WorldWideScience

Sample records for factor family peptides

  1. Quantitative measurements of trefoil factor family peptides: possibilities and pitfalls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Samson, Mie Hessellund

    2013-01-01

    as well as in the circulation. They have been linked to both inflammatory diseases and to various types of cancer, and serum concentrations of TFF3 show a more than 47-fold increase during pregnancy. Several both commercial and in-house immunoassays exist, but a number of methodological issues remain......The trefoil factor family (TFF) peptides TFF1, TFF2, and TFF3 are produced and secreted by mucous membranes throughout the body. Their importance for the protection and repair of epithelial surfaces is well established, and the three peptides are present in various amounts in mucosal secretions...

  2. Natriuretic peptide family as a novel antimigration factor of vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, M; Kohno, M; Yasunari, K; Yokokawa, K; Horio, T; Ueda, M; Morisaki, N; Yoshikawa, J

    1997-04-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC) migration is proposed to be an important process in the initiation and/or progression of atherosclerosis. The present study examined the effects of the natriuretic peptide family (atrial, brain, and C-type natriuretic peptides; ANP, BNP, and CNP) on the migration of cultured rat SMCs, using Boyden's chamber methods. Fetal calf serum (FCS) and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB potently stimulated SMC migration. Rat ANP(1-28), rat BNP-45, and rat CNP-22 clearly inhibited SMC migration stimulated with FCS or PDGF-BB in a concentration-dependent manner. CNP-22 had the most potent inhibitory effect compared with other natriuretic peptides. When PDGF-BB-induced migration was separated into chemotactic and chemokinetic activities, the chemotactic component was strongly inhibited by these natriuretic peptides. Such inhibition by these natriuretic peptides was paralleled by an increase in the cellular level of cyclic GMP. The addition of a cyclic GMP analogue, 8-bromo cyclic GMP, and an activator of the cytosolic guanylate cyclase, sodium nitroprusside, significantly inhibited FCS- and PDGF-BB-stimulated migration in a concentration-dependent manner. These results suggest that natriuretic peptides, especially CNP-22, inhibit FCS- or PDGF-BB-stimulated SMC migration at least in part through a cyclic GMP-dependent process. Thus, the natriuretic peptide family may play a role as an antimigration factor of SMCs under certain circumstances.

  3. Trefoil factor family peptides in the human foetus and at birth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Samson, Mie H; Poulsen, Steen S; Obeid, Rima;

    2011-01-01

    Eur J Clin Invest 2011; 41 (7): 785-792 ABSTRACT: Background Trefoil factors (TFF1-3) are cysteine-rich peptides secreted by mucosal surfaces. Changing levels of expression are reflected in serum concentrations. Serum levels of TFF2 and TFF3 are highly elevated during pregnancy. Here, we explore...... a possible foetal origin of these increased levels. Materials and methods We examined the expression of trefoil peptides in foetal tissues, placentas and foetal membranes from midterm abortions by immunohistochemistry. Employing in-house ELISAs, serum concentrations of TFF1-3 were measured in 92 paired...... samples of cord and maternal blood prior to delivery. Size exclusion chromatography was used to investigate the molecular forms of TFF1-3. Results Immunohistochemistry showed all trefoil peptides to be present during foetal life, but compared to adults with a more widespread expression of TFF2 and TFF3...

  4. Forced Trefoil Factor Family Peptide 3 (TFF3) Expression Reduces Growth, Viability, and Tumorigenicity of Human Retinoblastoma Cell Lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Große-Kreul, Jan; Busch, Maike; Winter, Claudia; Pikos, Stefanie; Stephan, Harald; Dünker, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Trefoil factor family (TFF) peptides have been shown to effect cell proliferation, apoptosis, migration and invasion of normal cells and various cancer cell lines. In the literature TFF peptides are controversially discussed as tumor suppressors and potential tumor progression factors. In the study presented, we investigated the effect of TFF3 overexpression on growth, viability, migration and tumorigenicity of the human retinoblastoma cell lines Y-79, WERI-Rb1, RBL-13 and RBL-15. As revealed by WST-1 and TUNEL assays as well as DAPI and BrdU cell counts, recombinant human TFF3 significantly lowers retinoblastoma cell viability and increases apoptosis levels. Transient TFF3 overexpression likewise significantly increases RB cell apoptosis. Stable, lentiviral TFF3 overexpression lowers retinoblastoma cell viability, proliferation and growth and significantly increases cell death in retinoblastoma cells. Blockage experiments using a broad-spectrum caspase inhibitor and capase-3 immunocytochemistry revealed the involvement of caspases in general and of caspase-3 in particular in TFF3 induced apoptosis in retinoblastoma cell lines. Soft agarose and in ovo chicken chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assays revealed that TFF3 overexpression influences anchorage independent growth and significantly decreases the size of tumors forming from retinoblastoma cells. Our study demonstrates that forced TFF3 expression exerts a significant pro-apoptotic, anti-proliferative, and tumor suppressive effect in retinoblastoma cells, setting a starting point for new additive chemotherapeutic approaches in the treatment of retinoblastoma.

  5. Forced Trefoil Factor Family Peptide 3 (TFF3) Expression Reduces Growth, Viability, and Tumorigenicity of Human Retinoblastoma Cell Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Claudia; Pikos, Stefanie; Stephan, Harald; Dünker, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Trefoil factor family (TFF) peptides have been shown to effect cell proliferation, apoptosis, migration and invasion of normal cells and various cancer cell lines. In the literature TFF peptides are controversially discussed as tumor suppressors and potential tumor progression factors. In the study presented, we investigated the effect of TFF3 overexpression on growth, viability, migration and tumorigenicity of the human retinoblastoma cell lines Y-79, WERI-Rb1, RBL-13 and RBL-15. As revealed by WST-1 and TUNEL assays as well as DAPI and BrdU cell counts, recombinant human TFF3 significantly lowers retinoblastoma cell viability and increases apoptosis levels. Transient TFF3 overexpression likewise significantly increases RB cell apoptosis. Stable, lentiviral TFF3 overexpression lowers retinoblastoma cell viability, proliferation and growth and significantly increases cell death in retinoblastoma cells. Blockage experiments using a broad-spectrum caspase inhibitor and capase-3 immunocytochemistry revealed the involvement of caspases in general and of caspase-3 in particular in TFF3 induced apoptosis in retinoblastoma cell lines. Soft agarose and in ovo chicken chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assays revealed that TFF3 overexpression influences anchorage independent growth and significantly decreases the size of tumors forming from retinoblastoma cells. Our study demonstrates that forced TFF3 expression exerts a significant pro-apoptotic, anti-proliferative, and tumor suppressive effect in retinoblastoma cells, setting a starting point for new additive chemotherapeutic approaches in the treatment of retinoblastoma. PMID:27626280

  6. Ghrelin family of peptides and gut motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asakawa, Akihiro; Ataka, Koji; Fujino, Kazunori; Chen, Chih-Yen; Kato, Ikuo; Fujimiya, Mineko; Inui, Akio

    2011-04-01

    Acyl ghrelin, des-acyl ghrelin, and obestatin are three peptides isolated from the gastrointestinal tract and encoded by the same preproghrelin gene. Three ghrelin gene products participate in modulating appetite, adipogenesis, glucose metabolism, cell proliferation, immune, sleep, memory, anxiety, cognition, and stress. We have investigated the effects of ghrelin family of peptides on fed and fasted motor activities in the stomach and duodenum of freely moving conscious rats by manometric method. Intracerebroventricular (ICV) and intravenous (IV) administration of acyl ghrelin induced fasted motor activity in the duodenum in fed rats. ICV and IV administration of des-acyl ghrelin disrupted fasted motor activity in the antrum. Changes in gastric motility induced by IV administration of des-acyl ghrelin were antagonized by ICV administration of a corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) 2 receptor antagonist. IV administration of obestatin decreased the percentage motor index in the antrum and prolonged the time taken to return to fasted motility in the duodenum in fed rats. ICV administration of CRF 1 and 2 receptor antagonists prevented the effects of obestatin on gastroduodenal motility. Ghrelin gene products regulate feeding-associated gastroduodenal motility. Stomach may regulate various functions including gastrointestinal motility via acyl ghrelin, des-acyl ghrelin and obestatin as an endocrine organ. Increasing knowledge of the effects of ghrelin family of peptides on gastrointestinal motility could lead to innovative new therapies for functional gastrointestinal disorders.

  7. The gene encoding human intestinal trefoil factor (TFF3) is located on chromosome 21q22.3 clustered with other members of the trefoil peptide family

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chinery, R. [Royal College of Surgeons of England, London (United Kingdom); Williamson, J.; Poulsom, R. [Imperial Cancer Research Fund, London (United Kingdom)

    1996-03-01

    The gene coding for human intestinal trefoil factor (hITF), a recently described cellular motogen produced by gastrointestinal goblet cells and epithelia elsewhere, is a member of the rapidly growing trefoil peptide family. In a rodent-human somatic cell hybrid panel, the hITF (HGMW-approved symbol TFF3) genomic locus segregated with human chromosome 21q. Fluorescence in situ hybridization with a 2.1-kb genomic probe of the hITF gene mapped this locus more precisely to the q22.3 region. Triple fluorescence in situ hybridization, together with physical mapping of human genomic DNA using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, revealed that the hITF gene is tightly linked to those encoding the other known human trefoil peptides, namely the breast cancer estrogen-inducable gene pS2 (BCEI) and human spasmolytic polypeptide (hSP/SML1). This gene family could become a useful marker for the genetic and physical mapping of chromosome 21 and for a better definition of the region involved in the clinical phenotype of several genetic diseases. 17 refs., 2 figs.

  8. Distinct Profiling of Antimicrobial Peptide Families

    KAUST Repository

    Khamis, Abdullah M.

    2014-11-10

    Motivation: The increased prevalence of multi-drug resistant (MDR) pathogens heightens the need to design new antimicrobial agents. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) exhibit broad-spectrum potent activity against MDR pathogens and kills rapidly, thus giving rise to AMPs being recognized as a potential substitute for conventional antibiotics. Designing new AMPs using current in-silico approaches is, however, challenging due to the absence of suitable models, large number of design parameters, testing cycles, production time and cost. To date, AMPs have merely been categorized into families according to their primary sequences, structures and functions. The ability to computationally determine the properties that discriminate AMP families from each other could help in exploring the key characteristics of these families and facilitate the in-silico design of synthetic AMPs. Results: Here we studied 14 AMP families and sub-families. We selected a specific description of AMP amino acid sequence and identified compositional and physicochemical properties of amino acids that accurately distinguish each AMP family from all other AMPs with an average sensitivity, specificity and precision of 92.88%, 99.86% and 95.96%, respectively. Many of our identified discriminative properties have been shown to be compositional or functional characteristics of the corresponding AMP family in literature. We suggest that these properties could serve as guides for in-silico methods in design of novel synthetic AMPs. The methodology we developed is generic and has a potential to be applied for characterization of any protein family.

  9. Family Factors in Small Family Business Growth

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jim Cater; Marilyn Young

    2016-01-01

    .... We suggest that while all three patterns of small family business growth may lead to individual company success and sustainability, businesses with units in multiple trade areas may be most adept at managing the six family factors.

  10. Short Exogenous Peptides Regulate Expression of CLE, KNOX1, and GRF Family Genes in Nicotiana tabacum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedoreyeva, L I; Dilovarova, T A; Ashapkin, V V; Martirosyan, Yu Ts; Khavinson, V Kh; Kharchenko, P N; Vanyushin, B F

    2017-04-01

    Exogenous short biologically active peptides epitalon (Ala-Glu-Asp-Gly), bronchogen (Ala-Glu-Asp-Leu), and vilon (Lys-Glu) at concentrations 10(-7)-10(-9) M significantly influence growth, development, and differentiation of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) callus cultures. Epitalon and bronchogen, in particular, both increase growth of calluses and stimulate formation and growth of leaves in plant regenerants. Because the regulatory activity of the short peptides appears at low peptide concentrations, their action to some extent is like that of the activity of phytohormones, and it seems to have signaling character and epigenetic nature. The investigated peptides modulate in tobacco cells the expression of genes including genes responsible for tissue formation and cell differentiation. These peptides differently modulate expression of CLE family genes coding for known endogenous regulatory peptides, the KNOX1 genes (transcription factor genes) and GRF (growth regulatory factor) genes coding for respective DNA-binding proteins such as topoisomerases, nucleases, and others. Thus, at the level of transcription, plants have a system of short peptide regulation of formation of long-known peptide regulators of growth and development. The peptides studied here may be related to a new generation of plant growth regulators. They can be used in the experimental botany, plant molecular biology, biotechnology, and practical agronomy.

  11. Familial risk factors in autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brimacombe, Michael; Xue Ming; Parikh, Amisha

    2007-05-01

    Familial history risk factors in relation to autism were examined in a cohort of 164 autistic children referred to The Autism Center at New Jersey Medical School-University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Newark, over a 2-year period (2001-2003). Information related to familial history was obtained from each family and reviewed by a clinician. It is shown that these families carry a higher overall burden of psychiatric and developmental illnesses compared to reported national levels. These families also carry a relatively high incidence of medical disorders, independently of developmental and psychiatric disorders. This work supports the underlying presence of genetic factors in the etiology of autism.

  12. Bioinformatic analysis of the CLE signaling peptide family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiller Georg F

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plants encode a large number of leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinases. Legumes encode several LRR-RLK linked to the process of root nodule formation, the ligands of which are unknown. To identify ligands for these receptors, we used a combination of profile hidden Markov models and position-specific iterative BLAST, allowing us to detect new members of the CLV3/ESR (CLE protein family from publicly available sequence databases. Results We identified 114 new members of the CLE protein family from various plant species, as well as five protein sequences containing multiple CLE domains. We were able to cluster the CLE domain proteins into 13 distinct groups based on their pairwise similarities in the primary CLE motif. In addition, we identified secondary motifs that coincide with our sequence clusters. The groupings based on the CLE motifs correlate with known biological functions of CLE signaling peptides and are analogous to groupings based on phylogenetic analysis and ectopic overexpression studies. We tested the biological function of two of the predicted CLE signaling peptides in the legume Medicago truncatula. These peptides inhibit the activity of the root apical and lateral root meristems in a manner consistent with our functional predictions based on other CLE signaling peptides clustering in the same groups. Conclusion Our analysis provides an identification and classification of a large number of novel potential CLE signaling peptides. The additional motifs we found could lead to future discovery of recognition sites for processing peptidases as well as predictions for receptor binding specificity.

  13. FAMILY OF FLP PEPTIDES IN CAENORHABDITIS ELEGANS AND RELATED NEMATODES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris eLi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Neuropeptides regulate all aspects of behavior in multicellular organisms. Because of their ability to act at long distances, neuropeptides can exert their effects beyond the conventional synaptic connections, thereby adding an intricate layer of complexity to the activity of neural networks. In the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, a large number of neuropeptide genes that are expressed throughout the nervous system has been identified. The actions of these peptides supplement the synaptic connections of the 302 neurons, allowing for fine tuning of neural networks and increasing the ways in which behaviors can be regulated. In this review, we focus on a large family of genes encoding FMRFamide-related peptides. These genes, the flp genes, have been used as a starting point to identifying flp genes throughout Nematoda. Nematodes have the largest family of FMRFamide-related peptides described thus far. The challenges in the future are the elucidation of their functions and the identification of the receptors and signaling pathways through which they function.

  14. The serendipitous origin of chordate secretin peptide family members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, João C R; Vieira, Florbela A; Gomes, Ana S; Power, Deborah M

    2010-05-06

    The secretin family is a pleotropic group of brain-gut peptides with affinity for class 2 G-protein coupled receptors (secretin family GPCRs) proposed to have emerged early in the metazoan radiation via gene or genome duplications. In human, 10 members exist and sequence and functional homologues and ligand-receptor pairs have been characterised in representatives of most vertebrate classes. Secretin-like family GPCR homologues have also been isolated in non-vertebrate genomes however their corresponding ligands have not been convincingly identified and their evolution remains enigmatic. In silico sequence comparisons failed to retrieve a non-vertebrate (porifera, cnidaria, protostome and early deuterostome) secretin family homologue. In contrast, secretin family members were identified in lamprey, several teleosts and tetrapods and comparative studies revealed that sequence and structure is in general maintained. Sequence comparisons and phylogenetic analysis revealed that PACAP, VIP and GCG are the most highly conserved members and two major peptide subfamilies exist; i) PACAP-like which includes PACAP, PRP, VIP, PH, GHRH, SCT and ii) GCG-like which includes GCG, GLP1, GLP2 and GIP. Conserved regions flanking secretin family members were established by comparative analysis of the Takifugu, Xenopus, chicken and human genomes and gene homologues were identified in nematode, Drosophila and Ciona genomes but no gene linkage occurred. However, in Drosophila and nematode genes which flank vertebrate secretin family members were identified in the same chromosome. Receptors of the secretin-like family GPCRs are present in protostomes but no sequence homologues of the vertebrate cognate ligands have been identified. It has not been possible to determine when the ligands evolved but it seems likely that it was after the protostome-deuterostome divergence from an exon that was part of an existing gene or gene fragment by rounds of gene/genome duplication. The duplicate exon

  15. The serendipitous origin of chordate secretin peptide family members

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gomes Ana S

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The secretin family is a pleotropic group of brain-gut peptides with affinity for class 2 G-protein coupled receptors (secretin family GPCRs proposed to have emerged early in the metazoan radiation via gene or genome duplications. In human, 10 members exist and sequence and functional homologues and ligand-receptor pairs have been characterised in representatives of most vertebrate classes. Secretin-like family GPCR homologues have also been isolated in non-vertebrate genomes however their corresponding ligands have not been convincingly identified and their evolution remains enigmatic. Results In silico sequence comparisons failed to retrieve a non-vertebrate (porifera, cnidaria, protostome and early deuterostome secretin family homologue. In contrast, secretin family members were identified in lamprey, several teleosts and tetrapods and comparative studies revealed that sequence and structure is in general maintained. Sequence comparisons and phylogenetic analysis revealed that PACAP, VIP and GCG are the most highly conserved members and two major peptide subfamilies exist; i PACAP-like which includes PACAP, PRP, VIP, PH, GHRH, SCT and ii GCG-like which includes GCG, GLP1, GLP2 and GIP. Conserved regions flanking secretin family members were established by comparative analysis of the Takifugu, Xenopus, chicken and human genomes and gene homologues were identified in nematode, Drosophila and Ciona genomes but no gene linkage occurred. However, in Drosophila and nematode genes which flank vertebrate secretin family members were identified in the same chromosome. Conclusions Receptors of the secretin-like family GPCRs are present in protostomes but no sequence homologues of the vertebrate cognate ligands have been identified. It has not been possible to determine when the ligands evolved but it seems likely that it was after the protostome-deuterostome divergence from an exon that was part of an existing gene or gene fragment

  16. Natriuretic Peptides, Diagnostic and Prognostic Biomarkers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.H.W. Rutten (Joost)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractIn humans, the natriuretic peptide family consists of three different types of peptides: atrial natriuretic peptide (synonym: atrial natriuretic factor), B-type natriuretic peptide (synonym: brain natriuretic peptide) and C-natriuretic peptide.1 Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) was the f

  17. A new family of cystine knot peptides from the seeds of Momordica cochinchinensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Lai Yue; He, Wenjun; Tan, Ninghua; Zeng, Guangzhi; Craik, David J; Daly, Norelle L

    2013-01-01

    Momordica cochinchinensis, a Cucurbitaceae plant commonly found in Southeast Asia, has the unusual property of containing both acyclic and backbone-cyclized trypsin inhibitors with inhibitor cystine knot (ICK) motifs. In the current study we have shown that M. cochinchinensis also contains another family of acyclic ICK peptides. We recently reported two novel peptides from M. cochinchinensis but have now discovered four additional peptides (MCo-3-MCo-6) with related sequences. Together these peptides form a novel family of M. cochinchinensis ICK peptides (MCo-ICK) that do not have sequence homology with other known peptides and are not potent trypsin inhibitors. Otherwise these new peptides MCo-3 to MCo-6 were evaluated for antimalarial activity against Plasmodium falciparum, and cytotoxic activity against the cancer cell line MDA-MB-231. But these peptides were not active. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Natriuretic Peptides, Diagnostic and Prognostic Biomarkers

    OpenAIRE

    Rutten, Joost

    2010-01-01

    textabstractIn humans, the natriuretic peptide family consists of three different types of peptides: atrial natriuretic peptide (synonym: atrial natriuretic factor), B-type natriuretic peptide (synonym: brain natriuretic peptide) and C-natriuretic peptide.1 Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) was the fi rst natriuretic peptide to be discovered and in humans ANP is predominantly formed in the cardiomyocytes of the atria.2 B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) was fi rst discovered in porcine brain hen...

  19. Effect of the endothelin family of peptides on human coronary artery smooth-muscle cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohno, M; Yokokawa, K; Yasunari, K; Kano, H; Minami, M; Yoshikawa, J

    1998-01-01

    The migration of coronary artery medial smooth-muscle cells (SMCs) is one of the key events in the process of intimal thickening in coronary atherosclerotic lesions. The objectives of the present study were to determine whether any of the three isoforms of endothelin (ET), ET-1, ET-2, and ET-3, or an intermediate form of ET, big ET-1, induces migration of human coronary artery SMCs, and to investigate the possible interaction of ET peptides and well-known migration-stimulatory factors, platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB and angiotensin II (Ang II), on SMC migration by the Boyden's chamber method. None of the ET peptides alone induced SMC migration between 10(-9) and 10(-7) mol/L. In contrast, ET-1 and ET-2 significantly induced SMC migration in the presence of low concentrations of PDGF-BB (0.5 ng/mL) or Ang II (10(-9) mol/L), although ET-3 was less active (ET-1 = ET-2 > ET-3). In contrast, big ET-1 was without significant activity on PDGF-BB-or Ang II-induced SMC migration. The potentiation of SMC migration by ET peptides was clearly inhibited by the ETA receptor antagonist BG-123 in a concentration-dependent manner. These results suggest that the ET family of peptides, especially ET-1 and ET-2, can induce human coronary artery SMC migration in combination with PDGF-BB or Ang II, probably via ETA receptors. Taken together with the finding that the concentrations of ET, PDGF-BB and Ang II are locally increased at sites of endothelial injury, this indicates that ET may be an initial stimulus for human coronary artery medial SMC recruitment during coronary atherosclerosis, possibly in combination with PDGF-BB or Ang II.

  20. Workplace Factors Associated with Family Dinner Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Tammy D.; Shockley, Kristen M.; Poteat, Laura F.

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated relationships between workplace factors and family dinners. We examined two aspects of the family dinner, the frequency that the entire family typically has dinner together each week and the frequency that children eat fast food for dinner. Participants were 220 parents who worked at least 20 h a week and had at least one…

  1. Trigger factors for familial hemiplegic migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jakob Møller; Hauge, Anne Werner; Ashina, Messoud

    2011-01-01

    The aim was to identify and describe migraine trigger factors in patients with familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM) from a population-based sample.......The aim was to identify and describe migraine trigger factors in patients with familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM) from a population-based sample....

  2. Trigger factors for familial hemiplegic migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jakob Møller; Hauge, Anne Werner; Ashina, Messoud

    2011-01-01

    The aim was to identify and describe migraine trigger factors in patients with familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM) from a population-based sample.......The aim was to identify and describe migraine trigger factors in patients with familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM) from a population-based sample....

  3. Fungal phytopathogens encode functional homologues of plant rapid alkalinization factor (RALF) peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thynne, Elisha; Saur, Isabel M L; Simbaqueba, Jaime; Ogilvie, Huw A; Gonzalez-Cendales, Yvonne; Mead, Oliver; Taranto, Adam; Catanzariti, Ann-Maree; McDonald, Megan C; Schwessinger, Benjamin; Jones, David A; Rathjen, John P; Solomon, Peter S

    2016-06-13

    In this article, we describe the presence of genes encoding close homologues of an endogenous plant peptide, rapid alkalinization factor (RALF), within the genomes of 26 species of phytopathogenic fungi. Members of the RALF family are key growth factors in plants, and the sequence of the RALF active region is well conserved between plant and fungal proteins. RALF1-like sequences were observed in most cases; however, RALF27-like sequences were present in the Sphaerulina musiva and Septoria populicola genomes. These two species are pathogens of poplar and, interestingly, the closest relative to their respective RALF genes is a poplar RALF27-like sequence. RALF peptides control cellular expansion during plant development, but were originally defined on the basis of their ability to induce rapid alkalinization in tobacco cell cultures. To test whether the fungal RALF peptides were biologically active in plants, we synthesized RALF peptides corresponding to those encoded by two sequenced genomes of the tomato pathogen Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici. One of these peptides inhibited the growth of tomato seedlings and elicited responses in tomato and Nicotiana benthamiana typical of endogenous plant RALF peptides (reactive oxygen species burst, induced alkalinization and mitogen-activated protein kinase activation). Gene expression analysis confirmed that a RALF-encoding gene in F. oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici was expressed during infection on tomato. However, a subsequent reverse genetics approach revealed that the RALF peptide was not required by F. oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici for infection on tomato roots. This study has demonstrated the presence of functionally active RALF peptides encoded within phytopathogens that harbour an as yet undetermined role in plant-pathogen interactions.

  4. Genome mining expands the chemical diversity of the cyanobactin family to include highly modified linear peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leikoski, Niina; Liu, Liwei; Jokela, Jouni; Wahlsten, Matti; Gugger, Muriel; Calteau, Alexandra; Permi, Perttu; Kerfeld, Cheryl A; Sivonen, Kaarina; Fewer, David P

    2013-08-22

    Ribosomal peptides are produced through the posttranslational modification of short precursor peptides. Cyanobactins are a growing family of cyclic ribosomal peptides produced by cyanobacteria. However, a broad systematic survey of the genetic capacity to produce cyanobactins is lacking. Here we report the identification of 31 cyanobactin gene clusters from 126 genomes of cyanobacteria. Genome mining suggested a complex evolutionary history defined by horizontal gene transfer and rapid diversification of precursor genes. Extensive chemical analyses demonstrated that some cyanobacteria produce short linear cyanobactins with a chain length ranging from three to five amino acids. The linear peptides were N-prenylated and O-methylated on the N and C termini, respectively, and named aeruginosamide and viridisamide. These findings broaden the structural diversity of the cyanobactin family to include highly modified linear peptides with rare posttranslational modifications.

  5. A unified nomenclature of NITRATE TRANSPORTER 1/PEPTIDE TRANSPORTER family members in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Léran, Sophie; Varala, Kranthi; Boyer, Jean-Christophe; Chiurazzi, Maurizio; Crawford, Nigel; Daniel-Vedele, Françoise; David, Laure; Dickstein, Rebecca; Fernandez, Emilio; Forde, Brian; Gassmann, Walter; Geiger, Dietmar; Gojon, Alain; Gong, Ji-Ming; Halkier, Barbara A; Harris, Jeanne M; Hedrich, Rainer; Limami, Anis M; Rentsch, Doris; Seo, Mitsunori; Tsay, Yi-Fang; Zhang, Mingyong; Coruzzi, Gloria; Lacombe, Benoît

    2014-01-01

    Members of the plant NITRATE TRANSPORTER 1/PEPTIDE TRANSPORTER (NRT1/PTR) family display protein sequence homology with the SLC15/PepT/PTR/POT family of peptide transporters in animals. In comparison to their animal and bacterial counterparts, these plant proteins transport a wide variety of substrates: nitrate, peptides, amino acids, dicarboxylates, glucosinolates, IAA, and ABA. The phylogenetic relationship of the members of the NRT1/PTR family in 31 fully sequenced plant genomes allowed the identification of unambiguous clades, defining eight subfamilies. The phylogenetic tree was used to determine a unified nomenclature of this family named NPF, for NRT1/PTR FAMILY. We propose that the members should be named accordingly: NPFX.Y, where X denotes the subfamily and Y the individual member within the species. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Familial risk factors favoring drug addiction onset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimić, Jadranka Ivandić; Jukić, Vlado

    2012-01-01

    This study, primarily aimed at identification of familial risk factors favoring drug addiction onset, was carried out throughout 2008 and 2009. The study comprised a total of 146 addicts and 134 control subjects. Based on the study outcome, it can be concluded that in the families the addicts were born into, familial risk factors capable of influencing their psychosocial development and favoring drug addiction onset had been statistically more frequently encountered during childhood and adolescence as compared to the controls. The results also indicated the need for further research into familial interrelations and the structure of the families addicts were born into, as well as the need for the implementation of family-based approaches to both drug addiction prevention and therapy.

  7. Molecular Structure and Diversity of PBAN/pyrokinin Family Peptides in Ants

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Man-Yeon; Vander Meer, Robert K.

    2012-01-01

    Neuropeptides are the largest group of insect hormones. They are produced in the central and peripheral nervous systems and affect insect development, reproduction, feeding, and behavior. A variety of neuropeptide families have been identified in insects. One of these families is the PBAN/pyrokinin family defined by a common FXPRLamide or similar amino acid fragment at the C-terminal end. These peptides, found in all insects studied thus far, have been conserved throughout evolution. The most...

  8. Molecular structure and diversity of PBAN/Pyrokinin family peptides in ants

    OpenAIRE

    Man-Yeon eChoi; Vander Meer, Robert K.

    2012-01-01

    Neuropeptides are the largest group of insect hormones. They are produced in the central and peripheral nervous systems and affect insect development, reproduction, feeding and behavior. A variety of neuropeptide families have been identified in insects. One of these families is the PBAN/pyrokinin family defined by a common FXPRLamide or similar amino acid fragment at the C-terminal end. These peptides, found in all insects studied thus far, have been conserved throughout evolution. The most ...

  9. Familial psychological factors are associated with encopresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akdemir, Devrim; Çengel Kültür, S Ebru; Saltık Temizel, İnci Nur; Zeki, Ayşe; Şenses Dinç, Gülser

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess maternal psychiatric symptoms, family functioning and parenting styles in children with encopresis. Forty-one children with encopresis were compared to 29 children without any psychiatric disorder. Higher maternal psychiatric symptoms were found in children with encopresis. The general family functioning and strictness/supervision in parenting were significant predictors of encopresis. Family functioning may be screened in children with encopresis, especially when standard interventions have had limited success. Identification and treatment of familial factors may enhance the treatment efficacy in encopresis. © 2014 Japan Pediatric Society.

  10. Buckwheat trypsin inhibitor with helical hairpin structure belongs to a new family of plant defence peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oparin, Peter B; Mineev, Konstantin S; Dunaevsky, Yakov E; Arseniev, Alexander S; Belozersky, Mikhail A; Grishin, Eugene V; Egorov, Tsezi A; Vassilevski, Alexander A

    2012-08-15

    A new peptide trypsin inhibitor named BWI-2c was obtained from buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum) seeds by sequential affinity, ion exchange and reversed-phase chromatography. The peptide was sequenced and found to contain 41 amino acid residues, with four cysteine residues involved in two intramolecular disulfide bonds. Recombinant BWI-2c identical to the natural peptide was produced in Escherichia coli in a form of a cleavable fusion with thioredoxin. The 3D (three-dimensional) structure of the peptide in solution was determined by NMR spectroscopy, revealing two antiparallel α-helices stapled by disulfide bonds. Together with VhTI, a trypsin inhibitor from veronica (Veronica hederifolia), BWI-2c represents a new family of protease inhibitors with an unusual α-helical hairpin fold. The linker sequence between the helices represents the so-called trypsin inhibitory loop responsible for direct binding to the active site of the enzyme that cleaves BWI-2c at the functionally important residue Arg(19). The inhibition constant was determined for BWI-2c against trypsin (1.7×10(-1)0 M), and the peptide was tested on other enzymes, including those from various insect digestive systems, revealing high selectivity to trypsin-like proteases. Structural similarity shared by BWI-2c, VhTI and several other plant defence peptides leads to the acknowledgement of a new widespread family of plant peptides termed α-hairpinins.

  11. Family Factors Predicting Categories of Suicide Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randell, Brooke P.; Wang, Wen-Ling; Herting, Jerald R.; Eggert, Leona L.

    2006-01-01

    We compared family risk and protective factors among potential high school dropouts with and without suicide-risk behaviors (SRB) and examined the extent to which these factors predict categories of SRB. Subjects were randomly selected from among potential dropouts in 14 high schools. Based upon suicide-risk status, 1,083 potential high school…

  12. Competitive inhibition of transcription factors by small interfering peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Pil Joon; Hong, Shin-Young; Kim, Sang-Gyu; Park, Chung-Mo

    2011-10-01

    Combinatorial assortment by dynamic dimer formation diversifies gene transcriptional specificities of transcription factors. A similar but biochemically distinct mechanism is competitive inhibition in which small proteins act as negative regulators by competitively forming nonfunctional heterodimers with specific transcription factors. The most extensively studied is the negative regulation of auxin response factors by AUXIN/INDOLE-3-ACETIC ACID repressors. Similarly, Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) little zipper and mini finger proteins act as competitive inhibitors of target transcription factors. Competitive inhibitors are also generated by alternative splicing and controlled proteolytic processing. Because they provide a way of attenuating transcription factors we propose to call them small interfering peptides (siPEPs). The siPEP-mediated strategy could be applied to deactivate specific transcription factors in crop plants.

  13. Dbl family guanine nucleotide exchange factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Y

    2001-12-01

    The Dbl family of guanine nucleotide exchange factors are multifunctional molecules that transduce diverse intracellular signals leading to the activation of Rho GTPases. The tandem Dbl-homology and pleckstrin-homology domains shared by all members of this family represent the structural module responsible for catalyzing the GDP-GTP exchange reaction of Rho proteins. Recent progress in genomic, genetic, structural and biochemical studies has implicated Dbl family members in diverse biological processes, including growth and development, skeletal muscle formation, neuronal axon guidance and tissue organization. The detailed pictures of their autoregulation, agonist-controlled activation and mechanism of interaction with Rho GTPase substrates, have begun to emerge.

  14. Gene structure, transcripts and calciotropic effects of the PTH family of peptides in Xenopus and chicken

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Power Deborah M

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Parathyroid hormone (PTH and PTH-related peptide (PTHrP belong to a family of endocrine factors that share a highly conserved N-terminal region (amino acids 1-34 and play key roles in calcium homeostasis, bone formation and skeletal development. Recently, PTH-like peptide (PTH-L was identified in teleost fish raising questions about the evolution of these proteins. Although PTH and PTHrP have been intensively studied in mammals their function in other vertebrates is poorly documented. Amphibians and birds occupy unique phylogenetic positions, the former at the transition of aquatic to terrestrial life and the latter at the transition to homeothermy. Moreover, both organisms have characteristics indicative of a complex system in calcium regulation. This study investigated PTH family evolution in vertebrates with special emphasis on Xenopus and chicken. Results The PTH-L gene is present throughout the vertebrates with the exception of placental mammals. Gene structure of PTH and PTH-L seems to be conserved in vertebrates while PTHrP gene structure is divergent and has acquired new exons and alternative promoters. Splice variants of PTHrP and PTH-L are common in Xenopus and chicken and transcripts of the former have a widespread tissue distribution, although PTH-L is more restricted. PTH is widely expressed in fish tissue but from Xenopus to mammals becomes largely restricted to the parathyroid gland. The N-terminal (1-34 region of PTH, PTHrP and PTH-L in Xenopus and chicken share high sequence conservation and the capacity to modify calcium fluxes across epithelia suggesting a conserved role in calcium metabolism possibly via similar receptors. Conclusions The parathyroid hormone family contains 3 principal members, PTH, PTHrP and the recently identified PTH-L. In teleosts there are 5 genes which encode PTHrP (2, PTH (2 and PTH-L and in tetrapods there are 3 genes (PTHrP, PTH and PTH-L, the exception is placental mammals which

  15. The antimicrobial peptides derived from chromogranin/secretogranin family, new actors of innate immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shooshtarizadeh, Peiman; Zhang, Dan; Chich, Jean-François; Gasnier, Claire; Schneider, Francis; Haïkel, Youssef; Aunis, Dominique; Metz-Boutigue, Marie-Hélène

    2010-11-30

    Chromogranins/secretogranins are members of the granin family present in secretory vesicles of nervous, endocrine and immune cells. In chromaffin cells, activation of nicotinic cholinergic receptors induces the release, with catecholamines, of bioactive peptides resulting from a natural processing. During the past decade, our laboratory has characterized new antimicrobial chromogranin-derived peptides in the secretions of stimulated bovine chromaffin cells. They act at the micromolar range against bacteria, fungi, yeasts, and are non-toxic for the mammalian cells. They are recovered in several biological fluids involved in defence mechanisms (human serum, neutrophil secretions and saliva). These new antimicrobial peptides demonstrate the major role of the adrenal medulla in innate immunity. In this review we focus on the antimicrobial peptides derived from human and bovine chromogranin A (CGA), chromogranin B (CGB) and secretogranin II (SGII) emphasizing their direct action against pathogens and their effects on immune cells.

  16. Plantaricin W from Lactobacillus plantarum belongs to a new family of two-peptide lantibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holo, H; Jeknic, Z; Daeschel, M; Stevanovic, S; Nes, I F

    2001-03-01

    Plantaricin W (Plw) is a new two-peptide bacteriocin, from Lactobacillus plantarum, which inhibits a large number of Gram-positive bacteria. The two peptides, Plwalpha (comprising 29 residues) and Plwbeta (comprising 32 residues), were isolated from the culture supernatants and characterized. The individual peptides had low antimicrobial activity but acted synergistically, and synergism was seen at all mixing ratios tested. The data indicate that the two peptides work in a 1:1 ratio. Chemical analyses showed that both peptides are lantibiotics, but two unmodified cysteines and one serine residue were present in Plwalpha, and Plwbeta contained one cysteine residue. The Plw structural genes were sequenced and shown to encode prepeptides with sequence similarities to two other two-peptide lantibiotics, namely staphylococcin C55 and lacticin 3147. The conserved residues are mainly serines, threonines and cysteines that can be involved in intramolecular thioether bond formation in the C-terminal parts of the molecules. This indicates that these bacteriocins are members of a new family of lantibiotics with common bridging patterns, and that the ring structures play an important functional role. Based on the data a structural model is presented in which each peptide has a central lanthionine and two overlapping thioether bridges close to their C-termini.

  17. Calcitonin gene-related peptide does not cause migraine attacks in patients with familial hemiplegic migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jakob M; Thomsen, Lise L; Olesen, Jes

    2011-01-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a key molecule in migraine pathogenesis. Intravenous CGRP triggers migraine-like attacks in patients with migraine with aura and without aura. In contrast, patients with familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM) with known mutations did not report more migraine-...

  18. Factors Affecting Peptide Interactions with Surface-Bound Microgels

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Effects of electrostatics and peptide size on peptide interactions with surface-bound microgels were investigated with ellipsometry, confocal microscopy, and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Results show that binding of cationic poly-L-lysine (pLys) to anionic, covalently immobilized, poly(ethyl acrylate-co-methacrylic acid) microgels increased with increasing peptide net charge and microgel charge density. Furthermore, peptide release was facilitated by decreasing either microgel or peptide ch...

  19. Identification and Characterization of a Novel Family of Cysteine-Rich Peptides (MgCRP-I) from Mytilus galloprovincialis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerdol, Marco; Puillandre, Nicolas; De Moro, Gianluca; Guarnaccia, Corrado; Lucafò, Marianna; Benincasa, Monica; Zlatev, Ventislav; Manfrin, Chiara; Torboli, Valentina; Giulianini, Piero Giulio; Sava, Gianni; Venier, Paola; Pallavicini, Alberto

    2015-07-21

    We report the identification of a novel gene family (named MgCRP-I) encoding short secreted cysteine-rich peptides in the Mediterranean mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis. These peptides display a highly conserved pre-pro region and a hypervariable mature peptide comprising six invariant cysteine residues arranged in three intramolecular disulfide bridges. Although their cysteine pattern is similar to cysteines-rich neurotoxic peptides of distantly related protostomes such as cone snails and arachnids, the different organization of the disulfide bridges observed in synthetic peptides and phylogenetic analyses revealed MgCRP-I as a novel protein family. Genome- and transcriptome-wide searches for orthologous sequences in other bivalve species indicated the unique presence of this gene family in Mytilus spp. Like many antimicrobial peptides and neurotoxins, MgCRP-I peptides are produced as pre-propeptides, usually have a net positive charge and likely derive from similar evolutionary mechanisms, that is, gene duplication and positive selection within the mature peptide region; however, synthetic MgCRP-I peptides did not display significant toxicity in cultured mammalian cells, insecticidal, antimicrobial, or antifungal activities. The functional role of MgCRP-I peptides in mussel physiology still remains puzzling.

  20. A family of cell-adhering peptides homologous to fibrinogen C-termini

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levy-Beladev, Liron [Institute of Chemistry, Safra Campus, Givat Ram, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Levdansky, Lilia; Gaberman, Elena [Lab. of Biotechnology and Radiobiology, Hadassah-Hebrew University Medical Center, P.O. Box 12000, Jerusalem 91120 (Israel); Friedler, Assaf [Institute of Chemistry, Safra Campus, Givat Ram, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Gorodetsky, Raphael, E-mail: Rafi@hadassah.org.il [Lab. of Biotechnology and Radiobiology, Hadassah-Hebrew University Medical Center, P.O. Box 12000, Jerusalem 91120 (Israel)

    2010-10-08

    Research highlights: {yields} Cell-adhesive sequences homologous to fibrinogen C-termini exist in other proteins. {yields} The extended homologous cell-adhesive C-termini peptides family is termed Haptides. {yields} In membrane-like environment random coiled Haptides adopt a helical conformation. {yields} Replacing positively charged residues with alanine reduces Haptides activity. -- Abstract: A family of cell-adhesive peptides homologous to sequences on different chains of fibrinogen was investigated. These homologous peptides, termed Haptides, include the peptides C{beta}, preC{gamma}, and C{alpha}E, corresponding to sequences on the C-termini of fibrinogen chains {beta}, {gamma}, and {alpha}E, respectively. Haptides do not affect cell survival and rate of proliferation of the normal cell types tested. The use of new sensitive assays of cell adhesion clearly demonstrated the ability of Haptides, bound to inert matrices, to mediate attachment of different matrix-dependent cell types including normal fibroblasts, endothelial, and smooth muscle cells. Here we present new active Haptides bearing homologous sequences derived from the C-termini of other proteins, such as angiopoietin 1 and 2, tenascins C and X, and microfibril-associated glycoprotein-4. The cell adhesion properties of all the Haptides were found to be associated mainly with their 11 N-terminal residues. Mutated preC{gamma} peptides revealed that positively charged residues account for their attachment effect. These results suggest a mechanism of direct electrostatic interaction of Haptides with the cell membrane. The extended Haptides family may be applied in modulating adhesion of cells to scaffolds for tissue regeneration and for enhancement of nanoparticulate transfection into cells.

  1. A peptide factor secreted by Staphylococcus pseudintermedius exhibits properties of both bacteriocins and virulence factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wladyka, Benedykt; Piejko, Marcin; Bzowska, Monika; Pieta, Piotr; Krzysik, Monika; Mazurek, Łukasz; Guevara-Lora, Ibeth; Bukowski, Michał; Sabat, Artur J.; Friedrich, Alexander W.; Bonar, Emilia; Międzobrodzki, Jacek; Dubin, Adam; Mak, Paweł

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus pseudintermedius is a common commensal bacterium colonizing the skin and mucosal surfaces of household animals. However, it has recently emerged as a dangerous opportunistic pathogen, comparable to S. aureus for humans. The epidemiological situation is further complicated by the increasing number of methicillin-resistant S. pseudintermedius infections and evidence of gene transmission driving antibiotic resistance between staphylococci colonizing human and zoonotic hosts. In the present study, we describe a unique peptide, BacSp222, that possesses features characteristic of both bacteriocins and virulence factors. BacSp222 is secreted in high quantities by S. pseudintermedius strain 222 isolated from dog skin lesions. This linear, fifty-amino-acid highly cationic peptide is plasmid-encoded and does not exhibit significant sequence similarities to any other known peptides or proteins. BacSp222 kills gram-positive bacteria (at doses ranging from 0.1 to several micromol/l) but also demonstrates significant cytotoxic activities towards eukaryotic cells at slightly higher concentrations. Moreover, at nanomolar concentrations, the peptide also possesses modulatory properties, efficiently enhancing interferon gamma-induced nitric oxide release in murine macrophage-like cell lines. BacSp222 appears to be one of the first examples of multifunctional peptides that breaks the convention of splitting bacteriocins and virulence factors into two unrelated groups. PMID:26411997

  2. A peptide factor secreted by Staphylococcus pseudintermedius exhibits properties of both bacteriocins and virulence factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wladyka, Benedykt; Piejko, Marcin; Bzowska, Monika; Pieta, Piotr; Krzysik, Monika; Mazurek, Łukasz; Guevara-Lora, Ibeth; Bukowski, Michał; Sabat, Artur J; Friedrich, Alexander W; Bonar, Emilia; Międzobrodzki, Jacek; Dubin, Adam; Mak, Paweł

    2015-09-28

    Staphylococcus pseudintermedius is a common commensal bacterium colonizing the skin and mucosal surfaces of household animals. However, it has recently emerged as a dangerous opportunistic pathogen, comparable to S. aureus for humans. The epidemiological situation is further complicated by the increasing number of methicillin-resistant S. pseudintermedius infections and evidence of gene transmission driving antibiotic resistance between staphylococci colonizing human and zoonotic hosts. In the present study, we describe a unique peptide, BacSp222, that possesses features characteristic of both bacteriocins and virulence factors. BacSp222 is secreted in high quantities by S. pseudintermedius strain 222 isolated from dog skin lesions. This linear, fifty-amino-acid highly cationic peptide is plasmid-encoded and does not exhibit significant sequence similarities to any other known peptides or proteins. BacSp222 kills gram-positive bacteria (at doses ranging from 0.1 to several micromol/l) but also demonstrates significant cytotoxic activities towards eukaryotic cells at slightly higher concentrations. Moreover, at nanomolar concentrations, the peptide also possesses modulatory properties, efficiently enhancing interferon gamma-induced nitric oxide release in murine macrophage-like cell lines. BacSp222 appears to be one of the first examples of multifunctional peptides that breaks the convention of splitting bacteriocins and virulence factors into two unrelated groups.

  3. A family of excitatory peptide toxins from venomous crassispirine snails: using Constellation Pharmacology to assess bioactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imperial, Julita S; Cabang, April B; Song, Jie; Raghuraman, Shrinivasan; Gajewiak, Joanna; Watkins, Maren; Showers-Corneli, Patrice; Fedosov, Alexander; Concepcion, Gisela P; Terlau, Heinrich; Teichert, Russell W; Olivera, Baldomero M

    2014-10-01

    The toxinology of the crassispirine snails, a major group of venomous marine gastropods within the superfamily Conoidea, is largely unknown. Here we define the first venom peptide superfamily, the P-like crassipeptides, and show that the organization of their gene sequences is similar to conotoxin precursors. We provide evidence that one peptide family within the P-like crassipeptide superfamily includes potassium-channel (K-channel) blockers, the κP-crassipeptides. Three of these peptides were chemically synthesized (cce9a, cce9b and iqi9a). Using conventional electrophysiology, cce9b was shown to be an antagonist of both a human Kv1.1 channel isoform (Shaker subfamily of voltage-gated K channels) and a Drosophila K-channel isoform. We assessed the bioactivity of these peptides in native mammalian dorsal root ganglion neurons in culture. We demonstrate that two of these crassipeptides, cce9a and cce9b, elicited an excitatory phenotype in a subset of small-diameter capsaicin-sensitive mouse DRG neurons that were also affected by κJ-conotoxin PlXIVA (pl14a), a blocker of Kv1.6 channels. Given the vast complexity of heteromeric K-channel isoforms, this study demonstrates that the crassispirine venoms are a potentially rich source for discovering novel peptides that can help to identify and characterize the diversity of K-channel subtypes expressed in native neurons and other cell types.

  4. Insecticidal activity of a recombinant knottin peptide from Loxosceles intermedia venom and recognition of these peptides as a conserved family in the genus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubara, F H; Meissner, G O; Herzig, V; Justa, H C; Dias, B C L; Trevisan-Silva, D; Gremski, L H; Gremski, W; Senff-Ribeiro, A; Chaim, O M; King, G F; Veiga, S S

    2017-02-01

    Loxosceles intermedia venom comprises a complex mixture of proteins, glycoproteins and low molecular mass peptides that act synergistically to immobilize envenomed prey. Analysis of a venom-gland transcriptome from L. intermedia revealed that knottins, also known as inhibitor cystine knot peptides, are the most abundant class of toxins expressed in this species. Knottin peptides contain a particular arrangement of intramolecular disulphide bonds, and these peptides typically act upon ion channels or receptors in the insect nervous system, triggering paralysis or other lethal effects. Herein, we focused on a knottin peptide with 53 amino acid residues from L. intermedia venom. The recombinant peptide, named U2 -sicaritoxin-Li1b (Li1b), was obtained by expression in the periplasm of Escherichia coli. The recombinant peptide induced irreversible flaccid paralysis in sheep blowflies. We screened for knottin-encoding sequences in total RNA extracts from two other Loxosceles species, Loxosceles gaucho and Loxosceles laeta, which revealed that knottin peptides constitute a conserved family of toxins in the Loxosceles genus. The insecticidal activity of U2 -SCTX-Li1b, together with the large number of knottin peptides encoded in Loxosceles venom glands, suggests that studies of these venoms might facilitate future biotechnological applications of these toxins. © 2016 The Royal Entomological Society.

  5. Calcitonin gene-related peptide does not cause the familial hemiplegic migraine phenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J.M.; Thomsen, L.L.; Olesen, J.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a migraine trigger that plays a crucial role in migraine pathophysiology, and CGRP antagonism is efficient in the treatment of migraine attacks. Familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM) is a dominantly inherited subtype of migraine.......58). Headache severity and intensity were not different between the groups. Conclusions: Familial hemiplegic migraine ( FHM) patients do not show hypersensitivity of the calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-cyclic adenosine 3 ', 5 '-monophosphate pathway, as characteristically seen in migraine patients...... with aura associated with several gene mutations. FHM shares many phenotypical similarities with common types of migraine, indicating common neurobiological pathways. We tested the hypothesis that the FHM genotype confers a CGRP hypersensitive phenotype. Methods: We included 9 FHM patients with known...

  6. Happiness among Adolescent Students in Thailand: Family and Non-Family Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Rossarin Soottipong; Chamratrithirong, Aphichat; Pattaravanich, Umaporn; Prasartkul, Pramote

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores family and non-family factors contributing to happiness among students aged 15-18 in Thailand. Data come from the Social and Cultural Situation and Mental Health Survey (n = 905). Based on regression analysis, family factors are more important than non- family factors in explaining the variations in adolescents' happiness.…

  7. Happiness among Adolescent Students in Thailand: Family and Non-Family Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Rossarin Soottipong; Chamratrithirong, Aphichat; Pattaravanich, Umaporn; Prasartkul, Pramote

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores family and non-family factors contributing to happiness among students aged 15-18 in Thailand. Data come from the Social and Cultural Situation and Mental Health Survey (n = 905). Based on regression analysis, family factors are more important than non- family factors in explaining the variations in adolescents' happiness.…

  8. Calcitonin gene-related peptide does not cause migraine attacks in patients with familial hemiplegic migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jakob M; Thomsen, Lise L; Olesen, Jes

    2011-01-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a key molecule in migraine pathogenesis. Intravenous CGRP triggers migraine-like attacks in patients with migraine with aura and without aura. In contrast, patients with familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM) with known mutations did not report more migraine......-like attacks compared to controls. Whether CGRP triggers migraine-like attacks in FHM patients without known mutations is unknown....

  9. Sensitive Periods, Vasotocin-Family Peptides, and the Evolution and Development of Social Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole M. Baran

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Nonapeptides, by modulating the activity of neural circuits in specific social contexts, provide an important mechanism underlying the evolution of diverse behavioral phenotypes across vertebrate taxa. Vasotocin-family nonapeptides, in particular, have been found to be involved in behavioral plasticity and diversity in social behavior, including seasonal variation, sexual dimorphism, and species differences. Although nonapeptides have been the focus of a great deal of research over the last several decades, the vast majority of this work has focused on adults. However, behavioral diversity may also be explained by the ways in which these peptides shape neural circuits and influence social processes during development. In this review, I synthesize comparative work on vasotocin-family peptides during development and classic work on early forms of social learning in developmental psychobiology. I also summarize recent work demonstrating that early life manipulations of the nonapeptide system alter attachment, affiliation, and vocal learning in zebra finches. I thus hypothesize that vasotocin-family peptides are involved in the evolution of social behaviors through their influence on learning during sensitive periods in social development.

  10. Rapid expansion of the protein disulfide isomerase gene family facilitates the folding of venom peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Safavi-Hemami, Helena; Li, Qing; Jackson, Ronneshia L.

    2016-01-01

    Formation of correct disulfide bonds in the endoplasmic reticulum is a crucial step for folding proteins destined for secretion. Protein disulfide isomerases (PDIs) play a central role in this process. We report a previously unidentified, hypervariable family of PDIs that represents the most...... diverse gene family of oxidoreductases described in a single genus to date. These enzymes are highly expressed specifically in the venom glands of predatory cone snails, animals that synthesize a remarkably diverse set of cysteine-rich peptide toxins (conotoxins). Enzymes in this PDI family, termed...... conotoxin-specific PDIs, significantly and differentially accelerate the kinetics of disulfide-bond formation of several conotoxins. Our results are consistent with a unique biological scenario associated with protein folding: The diversification of a family of foldases can be correlated with the rapid...

  11. The relaxin family peptide receptors and their ligands : new developments and paradigms in the evolution from jawless fish to mammals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yegorov, Sergey; Bogerd, Jan; Good, Sara V

    2014-01-01

    Relaxin family peptide receptors (Rxfps) and their ligands, relaxin (Rln) and insulin-like (Insl) peptides, are broadly implicated in the regulation of reproductive and neuroendocrine processes in mammals. Most placental mammals harbour genes for four receptors, namely rxfp1, rxfp2, rxfp3 and rxfp4.

  12. Calcitonin gene-related peptide induced migraine attacks in patients with and without familial aggregation of migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Song; Christensen, Anne Francke; Liu, Marie Louise

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Calcitonin gene-related peptide provokes migraine attacks in 65% of patients with migraine without aura. Whether aggregation of migraine in first-degree relatives (family load) or a high number of risk-conferring single nucleotide polymorphisms contributes to migraine susceptibility...... to calcitonin gene-related peptide infusion in migraine patients is unknown. We hypothesized that genetic enrichment plays a role in triggering of migraine and, therefore, migraine without aura patients with high family load would report more migraine attacks after calcitonin gene-related peptide infusion than...... patients with low family load. METHODS: We allocated 40 previously genotyped migraine without aura patients to receive intravenous infusion of 1.5 µg/min calcitonin gene-related peptide and recorded migraine attacks including headache characteristics and associated symptoms. Information of familial...

  13. Sex- and strain-specific expression and vomeronasal activity of mouse ESP family peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimoto, Hiroko; Sato, Koji; Nodari, Francesco; Haga, Sachiko; Holy, Timothy E; Touhara, Kazushige

    2007-11-06

    Male mice secrete exocrine-gland-secreting peptide 1 (ESP1) from the extraorbital lacrimal gland into tear fluid [1]. Other mice detect ESP1 through sensory neurons in the vomeronasal organ (VNO), a secondary olfactory system that senses pheromonal information, including sex, strain, and species. ESP1 is now known to be a member of a multigene family that encodes peptides of various lengths. We herein performed genomic and expression analyses of the ESP family. The ESP family consists of 38 members in mice and 10 members in rat but is absent from the human genome, suggesting rapid molecular evolution. In addition to the male-specific ESP1, we discovered one, which we designated ESP36, that, in adult BALB/c mice, is expressed only in the female extraorbital lacrimal gland. The sexually dimorphic expression is ensured by the release of testosterone after puberty. However, we observed dramatic differences in the expression levels of ESPs between strains. Finally, all ESPs elicited an electrical response in the vomeronasal epithelium but not in the main olfactory epithelium. Multielectrode recording of VNO activity demonstrated that ESP1 induces action potentials in vomeronasal neurons, leading to an increase in the spike firing rate, and that ESP1 is recognized by narrowly tuned vomeronasal sensory neurons. Sexual dimorphism and strain differences of ESPs and their reception in the VNO suggest that the ESP family can convey information about sex and individual identity via the vomeronasal system. The chemosensation of this nonvolatile peptide family by direct contact appears to be one of strategies for sociosexual communication in rodent species.

  14. Analysis on Family Factor in Construction of New Socialist Countryside

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    This paper analyzes the family factor in the construction of new socialist countryside. It is believed that the family plays both the positive role and negative role in new socialist countryside construction. Based on this analysis,it puts forward corresponding countermeasures,including bringing into play the effect of family in promoting production and carrying forward excellent factors of family culture.

  15. A family of small cyclic amphipathic peptides (SCAmpPs) genes in citrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belknap, William R; McCue, Kent F; Harden, Leslie A; Vensel, William H; Bausher, Michael G; Stover, Ed

    2015-04-16

    Citrus represents a crop of global importance both in economic impact and significance to nutrition. Citrus production worldwide is threatened by the disease Huanglongbing (HLB), caused by the phloem-limited pathogen Candidatus Liberibacter spp.. As a source of stable HLB-resistance has yet to be identified, there is considerable interest in characterization of novel disease-associated citrus genes. A gene family of Small Cyclic Amphipathic Peptides (SCAmpPs) in citrus is described. The citrus genomes contain 100-150 SCAmpPs genes, approximately 50 of which are represented in the citrus EST database. These genes encode small ~50 residue precursor proteins that are post-translationally processed, releasing 5-10 residue cyclic peptides. The structures of the SCAmpPs genes are highly conserved, with the small coding domains interrupted by a single intron and relatively extended untranslated regions. Some family members are very highly transcribed in specific citrus tissues, as determined by representation in tissue-specific cDNA libraries. Comparison of the ESTs of related SCAmpPs revealed an unexpected evolutionary profile, consistent with targeted mutagenesis of the predicted cyclic peptide domain. The SCAmpPs genes are displayed in clusters on the citrus chromosomes, with apparent association with receptor leucine-rich repeat protein arrays. This study focused on three SCAmpPs family members with high constitutive expression in citrus phloem. Unexpectedly high sequence conservation was observed in the promoter region of two phloem-expressed SCAmpPs that encode very distinct predicted cyclic products. The processed cyclic product of one of these phloem SCAmpPs was characterized by LC-MS-MS analysis of phloem tissue, revealing properties consistent with a K(+) ionophore. The SCAmpPs amino acid composition, protein structure, expression patterns, evolutionary profile and chromosomal distribution are consistent with designation as ribosomally synthesized defense

  16. von Willebrand factor binds to the surface of dendritic cells and modulates peptide presentation of factor VIII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorvillo, Nicoletta; Hartholt, Robin B; Bloem, Esther; Sedek, Magdalena; ten Brinke, Anja; van der Zwaan, Carmen; van Alphen, Floris P; Meijer, Alexander B; Voorberg, Jan

    2016-03-01

    It has been proposed that von Willebrand factor might affect factor VIII immunogenicity by reducing factor VIII uptake by antigen presenting cells. Here we investigate the interaction of recombinant von Willebrand factor with immature monocyte-derived dendritic cells using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. Surprisingly, von Willebrand factor was not internalized by immature dendritic cells, but remained bound to the cell surface. As von Willebrand factor reduces the uptake of factor VIII, we investigated the repertoire of factor VIII presented peptides when in complex with von Willebrand factor. Interestingly, factor VIII-derived peptides were still abundantly presented on major histocompatibility complex class II molecules, even though a reduction of factor VIII uptake by immature dendritic cells was observed. Inspection of peptide profiles from 5 different donors showed that different core factor VIII peptide sequences were presented upon incubation with factor VIII/von Willebrand factor complex when compared to factor VIII alone. No von Willebrand factor peptides were detected when immature dendritic cells were pulsed with different concentrations of von Willebrand factor, confirming lack of von Willebrand factor endocytosis. Several von Willebrand factor derived peptides were recovered when cells were pulsed with von Willebrand factor/factor VIII complex, suggesting that factor VIII promotes endocytosis of small amounts of von Willebrand factor by immature dendritic cells. Taken together, our results establish that von Willebrand factor is poorly internalized by immature dendritic cells. We also show that von Willebrand factor modulates the internalization and presentation of factor VIII-derived peptides on major histocompatibility complex class II.

  17. The Role of Phosphoglycans in the Susceptibility of Leishmania mexicana to the Temporin Family of Anti-Microbial Peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela A. Eggimann

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Natural product antimicrobial peptides (AMPs have been proposed as promising agents against the Leishmania species, insect vector borne protozoan parasites causing the neglected tropical disease leishmaniasis. However, recent studies have shown that the mammalian pathogenic amastigote form of L. mexicana, a causative agent of cutaneous leishmaniasis, is resistant to the amphibian-derived temporin family of AMPs when compared to the insect stage promastigote form. The mode of resistance is unknown, however the insect and mammalian stages of Leishmania possess radically different cell surface coats, with amastigotes displaying low (or zero quantities of lipophosphoglycan (LPG and proteophosphoglycan (PPG, macromolecules which form thick a glycocalyx in promastigotes. It has been predicted that negatively charged LPG and PPG influence the sensitivity/resistance of promastigote forms to cationic temporins. Using LPG and PPG mutant L. mexicana, and an extended range of temporins, in this study we demonstrated that whilst LPG has little role, PPG is a major factor in promastigote sensitivity to the temporin family of AMPs, possibly due to the conferred anionic charge. Therefore, the lack of PPG seen on the surface of pathogenic amastigote L. mexicana may be implicated in their resistance to these peptides.

  18. Penaeidins, a new family of antimicrobial peptides isolated from the shrimp Penaeus vannamei (Decapoda).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Destoumieux, D; Bulet, P; Loew, D; Van Dorsselaer, A; Rodriguez, J; Bachère, E

    1997-11-07

    We report here the isolation of three members of a new family of antimicrobial peptides from the hemolymph of shrimps Penaeus vannamei in which immune response has not been experimentally induced. The three molecules display antimicrobial activity against fungi and bacteria with a predominant activity against Gram-positive bacteria. The complete sequences of these peptides were determined by a combination of enzymatic cleavages, Edman degradation, mass spectrometry, and cDNA cloning using a hemocyte cDNA library. The mature molecules (50 and 62 residues) are characterized by an NH2-terminal domain rich in proline residues and a COOH-terminal domain containing three intramolecular disulfide bridges. One of these molecules is post-translationally modified by a pyroglutamic acid at the first position. Comparison of the data obtained from the cDNA clones and mass spectrometry showed that two of these peptides are probably COOH-terminally amidated by elimination of a glycine residue. These molecules with no evident homology to other hitherto described antimicrobial peptides were named penaeidins.

  19. Demographic Correlates and Factor Structure of the Family Environment Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boake, Corwin; Salmon, Paul G.

    1983-01-01

    Factor analyzed the Family Environment Scale (FES) subscale scores of 204 families and correlated them with family demographic characteristics. The obtained factor structure showed two major factors similar to "control" and "acceptance-rejection" dimensions in previous research. Results support the FES as part of multimethod…

  20. Molecular structure and diversity of PBAN/Pyrokinin family peptides in ants

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    Man-Yeon eChoi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Neuropeptides are the largest group of insect hormones. They are produced in the central and peripheral nervous systems and affect insect development, reproduction, feeding and behavior. A variety of neuropeptide families have been identified in insects. One of these families is the PBAN/pyrokinin family defined by a common FXPRLamide or similar amino acid fragment at the C-terminal end. These peptides, found in all insects studied thus far, have been conserved throughout evolution. The most well studied physiological function is regulation of moth sex pheromone biosynthesis through the Pheromone Biosynthesis Activating Neurohormone (PBAN, although several developmental functions have also been reported. Over the past years we have extended knowledge of the PBAN/pyrokinin family of peptides to ants, focusing mainly on the fire ant, Solenopsis invicta. The fire ant is one of the most studied social insects and over the last 60 years a great deal has been learned about many aspects of this ant, including the behaviors and chemistry of pheromone communication. However, virtually nothing is known about the regulation of these pheromone systems. Recently, we demonstrated the presence of PBAN/pyrokinin immunoreactive neurons in the fire ant, and identified and characterized PBAN and additional neuropeptides. We have mapped the fire ant PBAN gene structure and determined the tissue expression level in the central nervous system of the ant. We review here our research to date on the molecular structure and diversity of ant PBAN/pyrokinin peptides in preparation for determining the function of the neuropeptides in ants and other social insects.

  1. Unique translational modification of an invertebrate neuropeptide: a phosphorylated member of the adipokinetic hormone peptide family

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    Separation of an extract of corpora cardiaca from the protea beetle, Trichostetha fascicularis, by single-step RP (reverse-phase)-HPLC and monitoring of tryptophan fluorescence resulted in two distinctive peaks, the material of which mobilized proline and carbohydrates in a bioassay performed using the beetle. Material from one of these peaks was; however, inactive in the classical bioassays of locusts and cockroaches that are used for detecting peptides belonging to the AKH (adipokinetic hormone) family. After enzymatically deblocking the N-terminal pyroglutamic acid (pGlu) residue in the peptide material and sequencing by Edman degradation, a partial sequence was obtained: (pGlu)-Ile-Asn-Met-Thr-Xaa-Gly-Trp. The complete sequence was deduced from ESI-MSn (electrospray ionization multi-stage-MS); position six was identified as a phosphothreonine residue and the C-terminus is amidated. The peptide, code-named Trifa-CC, was chemically synthesized and used in confirmatory experiments to show that the primary structure had been correctly assigned. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a phosphorylated invertebrate neuropeptide. Synthetic Trifa-CC co-elutes with the natural peptide, found in the gland of the protea beetle, after RP-HPLC. Moreover, the natural peptide can be dephosphorylated by alkaline phosphatase and the product of that reaction has the same retention time as a synthetic nonphosphorylated octapeptide which has the same sequence as Trifa-CC. Finally, synthetic Trifa-CC has hypertrehalosaemic and hyperprolinaemic biological activity in the protea beetle, but even high concentrations of synthetic Trifa-CC are inactive in locusts and cockroaches. Hence, the correct peptide structure has been assigned. Trifa-CC of the protea beetle is an unusual member of the AKH family that is unique in its post-translational modification. Since it increases the concentration of carbohydrates and proline in the haemolymph when injected into the protea beetle, and

  2. Factors influencing brain natriuretic peptide levels in healthy pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayama, Michinori; Yoshihara, Masato; Uno, Kaname; Tano, Sho; Takeda, Takehiko; Ukai, Mayu; Kishigami, Yasuyuki; Oguchi, Hidenori

    2017-02-01

    The normal range of plasma brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) in pregnant women is still unclear. Moreover, pregnant women experience dynamic body weight changes and suffer from anemia, but effects on maternal BNP have not been investigated. This study aimed to reveal the normal plasma BNP range and examine the effects of physiological changes on BNP among pregnant women. Plasma BNP, hemoglobin, plasma creatinine and BMI were measured in 58 non-pregnant control women and in 773 normal pregnant women at late pregnancy, early postpartum and 1-month postpartum. Mean plasma BNP (in pg/mL) was 11.8 (95% confidence interval: 0-27.5) in non-pregnant women, 17.9 (0-44.7, pchange during pregnancy (p=0.001) and post-delivery creatinine (p=0.010) but negatively associated with body weight loss at delivery (pchanges, creatinine and hemoglobin levels; therefore, these factors should be considered when analysing cardiac function and the physiological implications of BNP levels in pregnant women. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Characterization of antibodies to synthetic nerve growth factor (NGF) and proNGF peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebendal, T; Persson, H; Larhammar, D; Lundströmer, K; Olson, L

    1989-03-01

    Sequence data for the mature nerve growth factor (NGF) protein and its precursor are available from molecular cloning of the NGF gene in several species, including mice, humans, rats, and chickens. Hydrophilicity analysis of the predicted rat and chicken prepro-NGF was carried out to locate putative antigenic determinants. Eight peptides were selected and synthesized based on hydrophilicity profiles. Two peptides represent sequences in the rat (and mouse) pro-NGF, one peptide (our peptide P3) represents a highly conserved region of the mature NGF protein (identical in humans, mice, rats, and chickens), two peptides are specific for the mature chicken NGF, and the remaining three peptides are specific for the mature rat NGF (each with only one amino acid substitution compared with corresponding segments of the mouse NGF). For immunization, the peptides were conjugated to keyhold limpet hemocyanin and used to produce antisera in rabbits. After bleeding, peptide-specific antibodies were purified on affinity columns prepared by coupling each of the synthetic peptides. The different peptide antisera and affinity-purified antibodies then were characterized by enzyme-linked immunoassay (ELISA) and immunohistochemistry of the male mouse submandibular gland, a rich exocrine source of NGF. ELISA analysis showed that all peptide antisera bound two to four orders of magnitude better than normal rabbit serum to a coat of their proper peptide. The higher binding was retained by the purified peptide antibodies compared with normal rabbit immunoglobulin. Specific tests, in which one peptide antiserum was checked against different peptide coats in the ELISA, also showed two to four orders of magnitude higher binding of antibodies to the proper synthetic peptide. The peptide antibodies also were tested for their ability to bind to native mouse beta NGF coated to the immunoplates. Only antibodies raised to the conserved P3 peptide recognized native NGF to an extent similar to that

  4. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. LXXIII. Nomenclature for the Formyl Peptide Receptor (FPR) Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    YE, RICHARD D.; BOULAY, FRANÇOIS; WANG, JI MING; DAHLGREN, CLAES; GERARD, CRAIG; PARMENTIER, MARC; SERHAN, CHARLES N.; MURPHY, PHILIP M.

    2009-01-01

    Formyl peptide receptors (FPRs) are a small group of seven-transmembrane domain, G protein-coupled receptors that are expressed mainly by mammalian phagocytic leukocytes and are known to be important in host defense and inflammation. The three human FPRs (FPR1, FPR2/ALX, and FPR3) share significant sequence homology and are encoded by clustered genes. Collectively, these receptors bind an extraordinarily numerous and structurally diverse group of agonistic ligands, including N-formyl and nonformyl peptides of different composition, that chemoattract and activate phagocytes. N-formyl peptides, which are encoded in nature only by bacterial and mitochondrial genes and result from obligatory initiation of bacterial and mitochondrial protein synthesis with N-formylmethionine, is the only ligand class common to all three human receptors. Surprisingly, the endogenous anti-inflammatory peptide annexin 1 and its N-terminal fragments also bind human FPR1 and FPR2/ALX, and the anti-inflammatory eicosanoid lipoxin A4 is an agonist at FPR2/ALX. In comparison, fewer agonists have been identified for FPR3, the third member in this receptor family. Structural and functional studies of the FPRs have produced important information for understanding the general pharmacological principles governing all leukocyte chemoattractant receptors. This article aims to provide an overview of the discovery and pharmacological characterization of FPRs, to introduce an International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology (IUPHAR)-recommended nomenclature, and to discuss unmet challenges, including the mechanisms used by these receptors to bind diverse ligands and mediate different biological functions. PMID:19498085

  5. Cysteine-Rich Peptide Family with Unusual Disulfide Connectivity from Jasminum sambac.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Geeta; Serra, Aida; Shin, Joon; Nguyen, Phuong Q T; Sze, Siu Kwan; Yoon, Ho Sup; Tam, James P

    2015-11-25

    Cysteine-rich peptides (CRPs) are natural products with privileged peptidyl structures that represent a potentially rich source of bioactive compounds. Here, the discovery and characterization of a novel plant CRP family, jasmintides from Jasminum sambac of the Oleaceae family, are described. Two 27-amino acid jasmintides (jS1 and jS2) were identified at the gene and protein levels. Disulfide bond mapping of jS1 by mass spectrometry and its confirmation by NMR spectroscopy revealed disulfide bond connectivity of C-1-C-5, C-2-C-4, and C-3-C-6, a cystine motif that has not been reported in plant CRPs. Structural determination showed that jS1 displays a well-defined structure framed by three short antiparallel β-sheets. Genomic analysis showed that jasmintides share a three-domain precursor arrangement with a C-terminal mature domain preceded by a long pro-domain of 46 residues and an intron cleavage site between the signal sequence and pro-domain. The compact cysteine-rich structure together with an N-terminal pyroglutamic acid residue confers jasmintides high resistance to heat and enzymatic degradation, including exopeptidase treatment. Collectively, these results reveal a new plant CRP structure with an unusual cystine connectivity, which could be useful as a scaffold for designing peptide drugs.

  6. Gene cloning and functional characterization of four novel antimicrobial-like peptides from scorpions of the family Vaejovidae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Carreto, Santos; Quintero-Hernández, Verónica; Jiménez-Vargas, Juana María; Corzo, Gerardo; Possani, Lourival D; Becerril, Baltazar; Ortiz, Ernesto

    2012-04-01

    From the cDNA libraries made from the venom glands of two scorpions belonging to the Vaejovidae family, four different putative non disulfide-bridged antimicrobial peptides were identified: VmCT1 and VmCT2 from Vaejovis mexicanus smithi plus VsCT1 and VsCT2 from Vaejovis subcristatus. These short peptides (with only 13 amino acid residues each) share important amino acid sequence similarities among themselves and with other reported antimicrobial peptides, but their biological activities vary dramatically. This communication reports the cloning, chemical synthesis and characterization of these peptides. Two peptides, VmCT1 and VmCT2 showed broad-spectrum antibacterial activity with minimum inhibitory concentrations MICs in the range of 5-25 μM and 10-20 μM respectively, whereas their hemolytic activity at these concentrations was low. Structure-function relationships that might determine the differences in activities are discussed.

  7. Expression profiles of relaxin family peptides and their receptors indicate their influence on spermatogenesis in the domestic cat (Felis catus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, B C; Müller, K; Jewgenow, K

    2015-07-01

    Disturbed spermatogenesis is a common problem in felines. Studying spermatogenesis in the domestic cat can improve the understanding of the biological background and help to counteract fertility problems in other feline species. Here, we analyzed 3 relaxin family peptides (relaxin, relaxin-3, and INSL3) and their receptors (RXFP1, RXFP2, and RXFP3) as potential spermatogenic factors involving their expression in the testis at different stages of its development. It may be concluded from its stage-dependent expression that relaxin, together with RXFP1, appears to be involved in the first stage of spermatogenesis, whereas relaxin-3 via binding to RXFP3 influences spermiogenesis. Furthermore, correlations were observed between relaxin, relaxin-3, RXFP1, RXFP2 and RXFP3 messenger RNA expression, and the relative numbers of haploid cells in testes. The peptide INSL3 was highly expressed at all testis development stages. Because of the low and stage-independent expression of its receptor RXFP2, an auto- and/or paracrine function of INSL3 in spermatogenesis seems unlikely. In the adult testis, messenger RNA expression of relaxin, RXFP1, and RXFP3 predominantly occurs in the tubular testis compartment, whereas INLS3 is mainly expressed in the interstitium.

  8. Reflections on a systematic nomenclature for antimicrobial peptides from the skins of frogs of the family Ranidae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conlon, J Michael

    2008-10-01

    Frogs belonging to the extensive family Ranidae represent a valuable source of antimicrobial peptides with therapeutic potential but there is currently no consistent system of nomenclature to describe these peptides. Terminology based solely on species name does not reflect the evolutionary relationships existing between peptides encoded by orthologous and paralogous genes. On the basis of limited structural similarity, at least 14 well-established peptide families have been identified (brevinin-1, brevinin-2, esculentin-1, esculentin-2, japonicin-1, japonicin-2, nigrocin-2, palustrin-1, palustrin-2, ranacyclin, ranalexin, ranatuerin-1, ranatuerin-2, temporin). It is proposed that terms that are synonymous with these names should no longer be used. Orthologous peptides from different species may be characterized by the initial letter of that species, set in upper case, with paralogs belonging to the same peptide family being assigned letters set in lower case, e.g. brevinin-1Pa, brevinin-1Pb, etc. When two species begin with the same initial letter, two letters may be used, e.g. P for pipiens and PL for palustris. Species names and assignments to genera may be obtained from Amphibian Species of the World Electronic Database, accessible at http://research.amnh.org/herpetology/amphibia/index.php. American Museum of Natural History, New York, USA.

  9. Cognitive, Personality, and Family Factors in Patients with Migraine Headache

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Johari-Fard

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Migraine is a disorder that has debilitating pain, and affects all aspects of life, including the academic, social, and family life of patients. In addition, studies show the effects of migraine on patient's relationships with family members such as spouse, children, and other family members. In addition to physical pain, migraines are tied to significant psychological and economic costs. Migraineurs tend to have high levels of depression and anxiety, and migraine headaches have a profoundly negative impact on sufferers’ quality of life. In the present research, we investigated the correlations and regressions of cognitive, personality, and family factors with migraine headache, to find predictor factors of migraine. In this study, the following questionnaires were used: For migraine: six-item Headache Impact Test (HIT-6, and Specific Quality of Life Questionnaire Version 2.1.; for cognitive factors: Irrational Beliefs Test and Dysfunctional Attitudes Scale; for personality factors: NEO Personality Inventory; and for family factors: Family Assessment Device. This project was on 58 women with migraine headaches, diagnosed by neurologist. The findings show that, there is a significant regression between cognitive, personality, and family factors and HIT-6. In cognitive factors, frustration reactivity and anxious overconcern, in personality factors, extraversion trait, and in family factors, affective involvement are significant. Moreover, there is a significant regression between cognitive, personality, and family factors and MSQ. In cognitive factors, frustration reactivity, anxious overconcern, and helplessness, in personality factors, agreeableness and consciousness, and in family factors, affective involvement and general functioning are significant. This project showed that cognitive, personality, and family factors have a correlation with migraine headache.

  10. Effects of whey peptides on cardiovascular disease risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pins, Joel J; Keenan, Joseph M

    2006-11-01

    Previous studies have shown that peptides derived from milk proteins can improve blood pressure. Therefore, the authors tested the blood pressure-lowering effects of a hydrolyzed whey protein supplement rich in bioactive peptides. In a 6-week controlled study, 30 prehypertensive or stage 1 hypertensive subjects (blood pressure >or=120/80 mm Hg and hydrolyzed whey protein (active treatment) or an unmodified whey protein (control treatment). Blood pressure, blood lipids, safety measures, side effects, and diet were evaluated throughout the trial. After completion of treatment, a 4-week follow-up was conducted. There was a mean reduction of 8.0+/-3.2 mm Hg in systolic blood pressure (Pprotein were significantly improved by treatment. Whey-derived peptides might be a viable treatment option for prehypertensive and/or stage 1 hypertensive populations.

  11. Self-assembling peptide amphiphiles and related methods for growth factor delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stupp, Samuel I.; Donners, Jack J. J. M.; Silva, Gabriel A.; Behanna, Heather A.; Anthony, Shawn G.

    2009-06-09

    Amphiphilic peptide compounds comprising one or more epitope sequences for binding interaction with one or more corresponding growth factors, micellar assemblies of such compounds and related methods of use.

  12. Family Factors in the Development and Management of Anxiety Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapee, Ronald M.

    2012-01-01

    Family variables are thought to play a key role in a wide variety of psychopathology according to many theories. Yet, specific models of the development of anxiety disorders place little emphasis on general family factors despite clear evidence that anxiety runs in families. The current review examines evidence for the involvement of a number of…

  13. Peptides encoded by short ORFs control development and define a new eukaryotic gene family.

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    Máximo Ibo Galindo

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Despite recent advances in developmental biology, and the sequencing and annotation of genomes, key questions regarding the organisation of cells into embryos remain. One possibility is that uncharacterised genes having nonstandard coding arrangements and functions could provide some of the answers. Here we present the characterisation of tarsal-less (tal, a new type of noncanonical gene that had been previously classified as a putative noncoding RNA. We show that tal controls gene expression and tissue folding in Drosophila, thus acting as a link between patterning and morphogenesis. tal function is mediated by several 33-nucleotide-long open reading frames (ORFs, which are translated into 11-amino-acid-long peptides. These are the shortest functional ORFs described to date, and therefore tal defines two novel paradigms in eukaryotic coding genes: the existence of short, unprocessed peptides with key biological functions, and their arrangement in polycistronic messengers. Our discovery of tal-related short ORFs in other species defines an ancient and noncanonical gene family in metazoans that represents a new class of eukaryotic genes. Our results open a new avenue for the annotation and functional analysis of genes and sequenced genomes, in which thousands of short ORFs are still uncharacterised.

  14. Gallin; an antimicrobial peptide member of a new avian defensin family, the ovodefensins, has been subject to recent gene duplication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalina Jiri

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Egg white must provide nutrients and protection to the developing avian embryo. One way in which this is achieved is an arsenal of antimicrobial proteins and peptides which are essentially extensions of the innate immune system. Gallin is a recently identified member of a family of peptides that are found in egg white. The function of this peptide family has not been identified and they are potentially antimicrobial. Results We have confirmed that there are at least 3 forms of the gallin gene in the chicken genome in 3 separate lines of chicken, all the forms are expressed in the tubular cells of the magnum region of the oviduct, consistent with its presence in egg white. mRNA expression levels are in the order 10,000 times greater in the magnum than the shell gland. The conservation between the multiple forms of gallin in the chicken genome compared with the conservation between gallin and other avian gallin like peptides, suggests that the gene duplication has occurred relatively recently in the chicken lineage. The gallin peptide family contains a six cysteine motif (C-X5-C-X3-C-X11-C-X3-C-C found in all defensins, and is most closely related to avian beta-defensins, although the cysteine spacing differs. Further support for the classification comes from the presence of a glycine at position 10 in the 41 amino acid peptide. Recombinant gallin inhibited the growth of Escherischia coli (E. coli at a concentration of 0.25 μM confirming it as part of the antimicrobial innate immune system in avian species. Conclusions The relatively recent evolution of multiple forms of a member of a new defensin related group of peptides that we have termed ovodefensins, may be an adaptation to increase expression or the first steps in divergent evolution of the gene in chickens. The potent antimicrobial activity of the peptide against E. coli increases our understanding of the antimicrobial strategies of the avian innate immune system

  15. Family factors for child meal skipping in low-income families in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Hwa-ok; Kim, Meesook; Hong, Soon-Myung

    2010-04-01

    The present study proposed to examine whether family factors are associated with child meal skipping in Korea. Family factors were divided into risk factors and protective factors on conceptual and theoretical bases. The sample was obtained from the Survey of Meal Service for Poor Children conducted by the Korea Institute for Health and Social Affairs in 2007. A final sample was composed of 944 children in low-income families who are served by the public meal program. Child meal skipping was positively associated with risk factors and negatively associated with protective factors, as hypothesized. Single-father family, middle or small urban area, presence of caretaker after school, health level of caretaker, caretaker's concern about child's diet, and degree of family cohesion significantly predicted child meal skipping. The authors suggest a few implications for practice based on the study findings.

  16. CLE peptide-encoding gene families in Medicago truncatula and Lotus japonicus, compared with those of soybean, common bean and Arabidopsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hastwell, April H; de Bang, Thomas C; Gresshoff, Peter M

    2017-01-01

    these complete CLE peptide-encoding gene families with those of fellow legumes, Glycine max and Phaseolus vulgaris, in addition to the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. This approach provided insight into the evolution of CLE peptide families and enabled us to establish putative M. truncatula and L. japonicus...

  17. FMRFamide-related peptides (FaRPs): A new family of peptides from amphibian defensive skin secretions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Lei; Smyth, Anita; Johnsen, Anders

    2009-01-01

    was cloned from a skin secretion library and found to contain a single copy of the peptide located at the C-terminus of a 58 amino acid residue open-reading frame. These data extend the potential targets of the defensive arsenal of amphibian tegumental secretions to parasitic/predatory invertebrates......Amphibian defensive skin secretions are known to contain a plethora of biologically-active peptides that are often structural and functional analogues of vertebrate neuropeptides. Here we report the structures of two invertebrate neuropeptide analogues, IPPQFMRF amide (IF-8 amide) and EGDEDEFLRF...

  18. Psychological, Cultural and Family Factors in Incest and Family Sexual Abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkelhor, David

    1978-01-01

    This paper reviews clinical experience and research evidence about father-daughter incest and family sexual abuse, and suggests six factors important in its etiology: the personal characteristics of the offender; the role of the mother; a milieu of abandonment; subcultural isolation; poor family sexual boundaries; and opportunity factors. (Author)

  19. SV-IV Peptide1–16 reduces coagulant power in normal Factor V and Factor V Leiden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferrazzi Paola

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Native Factor V is an anticoagulant, but when activated by thrombin, Factor X or platelet proteases, it becomes a procoagulant. Due to these double properties, Factor V plays a crucial role in the regulation of coagulation/anticoagulation balance. Factor V Leiden (FVL disorder may lead to thrombophilia. Whether a reduction in the activation of Factor V or Factor V Leiden may correct the disposition to thrombophilia is unknown. Therefore we tested SV-IV Peptide 1–16 (i.e. a peptide derived by seminal protein vescicle number IV, SV-IV to assess its capacity to inhibit the procoagulant activity of normal clotting factor V or Factor V Leiden (FVL. We found that SV-IV protein has potent anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory properties and also exerts procoagulant activity. In the present work we show that the SV-IV Peptide 1–16, incubated with plasma containing normal Factor V or FVL plasma for 5 minutes reduces the procoagulant capacity of both substances. This is an anticoagulant effect whereas SV-IV protein is a procoagulant. This activity is effective both in terms of the coagulation tests, where coagulation times are increased, and in terms of biochemical tests conducted with purified molecules, where Factor X activation is reduced. Peptide 1–16 was, in the pure molecule system, first incubated for 5 minutes with purified Factor V then it was added to the mix of phosphatidylserine, Ca2+, Factor X and its chromogenic molecule Chromozym X. We observed a more than 50% reduction in lysis of chromogenic molecule Chromozym X by Factor Xa, compared to the sample without Peptide 1–16. Such reduction in Chromozym X lysis, is explained with the reduced activation of Factor X by partial inactivation of Factor V by Peptide 1–16. Thus our study demonstrates that Peptide 1–16 reduces the coagulation capacity of Factor V and Factor V Leiden in vitro, and, in turn, causes factor X reduced activation.

  20. A family of helminth molecules that modulate innate cell responses via molecular mimicry of host antimicrobial peptides.

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    Mark W Robinson

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Over the last decade a significant number of studies have highlighted the central role of host antimicrobial (or defence peptides in modulating the response of innate immune cells to pathogen-associated ligands. In humans, the most widely studied antimicrobial peptide is LL-37, a 37-residue peptide containing an amphipathic helix that is released via proteolytic cleavage of the precursor protein CAP18. Owing to its ability to protect against lethal endotoxaemia and clinically-relevant bacterial infections, LL-37 and its derivatives are seen as attractive candidates for anti-sepsis therapies. We have identified a novel family of molecules secreted by parasitic helminths (helminth defence molecules; HDMs that exhibit similar biochemical and functional characteristics to human defence peptides, particularly CAP18. The HDM secreted by Fasciola hepatica (FhHDM-1 adopts a predominantly α-helical structure in solution. Processing of FhHDM-1 by F. hepatica cathepsin L1 releases a 34-residue C-terminal fragment containing a conserved amphipathic helix. This is analogous to the proteolytic processing of CAP18 to release LL-37, which modulates innate cell activation by classical toll-like receptor (TLR ligands such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS. We show that full-length recombinant FhHDM-1 and a peptide analogue of the amphipathic C-terminus bind directly to LPS in a concentration-dependent manner, reducing its interaction with both LPS-binding protein (LBP and the surface of macrophages. Furthermore, FhHDM-1 and the amphipathic C-terminal peptide protect mice against LPS-induced inflammation by significantly reducing the release of inflammatory mediators from macrophages. We propose that HDMs, by mimicking the function of host defence peptides, represent a novel family of innate cell modulators with therapeutic potential in anti-sepsis treatments and prevention of inflammation.

  1. A family of helminth molecules that modulate innate cell responses via molecular mimicry of host antimicrobial peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Mark W; Donnelly, Sheila; Hutchinson, Andrew T; To, Joyce; Taylor, Nicole L; Norton, Raymond S; Perugini, Matthew A; Dalton, John P

    2011-05-01

    Over the last decade a significant number of studies have highlighted the central role of host antimicrobial (or defence) peptides in modulating the response of innate immune cells to pathogen-associated ligands. In humans, the most widely studied antimicrobial peptide is LL-37, a 37-residue peptide containing an amphipathic helix that is released via proteolytic cleavage of the precursor protein CAP18. Owing to its ability to protect against lethal endotoxaemia and clinically-relevant bacterial infections, LL-37 and its derivatives are seen as attractive candidates for anti-sepsis therapies. We have identified a novel family of molecules secreted by parasitic helminths (helminth defence molecules; HDMs) that exhibit similar biochemical and functional characteristics to human defence peptides, particularly CAP18. The HDM secreted by Fasciola hepatica (FhHDM-1) adopts a predominantly α-helical structure in solution. Processing of FhHDM-1 by F. hepatica cathepsin L1 releases a 34-residue C-terminal fragment containing a conserved amphipathic helix. This is analogous to the proteolytic processing of CAP18 to release LL-37, which modulates innate cell activation by classical toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We show that full-length recombinant FhHDM-1 and a peptide analogue of the amphipathic C-terminus bind directly to LPS in a concentration-dependent manner, reducing its interaction with both LPS-binding protein (LBP) and the surface of macrophages. Furthermore, FhHDM-1 and the amphipathic C-terminal peptide protect mice against LPS-induced inflammation by significantly reducing the release of inflammatory mediators from macrophages. We propose that HDMs, by mimicking the function of host defence peptides, represent a novel family of innate cell modulators with therapeutic potential in anti-sepsis treatments and prevention of inflammation.

  2. Trefoil factor 3 peptide regulates migration via a Twist-dependent pathway in gastric cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Qianqian; Gao, Jian; Li, Honglin; Guo, Wendong; Mao, Qi; Gao, Enhui; Zhu, Ya-qin

    2013-08-16

    Trefoil factor 3 (TFF3) is a member of the TFF-domain peptide family and essential in regulating cell migration and maintaining mucosal integrity in gastrointestinal tract. However, the role of TFF3 and its downstream regulating mechanisms in cancer cell migration remain unclear. We previously reported that TFF3 prolonged the up-regulation of Twist protein to modulate IL-8 secretion in intestinal epithelial cells. In this study, we investigated the role of Twist protein in TFF3-induced migration of SGC7901 cells. While Twist was activated by TFF3, siRNA-mediated knockdown of Twist abolished TFF3-induced cell migration. Furthermore, the migration related marker CK-8 as well as ZO-1 and MMP-9 was also regulated by TFF3 via a Twist-dependent mechanism. Our study suggests that Twist, as an important potential downstream effector, plays a key role in TFF3-modulated metastasis in gastric cancer and can be a promising therapeutic target against intestinal-type gastric cancer.

  3. Prediction of Protein-Peptide Interactions: Application of the XPairIT to Anthrax Lethal Factor and Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Prediction of Protein-Peptide Interactions: Application of the XPairIt API to Anthrax Lethal Factor and Substrates by Margaret M. Hurley and...Peptide Interactions: Application of the XPairIt API to Anthrax Lethal Factor and Substrates Margaret M. Hurley and Michael S. Sellers Weapons and...Prediction of Protein-Peptide Interactions: Application of the XPairIt API to Anthrax Lethal Factor and Substrates 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER ORAUW911QX-04-C

  4. Maximum Likelihood Factor Structure of the Family Environment Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Patrick C.

    1981-01-01

    Presents the maximum likelihood factor structure of the Family Environment Scale. The first bipolar dimension, "cohesion v conflict," measures relationship-centered concerns, while the second unipolar dimension is an index of "organizational and control" activities. (Author)

  5. Factors influencing utilization of Natural Family Planning among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Factors influencing utilization of Natural Family Planning among Child Bearing Women in Chilonga ... Medical Journal of Zambia ... The literature review was mainly obtained from studies conducted globally, regionally and Zambia inclusively.

  6. Diversification of the C-TERMINALLY ENCODED PEPTIDE (CEP) gene family in angiosperms, and evolution of plant-family specific CEP genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogilvie, Huw A; Imin, Nijat; Djordjevic, Michael A

    2014-10-06

    Small, secreted signaling peptides work in parallel with phytohormones to control important aspects of plant growth and development. Genes from the C-TERMINALLY ENCODED PEPTIDE (CEP) family produce such peptides which negatively regulate plant growth, especially under stress, and affect other important developmental processes. To illuminate how the CEP gene family has evolved within the plant kingdom, including its emergence, diversification and variation between lineages, a comprehensive survey was undertaken to identify and characterize CEP genes in 106 plant genomes. Using a motif-based system developed for this study to identify canonical CEP peptide domains, a total of 916 CEP genes and 1,223 CEP domains were found in angiosperms and for the first time in gymnosperms. This defines a narrow band for the emergence of CEP genes in plants, from the divergence of lycophytes to the angiosperm/gymnosperm split. Both CEP genes and domains were found to have diversified in angiosperms, particularly in the Poaceae and Solanaceae plant families. Multispecies orthologous relationships were determined for 22% of identified CEP genes, and further analysis of those groups found selective constraints upon residues within the CEP peptide and within the previously little-characterized variable region. An examination of public Oryza sativa RNA-Seq datasets revealed an expression pattern that links OsCEP5 and OsCEP6 to panicle development and flowering, and CEP gene trees reveal these emerged from a duplication event associated with the Poaceae plant family. The characterization of the plant-family specific CEP genes OsCEP5 and OsCEP6, the association of CEP genes with angiosperm-specific development processes like panicle development, and the diversification of CEP genes in angiosperms provides further support for the hypothesis that CEP genes have been integral to the evolution of novel traits within the angiosperm lineage. Beyond these findings, the comprehensive set of CEP

  7. Conservation of a helix-stabilizing dipole moment in the PP-fold family of regulatory peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørnholm, B; Jørgensen, Flemming Steen; Schwartz, T W

    1993-01-01

    of the electrostatic properties of five representative members of the PP-fold family of peptides (human neuropeptide Y, human peptide YY, human pancreatic polypeptide, avian PP, and lamprey peptide methionine tyrosine) shows that this characteristic charge clustering gives rise to a common dipole moment of 325-450 D...... arrangement were performed in two ways: (1) by the use of a Poisson-Boltzmann approach which allows for an estimate of the screening effect, and (2) by the use of a uniform dielectric model (Coulomb's law). It is found that the alpha-helix is stabilized by approximately 5-10 kcal/mol due to electrostatic...... forces alone when the screening effect is considered. This energy is of the same order of magnitude as the enthalpy change for the unfolding of avian PP (approximately 30 kcal/mol), strongly indicating that the charge-dipole interactions are of significant importance for the stability of the three...

  8. Social, familial and psychological risk factors for psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shevlin, Mark; McElroy, Eoin; Christoffersen, Mogens Nygaard

    2016-01-01

    A broad range of biological, genetic, environmental, and psychological riskfactors for psychosis have been reported. However most research studies have tended to focus on one explanatory factor. The aim of this study wasto use data from a large Danish birth cohort to examine the associationsbetween...... psychosis and a broad range of familial (advanced paternal age, family dissolution, parental psychosis), environmental (urbanicity,deprivation) and psychological factors (childhood adversity). Findings indicated that all types of risk factors were significantly associated with psychosis. In conclusion......, large scale cohort studies using the Danish registry system is a powerful way of assessing the relative impact ofdifferent risk factors for psychosis....

  9. Anti-cyclic citrullinated peptides positivity rate in patients with familial Mediterranean fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceri, Mevlut; Unverdi, Selman; Altay, Mustafa; Ureten, Kemal; Oztürk, M Akif; Gönen, Namik; Duranay, Murat

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the prevalence and levels of anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies (anti-CCP) in patients with familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) with and without arthritis. Eighty-three patients with FMF and 43 healthy controls were included in the study. Thirty seven FMF patients had a history of arthritis, and 46 patients did not. Serum antibodies directed to the anti-CCP were assessed with a commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kit. Values 100U high positive. Positivity rate of anti-CCP in the whole FMF group (14.5%) was three-fold higher than the control group (4.7%). However, the difference failed to achieve a statistically significant level (p=0.09). Anti-CCP levels were 21±30.1 in patients with arthritis and 13.1±10.3 in the non arthritic group (p40U/ml). Anti-CCP levels were between 20-39U/ ml in 2FMF patients without arthritis and in 2 healthy controls. Anti-CCP positivity rate is higher in FMF patients with arthritis (27%) than healthy controls (4.7%) (p<0.005). Anti-CCP prevalence is higher in FMF patients with arthritis than without arthritis, and that a significant proportion of FMF patients with arthritis (13.5%) had moderate-high titers of anti-CCP. Therefore, anti-CCP antibodies may not be a reliable indicator to differentiate between FMF arthritis and rheumatoid arthritis.

  10. A familial factor in the development of colour agnosia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijboer, Tanja C W; van Zandvoort, Martine J E; de Haan, Edward H F

    2007-04-09

    An important aspect of research into the link between genes and behaviour concerns the identification of familial determination. There is evidence for familial factors in selective deficits, such as developmental dyslexia and developmental prosopagnosia. Colour agnosia concerns a selective neuropsychological condition in which colour perception is intact, while the identification and naming of colour is disrupted. We recently demonstrated that this deficit can occur as a developmental deficit. Here, we show that there is a familial factor in the development of colour agnosia by reporting the colour processing abilities of the mother and the daughters of a man with developmental colour agnosia.

  11. Cross-Family Transcription Factor Interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bemer, Marian; Dijk, van Aalt-Jan; Immink, Richard G.H.; Angenent, Gerco C.

    2017-01-01

    Specific and dynamic gene expression strongly depends on transcription factor (TF) activity and most plant TFs function in a combinatorial fashion. They can bind to DNA and control the expression of the corresponding gene in an additive fashion or cooperate by physical interactions, forming larger p

  12. Family functioning and risk factors for disordered eating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyke, Jennifer; Matsen, Julie

    2013-12-01

    This study investigated whether any of seven factors of family dysfunction predicted five risk factors for developing eating disorders in young adult women. Participants completed demographic questions, the McMaster Family Assessment Device (Epstein, Baldwin, & Bishop, 1983) and the Setting Conditions for Anorexia Nervosa Scale (Slade & Dewey, 1986) online. Five stepwise multiple regressions evaluated whether FAD scores predicted any of the eating disorder risk factors. Unhealthy affective responsiveness predicted general dissatisfaction and social and personal anxiety, and unhealthy general functioning predicted adolescent problems. No FAD factors predicted perfectionism or weight control. These results confirm the importance of families' affective responsiveness and general functioning to the risk of developing eating disorders. However, the lack of relationship among problem-solving, communication, roles, affective involvement, or behavior control with any of the risk factors for eating disorders warrants further investigation.

  13. A novel small peptide as an epidermal growth factor receptor targeting ligand for nanodelivery in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han CY

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Cui-yan Han,1,2 Li-ling Yue,2 Ling-yu Tai,1 Li Zhou,2 Xue-yan Li,2 Gui-hua Xing,2 Xing-gang Yang,1 Ming-shuang Sun,1 Wei-san Pan1 1School of Pharmacy, Shenyang Pharmaceutical University, Shenyang, People’s Republic of China; 2Qiqihar Medical University, Qiqihar, People’s Republic of China Abstract: The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR serves an important function in the proliferation of tumors in humans and is an effective target for the treatment of cancer. In this paper, we studied the targeting characteristics of small peptides (AEYLR, EYINQ, and PDYQQD that were derived from three major autophosphorylation sites of the EGFR C-terminus domain in vitro. These small peptides were labeled with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC and used the peptide LARLLT as a positive control, which bound to putative EGFR selected from a virtual peptide library by computer-aided design, and the independent peptide RALEL as a negative control. Analyses with flow cytometry and an internalization assay using NCI-H1299 and K562 with high EGFR and no EGFR expression, respectively, indicated that FITC-AEYLR had high EGFR targeting activity. Biotin-AEYLR that was specifically bound to human EGFR proteins demonstrated a high affinity for human non-small-cell lung tumors. We found that AEYLR peptide-conjugated, nanostructured lipid carriers enhanced specific cellular uptake in vitro during a process that was apparently mediated by tumor cells with high-expression EGFR. Analysis of the MTT assay indicated that the AEYLR peptide did not significantly stimulate or inhibit the growth activity of the cells. These findings suggest that, when mediated by EGFR, AEYLR may be a potentially safe and efficient delivery ligand for targeted chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and gene therapy. Keywords: EGFR, small peptide, tumor targeting, lung cancer, NLC

  14. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Peptide Ligands Explored by Competition Assay and Isothermal Titration Calorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reille-Seroussi, Marie; Gaucher, Jean-François; Desole, Claudia; Gagey-Eilstein, Nathalie; Brachet, Franck; Broutin, Isabelle; Vidal, Michel; Broussy, Sylvain

    2015-08-25

    The v114* cyclic peptide has been identified as a tight vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) ligand. Here we report on the use of isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), 96-well plate competition assay, and circular dichroism (CD) to explore the binding determinants of a new set of related peptides. Anti-VEGF antibodies are currently used in the clinic for regulating angiogenesis in cancer and age-related macular degeneration treatment. In this context, our aim is to develop smaller molecular entities with high affinity for the growth factor by a structure activity relationship approach. The cyclic disulfide peptide v114* was modified in several ways, including truncation, substitution, and variation of the size and nature of the cycle. The results indicated that truncation or substitution of the four N-terminal amino acids did not cause severe loss in affinity, allowing potential peptide labeling. Increase of the cycle size or substitution of the disulfide bridge with a thioether linkage drastically decreased the affinity, due to an enthalpy penalty. The leucine C-terminal residue positively contributed to affinity. Cysteine N-terminal acetylation induced favorable ΔΔG° and ΔΔH° of binding, which correlated with free peptide CD spectra changes. We also propose a biochemical model to extrapolate Ki from IC50 values measured in the displacement assay. These calculated Ki correlate well with the Kd values determined by extensive direct and reverse ITC measurements.

  15. Transcription Factor Families Regulate the Anthocyanin Biosynthetic Pathway in Capsicum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthocyanin structural gene transcription requires the expression of at least one member of each of three transcription factor families - MYC, MYB and WD40. These transcription factors form a complex that binds to structural gene promoters, thereby modulating gene expression. Capsicum annuum display...

  16. Greater prevalence of seropositivity for anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibody in unaffected first-degree relatives in multicase rheumatoid arthritis-affected families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seong-Kyu; Bae, Jisuk; Lee, Hwajeong; Kim, Ji Hun; Park, Sung-Hoon; Choe, Jung-Yoon

    2013-01-01

    This study determined the prevalence and determinants of seropositivity for rheumatoid factor (RF), anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP) antibody, and anti-mutated citrullinated vimentin (anti-MCV) antibody in unaffected first-degree relatives (FDRs) of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. A total of 337 subjects (135 with RA and 202 FDRs) were enrolled in this case-control study. Serum RF, anti-CCP antibody, and anti-MCV antibody were assayed. Subjects in multicase families (≥ 2 affected FDRs within the same family) were identified. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to identify risk factors associated with RA-related autoantibodies. Seropositivity for RF, anti-CCP antibody, or anti-MCV antibody was detected in 14.4%, 5.0%, or 13.4% of unaffected FDRs, respectively. Anti-CCP antibody seropositivity was more prevalent in FDRs in multicase families (17.8%) than in those not in multicase families (1.3%, p autoantibodies were detected in the FDR group (between RF and anti-CCP antibody: r = 0.366, p < 0.0001; between RF and anti-MCV antibody: r = 0.343, p < 0.0001; and between anti-CCP antibody and anti-MCV antibody: r = 0.849, p < 0.0001). After adjustment for age and sex, anti-CCP antibody seropositivity in FDRs was significantly associated with being in a multicase family (odds ratio, 49.8; 95% confidence interval, 5.6 to 441.6). The association between anti-CCP antibody seropositivity in unaffected FDRs and being in a multicase family suggests that genetic and/or environmental factors may increase the risk for RA development in unaffected FDRs.

  17. Personality factors in the Long Life Family Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Stacy L; Sun, Jenny X; Sebastiani, Paola

    2013-01-01

    within average population values. No significant differences were found between long-lived family members and their spouses.Discussion. Personality factors and more specifically low neuroticism and high extraversion may be important for achieving extreme old age. In addition, personality scores of family......Objectives. To evaluate personality profiles of Long Life Family Study participants relative to population norms and offspring of centenarians from the New England Centenarian Study.Method. Personality domains of agreeableness, conscientiousness, extraversion, neuroticism, and openness were...... assessed with the NEO Five-Factor Inventory in 4,937 participants from the Long Life Family Study (mean age 70 years). A linear mixed model of age and gender was implemented adjusting for other covariates. RESULTS: A significant age trend was found in all five personality domains. On average, the offspring...

  18. Neuritogenic and neuroprotective properties of peptide agonists of the fibroblast growth factor receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Shizhong; Bock, Elisabeth Marianne; Berezin, Vladimir

    2010-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs) interact with their cognate ligands, FGFs, and with a number of cell adhesion molecules (CAMs), such as the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM), mediating a wide range of events during the development and maintenance of the nervous system. Determination...... of protein structure, in silico modeling and biological studies have recently resulted in the identification of FGFR binding peptides derived from various FGFs and NCAM mimicking the effects of these molecules with regard to their neuritogenic and neuroprotective properties. This review focuses on recently...... developed functional peptide agonists of FGFR with possible therapeutic potential....

  19. Neuritogenic and Neuroprotective Properties of Peptide Agonists of the Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shizhong Li

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs interact with their cognate ligands, FGFs, and with a number of cell adhesion molecules (CAMs, such as the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM, mediating a wide range of events during the development and maintenance of the nervous system. Determination of protein structure, in silico modeling and biological studies have recently resulted in the identification of FGFR binding peptides derived from various FGFs and NCAM mimicking the effects of these molecules with regard to their neuritogenic and neuroprotective properties. This review focuses on recently developed functional peptide agonists of FGFR with possible therapeutic potential.

  20. Family - protective factor to prevent suicidal behavior in adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioana R. Rusu

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of our research was to establish a possible correlation between suicide risk in adolescents and a series ofintra-familial protective factors such as family harmony, intact families, increased family involvement in child education, empathy, ability toexpress emotions. Materials and Methods The study comprised the 1143 pupils, aged between 14 and 16 years from Cluj and Maramures counties,that participated in the SEYLE baseline evaluation. Results: Adolescents who have no problems with parents (p<0.001, being understoodby them (p<0.001 and having the belief that family is very important to them (p<0.001, are protected from the risk of committing suicide. Atthe same time, parents’ ability to listen children opinion (p<0.001 and help them take important decisions (p<0.001, the time spent discussingwith teens the problems they’re going through (p<0.001, and the fact that parents know what they do in their spare time (p=0.003 showsprotective factors of suicidal behavior with a statistically significant value in this study.Conclusion: The family is a psychosocial system witha major impact on adolescents’ personality formation. The attitude towards children, the parents availability to important moments for teens,the ability to be both subjective and objective towards their children initiatives, are factors of protection against adolescents’ suicidal behavior.

  1. Family structure and family education as the factors for personal development of preschooler

    OpenAIRE

    Golovey L.A.; Vasilenko V.E.; Savenysheva S.S.

    2016-01-01

    This article is devoted to analysis of personal characteristics of preschoolers in relation to the factors of gender, family structure (complete or one-parent, the presence of sibling) and family upbringing (parenting styles, parent-child emotional interaction). The study involved 155 boys, 157 girls and 312 mothers from Saint-Petersburg, Novosibirsk and Arkhangelsk. The age of children — from 4 to 7 years. We used the test and projective techniques. The study revealed that children from sing...

  2. Children's disaster reactions: the influence of family and social factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfefferbaum, Betty; Jacobs, Anne K; Houston, J Brian; Griffin, Natalie

    2015-07-01

    This review examines family (demographics, parent reactions and interactions, and parenting style) and social (remote effects, disaster media coverage, exposure to secondary adversities, and social support) factors that influence children's disaster reactions. Lower family socioeconomic status, high parental stress, poor parental coping, contact with media coverage, and exposure to secondary adversities have been associated with adverse outcomes. Social support may provide protection to children in the post-disaster environment though more research is needed to clarify the effects of certain forms of social support. The interaction of the factors described in this review with culture needs further exploration.

  3. Prevention of childhood obesity: sociocultural and familial factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruss, Mozhdeh B; Morris, Joseph; Dannison, Linda

    2003-08-01

    This study examined sociocultural and familial factors related to the prevention of childhood obesity. Primary caregivers of 6- to 10-year-old children representing several ethnic populations in Saipan participated in 4 focus groups (N=32). Trained moderators used semi-structured interviews and qualitative methods were used in data analysis. A central theme with several related factors emerged. The theme was a conflict expressed by the primary caregiver between sociocultural values, family expectations, traditional dietary beliefs and attitudes, and knowledge about food and disease. These findings have important implications for designing culturally sensitive interventions for prevention of childhood obesity.

  4. Two novel tyrosine-containing peptides (Tyr(4)) of the adipokinetic hormone family in beetles of the families Coccinellidae and Silphidae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gäde, Gerd; Šimek, Petr; Marco, Heather G

    2015-11-01

    Novel members of the adipokinetic hormone family of peptides have been identified from the corpora cardiaca (CC) of two species of beetles representing two families, the Silphidae and the Coccinellidae. A crude CC extract (0.3 gland equivalents) of the burying beetle, Nicrophorus vespilloides, was active in mobilizing trehalose in a heterologous assay using the cockroach Periplaneta americana, whereas the CC extract (0.5 gland equivalents) of the ladybird beetle, Harmonia axyridis, exhibited no hypertrehalosemic activity. Primary sequences of one adipokinetic hormone from each species were elucidated by liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray mass spectrometry (LC-MS). The multiple MS(N) electrospray mass data revealed an octapeptide with an unusual tyrosine residue at position 4 for each species: pGlu-Leu-Thr-Tyr-Ser-Thr-Gly-Trp amide for N. vespilloides (code-named Nicve-AKH) and pGlu-Ile-Asn-Tyr-Ser-Thr-Gly-Trp amide for H. axyridis (code-named Harax-AKH). Assignment of the correct sequences was confirmed by synthesis of the peptides and co-elution in reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection or by LC-MS. Moreover, synthetic peptides were shown to be active in the heterologous cockroach assay system, but Harax-AKH only at a dose of 30 pmol, which explains the negative result with the crude CC extract. It appears that the tyrosine residue at position 4 can be used as a diagnostic feature for certain beetle adipokinetic peptides, because this feature has not been found in another order other than Coleoptera.

  5. Characterization, tissue distribution and regulation by fasting of the agouti family of peptides in the sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agulleiro, Maria Josep; Cortés, Raúl; Leal, Esther; Ríos, Diana; Sánchez, Elisa; Cerdá-Reverter, José Miguel

    2014-09-01

    The melanocortin system is one of the most complex hormonal systems in vertebrates. Atypically, the signaling of melanocortin receptors is regulated by the binding of endogenous antagonists, named agouti-signaling protein (ASIP) and agouti-related protein (AGRP). Teleost specific genome duplication (TSGD) rendered new gene copies in teleost fish and up to four different genes of the agouti family of peptides have been characterized. In this paper, molecular cloning was used to characterize mRNA of the agouti family of peptides in sea bass. Four different genes were identified: AGRP1, ASIP1, AGRP2 and ASIP2. The AGRP1 gene is mainly expressed in the brain whereas ASIP1 is mainly expressed in the ventral skin. Both ASIP2 and AGRP2 are expressed in the brain and the pineal gland but also in some peripheral tissues. Immunocytochemical studies demonstrated that AGRP1 is exclusively expressed within the lateral tuberal nucleus, the homologue of the mammalian arcuate nucleus in fish. Long-term fasting (8-29 days) increased the hypothalamic expression of AGRP1 but depressed AGRP2 expression (15-29 days). In contrast, the hypothalamic expression of ASIP2 was upregulated during short-term fasting suggesting that this peptide could be involved in the short term regulation of food intake in the sea bass.

  6. The WRKY transcription factor family in Brachypodium distachyon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tripathi Prateek

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A complete assembled genome sequence of wheat is not yet available. Therefore, model plant systems for wheat are very valuable. Brachypodium distachyon (Brachypodium is such a system. The WRKY family of transcription factors is one of the most important families of plant transcriptional regulators with members regulating important agronomic traits. Studies of WRKY transcription factors in Brachypodium and wheat therefore promise to lead to new strategies for wheat improvement. Results We have identified and manually curated the WRKY transcription factor family from Brachypodium using a pipeline designed to identify all potential WRKY genes. 86 WRKY transcription factors were found, a total higher than all other current databases. We therefore propose that our numbering system (BdWRKY1-BdWRKY86 becomes the standard nomenclature. In the JGI v1.0 assembly of Brachypodium with the MIPS/JGI v1.0 annotation, nine of the transcription factors have no gene model and eleven gene models are probably incorrectly predicted. In total, twenty WRKY transcription factors (23.3% do not appear to have accurate gene models. To facilitate use of our data, we have produced The Database of Brachypodium distachyon WRKY Transcription Factors. Each WRKY transcription factor has a gene page that includes predicted protein domains from MEME analyses. These conserved protein domains reflect possible input and output domains in signaling. The database also contains a BLAST search function where a large dataset of WRKY transcription factors, published genes, and an extensive set of wheat ESTs can be searched. We also produced a phylogram containing the WRKY transcription factor families from Brachypodium, rice, Arabidopsis, soybean, and Physcomitrella patens, together with published WRKY transcription factors from wheat. This phylogenetic tree provides evidence for orthologues, co-orthologues, and paralogues of Brachypodium WRKY transcription factors

  7. Adrenomedullin A Novel Peptide Requires Coordination Of Genetic Physiologic And Environmental Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. R. Padma

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A healthy pregnancy requires strict coordination of genetic physiologic and environmental factors. The relatively common incidence of infertility and pregnancy complications has resulted in increased interest in understanding the mechanisms that underlie normal versus abnormal pregnancy. The peptide hormone adrenomedullin has recently been the focus of some exciting breakthroughs in the pregnancy field. Adrenomedullin ADM is a 52-amino acid peptide with structural homology to calcitonin gene-related peptide CGRP initially isolated from human pheochromocytoma. ADM is synthesized by many mammalian tissues including the adrenal medulla endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells myocardium and central nervous system. ADM binds to plasma membrane receptors composed of calcitonin receptor-like receptor CRLR a member of serpentine receptor superfamily and receptor activity modifying protein RAMP type 2 or 3. ADM has also some affinity for CGRP receptor composed of CRLR and RAMP1. Supported by mechanistic studies in genetic animal models there continues to be a growing body of evidence demonstrating the importance of adrenomedullin protein levels in a variety of human pregnancy complications. With measurement of foetal resorption sites we can examine the importance of adrenomedullin a peptide hormone in pregnancy which alters due to genetic physiologic and environmental factors. A growing body of evidence illustrates AM as a pivotal component in normal physiology and disease with marked beneficial effects in the host defense mechanism.

  8. Factors associated with family-centered involvement in family practice--a cross-sectional multivariate analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutsch, Tobias; Frese, Thomas; Sandholzer, Hagen

    2014-01-01

    The importance of a family-centered approach in family practice has been emphasized. Knowledge about factors associated with higher family-centered involvement seems beneficial to stimulate its realization. German office-based family physicians completed a questionnaire addressing several aspects of family-centered care. Logistic regression was used to identify associations with the involvement overall and in different domains: routine inquiry and documentation of family-related information, family orientation regarding diagnosis and treatment, family-oriented dialogues, family conferences, and case-related collaboration with marriage and family therapists. We found significant associations between physicians' family-centered involvement and expected patient receptiveness, perceived impact of the family's influence on health, self-perceived psychosocial family-care competences (overall and concerning concepts for family orientation, psychosocial intervention in family conferences, and the communication of the idea of family counseling), advanced training in psychosocial primary care (PPC), personal acquaintance with family therapists (regarding case-related collaboration), and rural office environment. Increased emphasis on the family's influence on health in medical education and training, the provision of concepts for a family-centered perspective, and versatile skills for psychosocial intervention and inquiry of patient preferences, as well as the strengthening of networking between family physicians and family therapists, might promote the family-centered approach in family practice.

  9. An Unusual Family of Glycosylated Peptides Isolated from Dendroaspis angusticeps Venom and Characterized by Combination of Collision Induced and Electron Transfer Dissociation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinton, Loïc; Gilles, Nicolas; Smargiasso, Nicolas; Kiehne, Andrea; de Pauw, Edwin

    2011-11-01

    This study describes the structural characterization of a totally new family of peptides from the venom of the snake green mamba ( Dendroaspis angusticeps). Interestingly, these peptides differ in several points from other already known mamba toxins. First of all, they exhibit very small molecular masses, ranging from 1.3 to 2.4 kDa. The molecular mass of classical mamba toxins is in the range of 7 to 25 kDa. Second, the new peptides do not contain disulfide bonds, a post-translational modification commonly encountered in animal toxins. The third difference is the very high proportion of proline residues in the sequence accounting for about one-third of the sequence. Finally, these new peptides reveal a carbohydrate moiety, indicating a glycosylation in the sequence. The last two features have made the structural characterization of the new peptides by mass spectrometry a real analytical challenge. Peptides were characterized by a combined use of MALDI- TOF/TOF and nanoESI-IT-ETD experiments to determine not only the peptide sequence but also the composition and the position of the carbohydrate moiety. Anyway, such small glycosylated and proline-rich toxins are totally different from any other known snake peptide and form, as a consequence, a new family of peptides.

  10. The role of family and maternal factors in childhood obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Lisa Y; Byrne, Susan M; Davis, Elizabeth A; Blair, Eve; Jacoby, Peter; Zubrick, Stephen R

    2007-06-04

    To investigate the relationship between a child's weight and a broad range of family and maternal factors. Cross-sectional data from a population-based prospective study, collected between January 2004 and December 2005, for 329 children aged 6-13 years (192 healthy weight, 97 overweight and 40 obese) and their mothers (n=265) recruited from a paediatric hospital endocrinology department and eight randomly selected primary schools in Perth, Western Australia. Height, weight and body mass index (BMI) of children and mothers; demographic information; maternal depression, anxiety, stress and self-esteem; general family functioning; parenting style; and negative life events. In a multilevel model, maternal BMI and family structure (single-parent v two-parent families) were the only significant predictors of child BMI z scores. Childhood obesity is not associated with adverse maternal or family characteristics such as maternal depression, negative life events, poor general family functioning or ineffective parenting style. However, having an overweight mother and a single-parent (single-mother) family increases the likelihood of a child being overweight or obese.

  11. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. LXXIII. Nomenclature for the Formyl Peptide Receptor (FPR) Family

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Richard D. Ye; François Boulay; Ji Ming Wang; Claes Dahlgren; Craig Gerard; Marc Parmentier; Charles N. Serhan; Philip M. Murphy

    2009-01-01

    Formyl peptide receptors (FPRs) are a small group of seven-transmembrane domain, G protein-coupled receptors that are expressed mainly by mammalian phagocytic leukocytes and are known to be important in host defense and inflammation...

  12. Factors Affecting the Form of Substitute Family Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Chrenková

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the system of care for endangered children has changed from the institutional as well as legislative point of view. In one of the partial areas of ongoing changes, research activities realised within the Students’ Grant Competition called The Factors Affecting the Form of Substitute Family Care are being focused. We deal with this topic because various forms of substitute family care are distinguished in the Czech Republic, where children are placed for various reasons, but we do not know the correct context of such placements. The main aim of the realised research was to find out the frequency of choosing a given form of placing children in substitute family care according to followed variables. The research sample of the quantitative research was consisted of children placed in one of the forms of substitute family care in the Moravian-Silesian region.

  13. The AP2/EREBP family of plant transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riechmann, J L; Meyerowitz, E M

    1998-06-01

    AP2 (APETALA2) and EREBPs (ethylene-responsive element binding proteins) are the prototypic members of a family of transcription factors unique to plants, whose distinguishing characteristic is that they contain the so-called AP2 DNA-binding domain. AP2/ REBP genes form a large multigene family, and they play a variety of roles throughout the plant life cycle: from being key regulators of several developmental processes, like floral organ identity determination or control of leaf epidermal cell identity, to forming part of the mechanisms used by plants to respond to various types of biotic and environmental stress. The molecular and biochemical characteristics of the AP2/EREBP transcription factors and their diverse functions are reviewed here, and this multigene family is analyzed within the context of the Arabidopsis thaliana genome sequence project.

  14. Is Nonsuicidal Self Injury Associated With Parenting and Family Factors?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baetens, Imke; Claes, Laurence; Martin, Graham; Onghena, Patrick; Grietens, Hans; Van Leeuwen, Karla; Pieters, Ciska; Wiersema, Jan R.; Griffith, James W.

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigates the association of parenting and family factors with nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) in preadolescents. A sample of 1,439 preadolescents and their parents were assessed by means of (a) adolescent-reported parenting behaviors (support and behavioral/psychological control

  15. Religious beliefs, coping skills and responsibility to family as factors ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    control groups were compared using psychosocial tests that ... Methods. The study was conducted in Kota Kinabalu, capital of Sabah, .... variables affects DSH individuals and is a substantial risk factor ... Don't know ... Comparison of scores for religious beliefs and responsibility to family between DSH patients and controls.

  16. Is Nonsuicidal Self Injury Associated With Parenting and Family Factors?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baetens, Imke; Claes, Laurence; Martin, Graham; Onghena, Patrick; Grietens, Hans; Van Leeuwen, Karla; Pieters, Ciska; Wiersema, Jan R.; Griffith, James W.

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigates the association of parenting and family factors with nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) in preadolescents. A sample of 1,439 preadolescents and their parents were assessed by means of (a) adolescent-reported parenting behaviors (support and behavioral/psychological control

  17. Familial and Institutional Factors: Job Satisfaction for Female Counselor Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander-Albritton, Carrie; Hill, Nicole R.

    2015-01-01

    Job satisfaction based on familial and institutional factors was explored for 157 female counselor educators. Results indicate that female associate professors had lower levels of intrinsic rewards domain after controlling for institutional type. Parental responsibility and partnership status were equivocal, with significant interaction effects…

  18. Familial and Temperamental Risk Factors for Social Anxiety Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirshfeld-Becker, Dina R.

    2010-01-01

    Social anxiety disorder (SAD) is a common disorder that can lead to significant impairment. In this chapter, the author provides background on the disorder and reviews hypothesized familial and temperamental risk factors. In particular, it highlights the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) Longitudinal Study of Children at Risk for Anxiety, now…

  19. Familial and Institutional Factors: Job Satisfaction for Female Counselor Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander-Albritton, Carrie; Hill, Nicole R.

    2015-01-01

    Job satisfaction based on familial and institutional factors was explored for 157 female counselor educators. Results indicate that female associate professors had lower levels of intrinsic rewards domain after controlling for institutional type. Parental responsibility and partnership status were equivocal, with significant interaction effects…

  20. Effect of natriuretic peptide family on the oxidized LDL-induced migration of human coronary artery smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohno, M; Yokokawa, K; Yasunari, K; Kano, H; Minami, M; Ueda, M; Yoshikawa, J

    1997-10-01

    The migration of medial smooth muscle cells (SMCs) into the intima is proposed to be an important process of intimal thickening in atherosclerotic lesions. The present study examined the possible effect of a novel endothelium-derived relaxing peptide, C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP), on oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-induced migration of cultured human coronary artery SMCs by the Boyden's chamber method. The effect of CNP was compared with that of atrial and brain natriuretic peptides (ANP and BNP, respectively). Oxidized LDL stimulates SMC migration in a concentration-dependent manner between 20 and 200 micrograms/mL. This stimulation was chemotactic in nature but was not chemokinetic. By contrast, native LDL was without significant activity. CNP-22 clearly inhibited SMC migration stimulated with 200 micrograms/mL oxidized LDL in a concentration-dependent manner between 10(-9) and 10(-6) mol/L. ANP-(1-28) and BNP-32 also inhibited oxidized LDL-induced SMC migration at concentrations of 10(-7) and 10(-6) mol/L, but these effects were weaker than the effect of CNP-22. Such inhibition by these natriuretic peptides was paralleled by an increase in the cellular level of cGMP. Oxidized LDL-induced migration was significantly inhibited by a stable analogue of cGMP, 8-bromo-cGMP, or an activator of the cytosolic guanylate cyclase, sodium nitroprusside. These natriuretic peptides did not suppress the cell adhesion either in the absence or presence of oxidized LDL. These data indicate that oxidized LDL stimulates migration of human coronary artery SMCs and that natriuretic peptides, especially CNP, inhibit this stimulated SMC migration, at least in part, through a cGMP-dependent process. Taken together with the finding that oxidized LDL is present in the intima, CNP may play a role as a local antimigration factor during the process of intimal thickening in hypercholesterolemia-induced coronary atherosclerosis.

  1. Transamidase subunit GAA1/GPAA1 is a M28 family metallo-peptide-synthetase that catalyzes the peptide bond formation between the substrate protein’s omega-site and the GPI lipid anchor’s phosphoethanolamine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenhaber, Birgit; Eisenhaber, Stephan; Kwang, Toh Yew; Grüber, Gerhard; Eisenhaber, Frank

    2014-01-01

    The transamidase subunit GAA1/GPAA1 is predicted to be the enzyme that catalyzes the attachment of the glycosylphosphatidyl (GPI) lipid anchor to the carbonyl intermediate of the substrate protein at the ω-site. Its ~300-amino acid residue lumenal domain is a M28 family metallo-peptide-synthetase with an α/β hydrolase fold, including a central 8-strand β-sheet and a single metal (most likely zinc) ion coordinated by 3 conserved polar residues. Phosphoethanolamine is used as an adaptor to make the non-peptide GPI lipid anchor look chemically similar to the N terminus of a peptide. PMID:24743167

  2. Transamidase subunit GAA1/GPAA1 is a M28 family metallo-peptide-synthetase that catalyzes the peptide bond formation between the substrate protein's omega-site and the GPI lipid anchor's phosphoethanolamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenhaber, Birgit; Eisenhaber, Stephan; Kwang, Toh Yew; Grüber, Gerhard; Eisenhaber, Frank

    2014-01-01

    The transamidase subunit GAA1/GPAA1 is predicted to be the enzyme that catalyzes the attachment of the glycosylphosphatidyl (GPI) lipid anchor to the carbonyl intermediate of the substrate protein at the ω-site. Its ~300-amino acid residue lumenal domain is a M28 family metallo-peptide-synthetase with an α/β hydrolase fold, including a central 8-strand β-sheet and a single metal (most likely zinc) ion coordinated by 3 conserved polar residues. Phosphoethanolamine is used as an adaptor to make the non-peptide GPI lipid anchor look chemically similar to the N terminus of a peptide.

  3. Common familial risk factors for schizophrenia and diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Debra L; Mackinnon, Andrew; Morgan, Vera A; Watts, Gerald F; Castle, David J; Waterreus, Anna; Galletly, Cherrie A

    2016-05-01

    The co-occurrence of type 2 diabetes and psychosis is an important form of medical comorbidity within individuals, but no large-scale study has evaluated comorbidity within families. The aim of this study was to determine whether there is evidence for familial comorbidity between type 2 diabetes and psychosis. Data were analysed from an observational study of a nationally representative sample of 1642 people with psychosis who were in contact with psychiatric services at the time of survey (The 2010 Australian National Survey of Psychosis). Participants were aged 18-64 years and met World Health Organization's International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision diagnostic criteria for a psychotic disorder (857 with schizophrenia, 319 with bipolar disorder with psychotic features, 293 with schizoaffective disorder, 81 with depressive psychosis and 92 with delusional disorder or other non-organic psychoses). Logistic regression was used to estimate the association between a family history of diabetes and a family history of schizophrenia. A positive family history of diabetes was associated with a positive family history of schizophrenia in those with a psychotic disorder (odds ratio = 1.35, p = 0.01, adjusted for age and gender). The association was different in those with an affective versus non-affective psychosis (odds ratio = 0.613, p = 0.019, adjusted for age and gender) and was significant only in those with a non-affective psychosis, specifically schizophrenia (odds ratio = 1.58, p = 0.005, adjusted for age and sex). Adjustment for demographic factors in those with schizophrenia slightly strengthened the association (odds ratio = 1.74, p = 0.001, adjusted for age, gender, diagnosis, ethnicity, education, employment, income and marital status). Elevated risk for type 2 diabetes in people with schizophrenia is not simply a consequence of antipsychotic medication; type 2 diabetes and schizophrenia share familial risk factors. © The Royal Australian and New

  4. Family of pH-Low-Insertion-Peptides (pHLIPs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weerakkody, Dhammika; Moshnikova, Anna; Moshnikova, Valentina; Thakur, Mak; Rossi, Bethany; Engelman, Donald; Andreev, Oleg; Reshetnyak, Yana

    2012-02-01

    pHLIP (pH (Low) Insertion Peptide) is a novel delivery system for targeting of acidic diseased tissue such as solid tumors, sites of inflammation, arthritis and other pathological states. The molecular mechanism of pHLIP action is based on pH-dependent insertion and folding of pHLIP in membrane. We performed sequence variation and investigated 16 pHLIP variants with main goals of understanding the main principles of peptide-lipid interactions and tune delivery capability of pHLIP. The biophysical studies including thermodynamics and kinetics of the peptides interaction with a lipid bilayer of liposomes and cellular membranes were carried out. We found that peptides association to membrane at neutral and low pH could be modulated by 3-4 times. The apparent pK of transition from surface bound to membrane-inserted state could be tuned from 6.5 to 4.5. The rate of peptide's insertion across a bilayer could be enhanced 100 times compared to parent pHLIP. As a result, blood clearance and tumor targeting were modulated in a significant degree. The work is supported by NIH grants CA133890 to OAA, DME, YRK.

  5. Population impact of familial and environmental risk factors for schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Holger Jelling; Nielsen, Philip Finn Rising; Pedersen, Carsten B

    2014-01-01

    Although several studies have examined the relative contributions of familial and environmental risk factors for schizophrenia, few have additionally examined the predictive power on the individual level and simultaneously examined the population impact associated with a wide range of familial...... and environmental risk factors. The authors present rate ratios (IRR), population-attributable risks (PAR) and sex-specific cumulative incidences of the following risk factors: parental history of mental illness, urban place of birth, advanced paternal age, parental loss and immigration status. We established...... a population-based cohort of 2,486,646million persons born in Denmark between 1 January 1955 and 31 December 1993 using Danish registers. We found that PAR associated with urban birth was 11.73%; PAR associated with one, respectively 2, parent(s) with schizophrenia was 2.67% and 0.12%. PAR associated...

  6. Genetic factors in familial aggregation of blood pressure of Portuguese nuclear families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fermino, Rogério César; Seabra, André; Garganta, Rui; Maia, José António Ribeiro

    2009-03-01

    Despite of the increase in the prevalence of hypertension in Portugal, the importance of genetic factors in blood pressure (BP) has not been studied extensively in our country. To verify the indirect presence of vertical transmission of genetic factors between parents and children in BP values, and to estimate the magnitude of genetic factors contributing for variation in BP values in the population. Sample size comprises 367 individuals (164 parents and 203 children) pertaining the 107 nuclear families participating in 'Familias Activas' project, proceeding from different regions of North Portugal. The BP was measured with Omron model M6 (HEM-7001-E) digital device. SPSS 15.0 was used for data analysis; PEDSTATS was used to verify the structure of each family data. Familial correlations and heritability estimates were computed in FCOR and ASSOC modules of S.A.G.E. version 5.3. For systolic BP (SBP), correlation values were low to moderate (0.21< or = r < or =0.35); for diastolic BP (DBP) values were found to be moderate (0.24< or = r < or =0. 50). Genetic factors explain 43 and 49% of the total variation in SBP and DBP, respectively. A moderate amount of the SBP and the DBP is accounted for by genetic factors.

  7. Factors determining family planning in Catalonia. Sources of inequity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurina Carme

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction In recent decades, the foreign population in Spain has increased significantly, particularly for Catalonia, an autonomous region of Spain (2.90% in 2000 and 15.95% in 2010 and in particular Girona province (6.18% in 2000 and 21.55% in 2010. Several studies have shown a lower use of family planning methods by immigrants. This same trend is observed in Spain. The objective of this paper is to determine the existence of differences and possible sources of inequity in the use of family planning methods among health service users in Catalonia (Spain by sex, health status, place of birth and socioeconomic conditions. Methods Data were taken from an ad-hoc questionnaire which was compiled following a qualitative stage of individual interviews. Said questionnaire was administered to 1094 Catalan public health service users during 2007. A complete descriptive analysis was carried out for variables related to public health service users’ sociodemographic characteristics and variables indicating knowledge and use of family planning methods, and bivariate relationships were analysed by means of chi-square contrasts. Considering the use (or non-use of family planning methods as a dependent variable and a set of demographic, socioeconomic and health status variables as explanatory factors, the relationship was modelled using mixed models. Results The analysed sample is comprised of 54.3% women and 45.7% men, with 74.3% natives (or from the EU and 25.7% economic immigrants. 54.8% use some method of family planning, the condom (46.7% and the pill (28.0% being the two most frequently used methods. Statistical modelling indicates that those factors which most influence the use of family planning methods are level of education (30.59% and 39.29% more likelihood and having children over 14 (35.35% more likelihood. With regard to the origin of the user, we observe that patients from North Africa,sub. Saharan Africa and Asia are less likely to

  8. Familial and social factors of involving teenagers into alcohol use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreeva, Tatiana

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Many authors discuss factors which influence involving adolescence into alcohol use. This study was aimed to assess contribution of factors related to alcohol use in the family, getting into situations of alcohol use as well as preventive work in teenage establishments.MATERIAL AND METHODS: Survey of 373 adolescents attending teenage clubs was conducted in Kazan, Russia, with questions related to alcohol use in the family and among peers, age and circumstances of first alcohol use. The outcome measure was whether respondents were current alcohol users. Associations were explored through logistic regression models.RESULTS: Alcohol use by teenagers did not differ by gender. Odds of using alcohol increased with age (OR=1.46 95%CI 1.19-1.80 per year. Risk of alcohol use was lower if no family members used alcohol (OR=0.3 95%CI 0.2-0.5 compared to those teenagers who have any family members who used alcohol. After adding to the model variables related to the first alcohol use, most significant was association with the response that no one has ever proposed to drink alcohol (OR=0.014 95%CI 0.005-0.041 compared to any situations of alcohol use, while the association with familial factors was attenuated. This shows that impact of familial factors could be mediated through the occasions of alcohol use. Teenagers whose parents do not use alcohol less likely get into situations where they are proposed to drink in a peer group (12% vs. 24% or at a party (18% vs. 25%.Adolescents who expressed negative attitude to alcohol-related work in youth clubs more likely were alcohol users themselves (OR=21.1 95%CI 2.6-170.3, which is better applicable for diagnostics than for program evaluation.CONCLUSION: Absence of alcohol in the family predetermines alcohol use by adolescents. Teenagers whose parents do not use alcohol less likely get into situations where they are suggested to drink alcohol.

  9. Factors influencing uptake of familial long QT syndrome genetic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Charlotte; McGaughran, Julie; Davis, Andrew; Semsarian, Christopher; Ingles, Jodie

    2016-02-01

    Ongoing challenges of clinical assessment of long QT syndrome (LQTS) highlight the importance of genetic testing in the diagnosis of asymptomatic at-risk family members. Effective access, uptake, and communication of genetic testing are critical for comprehensive cascade family screening and prevention of disease complications such as sudden cardiac death. The aim of this study was to describe factors influencing uptake of LQTS genetic testing, including those relating to access and family communication. We show those who access genetic testing are overrepresented by the socioeconomically advantaged, and that although overall family communication is good, there are some important barriers to be addressed. There were 75 participants (aged 18 years or more, with a clinical and/or genetic diagnosis of LQTS; response rate 71%) who completed a survey including a number of validated scales; demographics; and questions about access, uptake, and communication. Mean age of participants was 46 ± 16 years, 20 (27%) were males and 60 (80%) had genetic testing with a causative gene mutation in 42 (70%). Overall uptake of cascade testing within families was 60% after 4 years from proband genetic diagnosis. All participants reported at least one first-degree relative had been informed of their risk, whereas six (10%) reported at least one first-degree relative had not been informed. Those who were anxious or depressed were more likely to perceive barriers to communicating. Genetic testing is a key aspect of care in LQTS families and intervention strategies that aim to improve equity in access and facilitate effective family communication are needed.

  10. Molecular dynamics simulations of peptides at the air-water interface: influencing factors on peptide-templated mineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Alok; Jochum, Mara; Peter, Christine

    2014-12-30

    Biomineralization is the intricate, biomedically highly relevant process by which living organisms deposit minerals on biological matrices to stiffen tissues and build skeletal structures and shells. Rapaport and coworkers ( J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2000 , 122 , 12523 ; Adv. Funct. Mater. 2008 , 18 , 2889 ; Acta Biomater. 2012 , 8 , 2466 ) have designed a class of self-assembling amphiphilic peptides that are capable of forming hydrogels and attracting ions from the environment, generating structures akin to the extracellular matrix and promoting bone regeneration. The air-water interface serves both in experiment and in simulations as a model hydrophobic surface to mimic the cell's organic-aqueous interface and to investigate the organization of the peptide matrix into ordered β-pleated monolayers and the subsequent onset of biomineral formation. To obtain insight into the underlying molecular mechanism, we have used molecular dynamics simulations to study the effect of peptide sequence on aggregate stability and ion-peptide interactions. We find-in excellent agreement with experimental observations-that the nature of the peptide termini (proline vs phenylalanine) affect the aggregate order, while the nature of the acidic side chains (aspartic vs glutamic acid) affect the aggregate's stability in the presence of ions. These simulations provide valuable microscopic insight into the way ions and peptide templates mutually affect each other during the early stages of biomineralization preceding nucleation.

  11. Antimicrobial peptides with therapeutic potential from skin secretions of polyploid frogs of the Pipidae family

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mechkarska, M.P.M.

    2013-01-01

    The emergence of pathogenic bacteria and fungi resistant to commonly used antibiotics poses a serious threat to public health and necessitates novel treatment approaches in order to control infections. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are one of the central components of the system of innate immunity a

  12. Amino acids and peptides activate at least five members of the human bitter taste receptor family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohl, Susann; Behrens, Maik; Dunkel, Andreas; Hofmann, Thomas; Meyerhof, Wolfgang

    2013-01-09

    Amino acids and peptides represent important flavor molecules eliciting various taste sensations. Here, we present a comprehensive assessment of the interaction of various peptides and all proteinogenic amino acids with the 25 human TAS2Rs expressed in cell lines. L-Phenylalanine and L-tryptophan activate TAS2R1 and TAS2R4, respectively, whereas TAS2R4 and TAS2R39 responded to D-tryptophan. Structure-function analysis uncovered the basis for the lack of stereoselectivity of TAS2R4. The same three TAS2Rs or subsets thereof were also sensitive to various dipeptides containing L-tryptophan, L-phenylalanine, or L-leucine and to Trp-Trp-Trp, whereas Leu-Leu-Leu specifically activated TAS2R4. Trp-Trp-Trp also activated TAS2R46 and TAS2R14. Two key bitter peptides from Gouda cheese, namely, Tyr-Pro-Phe-Pro-Gly-Pro-Ile-His-Asn-Ser and Leu-Val-Tyr-Pro-Phe-Pro-Gly-Pro-Ile-His-Asn, both activated TAS2R1 and TAS2R39. Thus, the data demonstrate that the bitterness of amino acids and peptides is not mediated by specifically tuned TAS2Rs but rather is brought about by an unexpectedly complex pattern of sensitive TAS2Rs.

  13. Venom peptide analysis of Vipera ammodytes meridionalis (Viperinae) and Bothrops jararacussu (Crotalinae) demonstrates subfamily-specificity of the peptidome in the family Viperidae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munawar, Aisha; Trusch, Maria; Georgieva, Dessislava; Spencer, Patrick; Frochaux, Violette; Harder, Sönke; Arni, Raghuvir K; Duhalov, Deyan; Genov, Nicolay; Schlüter, Hartmut; Betzel, Christian

    2011-12-01

    Snake venom peptidomes are valuable sources of pharmacologically active compounds. We analyzed the peptidic fractions (peptides with molecular masses Vipera ammodytes meridionalis (Viperinae), the most toxic snake in Europe, and Bothrops jararacussu (Crotalinae), an extremely poisonous snake of South America. Liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS), direct infusion electrospray mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and matrix-assisted desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) were applied to characterize the peptides of both snake venoms. 32 bradykinin-potentiating peptides (BPPs) were identified in the Crotalinae venom and their sequences determined. 3 metalloproteinase inhibitors, 10 BPPs and a Kunitz-type inhibitor were observed in the Viperinae venom peptidome. Variability in the C-terminus of homologous BPPs was observed, which can influence the pharmacological effects. The data obtained so far show a subfamily specificity of the venom peptidome in the Viperidae family: BPPs are the major peptide component of the Crotalinae venom peptidome lacking Kunitz-type inhibitors (with one exception) while the Viperinae venom, in addition to BPPs, can contain peptides of the bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor family. We found indications for a post-translational phosphorylation of serine residues in Bothrops jararacussu venom BPP (S[combining low line]QGLPPGPPIP), which could be a regulatory mechanism in their interactions with ACE, and might influence the hypotensive effect. Homology between venom BPPs from Viperidae snakes and venom natriuretic peptide precursors from Elapidae snakes suggests a structural similarity between the respective peptides from the peptidomes of both snake families. The results demonstrate that the venoms of both snakes are rich sources of peptides influencing important physiological systems such as blood pressure regulation and hemostasis. The data can be used for pharmacological and medical applications.

  14. Family structure and family education as the factors for personal development of preschooler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golovey L.A.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This article is devoted to analysis of personal characteristics of preschoolers in relation to the factors of gender, family structure (complete or one-parent, the presence of sibling and family upbringing (parenting styles, parent-child emotional interaction. The study involved 155 boys, 157 girls and 312 mothers from Saint-Petersburg, Novosibirsk and Arkhangelsk. The age of children — from 4 to 7 years. We used the test and projective techniques. The study revealed that children from single parent families had higher indicators of anxiety, insecurity, depressiveness, self-distrust, hostility, feeling of inferiority, conflicts and difficulties in communication. In families with pronounced overprotection and characteristics of an authoritarian style children had lower self- esteem and higher indicators of anxiety and hostility. Children's aggressiveness was more pronounced in the case of permissive style and instability of parenting style. It was shown that emotional well-being in the parent-child relationships can be regarded as a resource for personal development of the child: understanding the causes of child s state, empathy. However we revealed that one third part of mothers had difficulties in emotional interaction with children. The research was supported by the Russian Foundation for Humanities (project №13-06-00480 «The family as a resource of child´s mental development in stable and critical ontogenetic periods».

  15. Archaeal translation initiation revisited: the initiation factor 2 and eukaryotic initiation factor 2B alpha-beta-delta subunit families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyrpides, N. C.; Woese, C. R.

    1998-01-01

    As the amount of available sequence data increases, it becomes apparent that our understanding of translation initiation is far from comprehensive and that prior conclusions concerning the origin of the process are wrong. Contrary to earlier conclusions, key elements of translation initiation originated at the Universal Ancestor stage, for homologous counterparts exist in all three primary taxa. Herein, we explore the evolutionary relationships among the components of bacterial initiation factor 2 (IF-2) and eukaryotic IF-2 (eIF-2)/eIF-2B, i.e., the initiation factors involved in introducing the initiator tRNA into the translation mechanism and performing the first step in the peptide chain elongation cycle. All Archaea appear to posses a fully functional eIF-2 molecule, but they lack the associated GTP recycling function, eIF-2B (a five-subunit molecule). Yet, the Archaea do posses members of the gene family defined by the (related) eIF-2B subunits alpha, beta, and delta, although these are not specifically related to any of the three eukaryotic subunits. Additional members of this family also occur in some (but by no means all) Bacteria and even in some eukaryotes. The functional significance of the other members of this family is unclear and requires experimental resolution. Similarly, the occurrence of bacterial IF-2-like molecules in all Archaea and in some eukaryotes further complicates the picture of translation initiation. Overall, these data lend further support to the suggestion that the rudiments of translation initiation were present at the Universal Ancestor stage.

  16. Amyloid-like fibrils from an 18-residue peptide analogue of a part of the central domain of the B-family of silkmoth chorion proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iconomidou, V A; Chryssikos, G D; Gionis, V; Vriend, G; Hoenger, A; Hamodrakas, S J

    2001-06-22

    Chorion is the major component of silkmoth eggshell. More than 95% of its dry mass consists of the A and B families of low molecular weight structural proteins, which have remarkable mechanical and chemical properties, and protect the oocyte and the developing embryo from the environment. We present data from negative staining, Congo red binding, X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform-Raman, attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy and modelling studies of a synthetic peptide analogue of a part of the central domain of the B family of silkmoth chorion proteins, indicating that this peptide folds and self-assembles, forming amyloid-like fibrils. These results support further our proposal, based on experimental data from a synthetic peptide analogue of the central domain of the A family of chorion proteins, that silkmoth chorion is a natural, protective amyloid [Iconomidou et al., FEBS Lett. 479 (2000) 141-145].

  17. Early evolution of the T-box transcription factor family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebé-Pedrós, Arnau; Ariza-Cosano, Ana; Weirauch, Matthew T.; Leininger, Sven; Yang, Ally; Torruella, Guifré; Adamski, Marcin; Adamska, Maja; Hughes, Timothy R.; Gómez-Skarmeta, José Luis; Ruiz-Trillo, Iñaki

    2013-01-01

    Developmental transcription factors are key players in animal multicellularity, being members of the T-box family that are among the most important. Until recently, T-box transcription factors were thought to be exclusively present in metazoans. Here, we report the presence of T-box genes in several nonmetazoan lineages, including ichthyosporeans, filastereans, and fungi. Our data confirm that Brachyury is the most ancient member of the T-box family and establish that the T-box family diversified at the onset of Metazoa. Moreover, we demonstrate functional conservation of a homolog of Brachyury of the protist Capsaspora owczarzaki in Xenopus laevis. By comparing the molecular phenotype of C. owczarzaki Brachyury with that of homologs of early branching metazoans, we define a clear difference between unicellular holozoan and metazoan Brachyury homologs, suggesting that the specificity of Brachyury emerged at the origin of Metazoa. Experimental determination of the binding preferences of the C. owczarzaki Brachyury results in a similar motif to that of metazoan Brachyury and other T-box classes. This finding suggests that functional specificity between different T-box classes is likely achieved by interaction with alternative cofactors, as opposed to differences in binding specificity. PMID:24043797

  18. Synthesis of fluorescent analogues of relaxin family peptides and their preliminary in vitro and in vivo characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Linda; Smith, Craig; Chua, Berenice; Lin, Feng; Bathgate, Ross; Separovic, Frances; Gundlach, Andrew; Hossain, M. Akhter; Wade, John

    2013-12-01

    Relaxin, a heterodimeric polypeptide hormone, is a key regulator of collagen metabolism and multiple vascular control pathways in humans and rodents. Its actions are mediated via its cognate G-protein-coupled receptor, RXFP1 although it also ‘pharmacologically’ activates RXFP2, the receptor for the related, insulin-like peptide 3 (INSL3), which has specific actions on reproduction and bone metabolism. Therefore, experimental tools to facilitate insights into the distinct biological actions of relaxin and INSL3 are required, particularly for studies of tissues containing both RXFP1 and RXFP2. Here, we chemically functionalized human (H2) relaxin, the RXFP1-selective relaxin analogue H2:A(4-24)(F23A), and INSL3 to accommodate a fluorophore without marked reduction in binding or activation propensity. Chemical synthesis of the two chains for each peptide was followed by sequential regioselective formation of their three disulfide bonds. Click chemistry conjugation of Cy5.5 at the B-chain N-terminus, with conservation of the disulfide bonds, yielded the analogues displaying appropriate selective binding affinity and ability to activate RXFP1 and/or RXFP2 in vitro. The in vivo biological activity of Cy5.5-H2 relaxin and Cy5.5-H2:A(4-24)(F23A) was confirmed in mice, as acute icv infusion of these peptides (but not Cy5.5-INSL3) stimulated water drinking, an established behavioral response elicited by central RXFP1 activation. The central distribution of Cy5.5-conjugated peptides was examined in mice killed 30 min after infusion, revealing fluorescence within brain tissue near-adjacent to the cerebral ventricle walls relative to deeper brain areas. These data will aid the interpretation of behavioral studies. Production of fluorophore-conjugated relaxin family peptides will facilitate future pharmacological studies to probe the function of H2 relaxin/RXFP1 and INSL3/RXFP2 signaling in vivo while tracking their distribution following central or peripheral administration.

  19. Synthesis of peptides containing C-terminal methyl esters using trityl side-chain anchoring: application to the synthesis of a-factor and a-factor analogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-Rodriguez, Veronica; Mullen, Daniel G; Ganusova, Elena; Becker, Jeffrey M; Distefano, Mark D

    2012-11-16

    A new cysteine anchoring method was developed for the synthesis of peptides containing C-terminal cysteine methyl esters. This method consists of attachment of Fmoc-Cys-OCH(3) to either 2-ClTrt-Cl or Trt-Cl resins (via the side-chain thiol) followed by preparation of the desired peptide using Fmoc-based SPPS. We applied this method to the synthesis of the mating pheromone a-factor and a 5-FAM labeled a-factor analog. The peptides were obtained with high yield and purity and were shown to be bioactive in a growth arrest assay.

  20. Comorbidity and Family Factors Associated with Selective Mutism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian A. Buzzella

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent findings suggest that Selective Mutism (SM is best conceptualized as a childhood anxiety disorder and that oppositional behavior may or may not be a significant part of the clinical picture. Twenty-nine mothers of children with SM and 28 mothers of children who did not meet diagnostic criteria for any Axis I disorder (a community comparison group completed parental self-report questionnaires and clinician-rated interviews assessing anxiety and oppositional behavior, parental psychopathology, and family factors with hypothesized relationships with childhood anxiety. Findings suggested that children with SM experienced more anxiety than those in the community comparison group, with significantly higher levels of social anxiety, rumination, and physical symptoms reported. Mothers of children with SM reported greater monitoring of their children's activities, but they did not significantly differ from community comparison group mothers on reports of other parenting behaviors. Such findings may have important implications for guiding family involvement in psychosocial interventions.

  1. Family factors associated with children's handwashing hygiene behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, In Han; Kim, Sang-A; Park, Woong-Sub

    2013-06-01

    Despite the importance of children's hand hygiene and family influence on children's behaviors, few studies have been dedicated to identifying family factors affecting handwashing practice. This study investigated the entire group of sixth-grade students (N = 2323) and their parents (N = 2089) at 11 elementary schools randomly selected from the Seoul Metropolitan Area, Korea. The results show that parents' handwashing practice, parent and child bonding, and shared time have a significant correlation with children's hand hygiene practice. The thoroughness of hand cleansing is more likely to be associated with health education, parents' practice of proper handwashing, greater parent-child bonding, and a greater amount of shared time with parents. Parent-child bonding and shared time are crucial in promoting children's hand hygiene. These results imply that public health policies need to be targeted at not only providing health education but at increasing parent-child bonding and shared time in order to promote children's health more effectively.

  2. Dock-family exchange factors in cell migration and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadea, Gilles; Blangy, Anne

    2014-10-01

    Dock family proteins are evolutionary conserved exchange factors for the Rho GTPases Rac and Cdc42. There are 11 Dock proteins in mammals, named Dock1 (or Dock180) to Dock11 that play different cellular functions. In particular, Dock proteins regulate actin cytoskeleton, cell adhesion and migration. Not surprisingly, members of the Dock family have been involved in various pathologies, including cancer and defects in the central nervous and immune systems. This review proposes an update of the recent findings regarding the function of Dock proteins, focusing on their role in the control of cell migration and invasion and the consequences in human diseases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  3. Expression analysis of TALE family transcription factors during avian development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coy, Sarah E; Borycki, Anne-Gaëlle

    2010-04-01

    The TALE family of homeodomain containing transcription factors consists of the Meis, Prep and Tgif, and the Pbx subfamily of proteins. Several TALE orthologues have been identified in amniotes, but no comprehensive analysis of their expression pattern during embryogenesis has been performed. Here, we report on TALE gene expression in the avian embryo. During embryonic development, Pbx genes are predominantly expressed in the neural ectoderm and paraxial mesoderm, although Pbx3 is restricted to the intermediate and lateral mesoderm, and anterior central nervous system. Members of the Meis, Prep, and Tgif subfamilies are expressed at high levels in the paraxial mesoderm, and display differential expression along the anterior-posterior and dorsoventral axes of the developing neural tube. Overall the expression patterns reported in this study are consistent with the known function of the TALE gene family in controlling early patterning of limb, neural tube and paraxial mesoderm tissues during embryogenesis.

  4. The ETS family of oncogenic transcription factors in solid tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sizemore, Gina M; Pitarresi, Jason R; Balakrishnan, Subhasree; Ostrowski, Michael C

    2017-06-01

    Findings over the past decade have identified aberrant activation of the ETS transcription factor family throughout all stages of tumorigenesis. Specifically in solid tumours, gene rearrangement and amplification, feed-forward growth factor signalling loops, formation of gain-of-function co-regulatory complexes and novel cis-acting mutations in ETS target gene promoters can result in increased ETS activity. In turn, pro-oncogenic ETS signalling enhances tumorigenesis through a broad mechanistic toolbox that includes lineage specification and self-renewal, DNA damage and genome instability, epigenetics and metabolism. This Review discusses these different mechanisms of ETS activation and subsequent oncogenic implications, as well as the clinical utility of ETS factors.

  5. Family Engagement in Education in Uttar Pradesh, India: Factors Associated with the Involvement of Families in Their Children's Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Amanda Joy

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the extent to which families within the Shravasti district of Uttar Pradesh, India are engaged in their children's education, as well as to examine the child, family, school, and community factors that are potentially associated with families' involvement in their children's education. Additionally,…

  6. Shape changes induced by biologically active peptides and nerve growth factor in blood platelets of rabbits.

    OpenAIRE

    Gudat, F; Laubscher, A.; Otten, U; Pletscher, A

    1981-01-01

    1 Nerve growth factor (NGF), substance P (SP) and thymopoietin all caused shape change reactions of rapid onset in rabbit platelets. NGF had the highest maximal effect, and SP the lowest EC50 (concentration causing half maximal shape change). The action of SP was reversible within 5 min, whereas that of NGF lasted for at least 1 h. A series of other peptides were inactive. 2 After preincubation of platelets with SP, a second application of SP no longer caused a shape change reaction, whereas ...

  7. Factors affecting unmet need for family planning in Eastern Sudan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Abdel Aziem A

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the developing countries millions of women in the reproductive age who don’t use contraceptives prefer to postpone or limit their birth. This indicates their failure to take necessary decision to prevent and avoid unwanted pregnancy. Methods A community-based cross sectional household survey was conducted to investigate unmet need for family planning and associated factors and total demand for family planning in Kassala, Eastern Sudan between 1st May and 31st July 2012. Results A total of 812 married women were enrolled in this study. Their mean age and parity was 31.8 (7.3 and 3.4 (1.8 respectively. Ever use of contraception was 25.4% (206/812 and 26.2% (213/812 were currently using contraception. Unmet need for spacing was 15.1% while unmet need for limiting was 0.7%. The pregnant and amenorrheic women whose the pregnancy or birth was unwanted and mistimed were 105 (13% and 130 (16% respectively. Using Westoff model the total unmet need was estimated as 44.8%. The total demand for family planning was 71%. In logistic regression model, while age, age at marriage, parity, residence and experience of child death were not associated with total unmet need for family planning, women education P=0.00, husband education P = 0.00 and woman’s occupation; housewife (OR=4.3; CI=2.5-7.2; P=0.00 were associated with the total unmet need. Conclusions Unmet need for family planning in Eastern Sudan was significantly higher among women with less than secondary education. Also; it is influenced by couple’s educational status and woman’s occupation. The results of this study necessitate the need for the programme managers to take into account the concept of reproductive health education.

  8. 利钠肽家族及其与心力衰竭的关系%Natriuretic peptide family and its relationship with heart failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩曼; 于远望

    2015-01-01

    The natriuretic peptide family as endocrine hormones, including atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), brain natriuretic peptide (BNP), C type natriuretic peptide (CNP) and D type natriuretic peptide (DNP), play a signifi-cant role in regulating blood volume, blood pressure, blood vessel elasticity through natriuresis, diuresis, vasodilata-tion and antagonism of the rennin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. Researches showed that the natriuretic peptide (es-pecially the BNP) in plasma was elevated in patients with heart failure (HF) or heart disease, and the elevated natriuret-ic peptide suggested high risk for cardiovascular events. The monitoring of natriuretic peptide is helpful for the diagno-sis, guidance of treatment and prognosis in HF. Here is to make a commentary of the relationship between natriuretic peptide family and HF.%利钠肽家族作为内分泌激素,主要包括心房钠尿肽、脑钠肽、C型利钠肽及D型利钠肽,通过利钠、利尿、舒张血管及对抗肾素-血管紧张素-醛固酮系统等途径在调节血容量、血管弹性、血压等方面发挥重要的作用。对利钠肽(尤其是脑钠肽)的研究表明,心力衰竭等心脏病患者血浆利钠肽水平升高,升高的利钠肽提示心血管事件的高危险性,监测血浆利钠肽有助于心力衰竭的诊断、治疗指导和预后评估。本文就利钠肽家族及其与心力衰竭的关系做一综述。

  9. Protection of nonself surfaces from complement attack by factor H-binding peptides: implications for therapeutic medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, You-Qiang; Qu, Hongchang; Sfyroera, Georgia; Tzekou, Apostolia; Kay, Brian K; Nilsson, Bo; Nilsson Ekdahl, Kristina; Ricklin, Daniel; Lambris, John D

    2011-04-01

    Exposure of nonself surfaces such as those of biomaterials or transplanted cells and organs to host blood frequently triggers innate immune responses, thereby affecting both their functionality and tolerability. Activation of the alternative pathway of complement plays a decisive role in this unfavorable reaction. Whereas previous studies demonstrated that immobilization of physiological regulators of complement activation (RCA) can attenuate this foreign body-induced activation, simple and efficient approaches for coating artificial surfaces with intact RCA are still missing. The conjugation of small molecular entities that capture RCA with high affinity is an intriguing alternative, as this creates a surface with autoregulatory activity upon exposure to blood. We therefore screened two variable cysteine-constrained phage-displayed peptide libraries for factor H-binding peptides. We discovered three peptide classes that differed with respect to their main target binding areas. Peptides binding to the broad middle region of factor H (domains 5-18) were of particular interest, as they do not interfere with either regulatory or binding activities. One peptide in this group (5C6) was further characterized and showed high factor H-capturing activity while retaining its functional integrity. Most importantly, when 5C6 was coated to a model polystyrene surface and exposed to human lepirudin-anticoagulated plasma, the bound peptide captured factor H and substantially inhibited complement activation by the alternative pathway. Our study therefore provides a promising and novel approach to produce therapeutic materials with enhanced biocompatibility.

  10. Temporally controlled release of multiple growth factors from a self-assembling peptide hydrogel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruggeman, Kiara F.; Rodriguez, Alexandra L.; Parish, Clare L.; Williams, Richard J.; Nisbet, David R.

    2016-09-01

    Protein growth factors have demonstrated great potential for tissue repair, but their inherent instability and large size prevents meaningful presentation to biologically protected nervous tissue. Here, we create a nanofibrous network from a self-assembling peptide (SAP) hydrogel to carry and stabilize the growth factors. We significantly reduced growth factor degradation to increase their lifespan by over 40 times. To control the temporal release profile we covalently attached polysaccharide chitosan molecules to the growth factor to increase its interactions with the hydrogel nanofibers and achieved a 4 h delay, demonstrating the potential of this method to provide temporally controlled growth factor delivery. We also describe release rate based analysis to examine the growth factor delivery in more detail than standard cumulative release profiles allow and show that the chitosan attachment method provided a more consistent release profile with a 60% reduction in fluctuations. To prove the potential of this system as a complex growth factor delivery platform we demonstrate for the first time temporally distinct release of multiple growth factors from a single tissue specific SAP hydrogel: a significant goal in regenerative medicine.

  11. Transmembrane signal transduction by peptide hormones via family B G protein-coupled receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly J Culhane

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Although family B G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs contain only 15 members, they play key roles in transmembrane signal transduction of hormones. Family B GPCRs are drug targets for developing therapeutics for diseases ranging from metabolic to neurological disorders. Despite their importance, the molecular mechanism of activation of family B GPCRs remains largely unexplored due to the challenges in expression and purification of functional receptors to the quantity for biophysical characterization. Currently, there is no crystal structure available of a full-length family B GPCR. However, structures of key domains, including the extracellular ligand binding regions and seven-helical transmembrane regions, have been solved by X-ray crystallography and NMR, providing insights into the mechanisms of ligand recognition and selectivity, and helical arrangements within the cell membrane. Moreover, biophysical and biochemical methods have been used to explore functions, key residues for signaling, and the kinetics and dynamics of signaling processes. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the signal transduction mechanism of family B GPCRs at the molecular level and comments on the challenges and outlook for mechanistic studies of family B GPCRs.

  12. The auto-inhibitory state of Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor ARHGEF5/TIM can be relieved by targeting its SH3 domain with rationally designed peptide aptamers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ping; Tan, De-Li; Liu, Hong-Xiang; Lv, Feng-Lin; Wu, Wei

    2015-04-01

    The short isoform of Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor ARHGEF5 is known as TIM, which plays diverse roles in, for example, tumorigenesis, neuronal development and Src-induced podosome formation through the activation of its substrates, the Rho family of GTPases. The activation is auto-inhibited by a putative helix N-terminal to the DH domain of TIM, which is stabilized by the intramolecular interaction of C-terminal SH3 domain with a poly-proline sequence between the putative helix and the DH domain. In this study, we systematically investigated the structural basis, energetic landscape and biological implication underlying TIM auto-inhibition by using atomistic molecular dynamics simulations and binding free energy analysis. The computational study revealed that the binding of SH3 domain to poly-proline sequence is the prerequisite for the stabilization of TIM auto-inhibition. Thus, it is suggested that targeting SH3 domain with competitors of the poly-proline sequence would be a promising strategy to relieve the auto-inhibitory state of TIM. In this consideration, we rationally designed a number of peptide aptamers for competitively inhibiting the SH3 domain based on modeled TIM structure and computationally generated data. Peptide binding test and guanine nucleotide exchange analysis solidified that these designed peptides can both bind to the SH3 domain potently and activate TIM-catalyzed RhoA exchange reaction effectively. Interestingly, a positive correlation between the peptide affinity and induced exchange activity was observed. In addition, separate mutation of three conserved residues Pro49, Pro52 and Lys54 - they are required for peptide recognition by SH3 domain -- in a designed peptide to Ala would completely abolish the capability of this peptide activating TIM. All these come together to suggest an intrinsic relationship between peptide binding to SH3 domain and the activation of TIM. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de

  13. The production of Multiple Small Peptaibol Families by Single 14-Module Peptide Synthetases in Trichoderma/Hypocrea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Degenkolb, Thomas; Aghchehb, Razieh Karimi; Dieckmann, Ralf; Neuhof, Torsten; Baker, Scott E.; Druzhinina, Irina S.; Kubicek, Christian P.; Brückner, Hans; von Dohren, Hans

    2012-03-01

    The most common peptaibibiotic structures are 11-residue peptaibols found widely distributed in the genus Trichoderma/Hypocrea. Frequently associated are 14-residue peptaibols sharing partial sequence identity. Genome sequencing projects of 3 Trichoderma strains of the major clades reveal the presence of up to 3 types of nonribosomal peptide synthetases with 7, 14, or 18-20 amino acid adding modules. We here provide evidence that the 14-module NRPS type found in T. virens, T. reesei (teleomorph Hypocrea jecorina) and T. atroviride produces both 11- and 14- residue peptaibols based on the disruption of the respective NRPS gene of T. reesei, and bioinformatic analysis of their amino acid activating domains and modules. The structures of these peptides may be predicted from the gene structures and have been confirmed by analysis of families of 11- and 14-residue peptaibols from the strain 618, termed hypojecorins A (23 sequences determined, 4 new) and B (3 new sequences), and the recently established trichovirins A from T. virens. The distribution of 11- and 14-residue products is strain-specific and depends on growth conditions as well. Possible mechanisms of module skipping are discussed.

  14. Peptide Bound Hypohydroxyprolinuria in Handigodu Disease: A Familial Syndrome of Spondylo Epi(metaphyseal Dysplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mallikarjun Badadani

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Handigodu Disease (HD is disorder of the osteoarticular system prevalent in few villages of two districts of the state Karnataka in southern India. 24 hrs urinary excretions of proline (Pro and 4-hydroxyproline (Hyp were analyzed by HPLC. Decreased peptide bound Hyp excretions (μmole/24 hrs were found in patient group when compared with controls (Nonaffected; 113.02 ± 67.96, Type-I; 36.22 ± 20.76, Type-II; 45.74 ± 14.95, Type-III; 40.46 ± 22.68 and without significant difference in Pro excretions. Significant increased peptide bound Pro to Hyp ratio were found in patient group compared to control (Nonaffected n = 63: 2.02 ± 1.65, Type-I n = 18: 3.144 ± 1.42, Type-II n = 28: 4.21 ± 1.95, Type-III n = 8: 8.60 ± 6.55. 24 hrs urinary excretions of deoxypyridinoline (DPD crosslinks were found without significant difference among affected and control, hence HD ruled out from general bone reduction. These results suggest hypohydroxyprolinuria may be because of reduced bone turnover or defective hydroxylation of prolyl residues during post translational modification of collagen biosynthesis.

  15. Family history in breast cancer is not a prognostic factor?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobsen, J J; Meerwaldt, J H; van der Palen, J

    2000-04-01

    The aim of this study is to determine if breast conservative treatment is justified for patients with a positive family history of breast cancer and to investigate whether they have a worse prognosis. We performed a prospective cohort study of breast cancer patients, treated with breast conservative treatment with radiotherapy at the Radiotherapy Department of the Medisch Spectrum Twente. Between 1984 and 1996, 1204 patients with T1 and T2 or =2 FDRs. The local recurrence rate was 4.1%, with similar rates for all groups. In young patients, or =2 FDRs. Patients with a positive FH had significantly more contralateral tumours. The 5-year corrected survival was 91.3%. Among patients with a positive FH, a 5-year corrected survival of 91% was observed and the survival 100% among patients with one and > or =2 FDR. Family history is not a contraindication for breast conservative treatment and is not associated with a worse prognosis. Family history is not a prognostic factor for local recurrence rate in patients older than 40 years.

  16. Signal peptide of eosinophil cationic protein upregulates transforming growth factor-alpha expression in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hao-Teng; Kao, Yu-Lin; Wu, Chia-Mao; Fan, Tan-Chi; Lai, Yiu-Kay; Huang, Kai-Ling; Chang, Yuo-Sheng; Tsai, Jaw-Ji; Chang, Margaret Dah-Tsyr

    2007-04-01

    Eosinophil cationic protein (ECP) is a major component of eosinophil granule protein that is used as a clinical bio-marker for asthma and allergic inflammatory diseases. Previously, it has been reported that the signal peptide of human ECP (ECPsp) inhibits the cell growth of Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Pichia pastoris (P. pastoris), but not mammalian A431 cells. The inhibitory effect is due to the lack of human signal peptide peptidase (hSPP), a protease located on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane, in the lower organisms. In this study, we show that the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is upregulated by the exogenous ECPsp-eGFP as a result of the increased expression of the transforming growth factor-alpha (TGF-alpha) at both transcriptional and translational levels in A431 and HL-60 clone 15 cell lines. Furthermore, the N-terminus of ECPsp fragment generated by the cleavage of hSPP (ECPspM1-G17) gives rise to over threefold increase of TGF-alpha protein expression, whereas another ECPsp fragment (ECPspL18-A27) and the hSPP-resistant ECPsp (ECPspG17L) do not show similar effect. Our results indicate that the ECPspM1-G17 plays a crucial role in the upregulation of TGF-alpha, suggesting that the ECPsp not only directs the secretion of mature ECP, but also involves in the autocrine system.

  17. Challenges in Targeting a Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factor with Hydrocarbon-Stapled Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Amanda L; Meijer, Dimphna H; Guerra, Rachel M; Molenaar, Remco J; Alberta, John A; Bernal, Federico; Bird, Gregory H; Stiles, Charles D; Walensky, Loren D

    2016-11-18

    Basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors play critical roles in organism development and disease by regulating cell proliferation and differentiation. Transcriptional activity, whether by bHLH homo- or heterodimerization, is dependent on protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions mediated by α-helices. Thus, α-helical decoys have been proposed as potential targeted therapies for pathologic bHLH transcription. Here, we developed a library of stabilized α-helices of OLIG2 (SAH-OLIG2) to test the capacity of hydrocarbon-stapled peptides to disrupt OLIG2 homodimerization, which drives the development and chemoresistance of glioblastoma multiforme, one of the deadliest forms of human brain cancer. Although stapling successfully reinforced the α-helical structure of bHLH constructs of varying length, sequence-specific dissociation of OLIG2 dimers from DNA was not achieved. Re-evaluation of the binding determinants for OLIG2 self-association and stability revealed an unanticipated role of the C-terminal domain. These data highlight potential pitfalls in peptide-based targeting of bHLH transcription factors given the liabilities of their positively charged amino acid sequences and multifactorial binding determinants.

  18. Generation of cytotoxic T lymphocytes specific for B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia family-shared peptides derived from immunoglobulin heavy chain framework region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Ying; ZHU Ping; HU Ya-mei

    2007-01-01

    Background Immunoglobulin heavy chain variable region (IgHV) is a well-characterized tumor antigen for B-cell malignancies. It can function as a target for T cell-mediated immune response. Clinical trials of IgHV protein vaccines against lymphoma have demonstrated induction of tumor-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses. However,complementary determining regions-based individual vaccines have disadvantages for wide clinical application. Although a recent study demonstrated that immunogenic peptides are derived from framework regions (FR) shared among patients with B-cell lymphoma, how to choose the appropriate peptides for each patient is still unsolved. The aim of this study was to investigate whether immunoglobulin heavy chain FR-derived peptides shared in each IgHV family are potential CTL epitopes presented by B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL). Such CTL epitopes might be beneficial to shifting vaccination strategies against B-ALL from individual specificity to family specificity.Methods Seven IgHV gene families were amplified respectively by PCR and sequenced directly from 71 childhood B-ALL cases. Bioinformatics was applied in analyzing characteristics of sequences available and predicting HLA-A*0201-restricted CTL epitopes for each IgHV family. An antigen-specific T cell expansion system was used to generate peptide-specific CTLs. The cytotoxicity of CTLs against B-ALL cells was assessed in the lactate dehydrogenase release assay.Results Complete IgHV rearrangements were identified in all of the 71 B-ALL cases. All of 40 sequences available showed ≥98% homology with the nearest germline IgHV genes, indicating IgHV genes in B-ALL of germline nature.Twelve nonapeptides of high HLA-A*0201-binding scores were obtained from 26 productive IgHV protein sequences. Ten (83%) of the peptides were located in FR1 and FR3 shared among the corresponding IgHV family. CTLs specific for the peptide QLVQSGAEV located in FR1 (3-11) shared among the IgHV1

  19. Hyperprolinaemia caused by novel members of the adipokinetic hormone/red pigment-concentrating hormone family of peptides isolated from corpora cardiaca of onitine beetles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gäde, G

    1997-01-01

    Two novel members of the adipokinetic hormone/red pigment-concentrating hormone family of peptides were identified in dung beetles of the genus Onitis using heterologous (measuring lipid and carbohydrate mobilization in locusts and cockroaches) and a homologous (measuring proline increase in the haemolymph) bioassay(s). Isolation of the peptides was achieved by single-step reverse-phase HPLC of corpora cardiaca extracts. The primary structure was elucidated by automated Edman degradation and by electrospray MS. Both peptides are blocked octapeptides containing three aromatic amino acids. Peptide 1, designated Ona-CC-I, is pGlu-Tyr-Asn-Phe-Ser-Thr-Gly-Trp-NH2, and peptide 2, designated Ona-CC-II, is pGlu-Phe-Asn-Tyr-Ser-Pro-Asp-Trp-NH2. The synthetic peptides were chromatographically indistinguishable from the natural compounds. They both had a hyperprolinaemic effect in the dung beetle. Moreover, flight experiments established that proline is an important fuel to power flight metabolism in Onitis species. Therefore, it is concluded that these novel and unique peptides are involved in regulating proline-based flight metabolism.

  20. Anti-diuretic factors in insects: the role of CAPA peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paluzzi, Jean-Paul V

    2012-05-01

    Insects have adapted to live in a wide variety of habitats and utilize an array of feeding strategies that present challenges to their ability to maintain osmotic balance. Regardless of the feeding strategy, water and ion levels within the haemolymph (insect blood) are maintained within a narrow range. This homeostasis involves the action of a variety of tissues, but is often chiefly regulated by the excretory system. Until recently, most research on the hormonal control of the excretory tissues has focused on factors known to have diuretic activities. In this mini-review, the current state of knowledge on anti-diuretic factors in insects will be discussed with a particular emphasis on the CAPA peptides in the blood-feeding Chagas' disease vector, Rhodnius prolixus.

  1. Diverse families of antimicrobial peptides isolated from skin secretions of three species of East Asian frogs, Babina daunchina, Babina adenopleura, and Rana omeimontis (Ranidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yuhong; Xu, Shiqi; Hu, Yonghong; Guo, Chao; Meng, Hao; Li, Jing; Liu, Jingze; Wang, Hui

    2014-07-01

    Twenty-two novel cDNAs encoding 22 peptide precursors for 19 mature peptides including antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) were identified from East Asian frog species Babina daunchina, Babina adenopleura, and Rana omeimontis skin-derived cDNA libraries. Two atypical members of the brevinin-1 family AMPs, named brevinin-1AN1 (FLTGVLKLASKIPSVLCAVLKTC) and brevinin-1DN1(FLKGVINLASKIPSMLCAVLKTC), were purified from the skin secretions of B. adenopleura and B. daunchina, respectively. A member of the ranatuerin-2 family AMP named ranatuerin-2DN1 (GLFDSITQGLKDTAVKLLDKIKCKLSACPPA) was also purified from the skin secretion of B. daunchina. One AMP named japonicin-2OM1 (FIVPSIFLLKKAFCIALKKNC) was purified from the skin secretion of R. omeimontis. The antimicrobial tests showed that brevinin-1DN1, brevinin-1DN2, brevinin-1AN1, and japonicin-2OM1 possess higher antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive bacteria than Gram-negative bacteria.

  2. Antimicrobial peptide inhibition of fungalysin proteases that target plant type 19 Family IV defense chitinases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cereal crops and other plants produce secreted seed chitinases that reduce pathogenic infection, most likely by targeting the fungal chitinous cell wall. We have shown that corn (Zea mays) produces three GH family 19, plant class IV chitinases, that help in protecting the plant against Fusarium and ...

  3. A Novel Tool for Peptide Pattern Recognition Identifies 13 Subgroups of the GH61 Family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Busk, Peter Kamp; Lange, Mette; Lange, Lene

    2011-01-01

    Proteins of the glycosyl hydrolase family 61 (gh61) are important proteins for fungal degradation of biomass. There are 132 entries for gh61 in the CAZY database, no subfamilies have been defined and each fungus may have several gh61s with very different sequences. Alignment of highly divergent s...

  4. Relationship of Marital Satisfaction, Family Support and Family-Work Conflict Factors Among Malaysian Fathers with Adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahayudin, A.A.

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The study on contextual factors in Malaysian family is more concentrated among mothers compared to the fathers. Malaysian fathers are often influenced by these factors embedded in the family. This study examines the level of contextual factors among fathers of adolescent children. The survey was conducted using a simple sampling method, on a group of 413 fathers with adolescent children from all districts in the state of Selangor, West Peninsular of Malaysia. A set of questionnaires was used to derive data from the fathers̕ contextual factors which are marriage satisfaction, family support and work-family conflict among fathers of adolescents. Analysis on frequency, percentage, mean, standard deviation, t-test, analysis of Variance (ANOVA and the Pearson correlations were used to investigate the level and correlation of contextual factors among fathers of adolescent children. The Pearson correlation shows that there is a significant correlation between work-family conflict and marriage satisfaction and between family support and marriage satisfaction. However, there is no significant correlation between family support and work-family conflict. The study proficiently contributes towards the exploration of influencing factors for the involvement of fathers in parenting.

  5. Peptide-based targeting of the platelet-derived growth factor receptor beta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askoxylakis, Vasileios; Marr, Annabell; Altmann, Annette; Markert, Annette; Mier, Walter; Debus, Jürgen; Huber, Peter E; Haberkorn, Uwe

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this work is to identify new ligands targeting the platelet-derived growth factor receptor beta (PDGFRβ). Biopanning was carried out with a 12-amino-acid phage display library against the recombinant extracellular domain of PDGFRβ. The identified peptide PDGFR-P1 was chemically synthesized and labeled with (125)I or (131)I. In vitro studies were performed on the PDGFRβ-expressing cell lines BxPC3 and MCF7 and on PDGFRβ-transfected HEK cells in comparison to negative control wtHEK293 and CaIX-transfected HEK cells. Biodistribution experiments were performed in Balb/c nude mice, carrying subcutaneously BxPC3 tumors. In vitro studies demonstrated a higher binding to BxPC3, MCF7, and PDGFRβ-tr-HEK cells in comparison to negative control cell lines. Binding was inhibited up to 90% by the unlabeled PDGFR-P1 peptide. Organ distribution studies revealed a higher accumulation in BxPC3 tumors than in most organs. PDGFR-P1 is a promising candidate for targeting human PDGFRβ.

  6. Human host defense peptide LL-37 stimulates virulence factor production and adaptive resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikola Strempel

    Full Text Available A multitude of different virulence factors as well as the ability to rapidly adapt to adverse environmental conditions are important features for the high pathogenicity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Both virulence and adaptive resistance are tightly controlled by a complex regulatory network and respond to external stimuli, such as host signals or antibiotic stress, in a highly specific manner. Here, we demonstrate that physiological concentrations of the human host defense peptide LL-37 promote virulence factor production as well as an adaptive resistance against fluoroquinolone and aminoglycoside antibiotics in P. aeruginosa PAO1. Microarray analyses of P. aeruginosa cells exposed to LL-37 revealed an upregulation of gene clusters involved in the production of quorum sensing molecules and secreted virulence factors (PQS, phenazine, hydrogen cyanide (HCN, elastase and rhamnolipids and in lipopolysaccharide (LPS modification as well as an induction of genes encoding multidrug efflux pumps MexCD-OprJ and MexGHI-OpmD. Accordingly, we detected significantly elevated levels of toxic metabolites and proteases in bacterial supernatants after LL-37 treatment. Pre-incubation of bacteria with LL-37 for 2 h led to a decreased susceptibility towards gentamicin and ciprofloxacin. Quantitative Realtime PCR results using a PAO1-pqsE mutant strain present evidence that the quinolone response protein and virulence regulator PqsE may be implicated in the regulation of the observed phenotype in response to LL-37. Further experiments with synthetic cationic antimicrobial peptides IDR-1018, 1037 and HHC-36 showed no induction of pqsE expression, suggesting a new role of PqsE as highly specific host stress sensor.

  7. Identification of small peptides inhibiting the integrase-LEDGF/p75 interaction through targeting the cellular co-factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalluzzo, Claudia; Christ, Frauke; Voet, Arnout; Sharma, Ajendra; Singh, Brajendra Kumar; Zhang, Kam Y J; Lescrinier, Eveline; De Maeyer, Marc; Debyser, Zeger; Van der Eycken, Erik

    2013-10-01

    The integration of the viral DNA into the host genome is one of the essential steps in the HIV replication cycle. This process is mediated by the viral enzyme integrase (IN) and lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF/p75). LEDGF/p75 has been identified as a crucial cellular co-factor of integration that acts by tethering IN to the cellular chromatin. Recently, circular peptides were identified that bind to the C-terminal domain of IN and disrupt the interaction with LEDGF/p75. Starting from the circular peptides, we identified a short peptidic sequence able to inhibit the LEDGF/p75-IN interaction at low μM concentration through its binding to the IN binding site of LEDGF/p75. This discovery can lead to the synthesis of peptidomimetics with high anti-HIV activity targeting the cellular co-factor LEDGF/p75 and not the viral protein IN.

  8. Social and Cultural Factors Influencing Family Violence in Tabriz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behnam Bashiri Khatibi

    2013-07-01

    In the present research which is of correlation one with quantitative method, the Survey method has Utilized in order to determine family violence rate and collection of necessary data to test hypothesizes that is cross-sectional and blind as well as to the domain, Small and of operational type. Statistical society and sampling method: The statistical society of the present research, is persons above 15 years old resident in Tabriz that based on latest statihstic of Iran statistical center were 733.208 persons in midyear 1384. The Sample selection method based on mass i.e pps was Used to Sampling which is multistep cluster sompling as called sampling with probability according mass. (Beby, 1384: 460. Sample mass determination : The Cocran formula with estimation accuracy d=0.05 and variance maximum has Used to Calclate Sample mass and about 384 persons was selected as sample. (Rafie poor, 1377, 383 Data collection method: In the present research, the documental studies (taking card has used to review resume problem nature and related descriptions as well as the necessary data has collector on utilized theory frames and hypothesizes test by questionnaire. Discussion of Result & Conclution The main aim was demonstration of family violence and review of effective social factors role on it. Thus, in the findings of the present research which was conducted as survey was determind that the violenve rate among foregoing persons oquals to 27.74 with standard deviation of 20.90 that was obtained of data which were minimum zero to maximum 96.06 from 100. While such violence rate is so lower than moderate on, it could be said that, violence is in optimum level within Tabriz families. Also, the resultant findings indicate that, the highest violence within Tabriz families was related to economical violence at 34.04 with standard deviation 27.41 (from minimum zero to maximum 100 and it’s lowest related to regional Violence at 15.53 with standard deviation (from minimum zero to

  9. A Model for Dimerization of the SOX Group E Transcription Factor Family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsook, Sarah N; Ni, Joyce; Shahangian, Shokofeh; Vakiloroayaei, Ana; Khan, Naveen; Kwan, Jamie J; Donaldson, Logan W

    2016-01-01

    Group E members of the SOX transcription factor family include SOX8, SOX9, and SOX10. Preceding the high mobility group (HMG) domain in each of these proteins is a thirty-eight amino acid region that supports the formation of dimers on promoters containing tandemly inverted sites. The purpose of this study was to obtain new structural insights into how the dimerization region functions with the HMG domain. From a mutagenic scan of the dimerization region, the most essential amino acids of the dimerization region were clustered on the hydrophobic face of a single, predicted amphipathic helix. Consistent with our hypothesis that the dimerization region directly contacts the HMG domain, a peptide corresponding to the dimerization region bound a preassembled HMG-DNA complex. Sequence conservation among Group E members served as a basis to identify two surface exposed amino acids in the HMG domain of SOX9 that were necessary for dimerization. These data were combined to make a molecular model that places the dimerization region of one SOX9 protein onto the HMG domain of another SOX9 protein situated at the opposing site of a tandem promoter. The model provides a detailed foundation for assessing the impact of mutations on SOX Group E transcription factors.

  10. Adolescent Substance Use and Family-based Risk and Protective Factors: A Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakalahi, Halaevalu F.

    2001-01-01

    Family influence has been established as one of the strongest sources of risk and protection when considering adolescent substance abuse. Theories used to view the family influence include family systems theory; social cognitive theory; social control theory; and strain theory. Specific family-based risk and protective factors include family…

  11. The relaxin family peptide receptors and their ligands: new developments and paradigms in the evolution from jawless fish to mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yegorov, Sergey; Bogerd, Jan; Good, Sara V

    2014-12-01

    Relaxin family peptide receptors (Rxfps) and their ligands, relaxin (Rln) and insulin-like (Insl) peptides, are broadly implicated in the regulation of reproductive and neuroendocrine processes in mammals. Most placental mammals harbour genes for four receptors, namely rxfp1, rxfp2, rxfp3 and rxfp4. The number and identity of rxfps in other vertebrates are immensely variable, which is probably attributable to intraspecific variation in reproductive and neuroendocrine regulation. Here, we highlight several interesting, but greatly overlooked, aspects of the rln/insl-rxfp evolutionary history: the ancient origin, recruitment of novel receptors, diverse roles of selection, differential retention and lineage-specific loss of genes over evolutionary time. The tremendous diversity of rln/insl and rxfp genes appears to have arisen from two divergent receptors and one ligand that were duplicated by whole genome duplications (WGD) in early vertebrate evolution, although several genes, notably relaxin in mammals, were also duplicated via small scale duplications. Duplication and loss of genes have varied across lineages: teleosts retained more WGD-derived genes, dominated by those thought to be involved in neuroendocrine regulation (rln3, insl5 and rxfp 3/4 genes), while eutherian mammals witnessed the diversification and rapid evolution of genes involved in reproduction (rln/insl3). Several genes that arose early in evolutionary history were lost in most mammals, but retained in teleosts and, to a lesser extent, in early diverging tetrapods. To elaborate on their evolutionary history, we provide updated phylogenies of the Rxfp1/2 and Rxfp3/4 receptors and their ligands, including new sequences from early diverging vertebrate taxa such as coelacanth, skate, spotted gar, and lamprey. We also summarize the recent progress made towards understanding the functional biology of Rxfps in non-mammalian taxa, providing a new conceptual framework for research on Rxfp signaling across

  12. Cloning and expression of the cDNA encoding the FXPRL family of peptides and a functional analysis of their effect on breaking pupal diapause in Helicoverpa armigera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tian-Yi; Sun, Jiu-Song; Zhang, Liu-Bin; Shen, Jin-Liang; Xu, Wei-Hua

    2004-01-01

    Diapause hormone (DH) and pheromone biosynthesis activating neuropeptide (PBAN) are encoded by a single mRNA in the suboesophegeal ganglion (SG) and are responsible for induction of embryonic diapause in Bombyx mori and sex pheromone biosynthesis in lepidopteran insects. PBAN cDNA analyses revealed that the DH-like peptide is present in several species that have a pupal diapause. However, the function of the DH-like peptide remains unknown. In the present study, we cloned the cDNA encoding DH-PBAN in Helicoverpa armigera utilizing the rapid amplification of the cDNA ends method. The nucleotide se quence analysis revealed that the longest open reading frame of this cDNA encodes a 194-amino acid precursor protein that con tains a 33-aa PBAN, a 24-aa DH-like peptide, and three other neuropeptides, all of which have a common C-terminal pentapeptide motif FXPR/KL ( X=G, T, S). A homology search showed that H. armigera DH-like and PBAN are highly homologous to those from other insects. Northern blot analysis demonstrated a single message RNA corresponding to the size of Har-DH-PBAN cDNA from pupal SG with significantly higher expression in the SG of nondiapause pupae than diapausing pupae. Western blot analysis showed DH-like peptide expression from SG of both males and females. When DH-like peptide was injected into nondiapause larvae and pupae, it did not induce diapause, but rather efficiently broke pupal diapause in H. armigera. The ED(50) of DH to terminate pupal diapause is 20 pmol/pupae. The other four FXPRLamide neuropeptides from the DH-PBAN polyprotein precursor have cross activity for diapause termination. These observations therefore suggest a potential role for these FXPRL family peptides in promoting continuous development in several noctuid species. The high expression of this gene in pharate adults and adults indicates that the FXPRL family peptides may have multiple physiological functions.

  13. Molecular evolution of the neuropeptide Y (NPY) family of peptides: cloning of three NPY-related peptides from the sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerdá-Reverter, J M; Martínez-Rodríguez, G; Zanuy, S; Carrillo, M; Larhammar, D

    2000-11-24

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is a 36-amino-acid peptide that is widely and abundantly expressed in the central nervous system of all vertebrates investigated. Related peptides have been found in various vertebrate groups: peptide YY (PYY) is present in gut endocrine cells of many species and pancreatic polypeptide (PP) is made in the pancreas of all tetrapods. In addition, a fish pancreatic peptide called PY has been reported in three species of fishes. The evolutionary relationships of fish PY have been unclear and it has been proposed to be the orthologue (species homologue) of each of the three tetrapod peptides. We demonstrate here with molecular cloning techniques that the sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax), an acanthomorph fish, has orthologues of both NPY and PYY as well as a separate PY peptide. Sequence comparisons suggest that PY arose as a copy of the PYY gene, presumably in a duplication event separate from the one that generated PP from PYY in tetrapods. PY sequences from four species of fish indicate that, similar to PP, PY evolves much more rapidly than NPY and PYY. The physiological role of PY is unknown, but we demonstrate here that sea bass PY, like NPY and PYY but in contrast to the tetrapod PP, is expressed in brain.

  14. Hydrogen peroxide is generated during the very early stages of aggregation of the amyloid peptides implicated in Alzheimer disease and familial British dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabner, Brian J; El-Agnaf, Omar M A; Turnbull, Stuart; German, Matthew J; Paleologou, Katerina E; Hayashi, Yoshihito; Cooper, Leanne J; Fullwood, Nigel J; Allsop, David

    2005-10-28

    Alzheimer disease and familial British dementia are neurodegenerative diseases that are characterized by the presence of numerous amyloid plaques in the brain. These lesions contain fibrillar deposits of the beta-amyloid peptide (Abeta) and the British dementia peptide (ABri), respectively. Both peptides are toxic to cells in culture, and there is increasing evidence that early "soluble oligomers" are the toxic entity rather than mature amyloid fibrils. The molecular mechanisms responsible for this toxicity are not clear, but in the case of Abeta, one prominent hypothesis is that the peptide can induce oxidative damage via the formation of hydrogen peroxide. We have developed a reliable method, employing electron spin resonance spectroscopy in conjunction with the spin-trapping technique, to detect any hydrogen peroxide generated during the incubation of Abeta and other amyloidogenic peptides. Here, we monitored levels of hydrogen peroxide accumulation during different stages of aggregation of Abeta-(1-40) and ABri and found that in both cases it was generated as a short "burst" early on in the aggregation process. Ultrastructural studies with both peptides revealed that structures resembling "soluble oligomers" or "protofibrils" were present during this early phase of hydrogen peroxide formation. Mature amyloid fibrils derived from Abeta-(1-40) did not generate hydrogen peroxide. We conclude that hydrogen peroxide formation during the early stages of protein aggregation may be a common mechanism of cell death in these (and possibly other) neurodegenerative diseases.

  15. A secreted peptide growth factor, phytosulfokine, acting as a stimulatory factor of carrot somatic embryo formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanai, H; Matsuno, T; Yamamoto, M; Matsubayashi, Y; Kobayashi, T; Kamada, H; Sakagami, Y

    2000-01-01

    Somatic embryogenesis of the carrot (Daucus carota L.) depends on a set of factors, some of which accumulate in culture medium (conditioned medium, CM). When embryogenic cell clusters were transferred to an embryo-inducing medium, addition of CM derived from somatic embryo culture markedly stimulated somatic embryo formation. The active principles were purified using a simple bioassay system and identified to be phytosulfokines (PSKs), sulfated oligopeptide growth factors originally isolated from a CM derived from asparagus (Asparagus officinalis L.) mesophyll culture. Quantification studies using a competition ELISA system employing an anti-PSK-alpha polyclonal antibody showed that PSK production might be related to growth of cells, rather than development of somatic embryos. Thus the stimulatory effect of PSK on somatic embryo formation might be due to promotion of cell proliferation.

  16. Anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies and rheumatoid factor sera titers in leprosy patients from Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavala-Cerna, María G; Fafutis-Morris, Mary; Guillen-Vargas, Cecilia; Salazar-Páramo, Mario; García-Cruz, Diana E; Riebeling, Carlos; Nava, Arnulfo

    2012-11-01

    Leprosy offers a broad spectrum of altered immunological sceneries, ranging from strong cell-mediated immune responses seen in tuberculoid leprosy (TT), through borderline leprosy (BB), to the virtual absence of T cell responses characteristic in lepromatous leprosy (LL). The exact mechanism of autoantibodies production remains unknown in leprosy and other chronic inflammatory diseases and also the contribution of these antibodies to the pathogenesis of the disease. The aim of this study is to evaluate the frequency and profiles of serum anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies (a-CCP), rheumatoid factor (RF) and its relationship with leprosy spectrum. Serum samples from 67 leprosy patients (54 LL, 5 TT and 8 BB) and 46 clinically healthy subjects (CHS) from the same endemic region were investigated. The clinical chart and questionnaire were used to obtain clinical information. Anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies (a-CCP) were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, whereas the rheumatoid factor (RF) levels were measured by nephelometric method. The mean age of patients was 51.5 ± 13 years. Sera levels of a-CCP where higher in leprosy patients than in CHS (5.9 ± 11.6 vs. 0.3 ± 0.29) (P < 0.0001); the same pattern was found for RF sera titers without reaching statistical significance (16.8 ± 22.5 vs. 9.9 ± 3) (P = NS). We did not find a correlation between a-CCP and RF Rho =0.02786 (IC 95%) P = 0.8229. However, LL patients had higher a-CCP and RF levels than TT patients. Although an absence in correlation was observed, the serum levels of a-CCP antibodies and RF appeared to be useful in distinguishing LL from TT patients with a limited significance in detecting reactional leprosy patients.

  17. Cultural Factors in Collegiate Eating Disorder Pathology: When Family Culture Clashes with Individual Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomiyama, A. Janet; Mann, Traci

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The authors evaluated the validity of familial enmeshment (extreme proximity in family relationships) as a risk factor for eating disorders across cultural value orientations. They tested the hypothesis that although familial enmeshment may be a risk factor for eating disorder pathology for (1) participants of non-Asian descent or (2)…

  18. Uniformity of Peptide Release Is Maintained by Methylation of Release Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William E. Pierson

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Termination of protein synthesis on the ribosome is catalyzed by release factors (RFs, which share a conserved glycine-glycine-glutamine (GGQ motif. The glutamine residue is methylated in vivo, but a mechanistic understanding of its contribution to hydrolysis is lacking. Here, we show that the modification, apart from increasing the overall rate of termination on all dipeptides, substantially increases the rate of peptide release on a subset of amino acids. In the presence of unmethylated RFs, we measure rates of hydrolysis that are exceptionally slow on proline and glycine residues and approximately two orders of magnitude faster in the presence of the methylated factors. Structures of 70S ribosomes bound to methylated RF1 and RF2 reveal that the glutamine side-chain methylation packs against 23S rRNA nucleotide 2451, stabilizing the GGQ motif and placing the side-chain amide of the glutamine toward tRNA. These data provide a framework for understanding how release factor modifications impact termination.

  19. Extensive sequence turnover of the signal peptides of members of the GDF/BMP family: exploring their evolutionary landscape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veitia Reiner A

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We show that the predicted signal peptide (SP sequences of the secreted factors GDF9, BMP15 and AMH are well conserved in mammals but dramatic divergence is noticed for more distant orthologs. Interestingly, bioinformatic predictions show that the divergent protein segments do encode SPs. Thus, such SPs have undergone extensive sequence turnover with full preservation of functionality. This can be explained by a pervasive accumulation of neutral and compensatory mutations. An exploration of the potential evolutionary landscape of some SPs is presented. Some of these signal sequences highlight an apparent paradox: they are encoded, by definition, by orthologous DNA segments but they are, given their striking divergence, examples of what can be called functional convergence. Reviewers: This article was reviewed by Fyodor Kondrashov and Eugene V. Koonin.

  20. Pharmacokinetics of trefoil peptides and their stability in gastrointestinal contents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjellev, Stine; Vestergaard, Else Marie; Nexø, Ebba

    2007-01-01

    Trefoil factor family (TFF) peptides are considered promising for therapeutic use in gastrointestinal diseases, and there is a need to explore the fate of injected TFF and the stability of the peptides in the gastrointestinal tract. We studied the pharmacokinetics of intravenously (i.v.) administ...

  1. Corticotrophin releasing factor: effects on circulating gut and pancreatic peptides in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lytras, N; Grossman, A; Rees, L H; Schally, A V; Bloom, S R; Besser, G M

    1984-06-01

    As a CRF-like peptide has been isolated from human gut, we investigated the effect of synthetic CRF-41 100 micrograms on gut and pancreatic peptides in six normal subjects. There was a significant rise in pancreatic polypeptide compared to a control infusion, but no change in plasma insulin, pancreatic glucagon, gastrin, somatostatin, motilin, neurotensin, gastric inhibitory peptide, or cholecystokinin was seen. In addition, there was no change in circulating met-enkephalin. We conclude that the rise in pancreatic polypeptide seen after CRF administration may suggest a role for a CRF-like peptide in the control of pancreatic function.

  2. Assessment of family functioning in Caucasian and Hispanic Americans: reliability, validity, and factor structure of the Family Assessment Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarons, Gregory A; McDonald, Elizabeth J; Connelly, Cynthia D; Newton, Rae R

    2007-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the factor structure, reliability, and validity of the Family Assessment Device (FAD) among a national sample of Caucasian and Hispanic American families receiving public sector mental health services. A confirmatory factor analysis conducted to test model fit yielded equivocal findings. With few exceptions, indices of model fit, reliability, and validity were poorer for Hispanic Americans compared with Caucasian Americans. Contrary to our expectation, an exploratory factor analysis did not result in a better fitting model of family functioning. Without stronger evidence supporting a reformulation of the FAD, we recommend against such a course of action. Findings highlight the need for additional research on the role of culture in measurement of family functioning.

  3. Shape changes induced by biologically active peptides and nerve growth factor in blood platelets of rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudat, F; Laubscher, A; Otten, U; Pletscher, A

    1981-11-01

    1 Nerve growth factor (NGF), substance P (SP) and thymopoietin all caused shape change reactions of rapid onset in rabbit platelets. NGF had the highest maximal effect, and SP the lowest EC50 (concentration causing half maximal shape change). The action of SP was reversible within 5 min, whereas that of NGF lasted for at least 1 h. A series of other peptides were inactive. 2 After preincubation of platelets with SP, a second application of SP no longer caused a shape change reaction, whereas the effect of NGF was not influenced. 3 An oxidized NGF-derivative without biological activity did not cause a shape change reaction, neither did epidermal growth factor. 4 Prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) and pretreatment of the platelets with 3% butanol, which counteract the shape changes caused by 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and adenosine 3',5'-diphosphate, also antagonized those induced by NGF and SP. Neither heparin nor methysergide, an antagonist of 5-HT-receptors, influenced the shape change induced by NGF or SP. The action of NGF was also antagonized by a specific antibody to NGF. 5 Thymopoietin, like the basic polypeptide polyornithine (mol. wt. 40,000) was not antagonized by PGE1 and butanol. Heparin, which counteracted the effect of polyornithine, did not influence that of thymopoietin. 6 In conclusion, different modes of action are involved in the shape change of blood platelets induced by polypeptides and proteins. SP and NGF may act by stimulating specific membrane receptors.

  4. Neurite outgrowth induced by a synthetic peptide ligand of neural cell adhesion molecule requires fibroblast growth factor receptor activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rønn, L C; Doherty, P; Holm, A;

    2000-01-01

    The neural cell adhesion molecule NCAM is involved in axonal outgrowth and target recognition in the developing nervous system. In vitro, NCAM-NCAM binding has been shown to induce neurite outgrowth, presumably through an activation of fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs). We have recently...... identified a neuritogenic ligand, termed the C3 peptide, of the first immunoglobulin (lg) module of NCAM using a combinatorial library of synthetic peptides. Here we investigate whether stimulation of neurite outgrowth by this synthetic ligand of NCAM involves FGFRs. In primary cultures of cerebellar neurons...... from wild-type mice, the C3 peptide stimulated neurite outgrowth. This response was virtually absent in cultures of cerebellar neurons from transgenic mice expressing a dominant-negative form of the FGFR1. Likewise, in PC12E2 cells transiently expressing a dominant-negative form of the mouse FGFR1...

  5. Prediction of protein-peptide interactions: application of the XPairIt API to anthrax lethal factor and substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, Margaret M.; Sellers, Michael S.

    2013-05-01

    As software and methodology develop, key aspects of molecular interactions such as detailed energetics and flexibility are continuously better represented in docking simulations. In the latest iteration of the XPairIt API and Docking Protocol, we perform a blind dock of a peptide into the cleavage site of the Anthrax lethal factor (LF) metalloprotein. Molecular structures are prepared from RCSB:1JKY and we demonstrate a reasonably accurate docked peptide through analysis of protein motion and, using NCI Plot, visualize and characterize the forces leading to binding. We compare our docked structure to the 1JKY crystal structure and the more recent 1PWV structure, and discuss both captured and overlooked interactions. Our results offer a more detailed look at secondary contact and show that both van der Waals and electrostatic interactions from peptide residues further from the enzyme's catalytic site are significant.

  6. [Comparison of the factors influencing children's self-esteem between two parent families and single parent families].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sok, Sohyune R; Shin, Sung Hee

    2010-06-01

    This study was done to compare factors influencing children's self-esteem between two parent families and single parent families. The participants were 692 children aged 11 to 13 yr (388 in two parent families and 304 in single parent families) recruited from 20 community agencies and 5 elementary schools in Gyeonggi Province and Seoul City, South Korea. Data were collected from May to July, 2007 using a survey questionnaire containing items on self-esteem, internal control, problematic behavior, school record, family hardiness, parent-child communication and social support. The data were analyzed using SPSS 15.0 program and factors affecting children's self-esteem were analyzed by stepwise multiple regression. Scores for the study variables were significantly different between the two groups. The factors influencing children's self-esteem were also different according to family type. For two parent families, internal control, problematic behavior, school record, and parent-child communication significantly predicted the level of self-esteem (adjusted R(2)=.505, pchild communication significantly predicted the level of self-esteem (adjusted R(2)=.444, pself-esteem.

  7. Enhanced Peptide Stability Against Protease Digestion Induced by Intrinsic Factor Binding of a Vitamin B12 Conjugate of Exendin-4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonaccorso, Ron L; Chepurny, Oleg G; Becker-Pauly, Christoph; Holz, George G; Doyle, Robert P

    2015-09-08

    Peptide digestion from proteases is a significant limitation in peptide therapeutic development. It has been hypothesized that the dietary pathway of vitamin B12 (B12) may be exploited in this area, but an open question is whether B12-peptide conjugates bound to the B12 gastric uptake protein intrinsic factor (IF) can provide any stability against proteases. Herein, we describe a new conjugate of B12 with the incretin peptide exendin 4 that demonstrates picomolar agonism of the glugacon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP1-R). Stability studies reveal that Ex-4 is digested by pancreatic proteases trypsin and chymotrypsin and by the kidney endopeptidase meprin β. Prebinding the B12 conjugate to IF, however, resulted in up to a 4-fold greater activity of the B12-Ex-4 conjugate relative to Ex-4, when the IF-B12-Ex-4 complex was exposed to 22 μg/mL of trypsin, 2.3-fold greater activity when exposed to 1.25 μg/mL of chymotrypsin, and there was no decrease in function at up to 5 μg/mL of meprin β.

  8. Activation of Relaxin Family Receptor 1 from different mammalian species by relaxin peptide and small molecule agonist ML290

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaohua eHuang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Relaxin peptide (RLN, which signals through the relaxin family peptide 1 (RXFP1 GPCR receptor, has shown therapeutic effects in an acute heart failure clinical trial. We have identified a small molecule agonist of human RXFP1, ML290; however, it does not activate the mouse receptor. To find a suitable animal model for ML290 testing and to gain mechanistic insights into the interaction of various ligands with RXFP1, we have cloned rhesus macaque, pig, rabbit, and guinea pig RXFP1s and analyzed their activation by RLN and ML290. HEK293T cells expressing macaque or pig RXFP1 responded to relaxin and ML290 treatment as measured by an increase of cAMP production. Guinea pig RXFP1 responded to relaxin but had very low response to ML290 treatment only at highest concentrations used. The rabbit RXFP1 amino acid sequence was the most divergent, with a number of unique substitutions within the ectodomain and the 7-transmembrane domain (7TM. Two splice variants of rabbit RXFP1 derived through alternative splicing of the forth exon were identified. In contrast to the other species, rabbit RXFP1s were activated by ML290, but not with human, pig, mouse, or rabbit relaxins. Using FLAG-tagged constructs, we have shown that both rabbit RXFP1 variants are expressed on the cell surface. No binding of human Eu-labeled relaxin to rabbit RXFP1 was detected, suggesting that in this species RXFP1 might be non-functional. We used chimeric rabbit-human and guinea pig-human constructs to identify regions important for RLN or ML290 receptor activation. Chimeras with the human ectodomain and rabbit 7TM domain were activated by RLN, whereas substitution of part of the guinea pig 7TM domain with the human sequence only partially restored ML290 activation, confirming the allosteric mode of action for the two ligands. Our data demonstrate that macaque and pig models can be used for ML290 testing.

  9. Genetic liability, prenatal health, stress and family environment: risk factors in the Harvard Adolescent Family High Risk for schizophrenia study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walder, Deborah J; Faraone, Stephen V; Glatt, Stephen J; Tsuang, Ming T; Seidman, Larry J

    2014-08-01

    The familial ("genetic") high-risk (FHR) paradigm enables assessment of individuals at risk for schizophrenia based on a positive family history of schizophrenia in first-degree, biological relatives. This strategy presumes genetic transmission of abnormal traits given high heritability of the illness. It is plausible, however, that adverse environmental factors are also transmitted in these families. Few studies have evaluated both biological and environmental factors within a FHR study of adolescents. We conceptualize four precursors to psychosis pathogenesis: two biological (genetic predisposition, prenatal health issues (PHIs)) and two environmental (family environment, stressful life events (SLEs)). Participants assessed between 1998 and 2007 (ages 13-25) included 40 (20F/20M) adolescents at FHR for schizophrenia (FHRs) and 55 (31F/24M) community controls. 'Genetic load' indexed number of affected family members relative to pedigree size. PHI was significantly greater among FHRs, and family cohesion and expressiveness were less (and family conflict was higher) among FHRs; however, groups did not significantly differ in SLE indices. Among FHRs, genetic liability was significantly associated with PHI and family expressiveness. Prenatal and family environmental disruptions are elevated in families with a first-degree relative with schizophrenia. Findings support our proposed 'polygenic neurodevelopmental diathesis-stress model' whereby psychosis susceptibility (and resilience) involves the independent and synergistic confluence of (temporally-sensitive) biological and environmental factors across development. Recognition of biological and social environmental influences across critical developmental periods points to key issues relevant for enhanced identification of psychosis susceptibility, facilitation of more precise models of illness risk, and development of novel prevention strategies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Bioactive Peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Banan-Mwine Daliri

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The increased consumer awareness of the health promoting effects of functional foods and nutraceuticals is the driving force of the functional food and nutraceutical market. Bioactive peptides are known for their high tissue affinity, specificity and efficiency in promoting health. For this reason, the search for food-derived bioactive peptides has increased exponentially. Over the years, many potential bioactive peptides from food have been documented; yet, obstacles such as the need to establish optimal conditions for industrial scale production and the absence of well-designed clinical trials to provide robust evidence for proving health claims continue to exist. Other important factors such as the possibility of allergenicity, cytotoxicity and the stability of the peptides during gastrointestinal digestion would need to be addressed. This review discusses our current knowledge on the health effects of food-derived bioactive peptides, their processing methods and challenges in their development.

  11. Bioactive Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daliri, Eric Banan-Mwine; Oh, Deog H; Lee, Byong H

    2017-04-26

    The increased consumer awareness of the health promoting effects of functional foods and nutraceuticals is the driving force of the functional food and nutraceutical market. Bioactive peptides are known for their high tissue affinity, specificity and efficiency in promoting health. For this reason, the search for food-derived bioactive peptides has increased exponentially. Over the years, many potential bioactive peptides from food have been documented; yet, obstacles such as the need to establish optimal conditions for industrial scale production and the absence of well-designed clinical trials to provide robust evidence for proving health claims continue to exist. Other important factors such as the possibility of allergenicity, cytotoxicity and the stability of the peptides during gastrointestinal digestion would need to be addressed. This review discusses our current knowledge on the health effects of food-derived bioactive peptides, their processing methods and challenges in their development.

  12. Localized Delivery of Mechano-Growth Factor E-domain Peptide via Polymeric Microstructures Improves Cardiac Function following Myocardial Infarction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña, James R.; Pinney, James; Ayala, Perla; Desai, Tejal; Goldspink, Paul H.

    2015-01-01

    The Insulin like growth factor-I isoform mechano-growth factor (MGF), is expressed in the heart following myocardial infarction and encodes a unique E-domain region. To examine E-domain function, we delivered a synthetic peptide corresponding to the unique E-domain region of the human MGF (IGF-1Ec) via peptide eluting polymeric microstructures to the heart. The microstructures were made of poly (ethylene glycol) dimethacrylate hydrogel and bioengineered to be the same size as an adult cardiac myocyte (100×15×15 μm) and with a stiffness of 20 kPa. Peptide eluting microrods and empty microrods were delivered via intramuscular injection following coronary artery ligation in mice. To examine the physiologic consequences, we assessed the impact of peptide delivery on cardiac function and cardiovascular hemodynamics using pressure-volume loops and gene expression by quantitative RT-PCR. A significant decline in both systolic and diastolic function accompanied by pathologic hypertrophy occurred by 2 weeks which decompensated further by 10 weeks post-infarct in the untreated groups. Delivery of the E-domain peptide eluting microrods decreased mortality, ameliorated the decline in hemodynamics, and delayed decompensation. This was associated with the inhibition of pathologic hypertrophy despite increasing vascular impedance. Delivery of the empty microrods had limited effects on hemodynamics and while pathologic hypertrophy persisted there was a decrease in ventricular stiffness. Our data show that cardiac restricted administration of the MGF E-domain peptide using polymeric microstructures may be used to prevent adverse remodeling of the heart and improve function following myocardial infarction. PMID:25678113

  13. Can positive family factors be protective against the development of psychosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Pinto, Ana; Ruiz de Azúa, Sonia; Ibáñez, Berta; Otero-Cuesta, Soraya; Castro-Fornieles, Josefina; Graell-Berna, Montserrat; Ugarte, Amaia; Parellada, Mara; Moreno, Dolores; Soutullo, Cesar; Baeza, Inmaculada; Arango, Celso

    2011-03-30

    Genetic and environmental factors are both involved in the aetiology of psychotic disorders. The aim of this study was to assess if positive and negative environmental factors, together with psychotic family antecedents, are associated with the recent development of psychosis. We also investigated the interactions between family history of psychosis and positive and negative family environment. The sample comprised 110 children and adolescents, who had suffered a first psychotic episode and 98 healthy controls. All subjects were interviewed about their socioeconomic status, family history of psychosis and family environment (Family Environment Scale, FES). Early onset psychosis was significantly associated with a family history of psychosis. Family environment was perceived as more negative and less positive among patients than among controls. A negative family environment increased the risk of psychosis independently of the family history of psychosis. However, there was a significant protective effect of a positive family environment for persons with a family history of psychosis. This effect was not seen in subjects without a family history of psychosis. Therefore, our results support the importance of considering both family history of psychosis and family environment in the early stages of psychosis.

  14. Nutritional Factors and Preservation of C-Peptide in Youth With Recently Diagnosed Type 1 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer-Davis, Elizabeth J.; Dabelea, Dana; Crandell, Jamie L.; Crume, Tessa; D’Agostino, Ralph B.; Dolan, Lawrence; King, Irena B.; Lawrence, Jean M.; Norris, Jill M.; Pihoker, Catherine; The, Natalie

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To test the novel hypothesis that nutritional factors previously associated with type 1 diabetes etiology or with insulin secretion are prospectively associated with fasting C-peptide (FCP) concentration among youth recently diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Included were 1,316 youth with autoantibody-positive type 1 diabetes who participated in the SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth study (baseline disease duration, 9.9 months; SD, 6.3). Nutritional exposures included breastfeeding and age at introduction of complementary foods, baseline plasma long-chain omega-3 fatty acids including eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), vitamin D, vitamin E, and, from a baseline food frequency questionnaire, estimated intake of the branched-chain amino acid leucine and total carbohydrate. Multiple linear regression models were conducted to relate each nutritional factor to baseline FCP adjusted for demographics, disease-related factors, and other confounders. Prospective analyses included the subset of participants with preserved β-cell function at baseline (baseline FCP ≥0.23 ng/mL) with additional adjustment for baseline FCP and time (mean follow-up, 24.3 months; SD, 8.2; n = 656). FCP concentration was analyzed as log(FCP). RESULTS In adjusted prospective analyses, baseline EPA (P = 0.02), EPA plus DHA (P = 0.03), and leucine (P = 0.03) were each associated positively and significantly with FCP at follow-up. Vitamin D was unexpectedly inversely associated with FCP (P = 0.002). CONCLUSIONS Increased intake of branched-chain amino acids and long-chain omega-3 fatty acids may support preservation of β-cell function. This represents a new direction for research to improve prognosis for type 1 diabetes. PMID:23801797

  15. Factors Associated with the Empowerment of Japanese Families Raising a Child with Developmental Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakimizu, Rie; Fujioka, Hiroshi; Yoneyama, Akira; Iejima, Atsushi; Miyamoto, Shinya

    2011-01-01

    We identified factors associated with the empowerment of Japanese families using the Family Empowerment Scale (FES) to contribute to the improvement of empowerment in Japanese families raising a child with developmental disorders (DDs). The study was conducted in 350 caregivers who raised children aged 4-18 years with DDs in urban and suburban…

  16. Family factors of internet addiction and substance use experience in Taiwanese adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Ju-Yu; Yen, Cheng-Fang; Chen, Cheng-Chung; Chen, Sue-Huei; Ko, Chih-Hung

    2007-06-01

    The aim of the study is to examine the differences in the diversity of family factors between adolescents with and without Internet addiction and substance use experience. A total of 3662 students (2328 boys and 1334 girls) were recruited from seven junior high schools, six senior high schools, and four vocational high schools in southern Taiwan. Internet addiction and substance experience were classified according to the score of Chen Internet Addiction Scale Questionnaires for Experience of Substance use. The family factors assessed included perceived family satisfaction, family economic status, parents' marriage status, care-givers, the frequency of intra-family conflict, families' habitual alcohol use, and perceived parents' or care givers' attitude toward adolescents' substance use. This study demonstrated that the characteristics of higher parent-adolescent conflict, habitual alcohol use of siblings, perceived parents' positive attitude to adolescent substance use, and lower family function could be used develop a predictive model for Internet addiction in the multiple logistic regression analysis. The former three family factors were also sufficient in themselves to develop a predictive model for substance use experience. The results revealed that adolescent Internet addiction and substance use experience shared similar family factors, which indicate that Internet addiction and substance use should be considered in the group of behavioral problem syndromes. A family-based preventive approach for Internet addiction and substance use should be introduced for adolescents with negative family factors.

  17. Epidermal cell density is autoregulated via a secretory peptide, EPIDERMAL PATTERNING FACTOR 2 in Arabidopsis leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Kenta; Yokoo, Toshiya; Kajita, Ryoko; Onishi, Takaaki; Yahata, Saiko; Peterson, Kylee M; Torii, Keiko U; Kakimoto, Tatsuo

    2009-06-01

    Regulation of the number of cells is critical for development of multicellular organisms. During plant epidermal development, a protodermal cell first makes a fate decision of whether or not to be the meristemoid mother cell (MMC), which undergoes asymmetric cell division forming a meristemoid and its sister cell. The MMC-derived lineage produces all stomatal guard cells and a large proportion of non-guard cells. We demonstrate that a small secretory peptide, EPIDERMAL PATTERING FACTOR 2 (EPF2), is produced by the MMC and its early descendants, and negatively regulates the density of guard and non-guard epidermal cells. Our results suggest that EPF2 inhibits cells from adopting the MMC fate in a non-cell-autonomous manner, thus limiting the number of MMCs. This feedback loop is critical for regulation of epidermal cell density. The amino acid sequence of EPF2 resembles that of EPF1, which is known to control stomatal positioning. Over-expression of EPF1 also inhibits stomatal development, but EPF1 can act only on a later developmental process than EPF2. Overexpression and promoter swapping experiments suggested that the protein functions of EPF1 and EPF2, rather than the expression patterns of the genes, are responsible for the specific functions. Although targets of EPF1 and EPF2 are different, both EPF1 and EPF2 require common putative receptor components TOO MANY MOUTHS (TMM), ERECTA (ER), ERECTA LIKE 1 (ERL1) and ERL2 in order to function.

  18. Factors that restrict the intestinal cell permeation of cyclic prodrugs of an opioid peptide (DADLE)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ouyang, Hui; Chen, Weiqing; Andersen, Thomas E;

    2009-01-01

    inactive or substantially less active than PSC-833 in increasing the P(B) values of these prodrugs. These data suggest that, while P-gp plays a role, other factors (e.g., substrate activity for other efflux transporters and/or for metabolic enzymes) may contribute to restricting the permeation of AOA......The objective of this study was to elucidate the role of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) in restricting the intestinal mucosal permeation of cyclic prodrugs (AOA-DADLE, CA-DADLE, and OMCA-DADLE) of the opioid peptide DADLE (H-Tyr-D-Ala-Gly-Phe-D-Leu-OH). In the Caco-2 cell model, the high P......(app,BL-to-AP)/P(app,AP-to-BL) ratios of AOA-DADLE, CA-DADLE, and OMCA-DADLE (71-117) were significantly decreased by including known P-gp inhibitors, GF-12098, cyclosporine (CyA), or PSC-833, in the incubation media, suggesting that P-gp is restricting the AP-to-BL permeation of these cyclic prodrugs. In the in situ perfused rat...

  19. Anemia as a factor that elevates plasma brain natriuretic peptide concentration in apparently healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Mika; Tsujino, Takeshi; Naito, Yoshiro; Lee-Kawabata, Masaaki; Ezumi, Akira; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Mano, Toshiaki; Masuyama, Tohru

    2008-09-01

    Plasma brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) is widely used as a biomarker of heart failure (HF); however, its concentration is often found to be high even in apparently healthy subjects and little is known about which factors contribute to physiological change in plasma BNP concentration in subjects without HF. We examined the effects of gender, age, and anemia on plasma BNP concentration in apparently healthy subjects. The study population consisted of 1036 healthy subjects who underwent an annual health examination at their company in 2005. There were 874 women, ranging in age from 30 to 63 years (mean, 41 years). Plasma BNP concentration was abnormal (> 18.4 pg/mL) in 292 subjects. The incidence was significantly higher in women than in men (31% versus 14%, P < 0.01). Mean plasma BNP concentration was higher in women than in men. The difference in plasma BNP concentration was associated with the difference in blood hemoglobin and age. Logarithmically transformed BNP concentration correlated inversely with blood hemoglobin (r = -0.30, P < 0.01 for all; r = -0.21, P < 0.01 for women; r = -0.20, P < 0.01 for men). By multiple regression analysis, logarithmically transformed BNP concentration correlated with hemoglobin, age, and gender. In conclusion, anemia is likely a critical determinant that elevates plasma BNP concentration in apparently healthy subjects.

  20. Mechano-growth factor peptide, the COOH terminus of unprocessed insulin-like growth factor 1, has no apparent effect on myoblasts or primary muscle stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornaro, Mara; Hinken, Aaron C; Needle, Saul; Hu, Erding; Trendelenburg, Anne-Ulrike; Mayer, Angelika; Rosenstiel, Antonia; Chang, Calvin; Meier, Viktor; Billin, Andrew N; Becherer, J David; Brace, Arthur D; Evans, William J; Glass, David J; Russell, Alan J

    2014-01-15

    A splice form of IGF-1, IGF-1Eb, is upregulated after exercise or injury. Physiological responses have been ascribed to the 24-amino acid COOH-terminal peptide that is cleaved from the NH3-terminal 70-amino acid mature IGF-1 protein. This COOH-terminal peptide was termed "mechano-growth factor" (MGF). Activities claimed for the MGF peptide included enhancing muscle satellite cell proliferation and delaying myoblast fusion. As such, MGF could represent a promising strategy to improve muscle regeneration. Thus, at our two pharmaceutical companies, we attempted to reproduce the claimed effect of MGF peptides on human and mouse muscle myoblast proliferation and differentiation in vitro. Concentrations of peptide up to 500 ng/ml failed to increase the proliferation of C2C12 cells or primary human skeletal muscle myoblasts. In contrast, all cell types exhibited a proliferative response to mature IGF-1 or full-length IGF-1Eb. MGF also failed to inhibit the differentiation of myoblasts into myotubes. To address whether the response to MGF was lost in these tissue culture lines, we measured proliferation and differentiation of primary mouse skeletal muscle stem cells exposed to MGF. This, too, failed to demonstrate a significant effect. Finally, we tested whether MGF could alter a separate documented in vitro effect of the peptide, activation of p-ERK, but not p-Akt, in cardiac myocytes. Although a robust response to IGF-1 was observed, there were no demonstrated activating responses from the native or a stabilized MGF peptide. These results call in to question whether there is a physiological role for MGF.

  1. The monocyte locomotion inhibitory factor an anti-inflammatory peptide; therapeutics originating from amebic abscess of the liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velazquez, Juan R

    2011-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica in culture produces a pentapeptide (MQCNS). This oligopeptide inhibits the in vitro and in vivo locomotion of human monocytes, hence its denomination Monocyte Locomotion Inhibitory Factor (MLIF). The original isolated peptide and its synthetic construct display similar effects, among others, being inhibition of the respiratory burst in monocytes and neutrophils, decrease of Dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB) skin hypersensitivity in guinea pigs and gerbils, and delay of mononuclear leukocytes in human Rebuck skin windows with inhibition of vascular cell Very late antigen (VLA)-4 and Vascular adhesion molecules (VCAM) in endothelia and monocytes. The MLIF molecular mechanism of action is unknown, but data reveal its implication in Nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) and Mitogenactivated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways. This could explain MLIF multiplicity of biological effects. On the other hand, the amebic peptide has been useful in treating experimental amebiasis of the liver. The amebic peptide is effective in reducing inflammation induced by carragenin and arthritis in a Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) model. Microarray data from experimental arthritis revealed an MLIF gene expression profile that includes genes that are involved in apoptosis, cell adhesion, extracellular matrix, and inflammation / chemotaxis. MLIF could be involved in unsuspected biological factions because there is increasing data on the peptide effect on several cell activities. This review also presents uses of MLIF as described in patents.

  2. Corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) binding protein: a novel regulator of CRF and related peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behan, D P; De Souza, E B; Lowry, P J; Potter, E; Sawchenko, P; Vale, W W

    1995-10-01

    A 37-kDa corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) binding protein (CRF-BP) was purified from human plasma by repeated affinity purification and subsequently sequenced and cloned. The human and rat CRF-BP cDNAs encode proteins of 322 amino acids with one putative signal sequence, one N-glycosylation site, and 10 conserved cysteines. Human CRF-BP binds human CRF with high affinity but has low affinity for the ovine peptide. In contrast, sheep CRF-BP binds human and ovine CRF with high affinity. The CRF-BP gene consists of seven exons and six introns and is located on chromosome 13 and loci 5q of the mouse and human genomes, respectively. CRF-BP inhibits the adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) releasing properties of CRF in vitro. CRF-BP dimerizes after binding CRF and clears the peptide from blood. This clearance mechanism protects the maternal pituitary gland from elevated plasma CRF levels found during the third trimester of human pregnancy. CRF-BP is expressed in the brains of all species so far tested but is uniquely expressed in human liver and placenta. In brain, CRF-BP is membrane associated and is predominantly expressed in the cerebral cortex and subcortical limbic structures. In some brain areas CRF-BP colocalizes with CRF and CRF receptors. The protein is also present in pituitary corticotropes, where it is under positive glucocorticoid control, and is likely to locally modulate CRF-induced ACTH secretion. The ligand requirements of the CRF receptor and the CRF-BP can be distinguished in that central human CRF fragments, such as CRF (6-33) and CRF (9-33), have high affinity for CRF-BP but low affinity for the CRF receptor. The binding protein's ability to inhibit CRF-induced ACTH secretion can be reversed by CRF (6-33) and CRF (9-33), suggesting that ligand inhibitors may have utility in elevating free CRF levels in disease states associated with decreased CRF. Thus, by controlling the amount of free CRF which activates CRF receptors, it is likely that the CRF

  3. A potential peptide therapeutic derived from the juxtamembrane domain of the epidermal growth factor receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aislyn D W Boran

    Full Text Available The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR is involved in many cancers and EGFR has been heavily pursued as a drug target. Drugs targeting EGFR have shown promising clinical results for several cancer types. However, resistance to EGFR inhibitors often occurs, such as with KRAS mutant cancers, therefore new methods of targeting EGFR are needed. The juxtamembrane (JXM domain of EGFR is critical for receptor activation and targeting this region could potentially be a new method of inhibiting EGFR. We hypothesized that the structural role of the JXM region could be mimicked by peptides encoding a JXM amino acid sequence, which could interfere with EGFR signaling and consequently could have anti-cancer activity. A peptide encoding EGFR 645-662 conjugated to the Tat sequence (TE-64562 displayed anti-cancer activity in multiple human cancer cell types with diminished activity in non-EGFR expressing cells and non-cancerous cells. In nude mice, TE-64562 delayed MDA-MB-231 tumor growth and prolonged survival, without inducing toxicity. TE-64562 induced non-apoptotic cell death after several hours and caspase-3-mediated apoptotic cell death with longer treatment. Mechanistically, TE-64562 bound to EGFR, inhibited its dimerization and caused its down-regulation. TE-64562 reduced phosphorylated and total EGFR levels but did not inhibit kinase activity and instead prolonged it. Our analysis of patient data from The Cancer Genome Atlas supported the hypothesis that down-regulation of EGFR is a potential therapeutic strategy, since phospho- and total-EGFR levels were strongly correlated in a large majority of patient tumor samples, indicating that lower EGFR levels are associated with lower phospho-EGFR levels and presumably less proliferative signals in breast cancer. Akt and Erk were inhibited by TE-64562 and this inhibition was observed in vivo in tumor tissue upon treatment with TE-64562. These results are the first to indicate that the JXM domain of EGFR

  4. Systemic inflammatory response syndrome following burns is mediated by brain natriuretic peptide/natriuretic peptide A receptor-induced shock factor 1 signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yang-Cheng; Luo, Cheng-Qun; Li, Xiong

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) in burn patients is mediated by the brain natriuretic peptide (BNP)/natriuretic peptide A receptor (NPRA)-induced heat shock factor 1 (HSF-1) signalling pathway. Mononuclear cells (MNCs) that were isolated from patients with burn injuries and SIRS mouse models and a RAW264.7 cell line were treated with normal serum or serum obtained from animals with burn injuries. In parallel, small hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) against BNP or NPRA were transfected in both cell types. Western blotting (WB) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) were used to detect protein expression and inflammatory factor levels, respectively. We found that interleukin (IL)-12, tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α, C-reactive protein (CRP), and BNP levels were increased and IL-10 levels were decreased in the plasma and MNCs in vivo in the animal model of SIRS. Additionally, NPRA was upregulated, whereas HSF-1 was downregulated in monocytes in vivo. Treatment of RAW264.7 cells with burn serum or BNP induced IL-12, TNF-α, and CRP secretion as well as HSF-1 expression. Finally, silencing BNP with shRNA interrupted the effect of burn serum on RAW264.7 cells, and silencing NPRA blocked burn serum- and BNP-mediated changes in RAW264.7 cells. These results suggest that the interaction of NPRA with BNP secreted from circulatory MNCs as well as mononuclear macrophages leads to inflammation via HSF-1 during SIRS development following serious burn injury.

  5. Intensive Care Unit death and factors influencing family satisfaction of Intensive Care Unit care

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Family satisfaction of Intensive Care Unit (FS-ICU) care is believed to be associated with ICU survival and ICU outcomes. A review of literature was done to determine factors influencing FS-ICU care in ICU deaths. Results: Factors that positively influenced FS-ICU care were (a) communication: Honesty, accuracy, active listening, emphatic statements, consistency, and clarity; (b) family support: Respect, compassion, courtesy, considering family needs and wishes, and emotional and...

  6. Family cohesion as a longevity factor of business with intergenerational transmission

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández-Roca, Fco. Javier; López-Manjón, Jesús D.; Gutiérrez-Hidalgo, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    This article contributes to a line of research in Business History that aims to determine the factors of family business longevity in the long term with the study of individual cases. The literature has identified family cohesion as one of the essential factors for survival. Cohesion may be reinforced or broken at the time of the intergenerational transfer. This study finds that a critical response on the part of the business family to the difficulties associated with intergenerational transf...

  7. Influence of Child and Family Factors on Judicial Decisions in Contested Custody Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Sara R.; Koerner, Susan Silverberg

    2003-01-01

    Explores how child and family factors influence judicial decision making in contested custody cases through interviews with 18 family court judges. Judges cited a variety of factors as being influential, including the child's age and developmental status, the child's wishes regarding the custody arrangement, the child's stability, parental…

  8. Factors that restrict intestinal cell permeation of cyclic prodrugs of an opioid peptide (DADLE)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ouyang, Hui; Chen, Weiqing; Andersen, Thomas E;

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the relative importance of metabolism by cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes versus efflux by P-glycoprotein (P-gp) in restricting the intestinal mucosal permeation of cyclic prodrugs (AOA-DADLE, CA-DADLE, OMCA-DADLE) of the opioid peptide DADLE (H......-gp), not metabolic enzymes (e.g., CYP 3A, esterases), restrict the permeation of peptide prodrugs across the rat intestinal mucosa....

  9. Postnatal roles of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor family members in nociceptors plasticity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sacha A. Malin; Brian M. Davis

    2008-01-01

    The neurotrophin and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) family of growth factors have been extensively studied because of their proven ability to regulate development of the peripheral nervous system. The neurotrophin family,which includes nerve growth factor (NGF), NT-3, NT4/5 and BDNF, is also known for its ability to regulate the function of adult sensory neurons. Until recently, little was known concerning the role of the GNDF-family (that includes GDNF, artemin, neurturin and persephin) in adult sensory neuron function. Here we describe recent data that indicates that the GDNF family can regulate sensory neuron function, that some of its members are elevated in inflammatory pain models and that application of these growth factors produces pain in vivo. Finally we discuss how these two families of growth factors may converge on a single membrane receptor, TRPV 1, to produce long-lasting hyperalgesia.

  10. Negative interference by rheumatoid factor of plasma B-type natriuretic peptide in chemiluminescent microparticle immunoassays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Fan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The chemiluminescent microparticle immunoassay (CMIA is widely used for the quantitative determination of B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP in human ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid plasma. Rheumatoid factor (RF is usually thought to result in a positive interference in immunoassays, but it is not clear whether its presence in plasma can lead to interferences in the CMIA of BNP. METHODS: The estimation of BNP recovery was carried out by diluting high-concentration BNP samples with RF-positive or RF-negative plasma at a ratio of 1:9. The diluted samples were then tested using the ARCHITECT i2000 System and ARCHITECT BNP Reagent Kits and the recovery was then calculated. RESULTS: When the RF level ranged from 48 to 1420 IU/mL, the average recovery of BNP was 79.29% and 91.61% in the RF-positive and RF-negative plasma samples, respectively, and was thus significantly lower in the group of RF-positive plasma samples than in the group of RF-negative plasma samples. At a dilution of 1:16, the measured BNP level increased by >36% in six of the seven RF-positive plasma samples. The recovery of BNP increased significantly in the RF-positive plasma samples after pretreatment with IgG-sensitive latex particles. In addition, The BNP recovery was not significantly related to the plasma RF at concentrations ranging from 48 to 2720 IU/mL. CONCLUSIONS: Measurement of BNP by CMIA is susceptible to interference from RF leading to predominantly (but not exclusively lower results. Pretreatment of samples with blocking reagents is advisable prior to the initiation of denying patient's necessary treatment.

  11. Negative interference by rheumatoid factor of plasma B-type natriuretic peptide in chemiluminescent microparticle immunoassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Wen; Xu, Lei; Xie, Liangcai; Yang, Decai; Liu, Xuezheng; Zhang, Jiajun; Li, Yirong; Yi, Cunjian

    2014-01-01

    The chemiluminescent microparticle immunoassay (CMIA) is widely used for the quantitative determination of B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) in human ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid plasma. Rheumatoid factor (RF) is usually thought to result in a positive interference in immunoassays, but it is not clear whether its presence in plasma can lead to interferences in the CMIA of BNP. The estimation of BNP recovery was carried out by diluting high-concentration BNP samples with RF-positive or RF-negative plasma at a ratio of 1:9. The diluted samples were then tested using the ARCHITECT i2000 System and ARCHITECT BNP Reagent Kits and the recovery was then calculated. When the RF level ranged from 48 to 1420 IU/mL, the average recovery of BNP was 79.29% and 91.61% in the RF-positive and RF-negative plasma samples, respectively, and was thus significantly lower in the group of RF-positive plasma samples than in the group of RF-negative plasma samples. At a dilution of 1:16, the measured BNP level increased by >36% in six of the seven RF-positive plasma samples. The recovery of BNP increased significantly in the RF-positive plasma samples after pretreatment with IgG-sensitive latex particles. In addition, The BNP recovery was not significantly related to the plasma RF at concentrations ranging from 48 to 2720 IU/mL. Measurement of BNP by CMIA is susceptible to interference from RF leading to predominantly (but not exclusively) lower results. Pretreatment of samples with blocking reagents is advisable prior to the initiation of denying patient's necessary treatment.

  12. [Amino acid and peptide derivatives of the tylosin family of macrolide antibiotics modified at the aldehyde group].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumbatian, N V; Kuznetsova, I V; Karpenko, V V; Fedorova, N V; Chertkov, V A; Korshunova, G A; Bogdanov, A A

    2010-01-01

    Fourteen new functionally active amino acid and peptide derivatives of the antibiotics tylosin, desmycosin, and 5-O-mycaminosyltylonolide were synthesized in order to study the interaction of the growing polypeptide chain with the ribosomal tunnel. The conjugation of various amino acids and peptides with a macrolide aldehyde group was carried out by two methods: direct reductive amination with the isolation of the intermediate Schiff bases or through binding via oxime using the preliminarily obtained derivatives of 2-aminooxyacetic acid.

  13. Factors Associated With the Perception of Family Nursing Practice Among Mental Health Nurses in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Chiu-Yueh; Tsai, Yun-Fang

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to examine factors that influenced the perceptions of mental health nurses about involving families in their nursing practice. A sample of 175 Taiwanese mental health nurses who are employed in both inpatient and community settings completed structured questionnaires designed to measure empathy, attitudes about involving families in care, and perceptions of family nursing practice. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, Pearson's product-moment correlation, t test, one-way ANOVA, and a hierarchical multiple regression analysis. Positive perceptions of family nursing practice were correlated with more years of clinical experience in mental health, empathy, supportive attitudes toward the importance of family nursing care, and personal experiences with family members with serious illness in need of professional care. These findings may assist in the development of effective educational programs designed to help nurses integrate family nursing knowledge and skills in the care of patients and families experiencing mental illness. © The Author(s) 2015.

  14. A Macrocyclic Peptide that Serves as a Cocrystallization Ligand and Inhibits the Function of a MATE Family Transporter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroaki Suga

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The random non-standard peptide integrated discovery (RaPID system has proven to be a powerful approach to discover de novo natural product-like macrocyclic peptides that inhibit protein functions. We have recently reported three macrocyclic peptides that bind to Pyrococcus furiosus multidrug and toxic compound extrusion (PfMATE transporter and inhibit the transport function. Moreover, these macrocyclic peptides were successfully employed as cocrystallization ligands of selenomethionine-labeled PfMATE. In this report, we disclose the details of the RaPID selection strategy that led to the identification of these three macrocyclic peptides as well as a fourth macrocyclic peptide, MaD8, which is exclusively discussed in this article. MaD8 was found to bind within the cleft of PfMATE’s extracellular side and blocked the path of organic small molecules being extruded. The results of an ethidium bromide efflux assay confirmed the efflux inhibitory activity of MaD8, whose behavior was similar to that of previously reported MaD5.

  15. Mechanisms of the self-assembly of EAK16-family peptides into fibrillar and globular structures: molecular dynamics simulations from nano- to micro-seconds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emamyari, Soheila; Kargar, Faezeh; Sheikh-Hasani, Vahid; Emadi, Saeed; Fazli, Hossein

    2015-05-01

    The self-assembly of EAK16-family peptides in a bulk solution was studied using a combination of all-atom and coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations. In addition, specified concentrations of EAK16 peptides were induced to form fibrillary or globular assemblies in vitro. The results show that the combination of all-atom molecular dynamics simulations on the single- and double-chain levels and coarse-grained simulations on the many-chain level predicts the experimental observations reasonably well. At neutral pH conditions, EAK16-I and EAK16-II assemble into fibrillary structures, whereas EAK16-IV aggregates into globular assemblies. Mechanisms of the formation of fibrillar and globular assemblies are described using the simulation results.

  16. Factors associated with family reunification for children in foster care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    López, Mónica; del Valle, Jorge F.; Montserrat, Carme; Bravo, Amaia

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we analyse reunification processes from family foster care, both kinship and non-kinship, and the variables associated with them in a Spanish sample. Data collection was carried out after a review of child protection and foster care files, and those responsible for the cases were also

  17. Factors associated with family reunification for children in foster care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    López, Mónica; del Valle, Jorge F.; Montserrat, Carme; Bravo, Amaia

    In this paper, we analyse reunification processes from family foster care, both kinship and non-kinship, and the variables associated with them in a Spanish sample. Data collection was carried out after a review of child protection and foster care files, and those responsible for the cases were also

  18. SOCIO-DEMOGRAPHIC FACTORS INFLUENCING FAMILY SIZE AMONG RURAL POPULATION OF DISTRICT NAINITAL, UTTARAKHAND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Pandey

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: India is the second most populous country in the world. A decline in its population growth rate has been shown amounting to during the last decades. The decline in the family size is important step towards population stabilization for our country. The status of family size is related to various demographic, socio-economic, cultural factors and attitude towards use of family planning methods. Objective: To assess the relationship of family size with socio-economic factors and effect of contraceptive use. Methodology: A cross sectional house to house survey to know the family size and socio-demographic was conducted in the adopted villages of field practice area. The study subjects are the married women of reproductive age group (15-49 years. Results: About half (44.9% of respondents were aged more than 35 years and only (0.9% were < 19 years. The family size in our study was 2.55. About 54.5% of respondents have family size d" 2. About two-third of families (65% with size less than or equals to two were of nuclear type. Education level of family has significant relationship with small family size. About 90% of the respondents and their spouse of family size two or less were literate. A significant association was found between occupation of the spouse and family size. The spouses of the respondents with family size more than two were mainly engaged in agriculture (29.7% and as labourer (38.5%. Among the families with family size of more than two, majority were from middle (81% and lower (14.9% class. There is no significant effect of use of contraceptives on the family size.

  19. Identification of a novel brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)-inhibitory factor: regulation of BDNF by teneurin C-terminal associated peptide (TCAP)-1 in immortalized embryonic mouse hypothalamic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Tiffany; Chand, Dhan; Song, Lifang; Al Chawaf, Arij; Watson, John D; Boutros, Paul C; Belsham, Denise D; Lovejoy, David A

    2012-02-10

    The teneurins are a family of four large transmembrane proteins that are highly expressed in the central nervous system (CNS) where they have been implicated in development and CNS function. At the tip of the carboxyl terminus of each teneurin lies a 43-amino acid sequence, that when processed, could liberate an amidated 41-residue peptide. We have called this region the teneurin C-terminal associated peptide (TCAP). Picomolar concentrations of the synthetic version of TCAP-1 inhibit stress-induced cocaine reinstatement in rats. Because cocaine-seeking is associated with increased brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the brain, we examined whether synthetic mouse TCAP-1 has the potential to regulate BDNF expression in immortalized mouse neurons. Immortalized mouse neurons (N38; mHypoE38) show strong FITC-labeled [K(8)]-TCAP-1 uptake and BDNF labeling in the cytosol. Moreover, FITC-labeled [K(8)]-TCAP-1 bound competitively to membrane fractions. In culture, the labeled TCAP-1 peptide could be detected on cell membranes within 15 min and subsequently became internalized in the cytosol and trafficked toward the nucleus. Administration of 10(-8)M unlabeled TCAP-1 to cultures of the N38 cells resulted in a significant decrease of total cell BDNF immunoreactivity over 4h as determined by western blot and ELISA analyses. Real-time PCR, utilizing primers to the various BDNF transcripts showed a significant decline of promoter IIB- and VI-driven transcripts. Taken together, these studies indicated that in vitro, TCAP-1 induces a significant decline in BDNF transcription and protein labeling in embyronic mouse immortalized hypothalamic neurons. Thus, TCAP-1 may act as a novel BDNF inhibitory factor.

  20. Factors associated with family resilience during pregnancy among inner-city women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennon, Suzanne L; Heaman, Maureen

    2015-10-01

    family resilience refers to the ability of a family group to adapt to challenging circumstances. For families residing in the inner-city, the concept of resilience is of particular salience as these families often encounter multiple stressors. The purpose of this study was to determine the factors associated with low family resilience during pregnancy among inner-city women. secondary analysis of data from a case-control study of factors related to inadequate antenatal care. participants consisted of 603 postpartum women who gave birth to a live infant and resided in one of eight inner-city neighbourhoods in Winnipeg, Manitoba. participants were designated as having low family resilience (n=155) or moderate to high family resilience (n=448) based on scores on the Family Hardiness Index. Univariate analyses were conducted to explore the association between a variety of factors during pregnancy and family resilience, and crude odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated. Factors significant at pfamily resilience among pregnant inner-city women in the final model: maternal age self-esteem (AOR 2.82), high perceived stress (AOR 3.01), alcohol use during pregnancy (AOR 3.20), and low interpersonal support (AOR 6.24). inner-city women who are young or have low self-esteem, high perceived stress, low interpersonal support, or who use alcohol during pregnancy are more likely to report lower levels of family resilience. midwives have the opportunity to develop ongoing relationships with their clients and families. As such, they are in an excellent position to understand the specific needs and strengths of individual families and foster the abilities of these families to strengthen and support resilience. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Vipericidins: a novel family of cathelicidin-related peptides from the venom gland of South American pit vipers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcao, C B; de La Torre, B G; Pérez-Peinado, C; Barron, A E; Andreu, D; Rádis-Baptista, G

    2014-11-01

    Cathelicidins are phylogenetically ancient, pleiotropic host defense peptides-also called antimicrobial peptides (AMPs)-expressed in numerous life forms for innate immunity. Since even the jawless hagfish expresses cathelicidins, these genetically encoded host defense peptides are at least 400 million years old. More recently, cathelicidins with varying antipathogenic activities and cytotoxicities were discovered in the venoms of poisonous snakes; for these creatures, cathelicidins may also serve as weapons against prey and predators, as well as for innate immunity. We report herein the expression of orthologous cathelicidin genes in the venoms of four different South American pit vipers (Bothrops atrox, Bothrops lutzi, Crotalus durissus terrificus, and Lachesis muta rhombeata)-distant relatives of Asian cobras and kraits, previously shown to express cathelicidins-and an elapid, Pseudonaja textilis. We identified six novel, genetically encoded peptides: four from pit vipers, collectively named vipericidins, and two from the elapid. These new venom-derived cathelicidins exhibited potent killing activity against a number of bacterial strains (S. pyogenes, A. baumannii, E. faecalis, S. aureus, E. coli, K. pneumoniae, and P. aeruginosa), mostly with relatively less potent hemolysis, indicating their possible usefulness as lead structures for the development of new anti-infective agents. It is worth noting that these South American snake venom peptides are comparable in cytotoxicity (e.g., hemolysis) to human cathelicidin LL-37, and much lower than other membrane-active peptides such as mastoparan 7 and melittin from bee venom. Overall, the excellent bactericidal profile of vipericidins suggests they are a promising template for the development of broad-spectrum peptide antibiotics.

  2. Identification and characterization of four novel peptide motifs that recognize distinct regions of the transcription factor CP2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Ho Chul; Chung, Bo Mee; Chae, Ji Hyung; Yang, Sung-Il; Kim, Chan Gil; Kim, Chul Geun

    2005-03-01

    Although ubiquitously expressed, the transcriptional factor CP2 also exhibits some tissue- or stage-specific activation toward certain genes such as globin in red blood cells and interleukin-4 in T helper cells. Because this specificity may be achieved by interaction with other proteins, we screened a peptide display library and identified four consensus motifs in numerous CP2-binding peptides: HXPR, PHL, ASR and PXHXH. Protein-database searching revealed that RE-1 silencing factor (REST), Yin-Yang1 (YY1) and five other proteins have one or two of these CP2-binding motifs. Glutathione S-transferase pull-down and coimmunoprecipitation assays showed that two HXPR motif-containing proteins REST and YY1 indeed were able to bind CP2. Importantly, this binding to CP2 was almost abolished when a double amino acid substitution was made on the HXPR sequence of REST and YY1 proteins. The suppressing effect of YY1 on CP2's transcriptional activity was lost by this point mutation on the HXPR sequence of YY1 and reduced by an HXPR-containing peptide, further supporting the interaction between CP2 and YY1 via the HXPR sequence. Mapping the sites on CP2 for interaction with the four distinct CP2-binding motifs revealed at least three different regions on CP2. This suggests that CP2 recognizes several distinct binding motifs by virtue of employing different regions, thus being able to interact with and regulate many cellular partners.

  3. Family Matters. The role of parental and family-related psychosocial factors in childhood dental caries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duijster, D.

    2015-01-01

    Dental caries is common childhood disease with children from lower socioeconomic status experiencing disproportionately higher levels of the disease. Parents and the broader family environment may play an important role in the development of childhood dental caries as mediators / moderators of risk.

  4. Family Matters. The role of parental and family-related psychosocial factors in childhood dental caries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duijster, D.

    2015-01-01

    Dental caries is common childhood disease with children from lower socioeconomic status experiencing disproportionately higher levels of the disease. Parents and the broader family environment may play an important role in the development of childhood dental caries as mediators / moderators of risk.

  5. Immunohistochemical characterization of calcitonin gene-related peptide in the trigeminal system of the familial hemiplegic migraine 1 knock-in mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Rammya; Andreou, Anna P; Chami, Linda; Bergerot, Astrid; van den Maagdenberg, Arn Mjm; Ferrari, Michel D; Goadsby, Peter J

    2011-10-01

    Familial hemiplegic migraine type 1 (FHM-1) is caused by mutations in the CACNA1A gene, with the R192Q mutation being the most common. Elevated calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) levels in acute migraine and clinical trials using CGRP receptor antagonists suggest CGRP-related mechanisms are important in migraine. Wild-type and R192Q knock-in mice were anaesthetized and perfused. Using immunohistochemical staining, the expression of CGRP in the trigeminocervical complex (TCC) and in the trigeminal and dorsal root ganglia was characterized. There was a 38% reduction in the percentage of CGRP-immunoreactive cells in the trigeminal ganglia (p migraine.

  6. Moderation of genetic factors by parental divorce in adolescents' evaluations of family functioning and subjective wellbeing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Aa, Niels; Boomsma, Dorret I; Rebollo-Mesa, Irene; Hudziak, James J; Bartels, Meike

    2010-04-01

    Adolescents' evaluations of family functioning may have a significant impact on their subjective well-being and adjustment. The aim of the study was to investigate the degree to which genetic and environmental influences affect variation in evaluations of general family functioning, family conflict, and quality of life and the overlap between them. We assessed whether genetic and environmental influences are moderated by parental divorce by analyzing self-report data from 6,773 adolescent twins and their non-twin siblings. Genetic, shared, and nonshared environmental influences accounted for variation in general family functioning and family conflict, with genetic influences being relatively more important in girls than boys in general family functioning. Genetic and nonshared environmental influences accounted for variation in quality of life, with genetic influences being relatively more important in girls. Evidence was found for interaction between genetic factors and parental divorce: genetic influence on general family functioning was larger in participants from divorced families. The overlap between general family functioning and quality of life, and family conflict and quality of life was accounted for the largest part by genetic effects, with nonshared environmental effects accounting for the remaining part. By examining the data from monozygotic twins, we found evidence for interaction between genotype and nonshared, non-measured, environmental influences on evaluations of general family functioning, family conflict, and quality of life.

  7. Familial growth hormone releasing factor deficiency in pseudopseudohypoparathyroidism.

    OpenAIRE

    Stirling, H F; Barr, D G; Kelnar, C J

    1991-01-01

    A mother with pseudopseudohypoparathyroidism and her short son showed poor spontaneous growth hormone secretion, and provocation tests suggested a deficiency of growth hormone releasing factor. This is the first report of growth hormone releasing factor deficiency in pseudopseudohypoparathyroidism. The boy has responded well to growth hormone treatment over a period of three years.

  8. RHEUMATOID FACTOR AND ANTI-CYCLIC CITRULLINATED PEPTIDE ANTIBODIES IN PATIENTS WITH PSORIATIC ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Badokin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to define the clinical value of rheumatoid factor (RF and anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies (anti-CCP in early psori- atic arthritis (PA. Subjects and methods. Fifty-six patients (32 females and 24 males with early PA with a mean duration of 12±6.7 months were studied. The examinees' age ranged from 18 to 76 years (mean age 44±15.5 years. Mean psoriasis duration was 12.5±2.2 years. RF IgM was determined using a high-sensitive nephelometric method on a BN Pro-Spec analyzer (Siemens, Germany and serum anti-CCP concentra- tions were measured by immunochemiluminescence on a COBAS e411 analyzer (Roche, Switzerland. Group 1 included 10 patients with anti-CCP and/or RF (a study group; Group 2 comprised 46 patients without anti-CCP and RF (a control group. Results. There was anti-CCP in 7 (12.5% of the patients with early PA, RF in 8 (14.3%, both of them in 5 (9%. The study group had a severer course of PA accompanied by polyarthritis, inflamed distal interphalangeal joints, axial arthritis, dactylitis, enthesitis, and, in some cases spondylitis and sacroiliitis. In groups 1 and 2, the number of tender joints was 17.6±4 and 10±1.5, respectively (p = 0.04; that of swollen ones, 12.6±1.5 and 7.0±1.1 (p = 0.02; DAS28 index, 5.9±1.7 and 4.5±1.5 (p = 0.02; ESR, 34.5±5.9 and 22±2.3 (p = 0.04, high-sensitive C reactive protein, 70±25.3 and 24.9±5.0 (p = 0.06; and Sharp ratio, 68.7±14.3 and 21.3±3.8 (p < 0.004. Conclusion. In patients with early PA, anti-CCP and RF were encountered with an approximately equal frequency; at the same time, they were associated with polyarthritis, high disease activity, and an erosive process. 

  9. Peptide pheromone signaling in Streptococcus and Enterococcus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Laura C; Federle, Michael J

    2014-05-01

    Intercellular chemical signaling in bacteria, commonly referred to as quorum sensing (QS), relies on the production and detection of compounds known as pheromones to elicit coordinated responses among members of a community. Pheromones produced by Gram-positive bacteria are comprised of small peptides. Based on both peptide structure and sensory system architectures, Gram-positive bacterial signaling pathways may be classified into one of four groups with a defining hallmark: cyclical peptides of the Agr type, peptides that contain Gly-Gly processing motifs, sensory systems of the RNPP family, or the recently characterized Rgg-like regulatory family. The recent discovery that Rgg family members respond to peptide pheromones increases substantially the number of species in which QS is likely a key regulatory component. These pathways control a variety of fundamental behaviors including conjugation, natural competence for transformation, biofilm development, and virulence factor regulation. Overlapping QS pathways found in multiple species and pathways that utilize conserved peptide pheromones provide opportunities for interspecies communication. Here we review pheromone signaling identified in the genera Enterococcus and Streptococcus, providing examples of all four types of pathways.

  10. Peptide pheromone signaling in Streptococcus and Enterococcus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Laura C.; Federle, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Intercellular chemical signaling in bacteria, commonly referred to as quorum sensing (QS), relies on the production and detection of compounds known as pheromones to elicit coordinated responses among members of a community. Pheromones produced by Gram-positive bacteria are comprised of small peptides. Based on both peptide structure and sensory system architectures, Gram-positive bacterial signaling pathways may be classified into one of four groups with a defining hallmark: cyclical peptides of the Agr type, peptides that contain Gly-Gly processing motifs, sensory systems of the RNPP family, or the recently characterized Rgg-like regulatory family. The recent discovery that Rgg family members respond to peptide pheromones increases substantially the number of species in which QS is likely a key regulatory component. These pathways control a variety of fundamental behaviors including conjugation, natural competence for transformation, biofilm development, and virulence factor regulation. Overlapping QS pathways found in multiple species and pathways that utilize conserved peptide pheromones provide opportunities for interspecies communication. Here we review pheromone signaling identified in the genera Enterococcus and Streptococcus, providing examples of all four types of pathways. PMID:24118108

  11. Determination of specificity influencing residues for key transcription factor families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Patel, Ronak Y.; Garde, Christian; Stormo, Gary D.

    2015-01-01

    -dimensional structure of protein. Structural restraints on the evolution of the amino-acid sequence lead to identification of false SIRs. In this manuscript we extended three methods (direct information, PSICOVand adjusted mutual information) that have been used to disentangle spurious indirect protein residue......-residue contacts from direct contacts, to identify SIRs from joint alignments of amino-acids and specificity. We predicted SIRs for homeodomain (HD), helix-loop-helix, LacI and GntR families of TFs using these methods and compared to MI. Using various measures, we show that the performance of these three methods...

  12. The USA National Longitudinal Lesbian Family Study (NLLFS): homophobia, psychological adjustment, and protective factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, H.M.W.; Gartrell, N.K.; Peyser, H.; van Balen, F.

    2008-01-01

    The study assessed the influence of protective factors on the psychological adjustment of children who had experienced homophobia and whose mothers were participants in a longitudinal study of planned lesbian families. Data were collected as part of the National Longitudinal Lesbian Family Study by

  13. Children in planned lesbian families: Stigmatisation, psychological adjustment and protective factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, H.M.W.; van Balen, F.

    2008-01-01

    The study assessed the extent to which children between eight and 12 years old in planned lesbian families in the Netherlands experience stigmatization, as well as the influence of protective factors (relationship with parents, social acceptance by peers, contact with children from other families

  14. Risk Factors for Adolescent Suicide and Suicidal Behavior: Mental and Substance Abuse Disorders, Family Environmental Factors, and Life Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brent, David A.

    1995-01-01

    Reviews psychopathologic risk factors for adolescent suicide and suicidal behavior, namely, affective, disruptive, substance abuse, psychotic, and personality disorders. Discusses interaction of psychopathology with age and gender. Reviews role of family environmental risk factors and stress events in suicide and suicidal behavior, both alone and…

  15. A Multidimensional Study of School-Family-Community Partnership Involvement: School, School Counselor, and Training Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, Julia A.; Griffin, Dana

    2010-01-01

    A multidimensional study examines both the dimensions of school counselors' involvement in school-family-community partnerships and the factors related to their involvement in partnerships. The School Counselor Involvement in Partnerships Survey was revised and its factor structure examined. Principal factor analyses revealed three dimensions of…

  16. Regulacin de la mineralizacin sea por factores inorgnicos y peptdicos Regulation of Bone Mineralization by inorganic and peptide factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.L Negri

    2011-10-01

    osteoctico perilacunar.Orthotopic mineralization begins with the production of matrix vesicles that are produced by polarized budding of the surface of condrocytes, osteoblasts and odontoblasts. It occurs in two steps: The first one is the formation of hydroxiapatite crystals within the matrix vesicles, followed by the propagation of the hydroxiapatite crystals through the membrane vesicle into the extra cellular matrix. In the regulation of orthotopic mineralization, apart from tissue-specific cells, a great number of enzymes, inorganic and peptide factors participate, that have complex interactions among them. Inorganic pyrophosphate (PPi antagonizes the ability of phosphate (Pi to crystallize with calcium and to form hydroxiapatite, thus suppressing its propagation. For the normal mineralization to continue, an adjusted balance of the extra cellular Pi and PPi levels is needed. Three molecules have been identified that have a central role in the regulation of extra cellular PPi levels: tissue non-specific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP, which hydrolyzes PPi, the nucleotide pyrophosphatase phosphodiesterase 1 (NPP1, which generates PPi from triphosphate nucleosides, and the multiple-steps transmembrane protein ANK which transfers PPi from the intracellular to the extracellular compartment. There are, in turn, two SIBLING proteins called DMP1 and MEPE that regulate mineralization. The expression of DMP1 by the osteocyte is dramatically induced in response to mechanical loading increasing bone mineralization. MEPE protein contains a protease resistant motif called ASARM, which is believed to be the candidate for the mineralization inhibitor (minhibin. Osteopontin is another mineralization inhibitor in its phosphorilated form and its secretion is markedly reduced in knockout mice for NPP1. Present data seem to support the hypothesis that these molecules could be the translators of bone strain and participate in the regulation of mineralization of the perilacunar osteocytic space.

  17. Impact of selected family socio-economic factors on coordinational predispositions of children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarosław Domaradzki

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Biological growth of children is genetically determined but there are a lot of factors modifying trends of growth. Among them the most important seems to be parents’ education and number of children in family – socio-economical factors. Factors don’t affect organism individually. Interactions between them can increase or decrease. So the aim of the work was to estimate the influence of socio-economic factors like parents’ education and number of children in family on coordinational traits of children aged 10–11. Material and methods: 199 children aged 10-11 underwent medical examination in 2008 in Polkowice and data collected were used in this study.. Information on parents’ education and number of children was used to divide children into four groups: lower education and 3 or more children in family, lower education and less than 3 children in family, higher education and more than 3 children in family and higher education and less than 3 children in family. Three coordinational traits were measured: short time memory, precision of hand and speed movement of the hand. MANOVA test was used to estimate differences between groups and to check interactions between factors. Results: From among 4 groups of boys, these from the worst socio-economic status of family received the worst results in all three tests. Differences between them and the rest of the groups were statistically significant. Differences between the rest of the groups were not statistically significant. In the girls groups children from families with higher parents’ education received statistically significant better results in test of memory. There were not differences between all 4 groups in precision of the hand test. Girls from family with higher parents’ education and 3 or more children in family received the best results in speed of the hand test. Conclusions: Boys are the gender more eco-sensitive. The family with more than 2 children in family

  18. Synthesis of a-factor peptide from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and photoactive analogues via Fmoc solid phase methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullen, Daniel G; Kyro, Kelly; Hauser, Melinda; Gustavsson, Martin; Veglia, Gianluigi; Becker, Jeffery M; Naider, Fred; Distefano, Mark D

    2011-01-01

    a-Factor from Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a farnesylated dodecapeptide involved in mating. The molecule binds to a G-protein coupled receptor and hence serves as a simple system for studying the interactions between prenylated molecules and their cognate receptors. Here, we describe the preparation of a-factor and two photoactive analogues via Fmoc solid-phase peptide synthesis using hydrazinobenzoyl AM NovaGel™ resin; the structure of the synthetic a-factor was confirmed by MS-MS analysis and NMR; the structures of the analogues were confirmed by MS-MS analysis. Using a yeast growth arrest assay, the analogues were found to have activity comparable to a-factor itself.

  19. Factoring in family freight forwarder company: case study

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Each freight forwarder company must independently determine whether factoring is the right choice for them and if will pay off. If the factoring as a financial method would not be economically viable, it certainly would not exist. There are several different financing methods, which are more or less useful. However, not all of them are appropriate for every company, just like all buyers do not represent equal risks for the suppliers. The same buyer can pay one supplier within t...

  20. Are family factors universally related to metabolic outcomes in adolescents with Type 1 diabetes?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cameron, F.J.; Skinner, T.C.; Beaufort, C.E. de

    2008-01-01

    . Conclusions Family factors, particularly dynamic and communication factors such as parental over-involvement and adolescent-parent concordance on responsibility for diabetes care appear be important determinants of metabolic outcomes in adolescents with diabetes. However, family dynamic factors do not account......Aims To assess the importance of family factors in determining metabolic outcomes in adolescents with Type 1 diabetes in 19 countries. Methods Adolescents with Type 1 diabetes aged 11-18 years, from 21 paediatric diabetes care centres, in 19 countries, and their parents were invited to participate....... Questionnaires were administered recording demographic data, details of insulin regimens, severe hypoglycaemic events and number of episodes of diabetic ketoacidosis. Adolescents completed the parental involvement scale from the Diabetes Quality of Life for Youth-Short Form (DQOLY-SF) and the Diabetes Family...

  1. Targeted inactivation of Snail family EMT regulatory factors by a Co(III)-Ebox conjugate

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Harney, Allison S; Meade, Thomas J; LaBonne, Carole

    2012-01-01

    Snail family proteins are core EMT (epithelial-mesenchymal transition) regulatory factors that play essential roles in both development and disease processes and have been associated with metastasis in carcinomas...

  2. A national study of factors influencing the career choice of osteopathic and allopathic family physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, G; Cummings, M; Veloski, J J; Brose, J

    1996-12-01

    This study examines the differences between osteopathic and allopathic physicians regarding those factors influencing their career choice of family practice. A total of 256 osteopathic physicians and 717 allopathic family physicians were surveyed. The surveyed physicians graduated in 1983 and 1984. Comparisons were made on 19 variables that influenced the physicians' decisions to enter family practice as well as on the six factor scores derived from these 19 variables. Osteopathic physicians' decisions to choose family practice was more influenced by financial obligations, medical school experiences, and family values, whereas the allopathic physicians were more influenced by personal social value. Overall, medical school experience and personal social value were two important factors that explained the largest variances of the 19 predictors influencing physicians' decisions to enter family practice. Those allopathic medical schools whose mission emphasizes the production of generalist physicians may be able to model some approaches already in place at osteopathic medical schools. Because of the influence of the personal social value factor in medical students' choosing family practice medicine, this factor warrants further study.

  3. Construction of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Peptide Magnetic Nanovesicles with Lipid Bilayers for Enhanced Capture of Liver Cancer Circulating Tumor Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Jian; Wang, Kai; Tang, Wen-Jie; Li, Dan; Wei, You-Zhen; Lu, Ying; Li, Zong-Hai; Liang, Xiao-Fei

    2016-09-20

    Highly effective targeted tumor recognition via vectors is crucial for cancer detection. In contrast to antibodies and proteins, peptides are direct targeting ligands with a low molecular weight. In the present study, a peptide magnetic nanovector platform containing a lipid bilayer was designed using a peptide amphiphile (PA) as a skeleton material in a controlled manner without surface modification. Fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) peptide nanoparticles (NPs) could specifically bind to EGFR-positive liver tumor cells. EGFR peptide magnetic vesicles (EPMVs) could efficiently recognize and separate hepatoma carcinoma cells from cell solutions and treated blood samples (ratio of magnetic EPMVs versus anti-EpCAM NPs: 3.5 ± 0.29). Analysis of the circulating tumor cell (CTC) count in blood samples from 32 patients with liver cancer showed that EPMVs could be effectively applied for CTC capture. Thus, this nanoscale, targeted cargo-packaging technology may be useful for designing cancer diagnostic systems.

  4. Zinc(II) interactions with brain-derived neurotrophic factor N-terminal peptide fragments: inorganic features and biological perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travaglia, Alessio; La Mendola, Diego; Magrì, Antonio; Pietropaolo, Adriana; Nicoletti, Vincenzo G; Grasso, Giuseppe; Malgieri, Gaetano; Fattorusso, Roberto; Isernia, Carla; Rizzarelli, Enrico

    2013-10-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a neurotrophin essential for neuronal differentiation, growth, and survival; it is involved in memory formation and higher cognitive functions. The N-terminal domain of BDNF is crucial for the binding selectivity and activation of its specific TrkB receptor. Zn(2+) ion binding may influence BDNF activity. Zn(2+) complexes with the peptide fragment BDNF(1-12) encompassing the sequence 1-12 of the N-terminal domain of BDNF were studied by means of potentiometry, electrospray mass spectrometry, NMR, and density functional theory (DFT) approaches. The predominant Zn(2+) complex species, at physiological pH, is [ZnL] in which the metal ion is bound to an amino, an imidazole, and two water molecules (NH2, N(Im), and 2O(water)) in a tetrahedral environment. DFT-based geometry optimization of the zinc coordination environment showed a hydrogen bond between the carboxylate and a water molecule bound to zinc in [ZnL]. The coordination features of the acetylated form [AcBDNF(1-12)] and of a single mutated peptide [BDNF(1-12)D3N] were also characterized, highlighting the role of the imidazole side chain as the first anchoring site and ruling out the direct involvement of the aspartate residue in the metal binding. Zn(2+) addition to the cell culture medium induces an increase in the proliferative activity of the BDNF(1-12) peptide and of the whole protein on the SHSY5Y neuroblastoma cell line. The effect of Zn(2+) is opposite to that previously observed for Cu(2+) addition, which determines a decrease in the proliferative activity for both peptide and protein, suggesting that these metals might discriminate and modulate differently the activity of BDNF.

  5. Individual Characteristics, Family Factors, and Classroom Experiences as Predictors of Low-Income Kindergarteners’ Social Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Shayl; Arnold, David; Voegler-Lee, Mary-Ellen; Kupersmidt, Janis

    2017-01-01

    There has been increasing awareness of the need for research and theory to take into account the intersection of individual characteristics and environmental contexts when examining predictors of child outcomes. The present longitudinal, multi-informant study examined the cumulative and interacting contributions of child characteristics (language skills, inattention/hyperactivity, and aggression) and preschool and family contextual factors in predicting kindergarten social skills in 389 low-income preschool children. Child characteristics and classroom factors, but not family factors, predicted teacher-rated kindergarten social skills, while child characteristics alone predicted change in teacher-rated social skills from preschool to kindergarten. Child characteristics and family factors, but not classroom factors, predicted parent-rated kindergarten social skills. Family factors alone predicted change in parent-rated social skills from preschool to kindergarten. Individual child characteristics did not interact with family or classroom factors in predicting parent- or teacher-rated social skills, and support was therefore found for an incremental, rather than an interactive, predictive model of social skills. The findings underscore the importance of assessing outcomes in more than one context, and of considering the impact of both individual and environmental contextual factors on children’s developing social skills when designing targeted intervention programs to prepare children for kindergarten. PMID:28804528

  6. Myosin II directly binds and inhibits Dbl family guanine nucleotide exchange factors: a possible link to Rho family GTPases

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Chan-Soo; Choi, Chang-Ki; Shin, Eun-Young; Schwartz, Martin Alexander; Kim, Eung-Gook

    2010-01-01

    Cell migration requires the coordinated spatiotemporal regulation of actomyosin contraction and cell protrusion/adhesion. Nonmuscle myosin II (MII) controls Rac1 and Cdc42 activation, and cell protrusion and focal complex formation in migrating cells. However, these mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we show that MII interacts specifically with multiple Dbl family guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs). Binding is mediated by the conserved tandem Dbl homology–pleckstrin homology modu...

  7. DMPD: The role of the interferon regulatory factor (IRF) family in dendritic celldevelopment and function. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 17702640 The role of the interferon regulatory factor (IRF) family in dendritic cel...b 2007 Aug 16. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show The role of the interferon regulatory factor (IRF) family ...e interferon regulatory factor (IRF) family in dendritic celldevelopment and function. Authors Gabriele L, O

  8. DMPD: The interferon regulatory factor family in host defense: mechanism of action. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 17502370 The interferon regulatory factor family in host defense: mechanism of acti....html) (.csml) Show The interferon regulatory factor family in host defense: mechanism of action. PubmedID 1...7502370 Title The interferon regulatory factor family in host defense: mechanism

  9. Impaired glucagon-like peptide-1-induced insulin secretion in carriers of transcription factor 7-like 2 (TCF7L2) gene polymorphisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schäfer, S A; Tschritter, O; Machicao, F;

    2007-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Polymorphisms in the transcription factor 7-like 2 (TCF7L2) gene are associated with type 2 diabetes and reduced insulin secretion. The transcription factor TCF7L2 is an essential factor for glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) secretion from intestinal L cells. We studied whether a d...

  10. [The family dysfunction as a risk factor of obesity in Mexican school children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Rico, José Luis; Vásquez-Garibay, Edgar M; Cabrera-Pivaral, Carlos E; González-Pérez, Guillermo J; Troyo-Sanromán, Rogelio

    2012-01-01

    it has been demonstrated that children obesity is a multifactorial disease and probably, the alteration of the family dynamic is another potential risk factor. The objective was to identify the association between obesity and family dysfunction in school children who attend to a family medicine unit. case and control study at Mexican Social Security Institute in Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico. Sociodemographic factors and family dynamic of obese and non-obese subjects (n = 452) of six to nine years old from nuclear families were achieved. the association between family dysfunction and obesity was [OR = 1.63 (1.08-2.46), p = 0.01]. Area II, Identity formation, and area VI, Discipline and methods, showed a lower score in cases of children with obesity (p family dysfunction [RM 1.79 (1.19, 2.71), p = 0.005] and low literacy of mothers [RM 1.61 (1.06, 2.45), p = 0.02)] were risk factors for obesity in school children. the results showed an association between family dysfunction and obesity in school children. We suggest to consider it in the prevention of obesity in Mexican school children.

  11. Bidirectional associations between family factors and Internet addiction among adolescents in a prospective investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Chih-Hung; Wang, Peng-Wei; Liu, Tai-Ling; Yen, Cheng-Fang; Chen, Cheng-Sheng; Yen, Ju-Yu

    2015-04-01

    This study aimed at evaluating the effect of family factors on the occurrence of Internet addiction and determining whether Internet addiction could make any difference in the family function. A total of 2293 adolescents in grade 7 participated in the study. We assessed their Internet addiction, family function, and family factors with a 1-year follow up. In the prospective investigation, inter-parental conflict predicted the incidence of Internet addiction 1 year later in forward regression analysis, followed by not living with mother and allowance to use Internet more than 2 h per day by parents or caregiver. The inter-parental conflict and allowance to use Internet more than 2 h per day also predicted the incidence in girls. Not cared for by parents and family APGAR score predicted the incidence of Internet addiction among boys. The prospective investigation demonstrated that the incidence group had more decreased scores on family APGAR than did the non-addiction group in the 1-year follow-up. This effect was significant only among girls. Inter-parental conflict and inadequate regulation of unessential Internet use predicted risk of Internet addiction, particularly among adolescent girls. Family intervention to prevent inter-parental conflict and promote family function and Internet regulation were necessary to prevent Internet addiction. Among adolescents with Internet addiction, it is necessary to pay attention to deterioration of family function, particularly among girls. © 2014 The Authors. Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences © 2014 Japanese Society of Psychiatry and Neurology.

  12. [Family cohesion associated with oral health, socioeconomic factors and health behavior].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Luale Leão; Brandão, Gustavo Antônio Martins; Garcia, Gustavo; Batista, Marília Jesus; Costa, Ludmila da Silva Tavares; Ambrosano, Gláucia Maria Bovi; Possobon, Rosana de Fátima

    2013-08-01

    Overall health surveys have related family cohesion to socio-economic status and behavioral factors. The scope of this study was to investigate the association between family cohesion and socio-economic, behavioral and oral health factors. This was a, cross-sectional study with two-stage cluster sampling. The random sample consisted of 524 adolescents attending public schools in the city of Piracicaba-SP. Variables were evaluated by self-applied questionnaires and caries and periodontal disease were assessed by DMF-T and CPI indices. The adolescent's perception of family cohesion was assessed using the family adaptability and cohesion scale. Univariate and multinomial logistic regression shows that adolescents with low family cohesion were more likely than those with medium family cohesion to have low income (OR 2,28 95% CI 1,14- 4,55), presence of caries (OR 2,23 95% CI 1,21-4,09), less than two daily brushings (OR 1,91 95% CI 1,03-3,54). Adolescents with high family cohesion were more likely than those with medium family cohesion to have high income and protective behavior against the habit of smoking. Thus, the data shows that adolescent perception of family cohesion was associated with behavioral, socio-economic and oral health variables, indicating the importance of an integral approach to patient health.

  13. Adolescent toothbrushing and the home environment: sociodemographic factors, family relationships and mealtime routines and disorganisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Kate A; Currie, Candace

    2010-02-01

    Previous studies have shown that sociodemographic factors are associated with adolescent toothbrushing. While there has been some investigation of parental modelling of oral health behaviour and the association between parental support and oral health, there has been no investigation of the home environment and its effect on oral health behaviour. The current study examines variables related to the family, including mealtime routines and family relationships to determine the best predictors of adolescent toothbrushing. Data from the 2006 Health Behaviour in School-Aged Children Survey were modelled using logistic univariate and multivariable modelling with outcome variable twice-a-day toothbrushing. Higher family socioeconomic and affluence were significantly associated with greater odds of toothbrushing twice a day or more. Family structure was also significantly associated with girls' toothbrushing. However, under the multivariable model, eating breakfast was found to be the best predictor of twice-a-day toothbrushing among boys and girls. The next best predictor of boys' toothbrushing was eating family meals and of girls' toothbrushing, never going to bed hungry, followed by family affluence for both boys and girls. Under the multivariable model, family structure was no longer significantly associated with girls' toothbrushing. The study shows that the family and home environment should play a central role in the promotion of oral health, through mealtime routines, incorporating a fair parenting style and developing open and positive family relationships. Not only are these strongly associated with twice a day toothbrushing but, unlike sociodemographic factors, they may be relatively easy to adopt.

  14. Predictive factors for familiality in a Danish clinical cohort of children with Tourette syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Debes, Nanette M M M; Hjalgrim, Helle; Skov, Liselotte

    2010-01-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is a chronic, neurobiological disease, characterized by the presence of motor and vocal tics and it is often accompanied by associated symptoms. The two best-known co-morbidities are Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD......). The fact that TS aggregates strongly in families suggests that family members share either genetic and/or environmental risk factors contributing to TS. Numerous studies have been performed to examine the familiality in TS, but clear-cut factors to predict hereditability in TS have not been found yet. We...

  15. Family history of venous thromboembolism and identifying factor V Leiden carriers during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, Amanda L; Momirova, Valerija; Dizon-Townson, Donna; Wenstrom, Katharine; Wendel, George; Samuels, Philip; Sibai, Baha; Spong, Catherine Y; Cotroneo, Margaret; Sorokin, Yoram; Miodovnik, Menachem; O'Sullivan, Mary J; Conway, Deborah; Wapner, Ronald J

    2010-03-01

    To estimate whether there is a correlation between family history of venous thromboembolism and factor V Leiden mutation carriage in gravid women without a personal history of venous thromboembolism. This is a secondary analysis of a prospective observational study of the frequency of pregnancy-related thromboembolic events among carriers of the factor V Leiden mutation. Family history of venous thromboembolism in either first- or second-degree relatives was self-reported. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of family history to predict factor V Leiden mutation carrier status were calculated. Women without a personal venous thromboembolism history and with available DNA were included (n=5,168). One hundred forty women (2.7% [95% confidence interval (CI) 2.3-3.2%]) were factor V Leiden mutation-positive. Four hundred twelve women (8.0% [95% CI 7.3-8.7%]) reported a family history of venous thromboembolism. Women with a positive family history were twofold more likely to be factor V Leiden mutation carriers than those with a negative family history (23 of 412 [5.6%] compared with 117 of 4,756 [2.5%], Pfactor V Leiden carriers were 16.4% (95% CI 10.7-23.6%), 92.3% (95% CI 91.5-93.0%), and 5.6% (95% CI 3.6-8.3%), respectively. Although a family history of venous thromboembolism is associated with factor V Leiden mutation in thrombosis-free gravid women, the sensitivity and positive predictive values are too low to recommend screening women for the factor V Leiden mutation based solely on a family history.

  16. A spotlight on preschool: the influence of family factors on children's early literacy skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, Steve M; Bishop, Dorothy V M; Bloor, Kimberley E; Boyle, Gemma L; Fletcher, Janet; Hogben, John H; Wigley, Charles A; Yeong, Stephanie H M

    2014-01-01

    Phonological awareness, letter knowledge, oral language (including sentence recall) and rapid automatised naming are acknowledged within-child predictors of literacy development. Separate research has identified family factors including socio-economic status, parents' level of education and family history. However, both approaches have left unexplained significant amounts of variance in literacy outcomes. This longitudinal study sought to improve prospective classification accuracy for young children at risk of literacy failure by adding two new family measures (parents' phonological awareness and parents' perceived self-efficacy), and then combining the within-child and family factors. Pre-literacy skills were measured in 102 four year olds (46 girls and 56 boys) at the beginning of Preschool, and then at the beginning and end of Kindergarten, when rapid automatised naming was also measured. Family factors data were collected at the beginning of Preschool, and children's literacy outcomes were measured at the end of Year 1 (age 6-7 years). Children from high-risk backgrounds showed poorer literacy outcomes than low-risk students, though three family factors (school socio-economic status, parents' phonological awareness, and family history) typically accounted for less Year 1 variance than the within-child factors. Combining these family factors with the end of Kindergarten within-child factors provided the most accurate classification (i.e., sensitivity = .85; specificity = .90; overall correct = .88). Our approach would identify at-risk children for intervention before they began to fail. Moreover, it would be cost-effective because although few at-risk children would be missed, allocation of unnecessary educational resources would be minimised.

  17. A spotlight on preschool: the influence of family factors on children's early literacy skills.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve M Heath

    Full Text Available RATIONALE: Phonological awareness, letter knowledge, oral language (including sentence recall and rapid automatised naming are acknowledged within-child predictors of literacy development. Separate research has identified family factors including socio-economic status, parents' level of education and family history. However, both approaches have left unexplained significant amounts of variance in literacy outcomes. This longitudinal study sought to improve prospective classification accuracy for young children at risk of literacy failure by adding two new family measures (parents' phonological awareness and parents' perceived self-efficacy, and then combining the within-child and family factors. METHOD: Pre-literacy skills were measured in 102 four year olds (46 girls and 56 boys at the beginning of Preschool, and then at the beginning and end of Kindergarten, when rapid automatised naming was also measured. Family factors data were collected at the beginning of Preschool, and children's literacy outcomes were measured at the end of Year 1 (age 6-7 years. RESULTS: Children from high-risk backgrounds showed poorer literacy outcomes than low-risk students, though three family factors (school socio-economic status, parents' phonological awareness, and family history typically accounted for less Year 1 variance than the within-child factors. Combining these family factors with the end of Kindergarten within-child factors provided the most accurate classification (i.e., sensitivity = .85; specificity = .90; overall correct = .88. IMPLICATIONS: Our approach would identify at-risk children for intervention before they began to fail. Moreover, it would be cost-effective because although few at-risk children would be missed, allocation of unnecessary educational resources would be minimised.

  18. Family and non-family businesses on internal factors of entrepreneurship

    OpenAIRE

    Duarte, Nelson; Francisco DINIZ

    2012-01-01

    Small firms are a major player in development. Thus, entrepreneurship is frequently attached to these rms and it must be present in daily management of factors such as planning and cooperation. We intend to analyze these factors, comparing familiar and non-familiar businesses. This study was conducted in a Portuguese region in the north of Portugal - Vale do Sousa . The results allow us to conclude that even with some managerial di erences it was not possible to identif...

  19. Renal Overexpression of Atrial Natriuretic Peptide and Hypoxia Inducible Factor-1α as Adaptive Response to a High Salt Diet

    OpenAIRE

    Silvana Lorena Della Penna; Gabriel Cao; Andrea Carranza; Elsa Zotta; Susana Gorzalczany; Carolina Susana Cerrudo; Natalia Lucía Rukavina Mikusic; Alicia Correa; Verónica Trida; Jorge Eduardo Toblli; María Inés Rosón; Belisario Enrique Fernández

    2014-01-01

    In the kidney, a high salt intake favors oxidative stress and hypoxia and causes the development of fibrosis. Both atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and hypoxia inducible factor (HIF-1α) exert cytoprotective effects. We tested the hypothesis that renal expression of ANP and HIF-1α is involved in a mechanism responding to the oxidative stress produced in the kidneys of rats chronically fed a high sodium diet. Sprague-Dawley rats were fed with a normal salt (0.4% NaCl) (NS) or a high salt (8% Na...

  20. Fatores de risco na gagueira desenvolvimental familial e isolada Risk factors in the familial and sporadic developmental stuttering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane Moço Canhetti de Oliveira

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: investigar e comparar os achados dos fatores de risco para a cronicidade da gagueira em crianças com gagueira desenvolvimental familial e isolada. MÉTODOS: participaram 60 crianças de ambos os gêneros, divididas em dois grupos: GI - 30 crianças com gagueira desenvolvimental familial; GII - 30 crianças com gagueira desenvolvimental isolada. A coleta de dados foi realizada por meio do Protocolo de Risco para a Gagueira do Desenvolvimento - PRGD (Andrade, 2006, que considera os seguintes fatores de risco: idade, gênero, tipo de surgimento e tempo de duração das disfluências, tipologia das disfluências, fatores comunicativos e qualitativos associados, histórico mórbido pré, peri e pós natal, fatores estressantes que ocorreram próximo ao surgimento do distúrbio, histórico familial, reação pessoal, familiar e social e atitudes familiares. RESULTADOS: quando o grupo I (GI foi comparado com o grupo II (GII, a única diferença estatisticamente significante foi com relação aos fatores estressantes que ocorreram próximo ao surgimento do distúrbio. CONCLUSÃO: os resultados confirmam a natureza complexa da gagueira, bem como a necessidade de se investigar os vários fatores considerados como de risco para o distúrbio, com intuito de melhorar a compreensão de suas possíveis etiologias.PURPOSE: to investigate and compare the risk factors for stuttering between children with familial developmental stuttering and children with sporadic developmental stuttering. METHODS: 60 children of both genders with stuttering took part, divided in two groups: GI - 30 children with familial developmental stuttering; GII - 30 children with sporadic developmental stuttering. Data were gathered through the Protocol of Risk for the Developmental Stuttering - PRGD (Andrade, 2006, which considers the following factors: age; gender; manner of onset and time of duration for the disfluencies; typology of the disfluencies; associated communicative

  1. Correlations for perceived family environmental factors with substance use among adolescents in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madu, S N; Matla, M P

    2003-04-01

    Perceived family environmental factors were used to predict self-reported use of substances (drugs or alcohol) among adolescents in South Africa. 435 high school students (ages 15 to 19 years, M=17.2 yr., SD=1.34) answered a questionnaire which included questions on demographic variables, the Family Environmental Scale, and questions on substances used (drugs or alcohol). Logistic regression analysis indicated that scores on family conflict and low family moral-religious emphasis were significantly associated with drug use (57.9% of the variance was accounted for) and use of alcohol (62.3% of the variance was accounted for). Programmes for the reduction of substance use among adolescents should include activities designed to reduce family conflict and strengthen family moral-religious emphasis.

  2. Intensive Care Unit death and factors influencing family satisfaction of Intensive Care Unit care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveen Salins

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Family satisfaction of Intensive Care Unit (FS-ICU care is believed to be associated with ICU survival and ICU outcomes. A review of literature was done to determine factors influencing FS-ICU care in ICU deaths. Results: Factors that positively influenced FS-ICU care were (a communication: Honesty, accuracy, active listening, emphatic statements, consistency, and clarity; (b family support: Respect, compassion, courtesy, considering family needs and wishes, and emotional and spiritual support; (c family meetings: Meaningful explanation and frequency of meetings; (d decision-making: Shared decision-making; (e end of life care support: Support during foregoing life-sustaining interventions and staggered withdrawal of life support; (f ICU environment: Flexibility of visiting hours and safe hospital environment; and (g other factors: Control of pain and physical symptoms, palliative care consultation, and family-centered care. Factors that negatively influenced FS-ICU care were (a communication: Incomplete information and unable to interpret information provided; (b family support: Lack of emotional and spiritual support; (c family meetings: Conflicts and short family meetings; (d end of life care support: Resuscitation at end of life, mechanical ventilation on day of death, ICU death of an elderly, prolonged use of life-sustaining treatment, and unfamiliar technology; and (e ICU environment: Restrictive visitation policies and families denied access to see the dying loved ones. Conclusion: Families of the patients admitted to ICU value respect, compassion, empathy, communication, involvement in decision-making, pain and symptom relief, avoiding futile medical interventions, and dignified end of life care.

  3. Intensive Care Unit death and factors influencing family satisfaction of Intensive Care Unit care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salins, Naveen; Deodhar, Jayita; Muckaden, Mary Ann

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Family satisfaction of Intensive Care Unit (FS-ICU) care is believed to be associated with ICU survival and ICU outcomes. A review of literature was done to determine factors influencing FS-ICU care in ICU deaths. Results: Factors that positively influenced FS-ICU care were (a) communication: Honesty, accuracy, active listening, emphatic statements, consistency, and clarity; (b) family support: Respect, compassion, courtesy, considering family needs and wishes, and emotional and spiritual support; (c) family meetings: Meaningful explanation and frequency of meetings; (d) decision-making: Shared decision-making; (e) end of life care support: Support during foregoing life-sustaining interventions and staggered withdrawal of life support; (f) ICU environment: Flexibility of visiting hours and safe hospital environment; and (g) other factors: Control of pain and physical symptoms, palliative care consultation, and family-centered care. Factors that negatively influenced FS-ICU care were (a) communication: Incomplete information and unable to interpret information provided; (b) family support: Lack of emotional and spiritual support; (c) family meetings: Conflicts and short family meetings; (d) end of life care support: Resuscitation at end of life, mechanical ventilation on day of death, ICU death of an elderly, prolonged use of life-sustaining treatment, and unfamiliar technology; and (e) ICU environment: Restrictive visitation policies and families denied access to see the dying loved ones. Conclusion: Families of the patients admitted to ICU value respect, compassion, empathy, communication, involvement in decision-making, pain and symptom relief, avoiding futile medical interventions, and dignified end of life care. PMID:27076710

  4. [Factors affecting subjective satisfaction with verbal communication among the disabled elderly and their family caregivers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Hiroko; Arai, Yumiko; Yamasaki, Kiyoko

    2005-05-01

    The aims of the present study were to investigate satisfaction with verbal communication among the disabled elderly and their family caregivers; and to find the significantly influential factors of satisfaction with verbal communication. The subjects were 85 disabled elderly and 85 family caregivers. For the disabled elderly, satisfaction with verbal communication, demographic, and physical factors were examined using an interview survey. For the caregivers, satisfaction with verbal communication, demographic factors, and some factors related caregiving were examined using a self-administered questionnaire. In the disabled elderly, 82.4% were satisfied with their verbal communication while 55.3% of family caregivers were satisfied. Satisfaction with verbal communication between the disabled elderly and their caregivers showed low agreement (kappa = 0.17). Bivariate analysis revealed that satisfaction with verbal communication of the disabled elderly was significantly related to ADL (p verbal communication of caregivers was significantly related to the gender of the disabled elderly and caregivers' burden. Furthermore, multiple regression analysis showed that the factor most related to satisfaction with verbal communication for the disabled elderly was ability of comprehension (p value = 0.032, odds ratio = 2.960), and the most related factor for their caregivers was the burden evaluated by J-ZBI_8 (p value = 0.004, odds ratio = 0.842). These results suggest that satisfaction with verbal communication of the disabled elderly disagrees with that of the family caregivers, and that some related factors for the disabled elderly are different from those in their family caregivers.

  5. Relevant Factors in the Process of Socialization, Involvement and Belonging of Descendants in Family Businesses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melquicedec Lozano-Posso

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This research works toward the identification of the factors that comprise the process of socialization, involvement and initial belonging of descendants in family businesses and the key relationships between them. By means of a qualitative detailed study of four cases, complemented by a quantitative survey of 274 Colombian family businesses, the authors generate a new model that takes into account both factors explored in previous research as well as others identified in this study. Findings confirm the specific dependency of each stage on the subsequent ones; socialization influences involvement, which in turn influences the belonging of the descendants to the family business, with a strong presence of factors such as knowledge, leadership, mode, timing, and motivation. Those responsible for the orientation of potential successors may examine these findings in order to optimize their preparation efforts and support of family human resources for the continuity of the business.

  6. Family Risk Factors Among Women With Addiction-Related Problems: An Integrative Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abasi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Context Recent years have produced many articles about women’s addiction and its risk factors and the consequences of substance use and misuse in the emotional, social, psychological, and economic domains of life. Family vulnerabilities are one of the most important variables contributing to addiction among women. Thus, the purpose of this article is to investigate areas of family life that lead to women’s taking up and maintaining drug and alcohol abuse. Evidence Acquisition A database search of PubMed, ScienceDirect, Springer, and Google Scholar was conducted using the following keywords: “women and addiction”, “women addiction and family”, “addiction”, “substance abuse” and “family”. For the first step, we chose studies that were conducted between 2000 and 2015, and for the second step, studies conducted before 2000. We categorized all search results into three main groups: processes related to family disturbances, factors related to parenting styles, and variables related to partners. Results Partners, parenting styles, and family disturbances are three main factors affecting children growing up in a family and their inclination toward addiction. Some of these pathways are complicated and indirect, and some are straightforward. Conclusions Future research should pay more attention to the mechanisms and pathways mediating or moderating the relationship between family risk factors and addiction in women. Clinicians and researchers should keep in mind these vulnerabilities and take into consideration factors special to processes related to addiction in women.

  7. Inefficient constitutive inhibition of P2X3 receptors by brain natriuretic peptide system contributes to sensitization of trigeminal sensory neurons in a genetic mouse model of familial hemiplegic migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchenkova, Anna; Vilotti, Sandra; Ntamati, Niels; van den Maagdenberg, Arn Mjm; Nistri, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    On trigeminal ganglion neurons, pain-sensing P2X3 receptors are constitutively inhibited by brain natriuretic peptide via its natriuretic peptide receptor-A. This inhibition is associated with increased P2X3 serine phosphorylation and receptor redistribution to non-lipid raft membrane compartments. The natriuretic peptide receptor-A antagonist anantin reverses these effects. We studied whether P2X3 inhibition is dysfunctional in a genetic familial hemiplegic migraine type-1 model produced by introduction of the human pathogenic R192Q missense mutation into the mouse CACNA1A gene (knock-in phenotype). This model faithfully replicates several properties of familial hemiplegic migraine type-1, with gain-of-function of CaV2.1 Ca(2+) channels, raised levels of the algogenic peptide calcitonin gene-related peptide, and enhanced activity of P2X3 receptors in trigeminal ganglia. In knock-in neurons, anantin did not affect P2X3 receptor activity, membrane distribution, or serine phosphorylation level, implying ineffective inhibition by the constitutive brain natriuretic peptide/natriuretic peptide receptor-A pathway. However, expression and functional properties of this pathway remained intact together with its ability to downregulate TRPV1 channels. Reversing the familial hemiplegic migraine type-1 phenotype with the CaV2.1-specific antagonist, ω-agatoxin IVA restored P2X3 activity to wild-type level and enabled the potentiating effects of anantin again. After blocking calcitonin gene-related peptide receptors, P2X3 receptors exhibited wild-type properties and were again potentiated by anantin. P2X3 receptors on mouse trigeminal ganglion neurons are subjected to contrasting modulation by inhibitory brain natriuretic peptide and facilitatory calcitonin gene-related peptide that both operate via complex intracellular signaling. In the familial hemiplegic migraine type-1 migraine model, the action of calcitonin gene-related peptide appears to prevail over brain natriuretic

  8. Association between family risk of stroke and myocardial infarction with prevalent risk factors and coexisting diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Richard E; Howard, George; Go, Rodney C; Rothwell, Peter M; Tiwari, Hemant K; Feng, Rui; McClure, Leslie A; Prineas, Ronald J; Banerjee, Amitava; Arnett, Donna K

    2012-04-01

    Familial transmission of stroke and myocardial infarction (MI) is partially mediated by transmission of cerebrovascular and cardiovascular risk factors. We examined relationships between family risk of stroke and MI with risk factors for these phenotypes. A cross-sectional association between the stratified log-rank family score for stroke and MI with prevalent risk factors was assessed in the REasons for Geographic And Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) cohort. Individuals in the fourth quartile of stratified log-rank family scores for stroke were more likely to have prevalent risk factors including hypertension (OR, 1.43; 95% CI, 1.30-1.58), left ventricular hypertrophy (OR, 1.42; 95% CI, 1.16-1.42), diabetes (OR, 1.26; 95% CI, 1.12-1.43), and atrial fibrillation (OR, 1.23; 95% CI, 1.03-1.45) compared with individuals in the first quartile. Likewise, individuals in the fourth quartile of stratified log-rank family scores for MI were more likely to have prevalent risk factors including hypertension (OR, 1.57; 95% CI, 1.27-1.94) and diabetes (OR, 1.29; 95% CI, 1.12-1.43) than the first quartile. In contrast to stroke, the family risk score for MI was associated with dyslipidemia (OR, 1.38; 95% CI, 1.23-1.55) and overweight/obesity (OR, 1.22; 95% CI, 1.10-1.37). Family risk of stroke and MI is strongly associated with the majority of risk factors associated with each disease. Family history and genetic studies separating nonspecific contributions of intermediate phenotypes from specific contributions to the disease phenotype may lead to a more thorough understanding of transmission for these complex disorders.

  9. Organizational Factors and the Implementation of Family to Family: Contextual Elements of Systems Reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crea, Thomas M.; Crampton, David S.; Knight, Nelson; Paine-Wells, Lisa

    2011-01-01

    In efforts to reform the child welfare system, agency leaders must involve staff at all levels; yet, little research has been done to determine which organizational factors encourage or inhibit staff engagement. Employees from an urban child welfare agency were invited to complete a survey regarding organizational effectiveness and its influence…

  10. The FIRO model of family therapy: implications of factor analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafner, R J; Ross, M W

    1989-11-01

    Schutz's FIRO model contains three main elements: inclusion, control, and affection. It is used widely in mental health research and practice, but has received little empirical validation. The present study is based on factor analysis of the resources to FIRO questionnaire of 120 normal couples and 191 couples who were attending a clinic for marital/psychiatric problems. Results confirmed the validity of the FIRO model for women only. The differences between the sexes reflected a considerable degree of sex-role stereotyping, the clinical implications of which are discussed.

  11. Factors impacting the mental health of the caregivers of children with asthma in china: effects of family socioeconomic status, symptoms control, proneness to shame, and family functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ting; Yi, Chunli; Zhang, Xuxia; Wang, Yuyin

    2014-12-01

    Caregiver mental health is widely considered to be an important factor influencing children's asthma symptoms. The present study aimed to examine key factors that contribute to caregiver mental health in pediatric asthma with a Chinese sample. Two hundred participants reported their family socioeconomic status (SES), proneness to shame, asthma symptoms control of their child, family functioning, and their depression and anxiety symptoms. Results suggested that low family SES, low family functioning, and a high level of shame proneness were associated with high levels of anxiety and depression for caregivers. Family functioning mediated the effects of SES and shame on caregiver mental health and also moderated the effects of SES and shame on caregiver depression. This study highlights the importance of reducing experience of shame and enhancing family functioning in families affected by pediatric asthma. © 2014 Family Process Institute.

  12. The effective family and personality factors on felony in adolescent felons of Khorramabad house of correction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    mandana Saki

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Social damage is one of the problems which destroys the active manpower and young population in the country and also prevents social development. Family is the first environment in which social ground for the child is provided.Any dispute, controversy or inferiority complex in the family may lead to wrong doings The present study aims at the effective family and personality factors on felony in felon adolescents kept in Khorramabad bouse of correction. Materials and Methods: This descriptive- analytic study was carried out on all of the adolescents in Khorramabad house of correction as case group selected using census random sampling and high school students as control group selected by cluster random sampling. Data gathering tool was a 2-part questionnaire including demographic information and standard SCL 90 questionnaire. Results: Results showed that there is a significant relationship between the place of residence, failure in school program, economic status of the family, parents presence, fathers job and education, mothers job and education, parents inter personal relationship and family conflicting. The results also showed that aggression, anxiety, depression, somatic complain, obsessive compulsive, inter personality sensitivity, Psychotic, paranoid and phobia had a significant difference in the case and control groups. Conclusion: Regarding the fact that family environment is considered as the most important educative factor and no social damage has not occurred out of family influence, so no society can claim to be healthy unless to have healthy families.

  13. Family factors that characterize adolescents with severe obesity and their role in weight loss surgery outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeller, Meg H; Hunsaker, Sanita; Mikhail, Carmen; Reiter-Purtill, Jennifer; McCullough, Mary Beth; Garland, Beth; Austin, Heather; Washington, Gia; Baughcum, Amy; Rofey, Dana; Smith, Kevin

    2016-12-01

    To comprehensively assess family characteristics of adolescents with severe obesity and whether family factors impact weight loss outcomes following weight loss surgery (WLS). Multisite prospective data from 138 adolescents undergoing WLS and primary caregivers (adolescent: Mage  = 16.9; MBMI = 51.5 kg/m(2) ; caregiver: Mage  = 44.5; 93% female) and 83 nonsurgical comparators (NSComp: adolescent: Mage  = 16.1; MBMI = 46.9 kg/m(2) ; caregiver: Mage  = 43.9; 94% female) were collected using standardized measures at presurgery/baseline and at 1 and 2 years. The majority (77.3%) of caregivers had obesity, with rates of caregiver WLS significantly higher in the WLS (23.8%) versus NSComp group (3.7%, P Family dysfunction was prevalent (≈1 in every two to three families), with rates higher for NSComp than the WLS group. For the WLS group, preoperative family factors (i.e., caregiver BMI or WLS history, dysfunction, social support) were not significant predictors of adolescent weight loss at 1 and 2 years postoperatively, although change in family functioning over time emerged as a significant correlate of percent weight loss. Rates of severe obesity in caregivers as well as family dysfunction were clinically noteworthy, although not related to adolescent weight loss success following WLS. However, change in family communication and emotional climate over time emerged as potential targets to optimize weight loss outcomes. © 2016 The Obesity Society.

  14. [Analysis of family influence factors of quality of life about vision].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Yirong; Wang, Hong; Cao, Xingyuan; Yuan, Baocheng; Chen, Jiaxu

    2015-09-01

    To explore the QOL About Vision of students and its family influence factors. 4096 students and 3740 parents were chosen from 8 primary and middle schools by stratified cluster random sampling in the suburbs and the urban area of Chongqing, surveyed with questionnaire by a QOL about vision for primary and middle school students, Family factors questionnaire (including parents' education, occupation, be myopia or not,family economic status etc.). The total score of QOL about vision among boys (92. 13 ± 12. 50) were more than girls > (90. 08 ± 12. 82), more and more as grade-grouping (96. 39 ± 9. 72 >90. 35 ±12. 07 >83. 45 ± 13. 46). The total score of rural students (91. 46 ± 12. 87) were more than that of urban students > (90. 84 ± 12. 54). The results for single factor analysis indicated that there were significant difference between different parents' degree of education,distance between eye and TV set, whether or not encouraging movement. The results of general linear regression analysis indicated that parents' degree of education and distance between eye and TV set were main factors which influence the students' QOL about vision. Family factors were main factors of QOL about vision.family should be one of the key intervention place.

  15. Factor Structure of the Family Environment Scale: Effects of Social Desirability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Patrick C.

    1982-01-01

    Presented for 64 subjects a replication of the Family Environment Scale's maximum likelihood factor structure for which the two-factor, Varimax-rotated solution was found to be stable when the correlations among the subscales were corrected for the effects of social desirability response bias. (Author)

  16. Personal, Familial, and Social Factors Contributing to Addiction Relapse, Ahvaz, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fayazi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background Drug addiction is deemed one of the gravest threats to society. Objectives The objective of this study was to determine what factors (personal, familial, or social are correlated with addiction relapse. Patients and Methods In this descriptive study, 146 addicts referring to addiction treatment centers in the Iranian city of Ahvaz were selected via purposive and non-randomized sampling. The study tool was a researcher-made questionnaire. Descriptive statistics and SPSS software were used for data analysis. Results The results showed that 46.1% of the participants aged between 20 and 30 years. All the subjects had at least one attempt at quitting drug abuse. Single individuals comprised 52.9% of the study population. The most significant physical factors were lack of appetite (23.9%, numbness and pins and needles (23.3%, and bone pain (22.4%, while the most significant mental factor was loneliness (44%. Concerning the social factors, association with addicted and misleading friends (35.2% had the utmost importance. Furthermore, lack of a permanent job (43% and absence of appropriate family relationships (32%, respectively, constituted the most important factors among the career and familial factors. Conclusions Our results showed that many personal, familial, and social factors play a role in addiction relapse. The high prevalence of return to addiction necessitates further strategies for the more optimal control of these factors.

  17. Factors affecting antimicrobial activity of MUC7 12-mer, a human salivary mucin-derived peptide

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    Bobek Libuse A

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MUC7 12-mer (RKSYKCLHKRCR, a cationic antimicrobial peptide derived from the human low-molecular-weight salivary mucin MUC7, possesses potent antimicrobial activity in vitro. In order to evaluate the potential therapeutic application of the MUC7 12-mer, we examined the effects of mono- and divalent cations, EDTA, pH, and temperature on its antimicrobial activity. Methods Minimal Inhibitory Concentrations (MICs were determined using a liquid growth inhibition assay in 96-well microtiter plates. MUC7 12-mer was added at concentrations of 1.56–50 μM. MICs were determined at three endpoints: MIC-0, MIC-1, and MIC-2 (the lowest drug concentration showing 10%, 25% and 50% of growth, respectively. To examine the effect of salts or EDTA, a checkerboard microdilution technique was used. Fractional inhibitory concentration index (FICi was calculated on the basis of MIC-0. The viability of microbial cells treated with MUC7 12-mer in the presence of sodium or potassium was also determined by killing assay or flow cytometry. Results The MICs of MUC7 12-mer against organisms tested ranged from 6.25–50 μM. For C. albicans, antagonism (FICi 4.5 was observed for the combination of MUC7 12-mer and calcium; however, there was synergism (FICi 0.22 between MUC7 12-mer and EDTA, and the synergism was retained in the presence of calcium at its physiological concentration (1–2 mM. No antagonism but additivity or indifference (FICi 0.55–2.5 was observed for the combination of MUC7 12-mer and each K+, Na+, Mg2+, or Zn2+. MUC7 12-mer peptide (at 25 μM also exerted killing activity in the presence of NaCl, (up to 25 mM for C. albicans and up to 150 mM for E. coli, a physiological concentration of sodium in the oral cavity and serum, respectively and retained candidacidal activity in the presence of KCl (up to 40 mM. The peptide exhibited higher inhibitory activity against C. albicans at pH 7, 8, and 9 than at pH 5 and 6, and temperature up to

  18. Protective factors for adolescents among divorced single-parent families from Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Mei-O; Leung, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    There has been growing research interest in relation to problems of divorced single-parent families and their children. This study investigates predictors of life adaptation problems among adolescents from divorced single-parent families. The participants included 291 youths, 39.9% of whom were living with single fathers and 46.4% of whom were living with single mothers. All measures were tested using split-half reliabilities and Cronbach's Alpha reliabilities. Factor analyses were employed repeatedly until the factor loadings of all items in each scale were larger than 0.5. Regression analysis determined the influence of these factors on the adolescents' adaptation. Results showed that adolescents had multidimensional adaptation problems. Resilience, family functioning, and social support had their relative effects on each aspect of adaptation. Among these factors, family functioning played such an important role that it appeared to enter into almost every multiple regression equation. Specifically, "family are cohesive and harmonious" and "family render affirmative behaviors" protected youth from many adaptation problems. It also revealed that "confidence in handling interpersonal relationship" in personal resilience was important. Finally, implications for social work practice are provided.

  19. [Family factors influence active commuting to school in Spanish children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-López, Carlos; Villa-González, Emilio; Pérez-López, Isaac J; Delgado-Fernández, Manuel; Ruiz, Jonatan R; Chillón, Palma

    2013-01-01

    Introducción: El desplazamiento activo al colegio contribuye a aumentar los niveles de actividad física en niños. Los factores familiares pueden determinar dicho comportamiento. Objetivo: El objetivo fue analizar la asociación de la actividad laboral y el desplazamiento al trabajo de los padres con el modo de desplazamiento de sus hijos. Método: Participaron 721 familias de 4 colegios de la provincia de Granada. Las familias completaron un cuestionario sobre el modo de desplazamiento de sus hijos, la actividad laboral y el modo de desplazamiento de los padres, y la distancia y tiempo del trayecto al colegio de sus hijos. Las asociaciones entre la actividad laboral de las familias y modo de desplazamiento al trabajo con el desplazamiento activo al colegio de sus hijos se estudiaron con regresión logística binaria ajustando por distancia al colegio y edad de los hijos. Resultados: Los niños cuyos padres y madres no trabajaban eran más propensos a ir de forma activa al colegio que aquellos donde ambos trabajaban (p = 0,023; OR: 2,67; 95% IC: 1,14-6,23). Los niños cuyos padres y madres se desplazaban de forma activa al trabajo eran más propensos a ir de forma activa al colegio que aquellos donde ambos padres se desplazaban de forma pasiva al trabajo (p = 0,014; OR: 6,30; 95% IC: 1,45-27,26). Conclusión: Los factores familiares estaban relacionados con el modo de desplazamiento de los niños al colegio: en familias con desempleo y en familias con empleo donde los padres se desplazan al trabajo de forma activa, los hijos parecen ser más activos.

  20. [Critical perspective of the family and acquaintances on family and community risk factors in illicit drug use in São Jose, Costa Rica].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granados Hernández, Mabell; Brands, Bruna; Adlaf, Edward; Giesbrecht, Norman; Simich, Laura; Wright, Maria da Gloria Miotto

    2009-01-01

    This article presents the results of a quantitative study. The purpose was to describe the perspective of family members and acquaintances of illicit drug users about family and community risk factors that can contribute to addiction to illicit drugs. A questionnaire was used for data collection. The population consisted of 100 individuals, 18 years of age or older, who reported being affected by their relationship with an illicit drug user (relative or acquaintance). Most users (82%) were men, with an average age of 27.3 years. Family risk factors included: family rejection (99%), not feeling loved (98%), lack of communication (95%), family conflicts and violence (95%). Social or community factors included: 99% having friends who use drugs, 99% peer pressure, 93% living in an unsafe area, and 99% experienced a stressful event. The critical perspective proposes to use more prevention strategies to avoid risk factors in the family and community.

  1. Binding of EGF1 Domain Peptide in Coagulation Factor Ⅶ with Tissue Factor and Its Implications for the Triggering of Coagulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梅恒; 胡豫; 王华芳; 石威; 邓君; 郭涛

    2010-01-01

    The binding function of EGF1 domain peptide with tissue factor(TF)and its ability of triggering coagulation were explored.The TF expression model in vitro was established by lipopolysaccha-ride induction.The affinity of EGFP-EGF1 and TF expressing cells was analyzed by fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry(FCM).The affinity of EGFP-EGF1 and rat soluble TF was quantitated by surface plasmon resonance(SPR).The ability of EGFP-EGF1 in triggering coagulation was tested by prothrombin time assay.The FCM res...

  2. The educational gradient in cardiovascular risk factors: impact of shared family factors in 228,346 Norwegian siblings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ariansen, Inger; Mortensen, Laust Hvas; Graff-Iversen, Sidsel

    2017-01-01

    Background: Various indicators of childhood socioeconomic position have been related to cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk in adulthood. We investigated the impact of shared family factors on the educational gradient in midlife CVD risk factors by assessing within sibling similarities in the gradi......Background: Various indicators of childhood socioeconomic position have been related to cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk in adulthood. We investigated the impact of shared family factors on the educational gradient in midlife CVD risk factors by assessing within sibling similarities...... category lower educational level was associated with 0.7 (95% confidence interval 0.6 to 0.8) mm Hg higher systolic blood pressure (27% attenuation), 0.4 (0.4 to 0.5) mmHg higher diastolic blood pressure (30%), 1.0 (1.0 to 1.1) more beats per minute higher heart rate (21%), 0.07 (0.06 to 0.07) mmol...

  3. Characterization of a novel peptide toxin from Acanthoscurria paulensis spider venom: a distinct cysteine assignment to the HWTX-II family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourão, Caroline B F; Heghinian, Mari D; Barbosa, Eder A; Marí, Frank; Bloch, Carlos; Restano-Cassulini, Rita; Possani, Lourival D; Schwartz, Elisabeth F

    2013-04-01

    Spider venom toxins have raised interest in prospecting new drugs and pesticides. Nevertheless, few studies are conducted with tarantula toxins, especially with species found in Brazil. This study aims to characterize chemically and biologically the first toxin isolated from Acanthoscurria paulensis venom. Ap1a consists of 48 amino acid residues and has a molecular mass of 5457.79 Da. The cloned gene encodes a putative sequence of 23 amino acid residues for the signal peptide and 27 for the pro-peptide. The sequence of the mature peptide is 60-84% identical with those of toxins of the HWTX-II family. Different from the structural pattern proposed for these toxins, the disulfide pairing of Ap1a is of the ICK type motif, which is also shared by the U1-TRTX-Bs1a toxin. Ap1a induced a dose-dependent and reversible paralytic effect in Spodoptera frugiperda caterpillars, with an ED50 of 13.0 ± 4.2 μg/g 8 h after injections. In the Drosophila melanogaster Giant Fiber circuit, Ap1a (1.14-22.82 μg/g) reduces both the amplitude and frequency of responses from GF-TTM and GF-DLM pathways, suggesting an action at the neuromuscular junction, which is mediated by glutamatergic receptors. It is also lethal to mice (1.67 μg/g, intracranial route), inducing effects similar to those reported with intracerebroventricular administration of NMDA. Ap1a (1 μM) does not alter the response induced by acetylcholine on the rhabdomyosarcoma cell preparation and shows no significant effects on hNav1.2, hNav1.4, hNav1.5, and hNav1.6 channels. Because of its unique sequence and cysteine assignment to the HWTX-II family, Ap1a is a significant contribution to the structure-function study of this family of toxins.

  4. Factores de riesgo para la salud familiar: acontecimientos significativos Risk factors for family health: significative events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia María Herrera Santi

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available El trabajo aborda el estudio de aquellos acontecimientos que pueden generar crisis familiares. Se define el concepto de acontecimiento significativo de la vida familiar y se establece una diferenciación de estos con las crisis familiares. Se realiza un recorrido por las diferentes etapas que atraviesa el ciclo de vida familiar y de los acontecimientos significativos que constituyen momentos de riesgo en éste.This work deals with the study of those events that can generate family crises. The concept of significative event of the family life is defined, and it is established a difference between them and the family crises. The different stages through which the family life passes by and the significative events that constitute risk peaks within this cycle are analyzed.

  5. Comparison of familial and psychological factors in groups of encopresis patients with constipation and without constipation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çengel-Kültür, S Ebru; Akdemir, Devrim; Saltık-Temizel, İnci N

    2014-01-01

    The study aimed to evaluate the differences between groups of encopresis patients with constipation and without constipation. The Symptom Checklist- 90-Revised, the COPE Questionnaire, the Relationship Scales Questionnaire, the McMaster Family Assessment Device and the Parenting Style Scale were used to evaluate, respectively, maternal psychiatric symptoms, coping abilities, attachment style, family functioning and children's perceptions of parenting behaviors. Psychiatric diagnoses were evaluated using the K-SADS. A higher level of maternal psychiatric symptoms, impaired role and affective involvement functioning of the family and less psychological autonomy were observed in the group of encopresis patients with constipation than in the group of encopresis patients without constipation. No significant differences were found between the groups in psychiatric comorbidities, maternal coping abilities and attachment style. The two groups had a similar pattern of comorbid psychiatric disorders and maternal psychological factors, although some familial factors-related mainly to parental authority-were differentiated in the encopresis with constipation group.

  6. [Factors family background of mothers involved in having a premature baby].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamburova, M; Hristova, I

    2014-01-01

    Level of prematurity is an objective criterion for determining the health welfare of the population. Several family background factors of the mother increases the risk of preterm birth child - family status, unwanted pregnancy, etc. Pregnancy among unmarried women and unwanted pregnancy are associated with a higher risk of giving premature baby. Aim of this study is a survey and analysis of factors of family background of the mother (family status and unplanned pregnancy) and their influence on the birth of a premature baby. The survey found nearly three times higher risk OR = 2,83 95 % CI (1,7-4,7) for the birth of a premature baby among unmarried mothers compared to married women, and twice as high proportion of unplanned pregnancy mothers of preterm infants - 20.7% compared to terminfants-10.4%.

  7. [Social and family factors associated with quality of life in children in schools from Piura, Peru].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solano, Fiorela E; Vilela-Estrada, Martin A; Meza-Liviapoma, Jessica; Araujo-Chumacero, Mary M; Vilela-Estrada, Ana L; Mejia, Christian R

    2017-04-01

    To determine the socio-familial factors associated with quality of life within the family in children of schools in Piura, Peru. A cross-sectional study in a convenience sample of children between 3 to 6 years in schools in the city of Piura, Perú. The quality of life was measured by the HOME test, with data adjusted to the Machover and Koppitz test, and were also associated with other social and family variables. P values were obtained by generalised linear models, adjusting for the residence of each subject. Of the 431 respondents, 64% (275) were male. The median age was 4 years old. A poor quality of life was observed in 50% of children. Traits of violence (p social and family protective factors were to live with both parents, and the demonstration of affection between both parents and play with both.

  8. The structure of risk factors and outcomes for family caregivers: implications for assessment and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarit, Steven H; Femia, Elia E; Kim, Kyungmin; Whitlatch, Carol J

    2010-03-01

    We examined the associations among risk factors (e.g., behavioral problems, family conflict) and outcomes (e.g., overload, depression) commonly used in the research literature in order to inform the design of caregiver assessment and interventions. A sample of 67 caregivers caring for a family member in the middle stages of dementia were assessed on 15 risk factors and six outcome measures. Risk factors were at best only moderately correlated with one another, suggesting their relative independence. Outcome measures showed somewhat higher correlations with one another, but participants varied in terms of the number and type of outcomes that were elevated. Multivariate results showed that risk factors differed in their contribution to models, predicting various outcomes. Caregivers possess unique combinations of risk factors and outcomes that suggest the need for individualized or tailored interventions. Designing an effective caregiver assessment and corresponding targeted intervention requires careful planning and selection of appropriate risk factors and outcomes.

  9. Characterization of the Far Transcription Factor Family in Aspergillus flavus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xingyu; Affeldt, Katharyn J.; Keller, Nancy P.

    2016-01-01

    Metabolism of fatty acids is a critical requirement for the pathogenesis of oil seed pathogens including the fungus Aspergillus flavus. Previous studies have correlated decreased ability to grow on fatty acids with reduced virulence of this fungus on host seed. Two fatty acid metabolism regulatory transcription factors, FarA and FarB, have been described in other filamentous fungi. Unexpectedly, we find A. flavus possesses three Far homologs, FarA, FarB, and FarC, with FarA and FarC showing a greater protein similarity to each other than FarB. farA and farB are located in regions of colinearity in all Aspergillus spp. sequenced to date, whereas farC is limited to a subset of species where it is inserted in an otherwise colinear region in Aspergillus genomes. Deletion and overexpression (OE) of farA and farB, but not farC, yielded mutants with aberrant growth patterns on specific fatty acids as well as altered expression of genes involved in fatty acid metabolism. Marked differences included significant growth defects of both ∆farA and ∆farB on medium-chain fatty acids and decreased growth of OE::farA on unsaturated fatty acids. Loss of farA diminished expression of mitochondrial β-oxidation genes whereas OE::farA inhibited expression of genes involved in unsaturated fatty acid catabolism. FarA also positively regulated the desaturase genes required to generate polyunsaturated fatty acids. Aflatoxin production on toxin-inducing media was significantly decreased in the ∆farB mutant and increased in the OE::farB mutant, with gene expression data supporting a role for FarB in tying β-oxidation processes with aflatoxin accumulation. PMID:27534569

  10. Psychological and Family Factors Associated with Suicidal Ideation in Pre-Adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Viñas i Poch, Ferran; Canals Sans, Josepa; Gras Pérez, María Eugenia; Ros, Claudia; Domènech, Edelmira

    2002-01-01

    To assess the psychological and family factors associated with suicidal ideation in preadolescent children, we studied a sample of 361 students, average age 9 years old. Two groups were formed, on the basis of the presence (n = 34) or absence (n = 44) of suicidal ideation. Suicidal ideation was assessed with the Children’s Depression Inventory and the Children’s Depression Rating Scale-Revised. Depression, hopelessness, self-esteem, and perceived family environment were compared in both th...

  11. Self-Reported Internalization Symptoms and Family Factors in Indigenous Sami and Non-Sami Adolescents in North Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bals, Margrethe; Turi, Anne Lene; Vitterso, Joar; Skre, Ingunn; Kvernmo, Siv

    2011-01-01

    Through differences in family socialization between indigenous and non-indigenous youth, there may be cultural differences in the impact of family factors on mental health outcome. Using structural equation modelling, this population-based study explored the relationship between symptoms of anxiety and depression and family factors in indigenous…

  12. Factors that Affect Suicide Attempts of Adolescents in Multicultural Families in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Subin; Lee, Yeeun

    2016-11-28

    We examined the factors that affect suicide attempts adolescents multicultural families in South Korea. The participants were 727 adolescents whose mothers and/or fathers were born outside of South Korea (376 males and 351 females). Among them, 41 (weighted prevalence 6.2%) had attempted suicide during the last 12 months. Female gender, residence in large cities (compared with in rural areas), living with relatives/alone/with friends/in a dormitory or living in a facility (compared with living with family), high and low socio-economic status (compared with a middle level), high and low academic performance (compared with a middle level), severe perceived stress (compared with non-severe stress), conflicts with a teacher (compared with conflicts with parent), and foreign-father/-parent families (compared with foreign-mother family) were associated with increased odds of suicide attempt. The results indicate that greater awareness of the possibility of suicidal behavior is prudent for adolescents in multicultural families with certain risk factors, such as being from a foreign-parents family, living separately from the family, and having conflicts with a teacher.

  13. Factors that Affect Suicide Attempts of Adolescents in Multicultural Families in Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subin Park

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available We examined the factors that affect suicide attempts adolescents multicultural families in South Korea. The participants were 727 adolescents whose mothers and/or fathers were born outside of South Korea (376 males and 351 females. Among them, 41 (weighted prevalence 6.2% had attempted suicide during the last 12 months. Female gender, residence in large cities (compared with in rural areas, living with relatives/alone/with friends/in a dormitory or living in a facility (compared with living with family, high and low socio-economic status (compared with a middle level, high and low academic performance (compared with a middle level, severe perceived stress (compared with non-severe stress, conflicts with a teacher (compared with conflicts with parent, and foreign-father/-parent families (compared with foreign-mother family were associated with increased odds of suicide attempt. The results indicate that greater awareness of the possibility of suicidal behavior is prudent for adolescents in multicultural families with certain risk factors, such as being from a foreign-parents family, living separately from the family, and having conflicts with a teacher.

  14. Lifestyle and cardiovascular risk factors in 2001 child-parent pairs: the PEP Family Heart Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwandt, Peter; Haas, Gerda-Maria; Liepold, Evelyn

    2010-12-01

    Genes and environment are the main determinants of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factor clustering in families. Since individual risk factor profiles are easily predicted within families, we examined whether CVD risk factors are affected by lifestyle factors in these families. Nutrition, physical activity, and smoking habits were assessed in 2001 biological child-parent pairs from 852 families participating in the Prevention Education Program (PEP). Height, weight, body mass index, waist circumference, blood pressure, and fasting lipid levels were measured. Within-family associations were calculated using generalized estimating equations (GEE). Fathers possessed the most adverse risk profile. Daily energy consumption above the recommended levels was higher in children (daughters +35.4%, sons +26.7%) than in parents (fathers +15.7%, mothers +10.6%). Higher energy consumption was significantly associated with hypertension in mothers (OR 2.5) and in fathers (OR 1.7). Hyper-caloric nutrition of the parents predicted the energy intake of the children in: mother-daughter (OR 7.5), mother-son (OR 3.0), and father-son (OR 2.8) pairs. Low mono-unsaturated fatty acid intake was significantly associated with a high LDL/HDL-C ratio (OR 3.4) and hypertriglyceridemia (OR 2.2) in fathers. Approximately 25% of parents and children reported at least two physical activities twice a week. The 23% of children who were passive smokers presented a far more adverse risk profile than children without exposure to second-hand smoke. Intergenerational lifestyle habits affect cardiovascular risk factors within biological families. As lifestyle habits are predictable, they may be used for implementation of family-based CVD prevention strategies. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Maternal and family factors and child eating pathology: risk and protective relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Previous studies have found associations between maternal and family factors and child eating disorder symptoms. However, it is not clear whether family factors predict eating disorder symptoms specifically, or relate to more general child psychopathology, of which eating disorder symptoms may be one component. This study aimed to identify maternal and family factors that may predict increases or decreases in child eating disorder symptoms over time, accounting for children’s body mass index z-scores and levels of general psychological distress. Methods Participants were 221 mother-child dyads from the Childhood Growth and Development Study, a prospective cohort study in Western Australia. Participants were assessed at baseline, 1-year follow-up and 2-year follow-up using interview and self-report measures. Children had a mean age of 10 years at baseline and 46% were male. Linear mixed models and generalised estimating equations were used to identify predictors of children’s eating disorder symptoms, with outcome variables including a global index of eating disorder psychopathology, levels of dietary restraint, levels of emotional eating, and the presence of loss of control (‘binge’) eating. Results Children of mothers with a current or past eating disorder reported significantly higher levels of global eating disorder symptoms and emotional eating than other children, and mothers with a current or past eating disorder reported significantly more concern about their children’s weight than other mothers. Maternal concern about child weight, rather than maternal eating disorder symptoms, was significant in predicting child eating disorder symptoms over time. Family exposure to stress and low maternal education were additional risk factors for eating disorder symptoms, whilst child-reported family satisfaction was a protective factor. Conclusions After adjusting for relevant confounding variables, maternal concern about child weight, children

  16. Quarrelsome family environment as an enhanced factor on child suicidal ideation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Fu-Gong; Lin, Jing-Ding; Hsieh, Yu-Hsin; Chang, Chien-Yi

    2014-12-01

    Suicide is a leading cause of death in adolescents, and develops through a process leading from depression to suicidal ideation and self-injury. In this study, we analyzed and compared suicidal ideation among elementary school children from distinct families and school-related backgrounds. We conducted a cross-sectional study to investigate suicidal ideation in elementary school children in Miaoli County of Western Taiwan. Our study included 979 eligible participants and collected data, including suicidal ideation, depression scores, demographic characteristics, and family and school variables. The results revealed that 175 students (17.9%) exhibited depression, and 146 students (14.9%) had contemplated suicide. A quarrelsome family environment was found to be an important independent factor in child suicidal ideation after controlling for depression status. Children living in quarrelsome families showed a 3.7-fold risk of suicidal ideation compared with children in a harmonious family. Among boys living in quarrelsome family environments, suicidal ideation risk was 7.4-fold higher than for girls living in harmonious families. A 27-fold high increased suicidal ideation risk was also observed among the depressed children who living in the quarrelsome family environment, compared with the non-depressed in the harmonious family environment. This study provides novel evidence indicating the enhanced effects of a quarrelsome family environment combined with depression symptoms and among boys on suicidal ideation. These findings suggest of quarrels in a family environment playing an important role on elementary school children's psychological development, and may help parents in improving their mental health.

  17. Family and social environmental factors associated with aggression among Chinese adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Chunxia; Wei, Zhen; Jin, Ke; Wang, He; Wang, Xiulan; Peng, Ziwen

    2015-09-01

    Family and school environments are assumed to be associated with and influence aggressive behaviors. However, which specific risk factors within these environments that are associated with aggressive behavior are unclear. The goal of this study is to identify family and social environmental qualities that are related to aggression among Chinese adolescents. Survey data were obtained from 3,213 randomly selected urban high school students ages 10 through 18 in southern China. Lower parental attachment, higher family income, mother's higher education levels, father's parenting goals, rough or changeable parenting styles, unsuitable peer relationships, and inadequate social atmospheres at school serve as risk factors for aggression among Chinese adolescents. Our findings provide some implications for understanding aggression among adolescents and suggests possible interventions to help overcome potential environmental risk factors and thus to prevent aggressive behavior in school.

  18. Synthesis of peptide sequences related to thrombospondin: factors affecting aspartimide by-product formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cebrián, J; Domingo, V; Reig, F

    2003-12-01

    Aspartimide formation is one of the most common secondary reactions on solid phase peptide synthesis. In the present work, we describe the optimization of the synthesis of two thrombospondin fragments containing an Asp-Gly sequence that show a strong tendency to form cyclic aspartimide derivatives in an unusual high percentage. Several different strategies were applied changing type of resin, Fmoc-deprotection reagents, coupling additives, resin cleavage cocktails and the use of Hmb-Gly derivative to minimize the extension of this byproduct. Best results were obtained with cross-linked ethoxylate acrylate (CLEAR-cross-linked ethoxylate Acrylate Resin)-type resin and pip/dimethylformamide deprotection. Besides, as in biological assays the aspartimide containing sequence resulted to be more active than the linear one, the optimization of its synthesis was also carried out.

  19. Metallothionein and a peptide modeled after metallothionein, EmtinB, induce neuronal differentiation and survival through binding to receptors of the low-density lipoprotein receptor family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ambjørn, Malene; Asmussen, Johanne W; Lindstam, Mats;

    2007-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that metallothionein (MT)-I and -II promote neuronal survival and regeneration in vivo. The present study investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying the differentiation and survival-promoting effects of MT and a peptide modeled after MT, EmtinB. Both MT...... and EmtinB directly stimulated neurite outgrowth and promoted survival in vitro using primary cultures of cerebellar granule neurons. In addition, expression and surface localization of megalin, a known MT receptor, and the related lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 (LRP) are demonstrated in cerebellar...... granule neurons. By means of surface plasmon resonance MT and EmtinB were found to bind to both megalin and LRP. The bindings were abrogated in the presence of receptor-associated protein-1, an antagonist of the low-density lipoprotein receptor family, which also inhibited MT- and EmtinB-induced neurite...

  20. Integration and diversity of the regulatory network composed of Maf and CNC families of transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motohashi, Hozumi; O'Connor, Tania; Katsuoka, Fumiki; Engel, James Douglas; Yamamoto, Masayuki

    2002-07-10

    Recent progress in the analysis of transcriptional regulation has revealed the presence of an exquisite functional network comprising the Maf and Cap 'n' collar (CNC) families of regulatory proteins, many of which have been isolated. Among Maf factors, large Maf proteins are important in the regulation of embryonic development and cell differentiation, whereas small Maf proteins serve as obligatory heterodimeric partner molecules for members of the CNC family. Both Maf homodimers and CNC-small Maf heterodimers bind to the Maf recognition element (MARE). Since the MARE contains a consensus TRE sequence recognized by AP-1, Jun and Fos family members may act to compete or interfere with the function of CNC-small Maf heterodimers. Overall then, the quantitative balance of transcription factors interacting with the MARE determines its transcriptional activity. Many putative MARE-dependent target genes such as those induced by antioxidants and oxidative stress are under concerted regulation by the CNC family member Nrf2, as clearly proven by mouse germline mutagenesis. Since these genes represent a vital aspect of the cellular defense mechanism against oxidative stress, Nrf2-null mutant mice are highly sensitive to xenobiotic and oxidative insults. Deciphering the molecular basis of the regulatory network composed of Maf and CNC families of transcription factors will undoubtedly lead to a new paradigm for the cooperative function of transcription factors.

  1. Substance P and Calcitonin Gene Related Peptide Mediate Pain in Chronic Pancreatitis and Their Expression is Driven by Nerve Growth Factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, LianSheng; Shenoy, Mohan; Pasricha, Pankaj Jay

    2014-01-01

    Context Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), substance P and nerve growth factor play an important role in inflammatory pain in various somatic pain models but their role in chronic pancreatitis has not been well studied. Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of intrathecal administration of calcitonin gene-related peptide antagonist and substance P receptor antagonist on pain behavior in a rat model of chronic pancreatitis and to determine whether nerve growth factor drives the up-regulation of expression of these neuropeptides in sensory neurons. Methods Pancreatitis was induced by retrograde infusion of trinitobenzene sulfonic acid into the pancreatic duct of adult rats. Three weeks post infusion continuous intrathecal infusion of the calcitonin gene-related peptide antagonist alpha CGRP8-37 or neurokinin-1 receptor antagonist CP-96345 or its inactive enantiomer CP-96344 was administered for seven days. The effects of treatment on pancreatic hyperalgesia were assessed by sensitivity of the abdominal wall to von Frey filament probing as well as by the nocifensive response to electrical stimulation of the pancreas. In a separate experiment chronic pancreatitis was induced and pancreas specific dorsal root ganglion neurons labeled with DiI were assessed for calcitonin gene-related peptide and substance P immunoreactivity. Results Intrathecal infusion of calcitonin gene-related peptide and neurokinin-1 receptor antagonists significantly attenuated behavioral pain responses in rats with chronic pancreatitis. Further, treatment of chronic pancreatitis rats with nerve growth factor antibody significantly reduced pancreas specific neurons expressing calcitonin gene-related peptide and substance P in thoracic dorsal root ganglion. Conclusions Calcitonin gene-related peptide and substance P mediate pancreatic hyperalgesia in chronic pancreatitis and nerve growth factor in turn sustains the up-regulation of these neuropeptides in pancreatic

  2. A conserved peptide pattern from a widespread microbial virulence factor triggers pattern-induced immunity in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah Böhm

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Microbe- or host damage-derived patterns mediate activation of pattern-triggered immunity (PTI in plants. Microbial virulence factor (effector-triggered immunity (ETI constitutes a second layer of plant protection against microbial attack. Various necrosis and ethylene-inducing peptide 1 (Nep1-like proteins (NLPs produced by bacterial, oomycete and fungal microbes are phytotoxic virulence factors that exert immunogenic activities through phytotoxin-induced host cell damage. We here show that multiple cytotoxic NLPs also carry a pattern of 20 amino acid residues (nlp20 that triggers immunity-associated plant defenses and immunity to microbial infection in Arabidopsis thaliana and related plant species with similar characteristics as the prototype pattern, bacterial flagellin. Characteristic differences in flagellin and nlp20 plant responses exist however, as nlp20s fail to trigger extracellular alkalinization in Arabidopsis cell suspensions and seedling growth inhibition. Immunogenic nlp20 peptide motifs are frequently found in bacterial, oomycete and fungal NLPs. Such an unusually broad taxonomic distribution within three phylogenetic kingdoms is unprecedented among microbe-derived triggers of immune responses in either metazoans or plants. Our findings suggest that cytotoxic NLPs carrying immunogenic nlp20 motifs trigger PTI in two ways as typical patterns and by inflicting host cell damage. We further propose that conserved structures within a microbial virulence factor might have driven the emergence of a plant pattern recognition system mediating PTI. As this is reminiscent of the evolution of immune receptors mediating ETI, our findings support the idea that there is a continuum between PTI and ETI.

  3. Identification of a potent serum factor that causes desensitization of the receptor for C-Type natriuretic peptide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chrisman Ted D

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Guanylyl cyclase-B (GC-B; NPR-B, the receptor for C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP is rapidly and effectively desensitized by a factor(s in serum. Given the potential importance of this receptor in remodeling after tissue injury, identification of the serum factor(s is of significant medical importance. Results Partial purification of desensitization activity in serum by DEAE-Sepharose and reverse phase C18 chromatography, followed by mass spectroscopy, identified peptide sequences identical to those of apolipoprotein A2 (Apo A2, a known component of high density lipoprotein (HDL. Apo A2, however, could be eliminated as the active desensitization factor. Never the less, substantial desensitization activity was associated with purified preparations of bovine or human HDL. Since HDL is a well-known transporter of various lipids and phospholipids, we extracted either HDL or partially purified serum preparations with butanol and all activity extracted into the solvent. Of various lipophilic signaling molecules known to be associated with HDL, a prominent component is sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P. We therefore tested authentic S1P as well as other known components of HDL (sphingosylphosphorylcholine; platelet activating factor for activity; only S1P caused desensitization of GC-B. S1P was relatively potent, causing one-half maximal desensitization of GC-B at concentrations of 5–10 nM. These effects were seen within a few minutes after addition. Lysophosphatidic acid, another component of serum capable of desensitizing GC-B, was only effective at Micromolar concentrations. The pathway by which serum or S1P desensitizes GC-B seems unique in that pertussis toxin failed to inhibit GC-B desensitization, and yet blocked serum or S1P activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK or Akt/protein kinase B (Akt/PKB. Conclusion Since the concentrations of S1P that desensitize GC-B are well within serum physiological ranges, this

  4. Review: Burden on Family Caregivers Caring for Patients with Schizophrenia and Its Related Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imas Rafiyah

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Family caregiver is the most important person who cares for patient with schizophrenia. However when care is provided for long time, he/she may experiences the burden.Purpose: The purpose was to review concept and factors related to burden on family caregivers caring for patients with schizophrenia.Method: A literatures were searched from databases: Pubmed, CINAHL, and Science Direct. Key words used to retrieve literature include caregiver burden and schizophrenia. Searching was limited in English language, full text, and the year of publication from 2000 to 2009 was used.Results: Twenty two studies were reviewed in this paper. The result showed that the caregivers caring for patients with schizophrenia experience burden. Burden was defined as a negative impact of caring for the impaired person experienced by caregiver on their activity (objective burden or feeling (subjective burden that involves emotional, physical health, social life, and financial status. Factors related to burden on family caregiver were grouped into: 1 caregiver‟s factors included age, gender, educational level, income, health status, and spent time per day, knowledge of schizophrenia, culture, and coping; 2 patient‟s factors included age, clinical symptoms, and disability in daily life; 3 environmental factors included mental health service and social support.Conclusion: Definition of burden have quite same meaning and mostly factors focus on the patient‟s symptoms, demographic factors of caregiver, and time spent per day. Most of studies cannot be generalized due to small sample used in the study and that too conducted in western countries. For further research, the correlation between burden and resources of family caregiver should be investigated particularly in eastern country.Key words: burden on family caregiver, caring, schizophrenia.

  5. Prevalence and risk factors of child maltreatment among migrant families in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yunjiao; Atkinson-Sheppard, Sally; Liu, Xing

    2017-03-01

    Although cases of child abuse among migrant families are often reported by social media, the issue of child maltreatment among migrant families in China has received little empirical attention. This study investigated both the prevalence of child maltreatment by parents among migrant families, and the individual, family and community-level risk factors associated with child abuse in this context. A survey was conducted with 667 migrant and 496 local adolescents in Shenzhen, South China, with a stratified two-stage cluster sampling design. Logistic regression analysis was conducted to compare the prevalence of maltreatment between migrant and local adolescents, and also to explore risk factors associated with the psychological and physical maltreatment in both groups. The results showed that parent-to-child abuse was more prevalent among migrant than local adolescents, with migrant adolescents 1.490 and 1.425 times more likely to be psychologically and physically abused by their parents than their local counterparts. Low academic performance, delinquent behavior, family economic adversity and low parent attachment put migrant adolescents at increased risk of both psychological and physical maltreatment, and neighborhood disorganization was significantly related to psychological aggression among migrant adolescents. The findings confirm that child abuse perpetuated by parents is a serious problem in Mainland China, especially among migrant families, and implications for policy and practice are discussed.

  6. Biodemographic and sociocultural factors in two generations of families from six Polish rural and urban populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolański, N

    1994-01-01

    There were investigated 6967 families from 6 rural regions, under industrialization, and industrialized urban regions. In the grandparents generation there were taken into account 10 traits (an education level, a mating radius, and a stature) and in parents generation 17 traits (the mentioned-above ones and a number of family members, a flat size, incomes, an employees No., a life mode, smoking etc. Numerical characteristics of traits have been calculated jointly and separately in six populations, matrices of correlation have been constructed and moreover factorial analysis have been carried out, as a result of which 8 rotated factors have been obtained. The highest cultural mobility (increase in the level of education) from generation to generation occurs in the population of textile industry town Lódź. The highest improvement of biological status, the increase in mating radius and high incomes are characteristic for this regions, too. On the other side are villages with low culture mobility (not large increase in education level), slight improvement of biological status, almost no migrations, overcrowded flats and low income per family member. The relations between pairs of traits appear to vary largely in several populations. Generally is a high correlation between the education level of the same family members in both generations. The has been stated negative correlation between grandfather stature both of the mother and the father lines, with occurring of positive assortative mating in the couples of two generations. In both investigated generations there is the positive assortative mating, but the negative correlation in the stature between grandfathers of the mother and the father lines. The grandparents education level is correlated with their and their offsprings stature. The duration of holidays is one of the best (closely correlated with others) indicators of life mode, and partially of a given family living conditions, too. 8 hidden factors have been

  7. A factor VIII-derived peptide enables von Willebrand factor (VWF)-binding of artificial platelet nanoconstructs without interfering with VWF-adhesion of natural platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haji-Valizadeh, Hassan; Modery-Pawlowski, Christa L; Sen Gupta, Anirban

    2014-05-01

    There is substantial clinical interest in synthetic platelet analogs for potential application in transfusion medicine. To this end, our research is focused on self-assembled peptide-lipid nanoconstructs that can undergo injury site-selective adhesion and subsequently promote site-directed active platelet aggregation, thus mimicking platelet's primary hemostatic actions. For injury site-selective adhesion, we have utilized a coagulation factor FVIII-derived VWF-binding peptide (VBP). FVIII binds to VWF's D'-D3 domain while natural platelet GPIbα binds to VWF's A1 domain. Therefore, we hypothesized that the VBP-decorated nanoconstructs will adhere to VWF without mutual competition with natural platelets. We further hypothesized that the adherent VBP-decorated constructs can enhance platelet aggregation when co-decorated with a fibrinogen-mimetic peptide (FMP). To test these hypotheses, we used glycocalicin to selectively block VWF's A1 domain and, using fluorescence microscopy, studied the binding of fluorescently labeled VBP-decorated nanoconstructs versus platelets to ristocetin-treated VWF. Subsequently, we co-decorated the nanoconstructs with VBP and FMP and incubated them with human platelets to study construct-mediated enhancement of platelet aggregation. Decoration with VBP resulted in substantial construct adhesion to ristocetin-treated VWF even if the A1-domain was blocked by glycocalicin. In comparison, such A1-blocking resulted in significant reduction of platelet adhesion. Without A1-blocking, the VBP-decorated constructs and natural platelets could adhere to VWF concomitantly. Furthermore, the constructs co-decorated with VBP and FMP enhanced active platelet aggregation. The results indicate significant promise in utilizing the FVIII-derived VBP in developing synthetic platelet analogs that do not interfere with VWF-binding of natural platelets but allow site-directed enhancement of platelet aggregation when combined with FMP.

  8. [Influence of selected family environment factors on the child's speech development].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzemień, Grazyna; Wolanin, Grazyna; Stemplewska, Bozena

    2004-01-01

    All environment strata, natural, cultural and social environment affect the individual in typical way and create his specific reactions as well as mental experiences. A speech, as one of elements enabling adaptation to life in community is formed individually with particular children. The basis of such process is always the possibility of the intercourse with speech. The aim of undertaken subject was the analysis of influence of selected family environment factors on the child's speech development. The study was conducted with children of six and seven year old, where speech should be mastered with fixed pronunciation and proper speech technique. The following research problems have been assumed: 1) how does the speech competences' development with children of six and seven proceed, 2) in which level do the following factors of family environment (parents' age, parents' education, family's financial conditions) influence the child's speech development, 3) does the family's structure influence the proper child's speech development. The following research methods were applied: observation, interview and questionnaire. Applied research tools may be described as follows: inquiry sheet of questionnaire, child's speech card, pictorial test, test chi2. The presented work is a trial of analysis how the selected family environment factors influence the child's speech development.

  9. Family factors associated with auto-aggressiveness in adolescents in Croatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripković, Mara; Francisković, Tanja; Grgić, Neda; Ercegović, Nela; Graovac, Mirjana; Zecević, Iva

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this research is to look into the roles of families' social situation and cohesion in adolescent auto-aggressiveness in Croatia. The research was conducted on a sample of Zagreb high school students which encompassed 701 pupils of both genders aged 14-19. The basic demographic data were obtained using the Structured Demographic and Family Data Questionnaire. Auto-aggressiveness was tested using a section of the Report on Youth Aged 11-18 and the Scale of Auto-destructiveness--SAD, whereas the family cohesion was tested with the Family Adaptability and Cohesion Evaluation Scales FACES III. The obtained results show differences according to the gender: girls are more prone to auto-aggressiveness than boys (t = -3.385, df = 565, p = 0.001) and girls more often show symptoms of destructiveness (t = -3.809, df = 637, p aggressiveness (t = 2.655, df = 653, p = 0.008). Significant family factors associated with auto-aggressiveness are parents' marital status (chi2 = 18.039, df = 4, p = 0.001), their financial situation (F(2.548) = 4.604, p = 0.010), alcoholic father (chi2 = 9.270, df = 2, p = 0.010), mentally ill mother (t = 5.264, df = 541, p aggressiveness. Family cohesion appears to be considerably associated with auto-aggressiveness and the adolescents that see their families as less cohesive have more mental problems (chi2 = 29.98, df = 2, p aggressiveness in adolescents.

  10. Family factors as moderators of link between reinforcement sensitivity and child and adolescent problem behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsova, Valeriya B

    2015-02-01

    Moderating effects of family factors on the association between children's reinforcement sensitivity and problem behaviour have been examined in a community sample of 533 children aged from 3 to 17 years. Family type and living in urban areas exacerbated the effect of sensitivity to reward on externalizing, internalizing and impact of problems on everyday life; a high level of the father's education exacerbated the effect of sensitivity to reward on externalizing; family aggression and harsh parenting were found to strengthen the link between sensitivity to reward and the impact of problems on everyday life, whereas family cohesion buffered the negative effect of sensitivity to reward on externalizing and the impact of problems in everyday life.

  11. Correlation Analysis of Personality Characteristics of Children with TIC Disorder with Family Factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Rui; WANG Liqun; MA Chunxia; MA Lixian

    2016-01-01

    Objective To explore the personality characteristics of children with tic disorders and their relationship with family factors.Methods Sixty cases of children with tic disorders diagnosed in our hospital were selected as the case group and 65 cases of normal children were selected as the control group.The children of two groups were assessed using Eysenck Personality Questionnaire (EPQ),Family Environment Scale (FES-CV) and general situation questionnaire of family (GSQ),respectively.The scores of EPQ personality characteristics,FES-CV and GSQ scores were compared for the children in the two groups.The Person correlation analysis method was used to analyze the correlation between personality scores of children in case group and family environment factors.Results The general situation questionnaire results showed that there was significant statistically difference in parenting style,parental education level and family types of the children between case group and control group (P < 0.05);EPQ results showed that the neuroticism and psychoticism scores of children in the case group were significantly higher than those in the control group (P< 0.05) and the lying degree scores in the control group were significantly higher than those in the case group (P< 0.05);FES-CV results showed that the family cohesion scores of the case group were significantly lower than those of the control group (P<0.05),and the family conflict scores in the case group were significantly higher than those in the control group (P<0.05).The Person correlation analysis results indicated that the psychoticism score was negatively correlated with the score of family cohesion (P<0.05),and positively correlated with family conflict (P<0.05),while the neuroticism score was positively correlated with family conflict score (P<0.05).Conclusion The children with tic disorders have significant personality deviation compared to the normal children,and the personality deviation degree is

  12. An important role for the activation peptide domain in controlling factor IX levels in the blood of haemophilia B mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begbie, Megan E; Mamdani, Asif; Gataiance, Sharon; Eltringham-Smith, Louise J; Bhakta, Varsha; Hortelano, Gonzalo; Sheffield, William P

    2005-12-01

    The factors responsible for the removal of injected factor IX (fIX) from the blood of individuals with haemophilia B are only partly understood, and may include binding to endothelial or subendothelial sites, passive extravasation related to size or charge, or interactions requiring fIX activation. To investigate these issues, we have produced and characterised recombinant fIX proteins with amino acid changes: delta155-177, an internal deletion which removes most of the activation peptide while retaining the activation cleavage sites; S365A, which inactivates the serine protease activity of fIXa; and K5A, previously shown to eliminate fIX binding of endothelial/subendothelial collagen IV. All proteins were expressed in stably transfected HEK 293 cells, purified by immunoaffinity chromatography, and compared to the wild type HEK 293-derived protein (fIX (WT)). Mutant fIX proteins K5A and delta155-177 exhibited 72 and 202% of the specific activity of fIX (WT), respectively; S365A was without activity. Following intravenous injection in haemophilia B (fIX knockout) mice, recoveries did not differ for fIX (WT) and delta155-177, but were higher for K5A and S365A. The terminal catabolic half-life of delta155-177, alone among the mutants, was increased, by 45% versus fIX (WT). Nine hours post-injection, the observed areas under the clearance curve (AUCs) of delta155-177 and K5, but not S365A, were elevated 2-fold. delta155-177 was equally effective as fIX (WT) in reducing blood loss following tail vein transection in haemophilia B mice. Our results suggest that deletion of the multiple sites of fIX post-translational modification found within the activation peptide eliminated important fIX clearance motifs.

  13. Isolation of an additional member of the fibroblast growth factor receptor family, FGFR-3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keegan, K.; Hayman, M.J. (State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook (United States)); Johnson, D.E.; Williams, L.T. (Univ. of California, San Francisco (United States))

    1991-02-15

    The fibroblast growth factors are a family of polypeptide growth factors involved in a variety of activities including mitogenesis, angiogenesis, and wound healing. Fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs) have previously been identified in chicken, mouse, and human and have been shown to contain an extracellular domain with either two or three immunoglobulin-like domains, a transmembrane domain, and a cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase domain. The authors have isolated a human cDNA for another tyrosine kinase receptor that is highly homologous to the previously described FGFR. Expression of this receptor cDNA in COS cells directs the expression of a 125-kDa glycoprotein. They demonstrate that this cDNA encodes a biologically active receptor by showing that human acidic and basic fibroblast growth factors activate this receptor as measured by {sup 45}Ca{sup 2+} efflux assays. These data establish the existence of an additional member of the FGFR family that they have named FGFR-3.

  14. Factor Structure and Psychometric Properties of the Work-Family Balance Scale in an Urban Chinese Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huiping; Yip, Paul S. F.; Chi, Peilian; Chan, Kinsun; Cheung, Yee Tak; Zhang, Xiulan

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the factor structure of the Work-Family Balance Scale (WFBS) and examine its reliability and validity in use in the urban Chinese population. The scale was validated using a sample of 605 urban Chinese residents from 7 cities. Exploratory factor analysis identified two factors: work-family conflict and…

  15. Childhood Nonspecific Abdominal Pain in Family Practice: Incidence, Associated Factors, and Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gieteling, Marieke J.; Leeuwen, Yvonne Lisman-van; van der Wouden, Johannes C.; Schellevis, Francois G.; Berger, Marjolein Y.

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE Nonspecific abdominal pain (NSAP) is a common complaint in childhood. In specialist care, childhood NSAP is considered to be a complex and time-consuming problem, and parents are hard to reassure. Little is known about NSAP in family practice, but the impression is that family physicians consider it to be a benign syndrome needing little more than reassurance. This discrepancy calls for a better understanding of NSAP in family practice. METHODS Data were obtained from the Second Dutch National Survey of General Practice (2001). Using registration data of 91 family practices, we identified children aged 4 to 17 years with NSAP. We calculated the incidence, and we studied factors associated with childhood NSAP, referrals, and prescriptions. RESULTS The incidence of NSAP was 25.0 (95% confidence interval [CI], 23.7–26.3) per 1,000 person years. Most children (92.7%) with newly diagnosed NSAP (N = 1,480) consulted their doctor for this condition once or twice. Factors independently associated with NSAP were female sex (odds ratio [OR] = 1.4; 95% CI, 1.3–1.5), nongastrointestinal-nonspecific somatic symptoms (OR = 1.3; 95% CI, 1.1–1.5), and health care use (OR = 1.04; 95% CI, 1.03–1.05). When NSAP was diagnosed at the first visit, 3% of the patients were referred to specialist care, and 1% received additional testing. Family physicians prescribed medication in 21.3% of the visits for NSAP. CONCLUSIONS Childhood NSAP is a common problem in family practice. Most patients visit their doctor once or twice for this problem. Family physicians use little additional testing and make few referrals in their management of childhood NSAP. Despite the lack of evidence for effectiveness, family physicians commonly prescribe medication for NSAP. PMID:21747105

  16. Factor of Awareness in Searching and Sharing of Halal Food Product among Muslim Families in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusoff Siti Zanariah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Information search activities are fundamental in information sharing, especially for the context of information confusion in the market for halal products. This research paper will focus on awareness factor in information searching and sharing of halal products in the Muslim families. Recently, the halal issue has become the hot topic as it involves community religious tenets. This study aims to enrich communications literature in terms of information seeking in halal food products. The sample of the research consisted of 340 Muslim families in Bangi, Selangor. The data are collected through questionnaire and analyzed using descriptive analysis and inferential analysis such as correlation. The result of the study revealed that awareness factor is significantly correlated with information seeking behavior among Muslim family.

  17. Factors associated with stroke survivor behaviors as identified by family caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Carmanny; Bakas, Tamilyn

    2013-01-01

    Stroke survivor behaviors that caregivers identify as bothersome can lead to family caregiver stress, which can result in premature institutionalization of the survivor. The purpose of this study was to explore demographic and theory-based factors associated with survivor bothersome behaviors as identified by family caregivers. A secondary analysis of a combined sample of 96 family caregivers of stroke survivors was conducted using baseline data from two existing studies. Bothersome behaviors were measured using the Revised Memory and Behavior Problems Checklist (RMBPC). Theory-based factors were measured using well-validated scales. Male stroke survivors exhibited more bothersome behaviors (t = 3.53, p caregiver depressive symptoms, task difficulty, life changes, and threat appraisal (F[5, 88] = 10.82, p caregivers. © 2013 Association of Rehabilitation Nurses.

  18. Bacillus globigii cell size is influenced by variants of the quorum sensing peptide extracellular death factor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sijbrandij, T.; Kaman, W.E.; Ligtenberg, A.J.M.; Nazmi, K.; Veerman, E.C.I.; Bikker, F.J.

    2014-01-01

    Toxin-antitoxin modules are necessary for the mode of action of several antibiotics. One of the most studied toxin-antitoxin modules is the quorum sensing - dependent MazEF system in Escherichia coli. The quorum sensing factor in this system is called the extracellular death factor (EDF), a linear p

  19. Bacillus globigii cell size is influenced by variants of the quorum sensing peptide extracellular death factor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Sijbrandij (T.); W.E. Kaman (Wendy); A.J.M. Ligtenberg (A. J M); K. Nazmi (Kamran); E.C.I. Veerman (Enno); F.J. Bikker (Floris)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractToxin-antitoxin modules are necessary for the mode of action of several antibiotics. One of the most studied toxin-antitoxin modules is the quorum sensing - dependent MazEF system in Escherichia coli. The quorum sensing factor in this system is called the extracellular death factor (EDF)

  20. The Association between Newborn Regional Body Composition and Cord Blood Concentrations of C-Peptide and Insulin-Like Growth Factor I.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma M Carlsen

    Full Text Available Third trimester fetal growth is partially regulated by C-peptide and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I. Prenatal exposures including maternal obesity and high gestational weight gain as well as high birth weight have been linked to subsequent metabolic disease. We evaluated the associations between newborn regional body composition and cord blood levels of C-peptide and IGF-I.We prospectively included obese and normal-weight mothers and their newborns; cord blood was collected and frozen. Analyses of C-peptide and IGF-I were performed simultaneously, after recruitment was completed. Newborn regional body composition was assessed with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scanning (DXA within 48 hours of birth.Three hundred thirty-six term infants were eligible to participate in the study; of whom 174 (52% infants had cord blood taken. Total, abdominal and arm and leg fat mass were positively associated with C-peptide (p < 0.001. Arm and leg fat mass was associated with IGF-I concentration: 28 g [95% confidence interval: 4, 53] per doubling of IGF-I. There was no association between total or abdominal fat mass and IGF-I. Fat-free mass was positively associated with both C-peptide (p < 0.001 and IGF-I (p = 0.004.Peripheral fat tissue accumulation was associated with cord blood C-peptide and IGF-I. Total and abdominal fat masses were related to C-peptide but not to IGF-I. Thus, newborn adiposity is partially mediated through C-peptide and early linear growth is associated with IGF-I.

  1. Prevalence of Internet Addiction and Correlations with Family Factors among South Korean Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Soo Kyung; Kim, Jae Yop; Cho, Choon Bum

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the prevalence of Internet addiction among South Korean adolescents and explored family factors associated with such addiction. The study participants were middle and high school students residing in Seoul. One-tenth (10.7%) of the 903 adolescents surveyed scored at least 70 on the Internet Addiction Scale. These youths…

  2. Are family factors universally related to metabolic outcomes in adolescents with Type 1 diabetes?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cameron, F. J.; Skinner, T. C.; de Beaufort, C. E.; Hoey, H.; Swift, P. G. F.; Aanstoot, H.; Aman, J.; Martul, P.; Chiarelli, F.; Daneman, D.; Danne, T.; Dorchy, H.; Kaprio, E. A.; Kaufman, F.; Kocova, M.; Mortensen, H. B.; Njolstad, P. R.; Phillip, M.; Robertson, K. J.; Schoenle, E. J.; Urakami, T.; Vanelli, M.; Ackermann, R. W.; Skovlund, S. E.

    2008-01-01

    Aims To assess the importance of family factors in determining metabolic outcomes in adolescents with Type 1 diabetes in 19 countries. Methods Adolescents with Type 1 diabetes aged 11-18 years, from 21 paediatric diabetes care centres, in 19 countries, and their parents were invited to participate.

  3. The Chinese Family Assessment Instrument (C-FAI): Hierarchical Confirmatory Factor Analyses and Factorial Invariance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shek, Daniel T. L.; Ma, Cecilia M. S.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: This paper examines the dimensionality and factorial invariance of the Chinese Family Assessment Instrument (C-FAI) using multigroup confirmatory factor analyses (MCFAs). Method: A total of 3,649 students responded to the C-FAI in a community survey. Results: Results showed that there are five dimensions of the C-FAI (communication,…

  4. Factors associated with young adults' knowledge regarding family history of Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Jose Melo Ramos Lima

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: to analyze the factors associated with young adults' knowledge regarding family history of stroke. Method: an analytical transversal study, with 579 young adults from state schools, with collection of sociodemographic, clinical and risk factor-related variables, analyzed using logistic regression (backward elimination. Results: a statistical association was detected between age, civil status, and classification of arterial blood pressure and abdominal circumference with knowledge of family history of stroke. In the final logistic regression model, a statistical association was observed between knowledge regarding family history of stroke and the civil status of having a partner (ORa=1.61[1.07-2.42]; p=0.023, abdominal circumference (ORa=0.98[0.96-0.99]; p=0.012 and normal arterial blood pressure (ORa=2.56[1.19-5.52]; p=0.016. Conclusion: an association was observed between socioeconomic factors and risk factors for stroke and knowledge of family history of stroke, suggesting the need for health education or even educational programs on this topic for the clientele in question.

  5. School, neighborhood, and family factors are associated with children's bullying involvement: a nationally representative longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowes, Lucy; Arseneault, Louise; Maughan, Barbara; Taylor, Alan; Caspi, Avshalom; Moffitt, Terrie E

    2009-05-01

    To test whether school, neighborhood, and family factors are independently associated with children's involvement in bullying, over and above their own behaviors that may increase their risk for becoming involved in bullying. We examined bullying in the Environmental Risk (E-Risk) Longitudinal Twin Study, a nationally representative 1994-1995 birth cohort of 2,232 children. We used mother and teacher reports to identify children who experienced bullying between the ages of 5 and 7 years either as victims, bullies, or bully-victims. We collected information about school characteristics from the Department for Children, Schools and Families. We collected reports from mothers about children's neighborhood and home environments and reports from mothers and teachers about children's internalizing and externalizing problems when they were 5 years old. Multinomial logistic regressions showed that over and above other socioenvironmental factors and children's behavior problems, school size was associated with an increased risk for being a victim of bullying, problems with neighbors was associated with an increased risk for being a bully-victim, and family factors (e.g., child maltreatment, domestic violence) were associated with all groups of children involved in bullying. Socioenvironmental factors are associated with children's risk for becoming involved in bullying over and above their own behaviors. Intervention programs aimed at reducing bullying should extend their focus beyond schools to include local communities and families.

  6. Family Factors in the Early Development of Children with Down Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooste, Ann Van; Maes, Bea

    2003-01-01

    This article provides an overview of important family and environmental factors that affect early development of infants and children with Down syndrome. It concludes that a moderately directive parenting style combined with sensitive, responsive, and reciprocal interactions, embedded in a general stimulating environment, are favorable to the…

  7. School, Neighborhood, and Family Factors Are Associated with Children's Bullying Involvement: A Nationally Representative Longitudinal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowes, Lucy; Arseneault, Louise; Maughan, Barbara; Taylor, Alan; Caspi, Ashalom; Moffitt, Terrie E.

    2009-01-01

    School size and problems with neighbors is associated with a greater risk of being a bullying victim while family factors such as maltreatment and domestic violence are associated with involvement in bullying. The findings are based on the Environmental Risk Longitudinal Twin Study that involves 2,232 children.

  8. Prevalence of Internet Addiction and Correlations with Family Factors among South Korean Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Soo Kyung; Kim, Jae Yop; Cho, Choon Bum

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the prevalence of Internet addiction among South Korean adolescents and explored family factors associated with such addiction. The study participants were middle and high school students residing in Seoul. One-tenth (10.7%) of the 903 adolescents surveyed scored at least 70 on the Internet Addiction Scale. These youths…

  9. Factors Affecting the Link between Physical Discipline and Child Externalizing Problems in Black and White Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Anna S.; Litrownik, Alan J.; Newton, Rae R.; Black, Maureen M.; Everson, Mark D.

    2006-01-01

    We examined contextual factors that may affect the impact of physical discipline on later child behavior problems among high-risk Black and White families. We examined race, parental warmth, and early child problems as potential moderators of the discipline-behavior problem link. The sample included 442 White and Black children and their…

  10. Family and Home Literacy Practices: Mediating Factors for Preliterate English Learners at Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denney, Maria K.; English, Judith P.; Gerber, Michael M.; Leafstedt, Jill; Ruz, Monica L.

    This paper reports the initial findings of a survey of family and home literacy factors that may influence the development of phonological awareness skills for preliterate English learners during the acquisition phase of reading development in a second language (L2). Preliminary findings are from the first year of a 3-year longitudinal study of…

  11. Effects of Cumulative Family Risk Factors on American Students' Academic Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunst, Carl J.; Hamby, Deborah W.

    2016-01-01

    The relationships between cumulative family risk factors and American students' academic performance were examined in all 50 States and the District of Columbia. Data from the 2007 "American Community Survey" were used to ascertain the percent of birth to 18 year old children in the United States who experienced three or more risk…

  12. Connecting Vulnerable Children and Families to Community-Based Programs Strengthens Parents' Perceptions of Protective Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Marcia; Joslyn, Allison; Wojton, Morella; O'Reilly, Mairead; Dworkin, Paul H.

    2016-01-01

    We employed principles from a nationally recognized prevention model on family support to investigate whether connecting vulnerable children to community-based programs and services through a statewide intervention system, the "Help Me Grow" program, strengthens parents' perceptions of protective factors. We used a parent survey modeled…

  13. Adolescent School Performance Following Parental Divorce: Are There Family Factors that Can Enhance Success?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCombs, Amanda; Forehand, Rex

    1989-01-01

    Examined relationship between adolescent school achievement and family factors which may mediate negative influence of divorce. Findings from 71 early adolescents and their recently divorced mothers revealed that adolescents with high grade point averages had mothers with lower depression, higher education, less conflict with ex-spouse, and less…

  14. Individual and Familial Factors Influencing the Educational and Career Plans of Chinese Immigrant Youths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Pei-Wen Winnie; Yeh, Christine J.

    2010-01-01

    The authors explore how individual and familial factors predict educational and career aspirations, plans, and vocational outcome expectations of urban, Chinese immigrant youths. Participants were 265 Chinese immigrant high school students in New York City. The results indicated that higher self-reported English language fluency and career-related…

  15. Family- and Classroom-Related Factors and Mother-Kindergarten Teacher Trust in Estonia and Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikas, Eve; Lerkkanen, Marja-Kristiina; Pakarinen, Eija; Poikonen, Pirjo-Liisa

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the role of family-related (mother's education, depressive symptoms and child's gender) and kindergarten-related (teacher's experience, teaching practices and class size) factors in mothers' and teachers' mutual trust in Estonia and Finland. Six hundred eighteen (206 Estonian and 412 Finnish) mothers of kindergarten children…

  16. Individual and Familial Factors Influencing the Educational and Career Plans of Chinese Immigrant Youths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Pei-Wen Winnie; Yeh, Christine J.

    2010-01-01

    The authors explore how individual and familial factors predict educational and career aspirations, plans, and vocational outcome expectations of urban, Chinese immigrant youths. Participants were 265 Chinese immigrant high school students in New York City. The results indicated that higher self-reported English language fluency and career-related…

  17. Understanding Mathematics Achievement: An Analysis of the Effects of Student and Family Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goforth, Kate; Noltemeyer, Amity; Patton, Jon; Bush, Kevin R.; Bergen, Doris

    2014-01-01

    Educators are increasingly recognising the importance of improving students' mathematics achievement. Much of the current research focuses on the impact of instructional variables on mathematics achievement. The goal of this study was to examine the influence of less researched variables--family and student factors. Participants were 747…

  18. Targeting Family Risk Factors in the Context of Treating Youth Depression: A Survey of Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra, Gilbert R.; Buckholdt, Kelly E.; Olsen, James P.; Jobe-Shields, Lisa; Davis, Genevieve L.; Gamble, Heather L.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the practices and perceptions of psychologists related to targeting family risk factors when treating youth depression. Participants were practicing psychologists recruited through the National Register of Health Service Providers in Psychology (N = 279). Psychologists completed a brief anonymous survey about addressing…

  19. The Relation Between Parental Mental Illness and Adolescent Mental Health: The Role of Family Factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loon, L.M.A. van; Ven, M.O.M. van de; Doesum, K.T.M. van; Witteman, C.L.M.; Hosman, C.M.H.

    2014-01-01

    Children of parents with a mental illness are often found to be at high risk of developing psychological problems themselves. Little is known about the role of family factors in the relation between parental and adolescent mental health. The current study focused on parent-child interaction and

  20. Positive Psychology and Familial Factors as Predictors of Latina/o Students' Hope and College Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavazos Vela, Javier; Lerma, Eunice; Lenz, A. Stephen; Hinojosa, Karina; Hernandez-Duque, Omar; Gonzalez, Stacey L.

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the contributions of positive psychology and familial factors as predictors of hope and academic performance among 166 Latina/o college students enrolled at a Hispanic Serving Institution of Higher Education. The results indicated that presence of meaning in life, search for meaning in life, daily spiritual experiences, and…

  1. Family-Level Factors and African American Children's Behavioral Health Outcomes: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington, Tyreasa; Rose, Theda; Colombo, Gia; Hong, Jun Sung; Coard, Stephanie Irby

    2015-01-01

    Background: Considerable prior research targeting African American children has focused on the pervasiveness of problematic behavior and negative risk factors associated with their development, however the influence of family on better behavioral health outcomes has largely been ignored. Objective: The purpose of this review is to examine…

  2. Simultaneous in vitro molecular screening of protein-peptide interactions by flow cytometry, using six Bcl-2 family proteins as examples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Peter C; Young, Susan M; Carter, Mark B; Waller, Anna; Zhai, Dayong; Reed, John C; Edwards, Bruce S; Sklar, Larry A

    2011-06-09

    The B-cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2) family contains six antiapoptotic members, each with a hydrophobic pocket in which Bcl-2 homology region 3 (BH3) helices bind. This binding quenches apoptotic signals from activated BH3 family members. Many tumor cells either have increased expression of one of these six proteins or become overexpressed under treatment. Six fusion proteins made up of glutathione-S-transferase and each of the Bcl-2 members are bound individually to six glutathione bead sets, each set being easily distinguished by its different intensity of red fluorescence. The coated bead sets are washed, combined and incubated with green fluorescent Bim-BH3 peptide and a small molecule in 10-μl wells for 1 h. The green fluorescence signal for each bead set is resolved, and selective inhibitors are expected to reduce the signal for individual bead sets. Each 384-well plate is analyzed in 12 min, measuring 200 of 2,000 beads (∼10%) of each type per well.

  3. iDPF-PseRAAAC: A Web-Server for Identifying the Defensin Peptide Family and Subfamily Using Pseudo Reduced Amino Acid Alphabet Composition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongchun Zuo

    Full Text Available Defensins as one of the most abundant classes of antimicrobial peptides are an essential part of the innate immunity that has evolved in most living organisms from lower organisms to humans. To identify specific defensins as interesting antifungal leads, in this study, we constructed a more rigorous benchmark dataset and the iDPF-PseRAAAC server was developed to predict the defensin family and subfamily. Using reduced dipeptide compositions were used, the overall accuracy of proposed method increased to 95.10% for the defensin family, and 98.39% for the vertebrate subfamily, which is higher than the accuracy from other methods. The jackknife test shows that more than 4% improvement was obtained comparing with the previous method. A free online server was further established for the convenience of most experimental scientists at http://wlxy.imu.edu.cn/college/biostation/fuwu/iDPF-PseRAAAC/index.asp. A friendly guide is provided to describe how to use the web server. We anticipate that iDPF-PseRAAAC may become a useful high-throughput tool for both basic research and drug design.

  4. Patterns of Positive Selection of the Myogenic Regulatory Factor Gene Family in Vertebrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiao; Yu, Qi; Huang, Ling; Liu, Qing-Xin

    2014-01-01

    The functional divergence of transcriptional factors is critical in the evolution of transcriptional regulation. However, the mechanism of functional divergence among these factors remains unclear. Here, we performed an evolutionary analysis for positive selection in members of the myogenic regulatory factor (MRF) gene family of vertebrates. We selected 153 complete vertebrate MRF nucleotide sequences from our analyses, which revealed substantial evidence of positive selection. Here, we show that sites under positive selection were more frequently detected and identified from the genes encoding the myogenic differentiation factors (MyoG and Myf6) than the genes encoding myogenic determination factors (Myf5 and MyoD). Additionally, the functional divergence within the myogenic determination factors or differentiation factors was also under positive selection pressure. The positive selection sites were more frequently detected from MyoG and MyoD than Myf6 and Myf5, respectively. Amino acid residues under positive selection were identified mainly in their transcription activation domains and on the surface of protein three-dimensional structures. These data suggest that the functional gain and divergence of myogenic regulatory factors were driven by distinct positive selection of their transcription activation domains, whereas the function of the DNA binding domains was conserved in evolution. Our study evaluated the mechanism of functional divergence of the transcriptional regulation factors within a family, whereby the functions of their transcription activation domains diverged under positive selection during evolution. PMID:24651579

  5. The Antimicrobial Peptide Human Beta-Defensin-3 Is Induced by Platelet-Released Growth Factors in Primary Keratinocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Bayer

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Platelet-released growth factors (PRGF and its related clinically used formulations (e.g., Vivostat Platelet-Rich Fibrin (PRF® contain a variety of chemokines, cytokines, and growth factors and are therefore used to support healing of chronic, hard-to-heal, or infected wounds. Human beta-defensin-3 (hBD-3 is an antimicrobial peptide inducibly expressed in human keratinocytes especially upon wounding. The potent antimicrobial activity of hBD-3 together with its wound closure-promoting activities suggests that hBD-3 may play a crucial role in wound healing. Therefore, we analyzed the influence of PRGF on hBD-3 expression in human primary keratinocytes in vitro. In addition, we investigated the influence of Vivostat PRF on hBD-3 expression in artificially generated human skin wounds in vivo. PRGF treatment of primary keratinocytes induced a significant, concentration- and time-dependent increase in hBD-3 gene expression which was partially mediated by the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR. In line with these cell culture data, in vivo experiments revealed an enhanced hBD-3 expression in experimentally produced human wounds after the treatment with Vivostat PRF. Thus, the induction of hBD-3 may contribute to the beneficial effects of thrombocyte concentrate lysates in the treatment of chronic or infected wounds.

  6. A composite demineralized bone matrix--self assembling peptide scaffold for enhancing cell and growth factor activity in bone marrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Tianyong; Li, Zhiqiang; Luo, Fei; Xie, Zhao; Wu, Xuehui; Xing, Junchao; Dong, Shiwu; Xu, Jianzhong

    2014-07-01

    The need for suitable bone grafts is high; however, there are limitations to all current graft sources, such as limited availability, the invasive harvest procedure, insufficient osteoinductive properties, poor biocompatibility, ethical problems, and degradation properties. The lack of osteoinductive properties is a common problem. As an allogenic bone graft, demineralized bone matrix (DBM) can overcome issues such as limited sources and comorbidities caused by invasive harvest; however, DBM is not sufficiently osteoinductive. Bone marrow has been known to magnify osteoinductive components for bone reconstruction because it contains osteogenic cells and factors. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) derived from bone marrow are the gold standard for cell seeding in tissue-engineered biomaterials for bone repair, and these cells have demonstrated beneficial effects. However, the associated high cost and the complicated procedures limit the use of tissue-engineered bone constructs. To easily enrich more osteogenic cells and factors to DBM by selective cell retention technology, DBM is modified by a nanoscale self-assembling peptide (SAP) to form a composite DBM/SAP scaffold. By decreasing the pore size and increasing the charge interaction, DBM/SAP scaffolds possess a much higher enriching yield for osteogenic cells and factors compared with DBM alone scaffolds. At the same time, SAP can build a cellular microenvironment for cell adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation that promotes bone reconstruction. As a result, a suitable bone graft fabricated by DBM/SAP scaffolds and bone marrow represents a new strategy and product for bone transplantation in the clinic.

  7. Calcitonin gene-related peptide regulation of glial cell-line derived neurotrophic factor in differentiated rat myotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Elyse; Cha, Jieun; Bain, James R; Fahnestock, Margaret

    2015-03-01

    Glial cell-line derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) is the most potent trophic factor for motoneuron survival and neuromuscular junction formation. GDNF is upregulated in injured or denervated skeletal muscle and returns to normal levels following reinnervation. However, the mechanism by which GDNF is regulated in denervated muscle is not well understood. The nerve-derived neurotransmitter calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is upregulated following neuromuscular injury and is subsequently released from motoneurons at the neuromuscular junction. CGRP also promotes nerve regeneration, but the mechanism is not well understood. The current study investigates whether this increase in CGRP regulates GDNF, thus playing a key role in promoting regeneration of injured nerves. This study demonstrates that CGRP increases GDNF secretion without affecting its transcription or translation. Rat L6 myoblasts were differentiated into myotubes and subsequently treated with CGRP. GDNF mRNA expression levels were quantified by quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, and secreted GDNF was quantified in the conditioned medium by ELISA. CGRP treatment increased secreted GDNF protein without altering GDNF mRNA levels. The translational inhibitor cycloheximide did not affect CGRP-induced GDNF secreted protein levels, whereas the secretional inhibitor brefeldin A blocked the CGRP-induced increase in GDNF. This study highlights the importance of injury-induced upregulation of CGRP by exposing its ability to increase GDNF levels and demonstrates a secretional mechanism for regulation of this key regeneration-promoting neurotrophic factor.

  8. Members of the Pmp protein family of Chlamydia pneumoniae mediate adhesion to human cells via short repetitive peptide motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mölleken, Katja; Schmidt, Eleni; Hegemann, Johannes H

    2010-11-01

    Chlamydiae sp. are obligate intracellular pathogens that cause a variety of diseases in humans. Adhesion of the infectious elementary body to the eukaryotic host cell is a pivotal step in chlamydial pathogenesis. Here we describe the characterization of members of the polymorphic membrane protein family (Pmp), the largest protein family (with up to 21 members) unique to Chlamydiaceae. We show that yeast cells displaying Pmp6, Pmp20 or Pmp21 on their surfaces, or beads coated with the recombinant proteins, adhere to human epithelial cells. A hallmark of the Pmp protein family is the presence of multiple repeats of the tetrapeptide motifs FxxN and GGA(I, L, V) and deletion analysis shows that at least two copies of these motifs are needed for adhesion. Importantly, pre-treatment of human cells with recombinant Pmp6, Pmp20 or Pmp21 protein reduces infectivity upon subsequent challenge with Chlamydia pneumoniae and correlates with diminished attachment of Chlamydiae to target cells. Antibodies specific for Pmp21 can neutralize infection in vitro. Finally, a combination of two different Pmp proteins in infection blockage experiments shows additive effects, possibly suggesting similar functions. Our findings imply that Pmp6, Pmp20 and Pmp21 act as adhesins, are vital during infection and thus represent promising vaccine candidates.

  9. Schizophrenia in Malaysian families: A study on factors associated with quality of life of primary family caregivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Eng J

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Schizophrenia is a chronic illness which brings detrimental effects in the caregivers' health. This study was aimed at highlighting the socio-demographic, clinical and psychosocial factors associated with the subjective Quality of Life (QOL of Malaysian of primary family caregivers of subjects with schizophrenia attending an urban tertiary care outpatient clinic in Malaysia. Methods A cross-sectional study was performed to study patient, caregiver and illness factors associated with the QOL among 117 individuals involved with caregiving for schizophrenia patients. The study used WHOQOL-BREF to assess caregivers' QOL and Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS to assess the severity of patients' symptoms. Social Readjustment Rating Scale (SRRS assessed the stress level due to life events. Results The mean scores of WHOQOL-BREF in physical, psychological, social and environmental domains were 66.62 (14.36, 61.32 (15.52, 62.77 (17.33, 64.02 (14.86 consecutively. From multiple regression analysis, factors found to be significantly associated with higher QOL were higher educational level among caregivers in social and environmental domains; caregivers not having medical problem/s in physical and psychological domains; later onset and longer illness duration of illness in social domains; patients not attending day care program in environmental domain; lower BPRS score in physical and environmental domains. SRRS score of caregivers was also found to have a significant negative correlation with QOL in environmental and psychological domains. Other factors were not significantly associated with QOL. Conclusion Caregivers with more social advantages such as higher educational level and physically healthier and dealing with less severe illness had significantly higher QOL in various aspects. Supporting the caregivers in some of these modifiable factors in clinical practice is important to achieve their higher level QOL.

  10. Ikaros family transcription factors expression in rat thymus: detection of impaired development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradzik, M; Novak, S; Mokrovic, G; Bordukalo Niksic, T; Heckel, D; Stipic, J; Pavicic Baldani, D; Cicin-Sain, L; Antica, M

    2012-01-01

    The expression of Ikaros family transcription factors and consequently their signalling pathway is limiting for hematopoietic and lymphocyte development in mice and human. Due to their importance, these transcription factors are highly homologous between species. As an initial approach to examining the possible involvement of Ikaros transcription factors in pathogenesis of rat lymphoid development, we analyzed the expression of all known Ikaros family members, Ikaros, Aiolos, Helios, Eos and Pegasus in the rat thymus. We established a semi-quantitative RT-PCR to detect mRNA of each transcription factor. For the first time we give evidence of the expression of Ikaros family transcription factors in the rat thymus. Further, we evaluated whether their mRNA expression was succumbed to changes when the rats were exposed to ethanol, as a known debilitating agent during development. Therefore we analyzed the thymus of adult rats whose mothers were forced to drink ethanol during gestation, to detect possible changes in thymus mRNA expression levels of Ikaros, Aiolos, Helios, Eos and Pegasus. We found that rats prenatally exposed to ethanol show a slightly higher expression of Ikaros family transcription factors in the adult thymus when compared to control rats, but these differences were not statistically significant. We further studied the distribution of the major lymphocyte subpopulations in the rat thymus according to CD3, CD4 and CD8 expression by four color flow cytometry. We found a higher incidence of CD3 positive cells in the double positive, CD4+CD8+ thymic subpopulation of rats prenatally exposed to ethanol when compared to non-exposed animals. Our findings indicate that ethanol exposure of pregnant rats might influence the development of CD3 positive cells in the thymus of the offspring but this result should be further tackled at the level of transcription factor expression.

  11. Family Structure, Psychosocial Factors, and Cardiovascular Risk Factors in the NHLBI CARDIA Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-21

    24) found that for men, having preschool aged children negatively impacted health while having a preschool aged child had protective functions for...2   Psychosocial Factors in the Development of CAD and...177 billion in 2011 (1). Therefore, the study of the contributing factors involved in the development of CAD may ultimately lead to development of

  12. Influence of residency training on personal stress and impairment in family life: analysis of related factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ríos, A; Sánchez Gascón, F; Martínez Lage, J F; Guerrero, M

    2006-01-01

    This cross-sectional study was designed to assess the level of stress among residents and stress-related impairment of family life. A 41-item anonymous questionnaire was designed to determine the level of stress and its effects on the residents' family as well as factors associated with stress during residency training in a tertiary-care hospital accredited with official resident training 'Medicos Internos Residentes' in Murcia, Spain. Questionnaires were distributed in sealed nominal envelopes during February and March 2002 to 227 eligible residents. Of the 227 residents, 175 (77%) completed and returned the questionnaires. Forty-two percent of residents recognized that residency training caused an important level of stress and 21% felt that stress interfered with family relationships. Both factors were significantly associated. Feelings of being unsatisfied with supervision of care and achievement of training objectives as well as low satisfaction with residency training and poor assessment of the hospital were significant stressors. Impairment in family life was significantly dependent on degree of satisfaction with residency training and evaluation of the hospital. The data showed that residency training generated stress and impaired family life. These were closely associated with perception of being unsatisfied with the residency training and evaluation. Copyright 2006 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Genome-wide Analysis of Plant-specific Dof Transcription Factor Family in Tomato

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaofeng Cai; Yuyang Zhang; Chanjuan Zhang; Tingyan Zhang; Tixu Hu; Jie Ye; Junhong Zhang

    2013-01-01

    The Dof (DNA binding with One Finger) family encoding single zinc finger proteins has been known as a family of plant-specific transcription factors.These transcription factors are involved in a variety of functions of importance for different biological processes in plants.In the current study,we identified 34 Dof family genes in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.),distributed on 11 chromosomes.A complete overview of SIDof genes in tomato is presented,including the gene structures,chromosome locations,phylogeny,protein motifs and evolution pattern.Phylogenetic analysis of 34 SlDof proteins resulted in four classes constituting six clusters.In addition,a comparative analysis between these genes in tomato,Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana L.) and rice (Oryza sativa L.) was also performed.The tomato Dof family expansion has been dated to recent duplication events,and segmental duplication is predominant for the SlDof genes.Furthermore,the SlDof genes displayed differential expression either in their transcript abundance or in their expression patterns under normal growth conditions.This is the first step towards genome-wide analyses of the Dof genes in tomato.Our study provides a very useful reference for cloning and functional analysis of the members of this gene family in tomato and other species.

  14. Is family sense of coherence a protective factor against the obesogenic environment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speirs, Katherine E; Hayes, Jenna T; Musaad, Salma; VanBrackle, Angela; Sigman-Grant, Madeleine

    2016-04-01

    Despite greater risk for poor nutrition, inactivity, and overweight, some low-income children are able to maintain a healthy weight. We explore if a strong family sense of coherence (FSOC) acts as a protective factor against childhood obesity for low-income preschool children. Families with a strong FSOC view challenges as predictable, understandable, worthy of engaging, and surmountable. Data were collected from 321 low-income mothers and their preschool children in five states between March 2011 and May 2013. FSOC was assessed using the Family Sense of Coherence Scale. A 16-item checklist was used to assess practicing healthy child behaviors (fruit and vegetable consumption and availability, physical activity, and family meals) and limiting unhealthy child behaviors (sweetened beverage and fast food consumption, energy dense snack availability, and screen time). Child body mass index (BMI) z-scores were calculated from measured height and weight. FSOC was significantly associated with practicing healthy child behaviors (β = 0.32, p family functioning in predicting health behaviors around food consumption and availability, physical activity, and family meals.

  15. Environmental risk factors and perinatal outcomes in preterm newborns, according to family recurrence of prematurity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupitzki, Hugo B.; Gadow, Enrique C.; Gili, Juan A.; Comas, Belén; Cosentino, Viviana R.; Saleme, César; Murray, Jeffrey C.; Lopez Camelo, Jorge S.

    2014-01-01

    Objetive We analyzed the role of environmental risk factors, socio-demographic characteristics, clinical characteristics, and reproductive history in preterm births and their associated perinatal outcomes in families classified according to their histories of preterm recurrence among siblings. Study Design A retrospective study was conducted at “Nuestra Señora de la Merced” Maternity Hospital in the city of Tucumán, Argentina. A total of 348 preterm, non-malformed, singleton children born to multipara women were reviewed. The family history score described by Khoury was applied, and families were classified as having no, medium or high genetic aggregation. Results Families with no familial aggregation showed a higher rate of short length of cohabitation, maternal urinary tract infections during the current pregnancy and maternal history of miscarriage during the previous pregnancy. Families with a high level of aggregation had a significantly higher incidence of pregnancy complications, such as diabetes, hypertension and immunological disorders. Conclusion Reproductive histories clearly differed between the groups, suggesting both a different response to environmental challenges based on genetic susceptibility, and the activation of different pathophysiological pathways to determine the duration of pregnancy in each woman. PMID:23132119

  16. Protective factors within the family, and their role in fostering resiliency in African American adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvert, W J

    1997-01-01

    Violence has reached epidemic proportions in the United States, with African American males residing in urban areas bearing the brunt of this epidemic. The violence permeating our society emanates from a variety of societal ills, including poverty, racism, substance abuse and exposure to violence. Traditionally, methods of research on adolescent violence have focused on an identification of associated risk factors. The majority of African American adolescents living in communities with widespread and chronic violence grow up to be law-abiding citizens. The reason for this may be due to resiliency within these adolescents. Resiliency has been defined as the ability to experience adverse circumstances and successfully overcome them. Resiliency is enhanced through three mechanisms identified as protective factors: individual characteristics/traits; familial traits; and extrafamilial relationships. The risks faced may be altered, and even ameliorated, through the presence of these protective factors. The purpose of this paper is to identify protective factors within the family that foster resiliency. Protective factors within the family may be categorized as having three broad characteristics: caring and support, high expectations, and encouragement of participation and involvement for the adolescent.

  17. Risk Factors for Anticipatory Grief in Family Members of Terminally Ill Veterans Receiving Palliative Care Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Laurie A; Clark, Karen A; Ali, Khatidja S; Gibson, Benjamin W; Smigelsky, Melissa A; Neimeyer, Robert A

    2015-01-01

    Anticipatory grief is the process associated with grieving the loss of loved ones in advance of their inevitable death. Because anticipatory grief has been associated with a variety of outcomes, risk factors for this condition deserve closer consideration. Fifty-seven family members of terminally ill, hospice-eligible veterans receiving palliative care services completed measures assessing psychosocial factors and conditions. Elevated anticipatory grief was found in families characterized by relational dependency, lower education, and poor grief-specific support, who also experienced discomfort with closeness and intimacy, neuroticism, spiritual crisis, and an inability to make sense of the loss. Thus, in this sample, anticipatory grief appears to be part of a cluster of factors and associated distress that call for early monitoring and possible intervention.

  18. Are familial factors underlying the association between socioeconomic position and prescription medicine?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Mia; Andersen, Per Kragh; Gerster, Mette;

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Although well established, the association between socioeconomic position and health and health behaviour is not clearly understood, and it has been speculated that familial factors, for example, dispositional factors or exposures in the rearing environment, may be underlying...... analyses were compared. RESULTS: An inverse social gradient in filling of prescriptions for all-purpose and system-specific drugs was observed in the unpaired analyses. In the intrapair analyses, associations were attenuated some in DZSS and more in MZ twins. Filling of drugs targeting the nervous system...... was still strongly associated with income in the intrapair analyses. CONCLUSIONS: Familial factors seem to account for part of the observed social inequality in filling of prescription medicine....

  19. Are the educational differences in incidence of cardiovascular disease explained by underlying familial factors?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Mia; Andersen, Per Kragh; Gerster, Mette;

    2014-01-01

    To isolate the effect of education from the influence of potential underlying factors, we investigated the association of education with the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and ischemic heart disease (IHD) using twin data to adjust for familial factors shared within twins, including genetic...... make-up and childhood environment. The study was based on data from the Danish Twin Registry linked to administrative and heath registers in Statistics Denmark. A total of 11,968 monozygotic and 20,464 dizygotic same sexed twins were followed from 1980 to 2009, including more than 8000 events of CVD....... Unpaired and intra-pair analyses were compared. In the unpaired analyses, an inverse educational gradient in CVD- and IHD risk was observed. This association was not replicated in the intra-pair analyses that control for shared familial factors exploiting that twins share their intrauterine- and childhood...

  20. TDP6, a brain-derived neurotrophic factor-based trkB peptide mimetic, promotes oligodendrocyte myelination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Agnes W; Giuffrida, Lauren; Wood, Rhiannon; Peckham, Haley; Gonsalvez, David; Murray, Simon S; Hughes, Richard A; Xiao, Junhua

    2014-11-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays critical roles in the development and maintenance of the central (CNS) and peripheral nervous systems (PNS). BDNF exerts its biological effects via tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) and the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR). We have recently identified that BDNF promotes CNS myelination via oligodendroglial TrkB receptors. In order to selectively target TrkB to promote CNS myelination, we have used a putative TrkB agonist, a small multicyclic peptide (tricyclic dimeric peptide 6, TDP6) previously described by us that structurally mimics a region of BDNF that binds TrkB. We confirmed that TDP6 acts as a TrkB agonist as it provoked autophosphorylation of TrkB and its downstream signalling effector extracellular related-kinase 1 and 2 (Erk1/2) in primary oligodendrocytes. Using an in vitro myelination assay, we show that TDP6 significantly promotes myelination by oligodendrocytes in vitro, as evidenced by enhanced myelin protein expression and an increased number of myelinated axonal segments. In contrast, a second, structurally distinct BDNF mimetic (cyclo-dPAKKR) that targets p75NTR had no effect upon oligodendrocyte myelination in vitro, despite the fact that cyclo-dPAKKR is a very effective promoter of peripheral (Schwann cell) myelination. The selectivity of TDP6 was further verified by using TrkB-deficient oligodendrocytes, in which TDP6 failed to promote myelination, indicating that the pro-myelinating effect of TDP6 is oligodendroglial TrkB-dependent. Together, our results demonstrate that TDP6 is a novel BDNF mimetic that promotes oligodendrocyte myelination in vitro via targeting TrkB.

  1. Vasoactive intestinal peptide induces cyclooxygenase-2 expression through nuclear factor-κB in human prostate cell lines. Differential time-dependent responses in cancer progression

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández-Martínez, Ana B.; Collado, Beatriz; Bajo, Ana M.; Sánchez-Chapado, Manuel; Prieto,Juan C.; Carmena, María J.

    2007-01-01

    Vasoactive intestinal peptide induces cyclooxygenase-2 expression through nuclear factor-?B in human prostate cell lines. Differential time-dependent responses in cancer progression SPAIN (Fernandez-Martinez, Ana B.) SPAIN Received: 2006-09-11 Revised: 2007-01-11 Accepted: 2007-01-11

  2. Factors That Affect the Degree of Twist in beta-Sheet Structures : A Molecular Dynamics Simulation Study of a Cross-beta Filament of the GNNQQNY Peptide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Periole, Xavier; Rampioni, Aldo; Vendruscolo, Michele; Mark, Alan E.

    2009-01-01

    By exploiting the recent availability of the crystal structure of a cross-beta filament of the GNNQQNY peptide fragment of the yeast prion protein Sup35, possible factors affecting the twisting of beta-sheets structures have been analyzed. The advantage of this system is that it is composed entirely

  3. Insulin-like growth factor I and glucagon-like peptide-2 responses to fasting followed by controlled or ad libitum refeeding in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nelson, David W; Murali, Sangita G; Liu, Xiaowen

    2008-01-01

    Luminal nutrients stimulate structural and functional regeneration in the intestine through mechanisms thought to involve insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) and glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2). We investigated the relationship between IGF-I and GLP-2 responses and mucosal growth in rats fasted ...

  4. Is the Association Between Education and Fertility Postponement Causal? The Role of Family Background Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tropf, Felix C; Mandemakers, Jornt J

    2017-02-01

    A large body of literature has demonstrated a positive relationship between education and age at first birth. However, this relationship may be partly spurious because of family background factors that cannot be controlled for in most research designs. We investigate the extent to which education is causally related to later age at first birth in a large sample of female twins from the United Kingdom (N = 2,752). We present novel estimates using within-identical twin and biometric models. Our findings show that one year of additional schooling is associated with about one-half year later age at first birth in ordinary least squares (OLS) models. This estimate reduced to only a 1.5-month later age at first birth for the within-identical twin model controlling for all shared family background factors (genetic and family environmental). Biometric analyses reveal that it is mainly influences of the family environment-not genetic factors-that cause spurious associations between education and age at first birth. Last, using data from the Office for National Statistics, we demonstrate that only 1.9 months of the 2.74 years of fertility postponement for birth cohorts 1944-1967 could be attributed to educational expansion based on these estimates. We conclude that the rise in educational attainment alone cannot explain differences in fertility timing between cohorts.

  5. Academic failure and child-to-parent violence: Family protective factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izaskun Ibabe

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A reduction in academic achievement over the course of adolescence has been observed. School failure is characterized by difficulties to teaching school goals. A variety of other behavioural problems are often associated with school failure. Child-to-parent violence has been associated with different school problems. The main objective of current study was to examine the contribution of family variables (parental education level, family cohesion, and positive family discipline on academic failure and child-to-parent violence of adolescents from a community sample. Moreover, a goal was to explore if academic failure was a valid predictor of child-to-parent violence. To this end, it has been developed a comprehensive statistical model through Structural Equation Modeling (SEM. Participants were 584 children from eight secondary schools in the Basque Country (Spain and aged between 12 and 18. Among other scales Conflict Tactics Scale and Family Environment Scale were administrated for measuring child-to-parent violence and family cohesion environment, respectively. The structural model revealed that parental education level is a relevant protective factor against academic failure. Positive family discipline (inductive discipline, supervision and penalty show a significant association with child-to-parent violence and academic failure. Disciplinary practices could be more efficient to prevent child-to-parent violence or school failure if children perceive a positive environment in their home. However, these findings could be explained by inverse causality, because some parents respond to child-to-parent violence or academic failure with disciplinary strategies. School failure had indirect effects on child-to-parent violence through family cohesion. For all that, education policies should focus on parental education courses for disadvantaged families in order to generate appropriate learning environments at home and to foster improvement of parent

  6. Academic Failure and Child-to-Parent Violence: Family Protective Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibabe, Izaskun

    2016-01-01

    A reduction in academic achievement over the course of adolescence has been observed. School failure is characterized by difficulties to teaching school goals. A variety of other behavioral problems are often associated with school failure. Child-to-parent violence has been associated with different school problems. The main objective of current study was to examine the contribution of family variables (parental education level, family cohesion, and positive family discipline) on academic failure and child-to-parent violence of adolescents from a community sample. Moreover, a goal was to explore if academic failure was a valid predictor of child-to-parent violence. To this end, it has been developed a comprehensive statistical model through Structural Equation Modeling (SEM). Participants were 584 children from eight secondary schools in the Basque Country (Spain) and aged between 12 and 18. Among other scales Conflict Tactics Scale and Family Environment Scale were administrated for measuring child-to-parent violence and family cohesion environment, respectively. The structural model revealed that parental education level is a relevant protective factor against academic failure. Positive family discipline (inductive discipline, supervision, and penalty) show a significant association with child-to-parent violence and academic failure. Disciplinary practices could be more efficient to prevent child-to-parent violence or school failure if children perceive a positive environment in their home. However, these findings could be explained by inverse causality, because some parents respond to child-to-parent violence or academic failure with disciplinary strategies. School failure had indirect effects on child-to-parent violence through family cohesion. For all that, education policies should focus on parental education courses for disadvantaged families in order to generate appropriate learning environments at home and to foster improvement of parent

  7. Academic Failure and Child-to-Parent Violence: Family Protective Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibabe, Izaskun

    2016-01-01

    A reduction in academic achievement over the course of adolescence has been observed. School failure is characterized by difficulties to teaching school goals. A variety of other behavioral problems are often associated with school failure. Child-to-parent violence has been associated with different school problems. The main objective of current study was to examine the contribution of family variables (parental education level, family cohesion, and positive family discipline) on academic failure and child-to-parent violence of adolescents from a community sample. Moreover, a goal was to explore if academic failure was a valid predictor of child-to-parent violence. To this end, it has been developed a comprehensive statistical model through Structural Equation Modeling (SEM). Participants were 584 children from eight secondary schools in the Basque Country (Spain) and aged between 12 and 18. Among other scales Conflict Tactics Scale and Family Environment Scale were administrated for measuring child-to-parent violence and family cohesion environment, respectively. The structural model revealed that parental education level is a relevant protective factor against academic failure. Positive family discipline (inductive discipline, supervision, and penalty) show a significant association with child-to-parent violence and academic failure. Disciplinary practices could be more efficient to prevent child-to-parent violence or school failure if children perceive a positive environment in their home. However, these findings could be explained by inverse causality, because some parents respond to child-to-parent violence or academic failure with disciplinary strategies. School failure had indirect effects on child-to-parent violence through family cohesion. For all that, education policies should focus on parental education courses for disadvantaged families in order to generate appropriate learning environments at home and to foster improvement of parent

  8. Factors Associated with Serum B-Type Natriuretic Peptide in Infants with Single Ventricles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butts, Ryan J.; Zak, Victor; Hsu, Daphne; Cnota, James; Colan, Steven D.; Hehir, David; Kantor, Paul; Levine, Jami C.; Margossian, Renee; Richmond, Marc; Szwast, Anita; Williams, Derek; Williams, Richard; Atz, Andrew M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Data regarding the value of B-type natriuretic peptide measurements (BNP) in infants with single ventricle (SV) physiology are lacking. The objective of this analysis was to describe the changes in BNP in infants with SV physiology before and after superior cavopulmonary connection (SCPC) surgery. Methods BNP levels were measured by a core laboratory pre-SCPC (5.0 ± 1.6 months) and at age 14 months during a multicenter trial of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibition therapy in infants with SV. Multivariable longitudinal analysis was utilized to model the associations between BNP with three sets of grouped variables (echocardiographic, catheterization, growth). Multivariable analysis was performed to assess associations with patient characteristics at both visits. Associations between BNP and neurodevelopmental variables were investigated at the 14 month visit as neurodevelopmental assessment was performed only at this visit. Results BNP was significantly higher before SCPC (n=173) than at 14 months (n=134); median [IQR] 80.8 pg/ml [35–187] v. 34.5 pg/ml [17–67], p 100 pg/ml was present in 72 (42%) subjects pre-SCPC and 21 (16%) at 14 months. In the 117 patients who had BNP at both visits, the median BNP decreased 32 pg/mL [1–79 pg/mL], p<0.01. In longitudinal multivariable analysis, higher BNP were associated with a higher end-systolic volume z-score (p=0.01), greater degree of atrioventricular (AV) valve regurgitation (p<0.01), lower weight z-score (p<0.01), and lower length z-score (p=0.02) In multivariable analyses, higher BNP at 14 months was associated with presence of arrhythmia post-SCPC surgery (p<0.01), prior Norwood procedure (p<0.01), longer length of hospital stay post-SCPC surgery (p=0.04), and lower Bayley Psychomotor Developmental Index (p=0.02). Conclusion BNP decreases in infants with SV from the pre- SCPC visit to 14 months. Higher BNP is associated with increased ventricular dilation in systole, increased AV valve

  9. Regulation of the MEF2 Family of Transcription Factors by p38†

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Ming; New, Liguo; Kravchenko, Vladimir V.; KATO, Yutaka; Gram, Hermann; Di Padova, Franco; Olson, Eric N.; Ulevitch, Richard J.; Han, Jiahuai

    1999-01-01

    Members of the MEF2 family of transcription factors bind as homo- and heterodimers to the MEF2 site found in the promoter regions of numerous muscle-specific, growth- or stress-induced genes. We showed previously that the transactivation activity of MEF2C is stimulated by p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase. In this study, we examined the potential role of the p38 MAP kinase pathway in regulating the other MEF2 family members. We found that MEF2A, but not MEF2B or MEF2D, is a substrate...

  10. Genome-Wide Identification and Evolutionary Analysis of the Animal Specific ETS Transcription Factor Family

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Zhipeng; Zhang, Qin

    2009-01-01

    The ETS proteins are a family of transcription factors (TFs) that regulate a variety of biological processes. We made genome-wide analyses to explore the classification of the ETS gene family. We identified 207 ETS genes which encode 321 ETS TFs from ten animal species. Of the 321 ETS TFs, 155 contain only an ETS domain, about 50% contain a ETS_PEA3_N or a SAM_PNT domain in addition to an ETS domain, the rest (only four) contain a second ETS domain or a second ETS_PEA3_N domain or an another ...

  11. Insights into the biological functions of Dock family guanine nucleotide exchange factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurin, Mélanie; Côté, Jean-François

    2014-03-15

    Rho GTPases play key regulatory roles in many aspects of embryonic development, regulating processes such as differentiation, proliferation, morphogenesis, and migration. Two families of guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) found in metazoans, Dbl and Dock, are responsible for the spatiotemporal activation of Rac and Cdc42 proteins and their downstream signaling pathways. This review focuses on the emerging roles of the mammalian DOCK family in development and disease. We also discuss, when possible, how recent discoveries concerning the biological functions of these GEFs might be exploited for the development of novel therapeutic strategies.

  12. Unravelling the Evolution of the Allatostatin-Type A, KISS and Galanin Peptide-Receptor Gene Families in Bilaterians: Insights from Anopheles Mosquitoes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rute C Felix

    Full Text Available Allatostatin type A receptors (AST-ARs are a group of G-protein coupled receptors activated by members of the FGL-amide (AST-A peptide family that inhibit food intake and development in arthropods. Despite their physiological importance the evolution of the AST-A system is poorly described and relatively few receptors have been isolated and functionally characterised in insects. The present study provides a comprehensive analysis of the origin and comparative evolution of the AST-A system. To determine how evolution and feeding modified the function of AST-AR the duplicate receptors in Anopheles mosquitoes, were characterised. Phylogeny and gene synteny suggested that invertebrate AST-A receptors and peptide genes shared a common evolutionary origin with KISS/GAL receptors and ligands. AST-ARs and KISSR emerged from a common gene ancestor after the divergence of GALRs in the bilaterian genome. In arthropods, the AST-A system evolved through lineage-specific events and the maintenance of two receptors in the flies and mosquitoes (Diptera was the result of a gene duplication event. Speciation of Anopheles mosquitoes affected receptor gene organisation and characterisation of AST-AR duplicates (GPRALS1 and 2 revealed that in common with other insects, the mosquito receptors were activated by insect AST-A peptides and the iCa2+-signalling pathway was stimulated. GPRALS1 and 2 were expressed mainly in mosquito midgut and ovaries and transcript abundance of both receptors was modified by feeding. A blood meal strongly up-regulated expression of both GPRALS in the midgut (p < 0.05 compared to glucose fed females. Based on the results we hypothesise that the AST-A system in insects shared a common origin with the vertebrate KISS system and may also share a common function as an integrator of metabolism and reproduction.AST-A and KISS/GAL receptors and ligands shared common ancestry prior to the protostome-deuterostome divergence. Phylogeny and gene

  13. Unravelling the Evolution of the Allatostatin-Type A, KISS and Galanin Peptide-Receptor Gene Families in Bilaterians: Insights from Anopheles Mosquitoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felix, Rute C; Trindade, Marlene; Pires, Isa R P; Fonseca, Vera G; Martins, Rute S; Silveira, Henrique; Power, Deborah M; Cardoso, João C R

    2015-01-01

    Allatostatin type A receptors (AST-ARs) are a group of G-protein coupled receptors activated by members of the FGL-amide (AST-A) peptide family that inhibit food intake and development in arthropods. Despite their physiological importance the evolution of the AST-A system is poorly described and relatively few receptors have been isolated and functionally characterised in insects. The present study provides a comprehensive analysis of the origin and comparative evolution of the AST-A system. To determine how evolution and feeding modified the function of AST-AR the duplicate receptors in Anopheles mosquitoes, were characterised. Phylogeny and gene synteny suggested that invertebrate AST-A receptors and peptide genes shared a common evolutionary origin with KISS/GAL receptors and ligands. AST-ARs and KISSR emerged from a common gene ancestor after the divergence of GALRs in the bilaterian genome. In arthropods, the AST-A system evolved through lineage-specific events and the maintenance of two receptors in the flies and mosquitoes (Diptera) was the result of a gene duplication event. Speciation of Anopheles mosquitoes affected receptor gene organisation and characterisation of AST-AR duplicates (GPRALS1 and 2) revealed that in common with other insects, the mosquito receptors were activated by insect AST-A peptides and the iCa2+-signalling pathway was stimulated. GPRALS1 and 2 were expressed mainly in mosquito midgut and ovaries and transcript abundance of both receptors was modified by feeding. A blood meal strongly up-regulated expression of both GPRALS in the midgut (p < 0.05) compared to glucose fed females. Based on the results we hypothesise that the AST-A system in insects shared a common origin with the vertebrate KISS system and may also share a common function as an integrator of metabolism and reproduction. AST-A and KISS/GAL receptors and ligands shared common ancestry prior to the protostome-deuterostome divergence. Phylogeny and gene synteny revealed

  14. A Family of CSαβ Defensins and Defensin-Like Peptides from the Migratory Locust, Locusta migratoria, and Their Expression Dynamics during Mycosis and Nosemosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liwei; Zhang, Pengfei; Zhang, Long

    2016-01-01

    Insect defensins are effector components of the innate defense system. During infection, these peptides may play a role in the control of pathogens by providing protective antimicrobial barriers between epithelial cells and the hemocoel. The cDNAs encoding four defensins of the migratory locust, Locusta migratoria, designated LmDEF 1, 3–5, were identified for the first time by transcriptome-targeted analysis. Three of the members of this CSαβ defensin family, LmDEF 1, 3, and 5, were detected in locust tissues. The pro regions of their sequences have little-shared identities with other insect defensins, though the predicted mature peptides align well with other insect defensins. Phylogenetic analysis indicates a completely novel position of both LmDEF 1 and 3, compared to defensins from hymenopterans. The expression patterns of the genes encoding LmDEFs in the fat body and salivary glands were studied in response to immune-challenge by the microsporidian pathogen Nosema locustae and the fungus Metarhizium anisopliae after feeding or topical application, respectively. Focusing on Nosema-induced immunity, qRT-PCR was employed to quantify the transcript levels of LmDEFs. A higher transcript abundance of LmDEF5 was distributed more or less uniformly throughout the fat body along time. A very low baseline transcription of both LmDEFs 1 and 3 in naïve insects was indicated, and that transcription increases with time or is latent in the fat body or salivary glands of infected nymphs. In the salivary glands, expression of LmDEF3 was 20-40-times higher than in the fat body post-microbial infection. A very low expression of LmDEF3 could be detected in the fat body, but eventually increased with time up to a maximum at day 15. Delayed induction of transcription of these peptides in the fat body and salivary glands 5–15 days post-activation and the differential expression patterns suggest that the fat body/salivary glands of this species are active in the immune response

  15. A Family of CSαβ Defensins and Defensin-Like Peptides from the Migratory Locust, Locusta migratoria, and Their Expression Dynamics during Mycosis and Nosemosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Mingyue; Mohamed, Amr Ahmed; Zhang, Liwei; Zhang, Pengfei; Zhang, Long

    2016-01-01

    Insect defensins are effector components of the innate defense system. During infection, these peptides may play a role in the control of pathogens by providing protective antimicrobial barriers between epithelial cells and the hemocoel. The cDNAs encoding four defensins of the migratory locust, Locusta migratoria, designated LmDEF 1, 3-5, were identified for the first time by transcriptome-targeted analysis. Three of the members of this CSαβ defensin family, LmDEF 1, 3, and 5, were detected in locust tissues. The pro regions of their sequences have little-shared identities with other insect defensins, though the predicted mature peptides align well with other insect defensins. Phylogenetic analysis indicates a completely novel position of both LmDEF 1 and 3, compared to defensins from hymenopterans. The expression patterns of the genes encoding LmDEFs in the fat body and salivary glands were studied in response to immune-challenge by the microsporidian pathogen Nosema locustae and the fungus Metarhizium anisopliae after feeding or topical application, respectively. Focusing on Nosema-induced immunity, qRT-PCR was employed to quantify the transcript levels of LmDEFs. A higher transcript abundance of LmDEF5 was distributed more or less uniformly throughout the fat body along time. A very low baseline transcription of both LmDEFs 1 and 3 in naïve insects was indicated, and that transcription increases with time or is latent in the fat body or salivary glands of infected nymphs. In the salivary glands, expression of LmDEF3 was 20-40-times higher than in the fat body post-microbial infection. A very low expression of LmDEF3 could be detected in the fat body, but eventually increased with time up to a maximum at day 15. Delayed induction of transcription of these peptides in the fat body and salivary glands 5-15 days post-activation and the differential expression patterns suggest that the fat body/salivary glands of this species are active in the immune response

  16. Adverse childhood experiences, health perception, and the role of shared familial factors in adult twins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostoufi, Sheeva M; Strachan, Eric; Chopko, Laura; Succop, Annemarie; Martinez, Beatrice; Ahumada, Sandra M; Afari, Niloofar

    2013-11-01

    To examine the relationship between adverse childhood experiences (ACE) and health perception in adulthood, and to explore the contribution of shared familial factors to these associations. Data were collected from 180 female twins (90 pairs) from the community-based University of Washington Twin Registry. Participants completed questionnaires including the modified ACE Questionnaire, Traumatic Life Events Questionnaire, McGill Pain Questionnaire-Short Form, and the SF-36. Mixed effects linear regression modeling investigated the effects of ACE on indices of health perception controlling for correlated twin data. Additional models examined the associations while controlling for the experience of physical and/or sexual abuse in childhood; within-twin pair models that inherently adjust for familial factors explored shared familial influences. After controlling for relevant demographic variables, more ACE was associated with worse perceptions of general health (p=.01) and vitality (p=.05) on the SF-36. After controlling for childhood physical and/or sexual abuse, the relationship between ACE and general health remained significant (p=.01) while vitality was no longer significant. None of the associations remained significant after accounting for the influence of familial factors. These results support previous findings on the negative link between ACE and perceived health in adulthood. The detrimental effects of ACE on vitality may be accounted for by the experience of childhood physical and/or sexual abuse. Shared familial factors might play a partial role in the relationship between ACE and health perception. Future research should further investigate the genetic and environmental mechanisms that may explain this relationship. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Family-based factors associated with overweight and obesity among Pakistani primary school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushtaq, Muhammad Umair; Gull, Sibgha; Shahid, Ubeera; Shafique, Mahar Muhammad; Abdullah, Hussain Muhammad; Shad, Mushtaq Ahmad; Siddiqui, Arif Mahmood

    2011-12-16

    Childhood obesity epidemic is now penetrating the developing countries including Pakistan, especially in the affluent urban population. There is no data on association of family-based factors with overweight and obesity among school-aged children in Pakistan. The study aimed to explore the family-based factors associated with overweight and obesity among Pakistani primary school children. A population-based cross-sectional study was conducted with a representative multistage cluster sample of 1860 children aged five to twelve years in Lahore, Pakistan. Overweight (> +1SD BMI-for-age z-score) and obesity (> +2SD BMI-for-age z-score) were defined using the World Health Organization reference 2007. Chi-square test was used as the test of trend. Linear regression was used to examine the predictive power of independent variables in relation to BMI. Logistic regression was used to quantify the independent predictors of overweight and adjusted odds ratios (aOR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were obtained. All regression analyses were controlled for age and gender and statistical significance was considered at P family-based correlates of overweight and obesity included higher parental education (P obesity. Higher parental education (P Family-based factors were significantly associated with overweight and obesity among school-aged children in Pakistan. Higher parental education, living in high-income neighborhoods and fewer siblings were independent predictors of overweight. These findings support the need to design evidence-based child health policy and implement targeted interventions, considering the impact of family-based factors and involving communities.

  18. Work-Family Enrichment: It’s Mediating Role in the Relationships between Dispositional Factors and Job Satisfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ng Swee Fung

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The growing interest in understanding the interface of work and family roles, in particular work-family enrichment, and its antecedents and outcomes, has stimulated the development of a mediation model. The mediation model developed includes dispositional factors (optimism, self-efficacy as antecedents, job satisfaction as the outcome, and work-family enrichment as the mediator. This present model is developed based on the conservation of resources theory (Hobfoll, 1989, the model of work-family enrichment (Greenhaus & Powell, 2006 and the social exchange theory (Blau, 1964. This model presents the mechanism of how dispositional factors could influence job satisfaction among employees through work-family enrichment.

  19. Complex phylogeny and gene expression patterns of members of the NITRATE TRANSPORTER 1/PEPTIDE TRANSPORTER family (NPF) in wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchner, Peter; Hawkesford, Malcolm J

    2014-10-01

    NPF (formerly referred to as low-affinity NRT1) and 'high-affinity' NRT2 nitrate transporter genes are involved in nitrate uptake by the root, and transport and distribution of nitrate within the plant. The NPF gene family consists of 53 members in Arabidopsis thaliana, however only 11 of these have been functionally characterized. Although homologous genes have been identified in genomes of different plant species including some cereals, there is little information available for wheat (Triticum aestivum). Sixteen genes were identified in wheat homologous to characterized Arabidopsis low-affinity nitrate transporter NPF genes, suggesting a complex wheat NPF gene family. The regulation of wheat NFP genes by plant N-status indicated involvement of these transporters in substrate transport in relation to N-metabolism. The complex expression pattern in relation to tissue specificity, nitrate availability and senescence may be associated with the complex growth patterns of wheat depending on sink/source demands, as well as remobilization during grain filling.

  20. Challenges in Targeting a Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factor with Hydrocarbon-Stapled Peptides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Edwards, Amanda L; Meijer, Dimphna H; Guerra, Rachel M; Molenaar, Remco J; Alberta, John A; Bernal, Federico; Bird, Gregory H; Stiles, Charles D; Walensky, Loren D

    2016-01-01

    Basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors play critical roles in organism development and disease by regulating cell proliferation and differentiation. Transcriptional activity, whether by bHLH homo- or heterodimerization, is dependent on protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions mediat

  1. Trefoil factor peptide 3 is positively correlated with the viscoelastic properties of the cervical mucus plug

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bastholm, Sara Kjær; Samson, Mie Hesselund; Becher, Naja

    2017-01-01

    The viscoelastic properties of the cervical mucus plug are considered essential for the occlusion of the cervical canal and thereby for protection against ascending infections during pregnancy. Factors controlling this property are virtually unknown. This study explores a possible role of trefoil...

  2. The value of anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies in rheumatoid arthritis: do they imply new risk factors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Longo, Francisco Javier; Sánchez-Ramón, Silvia; Carreño, Luis

    2009-11-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic autoimmune disease that causes chronic inflammation of the joints and several extra-articular manifestations that account for increased morbimortality of these patients. The involvement of B cells in RA pathophysiology was recognized early, with the discovery of rheumatoid factor antibody. Recently, a number of autoantibodies against citrullinated proteins have been described, of which anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP) is the most specific for RA. A cohort of 937 patients with RA was studied to determine the clinical correlates of anti-CCP antibodies. The presence of anti-CCP antibodies correlated with worse joint involvement and several extra-articular manifestations, i.e., higher incidence of ischemic heart disease independent of classic cardiovascular factors and higher mortality rate. A multivariate logistic regression model showed that only anti-CCP antibodies were independently associated with the development of ischemic heart disease in patients with RA. The clinical value of anti-citrullinated protein antibodies and the relevance of anti-CCP antibodies in daily clinical practice are reviewed. Copyright 2009 Prous Science, S.A.U. or its licensors. All rights reserved.

  3. Environmental risk factors differ between rheumatoid arthritis with and without auto-antibodies against cyclic citrullinated peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Line Merete Blak; Jacobsen, Søren; Klarlund, Mette

    2006-01-01

    -years) was selectively associated with risk of anti-CCP-positive RA, whereas alcohol consumption exhibited an inverse dose-response association with this RA subtype (OR = 1.98, 1.22-3.19, for 0 versus > 0-5 drinks per week). Furthermore, coffee consumption (OR = 2.18; 1.07-4.42, for > 10 versus 0 cups per day), ever use......The aim of this study was to evaluate new and previously hypothesised non-genetic risk factors for serologic subtypes of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) defined by the presence or absence of auto-antibodies to cyclic citrullinated peptides (CCP). In a national case-control study, we included 515 patients......-CCP-antibodies. Associations between exposure variables and risk of anti-CCP-positive and anti-CCP-negative RA were evaluated using logistic regression. A series of RA subtype-specific risk factors were identified. Tobacco smoking (odds ratio [OR] = 1.65; 95% confidence interval: 1.03-2.64, for > 20 versus 0 pack...

  4. Novel Nuclear Factor-KappaB Targeting Peptide Suppresses β-Amyloid Induced Inflammatory and Apoptotic Responses in Neuronal Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Mythily; Bayon, Baindu; Chopra, Nipun; Lahiri, Debomoy K.

    2016-01-01

    In the central nervous system (CNS), activation of the transcription factor nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κβ) is associated with both neuronal survival and increased vulnerability to apoptosis. The mechanisms underlying these dichotomous effects are attributed to the composition of NF-κΒ dimers. In Alzheimer’s disease (AD), β-amyloid (Aβ) and other aggregates upregulate activation of p65:p50 dimers in CNS cells and enhance transactivation of pathological mediators that cause neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration. Hence selective targeting of activated p65 is an attractive therapeutic strategy for AD. Here we report the design, structural and functional characterization of peptide analogs of a p65 interacting protein, the glucocorticoid induced leucine zipper (GILZ). By virtue of binding the transactivation domain of p65 exposed after release from the inhibitory IκΒ proteins in activated cells, the GILZ analogs can act as highly selective inhibitors of activated p65 with minimal potential for off-target effects. PMID:27764084

  5. Decision-making factors affecting different family members regarding the placement of relatives in long-term care facilities

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Ying-Chia; Chu, Chiao-Lee; Ho, Ching-Sung; Lan, Shou-Jen; Hsieh, Chen-Hsi; Hsieh, Yen-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this research was to investigate factors affecting different family members’ decisions regarding the placement of relatives in long-term car (LTC) facilities in Taiwan. The objective was to investigate the correlations between family members’ personal traits, the living conditions of residents in the LTC facilities, and family members’ experiences with LTC facilities. Methods This study selected family members visiting residents in LTC facilities as research subjects and...

  6. Phylogenetic analysis and positive-selection site detecting of vascular endothelial growth factor family in vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Wenwu; Tang, Yanyan; Qi, Bin; Lu, Chuansen; Qin, Chao; Wei, Yunfei; Yi, Jiachao; Chen, Mingwu

    2014-02-10

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), known to play an important role in vascular homeostasis, vascular integrity and angiogenesis, is little known about the evolutionary relationship of its five members especially the role of gene duplication and natural selection in the evolution of the VEGF family. In this study, seventy-five full-length cDNA sequences from 33 vertebrate species were extracted from the NCBI's GenBank, UniProt protein database and the Ensembl database. By phylogenetic analyses, we investigated the origin, conservation, and evolution of the VEGFs. Five VEGF family members in vertebrates might be formed by gene duplication. The inferred evolutionary transitions that separate members which belong to different gene clusters correlated with changes in functional properties. Selection analysis and protein structure analysis were combined to explain the relationship of the site-specific evolution in the vertebrate VEGF family. Eleven positive selection sites, one transmembrane region and the active sites were detected in this process.

  7. Perceived family support of women with breast cancer and affecting factors in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardahan, Melek; Yesilbalkan, Oznur Usta

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the percieved family support of the women with breast cancer and the affecting factors. The subjects were breast cancer cases undergoing treatment (n=240). The sample for this study was formed by women who accepted participation, were in the facility between the dates and hours when the study was applied, and who were selected with a nonprobability sampling technique (n=120). Two thirds of the women with breast cancer were in the 40-59 age group. The lowest score women with breast cancer for perceived family support scale was 0.00 and the highest was 40.0, with a mean of 30.1±8.85. In this study, it was determined that perceived family support of Turkish women with breast cancer was reasonable.

  8. Structure-based rational design of peptide hydroxamic acid inhibitors to target tumor necrosis factor-α converting enzyme as potential therapeutics for hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dan; Gu, Qiuhong; Zhao, Ning; Xia, Fei; Li, Zhiwei

    2015-12-01

    The human tumor necrosis factor-α converting enzyme (TACE) has recently been raised as a new and promising therapeutic target of hepatitis and other inflammatory diseases. Here, we reported a successful application of the solved crystal structure of TACE complex with a peptide-like ligand INN for rational design of novel peptide hydroxamic acid inhibitors with high potency and selectivity to target and inhibit TACE. First, the intermolecular interactions between TACE catalytic domain and INN were characterized through an integrated bioinformatics approach, with which the key substructures of INN that dominate ligand binding were identified. Subsequently, the INN molecular structure was simplified to a chemical sketch of peptide hydroxamic acid compound, which can be regarded as a linear tripeptide capped by a N-terminal carboxybenzyl group (chemically protective group) and a C-terminal hydroxamate moiety (coordinated to the Zn(2+) at TACE active site). Based on the sketch, a virtual combinatorial library containing 180 peptide hydroxamic acids was generated, from which seven samples were identified as promising candidates by using a knowledge-based protein-peptide affinity predictor and were then tested in vitro with a standard TACE activity assay protocol. Consequently, three designed peptide hydroxamic acids, i.e. Cbz-Pro-Ile-Gln-hydroxamic acid, Cbz-Leu-Ile-Val-hydroxamic acid and Cbz-Phe-Val-Met-hydroxamic acid, exhibited moderate or high inhibitory activity against TACE, with inhibition constants Ki of 36 ± 5, 510 ± 46 and 320 ± 26 nM, respectively. We also examined the structural basis and non-bonded profile of TACE interaction with a designed peptide hydroxamic acid inhibitor, and found that the inhibitor ligand is tightly buried in the active pocket of TACE, forming a number of hydrogen bonds, hydrophobic forces and van der Waals contacts at the interaction interface, conferring both stability and specificity for TACE-inhibitor complex

  9. Big defensins, a diverse family of antimicrobial peptides that follows different patterns of expression in hemocytes of the oyster Crassostrea gigas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael D Rosa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Big defensin is an antimicrobial peptide composed of a highly hydrophobic N-terminal region and a cationic C-terminal region containing six cysteine residues involved in three internal disulfide bridges. While big defensin sequences have been reported in various mollusk species, few studies have been devoted to their sequence diversity, gene organization and their expression in response to microbial infections. FINDINGS: Using the high-throughput Digital Gene Expression approach, we have identified in Crassostrea gigas oysters several sequences coding for big defensins induced in response to a Vibrio infection. We showed that the oyster big defensin family is composed of three members (named Cg-BigDef1, Cg-BigDef2 and Cg-BigDef3 that are encoded by distinct genomic sequences. All Cg-BigDefs contain a hydrophobic N-terminal domain and a cationic C-terminal domain that resembles vertebrate β-defensins. Both domains are encoded by separate exons. We found that big defensins form a group predominantly present in mollusks and closer to vertebrate defensins than to invertebrate and fungi CSαβ-containing defensins. Moreover, we showed that Cg-BigDefs are expressed in oyster hemocytes only and follow different patterns of gene expression. While Cg-BigDef3 is non-regulated, both Cg-BigDef1 and Cg-BigDef2 transcripts are strongly induced in response to bacterial challenge. Induction was dependent on pathogen associated molecular patterns but not damage-dependent. The inducibility of Cg-BigDef1 was confirmed by HPLC and mass spectrometry, since ions with a molecular mass compatible with mature Cg-BigDef1 (10.7 kDa were present in immune-challenged oysters only. From our biochemical data, native Cg-BigDef1 would result from the elimination of a prepropeptide sequence and the cyclization of the resulting N-terminal glutamine residue into a pyroglutamic acid. CONCLUSIONS: We provide here the first report showing that big defensins form a family

  10. Analysis of functional redundancies within the Arabidopsis TCP transcription factor family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danisman, Selahattin; van Dijk, Aalt D J; Bimbo, Andrea; van der Wal, Froukje; Hennig, Lars; de Folter, Stefan; Angenent, Gerco C; Immink, Richard G H

    2013-12-01

    Analyses of the functions of TEOSINTE-LIKE1, CYCLOIDEA, and PROLIFERATING CELL FACTOR1 (TCP) transcription factors have been hampered by functional redundancy between its individual members. In general, putative functionally redundant genes are predicted based on sequence similarity and confirmed by genetic analysis. In the TCP family, however, identification is impeded by relatively low overall sequence similarity. In a search for functionally redundant TCP pairs that control Arabidopsis leaf development, this work performed an integrative bioinformatics analysis, combining protein sequence similarities, gene expression data, and results of pair-wise protein-protein interaction studies for the 24 members of the Arabidopsis TCP transcription factor family. For this, the work completed any lacking gene expression and protein-protein interaction data experimentally and then performed a comprehensive prediction of potential functional redundant TCP pairs. Subsequently, redundant functions could be confirmed for selected predicted TCP pairs by genetic and molecular analyses. It is demonstrated that the previously uncharacterized class I TCP19 gene plays a role in the control of leaf senescence in a redundant fashion with TCP20. Altogether, this work shows the power of combining classical genetic and molecular approaches with bioinformatics predictions to unravel functional redundancies in the TCP transcription factor family.

  11. Individual and familial factors associated with teenage pregnancy: an interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haldre, Kai; Rahu, Kaja; Rahu, Mati; Karro, Helle

    2009-06-01

    The determinants of teenage sexual health, including pregnancies, can be addressed from social, familial and individual level perspectives. The main objective of this study was to examine whether pregnancy among 18 years old and younger girls were associated with selected individual (age at coitarche, score of sexual health knowledge, dislike of school) and family (mother's education) and family functioning (alcohol abuse in the family, parents' acceptance of sexual relationship) characteristics. An interview survey in two medical institutions in Estonia among 279 18 year old and younger girls, who: (i) used contraception, had been sexually active for at least 6 months and had not pregnancies--(148 girls); (ii) came for termination of pregnancy--abortion group; (iii) planned to deliver and came for prenatal care--delivery group. The last two groups were analysed together as the 'pregnancy group'--131 girls. Multivariate analysis, by means of logistic regression models, was used to explore whether the associations were sustained after adjusting for other variables. Crude odds ratios (ORs), adjusted ORs and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated, with girls having no pregnancies as the reference group. Risk factors associated with teenage pregnancy were low score of sexual health knowledge (adjusted ORs 3.07; 95% CIs 1.73-5.46), dislike of school (adjusted ORs 1.96; 95% CIs 1.08-3.54), alcohol abuse by family members (adjusted ORs 2.03; 95% CIs 1.16-3.54). Sexual knowledge of teenagers, their attitude towards school, alcohol abuse in the family are factors associated with teenage pregnancies.

  12. Dissolved families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Mogens

    The situation in the family preceding a family separation is studied here, to identify risk factors for family dissolution. Information registers covering prospective statistics about health aspects, demographic variables, family violence, self-destructive behaviour, unemployment, and the spousal...

  13. Dissolved families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Mogens

    The situation in the family preceding a family separation is studied here, to identify risk factors for family dissolution. Information registers covering prospective statistics about health aspects, demographic variables, family violence, self-destructive behaviour, unemployment, and the spousal...

  14. Leucine 7-proline 7 polymorphism in the signal peptide of neuropeptide Y is not a risk factor for exudative age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaarniranta, Kai; Holopainen, Juha M; Karvonen, Matti K; Koulu, Markku; Kallio, Jaana; Pesonen, Ullamari; Teräsvirta, Markku; Uusitalo, Hannu; Immonen, Ilkka

    2007-03-01

    Because of the regulatory role of neuropeptide Y (NPY) in angiogenesis, we set out to determine the presence of the leucine 7-proline 7 (Leu7Pro) polymorphism in exudative age-related macular degeneration (AMD) patients and to analyse its implications. Genotype analysis of the Leu7Pro polymorphism in the signal peptide region of the human prepro-NPY was performed in blood samples from exudative AMD patients (n = 240) and control subjects (n = 79). In all, 11% of exudative AMD patients and 14% of control subjects exhibited the NPY signal peptide Leu7Pro polymorphism. There were no statistically significant differences in Leu7Pro polymorphism frequency between the exudative AMD and control cases, as analysed by Fisher's exact two-sided test. Leu7Pro polymorphism in the signal peptide region of the human prepro-NPY is not a risk factor for exudative AMD.

  15. Regional differences in the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) pro-peptide, proBDNF and preproBDNF in the brain confer stress resilience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bangkun; Yang, Chun; Ren, Qian; Zhang, Ji-Chun; Chen, Qian-Xue; Shirayama, Yukihiko; Hashimoto, Kenji

    2016-12-01

    Using learned helplessness (LH) model of depression, we measured protein expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) pro-peptide, BDNF precursors (proBDNF and preproBDNF) in the brain regions of LH (susceptible) and non-LH rats (resilience). Expression of preproBDNF, proBDNF and BDNF pro-peptide in the medial prefrontal cortex of LH rats, but not non-LH rats, was significantly higher than control rats, although expression of these proteins in the nucleus accumbens of LH rats was significantly lower than control rats. This study suggests that regional differences in conversion of BDNF precursors into BDNF and BDNF pro-peptide by proteolytic cleavage may contribute to stress resilience.

  16. Education and adult cause-specific mortality--examining the impact of family factors shared by 871 367 Norwegian siblings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Næss, Oyvind; Hoff, Dominic A; Lawlor, Debbie;

    2012-01-01

    To estimate the impact family factors shared by siblings has on the association between length of education and cause-specific mortality in adulthood.......To estimate the impact family factors shared by siblings has on the association between length of education and cause-specific mortality in adulthood....

  17. Cognitive Functioning and Family Risk Factors in Relation to Symptom Behaviors of ADHD and ODD in Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forssman, Linda; Eninger, Lilianne; Tillman, Carin M.; Rodriguez, Alina; Bohlin, Gunilla

    2012-01-01

    Objective: In this study, the authors investigated whether ADHD and oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) behaviors share associations with problems in cognitive functioning and/or family risk factors in adolescence. This was done by examining independent as well as specific associations of cognitive functioning and family risk factors with ADHD and…

  18. Evaluation of What Parents Know about Their Children's Drug Use and How They Perceive the Most Common Family Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermida, Jose-Ramon Fernandez; Villa, Roberto Secades; Seco, Guillermo Vallejo; Perez, Jose-Manuel Errasti

    2003-01-01

    Research on family risk factors for addictive behaviors in young people has not paid a great deal of attention to parents' knowledge of their children's addictive behaviors and of the family risk factors that affect such behaviors. The aim of this work is to compare knowledge about these two aspects in two groups of parents that differ regarding…

  19. FAMILY HISTORY OF DISEASE AS A RISK FACTOR OF ACUTE MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoran Velickovic

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Myocardial infarction (MI is a complex disease that begins with a lifelong interaction between genetics and environmental factors. The aim of the study was to identify family history as a risk factor of myocardial infarction in examined population in the Municipality of Nis.We used a case-control study with 100 patients with a first MI (in the period 1998-2000 and 100 controls, matched with respect to sex and age (± 2 years from the Municipality of Nis.Data was obtained from the epidemiological questionnaire. The Yates c2 test, odds ratio-OR and their 99% interval of confident were used as statistical procedures.The results showed that statistical significance for MI was present among all three degrees of relatives of subjects who have had an acute MI, and for hypertension, hypercholesterolemia and stroke among first and second - degree relatives. The subjects with family history of hypercholesterolemia had 12.43 times higher risk of disease (p = 0,000 and in the case of family history of MI before the age of 55, the risk was almost 10 times (p = 0,000 higher. Almost 4 times higher risk of disease was registered in subjects with family history of hypertension (p < 0,00001 and stroke (before 65 years of age - (p < 00005; a two-fold higher risk was registered in subjects with diagnoses of diabetes (p < 0,05 and other cardiovascular diseases (unless hypertension (p < 0,01 in the nearest relatives before the age of 55.We concluded that family history of diseases on the sample of the Municipality of Nis inhabitants was very important risk factor, mostly in the first-degree relatives. Genetic epidemiology is the future for all investigations between different population, and special attention should be paid to investigations and findings of different genes and loci which are very important for myocardial infarction occurrence, which would allow a new approach to preventive medicine.

  20. Analysis of inversions in the factor VIII gene in Spanish hemophilia A patients and families

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domenech, M.; Tizzano, E.; Baiget, M. [Hospital de Sant Pau, Barcelona (Spain); Altisent, C. [Hospital Vall d`Hebron, Barcelona (Spain)

    1994-09-01

    Intron 22 is the largest intron of the factor VIII gene and contains a CpG island from which two additional transcripts originate. One of these transcripts corresponds to the F8A gene which have telomeric extragenic copies in the X chromosome. An inversion involving homologous recombination between the intragenic and the distal or proximal copies of the F8A gene has been recently described as a common cause of severe hemophilia A (HA). We analyzed intron 22 rearrangements in 195 HA patients (123 familial and 72 sporadic cases). According to factor VIII levels, our sample was classified as severe in 114 cases, moderate in 29 cases and mild in 52 cases. An intron 22 (F8A) probe was hybridized to Southern blots of BcII digested DNA obtained from peripheral blood. A clear pattern of altered bands identifies distal or proximal inversions. We detected an abnormal pattern identifying an inversion in 49 (25%) of the analyzed cases. 43% of severe HA patients (49 cases) showed an inversion. As expected, no inversion was found in the moderate and mild group of patients. We found a high proportion (78%) of the distal rearrangement. From 49 identified inversions, 33 were found in familial cases (27%), while the remaining 15 were detected in sporadic patients (22%) in support that this mutational event occurs with a similar frequency in familial or sporadic cases. In addition, we detected a significant tendency of distal inversion to occur more frequently in familial cases than in sporadic cases. Inhibitor development to factor VIII was documented in approximately 1/3 of the patients with inversion. The identification of such a frequent molecular event in severe hemophilia A patients has been applied in our families to carrier and prenatal diagnosis, to determine the origin of the mutation in the sporadic cases and to detect the presence of germinal mosaicism.

  1. Factors influencing decision-making around family presence during resuscitation: a grounded theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, Tracey; de Lacey, Sheryl; Muir-Cochrane, Eimear

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to examine factors impacting family presence during resuscitation practices in the acute care setting. Family presence during resuscitation was introduced in the 1980s, so family members/significant others could be with their loved ones during life-threatening events. Evidence demonstrates important benefits; yet despite growing support from the public and endorsement from professional groups, family presence is practiced inconsistently and rationales for poor uptake are unclear. Constructivist grounded theory design. Twenty-five health professionals, family members and patients informed the study. In-depth interviews were undertaken between October 2013-November 2014 to interpret and explain their meanings and actions when deciding whether to practice or participate in FPDR. The Social Construction of Conditional Permission explains the social processes at work when deciding to adopt or reject family presence during resuscitation. These processes included claiming ownership, prioritizing preferences and rights, assessing suitability, setting boundaries and protecting others/self. In the absence of formal policies, decision-making was influenced primarily by peoples' values, preferences and pre-existing expectations around societal roles and associated status between health professionals and consumers. As a result, practices were sporadic, inconsistent and often paternalistic rather than collaborative. An increased awareness of the important benefits of family presence and the implementation of clinical protocols are recommended as an important starting point to address current variations and inconsistencies in practice. These measures would ensure future practice is guided by evidence and standards for health consumer safety and welfare rather than personal values and preferences of the individuals 'in charge' of permissions. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Structure and Bioactivity of a Modified Peptide Derived from the LPS-Binding Domain of an Anti-Lipopolysaccharide Factor (ALF of Shrimp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Yang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The lipopolysaccharide binding domain (LBD in anti-lipopolysaccharide factor (ALF is the main functional element of ALF, which exhibits antimicrobial activities. Our previous studies show that the peptide LBDv, synthesized based on the modified sequence of LBD (named LBD2 from FcALF2, exhibited an apparently enhanced antimicrobial activity. To learn the prospect of LBDv application, the characteristics of LBDv were analyzed in the present study. The LBDv peptide showed higher antimicrobial and bactericidal activities compared with LBD2. These activities of the LBDv peptide were stable after heat treatment. LBDv could also exhibit in vivo antimicrobial activity to Vibrio harveyi. The LBDv peptide was found to bind bacteria, quickly cause bacterial agglutination, and kill bacteria by damaging their membrane integrity. Structure analysis showed that both LBDv and LBD2 held the β-sheet structure, and the positive net charge and amphipathicity characteristic were speculated as two important components for their antimicrobial activity. The cytotoxicity of LBDv was evaluated in cultured Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9 cells and Cherax quadricarinatus hemocytes. More than 80% cells could survive with the LBDv concentration up to 16 μM. Collectively, these findings highlighted the potential antimicrobial mechanism of LBD peptides, and provided important information for the commercial use of LBDv in the future.

  3. Autonomy and intimacy in the family as risk factors for sexual abuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanja Repič

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available The study examined the level of two risk factors (autonomy and intimacy for healthy functional family among sexually abused and sexually non-abused individuals. Autonomy and intimacy were measured with Family-of-Origin Scale (FOS; Hovestadt, Anderson, Piercy, Cochran, & Fine, 1985. 261 participants (194 girls and 67 boys completed the FOS, average age was 25 years (SD = 7. Among all participants 18% were sexually abused (N = 46, approximately every fifth (5.7 girl and every seventh (6.7 boy. There were 78% girls and 22% boys among sexually abused participants. Families of sexually abused participants in comparison with the families of sexually non-abused showed many statistically significant differences in elements of autonomy (clarity of expressing emotions, responsibility, respect for others, openness to others, and acceptance of separation and loss and intimacy (encouraging expression of a range of feelings, creating a warm atmosphere in the home, dealing with conflict resolution without undue stress, promoting empathy among family members, trust and developing trust. In general the sexually abused group had a statistically significantly lower level of autonomy and intimacy in comparison with sexually non-abused group.

  4. Functional conservation between members of an ancient duplicated transcription factor family, LSF/Grainyhead.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesan, Kavitha; McManus, Heather R; Mello, Craig C; Smith, Temple F; Hansen, Ulla

    2003-08-01

    The LSF/Grainyhead transcription factor family is involved in many important biological processes, including cell cycle, cell growth and development. In order to investigate the evolutionary conservation of these biological roles, we have characterized two new family members in Caenorhabditis elegans and Xenopus laevis. The C.elegans member, Ce-GRH-1, groups with the Grainyhead subfamily, while the X.laevis member, Xl-LSF, groups with the LSF subfamily. Ce-GRH-1 binds DNA in a sequence-specific manner identical to that of Drosophila melanogaster Grainyhead. In addition, Ce-GRH-1 binds to sequences upstream of the C.elegans gene encoding aromatic L-amino-acid decarboxylase and genes involved in post-embryonic development, mab-5 and dbl-1. All three C.elegans genes are homologs of D.melanogaster Grainyhead-regulated genes. RNA-mediated interference of Ce-grh-1 results in embryonic lethality in worms, accompanied by soft, defective cuticles. These phenotypes are strikingly similar to those observed previously in D.melanogaster grainyhead mutants, suggesting conservation of the developmental role of these family members over the course of evolution. Our phylogenetic analysis of the expanded LSF/GRH family (including other previously unrecognized proteins/ESTs) suggests that the structural and functional dichotomy of this family dates back more than 700 million years, i.e. to the time when the first multicellular organisms are thought to have arisen.

  5. Unique and interactive effects of empathy, family, and school factors on early adolescents' aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batanova, Milena; Loukas, Alexandra

    2014-11-01

    Although research indicates that empathy inhibits youth aggression, little is known about the prospective associations between different components of empathy and aggression, as well as whether family and school factors moderate the aforementioned associations in early adolescents. Based on prior research, the current study examined whether empathic concern and perspective taking would contribute to subsequent overt and relational aggression over a 1-year period in middle school. Guided by the social development model, we also examined if positive family relations and school connectedness would differentially moderate the associations between both components of empathy and aggression. Participants were 481 10- to 14-year old students (54 % female; 78 % European American) who completed the first wave of a survey in 6th and 7th grades. Hierarchical regression analyses indicated that only for girls did lower levels of empathic concern, not perspective taking, contribute to increases in subsequent overt, not relational, aggression. Although neither positive family relations nor school connectedness played protective roles for girls, results indicated that boys' reports of positive family relations buffered the negative impact of low empathic concern on both forms of aggression 1 year later. Over and above the two components of empathy, school connectedness also contributed to a decline in boys' subsequent overt aggression. Recommendations are made to foster family and school relationships among boys, as well as to more heavily consider the role of emotion processes in the study and prevention of early adolescents' aggression.

  6. Where should family medicine papers be published - following the impact factor?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peleg, Roni; Shvartzman, Pesach

    2006-01-01

    Academic institutions weigh the research contribution of family physicians and take this factor into account when determining eligibility for the candidates' promotion. Among other parameters, these institutions consider the journals in which family physicians publish. In this respect, the impact factor (IF) has gained a foothold as one of the most accepted means to measure this contribution. The IF may be a measure of the main importance of a scientific journal. IF has a huge, but controversial, influence on the perception and evaluation of published scientific research. It is important for family physicians to understand and be aware of the importance of the IF and the way it is calculated. The IF is one consideration in the decision-making process of a researcher as to where to publish because the IF of most family medicine journals is less than 2.0. Thus publication in these journals might not yield the proper "score" for academic promotion in many institutions. On the other hand, publication in journals with higher IF that are not necessarily widely read by primary care physicians could result in a small impact of their findings on direct patient care.

  7. Factors influencing student selection of marriage and family therapy graduate programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertlein, Katherine M; Lambert-Shute, Jennifer

    2007-01-01

    To understand which factors students consider most important in choosing a marriage and family therapy (MFT) graduate program and how programs met or did not meet these expectations of students over the course of graduate study, we conducted an online mixed-method investigation. One hundred twelve graduate students in Commission on Accreditation for Marriage and Family Therapy Education-accredited programs responded to an online survey assessing what factors led them to select a specific graduate program in MFT. In the quantitative portion, students ranked each factor (personal fit, faculty, funding, research, clinical work, and teaching) as well as characteristics of each factor in relation to its importance in their selection of an MFT program. Additionally, students indicated to what level their programs meet their expectations. In the qualitative portion, students described how they believed their chosen program was or was not meeting their expectations. Both doctoral and master's students ranked personal fit as the top factor affecting their choice of graduate program in MFT, but they differed on the characteristics of each of these factors and their importance in selecting an MFT program. Implications for this research include program evaluation and program advertising, and are consistent with the scientist-practitioner model.

  8. Analysis of factor VIII gene inversions in 164 unrelated hemophilia A families

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vnencak-Jones, L.; Phillips, J.A. III; Janco, R.L. [Vanderbilt Univ. School of Medicine, Nashville, TN (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Hemophilia A is an X-linked recessive disease with variable phenotype and both heterogeneous and wide spread mutations in the factor VIII (F8) gene. As a result, diagnostic carrier or prenatal testing often relies upon laborious DNA linkage analysis. Recently, inversion mutations resulting from an intrachromosomal recombination between DNA sequences in one of two A genes {approximately}500 kb upstream from the F8 gene and a homologous A gene in intron 22 of the F8 gene were identified and found in 45% of severe hemophiliacs. We have analyzed banked DNA collected since 1986 from affected males or obligate carrier females representing 164 unrelated hemophilia A families. The disease was sporadic in 37%, familial in 54% and in 10% of families incomplete information was given. A unique deletion was identified in 1/164, a normal pattern was observed in 110/164 (67%), and 53/164 (32%) families had inversion mutations with 43/53 (81%) involving the distal A gene (R3 pattern) and 10/53 (19%) involving the proximal A gene (R2 pattern). While 19% of all rearrangements were R2, in 35 families with severe disease (< 1% VIII:C activity) all 16 rearrangements seen were R3. In 18 families with the R3 pattern and known activities, 16 (89%) had levels < 1%, with the remaining 2 families having {le} 2.4% activity. Further, 18 referrals specifically noted the production of inhibitors and 8/18 (45%) had the R3 pattern. Our findings demonstrate that the R3 inversion mutation patterns is (1) only seen with VIII:C activity levels of {le} 2.4%, (2) seen in 46% of families with severe hemophilia, (3) seen in 45% of hemophiliacs known to have inhibitors, (4) not correlated with sporadic or familial disease and (5) not in disequilibrium with the Bcl I or Taq I intron 18 or ST14 polymorphisms. Finally, in families positive for an inversion mutation, direct testing offers a highly accurate and less expensive alternative to DNA linkage analysis.

  9. Social, familial and psychological risk factors for mood and anxiety disorders in childhood and early adulthood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyland, Philip; Shevlin, Mark; Elklit, Ask

    2016-01-01

    history of any anxiety and mood disorder, parental history of self-harming behaviour, advanced paternal age, gender, urban dwelling, economic deprivation, family dissolution, and childhood adversity were used to predict diagnosis of both anxiety and mood disorders from ages 10 to 21 years. Results: Binary...... by simultaneously testing a range of established psychosocial risk factors. Method: A national birth cohort of the Danish population born in 1984 and tracked over the course of the first 21 years of their life was used in the current study (n = 54,458). Psychosocial risk factors including paternal and maternal...... logistic regression analysis showed that being female and a parental history of a mood or anxiety disorder are the strongest predictors of both disorders. Economic deprivation, and family dissolution also increase likelihood of both disorders. Urban dwelling and childhood adversity are predictors...

  10. Racial and familial factors in otitis media. A point prevalence study on Easter Island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goycoolea, H G; Goycoolea, M V; Farfan, C R

    1988-02-01

    Of the 249 children aged 5 to 9 years who live on Easter Island, 220 underwent complete otolaryngological evaluation. Twenty children were found to have otitis media (acute, chronic, or both). Three of these children were genetically impure natives, nine were of mixed parentage, and eight were "continentals" (with a birth origin other than the island). None of the genetically pure natives had otitis media. Our data show that, in a population with all factors in common except for familial and racial background, the point prevalence of otitis media is higher in children of mixed or continental origin than in genetically pure native children. The high prevalence of otitis media in children of mixed parentage and in one particular family of European ancestry suggests the presence of intrinsic or pronicity factors that are seemingly transmissible.

  11. [The profile of fragility and associated factors among the elderly registered in a Family Health Unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Patrícia Honório Silva; Fernandes, Marcos Henrique; Casotti, Cezar Augusto; Coqueiro, Raildo da Silva; Carneiro, José Ailton Oliveira

    2015-06-01

    The scope of this study was to identify the profile of fragility and associated factors among the elderly registered in a Family Health Unit. It involved an observational, exploratory, household -based and cross-sectional study conducted with 139 elderly individuals. The data were collected using a structured questionnaire requesting the following information: personal history, family and self-reported diseases, socio-demographic information, level of physical activity, behavior variables, number of falls in the last year, depressive symptoms, unintentional weight loss and fatigue. Anthropometric measurements (weight and height) were also taken and the body mass index (BMI) was calculated. Descriptive analyses and Pearson's chi-square test or Fisher's exact test were performed, with a significance level of p fragility among the elderly was: frail (16.9%), pre-frail (61.8%) and non-frail (21.3%), respectively. The fragility profile was associated with: age (p factors associated with this syndrome.

  12. A Longitudinal Study of the Effects of Family Background Factors on Mathematics Achievements Using Quantile Regression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xi-zhi Wu; Mao-zai Tian

    2008-01-01

    Quantile regression is gradually emerging as a powerful tool for estimating models of conditional quantile functions, and therefore research in this area has vastly increased in the past two decades. This paper, with the quantile regression technique, is the first comprehensive longitudinal study on mathematics participation data collected in Alberta, Canada. The major advantage of longitudinal study is its capability to separate the so-called cohort and age effects in the context of population studies. One aim of this paper is to study whether the family background factors alter performance on the mathematical achievement of the strongest students in the same way as that of weaker students based on the large longitudinal sample of 2000,2001 and 2002 mathematics participation longitudinal data set. The interesting findings suggest that there may be differential family background factor effects at different points in the mathematical achievement conditional distribution.

  13. Antimicrobial Peptides in Echinoderms

    OpenAIRE

    Li, C; Haug, T; K Stensvåg

    2010-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are important immune effector molecules for invertebrates, including echinoderms, which lack a vertebrate-type adaptive immune system. Here we summarize the knowledge of such peptides in echinoderms. Strongylocins are a novel family of cysteine-rich AMPs, recently identified in the sea urchins, Strongylocentrotus droebachiensis and S. purpuratus. Although these molecules present diverse amino acid sequences, they share an identical cysteine arrangement pattern, d...

  14. Factors that Affect Suicide Attempts of Adolescents in Multicultural Families in Korea

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Subin; Lee, Yeeun

    2016-01-01

    We examined the factors that affect suicide attempts adolescents multicultural families in South Korea. The participants were 727 adolescents whose mothers and/or fathers were born outside of South Korea (376 males and 351 females). Among them, 41 (weighted prevalence 6.2%) had attempted suicide during the last 12 months. Female gender, residence in large cities (compared with in rural areas), living with relatives/alone/with friends/in a dormitory or living in a facility (compared with livin...

  15. Bombyx mori E26 transformation-specific 2 (BmEts2), an Ets family protein, represses Bombyx mori Rels (BmRels)-mediated promoter activation of antimicrobial peptide genes in the silkworm Bombyx mori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, H; Sagisaka, A; Suzuki, N; Yamakawa, M

    2016-10-01

    E26 transformation-specific (Ets) family transcription factors are known to play roles in various biological phenomena, including immunity, in vertebrates. However, the mechanisms by which Ets proteins contribute to immunity in invertebrates remain poorly understood. In this study, we identified a cDNA encoding BmEts2, which is a putative orthologue of Drosophila Yan and human translocation-ets-leukemia/Ets-variant gene 6, from the silkworm Bombyx mori. Expression of the BmEts2 gene was significantly increased in the fat bodies of silkworm larvae in response to injection with Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. BmEts2 overexpression dramatically repressed B. mori Rels (BmRels)-mediated promoter activation of antimicrobial peptide genes in silkworm cells. Conversely, gene knockdown of BmEts2 significantly enhanced BmRels activity. In addition, two κB sites located on the 5' upstream region of cecropin B1 were found to be involved in the repression of BmRels-mediated promoter activation. Protein-competition analysis further demonstrated that BmEts2 competitively inhibited binding of BmRels to κB sites. Overall, BmEts2 acts as a repressor of BmRels-mediated transactivation of antimicrobial protein genes by inhibiting the binding of BmRels to κB sites. © 2016 The Royal Entomological Society.

  16. Multi-Level Family Factors and Affective and Behavioral Symptoms of Oppositional Defiant Disorder in Chinese Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yixin Tang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Given the important role of family environment in children's psychological development, the objective of this study was to examine the linkages between family factors at the whole, dyadic, and individual levels and two dimensions (affective and behavioral of Oppositional Defiant Disorder (ODD symptoms in Chinese children. Participants comprised of 80 father-child dyads and 169 mother-child dyads from families with ODD children. The results indicated that multilevel family factors were differently associated with children's affective and behavioral ODD symptoms. All the family factors at the dyadic and individual levels were significantly associated with child affective ODD symptoms. However, only the most proximal factors (parent-child relationship and child emotion regulation, which were directly related to child were significantly related to child behavioral ODD symptoms. The present study extends the current knowledge regarding the relationships between family factors and two dimensions of child ODD symptoms by testing the comprehensive multilevel family factors model. This study also recommends that future interventions for ODD children should consider the multi-level family factors to enhance intervention efficacy.

  17. bZIPs and WRKYs: two large transcription factor families executing two different functional strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carles eMarco Llorca

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available bZIPs and WRKYs are two important plant transcription factor families regulating diverse developmental and stress-related processes. Since a partial overlap in these biological processes is obvious, it can be speculated that they fulfill non-redundant functions in a complex regulatory network. Here, we focus on the regulatory mechanisms that are so far described for bZIPs and WRKYs. bZIP factors need to heterodimerize for DNA-binding and regulation of transcription, and based on a bioinformatics approach, bZIPs can build up more than the double of protein interactions than WRKYs. In contrast, an enrichment of the WRKY DNA-binding motifs can be found in WRKY promoters, a phenomenon which is not observed for the bZIP family. Thus, the two transcription factor families follow two different functional strategies in which WRKYs regulate each other’s transcription in a transcriptional network whereas bZIP action relies on intensive heterodimerization.

  18. The smoking behaviors of indigenous Taiwanese: individual and family/community factors of influence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsing-Wen; Chu, Nain-Feng; Chen, Hsing-Hsia; Yeh, Mei-Ling

    2014-03-01

    Smoking, a self-selected behavior, is the sixth leading cause of death worldwide. Factors related to smoking in Taiwan's indigenous Malayo-Polynesian population should be elicited and addressed. This study examined the relationship between smoking behavior and individual and family/community factors in indigenous Taiwanese. This study was a secondary analysis of data obtained from household visits in central Taiwan that included a population of 562 indigenous adults aged 20-50 years. Data were analyzed using the chi-square test and hierarchical logistic regression to determine individual and family/community relevant factors of smoking behaviors. The smoking rate in the population studied was 57.48% (39.15% men, 18.33% women). The odds ratio for smoking was markedly higher in men than in women. Smokers were 0.45 times more likely to have fixed sexual partners. The OR for smoking was 2.68 times in households with smokers and 7.03 times in people living in mountainous areas. The issue of smoking in indigenous Taiwanese deserves further attention and concern. Further interventions for the harmful effects of tobacco can focus on younger indigenous people living in mountain regions and on smokers' sexual partners. In addition, male adults, female adults, and heads of households should take a greater role in changing the smoking behaviors of smokers and their family members.

  19. Strengthening the systemic ties that bind: integrating common factors into marriage and family therapy curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karam, Eli A; Blow, Adrian J; Sprenkle, Douglas H; Davis, Sean D

    2015-04-01

    Specific models guide the training of marriage and family therapists (MFTs) as they offer both structure and organization for both therapists and clients. Learning models may also benefit therapists-in-training by instilling confidence and preventing atheoretical eclecticism. The moderate common factors perspective argues that models are essential, but should not be taught as "the absolute truth," given there is no evidence for relative efficacy of one empirically validated model versus another, and no single model works in all instances. The following article provides a blueprint for infusing a common factors perspective into MFT programmes by reviewing innovations in course design, outlining specific teaching strategies, and highlighting potential implementation challenges.

  20. Pigment Epithelium Derived Factor Peptide Protects Murine Hepatocytes from Carbon Tetrachloride-Induced Injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shou-Chuan Shih

    Full Text Available Fibrogenesis is induced by repeated injury to the liver and reactive regeneration and leads eventually to liver cirrhosis. Pigment epithelium derived factor (PEDF has been shown to prevent liver fibrosis induced by carbon tetrachloride (CCl4. A 44 amino acid domain of PEDF (44-mer was found to have a protective effect against various insults to several cell types. In this study, we investigated the capability of synthetic 44-mer to protect against liver injury in mice and in primary cultured hepatocytes. Acute liver injury, induced by CCl4, was evident from histological changes, such as cell necrosis, inflammation and apoptosis, and a concomitant reduction of glutathione (GSH and GSH redox enzyme activities in the liver. Intraperitoneal injection of the 44-mer into CCl4-treated mice abolished the induction of AST and ALT and markedly reduced histological signs of liver injury. The 44-mer treatment can reduce hepatic oxidative stress as evident from lower levels of lipid hydroperoxide, and higher levels of GSH. CCl4 caused a reduction of Bcl-xL, PEDF and PPARγ, which was markedly restored by the 44-mer treatment. Consequently, the 44-mer suppressed liver fibrosis induced by repeated CCl4 injury. Furthermore, our observations in primary culture of rat hepatocytes showed that PEDF and the 44-mer protected primary rat hepatocytes against apoptosis induced by serum deprivation and TGF-β1. PEDF/44-mer induced cell protective STAT3 phosphorylation. Pharmacological STAT3 inhibition prevented the antiapoptotic action of PEDF/44-mer. Among several PEDF receptor candidates that may be responsible for hepatocyte protection, we demonstrated that PNPLA2 was essential for PEDF/44-mer-mediated STAT3 phosphorylation and antiapoptotic activity by using siRNA to selectively knockdown PNPLA2. In conclusion, the PEDF 44-mer protects hepatocytes from single and repeated CCl4 injury. This protective effect may stem from strengthening the counter oxidative stress

  1. Family Engagement in Literacy Activities: Revised Factor Structure for the Familia--An Instrument Examining Family Support for Early Literacy Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhs, Eric S.; Welch, Greg; Burt, Jennifer; Knoche, Lisa

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated a data-set drawn using "The Familia"--a measure originally developed to evaluate shared-reading activities. A newly developed set of conceptual supports and a confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) were applied to a new factor structure/model. Data were drawn from 219 young children and their families (mean age = 43…

  2. Family Engagement in Literacy Activities: Revised Factor Structure for the Familia--An Instrument Examining Family Support for Early Literacy Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhs, Eric S.; Welch, Greg; Burt, Jennifer; Knoche, Lisa

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated a data-set drawn using "The Familia"--a measure originally developed to evaluate shared-reading activities. A newly developed set of conceptual supports and a confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) were applied to a new factor structure/model. Data were drawn from 219 young children and their families (mean age = 43 months)…

  3. Family Engagement in Literacy Activities: Revised Factor Structure for the Familia--An Instrument Examining Family Support for Early Literacy Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhs, Eric S.; Welch, Greg; Burt, Jennifer; Knoche, Lisa

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated a data-set drawn using "The Familia"--a measure originally developed to evaluate shared-reading activities. A newly developed set of conceptual supports and a confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) were applied to a new factor structure/model. Data were drawn from 219 young children and their families (mean age = 43…

  4. Nurses' views of factors affecting sleep for hospitalized children and their families: A focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stremler, Robyn; Adams, Sherri; Dryden-Palmer, Karen

    2015-08-01

    Light, noise, and interruptions from hospital staff lead to frequent awakenings and detrimental changes to sleep quantity and quality for children who are hospitalized and their parents who stay with them overnight. An understanding of nurses' views on how care affects sleep for the hospitalized child and parent is crucial to the development of strategies to decrease sleep disturbance in hospital. The purpose of this descriptive qualitative study was to gain an understanding of nurses' views on their role in and influence on sleep for families; perceived barriers and facilitators of patient and parent sleep at night; strategies nurses use to preserve sleep; the distribution, between parent and nurse, of care for the child at night; views of the parent as a recipient of nursing care at night; and the nature of interactions between nurses and families at night. Thirty registered nurses from general pediatric and critical care units participated in one of four semi-structured focus groups. Four main influences on sleep were identified: child factors; environmental factors; nurse-parent interaction factors; and nursing care factors. Some of these restricted nurses' ability to optimize sleep, but many factors were amenable to intervention. Balancing strategies to preserve sleep with the provision of nursing assessment and intervention was challenging and complicated by the difficult nature of work outside of usual waking hours. Nurses highlighted the need for formal policy and mentoring related to provision of nursing care at night in pediatric settings.

  5. MTHFR homozygous mutation and additional risk factors for cerebral infarction in a large Italian family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Balzo, Francesca; Spalice, Alberto; Perla, Massimo; Properzi, Enrico; Iannetti, Paola

    2009-01-01

    Several cases with cerebral infarctions associated with the C677T mutation in the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene (MTHFR) have been reported. Given the large number of asymptomatic individuals with the MTHFR mutation, additional risk factors for cerebral infarction should be considered. This study describes a large family with the MTHFR mutation and a combination of heterozygous factor V Leiden mutations and different additional exogenous and endogenous thrombogenic risk factors. Psychomotor retardation and a left fronto-insular infarct associated with the MTHFR mutation together with diminished factor VII and low level of protein C was documented in the first patient. In the second patient, generalized epilepsy and a malacic area in the right nucleus lenticularis was associated with the MTHFR mutation and a low level of protein C. In the third patient, right hemiparesis and a left fronto-temporal porencephalic cyst were documented, together with the MTHFR mutation and hyperhomocysteinemia. An extensive search of additional circumstantial and genetic thrombogenic risk factors should be useful for prophylaxis and prognosis of infants with cerebral infarctions associated with the MTHFR mutation and of their related family members.

  6. Role of the GATA family of transcription factors in endocrine development, function, and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viger, Robert S; Guittot, Séverine Mazaud; Anttonen, Mikko; Wilson, David B; Heikinheimo, Markku

    2008-04-01

    The WGATAR motif is a common nucleotide sequence found in the transcriptional regulatory regions of numerous genes. In vertebrates, these motifs are bound by one of six factors (GATA1 to GATA6) that constitute the GATA family of transcriptional regulatory proteins. Although originally considered for their roles in hematopoietic cells and the heart, GATA factors are now known to be expressed in a wide variety of tissues where they act as critical regulators of cell-specific gene expression. This includes multiple endocrine organs such as the pituitary, pancreas, adrenals, and especially the gonads. Insights into the functional roles played by GATA factors in adult organ systems have been hampered by the early embryonic lethality associated with the different Gata-null mice. This is now being overcome with the generation of tissue-specific knockout models and other knockdown strategies. These approaches, together with the increasing number of human GATA-related pathologies have greatly broadened the scope of GATA-dependent genes and, importantly, have shown that GATA action is not necessarily limited to early development. This has been particularly evident in endocrine organs where GATA factors appear to contribute to the transcription of multiple hormone-encoding genes. This review provides an overview of the GATA family of transcription factors as they relate to endocrine function and disease.

  7. PEGylated PLGA Nanoparticles as Tumor Ecrosis Factor-α Receptor Blocking Peptide Carriers: Preparation,Characterization and Release in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Wei; YANG Anshu; LI Zhuoya; XU Huibi; YANG Xiangliang

    2007-01-01

    To assess the merits of PEGylated poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PEG-PLGA) nanoparticles as drug carriers for tumor necrosis factor-α receptor blocking peptide (TNFR-BP), PEG-PLGA copolymer,which could be used to prepare the stealth nanoparticles, was synthesized with methoxypolyethyleneglycol,DL-lactide and glycolide. The structure of PEG-PLGA was confirmed with 1H-NMR and FT-IR spectroscopy,and the molecular weight (MW) was determined by gel permeation chromatography. Fluorescent FITC-TNFR-BP was chosen as model protein and encapsulated within PEG-PLGA nanoparticles using the double emulsion method. Atomic force microscopy and photon correlation spectroscopy were employed to characterize the stealth nanoparticles fabricated for morphology, size with polydispersity index and zeta potential. Encapsulation efficiency (EE) and the release of FITC-TNFR-BP in nanoparticles in vitro were measured by the fluorescence measurement. The stealth nanoparticles were found to have the mean diameter less than 270 nm and zeta potential less than-20 mV. In all nanoparticle formulations, more than 45% of EE were obtained. FITC-TNFR-BP release from the PEG-PLGA nanoparticles exhibited a biphasic pattern, initial burst release and consequently sustained release. The experimental results show that PEG-PLGA nanoparticles possess the potential to develop as drug carriers for controlled release applications of TNFR-BP.

  8. The hemK gene in Escherichia coli encodes the N5-glutamine methyltransferase that modifies peptide release factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heurgué-Hamard, Valérie; Champ, Stéphanie; Engström, Åke; Ehrenberg, Måns; Buckingham, Richard H.

    2002-01-01

    Class 1 peptide release factors (RFs) in Escherichia coli are N5-methylated on the glutamine residue of the universally conserved GGQ motif. One other protein alone has been shown to contain N5-methylglutamine: E.coli ribosomal protein L3. We identify the L3 methyltransferase as YfcB and show that it methylates ribosomes from a yfcB strain in vitro, but not RF1 or RF2. HemK, a close orthologue of YfcB, is shown to methylate RF1 and RF2 in vitro. hemK is immediately downstream of and co-expressed with prfA. Its deletion in E.coli K12 leads to very poor growth on rich media and abolishes methylation of RF1. The activity of unmethylated RF2 from K12 strains is extremely low due to the cumulative effects of threonine at position 246, in place of alanine or serine present in all other bacterial RFs, and the lack of N5-methylation of Gln252. Fast-growing spontaneous revertants in hemK K12 strains contain the mutations Thr246Ala or Thr246Ser in RF2. HemK and YfcB are the first identified methyltransferases modifying glutamine, and are widely distributed in nature. PMID:11847124

  9. Interaction structure of the complex between neuroprotective factor humanin and Alzheimer's β-amyloid peptide revealed by affinity mass spectrometry and molecular modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maftei, Madalina; Tian, Xiaodan; Manea, Marilena; Exner, Thomas E; Schwanzar, Daniel; von Arnim, Christine A F; Przybylski, Michael

    2012-06-01

    Humanin (HN) is a linear 24-aa peptide recently detected in human Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain. HN specifically inhibits neuronal cell death in vitro induced by ß-amyloid (Aß) peptides and by amyloid precursor protein and its gene mutations in familial AD, thereby representing a potential therapeutic lead structure for AD; however, its molecular mechanism of action is not well understood. We report here the identification of the binding epitopes between HN and Aß(1-40) and characterization of the interaction structure through a molecular modeling study. Wild-type HN and HN-sequence mutations were synthesized by SPPS and the HPLC-purified peptides characterized by MALDI-MS. The interaction epitopes between HN and Aß(1-40) were identified by affinity-MS using proteolytic epitope excision and extraction, followed by elution and mass spectrometric characterization of the affinity-bound peptides. The affinity-MS analyses revealed HN(5-15) as the epitope sequence of HN, whereas Aß(17-28) was identified as the Aß interaction epitope. The epitopes and binding sites were ascertained by ELISA of the complex of HN peptides with immobilized Aß(1-40) and by ELISA with Aß(1-40) and Aß-partial sequences as ligands to immobilized HN. The specificity and affinity of the HN-Aß interaction were characterized by direct ESI-MS of the HN-Aß(1-40) complex and by bioaffinity analysis using a surface acoustic wave biosensor, providing a K(D) of the complex of 610 nm. A molecular dynamics simulation of the HN-Aß(1-40) complex was consistent with the binding specificity and shielding effects of the HN and Aß interaction epitopes. These results indicate a specific strong association of HN and Aß(1-40) polypeptide and provide a molecular basis for understanding the neuroprotective function of HN.

  10. THE FAMILY AS A FACTOR IN THE INTEGRAL DEVELOPMENT OF PRESCHOOL CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radovan Čokorilo

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Starting from the idea of organic unity between mind and body, the interdependence of organism and environment, and the contribution of physical activity, social, emotional and physiological development today is more correct to speak of "education through the physical" than the "physical education". According to this understanding of physical education is turning into a rich activity that not only develop muscles and coordination of movements, but as a whole person - physical education is becoming the backbone of global development. On the other hand, the family is an important factor in physical education because it formed the first paragraph and the first knowledge of the importance and value of physical education. Here is a very important role of parents as well as socio-economic status of families and family circumstances which manifests as a braking or promotion of child development. It is known that children from families that have a negative attitude towards sport and physical culture in general, are usually not involved in any sport or recreational activity. Many parents do not realize the importance of physical education and physical activity for proper development of the child or at least not sufficiently aware of that importance. Therefore they are very poorly or not at all interested in the results that their children achieve in sport and physical education has a negative effect on their further development. The paper analyzes the external factors of physical development and motor skills, especially the influence of family circumstances. The aim of this paper is that analysis of previous research in this field point out the good results and pedagogical implications of established knowledge but also to the synthesis of these findings point to possible practical solutions to defined problems.

  11. Evolution of the insulin-like growth factor binding protein (IGFBP) family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daza, Daniel Ocampo; Sundström, Görel; Bergqvist, Christina A; Duan, Cunming; Larhammar, Dan

    2011-06-01

    The evolution of the IGF binding protein (IGFBP) gene family has been difficult to resolve. Both chromosomal and serial duplications have been suggested as mechanisms for the expansion of this gene family. We have identified and annotated IGFBP sequences from a wide selection of vertebrate species as well as Branchiostoma floridae and Ciona intestinalis. By combining detailed sequence analysis with sequence-based phylogenies and chromosome information, we arrive at the following scenario: the ancestral chordate IGFBP gene underwent a local gene duplication, resulting in a gene pair adjacent to a HOX cluster. Subsequently, the gene family expanded in the two basal vertebrate tetraploidization (2R) resulting in the six IGFBP types that are presently found in placental mammals. The teleost fish ancestor underwent a third tetraploidization (3R) that further expanded the IGFBP repertoire. The five sequenced teleost fish genomes retain 9-11 of IGFBP genes. This scenario is supported by the phylogenies of three adjacent gene families in the HOX gene regions, namely the epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFR) and the Ikaros and distal-less (DLX) transcription factors. Our sequence comparisons show that several important structural components in the IGFBPs are ancestral vertebrate features that have been maintained in all orthologs, for instance the integrin interaction motif Arg-Gly-Asp in IGFBP-2. In contrast, the Arg-Gly-Asp motif in IGFBP-1 has arisen independently in mammals. The large degree of retention of IGFBP genes after the ancient expansion of the gene family strongly suggests that each gene evolved distinct and important functions early in vertebrate evolution.

  12. Myosin II directly binds and inhibits Dbl family guanine nucleotide exchange factors: a possible link to Rho family GTPases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chan-Soo; Choi, Chang-Ki; Shin, Eun-Young; Schwartz, Martin Alexander; Kim, Eung-Gook

    2010-08-23

    Cell migration requires the coordinated spatiotemporal regulation of actomyosin contraction and cell protrusion/adhesion. Nonmuscle myosin II (MII) controls Rac1 and Cdc42 activation, and cell protrusion and focal complex formation in migrating cells. However, these mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we show that MII interacts specifically with multiple Dbl family guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs). Binding is mediated by the conserved tandem Dbl homology-pleckstrin homology module, the catalytic site of these GEFs, with dissociation constants of approximately 0.3 microM. Binding to the GEFs required assembly of the MII into filaments and actin-stimulated ATPase activity. Binding of MII suppressed GEF activity. Accordingly, inhibition of MII ATPase activity caused release of GEFs and activation of Rho GTPases. Depletion of betaPIX GEF in migrating NIH3T3 fibroblasts suppressed lamellipodial protrusions and focal complex formation induced by MII inhibition. The results elucidate a functional link between MII and Rac1/Cdc42 GTPases, which may regulate protrusion/adhesion dynamics in migrating cells.

  13. Phage Display Screening for Tumor Necrosis Factor-α-Binding Peptides: Detection of Inflammation in a Mouse Model of Hepatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coralie Sclavons

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available TNF-α is one of the most abundant cytokines produced in many inflammatory and autoimmune conditions such as multiple sclerosis, chronic hepatitis C, or neurodegenerative diseases. These pathologies remain difficult to diagnose and consequently difficult to treat. The aim of this work is to offer a new diagnostic tool by seeking new molecular probes for medical imaging. The target-specific part of the probe consists here of heptameric peptides selected by the phage display technology for their affinity for TNF-α. Several affinity tests allowed isolating 2 peptides that showed the best binding capacity to TNF-α. Finally, the best peptide was synthesized in both linear and cyclic forms and tested on the histological sections of concanavalin-A-(ConA-treated mice liver. In this well-known hepatitis mouse model, the best results were obtained with the cyclic form of peptide 2, which allowed for the staining of inflamed areas in the liver. The cyclic form of peptide 2 (2C was, thus, covalently linked to iron oxide nanoparticles (magnetic resonance imaging (MRI contrast agent and tested in the ConA-induced hepatitis mouse model. The vectorized nanoparticles allowed for the detection of inflammation as well as of the free peptide. These ex vivo results suggest that phage display-selected peptides can direct imaging contrast agents to inflammatory areas.

  14. Isolation and structure of a novel charged member of the red-pigment-concentrating hormone-adipokinetic hormone family of peptides isolated from the corpora cardiaca of the blowfly Phormia terraenovae (Diptera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gäde, G; Wilps, H; Kellner, R

    1990-01-01

    A hypertrehalosaemic neuropeptide from the corpora cardiaca of the blowfly Phormia terraenovae has been isolated by reversed-phase h.p.l.c., and its primary structure was determined by pulsed-liquid phase sequencing employing Edman chemistry after enzymically deblocking the N-terminal pyroglutamate residue. The C-terminus was also blocked, as indicated by the lack of digestion when the peptide was incubated with carboxypeptidase A. The octapeptide has the sequence pGlu-Leu-Thr-Phe-Ser-Pro-Asp-Trp-NH2 and is clearly defined as a novel member of the RPCH/AKH (red-pigment-concentrating hormone/adipokinetic hormone) family of peptides. It is the first charged member of this family to be found. The synthetic peptide causes an increase in the haemolymph carbohydrate concentration in a dose-dependent fashion in blowflies and therefore is named 'Phormia terraenovae hypertrehalosaemic hormone' (Pht-HrTH). In addition, receptors in the fat-body of the American cockroach (Periplaneta americana) recognize the peptide, resulting in carbohydrate elevation in the blood. However, fat-body receptors of the migratory locust (Locusta migratoria) do not recognize this charged molecule, and thus no lipid mobilization is observed in this species. PMID:2386478

  15. Acculturation, Behavioral Factors, and Family History of Breast Cancer among Mexican and Mexican-American Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nodora, Jesse N; Cooper, Renee; Talavera, Gregory A; Gallo, Linda; Meza Montenegro, María Mercedes; Komenaka, Ian; Natarajan, Loki; Gutiérrez Millán, Luis Enrique; Daneri-Navarro, Adrian; Bondy, Melissa; Brewster, Abenaa; Thompson, Patricia; Martinez, María Elena

    2015-01-01

    Incidence rates for breast cancer are higher among Mexican-American (MA) women in the United States than women living in Mexico. Studies have shown higher prevalence of breast cancer risk factors in more acculturated than less acculturated Hispanic/Latinas in the United States. We compared the prevalence of behavioral risk factors and family history of breast cancer by level of acculturation and country of residence in women of Mexican descent. Data were collected from 1,201 newly diagnosed breast cancer patients living in Mexico (n = 581) and MAs in the United States (n = 620). MA participants were categorized into three acculturation groups (Spanish dominant, bilingual, and English dominant); women living in Mexico were used as the referent group. The prevalence of behavioral risk factors and family history of breast cancer were assessed according to acculturation level, adjusting for age at diagnosis and education. In the adjusted models, bilingual and English-dominant MAs were significantly more likely to have a body mass index of 30 kg/m(2) or greater, consume more than one alcoholic beverage a week, and report having a family history of breast cancer than women living in Mexico. All three U.S. acculturation groups were significantly more likely to have lower total energy expenditure (≤533 kcal/d) than women in Mexico. English-dominant women were significantly less likely to ever smoke cigarettes than the Mexican group. Our findings add to the limited scientific literature on the relationships among acculturation, health behavior, and family history of breast cancer in Mexican and MA women. Copyright © 2015 Jacobs Institute of Women's Health. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Comparing the second-order factor structure of the Family Environment Scale across husbands' and wives' perceptions of their family environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chipuer, H M; Villegas, T

    2001-01-01

    The Family Environment Scale (Moos & Moos, 1986) is one of the most widely used environmental measures in clinical and family research. Clinicians and researchers often use the FES for comparing spouses' perceptions of their family environment, under the assumption that the underlying structure of the FES is the same for husbands and wives. However, no studies have actually compared the structure of the FES across spouse responses to the FES. Additionally, a review of the literature generally suggests a lack of consensus regarding the factor structure of the FES. Using confirmatory factor analyses, we examined whether the second-order factor structures of the FES, as identified in the literature, were consistent across spouses' perceptions of their family environment. Husbands and wives in 130 nonclinical families responded to Form R of the FES. The findings supported the two-factor solution presented by Fowler (1981) and by Boake and Salmon (1983), and did not differ across responses by husbands and wives. In contrast, responses by husbands and wives to the FES could not be modeled using the three-factor solutions presented by Moos and Moos (1986) and by others. The importance of using a measure that is structurally the same across different groups of respondents is discussed.

  17. Family and personal protective factors moderate the effects of adversity and negative disposition on smoking among Chinese adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arpawong, Thalida Em; Sun, Ping; Chang, Megan Chia-Chen; Gallaher, Peggy; Pang, Zengchang; Guo, Qian; Johnson, C Anderson; Unger, Jennifer

    2010-07-01

    Tobacco use among Chinese adolescents is increasing at approximately 80,000 new smokers per day. Assessing the causes for initiating tobacco use in China will be important in developing effective interventions and policies to stem rising prevalence rates. This study tested predictors of Resilience Theory in a sample of 602 Chinese adolescents. Results revealed that prior adversity, measured through school and family-related events, was significantly associated with increased smoking in females. Family factors (i.e., family cohesion, family adaptability, parental monitoring) and one personal factor (i.e., academic score) were associated with lower odds for smoking due to prior adversity and negative disposition.

  18. Factors Impacting Transgender Patients' Discomfort with Their Family Physicians: A Respondent-Driven Sampling Survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greta R Bauer

    Full Text Available Representing approximately 0.5% of the population, transgender (trans persons in Canada depend on family physicians for both general and transition-related care. However, physicians receive little to no training on this patient population, and trans patients are often profoundly uncomfortable and may avoid health care. This study examined factors associated with patient discomfort discussing trans health issues with a family physician in Ontario, Canada.433 trans people age 16 and over were surveyed using respondent-driven sampling for the Trans PULSE Project; 356 had a family physician. Weighted logistic regression models were fit to produce prevalence risk ratios (PRRs via average marginal predictions, for transmasculine (n = 184 and transfeminine (n = 172 trans persons.Among the 83.1% (95% CI = 77.4, 88.9 of trans Ontarians who had a family physician, approximately half reported discomfort discussing trans health issues. 37.2% of transmasculine and 38.1% of transfeminine persons reported at least one trans-specific negative experience. In unadjusted analysis, sociodemographics did not predict discomfort, but those who planned to medically transition sex, but had not begun, were more likely to report discomfort (transmasculine: PRR = 2.62 (95% CI = 1.44, 4.77; transfeminine: PRR = 1.85 (95% CI = 1.08, 3.15. Adjusted for other factors, greater perceived physician knowledge about trans issues was associated with reduced likelihood of discomfort, and previous trans-specific negative experiences with a family physician with increased discomfort. Transfeminine persons who reported three or more types of negative experiences were 2.26 times as likely, and transmasculine persons 1.61 times as likely, to report discomfort. In adjusted analyses, sociodemographic associations differed by gender, with being previously married or having higher education associated with increased risk of discomfort among transfeminine persons, but decreased risk among

  19. Family environmental factors influencing the developing behavioral controls of food intake and childhood overweight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birch, L L; Davison, K K

    2001-08-01

    Although a large body of research has assessed direct genetic links between parent and child weight status, relatively little research has assessed the extent to which parents (particularly parents who are overweight) select environments that promote overweight among their children. Parents provide food environments for their children's early experiences with food and eating. These family eating environments include parents' own eating behaviors and child-feeding practices. Results of the limited research on behavioral mediators of familial patterns of overweight indicate that parents' own eating behaviors and their parenting practices influence the development of children's eating behaviors, mediating familial patterns of overweight. In particular, parents who are overweight, who have problems controlling their own food intake, or who are concerned about their children's risk for overweight may adopt controlling child-feeding practices in an attempt to prevent overweight in their children. Unfortunately, research reveals that these parental control attempts may interact with genetic predispositions to promote the development of problematic eating styles and childhood overweight. Although the authors have argued that behavioral mediators of family resemblances in weight status, such as parents' disinhibited or binge eating and parenting practices are shaped largely by environmental factors, individual differences in these behaviors also have genetic bases. A primary public health goal should be the development of family-based prevention programs for childhood overweight. The findings reviewed here suggest that effective prevention programs must focus on providing anticipatory guidance on parenting to foster patterns of preference and food selection in children more consistent with healthy diets and promote children's ability to self-regulate intake. Guidance for parents should include information on how children develop patterns of food intake in the family context

  20. GATA family of transcription factors of vertebrates: phylogenetics and chromosomal synteny

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Chunjiang He; Hanhua Cheng; Rongjia Zhou

    2007-12-01

    GATA genes are an evolutionarily conserved family, which encode a group of important transcription factors involved in the regulation of diverse processes including the development of the heart, haematopoietic system and sex gonads. However, the evolutionary history of the GATA family has not been completely understood. We constructed a complete phylogenetic tree with functional domain information of the GATA genes of both vertebrates and several invertebrates, and mapped the GATA genes onto relevant chromosomes. Conserved synteny was observed around the GATA loci on the chromosomes. GATAs have a tendency to segregate onto different chromosomes during evolution. The phylogenetic tree is consistent with the relevant functions of GATA members. Analysis of the zinc finger domain showed that the domain tends to be duplicated during evolution from invertebrates to vertebrates. We propose that the balance between duplications of zinc finger domains and GATA members should be maintained to exert their physiological roles in each evolutionary stage. Therefore, evolutionary pressure on the GATAs must exist to maintain the balance during evolution from invertebrates to vertebrates. These results reveal the evolutionary characteristics of the GATA family and contribute to a better understanding of the relationship between evolution and biological functions of the gene family, which will help to uncover the GATAs’ biological roles, evolution and their relationship with associated diseases.

  1. Genetic selection of peptide aptamers that interact and inhibit both Small protein B and alternative ribosome-rescue factor A of Aeromonas veronii C4

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    Peng Liu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Aeromonas veronii is a pathogenic gram-negative bacterium, which infects a variety of animals and results in mass mortality. The stalled-ribosome rescues are reported to ensure viability and virulence under stress conditions, of which primarily include trans-translation and alternative ribosome-rescue factor A (ArfA in A. veronii. For identification of specific peptides that interact and inhibit the stalled-ribosome rescues, peptide aptamer library (pTRG-SN-peptides was constructed using pTRG as vector and Staphylococcus aureus nuclease (SN as scaffold protein, in which 16 random amino acids were introduced to form an exposed surface loop. In the meantime both Small Protein B (SmpB which acts as one of the key components in trans-translation, and alternative ribosome-rescue factor A (ArfA were inserted to pBT to constitute pBT-SmpB and pBT-ArfA, respectively. The peptide aptamer PA-2 was selected from pTRG-SN-peptides by bacterial two-hybrid system (B2H employing pBT-SmpB or pBT-ArfA as baits. The conserved sites G133K134 and D138K139R140 of C-terminal SmpB were identified by interacting with N-terminal SN, and concurrently the residue K62 of ArfA was recognized by interacting with the surface loop of the specific peptide aptamer PA-2. The expression plasmids pN-SN or pN-PA-2, which combined the duplication origin of pRE112 with the neokanamycin promoter expressing SN or PA-2, were created and transformed into A. veronii C4, separately. The engineered A. veronii C4 which endowing SN or PA-2 expression impaired growth capabilities under stress conditions including temperatures, sucrose, glucose, potassium chloride (KCl and antibiotics, and the stress-related genes rpoS and nhaP were down-regulated significantly by Quantitative Real-time PCR (qRT-PCR when treating in 2.0% KCl. Thus,the engineered A. veronii C4 conferring PA-2 expression might be potentially attenuated vaccine, and also the peptide aptamer PA-2 could develop as anti

  2. Genome-wide identification, classification and analysis of heat shock transcription factor family in maize

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    Zhu Su-Wen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Heat shock response in eukaryotes is transcriptionally regulated by conserved heat shock transcription factors (Hsfs. Hsf genes are represented by a large multigene family in plants and investigation of the Hsf gene family will serve to elucidate the mechanisms by which plants respond to stress. In recent years, reports of genome-wide structural and evolutionary analysis of the entire Hsf gene family have been generated in two model plant systems, Arabidopsis and rice. Maize, an important cereal crop, has represented a model plant for genetics and evolutionary research. Although some Hsf genes have been characterized in maize, analysis of the entire Hsf gene family were not completed following Maize (B73 Genome Sequencing Project. Results A genome-wide analysis was carried out in the present study to identify all Hsfs maize genes. Due to the availability of complete maize genome sequences, 25 nonredundant Hsf genes, named ZmHsfs were identified. Chromosomal location, protein domain and motif organization of ZmHsfs were analyzed in maize genome. The phylogenetic relationships, gene duplications and expression profiles of ZmHsf genes were also presented in this study. Twenty-five ZmHsfs were classified into three major classes (class A, B, and C according to their structural characteristics and phylogenetic comparisons, and class A was further subdivided into 10 subclasses. Moreover, phylogenetic analysis indicated that the orthologs from the three species (maize, Arabidopsis and rice were distributed in all three classes, it also revealed diverse Hsf gene family expression patterns in classes and subclasses. Chromosomal/segmental duplications played a key role in Hsf gene family expansion in maize by investigation of gene duplication events. Furthermore, the transcripts of 25 ZmHsf genes were detected in the leaves by heat shock using quantitative real-time PCR. The result demonstrated that ZmHsf genes exhibit different

  3. The Association between Family and Parental Factors and Obesity among Children in Nanchang, China

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    Peng Zhang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: With rapid economic development in China, traditional patterns of health behaviors are changing, concurrent with a rise in childhood obesity. While the home environment and parenting behaviors are modifiable factors that could be targeted for intervention, little is known about their relationship with children’s health behaviors. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between obesity and home and parenting factors in Chinese children. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted in Nanchang, China in 2013 with caregivers (N = 470 of a child between the ages of 2-10 years. Regression analyses were conducted to determine risk factors for childhood obesity. Results: Obesity prevalence (21.7% did not differ by demographic variables. Eight physical activity, nutrition, and sedentary variables had significant relationships to obesity status. Logistic regression analysis revealed three significant predictors of obesity: the number of days the family eats meals together (odds ratio = 0.84, 95% CI 0.73-0.96 and parental home computer use time (odds ratio = 0.83, 95% CI 0.72-0.96 were related to lower levels of obesity, while parental television time (odds ratio = 1.25 95% CI 1.07-1.47 was related to higher levels of obesity. Conclusions: The prevalence of obesity among children is high in Nanchang. Family and environmental risk factors are significantly related to obesity.

  4. hypoxia-inducible factors activate CD133 promoter through ETS family transcription factors.

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    Shunsuke Ohnishi

    Full Text Available CD133 is a cellular surface protein that has been reported to be a cancer stem cell marker, and thus it is considered to be a potential target for cancer treatment. However, the mechanism regulating CD133 expression is not yet understood. In this study, we analyzed the activity of five putative promoters (P1-P5 of CD133 in human embryonic kidney (HEK 293 cells and colon cancer cell line WiDr, and found that the activity of promoters, particularly of P5, is elevated by overexpression of hypoxia-inducible factors (HIF-1α and HIF-2α. Deletion and mutation analysis identified one of the two E-twenty six (ETS binding sites (EBSs in the P5 region as being essential for its promoter activity induced by HIF-1α and HIF-2α. In addition, a chromatin imunoprecipitation assay demonstrated that HIF-1α and HIF-2α bind to the proximal P5 promoter at the EBSs. The immunoprecipitation assay showed that HIF-1α physically interacts with Elk1; however, HIF-2α did not bind to Elk1 or ETS1. Furthermore, knockdown of both HIF-1α and HIF-2α resulted in a reduction of CD133 expression in WiDr. Taken together, our results revealed that HIF-1α and HIF-2α activate CD133 promoter through ETS proteins.

  5. Family history, comorbidity, smoking and other risk factors in microscopic colitis: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickbom, Anna; Nyhlin, Nils; Montgomery, Scott M; Bohr, Johan; Tysk, Curt

    2017-05-01

    Data on heredity, risk factors and comorbidity in microscopic colitis, encompassing collagenous colitis (CC) and lymphocytic colitis (LC), are limited. The aim was to carry out a case-control study of family history, childhood circumstances, educational level, marital status, smoking and comorbidity in microscopic colitis. A postal questionnaire was sent in 2008-2009 to microscopic colitis patients resident in Sweden and three population-based controls per patient, matched for age, sex and municipality. Some 212 patients and 627 controls participated in the study. There was an association with a family history of microscopic colitis in both CC [odds ratio (OR): 10.3; 95% confidence interval (CI): 2.1-50.4, P=0.004] and LC (OR not estimated, P=0.008). Current smoking was associated with CC [OR: 4.7; 95% CI: 2.4-9.2, Pmicroscopic colitis indicates that familial factors may be important. The association with a history of UC should be studied further as it may present new insights into the pathogenesis of microscopic colitis and UC.

  6. Mediterranean diet and familial dysmetabolism as factors influencing the development of acne.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skroza, Nevena; Tolino, Ersilia; Semyonov, Leda; Proietti, Ilaria; Bernardini, Nicoletta; Nicolucci, Francesca; La Viola, Giorgio; Del Prete, Giuseppe; Saulle, Rosella; Potenza, Concetta; La Torre, Giuseppe

    2012-07-01

    To investigate the effects of adherence to the Mediterranean diet and familial dysmetabolisms on acne development. A community-based case-control study was carried out in Italy enrolling cases as acneic outpatients of a dermatological ambulatory service and controls as clinically healthy acne-free subjects. Food consumption were evaluated with a validated food-frequency questionnaire, exploring the consumption of pasta, meat, cheese, fish, fruit, vegetables, and olive oil. Adherence to the traditional Mediterranean diet was assessed by a 10-point Mediterranean diet scale that incorporated the main characteristics of this diet. A logistic regression analysis estimated the variables who predicted the odds of being case, using those variables that at the univariate analysis yielded a p-value diet score ≥6 revealed a protective effect towards acne (crude OR 0.22, 95% CI 0.08-0.64). Logistic regression analysis showed that familial hypercholesterolaemia, diabetes, and hypertension are strong risk factors for acne (AOR 8.79, 95% CI 1.67-46.22; 3.32, 95% CI 1.27-8.63; and 2.73, 95% CI 1.07-6.96, respectively), while the Mediterranean diet represents a protective factor (score ≥6, AOR 0.31, 95% CI 0.11-0.89). The odds for familial dysmetabolisms was higher in cases than in controls, confirming their role in determining or maintaining acne. Moreover, this is the first study demonstrating a protective role of the Mediterranean diet in the pathogenesis of acne.

  7. FAMILY AND SOCIO-DEMOGRAPHIC RISK FACTORS FOR PSYCHOPATHY AMONG PRISON INMATES

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    Juan A. Valdivia

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available A field study was conducted with prison inmates to explore to what extent family and socio-demographic characteristics represent risk factors for psychopathy and delinquent behavior. A psychopathy scale derived from Hare’s Revised Psychopathy Checklist and an instrument containing questions related to family and socio-demographic characteristics were administered to 178 prison inmates. The psychopathy scale’s reliability (α = .92 and construct validity were established. A confirmatory factor analysis provided support for a model showing a negative association between psychopathy and age at which the person stopped living with his family of origin, age of first incarceration, severity of delinquent acts, length of prison sentence, and length of time spent in prison. (χ2/df = 1.40, FD = 1.34, PNI = 0.38, RMSEA =.04, IFI = .94, CFI = .94 and TLI = .93. Furthermore, the model sustained a positive association of psychopathy with income and frequency of incarceration. Level of education and age were eliminated from the model given that no significant associations were found among these variables and psychopathy. The validation of this model enables to interpret research findings in relation with attachment theory.

  8. Families, nurses and organisations contributing factors to medication administration error in paediatrics: a literature review

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    Albara Alomari

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Medication error is the most common adverse event for hospitalised children and can lead to significant harm. Despite decades of research and implementation of a number of initiatives, the error rates continue to rise, particularly those associated with administration. Objectives: The objective of this literature review is to explore the factors involving nurses, families and healthcare systems that impact on medication administration errors in paediatric patients. Design: A review was undertaken of studies that reported on factors that contribute to a rise or fall in medication administration errors, from family, nurse and organisational perspectives. The following databases were searched: Medline, Embase, CINAHL and the Cochrane library. The title, abstract and full article were reviewed for relevance. Articles were excluded if they were not research studies, they related to medications and not medication administration errors or they referred to medical errors rather than medication errors. Results: A total of 15 studies met the inclusion criteria. The factors contributing to medication administration errors are communication failure between the parents and healthcare professionals, nurse workload, failure to adhere to policy and guidelines, interruptions, inexperience and insufficient nurse education from organisations. Strategies that were reported to reduce errors were doublechecking by two nurses, implementing educational sessions, use of computerised prescribing and barcoding administration systems. Yet despite such interventions, errors persist. The review highlighted families that have a central role in caring for the child and therefore are key to the administration process, but have largely been ignored in research studies relating to medication administration. Conclusions: While there is a consensus about the factors that contribute to errors, sustainable and effective solutions remain elusive. To date, families have not

  9. [Relations between aggressive behavior and family factors among preschool children in Shanghai].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Shou-mei; Wang, Ling; Shi, Ying-juan; Li, Ping

    2011-12-01

    To describe the prevalence of aggressive behavior among preschool children and its related family factors. 1234 preschool children in ten kindergartens were rated on their aggressive behavior by their parents, using Child Behavior Checklist (CBCI), Parent Behavior Inventory (PBI) and a general questionnaire. The overall prevalence of aggressive behavior among preschool children was 12.9% (95%CI: 11.0 - 15.0) according to the CBCL assessment, with the rate being slight higher (13.7%, 93/680) in boys than in girls (11.9%, 66/554). Data from logistic regression analysis showed that parents' hostile/coercive parenting style (OR = 2.396, 95%CI: 1.636 - 3.510) and inconsistent parenting attitude between parents and grandparents (OR = 1.867, 95%CI: 1.287 - 2.710) would lead to more aggressive behaviors in preschool children. Compared with children without difficulty in falling asleep, those who often (OR = 3.415, 95%CI: 1.901 - 6.135) or sometimes (OR = 2.147, 95%CI: 1.256 - 3.671) had problem falling asleep at night had more aggressive behaviors. On the other hand, factors as: watching TV less than 1 hour each day (OR = 0.252, 95%CI: 0.136 - 0.467), father in older age (OR = 0.703, 95%CI: 0.503 - 0.983) and participating in regular outdoor activities (OR = 0.617, 95%CI: 0.399 - 0.955) were protective factors to the aggressive behaviors of the children. The prevalence of aggressive behavior in preschool children was high which called for more attention. Intervention programs targeting the family should consider the influencing factors as ways of parenting, consistent attitude on parenting in the family etc. to reduce the occurrence of aggressive behavior among preschool children.

  10. Homicide in the western family and background factors of a perpetrator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aho, Anna Liisa; Remahl, Anni; Paavilainen, Eija

    2017-07-01

    Familicide is a multiple-victim homicide incident in which the killer's spouse and one or more children are slain. A systematic review was conducted to reveal the background factors of western homicide perpetrators. The systematic search was performed in the Arto, Medic, Cinahl, Medline, EBSCOhost Academic Search Premier and Social Services abstracts databases. The keywords were familicide, family homicide, familicide-suicide, filicide-suicide, extended suicide, child, murder, family, filicide and infanticide. The searches revealed 4139 references from the databases. The references were filtered and 32 peer-reviewed research articles revealed in years 2004-2014 were selected as data. The articles were analysed using inductive content analysis, by finding all possible background factors related to homicide. The factors were described as percentages of the range. The background factors of familicide perpetrators were categorised as follows: perpetrators who had committed homicide of a child and intimate partner and possibly committed suicide; a father had who killed a child; a mother who had killed a child; a father who had committed a filicide-suicide; and a mother who had committed a filicide-suicide. Psychological instability, violence and crime were found in all these categories of familicides. Perpetrators who had committed a suicide in addition to the familicide had more often been diagnosed with depression, but they sought treatment for mental health problems less often and had violence and self-destructiveness less often in their background than in other familicide categories. Social and healthcare professionals should be more sensitive to emerging family problems and be prepared for intervention.

  11. Invisible and Visible Language Planning: Ideological Factors in the Family Language Policy of Chinese Immigrant Families in Quebec

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curdt-Christiansen, Xiao Lan

    2009-01-01

    This ethnographic inquiry examines how family languages policies are planned and developed in ten Chinese immigrant families in Quebec, Canada, with regard to their children's language and literacy education in three languages, Chinese, English, and French. The focus is on how multilingualism is perceived and valued, and how these three languages…

  12. Family history, surgery, and APC mutation are risk factors for desmoid tumors in familial adenomatous polyposis: an international cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nieuwenhuis, Marry H; Lefevre, Jérémie H; Bülow, Steffen

    2011-01-01

    Ability to identify patients with familial adenomatous polyposis who have a high risk of developing desmoid tumors may affect decisions in clinical practice.......Ability to identify patients with familial adenomatous polyposis who have a high risk of developing desmoid tumors may affect decisions in clinical practice....

  13. Peptide affinity analysis of proteins that bind to an unstructured region containing the transactivating domain of the osmoprotective transcription factor NFAT5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuMond, Jenna F; Zhang, Xue; Izumi, Yuichiro; Ramkissoon, Kevin; Wang, Guanghui; Gucek, Marjan; Wang, Xujing; Burg, Maurice B; Ferraris, Joan D

    2016-10-07

    NFAT5 is a transcription factor originally identified because it is activated by hypertonicity and that activation increases expression of genes that protect against the adverse effects of the hypertonicity. However, its targets also include genes not obviously related to tonicity. The transactivating domain of NFAT5 is contained in its c-terminal region, which is predicted to be unstructured. Unstructured regions are common in transcription factors particularly in transactivating domains where they can bind co-regulatory proteins essential to their function. To identify potential binding partners of NFAT5 from either cytoplasmic or nuclear HEK293 cell extracts, we used peptide affinity chromatography followed by mass spectrometry. Peptide aptamer-baits consisted of overlapping 20 amino acid peptides within the predicted c-terminal unstructured region of NFAT5. We identify a total of 351 unique protein preys that associate with at least one c-terminal peptide bait from NFAT5 in either cytoplasmic or nuclear extracts from cells incubated at various tonicities (NaCl varied). In addition to finding many proteins already known to associate with NFAT5, we found many new ones whose function suggest novel aspects of NFAT5 regulation, interaction and function. Relatively few of the proteins pulled down by peptide baits from NFAT5 are generally involved in transcription and most, therefore, are likely to be specifically related to the regulation of NFAT5 or its function. The novel associated proteins are involved with cancer, effects of hypertonicity on chromatin, development, splicing of mRNA, transcription and vesicle trafficking. Copyright © 2016, Physiological Genomics.

  14. The USA National Longitudinal Lesbian Family Study (NLLFS): homophobia, psychological adjustment, and protective factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bos, Henny M W; Gartrell, Nanette K; Peyser, Heidi; van Balen, Frank

    2008-01-01

    The study assessed the influence of protective factors on the psychological adjustment of children who had experienced homophobia and whose mothers were participants in a longitudinal study of planned lesbian families. Data were collected as part of the National Longitudinal Lesbian Family Study by interviewing the children and having the mothers complete questionnaires. No significant differences were found in the psychological adjustment of children in the present study and their age-matched peers in a U.S.-population sample. Homophobia had a negative impact on the well-being of children who experienced it. Attending schools with LGBT curricula and their mothers' participation in the lesbian community were found to protect children against the negative influences of homophobia.

  15. Factors influencing the family consent rate for organ donation in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulme, W; Allen, J; Manara, A R; Murphy, P G; Gardiner, D; Poppitt, E

    2016-09-01

    The refusal rate for organ donation in the UK is 42%, among the highest in Europe. We extracted data on every family approach for donation in UK ICUs or Emergency Departments between 1st April 2012 and 30th September 2013, and performed multiple logistic regression to identify modifiable factors associated with consent. Complete data were available for 4703 of 4899 approaches during the study period. Consent for donation after brain death was 68.9%, and for donation after circulatory death 56.5% (p donation in the approach were strongly associated with consent (p donation after circulatory death than for donation after brain death, even after accounting for the impact of prior knowledge of patients' wishes. Involvement of the specialist nurse in the approach, encouraging family discussions about donation wishes and promotion of the organ donor register are key strategies to increase UK consent rates, and are supported by this study.

  16. Factors influencing life satisfaction of Korean older adults living with family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sok, Sohyune R

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the factors influencing life satisfaction of Korean older adults living with family. Participants included 267 adults age 65 and older who met eligibility criteria. Analyses showed that the prediction model of the life satisfaction of older adults who are living with their family was significant (F=24.429, plife satisfaction was depression (beta=0.090), monthly pocket money (beta=0.060), and age (beta=0.040). It is possible that older adults' life satisfaction increases when they are provided with nursing interventions and are able to effectively manage their health. Nursing interventions must strive to improve their self-esteem and address their depression.

  17. A highly conserved novel family of mammalian developmental transcription factors related to Drosophila grainyhead.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilanowski, Tomasz; Tuckfield, Annabel; Cerruti, Loretta; O'Connell, Sinead; Saint, Robert; Parekh, Vishwas; Tao, Jianning; Cunningham, John M; Jane, Stephen M

    2002-06-01

    The Drosophila transcription factor Grainyhead regulates several key developmental processes. Three mammalian genes, CP2, LBP-1a and LBP-9 have been previously identified as homologues of grainyhead. We now report the cloning of two new mammalian genes (Mammalian grainyhead (MGR) and Brother-of-MGR (BOM)) and one new Drosophila gene (dCP2) that rewrite the phylogeny of this family. We demonstrate that MGR and BOM are more closely related to grh, whereas CP2, LBP-1a and LBP-9 are descendants of the dCP2 gene. MGR shares the greatest sequence homology with grh, is expressed in tissue-restricted patterns more comparable to grh and binds to and transactivates the promoter of the human Engrailed-1 gene, the mammalian homologue of the key grainyhead target gene, engrailed. This sequence and functional conservation indicates that the new mammalian members of this family play important developmental roles.

  18. An extension to a statistical approach for family based association studies provides insights into genetic risk factors for multiple sclerosis in the HLA-DRB1 gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadovnick A Dessa

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multiple sclerosis (MS is a complex trait in which genes in the MHC class II region exert the single strongest effect on genetic susceptibility. The principal MHC class II haplotype that increases MS risk in individuals of Northern European descent are those that bear HLA-DRB1*15. However, several other HLA-DRB1 alleles have been positively and negatively associated with MS and each of the main allelotypes is composed of many sub-allelotypes with slightly different sequence composition. Given the role of this locus in antigen presentation it has been suggested that variations in the peptide binding site of the allele may underlie allelic variation in disease risk. Methods In an investigation of 7,333 individuals from 1,352 MS families, we assessed the nucleotide sequence of HLA-DRB1 for any effects on disease susceptibility extending a recently published method of statistical analysis for family-based association studies to the particular challenges of hyper-variable genetic regions. Results We found that amino acid 60 of the HLA-DRB1 peptide sequence, which had previously been postulated based on structural features, is unlikely to play a major role. Instead, empirical evidence based on sequence information suggests that MS susceptibility arises primarily from amino acid 13. Conclusion Identifying a single amino acid as a major risk factor provides major practical implications for risk and for the exploration of mechanisms, although the mechanism of amino acid 13 in the HLA-DRB1 sequence's involvement in MS as well as the identity of additional variants on MHC haplotypes that influence risk need to be uncovered.

  19. Number of Family Members, a New Influencing Factor to Affect the Risk of Melamine-Associated Urinary Stones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changjiang Liu

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Melamine is a new risk of urinary stones. Gansu province is a heavily affected area and has large population and underdeveloped economy. We hypothesized that number of family members and family income may play significant roles in the formation of urinary stones. A case-control study was performed among 190 infants. Results showed that the case group had less numbers of family members than the control (4.4 vs. 5.6, respectively. The multivariate logistic regression analysis indicated that number of family members was an independent influencing factor associated with urinary stones (OR, 0.606; 95% CI, 0.411-0.893; P = 0.011. Family income, however, did not exhibit a significant difference. Observed results suggested that number of family members was a new and significant influencing factor to affect the risk of melamine-associated urinary stones.

  20. [Prevalence and factors associated with frequent attendence in family medicine clinic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parejo Maestre, N; Lendínez-de la Cruz, J M; Bermúdez-Torres, F M; Gónzalez-Contero, L; Gutierrez-Espinosa de Los Monteros, M P; Espejo-Almazán María, T

    2016-01-01

    The use of health services has seen a steep rise. The frequent users are responsible for significant economic, human and social impact. The objective is to analyze the characteristics of frequent attenders in our Health Center, in order to evaluate the possibility of taking corrective measures to improve the quality of care and efficiency in the use of resources. Descriptive observational study of a sample of 379 patients over 18 years old. The dependent variables were attendance (number of visits to their family doctor during the previous year), frequent attendance (10 or more visits to the family doctor in the last year), and persistent frequent attenders (10 or more visits to the family doctor in each of the last two years). Data were collected from medical records and by telephone interview. The mean attendance was 6.83 (95%CI: 6.13-7.53), frequent attendance reached 25.4% (95%CI: 21.4-29.6), and persistent frequent attenders, 1.6% (95%CI: 0.5-2.9). Frequent attendance was associated with sex, age, marital status, educational level, family structure, existence of chronic disease, use of anxiolytic and antidepressants, request for additional tests, and referrals to other specialists, proximity to the health center, and level of satisfaction with their family doctor. The low persistent frequent attenders found suggests that frequent attendance could be largely due to factors related to professional and organization. Studies are required to address the high level of consumption of psychotropic drugs, and improving professional skills in dealing with mental problems. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. The intestinotrophic peptide, GLP-2, counteracts the gastrointestinal atrophy in mice induced by the epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor, erlotinib, and cisplatin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Andreas Rosén; Viby, Niels-Erik; Hare, Kristine Juul;

    2010-01-01

    Erlotinib, an epidermal-growth-factor receptor inhibitor, belongs to a new generation of targeted cancer therapeutics. Gastrointestinal side-effects are common and have been markedly aggravated when erlotinib is combined with cytostatics. We examined the effects of erlotinib alone and combined wi...... with the cytostatic, cisplatin, on the gastrointestinal tract and examined whether glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2), an intestinal hormone with potent intestinotrophic properties, might counteract the possible damaging effects of the treatments....

  2. Mechanical stretch up-regulates the B-type natriuretic peptide system in human cardiac fibroblasts: a possible defense against transforming growth factor-ß mediated fibrosis

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Watson, Chris J

    2012-07-07

    AbstractBackgroundMechanical overload of the heart is associated with excessive deposition of extracellular matrix proteins and the development of cardiac fibrosis. This can result in reduced ventricular compliance, diastolic dysfunction, and heart failure. Extracellular matrix synthesis is regulated primarily by cardiac fibroblasts, more specifically, the active myofibroblast. The influence of mechanical stretch on human cardiac fibroblasts’ response to pro-fibrotic stimuli, such as transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ), is unknown as is the impact of stretch on B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) and natriuretic peptide receptor A (NPRA) expression. BNP, acting via NPRA, has been shown to play a role in modulation of cardiac fibrosis.Methods and resultsThe effect of cyclical mechanical stretch on TGFβ induction of myofibroblast differentiation in primary human cardiac fibroblasts and whether differences in response to stretch were associated with changes in the natriuretic peptide system were investigated. Cyclical mechanical stretch attenuated the effectiveness of TGFβ in inducing myofibroblast differentiation. This finding was associated with a novel observation that mechanical stretch can increase BNP and NPRA expression in human cardiac fibroblasts, which could have important implications in modulating myocardial fibrosis. Exogenous BNP treatment further reduced the potency of TGFβ on mechanically stretched fibroblasts.ConclusionWe postulate that stretch induced up-regulation of the natriuretic peptide system may contribute to the observed reduction in myofibroblast differentiation.

  3. Familiality of factor analysis-derived YBOCS dimensions in OCD-affected sibling pairs from the OCD Collaborative Genetics Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasler, Gregor; Pinto, Anthony; Greenberg, Benjamin D; Samuels, Jack; Fyer, Abby J; Pauls, David; Knowles, James A; McCracken, James T; Piacentini, John; Riddle, Mark A; Rauch, Scott L; Rasmussen, Steven A; Willour, Virginia L; Grados, Marco A; Cullen, Bernadette; Bienvenu, O Joseph; Shugart, Yin-Yao; Liang, Kung-Yee; Hoehn-Saric, Rudolf; Wang, Ying; Ronquillo, Jonne; Nestadt, Gerald; Murphy, Dennis L

    2007-03-01

    Identification of familial, more homogenous characteristics of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) may help to define relevant subtypes and increase the power of genetic and neurobiological studies of OCD. While factor-analytic studies have found consistent, clinically meaningful OCD symptom dimensions, there have been only limited attempts to evaluate the familiality and potential genetic basis of such dimensions. Four hundred eighteen sibling pairs with OCD were evaluated using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV and the Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale (YBOCS) Symptom Checklist and Severity scales. After controlling for sex, age, and age of onset, robust sib-sib intraclass correlations were found for two of the four YBOCS factors: Factor IV (hoarding obsessions and compulsions (p = .001) and Factor I (aggressive, sexual, and religious obsessions, and checking compulsions; p = .002). Smaller, but still significant, familiality was found for Factor III (contamination/cleaning; p = .02) and Factor II (symmetry/ordering/arranging; p = .04). Limiting the sample to female subjects more than doubled the familiality estimates for Factor II (p = .003). Among potentially relevant comorbid conditions for genetic studies, bipolar I/II and major depressive disorder were strongly associated with Factor I (p < .001), whereas ADHD, alcohol dependence, and bulimia were associated with Factor II (p < .01). Factor-analyzed OCD symptom dimensions in sibling pairs with OCD are familial with some gender-dependence, exhibit relatively specific relationships to comorbid psychiatric disorders and thus may be useful as refined phenotypes for molecular genetic studies of OCD.

  4. Work-Family Enrichment: It’s Mediating Role in the Relationships between Dispositional Factors and Job Satisfaction

    OpenAIRE

    Ng Swee Fung; Aminah Ahmad; Zoharah Omar

    2012-01-01

    The growing interest in understanding the interface of work and family roles, in particular work-family enrichment, and its antecedents and outcomes, has stimulated the development of a mediation model. The mediation model developed includes dispositional factors (optimism, self-efficacy) as antecedents, job satisfaction as the outcome, and work-family enrichment as the mediator. This present model is developed based on the conservation of resources theory (Hobfoll, 1989), the model of work-f...

  5. Family aggregation and risk factors in substance use disorders over three generations in a nation-wide study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steinhausen, Hans-Christoph; Jakobsen, Helle; Munk-Jørgensen, Povl

    2017-01-01

    Abstract View references (39) Objective This nation-wide register-based study investigated how often substance use disorders (SUD) and co-morbid disorders occurred in affected families compared to control families. Method A total of N = 2504 child and adolescent psychiatric participants who were...... for age, sex, and residential region were included. Psychiatric diagnoses of the first-degree relatives were also obtained. A family load component was assessed. Results SUD occurred significantly more often in case families than in control families. SUD risk factors included SUD, depression, anxiety...... disorders, personality disorders, or conduct disorders in the family. Furthermore, male sex, more recent year of birth, and living in the capital city of Copenhagen were also significantly associated with having SUD. The family load explained 30% of the SUD manifestation in the case-probands. The findings...

  6. Family Resources as Protective Factors for Low-Income Youth Exposed to Community Violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardaway, Cecily R; Sterrett-Hong, Emma; Larkby, Cynthia A; Cornelius, Marie D

    2016-07-01

    Exposure to community violence is a risk factor for internalizing and externalizing problems; however, resources within the family can decrease the likelihood that adolescents will experience internalizing and externalizing problems as a result of such exposure. This study investigates the potential moderating effects of kinship support (i.e., emotional and tangible support from extended family) and parental involvement on the relation between exposure to community violence (i.e., witnessing violence and violent victimization) and socioemotional adjustment (i.e., internalizing and externalizing problems) in low-income adolescents. The sample included 312 (50 % female; 71 % African American and 29 % White) low-income youth who participated in a longitudinal investigation when adolescents were age 14 (M age = 14.49 years) and again when they were 16 (M age = 16.49 years). Exposure to community violence at age 14 was related to more internalizing and externalizing problems at age 16. High levels of kinship support and parental involvement appeared to function as protective factors, weakening the association between exposure to violence and externalizing problems. Contrary to prediction, none of the hypothesized protective factors moderated the association between exposure to violence and internalizing problems. The results from this study suggest that both kinship support and parental involvement help buffer adolescents from externalizing problems that are associated with exposure to community violence.

  7. Exploration of Individual and Family Factors Related to Community Reintegration in Veterans With Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriarty, Helene; Winter, Laraine; Robinson, Keith; True, Gala; Piersol, Catherine; Vause-Earland, Tracey; Iacovone, Dolores Blazer; Holbert, Laura; Newhart, Brian; Fishman, Deborah; Short, Thomas H

    2015-01-01

    Community reintegration (CR) poses a major problem for military veterans who have experienced a traumatic brain injury (TBI). Factors contributing to CR after TBI are poorly understood. To address the gap in knowledge, an ecological framework was used to explore individual and family factors related to CR. Baseline data from an intervention study with 83 veterans with primarily mild to moderate TBI were analyzed. Instruments measured CR, depressive symptoms, physical health, quality of the relationship with the family member, and sociodemographics. Posttraumatic stress disorder and TBI characteristics were determined through record review. Five variables that exhibited significant bivariate relationships with CR (veteran rating of quality of relationship, physical functioning, bodily pain, posttraumatic stress disorder diagnosis, and depressive symptoms) were entered into hierarchical regression analysis. In the final analysis, the five variables together accounted for 35% of the variance, but only depression was a significant predictor of CR, with more depressed veterans exhibiting lower CR. Efforts to support CR of Veterans with TBI should carefully assess and target depression, a modifiable factor. © The Author(s) 2015.

  8. Can family risk-factors moderate the link between psychopathy and life-history strategy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Međedović Janko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Life History Theory is an explanatory evolutionary framework which explains differences in fitness-relevant outcomes using the characteristics of the environment and individual organisms. Basically, individuals can be positioned somewhere on the r/K continuum of the Life History Strategy (LHS: a K or slow strategy represents later maturity and reproduction, a smaller number of offspring with higher investment in them, while the r (or fast strategy follows the opposite pattern. Previous research offered evidence that psychopathy can represent a trait associated with fast LHS. In the present research we examined the relations between the family risk-factors, a four-factor model of psychopathy and the LHS in a sample of male convicts (N=181. The results have shown that a manipulative and deceitful interpersonal style is associated with slow LHS while shallow affect and antisocial tendencies are related to fast LHS. The interactions between psychopathy and family risk-factors revealed that parental criminal behaviour enhances the relation between fast LHS and psychopathic traits, including the manipulative interpersonal style. The findings are in accordance with the Life History Theory and provide a deeper understanding of the preservation of psychopathy in contemporary populations.

  9. Velvet antler peptide prevents pressure overload-induced cardiac fibrosis via transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 pathway inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lihong; Mi, Yang; Guan, Hongya; Xu, Yan; Mei, Yingwu

    2016-07-15

    Velvet antlers (VAs) are commonly used in traditional Chinese medicine and invigorant and contain many functional components for health promotion. The velvet antler peptide sVAP32 is one of active components in VAs; based on structural study, the sVAP32 interacts with TGF-β1 receptors and disrupts the TGF-β1 pathway. We hypothesized that sVAP32 prevents cardiac fibrosis from pressure overload by blocking TGF-β1 signaling. Sprague-Dawley rats underwent transverse aortic constriction (TAC) or a sham operation. After one month, rats received either sVAP32 (15mg/kg/day) or vehicle for an additional one month. TAC surgery induced significant cardiac dysfunction, fibroblast activation and fibrosis; these effects were improved by treatment with sVAP32. In the heart tissue, TAC remarkably increased the expression of TGF-β1 and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), reactive oxygen species levels, and the phosphorylation levels of Smad2/3 and extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2). SVAP32 inhibited the increases in reactive oxygen species levels, CTGF expression and the phosphorylation of Smad2/3 and ERK1/2, but not TGF-β1 expression. In cultured cardiac fibroblasts, angiotensin II (Ang II) had similar effects compared to TAC surgery, such as increases in α-SMA-positive cardiac fibroblasts and collagen synthesis. SVAP32 eliminated these effects by disrupting TGF-β1 binding to its receptors and blocking Ang II/TGF-β1 downstream signaling. These results demonstrated that sVAP32 has anti-fibrotic effects by blocking the TGF-β1 pathway in cardiac fibroblasts.

  10. Enhanced neutrophil phagocytic capacity in rheumatoid arthritis related to the autoantibodies rheumatoid factor and anti-cyclic citrullinated peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Siqueira, Marcelo Bogliolo Piancastelli; da Mota, Licia Maria Henrique; Couto, Shirley Claudino Pereira; Muniz-Junqueira, Maria Imaculada

    2015-06-30

    There is no consensus on the mechanisms by which anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies (anti-CCP) and rheumatoid factor (RF) influence the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The current study verified if the presence of RF or anti-CCP is associated with phagocytic capacity and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production by phagocytes in RA patients to better clarify the role played by these antibodies in pathogenesis of the disease. A cohort of 30 RA patients followed from early stages of the disease were characterized by positivity for RF or anti-CCP, disease activity score (DAS-28), health assessment questionnaire (HAQ), use of synthetic or biologic therapy, lifestyle, comorbidities and radiographic erosions. Phagocytic capacity against Saccharomyces cerevisiae and superoxide anion production were assessed in RA patients and compared with 20 healthy controls. Phagocytic capacity and superoxide anion production were also compared between RF- and anti-CCP-positive and -negative RA patients. Anti-CCP- and RF-positive RA patients had higher neutrophil phagocytic capacity than anti-CCP- (p = 0.005) and RF (p = 0.005)-negative individuals through pattern-recognition receptors. As assessed via pattern recognition or opsonin receptors, neutrophils and monocytes from RA patients presented overall higher phagocytic capacity than neutrophils and monocytes from healthy controls (p autoantibodies. Furthermore, there was an overall hyperactivation of the phagocytes in RA patients. Our data suggest that anti-CCP and RF may indirectly enhance the inflammation cascade involving neutrophils and may indirectly sustain tissue damage in RA. Targeting the production of these autoantibodies may be a promising strategy in the management of RA.

  11. High circulating N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide and tumor necrosis factor-α in mixed cryoglobulinemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alessandro Antonelli; Clodoveo Ferri; Silvia Martina Ferrari; Fabio Galetta; Ferdinando Franzoni; Gino Santoro; Salvatore De Marco; Emiliano Ghiri; Poupak Fallahi

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate serum levels of N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NTproBNP) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) in a large series of patients with hepatitis C associated with mixed cryoglobulinemia (MC+HCV).METHODS: Serum NTproBNP and TNF-α levels were assayed in 50 patients with MC+HCV, and in 50 sex-and age-matched controls.RESULTS: Cryoglobulinemic patients showed significantly higher mean NTproBNP and TNF-α levels than controls ( P < 0.001; Mann-Whitney U test). By defining high NTproBNP level as a value higher than 125 pg/mL (the single cut-off point for outpatients under 75 years of age), 30% of MC+HCV and 6% of controls had high NTproBNP (χ~2, P < 0.01). With a cut-off point of 300 pg/mL (used to rule out heart failure (HF) in patients under 75 years of age), 8% of MC+HCV and 0 controls had high NTproBNP (χ~2, P < 0.04). With a cut-off point of 900 pg/mL (used for ruling in HF in patients aged 50-75 years; such as the patients of our study), 6% of MC+HCV and 0 controls had high NTproBNP (χ~2, P = 0.08).CONCLUSION: The study demonstrates high levels of circulating NTproBNP and TNF-α in MC+HCV patients.The increase of NTproBNP may indicate the presence of a subclinical cardiac dysfunction.

  12. Antidepressant-like effects of the CRF family peptides, urocortin 1, urocortin 2 and urocortin 3 in a modified forced swimming test in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Masaru; Telegdy, Gyula

    2008-03-28

    Most of the evidence suggests that corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) is involved in mood disorders. The CRF receptors type 1 (CRF(1) receptors) elicit a stress response, and their natural and synthetic antagonists have been studied as possible drugs against depression, whereas CRF receptors type 2 (CRF(2) receptors) appear to alleviate the stress response and mediate anxiolytic action. Other CRF family peptides are urocortin 1 (Ucn 1), urocortin 2 (Ucn 2) and urocortin 3 (Ucn 3). Little is known about the action of Ucn 1, Ucn 2 and Ucn 3 on depressive disorders. Antidepressant-like effects of Ucn 1, Ucn 2 and Ucn 3 (0.13, 0.25 and 0.5 microg/2 microl, i.c.v.) were assayed in mice in a modified forced swimming test (FST). This modified FST predicts the clinical efficacy of an antidepressant drug through the scoring of immobility, climbing and swimming behavior. The study demonstrated that Ucn 1 had no action on any of parameters studied in the modified FST. Ucn 2 elicited antidepressive-like action by shortening the immobility time. Additionally Ucn 2 significantly increased the climbing and swimming times. Ucn 3 likewise displayed an antidepressive-like effect by shortening the immobility time, and increasing the climbing and swimming times. The results suggest that CRF(2) receptor stimulation by Ucn 2 or Ucn 3 leads to antidepressant-like action, but dual stimulation of the CRF(1) and CRF(2) receptors by Ucn 1 does not trigger antidepressant-like action in the modified mouse FST.

  13. A Confirmatory Factor Analysis of Home Environment and Home Social Behavior Data from the Elementary School Success Profile for Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegmann, Kate M.; Thompson, Aaron M.; Bowen, Natasha K.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to test the factor structure and scale quality of data provided by caregivers about the home environment and child behavior at home using the Elementary School Success Profile (ESSP) for Families. The ESSP for Families is one component of the ESSP, an online social-environmental assessment that also collects…

  14. A nation-wide study of the family aggregation and risk factors in anorexia nervosa over three generations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steinhausen, Hans-Christoph; Jakobsen, Helle; Helenius, Dorte

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This nation-wide register-based study investigated how often anorexia nervosa (AN) and co-morbid disorders occur in affected families compared with control families. Furthermore, the study addressed the impact of sex, year of birth, and degree of urbanization in terms of risk factors...

  15. Do Family and Parenting Factors in Adolescence Influence Condom Use in Early Adulthood in a Multiethnic Sample of Young Adults?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillmore, Mary Rogers; Chen, Angela Chia-Chen; Haas, Steven A.; Kopak, Albert M.; Robillard, Alyssa G.

    2011-01-01

    Studies show that positive family factors help protect adolescents from engaging in risky sexual activities, but do they continue to protect adolescents as they transition to late adolescence/early adulthood? Using data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, we examined whether family support, parent-child closeness, parental…

  16. Do Family and Parenting Factors in Adolescence Influence Condom Use in Early Adulthood in a Multiethnic Sample of Young Adults?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillmore, Mary Rogers; Chen, Angela Chia-Chen; Haas, Steven A.; Kopak, Albert M.; Robillard, Alyssa G.

    2011-01-01

    Studies show that positive family factors help protect adolescents from engaging in risky sexual activities, but do they continue to protect adolescents as they transition to late adolescence/early adulthood? Using data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, we examined whether family support, parent-child closeness, parental…

  17. Family aggregation and risk factors of obsessive-compulsive disorders in a nationwide three-generation study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steinhausen, Hans-Christoph; Bisgaard, Charlotte; Munk-Jørgensen, Povl

    2013-01-01

    This nationwide register-based study investigates how often obsessive-compulsive disorders (OCD) with different age at diagnosis occur in affected families compared to control families. Furthermore, the study addresses the impact of certain risk factors, that is, sex, degree of urbanization, year...

  18. The Role of the E2F Transcription Factor Family in UV-Induced Apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orla Gannon

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The E2F transcription factor family is traditionally associated with cell cycle control. However, recent data has shown that activating E2Fs (E2F1-3a are potent activators of apoptosis. In contrast, the recently cloned inhibitory E2Fs (E2F7 and 8 appear to antagonize E2F-induced cell death. In this review we will discuss (i the potential role of E2Fs in UV-induced cell death and (ii the implications of this to the development of UV-induced cutaneous malignancies.

  19. Anti-antimicrobial Peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Lloyd; Lamarre, Baptiste; Diu, Ting; Ravi, Jascindra; Judge, Peter J.; Temple, Adam; Carr, Matthew; Cerasoli, Eleonora; Su, Bo; Jenkinson, Howard F.; Martyna, Glenn; Crain, Jason; Watts, Anthony; Ryadnov, Maxim G.

    2013-01-01

    Antimicrobial or host defense peptides are innate immune regulators found in all multicellular organisms. Many of them fold into membrane-bound α-helices and function by causing cell wall disruption in microorganisms. Herein we probe the possibility and functional implications of antimicrobial antagonism mediated by complementary coiled-coil interactions between antimicrobial peptides and de novo designed antagonists: anti-antimicrobial peptides. Using sequences from native helical families such as cathelicidins, cecropins, and magainins we demonstrate that designed antagonists can co-fold with antimicrobial peptides into functionally inert helical oligomers. The properties and function of the resulting assemblies were studied in solution, membrane environments, and in bacterial culture by a combination of chiroptical and solid-state NMR spectroscopies, microscopy, bioassays, and molecular dynamics simulations. The findings offer a molecular rationale for anti-antimicrobial responses with potential implications for antimicrobial resistance. PMID:23737519

  20. Sensitivity to reinforcement and family factors as predictors of psychological health problems in different age groups of children and teenagers

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    V. Kuznetsova

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The follow-up study was designed to assess and to compare the effects of sensitivity to reward, sensitivity to punishment and family environment on internalizing and externalizing problems in a community sample of 477 children and adolescents aged 3-18 (50% female. The level of problem behavior at Time 1 in all age groups was the best predictor of corresponding type of problem level at Time 2; the residual variance in problem behavior was also predicted by sensitivity to reinforcement. Family factors contributed for change in externalizing problems and hyperactivity in preschool and middle childhood children; living in the urban environment was significant factor for peer problem. The study showed that individual differences interact with the family factors in the process of development, and family environment could strengthen or mitigate the influence of biological factors on children and adolescents’ adjustment.

  1. Local gene regulation details a recognition code within the LacI transcriptional factor family.

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    Francisco M Camas

    Full Text Available The specific binding of regulatory proteins to DNA sequences exhibits no clear patterns of association between amino acids (AAs and nucleotides (NTs. This complexity of protein-DNA interactions raises the question of whether a simple set of wide-coverage recognition rules can ever be identified. Here, we analyzed this issue using the extensive LacI family of transcriptional factors (TFs. We searched for recognition patterns by introducing a new approach to phylogenetic footprinting, based on the pervasive presence of local regulation in prokaryotic transcriptional networks. We identified a set of specificity correlations--determined by two AAs of the TFs and two NTs in the binding sites--that is conserved throughout a dominant subgroup within the family regardless of the evolutionary distance, and that act as a relatively consistent recognition code. The proposed rules are confirmed with data of previous experimental studies and by events of convergent evolution in the phylogenetic tree. The presence of a code emphasizes the stable structural context of the LacI family, while defining a precise blueprint to reprogram TF specificity with many practical applications.

  2. Interleukin-6 gene promoter polymorphisms and cardiovascular risk factors. A family study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán-Guzmán, Iris Paola; Muñoz-Valle, José Francisco; Flores-Alfaro, Eugenia; Salgado-Goytia, Lorenzo; Salgado-Bernabé, Aralia Berenice; Parra-Rojas, Isela

    2010-01-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is a cytokine involved in inflammatory process, as well as in glucose and lipid metabolism. Several studies of the biological relevance of IL-6 gene polymorphisms have indicated a relationship with cardiovascular disease. The aim of this study was to assess whether the -174 G/C and -572 G/C of IL-6 gene polymorphisms are associated with cardiovascular risk factors in Mexican families. Ninety members of 30 Mexican families, in which an index case (proband) had obesity, were included in the study. We evaluated the body composition by bioelectrical impedance. Peripheral blood samples were collected to determine biochemical and hematological parameters. High sensitivity C- reactive protein levels were measurement for nephelometric analysis. Screening for both polymorphisms studied was performed by PCR-RFLP. In the parents, both polymorphisms were in Hardy-Weinberg's equilibrium. The genotypes -174 GC/CC were associated with T2D (OR=1.23, IC(95%) 1.01-1.5) and highest levels of hsCRP (p=0.02), whereas genotype -572 GG was associated with T2D (OR=1.24, IC(95%) 1.04-1.47) with an inflammatory state determined by the increase in the leukocyte count (OR=1.24, IC(95%) 1.02-1.51). The genotypes -174 GC/CC and -572 GG may confer susceptibility for the development of subclinical inflammation and type 2 diabetes in Mexican families.

  3. CRTR-1, a developmentally regulated transcriptional repressor related to the CP2 family of transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodda, S; Sharma, S; Scherer, M; Chapman, G; Rathjen, P

    2001-02-02

    CP2-related proteins comprise a family of DNA-binding transcription factors that are generally activators of transcription and expressed ubiquitously. We reported a differential display polymerase chain reaction fragment, Psc2, which was expressed in a regulated fashion in mouse pluripotent cells in vitro and in vivo. Here, we report further characterization of the Psc2 cDNA and function. The Psc2 cDNA contained an open reading frame homologous to CP2 family proteins. Regions implicated in DNA binding and oligomeric complex formation, but not transcription activation, were conserved. Psc2 expression in vivo during embryogenesis and in the adult mouse demonstrated tight spatial and temporal regulation, with the highest levels of expression in the epithelial lining of distal convoluted tubules in embryonic and adult kidneys. Functional analysis demonstrated that PSC2 repressed transcription 2.5-15-fold when bound to a heterologous promoter in ES, 293T, and COS-1 cells. The N-terminal 52 amino acids of PSC2 were shown to be necessary and sufficient for this activity and did not share obvious homology with reported repressor motifs. These results represent the first report of a CP2 family member that is expressed in a developmentally regulated fashion in vivo and that acts as a direct repressor of transcription. Accordingly, the protein has been named CP2-Related Transcriptional Repressor-1 (CRTR-1).

  4. Psychosocial factors associated with patterns of smoking surrounding pregnancy in fragile families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Robin L; Padilla, Yolanda C; Hamilton, Erin R

    2012-01-01

    Although research has documented factors associated with maternal smoking, we need a more in-depth understanding of the risk factors associated with changes in smoking behaviors during the postpartum period. We investigate smoking patterns during pregnancy and 1 year postpartum as a function of relevant psychosocial factors. We use data on 3,522 postpartum mothers from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study to analyze the predictors of smoking among mothers who did not smoke during pregnancy but smoked at 1 year postpartum, mothers who smoked both during pregnancy and postpartum, and mothers who did not smoke during either period. Our covariates are grouped into four categories of risk factors for smoking: socioeconomic status, health care, life course and health, and partner and social support. Postpartum mothers in our sample were more likely to smoke throughout or after their pregnancies if they had only a high school education or less, had a household income three or more times below the poverty line, had public or no health insurance, breastfed for less than 5 months, were not married to the infant's father, if the infant's father currently smoked, and if they attended religious services less than once a week. Mental health problems were consistently associated with an increased risk of constant and postpartum smoking relative to non-smoking. Psychosocial factors play a role in postpartum smoking, but they have a stronger effect in predicting smoking that persists throughout pregnancy and the first year postpartum.

  5. Family history: impact on coronary heart disease risk assessment beyond guideline-defined factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasanaj, Q; Wilson, B J; Little, J; Montazeri, Z; Carroll, J C

    2013-01-01

    Family history (FH) provides insights into the effects of shared genomic susceptibilities, environments and behaviors, making it a potentially valuable risk assessment tool for chronic diseases. We assessed whether coronary heart disease (CHD) risk assessment is improved when FH information is added to other clinical information recommended in guidelines. We applied logistic regression analyses to cross-sectional data originally obtained from a UK study of women who delivered a live-born infant between 1951 and 1970. We developed 3 models: Model 1 included only the covariates in a guideline applicable to the population, Model 2 added FH to Model 1, and Model 3 included a fuller range of risk factors. For each model, its ability to discriminate between study subjects with and those without CHD was evaluated and its impact on risk classification examined using the net reclassification index. FH was an independent risk factor for CHD (odds ratio = 1.7, 95% confidence interval = 1.26-2.47) and improved discrimination beyond guideline-defined clinical factors (p risk factor for CHD, it added little to risk factors typically included in guidelines. © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Targeted inactivation of Snail family EMT regulatory factors by a Co(III)-Ebox conjugate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harney, Allison S; Meade, Thomas J; LaBonne, Carole

    2012-01-01

    Snail family proteins are core EMT (epithelial-mesenchymal transition) regulatory factors that play essential roles in both development and disease processes and have been associated with metastasis in carcinomas. Snail factors are required for the formation of neural crest stem cells in most vertebrate embryos, as well as for the migratory invasive behavior of these cells. Snail factors have recently been linked to the formation of cancer stem cells, and expression of Snail proteins may be associated with tumor recurrence and resistance to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. We report that Co(III)-Ebox is a potent inhibitor of Snail-mediated transcriptional repression in breast cancer cells and in the neural crest of Xenopus. We further show that the activity of Co(III)-Ebox can be modulated by temperature, increasing the utility of this conjugate as a Snail inhibitor in model organisms. We exploit this feature to further delineate the requirements for Snail function during neural crest development, showing that in addition to the roles that Snail factors play in neural crest precursor formation and neural crest EMT/migration, inhibition of Snail function after the onset of neural crest migration leads to a loss of neural crest derived melanocytes. Co(III)-Ebox-mediated inhibition therefore provides a powerful tool for analysing the function of these core EMT factors with unparalleled temporal resolution. Moreover, the potency of Co(III)-Ebox as a Snail inhibitor in breast cancer cells suggests its potential as a therapeutic inhibitor of tumor progression and metastasis.

  7. Molecular analysis of a family with three cases of first cousins with free trisomy 21 excludes the existence of a familial predisposing factor for nondisjunction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girginoudis, P.; Avramopoulos, D. [Diagnostic Genetic Center, Athens (Greece); Robert, E. [Institut Europeen des Genomutations, Lyon (France)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    We have studied a French family with three individuals, paternally related first cousins, that presented free and complete trisomy 21. Using short sequence repeat polymorphisms from chromosome 21, we analyzed the DNA of two of the three affected individuals that were available. We determined the parental origin of the supernumerary chromosome in both cases. The trisomy in these cases was found to be due to maternal meiotic errors. Since the individuals were related through their paternal grandparents (their fathers were siblings) we conclude that the recurrence of trisomy 21 in this family is a result of chance and is not due to any possible genetic predisposing factors. This is in accordance with previous results on recurrent trisomy 21 families, where predisposing factors were also often excluded through the same kind of analysis.

  8. The Fos family of transcription factors and their role in tumourigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milde-Langosch, Karin

    2005-11-01

    Members of the Fos family (c-Fos, FosB and its smaller splice variants, Fra-1 and Fra-2) dimerise with Jun proteins to form the AP-1 transcription factor complex. Based on the rapidly growing amount of data from experimental studies, animal models and investigations on clinical tumour samples, this review summarises the current knowledge about the role of these proteins in carcinogenesis. In addition to c-Fos, which has oncogenic activity and is frequently overexpressed in tumour cells, Fra-1 seems to play a role in the progression of many carcinomas. The results obtained from various studies show different implications for these transcription factors according to tumour type, i.e., Fra-1 overexpression enhances the motility and invasion of breast and colorectal cancer cells, but inhibits the tumourigenicity of cervical carcinoma cell lines. Knowledge about regulation of invasion and metastasis in different malignant tumours in vivo might open promising perspectives to targeted therapeutic approaches.

  9. Parental and Familial Factors Among Latino/a Youths’ Successful Matriculation into Postsecondary Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah P. Maxwell

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Extant research focuses on the “educational attainment gap,” documenting the lack of parity among Latino youth and other high school graduates in college matriculation. This study reversed that question, and asked instead, what factors, and specifically what parental or family-related factors, contribute to Latino/a youth enrolling in four-year post-secondary institutions where future earnings tend to be higher than two-year colleges. Data from the Texas Higher Education Opportunity Project (THEOP, 2004 were analyzed to identify parental contributors to successful matriculation into post-secondary education. Findings indicate that parents attending college was one of the most important indicators of Latino/a enrollment in either a two- or four-year college or university. Also significant, and potentially critical in social welfare policy, was rewarding students for grades. Parents helping with and checking homework were not helpful in youths’ progression to postsecondary education.

  10. The TEAD/TEF family of transcription factor Scalloped mediates Hippo signaling in organ size control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Ren, Fangfang; Zhang, Qing; Chen, Yongbin; Wang, Bing; Jiang, Jin

    2008-03-01

    The Hippo (Hpo) signaling pathway governs cell growth, proliferation, and apoptosis by controlling key regulatory genes that execute these processes; however, the transcription factor of the pathway has remained elusive. Here we provide evidence that the TEAD/TEF family transcription factor Scalloped (Sd) acts together with the coactivator Yorkie (Yki) to regulate Hpo pathway-responsive genes. Sd and Yki form a transcriptional complex whose activity is inhibited by Hpo signaling. Sd overexpression enhances, whereas its inactivation suppresses, tissue overgrowth caused by Yki overexpression or tumor suppressor mutations in the Hpo pathway. Inactivation of Sd diminishes Hpo target gene expression and reduces organ size, whereas a constitutively active Sd promotes tissue overgrowth. Sd promotes Yki nuclear localization, whereas Hpo signaling retains Yki in the cytoplasm by phosphorylating Yki at S168. Finally, Sd recruits Yki to the enhancer of the pathway-responsive gene diap1, suggesting that diap1 is a direct transcriptional target of the Hpo pathway.

  11. Dissecting the catatonia phenotype in psychotic and mood disorders on the basis of familial-genetic factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peralta, Victor; Fañanás, Lourdes; Martín-Reyes, Migdyrai; Cuesta, Manuel J

    2017-09-14

    This study examines the familial aggregation (familiality) of different phenotypic definitions of catatonia in a sample of multiplex families with psychotic and mood disorders. Participants were probands with a lifetime diagnosis of a DSM-IV functional psychotic disorder, their parents and at least one first-degree relative with a psychotic disorder. The study sample included 441 families comprising 2703 subjects, of whom 1094 were affected and 1609 unaffected. Familiality (h(2)) was estimated by linear mixed models using family membership as a random effect, with h(2) indicating the portion of phenotypic variance accounted for by family membership. Familiality estimates highly varied for individual catatonia signs (h(2)=0.17-0.65), principal component analysis-derived factors (h(2)=0.29-0.49), number of catatonia signs present (h(2)=0.03-0.43) and severity of the catatonia syndrome (h(2)=0.25-0.59). Phenotypes maximizing familiality estimates included individual signs (mutism and rigidity, both h(2)=0.65), presence of ≥5 catatonia signs (h(2)=0.43), a classical catatonia factor (h(2)=0.49), a DSM-IV catatonia syndrome at a severity level of moderate or higher (h(2)=0.59) and the diagnostic construct of psychosis with prominent catatonia features (h(2)=0.56). Familiality estimates of a DSM-IV catatonia syndrome did not significantly differ across the diagnostic categories of psychotic and mood disorders (h(2)=0.40-0.47). The way in which catatonia is defined has a strong impact on familiality estimates with some catatonia phenotypes exhibiting substantial familial aggregation, which may inform about the most adequate phenotypes for molecular studies. From a familial-genetic perspective, the catatonia phenotype in psychotic and mood disorders has a transdiagnostic character. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Consumption pattern of lipids and the factors affecting their selection among families in Kermanshah (2011

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    Yahya Pasdar

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Choosing appropriate edible oils and right consumption amounts play an important role in the promotion of public health and prevention of chronic diseases. This study was aimed to evaluate the consumption level of various edible oils and factors affecting their selection among families in Kermanshah. Methods: This cross-sectional study was carried out on 500 families selected from six different areas using multi-stage cluster sampling method. Data were collected through face to face interview using a demographic questionnaire and a questionnaire about consumption of different edible oils. Descriptive statistics and regression and chi-square tests were applied to analyze the data. Results: The mean of edible oil consumption was 69.75±3.8 g/day per capita, more than half of which (34.7±2.2 g/day was supplied by hydrogenated fat. 31.4% of total daily energy intake was supplied by lipids from which 15.6% was supplied by hydrogenated fat, that is higher than the recommended level, maximum 10% (P<0.05. There was a positive relationship between socioeconomic status and rising consumption of oils instead of fats (r=0.2, P<0.001. Conclusion: This study showed that the daily consumption of hydrogenated fat was higher than half of the lipids consumed by families. Given the complications resulting from saturated fat consumption, decreasing the production of hydrogenated fat and increasing the nutritional knowledge of families through public media and educational programs are highly recommended.

  13. Differential expression of members of the E2F family of transcription factors in rodent testes

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    Toppari Jorma

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The E2F family of transcription factors is required for the activation or repression of differentially expressed gene programs during the cell cycle in normal and abnormal development of tissues. We previously determined that members of the retinoblastoma protein family that interacts with the E2F family are differentially expressed and localized in almost all the different cell types and tissues of the testis and in response to known endocrine disruptors. In this study, the cell-specific and stage-specific expression of members of the E2F proteins has been elucidated. Methods We used immunohistochemical (IHC analysis of tissue sections and Western blot analysis of proteins, from whole testis and microdissected stages of seminiferous tubules to study the differential expression of the E2F proteins. Results For most of the five E2F family members studied, the localizations appear conserved in the two most commonly studied rodent models, mice and rats, with some notable differences. Comparisons between wild type and E2F-1 knockout mice revealed that the level of E2F-1 protein is stage-specific and most abundant in leptotene to early pachytene spermatocytes of stages IX to XI of mouse while strong staining of E2F-1 in some cells close to the basal lamina of rat tubules suggest that it may also be expressed in undifferentiated spermatogonia. The age-dependent development of a Sertoli-cell-only phenotype in seminiferous tubules of E2F-1 knockout males corroborates this, and indicates that E2F-1 is required for spermatogonial stem cell renewal. Interestingly, E2F-3 appears in both terminally differentiated Sertoli cells, as well as spermatogonial cells in the differentiative pathway, while the remaining member of the activating E2Fs, E2F-2 is most concentrated in spermatocytes of mid to late prophase of meiosis. Comparisons between wildtype and E2F-4 knockout mice demonstrated that the level of E2F-4 protein displays a distinct

  14. The Relation between Personal, Family, Social and Economic Factors With the

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    Azar Gholizadeh

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThe present study aimed to investigate the relationship between personal, familial,social and economical factorswith the level of life satisfaction of aged people of Isfahan.To achieve this end ,from among 84912 elderlypeople above 65 living in the eleven districts of Isfahan in 1386 a sample of 384 was selected using clustersampeling method and Kurjesy-Morgan formula.The research procedure was a descriptive survey in which aresearcher,developed questionaire with 44 close ended questions was employed for data collection.Therespandants provided their answers based on Lickerts five-point scale.The reliability values for the first 29questions and subsequent 15questions on the questionaire were 0.84 and 0.88 respectively.The questionstargeted not only demographic factors such as age ,sex ,educational and so on,but also research variablesunder investigation ; namely, personal, familial,social and economical factors.The data was analayzed, at bothdescriptive and inferential statistical techniques.while the first accounted forpercentage,frequency,median and mean values, the second enlisted pearson and spearman correlations,F,Tand multiple regression tests .The finding revealed that the level of life satisfaction was positivelycorrelated with social(r=0.652,economical(r=0.656, family (r=0.618, physical health (r=0.183 andindividual independence (r=0.525.In addition there was no significant difference in life satisfaction of theelderly people in regard with marital status for the F-value of 4.516 at the confidence level of 0.001.

  15. Targeted disruption of the CP2 gene, a member of the NTF family of transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramamurthy, L; Barbour, V; Tuckfield, A; Clouston, D R; Topham, D; Cunningham, J M; Jane, S M

    2001-03-16

    The NTF-like family of transcription factors have been implicated in developmental regulation in organisms as diverse as Drosophila and man. The two mammalian members of this family, CP2 (LBP-1c/LSF) and LBP-1a (NF2d9), are highly related proteins sharing an overall amino acid identity of 72%. CP2, the best characterized of these factors, is a ubiquitously expressed 66-kDa protein that binds the regulatory regions of many diverse genes. Consequently, a role for CP2 has been proposed in globin gene expression, T-cell responses to mitogenic stimulation, and several other cellular processes. To elucidate the in vivo role of CP2, we have generated mice nullizygous for the CP2 allele. These animals were born in a normal Mendelian distribution and displayed no defects in growth, behavior, fertility, or development. Specifically, no perturbation of hematopoietic differentiation, globin gene expression, or immunological responses to T- and B-cell mitogenic stimulation was observed. RNA and protein analysis confirmed that the nullizygous mice expressed no full-length or truncated version of CP2. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays with nuclear extracts from multiple tissues demonstrated loss of CP2 DNA binding activity in the -/- lines. However, a slower migrating complex that was ablated with antiserum to NF2d9, the murine homologue of LBP-1a, was observed with these extracts. Furthermore, we demonstrate that recombinant LBP-1a can bind to known CP2 consensus sites and form protein complexes with previously defined heteromeric partners of CP2. These results suggest that LBP-1a/NF2d9 may compensate for loss of CP2 expression in vivo and that further analysis of the role of the NTF family of proteins requires the targeting of the NF2d9 gene.

  16. Transcriptional Activity of Nuclear Factor κB Family Genes in Patients with Systemic Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lis-Święty, Anna; Gola, Joanna; Mazurek, Urszula; Brzezińska-Wcisło, Ligia

    2017-05-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a connective tissue disease of unknown etiology and unclear pathogenesis. Evaluation of the activation of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) family genes IκBα, p50, p52, p65, and c-Rel, potentially involved in the regulation of immunity, inflammation, angiogenesis, and tissue remodeling in SSc, was carried out. The study included 19 patients with limited SSc, 11 patients with early SSc, and 10 healthy persons constituting the control group. Real-time QRT-PCR was used to evaluate the mRNAs in peripheral blood samples. The patients with early SSc showed a decrease in transcriptional activity of IκBα inhibitor and c-Rel subunit. Transcriptional activity decrease in the other patients with limited SSc included genes encoding c-Rel and p50, subunits of NF-κB factor. Deregulation of intracellular signal transduction by NF-κB takes place at the beginning of SSc and in its fibrosis stage. Associations between clinical variables and NF-κB related gene expression as well as the activation of NF-κB family members in SSc patients should be addressed in future studies. © 2017 by the Association of Clinical Scientists, Inc.

  17. Familial clustering of recurrent pericarditis may disclose tumour necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantarini, Luca; Lucherini, Orso Maria; Baldari, Cosima Tatiana; Laghi Pasini, Franco; Galeazzi, Mauro

    2010-01-01

    Although several causes of recurrent pericarditis have been identified, the etiology remains obscure in most cases. The tumour necrosis factor receptor-1 associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS) is the most common autosomal dominant autoinflammatory disorder and is caused by mutations in the TNFRSF1A gene encoding the 55-kD receptor for tumour necrosis factor-(TNF)-alpha. Serosal membrane inflammation is a common feature of TRAPS, usually in the form of polyserositis. In addition, patients affected with recurrent pericarditis as the only clinical manifestation of TRAPS have been recently described. Our aim was to investigate the possible involvement of mutations in the TNFRSF1A gene in a cohort of patients affected with idiopathic recurrent pericarditis. Twenty consecutive patients diagnosed with idiopathic recurrent pericarditis were enrolled. Each patient underwent detailed examinations in order to rule out underlying diseases such as infections, connective tissue disorders and malignancies, and mutations of the TN