IMP3, CK8/18, and CK14 was performed on 39 cases of invasive breast carcinomas with BRCA mutation (24 BRCA1, 14 BRCA2, and 1 dual BRCA1/BRCA2) and 54 cases of sporadic invasive breast carcinomas. The relationship between the IMP3, CK8/18, and CK14 and the tumor grade and molecular phenotypes were analyzed. IMP3, CK8/18, and CK14 positivity were present in 20 (51%), 22 (56%), and 14 (36%) of 39 BRCA-mutated breast carcinomas, and 11 (20%), 53 (98%), and 24 (44%) of 54 sporadic breast carcinomas respectively. The rates of IMP3 expression and absence of CK8/18 (44% versus 2%) in BRCA-mutated breast carcinomas was significantly higher than the sporadic breast carcinomas (p = 0.002 and p BRCA1-related and BRCA2-related breast carcinomas in the immunoprofile for IMP3, CK8/18, and CK14. No significant correlation was identified between the expression of IMP3 and CK8/18 and the tumor grade in both BRCA-mutated and sporadic breast carcinomas (p > 0.05). In cases with luminal A and B phenotypes, the rates of expression of IMP3 and loss of CK8/18 were significantly higher in BRCA-mutated as compared to sporadic breast carcinoma (p BRCA-mutated breast carcinomas (54% versus 0%, p = 0.001), while no difference was observed for IMP3 expression (p = 0.435). Regardless of mutation type, histologic grade, or molecular phenotype, the absence of CK8/18 expression and presence of IMP3 expression are seen at much higher rate in BRCA mutated breast carcinomas.

  8. Gasdermin C Is Upregulated by Inactivation of Transforming Growth Factor β Receptor Type II in the Presence of Mutated Apc, Promoting Colorectal Cancer Proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miguchi, Masashi; Hinoi, Takao; Shimomura, Manabu; Adachi, Tomohiro; Saito, Yasufumi; Niitsu, Hiroaki; Kochi, Masatoshi; Sada, Haruki; Sotomaru, Yusuke; Ikenoue, Tsuneo; Shigeyasu, Kunitoshi; Tanakaya, Kohji; Kitadai, Yasuhiko; Sentani, Kazuhiro; Oue, Naohide; Yasui, Wataru; Ohdan, Hideki

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in TGFBR2, a component of the transforming growth factor (TGF)-β signaling pathway, occur in high-frequency microsatellite instability (MSI-H) colorectal cancer (CRC). In mouse models, Tgfbr2 inactivation in the intestinal epithelium accelerates the development of malignant intestinal tumors in combination with disruption of the Wnt-β-catenin pathway. However, no studies have further identified the genes influenced by TGFBR2 inactivation following disruption of the Wnt-β-catenin pathway. We previously described CDX2P-G19Cre;Apcflox/flox mice, which is stochastically null for Apc in the colon epithelium. In this study, we generated CDX2P-G19Cre;Apcflox/flox;Tgfbr2flox/flox mice, with simultaneous loss of Apc and Tgfbr2. These mice developed tumors, including adenocarcinoma in the proximal colon. We compared gene expression profiles between tumors of the two types of mice using microarray analysis. Our results showed that the expression of the murine homolog of GSDMC was significantly upregulated by 9.25-fold in tumors of CDX2P-G19Cre;Apcflox/flox;Tgfbr2flox/flox mice compared with those of CDX2P-G19Cre;Apcflox/flox mice. We then investigated the role of GSDMC in regulating CRC tumorigenesis. The silencing of GSDMC led to a significant reduction in the proliferation and tumorigenesis of CRC cell lines, whereas the overexpression of GSDMC enhanced cell proliferation. These results suggested that GSDMC functioned as an oncogene, promoting cell proliferation in colorectal carcinogenesis. In conclusion, combined inactivation of both Apc and Tgfbr2 in the colon epithelium of a CRC mouse model promoted development of adenocarcinoma in the proximal colon. Moreover, GSDMC was upregulated by TGFBR2 mutation in CRC and promoted tumor cell proliferation in CRC carcinogenesis, suggesting that GSDMC may be a promising therapeutic target.

  9. Filaggrin loss-of-function mutations and atopic dermatitis as risk factors for hand eczema in apprentice nurses: part II of a prospective cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background/objectives Environmental exposure and personal susceptibility both contribute to the development of hand eczema. In this study, we investigated the effect of loss-of-function mutations in the filaggrin gene (FLG), atopic dermatitis and wet work exposure on the development of hand eczema in apprentice nurses. Methods Dutch apprentice nurses were genotyped for the four most common FLG mutations; atopic dermatitis and hand eczema history were assessed by questionnaire. Exposur...

  10. Comprehensive analysis of cooperative gene mutations between class I and class II in de novo acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Yuichi; Kiyoi, Hitoshi; Tsujimura, Akane; Miyawaki, Shuichi; Miyazaki, Yasushi; Kuriyama, Kazutaka; Tomonaga, Masao; Naoe, Tomoki

    2009-08-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) has been thought to be the consequence of two broad complementation classes of mutations: class I and class II. However, overlap-mutations between them or within the same class and the position of TP53 mutation are not fully analyzed. We comprehensively analyzed the FLT3, cKIT, N-RAS, C/EBPA, AML1, MLL, NPM1, and TP53 mutations in 144 newly diagnosed de novo AML. We found 103 of 165 identified mutations were overlapped with other mutations, and most overlap-mutations consisted of class I and class II mutations. Although overlap-mutations within the same class were found in seven patients, five of them additionally had the other class mutation. These results suggest that most overlap-mutations within the same class might be the consequence of acquiring an additional mutation after the completion both of class I and class II mutations. However, mutated genes overlapped with the same class were limited in N-RAS, TP53, MLL-PTD, and NPM1, suggesting the possibility that these irregular overlap-mutations might cooperatively participate in the development of AML. Notably, TP53 mutation was overlapped with both class I and class II mutations, and associated with morphologic multilineage dysplasia and complex karyotype. The genotype consisting of complex karyotype and TP53 mutation was an unfavorable prognostic factor in entire AML patients, indicating this genotype generates a disease entity in de novo AML. These results collectively suggest that TP53 mutation might be a functionally distinguishable class of mutation.

  11. Transcobalamin II Deficiency in Four Cases with Novel Mutations

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    Sule Unal

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Transcobalamin II deficiency is one of the rare causes of inherited vitamin B12 disorders in which the patients have characteristically normal or high vitamin B12 levels related to the transport defect of vitamin B12 into the cell, ending up with intracellular cobalamin depletion and high homocysteine and methylmalonic acid levels. METHODS: Herein, we describe the findings at presentation of four patients who were diagnosed to have transcobalamin II deficiency with novel mutations. RESULTS: These patients with transcobalamin II deficiency were found to have novel mutations, of whom 2 had the same large deletion (homozygous c.1106+1516-1222+1231del. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: Transcobalamin II deficiency should be considered in differential diagnosis of any infant with pancytopenia, failure to thrive, diarrhea, and vomiting.

  12. Mutation and biochemical analysis in carnitine palmitoyltransferase type II (CPT II) deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olpin, S E; Afifi, A; Clark, S

    2003-01-01

    Carnitine palmitoyltransferase type II (CPT II) deficiency has three basic phenotypes, late-onset muscular (mild), infantile/juvenile hepatic (intermediate) and severe neonatal. We have measured fatty acid oxidation and CPT II activity and performed mutation studies in 24 symptomatic patients......, the implication being that they may significantly influence the manifestation of clinical disease and could therefore potentially be considered as a susceptibility variants. Among myopathic individuals, males comprised 88% of patients, suggesting increased susceptibility to clinical disease. A small number...

  13. Novel dentin phosphoprotein frameshift mutations in dentinogenesis imperfecta type II.

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    Lee, K-E; Kang, H-Y; Lee, S-K; Yoo, S-H; Lee, J-C; Hwang, Y-H; Nam, K H; Kim, J-S; Park, J-C; Kim, J-W

    2011-04-01

    The dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) gene encodes the most abundant non-collagenous protein in tooth dentin and DSPP protein is cleaved into several segments including the highly phosphorylated dentin phosphoprotein (DPP). Mutations in the DSPP gene have been solely related to non-syndromic form of hereditary dentin defects. We recruited three Korean families with dentinogenesis imperfecta (DGI) type II and sequenced the exons and exon-intron boundaries of the DSPP gene based on the candidate gene approach. Direct sequencing of PCR products and allele-specific cloning of the highly repetitive exon 5 revealed novel single base pair (bp) deletional mutations (c.2688delT and c.3560delG) introducing hydrophobic amino acids in the hydrophilic repeat domain of the DPP coding region. All affected members of the three families showed exceptionally rapid pulp chambers obliteration, even before tooth eruption. Individuals with the c.3560delG mutation showed only mild, yellowish tooth discoloration, in contrast to the affected individuals from two families with c.2688delT mutation. We believe that these results will help us to understand the molecular pathogenesis of DGI type II as well as the normal process of dentin biomineralization.

  14. Dietary factors and Truncating APC Mutations in Sporadic Colorectal Adenomas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diergaarde, B.; Tiemersma, E.W.; Braam, H.; Muijen, van G.N.P.; Nagengast, F.M.; Kok, F.J.; Kampman, E.

    2005-01-01

    Inactivating mutations in APC are thought to be early, initiating events in colorectal carcinogenesis. To gain insight into the relationship between diet and inactivating APC mutations, we evaluated associations between dietary factors and the occurrence of these mutations in a Dutch case-control st

  15. Dietary factors and truncating APC mutations in sporadic colorectal adenomas.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diergaarde, B.; Tiemersma, E.W.; Braam, H.; Muijen, G.N.P. van; Nagengast, F.M.; Kok, F.J.; Kampman, E.

    2005-01-01

    Inactivating mutations in APC are thought to be early, initiating events in colorectal carcinogenesis. To gain insight into the relationship between diet and inactivating APC mutations, we evaluated associations between dietary factors and the occurrence of these mutations in a Dutch case-control st

  16. Complement factor H deficiency and endocapillary glomerulonephritis due to paternal isodisomy and a novel factor H mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schejbel, L; Schmidt, I M; Kirchhoff, Eva Maria;

    2011-01-01

    Complement factor H (CFH) is a regulator of the alternative complement activation pathway. Mutations in the CFH gene are associated with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome, membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis type II and C3 glomerulonephritis. Here, we report a 6-month-old CFH-deficient child...

  17. Factor V Leiden Mutation and PT 20210 Mutation Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is suspected that a person has an inherited risk factor for blood clots, for example, when an individual: Has a first deep venous thrombosis (DVT) or venous thromboembolism (VTE) before age 50 ...

  18. Asparaginase II of Saccharomyces cerevisiae: selection of four mutations that cause derepressed enzyme synthesis.

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    Kamerud, J Q; Roon, R J

    1986-01-01

    A positive selection method was used to isolate four Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutations that cause derepressed synthesis of asparaginase II. The four mutations (and1, and2, and3, and4) were neither closely linked to each other nor linked to previously characterized mutations (asp3, asp6) which cause the complete loss of asparaginase II activity. One of the new mutations (and4) was shown to be allelic to gdh-CR, a pleiotropic mutation which causes derepressed synthesis of a number of enzymes of nitrogen catabolism.

  19. Splicing site mutations in dentin sialophosphoprotein causing dentinogenesis imperfecta type II.

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    Holappa, Heidi; Nieminen, Pekka; Tolva, Liisa; Lukinmaa, Pirjo-Liisa; Alaluusua, Satu

    2006-10-01

    Dentinogenesis imperfecta (DGI) type II (OMIM # 125490) is an inherited disorder affecting dentin. Defective dentin formation results in discolored teeth that are prone to attrition and fracture. To date, several mutations have been described in the dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) gene, causing DGI types II and III and dentin dysplasia type II. DSPP encodes two proteins: dentin sialoprotein (DSP) and dentin phosphoprotein (DPP). Here, we describe a mutational analysis of DSPP in seven Finnish families with DGI type II. We report two mutations and five single nucleotide polymorphisms. In one family we found a mutation that has been described earlier in families with different ethnicity, while in six families we found a novel g.1194C>A (IVS2-3) transversion. Bioinformatic analysis of known DSPP mutations suggests that DGI type II is usually caused by aberration of normal splicing.

  20. Análise da mutação G20210A no gene da protrombina (fator II em pacientes com suspeita de trombofilia no sul do Brasil Analysis of prothrombin G20210A mutation (factor II in patients with suspected trombophilia in Southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Edgar Herkenhoff

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: A protrombina (fator II é uma proteína sanguínea sintetizada no fígado com a presença de vitamina K. É a precursora da trombina, que induz a formação de fibrina. Foi descrita uma mutação no gene da protrombina G20210A, associada diretamente a altos níveis de protrombina no sangue e, consequentemente, à trombofilia. Essa variante alélica consiste em mutação pontual, também chamada de polimorfismo de nucleotídeo simples (SNP, ocasionando a troca de uma guanina por uma adenina no nucleotídeo 20210, localizado em um sítio de clivagem do precursor do ácido ribonucleico mensageiro (mRNA. Essa troca caracteriza o alelo A e a ausência da mutação do alelo G. OBJETIVO: Quantificar o número de indivíduos homozigotos para alelo G, homozigotos para alelo A e heterozigotos, cujas amostras foram enviadas para o laboratório Genolab Análises Genéticas, abrangendo os estados do Paraná e Santa Catarina, no período de 1º de janeiro de 2009 a 10 de outubro de 2010. MÉTODOS: Análise de mutação pontual por reação em cadeia da polimerase em tempo real (RT-PCR. RESULTADOS: Obtivemos o número de 243 indivíduos e desse total 51,03% eram oriundos do estado do Paraná, enquanto 48,97%, oriundos do estado de Santa Catarina. Do total analisado, 88,89% possuíam o genótipo para homozigoto G, e nenhum indivíduo foi encontrado com mutação para homozigoto A. Apenas 11,11% possuíam genótipo heterozigoto. O estado de Santa Catarina apresentou frequência superior para genótipo heterozigoto em relação ao Paraná. CONCLUSÃO: Este estudo mostrou que é recomendável a identificação do genótipo para esse gene em pacientes com suspeita de trombofilia nos dois estados.INTRODUCTION: Prothrombin (factor II is a blood protein synthesized in the liver in the presence of vitamin K. It is a thrombin precursor, which induces fibrin formation. Prothrombin G20210A mutation and high prothrombin levels have been closely associated

  1. Livedoid vasculopathy and its association with factor V Leiden mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Angeline Anning; Tan, Audrey Wei Hsia; Giam, Yoke Chin; Tang, Mark Boon Yang

    2012-12-01

    Livedoid vasculopathy is a rare chronic relapsing disorder characterised by recurrent painful thrombotic and vasculitic ulcers on the legs. We present the cases of two Indian women with livedoid vasculopathy that were found to be associated with an underlying factor V Leiden heterozygous mutation. There were no other thrombotic manifestations, and livedoid vasculopathy was the sole presenting feature of the factor V Leiden mutation, although this could also be coincidental. Initial treatment with high-dose immunosuppressive therapy was suboptimal, and the addition of pentoxifylline and antiplatelet therapy was crucial in achieving disease control and remission. These cases highlight the possible association with an underlying prothrombotic disorder, such as factor V Leiden mutation, in patients with livedoid vasculopathy. Although this association is relatively uncommon, it is more relevant to Indian patients, as the presence of factor V Leiden mutation is highest in this ethnicity as compared to the local Malay and Chinese populations.

  2. Molecular characterization of factor V leiden G1691A and prothrombin G20210A mutations in Saudi newborns with stroke.

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    Gawish, Gihan E-H

    2011-10-01

    This study examined a possible association between the mutations related to Factor V Leiden and Factor II (prothrombin) and stroke in Saudi neonates. A multiplex PCR was established to detect Factor V Leiden G1691A and prothrombin G20210A mutations in 72 neonatal stroke subjects and 70 healthy adult controls with no family history of thromboembolic diseases. The frequency of the homozygous normal genotype (GG) of both genes was found to be significantly lower in the stroke subjects than in the controls (P Factor II heterozygous mutant form (GA) and the homozygous normal Factor V (GG) (P Factor V and the homozygous normal Factor II genotypes (GG) (P = 0.0) than controls. The study concluded that prothrombin and Factor V Leiden may be important risk factors for neonatal stroke in Saudi children.

  3. Positive mutations and mutation-dependent Verhulst factor in Penna ageing model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss de Oliveira, S.; Stauffer, D.; de Oliveira, P. M. C.; Sá Martins, J. S.

    2004-02-01

    We modify twice the Penna model for biological ageing. First, we introduce back (good) mutations and a memory for them into the model. It allows us to observe an improvement of the species fitness over long-time scales as well as punctuated equilibrium. Second, we adopt a food/space competition factor that depends on the number of accumulated mutations in the individuals genomes, and get rid of the fixed limiting number of allowed mutations. Besides reproducing the main results of the standard model, we also observe a mortality maximum for the oldest old.

  4. Mutations and binding sites of human transcription factors

    KAUST Repository

    Kamanu, Frederick Kinyua

    2012-06-01

    Mutations in any genome may lead to phenotype characteristics that determine ability of an individual to cope with adaptation to environmental challenges. In studies of human biology, among the most interesting ones are phenotype characteristics that determine responses to drug treatments, response to infections, or predisposition to specific inherited diseases. Most of the research in this field has been focused on the studies of mutation effects on the final gene products, peptides, and their alterations. Considerably less attention was given to the mutations that may affect regulatory mechanism(s) of gene expression, although these may also affect the phenotype characteristics. In this study we make a pilot analysis of mutations observed in the regulatory regions of 24,667 human RefSeq genes. Our study reveals that out of eight studied mutation types, insertions are the only one that in a statistically significant manner alters predicted transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs). We also find that 25 families of TFBSs have been altered by mutations in a statistically significant manner in the promoter regions we considered. Moreover, we find that the related transcription factors are, for example, prominent in processes related to intracellular signaling; cell fate; morphogenesis of organs and epithelium; development of urogenital system, epithelium, and tube; neuron fate commitment. Our study highlights the significance of studying mutations within the genes regulatory regions and opens way for further detailed investigations on this topic, particularly on the downstream affected pathways. 2012 Kamanu, Medvedeva, Schaefer, Jankovic, Archer and Bajic.

  5. A novel DSPP mutation is associated with type II dentinogenesis Imperfecta in a chinese family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Chengqi

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hereditary defects of tooth dentin are classified into two main groups: dentin dysplasia (DD (types I and II and dentinogenesis imperfecta (DGI (types I, II, and III. Type II DGI is one of the most common tooth defects with an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance. One disease-causing gene, the dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP gene, has been reported for type II DGI. Methods In this study, we characterized a four-generation Chinese family with type II DGI that consists of 18 living family members, including 8 affected individuals. Linkage analysis with polymorphic markers D4S1534 and D4S414 that span the DSPP gene showed that the family is linked to DSPP. All five exons and exon-intron boundaries of DSPP were sequenced in members of type II DGI family. Results Direct DNA sequence analysis identified a novel mutation (c.49C→T, p.Pro17Ser in exon 1 of the DSPP gene. The mutation spot, the Pro17 residue, is the second amino acid of the mature DSP protein, and highly conserved during evolution. The mutation was identified in all affected individuals, but not in normal family members and 100 controls. Conclusion These results suggest that mutation p.Pro17Ser causes type II DGI in the Chinese family. This study identifies a novel mutation in the DSPP gene, and expands the spectrum of mutations that cause DGI.

  6. Insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dell, S D; Day, I N

    1998-07-01

    Insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) plays a key role in mammalian growth, influencing foetal cell division and differentiation and possibly metabolic regulation. The mature 67 amino acid peptide shares sequence homology with both insulin and IGF-I. The liver is the main endocrine source of IGFs, but autocrine/paracrine activity is found in most tissues. The type 1 receptor mediates most of the biological effects of IGF-I and IGF-II; the type 2 receptor is involved with IGF-II degradation. Binding proteins may both localise IGFs to the receptors and regulate their activities. The IGF2 gene is maternally imprinted in mouse and human. Relaxation of IGF2 imprinting occurs in the Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome of somatic overgrowth, sporadic Wilms' tumour and a number of other cancers. In the general adult population, the IGF2-INS gene cluster may also influence body weight, in which case IGF-II function could become a target for therapeutic intervention in obesity.

  7. [Livedoid vasculopathy with heterozygous factor V Leiden mutation and sticky platelet syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewerenz, V; Burchardt, T; Büchau, A; Ruzicka, T; Megahed, M

    2004-04-01

    A 64-year-old male patient presented with painful ulcerations and livedo racemosa of both lower limbs. He had a history of cerebral and myocardial infarctions. Dermatohistologic findings and laboratory tests of the patient's coagulation system revealed the diagnosis of livedoid vasculopathy with heterozygous factor V Leiden mutation and sticky platelet syndrome type II. Systemic treatment with acetylsalicylic acid and heparin as well as topical therapy with disinfectant and granulation-inducing agents resulted in improvement of the skin lesions.

  8. Clinical and mutational investigations of tyrosinemia type II in Northern Tunisia: identification and structural characterization of two novel TAT mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charfeddine, C; Monastiri, K; Mokni, M; Laadjimi, A; Kaabachi, N; Perin, O; Nilges, M; Kassar, S; Keirallah, M; Guediche, M N; Kamoun, M R; Tebib, N; Ben Dridi, M F; Boubaker, S; Ben Osman, A; Abdelhak, S

    2006-06-01

    Tyrosinemia type II or Richner-Hanhart Syndrome (RHS) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by keratitis, palmoplantar keratosis, mental retardation, and elevated blood tyrosine levels. The disease is due to a deficiency of hepatic cytosolic tyrosine aminotransferase (TATc), an enzyme involved in the tyrosine catabolic pathway. Because of the high rate of consanguinity this disorder seems to be relatively common among the Arab and Mediterranean populations. RHS is characterized by inter and intrafamilial phenotypic variability. A large spectrum of mutations within TATc gene has been shown to be responsible for RHS. In the present study, we report the clinical features and the molecular investigation of RHS in three unrelated consanguineous Tunisian families including 7 patients with confirmed biochemical diagnosis of tyrosinemia type II. Mutation analyses were performed and two novel missense mutations were identified (C151Y) and (L273P) within exon 5 and exon 8, respectively. The 3D-structural characterization of these mutations provides evidence of defective folding of the mutant proteins, and likely alteration of the enzymatic activity. Phenotype variability was observed even among individuals sharing the same pathogenic mutation.

  9. Factors affecting the spontaneous mutational spectra in somatic mammalian cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    О.А. Ковальова

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available  In our survey of references we are discussed the influence of factors biological origin on the spontaneous mutation specters in mammalian. Seasonal and age components influence on the frequence of cytogenetic anomalies. The immune and endocrinous systems are take part in control of the alteration of the spontaneous mutation specters. Genetical difference of sensibility in animal and human at the alteration of factors enviroment as and  genetical differences of repair systems activity are may influence on individual variation of spontaneous destabilization characters of chromosomal apparatus.

  10. [Idiopathic intracranial hypertension and factor V Leiden mutation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younes, S; Aissi, M; Chérif, Y; Daoussi, N; Boughammoura, A; Frih Ayed, M; Sfar, M H; Jerbi, S

    2014-07-01

    Activated proteinC resistance is a frequent prothrombotic abnormality. In most cases it is due to factorV Leiden mutation by nucleotide G1691A substitution. This recently described thrombophilic defect of activated proteinC resistance has been postulated to be implicated in the pathogenesis of idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH). We report a case of factorV Leiden mutation in association with IIH and their likely link and implication in the management of IIH. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Myotonic Dystrophy-1 Complicated by Factor-V (Leiden Mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josef Finsterer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Presence of a factor-V Leiden mutation in a patient with myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1 has been reported only once. Here we report the second DM1 patient carrying a factor-V mutation who died from long-term complications of this mutation. Case Report. A 66-year-old DM1 patient with multi-organ-disorder syndrome developed a first deep venous thrombosis (DVT and consecutive pulmonary embolism (PE at age 50 y. Acetyl-salicylic acid was given. One year later he experienced a second DVT; that is why phenprocoumon was started. Despite anticoagulation, he experienced a third DVT bilaterally and a second PE bilaterally at 61 y; that is why a vena cava filter was additionally deployed. Despite therapeutic anticoagulation, he experienced a vena cava filter thrombosis at age 62 y. Genetic workup revealed a heterozygous factor-V mutation in addition to a CTG-repeat expansion of 500. As a consequence of PE he developed chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and experienced recurrent pulmonary infections, which were lastly responsible for decease at age 66 y despite intensive care measures. Conclusion. The heterozygous Leiden mutation may severely affect DM1 patients to such a degree that they die from its complications. If DM1 patients present with unusual manifestations, search for causes other than a CTG-repeat expansion is indicated.

  12. Factor V Leiden and Prothrombin Mutations in South of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Karimi

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Introduction & Objective: Factor V Leiden and prothrombin mutation are not common but they are involved in pediatric thrombosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of factor V Leiden & prohtrombin mutation in healthy population of Shiraz, south of Iran. Materials & Methods: In this cross-sectional study 195 healthy people (97 female and 98 male were randomly selected. Peripheral white blood cells obtained from 5 ml blood contained 1-2 mg/ml K2- EDTA. Genomic DNA extraction was performed following the protocol described by Miller et al. PCR amplification was carried out in 25μl reaction volume containing 0.5 units Taq polymerase, 200μM dNTP, 500 μM of each of the previously described primers. After initial denaturation, 35 cycles at 95◦c for 30s, and 72◦c for 20s and followed extention by 72 for 10 min were performed. About 10μl of PDR product was digested with MNI I or Mbo restriction enzymes. Results: In this study we determined factor V Leiden in 8 (4.1% and prothrombin mutation in 6 individual (3.07% of 198 cases in heterozygous form. No homozygous was seen for any of the mutations. Only one case presented a double heterozygous for factor V and prothrombin in this cohort. Conclusion: Several studies of factor V leiden and prothrombin mutations in the East of Asia showed the higher frequency of these mutations in Iran.

  13. [Identification of a novel mutation of IDS gene from a Chinese pedigree with MPS II].

    Science.gov (United States)

    GUO, Yi-Bin; PAN, Hong-Da; GUO, Chun-Miao; LI, Yong-Mei; CHEN, Lu-Ming

    2009-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand the molecular genetic mechanism of mucopolysaccharidosis type II (MPS II) and to provide a prerequisite for future prenatal gene diagnosis. A preliminary diagnosis was made by qualitative detection of Urinary Glycosaminoglycans of the suspected MPS II proband. Then, mutation detection was performed on the proband and his family members with PCR and direct sequencing of PCR products. After the novel mutation of c.876 del 2 in IDS gene was detected, sequence analysis was performed on exon 6 of IDS gene of the 135 cases, which consisted of 120 randomly selected normal controls, and other 15 patients with MPS I, IV, and VI other than MPS II. Besides, the patho-genicity of the novel mutation was analyzed with the following 2 methods: conservative analysis of the sequence of muta-tion spots of different species and the direct test of the IDS enzyme activity of the patient and his relative family members. The result of uroscopy of the proband was strong positive (GAGs +++). There was a novel deletion mutation of c.876-877 del TC in the coding region of exon 6 of IDS gene, which was a hemizygous mutation. However, the mutation of his mother and sister was a heterozygous mutation. Detection of the exon 6 of IDS gene showed that the mutation was not found among normal controls and other patients with MPS I, IV, and VI other than MPS II. Homology comparison of amino acid sequences from different species showed that the phenylalanine (F) glutamine (Q) of the mutation site of c.876-877 del TC located in p.292-293 was highly conserved. The activity of IDS enzyme of the proband was only 2.3 nmol/4 h/mL, which was much lower than normal; but the activity of IDS enzyme of his father, mother and sister was 641.9 nmol/4 h/mL, 95.8 nmol/4h/mL and 103.2 nmol/4h/mL, respectively. These results illustrated that the deletion and frame-shift mutation of c.876-877 del TC detected was a novel pathologic mutation, which was the underlying cause of

  14. A patient with pseudohypoaldosteronism type II complicated by congenital hypopituitarism carrying a KLHL3 mutation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitani, Marie; Furuichi, Munehiro; Narumi, Satoshi; Hasegawa, Tomonobu; Chiga, Motoko; Uchida, Shinichi; Sato, Seiji

    2016-01-01

    Abstract. Pseudohypoaldosteronism type II (PHA II) is a renal tubular disease that causes hyperkalemia, hypertension, and metabolic acidosis. Mutations in four genes (WNK4, WNK1, KLHL3, and CUL3) are known to cause PHA II. We report a patient with PHA II carrying a KLHL3 mutation, who also had congenital hypopituitarism. The patient, a 3-yr-old boy, experienced loss of consciousness at age 10 mo. He exhibited growth failure, hypertension, hyperkalemia, and metabolic acidosis. We diagnosed him as having PHA II because he had low plasma renin activity with normal plasma aldosterone level and a low transtubular potassium gradient. Further investigations revealed defective secretion of GH and gonadotropins and anterior pituitary gland hypoplasia. Genetic analyses revealed a previously known heterozygous KLHL3 mutation (p.Leu387Pro), but no mutation was detected in 27 genes associated with congenital hypopituitarism. He was treated with sodium restriction and recombinant human GH, which normalized growth velocity. This is the first report of a molecularly confirmed patient with PHA II complicated by congenital hypopituitarism. We speculate that both GH deficiency and metabolic acidosis contributed to growth failure. Endocrinological investigations will help to individualize the treatment of patients with PHA II presenting with growth failure. PMID:27780982

  15. Prevalence of coagulation factor II G20210A and factor V G1691A Leiden polymorphisms in Chechans, a genetically isolated population in Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dajani, Rana; Fatahallah, Raja; Dajani, Abdelrahman; Al-Shboul, Mohammad; Khader, Yousef

    2012-09-01

    Coagulation factor II G20210A and coagulation factor V (Leiden) G1691A single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are major inherited risk factors of venous thromboembolism. In view of the heterogeneity in their world distribution and lack of sufficient information about their distribution among Chechans, we addressed the prevalence of these SNPs in the Chechan population in Jordan, a genetically isolated population. Factor II G20210A and factor V Leiden SNPs were analysed by polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) method and Amplification refractory mutation detection system (ARMS) respectively in 120 random unrelated subjects from the Chechan population in Jordan. Among the subjects studied for factor II G20210A mutation there were three individuals carrying this mutation as heterozygous (one female and two male), giving a prevalence of 2.5 % and an allele frequency of 1.25 %. No homozygous factor II allele was found. Factor V Leiden G1691A mutation was detected as heterozygous in 22 of 120 of individuals (17 female and five male) indicating a prevalence of 18.3 % and allele frequency of 9.2 %. No homozygous allele was found. Our results indicated that prevalence of factor II G20210A mutation in the Chechan population is similar to prevalence in Jordan and Caucasian populations (1-6 %) while the prevalence of factor V Leiden was higher in the Chechan population compared to Jordan and Caucasian populations (2-15 %).

  16. Polymorphisms in the genes for coagulation factor II,V,VII in patients undergoing coronary angiography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐耕; 金国栋; 傅国胜; 马骥; 单江; 王建安

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether polymorphisms in the genes for coagulation factor II,V, VII could predispose an individual to increase risk for coronary artery disease (CAD) and/or myocardial infarction (MI) in Chinese. Methods: We screened coagulation factor II(G20210A),V(G1691A),VII (R353Q and HVR4) genotype in 374 patients undergoing coronary angiography by polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) assay. Results: The R353Q and HVR4 genotype of the factor VII distribution was in accordance with Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. The frequencies of FVII genotype or allele did not show statistically significant differences between CAD group and controls or between male and female. The frequencies of the Q allele and (RQ+QQ) genotype were significantly higher among the CAD patients without myocardial infarction (MI) history than among those with MI history (P<0.05). However, HVR4 polymorphism was not significantly different within groups. We only find one normal control of factorII(G20210A) mutation. No coagulation factor V(G1691A) mutation was found in the CAD patients and controls. Conclusion: The factor II(G20210A),V(G1691A) mutation is absent and may not be a major genetic factor for CAD and/or MI; the Q allele of the R353Q polymorphism of the factor VII gene may be a protective genetic factor against myocardial infarction in Chinese.

  17. Mutational hot spot in the DSPP gene causing dentinogenesis imperfecta type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung-Wook; Hu, Jan C-C; Lee, Jae-Il; Moon, Sung-Kwon; Kim, Young-Jae; Jang, Ki-Taeg; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Kim, Chong-Chul; Hahn, Se-Hyun; Simmer, James P

    2005-02-01

    The current system for the classification of hereditary defects of tooth dentin is based upon clinical and radiographic findings and consists of two types of dentin dysplasia (DD) and three types of dentinogenesis imperfecta (DGI). However, whether DGI type III should be considered a distinct phenotype or a variation of DGI type II is debatable. In the 30 years since the classification system was first proposed, significant advances have been made regarding the genetic etiologies of inherited dentin defects. DGI type II is recognized as an autosomal dominant disorder with almost complete penetrance and a low frequency of de novo mutations. We have identified a mutation (c.52G-->T, p.V18F) at the first nucleotide of exon 3 of the DSPP (dentin sialophosphoprotein) gene in a Korean family (de novo) and a Caucasian family. This mutation has previously been reported as causing DGI type II in a Chinese family. These findings suggest that this mutation site represents a mutational "hot spot" in the DSPP gene. The clinical and radiographic features of these two families include the classic phenotypes associated with both DGI type II and type III. Finding that a single mutation causes both phenotypic patterns strongly supports the conclusion that DGI type II and DGI type III are not separate diseases but rather the phenotypic variation of a single disease. We propose a modification of the current classification system such that the designation "hereditary opalescent dentin" or "DGI type II" should be used to describe both the DGI type II and type III phenotypes.

  18. Heterogeneous ethnic distribution of the factor v leiden mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franco Rendrik F.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Inherited resistance to activated protein C caused by the factor V Leiden (FVL mutation is the most common genetic cause of venous thrombosis yet described, being found in 20-60% of patients with venous thrombophilia. A relationship between the FVL mutation and an increased predisposition to arterial thrombosis in young women was recently reported. We assessed the prevalence of the FVL mutation in 440 individuals (880 chromosomes belonging to four different ethnic groups: Caucasians, African Blacks, Asians and Amerindians. PCR amplification followed by MnlI digestion was employed to define the genotype. The FVL mutation was found in a heterozygous state in four out of 152 Whites (2.6%, one out of 151 Amerindians (0.6%, and was absent among 97 African Blacks and 40 Asians. Our results confirm that FVL has a heterogeneous distribution in different human populations, a fact that may contribute to geographic and ethnic differences in the prevalence of thrombotic diseases. In addition, these data may be helpful in decisions regarding the usefulness of screening for the FVL mutation in subjects at risk for thrombosis.

  19. Leukoencephalopathy due to Complex II Deficiency and Bi-Allelic SDHB Mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønborg, Sabine; Darin, Niklas; Miranda, Maria J

    2017-01-01

    described in heterozygous form in patients with familial paraganglioma/pheochromocytoma and/or renal cell cancer. This is only the second example in the literature where one specific SDHx mutation is associated with both recessive mitochondrial disease in one patient and familial paraganglioma......Isolated complex II deficiency is a rare cause of mitochondrial disease and bi-allelic mutations in SDHB have been identified in only a few patients with complex II deficiency and a progressive neurological phenotype with onset in infancy. On the other hand, heterozygous SDHB mutations are a well......-known cause of familial paraganglioma/pheochromocytoma and renal cell cancer. Here, we describe two additional patients with respiratory chain deficiency due to bi-allelic SDHB mutations. The patients' clinical, neuroradiological, and biochemical phenotype is discussed according to current knowledge...

  20. A novel splicing mutation alters DSPP transcription and leads to dentinogenesis imperfecta type II.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Zhang

    Full Text Available Dentinogenesis imperfecta (DGI type II is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by a serious disorders in teeth. Mutations of dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP gene were revealed to be the causation of DGI type II (DGI-II. In this study, we identified a novel mutation (NG_011595.1:g.8662T>C, c.135+2T>C lying in the splice donor site of intron 3 of DSPP gene in a Chinese Han DGI-II pedigree. It was found in all affected subjects but not in unaffected ones or other unrelated healthy controls. The function of the mutant DSPP gene, which was predicted online and subsequently confirmed by in vitro splicing analysis, was the loss of splicing of intron 3, leading to the extended length of DSPP mRNA. For the first time, the functional non-splicing of intron was revealed in a novel DSPP mutation and was considered as the causation of DGI-II. It was also indicated that splicing was of key importance to the function of DSPP and this splice donor site might be a sensitive mutation hot spot. Our findings combined with other reports would facilitate the genetic diagnosis of DGI-II, shed light on its gene therapy and help to finally conquer human diseases.

  1. A novel DSPP mutation causes dentinogenesis imperfecta type II in a large Mongolian family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Yujie

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several studies have shown that the clinical phenotypes of dentinogenesis imperfecta type II (DGI-II may be caused by mutations in dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP. However, no previous studies have documented the clinical phenotype and genetic basis of DGI-II in a Mongolian family from China. Methods We identified a large five-generation Mongolian family from China with DGI-II, comprising 64 living family members of whom 22 were affected. Linkage analysis of five polymorphic markers flanking DSPP gene was used to genotype the families and to construct the haplotypes of these families. All five DSPP exons including the intron-exon boundaries were PCR-amplified and sequenced in 48 members of this large family. Results All affected individuals showed discoloration and severe attrition of their teeth, with obliterated pulp chambers and without progressive high frequency hearing loss or skeletal abnormalities. No recombination was found at five polymorphic markers flanking DSPP in the family. Direct DNA sequencing identified a novel A→G transition mutation adjacent to the donor splicing site within intron 3 in all affected individuals but not in the unaffected family members and 50 unrelated Mongolian individuals. Conclusion This study identified a novel mutation (IVS3+3A→G in DSPP, which caused DGI-II in a large Mongolian family. This expands the spectrum of mutations leading to DGI-II.

  2. A novel splicing mutation alters DSPP transcription and leads to dentinogenesis imperfecta type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun; Wang, Jiucun; Ma, Yanyun; Du, Wenqi; Zhao, Siyang; Zhang, Zuowei; Zhang, Xiaojiao; Liu, Yue; Xiao, Huasheng; Wang, Hongyan; Jin, Li; Liu, Jie

    2011-01-01

    Dentinogenesis imperfecta (DGI) type II is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by a serious disorders in teeth. Mutations of dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) gene were revealed to be the causation of DGI type II (DGI-II). In this study, we identified a novel mutation (NG_011595.1:g.8662T>C, c.135+2T>C) lying in the splice donor site of intron 3 of DSPP gene in a Chinese Han DGI-II pedigree. It was found in all affected subjects but not in unaffected ones or other unrelated healthy controls. The function of the mutant DSPP gene, which was predicted online and subsequently confirmed by in vitro splicing analysis, was the loss of splicing of intron 3, leading to the extended length of DSPP mRNA. For the first time, the functional non-splicing of intron was revealed in a novel DSPP mutation and was considered as the causation of DGI-II. It was also indicated that splicing was of key importance to the function of DSPP and this splice donor site might be a sensitive mutation hot spot. Our findings combined with other reports would facilitate the genetic diagnosis of DGI-II, shed light on its gene therapy and help to finally conquer human diseases.

  3. SPAK deficiency corrects pseudohypoaldosteronism II caused by WNK4 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Pei-Yi; Cheng, Chih-Jen; Wu, Yi-Chang; Fang, Yu-Wei; Chau, Tom; Uchida, Shinichi; Sasaki, Sei; Yang, Sung-Sen; Lin, Shih-Hua

    2013-01-01

    Stimulation of the OSR1 (Oxidative stress-responsive kinase-1)/SPAK [STE20 (sterile 20)/SPS1-related proline/alanine-rich kinase]-NCC (Na(+)-Cl(-) cotransporter) signaling cascade plays an important role in the WNK [With-No-Lysine (K)] kinase 4 D561A knock-in mouse model of pseudohypoaldosteronism type II (PHA II) characterized by salt-sensitive hypertension and hyperkalemia. The aim of this study was to investigate the respective roles of Osr1 and Spak in the pathogenesis of PHA II in vivo. Wnk4 (D561A/+) mice were crossed with kidney tubule-specific (KSP) Osr1 knockout (KSP-Osr1 (-/-)) and Spak knockout (Spak (-/-)) mice. Blood pressure, plasma and urine biochemistries, and the relevant protein expression in the kidneys were examined. Wnk4 (D561A/+), KSP-Osr1 (-/-), and Spak (-/-) mice recapitulated the phenotypes of PHA II, Bartter-like syndrome, and Gitelman syndrome, respectively. Wnk4 (D561A/+).KSP-Osr1 (-/-) remained phenotypically PHA II while Wnk4 (D561A/+).Spak (-/-) mice became normotensive and lacked the PHA II phenotype. Phosphorylated Spak and Ncc were similarly increased in both Wnk4 (D561A/+) and Wnk4 (D561A/+).KSP-Osr1 (-/-) mice while phosphorylated Ncc normalized in Wnk4 (D561A/+).Spak (-/-) mice. Furthermore, Wnk4 (D561A/+).KSP-Osr1 (-/-) mice exhibited exaggerated salt excretion in response to thiazide diuretics while Wnk4 (D561A/+).Spak (-/-) mice exhibited normal responses. Wnk4(D561A/+).Spak (-/-).KSP-Osr1 (-/-) triple mutant mice had low blood pressure and diminished phosphorylated Ncc. Both SPAK and OSR1 are important in the maintenance of blood pressure but activation of SPAK-NCC plays the dominant role in PHA II. SPAK may be a therapeutic target for disorders with salt-sensitive hypertension related to WNK4 activation.

  4. SPAK deficiency corrects pseudohypoaldosteronism II caused by WNK4 mutation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Yi Chu

    Full Text Available Stimulation of the OSR1 (Oxidative stress-responsive kinase-1/SPAK [STE20 (sterile 20/SPS1-related proline/alanine-rich kinase]-NCC (Na(+-Cl(- cotransporter signaling cascade plays an important role in the WNK [With-No-Lysine (K] kinase 4 D561A knock-in mouse model of pseudohypoaldosteronism type II (PHA II characterized by salt-sensitive hypertension and hyperkalemia. The aim of this study was to investigate the respective roles of Osr1 and Spak in the pathogenesis of PHA II in vivo. Wnk4 (D561A/+ mice were crossed with kidney tubule-specific (KSP Osr1 knockout (KSP-Osr1 (-/- and Spak knockout (Spak (-/- mice. Blood pressure, plasma and urine biochemistries, and the relevant protein expression in the kidneys were examined. Wnk4 (D561A/+, KSP-Osr1 (-/-, and Spak (-/- mice recapitulated the phenotypes of PHA II, Bartter-like syndrome, and Gitelman syndrome, respectively. Wnk4 (D561A/+.KSP-Osr1 (-/- remained phenotypically PHA II while Wnk4 (D561A/+.Spak (-/- mice became normotensive and lacked the PHA II phenotype. Phosphorylated Spak and Ncc were similarly increased in both Wnk4 (D561A/+ and Wnk4 (D561A/+.KSP-Osr1 (-/- mice while phosphorylated Ncc normalized in Wnk4 (D561A/+.Spak (-/- mice. Furthermore, Wnk4 (D561A/+.KSP-Osr1 (-/- mice exhibited exaggerated salt excretion in response to thiazide diuretics while Wnk4 (D561A/+.Spak (-/- mice exhibited normal responses. Wnk4(D561A/+.Spak (-/-.KSP-Osr1 (-/- triple mutant mice had low blood pressure and diminished phosphorylated Ncc. Both SPAK and OSR1 are important in the maintenance of blood pressure but activation of SPAK-NCC plays the dominant role in PHA II. SPAK may be a therapeutic target for disorders with salt-sensitive hypertension related to WNK4 activation.

  5. Two novel mutations of CLCN7 gene in Chinese families with autosomal dominant osteopetrosis (type II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Hui; Shao, Chong; Zheng, Yan; He, Jin-Wei; Fu, Wen-Zhen; Wang, Chun; Zhang, Zhen-Lin

    2016-07-01

    Autosomal dominant osteopetrosis type II (ADO-II) is a heritable bone disorder characterized by osteosclerosis, predominantly involving the spine (vertebral end-plate thickening, or rugger-jersey spine), the pelvis ("bone-within-bone" structures) and the skull base. Chloride channel 7 (CLCN7) has been reported to be the causative gene. In this study, we aimed to identify the pathogenic mutation in four Chinese families with ADO-II. All 25 exons of the CLCN7 gene, including the exon-intron boundaries, were amplified and sequenced directly in four probands from the Chinese families with ADO-II. The mutation site was then identified in other family members and 250 healthy controls. In family 1, a known missense mutation c.296A>G in exon 4 of CLCN7 was identified in the proband, resulting in a tyrosine (UAU) to cysteine (UGU) substitution at p.99 (Y99C); the mutation was also identified in his affected father. In family 2, a novel missense mutation c.865G>C in exon 10 was identified in the proband, resulting in a valine (GUC) to leucine (CUC) substitution at p.289 (V289L); the mutation was also identified in her healthy mother and sister. In family 3, a novel missense mutation c.1625C>T in exon 17 of CLCN7 was identified in the proband, resulting in an alanine (GCG) to valine (GUG) substitution at p.542 (A542V); the mutation was also identified in her father. In family 4, a hot spot, R767W (c.2299C>T, CGG>TGG), in exon 24 was found in the proband which once again proved the susceptibility of the site or the similar genetic background in different races. Moreover, two novel mutations, V289L and A542V, occurred at a highly conserved position, found by a comparison of the protein sequences from eight vertebrates, and were predicted to have a pathogenic effect by PolyPhen-2 software, which showed "probably damaging" with a score of approximately 1. These mutation sites were not identified in 250 healthy controls. Our present findings suggest that the novel missense

  6. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and EGFR mutations, function and possible role in clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voldborg, B R; Damstrup, L; Spang-Thomsen, M;

    1997-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a growth factor receptor that induces cell differentiation and proliferation upon activation through the binding of one of its ligands. The receptor is located at the cell surface, where the binding of a ligand activates a tyrosine kinase...... in the intracellular region of the receptor. This tyrosine kinase phosphorylates a number of intracellular substrates that activates pathways leading to cell growth, DNA synthesis and the expression of oncogenes such as fos and jun. EGFR is thought to be involved the development of cancer, as the EGFR gene is often...... amplified, and/or mutated in cancer cells. In this review we will focus on: (I) the structure and function of EGFR, (II) implications of receptor/ligand coexpression and EGFR mutations or overexpression, (III) its effect on cancer cells, (IV) the development of the malignant phenotype and (V) the clinical...

  7. Phenotype characterization and DSPP mutational analysis of three Brazilian dentinogenesis imperfecta type II families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo, A C; Santos, L J S; Paula, L M; Dong, J; MacDougall, M

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to perform phenotype analysis and dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) mutational analysis on 3 Brazilian families diagnosed with dentinogenesis imperfecta type II (DGI-II) attending the Dental Anomalies Clinic in Brasilia, Brazil. Physical and oral examinations, as well as radiographic and histopathological analyses, were performed on 28 affected and unaffected individuals. Clinical, radiographic and histopathological analyses confirmed the diagnosis of DGI-II in 19 individuals. Pulp stones were observed in ground sections of several teeth in 2 families, suggesting that obliteration of pulp chambers and root canals results from the growth of these nodular structures. Mutational DSPP gene analysis of representative affected family members revealed 7 various non-disease-causing alterations in exons 1-4 within the dentin sialoprotein domain. Further longitudinal studies are necessary to elucidate the progression of pulpal obliteration in the DGI-II patients studied as well as the molecular basis of their disease.

  8. Altered oncomodules underlie chromatin regulatory factors driver mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frigola, Joan; Iturbide, Ane; Lopez-Bigas, Nuria; Peiro, Sandra; Gonzalez-Perez, Abel

    2016-05-24

    Chromatin regulatory factors (CRFs), are known to be involved in tumorigenesis in several cancer types. Nevertheless, the molecular mechanisms through which driver alterations of CRFs cause tumorigenesis remain unknown. Here, we developed a CRFs Oncomodules Discovery approach, which mines several sources of cancer genomics and perturbaomics data. The approach prioritizes sets of genes significantly miss-regulated in primary tumors (oncomodules) bearing mutations of driver CRFs. We applied the approach to eleven TCGA tumor cohorts and uncovered oncomodules potentially associated to mutations of five driver CRFs in three cancer types. Our results revealed, for example, the potential involvement of the mTOR pathway in the development of tumors with loss-of-function mutations of MLL2 in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas. The experimental validation that MLL2 loss-of-function increases the sensitivity of cancer cell lines to mTOR inhibition lends further support to the validity of our approach. The potential oncogenic modules detected by our approach may guide experiments proposing ways to indirectly target driver mutations of CRFs.

  9. GTF2E2 Mutations Destabilize the General Transcription Factor Complex TFIIE in Individuals with DNA Repair-Proficient Trichothiodystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuschal, Christiane; Botta, Elena; Orioli, Donata; Digiovanna, John J; Seneca, Sara; Keymolen, Kathelijn; Tamura, Deborah; Heller, Elizabeth; Khan, Sikandar G; Caligiuri, Giuseppina; Lanzafame, Manuela; Nardo, Tiziana; Ricotti, Roberta; Peverali, Fiorenzo A; Stephens, Robert; Zhao, Yongmei; Lehmann, Alan R; Baranello, Laura; Levens, David; Kraemer, Kenneth H; Stefanini, Miria

    2016-04-01

    The general transcription factor IIE (TFIIE) is essential for transcription initiation by RNA polymerase II (RNA pol II) via direct interaction with the basal transcription/DNA repair factor IIH (TFIIH). TFIIH harbors mutations in two rare genetic disorders, the cancer-prone xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) and the cancer-free, multisystem developmental disorder trichothiodystrophy (TTD). The phenotypic complexity resulting from mutations affecting TFIIH has been attributed to the nucleotide excision repair (NER) defect as well as to impaired transcription. Here, we report two unrelated children showing clinical features typical of TTD who harbor different homozygous missense mutations in GTF2E2 (c.448G>C [p.Ala150Pro] and c.559G>T [p.Asp187Tyr]) encoding the beta subunit of transcription factor IIE (TFIIEβ). Repair of ultraviolet-induced DNA damage was normal in the GTF2E2 mutated cells, indicating that TFIIE was not involved in NER. We found decreased protein levels of the two TFIIE subunits (TFIIEα and TFIIEβ) as well as decreased phosphorylation of TFIIEα in cells from both children. Interestingly, decreased phosphorylation of TFIIEα was also seen in TTD cells with mutations in ERCC2, which encodes the XPD subunit of TFIIH, but not in XP cells with ERCC2 mutations. Our findings support the theory that TTD is caused by transcriptional impairments that are distinct from the NER disorder XP.

  10. GTF2E2 Mutations Destabilize the General Transcription Factor Complex TFIIE in Individuals with DNA Repair-Proficient Trichothiodystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuschal, Christiane; Botta, Elena; Orioli, Donata; Digiovanna, John J.; Seneca, Sara; Keymolen, Kathelijn; Tamura, Deborah; Heller, Elizabeth; Khan, Sikandar G.; Caligiuri, Giuseppina; Lanzafame, Manuela; Nardo, Tiziana; Ricotti, Roberta; Peverali, Fiorenzo A.; Stephens, Robert; Zhao, Yongmei; Lehmann, Alan R.; Baranello, Laura; Levens, David; Kraemer, Kenneth H.; Stefanini, Miria

    2016-01-01

    The general transcription factor IIE (TFIIE) is essential for transcription initiation by RNA polymerase II (RNA pol II) via direct interaction with the basal transcription/DNA repair factor IIH (TFIIH). TFIIH harbors mutations in two rare genetic disorders, the cancer-prone xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) and the cancer-free, multisystem developmental disorder trichothiodystrophy (TTD). The phenotypic complexity resulting from mutations affecting TFIIH has been attributed to the nucleotide excision repair (NER) defect as well as to impaired transcription. Here, we report two unrelated children showing clinical features typical of TTD who harbor different homozygous missense mutations in GTF2E2 (c.448G>C [p.Ala150Pro] and c.559G>T [p.Asp187Tyr]) encoding the beta subunit of transcription factor IIE (TFIIEβ). Repair of ultraviolet-induced DNA damage was normal in the GTF2E2 mutated cells, indicating that TFIIE was not involved in NER. We found decreased protein levels of the two TFIIE subunits (TFIIEα and TFIIEβ) as well as decreased phosphorylation of TFIIEα in cells from both children. Interestingly, decreased phosphorylation of TFIIEα was also seen in TTD cells with mutations in ERCC2, which encodes the XPD subunit of TFIIH, but not in XP cells with ERCC2 mutations. Our findings support the theory that TTD is caused by transcriptional impairments that are distinct from the NER disorder XP. PMID:26996949

  11. Efficiency of BRCAPRO and Myriad II mutation probability thresholds versus cancer history criteria alone for BRCA1/2 mutation detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Harssel, J J T; van Roozendaal, C E P; Detisch, Y; Brandão, R D; Paulussen, A D C; Zeegers, M; Blok, M J; Gómez García, E B

    2010-06-01

    Considerable differences exist amongst countries in the mutation probability methods and thresholds used to select patients for BRCA1/2 genetic screening. In order to assess the added value of mutation probability methods, we have retrospectively calculated the BRCAPRO and Myriad II probabilities in 306 probands who had previously been selected for DNA-analysis according to criteria based on familial history of cancer. DNA-analysis identified 52 mutations (16.9%) and 11 unclassified variants (UVs, 3.6%). Compared to cancer history, a threshold > or = 10% with BRCAPRO or with Myriad II excluded about 40% of the patients from analysis, including four with a mutation and probabilities 20% with BRCAPRO and Myriad II. In summary, BRCAPRO and Myriad II are more efficient than cancer history alone to exclude patients without a mutation. BRCAPRO performs better for the detection of BRCA1 mutations than of BRCA2 mutations. The Myriad II scores provided no additional information than the BRCAPRO scores alone for the detection of patients with a mutation. The use of thresholds excluded from analysis the majority of patients carrying an UV.

  12. Influence of the factor V Leiden mutation on infectious disease susceptibility and outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benfield, Thomas L; Dahl, Mortens; Nordestgaard, Borge G

    2005-01-01

    The effect of the coagulation factor V Leiden mutation on infectious disease susceptibility and outcome is controversial.......The effect of the coagulation factor V Leiden mutation on infectious disease susceptibility and outcome is controversial....

  13. EDNRB mutations cause Waardenburg syndrome type II in the heterozygous state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issa, Sarah; Bondurand, Nadege; Faubert, Emmanuelle; Poisson, Sylvain; Lecerf, Laure; Nitschke, Patrick; Deggouj, Naima; Loundon, Natalie; Jonard, Laurence; David, Albert; Sznajer, Yves; Blanchet, Patricia; Marlin, Sandrine; Pingault, Veronique

    2017-02-24

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is a genetic disorder characterized by sensorineural hearing loss and pigmentation anomalies. The clinical definition of four WS types is based on additional features due to defects in structures mostly arising from the neural crest, with type I and type II being the most frequent. While type I is tightly associated to PAX3 mutations, WS type II (WS2) remains partly enigmatic with mutations in known genes (MITF, SOX10) accounting for only 30% of the cases. We performed exome sequencing in a WS2 index case and identified a heterozygous missense variation in EDNRB. Interestingly, homozygous (and very rare heterozygous) EDNRB mutations are already described in type IV WS (that is, in association with Hirschsprung disease) and heterozygous mutations in isolated Hirschsprung disease. Screening of a WS2 cohort led to the identification of an overall of 6 heterozygous EDNRB variations. Clinical phenotypes, pedigrees and molecular segregation investigations unraveled a dominant mode of inheritance with incomplete penetrance. In parallel, cellular and functional studies showed that each of the mutations impairs the subcellular localization of the receptor or induces a defective downstream signaling pathway. Based on our results, we now estimate EDNRB mutations to be responsible for 5-6% of WS2. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  14. 21 CFR 864.7280 - Factor V Leiden DNA mutation detection systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Factor V Leiden DNA mutation detection systems....7280 Factor V Leiden DNA mutation detection systems. (a) Identification. Factor V Leiden deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) mutation detection systems are devices that consist of different reagents...

  15. Oligomeric state regulated trafficking of human platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase type-II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monillas, Elizabeth S; Caplan, Jeffrey L; Thévenin, Anastasia F; Bahnson, Brian J

    2015-05-01

    The intracellular enzyme platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase type-II (PAFAH-II) hydrolyzes platelet-activating factor and oxidatively fragmented phospholipids. PAFAH-II in its resting state is mainly cytoplasmic, and it responds to oxidative stress by becoming increasingly bound to endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi membranes. Numerous studies have indicated that this enzyme is essential for protecting cells from oxidative stress induced apoptosis. However, the regulatory mechanism of the oxidative stress response by PAFAH-II has not been fully resolved. Here, changes to the oligomeric state of human PAFAH-II were investigated as a potential regulatory mechanism toward enzyme trafficking. Native PAGE analysis in vitro and photon counting histogram within live cells showed that PAFAH-II is both monomeric and dimeric. A Gly-2-Ala site-directed mutation of PAFAH-II demonstrated that the N-terminal myristoyl group is required for homodimerization. Additionally, the distribution of oligomeric PAFAH-II is distinct within the cell; homodimers of PAFAH-II were localized to the cytoplasm while monomers were associated to the membranes of the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi. We propose that the oligomeric state of PAFAH-II drives functional protein trafficking. PAFAH-II localization to the membrane is critical for substrate acquisition and effective oxidative stress protection. It is hypothesized that the balance between monomer and dimer serves as a regulatory mechanism of a PAFAH-II oxidative stress response.

  16. Factor V-Leiden Mutation: A Common Risk Factor for Venous Thrombosis among Lebanese Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghid Kreidy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Lebanon exhibits one of the highest prevalences of factor V-Leiden (FVL in the world (14.4%. The aim of this study is to evaluate the incidence of FVL mutation among Lebanese patients with lower extremity venous thrombosis. Material and Methods. From January 2003 to January 2011, 283 consecutive Lebanese patients, diagnosed with deep venous thrombosis (DVT by duplex scan, were retrospectively reviewed. FVL mutation was tested among patients with conditions highly suggestive of hypercoagulation states (65 patients. Results. FVL mutation was detected among 56.9% of patients, 68.6% of patients younger than 50 years, and 43.4% of patients older than 50 years (=0.041. FVL mutation was commonly reported in young adults, in patients with pregnancy, estrogen drugs, recurrent DVT, and resistance to anticoagulation. Conclusion. The high rate of FVL mutation observed among Lebanese patients with venous thrombosis is related to the high prevalence of this mutation in the Lebanese population. Thrombophilia screening should be tailored to accommodate a population's risk factor. In countries with high prevalence of FVL, this mutation should be screened among patients younger than 50 years and patients with situations highly suggestive of hypercoagulation states.

  17. Correlation of IDH1 mutation with clinicopathologic factors and prognosis in primary glioblastoma: a report of 118 patients from China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Yan

    Full Text Available It has been reported that IDH1 (IDH1R132 mutation was a frequent genomic alteration in grade II and grade III glial tumors but rare in primary glioblastoma (pGBM. To elucidate the frequency of IDH1 mutation and its clinical significance in Chinese patients with pGBM, one hundred eighteen pGBMs were assessed by pyro-sequencing for IDH1 mutation status, and the results were correlated with clinical characteristics and molecular pathological factors. IDH1 mutations were detected in 19/118 pGBM cases (16.1%. Younger age, methylated MGMT promoter, high expression of mutant P53 protein, low expression of Ki-67 or EGFR protein were significantly correlated with IDH1 mutation status. Most notably, we identified pGBM cases with IDH1 mutation were mainly involved in the frontal lobe when compared with those with wild-type IDH1. In addition, Kaplan-Meier survival analysis revealed a highly significant association between IDH1 mutation and a better clinical outcome (p = 0.026 for progression-free survival; p = 0.029 for overall survival. However, in our further multivariable regression analysis, the independent prognostic effect of IDH1 mutation is limited when considering age, preoperative KPS score, extent of resection, TMZ chemotherapy, and Ki-67 protein expression levels, which might narrow its prognostic power in Chinese population in the future.

  18. Novel and recurrent tyrosine aminotransferase gene mutations in tyrosinemia type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hühn, R; Stoermer, H; Klingele, B; Bausch, E; Fois, A; Farnetani, M; Di Rocco, M; Boué, J; Kirk, J M; Coleman, R; Scherer, G

    1998-03-01

    Tyrosinemia type II (Richner-Hanhart syndrome, RHS) is a disorder of autosomal recessive inheritance characterized by keratitis, palmoplantar hyperkeratosis, mental retardation, and elevated blood tyrosine levels. The disease results from deficiency in hepatic tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT). We have previously described one deletion and six different point mutations in four RHS patients. We have now analyzed the TAT genes in a further seven unrelated RHS families from Italy, France, the United Kingdom, and the United States. We have established PCR conditions for the amplification of all twelve TAT exons and have screened the products for mutations by direct sequence analysis or by first performing single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis. We have thus identified the presumably pathological mutations in eight RHS alleles, including two nonsense mutations (R57X, E411X) and four amino acid substitutions (R119W, L201R, R433Q, R433W). Only the R57X mutation, which was found in one Scottish and two Italian families, has been previously reported in another Italian family. Haplotype analysis indicates that this mutation, which involves a CpG dinucleotide hot spot, has a common origin in the three Italian families but arose independently in the Scottish family. Two polymorphisms have also been detected, viz., a protein polymorphism, P15S, and a silent substitution S103S (TCG-->TCA). Expression of R433Q and R433W demonstrate reduced activity of the mutant proteins. In all, twelve different TAT gene mutations have now been identified in tyrosinemia type II.

  19. Common mutations in the fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR 3) gene account for achondroplasia, hypochondroplasia, and thanatophoric dwarfism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonaventure, J.; Rousseau, F.; Legeai-Mallet, L.; LeMerrer, M.; Munnich, A.; Maroteaux, P. [INSERM, Paris (France)

    1996-05-03

    The mapping of the achondroplasia locus to the short arm of chromosome 4 and the subsequent identification of a recurrent missense mutation (G380R) in the fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR-3) gene has been followed by the detection of common FGFR-3 mutations in two clinically related disorders: thanatophoric dwarfism (types I and II) and hypochondroplasia. The relative clinical homogeneity of achondroplasia was substantiated by demonstration of its genetic homogeneity as more than 98% of all patients hitherto reported exhibit mutations in the transmembrane receptor domain. Although most hypochondroplasia cases were accounted for by a recurrent missense substitution (N540K) in the first tyrosine kinase (TK 1) domain of the receptor, a significant proportion (40%) of our patients did not harbor the N540K mutation and three hypochondroplasia families were not linked to the FGFR-3 locus, thus supporting clinical heterogeneity of this condition. In thanatophoric dwarfism (TD), a recurrent FGFR-3 mutation located in the second tyrosine kinase (TK 2) domain of the receptor was originally detected in 100% of TD II cases; in our series, seven distinct mutations in three different protein domains were identified in 25 of 26 TD I patients, suggesting that TD, like achondroplasia, is a genetically homogenous skeletal disorder. 31 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Inactivation of the transforming growth factor beta type II receptor in human small cell lung cancer cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, S; Nørgaard, P; Abrahamsen, N;

    1999-01-01

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) exerts a growth inhibitory effect on many cell types through binding to two types of receptors, the type I and II receptors. Resistance to TGF-beta due to lack of type II receptor (RII) has been described in some cancer types including small cell lung...... cancer (SCLC). The purpose of this study was to examine the cause of absent RII expression in SCLC cell lines. Northern blot analysis showed that RII RNA expression was very weak in 16 of 21 cell lines. To investigate if the absence of RII transcript was due to mutations, we screened the poly-A tract...... for mutations, but no mutations were detected. Additional screening for mutations of the RII gene revealed a GG to TT base substitution in one cell line, which did not express RII. This mutation generates a stop codon resulting in predicted synthesis of a truncated RII of 219 amino acids. The nature...

  1. Possible incorrect genotyping of heterozygous factor V Leiden and Prothrombin 20210 gene mutations by the GeneXpert assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marturano, Alessandro; Bury, Loredana; Gresele, Paolo

    2014-08-05

    The GeneXpert analyzer is a hands-off system for the detection of Factor V Leiden and of Prothrombin G20210A (GPRO) gene thrombophilic mutations. Although the system is efficient and easy to use, we report the rare possibility of incorrect genotyping. 1648 samples were evaluated using the GeneXpert HemosIL Factor II and Factor V assay: 1319 were freshly analyzed while 329 were frozen, thawed and diluted with saline prior to analysis to avoid clogging of the instrument syringe. Two samples, both heterozygous, one for the factor V Leiden and the other for the GPRO gene, were incorrectly genotyped as homozygous for the relative mutation. Inspection of the Ct values and amplification curves and genotyping with PCR revealed the correct genotype as heterozygous for factor V Leiden and GPRO mutation. The GeneXpert HemosIL Factor II and Factor V assay is an automated, fast genotyping assay requiring almost no sample manipulation, advantageous characteristics if compared with other PCR-based methods. However, an inattentive use of it can generate incorrect diagnosis. A careful handling of the sample, in particular correct dilution of frozen/thawed samples before analysis, and the inspection of the amplification curves and Ct values are required to avoid artifacts. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Epidermal growth factor receptor mutation in adenocarcinoma lung in a North Indian population: Prevalence and relation with different clinical variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasana, Basharat Ahmad; Dar, Waseem Raja; Aziz, Sheikh Aijaz; Lone, Abdul Rashid; Sofi, Najeeb Ullah; Dar, Imtiyaz Ahmad; Latief, Muzamil; Arshad, Faheem; Hussain, Moomin; Hussain, Mir

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Lung cancer is one of the most common causes of cancer deaths worldwide. Adenocarcinoma is taking over squamous cell lung cancer as the predominant histological subtype. Several cytotoxic drugs are available for the treatment of lung cancer, but side effects limit their use. Recently, targeted therapies for cancers have come into clinical practice. Aims and Objectives: To determine the prevalence of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation in adenocarcinoma lung in a North Indian population and its relation with different clinical variables. Materials and Methods: A total of 57 patients who met inclusion criteria were recruited into the study. Relevant history, clinical examination and investigations were done. EGFR mutation was done in all patients. Results: A total of twenty patients tested positive for EGFR mutation. EGFR was more frequently detected in female patients (53.8%), while as only 19.4% of the male patients expressed EGFR mutation, which was statistically very significant (P = 0.007). EGFR mutation was more frequently detected in nonsmokers (52%) as compared to smokers (21.9%) which also was statistically significant (P value of 0.018). EGFR mutation was more common in Stage III and IV adenocarcinomas (48%) as compared to Stage I and II (21.4%) which was statistically significant (P value 0.034). Conclusion: EGFR mutation should be routinely done in all patients of adenocarcinoma lung particularly non-smoker females with Stage III and IV disease. PMID:27688613

  3. Is the NBN gene mutation I171V a potential risk factor for malignant solid tumors in children?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Jerzy; Mosor, Maria; Nowicka, Karina; Rembowska, Jolanta; Januszkiewicz, Danuta

    2011-08-01

    NBN gene is considered as one of the low-to-moderate cancer susceptibility gene. At least 4 germline NBN mutations have been found in several malignancies in adults. In our studies, we observed the high incidence of germline mutation I171V of NBN gene in breast, colorectal, larynx cancer, and in multiple primary tumors. In this study, we would like to answer the question whether I171V germline mutation of NBN gene may constitute risk factor for solid tumors in children. The frequency of this mutation has been analyzed in patients with neuroblastoma (n=66), Wilms tumor (n=54), medulloblastoma (n=57), and rhabdomyosarcoma (n=82) hospitalized in Pediatric Oncology, Hematology and Bone Marrow Transplantation Department in the years between 1987 and 2010. About 2947 anonymous blood samples collected on Guthrie cards drawn from the newborn screening program of the Wielkopolska region have been used as controls. All the patients and controls came from the same geographical region. I171V mutation of the NBN gene has been observed in 5 controls. Among children with solid tumors only in 1 child with medulloblastoma I171V variant has been found. In conclusion, I171V germline mutation in contrary to adults cannot be considered as a risk factor for children malignancies. However, owing to low number of patients with solid tumors the possibility of a Type II error may exist.

  4. Assembly of transcription factor IIB at a promoter in vivo requires contact with RNA polymerase II

    OpenAIRE

    Elsby, Laura M.; O'Donnell, Amanda J M; Green, Laura M.; Sharrocks, Andrew D.; Roberts, Stefan G. E.

    2006-01-01

    The general transcription factor TFIIB has a central role in the assembly of the preinitiation complex at the promoter, providing a platform for the entry of RNA polymerase II/TFIIF. We used an RNA interference (RNAi)-based system in which TFIIB expression is ablated in vivo and replaced with a TFIIB derivative that contains a silent mutation and is refractory to the RNAi. Using this approach, we found that transcriptionally defective TFIIB amino-terminal mutants showed distinct effects on th...

  5. The risk of mortality and the factor V Leiden mutation in a population-based cohort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijmans, B.T.; Westendorp, R.G.J.; Knook, D.L.; Kluft, C.; Slagboom, P.E.

    1998-01-01

    The factor V Leiden mutation (conferring resistance to activated protein C) has been implicated in the risk of arterial thrombosis and is a well-established risk factor for venous thrombosis especially in the elderly. We studied whether the disease association of the factor V mutation is reflected

  6. Antithrombin Cambridge II(A384S) mutation frequency and antithrombin activity levels in 120 of deep venous thrombosis and 150 of cerebral infarction patients in a single center in Southern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guang-sen; Tang, Yang-ming; Tang, Mei-qing; Qing, Zi-Ju; Shu, Chang; Tang, Xiang-qi; Deng, Ming-yang; Tan, Li-ming

    2010-09-01

    Antithrombin Cambridge II(A384S) mutation shows a relatively high frequency in western population. Some studies suggest that the mutation is an independent genetic risk factor both for deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and for arterial thrombosis, but whether the mutation has racial difference or has a general significance for thrombophilia remains unclear. In this study we performed an analysis of the prevalence of the mutation in Chinese southern population; Also, the antithrombin activity levels were evaluated in each investigated individual. The studies included 120 patients with DVT, 150 patients with cerebral infarction, and 110 controls. The mutation was detected using polymerase chain reaction/PvuII restrictive fragment length polymorphism procedures. Antithrombin activity assay was done using chromogenic substrate method. The results showed that no antithrombin Cambridge II mutation was detected in all three groups (DVT, cerebral infarction and controls), the incidence was 0/380. Plasma antithrombin activity was 91.37% +/- 16.15% in the DVT patients and 102.68% +/- 13.10% in the controls; the antithrombin activity was significantly reduced in the DVT group (P Cambridge II mutation has a racial difference, and may not be a valuable risk factor of thrombophilia in Asian population, and antithrombin deficiency remains a major genetic risk factor for DVT patients in China.

  7. Point mutations in the tyrosine aminotransferase gene in tyrosinemia type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natt, E; Kida, K; Odievre, M; Di Rocco, M; Scherer, G

    1992-10-01

    Tyrosinemia type II (Richner-Hanhart syndrome, RHS) is a disease of autosomal recessive inheritance characterized by keratitis, palmoplantar hyperkeratosis, mental retardation, and elevated blood tyrosine levels. The disease results from deficiency in hepatic tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT; L-tyrosine:2-oxoglutarate aminotransferase, EC 2.6.1.5), a 454-amino acid protein encoded by a gene with 12 exons. To identify the causative mutations in five TAT alleles cloned from three RHS patients, chimeric genes constructed from normal and mutant TAT alleles were tested in directing TAT activity in a transient expression assay. DNA sequence analysis of the regions identified as nonfunctional revealed six different point mutations. Three RHS alleles have nonsense mutations at codons 57, 223, and 417, respectively. One "complex" RHS allele carries a GT----GG splice donor mutation in intron 8 together with a Gly----Val substitution at amino acid 362. A new splice acceptor site in intron 2 of the fifth RHS allele leads to a shift in reading frame.

  8. Growth in individuals with Majewski osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II caused by pericentrin mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bober, Michael B; Niiler, Tim; Duker, Angela L; Murray, Jennie E; Ketterer, Tara; Harley, Margaret E; Alvi, Sabah; Flora, Christina; Rustad, Cecilie; Bongers, Ernie M H F; Bicknell, Louise S; Wise, Carol; Jackson, Andrew P

    2012-11-01

    Microcephalic primordial dwarfism (MPD) is a class of disorders characterized by intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), impaired postnatal growth and microcephaly. Majewski osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II (MOPD II) is one of the more common conditions within this group. MOPD II is caused by truncating mutations in pericentrin (PCNT) and is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner. Detailed growth curves for length, weight, and OFC are presented here and derived from retrospective data from 26 individuals with MOPD II confirmed by molecular or functional studies. Severe pre- and postnatal growth failure is evident in MOPD II patients. The length, weight, and OFC at term (when corrected for gestational age) were -7.0, -3.9, and -4.6 standard deviation (SD) below the population mean and equivalent to the 50th centile of a 28-29-, 31-32-, and 30-31-week neonate, respectively. While at skeletal maturity, the height, weight, and OFC were -10.3, -14.3, and -8.5 SD below the population mean and equivalent to the size of 3-year 10- to 11-month-old, a 5-year 2- to 3-month-old, and 5- to 6-month-old, respectively. During childhood, MOPD II patients grow with slowed, but fairly constant growth velocities and show no evidence of any pubertal growth spurt. Treatment with human growth hormone (n = 11) did not lead to any significant improvement in final stature. The growth charts presented here will be of assistance with diagnosis and management of MOPD II, and should have particular utility in nutritional management of MOPD II during infancy. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. The immune function of MHC class II molecules mutated in the putative superdimer interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayball, John D; Lake, Richard A

    2005-05-01

    Analysis of the crystal structure of human class II (HLA-DR1) molecules suggests that the alphabeta heterodimer may be further ordered as a dimer of heterodimers (superdimer), leading to the hypothesis that T cell receptor dimerisation is a mechanism for initiating signaling events preceding T cell activation. The interface between pairs of molecules is stabilised by both salt bridges, polar and hydrophobic interactions. The residues that form the superdimer interface occur in three areas distinct from the antigen-binding groove. They can be defined as follows: region 1, beta-beta contacts in the helix of the beta1 domain; region 2, alpha-alpha contacts near the alpha 1/alpha2 domain junction and region 3; alpha-beta contacts in the alpha2/beta2 domains adjacent to the plasma membrane. To determine whether salt bridges and polar interactions formed within these regions are involved in the immune function of the murine MHC class II molecule, I-A(b), appropriate residues in both the alpha and beta chain were identified and mutated to uncharged alanine. Cell lines transfected with different combinations of mutated alpha and beta chains were generated and tested for MHC class II expression, peptide binding capabilities, and ability to present antigenic peptide to an OVA-specific T cell hybridoma. With the exception of two residues in region 2, the substitutions tested did not modulate MHC class II expression, or peptide binding function. When tested for ability to present peptide to an antigen-specific T cell hybridoma, with the exception of mutations in region 2, the substitutions did not appear to abrogate the ability of I-A(b) to stimulate the T cells. These results suggest that mutation of residues in region 2 of the putative superdimer interface have a gross effect on the ability of I-A(b) to be expressed on the cell surface. However, abrogation of salt bridges in region 1 and 3 do not influence I-A(b) cell surface expression, peptide binding or ability to

  10. Mutations within enhancer II and BCP regions of hepatitis B virus in relation to advanced liver diseases in patients infected with subgenotype B3 in Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heriyanto, Didik Setyo; Yano, Yoshihiko; Utsumi, Takako; Anggorowati, Nungki; Rinonce, Hanggoro Tri; Lusida, Maria Inge; Soetjipto; Triwikatmani, Catharina; Ratnasari, Neneng; Maduseno, Sutanto; Purnama, Putut Bayu; Nurdjanah, Siti; Hayashi, Yoshitake

    2012-01-01

    Studies on the characteristics of mutations within the hepatitis B virus (HBV) genome, their roles in the pathogenesis of advanced liver diseases, and the involvement of host properties of HBV-infected individuals have not been conducted in subgenotype B3-infected populations. For addressing this issue, 40 cases with HBV surface antigen (HBsAg)-positive advanced liver diseases, including advanced liver cancer and cirrhosis (male 31, female 9, age 54.4 ± 11.6-year-old), were collected and compared with 109 cases with chronic hepatitis B (male 71, female 38, age 38.0 ± 13.4-year-old). Mutations in enhancer II (Enh II) and basal core promoter (BCP)/precore regions were analyzed by PCR-direct sequencing method. HBV viral load was examined by real-time PCR. For all examined regions, the prevalence of mutation was significantly higher in cases with advanced liver diseases. Multivariate analysis showed that, in patients older than 45 years, C1638T and T1753V mutations constituted independent risk factors for the advancement of liver diseases. The presence of C1638T and T1753V mutations may serve as predictive markers for the progression of liver diseases in Indonesia and other countries, where subgenotype B3 infection is prevalent.

  11. Mutations in the basic domain and the loop-helix II junction of TWIST abolish DNA binding in Saethre-Chotzen syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Ghouzzi, V; Legeai-Mallet, L; Benoist-Lasselin, C; Lajeunie, E; Renier, D; Munnich, A; Bonaventure, J

    2001-03-09

    Saethre-Chotzen syndrome is an autosomal dominant skull disorder resulting from premature fusion of coronal sutures (craniosynostosis). It is caused by mutations in the TWIST gene encoding a basic Helix-Loop-Helix transcription factor. Here we report on the identification of a novel mutation affecting a highly conserved residue of the basic domain. Unlike nonsense and missense mutations lying within helices, this mutation does not affect protein stability or heterodimerisation of TWIST with its partner E12. However, it does abolish TWIST binding capacity to a target E-box as efficiently as two missense mutations in the loop-helix II junction. By contrast, elongation of the loop through a 7 amino acid insertion appears not to hamper binding to the DNA target. We conclude that loss of TWIST protein function in Saethre-Chotzen patients can occur at three different levels, namely protein stability, dimerisation, and DNA binding and that the loop-helix II junction is essential for effective protein-DNA interaction.

  12. Molecular Analysis of Factor VIII and Factor IX Genes in Hemophilia Patients: Identification of Novel Mutations and Molecular Dynamics Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Allaf, Faisal A.; Taher, Mohiuddin M.; Abduljaleel, Zainularifeen; Bouazzaoui, Abdellatif; Athar, Mohammed; Bogari, Neda M.; Abalkhail, Halah A.; Owaidah, Tarek MA.

    2017-01-01

    Background Hemophilias A and B are X-linked bleeding disorders caused by mutations in the factor VIII and factor IX genes, respectively. Our objective was to identify the spectrum of mutations of the factor VIII and factor IX genes in Saudi Arabian population and determine the genotype and phenotype correlations by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. Methods For genotyping, blood samples from Saudi Arabian patients were collected, and the genomic DNA was amplified, and then sequenced by Sanger method. For molecular simulations, we have used softwares such as CHARMM (Chemistry at Harvard Macromolecular Mechanics; http://www.charmm-gui.org) and GROMACS. In addition, the secondary structure was determined based on the solvent accessibility for the confirmation of the protein stability at the site of mutation. Results Six mutations (three novel and three known) were identified in factor VIII gene, and six mutations (one novel and five known) were identified in factor IX gene. The factor VIII novel mutations identified were c.99G>T, p. (W33C) in exon 1, c.2138 DelA, p. (N713Tfs*9) in eon14, also a novel mutation at splicing acceptor site of exon 23 c.6430 - 1G>A. In factor IX, we found a novel mutation c.855G>C, p. (E285D) in exon 8. These novel mutations were not reported in any factor VIII or factor IX databases previously. The deleterious effects of these novel mutations were confirmed by PolyPhen2 and SIFT programs. Conclusion The protein functional and structural studies and the models built in this work would be appropriate for predicting the effects of deleterious amino acid substitutions causing these genetic disorders. These findings are useful for genetic counseling in the case of consanguineous marriages which is more common in the Saudi Arabia. PMID:28270892

  13. Factor V Leiden mutation: An added risk in single ventricle palliation

    OpenAIRE

    R Saileela; C Shanthi; Ravi Agarwal; Raghavan Subramanyan; K M Cherian

    2012-01-01

    We present the case report of a child with Factor V Leiden mutation who underwent Fontan procedure. Thromboembolism is a widely recognized complication of the Fontan procedure and its modifications. Factor V Leiden mutation, being a hypercoagulable state, posed a higher risk for thromboembolism in this child. Appropriate measures taken before and after surgery prevented postoperative coagulopathy.

  14. Epidermal growth factor receptor mutation enhances expression of vascular endothelial growth factor in lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Ming-Szu; Chen, I-Chuan; Lin, Paul-Yann; Lung, Jr-Hau; Li, Ya-Chin; Lin, Yu-Ching; Yang, Cheng-Ta; Tsai, Ying-Huang

    2016-12-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activation has been demonstrated to have a critical role in tumor angiogenesis. In the present study, the correlation between EGFR mutations and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was investigated in lung cancer cell lines and non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) tumor tissues. VEGF levels were significantly increased in culture medium of lung cancer cells and NSCLC tissues with EGFR mutations (H1650 vs. A549, P=0.0399; H1975 vs. A549, Plung cancer cell lines expressing mutant (exon 19 deletion, E746-A750; exon 21 missense mutation, L858R) and wild-type EGFR genes were established. Significantly increased expression of VEGF and stronger inhibitory effects of gefitinib to VEGF expression were observed in exon 19 deletion stable lung cancer cells (exon 19 deletion vs. wild-type EGFR, P=0.0005). The results of the present study may provide an insight into the association of mutant EGFR and VEGF expression in lung cancer, and may assist with further development of targeted therapy for NSCLC in the future.

  15. CS-27IDH1/2 MUTATIONS INFLUENCE ZEB1 EXPRESSION IN GRADES II AND III GLIOMAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesvick, Cody; Zhang, Chao; Montgomery, Blake; Lee, Michaela; Yang, Chunzhang; Wang, Herui; Merrill, Marsha; Heiss, John; Ray-Chaudhury, Abhik; Zhuang, Zhengping

    2014-01-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a cell program that crucially regulates polarity and enhances invasion in normal epithelia and carcinomas. It has been recently demonstrated that EMT-promoting transcription factors (EMT-TFs) also govern cell invasion in glioblastoma, but the role of these proteins in lower-grade gliomas has not yet been investigated. We investigated the impact of EMT-TF expression on overall survival in World Health Organization (WHO) grades II and III gliomas using the National Cancer Institute Repository for Molecular Brain Neoplasis Data (REMBRANDT) and Cancer Genome Atlas Network Lower-Grade Glioma (CGAN LGG) datasets. Surprisingly, while expression of EMT-promoting transcription factors were generally associated with a decrease in overall survival, high ZEB1 expression was associated with an increase in overall survival in both datasets (log-rank test on all grade II and III gliomas: for REMBRANDT, median overall survival (OS) 54.2 months ZEB1-high vs. 19.6 months ZEB1-low, p = 0.0016; for CGAN, median OS 134.3 months ZEB1-high vs. 63.6 months ZEB1-low, p = 0.0038). Mutations in the genes coding for Isocitrate Dehydrogenases 1 and 2 (IDH1/2) are found in 85-90% of grades II and III gliomas and confer a favorable prognosis in these tumors. Using the CGAN LGG dataset, we found that ZEB1 is upregulated in IDH1/2-mutant versus IDH1/2-wild type tumors (unpaired t-test on all grade II and III gliomas: t = 10.292, p < 0.0001). Moreover, IDH1/2-mutant gliomas express lower levels of genes that are suppressed by ZEB1 including MIR200B and MIR200C (unpaired t-test on all grade II and III gliomas: p < 0.0001 for both targets). We further validated these findings in an independent set of 37 grade II and III gliomas using quantitative real-time PCR, Western blot and immunohistochemistry. These findings reveal that ZEB1 not only has an unexpected prognostic significance in grades II and III gliomas but also may play an important role in IDH1

  16. Factors influencing electric utility expansion. Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masud, E. [ed.

    1977-01-01

    This report, Vol. 2, submitted by the General Electric Co., identifies factors that should be considered in planning interconnected systems and discusses how these factors relate to one another. The objective is to identify all the factors and classify them by their use and importance in arriving at a decision. Chapter 2 discusses the utility system and its system behavior characteristics, emphasizing behavior that affects the planning of the bulk-power generation and transmission system. Chapter 3 introduces interconnection planning by discussing the new system characteristics brought to operation and planning. Forty-two factors associated with cost, reliability, constraints, and coordination are related to each other by factor trees. Factor trees display the relationship of one factor such as reliability to more-detailed factors which in turn are further related to individual characteristics of facilities. These factor trees provide a structure to the presentation. A questionnaire including the 42 factors was completed by 52 system planners from utility companies and government authorities. The results of these questionnaires are tabulated and presented with pertinent discussion of each factor. Chapter 4 deals with generation planning, recognizing the existence of interconnections. Chapter 5 addresses transmission planning, questions related to reliability and cost measures and constraints, and factors related to both analytical techniques and planning procedures. The chapter ends with a discussion of combined generation-transmission planning. (MCW)

  17. Mutations in LCA5 are an uncommon cause of Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, Sylvie; Hanein, Sylvain; Perrault, Isabelle; Delphin, Nathalie; Aboussair, Nisrine; Leowski, Corinne; Dufier, Jean-Louis; Roche, Olivier; Munnich, Arnold; Kaplan, Josseline; Rozet, Jean-Michel

    2007-12-01

    Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) is the earliest and most severe form of inherited retinal dystrophy responsible for blindness or severe visual impairment at birth or within the first months of life. Up to date, ten LCA genes have been identified. Three of them account for ca. 43% of families and are responsible for a congenital severe stationary cone-rod dystrophy (Type I, 60% of LCA) while the seven remaining genes account for 32% of patients and are responsible for a progressive yet severe rod-cone dystrophy (Type II, 40% of LCA ). Recently, mutations in LCA5, encoding the ciliary protein lebercilin, were reported to be a rare cause of leber congenital amaurosis. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the involvement of this novel gene and to look for genotype-phenotype correlations. Here we report the identification of three novel LCA5 mutations (3/3 homozygous) in three families confirming the modest implication of this gene in our series (3/179; 1.7%). Besides, we suggest that the phenotype of these patients affected with a particularly severe form of LCA type II may represent a continuum with LCA type I.

  18. Combined congenital dysfibrinogenemia and factor VII deficiency from mutations in the FGB and F7 genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Hye In; Park, In-Ae; Lee, Ki-O; Kim, Sun-Hee; Kim, Hee-Jin

    2012-07-01

    Dysfibrinogenemia and factor VII (FVII) deficiency are rare congenital coagulopathies. In this report, the authors describe a man with both defects confirmed by molecular genetic tests. The patient was a 51-year-old man referred for prolonged prothrombin time (PT) that had been accidentally detected on preoperative screening. He had no history of bleeding tendency even on occasions of surgery. Routine coagulation studies revealed prolonged PT (1.53 INR) and thrombin time (42.2 s), and decreased fibrinogen level (57 mg/dl) and FVII activity (44%). Direct sequencing analyses were performed on FGA, FGB, and FGG genes to confirm dysfibrinogenemia and on the F7 gene to confirm FVII deficiency. As a result, the patient was shown to be heterozygous for a point mutation in exon 8 of the FGB gene (c.1475A > G, p.*492Trpext*12; Fibrinogen Magdeburg II) and for a missense mutation in exon 6 of the F7 gene (c.466G  > A, p.Gly156Ser). To our knowledge, this is the first report on a case of combined dysfibrinogenemia and FVII deficiency confirmed by molecular genetic tests.

  19. De novo mutation in the DSPP gene associated with dentinogenesis imperfecta type II in a Japanese family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kida, Miyuki; Tsutsumi, Tomonori; Shindoh, Masanobu; Ikeda, Hisami; Ariga, Tadashi

    2009-12-01

    Dentinogenesis imperfecta (DGI) type II is one of the most common dominantly inherited dentin defects, in which both the primary and permanent teeth are affected. Here, we report a Japanese family with autosomal-dominant DGI type II, including both molecular genetic defects and pathogenesis with histological analysis. Mutation analysis revealed a mutation (c.53T>A, p.V18D, g.1192T>A) involving the second nucleotide of the first codon within exon 3 of the dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) gene. This mutation has previously been reported in a Korean family. Thus far, 24 allelic DSPP mutations have been reported, and this is the seventh mutation involving the DSPP V18 residue. Among those, only one other was shown to be caused by a de novo mutation, and that mutation also affected the V18 amino acid residue. The DSPP V18 residue is highly conserved among other mammalian species. These findings thus suggest that the V18 amino acid might be a sensitive mutational hot spot, playing a critical role in the pathogenesis of DGI.

  20. Loeys-Dietz syndrome type I and type II: clinical findings and novel mutations in two Italian patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calzavara-Pinton Pier

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS is a rare autosomal dominant disorder showing the involvement of cutaneous, cardiovascular, craniofacial, and skeletal systems. In particular, LDS patients show arterial tortuosity with widespread vascular aneurysm and dissection, and have a high risk of aortic dissection or rupture at an early age and at aortic diameters that ordinarily are not predictive of these events. Recently, LDS has been subdivided in LDS type I (LDSI and type II (LDSII on the basis of the presence or the absence of cranio-facial involvement, respectively. Furthermore, LDSII patients display at least two of the major signs of vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. LDS is caused by mutations in the transforming growth factor (TGF beta-receptor I (TGFBR1 and II (TGFBR2 genes. The aim of this study was the clinical and molecular characterization of two LDS patients. Methods The exons and intronic flanking regions of TGFBR1 and TGFBR2 genes were amplified and sequence analysis was performed. Results Patient 1 was a boy showing dysmorphic signs, blue sclerae, high-arched palate, bifid uvula; skeletal system involvement, joint hypermobility, velvety and translucent skin, aortic root dilatation, tortuosity and elongation of the carotid arteries. These signs are consistent with an LDSI phenotype. The sequencing analysis disclosed the novel TGFBR1 p.Asp351Gly de novo mutation falling in the kinase domain of the receptor. Patient 2 was an adult woman showing ascending aorta aneurysm, with vascular complications following surgery intervention. Velvety and translucent skin, venous varicosities and wrist dislocation were present. These signs are consistent with an LDSII phenotype. In this patient and in her daughter, TGFBR2 genotyping disclosed in the kinase domain of the protein the novel p.Ile510Ser missense mutation. Conclusion We report two novel mutations in the TGFBR1 and TGFBR2 genes in two patients affected with LDS and showing marked

  1. Factores de crecimiento II: factores insulinoides de crecimiento Growth factors II: insuline-like growth binging proteins (GFBPs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Guillermo Maldonado E.

    1996-03-01

    Full Text Available Se revisan los Factores Insulinoides de Crecimiento, también denominados ";Factores de Crecimiento Similares a la Insulina";, sobre los cuales se dispone de abundante información. Se sintetizan conocimientos recientes sobre dichos factores con énfasis en los siguientes aspectos: estructura bioquímica, concentraciones y sus cambios en los líquidos biológicos, proteínas fijadoras, receptores, mecanismos de acción y efectos biológicos. This review summarizes recent knowledge concerning Insulin.like growth factors I and II, with emphasis on their biochemical structure, concentrations, binding proteins, receptors, mechanisms of action, biological effects, and alterations of their concentrations in biological fluids.

  2. Insulin-like growth factor-II regulates bone sialoprotein gene transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choe, Jin; Sasaki, Yoko; Zhou, Liming; Takai, Hideki; Nakayama, Yohei; Ogata, Yorimasa

    2016-09-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-I and -II (IGF-I and IGF-II) have been found in bone extracts of several different species, and IGF-II is the most abundant growth factor stored in bone. Bone sialoprotein (BSP) is a noncollagenous extracellular matrix glycoprotein associated with mineralized connective tissues. In this study, we have investigated the regulation of BSP transcription by IGF-II in rat osteoblast-like ROS17/2.8 cells. IGF-II (50 ng/ml) increased BSP mRNA and protein levels after 6-h stimulation, and enhanced luciferase activities of the constructs pLUC3 (-116 to +60), pLUC4 (-425 to +60), pLUC5 (-801 to +60) and pLUC6 (-938 to +60). Effects of IGF-II were inhibited by tyrosine kinase, extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2 and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitors, and abrogated by 2-bp mutations in cAMP response element (CRE), FGF2 response element (FRE) and homeodomain protein-binding site (HOX). The results of gel shift assays showed that nuclear proteins binding to CRE, FRE and HOX sites were increased by IGF-II (50 ng/ml) at 3 and 6 h. CREB1, phospho-CREB1, c-Fos and c-Jun antibodies disrupted the formation of the CRE-protein complexes. Dlx5 and Runx2 antibodies disrupted the FRE- and HOX-protein complex formations. These studies therefore demonstrated that IGF-II increased BSP transcription by targeting CRE, FRE and HOX elements in the proximal promoter of the rat BSP gene. Moreover, phospho-CREB1, c-Fos, c-Jun, Dlx5 and Runx2 transcription factors appear to be key regulators of IGF-II effects on BSP transcription.

  3. A novel splice acceptor mutation in the DSPP gene causing dentinogenesis imperfecta type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J W; Nam, S H; Jang, K T; Lee, S H; Kim, C C; Hahn, S H; Hu, J C C; Simmer, J P

    2004-08-01

    The dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) gene (4q21.3) encodes two major noncollagenous dentin matrix proteins: dentin sialoprotein (DSP) and dentin phosphoprotein (DPP). Defects in the human gene encoding DSPP cause inherited dentin defects, and these defects can be associated with bilateral progressive high-frequency sensorineural hearing loss. Clinically, five different patterns of inherited dentin defects are distinguished and are classified as dentinogenesis imperfecta (DGI) types I, II, and III, and dentin dysplasia types I and II. The genetic basis for this clinical heterogeneity is unknown. Among the 11 members recruited from the studied kindred, five were affected with autosomal dominant DGI type II. The mutation (g.1188C-->G, IVS2-3C-->G) lay in the third from the last nucleotide of intron 2 and changed its sequence from CAG to GAG. The mutation was correlated with the affection status and was absent in 104 unaffected individuals (208 alleles) with the same ethnic and geological background. The proband was in the primary dentition stage and presented with multiple pulp exposures. The occlusal surface of his dental enamel was generally abraded, and the dentin was heavily worn and uniformly shaded brown. The dental pulp chambers appeared originally to be within normal limits without any sign of obliteration, but over time (by age 4), the pulp chambers became partially or completely obliterated. The oldest affected member (age 59) showed mild hearing loss at high-frequency (8 kHz). Permanent dentition was severely affected in the adults, who had advanced dental attrition, premature loss of teeth, and extensive dental reconstruction.

  4. MTHFR homozygous mutation and additional risk factors for cerebral infarction in a large Italian family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Balzo, Francesca; Spalice, Alberto; Perla, Massimo; Properzi, Enrico; Iannetti, Paola

    2009-01-01

    Several cases with cerebral infarctions associated with the C677T mutation in the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene (MTHFR) have been reported. Given the large number of asymptomatic individuals with the MTHFR mutation, additional risk factors for cerebral infarction should be considered. This study describes a large family with the MTHFR mutation and a combination of heterozygous factor V Leiden mutations and different additional exogenous and endogenous thrombogenic risk factors. Psychomotor retardation and a left fronto-insular infarct associated with the MTHFR mutation together with diminished factor VII and low level of protein C was documented in the first patient. In the second patient, generalized epilepsy and a malacic area in the right nucleus lenticularis was associated with the MTHFR mutation and a low level of protein C. In the third patient, right hemiparesis and a left fronto-temporal porencephalic cyst were documented, together with the MTHFR mutation and hyperhomocysteinemia. An extensive search of additional circumstantial and genetic thrombogenic risk factors should be useful for prophylaxis and prognosis of infants with cerebral infarctions associated with the MTHFR mutation and of their related family members.

  5. TET2 gene mutation is unfavorable prognostic factor in cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia patients with NPM1+ and FLT3-ITD - mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Xiaopeng; Xu, Yang; Yin, Jia; Tian, Hong; Chen, Suning; Wu, Depei; Sun, Aining

    2014-07-01

    Cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia (cn-AML) is a group of heterogeneous diseases. Gene mutations are increasingly used to assess the prognosis of cn-AML patients and guide risk-adapted treatment. In the present study, we analyzed the molecular genetics characteristics of 373 adult cn-AML patients and explored the relationship between TET2 gene mutations or different genetic mutation patterns and prognosis. We found that 16.1 % of patients had TET2 mutations, 31.6 % had FLT3 internal tandem duplications (ITDs), 6.2 % had FLT3 tyrosine kinase domain mutations, 2.4 % had c-KIT mutations, 37.8 % had NPM1 mutations, 11.3 % had WT1 mutations, 5.9 % had RUNX1 mutations, 11.5 % had ASXL1 mutations, 3.8 % had MLL-PTDs, 7.8 % had IDH1 mutations, 7.8 % had NRAS mutations, 12.3 % had IDH2 mutations, 1.6 % had EZH2 mutations, and 14.7 % had DNMT3A mutations, while none had CBL mutations. Gene mutations were detected in 76.94 % (287/373) of all patients. In the NPM1m(+) patients, those with TET2 mutations were associated with a shorter median overall survival (OS) as compared to TET2 wild-type (wt) patients (9.9 vs. 27.0 months, respectively; P = 0.023); Interestingly, the TET2 mutation was identified as an unfavorable prognostic factor and was closely associated with a shorter median OS as compared to TET2-wt (9.5 vs. 32.2 months, respectively; P = 0.013) in the NPM1m(+)/FLT3-ITDm(-) patient group. Thus, identification of TET2 combined with classic NPM1 and FLT3-ITD mutations allowed us to stratify cn-AML into distinct subtypes.

  6. Hypoxia-Inducible FactorMutation-Related Paragangliomas Classify as Discrete Pseudohypoxic Subcluster

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.M.J. Fliedner (Stephanie); U. Shankavaram (Uma); Marzouca, G. (Geena); Elkahloun, A. (Abdel); Jochmanova, I. (Ivana); Daerr, R. (Roland); Linehan, W.M. (W. Marston); H.J. Timmers (Henri); A.S. Tischler (Arthur); K. Papaspyrou (Konstantinos); Brieger, J. (Jürgen); R.R. de Krijger (Ronald); Breza, J. (Jan); Eisenhofer, G. (Graeme); Zhuang, Z. (Zhengping); Lehnert, H. (Hendrik); K. Pacak (Karel)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractRecently, activating mutations of the hypoxia-inducible factor 2α gene (HIF2A/EPAS1) have been recognized to predispose to multiple paragangliomas (PGLs) and duodenal somatostatinomas associated with polycythemia, and ocular abnormalities. Previously, mutations in the SDHA/B/C/D, SDHAF2,

  7. Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 2alpha Mutation-Related Paragangliomas Classify as Discrete Pseudohypoxic Subcluster

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fliedner, S.M.; Shankavaram, U.; Marzouca, G.; Elkahloun, A.; Jochmanova, I.; Daerr, R.; Linehan, W.M.; Timmers, H.J.; Tischler, A.S.; Papaspyrou, K.; Brieger, J.; Krijger, R. de; Breza, J.; Eisenhofer, G.; Zhuang, Z.; Lehnert, H.; Pacak, K.

    2016-01-01

    Recently, activating mutations of the hypoxia-inducible factor 2alpha gene (HIF2A/EPAS1) have been recognized to predispose to multiple paragangliomas (PGLs) and duodenal somatostatinomas associated with polycythemia, and ocular abnormalities. Previously, mutations in the SDHA/B/C/D, SDHAF2, VHL,

  8. [Clinical features and acid alpha-glucosidase gene mutation in 7 Chinese patients with glycogen storage disease type II].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qi; Zhao, Juan; Wang, Zhao-xia; Zhang, Wei; Yuan, Yun

    2013-07-02

    To explore the clinical features and acid alpha-glucosidase (GAA) gene mutations of Chinese patients with glycogen storage disease typeII(GSDII). Seven patients with GSDII were diagnosed by muscle pathology examination at Department of Neurology, Peking University First Hospital from 2003 to 2011. One patient with infant-onset presented development retardation, generalized muscle weakness, dyspnea, cardiomegaly and hepatomegaly. Six cases were of late-onset ranging from 1 to 29 years. Their main clinical features included progressive muscle weakness. Two patients developed respiratory insufficiency. Increased serum creatine kinase was detected in all of them. Electromyography studies showed myopathic (n = 5) and neuropathic (n = 1) changes. Muscle biopsies showed basophilic vacuoles in muscle fibers containing a large amounts of glycogen on electron microscopy. GAA gene mutation was detected by direct sequencing of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) product. Novel mutations were screened in 100 normal controls. GAA gene mutations were found in all of them, including 10 point mutations and 1 frameshift deletion. Six mutations (p. P361L, p. P266S, p.R437C, p.R600C, p.W746S and p.W746*) have been reported before. And five novel mutations (p.R168Q, p.R168P, p.E521V, p.R594H and c.827_845del) were found in this study. None of these novel mutations were found in 100 normal controls except for p.R168Q mutation in two normal controls. p. P361L and p.W746* were detected in two unrelated GSDII patients while other mutations were carried by only one patient. In our study, we found several novel GAA mutations in Chinese patients with GSDII. No hot spot mutation of GAA gene existed in our patient group. However, p. P266S, p. P361L and p.R437C might be associated with late-onset GSDII.

  9. In silico calculated affinity of FVIII-derived peptides for HLA class II alleles predicts inhibitor development in haemophilia A patients with missense mutations in the F8 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pashov, A D; Calvez, T; Gilardin, L; Maillère, B; Repessé, Y; Oldenburg, J; Pavlova, A; Kaveri, S V; Lacroix-Desmazes, S

    2014-03-01

    Forty per cent of haemophilia A (HA) patients have missense mutations in the F8 gene. Yet, all patients with identical mutations are not at the same risk of developing factor VIII (FVIII) inhibitors. In severe HA patients, human leucocyte antigen (HLA) haplotype was identified as a risk factor for onset of FVIII inhibitors. We hypothesized that missense mutations in endogenous FVIII alter the affinity of the mutated peptides for HLA class II, thus skewing FVIII-specific T-cell tolerance and increasing the risk that the corresponding wild-type FVIII-derived peptides induce an anti-FVIII immune response during replacement therapy. Here, we investigated whether affinity for HLA class II of wild-type FVIII-derived peptides that correspond to missense mutations described in the Haemophilia A Mutation, Structure, Test and Resource database is associated with inhibitor development. We predicted the mean affinity for 10 major HLA class II alleles of wild-type FVIII-derived peptides that corresponded to 1456 reported cases of missense mutations. Linear regression analysis confirmed a significant association between the predicted mean peptide affinity and the mutation inhibitory status (P = 0.006). Significance was lost after adjustment on mutation position on FVIII domains. Although analysis of the A1-A2-A3-C1 domains yielded a positive correlation between predicted HLA-binding affinity and inhibitory status (OR = 0.29 [95% CI: 0.14-0.60] for the high affinity tertile, P = 0.002), the C2 domain-restricted analysis indicated an inverse correlation (OR = 3.56 [1.10-11.52], P = 0.03). Our data validate the importance of the affinity of FVIII peptides for HLA alleles to the immunogenicity of therapeutic FVIII in patients with missense mutations. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Tyrosinemia type II (Richner-Hanhart syndrome): a new mutation in the TAT gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culic, Vida; Betz, Regina C; Refke, Melanie; Fumic, Ksenija; Pavelic, Jasminka

    2011-01-01

    In the present study we report the clinical features and the molecular genetic investigation of the tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT) gene in a young girl from Croatia with Richner-Hanhart syndrome, mainly suffering from photophobia, hyperkeratosis of the palmes and soles and slight neurological abnormalities. Sequencing analysis of the TAT gene revealed a novel homozygous missense mutation c.1250G>A (p.R417Q) in exon 12, and herewith confirmed the clinical diagnosis. Showing the first symptoms in babyhood, at the age of 8 years it was for the first time clinically diagnosed that the patient suffers from tyrosinemia type II and a therapy with tyrosine and phenylalanine reduced diet has been started successfully. All symptoms disappeared within 2-4 weeks. Since that time, we have been following the girl until today for more than ten years. She is in a good condition, and attends the normal high school program.

  11. TERT promoter mutation status as an independent prognostic factor in cutaneous melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griewank, Klaus G; Murali, Rajmohan; Puig-Butille, Joan Anton; Schilling, Bastian; Livingstone, Elisabeth; Potrony, Miriam; Carrera, Cristina; Schimming, Tobias; Möller, Inga; Schwamborn, Marion; Sucker, Antje; Hillen, Uwe; Badenas, Celia; Malvehy, Josep; Zimmer, Lisa; Scherag, André; Puig, Susana; Schadendorf, Dirk

    2014-09-01

    Recently, TERT promoter mutations were identified at high frequencies in cutaneous melanoma tumor samples and cell lines. The mutations were found to have a UV-signature and to lead to increased TERT gene expression. We analyzed a large cohort of melanoma patients for the presence and distribution of TERT promoter mutations and their association with clinico-pathological characteristics. 410 melanoma tumor samples were analyzed by Sanger sequencing for the presence of TERT promoter mutations. An analysis of associations between mutation status and various clinical and pathologic variables was performed. TERT promoter mutations were identified in 154 (43%) of 362 successfully sequenced melanomas. Mutation frequencies varied between melanoma subtype, being most frequent in melanomas arising in nonacral skin (48%) and melanomas with occult primary (50%), and less frequent in mucosal (23%), and acral (19%) melanomas. Mutations carried a UV signature (C>T or CC>TT). The presence of TERT promoter mutations was associated with factors such as BRAF or NRAS mutation (P promoter mutation was independently associated with poorer overall survival in patients with nonacral cutaneous melanomas (median survival 80 months vs 291 months for wild-type; hazard ratio corrected for other covariates 2.47; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.29 to 4.74; P = .006). UV-induced TERT promoter mutations are one of the most frequent genetic alterations in melanoma, with frequencies varying depending on melanoma subtype. In nonacral cutaneous melanomas, presence of TERT promoter mutations is independently associated with poor prognosis. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Identification of High-Impact cis-Regulatory Mutations Using Transcription Factor Specific Random Forest Models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitry Svetlichnyy

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Cancer genomes contain vast amounts of somatic mutations, many of which are passenger mutations not involved in oncogenesis. Whereas driver mutations in protein-coding genes can be distinguished from passenger mutations based on their recurrence, non-coding mutations are usually not recurrent at the same position. Therefore, it is still unclear how to identify cis-regulatory driver mutations, particularly when chromatin data from the same patient is not available, thus relying only on sequence and expression information. Here we use machine-learning methods to predict functional regulatory regions using sequence information alone, and compare the predicted activity of the mutated region with the reference sequence. This way we define the Predicted Regulatory Impact of a Mutation in an Enhancer (PRIME. We find that the recently identified driver mutation in the TAL1 enhancer has a high PRIME score, representing a "gain-of-target" for MYB, whereas the highly recurrent TERT promoter mutation has a surprisingly low PRIME score. We trained Random Forest models for 45 cancer-related transcription factors, and used these to score variations in the HeLa genome and somatic mutations across more than five hundred cancer genomes. Each model predicts only a small fraction of non-coding mutations with a potential impact on the function of the encompassing regulatory region. Nevertheless, as these few candidate driver mutations are often linked to gains in chromatin activity and gene expression, they may contribute to the oncogenic program by altering the expression levels of specific oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes.

  13. Dynamic tracing for epidermal growth factor receptor mutations in urinary circulating DNA in gastric cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xiu-Qin; Xue, Wen-Hua; Zhao, Song-Feng; Zhang, Xiao-Jian; Sun, Wukong

    2017-02-01

    The mutations of epidermal growth factor receptor are detected in gastric cancer, indicating its suitability as a target for receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors, as well as a marker for clinical outcome of chemotherapeutic treatments. However, extraction of quality tumor tissue for molecular processes remains challenging. Here, we aimed to examine the clinical relevance of urinary cell-free DNA as an alternative tumor material source used specifically for monitoring epidermal growth factor receptor mutations. Therefore, 120 gastric cancer patients with epidermal growth factor receptor mutations and 100 healthy controls were recruited for the study. The gastric patients also received epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor treatment for a serial monitoring study. Paired primary tumor specimens were obtained with blood and urine samples, which were taken at a 1-month interval for a duration of 12 months. We found that urinary cell-free DNA yielded a close agreement of 92% on epidermal growth factor receptor mutation status when compared to primary tissue at baseline, and of 99% epidermal growth factor receptor mutation status when compared to plasma samples at different time points. Thus, our data suggest that urinary cell-free DNA may be a reliable source for screening and monitoring epidermal growth factor receptor mutations in the primary gastric cancer.

  14. Splicing factor gene mutations in the myelodysplastic syndromes: impact on disease phenotype and therapeutic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellagatti, Andrea; Boultwood, Jacqueline

    2017-01-01

    Splicing factor gene mutations are the most frequent mutations found in patients with the myeloid malignancy myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), suggesting that spliceosomal dysfunction plays a major role in disease pathogenesis. The aberrantly spliced target genes and deregulated cellular pathways associated with the commonly mutated splicing factor genes in MDS (SF3B1, SRSF2 and U2AF1) are being identified, illuminating the molecular mechanisms underlying MDS. Emerging data from mouse modeling studies indicate that the presence of splicing factor gene mutations can lead to bone marrow hematopoietic stem/myeloid progenitor cell expansion, impaired hematopoiesis and dysplastic differentiation that are hallmarks of MDS. Importantly, recent evidence suggests that spliceosome inhibitors and splicing modulators may have therapeutic value in the treatment of splicing factor mutant myeloid malignancies.

  15. Factor 8 (F8) gene mutation profile of Turkish hemophilia A patients with inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fidanci, Inanç D; Kavakli, Kaan; Uçar, Canan; Timur, Cetin; Meral, Adalet; Kilinç, Yurdanur; Sayilan, Hülya; Kazanci, Elif; Cağlayan, S Hande

    2008-07-01

    Factor VIII (FVIII) replacement therapy is ineffective in hemophilia A patients who develop alloantibodies (inhibitors) against FVIII. The type of factor 8 (F8) gene mutation, genes in the major histocompatibility complex loci, and also polymorphisms in IL-10 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha are the major predisposing factors for inhibitor formation. The present study was initiated to reveal the F8 gene mutation profile of 30 severely affected high-responder patients with inhibitor levels of more than 5 Bethesda U (BU)/ml and four low-responder patients with inhibitors less than 5 BU/ml. Southern blot and PCR analysis were performed to detect intron 22 and intron 1 inversions, respectively. Point mutations were screened by DNA sequence analysis of all coding regions, intron/exon boundaries, promoter and 3' UTR regions of the F8 gene. The prevalent mutation was the intron 22 inversion among the high-responder patients followed by large deletions, small deletions, and nonsense mutations. Only one missense and one splicing error mutation was seen. Among the low-responder patients, three single nucleotide deletions and one intron 22 inversion were found. All mutation types detected were in agreement with the severe hemophilia A phenotype, most likely leading to a deficiency of and predisposition to the development of alloantibodies against FVIII. It is seen that Turkish hemophilia A patients with major molecular defects have a higher possibility of developing inhibitors.

  16. Glucocerebrosidase gene L444P mutation is a risk factor for Parkinson's disease in Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qi-Ying; Guo, Ji-Feng; Wang, Lei; Yu, Ren-He; Zuo, Xing; Yao, Ling-Yan; Pan, Qian; Xia, Kun; Tang, Bei-Sha

    2010-06-15

    An association between mutations in the glucocerebrosidase (GBA) gene and Parkinson's disease (PD) has been reported in several populations. We searched for four common GBA mutations (L444P, F213I, R353W, and N370S) in 402 Chinese PD patients and 413 age- and sex-matched controls. In the PD cohort, 11 patients were found carrying a heterozygous GBA mutation and all of them had the L444P mutation. Heterozygous GBA mutations were detected none in controls. The GBA gene L444P mutation was detected at a significantly higher frequency among PD patients (11/402 = 2.74%), when compared with the control group (0/413): P = 0.0007. To evaluate the possible role of the GBA gene L444P mutation in PD in Ashkenazi Jewish and non-Jewish populations, we conducted a meta-analysis on the topic. In the Chinese population, the GBA gene L444P mutation was detected at a significantly higher frequency among PD patients, when compared with the control group: Z = 3.83, P = 0.0001, OR = 8.42, confidence interval = 95%, 2.83-25.06. In the non-Jewish populations, the difference was obviously significant: Z = 5.76, P < 0.00001, OR = 8.82, confidence interval = 95%, 4.21-18.48. The results suggest that the GBA gene L444P mutation appears to be a risk factor for PD in Chinese population.

  17. Transcription factor HAND2 mutations in sporadic Chinese patients with congenital heart disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Lei; LI Xiao-feng; SHEN A-dong; WANG Qiang; LIU Cai-xia; GUO Ya-jie; SONG Zhen-jiang; LI Zhong-zhi

    2010-01-01

    Background The basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor HAND2 plays an essential role in cardiac morphogenesis.However, the prevalence of HAND2 mutations in congenial heart disease (CHD) and the correlation between the HAND2 genotype and CHD phenotype have not been studied extensively. Methods We amplified the exons and the flanking intron sequences of the HAND2 gene in 131 patients diagnosed with congenital defects of the right ventricle, outflow tract, aortic artery or cardiac cushion and confirmed the mutations by sequencing.Results Seven mutations including three missense mutations (P11R, S36N and V83L), one isonymous mutation (H14H)and three mutations in untranslated region (241 A>G, 604C>T and 3237T>A) were identified in 12 out of the 131 patients.Both nonisonymous mutations are located in the transcriptional activation domain on the N-terminus. Only one mutation (S36N) was identified in 250 normal healthy controls. The distribution of 3637T>A is the unique one which was differentbetween the 2 groups.Conclusions HAND2 may be a potential candidate gene of stenosis of the right ventricle, outflow tract. Further study of those with a family history of HAND2 mutations will help convincingly relate their genotype to the pathogenesis of CHD.

  18. Radiogenomic correlation in lung adenocarcinoma with epidermal growth factor receptor mutations: Imaging features and histological subtypes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Su Jin [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Hanyang University, Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Tae Jung [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Samsung Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Yo Won [Hanyang University, Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jeong-Soo [Dankook Universicity, Department of Biochemistry, College of Medicine, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Jin-Haeng [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Pathology, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyung Won [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    To correlate imaging features of resected lung adenocarcinoma with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation and the IASLC/ATS/ERS classification histological subtypes. In 250 consecutive patients with resected lung adenocarcinoma, EGFR mutation status was correlated with demographics, imaging features including ground-glass opacity (GGO) proportion and the IASLC/ATS/ERS classification histological subtypes. EGFR mutations were significantly more frequent in women (54.5 % vs. 38.1 %, p = 0.011) and in never-smokers (54.7 % vs. 35.3 %, p = 0.003). GGO proportion was significantly higher in tumours with EGFR mutation than in those without (30.3 ± 33.8 % vs. 19.0 ± 29.3 %, p = 0.005). EGFR mutation was significantly more frequent in tumours with GGO ≥ 50 % and tumours with any GGO (p = 0.026 and 0.008, respectively). Adenocarcinomas with exon 19 or 21 mutation showed significantly higher GGO proportion than that in EGFR wild-type tumours (p = 0.009 and 0.029, respectively). Absence of GGO was an independent predictor of negative EGFR mutation (odds ratio, 1.81; 95 % confidence interval, 1.16-3.04; p = 0.018). GGO proportion in adenocarcinomas with EGFR mutation was significantly higher than that in EGFR wild-type tumours, and the absence of GGO on CT was an independent predictor of negative EGFR mutation. (orig.)

  19. IDENTIFICATION OF NOVEL FIBROBLAST GROWTH FACTOR RECEPTOR 3 GENE MUTATIONS IN ACTINIC CHEILITIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Annie; Dekker, Nusi; Jordan, Richard C.K.

    2009-01-01

    Objective Activating mutations in the fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) gene are responsible for several craniosynostosis and chondrodysplasia syndromes as well as some human cancers including bladder and cervical carcinoma. Despite a high frequency in some benign skin disorders, FGFR3 mutations have not been reported in cutaneous malignancies. Actinic cheilitis (AC) is a sun-induced premalignancy affecting the lower lip that frequently progresses to squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). The objective of this study was to determine if FGFR3 gene mutations are present in AC and SCC of the lip. Study Design DNA was extracted and purified from micro-dissected, formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue sections of 20 cases of AC and SCC arising in AC. Exons 7, 15, and 17 were PCR amplified and direct sequenced. Results Four novel somatic mutations in the FGFR3 gene were identified: exon 7 mutation 742C→T (amino acid change R248C), exon 15 mutations 1850A→G (D617G) and 1888G→A (V630M), and exon 17 mutation 2056G→A (E686K). Grade of dysplasia did not correlate with presence of mutations. Conclusion The frequency of FGFR3 receptor mutations suggests a functional role for the FGFR3 receptor in the development of epithelial disorders and perhaps a change may contribute to the pathogenesis of some AC and SCC. PMID:19327639

  20. Impact of smoking status and pathologic type on epidermal growth factor receptor mutations in lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Yi-sheng; WU Yi-long; YANG Jin-ji; ZHANG Xu-chao; YANG Xue-ning; HUANG Yu-juan; XU Chong-rui; ZHOU Qing; WANG Zhen; SU Jian

    2011-01-01

    Background Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations in lung carcinomas can make the disease more responsive to the treatment with tyrosine kinase inhibitors. We aimed to evaluate the prevalence of EGFR mutations in a large series of lung carcinomas.Methods We examined 1195 consecutive lung cancer patients for EGFR mutations in exons 18, 19, and 21 using direct sequencing of polymerase chain reaction products. A detailed smoking history was obtained. Patients were categorized as never smokers (<100 lifetime cigarettes), former smokers (quit >1 year ago), or current smokers (quit <1 year ago).Results There were EGFR mutations in 9 (4.5%) of 201 squamous carcinomas, in 1 (2%) of 50 large cell carcinomas,and in 1 (2.3%) of 44 small cell carcinomas that were investigated. Three hundred and twenty-seven mutations were found in the series of 858 adenocarcinomas (38.1%). Among 858 lung adenocarcinomas, we detected EGFR mutations in 250 (48.6%) of 514 never smokers, 39 (33.9%) of 115 former smokers, and 38 (16.6%) of 229 current smokers.Significantly fewer EGFR mutations were found in people who smoked for more than 15 pack-years (P=0.0002) or stopped smoking less than 15 years ago (P=0.033) compared with individuals who never smoked.Conclusions Adenocarcinoma is the most frequent EGFR mutation pathologic type in lung cancer. The likelihood of EGFR mutations in exons 18, 19 and 21 decreases as the number of pack-years increases. Mutations were less common in people who smoked for more than 15 pack-years or who stopped smoking cigarettes less than 15 years ago. These data can assist clinicians in assessing the likelihood of exons 18, 19, or 21 EGFR mutations in Chinese patients with lung cancer when mutational analysis is not feasible.

  1. Recurrent venous thromboembolism in a patient with heterozygous factor v leiden mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, C Whitney; Thomason, Angela R; Prince, Valerie

    2014-09-01

    To report a patient case identifying risk for recurrent venous thromboembolism (VTE) associated with heterozygous Factor V Leiden mutation. A 54-year-old Caucasian male was diagnosed with heterozygous Factor V Leiden mutation in 2008 after experiencing a deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and bilateral pulmonary embolism. The patient was treated appropriately and started on anticoagulation therapy with warfarin through an anticoagulation management clinic. After approximately 17 months of warfarin therapy without incident, warfarin was discontinued. Within 2 months after discontinuation of anticoagulation therapy, the patient experienced his second DVT and left pulmonary artery embolus. The risk of recurrent venous thromboembolism (VTE) in patients with heterozygous Factor V Leiden mutation is documented as an approximate 1.4-fold increase compared to patients without thrombophilia. However, the risk increases dramatically when nonreversible (age) or reversible risk factors (obesity, smoking, and long air flights) are present in this population. Based on recent literature, heterozygous Factor V Leiden mutation exponentially increases the risk of recurrent VTE, especially in the presence of other risk factors. Health care providers should complete a comprehensive review of the patients' other risk factors when deciding on duration of anticoagulation therapy for patients with positive heterozygous Factor V Leiden mutation.

  2. A novel splice site mutation in the dentin sialophosphoprotein gene in a Chinese family with dentinogenesis imperfecta type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, HaoYang; Hou, YanNing; Cui, YingXia; Huang, YuFeng; Shi, YiChao; Xia, XinYi; Lu, HongYong; Wang, YunHua; Li, XiaoJun

    2009-03-01

    Twenty-four individuals were investigated that spanned six generations in a Chinese family affected with an apparently autosomal dominant form of dentinogenesis imperfecta type II (DGI-II, OMIM #125490). All affected individuals presented with typical, clinical and radiographic features of DGI-II, but without bilateral progressive high-frequency sensorineural hearing loss. To investigate the mutated molecule, a positional candidate approach was used to determine the mutated gene in this family. Genomic DNA was obtained from 24 affected individuals, 18 unaffected relatives of the family and 50 controls. Haplotype analysis was performed using leukocyte DNA for 6 short tandem repeat (STR) markers present in chromosome 4 (D4S1534, GATA62A11, DSPP, DMP1, SPP1 and D4S1563). In the critical region between D4S1534 and DMP1, the dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) gene (OMIM *125485) was considered as the strongest candidate gene. The first four exons and exon/intron boundaries of the gene were analyzed using DNA from 24 affected individuals and 18 unaffected relatives of the same family. DNA sequencing revealed a heterozygous deletion mutation in intron 2 (at positions -3 to -25), which resulted in a frameshift mutation, that changed the acceptor site sequence from CAG to AAG (IVS2-3C-->A) and may also have disrupted the branch point consensus sequence in intron 2. The mutation was found in the 24 affected individuals, but not in the 18 unaffected relatives and 50 controls. The deletion was identified by allele-specific sequencing and denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC) analysis. We conclude that the heterozygous deletion mutation contributed to the pathogenesis of DGI-II.

  3. A novel splice site mutation in the dentin sialophosphoprotein gene in a Chinese family with dentinogenesis imperfecta type II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Haoyang [Institute of Laboratory Medicine, Jinling Hospital, School of Medicine, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210002 (China); Hou Yanning [Department of Stomatology, Third Affiliated Hospital, Nanjing Traditional Chinese Medicine University, Nanjing 210001 (China); Cui Yingxia [Institute of Laboratory Medicine, Jinling Hospital, School of Medicine, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210002 (China)], E-mail: cuiyx55@yahoo.com.cn; Huang Yufeng [Institute of Laboratory Medicine, Jinling Hospital, School of Medicine, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210002 (China)], E-mail: huangyf@androl.cn; Shi Yichao; Xia Xinyi; Lu Hongyong; Wang Yunhua; Li Xiaojun [Institute of Laboratory Medicine, Jinling Hospital, School of Medicine, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210002 (China)

    2009-03-09

    Twenty-four individuals were investigated that spanned six generations in a Chinese family affected with an apparently autosomal dominant form of dentinogenesis imperfecta type II (DGI-II, OMIM 125490). All affected individuals presented with typical, clinical and radiographic features of DGI-II, but without bilateral progressive high-frequency sensorineural hearing loss. To investigate the mutated molecule, a positional candidate approach was used to determine the mutated gene in this family. Genomic DNA was obtained from 24 affected individuals, 18 unaffected relatives of the family and 50 controls. Haplotype analysis was performed using leukocyte DNA for 6 short tandem repeat (STR) markers present in chromosome 4 (D4S1534, GATA62A11, DSPP, DMP1, SPP1 and D4S1563). In the critical region between D4S1534 and DMP1, the dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) gene (OMIM *125485) was considered as the strongest candidate gene. The first four exons and exon/intron boundaries of the gene were analyzed using DNA from 24 affected individuals and 18 unaffected relatives of the same family. DNA sequencing revealed a heterozygous deletion mutation in intron 2 (at positions -3 to -25), which resulted in a frameshift mutation, that changed the acceptor site sequence from CAG to AAG (IVS2-3C{yields}A) and may also have disrupted the branch point consensus sequence in intron 2. The mutation was found in the 24 affected individuals, but not in the 18 unaffected relatives and 50 controls. The deletion was identified by allele-specific sequencing and denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC) analysis. We conclude that the heterozygous deletion mutation contributed to the pathogenesis of DGI-II.

  4. Disease Model of GATA4 Mutation Reveals Transcription Factor Cooperativity in Human Cardiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ang, Yen-Sin; Rivas, Renee N; Ribeiro, Alexandre J S; Srivas, Rohith; Rivera, Janell; Stone, Nicole R; Pratt, Karishma; Mohamed, Tamer M A; Fu, Ji-Dong; Spencer, C Ian; Tippens, Nathaniel D; Li, Molong; Narasimha, Anil; Radzinsky, Ethan; Moon-Grady, Anita J; Yu, Haiyuan; Pruitt, Beth L; Snyder, Michael P; Srivastava, Deepak

    2016-12-15

    Mutation of highly conserved residues in transcription factors may affect protein-protein or protein-DNA interactions, leading to gene network dysregulation and human disease. Human mutations in GATA4, a cardiogenic transcription factor, cause cardiac septal defects and cardiomyopathy. Here, iPS-derived cardiomyocytes from subjects with a heterozygous GATA4-G296S missense mutation showed impaired contractility, calcium handling, and metabolic activity. In human cardiomyocytes, GATA4 broadly co-occupied cardiac enhancers with TBX5, another transcription factor that causes septal defects when mutated. The GATA4-G296S mutation disrupted TBX5 recruitment, particularly to cardiac super-enhancers, concomitant with dysregulation of genes related to the phenotypic abnormalities, including cardiac septation. Conversely, the GATA4-G296S mutation led to failure of GATA4 and TBX5-mediated repression at non-cardiac genes and enhanced open chromatin states at endothelial/endocardial promoters. These results reveal how disease-causing missense mutations can disrupt transcriptional cooperativity, leading to aberrant chromatin states and cellular dysfunction, including those related to morphogenetic defects. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Functional characterization of two novel splicing mutations in the OCA2 gene associated with oculocutaneous albinism type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimoldi, Valeria; Straniero, Letizia; Asselta, Rosanna; Mauri, Lucia; Manfredini, Emanuela; Penco, Silvana; Gesu, Giovanni P; Del Longo, Alessandra; Piozzi, Elena; Soldà, Giulia; Primignani, Paola

    2014-03-01

    Oculocutaneous albinism (OCA) is characterized by hypopigmentation of the skin, hair and eye, and by ophthalmologic abnormalities caused by a deficiency in melanin biosynthesis. OCA type II (OCA2) is one of the four commonly-recognized forms of albinism, and is determined by mutation in the OCA2 gene. In the present study, we investigated the molecular basis of OCA2 in two siblings and one unrelated patient. The mutational screening of the OCA2 gene identified two hitherto-unknown putative splicing mutations. The first one (c.1503+5G>A), identified in an Italian proband and her affected sibling, lies in the consensus sequence of the donor splice site of OCA2 intron 14 (IVS14+5G>A), in compound heterozygosity with a frameshift mutation, c.1450_1451insCTGCCCTGACA, which is predicted to determine the premature termination of the polypeptide chain (p.I484Tfs*19). In-silico prediction of the effect of the IVS14+5G>A mutation on splicing showed a score reduction for the mutant splice site and indicated the possible activation of a newly-created deep-intronic acceptor splice site. The second mutation is a synonymous transition (c.2139G>A, p.K713K) involving the last nucleotide of exon 20. This mutation was found in a young African albino patient in compound heterozygosity with a previously-reported OCA2 missense mutation (p.T404M). In-silico analysis predicted that the mutant c.2139G>A allele would result in the abolition of the splice donor site. The effects on splicing of these two novel mutations were investigated using an in-vitro hybrid-minigene approach that led to the demonstration of the causal role of the two mutations and to the identification of aberrant transcript variants.

  6. Combined deficiency of factor V and factor VIII is due to mutations in either LMAN1 or MCFD2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bin; McGee, Beth; Yamaoka, Jennifer S.; Guglielmone, Hugo; Downes, Katharine A.; Minoldo, Salvador; Jarchum, Gustavo; Peyvandi, Flora; de Bosch, Norma B.; Ruiz-Saez, Arlette; Chatelain, Bernard; Olpinski, Marian; Bockenstedt, Paula; Sperl, Wolfgang; Kaufman, Randal J.; Nichols, William C.; Tuddenham, Edward G. D.; Ginsburg, David

    2006-01-01

    Mutations in LMAN1 (ERGIC-53) or MCFD2 cause combined deficiency of factor V and factor VIII (F5F8D). LMAN1 and MCFD2 form a protein complex that functions as a cargo receptor ferrying FV and FVIII from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi. In this study, we analyzed 10 previously reported and 10 new F5F8D families. Mutations in the LMAN1 or MCFD2 genes accounted for 15 of these families, including 3 alleles resulting in no LMAN1 mRNA accumulation. Combined with our previous reports, we have identified LMAN1 or MCFD2 mutations as the causes of F5F8D in 71 of 76 families. Among the 5 families in which no mutations were identified, 3 were due to misdiagnosis, with the remaining 2 likely carrying LMAN1 or MCFD2 mutations that were missed by direct sequencing. Our results suggest that mutations in LMAN1 and MCFD2 may account for all cases of F5F8D. Immunoprecipitation and Western blot analysis detected a low level of LMAN1-MCFD2 complex in lymphoblasts derived from patients with missense mutations in LMAN1 (C475R) or MCFD2 (I136T), suggesting that complete loss of the complex may not be required for clinically significant reduction in FV and FVIII. PMID:16304051

  7. The absence of factor V Leiden mutation in Malays with recurrent spontaneous abortions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusoff, Narazah Mohd; Abdullah, Wan Zaidah; Ghazali, Selamah; Othman, Mohd Shukri; Baba, Abdul Aziz; Abdullah, Norazmi; Isa, Mohd Nizam; Chong, Chan Li

    2002-05-01

    The objectives of this study were to investigate the prevalence of factor V Leiden mutation in Malay women with recurrent spontaneous abortion and to clarify the contribution of the factor V Leiden mutation to recurrent miscarriages in these women. A prospective case control study between June 1999 and April 2000. Hospital University Science of Malaysia, Kubang Kerian, Kelantan, and Maternal and Child Health Clinic, Pasir Mas, Kelantan, Malaysia. A total of 46 Malay women with a history of three or more first or second trimester miscarriages were studied. The control group consisted of 46 parous women without obstetric complications. Diagnosis of factor V Leiden mutation was made by examination of factor V Leiden allele product following Mnl I digestion of factor V Leiden alleles amplified by polymerase chain reaction. None of the 46 women with recurrent spontaneous abortion carried the mutation. Also, we found no subject carrying the factor V Leiden alleles in the control group. These results suggest that that there is no association between the factor V Leiden mutation and recurrent spontaneous abortion in the Malay population.

  8. Delayed Seroconversion to HTLV-II Is Associated with a Stop-Codon Mutation in the pol Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dube, Syamalima; Dube, Dipak K; Abbott, Lynn; Glaser, Jordan; Poiesz, Bernard J

    2017-05-01

    A known HIV-1-positive intravenous drug user was found to be human T cell lymphoma/leukemia virus-II (HTLV-II) DNA positive by polymerase chain reaction but seronegative in a screening ELISA. He was consistently DNA positive but took 2 years to fully seroconvert. Sequencing of the HTLV-II strain in his cultured T lymphocytes indicated that it is a prototypical type A strain with no major differences in the long terminal repeat DNA sequence, nor major amino acid differences in the Gag, Env, Tax, and Rex proteins. However, a mutation in its pol gene created a stop codon at amino acid 543 of the Pol protein, a region that encodes for the RNase function. This mutation may account for the subject's slow seroconversion.

  9. Correlational study on mitochondrial DNA mutations as potential risk factors in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Linhai; Chen, Lidan; Li, Jun; Zhang, Weiyun; Liao, Yang; Chen, Jianyun; Sun, Zhaohui

    2016-05-24

    The presented study performed an mtDNA genome-wide association analysis to screen the peripheral blood of breast cancer patients for high-risk germline mutations. Unlike previous studies, which have used breast tissue in analyzing somatic mutations, we looked for germline mutations in our study, since they are better predictors of breast cancer in high-risk groups, facilitate early, non-invasive diagnoses of breast cancer and may provide a broader spectrum of therapeutic options. The data comprised 22 samples of healthy group and 83 samples from breast cancer patients. The sequencing data showed 170 mtDNA mutations in the healthy group and 393 mtDNA mutations in the disease group. Of these, 283 mtDNA mutations (88 in the healthy group and 232 in the disease group) had never been reported in the literature. Moreover, correlation analysis indicated there was a significant difference in 32 mtDNA mutations. According to our relative risk analysis of these 32 mtDNA mutations, 27 of the total had odds ratio values (ORs) of less than 1, meaning that these mutations have a potentially protective role to play in breast cancer. The remaining 5 mtDNA mutations, RNR2-2463 indelA, COX1-6296 C>A, COX1-6298 indelT, ATP6-8860 A>G, and ND5-13327 indelA, whose ORs were 8.050, 4.464, 4.464, 5.254 and 4.853, respectively, were regarded as risk factors of increased breast cancer. The five mutations identified here may serve as novel indicators of breast cancer and may have future therapeutic applications. In addition, the use of peripheral blood samples was procedurally simple and could be applied as a non-invasive diagnostic technique.

  10. The association of factor V leiden mutation with recurrent pregnancy loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashif, Sumreen; Kashif, Muhammad Ali; Saeed, Anjum

    2015-11-01

    To determine the association of factor V Leiden mutation with recurrent pregnancy loss. The case-control study was conducted at the Department of Haematology, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan, from January to June 2012, and comprised women of 18 to 45 years of age who had a history of recurrent pregnancy loss, and controls with no history of pregnancy loss. All the subjects belonged to Punjabi ethnic group. Three ml blood was taken from cases and controls and deoxyribonucleic acid was extracted. In order to identify Factor V Leiden mutation, polymerase chain reaction method was utilised combined with the amplification refractory mutation system. Data was analysed using SPSS 17. Of the 112 subjects, 56(50%) were in each of the two groups. The presence of factor V Leiden mutation among the cases was 3(5.4%) while it was absent among the controls. The mutation was significantly associated with recurrent pregnancy loss (p=0.017).Recurrent pregnancy loss was higher in cases than controls (p=0.001). Factor V Leiden mutation, Recurrent pregnancy loss, PCR (Polymerase chain reaction).

  11. Analysis of mutations in the entire coding sequence of the factor VIII gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bidichadani, S.I.; Lanyon, W.G.; Connor, J.M. [Glascow Univ. (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Hemophilia A is a common X-linked recessive disorder of bleeding caused by deleterious mutations in the gene for clotting factor VIII. The large size of the factor VIII gene, the high frequency of de novo mutations and its tissue-specific expression complicate the detection of mutations. We have used a combination of RT-PCR of ectopic factor VIII transcripts and genomic DNA-PCRs to amplify the entire essential sequence of the factor VIII gene. This is followed by chemical mismatch cleavage analysis and direct sequencing in order to facilitate a comprehensive search for mutations. We describe the characterization of nine potentially pathogenic mutations, six of which are novel. In each case, a correlation of the genotype with the observed phenotype is presented. In order to evaluate the pathogenicity of the five missense mutations detected, we have analyzed them for evolutionary sequence conservation and for their involvement of sequence motifs catalogued in the PROSITE database of protein sites and patterns.

  12. Importance of sigma factor mutations in increased triclosan resistance in Salmonella Typhimurium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gantzhorn, Mette Rørbæk; Olsen, John Elmerdahl; Thomsen, Line Elnif

    2015-01-01

    . Typhimurium 4/74 and DTU3 were adapted to increasing concentrations of the biocide triclosan by serial passage. High level triclosan resistant isolates (MIC > 1000 μg/ml) were obtained. Strains were genome sequenced, and SNPs in fabI, rpoS and rpoD were found to be associated with high level resistance....... However, work with defined mutants revealed that a SNP in fabI was not sufficient to obtain high level resistance. This required additional mutations in the sigma factors rpoS or rpoD. The adapted strains showed triclosan-dependent increased efflux, increased fabI expression and reduced susceptibility...... towards the antibiotics enrofloxacin and sulphamethoxazole/trimethoprim. CONCLUSIONS: Medium level triclosan resistance could be obtained by fabI mutations in S. Typhimurium, however, high level resistance was found to require sigma factor mutations in addition to a fabI mutation. Reduced antibiotic...

  13. The SDH mutation database: an online resource for succinate dehydrogenase sequence variants involved in pheochromocytoma, paraganglioma and mitochondrial complex II deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devilee Peter

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The SDHA, SDHB, SDHC and SDHD genes encode the subunits of succinate dehydrogenase (succinate: ubiquinone oxidoreductase, a component of both the Krebs cycle and the mitochondrial respiratory chain. SDHA, a flavoprotein and SDHB, an iron-sulfur protein together constitute the catalytic domain, while SDHC and SDHD encode membrane anchors that allow the complex to participate in the respiratory chain as complex II. Germline mutations of SDHD and SDHB are a major cause of the hereditary forms of the tumors paraganglioma and pheochromocytoma. The largest subunit, SDHA, is mutated in patients with Leigh syndrome and late-onset optic atrophy, but has not as yet been identified as a factor in hereditary cancer. Description The SDH mutation database is based on the recently described Leiden Open (source Variation Database (LOVD system. The variants currently described in the database were extracted from the published literature and in some cases annotated to conform to current mutation nomenclature. Researchers can also directly submit new sequence variants online. Since the identification of SDHD, SDHC, and SDHB as classic tumor suppressor genes in 2000 and 2001, studies from research groups around the world have identified a total of 120 variants. Here we introduce all reported paraganglioma and pheochromocytoma related sequence variations in these genes, in addition to all reported mutations of SDHA. The database is now accessible online. Conclusion The SDH mutation database offers a valuable tool and resource for clinicians involved in the treatment of patients with paraganglioma-pheochromocytoma, clinical geneticists needing an overview of current knowledge, and geneticists and other researchers needing a solid foundation for further exploration of both these tumor syndromes and SDHA-related phenotypes.

  14. Mutation Analysis of 16 Mucolipidosis II and III Alpha/Beta Chinese Children Revealed Genotype-Phenotype Correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shuang; Zhang, Weimin; Shi, Huiping; Yao, Fengxia; Wei, Min; Qiu, Zhengqing

    2016-01-01

    Mucolipidosis II and III alpha/beta are autosomal recessive diseases caused by mutations in the GNPTAB gene which encodes the α and β subunits of the N-acetylglucosamine-1-phosphotransferase. Clinically, mucolipidosis II (MLII) is characterized by severe developmental delay, coarse facial features, skeletal deformities, and other systemic involvement. In contrast, MLIII alpha/beta is a much milder disorder, the symptoms of which include progressive joint stiffness, short stature, and scoliosis. To study the relationship between the genotypes and phenotypes of the MLII and MLIII alpha/beta patients, we analyzed the GNPTAB gene in 16 Chinese MLII and MLIII alpha/beta patients. We collected and analyzed the patients’ available clinical data and all showed clinical features typical of MLII or MLIII alpha/beta. Moreover, the activity of several lysosomal enzymes was measured in the plasma and finally the GNPTAB gene was sequenced. We detected 30 mutant alleles out of 32 alleles in our patients. These include 10 new mutations (c.99delC, c.118-1G>A, c.523_524delAAinsG, c.1212C>G, c.2213C>A, c.2345C>T, c.2356C>T, c.2455G>T, c.2821dupA, and c.3136-2A>G) and 5 previously reported mutations (c.1071G>A, c.1090C>T, c.2715+1G>A, c.2550_2554delGAAA, and c.3613C>T). The most frequent mutation was the splicing mutation c.2715+1G>A, which accounted for 28% of the mutations. The majority of the mutations reported in the Chinese patients (57%) were located on exon 13 or in its intronic flanking regions. PMID:27662472

  15. Six missense mutations associated with type I and type II protein C deficiency and implications obtained from molecular modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Y Z; Sakata, T; Matsusue, T; Umeyama, H; Kato, H; Miyata, T

    1994-10-01

    The molecular basis of protein C deficiency was studied in three type I and three type II heterozygotes. Three probands showed thrombotic complications. All the exons and intron/exon junctions of the protein C gene were studied using a strategy combining by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification, single-strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP) analysis, and DNA sequencing of the PCR-amplified fragments. Six missense mutations were identified, including three novel ones. One was located in exon II, in which the initiating translation codon (ATG) encoding for Met at position -42 was replaced by ACG encoding for Thr. The other five were located in exon IX, and included TAC(Tyr399)-->CAC(His), CCG(Pro327)-->CTG(Leu), GAC(Asp359)-->AAC(Asn) in two cases, and GGG(Gly350)-->AGG(Arg). Four of the six missense mutations occurred in CG dinucleotide. Sequence analysis of the other exons excluded additional mutations. By restriction enzyme analysis, co-segregation of the mutation with protein C deficiency was observed in four families. The other two mutations at amino acid positions -42 and 350 were also considered to be associated with protein C deficiency due to the absence of these mutations in 50 normal individuals. A structural model of the protease domain of mutant activated protein C was constructed by the chimeric modelling method, and the resultant model suggested conformational changes due to each missense mutation identified in protein C deficiency. The present data also provide some evidence regarding the genetic heterogeneity of protein C deficiency.

  16. Pneumococcal meningitis and endocarditis in an infant: possible improved survival with factor V Leiden mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohapatra, Sitikant; Doulah, Assaf; Brown, Elspeth

    2017-08-12

    Streptococcus pneumoniae infections continue to remain associated with high morbidity and mortality. Although the incidence of invasive meningeal and/or lung disease are not uncommon, Streptococcus pneumoniae endocarditis is rare especially in healthy pediatric population. New studies have suggested a strong association between factor V leiden (FVL) mutation and favorable outcomes in critically ill children. A healthy 10 month old presented with sepsis and meningeal signs, was later confirmed to have Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis and endocarditis. She was found to have factor V leiden mutation and made a complete recovery despite initial complications. Presence of factor V leiden mutation in critically ill children with severe septicaemia possibly contributes to better outcomes. What is known: • Mortality and morbidity remain high with invasive pneumococcal disease. • Pneumococcal endocarditis is rare in healthy pediatric population and results in significant morbidity and mortality What is new: • New studies have suggested a strong association between factor V leiden (FVL) mutation and favorable outcomes in critically ill children. • The presence of factor V mutation in children with extensive invasive pneumococcal disease possibly contributes to a better outcome.

  17. A novel intergenic ETnII-β insertion mutation causes multiple malformations in polypodia mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica A Lehoczky

    Full Text Available Mouse early transposon insertions are responsible for ~10% of spontaneous mutant phenotypes. We previously reported the phenotypes and genetic mapping of Polypodia, (Ppd, a spontaneous, X-linked dominant mutation with profound effects on body plan morphogenesis. Our new data shows that mutant mice are not born in expected Mendelian ratios secondary to loss after E9.5. In addition, we refined the Ppd genetic interval and discovered a novel ETnII-β early transposon insertion between the genes for Dusp9 and Pnck. The ETn inserted 1.6 kb downstream and antisense to Dusp9 and does not disrupt polyadenylation or splicing of either gene. Knock-in mice engineered to carry the ETn display Ppd characteristic ectopic caudal limb phenotypes, showing that the ETn insertion is the Ppd molecular lesion. Early transposons are actively expressed in the early blastocyst. To explore the consequences of the ETn on the genomic landscape at an early stage of development, we compared interval gene expression between wild-type and mutant ES cells. Mutant ES cell expression analysis revealed marked upregulation of Dusp9 mRNA and protein expression. Evaluation of the 5' LTR CpG methylation state in adult mice revealed no correlation with the occurrence or severity of Ppd phenotypes at birth. Thus, the broad range of phenotypes observed in this mutant is secondary to a novel intergenic ETn insertion whose effects include dysregulation of nearby interval gene expression at early stages of development.

  18. Radial multipliers on amalgamated free products of II-factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Möller, Sören

    2014-01-01

    Let ℳi be a family of II1-factors, containing a common II1-subfactor 풩, such that [ℳi : 풩] ∈ ℕ0 for all i. Furthermore, let ϕ: ℕ0 → ℂ. We show that if a Hankel matrix related to ϕ is trace-class, then there exists a unique completely bounded map Mϕ on the amalgamated free product of the ℳi...... with amalgamation over 풩, which acts as a radial multiplier. Hereby, we extend a result of Haagerup and the author for radial multipliers on reduced free products of unital C*- and von Neumann algebras....

  19. Mutation analysis of tumor necrosis factor alpha-induced protein 3 gene in Hodgkin lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etzel, Barbara-Magdalena; Gerth, Melanie; Chen, Yuan; Wünsche, Elisa; Facklam, Tina; Beck, James F; Guntinas-Lichius, Orlando; Petersen, Iver

    2017-03-01

    Survival and proliferation of Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg (HRS) cells, the malignant cells of classical Hodgkin lymphoma (CHL), are dependent on constitutive activation of nuclear factor kB (NF-κB). A20, encoded by TNF alpha-induced protein 3 (TNFAIP3), one of the inhibitors of NF-kB, was found to be inactivated by deletions and/or point mutations in CHL. TNFAIP3 mutations were examined in 37 patients with CHL by using PCR and direct sequencing. In addition, protein expression of A20 was evaluated by immunohistochemistry. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) status of HL samples was determined by EBV EBER chromogenic in situ hybridization (ISH). We identified 8 mutation positive cases in a collective of 37 investigated cases (22%). Mutations were most frequent in the nodular sclerosis subtype. Our results revealed the tendency that cases harboring A20 mutations were negative for A20 staining. None of A20 mutation-positive CHL cases showed EBV infection. Our study confirms the involvement of the TNFAIP3 tumor suppressor gene in CHL. A20 may represent a suppressor of human lymphoma and provide a critical molecular link between chronic inflammation and cancer. None of A20 mutation-positive CHL cases showed EBV infection. This fact suggests complementing functions of TNFAIP3 inactivation and EBV infection in CHL pathogenesis and may represent an interesting point of further investigations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  20. KIT mutations confer a distinct gene expression signature in core binding factor leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lück, Sonja C; Russ, Annika C; Du, Juan; Gaidzik, Verena; Schlenk, Richard F; Pollack, Jonathan R; Döhner, Konstanze; Döhner, Hartmut; Bullinger, Lars

    2010-03-01

    Core binding factor (CBF) leukaemias, characterized by either inv(16)(p13.1q22) or t(8;21)(q22;q22), constitute acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) subgroups with favourable prognosis. However, 40-50% of patients relapse, emphasizing the need for risk-adapted treatment approaches. In this regard, studying secondary genetic aberrations, such as mutations of the KIT gene, is of great interest, particularly as they can be targeted by receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI). However, so far little is known about the biology underlying KIT-mutated CBF leukaemias. We analysed gene expression profiles of 83 CBF AML cases with known KIT mutation status in order to gain novel insights in KIT-mutated CBF pathogenesis. KIT-mutated cases were characterized by deregulation of genes belonging to the NFkB signalling complex suggesting impaired control of apoptosis. Notably, a subgroup of KIT wildtype cases was also characterized by the KIT mutation signature due to yet unknown aberrations. Our data suggest that this CBF leukaemia subgroup might profit from TKI therapy, however, the relevance of the KIT mutation-associated signature remains to be validated prior to clinical implementation. Nevertheless, the existence of such a signature supports the notion of relevant biological differences in CBF leukaemia and might serve as diagnostic tool in the future.

  1. Homozygous factor V Leiden mutation in type IV Ehlers-Danlos patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Refaat, Marwan; Hotait, Mostafa; Winston, Brion

    2014-03-16

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is a group of inherited connective tissue disorders caused by collagen synthesis defects. Several hemostatic abnormalities have been described in EDS patients that increase the bleeding tendencies of these patients. This case report illustrates a patient with an unusual presentation of a patient with type IV EDS, platelet δ-storage pool disease and factor V Leiden mutation. Young woman having previous bilateral deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary emboli coexisting with ruptured splenic aneurysm and multiple other aneurysms now presented with myocardial infarction. Presence of factor V Leiden mutation raises the possibility that the infarct was due to acute coronary thrombosis, although coronary artery aneurysm and dissection with myocardial infarction is known to occur in vascular type EDS. This is the first report in the medical literature of factor V Leiden mutation in an EDS patient which made the management of our patient challenging with propensity to both bleeding and clotting.

  2. Homozygous factor V Leiden mutation in type IV Ehlers-Danlos patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Refaat, Marwan; Hotait, Mostafa; Winston, Brion

    2014-01-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is a group of inherited connective tissue disorders caused by collagen synthesis defects. Several hemostatic abnormalities have been described in EDS patients that increase the bleeding tendencies of these patients. This case report illustrates a patient with an unusual presentation of a patient with type IV EDS, platelet δ-storage pool disease and factor V Leiden mutation. Young woman having previous bilateral deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary emboli coexisting with ruptured splenic aneurysm and multiple other aneurysms now presented with myocardial infarction. Presence of factor V Leiden mutation raises the possibility that the infarct was due to acute coronary thrombosis, although coronary artery aneurysm and dissection with myocardial infarction is known to occur in vascular type EDS. This is the first report in the medical literature of factor V Leiden mutation in an EDS patient which made the management of our patient challenging with propensity to both bleeding and clotting. PMID:24653990

  3. Characterization of the factor VIII defect in 147 patients with sporadic hemophilia A: Family studies indicate a mutation type-dependent sex ratio of mutation frequencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, J.; Schmidt, W.; Olek, K. [Univ. of Bonn (Germany)] [and others

    1996-04-01

    The clinical manifestation of hemophilia A is caused by a wide range of different mutations. In this study the factor VIII genes of 147 severe hemophilia A patients-all exclusively from sporadic families-were screened for mutations by use of the complete panel of modern DNA techniques. The pathogenous defect could be characterized in 126 patients (85.7%). Fifty-five patients (37.4%) showed a F8A-gene inversion, 47 (32.0%) a point mutation, 14 (9.5%) a small deletion, 8 (5.4%) a large deletion, and 2 (1.4%) a small insertion. Further, four (2.7%) mutations were localized but could not be sequenced yet. No mutation could be identified in 17 patients (11.6%). Sixteen (10.9%) of the P identified mutations occurred in the B domain. Four of these were located in an adenosine nucleotide stretch at codon 1192, indicating a mutation hotspot. Somatic mosaicisms were detected in 3 (3.9%) of 76 patients` mothers, comprising 3 of 16 de novo mutations in the patients` mothers. Investigation of family relatives allowed detection of a de novo mutation in 16 of 76 two-generation and 28 of 34 three-generation families. On the basis of these data, the male:female ratio of mutation frequencies (k) was estimated as k = 3.6. By use of the quotients of mutation origin in maternal grandfather to patient`s mother or to maternal grandmother, k was directly estimated as k = 15 and k = 7.5, respectively. Considering each mutation type separately, we revealed a mutation type-specific sex ratio of mutation frequencies. Point mutations showed a 5-to-10-fold-higher and inversions a >10-fold- higher mutation rate in male germ cells, whereas deletions showed a >5-fold-higher mutation rate in female germ cells. Consequently, and in accordance with the data of other diseases like Duchenne muscular dystrophy, our results indicate that at least for X-chromosomal disorders the male:female mutation rate of a disease is determined by its proportion of the different mutation types. 68 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  4. Factor V leiden mutation in Behcet’s disease and the relationship with clinical manifestations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mowla K

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available "n Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:Arial; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Background: Behcet's disease (BD is a multisystemic inflammatory disease with unknown origin characterized by recurrent oral aphtous ulcers, genital, ocular and skin lesions. A single point mutation 1691G to A in the factor V gene increases the risk of venous thrombosis. This study designed to determine factor V Leiden mutation in Behcet's disease, and to find out it's relationship with the clinical manifestations in Khuzestan province, Iran. "n"nMethods: One hundred patients with Behcet's Disease (44 males and 56 females based on international diagnostic criteria and 70 healthy subjects were included in the study. Patients and controls were tested for the presence of factor V Leiden mutation using polymerase chain reaction method."n"nResults: The prevalence of factor V Leiden mutation was significantly higher in BD (10 out of 100, 10% compared with healthy control subjects (1 out of 70, 1.4%, (p=0.025. Vascular lesions in this study were deep vein thrombosis (DVT (7%, subcutaneous thrombophlebitis (5%, stroke (1% and retinal vasculitis (39%. It was found that there was no association between venous thrombosis and the factor V Leiden mutation in Khuzestanian patients. Also, no association between

  5. Screening for FecGH Mutation of Growth Differentiation Factor 9 Gene in Iranian Ghezel Sheep Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahzad Akbarpour

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ghezel sheep are highly prolific and one of the local sheep breeds in Iran andTurkey. Growth differentiation factor-9 (GDF9 gene has been found to be essential for growthand differentiation of early ovarian follicles. Novel mutations in GDF9 have been associated withincreased ovulation rates and high litter sizes in heterozygous carriers. Therefore, fecundity genefor GDF9 (FecGH mutation in GDF9 is considered as a possible candidate for the increased littersize observed in Ghezel ewes.Materials and Methods: The aim was to evaluate the frequency of recently reported SNP (FecGHusing polymerase chain reaction (PCR - single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP in 110Ghezel ewes with a history of high litter size reproductive activity and 75 fertile ewes with normalreproductive activity.Results: The GDF9 gene exon II was investigated by this technique to screen whether they are FecGH(S395F carriers or not. SSCP analysis identified four fragments that contained conformationaldifferences; however the combined results with sequencing analysis data did not reveal the FecGHmutation (C to T in GDF9 gene in Iranian Ghezel ewes.Conclusion: Current results confirmed that FecGH mutation is not present in the selected IranianGhezel sheep population and is not associated with Ghezel sheep high prolificacy performance.Therefore, this SNP may not represent a molecular marker for marker assisted selection programsin this population.

  6. Analysis of human transforming growth factor β-induced gene mutation in corneal dystrophy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李杨; 孙旭光; 任慧媛; 董冰; 王智群; 孙秀英

    2004-01-01

    Background Corneal dystrophy is a group of inherited blinding diseases of the cornea. This study was to identify the mutations of the keratoepithelin (KE) gene for proper diagnosis of corneal dystrophy. Methods Three families with corneal dystrophy were analysed. Thirteen individuals at risk for corneal dystrophy in family A, the proband and her son in family B, and the proband in family C were examined after their blood samples were obtained. Mutation screening of human transforming growth factor β-induced gene (BIGH3 gene) was performed. Results Five individuals in family A were found by clinical evaluation to be affected with granular corneal dystrophy and carried the BIGH3 mutation W555R. However, both probands in families B and C, also diagnosed with granular corneal dystrophy, harboured the BIGH3 mutation R124H. Conclusion Molecular genetic analysis can improve accurate diagnosis of corneal dystrophy.

  7. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Mutations and Radiotherapy 
in Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing ZHONG

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Radiotherapy plays a pivotal role in the treatment for lung cancer. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR mutation in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC which predicts tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI treatment response may also has effect on radiation response. NSCLC harboring kinase-domain mutations in EGFR exhibits enhanced radio-sensitivity due to dramatically diminished capacity to resolve radiation-induced DSBs (DNA double-strand breaks associating with the inefficiency of EGFR nuclear translocation. Recently, several preliminary clinical studies show certain efficacy of concurrent EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors and radiotherapy. However its further response in EGFR-mutated NSCLC is unclear. The correlation between EGFR mutation genotype and the radiotherapy response and clinical outcome is worthy of further study.

  8. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Activating Mutations in Squamous Histology of Lung Cancer Patients of Southern Bulgaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genova Silvia N.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available There is only limited data on the prevalence of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR activating mutations in squamous cell carcinomas and adenosquamous carcinomas of the lung in patients of the Southern Bulgarian region and the efficacy of EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors. AIM: Previous reports for Bulgarian population showed high incidence of EGFR mutations in the squamous cell carcinomas, so we set the goal to investigate their frequency in Southern Bulgaria, after precise immunohistochemical verification of lung cancers. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Two hundred and thirty-six lung carcinomas were included in this prospective study. All biopsies were initially analysed with p63, TTF1, Napsin A, CK7, CK34βE12, synaptophysin, CK20 and CDX2. Two hundred and twenty-five non-small cell lung carcinomas were studied with real-time PCR technology to assess the status of the EGFR gene. RESULTS: We detected 132 adenocarcinomas (58.7%, 89 squamous cell carcinomas (39.2%, 4 adenosquamous carcinomas (1.8%, 9 large cell neuroendocrine carcinomas (3.8% and 2 metastatic colorectal adenocarcinomas (0.8%. Activating mutations in the EGF receptor had 3 out of 89 squamous cell carcinomas (3.37%. We have established mutations in L858R, deletion in exon 19 and rare mutation in S7681. One out of four adenosquamous carcinomas had a point mutation in the L858R (25%. CONCLUSIONS: The frequency of EGFR mutations we found in lung squamous cell carcinomas in a Southern Bulgarian region is lower than that in European countries. Ethnic diversity in the region does not play role of an independent predictive factor in terms of mutation frequency.

  9. Targeting and germ-line transmission of a null mutation at the metallothionein I and II loci in mouse.

    OpenAIRE

    Michalska, A E; Choo, K. H.

    1993-01-01

    We report the generation of transgenic mice deficient in the metallothionein MT-I and MT-II genes. The mutations were introduced into embryonic stem cells by homologous recombination. Chimeric mice resulting from the targeted embryonic stem cells transmitted the disrupted alleles through their germ line. Homozygous animals were born alive and appeared phenotypically normal and fertile. Absence of MT proteins was confirmed by direct measurement in liver extracts. Challenging the mutant animals...

  10. Majewski osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II (MOPD II) syndrome previously diagnosed as Seckel syndrome: report of a novel mutation of the PCNT gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piane, Maria; Della Monica, Matteo; Piatelli, Gianluca; Lulli, Patrizia; Lonardo, Fortunato; Chessa, Luciana; Scarano, Gioacchino

    2009-11-01

    We report on a 3-year-old boy with prenatal onset of proportionate dwarfism, postnatal severe microcephaly, high forehead with receded hairline, sparse scalp hair, beaked nose, mild retrognathia and hypotonia diagnosed at birth as Seckel syndrome. At age 3 years, he became paralyzed due to a cerebrovascular malformation. Based on the clinical and radiological features showing evidence of skeletal dysplasia, the diagnosis was revised to Majewski osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II (MOPD II) syndrome. Western blot analysis of the patient's lymphoblastoid cell line lysate showed the absence of the protein pericentrin. Subsequent molecular analysis identified a novel homozygous single base insertion (c.1527_1528insA) in exon 10 of the PCNT gene, which leads to a frameshift (Treo510fs) and to premature protein truncation. PCNT mutations must be considered diagnostic of MOPD II syndrome. A possible role of pericentrin in the development of cerebral vessels is suggested. Copyright 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. Prognostic model for brain metastases from lung adenocarcinoma identified with epidermal growth factor receptor mutation status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongwei; Wang, Weili; Jia, Haixia; Lian, Jianhong; Cao, Jianzhong; Zhang, Xiaqin; Song, Xing; Jia, Sufang; Li, Zhengran; Cao, Xing; Zhou, Wei; Han, Songye; Yang, Weihua; Xi, Yanfen; Lian, Shenming

    2017-09-01

    Several indices have been developed to predict survival of brain metastases (BM) based on prognostic factors. However, such models were designed for general brain metastases from different kinds of cancers, and prognostic factors vary between cancers and histological subtypes. Recently, studies have indicated that epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation status may be a potential prognostic biological factor in BM from lung adenocarcinoma. Thus, we sought to define the role of EGFR mutation in prognoses and introduce a prognostic model specific for BM from lung adenocarcinoma. Data of 256 patients with BM from lung adenocarcinoma identified with EGFR mutations were collected. Independent prognostic factors were confirmed using a Cox regression model. The new prognostic model was developed based on the results of multivariable analyses. The score of each factor was calculated by six-month survival. Prognostic groups were divided into low, medium, and high risk based on the total scores. The prediction ability of the new model was compared to the three existing models. EGFR mutation and Karnofsky performance status were independent prognostic factors and were thus integrated into the new prognostic model. The new model was superior to the three other scoring systems regarding the prediction of three, six, and 12-month survival by pairwise comparison of the area under the curve. Our proposed prognostic model specific for BM from lung adenocarcinoma incorporating EGFR mutation status was valid in predicting patient survival. Further verification is warranted, with prospective testing using large sample sizes. © 2017 The Authors. Thoracic Cancer published by China Lung Oncology Group and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  12. DETECTION OF RECESSIVE MUTATIONS (CVM, BLAD AND RED FACTOR INHOLSTEIN BULLS IN SLOVENIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betka LOGAR

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Detection of recessive mutations that causes complex vertebral malformation (CVM and bovine leukocyte adhesion defi ciency (BLAD in Holstein cattle is especially required for bulls, which are used for artifi cial insemination (A.I.; these enable elimination of carriers from the A.I. programs and therefore prevent transmission of unwanted mutations to a large number of offspring. Some breeders are also interested in the identifi cation of carriers of recessive allele for red and white coat colour (Red factor. Here, we performed genetic tests for detection of mutations associated with CVM, BLAD and Red factor using methods previously reported or modifi ed methods. Analysis of Holstein bulls, which were recommended for A.I in Slovenia in the years 2007 and 2008, revealed four (10 % carriers of CVM, and two (5.4 % carriers of red gene, while all bulls were non-carriers of BLAD.

  13. Sneddon Syndrome with Factor V Leiden, Methylene Tetrahydrofolate Reductase and FMF Gene Mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Terzi

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Sneddon syndrome (SNS, characterized by livedo racemosa and stroke, is a rare disease, especially in young adults. Livedo racemosa are large lesions, widespread on the extremities and the body, that are violet-colored and have a good appearance and ambiguous limits. A 33-years-old female presented to our clinic for headache. She had a two-year history of blue-purple skin marks on her body and legs. The skin lesions were consistent with livedo racemosa. She had experienced right hemiparesis according to her medical history. Factor V Leiden (G1691A mutation was heterozygote-positive. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR C677T and FMF gene (MEFV V726A mutations were determined. SNS is the cause of stroke, rarely seen in young adults. We considered this case to be of value since it is the first SNS case having factor V Leiden, MTHFR and MEFV mutations concomitantly.

  14. Reproductive and hormonal factors, and ovarian cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antoniou, Antonis C; Rookus, Matti; Andrieu, Nadine;

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Several reproductive and hormonal factors are known to be associated with ovarian cancer risk in the general population, including parity and oral contraceptive (OC) use. However, their effect on ovarian cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers has only been investigated...... in a small number of studies. METHODS: We used data on 2,281 BRCA1 carriers and 1,038 BRCA2 carriers from the International BRCA1/2 Carrier Cohort Study to evaluate the effect of reproductive and hormonal factors on ovarian cancer risk for mutation carriers. Data were analyzed within a weighted Cox...... proportional hazards framework. RESULTS: There were no significant differences in the risk of ovarian cancer between parous and nulliparous carriers. For parous BRCA1 mutation carriers, the risk of ovarian cancer was reduced with each additional full-term pregnancy (P trend = 0.002). BRCA1 carriers who had...

  15. Allelic mutations in noncoding genomic sequences construct novel transcription factor binding sites that promote gene overexpression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Erming; Børset, Magne; Sawyer, Jeffrey R; Brede, Gaute; Våtsveen, Thea K; Hov, Håkon; Waage, Anders; Barlogie, Bart; Shaughnessy, John D; Epstein, Joshua; Sundan, Anders

    2015-11-01

    The growth and survival factor hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is expressed at high levels in multiple myeloma (MM) cells. We report here that elevated HGF transcription in MM was traced to DNA mutations in the promoter alleles of HGF. Sequence analysis revealed a previously undiscovered single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and crucial single-nucleotide variants (SNVs) in the promoters of myeloma cells that produce large amounts of HGF. The allele-specific mutations functionally reassembled wild-type sequences into the motifs that affiliate with endogenous transcription factors NFKB (nuclear factor kappa-B), MZF1 (myeloid zinc finger 1), and NRF-2 (nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2). In vitro, a mutant allele that gained novel NFKB-binding sites directly responded to transcriptional signaling induced by tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) to promote high levels of luciferase reporter. Given the recent discovery by genome-wide sequencing (GWS) of numerous non-coding mutations in myeloma genomes, our data provide evidence that heterogeneous SNVs in the gene regulatory regions may frequently transform wild-type alleles into novel transcription factor binding properties to aberrantly interact with dysregulated transcriptional signals in MM and other cancer cells.

  16. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations in lung cancer: preclinical and clinical data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jorge, S.E.D.C.; Kobayashi, S.S.; Costa, D.B. [Harvard Medical School, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology/Oncology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2014-09-05

    Lung cancer leads cancer-related mortality worldwide. Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), the most prevalent subtype of this recalcitrant cancer, is usually diagnosed at advanced stages, and available systemic therapies are mostly palliative. The probing of the NSCLC kinome has identified numerous nonoverlapping driver genomic events, including epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene mutations. This review provides a synopsis of preclinical and clinical data on EGFR mutated NSCLC and EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). Classic somatic EGFR kinase domain mutations (such as L858R and exon 19 deletions) make tumors addicted to their signaling cascades and generate a therapeutic window for the use of ATP-mimetic EGFR TKIs. The latter inhibit these kinases and their downstream effectors, and induce apoptosis in preclinical models. The aforementioned EGFR mutations are stout predictors of response and augmentation of progression-free survival when gefitinib, erlotinib, and afatinib are used for patients with advanced NSCLC. The benefits associated with these EGFR TKIs are limited by the mechanisms of tumor resistance, such as the gatekeeper EGFR-T790M mutation, and bypass activation of signaling cascades. Ongoing preclinical efforts for treating resistance have started to translate into patient care (including clinical trials of the covalent EGFR-T790M TKIs AZD9291 and CO-1686) and hold promise to further boost the median survival of patients with EGFR mutated NSCLC.

  17. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR mutations in lung cancer: preclinical and clinical data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.E.D.C. Jorge

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer leads cancer-related mortality worldwide. Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC, the most prevalent subtype of this recalcitrant cancer, is usually diagnosed at advanced stages, and available systemic therapies are mostly palliative. The probing of the NSCLC kinome has identified numerous nonoverlapping driver genomic events, including epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR gene mutations. This review provides a synopsis of preclinical and clinical data on EGFR mutated NSCLC and EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs. Classic somatic EGFR kinase domain mutations (such as L858R and exon 19 deletions make tumors addicted to their signaling cascades and generate a therapeutic window for the use of ATP-mimetic EGFR TKIs. The latter inhibit these kinases and their downstream effectors, and induce apoptosis in preclinical models. The aforementioned EGFR mutations are stout predictors of response and augmentation of progression-free survival when gefitinib, erlotinib, and afatinib are used for patients with advanced NSCLC. The benefits associated with these EGFR TKIs are limited by the mechanisms of tumor resistance, such as the gatekeeper EGFR-T790M mutation, and bypass activation of signaling cascades. Ongoing preclinical efforts for treating resistance have started to translate into patient care (including clinical trials of the covalent EGFR-T790M TKIs AZD9291 and CO-1686 and hold promise to further boost the median survival of patients with EGFR mutated NSCLC.

  18. Error-prone initiation factor 2 mutations reduce the fitness cost of antibiotic resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorzet, Anna; Pavlov, Michael Y; Nilsson, Annika I; Ehrenberg, Måns; Andersson, Dan I

    2010-01-01

    Mutations in the fmt gene (encoding formyl methionine transferase) that eliminate formylation of initiator tRNA (Met-tRNAi) confer resistance to the novel antibiotic class of peptide deformylase inhibitors (PDFIs) while concomitantly reducing bacterial fitness. Here we show in Salmonella typhimurium that novel mutations in initiation factor 2 (IF2) located outside the initiator tRNA binding domain can partly restore fitness of fmt mutants without loss of antibiotic resistance. Analysis of initiation of protein synthesis in vitro showed that with non-formylated Met-tRNAi IF2 mutants initiated much faster than wild-type IF2, whereas with formylated fMet-tRNAi the initiation rates were similar. Moreover, the increase in initiation rates with Met-tRNAi conferred by IF2 mutations in vitro correlated well with the increase in growth rate conferred by the same mutations in vivo, suggesting that the mutations in IF2 compensate formylation deficiency by increasing the rate of in vivo initiation with Met-tRNAi. IF2 mutants had also a high propensity for erroneous initiation with elongator tRNAs in vitro, which could account for their reduced fitness in vivo in a formylation-proficient strain. More generally, our results suggest that bacterial protein synthesis is mRNA-limited and that compensatory mutations in IF2 could increase the persistence of PDFI-resistant bacteria in clinical settings. PMID:20132454

  19. A novel splice site mutation of the arginine vasopressin-neurophysin II gene identified in a kindred with autosomal dominant familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tae, Hyun-Jung; Baek, Ki-Hyun; Shim, Sun-Mi; Yoo, Soon-Jib; Kang, Moo-Il; Cha, Bong-Yun; Lee, Kwang-Woo; Son, Ho-Young; Kang, Sung-Koo

    2005-01-01

    Autosomal dominant familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus is an inherited deficiency of arginine vasopressin (AVP), and this is caused by mutations in the AVP-neurophysin II (AVP-NP II) gene. Most of these mutations have been located in the signal peptide or in the NP II moiety. In the present study, we have analyzed the AVP-NP II gene in a Korean family. Clinical and genetic studies were performed on three members of the family, and on a normal healthy unrelated individual. The diagnosis of neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus was done by performing a fluid deprivation test and a vasopressin challenge. For genetic analysis, the genomic DNA was extracted and the AVP-NP II gene was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Clinical assessment of the affected individuals confirmed the diagnosis of neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus. Genetic analysis of the AVP-NP II gene revealed a novel deletion mutation of a single nucleotide (guanine) within the splice acceptor site of intron 2 (IVS2 +1 delG). The affected individuals were heterozygous for this mutation. We also demonstrated through RT-PCR analysis of the mutant gene that this mutation resulted in the retention of intron 2 during pre-mRNA splicing. We concluded that a novel splicing mutation in the AVP-NP II gene causes neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus in this family.

  20. Molecular basis for the Kallmann syndrome-linked fibroblast growth factor receptor mutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thurman, Ryan D.; Kathir, Karuppanan Muthusamy; Rajalingam, Dakshinamurthy [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 72701 (United States); Kumar, Thallapuranam K. Suresh, E-mail: sthalla@uark.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 72701 (United States)

    2012-08-31

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The structural basis of the Kallmann syndrome is elucidated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Kallmann syndrome mutation (A168S) induces a subtle conformational change(s). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structural interactions mediated by beta-sheet G are most perturbed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ligand (FGF)-receptor interaction(s) is completely abolished by Kallmann mutation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Kallmann mutation directly affects the FGF signaling process. -- Abstract: Kallmann syndrome (KS) is a developmental disease that expresses in patients as hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and anosmia. KS is commonly associated with mutations in the extracellular D2 domain of the fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR). In this study, for the first time, the molecular basis for the FGFR associated KS mutation (A168S) is elucidated using a variety of biophysical experiments, including multidimensional NMR spectroscopy. Secondary and tertiary structural analysis using far UV circular dichroism, fluorescence and limited trypsin digestion assays suggest that the KS mutation induces subtle tertiary structure change in the D2 domain of FGFR. Results of isothermal titration calorimetry experiments show the KS mutation causes a 10-fold decrease in heparin binding affinity and also a complete loss in ligand (FGF-1) binding. {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N chemical perturbation data suggest that complete loss in the ligand (FGF) binding affinity is triggered by a subtle conformational change that disrupts crucial structural interactions in both the heparin and the FGF binding sites in the D2 domain of FGFR. The novel findings reported in this study are expected to provide valuable clues toward a complete understanding of the other genetic diseases linked to mutations in the FGFR.

  1. Association of high CD4-positive T cell infiltration with mutations in HLA class II-regulatory genes in microsatellite-unstable colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surmann, Eva-Maria; Voigt, Anita Y; Michel, Sara; Bauer, Kathrin; Reuschenbach, Miriam; Ferrone, Soldano; von Knebel Doeberitz, Magnus; Kloor, Matthias

    2015-03-01

    Besides being expressed on professional antigen-presenting cells, HLA class II antigens are expressed on various tumors of non-lymphoid origin, including a subset of colorectal cancers (CRC). Information about the regulation of HLA class II antigen expression is important for a better understanding of their role in the interactions between tumor and immune cells. Whether lack of HLA class II antigen expression in tumors reflects the selective immune destruction of HLA class II antigen-expressing tumor cells is unknown. To address this question, we tested whether lack of HLA class II antigen expression in CRC was associated with immune cell infiltration. We selected microsatellite-unstable (MSI-H) CRC, because they show pronounced tumor antigen-specific immune responses and, in a subset of tumors, lack of HLA class II antigen expression due to mutations inactivating HLA class II-regulatory genes. We examined HLA class II antigen expression, mutations in regulatory genes, and CD4-positive T cell infiltration in 69 MSI-H CRC lesions. Mutations in RFX5, CIITA, and RFXAP were found in 13 (28.9%), 3 (6.7%), and 1 (2.2%) out of 45 HLA class II antigen-negative tumors. CD4-positive tumor-infiltrating lymphocyte counts were significantly higher in HLA class II antigen-negative tumors harboring mutations in HLA class II-regulatory genes (107.4 T cells per 0.25 mm(2)) compared to tumors without mutations (55.5 T cells per 0.25 mm(2), p = 0.008). Our results suggest that the outgrowth of tumor cells lacking HLA class II antigen expression due to mutations of regulatory genes is favored in an environment of dense CD4-positive T cell infiltration.

  2. K-ras genetic mutation and influencing factor analysis for Han and Uygur nationality colorectal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eli, Mayinur; Mollayup, Ablikim; Muattar; Liu, Chao; Zheng, Chao; Bao, Yong-Xing

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the K-ras genetic mutation status in colorectal cancer patients, compare the difference of K-ras genetic mutation rate in Han and Uygur nationality and analyze the influencing factor. 91 cases (52 cases of Han nationality and 39 cases of Uygur nationality) of colorectal biopsy or surgical ablation pathology specimen from the first affiliated hospital of Xinjiang Medical University during January, 2010 to March, 2013 were collected to detect the 12th and 13th code mutation status of K-ras gene exon 2 with pyrosequencing method and compare the difference of K-ras gene mutation rate between Han and Uygur nationality patients. Single factor analysis and multiple factor logistic regression analysis were utilized to analyze the influencing factor for K-ras genetic mutation. 33 cases of patients with K-ras genetic mutation were found from the 91 cases colorectal cancer patients and the total mutation rate was 36.3%. Among them, 24 cases (72.7%) were found with mutation only in the 12th code, 9 cases (27.3%) were found with mutation only in the 13th code and no one case was found with mutation in both the two codes. Mutation rate of the 12th code in the Uygur nationality was significantly higher than that in the Han nationality (P0.05). There were no associativity (P>0.05) between the K-ras genetic mutation and sex, age, smoking history, drinking history, tumor location, macropathology type, differentiation level, staging, invasive depth, lymph nodes transferring and metastasis in colorectal cancer patients (P>0.05). K-ras genetic mutation rate is high in colorectal cancer patients. The mutation rate of 12th code in Uygur nationality is higher than that in Han nationality. There is no significant associativity between K-ras genetic mutation rate and patients' clinical pathology characteristic.

  3. Subacute Budd-Chiari syndrome associated with polycythemia vera and factor V Leiden mutation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simsek, S; Verheesen, RV; Haagsma, EB; Lourens, J

    We describe a 48-year-old caucasian woman with a subacute Budd-Chiari syndrome attributed to the presence of polycythaemia vera, heterozygosity for the factor V Leiden mutation and the use of an oral contraceptive pill. Two diagnostic pitfalls were encountered. First, on CT scanning of the abdomen

  4. Increased risk for fetal loss in carriers of the factor V Leiden mutation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meinardi, [No Value; Middeldorp, S; de Kam, PJ; Koopman, MMW; van Pampus, ECM; Hamulyak, K; Prins, MH; Buller, HR; van der Meer, J

    1999-01-01

    Background: An increased risk for fetal loss caused by placental thrombosis is probable in carriers of the factor V Leiden mutation but has not been demonstrated consistently in previous studies. Objective: To determine the overall risk for fetal loss and the separate risks for miscarriage and still

  5. Cerebral venous thrombosis following spinal surgery in a patient with Factor V Leiden mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yılmaz, Baran; Ekşi, Murat Şakir; Akakın, Akın; Toktaş, Zafer Orkun; Demir, Mustafa Kemal; Konya, Deniz

    2016-08-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis is a devastating event leading to high mortality and morbidity rates. We present a case of cerebral venous thrombosis that occurred following spinal surgery in a patient with Factor V Leiden mutation and G1691A heterozygosity. Possible prevention and treatment strategies have been discussed.

  6. Factor V Leiden mutation in relation to fecundity and miscarriage in women with venous thrombosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dunne, F.M.; Doggen, Catharina Jacoba Maria; Heemskerk, M.; Rosendaal, F.R.; Helmerhorst, F.M.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Factor V Leiden mutation (Arg506Gln) increases the likelihood of venous thrombosis; it may also have a positive effect through facilitation of embryo implantation. This may manifest itself as a reduced time to pregnancy (increased fecundity) and fewer miscarriages in the first trimester.

  7. MPN patients harbor recurrent truncating mutations in transcription factor NF-E2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jutzi, J.S.; Bogeska, R.; Nikoloski, G.; Schmid, C.A.; Seeger, T.S.; Stegelmann, F.; Schwemmers, S.; Grunder, A.; Peeken, J.C.; Gothwal, M.; Wehrle, J.; Aumann, K.; Hamdi, K.; Dierks, C.; Wang, W.; Dohner, K.; Jansen, J.H.; Pahl, H.L.

    2013-01-01

    The molecular etiology of myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) remains incompletely understood, despite recent advances incurred through the discovery of several different mutations in MPN patients. We have recently described overexpression of the transcription factor NF-E2 in MPN patients and shown

  8. Subacute Budd-Chiari syndrome associated with polycythemia vera and factor V Leiden mutation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simsek, S; Verheesen, RV; Haagsma, EB; Lourens, J

    2000-01-01

    We describe a 48-year-old caucasian woman with a subacute Budd-Chiari syndrome attributed to the presence of polycythaemia vera, heterozygosity for the factor V Leiden mutation and the use of an oral contraceptive pill. Two diagnostic pitfalls were encountered. First, on CT scanning of the abdomen t

  9. Unexpected discovery of 2 cases of hepatocyte nuclear factor 1α-mutated infracentimetric adenomatosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hervé Laumonier; Anne Rullier; Jean Saric; Chades Balabaud; Paulette Bioulac-Sage

    2008-01-01

    We present 2 cases of hepatocyte nuclear factor 1α(HNF1α)-mutated adenomatosis,discovered for reasons unrelated to this disease,and identified using immunohistochemical methods.These new tools may further our understanding of the link between adenomas/adenornatosis subtypes and their complications,and their association with other abnormalities.

  10. A novel mutation in the DSPP gene associated with dentinogenesis imperfecta type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S-K; Lee, K-E; Jeon, D; Lee, G; Lee, H; Shin, C-U; Jung, Y-J; Lee, S-H; Hahn, S-H; Kim, J-W

    2009-01-01

    Hereditary dentin defects are divided into dentinogenesis imperfecta and dentin dysplasia. We identified a family segregating severe dentinogenesis imperfecta. The kindred spanned four generations and showed an autosomal-dominant pattern of inheritance. The proband was a child presenting with a severely affected primary dentition, with wide-open pulp chambers and multiple pulp exposures, resembling a DGI type III (DGI-III) pattern. We hypothesized that a mutation in the DSPP gene is responsible for this severe phenotype. Mutational analyses revealed a novel mutation (c.53T>A, p.V18D) near the intron-exon boundary in the third exon of the DSPP gene. We analyzed the effect of the mutation by means of an in vitro splicing assay, which revealed that the mutation did not affect pre-mRNA splicing. Further studies are needed for a better understanding of the nature of the disease and the development of an appropriate treatment strategy.

  11. Homozygous factor V Leiden and double heterozygosity for factor V Leiden and prothrombin mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saemundsson, Ymir; Sveinsdottir, Signý Vala; Svantesson, Henrik; Svensson, Peter J

    2013-10-01

    The most common forms of familial thrombophilia are factor V Leiden (FVL) and prothrombin mutation (PTM). Homozygous FVL and PTM have long been feared conditions thought to cause high rates of morbidity and mortality. To analyse clinical features in patients with homozygous FVL and PTM, as well as patients with double heterozygosity for FVL and PTM. All patients with homozygous FVL, PTM or double heterozygosity in the MATS database of 1465 consecutive unselected patients were analysed regarding age at inclusion venous thromboembolism (VTE), age at first thrombosis, recurrence, clinical course and acquired risk factors. We found 36 patients homozygous for FVL. Patients homozygous for FVL were younger than controls at group level (56 ± 18 vs. 63 ± 17, p < 0.02). Homozygous women were younger than female controls (50 ± 19 vs. 63 ± 18, p < 0.002). No difference was observed when comparing male subjects. Women were younger than men at inclusion thrombosis (50 ± 19 vs. 65 ± 14, p < 0.02) and at first thrombosis (47 ± 19 vs. 64 ± 14, p < 0.01). Deep venous thrombosis (DVT) was seen in 33 patients (92 %), 6 (17 %) had pulmonary embolism (PE) and 3 (8 %) had combined DVT and PE. PE was less frequent in homozygous FVL women compared to female controls (p < 0.03). VTE recurred in 3 subjects during the duration of the study. Odds ratio for VTE in homozygous FVL patients compared to controls was 13.9 (95 % CI 9.9-19.7). We found no subjects with homozygous PTM. Double heterozygosity for FVL and PTM was seen in 12 subjects. There was no difference in age at inclusion VTE between double heterozygotes and controls (59 ± 16 vs. 63 ± 17, ns.). DVT was seen in 92 % at inclusion, 8 % had PE. Mean age at first VTE was 52 ± 17 (27-82). Consecutive homozygous FVL patients had a higher age at first thrombosis than previously described. Homozygous females are affected at an earlier age than homozygous men and female controls. It seems that

  12. Mutation of Gly195 of the ChlH Subunit of Mg-chelatase Reduces Chlorophyll and Further Disrupts PS II Assembly in a Ycf48-Deficient Strain of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Tim S.; Eaton-Rye, Julian J.; Summerfield, Tina C.

    2016-01-01

    Biogenesis of the photosystems in oxygenic phototrophs requires co-translational insertion of chlorophyll a. The first committed step of chlorophyll a biosynthesis is the insertion of a Mg2+ ion into the tetrapyrrole intermediate protoporphyrin IX, catalyzed by Mg-chelatase. We have identified a Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 strain with a spontaneous mutation in chlH that results in a Gly195 to Glu substitution in a conserved region of the catalytic subunit of Mg-chelatase. Mutant strains containing the ChlH Gly195 to Glu mutation were generated using a two-step protocol that introduced the chlH gene into a putative neutral site in the chromosome prior to deletion of the native gene. The Gly195 to Glu mutation resulted in strains with decreased chlorophyll a. Deletion of the PS II assembly factor Ycf48 in a strain carrying the ChlH Gly195 to Glu mutation did not grow photoautotrophically. In addition, the ChlH-G195E:ΔYcf48 strain showed impaired PS II activity and decreased assembly of PS II centers in comparison to a ΔYcf48 strain. We suggest decreased chlorophyll in the ChlH-G195E mutant provides a background to screen for the role of assembly factors that are not essential under optimal growth conditions. PMID:27489555

  13. HELLP Syndrome and Cerebral Venous Sinus Thrombosis Associated with Factor V Leiden Mutation during Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dag, Zeynep Ozcan; Işik, Yuksel; Simsek, Yavuz; Tulmac, Ozlem Banu; Demiray, Demet

    2014-01-01

    Preeclampsia is a leading cause of maternal mortality and morbidity worldwide. The neurological complications of preeclampsia and eclampsia are responsible for a major proportion of the morbidity and mortality for women and their infants alike. Hormonal changes during pregnancy and the puerperium carry an increased risk of venous thromboembolism including cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST). Factor 5 leiden (FVL) is a procoagulant mutation associated primarily with venous thrombosis and pregnancy complications. We report a patient with FVL mutation who presented with CVST at 24th week of pregnancy and was diagnosed as HELLP syndrome at 34th week of pregnancy.

  14. HELLP Syndrome and Cerebral Venous Sinus Thrombosis Associated with Factor V Leiden Mutation during Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeynep Ozcan Dag

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Preeclampsia is a leading cause of maternal mortality and morbidity worldwide. The neurological complications of preeclampsia and eclampsia are responsible for a major proportion of the morbidity and mortality for women and their infants alike. Hormonal changes during pregnancy and the puerperium carry an increased risk of venous thromboembolism including cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST. Factor 5 leiden (FVL is a procoagulant mutation associated primarily with venous thrombosis and pregnancy complications. We report a patient with FVL mutation who presented with CVST at 24th week of pregnancy and was diagnosed as HELLP syndrome at 34th week of pregnancy.

  15. Risk Factors Of Mutation Nucleotide Oligomerazation Domain 2 Gene To Chronic Periodontitis

    OpenAIRE

    Asmawati, Dr.drg.M. Kes

    2011-01-01

    The results showed that there was 12,3% of samples that had been mutation of NOD2 gene, and in the control group only 1,2%,and ststistically there was a significant difference ( p=0,005). In conclusion,mutation NOD2 gen is a risk factor to chronic periodontitis. Chronic Periodontitis is a chronic inflammatory disease that causes a damage of tooth supporting tissue. The incidence of chronic periodontitis disease is highly reported in Indonesia.Survey in Java, Bali and Sulawesi reported the...

  16. A nonsense mutation in cGMP-dependent type II protein kinase (PRKG2) causes dwarfism in American Angus cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koltes, James E; Mishra, Bishnu P; Kumar, Dinesh; Kataria, Ranjit S; Totir, Liviu R; Fernando, Rohan L; Cobbold, Rowland; Steffen, David; Coppieters, Wouter; Georges, Michel; Reecy, James M

    2009-11-17

    Historically, dwarfism was the major genetic defect in U.S. beef cattle. Aggressive culling and sire testing were used to minimize its prevalence; however, neither of these practices can eliminate a recessive genetic defect. We assembled a 4-generation pedigree to identify the mutation underlying dwarfism in American Angus cattle. An adaptation of the Elston-Steward algorithm was used to overcome small pedigree size and missing genotypes. The dwarfism locus was fine-mapped to BTA6 between markers AFR227 and BM4311. Four candidate genes were sequenced, revealing a nonsense mutation in exon 15 of cGMP-dependant type II protein kinase (PRKG2). This C/T transition introduced a stop codon (R678X) that truncated 85 C-terminal amino acids, including a large portion of the kinase domain. Of the 75 mutations discovered in this region, only this mutation was 100% concordant with the recessive pattern of inheritance in affected and carrier individuals (log of odds score = 6.63). Previous research has shown that PRKG2 regulates SRY (sex-determining region Y) box 9 (SOX9)-mediated transcription of collagen 2 (COL2). We evaluated the ability of wild-type (WT) or R678X PRKG2 to regulate COL2 expression in cell culture. Real-time PCR results confirmed that COL2 is overexpressed in cells that overexpressed R678X PRKG2 as compared with WT PRKG2. Furthermore, COL2 and COL10 mRNA expression was increased in dwarf cattle compared with unaffected cattle. These experiments indicate that the R678X mutation is functional, resulting in a loss of PRKG2 regulation of COL2 and COL10 mRNA expression. Therefore, we present PRKG2 R678X as a causative mutation for dwarfism cattle.

  17. The F309S mutation increases factor VIII secretion in human cell line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daianne Maciely Carvalho Fantacini

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVES: The capacity of a human cell line to secrete recombinant factor VIII with a F309S point mutation was investigated, as was the effect of the addition of chemical chaperones (betaine and sodium-4-phenylbutyrate on the secretion of factor VIII. METHODS: This work used a vector with a F309S mutation in the A1 domain to investigate FVIII production in the HEK 293 human cell line. Factor VIII activity was measured by chromogenic assay. Furthermore, the effects of chemical drugs on the culture were evaluated. RESULTS: The addition of the F309S mutation to a previously described FVIII variant increased FVIII secretion by 4.5 fold. Moreover, the addition of betaine or sodium-4-phenylbutyrate increased the secretion rate of FVIIIΔB proteins in HEK 293 cells, but the same effect was not seen for FVIIIΔB-F309S indicating that all the recombinant protein produced had been efficiently secreted. CONCLUSION: Bioengineering factor VIII expressed in human cells may lead to an efficient production of recombinant factor VIII and contribute toward low-cost coagulation factor replacement therapy for hemophilia A. FVIII-F309S produced in human cells can be effective in vivo.

  18. Impact of nonsynonymous mutations of factor X on the functions of factor X and anticoagulant activity of edoxaban.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, Kengo; Morishima, Yoshiyuki; Takahashi, Shinichi; Ishihara, Hiroaki; Shibano, Toshiro; Murata, Mitsuru

    2015-03-01

    Edoxaban is an oral direct factor Xa (FXa) inhibitor and its efficacy as an oral anticoagulant is less subject to drug-food and drug-drug interaction than existing vitamin K antagonists. Although this profile of edoxaban suggests it is well suited for clinical use, it is not clear whether genetic variations of factor X influence the activity of edoxaban. Our aim was to investigate a possible impact of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the factor X gene on the functions of factor X and the activity of edoxaban. Two nonsynonymous SNPs within mature factor X, Ala152Thr and Gly192Arg, were selected as possible candidates that might affect the functions of FXa and the activity of edoxaban. We measured catalytic activities of wild type and mutant FXas in a chromogenic assay using S-2222 and coagulation times including prothrombin time (PT) and activated partial thrombin time (aPTT) of plasma-containing recombinant FXs in the presence and absence of edoxaban. Michaelis-Menten kinetic parameters of FXas, Km and Vmax values, PT and aPTT were not influenced by either mutation indicating these mutations do not affect the FXa catalytic and coagulation activities. The Ki values of edoxaban for the FXas and the concentrations of edoxaban required to double PT and aPTT were not different between wild type and mutated FXas indicating that both mutations have little impact on the activity of edoxaban. In conclusion, these data suggest that edoxaban has little interpatient variability stemming from SNPs in the factor X gene.

  19. Efficient detection of factor IX mutations by denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography in Taiwanese hemophilia B patients, and the identification of two novel mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Chin Lin

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Hemophilia B (HB is an X-linked recessive disorder characterized by mutations in the clotting factor IX (FIX gene that result in FIX deficiency. Previous studies have shown a wide variation of FIX gene mutations in HB. Although the quality of life in HB has greatly improved mainly because of prophylactic replacement therapy with FIX concentrates, there exists a significant burden on affected families and the medical care system. Accurate detection of FIX gene mutations is critical for genetic counseling and disease prevention in HB. In this study, we used denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC, which has proved to be a highly informative and practical means of detecting mutations, for the molecular diagnosis of our patients with HB. Ten Taiwanese families affected by HB were enrolled. We used the DHPLC technique followed by direct sequencing of suspected segments to detect FIX gene mutations. In all, 11 FIX gene mutations (8 point mutations, 2 small deletions/insertions, and 1 large deletion, including two novel mutations (exon6 c.687–695, del 9 mer and c.460–461, ins T were found. According to the HB pedigrees, 25% and 75% of our patients were defined as familial and sporadic HB cases, respectively. We show that DHPLC is a highly sensitive and cost-effective method for FIX gene analysis and can be used as a convenient system for disease prevention.

  20. MTHFR Gene Polymorphism-Mutations and Air Pollution as Risk Factors for Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, Mildred C.; Yu, Pojui; Shiao, S. Pamela K.

    2017-01-01

    Background The methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene (MTHFR) is one of the most investigated genes associated with breast cancer for its role in epigenetic pathways. Objectives The objectives of this metaprediction study were to examine the polymorphism-mutation risk subtypes of MTHFR and air pollution as contributing factors for breast cancer. Methods For triangulation purposes in metapredictive analyses, we used a recursive partition tree, nonlinear association curve fit, and heat maps for data visualization, in addition to the conventional comparison procedure and pooled analyses. Results We included 36,683 breast cancer cases and 40,689 controls across 82 studies for MTHFR 677 and 23,252 cases and 27,094 controls across 50 studies for MTHFR 1298. MTHFR 677 TT was a risk genotype for breast cancer (p = .0004) and in the East Asian subgroup (p = .005). On global maps, the most polymorphism-mutations on MTHFR 677 TT were found in the Middle East, Europe, Asia, and the Americas, whereas the most mutations on MTHFR 1298 CC were located in Europe and the Middle East for the control group. The geographic information system maps further revealed that MTHFR 677 TT mutations yielded a higher risk of breast cancer for Australia, East Asia, the Middle East, South Europe, Morocco, and the Americas and that MTHFR 1298 CC mutations yielded a higher risk in Asia, the Middle East, South Europe, and South America. Metapredictive analysis revealed that air pollution level was significantly associated with MTHFR 677 TT polymorphism-mutation genotype. Discussion We present the most comprehensive analyses to date of MTHFR polymorphism-mutations and breast cancer risk. Future nursing studies are needed to investigate the health impact on breast cancer of epigenetics and air pollution across populations. PMID:28114181

  1. Alterations in bile acid synthesis in carriers of hepatocyte nuclear factormutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekholm, E; Nilsson, R; Groop, L; Pramfalk, C

    2013-09-01

    Heterozygous mutations in hepatocyte nuclear factor 1α (HNF1α) cause maturity onset diabetes of the young 3 (MODY3), an autosomal dominant form of diabetes. Deficiency of HNF1α in mice results in diabetes, hypercholesterolaemia and increased bile acid (BA) and cholesterol synthesis. Little is known about alterations in lipid metabolism in patients with MODY3. The aim of this study was to investigate whether patients with MODY3 have altered cholesterol and BA synthesis and intestinal cholesterol absorption. A secondary aim was to investigate the effects of HNF1α mutations on the transcriptional regulation of BA metabolism. Plasma biomarkers of BA and cholesterol synthesis and intestinal cholesterol absorption were measured in patients with MODY3 (n = 19) and in matched healthy control subjects (n = 15). Cotransfection experiments were performed with several promoters involved in BA metabolism along with expression vectors carrying the mutations found in these patients. Plasma analysis showed higher levels of BA synthesis in patients with MODY3. No differences were observed in cholesterol synthesis or intestinal cholesterol absorption. Cotransfection experiments showed that one of the mutations (P379A) increased the induction of the cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase promoter compared with HNF1α, without further differences in other studied promoters. By contrast, the other four mutations (L107I, T260M, P291fsinsC and R131Q) reduced the induction of the farnesoid X receptor (FXR) promoter, which was followed by reduced repression of the small heterodimer partner promoter. In addition, these mutations also reduced the induction of the apical sodium-dependent bile salt transporter promoter. BA synthesis is increased in patients with MODY3 compared with control subjects. Mutations in HNF1α affect promoters involved in BA metabolism. © 2013 The Association for the Publication of the Journal of Internal Medicine.

  2. Molecular genetics and phenotypic characteristics of MODY caused by hepatocyte nuclear factor 4alpha mutations in a large European collection.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pearson, E.R.; Pruhova, S.; Tack, C.J.J.; Johansen, A.; Castleden, H.A.; Lumb, P.J.; Wierzbicki, A.S.; Clark, P.M.; Lebl, J.; Pedersen, O.; Ellard, S.; Hansen, T.; Hattersley, A.T.

    2005-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Heterozygous mutations in the gene of the transcription factor hepatocyte nuclear factor 4alpha (HNF-4alpha) are considered a rare cause of MODY with only 14 mutations reported to date. The description of the phenotype is limited to single families. We investigated the genetics and

  3. A Young Male Patient With Multiple Thromboembolisms Associated With Factor V Leiden Mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çinier, Göksel; Öz, Ahmet; Tekkesin, Ahmet Ilker; Hayıroğlu, Mert İlker; Keskin, Muhammed; Avsar, Şahin

    2016-09-28

    Factor V Leiden (FVL) mutation is the most common hereditary thrombophilia. Association of this mutation with venous thrombosis is well established. However, there are several conflicting results regarding the association of FVL with arterial thrombosis, acute coronary syndrome, and intracardiac thrombosis. In this case report, we present a 44-yearold male patient with a medical history of both arterial and venous thrombosis who came to our emergency department with chest pain. After the initial evaluation he was diagnosed as having acute coronary syndrome and transthoracic echocardiography revealed an intracardiac apical thrombus. Coronary angiography showed non-critical stenosis. Thrombophilia panel was studied and the patient was found to be heterozygotic for FVL mutation. An apical thrombus was extracted surgically because of the high risk of systemic embolization.

  4. Lack of the type III epidermal growth factor receptor mutation in colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spindler, Karen-Lise Garm; Olsen, Dorte Aalund; Nielsen, Jens Nederby;

    2007-01-01

    network are being investigated and mutations in the EGFR gene have been identified. The type III epidermal growth factor receptor, a tumour-specific, ligand independent, constitutively activated form of EGFR, might contribute to the malignant phenotype in CRC and may be a potential target for anticancer...... therapy. The aim of the present study was to investigate the presence of EGFRvIII in CRC by PCR and protein analysis. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study included 79 colorectal cancer patients for PCR analysis and 50 patients for protein analysis by Western blots, in two different laboratories. RESULTS......: No type III mutations were detected in our material. CONCLUSION: The EGFRvIII mutations are rare in colorectal adenocarcinomas and overall probability does not appear to contribute to the malignant phenotype of this disease....

  5. Functional analysis of human mutations in homeodomain transcription factor PITX3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorokina Elena

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The homeodomain-containing transcription factor PITX3 was shown to be essential for normal eye development in vertebrates. Human patients with point mutations in PITX3 demonstrate congenital cataracts along with anterior segment defects in some cases when one allele is affected and microphthalmia with brain malformations when both copies are mutated. The functional consequences of these human mutations remain unknown. Results We studied the PITX3 mutant proteins S13N and G219fs to determine the type and severity of functional defects. Our results demonstrate alterations in DNA-binding profiles and/or transactivation activities and suggest a partial loss-of-function in both mutants with the G219fs form being more severely affected. No anomalies in cellular distribution and no dominant-negative effects were discovered for these mutants. Interestingly, the impairment of the G219fs activity varied between different ocular cell lines. Conclusion The G219fs mutation was found in multiple families affected with congenital cataracts along with anterior segment malformations in many members. Our data suggest that the presence/severity of anterior segment defects in families affected with G219fs may be determined by secondary factors that are expressed in the developing anterior segment structures and may modify the effect(s of this mutation. The S13N mutant showed only minor alteration of transactivation ability and DNA binding pattern and may represent a rare polymorphism in the PITX3 gene. A possible contribution of this mutation to human disease needs to be further investigated.

  6. KRAS mutational status as a predictor of epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor efficacy in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baynes, Roy D; Gansert, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    Inhibitors of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) have demonstrated promising potential in the treatment of advanced colorectal cancer. However, a proportion of patients do not respond to therapy with EGFR inhibitors, and therefore, there has been interest in identifying those patients most likely to benefit from therapy with these agents. KRAS, a member of the RAS family of signaling proteins, plays an important role in EGFR-mediated regulation of cellular proliferation and survival. Although there is still some debate regarding the prognostic importance of KRAS mutations in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer, several recent phase 2 and 3 studies have identified the presence of mutations at codons 12 and 13 of KRAS as predictors of poor response to the anti-EGFR monoclonal antibodies panitumumab and cetuximab. Patients with wild-type KRAS were found to have significantly better progression-free survival, overall survival, and/or objective response rate compared with patients harboring KRAS mutations. As a result, there has been growing interest in the development of KRAS mutational status as a biomarker for predicting patient response to EGFR-targeted therapy. Screening colorectal tumors for the absence of KRAS mutations may help identify patients most likely to benefit from anti-EGFR therapies.

  7. Hereditary juvenile cobalamin deficiency caused by mutations in the intrinsic factor gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Stephan M; Li, Zhongyuan; Perko, James D; Oner, Cihan; Cetin, Mualla; Altay, Cigdem; Yurtsever, Zekiye; David, Karen L; Faivre, Laurence; Ismail, Essam A; Gräsbeck, Ralph; de la Chapelle, Albert

    2005-03-15

    Hereditary juvenile megaloblastic anemia due to vitamin B12 (cobalamin) deficiency is caused by intestinal malabsorption of cobalamin. In Imerslund-Grasbeck syndrome (IGS), cobalamin absorption is completely abolished and not corrected by the administration of intrinsic factor (IF); if untreated, the disease is fatal. Biallelic mutations either in the cubilin (CUBN) or amnionless (AMN) gene cause IGS. In a series of families clinically diagnosed with likely IGS, at least six displayed no evidence of mutations in CUBN or AMN. A genome-wide search for linkage followed by mutational analysis of candidate genes was performed in five of these families. A region in chromosome 11 showed evidence of linkage in four families. The gastric IF (GIF) gene located in this region harbored homozygous nonsense and missense mutations in these four families and in three additional families. The disease in these cases therefore should be classified as hereditary IF deficiency. Clinically, these patients resembled those with typical IGS; radiocobalamin absorption tests had been inconclusive regarding the nature of the defect. In the diagnosis of juvenile cobalamin deficiency, mutational analysis of the CUBN, AMN, and GIF genes provides a molecular characterization of the underlying defect and may be the diagnostic method of choice.

  8. Epidermal growth factor receptor activation in glioblastoma through novel missense mutations in the extracellular domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey C Lee

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Protein tyrosine kinases are important regulators of cellular homeostasis with tightly controlled catalytic activity. Mutations in kinase-encoding genes can relieve the autoinhibitory constraints on kinase activity, can promote malignant transformation, and appear to be a major determinant of response to kinase inhibitor therapy. Missense mutations in the EGFR kinase domain, for example, have recently been identified in patients who showed clinical responses to EGFR kinase inhibitor therapy. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Encouraged by the promising clinical activity of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR kinase inhibitors in treating glioblastoma in humans, we have sequenced the complete EGFR coding sequence in glioma tumor samples and cell lines. We identified novel missense mutations in the extracellular domain of EGFR in 13.6% (18/132 of glioblastomas and 12.5% (1/8 of glioblastoma cell lines. These EGFR mutations were associated with increased EGFR gene dosage and conferred anchorage-independent growth and tumorigenicity to NIH-3T3 cells. Cells transformed by expression of these EGFR mutants were sensitive to small-molecule EGFR kinase inhibitors. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest extracellular missense mutations as a novel mechanism for oncogenic EGFR activation and may help identify patients who can benefit from EGFR kinase inhibitors for treatment of glioblastoma.

  9. A RARE CASE OF FACTOR V LEIDEN MUTATION COMPLICATING PREGNANCY IN INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chitra

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Factor V Leiden mutation (Factor V Leiden is an autosomal dominant haemostatic disorder that predisposes affected persons to venous thromboembolic events (VTE. Although the mutation causing FVL is easily diagnosed using molecular DNA techniques, (1 patients who are heterozygous for this disorder often remain asymptomatic until they develop a concurrent prothrombotic condition. Pregnancy, which may increase an individual woman’s risk of venous thromboembolic events by 5- to 6-fold. (2 Because there are potentially serious effects of FVL for both the mother and the child, and availability of effective treatment strategies, early detection and treatment of this condition is warranted. (3 We are presenting this case in order to emphasise the existence of Factor V Leiden in Indian population and its approach during pregnancy.

  10. NK and B cell deficiency in a MPS type II family with novel mutation in the IDS gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Leuridan Cavalcante; Soares, Diogo Cordeiro de Queiroz; Kulikowski, Leslie Domenici; Franco, Jose Francisco; Kim, Chong Ae

    2014-10-01

    The mucopolysaccharidoses (MPSs) are a group of rare, inherited lysosomal storage disorders that are clinically characterized by abnormalities in multiple organ systems and reduced life expectancy. Whereas the lysosome is essential to the functioning of the immune system, some authors suggest that the MPS patients have abnormalities in the immune system similar to the patients with primary immunodeficiency. In this study, we evaluated 8 male MPS type II patients of the same family with novel mutation in the IDS gene. We found in this MPS family a quantitative deficiency of NK and B cells with normal values of IgG, IgM and IgA serum antibodies and normal response to polysaccharide antigens. Interestingly, abnormalities found in these patients were not observed in other MPS patients, suggesting that the type of mutation found in the IDS gene can be implicated in the immunodeficiency. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Phenotypic expressions of a Gly154Arg mutation in type II collagen in two unrelated patients with spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia (SEMD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaitila, I.; Marttinen, E. [Helsinki Univ. Hospital (Finland); Koerkkoe, J.; Ala-Kokko, L. [Thomas Jefferson Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    1996-05-03

    Type II collagenopathies consist of chondrodysplasia ranging from lethal to mild in severity. A large number of mutations has been found in the COL2A1 gene. Glycine substitutions have been the most common types of mutation. Genotype-phenotype correlations in type II collagenopathies have not been established, partly because of insufficient clinical and radiographic description of the patients. We found a glycine-to-arginine substitution at position 154 in type II collagen in two unrelated isolated propositi with spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia and provide a comparative clinical and radiographic analysis from birth to young adulthood for this condition. The clinical phenotype was disproportionate short stature with varus/valgus deformities of the lower limbs requiring corrective osteotomies, and lumbar lordosis. The skeletal radiographs showed an evolution from short tubular bones, delayed epiphyseal development, and mild vertebral involvement to severe metaphyseal dysplasia with dappling irregularities, and hip {open_quotes}dysplasia.{close_quotes} The metaphyseal abnormalities disappeared by adulthood. 27 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Mutations in the COL5A1 gene are causal in the Ehlers-Danlos syndromes I and II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Paepe, A.; Nuytinck, L.; Naeyaert, J.M. [Universitaets-Hautklinik Heidelberg (Germany)] [and others

    1997-03-01

    The Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is a heterogeneous connective-tissue disorder of which at least nine subtypes are recognized. Considerable clinical overlap exists between the EDS I and II subtypes, suggesting that both are allelic disorders. Recent evidence based on linkage and transgenic mice studies suggest that collagen V is causally involved in human EDS. Collagen V forms heterotypic fibrils with collagen I in many tissues and plays an important role in collagen I fibrillogenesis. We have identified a mutation in COL5A1, the gene encoding the pro{alpha}1(V) collagen chain, segregating with EDS I in a four-generation family. The mutation causes the substitution of the most 5{prime} cysteine residue by a serine within a highly conserved sequence of the pro{alpha}1(V) C-propeptide domain and causes reduction of collagen V by preventing incorporation of the mutant pro{alpha}1 (V) chains in the collagen V trimers. In addition, we have detected splicing defects in the COL5A1 gene in a patient with EDS I and in a family with EDS II. These findings confirm the causal role of collagen V in at least a subgroup of EDS I, prove that EDS I and II are allelic conditions, and represent a, so far, unique example of a human collagen disorder caused by substitution of a highly conserved cysteine residue in the C-propeptide domain of a fibrillar collagen. 30 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Mutation Enhances Expression of Cadherin-5 in Lung Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Ming-Szu; Chen, I-Chuan; Lung, Jr-Hau; Lin, Paul-Yann; Li, Ya-Chin; Tsai, Ying-Huang

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activation has been shown to play a critical role in tumor angiogenesis. In this study, we investigate the correlation between EGFR mutations and cadherin-5 (CDH5), which is an angiogenic factor, in lung cancer cells. Increased expression CDH5 is observed in lung cancer cells with EGFR mutations. Stable lung cancer cell lines expressing mutant (exon 19 deletion E746-A750, and exon 21 missense mutation L858R) and wild type EGFR genes are established. A significantly higher expression of CDH5 is observed in exon 19 deletion stable lung cancer cells and mouse xenografts. Further studies show that expression of CDH5 is decreased after the inhibition of EGFR and downstream Akt pathways in lung cancer cells with EGFR mutation. In addition, mutant EGFR genes potentiates angiogenesis in lung cancer cells, which is inhibited by CDH5 siRNA, and potentiates migration and invasion in lung cancer cells. Our study shows that mutant EGFR genes are associated with overexpression of CDH5 through increased phosphorylation of EGFR and downstream Akt pathways. Our result may provide an insight into the association of mutant EGFR and CDH5 expression in lung cancer and aid further development of target therapy for NSCLC in the future.

  14. Complementing mutations in core binding factor leukemias: from mouse models to clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, A M S; Duque, J; Shizuru, J A; Lübbert, M

    2008-10-02

    A great proportion of acute myeloid leukemias (AMLs) display cytogenetic abnormalities including chromosomal aberrations and/or submicroscopic mutations. These abnormalities significantly influence the prognosis of the disease. Hence, a thorough genetic work-up is an essential constituent of standard diagnostic procedures. Core binding factor (CBF) leukemias denote AMLs with chromosomal aberrations disrupting one of the CBF transcription factor genes; the most common examples are translocation t(8;21) and inversion inv(16), which result in the generation of the AML1-ETO and CBFbeta-MYH11 fusion proteins, respectively. However, in murine models, these alterations alone do not suffice to generate full-blown leukemia, but rather, complementary events are required. In fact, a substantial proportion of primary CBF leukemias display additional activating mutations, mostly of the receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) c-KIT. The awareness of the impact and prognostic relevance of these 'second hits' is increasing with a wider range of mutations tested in clinical trials. Furthermore, novel agents targeting RTKs are emanating rapidly and entering therapeutic regimens. Here, we present a concise review on complementing mutations in CBF leukemias including pathophysiology, mouse models, and clinical implications.

  15. Coexistence of hypofibrinogenemia and factor V Leiden mutation: is the balance shifted to thrombosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miljić, Predrag; Nedeljkov-Jančić, Ružica; Zuvela, Marinko; Subota, Vesna; Dorđević, Valentina

    2014-09-01

    Congenital hypofibrinogenemia and afibrinogenemia are usually associated with an increased risk of bleeding, but occurrence of arterial or venous thrombosis has also been reported in individuals with fibrinogen deficiency. This study reports on a 25-year-old patient with hypofibrinogenemia (fibrinogen 0.6 g/l) and congenital thrombophilia due to heterozygous factor V Leiden mutation who developed spontaneous deep-vein thrombosis (DVT) in the right lower extremity. Regardless of hypofibrinogenemia, he was receiving anticoagulant therapy over 6 months, with no occurrence of bleeding. His father is also a heterozygous carrier of factor V Leiden, but with normal fibrinogen level and he remained asymptomatic despite having experienced surgery in the past. This case, as well as data from literature, suggests that risk of thrombosis in carriers of factor V Leiden mutation is not counterbalanced by moderate congenital hypofibrinogenemia, and that antithrombotic prophylaxis should not be omitted in high-risk situations for occurrence of thrombosis in patients with coinheritance of hypofibrinogenemia and factor V Leiden mutation.

  16. [Somatic hypermutagenesis in immunoglobulin genes. II. Properties of somatic mutations and clonal selection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogozin, I B; Solov'ev, V V

    1989-01-01

    Analysis of the collection of 203 somatic mutations in immunoglobulin genes was carried out. It was shown, that the high frequency of these mutations in CDRs of V-genes may be connected with the high concentration of repeats in these regions. In addition, the observed clusterization of mutations may emerge from simultaneous correction of several pertubations of complementarity in the heteroduplex, formed by the repeat regions. It was revealed, that somatic mutations in FRs are characterized by reliably smaller changes of some important amino acid physical-chemical properties than in CDRs. These data obviously indicate the occurrence of B-lymphocytes clonal selection. Analysis of synonymous substitutions has shown, that stabilizing selection seems to provide the conservatism of FRs (it leads to the conservation of the protein three-dimensional structure) and movement selection may provide the proliferation of B-lymphocytes with considerable changes in CDRs, if these mutations improve antigens binding. Preferential fixation of transitions in comparison with transversions, particularly expressed in FRs, may also be connected with the fact, that transitions lead to smaller changes of amino acid physical-chemical properties and they are rejected by selection to a smaller extent.

  17. Mutations in exons of the CYP17-II gene affect sex steroid concentration in male Japanese flounder ( Paralichthys olivaceus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ruiqin; He, Feng; Wen, Haishen; Li, Jifang; Shi, Bao; Shi, Dan; Liu, Miao; Mu, Weijie; Zhang, Yuanqing; Hu, Jian; Han, Weiguo; Zhang, Jianan; Wang, Qingqing; Yuan, Yuren; Liu, Qun

    2012-03-01

    As a specific gene of fish, cytochrome P450c17-II ( CYP17-II) gene plays a key role in the growth, development an reproduction level of fish. In this study, the single-stranded conformational polymorphism (SSCP) technique was used to characterize polymorphisms within the coding region of CYP17-II gene in a population of 75 male Japanese flounder ( Paralichthys olivaceus). Three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified in CYP17-II gene of Japanese flounder. They were c.G594A (p.G188R), c.G939A and c.G1502A (p.G490D). SNP1 (c.G594A), located in exon 4 of CYP17-II gene, was significantly associated with gonadosomatic index (GSI). Individuals with genotype GG of SNP1 had significantly lower GSI ( P < 0.05) than those with genotype AA or AG. SNP2 (c.G939A) located at the CpG island of CYP17-II gene. The mutation changed the methylation of exon 6. Individuals with genotype AA of SNP2 had significantly lower serum testosterone (T) level and hepatosomatic index (HSI) compared to those with genotype GG. The results suggested that SNP2 could influence the reproductive endocrine of male Japanese flounder. However, the SNP3 (c.G1502A) located in exon 9 did not affect the four measured reproductive traits. This study showed that CYP17-II gene could be a potentially useful candidate gene for the research of genetic breeding and physiological aspects of Japanese flounder.

  18. Recurrent pregnancy loss in a subject with heterozygote factor V Leiden mutation; a case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimzadeh-Vesal, Reza; Azam, Roza; Ghazarian, Arvin; Hajesmaeili, Mogge; Ranji, Najmeh; Ezzati, Mohammad Reza; Sadri, Mehrdad; Mohammadi, Mohammad Ali; Khavandi, Siamak

    2014-01-01

    Recurrent pregnancy loss is usually defined as the loss of two or more consecutive pregnancies before 20 weeks of gestation, which occurs in approximately 5% of reproductive-aged women. It has been suggested that women with thrombophilia have an increased risk of pregnancy loss and other adverse pregnancy outcomes. Thrombophilia is an important predisposition to blood clot formation and is considered as a significant risk factor for recurrent pregnancy loss. The inherited predisposition to thrombophilia is most often associated with factor V Leiden mutation, prothrombin G20210A mutation, and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase C677T and A1298C gene variants. The net effect is an increased cleavage of prothrombin to thrombin and excessive blood coagulation. PMID:26989729

  19. Targeting and germ-line transmission of a null mutation at the metallothionein I and II loci in mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalska, A E; Choo, K H

    1993-09-01

    We report the generation of transgenic mice deficient in the metallothionein MT-I and MT-II genes. The mutations were introduced into embryonic stem cells by homologous recombination. Chimeric mice resulting from the targeted embryonic stem cells transmitted the disrupted alleles through their germ line. Homozygous animals were born alive and appeared phenotypically normal and fertile. Absence of MT proteins was confirmed by direct measurement in liver extracts. Challenging the mutant animals with moderate levels of CdSO4 indicated their greater susceptibility to cadmium toxicity than wild-type animals. These mice should provide a useful model to allow detailed study of the physiological roles of MT-I and MT-II.

  20. Multiple Brain Abscesses in an Immunocompetent Patient With Factor V Leiden Mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafar, Saeed Zubair; Pervin, Najwa; Manthri, Sukesh; Bhattarai, Mukul

    2016-01-01

    Multiple brain abscesses in an immunocompetent patient is a challenging clinical problem in the medical world despite advances in imaging techniques, laboratory diagnostics, surgical interventions, and antimicrobial treatment. It is a clinical entity that typically tends to occur in the presence of known predisposing factors. Clinicians seek to determine the potential risk factors responsible for the development of brain abscess because it is very crucial for management of this life-threatening condition. At times, like in our case, there are clinical situations where it is difficult to reveal any traditional risk factors. We report a case of multiple brain abscesses in a 51-year-old female with a past medical history significant only for factor V Leiden mutation, and deep vein thrombosis on chronic anticoagulation. She underwent thorough evaluation but no predisposing factors were found. Based on our extensive literature review, this is the index case of multiple brain abscesses in a patient with history of factor V Leiden mutation and the absence of any conventional risk factors. We also postulate a possible mechanism of infection in such patients.

  1. Twenty-two novel mutations in the lysosomal alpha-glucosidase gene (GAA) underscore the genotype-phenotype correlation in glycogen storage disease type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermans, Monique M P; van Leenen, Dik; Kroos, Marian A; Beesley, Clare E; Van Der Ploeg, Ans T; Sakuraba, Hitoshi; Wevers, Ron; Kleijer, Wim; Michelakakis, Helen; Kirk, Edwin P; Fletcher, Janice; Bosshard, Nils; Basel-Vanagaite, Lina; Besley, Guy; Reuser, Arnold J J

    2004-01-01

    Patients with glycogen storage disease type II (GSDII, Pompe disease) suffer from progressive muscle weakness due to acid alpha-glucosidase deficiency. The disease is inherited as an autosomal recessive trait with a spectrum of clinical phenotypes. We have investigated 29 cases of GSDII and thereby identified 55 pathogenic mutations of the acid alpha-glucosidase gene (GAA) encoding acid maltase. There were 34 different mutations identified, 22 of which were novel. All of the missense mutations and two other mutations with an unpredictable effect on acid alpha-glucosidase synthesis and function were transiently expressed in COS cells. The effect of a novel splice-site mutation was investigated by real-time PCR analysis. The outcome of our analysis underscores the notion that the clinical phenotype of GSDII is largely dictated by the nature of the mutations in the GAA alleles. This genotype-phenotype correlation makes DNA analysis a valuable tool to help predict the clinical course of the disease.

  2. Optimal Therapeutic Strategy for Non-small Cell Lung Cancer with Mutated Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong SHI

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Although epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs have been widely used in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients, it is still controversial about how to combine EGFR-TKI with chemotherapy and other targeted drugs. We have made a summary on the current therapeutic models of EGFR-TKI combined with chemotherapy/bevacizumab in this review and aimed to find the optimal therapeutic strategy for NSCLC patients with EGFR mutation.

  3. Regional block anesthesia in a patient with factor V Leiden mutation and axillary artery occlusion

    OpenAIRE

    Ozdemir, haluk

    2011-01-01

    Kerem Erkalp1, Mevlut Comlekci1, Bekir Inan2, Gokcen Basaranoglu1, Haluk Ozdemir1, Leyla Saidoglu11Department of Anaesthesiology and Reanimation, Vakif Gureba Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey; 2Department of Vascular Surgery, Vakif Gureba Hospital, Istanbul, TurkeyAbstract: Anesthetic management of patients with coagulation disorders presents safety and technical challenges. This case describes a 58-year-old woman with factor V Leiden mutation who required distal saphenous vein harvest and axillo-b...

  4. Novel Mutations and Deletions of the KIT (Steel Factor Receptor) Gene in Human Piebaldism

    OpenAIRE

    Ezoe, Kazuhiko; Holmes, Stuart A.; Ho, Lingling; Bennett, Christopher P.; Bolognia, Jean L.; Brueton, Louise; Burn, John; Falabella, Rafael; Gatto, Emilia M.; Ishii, Norihisa; Moss, Celia; Pittelkow, Mark R.; Thompson, Elizabeth; Ward, K. Anne; Spritz, Richard A.

    1995-01-01

    Piebaldism is an autosomal dominant genetic disorder of pigmentation characterized by white patches of skin and hair. Melanocytes are lacking in these hypopigmented regions, the result of mutations of the KIT gene, which encodes the cell surface receptor for steel factor (SLF). We describe the analysis of 26 unrelated patients with piebaldism-like hypopigmentation—17 typical patients, 5 with atypical clinical features or family histories, and 4 with other disorders that involve white spotting...

  5. Complement Factor B Mutations in Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome—Disease-Relevant or Benign?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinozzi, Maria Chiara; Vergoz, Laura; Rybkine, Tania; Ngo, Stephanie; Bettoni, Serena; Pashov, Anastas; Cayla, Mathieu; Tabarin, Fanny; Jablonski, Mathieu; Hue, Christophe; Smith, Richard J.; Noris, Marina; Halbwachs-Mecarelli, Lise; Donadelli, Roberta; Fremeaux-Bacchi, Veronique

    2014-01-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is a genetic ultrarare renal disease associated with overactivation of the alternative pathway of complement. Four gain-of-function mutations that form a hyperactive or deregulated C3 convertase have been identified in Factor B (FB) ligand binding sites. Here, we studied the functional consequences of 10 FB genetic changes recently identified from different aHUS cohorts. Using several tests for alternative C3 and C5 convertase formation and regulation, we identified two gain-of-function and potentially disease-relevant mutations that formed either an overactive convertase (M433I) or a convertase resistant to decay by FH (K298Q). One mutation (R178Q) produced a partially cleaved protein with no ligand binding or functional activity. Seven genetic changes led to near-normal or only slightly reduced ligand binding and functional activity compared with the most common polymorphism at position 7, R7. Notably, none of the algorithms used to predict the disease relevance of FB mutations agreed completely with the experimental data, suggesting that in silico approaches should be undertaken with caution. These data, combined with previously published results, suggest that 9 of 15 FB genetic changes identified in patients with aHUS are unrelated to disease pathogenesis. This study highlights that functional assessment of identified nucleotide changes in FB is mandatory to confirm disease association. PMID:24652797

  6. Novel Mutations and Deletions of the KIT (Steel Factor Receptor) Gene in Human Piebaldism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezoe, Kazuhiko; Holmes, Stuart A.; Ho, Lingling; Bennett, Christopher P.; Bolognia, Jean L.; Brueton, Louise; Burn, John; Falabella, Rafael; Gatto, Emilia M.; Ishii, Norihisa; Moss, Celia; Pittelkow, Mark R.; Thompson, Elizabeth; Ward, K. Anne; Spritz, Richard A.

    1995-01-01

    Piebaldism is an autosomal dominant genetic disorder of pigmentation characterized by white patches of skin and hair. Melanocytes are lacking in these hypopigmented regions, the result of mutations of the KIT gene, which encodes the cell surface receptor for steel factor (SLF). We describe the analysis of 26 unrelated patients with piebaldism-like hypopigmentation—17 typical patients, 5 with atypical clinical features or family histories, and 4 with other disorders that involve white spotting. We identified novel pathologic mutations or deletions of the KIT gene in 10 (59%) of the typical patients, and in 2 (40%) of the atypical patients. Overall, we have identified pathologic KIT gene mutations in 21 (75%) of 28 unrelated patients with typical piebaldism we have studied. Of the patients without apparent KIT mutations, none have apparent abnormalities of the gene encoding SLF itself (MGF), and genetic linkage analyses in two of these families are suggestive of linkage of the piebald phenotype to KIT. Thus, most patients with typical piebaldism appear to have abnormalities of the KIT gene. ImagesFigure 2 PMID:7529964

  7. Expression of von Willebrand factor Normandy: An autosomal mutation that mimics hemophilia A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuley, E.A.; Worrall, N.K.; Sadler, J.E. (Washington Univ. School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States)); Gaucher, C.; Jorieux, S.; Mazurier, C. (Centre Regional de Transfusion Sanguine, Lille (France))

    1991-07-15

    von Willebrand disease Normandy (vWD Normandy) is a recently described phenotype in which a mutant von Willebrand factor (VWF) appears structurally and functionally normal except that is does not bind to blood coagulation factor VIII. This interaction is required for normal survival of factor VIII in the circulation; consequently, vWD Normandy can present as apparent hemophilia A but with autosomal recessive rather than X chromosome-linked inheritance. AvWF missense mutation, Thr{sup 28} {r arrow} Met, was identified in the propositus in or near the factor VIII binding site. The corresponding mutant recombinant vWF(T28M) formed normal multimers and had normal ristocetin cofactor activity. However, vWF(T28M) exhibited the same defect in factor VIII binding as natural vWF Normandy, confirming that this mutation causes the vWD Normandy phenotype. The distinction between hemophilia A and vWD Normandy is clinically important and should be considered in families affected by apparent mild hemophilia A that fail to show strict X chromosome-linked inheritance and, particularly, in potential female carriers with low factor VIII levels attributed to extreme lyonization.

  8. Cerebral venous and sinus thrombosis and thrombophilic mutations in Western Iran: association with factor V Leiden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi, Zohreh; Mozafari, Hadi; Bigvand, Amir Hossein Amiri; Doulabi, Reza Mohammad; Vaisi-Raygani, Asad; Afshari, Dariush; Razazian, Nazanin; Rezaei, Mansour

    2010-08-01

    The present study aimed at investigating the prevalence of factor V Leiden G1691A, prothrombin G20210A, and MTHFR C677T in cerebral venous and sinus thrombosis (CVST) patients and their possible association with CVST in Western Iran. A total of 24 CVST patients with the mean age of 37.1 +/- 11.7 years and 100 sex- and age-matched healthy individuals from Kermanshah Province of Iran with ethnic background of Kurd were studied for factor V Leiden G1691A, prothrombin G20210A and MTHFR C677T by PCR-RFLP method using Mnl I, Hind III, and Hinf I restriction enzymes, respectively. Prevalence of factor V Leiden was 16.7% in patients and 2% in control group. A significant association was found between factor V Leiden mutation and CVST with odds ratio (OR) of 9.8 (95% confidence intervals [CI] 1.68-57.2, P = .01). No prothrombin G20210A was found among patients. In patients, MTHFR C677T tended to be higher (58.3%) compared to control (44%), OR of 1.8 (95% CI 0.73-4.5, P = .2). Our study for the first time has determined the prevalence of inherited thrombophilia in a homogenous ethnic group of CVST patients and suggests that factor V Leiden, and not the prothrombin gene mutation is a risk factor for CVST in Western Iran.

  9. A single point mutation in a group I WW domain shifts its specificity to that of group II WW domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espanel, X; Sudol, M

    1999-06-11

    WW domains can be divided into three groups based on their binding specificity. By random mutagenesis, we switched the specificity of the Yes-associated protein (YAP) WW1 domain, a Group I WW domain, to that of the FE65 WW domain, which belongs to Group II. We showed that a single mutation, leucine 190 (betaB5) to tryptophan, is required to switch from Group I to Group II. Although this single substitution in YAP WW1 domain is sufficient to precipitate the two protein isoforms of Mena, an in vivo ligand of FE65, we showed that an additional substitution, histidine 192 (betaB7) to glycine, significantly increased the ability of YAP to mimic FE65. This double mutant (L190W/H192G) precipitates eight of the nine protein bands that FE65 pulls down from rat brain protein lysates. Based on both our data and a sequence comparison between Group I and Group II WW domains, we propose that a block of three consecutive aromatic amino acids within the second beta-sheet of the domain is required, but not always sufficient, for a WW domain to belong to Group II. These data deepen our understanding of WW domain binding specificity and provide a basis for the rational design of modified WW domains with potential therapeutic applications.

  10. Mutation of histidine residues in CP47 leads to destabilization of the photosystem II complex and to impairment of light energy transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, G; Eaton-Rye, J J; Vermaas, W F

    1993-05-18

    Site-directed mutagenesis has been used to change conserved histidine residues in hydrophobic regions of the photosystem II chlorophyll-binding protein CP47 in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. Nine mutants with one, four mutants with two, and four mutants with three His mutations in CP47 have been generated and characterized. Mutation of any one of seven different His residues to Tyr leads to slower photoautotrophic growth and apparent destabilization of the PS II complex. Mutations introduced into multiple His residues in one mutant exhibited a cumulative effect. Replacing His by Asn leads to a much smaller effect than observed upon mutation to Tyr. This is consistent with the hypothesis that the mutated His residues are chlorophyll ligands: Asn can substitute as chlorophyll ligand, whereas Tyr cannot. Further evidence supporting a role of the mutated His residues in chlorophyll binding comes from measurements of the light intensity needed to half-saturate oxygen evolution. All His mutants with impaired PS II function needed higher light intensities for half-saturation than wild type. A possible explanation for this decrease in antenna efficiency in the mutants is a loss of the Mg in the chlorophyll due to a loss of the fifth ligand, and thus the formation of a pheophytin molecule in the antenna. We conclude that conserved His residues in hydrophobic regions of CP47 indeed are chlorophyll ligands and that these ligands are important for PS II stability as well as efficient antenna function.

  11. A sodium channel mutation identified in Aedes aegypti selectively reduces cockroach sodium channel sensitivity to type I, but not type II pyrethroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhaonong; Du, Yuzhe; Nomura, Yoshiko; Dong, Ke

    2011-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are the primary target of pyrethroid insecticides. Numerous point mutations in sodium channel genes have been identified in pyrethroid-resistant insect species, and many have been confirmed to reduce or abolish sensitivity of channels expressed in Xenopus oocytes to pyrethroids. Recently, several novel mutations were reported in sodium channel genes of pyrethroid-resistant Aedes mosquito populations. One of the mutations is a phenylalanine (F) to cysteine (C) change in segment 6 of domain III (IIIS6) of the Aedes mosquito sodium channel. Curiously, a previous study showed that alanine substitution of this F did not alter the action of deltamethrin, a type II pyrethroid, on a cockroach sodium channel. In this study, we changed this F to C in a pyrethroid-sensitive cockroach sodium channel and examined mutant channel sensitivity to permethrin as well as five other type I or type II pyrethroids in Xenopus oocytes. Interestingly, the F to C mutation drastically reduced channel sensitivity to three type I pyrethroids, permethrin, NRDC 157 (a deltamethrin analogue lacking the α-cyano group) and bioresemthrin, but not to three type II pyrethroids, cypermethrin, deltamethrin and cyhalothrin. These results confirm the involvement of the F to C mutation in permethrin resistance, and raise the possibility that rotation of type I and type II pyrethroids might be considered in the control of insect pest populations where this particular mutation is present.

  12. Macrolides and lincomycin susceptibility of Mycoplasma hyorhinis and variable mutation of domain II and V in 23S ribosomal RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Hideki; Nakajima, Hiromi; Shimizu, Yuka; Eguchi, Masashi; Hata, Eiji; Yamamoto, Koshi

    2005-08-01

    A total of 151 strains of Mycoplasma hyorhinis isolated from porcine lung lesions (weaned pigs, n=71, and finishers, n=80) were investigated for their in vitro susceptibility to 10 antimicrobial agents. Thirty-one strains (28 from weaned pigs and 3 from finishers) showed resistance to 16-membered macrolide antibiotics and lincomycin. The prevalence of the 16-membered macrolide-resistant M. hyorhinis strain in weaned pigs from Japanese herds has approximately quadrupled in the past 10 years. Several of the 31 strains were examined for mutations in the 23S ribosomal RNA (rRNA). All field strains tested showed a transition of A to G at position 2059 of 23S rRNA-rendered Escherichia coli. On the other hand, individual tylosin- and lincomycin-resistant mutants of M. hyorhinis were selected in vitro from the susceptible type strain BTS7 by 3 to 9 serial passages in subinhibitory concentrations of each antibiotic. The 23S rRNA sequences of both tylosin and lincomycin-resistant mutants were compared with that of the radical BTS7 strain. The BTS7 mutant strain selected by tylosin showed the same transition as the field-isolated strains of A2059G. However, the transition selected in lincomycin showed mutations in domains II and V of 23S rRNA, G2597U, C2611U in domain V, and the addition of an adenine at the pentameric adenine loop in domain II. The strain selected by lincomycin showed an additional point mutation of A2062G selected by tylosin.

  13. In situ determination of quenching factors in Cresst-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zoeller, Andreas; Ertl, Andreas; Guetlein, Achim; Lanfranchi, Jean-Come; Muenster, Andrea; Potzel, Walter; Sivers, Moritz von; Strauss, Raimund; Roth, Sabine; Wawoczny, Stephan; Willers, Michael; Wuestrich, Marc [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik Department E15 (Germany); Jochum, Josef [Eberhard Karls Universitaet Tuebingen (Germany); Proebst, Franz [Max Planck Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); Scholl, Stephan [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik Department E15 (Germany); Max Planck Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    The CRESST-II experiment is searching for WIMPs (Weakly Interacting Massive Particles) via their elastic scattering off nuclei in scintillating CaWO{sub 4} single crystals at low temperatures. Each particle interaction in CaWO{sub 4} produces a phonon as well as a light signal. The ratio between the recorded light and phonon signal - the Quenching Factor (QF) - is a crucial parameter to discriminate very efficiently between electron recoils from radioactive e/γ background and nuclear recoils, e.g. WIMP events. Moreover, to some extent, the different types of recoiling nuclei (O,Ca,W) can be distinguished, if the QFs are known accurately enough. The QF cannot only be extracted from dedicated experiments but also from calibration data, gathered with an AmBe-source placed inside and outside the neutron shielding of CRESST-II. In this talk we present a method to determine the QFs of CaWO{sub 4} in situ from these calibration data.

  14. Masas and Bimodule Decompositions of $\\rm{II}_{1}$ Factors

    CERN Document Server

    Mukherjee, Kunal

    2008-01-01

    The measure-multiplicity-invariant for masas in $\\rm{II}_{1}$ factors was introduced in \\cite{MR2261688} to distinguish masas that have the same Puk\\'{a}nszky invariant. In this paper we study the measure class in the measure-multiplicity-invariant. This is equivalent to studying the standard Hilbert space as an associated bimodule. We characterize the type of any masa depending on the left-right-measure using Baire category methods (selection principle of Jankov and von Neumann). We present a second proof of Chifan's result on normalisers and a measure theoretic proof of the equivalence of weak asymptotic homomorphism property (WAHP) and singularity that appeared in \\cite{MR2417416}.

  15. Human insulin-like growth factor II leader 2 mediates internal initiation of translation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Susanne K; Christiansen, Jan; Hansen, Thomas v O

    2002-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) is a fetal growth factor, which belongs to the family of insulin-like peptides. During fetal life, the IGF-II gene generates three mRNAs with different 5' untranslated regions (UTRs), but identical coding regions and 3' UTRs. We have shown previously that IG...

  16. The factor VIII Structure and Mutation Resource Site: HAMSTeRS version 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemball-Cook, G; Tuddenham, E G; Wacey, A I

    1998-01-01

    Since 1996 the HAMSTeRS (Haemophilia A Mutation, Search, Test and Resource Site) WWW site has provided an online resource for access to data on the molecular pathology of haemophilia A, replacing previous text editions of the Haemophilia A Database published in Nucleic Acids Research . This report describes the continued development of the site (version 4), and in particular the expansion of factor VIII (FVIII) structure-related features. Access to the mutation database itself, both for searching the listings and for submission of new mutations, is via custom-designed forms: more powerful Boolean searches of the point mutations in the database are also available. During 1997 a total of 22 novel missense mutations were reported, increasing the total number of unique variants now described to 252 (238 in exonic sequences and 14 at intronic splice junctions). Currently, a total of 586 individual reports with associated phenotypic data are available for searching by any category including phenotype. The FVIII structure section now includes a download of a FVIII A domain homology model in Protein Data Bank format and a multiple alignment of the FVIII amino-acid sequencies from four species (human, murine, porcine and canine) in addition to the virtual reality simulations, secondary structural data and FVIII animation already available. Finally, to aid navigation across this site, a clickable roadmap of the main features provides easy access to the page desired. Our intention is that continued development and updating of the site shall provide workers in the fields of molecular and structural biology with a one-stop resource site to facilitate FVIII research and education. The HAMSTeRS URL is http://europium.mrc.rpms.ac.uk

  17. Aberrant RNA splicing in cancer; expression changes and driver mutations of splicing factor genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sveen, A; Kilpinen, S; Ruusulehto, A; Lothe, R A; Skotheim, R I

    2016-05-12

    Alternative splicing is a widespread process contributing to structural transcript variation and proteome diversity. In cancer, the splicing process is commonly disrupted, resulting in both functional and non-functional end-products. Cancer-specific splicing events are known to contribute to disease progression; however, the dysregulated splicing patterns found on a genome-wide scale have until recently been less well-studied. In this review, we provide an overview of aberrant RNA splicing and its regulation in cancer. We then focus on the executors of the splicing process. Based on a comprehensive catalog of splicing factor encoding genes and analyses of available gene expression and somatic mutation data, we identify cancer-associated patterns of dysregulation. Splicing factor genes are shown to be significantly differentially expressed between cancer and corresponding normal samples, and to have reduced inter-individual expression variation in cancer. Furthermore, we identify enrichment of predicted cancer-critical genes among the splicing factors. In addition to previously described oncogenic splicing factor genes, we propose 24 novel cancer-critical splicing factors predicted from somatic mutations.

  18. Mutations in TWIST, a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor, in Saethre-Chotzen syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, T D; Paznekas, W A; Green, E D; Chiang, L C; Ma, N; Ortiz de Luna, R I; Garcia Delgado, C; Gonzalez-Ramos, M; Kline, A D; Jabs, E W

    1997-01-01

    Saethre-Chotzen syndrome is one of the most common autosomal dominant disorders of craniosynostosis in humans and is characterized by craniofacial and limb anomalies. The locus for Saethre-Chotzen syndrome maps to chromosome 7p21-p22. We have evaluated TWIST, a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor, as a candidate gene for this condition because its expression pattern and mutant phenotypes in Drosophila and mouse are consistent with the Saethre-Chotzen phenotype. We mapped TWIST to human chromosome 7p21-p22 and mutational analysis reveals nonsense, missense, insertion and deletion mutations in patients. These mutations occur within the basic DNA binding, helix I and loop domains, or result in premature termination of the protein. Studies in Drosophila indicate that twist may affect the transcription of fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs), another gene family implicated in human craniosynostosis. The emerging cascade of molecular components involved in craniofacial and limb development now includes TWIST, which may function as an upstream regulator of FGFRs.

  19. Activation of initiation factor 2 by ligands and mutations for rapid docking of ribosomal subunits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlov, Michael Y; Zorzet, Anna; Andersson, Dan I; Ehrenberg, Måns

    2011-01-19

    We previously identified mutations in the GTPase initiation factor 2 (IF2), located outside its tRNA-binding domain, compensating strongly (A-type) or weakly (B-type) for initiator tRNA formylation deficiency. We show here that rapid docking of 30S with 50S subunits in initiation of translation depends on switching 30S subunit-bound IF2 from its inactive to active form. Activation of wild-type IF2 requires GTP and formylated initiator tRNA (fMet-tRNA(i)). In contrast, extensive activation of A-type IF2 occurs with only GTP or with GDP and fMet-tRNA(i), implying a passive role for initiator tRNA as activator of IF2 in subunit docking. The theory of conditional switching of GTPases quantitatively accounts for all our experimental data. We find that GTP, GDP, fMet-tRNA(i) and A-type mutations multiplicatively increase the equilibrium ratio, K, between active and inactive forms of IF2 from a value of 4 × 10(-4) for wild-type apo-IF2 by factors of 300, 8, 80 and 20, respectively. Functional characterization of the A-type mutations provides keys to structural interpretation of conditional switching of IF2 and other multidomain GTPases.

  20. Activation of initiation factor 2 by ligands and mutations for rapid docking of ribosomal subunits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlov, Michael Y; Zorzet, Anna; Andersson, Dan I; Ehrenberg, Måns

    2011-01-01

    We previously identified mutations in the GTPase initiation factor 2 (IF2), located outside its tRNA-binding domain, compensating strongly (A-type) or weakly (B-type) for initiator tRNA formylation deficiency. We show here that rapid docking of 30S with 50S subunits in initiation of translation depends on switching 30S subunit-bound IF2 from its inactive to active form. Activation of wild-type IF2 requires GTP and formylated initiator tRNA (fMet-tRNAi). In contrast, extensive activation of A-type IF2 occurs with only GTP or with GDP and fMet-tRNAi, implying a passive role for initiator tRNA as activator of IF2 in subunit docking. The theory of conditional switching of GTPases quantitatively accounts for all our experimental data. We find that GTP, GDP, fMet-tRNAi and A-type mutations multiplicatively increase the equilibrium ratio, K, between active and inactive forms of IF2 from a value of 4 × 10−4 for wild-type apo-IF2 by factors of 300, 8, 80 and 20, respectively. Functional characterization of the A-type mutations provides keys to structural interpretation of conditional switching of IF2 and other multidomain GTPases. PMID:21151095

  1. Mutations in the Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor-1β Gene Are Associated with Familial Hypoplastic Glomerulocystic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingham, Coralie; Bulman, Michael P.; Ellard, Sian; Allen, Lisa I. S.; Lipkin, Graham W.; Hoff, William G. van't; Woolf, Adrian S.; Rizzoni, Gianfranco; Novelli, Giuseppe; Nicholls, Anthony J.; Hattersley, Andrew T.

    2001-01-01

    Familial glomerulocystic kidney disease (GCKD) is a dominantly inherited condition characterized by glomerular cysts and variable renal size and function; the molecular genetic etiology is unknown. Mutations in the gene encoding hepatocyte nuclear factor (HNF)–1β have been associated with early-onset diabetes and nondiabetic renal disease—particularly renal cystic disease. We investigated a possible role for the HNF-1β gene in four unrelated GCKD families and identified mutations in two families: a nonsense mutation in exon 1 (E101X) and a frameshift mutation in exon 2 (P159fsdelT). The family members with HNF-1β gene mutations had hypoplastic GCKD and early-onset diabetes or impaired glucose tolerance. We conclude that there is genetic heterogeneity in familial GCKD and that the hypoplastic subtype is a part of the clinical spectrum of the renal cysts and diabetes syndrome that is associated with HNF-1β mutations. PMID:11085914

  2. Mutations in the Lactococcus lactis Ll.LtrB group II intron that retain mobility in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D'Souza Lisa M

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Group II introns are mobile genetic elements that form conserved secondary and tertiary structures. In order to determine which of the conserved structural elements are required for mobility, a series of domain and sub-domain deletions were made in the Lactococcus lactis group II intron (Ll.LtrB and tested for mobility in a genetic assay. Point mutations in domains V and VI were also tested. Results The largest deletion that could be made without severely compromising mobility was 158 nucleotides in DIVb(1–2. This mutant had a mobility frequency comparable to the wild-type Ll.LtrB intron (ΔORF construct. Hence, all subsequent mutations were done in this mutant background. Deletion of DIIb reduced mobility to approximately 18% of wild-type, while another deletion in domain II (nts 404–459 was mobile to a minor extent. Only two deletions in DI and none in DIII were tolerated. Some mobility was also observed for a DIVa deletion mutant. Of the three point mutants at position G3 in DV, only G3A retained mobility. In DVI, deletion of the branch-point nucleotide abolished mobility, but the presence of any nucleotide at the branch-point position restored mobility to some extent. Conclusions The smallest intron capable of efficient retrohoming was 725 nucleotides, comprising the DIVb(1–2 and DII(iia,b deletions. The tertiary elements found to be nonessential for mobility were alpha, kappa and eta. In DV, only the G3A mutant was mobile. A branch-point residue is required for intron mobility.

  3. Mutation induction in Haemophilus influenzae by ICR-191 II. Role of DNA replication and repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimball, R.F.; Perdue, S.W.

    1981-01-01

    Evidence is presented to show that presumptive frameshift mutations induced in Haemophilus influenzae by ICR-191 are fixed very repidly, essentially at the time of treatment. DNA synthesis during treatment is essential for fixation, but DNA synthesis after treatment has no effect. The conclusion is drawn that the mutagen acts at the replication fork, possibly to stabilize misannealings arising in association with the discontinuities in the newly synthesized DNA. (JMT)

  4. Splitting trees with neutral Poissonian mutations II: Largest and Oldest families

    CERN Document Server

    Champagnat, Nicolas

    2011-01-01

    We consider a supercritical branching population, where individuals have i.i.d. lifetime durations (which are not necessarily exponentially distributed) and give birth (singly) at constant rate. We assume that individuals independently experience neutral mutations, at constant rate $\\theta$ during their lifetimes, under the infinite-alleles assumption: each mutation instantaneously confers a brand new type, called allele or haplotype, to its carrier. The type carried by a mother at the time when she gives birth is transmitted to the newborn. We are interested in the sizes and ages at time $t$ of the clonal families carrying the most abundant alleles or the oldest ones, as $t\\to\\infty$, on the survival event. Intuitively, the results must depend on how the mutation rate $\\theta$ and the Malthusian parameter $\\alpha>0$ compare. Hereafter, $N\\equiv N_t$ is the population size at time $t$, constants $a,c$ are scaling constants, whereas $k,k'$ are explicit positive constants which depend on the parameters of the m...

  5. Mutation of a type II keratin gene (K6a) in pachyonychia congenita.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowden, P E; Haley, J L; Kansky, A; Rothnagel, J A; Jones, D O; Turner, R J

    1995-07-01

    Pachyonychia congenita (PC) is a rare autosomal dominant condition characterized by multiple ectodermal abnormalities. Patients with Jadassohn-Lewandowsky Syndrome (MIM #167200; PC-1) have nail defects (onchyogryposis), palmoplantar hyperkeratosis, follicular hyperkeratosis and oral leukokeratosis. Those with the rarer Jackson-Lawler Syndrome (MIM #167210; PC-2) lack oral involvement but have natal teeth and cutaneous cysts. Ultra-structural studies have identified abnormal keratin tonofilaments and linkage to the keratin gene cluster on chromosome 17 has been found in PC families. Keratins are the major structural proteins of the epidermis and associated appendages and the nail, hair follicle, palm, sole and tongue are the main sites of constitutive K6, K16 and K17 expression. Furthermore, mutations in K16 and K17 have recently been identified in some PC patients. Although we did not detect K16 or K17 mutations in PC families from Slovenia, we have found a heterozygous deletion in a K6 isoform (K6a) in the affected members of one family. This 3 bp deletion (AAC) in exon 1 of K6a removes a highly conserved asparagine residue (delta N170) from position 8 of the 1A helical domain (delta N8). This is the first K6a mutation to be described and this heterozygous K6a deletion is sufficient to explain the pathology observed in this PC-1 family.

  6. Uncovering the profile of mutations of transforming growth factor beta-induced gene in Chinese corneal dystrophy patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Dan Hao

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To uncover the mutations profile of transforming growth factor beta-induced (TGFBI gene in Chinese corneal dystrophy patients and further investigate the characteristics of genotype-phenotype correlations. METHODS: Forty-two subjects (6 unrelated families including 15 patients and 8 unaffected members, and 19 sporadic patients of Chinese origin were subjected to phenotypic and genotypic characterization. The corneal phenotypes of patients were documented by slit lamp photography. Mutation screening of the coding regions of TGFBI was performed by direct sequencing. RESULTS: We detected four corneal dystrophy types. The most frequent phenotypes were granular corneal dystrophy (GCD (including 3 families and 8 sporadic patients and lattice corneal dystrophy (LCD (including 2 families and 9 sporadic patients. The next phenotypes were corneal dystrophy of Bowman layer (CDB (1 family and 1 sporadic patient and epithelial basement membrane dystrophy (EBMD (1 sporadic patient. Six distinct mutations responsible for TGFBI corneal dystrophies were identified in 30 individuals with corneal dystrophies. Those were, p.R124H mutation in 1 family and 2 sporadic patients with GCD, p.R555W mutation in 2 families and 3 sporadic patients with GCD, p.R124C mutation in 2 families and 7 sporadic patients with LCD, p.A620D mutation in 1 sporadic patient with LCD, p.H626R mutation in 1 sporadic patient with LCD, and p.R555Q in 1 family and 1 sporadic patient with CDB. No mutation was detected in the remaining 3 atypical GCD patients and 1 EBMD patient. CONCLUSION: GCD and LCD are the most frequent phenotypes in Chinese population. R555W was the most common mutation for GCD; R124C was the most common mutation for LCD. Our findings extend the mutational spectrum of TFGBI, and this is the extensively delineated TGFBI mutation profile associated with the various corneal dystrophies in the Chinese population.

  7. A Case of Transforming Growth Factor-β-Induced Gene-Related Oculorenal Syndrome: Granular Corneal Dystrophy Type II with a Unique Nephropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwafuchi, Yoichi; Morioka, Tetsuo; Oyama, Yuko; Nozu, Kandai; Iijima, Kazumoto; Narita, Ichiei

    2016-01-01

    Many types of inherited renal diseases have ocular features that occasionally support a diagnosis. The following study describes an unusual example of a 40-year-old woman with granular corneal dystrophy type II complicated by renal involvement. These two conditions may coincidentally coexist; however, there are some reports that demonstrate an association between renal involvement and granular corneal dystrophy type II. Granular corneal dystrophy type II is caused by a mutation in the transforming growth factor-β-induced (TGFBI) gene. The patient was referred to us because of the presence of mild proteinuria without hematuria that was subsequently suggested to be granular corneal dystrophy type II. A kidney biopsy revealed various glomerular and tubular basement membrane changes and widening of the subendothelial space of the glomerular basement membrane by electron microscopy. However, next-generation sequencing revealed that she had no mutation in a gene that is known to be associated with monogenic kidney diseases. Conversely, real-time polymerase chain reaction, using a simple buccal swab, revealed TGFBI heteromutation (R124H). The TGFBI protein plays an important role in cell-collagen signaling interactions, including extracellular matrix proteins which compose the renal basement membrane. This mutation can present not only as corneal dystrophy but also as renal disease. TGFBI-related oculorenal syndrome may have been unrecognized. It is difficult to diagnose this condition without renal electron microscopic studies. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first detailed report of nephropathy associated with a TGFBI mutation.

  8. Mutations in Splicing Factor Genes Are a Major Cause of Autosomal Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa in Belgian Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppieters, Frauke; Roels, Dimitri; De Jaegere, Sarah; Flipts, Helena; De Zaeytijd, Julie; Walraedt, Sophie; Claes, Charlotte; Fransen, Erik; Van Camp, Guy; Depasse, Fanny; Casteels, Ingele; de Ravel, Thomy

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP) is characterized by an extensive genetic heterogeneity, implicating 27 genes, which account for 50 to 70% of cases. Here 86 Belgian probands with possible adRP underwent genetic testing to unravel the molecular basis and to assess the contribution of the genes underlying their condition. Methods Mutation detection methods evolved over the past ten years, including mutation specific methods (APEX chip analysis), linkage analysis, gene panel analysis (Sanger sequencing, targeted next-generation sequencing or whole exome sequencing), high-resolution copy number screening (customized microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization). Identified variants were classified following American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics (ACMG) recommendations. Results Molecular genetic screening revealed mutations in 48/86 cases (56%). In total, 17 novel pathogenic mutations were identified: four missense mutations in RHO, five frameshift mutations in RP1, six mutations in genes encoding spliceosome components (SNRNP200, PRPF8, and PRPF31), one frameshift mutation in PRPH2, and one frameshift mutation in TOPORS. The proportion of RHO mutations in our cohort (14%) is higher than reported in a French adRP population (10.3%), but lower than reported elsewhere (16.5–30%). The prevalence of RP1 mutations (10.5%) is comparable to other populations (3.5%-10%). The mutation frequency in genes encoding splicing factors is unexpectedly high (altogether 19.8%), with PRPF31 the second most prevalent mutated gene (10.5%). PRPH2 mutations were found in 4.7% of the Belgian cohort. Two families (2.3%) have the recurrent NR2E3 mutation p.(Gly56Arg). The prevalence of the recurrent PROM1 mutation p.(Arg373Cys) was higher than anticipated (3.5%). Conclusions Overall, we identified mutations in 48 of 86 Belgian adRP cases (56%), with the highest prevalence in RHO (14%), RP1 (10.5%) and PRPF31 (10.5%). Finally, we expanded the molecular

  9. Novel Point Mutations and A8027G Polymorphism in Mitochondrial-DNA-Encoded Cytochrome c Oxidase II Gene in Mexican Patients with Probable Alzheimer Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loera-Castañeda, Verónica; Sandoval-Ramírez, Lucila; Pacheco Moisés, Fermín Paul; Macías-Islas, Miguel Ángel; Alatorre Jiménez, Moisés Alejandro; González-Renovato, Erika Daniela; Cortés-Enríquez, Fernando; Célis de la Rosa, Alfredo; Velázquez-Brizuela, Irma E.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been thought to contribute to Alzheimer disease (AD) pathogenesis through the accumulation of mitochondrial DNA mutations and net production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Mitochondrial cytochrome c-oxidase plays a key role in the regulation of aerobic production of energy and is composed of 13 subunits. The 3 largest subunits (I, II, and III) forming the catalytic core are encoded by mitochondrial DNA. The aim of this work was to look for mutations in mitochondrial cytochrome c-oxidase gene II (MTCO II) in blood samples from probable AD Mexican patients. MTCO II gene was sequenced in 33 patients with diagnosis of probable AD. Four patients (12%) harbored the A8027G polymorphism and three of them were early onset (EO) AD cases with familial history of the disease. In addition, other four patients with EOAD had only one of the following point mutations: A8003C, T8082C, C8201T, or G7603A. Neither of the point mutations found in this work has been described previously for AD patients, and the A8027G polymorphism has been described previously; however, it hasn't been related to AD. We will need further investigation to demonstrate the role of the point mutations of mitochondrial DNA in the pathogenesis of AD. PMID:24701363

  10. Novel Point Mutations and A8027G Polymorphism in Mitochondrial-DNA-Encoded Cytochrome c Oxidase II Gene in Mexican Patients with Probable Alzheimer Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verónica Loera-Castañeda

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial dysfunction has been thought to contribute to Alzheimer disease (AD pathogenesis through the accumulation of mitochondrial DNA mutations and net production of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Mitochondrial cytochrome c-oxidase plays a key role in the regulation of aerobic production of energy and is composed of 13 subunits. The 3 largest subunits (I, II, and III forming the catalytic core are encoded by mitochondrial DNA. The aim of this work was to look for mutations in mitochondrial cytochrome c-oxidase gene II (MTCO II in blood samples from probable AD Mexican patients. MTCO II gene was sequenced in 33 patients with diagnosis of probable AD. Four patients (12% harbored the A8027G polymorphism and three of them were early onset (EO AD cases with familial history of the disease. In addition, other four patients with EOAD had only one of the following point mutations: A8003C, T8082C, C8201T, or G7603A. Neither of the point mutations found in this work has been described previously for AD patients, and the A8027G polymorphism has been described previously; however, it hasn’t been related to AD. We will need further investigation to demonstrate the role of the point mutations of mitochondrial DNA in the pathogenesis of AD.

  11. Novel Point Mutations and A8027G Polymorphism in Mitochondrial-DNA-Encoded Cytochrome c Oxidase II Gene in Mexican Patients with Probable Alzheimer Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loera-Castañeda, Verónica; Sandoval-Ramírez, Lucila; Pacheco Moisés, Fermín Paul; Macías-Islas, Miguel Ángel; Alatorre Jiménez, Moisés Alejandro; González-Renovato, Erika Daniela; Cortés-Enríquez, Fernando; Célis de la Rosa, Alfredo; Velázquez-Brizuela, Irma E; Ortiz, Genaro Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been thought to contribute to Alzheimer disease (AD) pathogenesis through the accumulation of mitochondrial DNA mutations and net production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Mitochondrial cytochrome c-oxidase plays a key role in the regulation of aerobic production of energy and is composed of 13 subunits. The 3 largest subunits (I, II, and III) forming the catalytic core are encoded by mitochondrial DNA. The aim of this work was to look for mutations in mitochondrial cytochrome c-oxidase gene II (MTCO II) in blood samples from probable AD Mexican patients. MTCO II gene was sequenced in 33 patients with diagnosis of probable AD. Four patients (12%) harbored the A8027G polymorphism and three of them were early onset (EO) AD cases with familial history of the disease. In addition, other four patients with EOAD had only one of the following point mutations: A8003C, T8082C, C8201T, or G7603A. Neither of the point mutations found in this work has been described previously for AD patients, and the A8027G polymorphism has been described previously; however, it hasn't been related to AD. We will need further investigation to demonstrate the role of the point mutations of mitochondrial DNA in the pathogenesis of AD.

  12. Mutations in domain II of 23 S rRNA facilitate translation of a 23 S rRNA-encoded pentapeptide conferring erythromycin resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam, M; Douthwaite, S; Tenson, T

    1996-01-01

    Mutations in domain II of Escherichia coli 23 S rRNA that cause resistance to erythromycin do so in a manner fundamentally different from mutations at the drug binding site in domain V of the 23 S rRNA. The domain II mutations are located in a hairpin structure between nucleotides 1198 and 1247....... This is close to a short open reading frame in the 23 S rRNA that encodes a pentapeptide (E-peptide) whose expression in vivo renders cells resistant to erythromycin. Therefore, a possible mechanism of resistance caused by domain II mutations may be related to an increased expression of the E-peptide. To test...... this hypothesis, a range of point mutations was generated in domain II of 23 S rRNA in the vicinity of the E-peptide open reading frame. We find a correlation between erythromycin resistance of the mutant clones and increased accessibility of the ribosome binding site of the E-peptide gene. Furthermore...

  13. Characterization of a Chinese hamster ovary cell mutant having a mutation in elongation factor-2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradeep K Gupta

    Full Text Available Retroviral insertional mutagenesis provides an effective forward genetic method for identifying genes involved in essential cellular pathways. A Chinese hamster ovary cell line mutant resistant to several bacterial ADP-ribosylating was obtained by this approach. The toxins used catalyze ADP-ribosylation of eukaryotic elongation factor 2 (eEF-2, block protein synthesis, and cause cell death. Strikingly, in the CHO PR328 mutant cells, the eEF-2 substrate of these ADP-ribosylating toxins was found to be modified, but the cells remained viable. A systematic study of these cells revealed the presence of a structural mutation in one allele of the eEF-2 gene. This mutation, Gly717Arg, is close to His715, the residue that is modified to become diphthamide. This Arg substitution prevents diphthamide biosynthesis at His715, rendering the mutated eEF-2 non-responsive to ADP-ribosylating toxins, while having no apparent effect on protein synthesis. Thus, CHO PR328 cells are heterozygous, having wild type and mutant eEF-2 alleles, with the latter allowing the cells to survive even in the presence of ADP-ribosylating toxins. Here, we report the comprehensive characterization of these cells.

  14. Rituximab therapy for factor II inhibitor in a patient with antiphospholipid antibody syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guddati, Achuta K; Kuter, David J

    2014-04-01

    Factor II inhibitors have been associated with an increased risk of bleeding. The management of patients with factor II inhibitors has not been adequately described. We describe a patient with an increased bleeding tendency due to factor II inhibitor who was unable to undergo surgery due to her bleeding tendency. The patient was successfully treated with a course of rituximab, which markedly reduced her factor II inhibitor: the factor II level rose from 12 to 61%; prothrombin time decreased from 20 to 14.7 s; and partial thromboplastin time (PTT) decreased from 148 to 38.8 s. She was able to undergo abdominal surgery without any hemorrhagic complications. This case exemplifies the possibility of treating patients with factor II inhibitors with rituximab therapy.

  15. A novel splice site mutation in neonatal carnitine palmitoyl transferase II deficiency.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeets, R.J.P.; Smeitink, J.A.M.; Semmekrot, B.A.; Scholte, H.R.; Wanders, R.J.; Heuvel, L.P.W.J. van den

    2003-01-01

    Mitochondrial beta-oxidation of long-chain fatty acids requires the concerted action of three tightly integrated membrane-bound enzymes (carnitine palmitoyltransferase I and II and carnitine/acylcarnitine translocase) that transport them into mitochondria. Neonatal onset of carnitine palmitoyltransf

  16. EPIDEMIOLOGY OF ACTIVATED PROTEIN C RESISTANCE AND FACTOR V LEIDEN MUTATION IN THE MEDITERRANEAN REGION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrez Mehrez M. Jadaon

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Venous thromboembolic disorders (VTE are serious disorders with high morbidity and mortality rates. Many genetic and acquired risk factors were identified to cause VTE The most common genetic risk factor is Factor V Leiden mutation (FVL. FVL was found in high percentage of populations of Caucasian origin but was almost absent in non-Caucasians. It was also reported in populations living in North Africa and the Middle East.  This review article briefly explains FVL and how it causes VTE, the distribution of FVL worldwide, and then it elaborates on the epidemiology of FVL in the Mediterranean Region and how this brought speculations that FVL might have originated in the Eastern Mediterranean area.

  17. Epidemiology of Activated Protein C Resistance and Factor V Leiden Mutation in the Mediterranean Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadaon, Mehrez M.

    2011-01-01

    Venous thromboembolic disorders (VTE) are serious disorders with high morbidity and mortality rates. Many genetic and acquired risk factors were identified to cause VTE. The most common genetic risk factor is Factor V Leiden mutation (FVL). FVL was found in high percentage of populations of Caucasian origin but was almost absent in non-Caucasians. It was also reported in populations living in North Africa and the Middle East. This review article briefly explains FVL and how it causes VTE, the distribution of FVL worldwide, and then it elaborates on the epidemiology of FVL in the Mediterranean Region and how this brought speculations that FVL might have originated in the Eastern Mediterranean area. PMID:22224194

  18. An outbreak of acute respiratory disease caused by a virus associated RNA II gene mutation strain of human adenovirus 7 in China, 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Beibei; Wu, Fuli; Li, Hao; Liu, Hongbo; Sheng, Chunyu; Ma, Qiuxia; Yang, Chaojie; Xie, Jing; Li, Peng; Jia, Leili; Wang, Ligui; Du, Xinying; Qiu, Shaofu; Song, Hongbin

    2017-01-01

    Human adenovirus 7 (HAdV-7) strains are a major cause of acute respiratory disease (ARD) among adults and children, associated with fatal pneumonia. An ARD outbreak caused by HAdV-7 that involved 739 college students was reported in this article. To better understand the underlying cause of this large-scale epidemic, virus strains were isolated from infected patients and sequence variations of the whole genome sequence were detected. Evolutionary trees and alignment results indicated that the major capsid protein genes hexon and fibre were strongly conserved among serotype 7 strains in China at that time. Instead, the HAdV-7 strains presented three thymine deletions in the virus associated RNA (VA RNA) II terminal region. We also found that the mutation might lead to increased mRNA expression of an adjacent gene, L1 52/55K, and thus promoted faster growth. These findings suggest that sequence variation of VA RNA II gene was a potential cause of such a severe HAdV-7 infection and this gene should be a new-emerging factor to be monitored for better understanding of HAdV-7 infection. PMID:28225804

  19. Regional block anesthesia in a patient with factor V Leiden mutation and axillary artery occlusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerem Erkalp

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Kerem Erkalp1, Mevlut Comlekci1, Bekir Inan2, Gokcen Basaranoglu1, Haluk Ozdemir1, Leyla Saidoglu11Department of Anaesthesiology and Reanimation, Vakif Gureba Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey; 2Department of Vascular Surgery, Vakif Gureba Hospital, Istanbul, TurkeyAbstract: Anesthetic management of patients with coagulation disorders presents safety and technical challenges. This case describes a 58-year-old woman with factor V Leiden mutation who required distal saphenous vein harvest and axillo-brachial bypass to treat axillary artery occlusion. The patient underwent surgery with satisfactory anesthesia using infraclavicular brachial plexus block, thoracic paravertebral block, and unilateral subarachnoid block. These three regional anesthetic interventions were performed in lieu of general anesthesia to minimize risks of thrombotic events, pain, and to decrease recovery time. Despite higher failure rates of regional anesthesia, longer time required for procedures, and added discomforts during surgery, the benefits may outweigh risks for selected high-risk patients, including those with factor V Leiden mutations.Keywords: regional anesthesia, factor V Leiden, pain, vein harvest

  20. Mutations That Alter Use of Hepatitis C Virus Cell Entry Factors Mediate Escape From Neutralizing Antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    FAUVELLE, CATHERINE; ZAHID, MUHAMMAD NAUMAN; TUREK, MARINE; HEYDMANN, LAURA; CURY, KARINE; HAYER, JULIETTE; COMBET, CHRISTOPHE; COSSET, FRANÇOIS–LOÏC; PIETSCHMANN, THOMAS; HIET, MARIE–SOPHIE; BARTENSCHLAGER, RALF; HABERSETZER, FRANÇOIS; DOFFOËL, MICHEL; KECK, ZHEN–YONG; FOUNG, STEVEN K. H.; ZEISEL, MIRJAM B.; STOLL–KELLER, FRANÇOISE; BAUMERT, THOMAS F.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS The development of vaccines and other strategies to prevent hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is limited by rapid viral evasion. HCV entry is the first step of infection; this process involves several viral and host factors and is targeted by host-neutralizing responses. Although the roles of host factors in HCV entry have been well characterized, their involvement in evasion of immune responses is poorly understood. We used acute infection of liver graft as a model to investigate the molecular mechanisms of viral evasion. METHODS We studied factors that contribute to evasion of host immune responses using patient-derived antibodies, HCV pseudoparticles, and cell culture–derived HCV that express viral envelopes from patients who have undergone liver transplantation. These viruses were used to infect hepatoma cell lines that express different levels of HCV entry factors. RESULTS By using reverse genetic analyses, we identified altered use of host-cell entry factors as a mechanism by which HCV evades host immune responses. Mutations that alter use of the CD81 receptor also allowed the virus to escape neutralizing antibodies. Kinetic studies showed that these mutations affect virus–antibody interactions during postbinding steps of the HCV entry process. Functional studies with a large panel of patient-derived antibodies showed that this mechanism mediates viral escape, leading to persistent infection in general. CONCLUSIONS We identified a mechanism by which HCV evades host immune responses, in which use of cell entry factors evolves with escape from neutralizing antibodies. These findings advance our understanding of the pathogenesis of HCV infection and might be used to develop antiviral strategies and vaccines. PMID:22503792

  1. F8 gene mutation profile in Indian hemophilia A patients: Identification of 23 novel mutations and factor VIII inhibitor risk association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Patricia; Ghosh, Kanjaksha; Shetty, Shrimati

    2016-04-01

    'FVIII inhibitors', especially in severe hemophilia A (HA) patients, is a serious adverse effect that complicates their clinical management. Many genetic and non-genetic risk factors have been proposed for FVIII inhibitor development, diverse in different population groups. This is the first study in Indian hemophiliacs that analyzes inhibitor risk in relation to the complete F8 mutation profile, in a case-control study that included 145 Indian severe HA patients, i.e. 69 inhibitor positive (with 18 inhibitor concordant/discordant family members), and 58 inhibitor negative patients, after informed consent. While 53.54% (68/127) index cases were positive for intron 22 or intron 1 inversions, 55 causative F8 mutations were detected in the 59 inversion negative patients, of which 23 were novel mutations (in 24 patients) and 32 were reported earlier (in 35 patients). A higher incidence of mutations, in the C1 and C2 domains in inhibitor positive patients, and in the A1 domain in inhibitor negative patients was observed, though not significantly different. The study suggests that large F8 rearrangements (significantly higher in the inhibitor positive patients) pose the highest risk, while missense mutations (significantly higher in the inhibitor negative patients) pose the lowest risk of inhibitor development in Indian hemophilia A patients.

  2. Evaluation the frequency of factor V Leiden mutation in pregnant women with preeclampsia syndrome in an Iranian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Samieh; Yavarian, Majid; Azinfar, Azadeh; Rajaei, Minoo; Azizi Kootenaee, Maryam

    2012-01-01

    Role of genetic factors in etiology of preeclampsia is not confirmed yet. Gene defect frequency varies in different geographic areas as well as ethnic groups. In this study, the role of factor V Leiden mutation in the pathogenesis of preeclampsia syndrome among the pregnant population of northern shore of Persian Gulf in Iran, were considered. Between Jan. 2008 and Dec. 2009, in a nested case control study, pregnant women with preeclampsia (N=198) as cases and healthy (N=201) as controls were enrolled in the study. DNA were extracted from 10 CC peripheral blood and analyzed for presence of factor V Leiden mutation in these subjects. The maternal and neonatal outcomes of pregnancy according to the distribution of factor V Leiden were also compared among cases. In total, 17(8.6%) of cases and 2(1%) of controls showed the factor V Leiden mutation. The incidence of factor V Leiden was typically higher in preeclamptic women than control group (OR: 9.34 %95 CI: 2.12-41.01). There was no difference in incidence rate of preterm deliveryfactor V Leiden mutation. The pregnant women with factor V Leiden mutation are prone for preeclampsia syndrome during pregnancy, but this risk factor was not correlated to pregnancy complications in the studied women.

  3. Induced mutations in the starch branching enzyme II (SBEII) genes increase amylose and resistant starch content in durum wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazard, Brittany; Zhang, Xiaoqin; Colasuonno, Pasqualina; Uauy, Cristobal; Beckles, Diane M; Dubcovsky, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    Starch is the largest component of the wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) grain and consists of approximately 70-80% amylopectin and 20-30% amylose. Amylopectin is a highly-branched, readily digested polysaccharide, whereas amylose has few branches and forms complexes that resist digestion and mimic dietary fiber (resistant starch). Down-regulation of the starch branching enzyme II (SBEII) gene by RNA interference (RNAi) was previously shown to increase amylose content in both hexaploid and tetraploid wheat. We generated ethyl methane sulphonate (EMS) mutants for the SBEIIa-A and SBEIIa-B homoeologs in the tetraploid durum wheat variety Kronos (T. turgidum ssp. durum L.). Single-gene mutants showed non-significant increases in amylose and resistant starch content, but a double mutant combining a SBEIIa-A knock-out mutation with a SBEIIa-B splice-site mutation showed a 22% increase in amylose content (P<0.0001) and a 115% increase in resistant starch content (P<0.0001). In addition, we obtained mutants for the A and B genome copies of the paralogous SBEIIb gene, mapped them 1-2 cM from SBEIIa, and generated double SBEIIa-SBEIIb mutants to study the effect of the SBEIIb gene in the absence of SBEIIa. These mutants are available to those interested in increasing amylose content and resistant starch in durum wheat.

  4. Detection of epidermal growth factor receptor mutation in lung cancer by droplet digital polymerase chain reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Q

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Qing Xu,1,* Yazhen Zhu,2,* Yali Bai,1 Xiumin Wei,1 Xirun Zheng,2 Mao Mao,1 Guangjuan Zheng21Translational Bioscience and Diagnostics, WuXi AppTec, Shanghai, 2Department of Pathology, Guangdong Provincial Hospital of TCM, Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, Guangdong Provincial Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China*These authors contributed equally to this workBackground: Two types of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR mutations in exon 19 and exon 21 (ex19del and L858R are prevalent in lung cancer patients and sensitive to targeted EGFR inhibition. A resistance mutation in exon 20 (T790M has been found to accompany drug treatment when patients relapse. These three mutations are valuable companion diagnostic biomarkers for guiding personalized treatment. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR-based methods have been widely used in the clinic by physicians to guide treatment decisions. The aim of this study was to evaluate the technical and clinical sensitivity and specificity of the droplet digital polymerase chain reaction (ddPCR method in detecting the three EGFR mutations in patients with lung cancer.Methods: Genomic DNA from H1975 and PC-9 cells, as well as 92 normal human blood specimens, was used to determine the technical sensitivity and specificity of the ddPCR assays. Genomic DNA of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded specimens from 78 Chinese patients with lung adenocarcinoma were assayed using both qPCR and ddPCR.Results: The three ddPCR assays had a limit of detection of 0.02% and a wide dynamic range from 1 to 20,000 copies measurement. The L858R and ex19del assays had a 0% background level in the technical and clinical settings. The T790M assay appeared to have a 0.03% technical background. The ddPCR assays were robust for correct determination of EGFR mutation status in patients, and the dynamic range appeared to be better than qPCR methods. The ddPCR assay for T790M could detect

  5. Autosomal recessive cutis laxa Type II: Report of novel mutation in a child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Autosomal recessive cutis laxa type-II (ARCLII is a spectrum of clinical disorders with prenatal and postnatal growth retardation, cutis laxa, dysmorphism, and skeletal abnormalities. We report the case of a 14-month-old boy with developmental delay, hypotonia, dysmorphism, and loose skin. A novel homozygous variant was observed in ATP6VOA2 gene. Clinical spectrum of ARCLII is highly heterogeneous and molecular analysis should be done to confirm the diagnosis.

  6. A point mutation in the extracellular domain activates LET-23, the Caenorhabditis elegans epidermal growth factor receptor homolog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, W S; Lesa, G M; Yannoukakos, D; Clandinin, T R; Schlessinger, J; Sternberg, P W

    1996-01-01

    The let-23 gene encodes a Caenorhabditis elegans homolog of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) necessary for vulval development. We have characterized a mutation of let-23 that activates the receptor and downstream signal transduction, leading to excess vulval differentiation. This mutation alters a conserved cysteine residue in the extracellular domain and is the first such point mutation in the EGFR subfamily of tyrosine kinases. Mutation of a different cysteine in the same subdomain causes a strong loss-of-function phenotype, suggesting that cysteines in this region are important for function and nonequivalent. Vulval precursor cells can generate either of two subsets of vulval cells (distinct fates) in response to sa62 activity. The fates produced depended on the copy number of the mutation, suggesting that quantitative differences in receptor activity influence the decision between these two fates. PMID:8552080

  7. Evolutionary pattern of mutation in the factor IX genes of great apes: How does it compare to the pattern of recent germline mutation in patients with hemophilia B?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grouse, L.H.; Ketterling, R.P.; Sommer, S.S. [Mayo Clinic/Foundation, Rochester, MN (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Most mutations causing hemophilia B have arisen within the past 150 years. By correcting for multiple biases, the underlying rates of spontaneous germline mutation have been estimated in the factor IX gene. From these rates, an underlying pattern of mutation has emerged. To determine if this pattern compares to a underlying pattern found in the great apes, sequence changes were determined in intronic regions of the factor IX gene. The following species were studied: Gorilla gorilla, Pan troglodytes (chimpanzee), Pongo pygmacus (orangutan) and Homo sapiens. Intronic sequences at least 200 bp from a splice junction were randomly chosen, amplified by cross-species PCR, and sequenced. These regions are expected to be subject to little if any selective pressure. Early diverged species of Old World monkeys were also studied to help determine the direction of mutational changes. A total of 62 sequence changes were observed. Initial data suggest that the average pattern since evolution of the great apes has a paucity of transitions at CpG dinucleotides and an excess of microinsertions to microdeletions when compared to the pattern observed in humans during the past 150 years (p<.05). A larger study is in progress to confirm these results.

  8. Identification of two novel critical mutations in PCNT gene resulting in microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II associated with multiple intracranial aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fei-Feng; Wang, Xu-Dong; Zhu, Min-Wei; Lou, Zhi-Hong; Zhang, Qiong; Zhu, Chun-Yu; Feng, Hong-Lin; Lin, Zhi-Guo; Liu, Shu-Lin

    2015-12-01

    Microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II (MOPD II) is a highly detrimental human autosomal inherited recessive disorder. The hallmark characteristics of this disease are intrauterine and postnatal growth restrictions, with some patients also having cerebrovascular problems such as cerebral aneurysms. The genomic basis behind most clinical features of MOPD II remains largely unclear. The aim of this work was to identify the genetic defects in a Chinese family with MOPD II associated with multiple intracranial aneurysms. The patient had typical MOPD II syndrome, with subarachnoid hemorrhage and multiple intracranial aneurysms. We identified three novel mutations in the PCNT gene, including one single base alteration (9842A>C in exon 45) and two deletions (Del-C in exon 30 and Del-16 in exon 41). The deletions were co-segregated with the affected individual in the family and were not present in the control population. Computer modeling demonstrated that the deletions may cause drastic changes on the secondary and tertiary structures, affecting the hydrophilicity and hydrophobicity of the mutant proteins. In conclusion, we identified two novel mutations in the PCNT gene associated with MOPD II and intracranial aneurysms, and the mutations were expected to alter the stability and functioning of the protein by computer modeling.

  9. Correlation between {sup 18}F Fluorodeoxyglucose uptake and epidermal growth factor receptor mutations in advanced lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Yun Jung; Cho, Byoung Chul; Jeong, Youg Hyu; Seo, Hyo Jung; Kim, Hyun Jeong; Cho, Arthur; Lee, Jae Hoon; Yun, Mi Jin; Jeon, Tae Joo; Lee, Jong Doo; Kang, Won Jun [Yonsei Univ., Health System, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-15

    Mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)gene have been identified as potential targets for the treatment and prognostic factors for non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We assessed the correlation between fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake and EGFR mutations, as well as their prognostic implications. A total of 163 patients with pathologically confirmed NSCLC were enrolled (99 males and 64 females; median age, 60 years). All patients underwent FDG positron emission tomography before treatment, and genetic studies of EGFR mutations were performed. The maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax)of the primary lung cancer was measured and normalized with regard to liver uptake. The SUVmax between the wild type and EGFR mutant groups was compared. Survival was evaluated according to SUVmax and EGFR mutation status. EGFR mutations were found in 57 patients (60.8%). The SUVmax tended to be higher in wild type than mutant tumors, but was not significantly different (11.1{+-}5.7 vs. 9.8{+-}4.4, P=0.103). The SUVmax was significantly lower in patients with an exon 19 mutation than in those with either an exon 21 mutation or wild type (P=0.003 and 0.009, respectively). The EGFR mutation showed prolonged overall survival (OS) compared to wild type tumors (P=0.004). There was no significant difference in survival according to SUVmax. Both OS and progression free survival of patients with a mutation in exon 19 were significant longer than in patients with wild type tumors. In patients with NSCLC, a mutation in exon 19 was associated with a lower SUVmax and is a reliable predictor for good survival.

  10. Molecular epidemiology of VHL gene mutations in renal cell carcinoma patients: relation to dietary and other factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemminki, Kari; Jiang, Yongwen; Ma, Xin; Yang, Ke; Egevad, Lars; Lindblad, Per

    2002-05-01

    Carcinogenic chemicals act through DNA damage and mitogenic effects. No established mechanism explains the cancer preventive effects, if any, of food items, such as vegetables and fruit. If such data were available, preferably on tumor-initiating genes, the evidence for the protective effects would become stronger. The von Hipple-Lindau (VHL) gene is the tumor suppressor gene predisposing to both sporadic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and von Hippel-Lindau disease. We have earlier analyzed VHL mutations in RCCs from 102 Swedish patients identified in a case-control study and here examine associations between patient characteristics, including dietary habits and mutations, considering the type of mutation. The results are given as odds ratios (OR), separately for smokers and all patients. In univariate analysis, consumption of vegetables and citrus fruit decreased the frequency of VHL mutations among smokers and citrus fruit among all patients. In multivariate analysis of smokers' characteristics, welding fumes showed a risk of 5.63 for multiple VHL mutations. In smokers, citrus fruit decreased the OR of GC to AT mutations to 0.13 and that of multiple mutations to 0.17; vegetables decreased the OR for single mutations to 0.22. Among all subjects, welding fumes were a risk factor and citrus fruit a protective factor. Additionally, an intake of selenium protected against multiple mutations. The present results provide evidence that the intake of vegetables, selenium and particularly of citrus fruit protects the renal VHL gene from mutational insults that may be endogenous or common in a population. Even though most of the associations are biologically plausible, and vegetables and fruit were an a priori hypothesis, fortuitous results cannot be ruled out in this relatively small study.

  11. Mutations in fibroblast growth factor receptors: Phenotypic consequences during eukaryotic development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, W.J.; Bellus, G.A.; Jabs, E.W. [Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Recently, a tremendous amount of excitement and interest has been generated by the rapid succession of discoveries in the human fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) field. In less than a year, mutations in three FGFRs (FGFR1-FGFR3) have been associated with three skeletal dysplasias and four craniosynostotic syndromes. FGFRs are members of the receptor tyrosine kinase family that bind fibroblast growth factors (FGFs). The FGF family consists of structurally related polypeptides that play a key role in numerous aspects of embryogenesis, growth, and homeostasis. FGFs have a potent growth stimulatory and/or differentiation-inducing effect on cells such as those derived from the early-embryonic mesoderm or ectoderm. In addition to mitogenesis and differentiation, FGFs also stimulate chemotaxis, cell survival, and angiogenesis. FGFs mediate cellular responses on binding to and activation of FGFRs. 45 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Gastric intrinsic factor deficiency with combined GIF heterozygous mutations and FUT2 secretor variant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chery, Celine; Hehn, Alain; Mrabet, Nadir; Oussalah, Abderrahim; Jeannesson, Elise; Besseau, Cyril; Alberto, Jean-Marc; Gross, Isabelle; Josse, Thomas; Gérard, Philippe; Guéant-Rodriguez, Rosa Maria; Freund, Jean-Noel; Devignes, Jean; Bourgaud, Frédérique; Peyrin-Biroulet, Laurent; Feillet, François; Guéant, Jean-Louis

    2013-05-01

    Several genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified a strong association between serum vitamin B12 and fucosyltransferase 2 (FUT2), a gene associated with susceptibility to Helicobacter pylori infection. Hazra et al. conducted a meta-analysis of three GWAS and found three additional loci in MUT, CUBN and TCN1. Other GWAS conducted in Italy and China confirmed the association for FUT2 gene. Alpha-2-fucosyltransferase (FUT2) catalyzes fucose addition to form H-type antigens in exocrine secretions. FUT2 non-secretor variant produces no secretion of H-type antigens and is associated with high-plasma vitamin B12 levels. This association was explained by the influence of FUT2 on H. pylori, which is a risk factor of gastritis, a main cause of vitamin B12 impaired absorption. However, we recently showed that H. pylori serology had no influence on FUT2 association with vitamin B12, in a large sample population, suggesting the involvement of an alternative mechanism. GIF is another gene associated with plasma levels of vitamin B12 and gastric intrinsic factor (GIF) is a fucosylated protein needed for B12 absorption. Inherited GIF deficiency produces B12 deficiency unrelated with gastritis. We report 2 families with heterozygous GIF mutation, 290T>C, M97T, with decreased binding affinity of GIF for vitamin B12 and one family with heterozygous GIF mutation 435_437delGAA, K145_N146delinsN and no B12 binding activity of mutated GIF. All cases with vitamin B12 deficit carried the FUT2 rs601338 secretor variant. Ulex europeus binding to GIF was influenced by FUT2 genotypes and GIF concentration was lower, in gastric juice from control subjects with the secretor genotype. GIF290C allele was reported in 5 European cases and no Africans among 1282 ambulatory subjects and was associated with low plasma vitamin B12 and anaemia in the single case bearing the FUT2 secretor variant. We concluded that FUT2 secretor variant worsens B12 status in cases with heterozygous GIF

  13. Recurrent atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome associated with factor I mutation in a living related renal transplant recipient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Micah R; Thomas, Christie P; Torrealba, Jose R; Djamali, Arjang; Fernandez, Luis A; Nishimura, Carla J; Smith, Richard J H; Samaniego, Millie D

    2009-02-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome, or the nondiarrheal form of hemolytic uremic syndrome, is a rare disorder typically classified as familial or sporadic. Recent literature has suggested that approximately 50% of patients have mutations in factor H (CFH), factor I (CFI), or membrane cofactor protein (encoded by CD46). Importantly, results of renal transplantation in patients with mutations in either CFH or CFI are dismal, with recurrent disease leading to graft loss in the majority of cases. We describe an adult renal transplant recipient who developed recurrent hemolytic uremic syndrome 1 month after transplantation. Bidirectional sequencing of CFH, CFI, and CD46 confirmed that the patient was heterozygous for a novel missense mutation, a substitution of a serine reside for a tyrosine residue at amino acid 369, in CFI. This report reemphasizes the importance of screening patients with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome for mutations in these genes before renal transplantation and shows the challenges in the management of these patients.

  14. Relationships Between RNA Polymerase II Activity and Spt Elongation Factors to Spt- Phenotype and Growth in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Cui

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The interplay between adjacent transcription units can result in transcription-dependent alterations in chromatin structure or recruitment of factors that determine transcription outcomes, including the generation of intragenic or other cryptic transcripts derived from cryptic promoters. Mutations in a number of genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae confer both cryptic intragenic transcription and the Suppressor of Ty (Spt- phenotype for the lys2-128∂ allele of the LYS2 gene. Mutants that suppress lys2-128∂ allow transcription from a normally inactive Ty1 ∂ promoter, conferring a LYS+ phenotype. The arrangement of transcription units at lys2-128∂ is reminiscent of genes containing cryptic promoters within their open reading frames. We set out to examine the relationship between RNA Polymerase II (Pol II activity, functions of Spt elongation factors, and cryptic transcription because of the previous observation that increased-activity Pol II alleles confer an Spt- phenotype. We identify both cooperating and antagonistic genetic interactions between Pol II alleles and alleles of elongation factors SPT4, SPT5, and SPT6. We find that cryptic transcription at FLO8 and STE11 is distinct from that at lys2-128∂, though all show sensitivity to reduction in Pol II activity, especially the expression of lys2-128∂ found in Spt- mutants. We determine that the lys2-128∂ Spt- phenotypes for spt6-1004 and increased activity rpo21/rpb1 alleles each require transcription from the LYS2 promoter. Furthermore, we identify the Ty1 transcription start site (TSS within the ∂ element as the position of Spt- transcription in tested Spt- mutants.

  15. Risk factors for major bleeding in the SEATTLE II trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadiq, Immad; Goldhaber, Samuel Z; Liu, Ping-Yu; Piazza, Gregory

    2017-02-01

    Ultrasound-facilitated, catheter-directed, low-dose fibrinolysis minimizes the risk of intracranial bleeding compared with systemic full-dose fibrinolytic therapy for pulmonary embolism (PE). However, major bleeding is nevertheless a potential complication. We analyzed the 150-patient SEATTLE II trial of submassive and massive PE patients to describe those who suffered major bleeding events following ultrasound-facilitated, catheter-directed, low-dose fibrinolysis and to identify risk factors for bleeding. Major bleeding was defined as GUSTO severe/life-threatening or moderate bleeds within 72 hours of initiation of the procedure. Of the 15 patients with major bleeding, four (26.6%) developed access site-related bleeding. Multiple venous access attempts were more frequent in the major bleeding group (27.6% vs 3.6%; p<0.001). All patients with major bleeding had femoral vein access for device delivery. Patients who developed major bleeding had a longer intensive care stay (6.8 days vs 4.7 days; p=0.004) and longer hospital stay (12.9 days vs 8.4 days; p=0.004). The frequency of inferior vena cava filter placement was 40% in patients with major bleeding compared with 13% in those without major bleeding ( p=0.02). Massive PE (adjusted odds ratio 3.6; 95% confidence interval 1.01-12.9; p=0.049) and multiple venous access attempts (adjusted odds ratio 10.09; 95% confidence interval 1.98-51.46; p=0.005) were independently associated with an increased risk of major bleeding. In conclusion, strategies for improving venous access should be implemented to reduce the risk of major bleeding associated with ultrasound-facilitated, catheter-directed, low-dose fibrinolysis. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01513759; EKOS Corporation 10.13039/100006522.

  16. Perturbing the water cavity surrounding the manganese cluster by mutating the residue D1-valine 185 has a strong effect on the water oxidation mechanism of photosystem II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilbeck, Preston L; Bao, Han; Neveu, Curtis L; Burnap, Robert L

    2013-10-01

    The active site of water oxidation in Photosystem II (PSII) is a Mn4CaO5 cluster that is located in a cavity between the D1 and CP43 protein subunits by which it is coordinated. The remainder of this cavity is filled with water molecules, which serve as a source of substrate and participate in poorly understood hydrogen bond networks that may modulate the function of the Mn4CaO5 cluster. These water molecules interact with the first and second sphere amino acid ligands to the Mn4CaO5 cluster and some water interacts directly with the Mn4CaO5 cluster. Here, the results of mutations to the amino acids that line the walls of several predicted cavities in the immediate vicinity of the Mn4CaO5 cluster were examined in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. Of these, mutations of Val185 in the D1 subunit resulted in the most interesting functional alterations. The hydrophobic D1-Val185 occupies a location contacting water molecules that are positioned between the redox active tyrosine (YZ) and the putative proton gate residue, D1-Asp61, and at a position opposite the oxo bridge atom, O5, of the cluster. Mutations of the residue D1-Val185 were produced, with the intention that the substitute residue would extend into the water cavity that includes H2O molecules that interact with the Mn4CaO5 cluster, amino acid ligands of the Mn4CaO5 cluster, YZ and the chloride co-factor of PSII. Three of these mutants, D1-Val185Asn, D1-Val185Thr, and D1-Val185Phe, were able to accumulate significant levels of charge separating PSII and were characterized using polarographic and fluorescent techniques. Of the three substitutions, the phenylalanine substitution was the most severe with a complete inability to evolve oxygen, despite being able to accumulate PSII and to undergo stable charge separation. The threonine substitution had no apparent effect on oxygen evolution other than a 40% reduction in the steady state rate of O2 production compared to the case of wild-type Synechocystis , due to a

  17. CS-27IDH1/2 MUTATIONS INFLUENCE ZEB1 EXPRESSION IN GRADES II AND III GLIOMAS

    OpenAIRE

    Nesvick, Cody; Zhang, Chao; Montgomery, Blake; Lee, Michaela; Yang, Chunzhang; Wang, Herui; Merrill, Marsha; Heiss, John; Ray-Chaudhury, Abhik; Zhuang, Zhengping

    2014-01-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a cell program that crucially regulates polarity and enhances invasion in normal epithelia and carcinomas. It has been recently demonstrated that EMT-promoting transcription factors (EMT-TFs) also govern cell invasion in glioblastoma, but the role of these proteins in lower-grade gliomas has not yet been investigated. We investigated the impact of EMT-TF expression on overall survival in World Health Organization (WHO) grades II and III gliomas using...

  18. Systemic mastocytosis uncommon in KIT D816V mutation positive core-binding factor acute myeloid leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Thomas; Preiss, Birgitte; Broesby-Olsen, Sigurd

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The KIT D816V mutation is detected in the vast majority of adult cases of systemic mastocytosis (SM). The mutation is also frequently detected in core-binding factor acute myeloid leukemia (CBF-AML) defined by the presence of t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1 or inv(16)(p13.1;q22)/t(16;16)(p...

  19. Do Factor V Leiden and Prothrombin G20210A Mutations Predict Recurrent Venous Thromboembolism in Older Patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méan, Marie; Limacher, Andreas; Stalder, Odile; Angelillo-Scherrer, Anne; Alberio, Lorenzo; Fontana, Pierre; Beer, Hans-Jürg; Rodondi, Nicolas; Lämmle, Bernhard; Aujesky, Drahomir

    2017-10-01

    The value of genetic thrombophilia testing in elderly patients with an unprovoked venous thromboembolism is unclear. We assessed whether the Factor V Leiden and the prothrombin G20210A mutation are associated with recurrent venous thromboembolism in elderly patients in a prospective multicenter cohort study. We genotyped the Factor V Leiden and the prothrombin G20210A mutation in 354 consecutive in- and outpatients aged ≥65 years with a first unprovoked venous thromboembolism from 9 Swiss hospitals. Patients and managing physicians were blinded to testing results. The outcome was recurrent symptomatic venous thromboembolism during follow-up. We examined the association between the Factor V Leiden and the prothrombin G20210A mutation and venous thromboembolism recurrence using competing risk regression, adjusting for age, sex, and periods of anticoagulation as a time-varying covariate. Overall, 9.0% of patients had a Factor V Leiden and 3.7% had a prothrombin G20210A mutation. At 36 months of follow-up, patients with a Factor V Leiden and a prothrombin G20210A mutation had a cumulative incidence of recurrent venous thromboembolism of 12.9% (95% confidence interval [CI], 5.1%-30.8%) and 18.5% (95% CI, 4.9%-56.5%), respectively, compared with 16.7% (95% CI, 12.5%-22.1%) of patients without mutation (P = .91 by the log-rank test). After adjustment, neither the Factor V Leiden (sub-hazard ratio 0.98; 95% CI, 0.35-2.77) nor the prothrombin G20210A mutation (sub-hazard ratio 1.15; 95% CI, 0.25-5.19) was associated with recurrent venous thromboembolism. Our results suggest that testing for genetic thrombophilia may not be beneficial in elderly patients with a first unprovoked venous thromboembolism. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The Factor VIII Mutation Database on the World Wide Web: the haemophilia A mutation, search, test and resource site. HAMSTeRS update (version 3.0).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemball-Cook, G; Tuddenham, E G

    1997-01-01

    The HAMSTeRS WWW site was set up in 1996 in order to facilitate easy access to, and aid understanding of, the causes of haemophilia A at the molecular level; previously, the first and second text editions of the database have been published in Nucleic Acids Research. This report describes the facilities originally available at the site and the recent additions which we have made to increase its usefulness to clinicians, the molecular genetics community and structural biologists interested in factor VIII. The database (version 3.0) has been completely updated with easy submission of point mutations, deletions and insertions via e-mail of custom-designed forms. The searching of point mutations in the database has been made simpler and more robust, with a concomitantly expanded real-time bioinformatic analysis of the database. A methods section devoted to mutation detection has been added, highlighting issues such as choice of technique and PCR primer sequences. Finally, a FVIII structure section gives access to 3D VRML (Virtual Reality Modelling Language) files for any user-definable residue in a FVIII A domain homology model based on the crystal structure of human caeruloplasmin, together with secondary structural data and a sound+video animation of the model. It is intended that the general availability of this model will assist both in interpretation of causative mutations and selection of candidate residues forin vitromutagenesis. The HAMSTeRS URL is http://europium.mrc.rpms.ac.uk.

  1. Mutations in mitochondrial-encoded cytochrome c oxidase subunits I, II, and III genes detected in Alzheimer's disease using single-strand conformation polymorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamblet, Natasha S; Ragland, Brian; Ali, Mervat; Conyers, Barbara; Castora, Frank J

    2006-02-01

    A "mitochondrial hypothesis" of late onset Alzheimer's disease (AD) has been proposed. Biochemical studies indicate that there is a significant decrease in cytochrome oxidase (CO) activity as well as perturbed CO I and CO III mRNA levels in platelets and brain tissue from Alzheimer's patients. Using the electrophoretic mutation detection technique SSCP and DNA sequencing, we have identified 20 point mutations in the mitochondrial-encoded CO subunits (CO I, II, and III) in AD and age-matched control brain samples. Eight of the mutations are new variants of the mitochondrial genome. The efficiency of SSCP in detecting mutations in the CO subunits was estimated to be 80% when compared to dideoxy sequencing. One of the mutations (at position 9,861) results in a phenylalanine-->leucine substitution at a highly conserved residue in CO III. CO activity was reduced by an average of 35% in all AD brains compared to age-matched control samples, which agrees with previous reports. CO activity in one of the AD brain samples carrying the 9,861 mutation decreased by 80% relative to control brain samples, suggesting that the phenotypic expression of this mutation may result in reduced CO activity and compromised mitochondrial function.

  2. Novel CFI mutation in a patient with leukocytoclastic vasculitis may redefine the clinical spectrum of Complement Factor I deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Jakob Thaning; Katzenstein, Terese Lea; Kofoed, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    presentation of Factor I deficiency varies and includes severe recurrent bacterial infections, glomerulonephritis and autoimmune diseases. The patient, a 28-years old woman with consanguineous parents, presented with recurrent leukocytoclastic vasculitis in the lower extremities with no associated systemic...... mutations vary among patients sole association with leukocytoclastic vasculitis redefines the clinical spectrum of complete Factor I deficiency....

  3. Not all epidermal growth factor receptor mutations in lung cancer are created equal: Perspectives for individualized treatment strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Yoshihisa; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya

    2016-09-01

    Somatic mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene are present in approximately 20% (in Caucasians) to 40% (in East Asians) of adenocarcinomas of the lung. Targeted therapy for these lung cancers has been established based on evidence regarding mainly common mutations; that is, exon 19 deletions (Del19) and L858R. EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI), gefitinib, erlotinib or afatinib showed high objective response rates (ORR) of approximately 60%. Several studies suggested that Del19 might be more sensitive to EGFR-TKI than L858R. On the other hand, it has been difficult to establish evidence for other less common mutations, accounting for 12% of all EGFR mutations, because there are many variants and many studies have excluded patients with these uncommon mutations. However, recent studies revealed that these rare genotypes could be targetable if appropriate TKI are selected. For example, G719X (X denotes A, S, C and so on), Del18, E709K, insertions in exon 19 (Ins19), S768I or L861Q showed moderate sensitivities to gefitinib or erlotinb with ORR of 30%-50%. However, afatinib appeared to be especially effective for these tumors. Although Ins20s (except for insFQEA) have been regarded as resistant mutations, osimertinib may be effective for rare subtypes of them and nazartinib (EGF816) is promising for the majority of them. For the further development of targeted therapy in all EGFR mutations, it is important to precisely detect targetable mutations, to select the most appropriate TKI for each mutation, and to continue investigating in vitro studies and collecting clinical data on even rare mutations. © 2016 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  4. Splicing factor SF3B1 mutations and ring sideroblasts in myelodysplastic syndromes: a Brazilian cohort screening study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia Sacilotto Donaires

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Background: Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS comprise a group of malignant clonal hematologic disorders characterized by ineffective hematopoiesis and propensity for progression to acute myeloid leukemia. Acquired mutations in the gene encoding RNA splicing factor 3B subunit 1 (SF3B1 are highly associated with the MDS subtypes presenting ring sideroblasts, and represent a specific nosological entity. The effects of these mutations on clinical outcomes are diverse and contrasting. Methods: A cohort of 91 Brazilian MDS patients, including patients with ring sideroblasts in the bone marrow, were screened for mutations in the SF3B1 hotspots (exons 12-15 by direct Sanger sequencing. Results: SF3B1 heterozygous mutations were identified in six patients (7%, all of them with ring sideroblasts, thus confirming the association between SF3B1 mutations and myelodysplastic syndrome subtypes bearing this morphologic feature (frequency of 6/13, p-value < 0.0001. Conclusion: This is the first screening of SF3B1 mutations in a cohort of Brazilian myelodysplastic syndrome patients. Our findings confirm that mutations in this splicing gene correlate with bone marrow ringed sideroblasts.

  5. Importance of sigma factor mutations in increased triclosan resistance in Salmonella Typhimurium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gantzhorn, Mette Rørbæk; Olsen, John Elmerdahl; Thomsen, Line Elnif

    2015-01-01

    to disinfectants might lead to decreased susceptibility to antibiotics. The current study aimed to identify genetic changes causing high level triclosan resistance in S. enterica serovar Typhimurium and evaluate how these affected antibiotic resistance and efflux pump activity. RESULTS: Wild type strains S....... Typhimurium 4/74 and DTU3 were adapted to increasing concentrations of the biocide triclosan by serial passage. High level triclosan resistant isolates (MIC > 1000 μg/ml) were obtained. Strains were genome sequenced, and SNPs in fabI, rpoS and rpoD were found to be associated with high level resistance....... However, work with defined mutants revealed that a SNP in fabI was not sufficient to obtain high level resistance. This required additional mutations in the sigma factors rpoS or rpoD. The adapted strains showed triclosan-dependent increased efflux, increased fabI expression and reduced susceptibility...

  6. RISK FACTORS FOR HTLV-II INFECTION IN PERUVIAN MEN WHO HAVE SEX WITH MEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    ZUNT, JOSEPH R.; LA ROSA, ALBERTO M.; PEINADO, JESÚS; LAMA, JAVIER R.; SUAREZ, LUIS; PUN, MONICA; CABEZAS, CESAR; SANCHEZ, JORGE

    2009-01-01

    Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type-II (HTLV-II) infection is endemic in indigenous groups in the Americas and injection drug users (IDUs) worldwide. In Peru, HTLV-II infection was previously identified in two indigenous Amazonians. We examined risk factors for HTLV-II infection in 2,703 Peruvian men who have sex with men (MSM): 35 (1.3%) were HTLV-II positive. HTLV-II infection was associated with syphilis, HSV-2 infection, unprotected receptive anal intercourse, and older age. This is the first report of HTLV-II in a non-indigenous non-IDU population in Peru. Additional studies are needed to determine if HTLV-II is a sexually transmitted infection in this and other sexually active populations. PMID:16687704

  7. Increased activation of blood coagulation in pregnant women with the Factor V Leiden mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjellberg, Ulla; van Rooijen, Marianne; Bremme, Katarina; Hellgren, Margareta

    2014-10-01

    The risk of venous thromboembolism is enhanced in pregnant carriers of the Factor V Leiden mutation. The primary aim of the study was to compare prothrombin fragments 1+2, soluble fibrin and D-dimer levels in pregnant Factor V Leiden mutation carriers with those in non-carriers. Secondary aims were to evaluate whether these biomarkers could predict placenta-mediated complications or venous thromboembolism, and to study blood coagulation after caesarean section with thromboprophylaxis and after vaginal delivery without thromboprophylaxis. Prothrombin fragments 1+2, soluble fibrin and D-dimer levels were studied longitudinally in 476 carriers with singleton pregnancies from gestational weeks 23-25 until 8-10 weeks postpartum. Prothrombin fragments 1+2 and D-dimer levels gradually increased during pregnancy. D-dimer levels were higher in carriers, both during pregnancy and puerperium, compared to non-carriers. D-dimer levels above 0.5mg/l were found in about 30% and 20% of the heterozygous carriers at 4-5 and 8-10 weeks postpartum, respectively. Soluble fibrin levels were mainly unchanged during pregnancy, with no difference between carriers and non-carriers. Biomarker levels were similar in carriers with uncomplicated and complicated pregnancies. Higher D-dimer levels indicate increased blood coagulation and fibrinolysis activity in carriers. The high proportion of carriers with D-dimer levels exceeding 0.5mg/l postpartum must be considered when assessing the probability of venous thromboembolism. Large overlaps in biomarker levels in normal and complicated pregnancies suggest that these biomarkers cannot be used as predictors. Thromboprophylaxis following caesarean section may prevent increased activation of blood coagulation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Evaluation the frequency of factor V Leiden mutation in pregnant women with preeclampsia syndrome in an Iranian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azadeh Azinfar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Role of genetic factors in etiology of preeclampsia is not confirmed yet.Objective: Gene defect frequency varies in different geographic areas as well as ethnic groups. In this study, the role of factor V Leiden mutation in the pathogenesis of preeclampsia syndrome among the pregnant population of northern shore of Persian Gulf in Iran, were considered.Materials and Methods: Between Jan. 2008 and Dec. 2009, in a nested case control study, pregnant women with preeclampsia (N=198 as cases and healthy (N=201 as controls were enrolled in the study. DNA were extracted from 10 CC peripheral blood and analyzed for presence of factor V Leiden mutation in these subjects. The maternal and neonatal outcomes of pregnancy according to the distribution of factor V Leiden were also compared among cases.Results: In total, 17(8.6% of cases and 2(1% of controls showed the factor V Leiden mutation. The incidence of factor V Leiden was typically higher in preeclamptic women than control group (OR: 9.34 %95 CI: 2.12-41.01. There was no difference in incidence rate of preterm delivery< 37 weeks (OR: 1.23 %95 CI: 0.38-4.02, very early preterm delivery<32 weeks (OR: 1.00 %95 CI: 0.12-8.46, intra uterine fetal growth restriction (IUGR (OR: 1.32 %95 CI: 0.15-11.30 ,and the rate of cesarean section (OR: 0.88 %95 CI: 0.29-2.62 among cases based on the prevalence of factor V Leiden mutation.Conclusion: The pregnant women with factor V Leiden mutation are prone for preeclampsia syndrome during pregnancy, but this risk factor was not correlated to pregnancy complications in the studied women

  9. Involvement of Krüppel-like factor 6 (KLF6) mutation in the development of nonpolypoid colorectal carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To examine Krüppel-like factor 6 (KLF6) mutations in nonpolypoid-type tumors and alterations of K-ras, p53,and B-raf in relation between mutation and morphologic type, particularly nonpolypoid-type colorectal carcinomas.METHODS: Fifty-five early nonpolypoid colorectal carcinomas were analyzed. Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of KLF6 and p53 was determined by microsatellite assay.Mutations of KLF6, K-ras, and B-raf were examined by polymerase chain reaction-single-strand conformation polymorphism followed by direct sequencing. In LOH-positive and/or mutation-positive tumors, multiple (4-7) samples in each tumor were microdissected and examined for genetic alterations, p53 expression was evaluated by immunohistochemistry.RESULTS: LOH of KLF6 and p53 was found in 14 of 29 (48.3%) and 14 of 31 (45.2%) tumors, respectively. In 10 of the 14 (71.4%) KLF6 LOH-positive tumors and 9 of the 14 (64.3%) p53 LOH-positive tumors, LOH was found in all of the microdissected samples. In 1 of the 10 (10.0%) KLF6 LOH-positive tumors, a single missense mutation was identified. K-ras and B-raf mutations were found in 5 of 55 (9.1%) and 6 of 55 (10.9%) tumors,respectively. However, these mutations were detected only in subsets of microdissected tumor samples.CONCLUSION: These data suggest that KLF6 and p53 mutations are involved in the development of nonpolypoid colorectal carcinoma, whereas K-ras and B-raf mutations are not.

  10. Characterization of osteoclasts from patients harboring a G215R mutation in ClC-7 causing autosomal dominant osteopetrosis type II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Kim; Gram, Jeppe; Schaller, Sophie

    2004-01-01

    Autosomal dominant osteopetrosis II (ADOII) is a relatively benign disorder caused by a missense mutation in the ClCN7 gene. In this study, we characterize the osteoclasts from patients with ADOII, caused by a G215R mutation, and investigate the effect on osteoclast function in vitro. Osteoclasts......, the morphology, and the expression of markers, such as cathepsin K and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase. When mature ADOII osteoclasts were investigated on mineralized bone, they degraded the bone material, however only to 10 to 20% of the level in controls. We show by acridine orange, that the reduced...

  11. Positive Selection during the Evolution of the Blood Coagulation Factors in the Context of Their Disease-Causing Mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rallapalli, Pavithra M.; Orengo, Christine A.; Studer, Romain A.; Perkins, Stephen J.

    2014-01-01

    Blood coagulation occurs through a cascade of enzymes and cofactors that produces a fibrin clot, while otherwise maintaining hemostasis. The 11 human coagulation factors (FG, FII–FXIII) have been identified across all vertebrates, suggesting that they emerged with the first vertebrates around 500 Ma. Human FVIII, FIX, and FXI are associated with thousands of disease-causing mutations. Here, we evaluated the strength of selective pressures on the 14 genes coding for the 11 factors during vertebrate evolution, and compared these with human mutations in FVIII, FIX, and FXI. Positive selection was identified for fibrinogen (FG), FIII, FVIII, FIX, and FX in the mammalian Primates and Laurasiatheria and the Sauropsida (reptiles and birds). This showed that the coagulation system in vertebrates was under strong selective pressures, perhaps to adapt against blood-invading pathogens. The comparison of these results with disease-causing mutations reported in FVIII, FIX, and FXI showed that the number of disease-causing mutations, and the probability of positive selection were inversely related to each other. It was concluded that when a site was under positive selection, it was less likely to be associated with disease-causing mutations. In contrast, sites under negative selection were more likely to be associated with disease-causing mutations and be destabilizing. A residue-by-residue comparison of the FVIII, FIX, and FXI sequence alignments confirmed this. This improved understanding of evolutionary changes in FVIII, FIX, and FXI provided greater insight into disease-causing mutations, and better assessments of the codon sites that may be mutated in applications of gene therapy. PMID:25158795

  12. Chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter transcription factor II regulates renin gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Sandra; Roeser, Marc; Lachmann, Peter; Ishii, Sumiyashi; Suh, Jae Mi; Harlander, Sabine; Desch, Michael; Brunssen, Coy; Morawietz, Henning; Tsai, Sophia Y; Tsai, Ming-Jer; Hohenstein, Bernd; Hugo, Christian; Todorov, Vladimir T

    2012-07-13

    This study aimed to investigate the possible involvement of the orphan nuclear receptor chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter transcription factor II (COUP-TFII) in the regulation of renin gene expression. COUP-TFII colocalized with renin in the juxtaglomerular cells of the kidney, which are the main source of renin in vivo. Protein-DNA binding studies demonstrated that COUP-TFII binds to an imperfect direct repeat COUP-TFII recognition sequence (termed hereafter proxDR) in the proximal renin promoter. Because cAMP signaling plays a central role in the control of the renin gene expression, we suggested that COUP-TFII may modulate this cAMP effect. Accordingly, knockdown of COUP-TFII in the clonal renin-producing cell lines As4.1 and Calu-6 diminished the stimulation of the renin mRNA expression by cAMP agonists. In addition, the mutation of the proxDR element in renin promoter reporter gene constructs abrogated the inducibility by cAMP. The proxDR sequence was found to be necessary for the function of a proximal renin promoter cAMP-response element (CRE). Knockdown of COUP-TFII or cAMP-binding protein (CREB), which is the archetypal transcription factor binding to CRE, decreased the basal renin gene expression. However, the deficiency of COUP-TFII did not further diminish the renin expression when CREB was knocked down. In agreement with the cell culture studies, mutant mice deficient in COUP-TFII have lower renin expression than their control strain. Altogether our data show that COUP-TFII is involved in the control of renin gene expression.

  13. Mutational analysis of divalent metal ion binding in the active site of class II α-mannosidase from sulfolobus solfataricus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Dennis K.; Webb, Helen; Nielsen, Jonas Willum;

    2015-01-01

    Mutational analysis of Sulfolobus solfataricus class II α-mannosidase was focused on side chains that interact with the hydroxyls of the-1 mannosyl of the substrate (Asp-534) or form ligands to the active site divalent metal ion (His-228 and His-533) judged from crystal structures of homologous...... enzymes. D534A and D534N appeared to be completely inactive. When compared to the wild-type enzyme, the mutant enzymes in general showed only small changes in KM for the substrate, p-nitrophenyl-α-mannoside, but elevated activation constants, KA, for the divalent metal ion (Co2+, Zn2+, Mn2+, or Cd2......+). Some mutant enzyme forms displayed an altered preference for the metal ion compared to that of the wild type-enzyme. Furthermore, the H228Q, H533E, and H533Q enzymes were inhibited at increasing Zn2+ concentrations. The catalytic rate was reduced for all enzymes compared to that of the wild-type enzyme...

  14. Specific mutations in the enhancer II/core promoter/precore regions of hepatitis B virus subgenotype C2 in Korean patients with hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ja Kyung; Chang, Hye Young; Lee, Jung Min; Baatarkhuu, Oidov; Yoon, Young Joon; Park, Jun Yong; Kim, Do Young; Han, Kwang-Hyub; Chon, Chae Yoon; Ahn, Sang Hoon

    2009-06-01

    Recently, hepatitis B virus (HBV) genotypes and mutations have been reported to be related to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). This cross-sectional case-control study examined the relationship between HCC and mutations in the enhancer II/core promoter and precore regions of HBV by comparing 135 Korean HCC patients infected with HBV genotype C2 (HBV/C2; HCC group) with 135 age-, sex-, and hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg) status-matched patients without HCC (non- HCC group). Age and sex were also matched between HBeAg-positive and -negative patients. The prevalence of T1653, A1689, V1753, T1762/A1764, T1846, A1850, C1858, and A1896 mutations was evaluated in this population. The prevalence of the T1653 mutation in the box alpha region, the T1689 [corrected] mutation in between the box alpha and beta regions, and the T1762/A1764 mutations in the basal core promoter region was significantly higher in the HCC group compared to the non-HCC group (8.9% vs. 2.2%, P = 0.017; 19.3% vs. 4.4%, P HBV/C2.

  15. [Mutation screening in Angiotensin II receptors, AGTR1 and AGTR2, and evaluation of AGTR1 polymorphisms C573T and A1166C in patients with premature adrenarche].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura, Mônica S F; de Melo, Mônica B; Longui, Carlos Alberto; Rocha, Mylene N; Monte, Osmar

    2006-10-01

    Precocious pubarche is the appearance of pubic hair before the age of 8 years in girls and 9 years in boys. The most frequent etiology is idiopathic precocious adrenarche, suggested, after long-term follow-up, to be associated with metabolic syndrome. One of the factors involved in the genesis of precocious adrenarche is Angiotensin II (Ang II), which promotes cell proliferation and steroidogenesis through type 1 (AT1) and type 2 (AT2) receptors. In order to study Ang II receptors mutations, 50 children with idiopathic precocious adrenarche were evaluated and compared to a control group of normal individuals. Mutations were not detected in the AGTR1 and AGTR2 genes; however, two polymorphisms were identified in the AGTR1 gene: the C573T (exon 5) and the A1166C (3' untranslated region). The polymorphic allele T573 was found in 35% of the patients and 38% of controls. The polymorphic allele C1166 was present in 24% of the patients and 26% of controls. There was no statistical difference between groups. There was also no correlation between the polymorphisms and clinical and laboratory findings, as well as their family history of metabolic syndrome.

  16. Molecular diagnosis of mucopolysaccharidosis Type II (Hunter syndrome) by automated sequencing and computer-assisted interpretation: Toward mutation mapping of the Iduronate-2-sulfatase gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jonsson, J.J.; Aronovich, E.L.; Braun, S.E.; Whitley, C.B. [Univ. of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    1995-03-01

    Virtually all mutations causing Hunter syndrome (mucopolysaccharidosis type II) are expected to be new mutations. Therefore, as a means of molecular diagnosis, we developed a rapid method to sequence the entire iduronate-2-sulfatase (IDS) coding region. PCR amplicons representing the IDS cDNA were sequenced with an automatic instrument, and output was analyzed by computer-assisted interpretation of tracings, using Staden programs on a Sun computer. Mutations were found in 10 of 11 patients studied. Unique missense mutations were identified in five patients: H229Y (685{r_arrow}T, severe phenotype); P358R (1073C{r_arrow}G, severe); R468W (1402C{r_arrow}T, mild); P469H (1406C{r_arrow}A, mild); and Y523C (1568A{r_arrow}G, mild). Nonsense mutations were identified in two patients: R172X (514C{r_arrow}T, severe) and Q389X (1165C{r_arrow}T, severe). Two other patients with severe disease had insertions of 1 and 14 bp, in exons 3 and 6, respectively. In another patient with severe disease, the predominant (<95%) IDS message resulted from aberrant splicing, which skipped exon 3. In this last case, consensus sequences for splice sites in exon 3 were intact, but a 395C{r_arrow}G mutation was identified 24 bp upstream from the 3` splice of exon 3. This mutation created a cryptic 5` splice site with a better consensus sequence for 5` splice sites than the natural 5` splice site of intron 3. A minor population of the IDS message was processed by using this cryptic splice site; however, no correctly spliced message was detected in leukocytes from this patient. The mutational topology of the IDS gene is presented. 46 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Different presentations in patients with tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome mutations: report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celebi-Tayfur, Aslı; Bilginer, Yelda; Finetti, Martina; Gattorno, Marco; Ozen, Seza

    2013-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS) is an autosomal dominant autoinflammatory disorder caused by mutations in the TNFRSF1A gene encoding the 55-kDa receptor for tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α. It is characterized by recurrent prolonged episodes of fever accompanied by abdominal pain, pleuritis, migratory skin rashes, fasciitis, headache, conjunctivitis, and periorbital edema. We report two children, one with a severe mutation in the TNFRSF1A gene causing the typical phenotype. The second patient had a homozygous R92Q-type mutation and displayed a periodic fever with aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis and adenitis (PFAPA) syndrome-like phenotype. In the eastern Mediterranean region, TRAPS is probably underdiagnosed because of the overwhelming frequency of familial Mediterranean fever (FMF). However, TRAPS should be sought for in patients with atypical symptoms for FMF.

  18. Novel Mutation of Cleidocranial Dysplasia-related Frameshift Runt-related Transcription Factor 2 in a Sporadic Chinese Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Xue-Yan; Jia, Pei-Zeng; Zhao, Hua-Xiang; Li, Wei-Ran; Chen, Feng; Lin, Jiu-Xiang

    2017-01-01

    Background: Cleidocranial dysplasia (CCD) is an autosomal dominant disease that affects the skeletal system. Common symptoms of CCD include hypoplasia or aplasia of the clavicles, delayed or even absent closure of the fontanels, midface hypoplasia, short stature, and delayed eruption of permanent and supernumerary teeth. Previous studies reported a connection between CCD and the haploinsufficiency of runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2). Here, we report a sporadic Chinese case presenting typical symptoms of CCD. Methods: We made genetic testing on this sporadic Chinese case and identified a novel RUNX2 frameshift mutation: c.1111dupT. In situ immunofluorescence microscopy and osteocalcin promoter luciferase assay were performed to compare the functions of the RUNX2 mutation with those of wild-type RUNX2. Results: RUNX2 mutation was observed in the perinuclear region, cytoplasm, and nuclei. In contrast, wild-type RUNX2 was confined in the nuclei, which indicated that the subcellular compartmentalization of RUNX2 mutation was partially perturbed. The transactivation function on osteocalcin promoter of the RUNX2 mutation was obviously abrogated. Conclusions: We identified a sporadic CCD patient carrying a novel insertion/frameshift mutation of RUNX2. This finding expanded our understanding of CCD-related phenotypes. PMID:28091408

  19. Complex molecular genetic abnormalities involving three or more genetic mutations are important prognostic factors for acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakita, S; Yamaguchi, H; Ueki, T; Usuki, K; Kurosawa, S; Kobayashi, Y; Kawata, E; Tajika, K; Gomi, S; Koizumi, M; Fujiwara, Y; Yui, S; Fukunaga, K; Ryotokuji, T; Hirakawa, T; Arai, K; Kitano, T; Kosaka, F; Tamai, H; Nakayama, K; Fukuda, T; Inokuchi, K

    2016-03-01

    We conducted a comprehensive analysis of 28 recurrently mutated genes in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in 271 patients with de novo AML. Co-mutations were frequently detected in the intermediate cytogenetic risk group, at an average of 2.76 co-mutations per patient. When assessing the prognostic impact of these co-mutations in the intermediate cytogenetic risk group, overall survival (OS) was found to be significantly shorter (P=0.0006) and cumulative incidence of relapse (CIR) significantly higher (P=0.0052) in patients with complex molecular genetic abnormalities (CMGAs) involving three or more mutations. This trend was marked even among patients aged ⩽65 years who were also FLT3-ITD (FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3 internal tandem duplications)-negative (OS: P=0.0010; CIR: P=0.1800). Moreover, the multivariate analysis revealed that CMGA positivity was an independent prognostic factor associated with OS (P=0.0007). In stratification based on FLT3-ITD and CEBPA status and 'simplified analysis of co-mutations' using seven genes that featured frequently in CMGAs, CMGA positivity retained its prognostic value in transplantation-aged patients of the intermediate cytogenetic risk group (OS: P=0.0002. CIR: Pmutation analysis to have clinical usefulness and applicability.

  20. Deep mutational scanning of an antibody against epidermal growth factor receptor using mammalian cell display and massively parallel pyrosequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsyth, Charles M; Juan, Veronica; Akamatsu, Yoshiko; DuBridge, Robert B; Doan, Minhtam; Ivanov, Alexander V; Ma, Zhiyuan; Polakoff, Dixie; Razo, Jennifer; Wilson, Keith; Powers, David B

    2013-01-01

    We developed a method for deep mutational scanning of antibody complementarity-determining regions (CDRs) that can determine in parallel the effect of every possible single amino acid CDR substitution on antigen binding. The method uses libraries of full length IgGs containing more than 1000 CDR point mutations displayed on mammalian cells, sorted by flow cytometry into subpopulations based on antigen affinity and analyzed by massively parallel pyrosequencing. Higher, lower and neutral affinity mutations are identified by their enrichment or depletion in the FACS subpopulations. We applied this method to a humanized version of the anti-epidermal growth factor receptor antibody cetuximab, generated a near comprehensive data set for 1060 point mutations that recapitulates previously determined structural and mutational data for these CDRs and identified 67 point mutations that increase affinity. The large-scale, comprehensive sequence-function data sets generated by this method should have broad utility for engineering properties such as antibody affinity and specificity and may advance theoretical understanding of antibody-antigen recognition.

  1. Type II1 factors satisfying the spatial isomorphism conjecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cameron, Jan; Christensen, Erik; Sinclair, Allan M.;

    2012-01-01

    Det vises at hvis et par af von Neumann algebraer er tilstrækkeligt tæt på hinanden i Hausdorff-metrikken, og den ene er en II1 faktor, som er et krydset produkt af en abelsk von Neumann algebra med en gruuppvirkning af en gruppe men triviel begrænset kohomologi, så er de to algebraer unitært...

  2. Purification and characterization of an insulin-like growth factor II variant from human plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampton, B; Burgess, W H; Marshak, D R; Cullen, K J; Perdue, J F

    1989-11-15

    An insulin-like growth factor II variant (IGF-II variant) was purified from Cohn fraction IV1 of human plasma by ion exchange, gel filtration, and reversed-phase high pressure liquid chromatography. The amino-terminal sequence of the first 35 amino acid residues showed a replacement of Ser-29 of IGF-II with the tetrapeptide Arg-Leu-Pro-Gly of IGF-II variant. Peptides isolated and sequenced after digestion with endoproteinase Asp-N and endoproteinase Glu-C disclosed no differences with the sequence predicted from an IGF-II variant cDNA clone isolated by Jansen, M., van Shaik, F. M. A., van Tol, H., Van den Brande, J. L., and Sussenbach, J. S. (1985) FEBS Lett., 179, 243-246. The molecular ion of intact IGF-II variant was 7809.4 mass units, as measured by plasma desorption mass spectrometry. This is in close agreement with the molecular ion of 7812.8 mass units calculated from the determined sequence and indicates the entire amino acid sequence had been accounted for. Binding of IGF-II variant to purified insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) receptors demonstrated a 2-3-fold lower affinity for this receptor compared with IGF-I or IGF-II. The dissociation constants for IGF-I, IGF-II, and IGF-II variant are 0.23, 0.38, and 0.80 nM, respectively. In a growth assay, the concentration of IGF-II and IGF-II variant required to stimulate the half-maximal growth of MCF-7 cells was 4 and 13 nM, respectively. Finally, the amount of IGF-II variant that can be purified by this method constitutes approximately 25% of the total IGF-II isolated from Cohn fraction IV1 of human plasma.

  3. Association between thyroid cancer and epidermal growth factor receptor mutation in female with nonsmall cell lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seo Yun; Kim, Hye-Ryoun; Kim, Cheol Hyeon; Koh, Jae Soo; Baek, Hee Jong; Choi, Chang-Min; Song, Joon Seon; Lee, Jae Cheol; Na, Im II

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to investigate the association between epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation and thyroid cancer in female patients with nonsmall-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). METHODS: In a retrospective study, we examined 835 female patients who were diagnosed with NSCLC and underwent an EGFR mutation test between June 2003 and August 2013. The associations of EGFR mutation with thyroid cancer and a family history of thyroid cancer were evaluated using logistic regression models. RESULTS: EGFR mutation was found in 378 of 835 patients. In addition to adenocarcinoma (P cancer (5.8% versus 2.6%; P = 0.020), while showing a trend toward inverse association with a personal history of nonthyroid cancer (5.8% vs. 9.0%; P = 0.086). Likewise, the incidence of EGFR mutations was associated with a family history of thyroid cancer (2.9% vs. 0.9%; P = 0.028), while showing a trend toward inverse association with a family history of nonthyroid cancer (27.8% vs. 33.7%; P = 0.066). Multivariate logistic regression showed that the incidence of EGFR mutations was different in women with thyroid or nonthyroid cancer (P = 0.035) and in women with a family history of thyroid or nonthyroid cancer (P = 0.023). CONCLUSIONS: Our data suggest that thyroid cancer and a family history of thyroid cancer are associated with EGFR-mutated NSCLC in female patients. The differences in the incidence of thyroid cancer and a family history of thyroid cancer by EGFR mutational status provide new insight into pathogenesis of this genetic change.

  4. Mutations in transcription factor Mrr2p contribute to fluconazole resistance in clinical isolates of Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Liu, Jin-Yan; Shi, Ce; Li, Wen-Jing; Zhao, Yue; Yan, Lan; Xiang, Ming-Jie

    2015-11-01

    The Candida albicans zinc cluster proteins are a family of transcription factors (TFs) that play essential roles in the development of antifungal drug resistance. Gain-of-function mutations in several TFs, such as Tac1p, Mrr1p and Upc2p, have been previously well documented in azole-resistant clinical C. albicans isolates. Mrr2p (multidrug resistance regulator 2) is a novel TF controlling expression of the ABC transporter gene CDR1 and mediating fluconazole resistance. In this study, the relationship between naturally occurring mutations in MRR2 and fluconazole resistance in clinical C. albicans isolates was investigated. Among a group of 20 fluconazole-resistant clinical C. albicans and 10 fluconazole-susceptible C. albicans, 12 fluconazole-resistant isolates overexpressed CDR1 by at least two-fold compared with the fluconazole-susceptible isolates. Of these 12 resistant isolates, three (C7, C9, C15) contained 11 identical missense mutations, 6 of which occurred only in the azole-resistant isolates. The contribution of these mutations to CDR1 overexpression and therefore to fluconazole resistance was further verified by generating recombinant strains containing the mutated MRR2 gene. The mutated MRR2 alleles from isolate C9 contributed to an almost six-fold increase in CDR1 expression and an eight-fold increase in fluconazole resistance; the missense mutations S466L and T470N resulted in an increase in CDR1 expression of more than two-fold and a four-fold increase in fluconazole resistance. In contrast, the other four missense mutations conferred only two- to four-fold increases in fluconazole resistance, with no significant increase in CDR1 expression. These findings provide some insight into the mechanism by which MRR2 regulates C. albicans multidrug resistance.

  5. The human insulin-like growth factor II gene contains two development-specific promoters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pagter-Holthuizen, P. de; Jansen, M.; Schaik, F.M.A.; Kammen, R. van der; Oosterwijk, C.; Brande, J.L. van den; Sussenbach, J.S.

    1987-01-01

    The insulin-like growth factors (IGF) play an important role in fetal and postnatal development. Recently, the nucleotide sequences of the cDNAs encoding IGF-I and IGF-II and part of the human IGF genes were reported. In this communication we describe two distinct IGF-II cDNAs isolated from a human

  6. Methyltetrahydrofolate reductase C677T gene mutation and hyperhomocysteinemia as a novel risk factor for diabetic nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukinc, Kubilay; Ersoz, Halil Onder; Karahan, Caner; Erem, Cihangir; Eminagaoglu, Selcuk; Hacihasanoglu, Arif Bayram; Yilmaz, Mustafa; Kocak, Mustafa

    2009-10-01

    Hyperhomocysteinemia is a well-defined risk factor for endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis. A point mutation (677 C-T) of MTHFR gene results in a significant increase at plasma homocysteine levels. In this study we aimed to evaluate the effects of MTHFR gene mutation and consequent hyperhomocysteinemia on the development of diabetic microvascular complications in comparison with the other defined risk factors. Diabetic patients without a history of macrovascular complication or overt nephropathy enrolled into the study. The presence of MTHFR 677 C-T point mutation was evaluated by Real-Time PCR technique by using a LightCycler. MTHFR heterozygous mutation was present in 24 patients over 52. Patients with diabetes were divided into two groups according to the presence of MTHFR gene mutation. Both groups were well matched regarding age and diabetes duration. Metabolic parameters, plasma homocysteine, microalbuminuria, folic acid, and vitamin B12 levels were also studied. Presence of neuropathy and retinopathy were evaluated by specific tests. Duration of diabetes, BMI, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, plasma CRP, HbA1c, and lipid levels were not different between the two groups. Plasma homocysteine (12.89 +/- 1.74 and 8.98 +/- 1.91 micromol/l; P diabetic nephropathy had MTHFR gene mutation, while this was only 27% (8 over 30) in normoalbuminuric patients (P = 0.017). There was a significant correlation of plasma homocysteine level with microalbuminuria (r = 0.54; P = 0.031) in the patients with diabetic nephropathy who had C677T polymorphism. We did not find any specific association of MTHFR gene mutation and hyperhomocysteinemia with retinopathy or neuropathy.

  7. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR mutations and expression in squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus in central Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abedi-Ardekani Behnoush

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC shows geographic variations in incidence, with high incidences (>50/105 person-years in central Asia, including North Eastern Iran (Golestan and Northern India (Kashmir. In contrast to Western countries, smoking does not appear to be a significant risk factor for ESCC in central Asia. In lung adenocarcinoma, activating mutations in the gene encoding epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR are frequent in tumors of never smokers of Asian origin, predicting therapeutic sensitivity to Egfr-targeting drugs. Methods In this study 152 cases of histologically confirmed ESCC from Iran (Tehran and Golestan Province and North India (Kashmir Valley have been analyzed for EGFR mutation by direct sequencing of exons 18–21. Egfr protein expression was evaluated by immunohistochemistry in 34 samples from Tehran and HER2 mutations were analyzed in 54 cases from Kashmir. Results A total of 14 (9.2% EGFR variations were detected, including seven variations in exons. Among those, four (2.6% were already documented in lung cancers, two were reported as polymorphisms and one was a potentially new activating mutation. All but one variation in introns were previously identified as polymorphisms. Over-expression of Egfr was detected in 22/34 (65% of tested cases whereas no HER2 mutation was found in 54 cases from Kashmir. Conclusion Overall, EGFR mutations appear to be a rare event in ESCC in high incidence areas of central Asia, although a very small proportion of cases may harbor mutations predicting sensitivity to anti-Egfr drugs.

  8. FGFR4 polymorphism, TP53 mutation, and their combinations are prognostic factors for oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanuma, Jun-Ichi; Izumo, Toshiyuki; Hirano, Masato; Oyazato, Yoshitaka; Hori, Fumiya; Umemura, Eri; Shisa, Hayase; Hiai, Hiroshi; Kitano, Motoo

    2010-03-01

    The genotype of the fibroblast growth factor receptor 4 (FGFR4) gene and TP53 mutation have been reported as prognostic factors for cancers of the head and neck, bladder, breast and colon. To determine whether they are applicable for oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), we investigated these two genes in OSCC samples from 150 patients who had undergone radical surgery and in 100 cancer-free individuals. In OSCC, the FGFR4 Gly388Arg polymorphism and the presence or absence of mutation in TP53 did not show a significant association with the clinicopathological features of the tumors at surgery. However, the FGFR4 Arg388 allele, as well as mutations in TP53, was found to be closely associated with poor prognosis. Moreover, these two parameters synergistically affected the survival of OSCC patients. During 60 months of observation after radical surgery, a majority of patients with homozygous Arg388 FGFR4 plus mutated TP53 died of cancer, whereas >90% patients carrying homozygous Gly388 FGFR4 plus wild-type TP53 survived. Therefore, the FGFR4 Gly388Arg polymorphism and TP53 mutations, as well as their combinations, are excellent predictors of the prognosis for OSCC patients.

  9. Function of IHF in lambda DNA packaging. II. Effects of mutations altering the IHF binding site and the intrinsic bend in cosB on lambda development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, W; Cai, Z H; Feiss, M

    1993-03-20

    cosB is the binding site on lambda DNA for terminase, the phage DNA packaging protein. cosB contains three binding sites for gpNu1, the small subunit of terminase, and a site for integration host factor (IHF). IHF plays an accessory role in lambda DNA packaging, and IHF stimulates the burst size of lambda several-fold, presumably by assisting the interaction of terminase with cosB. The present work includes a study of the effect on lambda development of a mutation, called I1A-, which consists of three adjacent base-pair changes in the IHF binding site. The I1A- mutation was found to abolish IHF stimulation of the lambda burst size, indicating that IHF is unable to bind to the mutant I1A site. A second mutation, called I1B- and also consisting of three adjacent base-pair changes, is a mutation that reduces an intrinsic bend found in cosB. lambda I1B- was more dependent on IHF than lambda+, raising the possibility that the intrinsic bend in cosB plays a role in cos function for lambda+ under the IHF- conditions. In vitro DNA packaging experiments established that the I1 mutations affect DNA packaging per se. A series of Nu1 mutations that create terminases able to suppress a variety of cosB defects were found to suppress the defects of the I1A- and I1B- mutations under IHF- conditions.

  10. Plasmin is a natural trigger for bradykinin production in patients with hereditary angioedema with factor XII mutations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Maat, Steven; Björkqvist, Jenny; Suffritti, Chiara; Wiesenekker, Chantal P.; Nagtegaal, Willem; Koekman, Arnold; van Dooremalen, Sanne; Pasterkamp, Gerard; de Groot, Philip G.; Cicardi, Marco; Renné, Thomas; Maas, Coen

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with angioedema experience unpredictable attacks of tissue swelling in which bradykinin is implicated. Several distinct mutations in Factor XII (FXII) are associated with hereditary angioedema (HAE) in the presence of normal C1 esterase inhibitor activity (FXII-HAE). The underly

  11. A novel phenotype of a hepatocyte nuclear factor homeobox A (HNF1A) gene mutation, presenting with neonatal cholestasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Aleida G. M.; Bakker-van Waarde, Willie M.; Dassel, Anne C. M.; Losekoot, Monique; Duiker, Evelien W.; Gouw, Annette S. H.; Bodewes, Frank A. J. A.

    2015-01-01

    We report a novel phenotype of a hepatocyte nuclear factor homeobox A (HNF1A) mutation (heterozygote c.130dup, p.Leu44fs) presenting with transient neonatal cholestasis, subsequently followed by persistent elevation of transaminases, maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY) type 3 and hepatocellu

  12. Life-threatening aortic thrombosis in a trauma patient homozygous for factor V Leiden mutation: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kopterides Petros

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We report a case of near fatal aortic thrombosis in a trauma patient homozygous for mutation of Factor V Leiden. He responded well to vascular surgery and intensive care unit management and was discharged successfully from the hospital one month later.

  13. Impact of the factor V Leiden mutation on the outcome of pneumococcal pneumonia: a controlled laboratory study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten, M.; van 't Veer, C.; Roelofs, J.J.; Levi, M.; van der Poll, T.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Streptococcus (S.) pneumoniae is the most common cause of community-acquired pneumonia. The factor V Leiden (FVL) mutation results in resistance of activated FV to inactivation by activated protein C and thereby in a prothrombotic phenotype. Human heterozygous FVL carriers have been re

  14. Hypercholesterolemia Induced by a PCSK9 Gain-of-Function Mutation Augments Angiotensin II-Induced Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms in C57BL/6 Mice-Brief Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hong; Howatt, Deborah A; Balakrishnan, Anju; Graham, Mark J; Mullick, Adam E; Daugherty, Alan

    2016-09-01

    Gain-of-function mutations of PCSK9 (proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9) lead to hypercholesterolemia. This study was to determine whether infection of normocholesterolemic mice with an adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector expressing a gain-of-function mutation of mouse PCSK9 increased angiotensin II (AngII)-induced abdominal aortic aneurysms. In an initial study, male C57BL/6 mice were injected intraperitoneally with either an empty vector or PCSK9 gain-of-function mutation (D377Y). AAV at 3 doses and fed a saturated fat-enriched diet for 6 weeks. Two weeks after AAV injection, mice were infused with AngII for 4 weeks. Plasma PCSK9 concentrations were increased dose dependently in mice injected with AAV containing PCSK9D377Y mutation and positively associated with elevations of plasma cholesterol concentrations. Infection with intermediate and high doses of PCSK9D377Y.AAV led to equivalent increases of maximal width of abdominal aortas in C57BL/6 mice infused with AngII. Therefore, the intermediate dose was used in subsequent experiments. We then determined effects of PCSK9D377Y.AAV infection on 5 normolipidemic mouse strains, demonstrating that C57BL/6 mice were the most susceptible to this AAV infection. PCSK9D377Y.AAV infected male C57BL/6 mice were also compared with age-matched male low-density lipoprotein receptor(-/-) mice. Although plasma cholesterol concentrations were lower in mice infected with PCSK9D377Y.AAV, these mice had equivalent abdominal aortic aneurysmal formation, compared to low-density lipoprotein receptor(-/-) mice. In a separate study, reduced plasma PCSK9 concentrations by PCSK9 antisense oligonucleotides in male low-density lipoprotein receptor(-/-) mice did not influence AngII-induced abdominal aortic aneurysms. AAV-mediated infection with a mouse PCSK9 gain-of-function mutation is a rapid, easy, and efficient approach for inducing hypercholesterolemia and promoting abdominal aortic aneurysms in C57BL/6 mice infused with AngII

  15. Invariants for Normal Completely Positive Maps on the Hyperfinite $II_1$ Factor

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Debashish Goswami; Lingaraj Sahu

    2006-11-01

    We investigate certain classes of normal completely positive (CP) maps on the hyperfinite $II_1$ factor $\\mathcal{A}$. Using the representation theory of a suitable irrational rotation algebra, we propose some computable invariants for such CP maps.

  16. COMPARATIVE STUDY OF RISK FACTORS OF TYPE-II DIABETES IN RURAL AND URBAN POPULATION

    OpenAIRE

    Ch. Kiranmai; Sukhes; Rama Krishna; Preethi; Aruna

    2014-01-01

    : A study of effect of various risk factors on Type–II diabetes in Urban and rural population. Generally Indians seems to have great tendency to develop diabetes mellitus. In addition to this, unhealthy food habits, lack of physical activity, diabetic family history, age, obesity, smoking & alcoholism are the other causes for diabetes mellitus. AIM: To analyze the impact of different risk factors on Type – II diabetes in urban and rural population. METHODS: Total 160 subjects ...

  17. Mutation in the splicing factor Hprp3p linked to retinitis pigmentosa impairs interactions within the U4/U6 snRNP complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Santos, Juana Maria; Cao, Huibi; Duan, Rongqi Cathleen; Hu, Jim

    2008-01-15

    Mutations in PRPF3, a gene encoding the essential pre-mRNA splicing factor Hprp3p, have been identified in patients with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa type 18 (RP18). Patients with RP18 have one of two single amino acid substitutions, Pro493Ser or Thr494Met, at the highly conserved Hprp3p C-terminal region. Pro493Ser occurs sporadically, whereas Thr494Met is observed in several unlinked RP families worldwide. The latter mutation also alters a potential recognition motif for phosphorylation by casein kinase II (CKII). To understand the molecular basis of RP18, we examined the consequences of Thr494Met mutation on Hprp3p molecular interactions with components of the U4/U6.U5 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles (snRNPs) complex. Since numerous mutations causing human diseases change pre-mRNA splice sites, we investigated whether Thr494Met substitution affects the processing of PRPF3 mRNA. We found that Thr494Met does not affect PRPF3 mRNA processing, indicating that the mutation may exert its effect primarily at the protein level. We used small hairpin RNAs to specifically silence the endogenous PRPF3 while simultaneously expressing HA-tagged Thr494Met. We demonstrated that the C- but not N-terminal region of Hprp3p is indeed phosphorylated by CKII in vitro and in cells. CKII-mediated Hprp3p phosphorylation was significantly reduced by Thr494Met mutation. Consequently, the Hprp3p C-terminal region is rendered partially defective in its association with itself, Hprp4p, and U4/U6 snRNA. Our findings provide new insights into the biology of Hprp3p and suggest that the loss of Hprp3p phosphorylation at Thr494 is a key step for initiating Thr494Met aberrant interactions within U4/U6 snRNP complex and that these are likely linked to the RP18 phenotype.

  18. Factor V Leiden mutation, prothrombin gene mutation, and deficiencies in coagulation inhibitors associated with Budd-Chiari syndrome and portal vein thrombosis: results of a case-control study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.L.A. Janssen (Harry); J.P. Vandenbroucke; F.R. Rosendaal (Frits); B. van Hoek (Bart); J.R. Meinardi; F.P. Vleggaar (Frank); S.H. van Uum; E.B. Haagsma (Els); F.J.M. van der Meer; J. van Hattum (Jan); R.A. Chamuleau; R.P.R. Adang (Rob)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractIn a collaborative multicenter case-control study, we investigated the effect of factor V Leiden mutation, prothrombin gene mutation, and inherited deficiencies of protein C, protein S, and antithrombin on the risk of Budd-Chiari syndrome (BCS) and portal vein thrombosi

  19. Factor V Leiden, factor V Cambridge, factor II GA20210, and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase in cerebral venous and sinus thrombosis: A case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadatnia, Mohammad; Salehi, Mansour; Movahedian, Ahmad; Shariat, Seyed Ziaeddin Samsam; Salari, Mehri; Tajmirriahi, Marzieh; Asadimobarakeh, Elham; Salehi, Rasoul; Amini, Gilda; Ebrahimi, Homa; Kheradmand, Ehsan

    2015-06-01

    Factor V G1691A (FV Leiden), FII GA20210, and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T mutations are the most common genetic risk factors for thromboembolism in the Western countries. However, there is rare data in Iran about cerebral venous and sinus thrombosis (CVST) patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of common genetic thrombophilic factors in CVST patients. Forty consequently CVST patients from two University Hospital in Isfahan University of Medical Sciences aged more than 15 years from January 2009 to January 2011 were recruited. In parallel, 51 healthy subjects with the same age and race from similar population selected as controls. FV Leiden, FII GA20210, MTHFR C677T, and FV Cambridge gene mutations by polymerase chain reaction technique were evaluated in case and control groups. FV Leiden, FII GA20210, and FV Cambridge gene mutations had very low prevalence in both case (5%, 2%, 0%) and control (2.5%, 0%, 0%) and were not found any significant difference between groups. MTHFR C677T mutations was in 22 (55%) of patients in case group and 18 (35.5%) of control group (P = 0.09). This study showed that the prevalence of FV Leiden, FII GA20210, and FV Cambridge were low. Laboratory investigations of these mutations as a routine test for all patients with CVST may not be cost benefit.

  20. Mutations of photosystem II D1 protein that empower efficient phenotypes of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii under extreme environment in space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giardi, Maria Teresa; Rea, Giuseppina; Lambreva, Maya D; Antonacci, Amina; Pastorelli, Sandro; Bertalan, Ivo; Johanningmeier, Udo; Mattoo, Autar K

    2013-01-01

    Space missions have enabled testing how microorganisms, animals and plants respond to extra-terrestrial, complex and hazardous environment in space. Photosynthetic organisms are thought to be relatively more prone to microgravity, weak magnetic field and cosmic radiation because oxygenic photosynthesis is intimately associated with capture and conversion of light energy into chemical energy, a process that has adapted to relatively less complex and contained environment on Earth. To study the direct effect of the space environment on the fundamental process of photosynthesis, we sent into low Earth orbit space engineered and mutated strains of the unicellular green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, which has been widely used as a model of photosynthetic organisms. The algal mutants contained specific amino acid substitutions in the functionally important regions of the pivotal Photosystem II (PSII) reaction centre D1 protein near the QB binding pocket and in the environment surrounding Tyr-161 (YZ) electron acceptor of the oxygen-evolving complex. Using real-time measurements of PSII photochemistry, here we show that during the space flight while the control strain and two D1 mutants (A250L and V160A) were inefficient in carrying out PSII activity, two other D1 mutants, I163N and A251C, performed efficient photosynthesis, and actively re-grew upon return to Earth. Mimicking the neutron irradiation component of cosmic rays on Earth yielded similar results. Experiments with I163N and A251C D1 mutants performed on ground showed that they are better able to modulate PSII excitation pressure and have higher capacity to reoxidize the QA (-) state of the primary electron acceptor. These results highlight the contribution of D1 conformation in relation to photosynthesis and oxygen production in space.

  1. Mutations of photosystem II D1 protein that empower efficient phenotypes of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii under extreme environment in space.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Teresa Giardi

    Full Text Available Space missions have enabled testing how microorganisms, animals and plants respond to extra-terrestrial, complex and hazardous environment in space. Photosynthetic organisms are thought to be relatively more prone to microgravity, weak magnetic field and cosmic radiation because oxygenic photosynthesis is intimately associated with capture and conversion of light energy into chemical energy, a process that has adapted to relatively less complex and contained environment on Earth. To study the direct effect of the space environment on the fundamental process of photosynthesis, we sent into low Earth orbit space engineered and mutated strains of the unicellular green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, which has been widely used as a model of photosynthetic organisms. The algal mutants contained specific amino acid substitutions in the functionally important regions of the pivotal Photosystem II (PSII reaction centre D1 protein near the QB binding pocket and in the environment surrounding Tyr-161 (YZ electron acceptor of the oxygen-evolving complex. Using real-time measurements of PSII photochemistry, here we show that during the space flight while the control strain and two D1 mutants (A250L and V160A were inefficient in carrying out PSII activity, two other D1 mutants, I163N and A251C, performed efficient photosynthesis, and actively re-grew upon return to Earth. Mimicking the neutron irradiation component of cosmic rays on Earth yielded similar results. Experiments with I163N and A251C D1 mutants performed on ground showed that they are better able to modulate PSII excitation pressure and have higher capacity to reoxidize the QA (- state of the primary electron acceptor. These results highlight the contribution of D1 conformation in relation to photosynthesis and oxygen production in space.

  2. Clinical and molecular analysis of a Chinese family with autosomal dominant neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus associated with a novel missense mutation in the vasopressin-neurophysin II gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yongfeng; Wang, Binbin; Qiu, Yu; Zhang, Chuan; Jin, Chengluo; Zhao, Yakun; Zhu, Qingguo; Ma, Xu

    2012-08-01

    The objective of this study is to identify the genetic defects in a Chinese family with autosomal dominant familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus. Complete physical examination, fluid deprivation, and DDAVP tests were performed in three affected and three healthy members of the family. Genomic DNA was extracted from leukocytes of venous blood of these individuals for polymerase chain reaction amplification and direct sequencing of all three coding exons of arginine vasopressin-neurophysin II (AVP-NPII) gene. Seven members of this family were suspected to have symptomatic vasopressin-deficient diabetes insipidus. The water deprivation test in all the patients confirmed the diagnosis of vasopressin-deficient diabetes insipidus, with the pedigree demonstrating an autosomal dominant inheritance. Direct sequence analysis revealed a novel mutation (c.193T>A) and a synonymous mutation (c.192C>A) in the AVP-NPII gene. The missense mutation resulted in the substitution of cysteine by serine at a highly conserved codon 65 of exon 2 of the AVP-NPII gene in all affected individuals, but not in unaffected members. We concluded that a novel missense mutation in the AVP-NPII gene caused neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus in this family, due to impaired neurophysin function as a carrier protein for AVP. The Cys65 is essential for NPII in the formation of a salt bridge with AVP. Presence of this mutation suggests that the portion of the neurophysin peptide encoded by this sequence is important for the normal expression of vasopressin.

  3. Mucolipidosis II: a single causal mutation in the N-acetylglucosamine-1-phosphotransferase gene (GNPTAB) in a French Canadian founder population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plante, M; Claveau, S; Lepage, P; Lavoie, E-M; Brunet, S; Roquis, D; Morin, C; Vézina, H; Laprise, C

    2008-03-01

    Mucolipidosis (ML) II (I-cell disease) is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by a deficiency of UDP-N-acetylglucosamine:lysosomal enzyme N-acetylglucosamine-1-phosphotransferase. MLII is an autosomal recessive disease with a carrier rate estimated at 1/39 in Saguenay-Lac-Saint-Jean (SLSJ) (Quebec, Canada), which is the highest frequency documented worldwide. To identify the causing mutation, we sequenced GNPTAB exons in 27 parents of 16 MLII-deceased children from the SLSJ region as obligatory and potential carriers. We also performed a genealogical reconstruction for each parent to evaluate consanguinity levels and genetic contribution of ancestors. Our goal was to identify which parameters could explain the high MLII frequency observed in the SLSJ population. A single mutation (c.3503_3504delTC) was found in all obligatory carriers. In addition, 11 apparent polymorphisms were identified. The mutation was not detected in genomic DNA of 50 unrelated controls. Genealogical data show six founders (three couples) with a higher probability of having introduced the mutation in the population. The frequency of the mutation was increased as a consequence of this founder effect and of the resulting population structure. We suggest that c.3503_3504delTC is the allele causing MLII in the SLSJ population, and its high carrier rate is most likely explained by a founder effect.

  4. Poor response to gefitinib in lung adenocarcinoma with concomitant epidermal growth factor receptor mutation and anaplastic lymphoma kinase rearrangement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jianya; Zheng, Jing; Zhao, Jing; Sheng, Yihong; Ding, Wei; Zhou, Jianying

    2015-03-01

    A patient presenting with concomitant epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) translocation is rare. We report a non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patient with concomitant ALK rearrangement and exon 19 (E746-A750del) EGFR mutation. The ALK rearrangement was confirmed not only in the primary tumor biopsy specimen, but also in the pleural effusion cell block by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), Ventana ALK immunohistochemistry assay, and fluorescence in situ hybridization. No clinical benefit using chemotherapy or EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor gefitinib was obtained in this case.

  5. Development of human factors design review guidelines(II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jung Woon; Oh, In Suk; Suh, Sang Moon; Lee, Hyun Chul [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1998-06-01

    The objective of this study is to develop human factors engineering program review guidelines and alarm system review guidelines in order to resolve the two major technical issues: 25. Human Factors Engineering Program Review Model and 26. Review Criteria for Human Factors Aspects of Advanced Controls and Instrumentation, which are related to the development of human factors safety regulation guides being performed by KINS. For the development of human factors program review guidelines, we made a Korean version of NUREG-0711 and added our comments by considering Korean regulatory situation and reviewing the reference documents of NUREG-0711. We also computerized the Korean version of NUREG-0711, additional comments, and selected portion of the reference documents for the developer of safety regulation guides in KINS to see the contents comparatively at a glance and use them easily. For the development of alarm system review guidelines, we made a Korean version of NUREG/CR-6105, which was published by NRC in 1994 as a guideline document for the human factors review of alarm systems. Then we will update the guidelines by reviewing the literature related to alarm design published after 1994. (author). 11 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Prospective evaluation of gene mutations and minimal residual disease in patients with core binding factor acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jourdan, Eric; Boissel, Nicolas; Chevret, Sylvie; Delabesse, Eric; Renneville, Aline; Cornillet, Pascale; Blanchet, Odile; Cayuela, Jean-Michel; Recher, Christian; Raffoux, Emmanuel; Delaunay, Jacques; Pigneux, Arnaud; Bulabois, Claude-Eric; Berthon, Céline; Pautas, Cécile; Vey, Norbert; Lioure, Bruno; Thomas, Xavier; Luquet, Isabelle; Terré, Christine; Guardiola, Philippe; Béné, Marie C; Preudhomme, Claude; Ifrah, Norbert; Dombret, Hervé

    2013-03-21

    Not all patients with core binding factor acute myeloid leukemia (CBF-AML) display a good outcome. Modern risk factors include KIT and/or FLT3 gene mutations and minimal residual disease (MRD) levels, but their respective values have never been prospectively assessed. A total of 198 CBF-AML patients were randomized between a reinforced and a standard induction course, followed by 3 high-dose cytarabine consolidation courses. MRD levels were monitored prospectively. Gene mutations were screened at diagnosis. Despite a more rapid MRD decrease after reinforced induction, induction arm did not influence relapse-free survival (RFS) (64% in both arms; P = .91). Higher WBC, KIT, and/or FLT3-ITD/TKD gene mutations, and a less than 3-log MRD reduction after first consolidation, were associated with a higher specific hazard of relapse, but MRD remained the sole prognostic factor in multivariate analysis. At 36 months, cumulative incidence of relapse and RFS were 22% vs 54% (P gene mutations, should be used for future treatment stratifications in CBF-AML patients. This trial was registered at EudraCT as #2006-005163-26 and at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT 00428558.

  7. Insulin-like growth factor II: complexity of biosynthesis and receptor binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammeltoft, S; Christiansen, Jan; Nielsen, F C

    1991-01-01

    , Man-6-P induces cellular responses. We have studied rat brain neuronal precursor cells where Man-6-P acted as a mitogen suggesting that phosphomannosylated proteins may act as growth factors via the Man-6-P/IGF-II receptor. In conclusion, the gene expression and mechanism of action of IGF-II is very...... and the mannose-6-phosphate (Man-6-P)/IGF-II receptor. There is consensus that the cellular effects of IGF-II are mediated by the IGF-I receptor via activation of its intrinsic tyrosine kinase. The Man-6-P/IGF-II receptor is involved in endocytosis of lysosomal enzymes and IGF-II. In selected cell types, however...... complex suggesting that its biological actions can be regulated at different levels including the transcription, translation, posttranslational processing, receptor binding and intracellular signalling....

  8. A nonsense mutation in the DNA repair factor Hebo causes mild bone marrow failure and microcephaly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shu; Pondarre, Corinne; Pennarun, Gaelle; Labussiere-Wallet, Helene; Vera, Gabriella; France, Benoit; Chansel, Marie; Rouvet, Isabelle; Revy, Patrick; Lopez, Bernard; Soulier, Jean; Bertrand, Pascale; Callebaut, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Inherited bone marrow failure syndromes are human conditions in which one or several cell lineages of the hemopoietic system are affected. They are present at birth or may develop progressively. They are sometimes accompanied by other developmental anomalies. Three main molecular causes have been recognized to result in bone marrow failure syndromes: (1) defects in the Fanconi anemia (FA)/BRCA DNA repair pathway, (2) defects in telomere maintenance, and (3) abnormal ribosome biogenesis. We analyzed a patient with mild bone marrow failure and microcephaly who did not present with the typical FA phenotype. Cells from this patient showed increased sensitivity to ionizing radiations and phleomycin, attesting to a probable DNA double strand break (dsb) repair defect. Linkage analysis and whole exome sequencing revealed a homozygous nonsense mutation in the ERCC6L2 gene. We identified a new ERCC6L2 alternative transcript encoding the DNA repair factor Hebo, which is critical for complementation of the patient’s DNAdsb repair defect. Sequence analysis revealed three structured regions within Hebo: a TUDOR domain, an adenosine triphosphatase domain, and a new domain, HEBO, specifically present in Hebo direct orthologues. Hebo is ubiquitously expressed, localized in the nucleus, and rapidly recruited to DNAdsb’s in an NBS1-dependent manner. PMID:27185855

  9. A nonsense mutation in the DNA repair factor Hebo causes mild bone marrow failure and microcephaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shu; Pondarre, Corinne; Pennarun, Gaelle; Labussiere-Wallet, Helene; Vera, Gabriella; France, Benoit; Chansel, Marie; Rouvet, Isabelle; Revy, Patrick; Lopez, Bernard; Soulier, Jean; Bertrand, Pascale; Callebaut, Isabelle; de Villartay, Jean-Pierre

    2016-05-30

    Inherited bone marrow failure syndromes are human conditions in which one or several cell lineages of the hemopoietic system are affected. They are present at birth or may develop progressively. They are sometimes accompanied by other developmental anomalies. Three main molecular causes have been recognized to result in bone marrow failure syndromes: (1) defects in the Fanconi anemia (FA)/BRCA DNA repair pathway, (2) defects in telomere maintenance, and (3) abnormal ribosome biogenesis. We analyzed a patient with mild bone marrow failure and microcephaly who did not present with the typical FA phenotype. Cells from this patient showed increased sensitivity to ionizing radiations and phleomycin, attesting to a probable DNA double strand break (dsb) repair defect. Linkage analysis and whole exome sequencing revealed a homozygous nonsense mutation in the ERCC6L2 gene. We identified a new ERCC6L2 alternative transcript encoding the DNA repair factor Hebo, which is critical for complementation of the patient's DNAdsb repair defect. Sequence analysis revealed three structured regions within Hebo: a TUDOR domain, an adenosine triphosphatase domain, and a new domain, HEBO, specifically present in Hebo direct orthologues. Hebo is ubiquitously expressed, localized in the nucleus, and rapidly recruited to DNAdsb's in an NBS1-dependent manner.

  10. Transcription initiation factor IID-interactive histone chaperone CIA-II implicated in mammalian spermatogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umehara, Takashi; Horikoshi, Masami

    2003-09-12

    Histones are thought to have specific roles in mammalian spermatogenesis, because several subtypes of histones emerge that are post-translationally modified during spermatogenesis. Though regular assembly of nucleosome is guaranteed by histone chaperones, their involvement in spermatogenesis is yet to be characterized. Here we identified a histone chaperone-related factor, which we designated as CCG1-interacting factor A-II (CIA-II), through interaction with bromodomains of TAFII250/CCG1, which is the largest subunit of human transcription initiation factor IID (TFIID). We found that human CIA-II (hCIA-II) localizes in HeLa nuclei and is highly expressed in testis and other proliferating cell-containing tissues. Expression of mouse CIA-II (mCIA-II) does not occur in the germ cell-lacking testes of adult WBB6F1-W/Wv mutant mice, indicating its expression in testis to be specific to germ cells. Fractionation of testicular germ cells revealed that mCIA-II transcripts accumulate in pachytene spermatocytes but not in spermatids. In addition, the mCIA-II transcripts in testis were present as early as 4 days after birth and decreased at 56 days after birth. These findings indicate that mCIA-II expression in testis is restricted to premeiotic to meiotic stages during spermatogenesis. Also, we found that hCIA-II interacts with histone H3 in vivo and with histones H3/H4 in vitro and that it facilitates supercoiling of circular DNA when it is incubated with core histones and topoisomerase I in vitro. These data suggest that CIA-II is a histone chaperone and is implicated in the regulation of mammalian spermatogenesis.

  11. Characterization of a novel mutation in the von Willebrand factor propeptide in a distinct subtype of recessive von Willebrand disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lanke, Elsa; Kristoffersson, Ann-Charlotte; Philips, Malou

    2008-01-01

    von Willebrand factor (VWF) is a plasma protein that consists of a series of multimers of which the high-molecular-weight VWF multimers are the most potent in platelet adhesion and aggregation. The propeptide of the VWF (VWFpp) is known to be essential in the process of multimer assembly. Genetic......, caused by a 1709G>C transition in exon 14 of the VWF gene coding for the propeptide. Three asymptomatic relatives were found to be heterozygous. In-vitro mutagenesis and expression in COS-7 cells confirmed the detrimental effect of the mutation on VWF multimerization. Our findings show that the C570S...... mutation in the VWFpp abolishes multimerization of VWF. The mutation probably disrupts the normal configuration of the VWFpp, which is essential for correct orientation of the protomers and ultimately multimerization. The mutant amino acid is located in a region that is highly conserved across several...

  12. Evaluation of von Willebrand factor phenotypes and genotypes in Hemophilia A patients with and without identified F8 mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boylan, Brian; Rice, Anne S.; De Staercke, Christine; Eyster, M. Elaine; Yaish, Hassan M.; Knoll, Christine M.; Bean, Christopher J.; Miller, Connie H.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Hemophilia A (HA) is an X-linked bleeding disorder caused by a deficiency in factor VIII (FVIII). von Willebrand disease (VWD) is characterized by a quantitative or qualitative defect in von Willebrand Factor (VWF). Patients with VWD with severely low VWF or VWD Type 2N (VWD2N), a VWD subtype distinguished by defective VWF binding to FVIII, may have reduced FVIII levels secondary to their VWD. These patients superficially resemble patients with HA, and pose a potential for misdiagnosis. Objectives Investigate the unexplained cause of bleeding in HA patients without known FVIII mutations by assessing plasma VWF antigen (VWF:Ag), FVIII binding capacities, and VWF genotypes. Patients/Methods Thirty-seven of 1027 patients with HA studied as part of the Hemophilia Inhibitor Research Study lacked identifiable F8 mutations. These patients (cases) and 73 patients with identified F8 mutations (controls) were evaluated for VWF:Ag, patient's VWF capacity to bind FVIII (VWF:FVIIIB), and VWF sequence. Results Four cases had VWF:Ag <3 IU/dL and VWF mutations consistent with Type3 VWD. Six cases and one control were heterozygous for mutations previously reported to cause Type1 VWD (VWD1) (n=5 cases and 1 control) or predicted to be deleterious by Polyphen2 and SIFT prediction tools (n=1 case). One control had VWF:Ag <30 IU/dl, and seven patients (4 cases and 3 controls), including two cases who were heterozygous for a known VWD2N mutation, had reduced VWF:FVIIIB. Conclusions These data emphasize that some patients diagnosed with HA require VWF assessments in order to achieve a comprehensive diagnosis and an optimal treatment strategy. PMID:25780857

  13. Hepatocyte nuclear factor 1-alpha mutation in normal glucose-tolerant subjects and early-onset type 2 diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Dong Mee; Huh, Nam; Park, Keun Yong

    2008-12-01

    The prevalence of diabetes in Korea is reported to be approximately 10%, but cases of maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY) are rare in Korea. A diagnostic technique for autosomal dominant MODY is being actively sought. In this regard, we used a DNA chip to investigate the frequency of mutations of the MODY3 gene (hepatocyte nuclear factor-1alpha) in Korean patients with early-onset type 2 diabetes. The genomic DNA of 30 normal individuals [age, 24.9+/-8.6 years] and 25 patients with early-onset type 2 diabetes (age, 27+/-5.9 years) was extracted, and the MODY3 gene was amplified. The amplified DNA was hybridized onto a MODY3 chip, which has oligonucleotides of 15-25 bases, representing wild-type and mutant MODY3 sequences in both forward and reverse orientations, immobilized on its surface. Among the normal subjects, there was no mutation of MODY3. Among those with early-onset type 2 diabetes, there was one case of MODY3 mutation. Our results indicate that MODY3 mutations are not rare in Korean early-onset type 2 diabetes patients in Korea and suggest that MODY3 mutations in patients with early-onset type 2 diabetes need to be further evaluated.

  14. Prognostic value of BRAF and KRAS mutation status in stage II and III microsatellite instable colon cancers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Cuba, E. M. V.; Snaebjornsson, P.; Heideman, D. A. M.; van Grieken, N. C. T.; Bosch, L.J.W.; Fijneman, R. J. A.; Belt, E.; Bril, H.; Stockmann, H. B. A. C.; Hooijberg, E.; Punt, C. J. A.; Koopman, M.; Nagtegaal, I. D.; Coupe, V. H. M.; Carvalho, B.; Meijer, G. A.

    2016-01-01

    Microsatellite instability (MSI) has been associated with favourable survival in early stage colorectal cancer (CRC) compared to microsatellite stable (MSS) CRC. The BRAF V600E mutation has been associated with worse survival in MSS CRC. This mutation occurs in 40% of MSI CRC and it is unclear wheth

  15. The Domain II S4-S5 Linker in Nav1.9: A Missense Mutation Enhances Activation, Impairs Fast Inactivation, and Produces Human Painful Neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Chongyang; Yang, Yang; de Greef, Bianca T A; Hoeijmakers, Janneke G J; Gerrits, Monique M; Verhamme, Camiel; Qu, Jian; Lauria, Giuseppe; Merkies, Ingemar S J; Faber, Catharina G; Dib-Hajj, Sulayman D; Waxman, Stephen G

    2015-06-01

    Painful small fiber neuropathy is a challenging medical condition with no effective treatment. Non-genetic causes can be identified in one half of the subjects. Gain-of-function variants of sodium channels Nav1.7 and Nav1.8 have recently been associated with painful small fiber neuropathy. More recently, mutations of sodium channel Nav1.9 have been linked to human pain disorders, with two gain-of-function mutations found in patients with painful small fiber neuropathy. Here we report a novel Nav1.9 mutation, a glycine 699 substitution by arginine (G699R) in the domain II S4-S5 linker, identified in a patient with painful small fiber neuropathy. In this study, we assayed the mutant channels by voltage-clamp in superior cervical ganglion neurons, which do not produce endogenous Nav1.8 or Nav1.9 currents, and provide a novel platform where Nav1.9 is expressed at relatively high levels. Voltage-clamp analysis showed that the mutation hyperpolarizes (-10.1 mV) channel activation, depolarizes (+6.3 mV) steady-state fast inactivation, slows deactivation, and enhances ramp responses compared with wild-type Nav1.9 channels. Current-clamp analysis showed that the G699R mutant channels render dorsal root ganglion neurons hyperexcitable, via depolarized resting membrane potential, reduced current threshold and increased evoked firing. These observations show that the domain II S4-S5 linker plays an important role in the gating of Nav1.9 and demonstrates that a mutation in this linker is linked to a common pain disorder.

  16. Novel mutations of epidermal growth factor receptor in localized prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Diah A; Zhong, Hong; Ro, Jae Y; Oddoux, Carole; Berger, Aaron D; Pincus, Matthew R; Satagopan, Jaya M; Gerald, William L; Scher, Howard I; Lee, Peng; Osman, Iman

    2006-09-01

    We recently demonstrated that EGFR protein overexpression is more common in African American (AA) prostate cancer patients compared to Caucasian patients. We further examine EGFR dysregulation by determining EGFR mutation status in the tyrosine kinase (TK) domain in prostate cancer patients of different ethnicity. Normal and tumor DNA from 89 radical prostatectomy cases were studied for mutations in the EGFR TK domain using genomic DNA sequencing. We identified 4 novel missense mutations in exons 19, 20 and 21 of EGFR TK domain: 3 in Koreans and 1 in Caucasian but none in AA. We also identified 5 distinct synonymous DNA sequence changes, which did not alter the encoded amino acid, in exons 20 and 21 in 31/89 (35%) patients. Interestingly, these synonymous sequence changes were not observed in normal DNA in 7(23%) patients, indicating the presence of de novo somatic mutation to a new synonymous sequence. Our data reveal that EGFR missense mutation in the TK domain occurs in localized prostate cancer. Our data also demonstrate the presence of somatic mutation to a new synonymous sequence in a subset of patients. Larger population-based studies are required to define the association between EGFR mutations and the ethnic background of patients.

  17. International preferences for pork appearance: II. Factors influencing consumer choice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ngapo, T.M.; Martin, J.F.; Dransfield, E.

    2007-01-01

    The preference for pork varying in its fat cover, lean colour, marbling and drip differs among countries, but the influence of socio-demographic factors is unknown. In this study of 11,717 consumers from 22 countries, more than 80% of consumers liked pork, thought that pork quality was at least

  18. Outcome of Patients with Venous Thromboembolism and Factor V Leiden or Prothrombin 20210 Carrier Mutations During the Course of Anticoagulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzoran, Inna; Papadakis, Manolis; Brenner, Benjamin; Fidalgo, Ángeles; Rivas, Agustina; Wells, Philip S; Gavín, Olga; Adarraga, María Dolores; Moustafa, Farès; Monreal, Manuel

    2017-04-01

    Individuals with factor V Leiden or prothrombin G20210A mutations are at a higher risk to develop venous thromboembolism. However, the influence of these polymorphisms on patient outcome during anticoagulant therapy has not been consistently explored. We used the Registro Informatizado de Enfermedad TromboEmbólica database to compare rates of venous thromboembolism recurrence and bleeding events occurring during the anticoagulation course in factor V Leiden carriers, prothrombin mutation carriers, and noncarriers. Between March 2001 and December 2015, 10,139 patients underwent thrombophilia testing. Of these, 1384 were factor V Leiden carriers, 1115 were prothrombin mutation carriers, and 7640 were noncarriers. During the anticoagulation course, 160 patients developed recurrent deep vein thrombosis and 94 patients developed pulmonary embolism (16 died); 154 patients had major bleeding (10 died), and 291 patients had nonmajor bleeding. On multivariable analysis, factor V Leiden carriers had a similar rate of venous thromboembolism recurrence (adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 1.16; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.82-1.64), half the rate of major bleeding (adjusted HR, 0.50; 95% CI, 0.25-0.99) and a nonsignificantly lower rate of nonmajor bleeding (adjusted HR, 0.66; 95% CI, 0.43-1.01) than noncarriers. Prothrombin mutation carriers and noncarriers had a comparable rate of venous thromboembolism recurrence (adjusted HR, 1.00; 95% CI, 0.68-1.48), major bleeding (adjusted HR, 0.75; 95% CI, 0.42-1.34), and nonmajor bleeding events (adjusted HR, 1.10; 95% CI, 0.77-1.57). During the anticoagulation course, factor V Leiden carriers had a similar risk for venous thromboembolism recurrence and half the risk for major bleeding compared with noncarriers. This finding may contribute to decision-making regarding anticoagulation duration in selected factor V Leiden carriers with venous thromboembolism. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Assessment of BRCA 1,2 gene mutation as genetic risk factor for ovarian cancer

    OpenAIRE

    MAMARASULOVA DILFUZAHON ZAKIRJANOVNA; MAMADALIEVA YASHNAR SOLIEVNA; ERGASHEVA ZUMRAD ABDUKAUMOVNA; AZIZOV URYI DALIMOVICH

    2016-01-01

    The analysis was conducted pathological preparations 204 patients with verified diagnosis of ovarian cancer. Prevailed 5382insC mutation (BRCA1) 4.0 % of the sample of breast cancer patients, 11.6 % of the sample of patients with ovarian cancer, which is consistent with the data of numerous works of domestic and foreign authors, which have been shown the prevalence of mutations 5382insC gene BRCA1 in various areas of Andizhan region. Five mutations 4153delA, 5382insC, Cys61Gly, 2080delA, 3819...

  20. Identification of platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase II in human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Mariangela; Pei, Yong; Southall, Michael D; Johnston, John M; Arai, Hiroyuki; Aoki, Junken; Inoue, Takao; Seltmann, Holger; Zouboulis, Christos C; Travers, Jeffrey B

    2002-10-01

    Platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolases are a family of specialized phospholipase A2 enzymes. They serve an anti-inflammatory function by converting the proinflammatory autocoid, PAF, into biologically inactive lyso-PAF, by the removal of the sn-2 acetyl group of this glycerophospholipid. Similarly, platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolases can also degrade oxidatively modified sn-2 polyunsaturated-fatty-acid-containing phospholipids, which are toxic to cells. Platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase II is a recently cloned member of this family of specialized phospholipases. Consistent with a potential role of this intracellular enzyme in protecting membrane phospholipids against oxidative stress, platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase II has been shown to translocate from cytosol to membranes in response to pro-oxidative stressors, and overexpression of this enzyme decreases the cytotoxic effects of these agents. The objective of this study was to assess whether platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase II is involved in protecting skin against oxidative stress. Platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase II protein was demonstrated in human skin by immunohistochemistry, with the highest levels of the enzyme found in sebaceous glands and lesser amounts in epidermal keratinocytes. Treatment of epidermal cells with t-butylhydroperoxide or ultraviolet B radiation resulted in platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase II translocation from cytosol to membranes. To assess the role of this enzyme in epidermal function, a recombinant retroviral strategy was used to overexpress platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase II in the human keratinocyte-derived cell line HaCaT. Overexpression of platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase II protected HaCaT cells against apop tosis induced by oxidative stressors t-butylhydroperoxide and ultraviolet B radiation. Similar levels of apoptosis, however, were seen in both control and platelet-activating-factor-acetylhydrolase-II

  1. Dynamics of the full length and mutated heat shock factor 1 in human cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaëtan Herbomel

    Full Text Available Heat shock factor 1 is the key transcription factor of the heat shock response. Its function is to protect the cell against the deleterious effects of stress. Upon stress, HSF1 binds to and transcribes hsp genes and repeated satellite III (sat III sequences present at the 9q12 locus. HSF1 binding to pericentric sat III sequences forms structures known as nuclear stress bodies (nSBs. nSBs represent a natural amplification of RNA pol II dependent transcription sites. Dynamics of HSF1 and of deletion mutants were studied in living cells using multi-confocal Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (mFCS and Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching (FRAP. In this paper, we show that HSF1 dynamics modifications upon heat shock result from both formation of high molecular weight complexes and increased HSF1 interactions with chromatin. These interactions involve both DNA binding with Heat Shock Element (HSE and sat III sequences and a more transient sequence-independent binding likely corresponding to a search for more specific targets. We find that the trimerization domain is required for low affinity interactions with chromatin while the DNA binding domain is required for site-specific interactions of HSF1 with DNA.

  2. Infantile encephalopathy and defective mitochondrial DNA translation in patients with mutations of mitochondrial elongation factors EFG1 and EFTu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valente, Lucia; Tiranti, Valeria; Marsano, Rene Massimiliano; Malfatti, Edoardo; Fernandez-Vizarra, Erika; Donnini, Claudia; Mereghetti, Paolo; De Gioia, Luca; Burlina, Alberto; Castellan, Claudio; Comi, Giacomo P; Savasta, Salvatore; Ferrero, Iliana; Zeviani, Massimo

    2007-01-01

    Mitochondrial protein translation is a complex process performed within mitochondria by an apparatus composed of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA)-encoded RNAs and nuclear DNA-encoded proteins. Although the latter by far outnumber the former, the vast majority of mitochondrial translation defects in humans have been associated with mutations in RNA-encoding mtDNA genes, whereas mutations in protein-encoding nuclear genes have been identified in a handful of cases. Genetic investigation involving patients with defective mitochondrial translation led us to the discovery of novel mutations in the mitochondrial elongation factor G1 (EFG1) in one affected baby and, for the first time, in the mitochondrial elongation factor Tu (EFTu) in another one. Both patients were affected by severe lactic acidosis and rapidly progressive, fatal encephalopathy. The EFG1-mutant patient had early-onset Leigh syndrome, whereas the EFTu-mutant patient had severe infantile macrocystic leukodystrophy with micropolygyria. Structural modeling enabled us to make predictions about the effects of the mutations at the molecular level. Yeast and mammalian cell systems proved the pathogenic role of the mutant alleles by functional complementation in vivo. Nuclear-gene abnormalities causing mitochondrial translation defects represent a new, potentially broad field of mitochondrial medicine. Investigation of these defects is important to expand the molecular characterization of mitochondrial disorders and also may contribute to the elucidation of the complex control mechanisms, which regulate this fundamental pathway of mtDNA homeostasis.

  3. Infantile Encephalopathy and Defective Mitochondrial DNA Translation in Patients with Mutations of Mitochondrial Elongation Factors EFG1 and EFTu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valente, Lucia; Tiranti, Valeria; Marsano, René Massimiliano; Malfatti, Edoardo; Fernandez-Vizarra, Erika; Donnini, Claudia; Mereghetti, Paolo; De Gioia, Luca; Burlina, Alberto; Castellan, Claudio; Comi, Giacomo P.; Savasta, Salvatore; Ferrero, Iliana; Zeviani, Massimo

    2007-01-01

    Mitochondrial protein translation is a complex process performed within mitochondria by an apparatus composed of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA)–encoded RNAs and nuclear DNA–encoded proteins. Although the latter by far outnumber the former, the vast majority of mitochondrial translation defects in humans have been associated with mutations in RNA-encoding mtDNA genes, whereas mutations in protein-encoding nuclear genes have been identified in a handful of cases. Genetic investigation involving patients with defective mitochondrial translation led us to the discovery of novel mutations in the mitochondrial elongation factor G1 (EFG1) in one affected baby and, for the first time, in the mitochondrial elongation factor Tu (EFTu) in another one. Both patients were affected by severe lactic acidosis and rapidly progressive, fatal encephalopathy. The EFG1-mutant patient had early-onset Leigh syndrome, whereas the EFTu-mutant patient had severe infantile macrocystic leukodystrophy with micropolygyria. Structural modeling enabled us to make predictions about the effects of the mutations at the molecular level. Yeast and mammalian cell systems proved the pathogenic role of the mutant alleles by functional complementation in vivo. Nuclear-gene abnormalities causing mitochondrial translation defects represent a new, potentially broad field of mitochondrial medicine. Investigation of these defects is important to expand the molecular characterization of mitochondrial disorders and also may contribute to the elucidation of the complex control mechanisms, which regulate this fundamental pathway of mtDNA homeostasis. PMID:17160893

  4. Epidermal growth factor receptor mutations in nonsmall cell lung carcinoma patients in Kuwait

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabeah Al-Temaimi

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: Given the evidence of EGFR gene alterations occurring in NSCLC patients in Kuwait, there is a need to incorporate EGFR gene mutational screen for NSCLC patients to implement its consequent use in patient treatment.

  5. Assessment of knowledge, awareness, and self-reported risk factors for type II diabetes among adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajerin, Arash; Fras, Andrew; Vanhecke, Thomas E; Ledesma, Jeremiah

    2008-08-01

    This study assessed adolescents' level of knowledge of and self-reported risk factors for type II diabetes mellitus (T2DM). We found adolescents had a relatively high level of knowledge and perception of health consequences from T2DM, but also had a high rate of self-reported risk factors.

  6. Prenatal cocaine exposure impairs cognitive function of progeny via insulin growth factor II epigenetic regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qian; Hou, Jing; Chen, Bo; Shao, Xue; Zhu, Ruiming; Bu, Qian; Gu, Hui; Li, Yan; Zhang, Baolai; Du, Changman; Fu, Dengqi; Kong, Jueying; Luo, Li; Long, Hailei; Li, Hongyu; Deng, Yi; Zhao, Yinglan; Cen, Xiaobo

    2015-10-01

    Studies have showed that prenatal cocaine exposure (PCOC) can impair cognitive function and social behavior of the offspring; however, the mechanism underlying such effect is poorly understood. Insulin-like growth factor II (Igf-II), an imprinted gene, has a critical role in memory consolidation and enhancement. We hypothesized that epigenetic regulation of hippocampal Igf-II may attribute to the cognitive deficits of PCOC offspring. We used Morris water maze and open-field task to test the cognitive function in PCOC offspring. The epigenetic alteration involved in hippocampal Igf-II expression deficit in PCOC offspring was studied by determining Igf-II methylation status, DNA methyltransferases (DNMT) expressions and L-methionine level. Moreover, IGF-II rescue experiments were performed and the downstream signalings were investigated in PCOC offspring. In behavioral tests, we observed impaired spatial learning and memory and increased anxiety in PCOC offspring; moreover, hippocampal IGF-II mRNA and protein expressions were significantly decreased. Hippocampal methylation of cytosine-phospho-guanine (CpG) dinucleotides in differentially methylated region (DMR) 2 of Igf-II was elevated in PCOC offspring, which may be driven by the upregulation of L-methionine and DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) 1. Importantly, intra-hippocampal injection of recombinant IGF-II reactivated the repressed calcium calmodulin kinase II α (CaMKIIα) and reversed cognitive deficits in PCOC offspring. Collectively, our findings suggest that cocaine exposure during pregnancy impairs cognitive function of offspring through epigenetic modification of Igf-II gene. Enhancing IGF-II signaling may represent a novel therapeutical strategy for cocaine-induced cognitive impairment.

  7. SCN4A mutation as modifying factor of myotonic dystrophy type 2 phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugiardini, E; Rivolta, I; Binda, A; Soriano Caminero, A; Cirillo, F; Cinti, A; Giovannoni, R; Botta, A; Cardani, R; Wicklund, M P; Meola, G

    2015-04-01

    In myotonic dystrophy type 2 (DM2), an association has been reported between early and severe myotonia and recessive chloride channel (CLCN1) mutations. No DM2 cases have been described with sodium channel gene (SCN4A) mutations. The aim is to describe a DM2 patient with severe and early onset myotonia and co-occurrence of a novel missense mutation in SNC4A. A 26-year-old patient complaining of hand cramps and difficulty relaxing her hands after activity was evaluated at our department. Neurophysiology and genetic analysis for DM1, DM2, CLCN1 and SCN4A mutations were performed. Genetic testing was positive for DM2 (2650 CCTG repeat) and for a variant c.215C>T (p.Pro72Leu) in the SCN4A gene. The variation affects the cytoplasmic N terminus domain of Nav1.4, where mutations have never been reported. The biophysical properties of the mutant Nav1.4 channels were evaluated by whole-cell voltage-clamp analysis of heterologously expressed mutant channel in tsA201 cells. Electrophysiological studies of the P72L variant showed a hyperpolarizing shift (-5 mV) of the voltage dependence of activation that may increase cell excitability. This case suggests that SCN4A mutations may enhance the myotonic phenotype of DM2 patients and should be screened for atypical cases with severe myotonia.

  8. Glucocerebrosidase mutations are not a common risk factor for Parkinson disease in North Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishioka, Kenya; Vilariño-Güell, Carles; Cobb, Stephanie A; Kachergus, Jennifer M; Ross, Owen A; Wider, Christian; Gibson, Rachel A; Hentati, Faycal; Farrer, Matthew J

    2010-06-21

    Mutations in the glucocerebrosidase gene (GBA) have recently been associated with an increased risk of Parkinson disease (PD). GBA mutations have been observed to be particularly prevalent in the Ashkenazi Jewish population. Interestingly, this population also has a high incidence of the Lrrk2 p.G2019S mutation which is similar in North African Arab-Berber populations. Herein, our sequencing of the GBA gene, in 33 North African Arab-Berber familial parkinsonism probands, identified two novel mutations in three individuals (p.K-26R and p.K186R). Segregation analysis of these two variants did not support a pathogenic role. Genotyping of p.K-26R, p.K186R and the common p.N370S in an ethnically matched series consisting of 395 patients with PD and 372 control subjects did not show a statistically significant association (P>0.05). The p.N370S mutation was only identified in 1 sporadic patient with PD and 3 control subjects indicating that the frequency of this mutation in the North African Arab-Berber population is much lower than that observed in Ashkenazi Jews, and therefore arose in the latter after expansion of the Lrrk2 p.G2019S variant in North Africa.

  9. KRAS mutation as a prognostic factor in ampullary adenocarcinoma: a meta-analysis and review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bum Jun; Jang, Hyun Joo; Kim, Jung Han; Kim, Hyeong Su; Lee, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Ampullary adenocarcinoma (A-AC) is a rare malignancy arising from the ampulla of Vater. KRAS mutation is detected in 30–40% of patients with A-AC, but its clinical implication and prognostic value are not well described. We conducted this meta-analysis to investigate the association between KRAS mutation and prognosis in patients with A-AC. We searched Pubmed, MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library databases for articles including following terms in their titles, abstracts, or keywords: ‘ampullary or periampullary or ampulla of vater’, ‘cancer or carcinoma’, and ‘KRAS’. There were five studies with survival data of patients. A total of 388 patients with A-AC from the 5 studies were included in the overall survival (OS) analysis, and 169 patients from 2 studies were eligible for the relapse-free-survival (RFS) analysis. Out of 388 patients, 175 (45%) had KRAS mutation. There was no association between KRAS mutation and OS (HR = 1.06, 95% CI: 0.87–1.29, P = 0.58). However, there was a significant correlation between KRAS mutation and worse RFS (HR = 2.74, 95% CI: 1.52–4.92, P = 0.0008). In conclusion, this meta-analysis indicates that KRAS mutation is associated with poor RFS, but not with OS in patients with A-AC. PMID:27517148

  10. FINCA LA ROSITA. II: FACTORES LIMITANTES DE LOS SUELOS

    OpenAIRE

    Morell, F; López, D.; Hernández, A.

    2008-01-01

    En la actualidad, existe la tendencia a confundir diferentes factores limitantes, que son intrínsecos del suelo producto de sus propios procesos de formación, con los procesos de degradación provocados por la acción antrópica; este es un aspecto importante a tener en cuenta a la hora de caracterizar y clasificar los suelos. Sobre la base de un estudio mediante el establecimiento de un Sector de Referencia y la aplicación conjunta de un Sistema de Información Geográfica, se procedió a determin...

  11. Orthodontics as a risk factor for temporomandibular disorders (TMD). II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremenak, C R; Kinser, D D; Melcher, T J; Wright, G R; Harrison, S D; Ziaja, R R; Harman, H A; Ordahl, J N; Demro, J G; Menard, C C

    1992-01-01

    Debate about orthodontic treatment as a risk factor for temporomandibular disorders (TMD) led to this study. This report, the second in a series, concerns findings from a longitudinal study in which 30 new orthodontic patients have been enrolled annually since 1983. The method of Helkimo was used to collect TMD data before initiation of orthodontic treatment, and at annual intervals after debanding. Treatment was by fixed edgewise appliances. Data from a pretreatment and at least one posttreatment Helkimo examination were available for 109 patients. Follow-up data were available for 92 patients in the first year after debanding, with the corresponding sample sizes declining to 56, 33, 19, 11, and 7 for the second through the sixth posttreatment years, respectively. Primary analyses involved comparison of mean scores from the Helkimo 25-point dysfunction index scale. There were no significant differences between mean pretreatment and posttreatment Helkimo scores for any of the various groupings except for small, clinically unimportant improvements seen in the 12 to 24 month subgroup of 55 patients and in the 48 to 60 month subgroup of 11 patients. With average follow-up time of about 2 years for the 109 patients, 90% had Helkimo scores that stayed the same or improved, and 10% had scores that increased or worsened from 2 to 5 Helkimo points. We conclude that the orthodontic treatment experienced by our sample was not an important etiologic factor for TMD.

  12. A familial case of achondrogenesis type II caused by a dominant COL2A1 mutation and "patchy" expression in the mosaic father.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forzano, F; Lituania, M; Viassolo, A; Superti-Furga, V; Wildhardt, G; Zabel, B; Faravelli, F

    2007-12-01

    Achondrogenesis type II (ACG2) is the most severe disorder that can be produced by dominant mutations in COL2A1. We report on four pregnancies of an apparently healthy, nonconsanguineous young couple. The father had scoliosis as a child, and has slight body disproportion with short trunk. The first child was born at 32 weeks and died neonatally. In the second pregnancy, short limbs and fetal hygroma were noted on ultrasound at 17 weeks' gestation. Similar findings were observed in the third fetus. Clinical, radiological, and histological evaluation of the fetuses after termination of the pregnancies showed findings consistent with ACG2. Molecular analysis of genomic DNA extracted from amniotic cells of the second and third fetuses revealed heterozygosity for a 10370G > T missense mutation (G346V) in the COL2A1 gene. This mutation was also found in the father, as a mosaic. The couple had a fourth pregnancy, and at 11 weeks fetal hydrops with a septated cystic hygroma were obvious. DNA from CVS demonstrated the same COL2A1 mutation.

  13. The Frequency of Some Thrombophilic Mutations in Eastern Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozturk, Nurinnisa; Bakan, Ebubekir; Gul, Mehmet Ali; Bakan, Nuri; Sebin, Engin; Kiziltunc, Ahmet

    2016-02-01

    Factor V / Factor II / Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase, gene polymorphisms are closely associated with thrombophilia. Regional frequencies of these mutations may show a characteristic state. The aim of our study was to evaluate the frequency of commonly seen Factor V / Factor II / Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene polymorphisms in Eastern Turkey. In 433 patients sent to the laboratory with the suspicion of thrombophilia, using whole blood samples, an automated Nucleic Acid Test was used for mutation determinations in Verigene System. The kit module was designed to detect the Factor V G1691A / Factor II G20210A / Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene C677T single nucleotide polymorphisms. In 433 patients, 8.7% for Factor V G1691A polymorphisms were heterozygous genotype, 3.9% for Factor II G20210A polymorphisms were heterozygous genotype, and 43.9% for methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase 677C>T polymorphisms were heterozygous genotype and 3.0% homozygous mutation genotype. Detection of these commonly seen Factor V / Factor II / Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase single nucleotide polymorphisms can help to identify patients in high risk group and to evaluate the interaction of genetic and acquired risk factors. Our findings suggest that commonly seen thrombophilic allele mutation frequency in our region is the same as the data reported in the literature.

  14. NANOCOMPOSITE COMPLEX EMAP II INFLUENCE ON TUMOR NECROSIS FACTOR AND INTERFERON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. A. Kolomiets-Babenko

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The goal of the research was to determine the ability of new nanocomposite preparation EMAP II (endothelial monocyte activating poplypeptide II to affect the expression of the tumor-necrosis factor and interferon in vitro. In the experiments, the transformed cell line L929 cells was used. The induced interferon levels were determined in samples of culture medium by the microtitration method in the L929 cell culture against test virus vesicular stomatitus VSV. Toxicity of the substance was assessed by its maximum tolerated dose. The amount of endotoxins in nanocomposite preparation EMAP II was measured using gel-clot test. The range of concentrations of EMAP II causing the production of tumor necrosis factor was determined. The concentration of lipopolysaccharides in the tested nanocomposite preparation was less then 0.5 IEU/kg. New nanocomposite preparation EMAP II has the ability to induce TNF-α production at rather low concentration 1.56–25.00 μg/ml (82.49–1370.00 mol х 10–12. The interferon production under the influence of nanocomposite preparation EMAP II was not found. The results support the application of the target nanocomposite reparation EMAP II for cancer treatment.

  15. Risk of venous thromboembolism and myocardial infarction associated with factor V Leiden and prothrombin mutations and blood type

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sode, Birgitte F; Allin, Kristine H; Dahl, Morten

    2013-01-01

    ABO blood type locus has been reported to be an important genetic determinant of venous and arterial thrombosis in genome-wide association studies. We tested the hypothesis that ABO blood type alone and in combination with mutations in factor V Leiden R506Q and prothrombin G20210A is associated...... with the risk of venous thromboembolism and myocardial infarction in the general population....

  16. Mutations in the coding regions of the hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 alpha in Iranian families with maturity onset diabetes of the young

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tavakolafshari Jalil

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α (HNF4α is a nuclear receptor involved in glucose homeostasis and is required for normal β cell function. Mutations in the HNF4α gene are associated with maturity onset diabetes of the young type 1 (MODY1. The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence and nature of mutations in HNF4α gene in Iranian patients with a clinical diagnosis of MODY and their family members. Twelve families including 30 patients with clinically MODY diagnosis and 21 members of their family were examined using PCR-RFLP method and in case of mutation confirmed by sequencing techniques. Fifty age and sex matched subjects with normal fasting blood sugar (FBS and Glucose tolerance test (GTT were constituted the control group and investigated in the similar pattern. Single mutation of V255M in the HNF4α gene was detected. This known mutation was found in 8 of 30 patients and 3 of 21 individuals in relatives. Fifty healthy control subjects did not show any mutation. Here, it is indicated that the prevalence of HNF4α mutation among Iranian patients with clinical MODY is considerable. This mutation was present in 26.6% of our patients, but nothing was found in control group. In the family members, 3 subjects with the age of ≤25 years old carried this mutation. Therefore, holding this mutation in this range of age could be a predisposing factor for developing diabetes in future.

  17. Analysis of Intron 22 Inversion Mutation of Factor Ⅷ Gene in the Patients with Hemophilia A in J&K State of India

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Parvinder Kumer; Mohammed Idris; Vikas Dogra; K. Radha Mani; Kulbhushan Singh Jamwal; Wahied Khawar Balwan; T. R. Raina; G. R. Chandak; Subash Gupta

    2005-01-01

    Objective Hemophilia A, an X-linked bleeding disorder, affecting 1 in 5 000 males is caused by heterogeneous mutations in factor Ⅷ gene. Inversion mutation in intron 22 of F8C gene remains its leading cause. The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency and distribution of the intron 22-inversion mutation in the patients and in the family members in the region. Methods 29 hemophilia A patients from Jammu and Kashmir (20 severe, 8 moderate and 1 mild) were analyzed for intron 22-inversion mutation. Results 11 (38%) were positive for the distal type of inversion mutation. The mutation was found in 9/20 (45%) patients with severe factor Ⅷ deficiency and 2/8 (25%) with moderate severity hemophilia A, whereas the patient with mild hemophilia A was found to be negative for inversion mutation. Evaluation of twenty-six female relatives from 11 families of inversion mutation positive patients identified one mother and one sister from one family to be the carrier, suggesting its origin in the mother. Conclusion The present study confirms the intron-22 inversion mutation in F8C gene as the major cause of hemophilia A in the population from Jammu and Kashmir with a higher frequency of inversion mutation in sporadic cases compared to the familial cases.

  18. Novel point mutations and mutational complexes in the enhancer II, core promoter and precore regions of hepatitis B virus genotype D1 associated with hepatocellular carcinoma in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Anis; Al Balwi, Mohammed A; Tanaka, Yasuhito; Hajeer, Ali; Sanai, Faisal M; Al Abdulkarim, Ibrahim; Al Ayyar, Latifah; Badri, Motasim; Saudi, Dib; Tamimi, Waleed; Mizokami, Masashi; Al Knawy, Bandar

    2013-12-15

    In this study, a cohort of 182 patients [55 hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and 127 non-HCC] infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV) in Saudi Arabia was investigated to study the relationship between sequence variation in the enhancer II (EnhII), basal core promoter (BCP) and precore regions of HBV genotype D (HBV/D) and the risk of HCC. HBV genotypes were determined by sequencing analysis and/or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Variations in the EnhII, BCP and precore regions were compared between 107 non-HCC and 45 HCC patients infected with HBV/D, followed by age-matched analysis of 40 cases versus equal number of controls. Age and male gender were significantly associated with HCC (p = 0.0001 and p = 0.03, respectively). Serological markers such as aspartate aminotransferase, albumin and anti-HBe were significantly associated with HCC (p = 0.0001 for all), whereas HBeAg positivity was associated with non-HCC (p = 0.0001). The most prevalent HBV genotype was HBV/D (94%), followed by HBV/E (4%), HBV/A (1.6%) and HBV/C (0.5%). For HBV/D1, genomic mutations associated with HCC were T1673/G1679, G1727, C1741, C1761, A1757/T1764/G1766, T1773, T1773/G1775 and C1909. Age- and gender-adjusted stepwise logistic regression analysis indicated that mutations G1727 [odds ratio (OR) = 18.3; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 2.8-118.4; p = 0.002], A1757/T1764/G1766 (OR = 4.7; 95% CI = 1.3-17.2; p = 0.01) and T1773 (OR = 14.06; 95% CI = 2.3-84.8; p = 0.004) are independent predictors of HCC development. These results implicate novel individual and combination patterns of mutations in the X/precore region of HBV/D1 as predictors of HCC. Risk stratification based on these mutation complexes would be useful in determining high-risk patients and improving diagnostic and treatment strategies for HBV/D1.

  19. Factor V Leiden, Prothrombin and MTHFR Mutation in Patients with Preeclamsia, Intrauterine Growth Restriction and Placental Abruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livrinova, Vesna; Lega, Marija Hadzi; Dimcheva, Anita Hristova; Samardziski, Igor; Isjanovska, Rozalinda

    2015-12-15

    Factor V Leiden, Prothrombin and MTHFR gene mutation, could have an influence in pregnancy with adverse outcome Preeclamsia, IUGR and Placental abruption. The aim of this study is to investigate the presence of above mentioned inherited thrombophilias and its statistical significance, distribution among the complicated and normal pregnancy, and relative risk for carrier of mutation to develop preeclampsia, IUGR and placental abruption. Prospective cohort study is implemented at University Clinic for Obstetric and Gynecology in Skopje, Republic of Macedonia. The study included 109 delivered patients: 40 with preeclapmsia, 22 with IUGR, 17 with placental abruption and 30 as control group with normal pregnancy. The amount of 3 ml venous blood has been used for detection of these point mutations using ThromboStrip -Opegen, QIAGEN kit manufactured for thrombotic risk. The highest frequency was found: in the group with preeclampsia 35% were MTHFR homozygous, IUGR -MTHFR heterozygous 45%, Placental abruption- 52.9% MTHFR heterozygous, and in the control group without thrombophilia 56.7%. There were combined thrombophilia in 3 patients. There aren`t statistical significance in presence of thrombophilia among groups (p > 0.05). Statistical significance (p Factor V Leiden heterozygous was 4.50 (0.47Factor V Leiden for placental abruption. Further investigations with more patients are warranted.

  20. A novel nine base deletion mutation in NADH-cytochrome b5 reductase gene in an Indian family with recessive congenital methemoglobinemia-type-II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant Warang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Recessive hereditary methemoglobinemia (RCM associated with severe neurological abnormalities is a very rare disorder caused by NADH- cytochrome b5 reductase (cb5r deficiency (Type II. We report a case of 11 month old male child who had severe mental retardation, microcephaly and gross global developmental delay with methemoglobin level of 61.1%. The diagnosis of NADH-CYB5R3 deficiency was made by the demonstration of significantly reduced NADH-CYB5R3 activity in the patient and intermediate enzyme activity in both the parents. Mutation analysis of the CYB5R gene revealed a novel nine nucleotide deletion in exon 6 leading to the elimination of 3 amino acid residues (Lys173, Ser174 and Val 175. To confirm that this mutation was not an artifact, we performed PCR-RFLP analysis using the restriction enzyme Drd I. As the normal sequence has a restriction recognition site for Drd I which was eliminated by the deletion, a single band of 603-bp was seen in the presence of the homozygous mutation. Molecular modeling analysis showed a significant effect of these 3 amino acids deletion on the protein structure and stability leading to a severe clinical presentation. A novel homozygous 9 nucleotide deletion (p.K173–p.V175del3 is shown to be segregated with the disease in this family. Knowing the profile of mutations would allow us to offer prenatal diagnosis in families with severe neurological disorders associated with RCM — Type II.

  1. Risk of venous thromboembolism and myocardial infarction associated with factor V Leiden and prothrombin mutations and blood type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sode, Birgitte F; Allin, Kristine H; Dahl, Morten; Gyntelberg, Finn; Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2013-03-19

    ABO blood type locus has been reported to be an important genetic determinant of venous and arterial thrombosis in genome-wide association studies. We tested the hypothesis that ABO blood type alone and in combination with mutations in factor V Leiden R506Q and prothrombin G20210A is associated with the risk of venous thromboembolism and myocardial infarction in the general population. We used data from 2 Danish studies that followed members of the general public from 1977 through 2010. We obtained the genotype of 66 001 white participants for ABO blood type, factor V Leiden R506Q and prothrombin G20210A. We calculated hazard ratios (HRs) and population attributable risk. Our main outcome measures were venous thromboembolism and myocardial infarction. The multivariable adjusted HR for venous thromboembolism was 1.4 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.3-1.5) for non-O blood type (v. O blood type). For the factor V Leiden R506Q mutation, the adjusted HR was 2.2 (95% CI 2.0-2.5) for heterozygous participants and 7.0 (95%CI 4.8-10) for homozygous participants (v. participants without the mutation). For prothrombin G20210A, the adjusted HR was 1.5 (95%CI 1.2-1.9) for heterozygous participants and 11 (95% CI 2.8-44) for homozygous participants (v. participants without the mutation). When we combined ABO blood type and factor V Leiden R506Q or prothrombin G20210A genotype, there was a stepwise increase in the risk of venous thromboembolism (trend, pfactor V Leiden R506Q and 1% for prothrombin G20210A. Multivariable adjusted HRs for myocardial infarction by genotypes did not differ from 1.0. ABO blood type had an additive effect on the risk of venous thromboembolism when combined with factor V Leiden R506Q and prothrombin G20210A mutations; blood type was the most important risk factor for venous thromboembolism in the general population.

  2. Psychological mechanisms in hyperactivity: II. The role of genetic factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuntsi, J; Stevenson, J

    2001-02-01

    The main aim of this study was to combine two research approaches to hyperactivity: the behaviour genetic approach and the testing of psychological theories of hyperactivity. For a sample of 268 twin pairs aged 7-11 years we obtained ratings on the Conners' scales from both teachers (CTRS-28) and parents (CPRS-48). Forty-six hyperactive twin pairs (pairs in which at least one twin was pervasively hyperactive) and 47 control twin pairs were assessed on a psychological test battery. Confirming findings from previous twin studies, a substantial proportion of the variance in hyperactivity considered as a dimension was due to genetic effects. There was significant evidence of genetic effects also on extreme hyperactivity, although the present group heritability estimates were somewhat lower than those reported in most previous studies. We investigated the possibility that the psychological mechanisms we reported to be associated with hyperactivity (Kuntsi, Oosterlaan, & Stevenson, 2001) share common genetic factors with hyperactive behaviour. The data produced significant evidence of such shared genetic effects only on hyperactivity and the variability of reaction times. Given that the high variability in speed of responding would indicate a state-regulation problem, this is the psychological mechanism that could possibly be the "link" between genetic effects and hyperactive behaviour.

  3. Binding of the Covalent Flavin Assembly Factor to the Flavoprotein Subunit of Complex II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maklashina, Elena; Rajagukguk, Sany; Starbird, Chrystal A; McDonald, W Hayes; Koganitsky, Anna; Eisenbach, Michael; Iverson, Tina M; Cecchini, Gary

    2016-02-05

    Escherichia coli harbors two highly conserved homologs of the essential mitochondrial respiratory complex II (succinate:ubiquinone oxidoreductase). Aerobically the bacterium synthesizes succinate:quinone reductase as part of its respiratory chain, whereas under microaerophilic conditions, the quinol:fumarate reductase can be utilized. All complex II enzymes harbor a covalently bound FAD co-factor that is essential for their ability to oxidize succinate. In eukaryotes and many bacteria, assembly of the covalent flavin linkage is facilitated by a small protein assembly factor, termed SdhE in E. coli. How SdhE assists with formation of the covalent flavin bond and how it binds the flavoprotein subunit of complex II remain unknown. Using photo-cross-linking, we report the interaction site between the flavoprotein of complex II and the SdhE assembly factor. These data indicate that SdhE binds to the flavoprotein between two independently folded domains and that this binding mode likely influences the interdomain orientation. In so doing, SdhE likely orients amino acid residues near the dicarboxylate and FAD binding site, which facilitates formation of the covalent flavin linkage. These studies identify how the conserved SdhE assembly factor and its homologs participate in complex II maturation.

  4. SLC26A4 p.Thr410Met homozygous mutation in a patient with a cystic cochlea and an enlarged vestibular aqueduct showing characteristic features of incomplete partition type I and II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Hiroshi; Naito, Yasushi; Moroto, Saburo; Tamaya, Rinko; Yamazaki, Tomoko; Fujiwara, Keizo; Ito, Juichi

    2014-12-01

    Mutations of SLC26A4 are associated with incomplete partition type II (IP-II) and isolated enlargement of the vestibular aqueduct (EVA). We experienced a congenitally deaf 6-year-old boy with a rare p.Thr410Met homozygous mutation in SLC26A4 who underwent bilateral cochlear implantation. He had bilateral inner ear malformation, in which the dilated vestibule and EVA were identical to those in IP-II, but the cochlea lacking a bony modiolus resembled that in incomplete partition type I. These results suggest that homozygous mutations in SLC26A4 are always associated with EVA, while the severity of cochlear malformation may vary depending on the type of SLC26A4 mutation.

  5. A Phase I-II Study of the Oral PARP Inhibitor Rucaparib in Patients with Germline BRCA1/2-Mutated Ovarian Carcinoma or Other Solid Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristeleit, Rebecca; Shapiro, Geoffrey I; Burris, Howard A; Oza, Amit M; LoRusso, Patricia; Patel, Manish R; Domchek, Susan M; Balmaña, Judith; Drew, Yvette; Chen, Lee-May; Safra, Tamar; Montes, Ana; Giordano, Heidi; Maloney, Lara; Goble, Sandra; Isaacson, Jeff; Xiao, Jim; Borrow, Jen; Rolfe, Lindsey; Shapira-Frommer, Ronnie

    2017-08-01

    Purpose: Rucaparib is a potent, oral, small-molecule PARP inhibitor. This phase I-II study was the first to evaluate single-agent oral rucaparib at multiple doses.Experimental Design: Part 1 (phase I) sought to determine the MTD, recommended phase II dose (RP2D), and pharmacokinetics of oral rucaparib administered in 21-day continuous cycles in patients with advanced solid tumors. Part 2A (phase II) enrolled patients with platinum-sensitive, high-grade ovarian carcinoma (HGOC) associated with a germline BRCA1/2 mutation who received two to four prior regimens and had a progression-free interval of 6 months or more following their most recent platinum therapy. The primary endpoint was investigator-assessed objective response rate (ORR) by RECIST version 1.1.Results: In part 1, 56 patients received oral rucaparib (40 to 500 mg once daily and 240 to 840 mg twice daily). No MTD was identified per protocol-defined criteria; 600 mg twice daily was selected as the RP2D based on manageable toxicity and clinical activity. Pharmacokinetics were approximately dose-proportional across all dose levels. In part 2A, 42 patients with germline BRCA1/2-mutated HGOC received rucaparib 600 mg twice daily. Investigator-assessed ORR was 59.5%. The most common treatment-emergent adverse events (all grades) were asthenia/fatigue (85.7%; 36/42), nausea (83.3%; 35/42), anemia (71.4%; 30/42), alanine transaminase and/or aspartate transaminase elevations (57.1%; 24/42), and vomiting (54.8%; 23/42). Among 98 patients, 5 (5.1%) discontinued because of an adverse event (excluding disease progression).Conclusions: Rucaparib was tolerable and had activity in patients with platinum-sensitive germline BRCA1/2-mutated HGOC. Clin Cancer Res; 23(15); 4095-106. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  6. Comparison of three methods for detecting epidermal growth factor receptor mutations in plasma DNA samples of Chinese patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIN Ling; ZHONG Wei; ZHANG Li; LI Long-yun; WANG Meng-zhao

    2011-01-01

    Background Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations can predict tumor response to tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). Detecting EGFR mutations in plasma DNA samples in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer is challenging and promising. We compared three methods for detecting plasma EGFR mutations, including direct DNA sequencing, denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC) and Scorpions Amplification Refractory Mutation System (Scorpions ARMS).Methods Plasma DNA samples from 73 patients with stage ⅢB to Ⅳ adenocarcinoma were analyzed for EGFR mutations in exons 19 (deletion mutation) and 21(L858R mutation) using direct DNA sequencing, DHPLC and Scorpions ARMS. Sensitivities of the three methods were compared and the relationship between EGFR mutations and patients'survival was analyzed.Results In 73 patients, we detected EGFR mutations in 5 samples (6.9%) by direct DNA sequencing, in 22 samples (30.1%) by DHPLC, and in 28 samples (38.4%) by Scorpions ARMS. EGFR mutations were found in 13 samples in exon 19 and in 9 samples in exon 21 by DHPLC, while we found mutations in 15 samples in exon 19 and in 13 samples in exon 21 by Scorpions ARMS. Among the 73 patients, there was 90.4% concordance between DHPLC and Scorpions ARMS (66/73, K=0.79, P=0.07). Of the 73 patients, 46 patients were treated with gefitinib, including 18 patients with mutations and 28 patients without mutations as determined by Scorpions ARMS. The 18 patients with mutations had a significantly longer progression-free survival (PFS) time (median PFS was 21.0 months) than the 28 patients without mutations (median PFS was 7.0 months) (P=0.022).Conclusions Among the three methods for detecting EGFR mutations in plasma DNA samples of patients with advanced lung adenocarcinoma, direct gene sequencing had the lowest sensitivity, while Scorpion ARMS showed the highest mutation detecting capability. DHPLC is slightly less sensitive than Scorpion ARMS. EGFR

  7. Human NR5A1/SF-1 mutations show decreased activity on BDNF (brain-derived neurotrophic factor), an important regulator of energy balance: testing impact of novel SF-1 mutations beyond steroidogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malikova, Jana; Camats, Núria; Fernández-Cancio, Mónica; Heath, Karen; González, Isabel; Caimarí, María; del Campo, Miguel; Albisu, Marian; Kolouskova, Stanislava; Audí, Laura; Flück, Christa E

    2014-01-01

    Human NR5A1/SF-1 mutations cause 46,XY disorder of sex development (DSD) with broad phenotypic variability, and rarely cause adrenal insufficiency although SF-1 is an important transcription factor for many genes involved in steroidogenesis. In addition, the Sf-1 knockout mouse develops obesity with age. Obesity might be mediated through Sf-1 regulating activity of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), an important regulator of energy balance in the ventromedial hypothalamus. To characterize novel SF-1 gene variants in 4 families, clinical, genetic and functional studies were performed with respect to steroidogenesis and energy balance. 5 patients with 46,XY DSD were found to harbor NR5A1/SF-1 mutations including 2 novel variations. One patient harboring a novel mutation also suffered from adrenal insufficiency. SF-1 mutations were studied in cell systems (HEK293, JEG3) for impact on transcription of genes involved in steroidogenesis (CYP11A1, CYP17A1, HSD3B2) and in energy balance (BDNF). BDNF regulation by SF-1 was studied by promoter assays (JEG3). Two novel NR5A1/SF-1 mutations (Glu7Stop, His408Profs*159) were confirmed. Glu7Stop is the 4th reported SF-1 mutation causing DSD and adrenal insufficiency. In vitro studies revealed that transcription of the BDNF gene is regulated by SF-1, and that mutant SF-1 decreased BDNF promoter activation (similar to steroid enzyme promoters). However, clinical data from 16 subjects carrying SF-1 mutations showed normal birth weight and BMI. Glu7Stop and His408Profs*159 are novel SF-1 mutations identified in patients with 46,XY DSD and adrenal insufficiency (Glu7Stop). In vitro, SF-1 mutations affect not only steroidogenesis but also transcription of BDNF which is involved in energy balance. However, in contrast to mice, consequences on weight were not found in humans with SF-1 mutations.

  8. Human NR5A1/SF-1 mutations show decreased activity on BDNF (brain-derived neurotrophic factor, an important regulator of energy balance: testing impact of novel SF-1 mutations beyond steroidogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Malikova

    Full Text Available Human NR5A1/SF-1 mutations cause 46,XY disorder of sex development (DSD with broad phenotypic variability, and rarely cause adrenal insufficiency although SF-1 is an important transcription factor for many genes involved in steroidogenesis. In addition, the Sf-1 knockout mouse develops obesity with age. Obesity might be mediated through Sf-1 regulating activity of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, an important regulator of energy balance in the ventromedial hypothalamus.To characterize novel SF-1 gene variants in 4 families, clinical, genetic and functional studies were performed with respect to steroidogenesis and energy balance.5 patients with 46,XY DSD were found to harbor NR5A1/SF-1 mutations including 2 novel variations. One patient harboring a novel mutation also suffered from adrenal insufficiency.SF-1 mutations were studied in cell systems (HEK293, JEG3 for impact on transcription of genes involved in steroidogenesis (CYP11A1, CYP17A1, HSD3B2 and in energy balance (BDNF. BDNF regulation by SF-1 was studied by promoter assays (JEG3.Two novel NR5A1/SF-1 mutations (Glu7Stop, His408Profs*159 were confirmed. Glu7Stop is the 4th reported SF-1 mutation causing DSD and adrenal insufficiency. In vitro studies revealed that transcription of the BDNF gene is regulated by SF-1, and that mutant SF-1 decreased BDNF promoter activation (similar to steroid enzyme promoters. However, clinical data from 16 subjects carrying SF-1 mutations showed normal birth weight and BMI.Glu7Stop and His408Profs*159 are novel SF-1 mutations identified in patients with 46,XY DSD and adrenal insufficiency (Glu7Stop. In vitro, SF-1 mutations affect not only steroidogenesis but also transcription of BDNF which is involved in energy balance. However, in contrast to mice, consequences on weight were not found in humans with SF-1 mutations.

  9. TERT promoter mutations and polymorphisms as prognostic factors in primary glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosrati, Mohamed Ali; Malmström, Annika; Lysiak, Malgorzata; Krysztofiak, Adam; Hallbeck, Martin; Milos, Peter; Hallbeck, Anna-Lotta; Bratthäll, Charlotte; Strandéus, Michael; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Söderkvist, Peter

    2015-06-30

    Telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) activity is up-regulated in several types of tumors including glioblastoma (GBM). In the present study, 128 primary glioblastoma patients were examined for single nucleotide polymorphisms of TERT in blood and in 92 cases for TERT promoter mutations in tumors. TERT promoter mutations were observed in 86% of the tumors and of these, C228T (-124 bp upstream start codon) was detected in 75% and C250T (-146 bp) in 25% of cases. TERT promoter mutations were associated with shorter overall survival (11 vs. 20 months p = 0.002 and 12 vs. 20, p = 0.04 for C228T and C250T, respectively). The minor alleles of rs2736100 and rs10069690 SNP's, located in intron 2 and the promotor regions, respectively, were associated with an increased risk of developing GBM (p = 0.004 and 0.001). GBM patients having both TERT promoter mutations and being homozygous carriers of the rs2853669 C-allele displayed significantly shorter overall survival than those with the wild type allele. The rs2853669 SNP is located in a putative Ets2 binding site in the promoter (-246 bp upstream start codon) close to the C228T and C250T mutation hot spots. Interleukin-6 (IL-6) expression regulated by TERT promoter status and polymorphism, what leads us to think that TERT and IL-6 plays a significant role in GBM, where specific SNPs increase the risk of developing GBM while the rs2853669 SNP and specific mutations in the TERT promoter of the tumor lead to shorter survival.

  10. A family of insulin-like growth factor II mRNA-binding proteins represses translation in late development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, J; Christiansen, J; Lykke-Andersen, J;

    1999-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) is a major fetal growth factor. The IGF-II gene generates multiple mRNAs with different 5' untranslated regions (5' UTRs) that are translated in a differential manner during development. We have identified a human family of three IGF-II mRNA-binding proteins.......5 followed by a decline towards birth, and, similar to IGF-II, IMPs are especially expressed in developing epithelia, muscle, and placenta in both mouse and human embryos. The results imply that cytoplasmic 5' UTR-binding proteins control IGF-II biosynthesis during late mammalian development....

  11. Impact of active smoking on survival of patients with metastatic lung adenocarcinoma harboring an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdogan, Bulent; Kodaz, Hilmi; Karabulut, Senem; Cinkaya, Ahmet; Tozkir, Hilmi; Tanriverdi, Ozgur; Cabuk, Devrim; Hacioglu, Muhammed Bekir; Turkmen, Esma; Hacibekiroglu, Ilhan; Uzunoglu, Sernaz; Cicin, Irfan

    2016-11-10

    Lung cancer in smokers and non-smokers demonstrates distinct genetic profiles, and cigarette smoking affects epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) function and causes secondary EGFR tyrosine kinase resistance. We evaluated the effect of active smoking in patients with metastatic lung adenocarcinoma. A total of 132 metastatic lung adenocarcinoma patients, diagnosed between 2008 and 2013, with known EGFR mutation status, were evaluated retrospectively. Among these patients, 40 had an activating EGFR mutation. Patients who continued smoking during the treatment were defined as active smokers. Former smokers and never smokers were together defined as non-smokers. The outcomes of the treatment in relation to the EGFR mutation and smoking status were evaluated. The median follow-up time was 10.5 months. The overall response rate for the first-line therapy was significantly higher among the EGFR-mutant patients (p = 0.01), however, smoking status had no impact on the response rate (p = 0.1). The EGFR-mutant active smokers progressed earlier than the non-smokers (p Smoking status did not affect the OS in EGFR wild type tumors (p = 0.49) but EGFR-mutant non-smokers had a longer OS than the active smokers (p = 0.01).The active smokers treated with erlotinib had poorer survival than the non-smokers (p = 0.03). Multivariate analysis of EGFR-mutant patients showed that erlotinib treatment at any line and non-smoking were independent prognostic factors for the OS (p = 0.04 and p = 0.01, respectively). Smoking during treatment is a negative prognostic factor in metastatic lung adenocarcinoma with an EGFR mutation.

  12. Different Eukaryotic Initiation Factor Mutations Lead to Various Degrees of Intolerance to the Stress of Endoplasmic Reticulum in Oligodendrocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Na Chen; Yu-Wu Jiang; Hong-Jun Hao; Ting-Ting Ban; Kai Gao; Zhong-Bin Zhang; Jing-Min Wang

    2015-01-01

    Background:Vanishing white matter disease (VWM),a human autosomal recessive inherited leukoencephalopathy,is due to mutations in eukaryotic initiation factor 2B (eIF2B).eIF2B is responsible for the initiation of protein synthesis by its guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) activity.Mutations ofeIF2B impair GEF activity at different degree.Previous studies implied improperly activated unfolded protein response (UPR) and endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS) participated in the pathogenesis ofVWM.Autophagy relieves endoplasmic reticulum load by eliminating the unfolded protein.It is still unknown the effects of genotypes on the pathogenesis.In this work,UPR and autophagy flux were analyzed with different mutational types.Methods:ERS tolerance,reflected by apoptosis and cell viability,was detected in human oligodendrocyte cell line transfected with the wild type,or different mutations ofp.Arg 113His,p.Arg269* or p.Ser610-Asp613del in eIF2Bε.A representative UPR-PERK component of activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) was measured under the basal condition and ERS induction.Autophagy was analyzed the flux in the presence of lysosomal inhibitors.Results:The degree of ERS tolerance varied in different genotypes.The truncated or deletion mutant showed prominent apoptosis cell viability declination afder ERS induction.The most seriously damaged GEF activity ofp.Arg269* group underwent spontaneous apoptosis.The truncated or deletion mutant showed elevated ATF4 under basal as well as ERS condition.Decreased expression of LC3-Ⅰ and LC3-Ⅱ in the mutants reflected an impaired autophagy flux,which was more obvious in the truncated or deletion mutants after ERS induction.Conclusions:GEF activities in different genotypes could influence the cell ERS tolerance as well as compensatory pathways of UPR and autophagy.Oligodendrocytes with truncated or deletion mutants showed less tolerable to ERS.

  13. A class of ${\\rm II_1}$ factors with an exotic abelian maximal amenable subalgebra

    CERN Document Server

    Houdayer, Cyril

    2012-01-01

    We show that for every mixing orthogonal representation $\\pi : \\Z \\to \\mathcal O(H_\\R)$, the abelian subalgebra $\\LL(\\Z)$ is maximal amenable in the crossed product ${\\rm II}_1$ factor $\\Gamma(H_\\R)\\dpr \\rtimes_\\pi \\Z$ associated with the free Bogoljubov action of the representation $\\pi$. This provides uncountably many non-isomorphic $A$-$A$-bimodules which are disjoint from the coarse $A$-$A$-bimodule and of the form $\\LL^2(M \\ominus A)$ where $A \\subset M$ is a maximal amenable masa in a ${\\rm II_1}$ factor.

  14. Krüppel-like factor 1 mutations and expression of hemoglobins F and A2 in homozygous hemoglobin E syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tepakhan, Wanicha; Yamsri, Supawadee; Fucharoen, Goonnapa; Sanchaisuriya, Kanokwan; Fucharoen, Supan

    2015-07-01

    The basis for variability of hemoglobin (Hb) F in homozygous Hb E disease is not well understood. We have examined multiple mutations of the Krüppel-like factor 1 (KLF1) gene; an erythroid specific transcription factor and determined their associations with Hbs F and A2 expression in homozygous Hb E. Four KLF1 mutations including G176AfsX179, T334R, R238H, and -154 (C-T) were screened using specific PCR assays on 461 subjects with homozygous Hb E and 100 normal controls. None of these four mutations were observed in 100 normal controls. Among 461 subjects with homozygous Hb E, 306 had high (≥5 %) and 155 had low (<5 %) Hb F. DNA analysis identified the KLF1 mutations in 35 cases of the former group with high Hb F, including the G176AfsX179 mutation (17/306 = 5.6 %), T334R mutation (9/306 = 2.9 %), -154 (C-T) mutation (7/306 = 2.3 %), and R328H mutation (2/306 = 0.7 %). Only two subjects in the latter group with low Hb F carried the G176AfsX179 and -154 (C-T) mutations. Significant higher Hb A2 level was observed in those of homozygous Hb E with the G176AfsX179 mutation as compared to those without KLF1 mutations. These results indicate that KLF1 is among the genetic factors associated with increased Hbs F and A2, and in combination with other factors could explain the variabilities of these Hb expression in Hb E syndrome.

  15. Prevalence of factor V Leiden mutation in non-European populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepe, G; Rickards, O; Vanegas, O C; Brunelli, T; Gori, A M; Giusti, B; Attanasio, M; Prisco, D; Gensini, G F; Abbate, R

    1997-02-01

    A difference in the prevalence of venous thromboembolism (TE) in major human groups has been described and an uneven distribution of FV Leiden mutation over the world has recently been reported. We investigated FV Leiden mutation in 584 apparently healthy subjects mostly from populations different from those previously investigated: 170 Europeans (Spanish, Italians), 101 sub-saharan Africans (Fon, Bariba, Berba, Dendi), 115 Asians (Indonesians, Chinese, Tharus), 57 Amerindians (Cayapa), 84 Afroamericans (Rio Cayapa, Viche), and 57 Ethiopians (Amhara, Oromo). The mutation was detected in only 1/115 Asian (Tharu) and in 5/170 Europeans (4 Italians, 1 Spanish). These data confirm that in non-Europeans the prevalence of FV mutation is at least 7 times lower than in Europeans and provide indirect evidence of a low prevalence not only of the FV Leiden gene but also of other genes leading to more severe thrombophilia. Finally, findings from the literature together with those pertaining to this study clearly show a marked heterogeneity among Europeans.

  16. Transforming growth factor-beta receptor mutations and pulmonary arterial hypertension in childhood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harrison, RE; Berger, R; Haworth, SG; Tulloh, R; Mache, CJ; Morrell, NW; Aldred, MA; Trembath, RC

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a potentially fatal vasculopathy that can develop at any age. Adult-onset disease has previously been associated with mutations in BMPR2 and ALK-1. Presentation in early life may be associated with congenital heart disease but frequently is idiopa

  17. Frequency of epidermal growth factor receptor mutations in Jordanian lung adenocarcinoma patients at diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natheir Obeidat

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: The present study revealed that the EGFR mutations rate in Jordanian patients with adenocarcinoma of the lung was higher than in African-American, and some white Caucasian patients, and was lower than in patients in East Asia, and other countries of South Asia.

  18. Risk-reducing mastectomy in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers : Factors influencing uptake and timing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Driel, Catheleine M.; Eltahir, Yassir; de Vries, J; Jaspers, Jan P.; Oosterwijk, Jan C.; Mourits, Marian J.; de Bock, Geertruida H.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Strategies in case of high risk of breast cancer in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers are either intensive breast cancer screening or risk-reducing mastectomy (RRM). Both options have a high physical and psychosexual impact. The aim of this study is to investigate who chooses when to undergo R

  19. Free insulin-like growth factors (IGF-I and IGF-II) in human serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frystyk, J; Skjaerbaek, C; Dinesen, B; Orskov, H

    1994-07-11

    Using ultrafiltration by centrifugation we have isolated the free, unbound fractions of insulin-like growth factor I and II (free IGF-I and IGF-II) in human serum. In this way near in vivo conditions could be maintained before and during isolation. The recovery was 80 to 100% in the ultrafiltrates, which contained no detectable amounts of IGF-binding proteins (IGFBPs) as measured by Western ligand blotting and IGFBP-1 and IGFBP-3 immunoassays. The concentration of free peptides was measured in two ultrasensitive non-competitive IGF-I and IGF-II time-resolved fluoroimmunoassays. We found that (i) equilibrium between free and protein-complexed IGF was strongly dependent on re-establishment of in vivo conditions (temperature, pH, ionic milieu and dilution); (ii) metabolic events (glucose load and fasting) caused significant changes in free IGF-I and IGF-II levels without concomitant changes in total circulating levels of IGFs; (iii) in 49 healthy adult subjects (20 to above 60 years) free IGF-I was inversely related to age and ranged from 950 +/- 150 ng/l (mean +/- S.E.M.) (20-30 years) to 410 +/- 70 ng/l (> 60 years). The relative percentage was, however, unchanged, being 0.38 +/- 0.02% of total IGF-I. In contrast, free IGF-II was independent of age, being 1,480 +/- 80 ng/l (approximately 0.20 +/- 0.01% of total IGF-II).

  20. Use of CT-guided fine needle aspiration biopsy in epidermal growth factor receptor mutation analysis in patients with advanced lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhuang, Yi-Ping; Wang, Hai-Yan; Zhang, Jin; Feng, Yong (Dept. of Radiology, Jiangsu Cancer Inst. and Hospital, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China)), email: yipingzhuang2010@sina.com; Shi, Mei-Qi (Dept. of Chemotherapy, Jiangsu Cancer Inst. and Hospital, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China))

    2011-12-15

    Background. The safety of using a cutting needle when performing a core-needle biopsy is of major concern, in particular for small lung tumors or tumors near the hilum. Purpose. To investigate the usefulness of CT-guided fine needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) of the lung in obtaining tumor tissue for epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation analysis in advanced lung cancer patients. Material and Methods. Forty-three patients with stage IIIB-IV lung cancer were enrolled. In all patients, CT-guided FNAB was performed using an 18-gauge or 20-gauge Chiba aspiration needle for histology diagnosis and EGFR mutation analysis. Complications associated with CT-guided FNAB were observed, and the specimen mutational assessments were recorded. Results. The obtained tumor samples ranged from 0.5-1.5 cm in length and were adequate for histological and DNA analyses in all patients. No patient had a pneumothorax or hemoptysis. Minor needle tract bleeding appeared in eight patients. Mutation analysis was satisfactorily demonstrated in 23 mutations and 20 non-mutations. Ten and 13 mutations were identified by 18-gauge and 20-gauge needle biopsies, respectively. EFGR mutations, including 12 cases of EGFR exon 19 deletion and 11 cases of exon 21 point mutation, were present in 21 patients with adenocarcinomas, one with squamous cell carcinoma, and one with undifferentiated carcinoma. Conclusion. CT-guided FNAB is a feasible and safe technique for obtaining lung tumor tissues for EGFR gene mutation analysis

  1. A STUDY OF PNEUMOCOCCI REACTING WITH ANTIPNEUMOCOCCUS SERA OF TYPES I, II, AND III, WITH AN OBSERVATION OF A MUTATION OF ONE OF THE STRAINS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clough, M C

    1919-08-01

    atypically agglutinable strains reported in this paper. The agglutinins concerned in the agglutination of these peculiar strains are therefore minor agglutinins. As shown not only by agglutination tests, but also by protection tests and agglutinin absorption tests, these organisms bear the same relation to Types I, II, and III, as do atypical Type II strains to Type II. Immune sera were prepared with these strains, and each strain was tested with all the immune sera by means of phagocytic and agglutinative reactions. In general, the strains were found to be serologically distinct, though some interrelationships existed between Strains V and R, and between Strains H, F, and N. These sera had no activity towards strains belonging to Type I or II, or atypical Type II. A mutation occurred in one of the strains, B, while it was under observation. On isolation this strain had the cultural reactions of a typical pneumococcus, and had the phagocytic and agglutinative reactions of an atypical Type II. After 6 months cultivation on blood agar its serological reactions changed, and it became actively phagocyted and agglutinated in antipneumococcus sera of Types I, II, and III. Its cultural characteristics also changed, and it became bile-insoluble, did not ferment inulin, and caused precipitation in glucose ascitic fluid agar. At this time it caused an intense green discoloration at the base of the blood agar slants around the water of condensation. By repeated animal passages this strain was three times made to revert abruptly to its original form (atypical Type IIa), both in cultural and serological reactions. An immune serum was prepared to each form of the strain, and each serum acted strongly on the homologous form, but was without action on the heterologous form of the strain. This mutation suggests that these pneumococci reacting with all three types of antipneumococcus sera may represent primitive, relatively undifferentiated forms from which the fixed types may have arisen.

  2. Analysis of P gene mutations in patients with type II (tyrosinase-positive) oculocutaneous albinism (OCA2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S.T.; Nicholls, R.D.; Schnur, R. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)]|[Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States)]|[Children`s Hospital of Philadelphia, PA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    OCA2 is an autosomal recessive disorder in which the biosynthesis of melanin pigment is greatly reduced in the skin, hair, and eyes. Recently, we showed that OCA2 results from mutations of the P gene, in chromosome segment 15q11-q13. In addition to OCA2, mutations of P account for OCA associated with the Prader-Willi syndrome and some cases of {open_quotes}autosomal recessive ocular albinism{close_quotes} (AROA). We have now studied 38 unrelated patients with various forms of OCA2 or AROA from a variety of different ethnic groups. None of these patients had detectable abnormalities of the tyrosinase (TYR) gene. Among 8 African-American patients with OCA2 we observed apparent locus homogeneity. We detected abnormalities of the P gene in all 8 patients, including 12 different mutations and deletions, most of which are unique to this group and none of which is predominant. In contrast, OCA2 in other populations appears to be genetically heterogeneous. Among 21 Caucasian patients we detected abnormalities of the P gene in only 8, comprising 9 different point mutations and deletions, some of which also occurred among the African-American patients. Among 3 Middle-Eastern, 3 Indo-Pakistani, and 3 Asian patients we detected mutations of the P gene in only one from each group. In a large Indo-Pakistani kindred with OCA2 we have excluded both the TYR and P genes on the basis of genetic linkage. The prevalence of mutations of the P gene thus appears to be much higher among African-Americans with OCA2 than among patients from other ethnic groups. The incidence of OCA2 in some parts of equatorial Africa is extremely high, as frequent as 1 per 1100, and the disease has been linked to P in South African Bantu. The eventual characterization of P gene mutations in Africans will be informative with regard to the origins of P gene mutations in African-American patients.

  3. Brain-lung-thyroid disease: clinical features of a kindred with a novel thyroid transcription factor 1 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrara, Joseph M; Adam, Octavian R; Kirwin, Susan M; Houghton, David J; Shepherd, Casey; Vinette, Kathy M B; Litvan, Irene

    2012-01-01

    Brain-lung-thyroid disease is a rare familial disorder caused by mutations in thyroid transcription factor 1, a gene that regulates neuronal migration. We report the clinical features of ten patients from a single family with a novel gene mutation, including observations regarding treatment. Neurologic features of the kindred included developmental delay, learning difficulties, psychosis, chorea, and dystonia. Three patients had a history of seizure, which has not been previously reported in genetically confirmed cases. Low-dose dopamine-receptor blocking drugs were poorly tolerated in 2 patients who received this therapy, levodopa improved chorea in 3 of 4 children, and diazepam was markedly effective in a single adult patient. Chorea related to brain-lung-thyroid disease appears to respond paradoxically to antidopaminergic drugs. The unusual therapeutic response seen in our patients and others may help elucidate how disease-related migratory deficits affect neural pathways associated with motor control.

  4. Successful isolated liver transplantation in a child with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome and a mutation in complement factor H.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haller, W; Milford, D V; Goodship, T H J; Sharif, K; Mirza, D F; McKiernan, P J

    2010-09-01

    A male infant was diagnosed with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) at the age of 5.5 months. Sequencing of the gene (CFH) encoding complement factor H revealed a heterozygous mutation (c.3644G>A, p.Arg1215Gln). Despite maintenance plasmapheresis he developed recurrent episodes of aHUS and vascular access complications while maintaining stable renal function. At the age of 5 years he received an isolated split liver graft following a previously established protocol using pretransplant plasma exchange (PE) and intratransplant plasma infusion. Graft function, renal function and disease remission are preserved 2 years after transplantation. Preemptive liver transplantation prior to the development of end stage renal disease is a valuable option in the management of aHUS associated with CFH mutations.

  5. Third-Generation Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors Targeting Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Mutations in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tristan A. Barnes

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Sensitizing mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR predict response to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs and both first- and second-generation TKIs are available as first-line treatment options in patients with advanced EGFR-mutant non-small cell lung cancer. Eventual resistance develops with multiple mechanisms identifiable both upon repeat biopsy and in plasma circulating tumor DNA. The T790M gatekeeper mutation is responsible for almost 60% of cases. A number of third-generation TKIs are in clinical development, and osimertinib has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of patients with EGFR T790M mutant lung cancer after failure of initial EGFR kinase therapy. Resistance mechanisms are being identified to these novel agents, and the treatment landscape of EGFR-mutant lung cancer continues to evolve. The sequence of EGFR TKIs may change in the future and combination therapies targeting resistance appear highly promising.

  6. Third-Generation Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors Targeting Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Mutations in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Tristan A; O'Kane, Grainne M; Vincent, Mark David; Leighl, Natasha B

    2017-01-01

    Sensitizing mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) predict response to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) and both first- and second-generation TKIs are available as first-line treatment options in patients with advanced EGFR-mutant non-small cell lung cancer. Eventual resistance develops with multiple mechanisms identifiable both upon repeat biopsy and in plasma circulating tumor DNA. The T790M gatekeeper mutation is responsible for almost 60% of cases. A number of third-generation TKIs are in clinical development, and osimertinib has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of patients with EGFR T790M mutant lung cancer after failure of initial EGFR kinase therapy. Resistance mechanisms are being identified to these novel agents, and the treatment landscape of EGFR-mutant lung cancer continues to evolve. The sequence of EGFR TKIs may change in the future and combination therapies targeting resistance appear highly promising.

  7. The Impact of EuroSCORE II Risk Factors on Prediction of Long-Term Mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barili, Fabio; Pacini, Davide; D'Ovidio, Mariangela; Dang, Nicholas C; Alamanni, Francesco; Di Bartolomeo, Roberto; Grossi, Claudio; Davoli, Marina; Fusco, Danilo; Parolari, Alessandro

    2016-10-01

    The European System for Cardiac Operation Risk Evaluation (EuroSCORE) II has not been tested yet for predicting long-term mortality. This study was undertaken to evaluate the relationship between EuroSCORE II and long-term mortality and to develop a new algorithm based on EuroSCORE II factors to predict long-term survival after cardiac surgery. Complete data on 10,033 patients who underwent major cardiac surgery during a 7-year period were retrieved from three prospective institutional databases and linked with the Italian Tax Register Information System. Mortality at follow-up was analyzed with time-to-event analysis. The Kaplan-Meier estimates of survival at 1 and 5 were, respectively, 95.0% ± 0.2% and 84.7% ± 0.4%. Both discrimination and calibration of EuroSCORE II decreased in the prediction of 1-year and 5-year mortality. Nonetheless, EuroSCORE II was confirmed to be an independent predictor of long-term mortality with a nonlinear trend. Several EuroSCORE II variables were independent risk factors for long-term mortality in a regression model, most of all very low ejection fraction (less than 20%), salvage operation, and dialysis. In the final model, isolated mitral valve surgery and isolated coronary artery bypass graft surgery were associated with improved long-term survival. The EuroSCORE II cannot be considered a direct estimator of long-term risk of death, as its performance fades for mortality at follow-up longer than 30 days. Nonetheless, it is nonlinearly associated with long-term mortality, and most of its variables are risk factors for long-term mortality. Hence, they can be used in a different algorithm to stratify the risk of long-term mortality after surgery. Copyright © 2016 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. HEREDITARY FACTOR VII DEFICIENCY IN THE ASIAN ELEPHANT (ELEPHAS MAXIMUS) CAUSED BY A F7 MISSENSE MUTATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Michael; McGrath, Ken; Raj, Karthik; McLaren, Philippa; Payne, Karen; McCoy, Richard; Giger, Urs

    2017-04-01

    Hereditary disorders and genetic predispositions to disease are rarely reported in captive and free-ranging wildlife, and none have been definitively identified and characterized in elephants. A wild-caught, 41-yr-old male Asian elephant ( Elephas maximus ) without an apparent increased bleeding tendency was consistently found to have prolonged prothrombin times (PTs, mean=55±35 s) compared to 17 other elephants (PT=10±2 s). This elephant's partial thromboplastin times (PTT) fell within the normal range of the other elephants (12-30 s). A prolonged PT in the presence of a normal PTT suggests disruption of the extrinsic pathway via deficiency of coagulation Factor VII (FVII). This elephant's plasma FVII activity was very low (2%) compared to that of 15 other elephants (57-80%), but other coagulation factors' activities did not differ from the control elephants. Sequencing of genomic DNA from ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid blood revealed a single homozygous point mutation (c.202A>G) in the F7 gene of the FVII deficient elephant that was not present in unrelated elephants. This mutation causes an amino acid substitution (p.Arg68Gly) that is predicted to be deleterious. Two living offspring of the affected elephant were heterozygous for the mutation and had normal plasma FVII activities and coagulation profiles. Tissue from a third offspring, a deceased calf, was utilized to show that it was also a heterozygote. A DNA test has been developed to enable the screening of additional elephants for this mutation. Consistent with FVII deficiency investigations in other species, the condition did not cause a serious bleeding tendency in this individual elephant.

  9. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Mutation in a Patient with Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lung: Who Should Be Tested

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Schwitter

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a 64-year-old ex-smoker with metastatic poorly differentiated squamous cell carcinoma (SCC of the lung and an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR mutation in exon 21 (p.L858R who achieved prolonged clinical benefit from treatment with an EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI. The initial diagnosis of SCC of the lung obtained by bronchoscopic biopsy was based on immunohistochemical staining only with positivity for cytokeratin (CK 5/6 and p63 because morphological diagnosis was not possible. Patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC, not otherwise specified (NOS favouring SCC are usually not tested for the presence of EGFR mutations, and therefore may not receive EGFR TKI therapy. A bronchoscopic rebiopsy showed small nests of undifferentiated tumour cells with weak immunoreactivity of some tumour cells for CK5/6, p63 and no positivity of some tumour cells for thyroid transcription factor-1. These findings suggested a mixed squamous/glandular immunophenotype that has been missed at the initial biopsy. Our clinical case illustrates the problem of tumour heterogeneity encountered in small bronchoscopic biopsies and the difficulties of evaluating the histological subtype in poorly differentiated carcinomas. Initial bronchoscopy should be performed by an experienced pulmonologist who attempts to obtain sufficient material from different areas of the tumour. In the era of targeted therapy, a remote smoking history in a patient with NOS favouring SCC should also lead to EGFR mutation testing to allow highly effective therapy to be offered to mutation-positive patients.

  10. Prevalence and factors associated with darunavir resistance mutations in multi-experienced HIV-1-infected patients failing other protease inhibitors in a referral teaching center in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose E Vidal

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Information about resistance profile of darunavir (DRV is scarce in Brazil. Our objectives were to estimate the prevalence of DRV resistance mutations in patients failing protease inhibitors (PI and to identify factors associated with having more DRV resistance mutations. All HIV-infected patients failing PI-based regimens with genotyping performed between 2007 and 2008 in a referral teaching center in São Paulo, Brazil, were included. DRV-specific resistance mutations listed by December 2008 IAS-USA panel update were considered. Two Poisson regression models were constructed to assess factors related to the presence of more DRV resistance mutations. A total of 171 HIV-infected patients with available genotyping were included. The number of patients with lopinavir, saquinavir, and amprenavir used in previous regimen were 130 (76%, 83 (49%, and 35 (20%, respectively. The prevalence of major DRV resistance mutations was 50V: 5%; 54M: 1%; 76V: 4%; 84V: 15%. For minor mutations, the rates were 11I: 3%; 32I: 7%; 33F: 23%; 47V: 6%; 54L: 6%; 74P: 3%; 89V: 6%. Only 11 (6% of the genotypes had > 3 DRV resistance mutations. In the clinical model, time of HIV infection of > 10 years and use of amprenavir were independently associated with having more DRV resistance mutations. In the genotyping-based model, only total number of PI resistance mutations was associated with our outcome. In conclusion, the prevalence of DRV mutations was low. Time of HIV infection, use of amprenavir and total number of PI resistance mutations were associated with having more DRV mutations.

  11. Mutation of Photosystem II D1 protein that empower efficient phenotypes of Chlamydomonas Reinhardtii under extreme environment in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxygenic photosynthesis involves capture and conversion of light energy into chemical energy, a process fundamental to life including plant productivity on Earth. Photosynthetic electron transport is catalyzed by two photochemical reaction centres in series, photosystem II (PS II) and photosytem I (...

  12. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR / HER-1 gatekeeper mutation T790M is present in European patients with early breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Bemanian

    Full Text Available The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR is one of the major oncogenes identified in a variety of human malignancies including breast cancer (BC. EGFR-mutations have been studied in lung cancer for some years and are established as important markers in guiding therapy with tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs. In contrast, EGFR-mutations have been reported to be rare if not absent in human BC, although recent evidence has suggested a significant worldwide variation in somatic EGFR-mutations. Therefore, we investigated the presence of EGFR-mutations in 131 norwegian patients diagnosed with early breast cancer using real-time PCR methods. In the present study we identified three patients with an EGFR-T790M-mutation. The PCR-findings were confirmed by direct Sanger sequencing. Two patients had triple-negative BC (TNBC while the third was classified as luminal-A subtype. The difference in incidence of T790M mutations comparing the TNBC subgroup with the other BC subgroups was statistical significant (P = 0.023. No other EGFR mutations were identified in the entire cohort. Interestingly, none of the patients had received any previous cancer treatment. To our best knowledge, the EGFR-T790M-TKI-resistance mutation has not been previously detected in breast cancer patients. Our findings contrast with the observations made in lung cancer patients where the EGFR-T790M-mutation is classified as a typical "second mutation"causing resistance to TKI-therapy during ongoing anticancer therapy. In conclusion, we have demonstrated for the first time that the EGFR-T790M-mutation occurs in primary human breast cancer patients. In the present study the EGFR-T790M mutation was not accompanied by any simultaneous EGFR-activating mutation.

  13. [Functional analysis of transforming growth factor-beta type II dominant negative receptor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takarada, M

    1996-06-01

    The transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) is a multifunctional homodimeric protein with an apparent molecular weight of 25 KDa. TGF-beta transduces signals by forming heteromeric complexes of their type-I (T beta R-I) and type-II (T beta R-II) serin/threonine kinase receptors. TGF-beta binds first to T beta R-II receptor, and then the ligand in this complex is recognized by T beta R-I, resulting in formation of a heteromeric receptor complex composed of T beta R-I and T beta R-II. Once received, T beta R-I becomes phosphorylated in the GS domain by the associated constitutively active T beta R-II and transmits the downstream signal. It has been reported that formation of the heteromeric complex is indispensible at least in epithelial cells for growth inhibition and extracellular matrix production induced by TGF-beta. In this study, the functional role of T beta R-II for the TGF-beta-induced signals in osteoblastic cells was investigated by using a dominant negative type of T beta R-II mutant receptors (T beta RIIDNR). ROS 17/2.8 and MG 63 cells were found to express T beta R-I, T beta R-II, and T beta R-III, and their cell growth was inhibited by TGF-beta, whereas alkaline phosphatase activity was stimulated. Cells that were stably transfected with the T beta RIIDNR plasmid showed decreased response to TGF-beta during growth and alkaline phosphatase activity. These results indicate that the intracellular serine/threonine kinase domain of T beta R-II is essential for signal transduction of the TGF-beta-induced alkaline phosphatase activity as well as growth inhibition.

  14. Field-collected permethrin-resistant Aedes aegypti from central Thailand contain point mutations in the domain IIS6 of the sodium channel gene (KDR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srisawat, Raweewan; Komalamisra, Narumon; Apiwathnasorn, Chamnarn; Paeporn, Pungasem; Roytrakul, Sittiruk; Rongsriyam, Yupha; Eshita, Yuki

    2012-11-01

    One of the mechanisms responsible for pyrethroid resistance in mosquitoes is mutations in domain IIS6 of voltage-gated sodium channel gene (kdr). Aedes aegypti larvae were collected from the central provinces of Thailand (Bangkok, Prachin Buri and Ratchaburi) and colonized until they became adults. Partial fragment of kdr of permethrin-resistant mosquitoes were amplified by RT-PCR and sequenced. Among the four nucleotide mutations detected, two mutations resulted in two amino acid substitutions, S(TCC) 989 P(CCC) and V(GTA)1016 G(GGA). Among 94 permethrin-resistant mosquitoes, the SS genotype (SS/VV) was found to predominate (n = 74), followed by SR (SP/VG) (n = 15) and RR (PP/ GG) genotypes (n = 5), with the resistant allele frequency ranging from 0.03 to 0.17. As pyrethroid insecticides are currently being advocated for use in Thailand, investigations of pyrethroid resistance in other regions of the country are needed to prevent potential cross-resistance among different types of insecticides.

  15. Female reproductive factors and risk of Seizure or Epilepsy: Data from the Nurses’ Health Study II

    OpenAIRE

    Dworetzky, Barbara A.; Townsend, Mary K.; Pennell, Page B; Kang, Jae H.

    2011-01-01

    Reproductive factors are associated with seizures in women with epilepsy. We prospectively examined the association between reproductive factors and the risk of adult-onset isolated seizure, epilepsy, or any unprovoked seizure (defined as single unprovoked seizure or epilepsy) among 114,847 Nurses’ Health Study II participants followed from 1989–2005. Validated seizure questionnaires and medical records were used to confirm incident cases of isolated seizure (n=95) or epilepsy (n=151). Overal...

  16. Impact of mutational status on outcomes in myelofibrosis patients treated with ruxolitinib in the COMFORT-II study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guglielmelli, Paola; Biamonte, Flavia; Rotunno, Giada; Artusi, Valentina; Artuso, Lucia; Bernardis, Isabella; Tenedini, Elena; Pieri, Lisa; Paoli, Chiara; Mannarelli, Carmela; Fjerza, Rajmonda; Rumi, Elisa; Stalbovskaya, Viktoriya; Squires, Matthew; Cazzola, Mario; Manfredini, Rossella; Harrison, Claire; Tagliafico, Enrico; Vannucchi, Alessandro M; Kluin-Nelemans, H.C.

    2014-01-01

    The JAK1/JAK2 inhibitor ruxolitinib produced significant reductions in splenomegaly and symptomatic burden and improved survival in patients with myelofibrosis (MF), irrespective of their JAK2 mutation status, in 2 phase III studies against placebo (COMFORT-I) and best available therapy

  17. The correlation between BRAF mutations, RET/PTC rearrangements and platelet-derived growth factor B expression in papillary thyroid carcinomas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王萍

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the prevalence of BRAF T1799A mutation and RET/PTC rearrangement in Qingdao and detect the expression of platelet-derived growth factor B(PDGF-B) in order to investigate the correlation

  18. Associations of anthropometric factors with KRAS and BRAF mutation status of primary colorectal cancer in men and women: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brändstedt, Jenny; Wangefjord, Sakarias; Nodin, Björn; Eberhard, Jakob; Sundström, Magnus; Manjer, Jonas; Jirström, Karin

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a well-established risk factor for colorectal cancer (CRC), and accumulating evidence suggests a differential influence of sex and anthropometric factors on the molecular carcinogenesis of the disease. The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between height, weight, bodyfat percentage, waist- and hip circumference, waist-hip ratio (WHR), body mass index (BMI) and CRC risk according to KRAS and BRAF mutation status of the tumours, with particular reference to potential sex differences. KRAS and BRAF mutations were analysed by pyrosequencing in tumours from 494 incident CRC cases in the Malmö Diet and Cancer Study. Hazard ratios of CRC risk according to anthropometric factors and mutation status were calculated using multivariate Cox regression models. While all anthropometric measures except height were associated with an increased risk of KRAS-mutated tumours, only BMI was associated with an increased risk of KRAS wild type tumours overall. High weight, hip, waist, WHR and BMI were associated with an increased risk of BRAF wild type tumours, but none of the anthropometric factors were associated with risk of BRAF-mutated CRC, neither in the overall nor in the sex-stratified analysis. In men, several anthropometric measures were associated with both KRAS-mutated and KRAS wild type tumours. In women, only a high WHR was significantly associated with an increased risk of KRAS-mutated CRC. A significant interaction was found between sex and BMI with respect to risk of KRAS-mutated tumours. In men, all anthropometric factors except height were associated with an increased risk of BRAF wild type tumours, whereas in women, only bodyfat percentage was associated with an increased risk of BRAF wild type tumours. The results from this prospective cohort study further support an influence of sex and lifestyle factors on different pathways of colorectal carcinogenesis, defined by KRAS and BRAF mutation status of the tumours.

  19. An engineered tale-transcription factor rescues transcription of factor VII impaired by promoter mutations and enhances its endogenous expression in hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbon, Elena; Pignani, Silvia; Branchini, Alessio; Bernardi, Francesco; Pinotti, Mirko; Bovolenta, Matteo

    2016-06-24

    Tailored approaches to restore defective transcription responsible for severe diseases have been poorly explored. We tested transcription activator-like effectors fused to an activation domain (TALE-TFs) in a coagulation factor VII (FVII) deficiency model. In this model, the deficiency is caused by the -94C > G or -61T > G mutation, which abrogate the binding of Sp1 or HNF-4 transcription factors. Reporter assays in hepatoma HepG2 cells naturally expressing FVII identified a single TALE-TF (TF4) that, by targeting the region between mutations, specifically trans-activated both the variant (>100-fold) and wild-type (20-40-fold) F7 promoters. Importantly, in the genomic context of transfected HepG2 and transduced primary hepatocytes, TF4 increased F7 mRNA and protein levels (2- to 3-fold) without detectable off-target effects, even for the homologous F10 gene. The ectopic F7 expression in renal HEK293 cells was modestly affected by TF4 or by TALE-TF combinations. These results provide experimental evidence for TALE-TFs as gene-specific tools useful to counteract disease-causing promoter mutations.

  20. The Role of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Mutations and Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor-Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors in the Treatment of Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Shih-Chieh [Department of Internal Medicine, National Yang-Ming University Hospital, Yilan 260, Taiwan (China); Chang, Cheng-Yu [Department of Chest Medicine, Far Eastern Memorial Hospital, Taipei 220, Taiwan (China); Shih, Jin-Yuan, E-mail: jyshih@ntu.edu.tw [Department of Internal Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital and College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei 100, Taiwan (China)

    2011-06-10

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cases comprise approximately 85% of the lung cancer cases. Before the era of target therapy, platinum-based doublet chemotherapy only led to a median survival of 8–9 months and a one-year survival of 30%–40% in patients with advanced NSCLC. In July 2002, gefitinib, a small-molecule epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitor (EGFR-TKI), was approved for the treatment of patients with advanced NSCLC in Japan. After the widespread use of gefitinib in the treatment of NSCLC, there have been many new studies regarding the association between the clinical anticancer efficacy of gefitinib and the somatic EGFR mutation status in patients with NSCLC. This article summarizes the role of EGFR mutations in lung cancer and the use of EGFR antagonists in the treatment of lung cancer and its associated adverse effects.

  1. Correlation with Platelet Parameters and Genetic Markers of Thrombophilia Panel (Factor II g.20210G>A, Factor V Leiden, MTHFR (C677T, A1298C), PAI-1, β-Fibrinogen, Factor XIIIA (V34L), Glycoprotein IIIa (L33P)) in Ischemic Strokes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasdemir, Sener; Erdem, Haktan Bagis; Sahin, Ibrahim; Ozel, Lutfi; Ozdemir, Gokhan; Eroz, Recep; Tatar, Abdulgani

    2016-06-01

    An important type of arterial thrombosis, ischemic stroke is associated with increased mortality risk, severe disability and life quality impairment. In this study, we analyzed mean platelet volume, platelet count values and genetic thrombophilia markers of patients who have ischemic stroke history and searched the relationship with genetic predisposition of ischemic strokes and platelet parameters. A retrospective, clinical trial was performed by reviewing the ischemic stroke history (except cryptogenic events) of 599 patients and 100 controls. The results of the genetic thrombophilia panel were used to classify the study group and control group into low and high risk for thrombophilia groups. The high-risk group included patients homozygous/heterozygous for Factor II g.20210G>A or Factor V Leiden mutations with/without any other polymorphism. The low-risk group included patients heterozygous or homozygous for MTHFR (C677T, A1298C), PAI-1, β-fibrinogen, Factor XIIIA (V34L) and glycoprotein IIIa (L33P) polymorphisms or negative in terms of both mutations and polymorphisms. The results of study showed us that high-risk group mutations are important risk factors for ischemic stroke but low-risk group polymorphisms are not significant. According to platelet parameters, although there was a significant difference between MPV and PLT values of ischemic stroke and control group, thrombophilia mutations and polymorphisms have not a significant effect on MPV and PLT values in ischemic stroke patients.

  2. Factors affecting buccal corridor space in Angle′s Class II Division 1 malocclusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashmi Bhat

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Buccal corridor space has been thought of primarily in terms of maxillary width, but there is also evidence that they are heavily influenced by the antero-posterior position of maxilla. The present study was undertaken with an aim of evaluating and comparing the dental and skeletal factors related to buccal corridor space in individuals having Class I and Class II Division 1 malocclusions. Materials and Methods: A total of 80 subjects of which 40 were males and 40 were females in the age group of 20-30 years were selected as per inclusion criteria and were grouped as Group I having Class I malocclusion and as Group II having Class II malocclusions based on angle ANB. 12 linear and 2 angular cephalometric measurements and 4 study cast measurements were used to correlate with the buccal corridor linear ratio (BCLR, calculated on smile photograph using the Adobe Photoshop 7.0 software (Adobe Systems Inc., San Jose, California, USA. The data obtained was statistically evaluated using independent t-test and multiple linear regression analysis. Result: Buccal corridor space is larger in individuals with Class II Division 1 malocclusion when compared with individuals with Class I malocclusions. There exists a significant difference in buccal corridor space between males and females. Conclusion: The present study helps in establishing the correlation between certain factors and the amount of buccal corridor space in individuals having skeletal Class II pattern.

  3. A novel treatment of cystic fibrosis acting on-target: cysteamine plus epigallocatechin gallate for the autophagy-dependent rescue of class II-mutated CFTR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosco, A; De Gregorio, F; Esposito, S; De Stefano, D; Sana, I; Ferrari, E; Sepe, A; Salvadori, L; Buonpensiero, P; Di Pasqua, A; Grassia, R; Leone, C A; Guido, S; De Rosa, G; Lusa, S; Bona, G; Stoll, G; Maiuri, M C; Mehta, A; Kroemer, G; Maiuri, L; Raia, V

    2016-08-01

    We previously reported that the combination of two safe proteostasis regulators, cysteamine and epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), can be used to improve deficient expression of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) in patients homozygous for the CFTR Phe508del mutation. Here we provide the proof-of-concept that this combination treatment restored CFTR function and reduced lung inflammation (PCftr (but not in Cftr-null mice), provided that such mice were autophagy-competent. Primary nasal cells from patients bearing different class II CFTR mutations, either in homozygous or compound heterozygous form, responded to the treatment in vitro. We assessed individual responses to cysteamine plus EGCG in a single-centre, open-label phase-2 trial. The combination treatment decreased sweat chloride from baseline, increased both CFTR protein and function in nasal cells, restored autophagy in such cells, decreased CXCL8 and TNF-α in the sputum, and tended to improve respiratory function. These positive effects were particularly strong in patients carrying Phe508del CFTR mutations in homozygosity or heterozygosity. However, a fraction of patients bearing other CFTR mutations failed to respond to therapy. Importantly, the same patients whose primary nasal brushed cells did not respond to cysteamine plus EGCG in vitro also exhibited deficient therapeutic responses in vivo. Altogether, these results suggest that the combination treatment of cysteamine plus EGCG acts 'on-target' because it can only rescue CFTR function when autophagy is functional (in mice) and improves CFTR function when a rescuable protein is expressed (in mice and men). These results should spur the further clinical development of the combination treatment.

  4. Regulation and role of connective tissue growth factor in AngII-induced myocardial fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosin, Nicole L; Falkenham, Alec; Sopel, Mryanda J; Lee, Timothy D G; Légaré, Jean-Francois

    2013-03-01

    Exposure of rodents to angiotensin II (AngII) is a common model of fibrosis. We have previously shown that cellular infiltration of bone marrow-derived progenitor cells (fibrocytes) occurs before deposition of extracellular matrix and is associated with the production of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF). In the present study, we characterized the role of CTGF in promoting fibrocyte accumulation and regulation after AngII exposure. In animals exposed to AngII using osmotic minipumps (2.0 μg/kg per min), myocardial CTGF mRNA peaked at 6 hours (21-fold; P fibrocyte migration (1 day) into the myocardium or ECM deposition (3 days). CTGF protein expression was evident by day 3 of AngII exposure and seemed to be localized to resident cells. Isolated cardiomyocytes and microvascular endothelial cells responded to AngII with increased CTGF production (2.1-fold and 2.8-fold, respectively; P fibrocytes suggested a role in fibrocyte proliferation (twofold; P fibrocytes or TGF-β mRNA up-regulation. In addition, CTGF contributes to fibrocyte proliferation in the myocardium and enhances fibrocyte differentiation into a myofibroblast phenotype responsible for ECM deposition.

  5. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α polymorphisms and TSC1/2 mutations are complementary in head and neck cancers

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    Nikitakis Nikolaos G

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polymorphisms or mutations in hypoxia inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1alpha that increases its activity and stability under normoxia have recently been identified. Likewise, disruption of the TSC1/TSC2 complex through loss of TSC1 or TSC2 has been shown to result in abnormal accumulation of HIF-1α. Here, we investigate the novel polymorphisms in exon 12, that approximate the oxygen-dependent degradation domain of HIF-1alpha in five cell lines and 28 patients with oral squamous carcinomas. Moreover, we assess for the presence of polymorphisms and mutations in TSC1 and TSC2, to ascertain if dysregulation of such might complement HIF-1alpha expression. Results Denaturing high pressure liquid chromatography (DHPLC analysis on PCR fragments in exon 12 of HIF-1alpha from 28 patients with OSCC revealed that 6 of 28 patients had mismatched heteroduplex patterns. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood leukocytes and direct sequencing showed that in 5 of the six cases these changes represented polymorphisms while, one case was a somatic mutation. Analyses of TSC1 and TSC2 revealed heteroduplexes in exons: TSC1 exon 17; TSC2 exons 36,40, and 41. The relative levels of HIF-1alpha were significantly greater for tumors possessing a HIF-1alpha polymorphism or mutation within exon 12, whereas tumors possessing a deletion or polymorphism in TSC1/TSC2 displayed a trend for higher levels of HIF-1alpha. Western blot analyses for HIF-1alpha, TSC1 and TSC2 in five SCC cell lines revealed high levels of HIF-1alpha in SCC cells possessing TSC1 and/or TSC2 mutations. Wild-type TSC2 cells targeted with siRNA to TSC2 exhibited increased levels of HIF-1alpha. Transfection of a HIF-1alpha mutant produced higher levels of HIF-1alpha in TSC1/TSC2 mutant cell lines than in wild type cells. TSC1/TSC2 mutant cell lines administered Rapamycin blocked S6 phorphorylation and diminished the levels of HIF-1alpha to those observed in cell lines with wild

  6. Overexpression of insulin-like growth factor-II induces accelerated myoblast differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, C E; James, P L; Fant, M E; Rotwein, P

    1996-10-01

    Previous studies have shown that exogenous insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) can stimulate the terminal differentiation of skeletal myoblasts in culture and have established a correlation between the rate and the extent of IGF-II secretion by muscle cell lines and the rate of biochemical and morphological differentiation. To investigate the hypothesis that autocrine secretion of IGF-II plays a critical role in stimulating spontaneous myogenic differentiation in vitro, we have established C2 muscle cell lines that stably express a mouse IGF-II cDNA under control of the strong, constitutively active Moloney sarcoma virus promoter, enabling us to study directly the effects of IGF-II overproduction. Similar to observations with other muscle cell lines, IGF-II overexpressing myoblasts proliferated normally in growth medium containing 20% fetal serum, but they underwent enhanced differentiation compared with controls when incubated in low-serum differentiation medium. Accelerated differentiation of IGF-II overexpressing C2 cells was preceded by the rapid induction of myogenin mRNA and protein expression (within 1 h, compared with 24-48 h in controls) and was accompanied by an enhanced proportion of the retinoblastoma protein in an underphosphrylated and potentially active form, by a marked increase in activity of the muscle-specific enzyme, creatine phosphokinase, by extensive myotube formation by 48 h, and by elevated secretion of IGF binding protein-5 when compared with controls. These results confirm a role for IGF-II as an autocrine/paracrine differentiation factor for skeletal myoblasts, and they define a model cell system that will be useful in determining the biochemical mechanisms of IGF action in cellular differentiation.

  7. Novel mutation identified in severe early-onset tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakrishna, Suhas M; Grimm, Amy; Broderick, Lori

    2017-04-20

    Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor-Associated Periodic Syndrome (TRAPS) is the second most common heritable autoinflammatory disease, typically presenting in pre-school aged children with fever episodes lasting 1-3 weeks. Systemic symptoms can include rash, myalgia, ocular inflammation, and serositis. Here we report an unusual presentation of TRAPS in a 7 month old girl who presented with only persistent fever. She was initially diagnosed with incomplete Kawasaki Disease and received IVIG and infliximab; however, her fevers quickly recurred. Subsequent testing revealed a urinary tract infection, but she did not improve despite appropriate therapy. As fever continued, she developed significant abdominal distension with imaging concerning for appendicitis, followed by hyperthermia and hemodynamic instability. Given her protracted clinical course and maternal history of a poorly defined inflammatory condition, an autoinflammatory disease was considered. Therapy with anakinra was initiated, resulting in rapid resolution of fever and normalization of inflammatory markers. She was found to have a previously unreported mutation, Thr90Pro, in the TNFRSF1A gene associated with TRAPS. This novel mutation was also confirmed in the patient's mother and maternal uncle. This report reviews a severe case of TRAPS in infancy associated with a novel mutation, Thr90Pro, in the TNFRSF1A gene, and emphasizes that autoinflammatory disease should be considered in the differential of infants with fever of unknown origin.

  8. Heterogeneity of epidermal growth factor receptor mutations in lung adenocarcinoma harboring anaplastic lymphoma kinase rearrangements: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qiong; Wu, Jian-Yu; Jiao, Shun-Chang

    2014-11-01

    Lung cancer is a heterogeneous and complex disease that remains the leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. The identification of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) rearrangements has changed the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer, creating a personalized treatment era that is based on the appropriate molecular selection of patients. In spite of the efficacy of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), acquired resistance remains inevitable due to various mechanisms. The present study reports the case of a 30-year-old patient with stage IV lung adenocarcinoma initially harboring an EGFR mutation. However, following disease progression and a series of treatments, the wild-type EGFR gene was observed and the ALK rearrangements were revealed. Erlotinib administration resulted in a good response in the patient initially, but crizotinib did not. This indicated an association between the secondary mutations in kinases and the drug resistance to TKIs. This case should also highlight the clinical significance of repeat biopsies for the subsequent therapeutic choices at the onset of clinical progression.

  9. Identification and Genetic Analysis of a Factor IX Gene Intron 3 Mutation in a Hemophilia B Pedigree in China

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    Dong Hua Cao

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Hemophilia B is caused by coagulation defects in the factor IX gene located in Xq27.1 on the X chromosome. A wide range of mutations, showing extensive molecular heterogeneity, have been described in hemophilia B patients. Our study was aimed at genetic analysis and prenatal diagnosis of hemophilia B in order to further elucidate the pathogenesis of the hemophilia B pedigree in China. METHODS: Polymerase chain reaction amplification and direct sequencing of all the coding regions was conducted in hemophilia B patients and carriers. Prenatal diagnosis of the proband was conducted at 20 weeks. RESULTS: We identified the novel point mutation 10.389 A>G, located upstream of the intron 3 acceptor site in hemophilia B patients. The fetus of the proband’s cousin was identified as a carrier. CONCLUSION: Our identification of a novel mutation in the F9 gene associated with hemophilia B provides novel insight into the pathogenesis of this genetically inherited disorder and also represents the basis of prenatal diagnosis.

  10. Analysis of Mutations in Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Gene in Korean Patients with Non-small Cell Lung Cancer: Summary of a Nationwide Survey

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    Sang Hwa Lee

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Analysis of mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor gene (EGFR is important for predicting response to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors. The overall rate of EGFR mutations in Korean patients is variable. To obtain comprehensive data on the status of EGFR mutations in Korean patients with lung cancer, the Cardiopulmonary Pathology Study Group of the Korean Society of Pathologists initiated a nationwide survey. Methods: We obtained 1,753 reports on EGFR mutations in patients with lung cancer from 15 hospitals between January and December 2009. We compared EGFR mutations with patient age, sex, history of smoking, histologic diagnosis, specimen type, procurement site, tumor cell dissection, and laboratory status. Results: The overall EGFR mutation rate was 34.3% in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC and 43.3% in patients with adenocarcinoma. EGFR mutation rate was significantly higher in women, never smokers, patients with adenocarcinoma, and patients who had undergone excisional biopsy. EGFR mutation rates did not differ with respect to patient age or procurement site among patients with NSCLC. Conclusions EGFR mutation rates and statuses were similar to those in published data from other East Asian countries.

  11. Discordance of Mutation Statuses of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor and K-ras between Primary Adenocarcinoma of Lung and Brain Metastasis

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    Kun-Ming Rau

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Mutations on epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR of adenocarcinomas of lung have been found to be associated with increased sensitivity to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors and K-ras mutations may correlate with primary resistance. We aimed to explore the discordant mutation statuses of EGFR and K-ras between primary tumors and matched brain metastases in adenocarcinomas of lung. We used a sensitive Scorpion ARMS method to analyze EGFR mutation, and Sanger sequencing followed by allele-specific real-time polymerase chain reaction to analyze K-ras mutation. Forty-nine paired tissues with both primary adenocarcinoma of lung and matched brain metastasis were collected. Thirteen patients (26.5% were discordant for the status of EGFR between primary and metastatic sites. K-ras gene could be checked in paired specimens from 33 patients, thirteen patients (39.6% were discordant for the status of K-ras. In primary lung adenocarcinoma, there were 14 patients of mutant EGFR had mutant K-ras synchronously. This study revealed that the status of EGFR mutation in lung adenocarcinomas is relatively consistent between primary and metastatic sites compared to K-ras mutation. However, there are still a few cases of adenocarcinoma of lung showing discordance for the status of EGFR mutation. Repeated analysis of EGFR mutation is highly recommended if tissue from metastatic or recurrent site is available for the evaluation of target therapy.

  12. Factor V G1691A (Leiden and prothrombin G20210A gene mutation status, and thrombosis in patients with chronic myeloproliferative disorders

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    Nur Soyer

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to examine Factor V G1691A (Leiden (FVL and prothrombin G20210A (PT gene mutation status, and their relationship with thrombosis in patients with chronic myeloproliferative disorders (CMPDs.Materials and Methods: The study included 160 patients with a CMPD that were regularly followed-up between 1993 and 2009. FVL and PT mutation status was established based on blood samples analyzed via PCR using specific primers.Results: The frequency of FVL and PT mutation was 12.5% and 4.4%, respectively. In total, 27 episodes of thrombosis occurred in 24 (15% of the patients, and there wasn’t an association between the observed thrombotic events, and FVL or PT mutations. Hepatic vein thrombosis was noted in 3 patients that had FVL mutation, of which 1 also had PT mutation.Conclusion: We did not observe a relationship between thrombosis, and FVL or PT mutations in CMPD patients; however, 3 of the patients that had hepatic vein thrombosis also had FVL mutation. Larger studies are needed to more clearly determine if all CMPD patients with hepatic vein thrombosis need be investigated for FVL and PT mutation.

  13. Platelet-derived growth factor receptor-β in myocyte was upregulated by angiotensin II

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    To observe the regulation of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) receptor-βin myocyte stimulated by angiotensin II (AngII) at both integrated and cellular levels and reveal the signal transduction mechanism in cell, two kidneys, one clip (2K1C) renal hypertension were performed by placing a sliver clip around the left renal artery. Blood pressure and the ratio of left ventricular weight to body weight were measured at 4 and 8 weeks after operation. The content of AngII in heart was detected by radioimmunology assay; the protein level of PDGF receptor-βin heart was measured by Western blot analysis. The alteration of PDGF receptor-βstimulated by AngII and several inhibitors was observed on cultured neonatal rat ventricular myocyte (NRVM). The content of AngII in heart of 2K1C renal hypertensive rat at 4 and 8 weeks after operation was increased. Compared with sham group, 4 and 8 weeks after operation, PDGF receptor-βin heart of 2K1C group was upregulated by 100.3% and 127.1% (P < 0.05), respectively. This upregulation could be inhibited by captopril. For cultured myocyte, PDGF receptor-βwas increased by 47.1% after being stimulated by AngII and this upregulation could be inhibited by losartan which was an inhibitor of AT1 receptor. PLC inhibitor (U73122) and MEK inhibitor (PD98059) could partly inhibit PDGF receptor-βupregulation induced by AngII. These results suggested that AngII could upregulate PDGF receptor-βin myocyte by its AT1 receptor and this effect was at least partly dependent on PLC and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK).

  14. Effectors of epidermal growth factor receptor pathway: the genetic profiling ofKRAS, BRAF, PIK3CA, NRAS mutations in colorectal cancer characteristics and personalized medicine.

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    Yinchen Shen

    Full Text Available Mutations in KRAS oncogene are recognized biomarkers that predict lack of response to anti- epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR antibody therapies. However, some patients with KRAS wild-type tumors still do not respond, so other downstream mutations in BRAF, PIK3CA and NRAS should be investigated. Herein we used direct sequencing to analyze mutation status for 676 patients in KRAS (codons 12, 13 and 61, BRAF (exon 11 and exon 15, PIK3CA (exon 9 and exon 20 and NRAS (codons12, 13 and 61. Clinicopathological characteristics associations were analyzed together with overall survival (OS of metastatic colorectal cancer patients (mCRC. We found 35.9% (242/674 tumors harbored a KRAS mutation, 6.96% (47/675 harbored a BRAF mutation, 9.9% (62/625 harbored a PIK3CA mutation and 4.19% (26/621 harbored a NRAS mutation. KRAS mutation coexisted with BRAF, PIK3CA and NRAS mutation, PIK3CA exon9 mutation appeared more frequently in KRAS mutant tumors (P = 0.027 while NRAS mutation almost existed in KRAS wild-types (P<0.001. Female patients and older group harbored a higher KRAS mutation (P = 0.018 and P = 0.031, respectively; BRAF (V600E mutation showed a higher frequency in colon cancer and poor differentiation tumors (P = 0.020 and P = 0.030, respectively; proximal tumors appeared a higher PIK3CA mutation (P<0.001 and distant metastatic tumors shared a higher NRAS mutation (P = 0.010. However, in this study no significant result was found between OS and gene mutation in mCRC group. To our knowledge, the first large-scale retrospective study on comprehensive genetic profile which associated with anti-EGFR MoAbs treatment selection in East Asian CRC population, appeared a specific genotype distribution picture, and the results provided a better understanding between clinicopathological characteristics and gene mutations in CRC patients.

  15. [Neonatal renal vein thrombosis in a heterozygous carrier of both factor V Leiden and the MTHFR gene mutation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wannes, S; Soua, H; Ghanmi, S; Braham, H; Hassine, M; Hamza, H A; Ben Hamouda, H; Sfar, M-T

    2012-04-01

    Renal vein thrombosis (RVT) is a rare but potentially serious neonatal disease. Its epidemiology and its clinical and biological expression are currently well known, but its etiological exploration, like that of venous thromboembolism, is increasingly complex. Perinatal risk factors such as prematurity, dehydration, and birth asphyxia have lost their direct accountability at the expense of their interaction with constitutional disorders of hemostasis. We report a case of RVT in a newborn who was a heterozygous carrier of both factor V Leiden and the methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene mutation. We recall the clinical and epidemiological characteristics. A search for inborn blood coagulation disorders should be systematic in the newborn infant with venous thrombosis because of the risk of recurrence, taking into account perinatal factors and maternal thrombophilia (especially if RVT is established during the prenatal period).

  16. COMPARATIVE STUDY OF RISK FACTORS OF TYPE-II DIABETES IN RURAL AND URBAN POPULATION

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    Ch. Kiranmai

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available : A study of effect of various risk factors on Type–II diabetes in Urban and rural population. Generally Indians seems to have great tendency to develop diabetes mellitus. In addition to this, unhealthy food habits, lack of physical activity, diabetic family history, age, obesity, smoking & alcoholism are the other causes for diabetes mellitus. AIM: To analyze the impact of different risk factors on Type – II diabetes in urban and rural population. METHODS: Total 160 subjects of urban and rural population were included in this study and their detailed histories were taken by the questionnaire. In this study we compared the blood glucose levels, unhealthy food habits, lack of physical activity, age, obesity, smoking & alcoholism in urban and rural population. RESULT: The study showed that the blood glucose levels, unhealthy food habits, lack of physical activity, diabetic family history, age, obesity, smoking & alcoholism were found higher in urban than in rural population. CONCLUSION: The results showed that the fond of Type – II diabetes is very less in rural population when compared to urban population. This is because of, the rural population had more physical activity, intake of moderate calorie food, less diabetic family history and less obese. So, these factors help to overcome the increased effect of age, smoking and alcoholism on Type – II diabetes in rural population.

  17. A preliminary biophysical analysis of site-specific mutations in the photosystem II reaction center of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis 6803

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sithole, I.; Bowlby, N.; Babcock, G.T.; McIntosh, L. (Michigan State Univ., East Lansing (USA))

    1990-05-01

    In an attempt to identify ligands for the manganese cluster and understand the conformational constraints around Ya{sup +}; we have generated a series of site-specific mutations in the psbA and psbD genes of Synechocystis PCC 6803, specifically at aspartate and glutamate residues in the AB interhelical region of the D1 and D2 polypeptides; and P162D1, P161D2, W167D2 and F168D1 in the vicinity of Yz{sup +}. One of these mutations is lethal and only grows photoheterotrophically in the presence of glucose, and the remainder have an altered oxygen evolution rate but are capable of photoautotrophic growth in the absence of glucose. Preliminary biochemical and spectroscopic data will be presented.

  18. The Frequency of Factor V Leiden, Prothrombin G20210A and Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase C677T Mutations in Migraine Patients

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    Ruhsen Öcal

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Migraine is an independent risk factor for ischemic stroke, but its pathophysiology is still unclear. Genetic factors that predispose patients to thrombosis have been studied in patients with migraine to highlight the pathogenesis, but the results remain controversial. In this study, the frequencies of factor V Leiden (FVL, prothrombin (Pt G20210A and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR C677T mutations were investigated. METHODS: One hundred and sixty patients aged of 15 to 55 years with no history of systemic disease and who had been diagnosed as migraine according to the International Headache Society (IHS diagnostic criteria at Baskent University Hospital Neurology Outpatient Clinics were investigated for FVL, Pt G20210A and MTHFR C677T mutations from their genomic DNA, and the results were compared with those of healthy controls. RESULTS: One hundred and fifty five (96.9% of 160 migraine patients were homozygote normal, 5 (3.1% were heterozygote and none of them were homozygote mutant for FVL. The control group had 9.8% heterozygote individuals but the difference between the percentages was not statistically significant (p> 0.05. There were no homozygote mutant individuals in the Turkish population study in normal subjects like our study. Thirty nine (24.4% of 160 migraine patients were heterozygote and 8 (5% were homozygote mutant for MTHFR C677T. The control group had 37 (34.9% heterozygote and 6 (5.6% homozygote mutant individuals. The difference between the percentages was not statistically significant (p= 0.15. Three (1.9% of 160 migraine patients were heterozygote and 5 (2.9% of the control group were heterozygote mutant for Pt G20210A mutation. The control group had 37 (34.9% heterozygote and 6 (5.6% homozygote mutant individuals. The difference between the percentages was not statistically significant (p= 0.420. CONCLUSION: Our study indicates that FVL, Pt G20210A and MTHFR C677T gene mutations, which are considered

  19. Phenotypic presentation of thrombophilia in double heterozygote for factor v leiden and prothrombin 20210 G>A mutations: Case report

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    Nagorni-Obradović Ljudmila

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Physicians usually do not suspect pulmonary thromboembolism in younger patients except in those who have thrombophilia. In those latter patients some special conditions such as trauma or surgery may provoke the disease. In some adult persons, thrombophilia may still remain unrecognized, until appearance of additional conditions influence development of thrombosis. A 55-year-old Caucasian female, non-smoker, experienced sudden chest pain and hemoptysis without chest trauma. History taking revealed type 2 diabetes mellitus and hypothyroidism. She was overweight with body mass index 29.0. The review of the family history revealed that her father and mother died of brain infarction, while her 22-year-old son and 24-year-old daughter were healthy. Due to suspicion for thrombosis, multi-slice computerized tomography thorax scan was done and pulmonary embolism was diagnosed. Although without clear risk factor for thrombosis in our patient, we performed laboratory investigation for congenital thrombophilia. Genetic analysis showed double heterozygous for factor V Leiden and prothrombin 20210 G>A mutations. Congenital thrombophilia was risk factor for thrombosis in our patient but haemostatic imbalance was not previously clinically recognized. She had two pregnancies without complications. Appearance of other associative factors such as endocrine disorders - hypothyroidism and metabolic syndrome with diabetes type 2, and overweigh were additional potential triggers for clinical manifestation of pulmonary thromboembolism in her adult age. Her children underwent genetic analysis, too. The son was also double heterozygous for factor V Leiden and prothrombin 20210 G>A mutations, while daughter was heterozygous for factor V Leiden, and none had clinical signs of thrombosis. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. ON175081 i br. ON 175091

  20. Variation in baseline factor VIII concentration in a retrospective cohort of mild/moderate hemophilia A patients carrying identical F8 mutations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loomans, J.I.; Velzen, A.S. van; Eckhardt, C.L.; Peters, M.; Makipernaa, A.; Holmstrom, M.; Brons, P.P.T.; Dors, N.; Haya, S.; Voorberg, J.; Bom, J.G. Van Der; Fijnvandraat, K.

    2017-01-01

    Essentials Factor VIII levels vary in mild and moderate hemophilia A (MHA) patients with the same mutation. We aimed to estimate the variation and determinants of factor VIII levels among MHA patients. Age and genotype explain 59% of the observed inter-individual variation in factor VIII levels.

  1. Retinopathy risk factors in type II diabetic patients using factor analysis and discriminant analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Tazhibi, Mahdi; Sarrafzade, Sheida; Amini, Masoud

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Diabetes is one of the most common chronic diseases in the world. Incidence and prevalence of diabetes are increasing in developing countries as well as in Iran. Retinopathy is the most common chronic disorder in diabetic patients. Materials and Methods: In this study, we used the information of diabetic patients’ reports that refer to endocrine and metabolism research center of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences to determine diabetic retinopathy risk factors. We used factor...

  2. Potential RNA polymerase II-induced interactions of transcription factor TFIIB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, S; Lee, D K; Roeder, R G

    1993-10-01

    The ubiquitous transcription factor TFIIB is required for initiation by RNA polymerase II and serves as a target of some regulatory factors. The carboxy-terminal portion of TFIIB contains a large imperfect direct repeat reminiscent of the structural organization of the TATA-binding component (TBP) of TFIID, as well as sequence homology to conserved regions of bacterial sigma factors. The present study shows that the carboxy-terminal portion of TFIIB, like that of TBP, is folded into a compact protease-resistant core. The TFIIB core, unlike the TBP core, is inactive in transcription but retains structural features that enable it to form a complex with promoter-bound TFIID. The protease-susceptible amino terminus appears to contain components responsible for direct interaction with RNA polymerase II (in association with TFIIF) either on the promoter (in association with TFIID) or independently. In addition, core TFIIB (but not intact TFIIB) extends the footprint of TBP on promoter DNA, suggesting that TFIIB has a cryptic DNA-binding potential. These results are consistent with a model in which TFIIB, in a manner functionally analogous to that of bacterial sigma factors, undergoes an RNA polymerase II-dependent conformational change with resultant DNA interactions during the pathway leading to a functional preinitiation complex.

  3. Development of epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors against EGFR T790M. Mutation in non small-cell lung carcinoma

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    Wang Yuli

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Individualized therapies targeting epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR mutations show promises for the treatment of non small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC. However, disease progression almost invariably occurs 1 year after tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI treatment. The most prominent mechanism of acquired resistance involves the secondary EGFR mutation, namely EGFR T790M, which accounts for 50%–60% of resistant tumors. A large amount of studies have focused on the development of effective strategies to treat TKI-resistant EGFR T790M mutation in lung tumors. Novel generations of EGFR inhibitors are producing encouraging results in patients with acquired resistance against EGFR T790M mutation. This review will summarize the novel inhibitors, which might overcome resistance against EGFR T790M mutation.

  4. Insulin-like growth factors I and II in maternal and fetal guinea pig serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daughaday, W H; Yanow, C E; Kapadia, M

    1986-08-01

    The role of insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) in fetal development has been the subject of much speculation. We undertook studies of maternal and fetal IGF I and II in the guinea pig because the long gestation period and greater size of the fetuses permitted blood sampling over a longer period of gestation and maturation than is possible in the rat. Acid gel filtrates of fetal and maternal serum were prepared, and the IGF I was measured by RIA; IGF II was measured by rat placental membrane radioreceptor assay. Fetal IGF I levels were lower than maternal levels from the 33rd day of estimated gestation to term. Fetal IGF II levels from the 33rd day to the 49th day of gestation were not significantly different from those of maternal serum [1597 +/- 377 (SE) ng/ml vs. 1295 +/- 224] ng/ml. Very high levels of IGF II, in excess of 5000 ng/ml, were observed in fetuses at 50, 55, and 60 days of gestation. Thereafter, fetal IGF II levels fell markedly before term. Fetal and maternal IGFs after 49, 50, 60, and 65 days of pregnancy were compared by isoelectric focusing. The guinea pig normally has two major basic peaks of IGF I, which were present both in maternal and fetal serum. Most maternal and fetal guinea pig sera contained only a single, slightly acidic peak of IGF II. No evidence of a unique fetal IGF was detected by our methods. The very high levels of IGF II reached in fetal guinea pig sera suggest that it may have a role in fetal development.

  5. Levels of acarboxy prothrombin (PIVKA-II) and coagulation factors in warfarin-treated patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umeki, S; Umeki, Y

    1990-04-01

    PIVKA-II (protein induced by vitamin K absence or antagonists-II) was determined and compared with other coagulation factors in normal subjects and patients treated with the anticoagulant warfarin. In 18 (60%) of 30 patients treated with warfarin, PIVKA-II values were 1 microgram/ml or more, although they were less than 1 microgram/ml in all 39 normal subjects (100%). In patients treated with warfarin, values of prothrombin time and partial thromboplastin time were significantly higher than those in normal subjects. However, values of hepaplastintest (normotest) and thrombotest in the patients were greatly lower than those in normal subjects. There were no significant differences between bleeding time or plasma fibrinogen values in the patients and normal subjects. The values of PIVKA-II were inversely correlated (P less than 0.01) with those of hepaplastintest and thrombotest. The measurement of PIVKA-II in the plasma should be useful in detecting vitamin K-deficient status among haemorrhagic disorders.

  6. Dual surrogate markers for rapid prediction of epidermal growth factor receptor mutation status in advanced adenocarcinoma of the lung: A novel approach in resource-limited setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K S Udupa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Tyrosine kinase inhibitors have revolutionized the treatment of metastatic lung cancer in patients with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR mutations. Amplified refractory mutation system (ARMS-reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR, the current standard for detecting EGFR mutation status is time-consuming and highly expensive. Consequently any surrogate test which are cheaper, faster and as accurate as the PCR method will help in early diagnosis and management of patients with lung cancer, especially in resource-limited settings. Materials and Methods: Eighty-five patients, all of South Indian origin, with adenocarcinoma of lung, registered between October 2009 and January 2013, were evaluated for EGFR mutation status by using scorpion probe based ARMS RT-PCR method. Immunohistochemical (IHC was performed using the phosphorylated AKT (P-AKT and thyroid transcription factor-1 (TTF-1 on above patient's sample, and the results were compared with EGFR mutation tests. Results: EGFR mutation was positive in 34 of 85 patients (40%. P-AKT and TTF-1 were positive in 50 (58.8% and 68 (80% patients respectively. Both P-AKT and TTF-1 had statistically significant correlation with EGFR mutation status. Positive and negative predictive value of P-AKT in diagnosing EGFR mutation was 58% and 85.5% and that for TTF-1 was 48.5% and 94.1%, respectively. The problem of low positive predictive value can partly be overcome by testing P-AKT and TTF-1 simultaneously. Conclusion: P-AKT and TTF-1 using IHC had statistically significant correlation with EGFR mutation with high negative predictive value. In the case of urgency of starting treatment, EGFR mutation testing may be avoided in those patients who are negative for these IHC markers and can be started on chemotherapy.

  7. Value of {sup 18}F-FDG uptake on PET/CT and CEA level to predict epidermal growth factor receptor mutations in pulmonary adenocarcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Kai-Hsiung; Hsu, Hsian-He; Chang, Wei-Chou; Hsu, Yi-Chih; Chang, Tsun-Hou [Tri-Service General Hospital and National Defense Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Taipei 114 (China); Huang, Tsai-Wang; Chang, Hung [Tri-Service General Hospital and National Defense Medical Center, Department of Thoracic Surgery, Taipei (China); Gao, Hong-Wei [Tri-Service General Hospital and National Defense Medical Center, Department of Pathology, Taipei (China); Shen, Daniel H.Y. [Tri-Service General Hospital and National Defense Medical Center, Department of Nuclear medicine, Taipei (China); Chu, Chi-Ming [Institute of Public Health, National Defense Medical Center and University, Section of Health Informatics, Taipei (China); Ho, Ching-Liang [Tri-Service General Hospital and National Defense Medical Center, Division of Hematology-Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, Taipei (China)

    2014-10-15

    The identification of the mutation status of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is important for the optimization of treatment in patients with pulmonary adenocarcinoma. The acquisition of adequate tissues for EGFR mutational analysis is sometimes not feasible, especially in advanced-stage patients. The aim of this study was to predict EGFR mutation status in patients with pulmonary adenocarcinoma based on {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake and imaging features in positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT), as well as on the serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) level. We retrospectively reviewed 132 pulmonary adenocarcinoma patients who underwent EGFR mutation testing, pretreatment FDG PET/CT and serum CEA analysis. The associations between EGFR mutations and patient characteristics, maximal standard uptake value (SUVmax) of primary tumors, serum CEA level and CT imaging features were analyzed. Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was performed to quantify the predictive value of these factors. EGFR mutations were identified in 69 patients (52.2 %). Patients with SUVmax ≥6 (p = 0.002) and CEA level ≥5 (p = 0.013) were more likely to have EGFR mutations. The CT characteristics of larger tumors (≥3 cm) (p = 0.023) and tumors with a nonspiculated margin (p = 0.026) were also associated with EGFR mutations. Multivariate analysis showed that higher SUVmax and CEA level, never smoking and a nonspiculated tumor margin were the most significant predictors of EGFR mutation. The combined use of these four criteria yielded a higher area under the ROC curve (0.82), suggesting a good discrimination. The combined evaluation of FDG uptake, CEA level, smoking status and tumor margins may be helpful in predicting EGFR mutation status in patients with pulmonary adenocarcinoma, especially when the tumor sample is inadequate for genetic analysis or genetic testing is not available. Further large-scale prospective studies are

  8. Assessment of epidermal growth factor receptor and K-ras mutation status in cytological stained smears of non-small cell lung cancer patients: correlation with clinical outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano, Maria D; Zulueta, Javier J; Echeveste, Jose I; Gúrpide, Alfonso; Seijo, Luis M; Martín-Algarra, Salvador; Del Barrio, Anabel; Pio, Ruben; Idoate, Miguel Angel; Labiano, Tania; Perez-Gracia, Jose Luis

    2011-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and K-ras mutations guide treatment selection in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Although mutation status is routinely assessed in biopsies, cytological specimens are frequently the only samples available. We determined EGFR and K-ras mutations in cytological samples. DNA was extracted from 150 consecutive samples, including 120 Papanicolau smears (80%), 10 cell blocks (7%), nine fresh samples (6%), six ThinPrep® tests (4%), and five body cavity fluids (3.3%). Papanicolau smears were analyzed when they had >50% malignant cells. Polymerase chain reaction and direct sequencing of exons 18-21 of EGFR and exon 2 of K-ras were performed. EGFR mutations were simultaneously determined in biopsies and cytological samples from 20 patients. Activity of EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) was assessed. The cytological diagnosis was adenocarcinoma in 110 samples (73%) and nonadenocarcinoma in 40 (27%) samples. EGFR mutations were identified in 26 samples (17%) and K-ras mutations were identified in 18 (12%) samples. EGFR and K-ras mutations were mutually exclusive. In EGFR-mutated cases, DNA was obtained from stained smears in 24 cases (92%), pleural fluid in one case (4%), and cell block in one case (4%). The response rate to EGFR TKIs in patients harboring mutations was 75%. The mutation status was identical in patients who had both biopsies and cytological samples analyzed. Assessment of EGFR and K-ras mutations in cytological samples is feasible and comparable with biopsy results, making individualized treatment selection possible for NSCLC patients from whom tumor biopsies are not available.

  9. Complement factor I deficiency: a not so rare immune defect. Characterization of new mutations and the first large gene deletion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alba-Domínguez María

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Complement Factor I (CFI is a serine protease with an important role in complement alternative pathway regulation. Complete factor I deficiency is strongly associated with severe infections. Approximately 30 families with this deficiency have been described worldwide. Patients and methods We have studied five new Spanish families suffering from CFI deficiency. From 19 screened people, 7 homozygous, 10 heterozygous and 2 healthy subjects were identified. Clinical, biochemical and genetic descriptions are included. Results Molecular studies demonstrated 4 novel mutations in the screened individuals; amongst them, we describe here the first great gene deletion reported in the CFI locus, which includes full exon 2 and part of the large intron 1. Conclusion CFI deficiency is possibly an underestimated defect and the eventual existence of this deficiency should be tested in those patients exhibiting low C3 and recurrent bacterial infections. We propose a simple diagnostic flowchart to help clinicians in the identification and correct diagnosis of such patients.

  10. Single-Tube Mutation Scanning of The Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Gene Using Multiplex LATE-PCR and Lights-On/Lights-Off Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetrault, Shana M.; Rice, John E.; Wangh, Lawrence J.; Sanchez, J. Aquiles

    2014-01-01

    Background Numerous mutations in exons 18-21 of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene determine the response of many patients with non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) to anti-EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). This paper describes a single closed-tube assay for simultaneous mutational scanning of EGFR exons 18-21. Methods The assay first co-amplifies all four exons as separate single-stranded DNA products using Linear-After-The-Exponential (LATE)-PCR. The amplicons are then interrogated at endpoint along their length using sets of Lights-On/Lights-Off probes of a different color for each exon. The four resulting fluorescent signatures are unique for each underlying DNA sequence. Every mutation in a target potentially alters its unique fluorescent signature thereby revealing the presence of the mutation. Results The assay readily detects mutations which cause sensitivity or resistance to TKIs and can distinguish these clinically important genetic changes from silent mutations which have no impact on protein function. The assay identifies as little as 5% mutant sequences in mixtures of normal DNA and mutant DNA prepared from cancer cell lines. Proof-of-principle experiments demonstrate mutation identification in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded NSCLC biopsies. Conclusion The LATE-PCR EGFR assay described here represents a new type of highly informative, single-tube diagnostic test for mutational scanning of multiple gene coding regions and/or multiple gene targets for personalized cancer therapies. PMID:25411647

  11. Enhancement of Cry19Aa Mosquitocidal Activity against Aedes aegypti by Mutations in the Putative Loop Regions of Domain II

    OpenAIRE

    Abdullah, Mohd Amir F.; Donald H Dean

    2004-01-01

    Improvements in the mosquitocidal activity of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry19Aa were achieved by protein engineering of putative surface loop residues in domain II through rational design. The improvement of Aedes toxicity in Cry19Aa was 42,000-fold and did not affect its toxicity against Anopheles or Culex.

  12. Clinical significance of factor V leiden and prothrombin G20210A-mutations in cerebral venous thrombosis - comparison with arterial ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beye, Aida; Pindur, Gerhard

    2017-08-28

    Cerebrovascular diseases are considered in a different way concerning their etiology with regard to arterial and venous occlusion. The role of thrombophilia in this context remains undetermined. For this reason, a case-control study was conducted including a total of 202 patients (154 females, 48 males) aged from 18 to 76 years (mean: 39.8 years) suffering either from cerebral sinus venous thrombosis (n = 101) or from arterial ischemic stroke (n = 101). Study groups were evaluated on the basis of age- and gender-matched pairs. Gene mutations of factor V-1691 (factor V Leiden) and prothrombin-20210 being considered as the most common thrombophilia markers were analyzed in this study. Factor V Leiden-mutations were found in 16.8% of patients with cerebral sinus venous thrombosis (CVT) and in 17.8% of patients with arterial ischemic stroke (AIS), which was significantly more frequent than in controls at a rate of 4.95% (ORs: 3.89 and 4.16). Prothrombin-mutations were significantly more frequent in CVT at a rate of 14.9% versus 2.97% in controls (OR: 5.70). This does not apply for AIS showing a rate of 4.95% prothrombin-mutations. Rates of factor V Leiden-mutations are not different in CVT compared with AIS. In contrast, however, prothrombin-mutations were significantly more frequent in CVT than in AIS with a rate of 14.9% versus 4.95% (OR 3.35). Furthermore, 3 cases with combined heterozygosity of factor V Leiden- and prothrombin-mutation have been identified in CVT, but not in AIS or controls. All of the above mentioned mutations were exclusively heterozygous. We conclude from these data that thrombophilia in terms of factor V Leiden genotype is a risk factor for both CVT and AIS in equal measure. In contrast, prothrombin-20210-mutations were different playing a significant role in the pathogenesis of cerebral sinus vein- thrombosis, but not in arterial ischemic stroke. Also, the combined occurrence of heterozygous prothrombin- and factor V Leiden-mutation

  13. Typical and severe tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome in the absence of mutations in the TNFRSF1A gene: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantarini, Luca; Lucherini, Orso Maria; Cimaz, Rolando; Rigante, Donato; Baldari, Cosima Tatiana; Laghi Pasini, Franco; Galeazzi, Mauro

    2012-12-01

    Tumor necrosis factor receptor-1-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS) is the most common autosomal dominant autoinflammatory disorder and is caused by mutations in the TNFRSF1A gene encoding the 55-kDa receptor for tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α. TRAPS is characterized by recurrent attacks of fever, typically lasting from 1 to 3 weeks. In addition to fever, common clinical features include periorbital edema, a migratory erythematous plaque simulating erysipela with underlying myalgia, and arthralgia or arthritis. Serosal membrane inflammation is also a common feature, usually in the form of polyserositis. To date, at least 40 different TNFRSF1A mutations have been identified, but few patients with symptoms highly suggestive of TRAPS with no mutations in the TNFRSF1A gene have recently been described, thus suggesting that not all mutations are yet known or that alternative mechanisms might be involved in the pathogenesis of the disease. We report on three such patients here.

  14. MHC Class II and Non-MHC Class II Genes Differentially Influence Humoral Immunity to Bacillus anthracis Lethal Factor and Protective Antigen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith A. James

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Anthrax Lethal Toxin consists of Protective Antigen (PA and Lethal Factor (LF, and current vaccination strategies focus on eliciting antibodies to PA. In human vaccination, the response to PA can vary greatly, and the response is often directed toward non-neutralizing epitopes. Variable vaccine responses have been shown to be due in part to genetic differences in individuals, with both MHC class II and other genes playing roles. Here, we investigated the relative contribution of MHC class II versus non-MHC class II genes in the humoral response to PA and LF immunization using three immunized strains of inbred mice: A/J (H-2k at the MHC class II locus, B6 (H-2b, and B6.H2k (H-2k. IgG antibody titers to LF were controlled primarily by the MHC class II locus, whereas IgG titers to PA were strongly influenced by the non-MHC class II genetic background. Conversely, the humoral fine specificity of reactivity to LF appeared to be controlled primarily through non-MHC class II genes, while the specificity of reactivity to PA was more dependent on MHC class II. Common epitopes, reactive in all strains, occurred in both LF and PA responses. These results demonstrate that MHC class II differentially influences humoral immune responses to LF and PA.

  15. Preoperative Serum Interleukin-6 Is a Potential Prognostic Factor for Colorectal Cancer, including Stage II Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuyoshi Shiga

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. To evaluate the prognostic significance of serum interleukin-6 (IL-6 in colorectal cancer (CRC. Patients and Methods. Preoperative serum IL-6 was measured in 233 CRC patients and 13 healthy controls. Relationships between IL-6 and various clinicopathological factors were evaluated, and the overall survival (OS and disease-free survival (DFS rates according to IL-6 status were calculated for all patients and according to disease stage. Results. The mean IL-6 level was 6.6 pg/mL in CRC patients and 2.6 pg/mL in healthy controls. Using a cutoff of 6.3 pg/mL, obtained using receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, 57 patients had a high IL-6 level. The mean value was higher for stage II disease than for stage III disease. IL-6 status correlated with C-reactive protein (CRP and carcinoembryonic antigen levels, obstruction, and pT4 disease. The OS differed according to the IL-6 status for all patients, whereas the DFS differed for all patients and for those with stage II disease. The Cox proportional hazards model showed that pT4 disease was an independent risk factor for recurrence in all CRC patients; IL-6, CRP, and pT4 were significant risk factors in stage II patients. Conclusions. The preoperative IL-6 level influences the risk of CRC recurrence.

  16. Functional analysis of splicing mutations in the IDS gene and the use of antisense oligonucleotides to exploit an alternative therapy for MPS II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matos, Liliana; Gonçalves, Vânia; Pinto, Eugénia; Laranjeira, Francisco; Prata, Maria João; Jordan, Peter; Desviat, Lourdes R; Pérez, Belén; Alves, Sandra

    2015-12-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis II is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by mutations in the IDS gene, including exonic alterations associated with aberrant splicing. In the present work, cell-based splicing assays were performed to study the effects of two splicing mutations in exon 3 of IDS, i.e., c.241C>T and c.257C>T, whose presence activates a cryptic splice site in exon 3 and one in exon 8, i.e., c.1122C>T that despite being a synonymous mutation is responsible for the creation of a new splice site in exon 8 leading to a transcript shorter than usual. Mutant minigene analysis and overexpression assays revealed that SRSF2 and hnRNP E1 might be involved in the use and repression of the constitutive 3' splice site of exon 3 respectively. For the c.1122C>T the use of antisense therapy to correct the splicing defect was explored, but transfection of patient fibroblasts with antisense morpholino oligonucleotides (n=3) and a locked nucleic acid failed to abolish the abnormal transcript; indeed, it resulted in the appearance of yet another aberrant splicing product. Interestingly, the oligonucleotides transfection in control fibroblasts led to the appearance of the aberrant transcript observed in patients' cells after treatment, which shows that the oligonucleotides are masking an important cis-acting element for 5' splice site regulation of exon 8. These results highlight the importance of functional studies for understanding the pathogenic consequences of mis-splicing and highlight the difficulty in developing antisense therapies involving gene regions under complex splicing regulation.

  17. HIV-1 diversity, drug-resistant mutations, and viral evolution among high-risk individuals in phase II HIV vaccine trial sites in southern China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiyan Qi

    Full Text Available HIV-1 prevalence in Guangxi, China, has been growing since 1996, when the first case was reported. Over half of HIV-1 positive patients in Guangxi Province were injecting drug users (IDUs, possibly because of the province's location near drug-trafficking routes. Since a phase II HIV vaccine trial is ongoing there, a current characterization of the subtypes of HIV-1 among IDUs in Guangxi would provide critical information for future HIV vaccine trials, as well as further control and prevention of HIV-1 transmission. Thus, we conducted a molecular epidemiological investigation of HIV-1 samples from 2008-2010 among IDUs in multiple cities in Guangxi Province. Our results, based on the gag/pol fragment, indicated a very high proportion (78.47% of HIV-1 CRF08_BC recombinants, some CRF01_AE (15.38% recombinants, and a low proportion of CRF07_BC (6.15% recombinants among the IDUs. The high proportion of CRF08 HIV-1 strains among recent IDUs matches the vaccine candidate constructs. However, future vaccine development should also incorporate CRF01-targeted vaccine candidates. Distinct Env sequence evolution patterns were observed for CRF08_BC and CRF01_AE, indicating that different local selection pressures have been exerted on these two HIV-1 subtypes. Unique drug-resistant mutations were also detected, and our data indicate that HIV treatment programs should consider pre-existing drug-resistant mutations.

  18. A new mutation of the PCNT gene in a Colombian patient with microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pachajoa, Harry; Ruiz-Botero, Felipe; Isaza, Carolina

    2014-06-13

    Microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism is a syndrome characterized by the presence of intrauterine growth restriction, post-natal growth deficiency and microcephaly. Microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II is the most distinctive syndrome in this group of entities. Individuals affected by this disease present at an adult height of less than 100 cm, a post-pubertal head circumference of 40 cm or less, mild mental retardation, an outgoing personality and bone dysplasia. We report the first case of a five-year-old Colombian boy of mixed race ancestry (mestizo), with clinical features of microcephaly, prominent and narrow nose, arched palate, amelogenesis imperfecta, short stature, tall and narrow pelvis, disproportionate shortening of fore-arms and legs, and mild coxa vara. Analysis of the PCNT gene by sequencing showed the presence of a nucleotide change in exon 10, c. 1468C>T, evidencing a new mutation not reported in the literature for microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism. The new mutation identified in this case could be associated with the severity of the phenotypic expression of the disease, resulting in the extreme short stature of the patient. Further studies are required to reach an explanation that can justify such findings, and it is vital to emphasize the importance of detection and follow-up by the epidemiological surveillance groups in birth defects and rare diseases.

  19. Succinate dehydrogenase (SDHx) mutations in pituitary tumors: could this be a new role for mitochondrial complex II and/or Krebs cycle defects?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xekouki, Paraskevi; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2012-12-01

    Succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) or mitochondrial complex II is a multimeric enzyme that is bound to the inner membrane of mitochondria and has a dual role as it serves both as a critical step of the tricarboxylic acid or Krebs cycle and as a member of the respiratory chain that transfers electrons directly to the ubiquinone pool. Mutations in SDH subunits have been implicated in the formation of familial paragangliomas (PGLs) and/or pheochromocytomas (PHEOs) and in Carney-Stratakis syndrome. More recently, SDH defects were associated with predisposition to a Cowden disease phenotype, renal, and thyroid cancer. We recently described a kindred with the coexistence of familial PGLs and an aggressive GH-secreting pituitary adenoma, harboring an SDHD mutation. The pituitary tumor showed loss of heterozygosity at the SDHD locus, indicating the possibility that SDHD's loss was causatively linked to the development of the neoplasm. In total, 29 cases of pituitary adenomas presenting in association with PHEOs and/or extra-adrenal PGLs have been reported in the literature since 1952. Although a number of other genetic defects are possible in these cases, we speculate that the association of PHEOs and/or PGLs with pituitary tumors is a new syndromic association and a novel phenotype for SDH defects.

  20. Nonsense-mediated mRNA decay was demonstrated in two hypofibrinogenemias caused by heterozygous nonsense mutations of FGG, Shizuoka III and Kanazawa II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soya, Keisuke; Takezawa, Yuka; Okumura, Nobuo; Terasawa, Fumiko

    2013-10-01

    We report two novel hypofibrinogenemias, Shizuoka III and Kanazawa II, which are caused by heterozygous mutations in FGG. Shizuoka III showed c.147delT and 147_149insACA in FGG exon 3 and a subsequent frameshift mutation, resulting in mature protein γ23X (native protein: γ49X), and Kanazawa II showed c.1205G>A in FGG exon 9, resulting in γ376X (native protein: γ402X). To determine whether the truncated γ-chains, γ23X and γ376X, were synthesized and participated in the assembly of fibrinogen, mutant-type cDNA vectors were transfected into Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. Significant levels of mutant fibrinogen were not detected by ELISA in the culture media and cell lysates. Immunoblot analysis of cell lysates revealed that the mutant γ-chain of γ376X was observed but intact fibrinogen was not. On the other hand, mutant γ-chain was not observed in γ23X-expressing cells. To demonstrate the involvement of the mechanisms of nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD), we cloned wild- and mutant-type mini-genes containing γ23 or γ376 codon and transfected these into CHO cell lines in the absence or presence of cycloheximide as an NMD inhibitor. mRNA levels were determined using real-time quantitative RT-PCR in CHO cells. In the absence of cycloheximide, levels of mRNAs transcribed from the mutant gene were lower than from the wild-type gene whereas, in the presence of cycloheximide, levels of mRNAs transcribed from the mutant gene increased dose-dependently. Finally, these results demonstrated that mRNAs containing γ23X or γ376X are degraded by the NMD system and translation of the truncated γ-chain polypeptide decrease in patients' hepatocytes, resulting in hypofibrinogenemias.

  1. Proteinuria, a modifiable risk factor: angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) and angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dykeman-Sharpe, Jennifer

    2003-01-01

    Microalbuminuria and proteinuria have been determined to be modifiable risk factors for the progression of chronic kidney disease as well as risk factors for cardiovascular events. Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers have been demonstrated to decrease proteinuria at all stages and slow the progression of renal disease. Proteinuria can be used as a marker of successful treatment in patients with chronic kidney disease in combination with other established targets. This article discusses the various diagnostic tests used for the detection of microalbuminuria and proteinuria and appropriate pharmaceutical treatment.

  2. Epidermal growth factor receptor exon 20 p.S768I mutation in non-small cell lung carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Improta, Giuseppina; Pettinato, Angela; Gieri, Stefania;

    2016-01-01

    mutations may be used to identify tumors sensitive to the effects of small-molecule EGFR-TKIs (gefitinib and erlotinib), and alternative, less frequently observed mutations, including the majority of mutations identified within exon 20, may be associated with a lack of response to TKIs. However, due...... to the comparative rarity of EGFR exon 20 mutations, clinical information concerning the association between EGFR exon 20 mutations and responsiveness to TKIs has been limited within the relevant literature, particularly for certain rare mutations, including p.S768I. The current study reports the case of a patient...... with NSCLC harboring a p.S768I mutation in the EGFR gene [a substitution at codon 768 of exon 20 (c.2303G>T, p.S768I)], as well as a mutation at codon 719, exon 18 (p.G719A). The relevant literature concerning this rare EGFR somatic mutation is also reviewed....

  3. Insulin-like growth factor II stimulates production of inositol trisphosphate in proximal tubular basolateral membranes from canine kidney.

    OpenAIRE

    Rogers, S A; Hammerman, M R

    1988-01-01

    To determine whether insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) activates phospholipase C in the basolateral membrane of the renal proximal tubular cell, we incubated basolateral membranes isolated from canine kidney with rat IGF-II (rIGF-II) and measured levels of inositol trisphosphate (Ins-P3) in suspensions and of diacylglycerol extractable from the membranes. Incubation with rIGF-II increased levels of Ins-P3 and diacylglycerol in a concentration-dependent manner. Significant enhancement of ...

  4. Regulation of rat mesangial cell migration by platelet-derived growth factor, angiotensin II, and adrenomedullin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohno, M; Yasunari, K; Minami, M; Kano, H; Maeda, K; Mandal, A K; Inoki, K; Haneda, M; Yoshikawa, J

    1999-12-01

    This study sought to determine whether platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) and angiotensin II (AngII) stimulate migration of cultured rat glomerular mesangial cells. After finding that this was so, the effects of adrenomedullin (ADM) and cAMP-elevating agents on basal and stimulated mesangial cell migration were examined. Two isoforms of PDGF, AB and BB, stimulated migration in a concentration-dependent manner between 1 and 50 ng/ml, while the AA isoform lacked significant effect. AngII modestly but significantly stimulated migration in a concentration-dependent manner between 10(-7) and 10(-6) mol/L. Rat ADM significantly inhibited the PDGF BB- and AngII-stimulated migration in a concentration-dependent manner between 10(-8) and 10(-7) mol/L. Inhibition by rat ADM was accompanied by an increase in cellular cAMP. cAMP agonists or inducers such as 8-bromo cAMP, forskolin, and prostaglandin I2 also significantly reduced the stimulated migration. H 89, a protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor, attenuated the inhibitory effect of ADM, and a calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor antagonist, human CGRP (8-37), abolished the inhibitory effects of rat ADM. These results suggest that PDGF AB and BB as well as AngII stimulate rat mesangial cell migration and that ADM can inhibit PDGF BB- and AngII-stimulated migration, at least in part through cAMP-dependent mechanisms likely to involve specific ADM receptors with which CGRP interacts. The adenylate cyclase/cAMP/PKA system may be involved in the migration-inhibitory effect of ADM in these cells.

  5. Impaired secretion of carboxyl-terminal truncated factor VII due to an F7 nonsense mutation associated with FVII deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Ryoko; Nakashima, Daisuke; Suzuki, Atsuo; Miyawaki, Yuhri; Fujimori, Yuta; Yamada, Takayuki; Takagi, Akira; Murate, Takashi; Yamamoto, Koji; Katsumi, Akira; Matsushita, Tadashi; Naoe, Tomoki; Kojima, Tetsuhito

    2010-03-01

    Factor VII (FVII) is a vitamin K-dependent glycoprotein secreted into the blood circulation from hepatic cells. We investigated the molecular basis of the congenital FVII deficiency found in a Japanese patient. We analyzed the F7 gene of the patient, who was diagnosed with a FVII deficiency at pregnancy. We expressed a carboxyl-terminal truncated FVII (Arg462X FVII) corresponding to the identified mutation in CHO-K1 cells. To study roles of the carboxyl-terminus in the secretion of FVII, we also expressed a series of recombinant FVIIs deleted of limited numbers of carboxyl-terminal amino acids (462Arg-466Pro). We identified a nonsense mutation (c.1384C>T: p.Arg462X) in F7, leading to a lack of five amino acids in the carboxyl-terminus. In expression experiments, Arg462X FVII was undetectable not only by Western blotting, but also by ELISA. A Western blot analysis of the truncated FVIIs revealed that all mutants were expressed in the cells the same as the wild type, but were secreted into the culture medium in lesser amounts than the wild type depending on the length of the deletion, which was confirmed by ELISA. Arg462X FVII did not colocalize with the Golgi on immunofluorescence staining, suggesting that it might be retained in the ER and degraded in the cell. The carboxyl-terminal amino acids of FVII play an important role in its secretion, and the p.Arg462X mutation was likely to have caused the FVII deficiency in this patient. (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Molecular dynamics simulation study of conformational changes of transcription factor TFIIS during RNA polymerase II transcriptional arrest and reactivation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changsun Eun

    Full Text Available Transcription factor IIS (TFIIS is a protein known for catalyzing the cleavage reaction of the 3'-end of backtracked RNA transcript, allowing RNA polymerase II (Pol II to reactivate the transcription process from the arrested state. Recent structural studies have provided a molecular basis of protein-protein interaction between TFIIS and Pol II. However, the detailed dynamic conformational changes of TFIIS upon binding to Pol II and the related thermodynamic information are largely unknown. Here we use computational approaches to investigate the conformational space of TFIIS in the Pol II-bound and Pol II-free (unbound states. Our results reveal two distinct conformations of TFIIS: the closed and the open forms. The closed form is dominant in the Pol II-free (unbound state of TFIIS, whereas the open form is favorable in the Pol II-bound state. Furthermore, we discuss the free energy difference involved in the conformational changes between the two forms in the presence or absence of Pol II. Additionally, our analysis indicates that hydrophobic interactions and the protein-protein interactions between TFIIS and Pol II are crucial for inducing the conformational changes of TFIIS. Our results provide novel insights into the functional interplay between Pol II and TFIIS as well as mechanism of reactivation of Pol II transcription by TFIIS.

  7. Phenotype of Usher syndrome type II assosiated with compound missense mutations of c.721 C>T and c.1969 C>T in MYO7A in a Chinese Usher syndrome family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhai

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To identify the pathogenic mutations in a Chinese pedigree affected with Usher syndrome type II (USH2.METHODS:The ophthalmic examinations and audiometric tests were performed to ascertain the phenotype of the family. To detect the genetic defect, exons of 103 known RDs -associated genes including 12 Usher syndrome (USH genes of the proband were captured and sequencing analysis was performed to exclude known genetic defects and find potential pathogenic mutations. Subsequently, candidate mutations were validated in his pedigree and 100 normal controls using polymerase chain reaction (PCR and Sanger sequencing.RESULTS:The patient in the family occurred hearing loss (HL and retinitis pigmentosa (RP without vestibular dysfunction, which were consistent with standards of classification for USH2. He carried the compound heterozygous mutations, c.721 C>T and c.1969 C>T, in the MYO7A gene and the unaffected members carried only one of the two mutations. The mutations were not present in the 100 normal controls.CONCLUSION:We suggested that the compound heterozygous mutations of the MYO7A could lead to USH2, which had revealed distinguished clinical phenotypes associated with MYO7A and expanded the spectrum of clinical phenotypes of the MYO7A mutations.

  8. The importance of relative mutant level for evaluating impact on outcome of KIT, FLT3 and CBL mutations in core-binding factor acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, C; Hills, R K; Lamb, K; Evans, C; Tinsley, S; Sellar, R; O'Brien, M; Yin, J L; Burnett, A K; Linch, D C; Gale, R E

    2013-09-01

    Several different mutations collaborate with the fusion proteins in core-binding factor acute myeloid leukemia (CBF-AML) to induce leukemogenesis, but their prognostic significance remains unclear. We screened 354 predominantly younger (mutations and FLT3 internal tandem duplications (FLT3(ITD)) and assessed the impact of relative mutant level on outcome. Overall, 28% had KIT, 6% FLT3(ITD), 10% FLT3(TKD), 27% RAS and 6% CBL mutations. Mutant levels for all genes/loci were highly variable. KIT mutations were associated with a higher cumulative incidence of relapse but in multivariate analysis this was only significant for cases with a higher mutant level of 25% or greater (95% confidence interval (CI)=1.01-1.52, P=0.04). Similarly, only FLT3(ITD-HIGH) was a significant adverse factor for overall survival (OS; CI=1.27-5.39, P=0.004). Conversely, FLT3(TKD-HIGH) and CBL(HIGH) were both favorable factors for OS (CI= 0.31-0.89, P=0.01 and CI=0.05-0.85, P=0.02, respectively). KIT mutations were frequently lost at relapse, which is relevant to minimal residual disease detection and the clinical use of KIT inhibitors. These results indicate that relative mutant level should be taken into account when evaluating the impact of mutations in CBF-AML.

  9. A novel mutation in a patient with congenital coagulation factor Ⅻ deficiency

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Ying; YE Xu; PANG Ying; DAI Jing; WANG Xue-feng; ZHOU Xu-hong

    2008-01-01

    @@ Human coagulation factor Ⅻ(FⅫ),also called Hageman factor,is a plasma plycoprotein that is functionally deficient in individuals with Hageman trait:which is an inhefited trait discovered by chance during preoperative blood coagulation screening tests.FⅫ is a single-chain 596-amino-acid zymogen of a serine protease with an approximate molecular weight of 80 000.

  10. Copper(II) complexes of neuropeptide gamma with point mutations (S8,16A) products of metal-catalyzed oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Błaszak, Marta; Jankowska, Elżbieta; Kowalik-Jankowska, Teresa

    2013-12-01

    To obtain the information about the influence of the serine residues (S8,S16) on the acid-base properties of the neuropeptide gamma, the peptide with point mutations (S8,16A) and its N-acetyl derivative were synthesized. Any additional deprotonations were not observed. It means that the presence of serine residues is necessary in the amino acid sequence of the neuropeptide gamma to have its acid-base properties. The stability constants, stoichiometry and solution structures of copper(II) complexes of the neuropeptide gamma mutants D(1)AGH(4)GQIA(8)H(9)KRH(12)KTDA(16)FVGLM(21)-NH2 (S8,16A) 2ANPG and its N-acetyl derivative Ac-2ANPG were determined in aqueous solution. The equilibrium and structural properties of copper(II) complexes have been characterized by pH-metric, spectroscopic (UV-visible, CD, EPR) and mass spectrometric (MS) methods. At physiological pH7.4 the 2ANPG forms the CuH2L and CuHL complexes in equilibrium with 3N {NH2,βCOO(-)-D(1),2NIm} and 4N {NH2,N(-),2NIm} binding sites, respectively. The exchange Ser on Ala residues does not alter the coordination mode of the peptide. To elucidate the products of the copper(II)-catalyzed oxidation of 2ANPG and Ac-2ANPG the liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry method (LC-MS) and the Cu(II)/H2O2 as a model oxidizing system were employed. For solutions containing a 1:4 peptide-hydrogen peroxide molar ratio oxidation of the methionine residue to methionine sulphoxide was observed. For the 1:1:4 Cu(II)-2ANPG-H2O2 system oxidation of two His residues and cleavage of the G(3)H(4) peptide bond was observed, while for the 1:1:4 Cu(II)-Ac-2ANPG-H2O2 system oxidation of three histidine residues to 2-oxohistidines was also observed.

  11. Dietary factors, metabolic syndrome and risks of breast cancer and type II diabetes in the E3N cohort

    OpenAIRE

    Fagherazzi, Guy

    2011-01-01

    Breast cancer and type II diabetes are two of the main chronic diseases in women and are suspected to share common risk factors. But their etiologies are still partially unknown, in particular concerning some dietary factors and some parameters of the metabolic syndrome. If evidence is convincing that themetabolic syndrome is associated with an increased type II diabetes risk, questions remain unanswered regarding cholesterol level, anthropometric factors and breast cancer risk. The French E3...

  12. Factor V Leiden, prothrombin G20210A, and methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase mutations and stillbirth: the Stillbirth Collaborative Research Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Robert M; Saade, George R; Thorsten, Vanessa; Parker, Corette B; Reddy, Uma M; Drews-Botsch, Carey; Conway, Deborah; Coustan, Donald; Dudley, Donald J; Bukowski, Radek; Rowland Hogue, Carol J; Pinar, Halit; Varner, Michael W; Goldenberg, Robert; Willinger, Marian

    2016-10-01

    An evaluation for heritable thrombophilias is recommended in the evaluation of stillbirth. However, the association between thrombophilias and stillbirth remains uncertain. We sought to assess the association between maternal and fetal/placental heritable thrombophilias and stillbirth in a population-based, case-control study in a geographically, racially, and ethnically diverse population. We conducted secondary analysis of data from the Stillbirth Collaborative Research Network, a population-based case-control study of stillbirth. Testing for factor V Leiden, prothrombin G20210A, methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase C677T and A1298C, and plasminogen activating inhibitor (PAI)-1 4G/5G mutations was done on maternal and fetal (or placental) DNA from singleton pregnancies. Data analyses were weighted for oversampling and other aspects of the design. Odds ratios (OR) were generated from univariate models regressing stillbirth/live birth status on each thrombophilia marker. Results were available for ≥1 marker in 488 stillbirths and 1342 live birth mothers and 405 stillbirths and 990 live birth fetuses. There was an increased odds of stillbirth for maternal homozygous factor V Leiden mutation (2/488; 0.4% vs 1/1380; 0.0046%; OR, 87.44; 95% confidence interval, 7.88-970.92). However, there were no significant differences in the odds of stillbirth for any other maternal thrombophilia, even after stratified analyses. Fetal 4G/4G PAI-1 (OR, 0.63; 95% confidence interval, 0.43-0.91) was associated with decreased odds of stillbirth. Other fetal thrombophilias were similar among groups. Most maternal and fetal thrombophilias were not associated with stillbirth. Maternal factor V Leiden was weakly associated with stillbirth, and the fetal PAI-1 4G/4G polymorphism was associated with live birth. Our data do not support routine testing for heritable thrombophilias as part of an evaluation for possible causes of stillbirth. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Membrane-bound estrogen receptor-α expression and epidermal growth factor receptor mutation are associated with a poor prognosis in lung adenocarcinoma patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shimizu Katsuhiko

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study is to clarify the correlations between the expression of membrane-bound estrogen receptor-α (mERα and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR mutation and clinicopathological factors, especially in relation to the prognosis, in patients with lung adenocarcinoma. Methods We conducted a retrospective review of the data of 51 lung adenocarcinoma patients with tumors measuring less than 3 cm in diameter. Immunohistochemical staining for mERα expression and detection of the EGFR mutation status were performed. Results Among the 51 patients, the tumors in 15 showed both mERα expression and EGFR mutation. ("double positive" Significant associations between "double positive" and vascular invasion, vascular endothelial growth factor expression, and Ki-67 expression were observed. A multivariate analysis revealed that only "double positive" was an independent risk factor influencing the recurrence-free survival. Conclusions Presence of mERα expression together with EGFR mutation was found to be an independent prognostic factor for survival in patients with lung adenocarcinoma, suggesting cross-talk between mERα and EGFR mutation.

  14. Relationship between epidermal growth factor receptor gene mutation and copy number in Chinese patients with non-small cell lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lan-Jun Zhang; Ling Cai; Zhe Li; Wu-Ping Wang; Kang Guo; Jian-Yong Shao; Jun-Ye Wang; Hui Yu; Tie-Hua Rong

    2012-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFP) gene mutation and copy number are useful predictive markers that guide the selection of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients for EGFR-targeting therapy.This study aimed to investigate the correlation between EGFR gene mutation and copy number and clinicopathologic characteristics of Chinese patients with NSCLC.NSCLC specimens collected from 205 patients between November 2009 and January 2011 were selected to detect EGFR gene mutations with real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and to detect EGFR gene copy number with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH).EGFR mutations primarily occurred in females,non-smokers,and patients with adenocarinomas (all P < 0.001).Tissues from 128 (62%) patients were FISH-positive for EGFR,including 37 (18%) with gene amplification and 91 (44%) with high polysomy.EGFR gene mutation was correlated with FISH-positive status (R =0.340,P < 0.001).Multivariate analysis showed that not smoking (OR =5.910,95% CI =2.363-14.779,P < 0.001) and having adenocarcinoma (OR =0.122,95% CI =0.026-0.581,P =0.008) were favorable factors for EGFR gene mutation.These results show a high frequency of EGFR FISH positivity in NSCLC tissues from Chinese patients and a significant relevance between EGFR gene mutations and FISH-positive status.Among the FISH-positive samples,EGFR gene mutation occurred more frequently in samples with gene amplification compared to those with high polysomy,suggesting that EGFR mutation and gene amplification should be used as clinical decision parameters to predict response to EGFR-targeting therapy.

  15. Endonucleolysis in the turnover of insulin-like growth factor II mRNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, F C; Christiansen, Jan

    1992-01-01

    between a putative hairpin and a phylogenetically conserved guanosine-rich region which forms a stable higher order RNA structure in the presence of K+. We suggest that endonucleolysis is the initial step in IGF-II mRNA decay and that this event may participate in the post-transcriptional regulation......The overlapping transcription units constituting the rat insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) locus generate multiple mRNAs by using different promoters. Three promoters have been identified, giving rise to 4.6-, 3.8-, and 3.6-kilobase mRNAs. The latter, originating from promoter P3, is the most...... abundant IGF-II mRNA in the rat liver cell-line BRL-3A. Moreover, a non-polyadenylated 1.2-kilobase (kb) transcript and a 1.8-kb tail fragment are prominent transcripts at steady-state. In this study, we show that the 1.8-kb tail fragment is uncapped and sediments as a 30 S ribonucleoprotein particle...

  16. A unique point mutation in the fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 gene (FGFR3) defines a new craniosynostosis syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muenke, M.; Gripp, K.W.; McDonald-McGinn, D.M. [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)] [and others

    1997-03-01

    The underlying basis of many forms of syndromic craniosynostosis has been defined on a molecular level. However, many patients with familial or sporadic craniosynostosis do not have the classical findings of those craniosynostosis syndromes. Here we present 61 individuals from 20 unrelated families where coronal synostosis is due to an amino acid substitution (Pro250Arg) that results from a single point mutation in the fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 gene on chromosome 4p. In this instance, a new clinical syndrome is being defined on the basis of the molecular finding. In addition to the skull findings, some patients had abnormalities on radiographs of hands and feet, including thimble-like middle phalanges, coned epiphyses, and carpal and tarsal fusions. Brachydactyly was seen in some cases; none had clinically significant syndactyly or deviation of the great toe. Sensorineural hearing loss was present in some, and developmental delay was seen in a minority. While the radiological findings of hands and feet can be very helpful in diagnosing this syndrome, it is not in all cases clearly distinguishable on a clinical basis from other craniosynostosis syndromes. Therefore, this mutation should be tested for in patients with coronal synostosis. 54 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. The human glia maturation factor-gamma gene: genomic structure and mutation analysis in gliomas with chromosome 19q loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, N; Smith, J S; Tachibana, I; Lee, H K; Pohl, U; Portier, B P; Louis, D N; Jenkins, R B

    1999-09-01

    Human glia maturation factor-gamma (hGMF-gamma) is a recently identified gene that may be involved in glial differentiation, neural regeneration, and inhibition of tumor cell proliferation. The gene maps to the long arm of chromosome 19 at band q13.2, a region that is frequently deleted in human malignant gliomas and is thus suspected to harbor a glioma tumor suppressor gene. Given the putative role of hGMF-gamma in cell differentiation and proliferation and its localization to chromosome 19q13, this gene is an interesting candidate for the chromosome 19q glioma tumor suppressor gene. To evaluate this possibility, we determined the genomic structure of human hGMF-gamma and performed mutation screening in a series of 41 gliomas with and without allelic loss of chromosome 19q. Mutations were not detected, which suggests that hGMF-gamma is not the chromosome 19q glioma suppressor gene. However, the elucidation of the genomic structure of hGMF-gamma may prove useful in future investigations of hGMF-gamma in the normal adult and developing human nervous system.

  18. Mutations in CUBN, encoding the intrinsic factor-vitamin B12 receptor, cubilin, cause hereditary megaloblastic anaemia 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminoff, M; Carter, J E; Chadwick, R B; Johnson, C; Gräsbeck, R; Abdelaal, M A; Broch, H; Jenner, L B; Verroust, P J; Moestrup, S K; de la Chapelle, A; Krahe, R

    1999-03-01

    Megaloblastic anaemia 1 (MGA1, OMIM 261100) is a rare, autosomal recessive disorder characterized by juvenile megaloblastic anaemia, as well as neurological symptoms that may be the only manifestations. At the cellular level, MGA1 is characterized by selective intestinal vitamin B12 (B12, cobalamin) malabsorption. MGA1 occurs worldwide, but its prevalence is higher in several Middle Eastern countries and Norway, and highest in Finland (0.8/100,000). We previously mapped the MGA1 locus by linkage analysis in Finnish and Norwegian families to a 6-cM region on chromosome 10p12.1 (ref. 8). A functional candidate gene encoding the intrinsic factor (IF)-B12 receptor, cubilin, was recently cloned; the human homologue, CUBN, was mapped to the same region. We have now refined the MGA1 region by linkage disequilibrium (LD) mapping, fine-mapped CUBN and identified two independent disease-specific CUBN mutations in 17 Finnish MGA1 families. Our genetic and molecular data indicate that mutations in CUBN cause MGA1.

  19. Relationship between serum carcinoembryonic antigen level and epidermal growth factor receptor mutations with the influence on the prognosis of non-small-cell lung cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cai ZX

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Zuxun Cai Department of Thoracic Surgery, Henan Provincial Chest Hospital, Zhengzhou City, People’s Republic of China Objective: To investigate the relationship between serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA level and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR gene mutations in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients and to analyze the influence of CEA level on postoperative survival time in lung cancer patients. Methods: A total of 296 patients who were treated in Thoracic Surgery Department of Henan Provincial Chest Hospital from September 2011 to September 2013 were recruited. The level of tumor markers, such as CEA, was determined before the surgery, and EGFR gene mutations were detected after surgery. Thereby, the relationship between tumor makers, including CEA, and EGFR mutation and its influence on prognosis could be investigated. Results: Among 296 patients, the positive rate of EGFR gene mutation was 37.84% (112/296; the mutation occurred more frequently in nonsmokers, adenocarcinoma patients, women, and patients aged <60 years (P<0.05. Both tumor markers and chemosensitivity indicators were related to the profile of EGFR mutations. Elevated squamous cell carcinoma and Cyfra21-1 as well as positively expressed ERCC1 were more common in patients with wild-type EGFR (P<0.05, whereas increased CEA level was observed more frequently in patients with EGFR gene mutation (P=0.012. The positive rate of EGFR gene mutations was higher as the serum CEA level increased, that is, the positive rate in patients with serum CEA level <5, 5–20, and >20 µg/L was 39.81%, 45.32%, and 65.47%, respectively (P=0.004. Logistic regression analysis showed that CEA level was an independent factor in predicting EGFR gene mutations, and serum CEA level was also an independent factor in affecting the prognosis of NSCLC patients, as the overall 2-year survival rate was 73.86% in elevated CEA group and 86.43% in normal group (P<0.01. Conclusion: The prognosis of

  20. [Effect of Escherichia coli mutation affecting the RNA polymerase sigma factor on phage T4 development].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zograf, Iu N

    1982-01-01

    The bacterial RNA polymerase sigma factor is necessary throughout T4 development. T4 can develop in the E. coli RpoD800 mutant cells only at permissive temperature. RNA synthesis in T4-infected mutant cells remains temperature-sensitive throughout infection as in uninfected mutant bacteria. This shows that bacterial sigma factor is necessary for all types of RNA synthesis in infected E. coli. The data obtained suggest also that active sigma factor is necessary for early, but not for late T4 DNA replication.

  1. Novel KRAS gene mutations in sporadic colorectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walid M Naser

    Full Text Available In this article, we report 7 novel KRAS gene mutations discovered while retrospectively studying the prevalence and pattern of KRAS mutations in cancerous tissue obtained from 56 Saudi sporadic colorectal cancer patients from the Eastern Province.Genomic DNA was extracted from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded cancerous and noncancerous colorectal tissues. Successful and specific PCR products were then bi-directionally sequenced to detect exon 4 mutations while Mutector II Detection Kits were used for identifying mutations in codons 12, 13 and 61. The functional impact of the novel mutations was assessed using bioinformatics tools and molecular modeling.KRAS gene mutations were detected in the cancer tissue of 24 cases (42.85%. Of these, 11 had exon 4 mutations (19.64%. They harbored 8 different mutations all of which except two altered the KRAS protein amino acid sequence and all except one were novel as revealed by COSMIC database. The detected novel mutations were found to be somatic. One mutation is predicted to be benign. The remaining mutations are predicted to cause substantial changes in the protein structure. Of these, the Q150X nonsense mutation is the second truncating mutation to be reported in colorectal cancer in the literature.Our discovery of novel exon 4 KRAS mutations that are, so far, unique to Saudi colorectal cancer patients may be attributed to environmental factors and/or racial/ethnic variations due to genetic differences. Alternatively, it may be related to paucity of clinical studies on mutations other than those in codons 12, 13, 61 and 146. Further KRAS testing on a large number of patients of various ethnicities, particularly beyond the most common hotspot alleles in exons 2 and 3 is needed to assess the prevalence and explore the exact prognostic and predictive significance of the discovered novel mutations as well as their possible role in colorectal carcinogenesis.

  2. Dietary, lifestyle and clinicopathological factors associated with BRAF and K-ras mutations arising in distinct subsets of colorectal cancers in the EPIC Norfolk study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McTaggart Alison

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background BRAF and K-ras proto-oncogenes encode components of the ERK signalling pathway and are frequently mutated in colorectal cancer. This study investigates the associations between BRAF and K-ras mutations and clinicopathological, lifestyle and dietary factors in colorectal cancers. Methods 186 adenocarcinomas and 16 adenomas from the EPIC Norfolk study were tested for BRAF and K-ras mutations. Diet and lifestyle data were collected prospectively using seven day food diaries. Results BRAF V600E mutation was found in 15.6% of colorectal cancers but at higher frequencies in cancers with proximal location, poor differentiation and microsatellite instability (MSI (all p K-ras mutation (mostly in codons 12 and 13 was found in 22.0% of colorectal cancers but at higher frequencies in cancers of more advanced Dukes' stage (p = 0.001, microsatellite stable (MSS status (p = 0.002 and in individuals with lower blood high-density lipoprotein concentrations (p = 0.04. Analysis of dietary factors demonstrated no link between BRAF mutation and any specific dietary constituent, however, K-ras mutation was found at higher frequencies in individuals with higher white meat consumption (p K-ras were observed at higher frequencies in individuals consuming lower amounts of fruit (p = 0.02. Conclusion These data support the model of BRAF and K-ras mutations arising in distinct colorectal cancer subsets associated with different clinicopathological and dietary factors, acting as mutually exclusive mechanisms of activation of the same signalling pathway.

  3. KDF1, encoding keratinocyte differentiation factor 1, is mutated in a multigenerational family with ectodermal dysplasia

    KAUST Repository

    Shamseldin, Hanan E.

    2016-11-12

    Ectodermal dysplasia is a highly heterogeneous group of disorders that variably affect the derivatives of the ectoderm, primarily skin, hair, nails and teeth. TP63, itself mutated in ectodermal dysplasia, links many other ectodermal dysplasia disease genes through a regulatory network that maintains the balance between proliferation and differentiation of the epidermis and other ectodermal derivatives. The ectodermal knockout phenotype of five mouse genes that regulate and/or are regulated by TP63 (Irf6, Ikkα, Ripk4, Stratifin, and Kdf1) is strikingly similar and involves abnormal balance towards proliferation at the expense of differentiation, but only the first three have corresponding ectodermal phenotypes in humans. We describe a multigenerational Saudi family with an autosomal dominant form of hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia in which positional mapping and exome sequencing identified a novel variant in KDF1 that fully segregates with the phenotype. The recapitulation of the phenotype we observe in this family by the Kdf1−/− mouse suggests a causal role played by the KDF1 variant.

  4. Factors influencing the clinical expression of intermediate CAG repeat length mutations of the Huntington's disease gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panegyres, Peter K; Shu, Chen-Chun; Chen, Huei-Yang; Paulsen, Jane S

    2015-02-01

    Our aim is to elucidate the clinical variables associated with the development of manifest HD in patients with intermediate CAG repeat lengths. 2,167 participants were seen throughout 44 research sites in the United States, Canada or Australia over a five-year natural history observational study (2006-2011) (Trial # NCT00313495). The Chi-square test and a generalised linear model were used to examine the differences in demographics and cognitive tests among three groups of CAG repeat length. The mixed model was then used to examine the time effect on cognitive assessments by CAG groups. No patient with CAG repeat length 27-35 developed manifest HD, whereas three patients with 36-39 did. Total motor score, maximal chorea score and maximal dystonia score were significantly different at baseline (p CAG 36-39; those with an associated university degree or higher education were less frequently diagnosed as manifest HD (OR 0.10, 95 % CI 0.02-0.54, p = 0.007). Age, smoking and lower education achievement were found to be significantly associated with higher odds of manifest HD in patients with intermediate CAG repeat length mutations.

  5. Risk Factors Accompanied with Nephropathy in Patients with Type II Diabetes; Test of the Biopsychosocial Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Rahimian Boogar

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: The study of biopsychosocial factors influencing nephropathy as a most serious complication of type II diabetes is important. This study aimed to investigate risk factors accompanied with nephropathy in patients with type II diabetes based on the biopsychosocial model. Materials & Methods: In a cross-sectional descriptive study, 295 patients with type II diabetes were selected by convenience sampling in Tehran Shariati hospital outpatient clinics. The data were collected by demographical information questionnaire along with disease characteristics and depression anxiety stress scales (dass, quality of life scale (who- qol- bref, diabetes self-management scale (dsms, and diabetes knowledge scale (dks, then analyzed by chi-square, independent t-test and logistic regression with pasw software. Results: Hypertension (OR=3.841 & P0.05.Conclusion: It is important to pay attention to hypertension, glycated hemoglobin, body mass index, diabetes self-management, depression, quality of life, and diabetes knowledge for therapeutic intervention programming and diabetes complications control protocols for diabetic patients.(Sci J Hamadan Univ Med Sci 2012;19(2:44-53

  6. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors for epidermal growth factor receptor gene mutation-positive non-small cell lung cancers: an update for recent advances in therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Clement

    2016-06-01

    The presence of activating gene mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor of non-small cell lung cancer patients is predictive (improved progression-free survival and improved response rate) when treated with small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors such as gefitinib, erlotinib and afatinib. The two most common mutations that account for greater than 85% of all EGFR gene mutations are in-frame deletions in exon 19 (LREA deletions) and substitution in exon 21 (L858R). Exon 18 mutations occur much less frequently at about 4% of all EGFR gene mutations. Together, exon 19 deletion and exon 21 L858R gene substitution are present in about 10% of Caucasian patients and 20-40% of Asian patients with non-small cell lung cancer. T790M gene mutation at exon 20 is associated with acquired resistance to epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Early studies showed that activating EGFR gene mutations are most common in patients with adenocarcinoma histology, women, never smokers and those of Asian ethnicity. A recent multi-center phase III trial suggested that frontline epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy with afatinib is associated with improved progression-free survival compared to chemotherapy regardless of race. Moreover, guidelines now suggest EGFR gene mutation testing should be conducted in all patients with lung adenocarcinoma or mixed lung cancers with an adenocarcinoma component, regardless of characteristics such as smoking status, gender or race. The success of targeted therapies in non-small cell lung cancer patients has changed the treatment paradigm in metastatic non-small cell lung cancer. However, despite a durable response of greater than a year, resistance to epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors inevitably occurs. This mini-review describes the clinically relevant EGFR gene mutations and the efficacy/toxicity of small molecule epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase

  7. Preserved fertility in a non-mosaic Klinefelter patient with a mutation in the fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, A; Aksglaede, L; Lund, A M;

    2007-01-01

    receptor 3 (FGFR3) gene, which is a gain-of-function mutation resulting in achondroplasia. The patient had phenotypic characteristics of achondroplasia (e.g. short limbed dwarfism and frontal bossing). Testicular volume was 8 ml at 27 years of age and repeated semen samples showed sperm concentrations of 0...... a child from a spontaneous pregnancy. The observed testicular size and function in our patient contrast the typical findings in classical Klinefelter syndrome. We speculate that the alteration of FGFR3 protein function in our Klinefelter patient alleviated the destruction of the seminiferous tubules...... and may suggest that the fibroblast growth factor family has a pleiotrophic function in human spermatogonia, which physiologically express FGFR3....

  8. Preserved fertility in a non-mosaic Klinefelter patient with a mutation in the fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, A; Aksglaede, L; Lund, A M;

    2007-01-01

    Patients with Klinefelter syndrome (47,XXY) are characterized by eunuchoid body proportions, gynaecomastia, small firm testes and azoospermia. We describe a Klinefelter patient (non-mosaic 47,XXY karyotype) who was heterozygous for the classical 1138G>A mutation in the fibroblast growth factor.......175 million/ml. Serum FSH levels were elevated (21.7 IU/l) compared to normal age-matched healthy male controls and patients with non-mosaic Klinefelter syndrome, and inhibin B levels were low-normal, in contrast to the usually undetectable inhibin B levels in adult Klinefelter patients. The patient fathered...... a child from a spontaneous pregnancy. The observed testicular size and function in our patient contrast the typical findings in classical Klinefelter syndrome. We speculate that the alteration of FGFR3 protein function in our Klinefelter patient alleviated the destruction of the seminiferous tubules...

  9. Cytomegalovirus-associated splenic infarcts in a female patient with Factor V Leiden mutation: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atzmony Lihi

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Cytomegalovirus-associated thrombosis has rarely been reported in the medical literature, and if so, mainly in immunocompromized patients. Case presentation We report the case of a 36-year-old Caucasian woman with acute cytomegalovirus infection presenting with spontaneous splenic infarcts. Trans-esophageal echocardiography did not show any vegetations or mural thrombi. The patient was also found to be heterozygous for the Factor V Leiden mutation. Anticoagulation treatment was considered but ruled out since cytomegalovirus was the obvious trigger for thrombosis in this patient. To the best of our knowledge, this is only the third report to date of cytomegalovirus-associated splenic infarcts. Conclusion This case report serves as additional evidence for the role of cytomegalovirus in thrombosis.

  10. Insulin-like growth factors I and II in healthy women with and without established osteoporosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Pernille; Spencer, E M; Christiansen, C

    1995-01-01

    We measured serum concentrations of insulin-like growth factors I and II (IGF-I and IGF-II) by radioimmunoassay in 107 healthy women aged 28-78 years and in 116 women with established osteoporosis. The women with established osteoporosis were randomized to a 1-year double-blind, placebo...... women with established osteoporosis, IGF-I was 30% lower (p ....05) was seen in the nandrolone decanoate-treated group. The same tendency was seen for hormone replacement therapy, although it was not significant. In conclusion, the serum level of IGF-I is high in young women, when peak bone mass is attained, and low in postmenopausal women with established osteoporosis....

  11. [Association of the insulin-like growth factor II (IGF2) gene with human cognitive functions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfimova, M V; Lezheĭko, T V; Gritsenko, I K; Golimbet, V E

    2012-08-01

    Active search for candidate genes whose polymorphisms are associated with human cognitive functions has been in progress in the past years. The study focused on the role that the insulin-like growth factor II (IGF2) gene may play in the variation of cognitive processes related to executive functions. The ApaI polymorphism of the IGF2 gene was tested for association with selective attention during visual search, working memory/mental control, and semantic verbal fluency in a group of 182 healthy individuals. The ApaI polymorphism was associated with the general cognitive index and selective attention measure. Carriers of genotype AA displayed higher values of the two parameters than carriers of genotype GG. It was assumed that the ApaI polymorphism of the IGF2 gene influences the human cognitive functions, acting possibly via modulation of the IGF-II level in the central nervous system.

  12. Microscopic model for the neutron dynamic structure factor of solid methane in phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin Yunchang, E-mail: yunchang.shin@yale.ed [Department of Physics, Indiana University Bloomington, IN 47408 (United States); Department of Physics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Mike Snow, W.; Liu, C.Y.; Lavelle, C.M.; Baxter, David V. [Department of Physics, Indiana University Bloomington, IN 47408 (United States)

    2010-08-21

    We have constructed a microscopic model for the neutron dynamic structure factor S(Q,{omega}) of solid methane in phase II. We expect this model to apply for neutron energies below 1 eV at pressures near 1 bar and temperatures below 20 K where methane possesses both free rotation and hindered rotation modes of the tetrahedral molecules in the unit cell. The model treats the motions of molecular translations, intra-molecular vibrations and the free and hindered rotations of methane molecule as independent. Total scattering cross-sections calculated from the model agree with the cross-section measurements for incident neutron energies of 0.5 meV-1 eV. The effective density of states is extracted from the model. We also present the quantitative calculation of the separate contributions of the two different rotational modes to the inelastic cross-section for different methane temperatures in phase II.

  13. Insulin-like growth factor II mRNA, peptides, and receptors in a thoracopulmonary malignant small round cell tumor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, F C; Orskov, C; Haselbacher, G;

    1994-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-(IGF) II and IGF-I and IGF-II/mannose 6-phosphate receptors were expressed in a thoracopulmonary malignant small round cell tumor (MSRCT) from a 14-year-old boy. Northern analysis showed that the MSRCT expresses multiple IGF-II mRNA of 6.0, 4.8, 4.2, and 2.2 kilobase from...

  14. Angiotensin II upregulates the expression of placental growth factor in human vascular endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo Yingqiang

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Atherosclerosis is now recognized as a chronic inflammatory disease. Angiotensin II (Ang II is a critical factor in inflammatory responses, which promotes the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Placental growth factor (PlGF is a member of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF family cytokines and is associated with inflammatory progress of atherosclerosis. However, the potential link between PlGF and Ang II has not been investigated. In the current study, whether Ang II could regulate PlGF expression, and the effect of PlGF on cell proliferation, was investigated in human vascular endothelial cells (VECs and smooth muscle cells (VSMCs. Results In growth-arrested human VECs and VSMCs, Ang II induced PlGF mRNA expression after 4 hour treatment, and peaked at 24 hours. 10-6 mol/L Ang II increased PlGF protein production after 8 hour treatment, and peaked at 24 hours. Stimulation with Ang II also induced mRNA expression of VEGF receptor-1 and -2(VEGFR-1 and -2 in these cells. The Ang II type I receptor (AT1R antagonist blocked Ang II-induced PlGF gene expression and protein production. Several intracellular signals elicited by Ang II were involved in PlGF synthesis, including activation of protein kinase C, extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2 and PI3-kinase. A neutralizing antibody against PlGF partially inhibited the Ang II-induced proliferation of VECs and VSMCs. However, this antibody showed little effect on the basal proliferation in these cells, whereas blocking antibody of VEGF could suppress both basal and Ang II-induced proliferation in VECs and VSMCs. Conclusion Our results showed for the first time that Ang II could induce the gene expression and protein production of PlGF in VECs and VSMCs, which might play an important role in the pathogenesis of vascular inflammation and atherosclerosis.

  15. Risk factors for periodontal diseases among Yemeni type II diabetic patients. A case-control study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anas Shamala

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic periodontal diseases are one of diabetes mellitus complications. The present study aims to compare the periodontal status of type II diabetic patients to a control group and assess the role of risk factors in both groups. Materials and methods: A case-control study was conducted of 270 individuals (132 type II diabetics and 138 non-diabetics. Full mouth periodontal examination including plaque index, gingival bleeding, gingival recession, clinical attachment loss (CAL, tooth mobility, furcation involvement and the number of missing teeth. The case group was subdivided according to glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c status (poorly controlled HbA1c >8 and well controlled HbA1c≤8 Likewise, the duration of diabetes mellitus as short or long duration (DM≤10 or >10. The diabetic group was also subdivided according to smoking and Khat chewing habits. Result: The severity of periodontal disease among type II diabetic patients were significantly higher compared to the control group regarding the plaque index 2.6 (1.6-4.3, bleeding on probing 3.5 (2.3-13.0, gingival recession 2.0 (1.2-3.4, furcation involvement 4.0 (2.3-6.7, clinical attachment loss 5.7 (3.1-10.5, tooth mobility 2.0 (1.2-3.4, and number of missing teeth 4.4 (2.3-8.5. In addition, poorly controlled type II DM and long duration had higher CAL and number of missing teeth than well-controlled DM and short duration. No significant differences were found between smokers/nonsmokers and Khat chewers/non-chewers among the diabetic group. Conclusion: Type II diabetic patients have severe periodontal destruction and tooth loss compared to non-diabetic people and there were no differences within the diabetic group in regards to smoking and Khat chewing habits.

  16. Mutation of isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 induces glioma cell proliferation via nuclear factor-κB activation in a hypoxia-inducible factor 1-α dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guoliang; Sai, Ke; Gong, Fanghe; Yang, Qunying; Chen, Furong; Lin, Jian

    2014-05-01

    Recently, mutations of the isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) 1 gene, which specifically occur in the majority of low-grade and secondary high-grade gliomas, have drawn particular attention of neuro-oncologists. Mutations of the IDH1 gene have been proposed to have significant roles in the tumorigenesis, progression and prognosis of gliomas. However, the molecular mechanism of the role of IDH1 mutants in gliomagenesis remains to be elucidated. The present study, showed that forced expression of an IDH1 mutant, of which the 132th amino acid residue arginine is substituted by histidine (IDH1R132H), promoted cell proliferation in cultured cells, while wild-type IDH1 overexpression had no effect on cell proliferation. Consistent with previous studies, it was also observed that expression of hypoxia-inducible factor 1-α (HIF1-α) was upregulated in IDH1R132H expressing cells with the induction of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression. However, knockdown of VEGF via small RNA interference had no significant influence on the cell proliferation induced by overexpression of IDH1R132H, implying that another signaling pathway may be involved. Next, forced expression of IDH1R132H was found to activate nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), since the inhibitory IκB protein (IκBα) was highly phosphorylated and the NF-κB p65 subunit was translocated into the nucleus. Notably, knockdown of HIF1-α significantly blocked NF-κB activation, which was induced by the overexpression of IDH1 mutants. In addition, expression of IDH1 mutants markedly induced the NF-κB target gene expression, including cyclin D1 and E and c-myc, which were involved in the regulation of cell proliferation. In conclusion, it was demonstrated that the IDH1 mutant activated NF-κB in a HIF1-α‑dependent manner and was involved in the regulation of cell proliferation.

  17. Mutations in a plastid-localized elongation factor G alter early stages of plastid development in Arabidopsis thaliana

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    Hangarter Roger P

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proper development of plastids in embryo and seedling tissues is critical for plant development. During germination, plastids develop to perform many critical functions that are necessary to establish the seedling for further growth. A growing body of work has demonstrated that components of the plastid transcription and translation machinery must be present and functional to establish the organelle upon germination. Results We have identified Arabidopsis thaliana mutants in a gene that encodes a plastid-targeted elongation factor G (SCO1 that is essential for plastid development during embryogenesis since two T-DNA insertion mutations in the coding sequence (sco1-2 and sco1-3 result in an embryo-lethal phenotype. In addition, a point mutation allele (sco1-1 and an allele with a T-DNA insertion in the promoter (sco1-4 of SCO1 display conditional seedling-lethal phenotypes. Seedlings of these alleles exhibit cotyledon and hypocotyl albinism due to improper chloroplast development, and normally die shortly after germination. However, when germinated on media supplemented with sucrose, the mutant plants can produce photosynthetically-active green leaves from the apical meristem. Conclusion The developmental stage-specific phenotype of the conditional-lethal sco1 alleles reveals differences in chloroplast formation during seedling germination compared to chloroplast differentiation in cells derived from the shoot apical meristem. Our identification of embryo-lethal mutant alleles in the Arabidopsis elongation factor G indicates that SCO1 is essential for plant growth, consistent with its predicted role in chloroplast protein translation.

  18. Copper(II) complexes of alloferon 1 with point mutations (H1A) and (H9A) stability structure and biological activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matusiak, Agnieszka; Kuczer, Mariola; Czarniewska, Elżbieta; Rosiński, Grzegorz; Kowalik-Jankowska, Teresa

    2014-09-01

    Mono- and polynuclear copper(II) complexes of the alloferon 1 with point mutations (H1A) A(1)GVSGH(6)GQH(9)GVH(12)G (Allo1A) and (H9A) H(1)GVSGH(6)GQA(9)GVH(12)G (Allo9A) have been studied by potentiometric, UV-visible, CD, EPR spectroscopic and mass spectrometry (MS) methods. To obtain a complete complex speciation different metal-to-ligand molar ratios ranging from 1:1 to 4:1 for Allo1A and to 3:1 for Allo9A were studied. The presence of the His residue in first position of the peptide chain changes the coordination abilities of the Allo9A peptide in comparison to that of the Allo1A. Imidazole-N3 atom of N-terminal His residue of the Allo9A peptide forms stable 6-membered chelate with the terminal amino group. Furthermore, the presence of two additional histidine residues in the Allo9A peptide (H(6),H(12)) leads to the formation of the CuL complex with 4N {NH2,NIm-H(1),NIm-H(6),NIm-H(12)} binding site in wide pH range (5-8). For the Cu(II)-Allo1A system, the results demonstrated that at physiological pH7.4 the predominant complex the CuH-1L consists of the 3N {NH2,N(-),CO,NIm} coordination mode. The inductions of phenoloxidase activity and apoptosis in vivo in Tenebrio molitor cells by the ligands and their copper(II) complexes at pH7.4 were studied. The Allo1A, Allo1K peptides and their copper(II) complexes displayed the lowest hemocytotoxic activity while the most active was the Cu(II)-Allo9A complex formed at pH7.4. The results may suggest that the N-terminal-His(1) and His(6) residues may be more important for their proapoptotic properties in insects than those at positions 9 and 12 in the peptide chain.

  19. A novel mutation (4040-4045 nt. delA in exon 14 of the factor VIII gene causing severe hemophilia A

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    Habib Onsori

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemophilia A is an X-linked congenital bleeding disorder caused by Factor VIII deficiency. Different mutations including point mutations, deletions, insertions and inversions have been reported in the FVIII gene, which cause hemophilia A. In the current study, with the use of conformational sensitive gel electrophoresis (CSGE analysis, we report a novel 1-nt deletion in the A6 sequence at codons 1328-1330 (4040-4045 nt delA occurring in exon 14 of the FVIII gene in a seven-year-old Iranian boy with severe hemophilia A. This mutation that causes frameshift and premature stop-codon at 1331 has not previously been reported in the F8 Hemophilia A Mutation, Structure, Test and Resource Site (HAMSTeRS database.

  20. Factor structure of the Beck Depression Inventory-II among South Africans receiving antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagee, Ashraf; Nel, Adriaan; Saal, Wylene

    2014-02-01

    Considerable evidence suggests that mood disturbance is common among patients living with HIV and may be an important barrier to anti-retroviral therapy (ART) adherence. Thus the assessment of depressed mood is an important and necessary aspect of the experience of persons living with HIV as it may impact the health status of individuals directly and indirectly. We sought to determine the factor structure of the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) among a sample of 185 South Africans living with HIV and receiving ART. The mean BDI score was 16.5 (SD 12.15) with a range from 0-50 (out of a possible 63), indicating on average moderate levels of depression. Cronbach's alpha for the total scale was 0.90. Although the four factors had eigenvalues that were technically above 1.0, only three factors could logically be extracted, the combination of which accounted for 47.29% of the variance. These three factors were Cognitive, Affective and Somatic. The results indicate that the BDI-II is a reliable measure of symptoms of depression among persons living with HIV. The factor structure among South Africans receiving ART is similar to that of other samples, although surprisingly, the item assessing appetite disturbance did not load on any factor. The results of the study suggest that the BDI-II is a useful measure among South Africans living with HIV. In the context of the need to rapidly identify depressed mood among persons receiving ART in public health clinics, the BDI may be a useful instrument. We end the paper with certain cautions associated with routine screening.

  1. Toxicity profile of epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors in patients with epidermal growth factor receptor gene mutation-positive lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Masayuki; Nakagawa, Kazuhiko

    2017-01-01

    Recent progress in the research on the molecular biology of lung cancer revealed that the clinical response to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) is associated with the presence of activating EGFR mutations. Three EGFR-TKIs, namely afatinib, erlotinib and gefitinib, are currently available for the treatment of patients with EGFR mutation-positive non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Due to the dearth of published phase III trials prospectively evaluating the effects of one EGFR-TKI in comparison with another in such patients, the decision-making regarding which agent to recommend to any given patient lies with the treating physician. Given the potential long-term exposure of such patients to EGFR-TKIs, the toxicological properties of these drugs in such patients may differ from those observed in unselected patients. The aim of the present study was to provide an overview of the key adverse events (rash, diarrhea, hepatotoxicity and interstitial lung disease) reported for EGFR-TKIs in clinical trials including patients with advanced NSCLC. PMID:28123721

  2. The Role of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Mutations and Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor-Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors in the Treatment of Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Chieh Chang

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC cases comprise approximately 85% of the lung cancer cases. Before the era of target therapy, platinum-based doublet chemotherapy only led to a median survival of 8–9 months and a one-year survival of 30%–40% in patients with advanced NSCLC. In July 2002, gefitinib, a small-molecule epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitor (EGFR-TKI, was approved for the treatment of patients with advanced NSCLC in Japan. After the widespread use of gefitinib in the treatment of NSCLC, there have been many new studies regarding the association between the clinical anticancer efficacy of gefitinib and the somatic EGFR mutation status in patients with NSCLC. This article summarizes the role of EGFR mutations in lung cancer and the use of EGFR antagonists in the treatment of lung cancer and its associated adverse effects.

  3. The frequency of factor V Leiden and prothrombin G20210A mutations in Slovak and Roma (Gypsy) ethnic group of Eastern Slovakia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bôžiková, Alexandra; Gabriková, Dana; Sovičová, Adriana; Behulová, Regina; Mačeková, Soňa; Boroňová, Iveta; Petrejčíková, Eva; Soták, Miroslav; Bernasovská, Jarmila; Bernasovský, Ivan

    2012-10-01

    Factor V Leiden and prothrombin G20210A are the two most prevalent causes of inherited thrombophilia. The prevalence of these mutations varies widely in healthy Caucasian population. The aim of our study was to determine the frequency of factor V Leiden and prothrombin G20210A mutations in Slovak and Roma ethnic group from Eastern Slovakia. We analyzed 540 asymptomatic individuals (269 individuals of Slovak ethnicity and 271 individuals of Roma ethnicity) by real-time PCR method. The detected allele frequencies were 2.97 versus 6.64 % for factor V Leiden (p = 0.0049), and 0.74 versus 0.92 % for prothrombin mutation (p = 0.7463) in Slovak and Roma population, respectively. The Roma ethnic group had significantly higher prevalence of factor V Leiden mutation when compared to Slovak ethnic group. The allele frequency of factor V Leiden in ethnic Romanies from Eastern Slovakia was one of the highest in Europe. Our results confirm an uneven geographical and ethnic distribution of factor V Leiden.

  4. Identification and characterization of novel parathyroid-specific transcription factor Glial Cells Missing Homolog B (GCMB) mutations in eight families with autosomal recessive hypoparathyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowl, Michael R; Mirczuk, Samantha M; Grigorieva, Irina V; Piret, Sian E; Cranston, Treena; Southam, Lorraine; Allgrove, Jeremy; Bahl, Shailini; Brain, Caroline; Loughlin, John; Mughal, Zulf; Ryan, Fiona; Shaw, Nick; Thakker, Yogini V; Tiosano, Dov; Nesbit, M Andrew; Thakker, Rajesh V

    2010-05-15

    GCMB is a member of the small transcription factor family GCM (glial cells missing), which are important regulators of development, present in vertebrates and some invertebrates. In man, GCMB encodes a 506 amino acid parathyroid gland-specific protein, mutations of which have been reported to cause both autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive hypoparathyroidism. We ascertained 18 affected individuals from 12 families with autosomal recessive hypoparathyroidism and have investigated them for GCMB abnormalities. Four different homozygous germline mutations were identified in eight families that originate from the Indian Subcontinent. These consisted of a novel nonsense mutation R39X; a missense mutation, R47L in two families; a novel missense mutation, R110W; and a novel frameshifting deletion, I298fsX307 in four families. Haplotype analysis, using polymorphic microsatellites from chromosome 6p23-24, revealed that R47L and I298fsX307 mutations arose either as ancient founders, or recurrent de novo mutations. Functional studies including: subcellular localization studies, EMSAs and luciferase-reporter assays, were undertaken and these demonstrated that: the R39X mutant failed to localize to the nucleus; the R47L and R110W mutants both lost DNA-binding ability; and the I298fsX307 mutant had reduced transactivational ability. In order to gain further insights, we undertook 3D-modeling of the GCMB DNA-binding domain, which revealed that the R110 residue is likely important for the structural integrity of helix 2, which forms part of the GCMB/DNA binding interface. Thus, our results, which expand the spectrum of hypoparathyroidism-associated GCMB mutations, help elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying DNA-binding and transactivation that are required for this parathyroid-specific transcription factor.

  5. Factor XII mutations, estrogen-dependent inherited angioedema, and related conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binkley Karen E

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The clinical, biochemical and genetic features of the conditions known as estrogen-dependent inherited angioedema, estrogen-associated angioedema, hereditary angioedema with normal C-1 inhibitor, type III angioedema, or factor XII angioedema are reviewed. Discussion emphasizes pathogenesis, diagnosis, and management.

  6. Factor XII mutations, estrogen-dependent inherited angioedema, and related conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Binkley Karen E

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The clinical, biochemical and genetic features of the conditions known as estrogen-dependent inherited angioedema, estrogen-associated angioedema, hereditary angioedema with normal C-1 inhibitor, type III angioedema, or factor XII angioedema are reviewed. Discussion emphasizes pathogenesis, diagnosis, and management.

  7. Mutational analysis of Glu272 in elongation factor 1A of E. coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mansilla, Francisco; Knudsen, Charlotte Rohde; Clark, Brian F. C.

    1998-01-01

    In our previous work (Mansilla et al. (1997) Protein Eng. 10, 927-934) we showed that Arg7 of Escherichia coli elongation factor Tu (EF1A) plays an essential role in aminoacyl-tRNA (aa-tRNA) binding. Substitution of Arg7 by Ala or Glu lost this activity. We proposed that Arg7 forms a salt bridge...

  8. Mutational analyses of epidermal growth factor receptor and downstream pathways in adrenocortical carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermsen, I.G.; Haak, H.R.; Krijger, R.R. de; Kerkhofs, T.M.; Feelders, R.A.; Herder, W.W. de; Wilmink, H.; Smit, J.W.A.; Gelderblom, H.; Miranda, N.F. de; Eijk, R. van; Wezel, T. van; Morreau, H.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) is a rare disease with a poor prognosis and limited therapeutic options. Mitotane is considered the standard first-line therapy with only 30% of the patients showing objective tumour response. Defining predictive factors for response is therefore of clinica

  9. Homozygous and heterozygous expression of a novel insulin-like growth factor-I mutation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walenkamp, MJE; Karperien, M; Pereira, AM; Hilhorst-Hofstee, Y; van Doorn, J; Chen, JW; Mohan, S; Denley, A; Forbes, B; van Duyvenvoorde, HA; van Thiel, SW; Sluimers, CA; Bax, JJ; de Laat, JAPM; Breuning, MB; Romijn, JA; Wit, JM

    2005-01-01

    IGF-I is a key factor in intrauterine development and postnatal growth and metabolism. The secretion of IGF-I in utero is not dependent on GH, whereas in childhood and adult life, IGF-I secretion seems to be mainly controlled by GH, as revealed from studies on patients with GHRH receptor and GH rece

  10. Mutational analysis of Glu272 in elongation factor 1A of E. coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mansilla, Francisco; Knudsen, Charlotte Rohde; Clark, Brian F. C.

    1998-01-01

    In our previous work (Mansilla et al. (1997) Protein Eng. 10, 927-934) we showed that Arg7 of Escherichia coli elongation factor Tu (EF1A) plays an essential role in aminoacyl-tRNA (aa-tRNA) binding. Substitution of Arg7 by Ala or Glu lost this activity. We proposed that Arg7 forms a salt bridge ...

  11. Medication Adherence and its Related Factors in Patients with Type II Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behzad Gholamaliei

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Low levels of medication adherence in patients with type 2 diabetes is one of the greatest challenges in the treatment and control of diabetes. This study was designed to determine medication adherence and its related factors in patients with type II diabetes. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, a total of 300patients with type 2diabetes records in the health centers of Tuyserkan city were randomly selected in 2015. Data collection instrument was a self-made questionnaire, which consisted of factors related to the medication adherence. Questionnaires were completed after confirmation of validity and reliability, by interviews. To analyze the data, descriptive and inferential statistics (T-test, AnOVA, Simple and multiple linear regression were applied, using SPSS software, version 19. Results: Overall, %26.3 of patients were male and %73.7 were female. Also, %65 of patients were illiterate, %24 had some degree of symptoms, and %59.4 had poor medication adherence. There was a significant relationship between age, education, patient care and treatment expenditure, health care team and health system, therapy-related factors and condition-related factors, beliefs about illness, efficacy, and concerns about drugs and medication adherence (P < 0.05. Conclusions: This study showed that medication adherence in patients with diabetes was not suitable and individual, economical and social factors were influential.Therefore, the role of these factors must be considered when designing intervention programs.

  12. Association of factor V Leiden, Janus kinase 2, prothrombin, and MTHFR mutations with primary Budd-Chiari syndrome in Egyptian patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Sebay, Hatem M; Safan, Manal A; Daoud, Ashraf A; Tayel, Safaa I; Nouh, Mohamed A; El Shafie, Shymaa

    2016-01-01

    Budd-Chiari syndrome (BCS) is defined as obstruction of hepatic venous outflow anywhere from the small hepatic veins to the suprahepatic inferior vena cava. The pathogenesis of BCS is still not fully understood. This study aimed to evaluate the association of factor V Leiden (FVL), Janus kinase 2 (JAK2), prothrombin, and methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) mutations with primary BCS. The study was carried out on 35 patients with primary BCS and 15 age and gender matched healthy individuals as a control group. Genotyping of FVL, prothrombin, and MTHFR mutations was determined by GENEQUALITY AB-THROMBO TYPE kit based on the reverse hybridization principle. JAK2 mutation was determined by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism. There was a statistically significant difference between patients and controls regarding FVL, MTHFR C677T, and MTHFR A1298C mutations with odds ratio of 1.83, 2.0, and 1.79, respectively. Hetero MTHFR C677T, hetero FVL, and hetero MTHFR A1298C were the most common etiological factors being responsible for 57.1, 42.9, and 42.9% of primary BCS cases, respectively. It could be concluded that BCS is a multifactorial disease; in the current study, MTHFR C677T mutation was the most common cause of disease. Identification of one cause of BCS should not eliminate investigations for detection of other etiological factors. © 2015 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  13. Topoisomerase II alpha--a fundamental prognostic factor in breast carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajduk, Magdalena

    2009-01-01

    Because of the introduction of modern diagnostic methods, numerous prognostic and predictive factors have been recognized and are today considered classic, yet they seem to be insufficient in assessment of prognosis, hence the need for further investigations. Among factors newly discovered by molecular techniques, there are class I and II topoisomerases, the role of which as prognosticators has not been fully determined. The objective of the present investigation was the assessment of topoisomerase II alpha (TOP2A) expression in patients with infiltrating breast carcinoma, as a prognostic factor in correlation with other recognized prognosticators and patient survival. The study was carried out in 151 patients treated by mastectomy and lymph node excision followed by adjuvant chemotherapy. The material was evaluated histopathologically according to the pTNM system, taking into consideration such parameters as grade of malignancy (G); the ER, PR as well as HER2 and TOP2A receptors status--all of them were assessed immunohistochemically. TOP2A was expressed with varying intensity in the majority of infiltrating ductal carcinomas studied, more frequently in large T3 and T4, grade G2 and G3 tumours, in patients with extensive metastases to regional N2 and N3 lymph nodes, a positive HER2 and negative ER and PR status. Five-year mortality rates were higher and 5-year symptom-free survival rates were lower in patients with TOP2A-positive tumours as compared to individuals with a negative TOP2A status. The study indicates that TOP2A expression is a negative predictive factor and may be recognized as a prognostic factor.

  14. Prevalence of JAK2V617F mutation in deep venous thrombosis patients and its clinical significance as a thrombophilic risk factor: Indian perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Neha; Sharma, Amit; Sazawal, Sudha; Ahuja, Ankur; Upadhyay, Ashish; Mahapatra, Manoranjan; Saxena, Renu

    2015-09-01

    Venous thromboembolism is known to be a complex interaction of genetic and acquired factors leading to thrombosis. JAK2V617F mutation is believed to contribute to a thrombophilic phenotype, possibly through enhanced leukocyte-platelet interactions in myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs). Several studies have focused on the importance of screening for JAK2V617F mutation in patients with splanchnic venous thrombosis (VT) for the detection of nonovert MPNs. The role of JAK2V617F mutation in VT outside the splanchnic region is still widely unsettled. The primary aim of this study was to find out the prevalence of JAK2V617F mutation in patients with deep venous thrombosis (DVT), its clinical significance as a prothrombotic risk factor, and its possible interactions with other genetic thrombophilic risk factors. A total of 148 patients with idiopathic, symptomatic DVT were evaluated. Median age of presentation was 32 years (range 15-71 years) with a sex ratio of 1.3:1. Overall, the most common genetic prothrombotic factor was factor V Leiden mutation, found in 10.8% (16 of 148) of patients who also showed strong association with increased risk of thrombosis (odds ratio 5.94, confidence interval 1.33-26.4, P = .019). Deficiencies in protein C, protein S, and antithrombin were seen in 8 (5.4%), 10 (6.7%), and 8 (5.4%) patients, respectively. It was observed that the frequency of JAK2V617F mutation was lower in Indian patients, and it also showed weaker association with risk of thrombosis, at least in cases of venous thrombosis outside the splanchnic region.

  15. Enhancement of pulmonary tumour seeding by human coagulation factors II, IX, X--an investigation into the possible mechanisms involved.

    OpenAIRE

    Purushotham, A D; McCulloch, P.; George, W. D.

    1991-01-01

    Warfarin inhibits metastasis in the animal model and injection of the Warfarin-dependent coagulation factor complex II, IX, X enhances pulmonary metastasis in the same model. We have studied two possible mechanisms responsible for the observed effect. Mtln3, rat mammary carcinoma cells, radiolabelled with 5-(125) Iodo-2'-deoxyuridine (IUDR) were injected intravenously in female Fisher 344 rats either alone or in combination with factor complex II, IX, X or bovine serum albumin. Following sacr...

  16. A new compound heterozygous frameshift mutation in the type II 3{beta}-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 3{beta}-HSD gene causes salt-wasting 3{beta}-HSD deficiency congenital adrenal hyperplasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, L.; Sakkal-Alkaddour, S.; Chang, Ying T.; Yang, Xiaojiang; Songya Pang [Univ. of Illinois, Chicago, IL (United States)

    1996-01-01

    We report a new compound heterozygous frameshift mutation in the type II 3{Beta}-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3{beta}-HSD) gene in a Pakistanian female child with the salt-wasting form of 3{Beta}-HSD deficiency congenital adrenal hyperplasia. The etiology for her congenital adrenal hyperplasia was not defined. Although the family history suggested possible 3{beta}-HSd deficiency disorder, suppressed adrenal function caused by excess glucocorticoid therapy in this child at 7 yr of age did not allow hormonal diagnosis. To confirm 3{beta}-HSD deficiency, we sequenced the type II 3{beta}-HSD gene in the patient, her family, and the parents of her deceased paternal cousins. The type II 3{beta}-HSD gene region of a putative promotor, exons I, II, III, and IV, and exon-intron boundaries were amplified by PCR and sequenced in all subjects. The DNA sequence of the child revealed a single nucleotide deletion at codon 318 [ACA(Thr){r_arrow}AA] in exon IV in one allele, and two nucleotide deletions at codon 273 [AAA(Lys){r_arrow}A] in exon IV in the other allele. The remaining gene sequences were normal. The codon 318 mutation was found in one allele from the father, brother, and parents of the deceased paternal cousins. The codon 273 mutation was found in one allele of the mother and a sister. These findings confirmed inherited 3{beta}-HSD deficiency in the child caused by the compound heterozygous type II 3{beta}-HSD gene mutation. Both codons at codons 279 and 367, respectively, are predicted to result in an altered and truncated type II 3{beta}-HSD protein, thereby causing salt-wasting 3{beta}-HSD deficiency in the patient. 21 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Clinicopathological Features and Prognosis of Papillary Thyroid Microcarcinoma for Surgery and Relationships with the BRAFV600E Mutational Status and Expression of Angiogenic Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Chenlei; Guo, Yong; Lv, Yichen; Nanding, Abiyasi; Shi, Tiefeng; Qin, Huadong; He, Jianjun

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the clinicopathological characteristics of papillary thyroid microcarcinoma (PTMC) for surgery by comparing the difference between PTMC and larger papillary thyroid carcinoma (LPTC). Methods We analyzed the differences in the clinicopathological characteristics, prognosis, B-type RAF kinase (BRAF)V600E mutational status and expression of angiogenic factors, including pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF), Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF), and hypoxia-inducible factor alpha subunit (HIF-1α), between PTMC and LPTC by retrospectively reviewing the records of 251 patients with papillary thyroid carcinoma, 169 with PTMC, and 82 with LPTC (diameter >1 cm). Results There were no significant differences in the gender, age, multifocality, Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, TNM stage, PEDF protein expression, rate of recurrence, or mean follow-up duration between patients with PTMC or LPTC. The prevalence of extrathyroidal invasion (EI), lymph node metastasis (LNM), and BRAF mutation in patients with PTMC was significantly lower than in patients with LPTC. In addition, in PTMC patients with EI and/or LNM and/or positive BRAF (high-risk PTMC patients), the prevalence of extrathyroidal invasion, Hashimoto's disease, lymph node metastasis, tumor TNM stage, PEDF positive protein expression, the rate of recurrent disease, and the mRNA expression of anti-angiogenic factors was almost as high as in patients with larger PTC, but with no significant difference. Conclusions Extrathyroid invasion, lymph node metastases, and BRAFV600E mutation were the high risk factors of PTMC. PTMC should be considered for the same treatment strategy as LPTC when any of these factors is found. Particularly, PTMC with BRAFV600E gene mutations needed earlier surgical treatment. In addition, the high cell subtype of PTMC with BRAFV600E gene mutation is recommended for total thyroidectomy in primary surgery to reduce the risk of recurrence. PMID:27936049

  18. Placental insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) and its relation to litter size in the common marmoset monkey (Callithrix jacchus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherford, Julienne N; Eklund, Amy; Tardif, Suzette

    2009-12-01

    The primate placenta produces a wide variety of hormones throughout gestation that regulate placental function and fetal growth. One such hormone is insulin-like growth factor-II (IGF-II), a peptide implicated in cell division, differentiation, and amino acid transport. IGF-II concentrations were measured in 23 common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) term placentas from twin and triplet litters in order to determine whether previously described differences in fetoplacental phenotype such as placental and litter mass and placental surface area were related to differences in endocrine function. IGF-II was extracted from frozen tissue samples and measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit designed for human tissue, which was validated for marmoset placenta. IGF-II concentrations were not related to placental or litter mass, and twin and triplet placentas did not differ in total concentration. However, per individual fetus, triplets were associated with a significant 42% reduction in IGF-II concentration (P = 0.03), and IGF-II concentration per gram of fetal mass was a third lower in triplet litters. The triplet placenta exhibits a global expansion of the surface area which was contrasted by a per unit area reduction in IGF-II concentration (r = -0.75, P = 0.01), a pattern that explains why twin and triplet placentas overall did not differ in concentration. Per fetus, triplet pregnancies are associated with relatively less maternal mass, placental mass and microscopic surface area suggesting that the intrauterine growth of triplets is supported by systems that increase the efficiency of nutrient transfer. The finding that individual triplet fetuses are also associated with significantly lower IGF-II concentrations is consistent with the view that the marmoset fetoplacental unit exhibits a flexible pattern of placental allocation and metabolism. Plasticity in placental endocrine and metabolic function is likely to play an important role in the ability of the

  19. Tumor necrosis factor-α produced in the kidney contributes to angiotensin II-dependent hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiandong; Patel, Mehul B; Griffiths, Robert; Mao, Alice; Song, Young-soo; Karlovich, Norah S; Sparks, Matthew A; Jin, Huixia; Wu, Min; Lin, Eugene E; Crowley, Steven D

    2014-12-01

    Immune system activation contributes to the pathogenesis of hypertension and the resulting progression of chronic kidney disease. In this regard, we recently identified a role for proinflammatory Th1 T-lymphocyte responses in hypertensive kidney injury. Because Th1 cells generate interferon-γ and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), we hypothesized that interferon-γ and TNF-α propagate renal damage during hypertension induced by activation of the renin-angiotensin system. Therefore, after confirming that mice genetically deficient of Th1 immunity were protected from kidney glomerular injury despite a preserved hypertensive response, we subjected mice lacking interferon-γ or TNF-α to our model of hypertensive chronic kidney disease. Interferon deficiency had no impact on blood pressure elevation or urinary albumin excretion during chronic angiotensin II infusion. By contrast, TNF-deficient (knockout) mice had blunted hypertensive responses and reduced end-organ damage in our model. As angiotensin II-infused TNF knockout mice had exaggerated endothelial nitric oxide synthase expression in the kidney and enhanced nitric oxide bioavailability, we examined the actions of TNF-α generated from renal parenchymal cells in hypertension by transplanting wild-type or TNF knockout kidneys into wild-type recipients before the induction of hypertension. Transplant recipients lacking TNF solely in the kidney had blunted hypertensive responses to angiotensin II and augmented renal endothelial nitric oxide synthase expression, confirming a role for kidney-derived TNF-α to promote angiotensin II-induced blood pressure elevation by limiting renal nitric oxide generation.

  20. The Prevalence of Factor V Leiden (G1691A) and Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase C677T Mutations in Sickle Cell Disease in Western India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kangne, Harshada K; Jijina, Farah F; Italia, Yazdi M; Jain, Dipti L; Nadkarni, Anita H; Ghosh, Kanjaksha K; Colah, Roshan B

    2015-03-01

    The prevalence of the Factor V Leiden (FVL; G1691A) mutation and the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR; C677T) mutation was determined in 180 patients with sickle cell (SS) disease (126 sickle homozygous and 54 sickle β-thalassaemia--age 1-47 years) and in 130 healthy controls. The FVL mutation in the heterozygous state was present in only 3 patients with SS disease and was absent in the controls. Genotyping of MTHFR 677C > T revealed increased frequency of the C allele than the T allele in patients as well as in controls. This suggests that these genetic markers may not be major risk factors for a hypercoagulable state in Indian patients with SS disease. © The Author(s) 2013.

  1. Nutritional status in the era of target therapy: poor nutrition is a prognostic factor in non-small cell lung cancer with activating epidermal growth factor receptor mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sehhoon; Park, Seongyeol; Lee, Se-Hoon; Suh, Beomseok; Keam, Bhumsuk; Kim, Tae Min; Kim, Dong-Wan; Kim, Young Whan; Heo, Dae Seog

    2016-11-01

    Pretreatment nutritional status is an important prognostic factor in patients treated with conventional cytotoxic chemotherapy. In the era of target therapies, its value is overlooked and has not been investigated. The aim of our study is to evaluate the value of nutritional status in targeted therapy. A total of 2012 patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) were reviewed and 630 patients with activating epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation treated with EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) were enrolled for the final analysis. Anemia, body mass index (BMI), and prognostic nutritional index (PNI) were considered as nutritional factors. Hazard ratio (HR), progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) for each group were calculated by Cox proportional analysis. In addition, scores were applied for each category and the sum of scores was used for survival analysis. In univariable analysis, anemia (HR, 1.29; p = 0.015), BMI lower than 18.5 (HR, 1.98; p = 0.002), and PNI lower than 45 (HR, 1.57; p nutritional status is a prognostic marker in NSCLC patients treated with EGFR TKI. Hence, baseline nutritional status should be more carefully evaluated and adequate nutrition should be supplied to these patients.

  2. A single mutation in the 15S rRNA gene confers nonsense suppressor activity and interacts with mRF1 the release factor in yeast mitochondria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Gargouri

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available We have determined the nucleotide sequence of the mim3-1 mitochondrial ribosomal suppressor, acting on ochre mitochondrial mutations and one frameshift mutation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The 15s rRNA suppressor gene contains a G633 to C transversion. Yeast mitochondrial G633 corresponds to G517 of the E.coli 15S rRNA, which is occupied by an invariant G in all known small rRNA sequences. Interestingly, this mutation has occurred at the same position as the known MSU1 mitochondrial suppressor which changes G633 to A. The suppressor mutation lies in a highly conserved region of the rRNA, known in E.coli as the 530-loop, interacting with the S4, S5 and S12 ribosomal proteins. We also show an interesting interaction between the mitochondrial mim3-1 and the nuclear nam3-1 suppressors, both of which have the same action spectrum on mitochondrial mutations: nam3-1 abolishes the suppressor effect when present with mim3-1 in the same haploid cell. We discuss these results in the light of the nature of Nam3, identified by [1] as the yeast mitochondrial translation release factor. A hypothetical mechanism of suppression by "ribosome shifting" is also discussed in view of the nature of mutations suppressed and not suppressed.

  3. The human epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR gene in European patients with advanced colorectal cancer harbors infrequent mutations in its tyrosine kinase domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delvenne Philippe

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, a member of the ErbB family of receptors, is a transmembrane tyrosine kinase (TK activated by the binding of extracellular ligands of the EGF-family and involved in triggering the MAPK signaling pathway, which leads to cell proliferation. Mutations in the EGFR tyrosine kinase domain are frequent in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC. However, to date, only very few, mainly non-European, studies have reported rare EGFR mutations in colorectal cancer (CRC. Methods We screened 236 clinical tumor samples from European patients with advanced CRC by direct DNA sequencing to detect potential, as yet unknown mutations, in the EGFR gene exons 18 to 21, mainly covering the EGFR TK catalytic domain. Results EGFR sequences showed somatic missense mutations in exons 18 and 20 at a frequency of 2.1% and 0.4% respectively. Somatic SNPs were also found in exons 20 and 21 at a frequency of about 3.1% and 0.4% respectively. Of these mutations, four have not yet been described elsewhere. Conclusions These mutation frequencies are higher than in a similarly sized population characterized by Barber and colleagues, but still too low to account for a major role played by the EGFR gene in CRC.

  4. Structural and functional insight into TAF1-TAF7, a subcomplex of transcription factor II D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharya, Suparn