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  1. Factors affecting patient dose in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poletti, J.L.

    1994-03-01

    The report, Factors Affecting Patient Dose in Diagnostic Radiology is divided into three main sections. Part one is introductory and covers the basic principles of x-ray production and image formation. It includes discussion of x-ray generators and x-ray tubes, radiation properties and units, specification and measurement of x-ray beams, methods of patient dose measurement, radiation effects, radiation protection philosophy and finally the essentials of imaging systems. Part two examines factors affecting the x-ray output of x-ray machines and the characteristics of x-ray beams. These include the influence of heat ratings, kVp, waveform, exposure timer, filtration, focus-film distance, beam intensity distribution, x-ray tube age and focal spot size. Part three examines x-ray machine, equipment and patient factors which affect the dose received by individual patients. The factors considered include justification of examinations, choice of examination method, film/screen combinations, kVp, mAs, focus-film distance, collimation and field size, exposure time, projection, scatter, generator calibration errors, waveform, filtration, film processing and patient size. The patient dose implications of fluoroscopy systems, CT scanners, special procedures and mammography are also discussed. The report concludes with a brief discussion of patient dose levels in New Zealand and dose optimisation. 104 refs., 32 figs., 27 tabs

  2. Malnutrition predicting factors in hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahromi, Soodeh Razeghi; Hosseini, Saeed; Razeghi, Effat; Meysamie, Ali pasha; Sadrzadeh, Haleh

    2010-09-01

    Malnutrition is a predictor of increased mortality in chronic hemodialysis (HD) patients. Various factors may contribute to malnutrition in these patients including energy and protein intake, inflammation, and comorbidity. To determine the importance of these factors in malnutrition of chronic HD patients, we studied 112 chronic HD patients in two centers was evaluated with the Dialysis Malnutrition Score (DMS) and anthropometric and biochemical indices. Seventy six (67.8%) patients were classified as malnourished. According to DMS score, poor protein intake (r= -0.34, Penergy intake (r= - 0.18, Pmalnutrition in descending order of importance. Multiple regression analysis showed that only poor protein intake was the explanatory variable of anthropometric measurements decline including body mass index, triceps skin fold thick-ness, mid arm circumference, mid arm muscle circumference, fat free mass, fat mass, albumin, creatinine and transferrine. None of the mentioned factors predicted the decrease of biochemical markers. We conclude that the frequency of malnutrition is high in our population and poor protein intake is the primary contributing factor for this condition. Therefore, providing enough protein may be a simple and effective way in preventing malnutrition in these patients.

  3. Human factors and safe patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Beverley

    2009-03-01

    This paper aims to introduce the topic of human factors to nursing management and to identify areas where it can be applied to patient safety. Human factors is a discipline established in most safety critical industries and uses knowledge about human behaviour in the analysis and design of complex systems, yet it is relatively new to many in healthcare. Most safety critical industries have developed tools and techniques to apply human factors to system design, and these have been reviewed together with those resources already available for use in healthcare. Models of human behaviour such as the nature and patterns of human error, information processing, decision-making and team work have clear applications to healthcare. Human factors focus on a system view of safety, and propose that safety should, where possible, be 'designed in'. Other interventions such as building defences, mitigating hazards and education and training should only be used where design solutions cannot be found. Simple human factors principles such as: designing for standardization; the involvement of users and staff in designing services and procuring equipment; understanding how errors occur; and the workarounds that staff will inevitably take are vital considerations in improving patient safety. Opportunities for the application of human factors to healthcare and improved patient safety are discussed. Some existing tools and techniques for applying human factors in nursing management are also presented.

  4. Factors associated with mortality in tuberculosis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roya Alavi-Naini

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tuberculosis (TB is one of the main causes of morbidity and mortality in different societies. Understanding factors leading to death following diagnosis of TB is important to predict prognosis in TB patients. The aim of this study was to identify common risk factors associated with death in patients with an in-hospital diagnosis of TB, in a city in Iran with the highest prevalence and incidence of TB in the country. Materials and Methods: A retrospective study was conducted at a university-affiliated hospital, Zahedan, in the south-east of Iran, which is a referral center for TB. To identify factors leading to death, medical records of 715 patients ≥15 years old with pulmonary TB from February 2002 to February 2011 have been evaluated. Registered factors included smoking, human immune deficiency virus (HIV infection, using drugs, lung cancer, drug hepatitis following anti-TB medications, diabetes mellitus, previous TB treatment, anemia; and results of sputum smears. Univariate comparison and multiple logistic regression were performed to identify factors associated with mortality in TB patients. Results: Among 715 registered TB patients, 375 (52.5% patients were male; among those, 334 (53% were in the alive group and 41 (54% in the death group. Seventy-five (10.5% of the total number of TB patients died during TB treatment. The multivariate model showed that anemia (AOR: 19.8, 95% CI: 5.6-35.5, positive sputum smear (AOR: 13.4, 95% CI: 6.8-33.6, smoking (AOR: 12.9, 95% CI: 3.9-27.3, drug hepatitis (AOR: 12.3, 95% CI: 6.7-24.7, diabetes mellitus (AOR: 9.7, 95% CI: 2.9-32.0, drug use (AOR: 7.8, 95% CI: 2.4-25.5, and history of previous TB (AOR: 6.8, 95% CI: 2.2-21.3 were major risk factors for death in TB patients. Conclusion: Monitoring co-morbid conditions like diabetes mellitus and anemia are important to reduce death rate in TB patients. Preventive measures for smoking and drug addiction also play an important role to decrease

  5. Patients who fall in hospital - Contributing factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.I. Bright

    1983-09-01

    Full Text Available This is a retrospective study of the factors which contributed to accidental injuries sustained by those patients who fell in a White provincial hospital in die period 1 January to 30 June 1982. The research study was undertaken by Diploma in Nursing Administration students during their 3-week hospital practice at a White provincial hospital.

  6. Factors Associated with Prevalent Tuberculosis Among Patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Tuberculosis (TB) causes significant morbidity/mortality among human immunodeficiency virus‑infected individuals in Africa. Reducing TB burden in the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) is a public health priority. Aim: We determined the factors associated with prevalent TB among patients ...

  7. Prognostic factors in patients with occipital encephalocele.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiymaz, Nejmi; Yilmaz, Nebi; Demir, Ismail; Keskin, Siddik

    2010-01-01

    An encephalocele is a herniation of the brain and the meninges through a skull defect protruding towards the exterior. The condition is not rare when compared to spinal dysraphisms, but the worldwide incidence is not precisely known. The cases involving occipital encephaloceles which we have diagnosed in our clinic and the surgical approaches for this rare condition are presented herein. Thirty patients who were diagnosed with occipital encephaloceles and referred to our Neurosurgery Clinic at the Yuzuncu Yil University, Faculty of Medicine Research Hospital between 2000 and 2009 were enrolled in this study. The age of the patient, size of the sac, pathologies that accompanied the condition, and treatments applied were assessed. In the present study, 30 patients (22 girls and 8 boys), whose ages varied between newborn and 14 months, were evaluated. The encephalocele sac was located in the occipital region in 27 patients (90%) and in the occipitocervical region in 3 patients (3%). Nine (30%) of the 30 patients died; 2 in the preoperative period, 2 in the postoperative early period (0-7 days) and 5 in the late postoperative period (first week to 3 months). With the exception of the 2 patients who died preoperatively, surgery was performed on all of the patients. The mortality rate in our study was 29%. Our study demonstrated that factors which determine the prognosis of patients diagnosed with occipital encephaloceles include the size of the sac, the contents of the neural tissue, hydrocephaly, infections, and pathologies that accompany the condition. An occipital encephalocele is a congenital neurologic condition with an extremely high morbidity and mortality in spite of the treatments rendered pre- and postoperatively. Copyright 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Factors Affecting Patient Satisfaction During Endoscopic Procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qureshi, M. O.; Shafqat, F.; Ahmed, S.; Niazi, T. K.; Khokhar, N. K.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To assess the quality and patient satisfaction in Endoscopy Unit of Shifa International Hospital. Study Design: Cross-sectional survey. Place and Duration of Study: Division of Gastroenterology, Shifa International Hospital, Islamabad, Pakistan, from July 2011 to January 2012. Methodology: Quality and patient satisfaction after the endoscopic procedure was assessed using a modified GHAA-9 questionnaire. Data was analyzed using SPSS version 16. Results: A total of 1028 patients were included with a mean age of 45 A+- 14.21 years. Out of all the procedures, 670 (65.17%) were gastroscopies, 181 (17.60%) were flexible sigmoidoscopies and 177 (17.21%) were colonoscopies. The maximum unsatisfactory responses were on the waiting time before the procedure (13.13 %), followed by unsatisfactory explanation of the procedure and answers to questions (7.58%). Overall, unsatisfied impression was 4.86%. The problem rate was 6.22%. Conclusion: The quality of procedures and level of satisfaction of patients undergoing a gastroscopy or colonoscopy was generally good. The factors that influence the satisfaction of these patients are related to communication between doctor and patient, doctor's manner and waiting time for the procedure. Feedback information in an endoscopy unit may be useful in improving standards, including the performance of endoscopists. (author)

  9. Factors predicting malnutrition in hemodialysis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moncef El M′Barki Kadiri

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Signs of protein-energy malnutrition are common in maintenance hemodialyis (HD patients and are associated with increased morbidity and mortality. To evaluate the nutritional status and relationship between various parameters used for assessing malnutrition, we performed a cross-sectional study in 37 HD patients treated with thrice weekly sessions for at least two weeks. Global nutritional status was evaluated by the dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA scan. Body weight and several laboratory values, including serum albumin (Salb, serum prealbumin, bicarbonate, cholesterol, serum C-reactive protein (SCRP, and hemoglobin, were recorded. Dose of dialysis was evaluated by urea kinetic modeling. The patients were subdivided into two groups based on body mass index: group I, normal nutritional status (71% and group II, malnutrition (29%. The clinical factors associated with malnutrition included advanced age and cardio-vascular diseases (CVD, decreased fat mass (FM measured by DEXA, low Salb and prealbumin, and severe anemia. The Salb level was not only a predictor of nutritional status, but also was independently influenced by age and SCRP, which was more common in malnourished patients than in patients with normal nutritional status. Both low Kt/V and less weekly dialysis time were associated with malnutrition. The FM and lean body mass (LBM calculated by DEXA correlated with CVD and other markers of malnutrition (Salb, total cholesterol.

  10. Risk factors for multidrug resistant tuberculosis patients in Amhara ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Risk factors for multidrug resistant tuberculosis patients in Amhara National ... risk factors of MDR-TB patients in Amhara National Regional State, Ethiopia. ... strict adherence to directly observed therapy, appropriate management of TB ...

  11. Factors affecting dignity of patients with multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifi, Simin; Borhani, Fariba; Abbaszadeh, Abbas

    2016-12-01

    MS is one of the most common chronic diseases of the nervous system. Apart from disease progression, other complications such as unemployment, separation and divorce could potentially threat patients' dignity. Most of the previous studies have been done of maintaining patients' dignity in interaction with healthcare team, but studies on affecting factors of dignity in chronic patients in the society and in interaction with usual people are scarce. We aimed to investigate factors affecting dignity of Iranian patients with MS in daily living and in interaction of them with the society. In this qualitative study, 13 patients with multiple sclerosis were chosen by purposive sampling and semi-structured interviews were conducted until data saturation. The study was done in Tehran, the capital city of Iran. Factors affecting dignity were classified as 'personal factors' and 'social factors'. Personal factors consist of the following subcategories: patients' communication with self, patients' knowledge, patients' values and beliefs and patients' resources. Social factors include others' communication with patients, social knowledge, social values and beliefs and social resources. Multiple personal and social factors interfere in perceived patient dignity. In fact, interaction between personal and social factors can be influential in final perceived dignity. By focusing on whole aspects of the patients' lives, we can identify dignity-promoting or dignity-threatening factors and help patients maintain their dignity by taking appropriate measures for moderating threatening factors and improving dignity enhancing ones. © 2016 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  12. Recombinant factor VIIa treatment for asymptomatic factor VII deficient patients going through major surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livnat, Tami; Shenkman, Boris; Spectre, Galia; Tamarin, Ilia; Dardik, Rima; Israeli, Amnon; Rivkind, Avraham; Shabtai, Moshe; Marinowitz, Uri; Salomon, Ophira

    2012-07-01

    Factor VII deficiency is the most common among the rare autosomal recessive coagulation disorders worldwide. In factor VII deficient patients, the severity and clinical manifestations cannot be reliably determined by factor VII levels. Severe bleeding tends to occur in individuals with factor VII activity levels of 2% or less of normal. Patients with 2-10% factor VII vary between asymptomatic to severe life threatening haemorrhages behaviour. Recombinant factor VIIa (rFVIIa) is the most common replacement therapy for congenital factor VII deficiency. However, unlike haemophilia patients for whom treatment protocols are straight forward, in asymptomatic factor VII deficiency patients it is still debatable. In this study, we demonstrate that a single and very low dose of recombinant factor VIIa enabled asymptomatic patients with factor VII deficiency to go through major surgery safely. This suggestion was also supported by thrombin generation, as well as by thromboelastometry.

  13. CLINICAL PROGNOSTIC FACTORS IN PATIENTS WITH ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Patients and Methods: In this study we retrospectively evaluated the medical record data of 222 patients with advanced stage prostate cancer treated by hormonal therapy (either castration or total androgen blockade (TAB)). All pre- and post- treatment data records were evaluated with respect to patient age, prostate and ...

  14. Pharmacological undertreatment of coronary risk factors in patients with psoriasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahlehoff, Ole; Skov, Lone; Gislason, Gunnar Hilmar

    2012-01-01

    Patients with psoriasis have increased prevalence of coronary risk factors and limited recent results have suggested that these risk factors are undertreated in patients with psoriasis. This may contribute to the increased risk of cardiovascular diseases observed in patients with psoriasis....

  15. Factors affecting patient dose in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poletti, J.L.

    1985-01-01

    There are two stages in the X-ray image forming process; first the irradiation of the patient to produce the X-ray pattern in space, known as the primary radiological image, and second, the conversion of this pattern into a visible form. This report discusses the first stage and its interrelation with image quality and patient dose

  16. Patient delay and associated factors among breast cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, M.A.; Khan, M.I.; Andleeb, U.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To stratify patients into various stages, calculate average patient delay and study various causes of delay to presentation. Methodology: This was a one year hospital based cross sectional study at Khyber Teaching Hospital, using non probability consecutive sampling. A simplified staging was used for this study; Early (Stage I), Intermediate (Stage II, III), and Late (Stage IV). A patient was labelled delay when >3 months had elapsed between first symptom perception and first doctor consultation. Results: 80 patients were included with age 21-80 years (mean 45.28+-13.15). 80% of the patients were married, 76.3% (n=61/80) were poor with annual income of <500 US $, 85% of patients were illiterate. The participants from Rural and Urban areas were similar (37 % vs 31%); 15% were from Afghanistan. 80% patients presented with a delay of >3 months. Most common cause of delay was false symptom interpretation in 25.3% (n=17) patients. Conclusion: Late clinical presentation is because of lack of health education, unawareness, misconceptions about treatment and strong belief in traditional medicine resulting in advanced disease. This is worsened by poverty and unavailability of health care services especially in rural areas. (author)

  17. [Coagulation factor VII levels in uremic patients and theirs influence factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Jun; Xia, Ling-Hui; Wei, Wen-Ning; Song, Shan-Jun

    2004-12-01

    This study was aimed to investigate coagulation factor VII level in uremic patients with chronic renal failure and to explore theirs influence factors. The plasma levels of coagulation factor VII were detected in 30 uremic patients with chronic renal failure before and after hemodialysis for 1 month, the factor VII activity (FVII:C) was determined by one-stage coagulation method, while activated factor VII (FVIIa) was measured by one-stage coagulation method using recombinant soluble tissue factor, and factor VII antigen was detected by ELISA. The results showed that: (1) The FVIIa, FVII:C and FVIIAg levels in chronic uremic patients before hemodialysis were 4.00 +/- 0.86 microg/L, (148.5 +/- 40.4)% and (99.8 +/- 21.1)% respectively, which were significantly increased, as compared with healthy controls [2.77 +/- 1.02 microg/L, (113.1 +/- 33.0)% and (73.7 +/- 18.3)% respectively, P factor VII was positively correlated with levels of blood uria nitrogen and serum creatinine before hemodialysis but not after hemodialysis. It is concluded that the enhanced levels of coagulation factor VII in chronic uremic patients suggested abnormal activated state, herperactivity and elevated production of factor VII which correlated with renal functional injury. The abnormality of factor VII in uremia may be aggravated by hemodialysis. Coagulation factor (FVII) may be a risk factor for cardiovascular events in uremic patients who especially had been accepted long-term hemodialysis.

  18. Risk factors for falls of hospitalized stroke patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tutuarima, J. A.; van der Meulen, J. H.; de Haan, R. J.; van Straten, A.; Limburg, M.

    1997-01-01

    Patients with stroke are at a high risk for falling. We assessed the fall incidence and risk factors for patients hospitalized as the result of an acute stroke. We studied a cohort of 720 stroke patients from 23 hospitals in The Netherlands. The data were abstracted from the medical and nursing

  19. Physical Design Factors Contributing to Patient Falls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pati, Debajyoti; Valipoor, Shabboo; Cloutier, Aimee; Yang, James; Freier, Patricia; Harvey, Thomas E; Lee, Jaehoon

    2017-02-03

    The aim of this study was to identify physical design elements that contribute to potential falls in patient rooms. An exploratory, physical simulation-based approach was adopted for the study. Twenty-seven subjects, older than 70 years (11 male and 16 female subjects), conducted scripted tasks in a mockup of a patient bathroom and clinician zone. Activities were captured using motion-capture technology and video recording. After biomechanical data processing, video clips associated with potential fall moments were extracted and then examined and coded by a group of registered nurses and health care designers. Exploratory analyses of the coded data were conducted followed by a series of multivariate analyses using regression models. In multivariate models with all personal, environmental, and postural variables, only the postural variables demonstrated statistical significance-turning, grabbing, pushing, and pulling in the bathroom and pushing and pulling in the clinician zone. The physical elements/attributes associated with the offending postures include bathroom configuration, intravenous pole, door, toilet seat height, flush, grab bars, over-bed table, and patient chair. Postural changes, during interactions with the physical environment, constitute the source of most fall events. Physical design must include simultaneous examination of postural changes in day-to-day activities in patient rooms and bathrooms. Among discussed testable recommendations in the article, the followings design strategies should be considered: (a) designing bathrooms to reduce turning as much as possible and (b) designing to avoid motions that involve 2 or more of the offending postures, such as turning and grabbing or grabbing and pulling, and so on.

  20. Factors affecting functional prognosis of patients with hip fracture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, M T

    2011-01-01

    to just one or two single factors. The current article reviews important factors affecting the functional prognosis, and clinicians are encouraged to include all factors potentially influencing the outcome of patients with hip fracture in their individualised treatment and rehabilitation plan. Especially......Having a hip fracture is considered one of the most fatal fractures for elderly people, resulting in impaired function, and increased morbidity and mortality. This challenges clinicians in identifying patients at risk of worse outcome, in order to optimise and intensify treatment in these patients....... A variety of factors such as age, prefracture function and health status, fracture type, pain, anaemia, muscle strength, and the early mobility level have been shown to influence patient outcome. Thus, the outcome of patients with hip fracture is considered multi-factorial, and can therefore not be related...

  1. Non medical factors associated with psychological disorders in cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iqbal, A.; Intikhab, K.; Saeed, K.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To find out major non-medial factors associated with psychological disorders in cancer patients. Design: An observational study conducted on adult cancer patients. Place and Duration of Study: The study was conducted at Shaukat Khanum Memorial Cancer Hospital and Research Center Lahore Pakistan from January 1999. Patients and Methods: Two hundred and twenty-four newly-diagnosed adult cancer patients were interviewed by the clinical psychologist and data was collected regarding non-medical causal factors, patients age, gender family support system, general home atmosphere and marital status. Collected data was analyzed by utilizing. SPSS for windows version 10.0. Results: Of the 224 patients 142 (63.4%) reported non-medical factors causing psychological distress and 82 (36.6%) reported that medical sources are the most distressing. Ten most common non-medical sources of developing psychological disorders were identified. It was observed that family support system and general home atmosphere were significantly associated with the development of psychological disorders whereas the other variables such as age, gender and marital status had no significant relationship with the non Medical factors. Conclusion: It was concluded that non-medical factors causing psychological problems are significant in cancer patients. The results suggest that we should identify these factors and target psychosocial intervention for those patients most at risk. (author)

  2. Patient related factors for optimal blood pressure control in patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EB

    2013-09-03

    Sep 3, 2013 ... e” 90 mm Hg.8. Interview questionnaires. The questionnaires during the interview were comprised of four categories. The first was in relation to formal .... high blood pressure in clinics and hospitals is a major cause. Our earlier study on a rural Australian population showed that 56.7% of the patients with.

  3. Cardiovascular morbidity and mortality risk factors in peritoneal dialysis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanović Dijana B.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular (CVS morbidity and mortality in the endstage renal disease (ESRD patients on peritoneal dialysis therapy is 10-30 folds higher than in general population. The prevalence of well known traditional risk factors such as age, sex, race, arterial hypertension, hyperlipidaemia, diabetes, smoking, physical inactivity is higher in the uraemic patients. Besides these, there are specific, nontraditional risk factors for dialysis patients. Mild inflammation present in peritoneal dialysis (PD patients which can be confirmed by specific inflammatory markers is the cause of CVS morbidity and mortality in these patients. Hypoalbuminaemia, hyperhomocysteinaemia and a higher level of leptin are important predictors of vascular complications as well as CVS events in the PD patients. Plasma norepinephrine, an indicator of sympathetic activity, is high in the ESRD patients and higher in the PD patients than in the patients on haemodialysis (HD. Therefore, norepinephrine may be a stronger risk factor in the PD patients. The same applies to asymmetric dimethylargine (ADMA, an endogenous inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase, which is an important risk factor of CVS morbidity and mortality 15 % higher in the PD than the HD patients. Hyperphosphataemia, secondary hyperparathyroidism and high calcium x phosphate product have been associated with the progression of the coronary artery calcification and valvular calcifications and predict all-cause CVS mortality in the PD patients. Residual renal function (RRF declines with time on dialysis but is slower in the PD than the HD patients. RRF decline is associated with the rise of proinflammatory cytokines and the onset of hypervolaemia and hypertension which increase the risk of CVS diseases, mortality in general and CVS mortality. In conclusion, it is very important to establish all CVS risk factors in the PD patients to prevent CVS diseases and CVS mortality in this population.

  4. Patient knowledge on stroke risk factors, symptoms and treatment options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faiz, Kashif Waqar; Sundseth, Antje; Thommessen, Bente; Rønning, Ole Morten

    2018-01-01

    Public campaigns focus primarily on stroke symptom and risk factor knowledge, but patients who correctly recognize stroke symptoms do not necessarily know the reason for urgent hospitalization. The aim of this study was to explore knowledge on stroke risk factors, symptoms and treatment options among acute stroke and transient ischemic attack patients. This prospective study included patients admitted to the stroke unit at the Department of Neurology, Akershus University Hospital, Norway. Patients with previous cerebrovascular disease, patients receiving thrombolytic treatment and patients who were not able to answer the questions in the questionnaire were excluded. Patients were asked two closed-ended questions: "Do you believe that stroke is a serious disorder?" and "Do you believe that time is of importance for stroke treatment?". In addition, patients were asked three open-ended questions where they were asked to list as many stroke risk factors, stroke symptoms and stroke treatment options as they could. A total of 173 patients were included, of whom 158 (91.3%) confirmed that they regarded stroke as a serious disorder and 148 patients (85.5%) considered time being of importance. In all, 102 patients (59.0%) could not name any treatment option. Forty-one patients (23.7%) named one or more adequate treatment options, and they were younger ( p options, which may contribute to reduce prehospital delay and onset-to-treatment-time.

  5. Risk factors in young patients of acute myocardial infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faisal, A.W.; Khan, R.A.A.T.; Ayub, M.; Husnain, S.S.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Ischemic heart disease is a leading cause of death throughout the world. CAD has been recognized among younger age group more frequently in recent years. Very limited data is available regarding the prevalence of various risk factors in our younger patients that is why this study was planed. Objectives of the study were to look for the risk factors most prevalent in our young patient of first Acute Myocardial Infarction. And to also look for the number of Risk Factors present in each patient. Methods: We studied 100 consecutive patients from 16-45 years of age presenting with first acute MI. Twelve risk factors were studied namely, gender, family history of premature CAD, smoking hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia, obesity, mental stress (type A personality), alcohol, oral contraceptive pills (OCPs), physical activity, and diet. We divided the patients into two groups. Group A with patients 35 years of age or less and group B with patients 36-45 years of age. All risk factors were compared in both the groups. Results: Smoking, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia and hypertension were statistically different between the two groups. Frequency wise risk factors were lined up as male sex (91%) Diet (66%), Dyslipidemia (62%), smoking (46%), Type A personality(46%), family history (32%), diabetes mellitus (28%), sedentary lifestyle (26%), hypertension (22%), obesity (17%), alcohol (3%), and OCPs (0%) Most of the patients that is 94% had 3 or more risk factors. Conclusion: Smoking, hypertension, diabetes and dyslipidemia are the major modifiable risk factors in our young adults. If a young male who is smoker or a young female who is diabetic, presents in emergency room with chest pain, always suspect coronary artery disease. Other conventional risk factors are also prevalent but alcohol and OCPs are not a major health problem for us. (author)

  6. Risk factors in young patients of acute myocardial infarction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faisal, A W; Khan, R A.A.T. [General Physician Minir Hospital, Sargodha (Pakistan); Ayub, M [Munir Hospital, Sargodha (Pakistan); Husnain, S S [Allama Iqbal Medical College, Lahore (Pakistan)

    2011-07-15

    Background: Ischemic heart disease is a leading cause of death throughout the world. CAD has been recognized among younger age group more frequently in recent years. Very limited data is available regarding the prevalence of various risk factors in our younger patients that is why this study was planed. Objectives of the study were to look for the risk factors most prevalent in our young patient of first Acute Myocardial Infarction. And to also look for the number of Risk Factors present in each patient. Methods: We studied 100 consecutive patients from 16-45 years of age presenting with first acute MI. Twelve risk factors were studied namely, gender, family history of premature CAD, smoking hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia, obesity, mental stress (type A personality), alcohol, oral contraceptive pills (OCPs), physical activity, and diet. We divided the patients into two groups. Group A with patients 35 years of age or less and group B with patients 36-45 years of age. All risk factors were compared in both the groups. Results: Smoking, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia and hypertension were statistically different between the two groups. Frequency wise risk factors were lined up as male sex (91%) Diet (66%), Dyslipidemia (62%), smoking (46%), Type A personality(46%), family history (32%), diabetes mellitus (28%), sedentary lifestyle (26%), hypertension (22%), obesity (17%), alcohol (3%), and OCPs (0%) Most of the patients that is 94% had 3 or more risk factors. Conclusion: Smoking, hypertension, diabetes and dyslipidemia are the major modifiable risk factors in our young adults. If a young male who is smoker or a young female who is diabetic, presents in emergency room with chest pain, always suspect coronary artery disease. Other conventional risk factors are also prevalent but alcohol and OCPs are not a major health problem for us. (author)

  7. Mortality-related Factors in Patients with Malignant Obstructive Jaundice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurniawan, Juferdy; Hasan, Irsan; Gani, Rino Alvani; Simadibrata, Marcellus

    2016-10-01

    to obtain survival rate and mortality-related factors of malignant obstructive jaundice patients. all medical records of obstructive jaundice inpatient at Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital, Jakarta from January 2010 to December 2013 were reviewed retrospectively. The following factors were analyzed in terms of mortality: age, gender, sepsis, hypoalbumin, serum bilirubin level, serum CA 19-9 level, billiary drainage, non-ampulla Vateri carcinoma, and comorbid factors. total 181 out of 402 patients were enrolled in this study with male proportion was 58.6%, and patients aged 50 years or above was 57.5%. Multivariate analysis showed that only sepsis, unsuccessful or no prior biliary drainage and Charlson comorbid score ≥4 were independent predictors of mortality. Patients with significant prognostic factors had median survival 14 days compared with overall median survival 26 days. Score ≥2 identified as the highest prognostic score threshold with sensitivity 68%, specificity 75%, and AUC on ROC curve 0.769. sepsis, unsuccessful or no prior bilirary drainage, and Charlson comorbid score ≥4 are factors significantly associated with shortened survival in malignant obstructive jaundice patients. Prognostic score  ≥2 was determined to classify patients into high risk mortality group. Mortality of patients with those significant prognostic factors can be predicted in 76.9%.

  8. [Risk factors for development of hypomagnesemia in the burned patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durán-Vega, Héctor César; Romero-Aviña, Francisco Javier; Gutiérrez-Salgado, Jorge Eduardo; Silva-Díaz, Teresita; Ramos-Durón, Luis Ernesto; Carrera-Gómez, Francisco Javier

    2004-01-01

    Electrolyte abnormalities are common in the severely burned patient. There is little information with regard to the frequency and magnitude of hypomagnesemia, as well as on risk factors for this condition. We performed an observational, retrospective analysis of 35 burned patients treated at the Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Service at the Hospital Central Sur PEMEX, Mexico City. We determined serum magnesium behavior and divided patients into two groups: the first included 11 patients with burns and hypomagnesemia, and the second, 24 patients with burns but without hypomagnesemia. Risk factor identification was performed. We found patient at risk was the one with more than 40% of 2nd or 3rd degree total burned body area, in day 4 or 10 after the burn, and with hypokalemia, hypocalcemia, or both, and without intravenous (i.v.) supplementation of magnesium. The best way to prevent or avoid major complications is to identify the high-risk patient, or to diagnose earlier.

  9. Factors associated with patient preferences for communication of bad news.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimori, Maiko; Akechi, Tatsuo; Uchitomi, Yosuke

    2017-06-01

    Communication based on patient preferences can alleviate their psychological distress and is an important part of patient-centered care for physicians who have the task of conveying bad news to cancer patients. The present study aimed to explore the demographic, medical, and psychological factors associated with patient preferences with regard to communication of bad news. Outpatients with a variety of cancers were consecutively invited to participate in our study after their follow-up medical visit. A questionnaire assessed their preferences regarding the communication of bad news, covering four factors-(1) how bad news is delivered, (2) reassurance and emotional support, (3) additional information, and (4) setting-as well as on demographic, medical, and psychosocial factors. A total of 529 outpatients with a variety of cancers completed the questionnaire. Multiple regression analyses indicated that patients who were younger, female, had greater faith in their physician, and were more highly educated placed more importance on "how bad news is delivered" than patients who were older, male, had less faith in their physician, and a lower level of education. Female patients and patients without an occupation placed more importance on "reassurance and emotional support." Younger, female, and more highly educated patients placed more importance on "additional information." Younger, female, and more highly educated patients, along with patients who weren't undergoing active treatment placed more importance on "setting." Patient preferences with regard to communication of bad news are associated with factors related to patient background. Physicians should consider these characteristics when delivering bad news and use an appropriate communication style tailored to each patient.

  10. Original Research Risk factors for common cancers among patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusions. Age, smoking, and HIV are important risk factors for the 3 commonest cancer types (oesophageal, KS, and cervical) at this teaching .... cancer (95%) patients had no history of smoking or alcohol ..... Africa: a current perspective.

  11. The effect of psychosocial factors and patients' perception of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of psychosocial factors and patients' perception of tuberculosis treatment ... psychological distress, alcohol use, tobacco smoking and six HBM domains. ... with health promotion intervention to enhance TB treatment adherence.

  12. Predictive factors of thyroid cancer in patients with Graves' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Meng; Wu, Mu Chao; Shang, Chang Zhen; Wang, Xiao Yi; Zhang, Jing Lu; Cheng, Hua; Xu, Ming Tong; Yan, Li

    2014-01-01

    The best preoperative examination in Graves' disease with thyroid cancer still remains uncertain. The objectives of the present study were to investigate the prevalence of thyroid cancer in Graves' disease patients, and to identify the predictive factors and ultrasonographic features of thyroid cancer that may aid the preoperative diagnosis in Graves' disease. This retrospective study included 423 patients with Graves' disease who underwent surgical treatment from 2002 to 2012 at our institution. The clinical features and ultrasonographic findings of thyroid nodules were recorded. The diagnosis of thyroid cancer was determined according to the pathological results. Thyroid cancer was discovered in 58 of the 423 (13.7 %) surgically treated Graves' disease patients; 46 of those 58 patients had thyroid nodules, and the other 12 patients were diagnosed with incidentally discovered thyroid carcinomas without thyroid nodules. Among the 58 patients with thyroid cancer, papillary microcarcinomas were discovered in 50 patients, and multifocality and lymph node involvement were detected in the other 8 patients. Multivariate regression analysis showed younger age was the only significant factor predictive of metastatic thyroid cancer. Ultrasonographic findings of calcification and intranodular blood flow in thyroid nodules indicate that they are more likely to harbor thyroid cancers. Because the influencing factor of metastatic thyroid cancers in Graves' disease is young age, every suspicious nodule in Graves' disease patients should be evaluated and treated carefully, especially in younger patients because of the potential for metastasis.

  13. Risk factors for common cancers among patients at Kamuzu Central ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Little is known about risk factors for different cancers in Malawi. This study aimed to assess risk factors for and epidemiologic patterns of common cancers among patients treated at Kamuzu Central Hospital (KCH) in Lilongwe, and to determine the prevalence of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection in ...

  14. Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Diseases among Diabetic Patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: Studies on cardiovascular risk factors among diabetic persons in Ethiopia are lacking. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of the cardiovascular risk factors (hypertension, obesity, physical inactivity, dyslipidemia and smoking) among diabetic patients at the diabetic clinic of Jimma ...

  15. Factors affecting mortality and epidemiological data in patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Burns continue to be responsible for significant morbidity and mortality in developing countries. In this study we aimed to determine the factors affecting mortality and epidemiological data by examining the records of burned patients. Method. The hospital records of 980 patients who were hospitalised in the ...

  16. Risk factors for mortality among tuberculosis patients on treatment at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Tuberculosis (TB) is still an important cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Though it can effectively be treated, still a significant proportion of patients die on the course of their treatment. The objective of this study was to determine the outcome and risk factors of mortality among patients diagnosed with ...

  17. Patient and social work factors related to successful placement of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Patient and social work factors related to successful placement of long-term psychiatric in-patients from a specialist psychiatric hospital in South Africa. ... away; a low frequency of behavioural problems (especially of cannabis abuse, verbal or physical aggression, uncontrolled sexual activity), and agitation or restlessness.

  18. Factors Influencing the Outcomes in Extradural Haematoma Patients

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    neurosurgical emergencies and are one of the most common causes of mortality and disability after traumatic brain injury. This study aimed at evaluating the current management and factors that influence outcome in patients treated for extradural hematoma in an African setting. Methods: A total of 224 consecutive patients ...

  19. Risk factors for postoperative nosocomial infections among patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to identify possible risk factors for post operative nosocomial infections among operated patients at Felege Hiwot Referral ... Bacterial culture confirmation was done for all patients who developed clinical signs and symptoms of surgical site and/or bloodstream infection starting from the ...

  20. Risk Factors of Endocarditis in Patients with Enterococcus faecalis Bacteremia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Anders; Lauridsen, Trine K; Arpi, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND:  The NOVA score is a recently developed diagnostic tool to identify patients with increased risk of infective endocarditis (IE) among patients with Enterococcus faecalis (EF) bacteremia. We aim to validate an adapted version of the NOVA score and to identify risk factors for IE...

  1. Factors affecting quality of life in cancer patients undergoing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Factors affecting quality of life in cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. ... Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the QoL in cancer patients with solid tumors and at the different chemotherapy cycles (CT). ... Results: A significant relationship between the cancer type, pain intensity, and fatigue was found.

  2. Risk Factors Precipitating Exacerbations in Adult Asthma Patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Controls were stable asthma patients recruited from the outpatient departments. A structured questionnaire was used to interview patients concerning their possible exposure to certain triggers and risk factors. Univariate and multivariate analyses with conditional logistic regression were done to determine any significant ...

  3. Human Factors Affecting the Patient's Acceptance of Wireless Biomedical Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fensli, Rune; Boisen, Egil

    In monitoring arrhythmia, the quality of medical data from the ECG sensors may be enhanced by being based on everyday life situations. Hence, the development of wireless biomedical sensors is of growing interest, both to diagnose the heart patient, as well as to adjust the regimen. However, human factors such as emotional barriers and stigmatization, may affect the patient's behavior while wearing the equipment, which in turn may influence quality of data. The study of human factors and patient acceptance is important both in relation to the development of such equipment, as well as in evaluating the quality of data gathered from the individual patient. In this paper, we highlight some important aspects in patient acceptance by comparing results from a preliminary clinical trial with patients using a wireless ECG sensor for three days out-of-hospital service, to available published results from telehomecare projects, and discuss important aspects to be taken into account in future investigations.

  4. Vena porta thrombosis in patient with inherited factor VII deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klovaite, Jolanta; Friis-Hansen, Lennart Jan; Larsen, Fin S

    2010-01-01

    Most clotting factor VII (FVII)-deficient patients suffer from bleeding episodes and occasionally thromboembolic complications after surgical interventions or replacement therapy. However, thromboses without apparent triggering factors may occur as well. We report a case of a pregnant woman...... vein with well expressed portosystemic collaterals, heterozygosity for three common polymorphisms in FVII gene, associated with reduction in plasma FVII levels, and no other factors predisposing to thrombosis....

  5. Risk factors for peptic ulcer in patients with acute pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LIAO Juan

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo investigate the clinical characteristics of acute pancreatitis (AP associated with peptic ulcer (PU and to analyze the risk factors for PU in AP patients. MethodsA retrospective analysis was performed on the clinical data of 156 AP patients who were admitted to our hospital from January 2008 to January 2012. All patients underwent gastroscopy within 48 h after admission to detect PU and Helicobacter pylori (Hp infection. The severity of AP was assessed by Ranson score, APACHE Ⅱ score, and CT severity index. The clinical characteristics of AP patients with or without PU were statistically analyzed using independent samples t-test and chi-square test. The univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to determine the risk factors for PU in AP patients. ResultsAmong the 156 AP patients, 88 (56.4% had PU, but only 28 (31.8% of the 88 cases were infected with Hp. Of the 28 patients, 22 had gastric ulcer, and 6 had both gastric ulcer and duodenal ulcer. Of the 60 PU patients not infected with Hp, 25 had gastric ulcer, 26 had duodenal ulcer, and 9 had both gastric ulcer and duodenal ulcer. The univariate logistic regression analysis showed that male gender, alcohol-induced pancreatitis, smoking, alcohol consumption, high triglyceride level, high C-reactive protein level, and APACHE Ⅱ score ≥8 were significantly associated with PU in AP patients. However, the multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that APACHE Ⅱ score ≥8 was the independent risk factor for PU in AP patients (OR=8.54, 95% CI: 4.52-16.15, P<0.01. ConclusionAP patients are susceptible to PU, but the infection rate of Hp is low. APACHE Ⅱ score ≥8 is the independent risk factor for PU in AP patients.

  6. Factors Influencing Depression among Elderly Patients in Geriatric Hospitals

    OpenAIRE

    Jee, Young Ju; Lee, Yun Bok

    2013-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of depression among elderly patients and identify the factors influencing depression in a geriatric hospital in Korea. [Subjects] A self-report questionnaire was administered to the patients in community geriatric hospitals. Participants were 195 elderly patients. [Methods] The instruments utilized in this study were the Geriatric Depression Scale Short Form Korea (GDSSF-K), an activity of daily living scale, a self-esteem ...

  7. Risk factors affecting survival in heart transplant patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almenar, L; Cardo, M L; Martínez-Dolz, L; García-Palomar, C; Rueda, J; Zorio, E; Arnau, M A; Osa, A; Palencia, M

    2005-11-01

    Certain cardiovascular risk factors have been linked to morbidity and mortality in heart transplant (HT) patients. The sum of various risk factors may have a large cumulative negative effect, leading to a substantially worse prognosis and the need to consider whether HT is contraindicated. The objective of this study was to determine whether the risk factors usually available prior to HT result in an excess mortality in our setting that contraindicates transplantation. Consecutive patients who underwent heart transplantation from November 1987 to January 2004 were included. Heart-lung transplants, retransplants, and pediatric transplants were excluded. Of the 384 patients, 89% were men. Mean age was 52 years (range, 12 to 67). Underlying disease included ischemic heart disease (52%), idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (36%), valvular disease (8%), and other (4%). Variables considered risk factors were obesity (BMI >25), dyslipidemia, hypertension, prior thoracic surgery, diabetes, and history of ischemic heart disease. Survival curves by number of risk factors using Kaplan-Meier and log-rank for comparison of curves. Overall patient survival at 1, 5, 10, and 13 years was 76%, 68%, 54%, and 47%, respectively. Survival at 10 years, if fewer than two risk factors were present, was 69%; 59% if two or three factors were present; and 37% if more than three associated risk factors were present (P = .04). The presence of certain risk factors in patients undergoing HT resulted in lower survival rates. The combination of various risk factors clearly worsened outcomes. However, we do not believe this should be an absolute contraindication for transplantation.

  8. Patient safety - the role of human factors and systems engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carayon, Pascale; Wood, Kenneth E

    2010-01-01

    Patient safety is a global challenge that requires knowledge and skills in multiple areas, including human factors and systems engineering. In this chapter, numerous conceptual approaches and methods for analyzing, preventing and mitigating medical errors are described. Given the complexity of healthcare work systems and processes, we emphasize the need for increasing partnerships between the health sciences and human factors and systems engineering to improve patient safety. Those partnerships will be able to develop and implement the system redesigns that are necessary to improve healthcare work systems and processes for patient safety.

  9. Patient Safety: The Role of Human Factors and Systems Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carayon, Pascale; Wood, Kenneth E.

    2011-01-01

    Patient safety is a global challenge that requires knowledge and skills in multiple areas, including human factors and systems engineering. In this chapter, numerous conceptual approaches and methods for analyzing, preventing and mitigating medical errors are described. Given the complexity of healthcare work systems and processes, we emphasize the need for increasing partnerships between the health sciences and human factors and systems engineering to improve patient safety. Those partnerships will be able to develop and implement the system redesigns that are necessary to improve healthcare work systems and processes for patient safety. PMID:20543237

  10. Effective dose in abdominal digital radiography: Patient factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Ji Sung; Koo, Hyun Jung; Park, Jung Hoon; Cho, Young Chul; Do, Kyung Hyun [Dept. of Radiology, and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul(Korea, Republic of); Yang, Hyung Jin [Dept. of Medical Physics, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-08-15

    To identify independent patient factors associated with an increased radiation dose, and to evaluate the effect of patient position on the effective dose in abdominal digital radiography. We retrospectively evaluated the effective dose for abdominal digital radiography in 222 patients. The patients were divided into two groups based on the cut-off dose value of 0.311 mSv (the upper third quartile of dose distribution): group A (n = 166) and group B (n = 56). Through logistic regression, independent factors associated with a larger effective dose were identified. The effect of patient position on the effective dose was evaluated using a paired t-test. High body mass index (BMI) (≥ 23 kg/m2), presence of ascites, and spinal metallic instrumentation were significantly associated with a larger effective dose. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that high BMI [odds ratio (OR), 25.201; p < 0.001] and ascites (OR, 25.132; p < 0.001) were significantly associated with a larger effective dose. The effective dose was significantly lesser (22.6%) in the supine position than in the standing position (p < 0.001). High BMI and ascites were independent factors associated with a larger effective dose in abdominal digital radiography. Significant dose reduction in patients with these factors may be achieved by placing the patient in the supine position during abdominal digital radiography.

  11. Thrombophilic Risk Factors in Patients With Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazici, Ayten; Senturk, Omer; Aygun, Cem; Celebi, Altay; Caglayan, Cigdem; Hulagu, Sadettin

    2010-06-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients have an increased risk for thromboembolism. The aim of this study was to assess the presence of thrombophilic risk factors in IBD patients and to assess the associations of these factors with disease activity. Forty-eight patients with IBD (24 ulcerative colitis, 24 Crohn's disease) and 40 matched healthy control individuals were enrolled. In addition to routine biochemical analysis, fasting blood samples were studied for prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), fibrinogen, protein-C, protein-S, antithrombin III, factor VII, factor VIII, D-dimer, vitamin B 12 , folic acid and homocysteine. Levels of erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), C-reactive protein (CRP), fibrinogen, D-dimer and the number of platelets were significantly higher in patients with IBD. When compared to control group, in patients with Crohn's disease serum homocystein levels were significantly higher (p = 0.025) while serum folic acid levels were significantly lower (p homocystein and the number of platelets were found to be significantly higher in Crohn's disease patients who were in active period of the disease. Thrombophilic defects are multifactorial and might be frequently seen in IBD patients. They might contribute to thrombotic complications of this disease.

  12. Factors contributing to malnutrition in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung R; Chung, Sun J; Yoo, Sung-Hee

    2016-04-01

    Our objective in this study was to evaluate the nutritional status and to identify clinical, psychosocial, and nutritional factors contributing to malnutrition in Korean patients with Parkinson's disease. We used a descriptive, cross-sectional study design. Of 102 enrolled patients, 26 (25.5%) were malnourished and 27 (26.5%) were at risk of malnutrition based on Mini-Nutritional Assessment scores. Malnutrition was related to activity of daily living score, Hoehn and Yahr stage, duration of levodopa therapy, Beck Depression Inventory and Spielberger's Anxiety Inventory scores, body weight, body weight at onset of Parkinson's disease, and body mass index. On multiple logistic regression analysis, anxiety score, duration of levodopa therapy, body weight at onset of Parkinson's disease, and loss of body weight were significant factors predicting malnutrition in Parkinson's disease patients. Therefore, nutritional assessment, including psychological evaluation, is required for Parkinson's disease patients to facilitate interdisciplinary nutritional intervention for malnourished patients. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  13. Comorbidities and risk factors among patients with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Christopher; Charles, Janice; Britt, Helena

    2015-01-01

    General practitioners (GPs) are charged with maintaining a holistic approach to their patients' health. While most patients with schizophrenia attend public mental health services and/or non-government organisations supporting people with mental illness, 88.2% of people with a psychotic illness (the majority being schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder) had visited a GP in the previous year. For at least 30-40% of people living with schizophrenia in Australia, ongoing management is provided by their GP alone. Moreover, there is evidence that patients with schizophrenia value the help provided by GPs. Patients with schizophrenia have reduced life expectancy. Overseas research (primarily from the UK and US) has found that the poor physical health of patients with schizophrenia can be attributed to a number of factors such as modifiable lifestyle risk factors and side effects of medication, compounded by causes intrinsic to the illness such as mental stress and loss of initiative.

  14. Pulmonary hypertenstion ad leading factor in patients undergoing dialysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehman, I.U.; Sumera, A.; Idrees, M.K.; Tanweer, A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the frequency and leading factors of pulmonary hypertension among chronic hemodialysis patients. Study Design: Case series. Place and Duration of Study: Hemodialysis Unit, Department of Nephrology, Sindh Institute of Urology and Transplantation, Karachi, from September 2011 to March 2012. Methodology: Patients of either gender aged between 16 to 60 years of age undergoing hemodialysis for at least 3 months not having pre-existing valvular heart disease, chronic lung disease or connective tissue disorder were included. Pulmonary hypertension was prospectively estimated by Doppler echocardiogram on patients undergoing dialysis. Pulmonary artery pressure was calculated on the post-dialysis day and leading factors were compared between patients with and without pulmonary hypertension. Results: A total of 178 patients were included in study with male to female ratio120/58 (2.06:1). The mean age was 33.84 +- 11.9 years. The mean duration of hemodialysis was 23.85 +- 22.48 months. Pulmonary hypertension was found in 76 (42.7%) patients. Out of the studied factors, low serum albumin ( 3.4 mg/dl, p = 0.01) was found to be statistically significant in patients with pulmonary hypertension. Conclusion: Pulmonary hypertension was frequently present in dialysis population (42.7%). This subset of patients had significantly lower albumin levels in serum. More research is needed in its pathogenesis to arrest its course. (author)

  15. A systematic study on factors affecting patient dose, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otsuka, Akiyoshi; Higashida, Yoshiharu; Utsumi, Hiromoto; Ota, Masaji; Nakanishi, Takashi

    1979-01-01

    In the preceding report, we dealt with the field size and the tube voltage. This paper covers the differences in patient dose due to the focus to film distance (FFD), the patient thickness and whether the grid is used or not. Regarding the FFD, 100 cm is most commonly employed except in X-ray examinations of the chest, but from the viewpoint of the patient dose, this requires special consideration as to whether there is any theoretical basis for it. The patient thickness has a great bearing on the patient dose, but there is an individual difference, and it is almost impossible to change it artificially. However, there has been no detailed report on the relation between the patient thickness and the patient dose, therefore, this report treats of such relationship as well. Concerning the grid, consideration is given to the exposure times (Bucky factor). (author)

  16. Cognitive, Personality, and Family Factors in Patients with Migraine Headache

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Johari-Fard

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Migraine is a disorder that has debilitating pain, and affects all aspects of life, including the academic, social, and family life of patients. In addition, studies show the effects of migraine on patient's relationships with family members such as spouse, children, and other family members. In addition to physical pain, migraines are tied to significant psychological and economic costs. Migraineurs tend to have high levels of depression and anxiety, and migraine headaches have a profoundly negative impact on sufferers’ quality of life. In the present research, we investigated the correlations and regressions of cognitive, personality, and family factors with migraine headache, to find predictor factors of migraine. In this study, the following questionnaires were used: For migraine: six-item Headache Impact Test (HIT-6, and Specific Quality of Life Questionnaire Version 2.1.; for cognitive factors: Irrational Beliefs Test and Dysfunctional Attitudes Scale; for personality factors: NEO Personality Inventory; and for family factors: Family Assessment Device. This project was on 58 women with migraine headaches, diagnosed by neurologist. The findings show that, there is a significant regression between cognitive, personality, and family factors and HIT-6. In cognitive factors, frustration reactivity and anxious overconcern, in personality factors, extraversion trait, and in family factors, affective involvement are significant. Moreover, there is a significant regression between cognitive, personality, and family factors and MSQ. In cognitive factors, frustration reactivity, anxious overconcern, and helplessness, in personality factors, agreeableness and consciousness, and in family factors, affective involvement and general functioning are significant. This project showed that cognitive, personality, and family factors have a correlation with migraine headache.

  17. Factors Associated with Sleep Quality in Maxillectomy Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Na; Otomaru, Takafumi; Said, Mohamed Moustafa; Kanazaki, Ayako; Yeerken, Yesiboli; Taniguchi, Hisashi

    To investigate factors affecting sleep quality in maxillectomy patients after prosthetic rehabilitation and to determine the association between defect status and sleep quality. A total of 57 patients participated in this study. Sleep quality, general health, and oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) were evaluated. Of the total sample, 89% had poor sleep quality. Early morning awakening and daytime sleepiness were the most common complaints. Defect status and the extent of neck dissection could affect sleep quality in these patients. Improvement of OHRQoL in patients with dentomaxillary prostheses may help improve sleep.

  18. Skin Perfusion Pressure Is a Prognostic Factor in Hemodialysis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shingo Hatakeyama

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral arterial disease (PAD is common in hemodialysis patients and predicts a poor prognosis. We conducted a prospective cohort study to identify risk factors for PAD including skin perfusion pressure (SPP in hemodialysis patients. The cohort included 373 hemodialysis patients among 548 patients who received hemodialysis at Oyokyo Kidney Research Institute, Hirosaki, Japan from August 2008 to December 2010. The endpoints were lower limb survival (peripheral angioplasty or amputation events and overall survival of 2 years. Our results showed that <70 mmHg SPP was a poor prognosis for the lower limb survival and overall survival. We also identified age, history of cardiovascular disease, presence of diabetes mellitus, smoking history, and SPP < 70 mmHg as independent risk factors for lower limb survival and overall survival. Then, we constructed risk criteria using the significantly independent risk factors. We can clearly stratify lower limb survival and overall survival of the hemodialysis patients into 3 groups. Although the observation period is short, we conclude that SPP value has the potential to be a risk factor that predicts both lower limb survival and the prognosis of hemodialysis patients.

  19. Factors related to treatment refusal in Taiwanese cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Ting-Yu; Wang, Chao-Hui; Lin, Yu-Fen; Chou, Shu-Lan; Wang, Ching-Ting; Juang, Hsiao-Ting; Lin, Yung-Chang; Lin, Mei-Hsiang

    2015-01-01

    Incidence and mortality rates for cancer have increased dramatically in the recent 30 years in Taiwan. However, not all patients receive treatment. Treatment refusal might impair patient survival and life quality. In order to improve this situation, we proposed this study to evaluate factors that are related to refusal of treatment in cancer patients via a cancer case manager system. This study analysed data from a case management system during the period from 2010 to 2012 at a medical center in Northern Taiwan. We enrolled a total of 14,974 patients who were diagnosed with cancer. Using the PRECEDE Model as a framework, we conducted logistic regression analysis to identify independent variables that are significantly associated with refusal of therapy in cancer patients. A multivariate logistic regression model was also applied to estimate adjusted the odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (95%CI). A total of 253 patients (1.69%) refused treatment. The multivariate logistic regression result showed that the high risk factors for refusal of treatment in cancer patient included: concerns about adverse effects (prefuse treatment have poor survival. The present study provides evidence of factors that are related to refusal of therapy and might be helpful for further application and improvement of cancer care.

  20. Predictive factors for relapse in patients on buprenorphine maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferri, Michael; Finlayson, Alistair J Reid; Wang, Li; Martin, Peter R

    2014-01-01

    Despite the dramatic increase in the use of buprenorphine for the treatment of opioid dependence, clinical outcomes of this treatment approach continue to need evaluation. This study examines factors associated with relapse and retention during buprenorphine treatment in a sample of opioid dependent outpatients. In a retrospective chart review of 62 patients with opioid dependence, relapse was determined by self-report, urine toxicology screens, and by checking the state controlled substance monitoring database. Data was analyzed using two-way tests of association and logistic regression. Patients with comorbid anxiety disorders, active benzodiazepine use (contrary to clinic policy), or active alcohol abuse, were significantly more likely to relapse. Patients who relapsed were also more likely to be on a higher buprenorphine maintenance dose. This study identifies relapse risk factors during buprenorphine treatment for opioid dependence. Future research is needed to determine whether modifying these factors may lead to improved treatment outcomes. © American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry.

  1. [Ecologic factors and risk of rehospitalization of psychotic patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klusmann, D; Angermeyer, M C

    1986-01-01

    The present study investigates the relationship between ecological factors and the community tenure patients with functional psychoses. Data were gathered from the records of three psychiatric hospitals in the city of Hamburg. The analysis controls for the effects of sociodemographic variables and variables pertaining to the last impatient treatment. Variations in readmission rates can be explained by the latter to a certain extent, but only poorly by sociodemographic variables and hardly at all by ecological factors. These findings are discussed with respect to the methodological limitations of the study and as substantive results. Two lines of interpretation are offered. Firstly, equal readmission rates may have been caused by different sets of ecological factors; secondly, patients released from mental hospital may be relatively insusceptible to the impact of ecological factors.

  2. Risk factors in patients surgically treated for peptic ulcer perforation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Morten Hylander; Shah, Kamran; Bendix, Jørgen

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The overall mortality for patients undergoing surgery for perforated peptic ulcer has increased despite improvements in perioperative monitoring and treatment. The objective of this study was to identify and describe perioperative risk factors in order to identify ways of optimizing...... the treatment and to improve the outcome of patients with perforated peptic ulcer. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Three hundred and ninety-eight patients undergoing emergency surgery in four university hospitals in Denmark were included in the study. Information regarding the pre-, intra- and postoperative phases were...... insufficiency upon admission and insufficient postoperative nutrition have been added to the list of independent risk factors for death within 30 days of surgery in patients with peptic ulcer perforation. Finding that shock upon admission, reduced albumin blood levels upon admission, renal insufficiency upon...

  3. High risk factors in patient with carcinoma esophagus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afridi, S.P.; Khan, A.; Waheed, I.

    2000-01-01

    This study was conducted to identify the presence of high risk factors in carcinoma esophagus from February, 1992 to August, 1995 at Surgical unit 1, Jinnah Postgraduate Medical Centre (JPMC), Karachi. In all 37 patients, 22 males and 15 females, were included in the study through outpatient department, surgical emergency and those referred from other cities of the country. All patients were cachectic. Diagnosis was made by detailed history, examination and laboratory investigations. Diagnosis was confirmed on barium swallow and endoscopic biopsy. Highest number of patients were in their 6th decade of life. History of snuff inhalation and opium was present in 2.7% cases each. Lower 3rd of the esophagus was affected in 62.16% middle third in 21.62% and upper third in 16.21% cases. Smoking, pan chewing, naswar eating and snuff inhalation were identified as high risk factors among patients of carcinoma esophagus. (author)

  4. Characteristic risk factors in cirrhotic patients for posthepatectomy complications: comparison with noncirrhotic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Shinji; Uchiyama, Hideaki; Kawanaka, Hirofumi; Higashi, Takahiro; Egashira, Akinori; Eguchi, Daihiko; Okuyama, Toshiro; Tateishi, Masahiro; Korenaga, Daisuke; Takenaka, Kenji

    2014-02-01

    There seemed to be characteristic risk factors in cirrhotic patients for posthepatectomy complications because these patients have less hepatic reserve as compared with noncirrhotic patients. The aim of the current study was to identify these characteristic risk factors in cirrhotic patients. We performed 419 primary hepatectomies for hepatocellular carcinoma. The patients were divided into the cirrhotic group (n = 198) and the noncirrhotic group (n = 221), and the risk factors for posthepatectomy complications were compared between the groups. Thirty-six cirrhotic patients (18.2%) experienced Clavien's Grade III or more complications. Tumor size, intraoperative blood loss, duration of operation, major hepatectomy (two or more segments), and necessity of blood transfusion were found to be significant risk factors in univariate analyses. Multivariate analysis revealed that major hepatectomy and intraoperative blood loss were independent risk factors for posthepatectomy complications in patients with cirrhosis. On the other hand, the duration of operation was only an independent risk factor for posthepatectomy complication in noncirrhotic patients. Cirrhotic patients should avoid a major hepatectomy and undergo a limited resection preserving as much liver tissue as possible and meticulous surgical procedures to lessen intraoperative blood loss are mandatory to prevent major posthepatectomy complications.

  5. Factors Associated with Neurologists' Provision of MS Patient Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpern, Michael T.; Teixeira-Poit, Stephanie M.; Kane, Heather; Frost, Corey; Keating, Michael; Olmsted, Murrey

    2014-01-01

    Neurologists are central to providing quality care for individuals with MS. However, neurologist shortages may restrict access to care for MS patients. To examine factors influencing neurologists' provision of MS care, we surveyed 1,700 US neurologists to assess demographic/practice characteristics, training, and attitudes toward MS care. The study population consisted of 573 respondents: 87 (15.2%) MS subspecialists and 486 (84.8%) “other neurologists,” including subspecialists in other neurology areas (i.e., non-MS) and general neurologists. MS subspecialists indicating they “enjoy interacting with MS patients” had a significantly greater rate of MS patients seen per week. In separate analyses of the “other neurologists” group, the rate of MS patients seen was lower among neurologists in university-based groups or those practicing in major cities; female neurologists; and neurologists who indicated lack of sufficient knowledge regarding MS patient care. Rates of MS patients seen were significantly greater for other neurologists who agreed that MS care involved “ability to improve patient outcomes and quality of life”; “dynamic area with evolving treatment options”; and “enjoy interacting with MS patients.” Understanding factors influencing MS patient care by neurologists and developing policies for appropriate access to care is critical for optimal outcomes among this population. PMID:24949203

  6. Factors Associated with Neurologists’ Provision of MS Patient Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael T. Halpern

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurologists are central to providing quality care for individuals with MS. However, neurologist shortages may restrict access to care for MS patients. To examine factors influencing neurologists’ provision of MS care, we surveyed 1,700 US neurologists to assess demographic/practice characteristics, training, and attitudes toward MS care. The study population consisted of 573 respondents: 87 (15.2% MS subspecialists and 486 (84.8% “other neurologists,” including subspecialists in other neurology areas (i.e., non-MS and general neurologists. MS subspecialists indicating they “enjoy interacting with MS patients” had a significantly greater rate of MS patients seen per week. In separate analyses of the “other neurologists” group, the rate of MS patients seen was lower among neurologists in university-based groups or those practicing in major cities; female neurologists; and neurologists who indicated lack of sufficient knowledge regarding MS patient care. Rates of MS patients seen were significantly greater for other neurologists who agreed that MS care involved “ability to improve patient outcomes and quality of life”; “dynamic area with evolving treatment options”; and “enjoy interacting with MS patients.” Understanding factors influencing MS patient care by neurologists and developing policies for appropriate access to care is critical for optimal outcomes among this population.

  7. Quality of life and Related Factors in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mosharafeh Chaleshgar kordasiabi

    2016-12-01

    planners, and clinical specialists. Therefore, we aimed to evaluate QOL and the factors affecting it in patients with RA.Methods: This descriptive-analytical study was performed in 185 RA patients (2014 at Shariati Hospital. The participants were chosen through convenience sampling. The data collection tools included a form on demographic and clinical factors, health status (arthritis impact measurement scale2 [AIMS2], and SF20 QOL questionnaire. Data was analyzed in SPSS 16 using descriptive, univariate, and multivariate regression analysis.Results: The patients had a mean age of 46.97±11.47 years, and most of the patients were female (80.5%, 67.6% of whom were housewives. In general, 90% of the patients had diploma or lower education. Mean of physical dimension of QOL was lower and social and role dimensions were higher than other dimensions. Univariate analysis regression showed that QOL have significant negative relationship with age, disease duration, disease activity score (DAS and significant positive relationship with education and health status. In multivariate regression analysis, health status, DAS, and education explained 71.7% of QOL. Conclusion: Our results highlighted the influence of demographic and diseaserelated factors on QOL. Thus, they should be implemented in designing educational programs to increase QOL in RA patients.

  8. Patients' Perspectives on Factors that Influence Diabetes Self-Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakibazadeh, E; Larijani, B; Shojaeezadeh, D; Rashidian, A; Forouzanfar, Mh; Bartholomew, Lk

    2011-12-01

    Although diabetes mellitus is of high concern in Iran, and the level of control is unacceptable, few qualitative studies have been carried out to reflect the experiences of patients on the barriers and motivators to self-care. This study aimed to explore a culturally based experience of Iranian diabetic patients regarding the personal and environmental barriers to and facilitating factors for diabetes self-care. Six focus groups were conducted among type 2 diabetic patients in the Charity Foundation for Special Diseases' diabetes clinic. Purposeful sampling was used. Newly diagnosed patients (less than six months) and all type 1 diabetic patients were excluded. Three focus groups were held on for each sex. A total of 43 patients participated in the study. Frame-work analysis was used to extract the themes from the data. DATA ANALYSIS SHOWED FIVE MAIN BARRIERS: physical barriers (such as physical effects of diabetes); psychological barriers (such as health beliefs); educational barriers (such as lack of knowledge about diabetes); social barriers (such as group pressure); and care system barriers (such as service availability). Along with the barriers, there were some motivators that the participants mentioned as a stimuli to control their diabetes. They include beliefs about diabetes, perceived responsibility for family, religious beliefs, and the views of significant others. Culturally based interventions are needed to improve diabetes care management in Iran. In addition to personal factors, diabetes health educators should pay attention to the environmental factors when they develop programs.

  9. Factors that influence treatment delay in patients with colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarcos-Pedrinaci, Irene; Fernández-López, Alberto; Téllez, Teresa; Rivas-Ruiz, Francisco; Rueda A, Antonio; Suarez-Varela, María Manuela Morales; Briones, Eduardo; Baré, Marisa; Escobar, Antonio; Sarasqueta, Cristina; de Larrea, Nerea Fernández; Aguirre, Urko; Quintana, José María; Redondo, Maximino

    2017-01-01

    A prospective study was performed of patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer (CRC), distinguishing between colonic and rectal location, to determine the factors that may provoke a delay in the first treatment (DFT) provided. 2749 patients diagnosed with CRC were studied. The study population was recruited between June 2010 and December 2012. DFT is defined as time elapsed between diagnosis and first treatment exceeding 30 days. Excessive treatment delay was recorded in 65.5% of the cases, and was more prevalent among rectal cancer patients. Independent predictor variables of DFT in colon cancer patients were a low level of education, small tumour, ex-smoker, asymptomatic at diagnosis and following the application of screening. Among rectal cancer patients, the corresponding factors were primary school education and being asymptomatic. We conclude that treatment delay in CRC patients is affected not only by clinicopathological factors, but also by sociocultural ones. Greater attention should be paid by the healthcare provider to social groups with less formal education, in order to optimise treatment attention. PMID:27888636

  10. Survey of factors associated with nurses' perception of patient safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sun A; Lee, Sui Jin; Choi, Go Un

    2011-01-01

    To describe the nurses' perception of hospital organization related to cultural issues on the safety of the patient and reporting medical errors. In addition, to identify factors associated with the safety of the patient and the nurse. A survey conducted during December 2008-Jannuary 2009, with 126 nurses using the Korean version of the AHRQ patient safety survey, a self-report 5-point Likert scale. Stata 10.0 was used for descriptive analysis, ANOVA (Analysis of variance) and logistic regression. National Cancer Center in Korea. The means for a working environment related to patient safety was 3.4 (±0.62). The associated factors of duration were at a present hospital, a special area, and direct contact with patients. Among organizational culture factors related to patient safety, the means were 3.81(±0.54) for the boss/manager's perception of patient safety and 3.37(±0.49) for the cooperation/collaboration between units. The frequent number of errors reported by nurses were 1~2(22.2%) times over the past 12 months. For incidence reporting, the items that the 'nurses perceived for communication among clinicians as fair' had a means of 3.23(±0.40) and the 'overall evaluation of patient safety was a good' 3.34(±0.73). The nurses' perception of cooperation and collaboration between units were associated with the direct contact between the patient and the nurse. The frequency of incidence reporting was associated with the duration of working hours at the present hospital and also their work experience. The nurses' perception of hospital environment, organizational culture, and incidence reporting was above average and mostly associated with organizational culture.

  11. Factors associated with polypharmacy in elderly home-care patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komiya, Hitoshi; Umegaki, Hiroyuki; Asai, Atsushi; Kanda, Shigeru; Maeda, Keiko; Shimojima, Takuya; Nomura, Hideki; Kuzuya, Masafumi

    2018-01-01

    Polypharmacy, which is often observed in elderly patients, has been associated with several unfavorable outcomes, including an increased risk of potentially inappropriate medications, medication non-adherence, drug duplication, drug-drug interactions, higher healthcare costs and adverse drug reactions. A significant association between polypharmacy and adverse outcomes among older people living in the community has also been confirmed. A reduction in the number of medications should thus be pursued for many older individuals. Nevertheless, the factors associated with polypharmacy in elderly home-care patients have not been reported. Here, we investigated those factors in elderly home-care patients in Japan. We used the data of the participants in the Observational Study of Nagoya Elderly with Home Medical investigation. Polypharmacy was defined as the current use of six or more different medications. We carried out univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses to assess the associations between polypharmacy and each of several factors. A total of 153 home-care patients were registered. The mean number of medications used per patient was 5.9, and 51.5% of the patients belonged to the polypharmacy group. The multivariate model showed that the patients' scores on the Charlson Comorbidity Index and the Mini-Nutrition Assessment Short Form were inversely associated with polypharmacy, and potentially inappropriate medication was most strongly associated with polypharmacy (odds ratio 4.992). The present findings showed that polypharmacy was quite common among the elderly home-care patients, and they suggest that home-care physicians should prescribe fewer medications in accord with the deterioration of home-care patients' general condition. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2018; 18: 33-41. © 2017 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  12. Sociodemographic factors responsible for blindness in diabetic Egyptian patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abueleinen KGI

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Khaled Gamal Ibraheem Abueleinen1, Hany El-Mekawey1, Yasser Sayed Saif2, Amr Khafagy1, Hoda Ibrahim Rizk3, Eman M Eltahlawy41Department of Ophthalmology, Cairo University, Cairo, Egypt; 2Department of Ophthalmology, Beni-Suef University, Beni-Suef, Egypt; 3Department of Public Health, Cairo University, Cairo, Egypt; 4Public Health and Community Medicine National Research Center, Cairo, EgyptPurpose: To evaluate factors behind the delay in diagnosis and treatment among Egyptian patients who present with complicated diabetic retinopathy.Methods: Observational cross-sectional study of diabetic patients with advanced diabetic retinopathy. Patients were asked to answer a questionnaire to assess the impact of several sociodemographic factors.Results: A total of 397 patients agreed to take the questionnaire. Diabetic vitreous hemorrhage was the most common ocular complication and was found in 359 patients (90.4%. A total of 158 (39.8% patients knew that diabetes mellitus can be sight threatening, while 240 (60.2% were not aware until they developed sight threatening complication. A total of 179 patients (45.1% had early retirement because of visual loss related to diabetes mellitus. Multivariate logistic regression has shown that education, internist, contact with other patients, and media were respectively significant in predicting the awareness of patients about the sight-threatening effect of diabetic retinopathy.Conclusion: Patient education regarding diabetes and diabetic eye disease is essential for early detection and compliance with treatment. Illiteracy has a significant impact on development of sight-threatening diabetic complications. The internist is the first line of prophylaxis. Media has to participate more in patient education.Keywords: blindness, education, laser photocoagulation, macular edema, vitreous hemorrhage

  13. Risk factors for concurrent bacteremia in adult patients with dengue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thein, Tun-Linn; Ng, Ee-Ling; Yeang, Ming S; Leo, Yee-Sin; Lye, David C

    2017-06-01

    Bacteremia in dengue may occur with common exposure to pathogens in association with severe organ impairment or severe dengue, which may result in death. Cohort studies identifying risk factors for concurrent bacteremia among patients with dengue are rare. We conducted a retrospective case-control study of adult patients with dengue who were admitted to the Department of Infectious Diseases at Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore from 2004 to 2008. For each case of dengue with concurrent bacteremia (within the first 72 hours of admission), we selected four controls without bacteremia, who were matched on year of infection and dengue confirmation method. Conditional logistic regression was performed to identify risk factors for concurrent bacteremia. Among 9,553 patients with dengue, 29 (0.3%) had bacteremia. Eighteen of these patients (62.1%) had concurrent bacteremia. The predominant bacteria were Staphylococcus aureus, one of which was a methicillin-resistant strain. Dengue shock syndrome occurred more frequently and hospital stay was longer among cases than among controls. Three cases did not survive, whereas none of the controls died. In multivariate analysis, being critically ill at hospital presentation was independently associated with 15 times the likelihood of a patient with dengue having concurrent bacteremia. Concurrent bacteremia in adult patients with dengue is uncommon but presents atypically and results in more deaths and longer hospital stay. Given the associated mortality, collection of blood cultures and empiric antibiotic therapy may be considered in patients who are critically ill. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Labeled factor IX kinetics in patients with hemophilia-B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, K.J.; Thompson, A.R.

    1981-01-01

    Labeled factor IX was infused five time into four patients with hemophilia-B. Ten-minute plasma recovery average 35% (SD +/- 2) and the mean T 1/2 beta-phase elimination was 23 hr (+/- 5). No alteration in the postinfusion 125I-factor-IX could be detected by radioautography of plasma samples run on polyacrylamide gels or on crossed-immunoelectrophoresis. Label was excreted into the urine as free 125I-iodide. Kinetics were similar when the labeled preparation was infused alone or with a commercial concentrate containing unlabeled factor IX. Infusion of factor IX in man is best described by a two-compartment open pharmacokinetic model where factor IX is distributed in a space larger than the plasma volume

  15. Factors that influence serum hyaluronan levels in hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Medina, M; Ashby, M; Diego, J; Pennell, J P; Hill, M; Schiff, E R; Perez, G O

    1999-01-01

    Serum hyaluronan levels are increased in dialysis patients. We evaluated several factors that influence serum hyaluronan levels in 184 patients on chronic hemodialysis (duration 2.3 +/- 2.3 [SD] years). The levels were higher than normal in the whole group and in a subgroup of 133 patients without chronic infection, liver disease, or rheumatoid arthritis (215 +/- 19 and 205 +/- 22 microg/L, respectively). There was a tendency for the levels to be higher in a subgroup of patients with hepatitis c virus (HCV) infection. There was no correlation between hyaluronan levels, alanine aminotransferase (ALT), and duration or dose of dialysis. A weak but highly significant negative correlation between serum albumin levels and serum hyaluronan and ferritin levels was seen. The data suggest that chronic inflammation may explain, at least in part, the increased hyaluronan levels found in chronic dialysis patients.

  16. Factors Associated with Sarcopenia among Older Patients Attending ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-04-04

    Apr 4, 2018 ... Keywords: Geriatric clinic, Nigeria, older patients, sarcopenia. Factors Associated ... sarcopenia are disuse‑related sarcopenia, disease‑related sarcopenia, ... psychiatry, and dental care. All newly .... respondents who received treatment in places other ..... physical disability: The cardiovascular health study.

  17. Plasma transforming growth factor beta levels in breast cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sminia, P; Barten, AD; Van Waarde, MAWH; Vujaskovic, Z; Van Tienhoven, G

    1998-01-01

    We investigated whether the concentration of circulating transforming growth factor beta (TGF beta) yields diagnostic value in breast cancer. Blood was collected from twenty stage I and II breast cancer patients both prior to treatment and after surgical excision of the tumour. Both latent and

  18. Plasma transforming growth factor beta levels in breast cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sminia, P.; Barten, A. D.; van Waarde, M. A.; Vujaskovic, Z.; van Tienhoven, G.

    1998-01-01

    We investigated whether the concentration of circulating transforming growth factor beta (TGFbeta) yields diagnostic value in breast cancer. Blood was collected from twenty stage I and II breast cancer patients both prior to treatment and after surgical excision of the tumour. Both latent and active

  19. Factors Influencing Smoking Cessation in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Kryss; Higgins, Helen

    1997-01-01

    Ten sociodemographic, clinical, and psychological characteristics considered predictors of difficulty with smoking cessation in patients with coronary artery disease are reviewed. The compounding effects of nicotine addiction are discussed. Consideration of these factors may result in individualized programs for smoking cessation. A brief overview…

  20. Prognostic factors for recovery in Portuguese patients with Bell's palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Margarida; Firmino-Machado, João; Marques, Elisa A; Santos, Paula C; Simões, Ana Daniela; Duarte, José A

    2016-10-01

    The main aim of this study was to identify the prognostic factors that contribute to complete recovery at 6 weeks and 6 months in patients with Bell's palsy. This is a prospective, longitudinal, and descriptive study that included 123 patients diagnosed with facial nerve palsy (FNP) at a hospital in Guimarães, Portugal. However, only 73 patients with Bell's palsy (BP) were included in the assessment of recovery at 6 weeks and 6 months. We analyzed the demographic and clinical characteristics of the patients, including sex, age, paralyzed side, occupation, previous and associated symptoms, seasonal occurrence, familial facial palsy, patient perception, intervention options, and baseline grade according to the House-Brackmann facial grading system (HB-FGS). Of the 123 cases with FNP, 79 (64.2%) patients had BP. Age, sex, and baseline HB-FGS grades were significant predictors of complete recovery at 6 weeks. Patients with HB-FGS grade III or lower (6 weeks baseline) had significant recovery of function at 6 months. Baseline severity of BP, elderly patients, and male sex were early predictors of poor prognosis. Patients with mild and moderate dysfunction according to the HB-FGS achieved significant normal facial function at 6 months. Further prospective studies with longer observation periods and larger samples are needed to verify the results.

  1. Factors Influencing Patient Selection of a Foot and Ankle Surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Blaine T; Bohl, Daniel D; Wang, Kevin C; Hamid, Kamran S; Holmes, George B; Lee, Simon

    2017-09-01

    An increasingly consumer-centric health insurance market has empowered patients to select the providers of their choice. There is a lack of studies investigating the rationale by which patients select a foot and ankle surgeon. In the present study, 824 consecutive new patients seeking treatment from 3 foot-ankle surgeons were consecutively administered an anonymous questionnaire prior to their first appointment. It included rating the importance of 15 factors regarding specialist selection on a 1 to 10 scale, with 10 designated " Very important" and 1 designated " Not important at all." The remaining questions were multiple choice regarding patient perspectives on other surgeon aspects (appointment availability, waiting room times, clinic proximity, etc). Of 824 consecutive patients administered the survey, 305 (37%) responded. Patients rated board certification (9.24 ± 1.87) and on-site imaging availability (8.48 ± 2.37)-on a 1 to 10 scale, with 10 designated "Very important- as the 2 most important criteria in choosing a foot and ankle surgeon. Patients rated advertisements as least important. Among the patients, 91% responded that a maximum of 30 minutes should elapse between clinic check-in and seeing their physician; 61% responded that a maximum of 20 minutes should elapse between clinic check-in and seeing their physician. In the context of an increasingly consumer-driven paradigm of health care delivery and reimbursement, it is important to understand patients' preferences in specialist selection. Level III: Prospective questionnaire.

  2. Risk Factors and Stroke Characteristic in Patients with Postoperative Strokes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yi; Cao, Wenjie; Cheng, Xin; Fang, Kun; Zhang, Xiaolong; Gu, Yuxiang; Leng, Bing; Dong, Qiang

    2017-07-01

    Intravenous thrombolysis and intra-arterial thrombectomy are now the standard therapies for patients with acute ischemic stroke. In-house strokes have often been overlooked even at stroke centers and there is no consensus on how they should be managed. Perioperative stroke happens rather frequently but treatment protocol is lacking, In China, the issue of in-house strokes has not been explored. The aim of this study is to explore the current management of in-house stroke and identify the common risk factors associated with perioperative strokes. Altogether, 51,841 patients were admitted to a tertiary hospital in Shanghai and the records of those who had a neurological consult for stroke were reviewed. Their demographics, clinical characteristics, in-hospital complications and operations, and management plans were prospectively studied. Routine laboratory test results and risk factors of these patients were analyzed by multiple logistic regression model. From January 1, 2015, to December 31, 2015, over 1800 patients had neurological consultations. Among these patients, 37 had an in-house stroke and 20 had more severe stroke during the postoperative period. Compared to in-house stroke patients without a procedure or operation, leukocytosis and elevated fasting glucose levels were more common in perioperative strokes. In multiple logistic regression model, perioperative strokes were more likely related to large vessel occlusion. Patients with perioperative strokes had different risk factors and severity from other in-house strokes. For these patients, obtaining a neurological consultation prior to surgery may be appropriate in order to evaluate the risk of perioperative stroke. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Glaucoma Patient-Reported Concerns and Associated Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogil, Rachel S; Tirsi, Andrew; Lee, Jung Min; Tello, Celso; Park, Sung Chul

    2017-06-01

    To assess the character and degree of concerns of glaucoma patients and identify demographic/clinical factors affecting the concerns. Prospective cross-sectional study. A questionnaire that addressed patients' concerns was administered to consecutive glaucoma patients. Severity of concern was scored with a scale of 0-5 in order of increasing severity. Age, sex, intraocular pressure, visual field (VF) mean deviation (MD), number of antiglaucoma medications, history of glaucoma surgery, and employment status were recorded. Questionnaire results of 152 patients (mean VF MD, -8.03 ± 7.86 dB [better eye] and -16.06 ± 10.22 dB [worse eye]; mean age, 69 ± 14 years) were analyzed. Severity of concern was greatest for general eyesight (2.92/5.00) and visual symptoms (2.78/5.00), followed by activities (2.20/5.00) and socioeconomic factors (2.13/5.00), and then ocular symptoms (1.69/5.00) (P factors correlated with VF MD of the better eye (r = -0.245; P = .003) and age (r = -0.260; P = .001). Glaucoma patients reported varied degrees of concern regarding items associated with quality of life. Certain items may be more concerning than others. Severity of some concerns increased with more severe VF loss, prior glaucoma surgery, or younger age. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. [Therapeutic education of total laryngectomy patients: Influence of social factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woisard, V; Galtier, A; Baumann, L; Delpierre, C; Puech, M; Balaguer, M

    Current health policies promote patient education, parti­cu­lar­ly in oncology. Therapeutic education program must be tailo­red to the characteristics, needs and expectations of the population. In the ENT Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Larrey Hospital in Toulouse, a therapeutic education program for patient with total laryngectomy has been experienced since 2011. But its propagation remains difficult. The aim of this study is to determine if social factors are nfluencing the parti­cipation of the laryngectomized population in the program. The brochure explaining this program and a registration form coupled with a survey questionnaire were distributed to the regio­nal population of patient with total laryngectomy. After two months of investigation we collected 42 responses. It is clear from their analysis that social factors underlie partici­pa­tion, particularly educational level, available financial resources level and the socio-professional group.

  5. Trigger factors in migraine patients Fatores desencadeantes de enxaqueca

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Timy Fukui

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Migraine is a chronic neurological disease with several trigger factors, including dietary, hormonal and environmental factors. PURPOSE: To analyse precipitating factors in a sample of migraine patients. METHOD: Two hundred consecutive migraine patients were interviewed about possible trigger factors for migraine attacks. RESULTS: Most patients showed at least one dietary trigger, fasting was the most frequent one, followed by alcohol and chocolate. Hormonal factors appeared in 53% , being the pre-menstrual period the most frequent trigger. Physical activities caused migraine in 13%, sexual activities in 2.5% and 64% reported emotional stress a trigger factor. 81% related some sleep problem as a trigger factor. Regarding environmental factors, smells were reported by 36.5%. CONCLUSION: Trigger factors are frequent in migraine patients, its avoidance may decrease headache frequency and also improve patients' quality of life.INTRODUÇÃO: A enxaqueca é uma doença neurológica crônica que apresenta diversos desencadeantes como fatores alimentares, hormonais e ambientais. OBJETIVO: Analisar os fatores desencadeantes em uma amostra de pacientes com enxaqueca. MÉTODO: Duzentos pacientes com diagnóstico de enxaqueca foram questionados sobre fatores que pudessem desencadear suas crises. RESULTADOS: 83,5% apresentaram algum fator alimentar, jejum foi o fator mais freqüente, seguido de álcool e chocolate. Dos fatores hormonais, o período pré-menstrual foi o mais freqüente. Atividade física causou enxaquecas em 13%, atividade sexual em 2,5%, estresse em 64% e 81% relataram o sono como fator desencadeante. Em relação aos fatores ambientais, odores foram desencadeantes em 36,5%. CONCLUSÃO: Os fatores desencadeantes são freqüentes em enxaqueca e a sua detecção deve ser pormenorizada para que se reduza a freqüência de crises e melhore a qualidade de vida do paciente.

  6. Factors associated with suicide in patients with genitourinary malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaassen, Zachary; Jen, Rita P; DiBianco, John M; Reinstatler, Lael; Li, Qiang; Madi, Rabii; Lewis, Ronald W; Smith, Arthur M; Neal, Durwood E; Moses, Kelvin A; Terris, Martha K

    2015-06-01

    Approximately 70% of all suicides in patients aged >60 years are attributed to physical illness, with higher rates noted in patients with cancer. The purpose of the current study was to characterize suicide rates among patients with genitourinary cancers and identify factors associated with suicide in this specific cohort. Patients with prostate, bladder, kidney, testis, and penile cancer were identified in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database (1988-2010). Standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were calculated for each anatomic site. Multivariable logistic regression models generated odds ratios (ORs) for the identification of factors associated with suicide for each malignancy. There were 2268 suicides identified among 1,239,522 individuals with genitourinary malignancies observed for 7,307,377 person-years. The SMRs for patients with cancer were 1.37 for prostate cancer (95% CI, 0.99-1.86), 2.71 for bladder cancer (95% CI, 2.02-3.62), 1.86 for kidney cancer (95% CI, 1.32-2.62), 1.23 for testis cancer (95% CI, 0.88-1.73), and 0.95 for penile cancer (95% CI, 0.65-1.35). On multivariable analysis, male sex was found to be associated with odds of suicide among patients with bladder cancer (OR, 6.63) and kidney cancer (OR, 4.98). Increasing age was associated with suicide for patients with prostate, bladder, and testis cancer (OR range, 1.03-1.06). Distant disease was associated with suicide in patients with prostate, bladder, and kidney cancer (OR range, 2.82-5.43). Among patients with prostate, bladder, and kidney cancer, African American patients were less likely to commit suicide compared with white individuals (OR range, 0.26-0.46). Suicide in patients with genitourinary malignancies poses a public health dilemma, especially among men, the elderly, and those with aggressive disease. Clinicians should be aware of risk factors for suicide in these patients. © 2015 American Cancer Society.

  7. Factors Affecting Mortality in Elderly Patients Hospitalized for Nonmalignant Reasons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teslime Ayaz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Elderly population is hospitalized more frequently than young people, and they suffer from more severe diseases that are difficult to diagnose and treat. The present study aimed to investigate the factors affecting mortality in elderly patients hospitalized for nonmalignant reasons. Demographic data, reason for hospitalization, comorbidities, duration of hospital stay, and results of routine blood testing at the time of first hospitalization were obtained from the hospital records of the patients, who were over 65 years of age and hospitalized primarily for nonmalignant reasons. The mean age of 1012 patients included in the study was 77.8 ± 7.6. The most common reason for hospitalization was diabetes mellitus (18.3%. Of the patients, 90.3% had at least a single comorbidity. Whilst 927 (91.6% of the hospitalized patients were discharged, 85 (8.4% died. Comparison of the characteristics of the discharged and dead groups revealed that the dead group was older and had higher rates of poor general status and comorbidity. Differences were observed between the discharged and dead groups in most of the laboratory parameters. Hypoalbuminemia, hypertriglyceridemia, hypopotassemia, hypernatremia, hyperuricemia, and high TSH level were the predictors of mortality. In order to meet the health necessities of the elderly population, it is necessary to well define the patient profiles and to identify the risk factors.

  8. Pharmacists' Roles and Factors Affecting Patient Care in Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica J. Hwang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study was conducted to explore Korean community pharmacists' perceptions of their roles in providing care to patients after the implementation of the Separation of Prescribing and Dispensing Act (SPD Act and to investigate pharmacists' perceptions about factors that impact their patient care. Methods: Eight community pharmacists participated in semi-structured, face-to-face, in-depth interviews in Korea. A snowball sampling technique was used to obtain participants. Interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed. Interviews were analyzed using a summative content analysis procedure. Key findings: Participants' perceptions of their roles centered on dispensing prescriptions, educating and counseling patients, and helping patients with OTC products. Participants perceived time constraints due to prescription volume and patient expectations as factors influencing their provision of patient care. Conclusion: This study suggests that the SPD Act was successful in changing pharmacists' roles in the Korean health care system. None of the participants perceived their role to include prescribing, while all of the participants indicated that their primary role was to dispense medications. Future research should examine the pervasiveness of the themes identified in this study across Korean community pharmacy practice in order to generalize the impact of the SPD Act.   Type: Original Research

  9. Factors affecting RAIU in hyperthyroidism patients: an analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang Yi; Liu Jianfeng; Zhang Xiuli

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the factors affecting thyroid radioiodine uptake (RAIU) of hyperthyroidism patients. Methods; RAIU was performed in 106 hyperthyroidism patients. Some factors were studied to analyze influences on the peak of RAIU, including patients' age and sex, gland weight, taking antithyroid drugs (ATD) or not, time of ATD taking and withdrawal. Results: Patients' RAIU peak had no significant difference for different ages and sex (F=1.68, P=0.1439). If preparation was performed according to the requirements before RAIU measurement, taking ATD or not had no influence on RAIU (t=1.1362, P=0.2625). RAIU peak was different between patients whose gland weight was ≤ 30 g and >30 g. Conclusions: Age and sex have no influence on RAIU. As long as ATD was discontinued at least one week before RAIU measurement, time of taking ATD and discontinuation have no influence on RAIU, and the result of measurement coincide with that of patients who do not take medicine. RAIU peak has relation with gland weight, and RAIU of people with gland weight ≤30 g was lower than that of people with gland weight >30 g

  10. Review: Psychological Factors Affecting Rehabilitation of Neurologic Patients

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    Mahshid Foroughan

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Psychological factors imply their negative effects on neurologic patients in two ways. Directly, through pathogenic processes of central nervous system, and indirectly, through maladaptive reactions toward disability. Depression: is a common finding in many neurologic diseases and may interfere with rehabilitation process. Correcting patient's attitude toward disability, reducing environmental stresses and potentiating social support network along with antidepressant drugs often help these patients remain in rehabilitation program. Chronic fatigue: decreases the activity levels of patients and the possibility for them to achieve set goals of rehabilitation in proper times. Support, reassurance and sometimes antidepressant drugs may help. Conversion reactions: often accompany chronic illnesses and disabilities and make evaluation and diagnosis difficult. Application of behavioral Techniques may lead to better results. Altered self image: is a prominent feature in patients with spinal cord injury. Counseling and Free discussion on altered self image and sexual problems are essential and other forms of sexual expression must be taught to these patients. Chronic pain: is a disabling condition. Usually physical findings are minor and it seems psychological factors play a more important role in causing it. Antidepressant drugs are effective in most cases. Intensive physical and occupational therapy must be avoided. Excessive emotionality: is a consequence of executive dysfunction arising from frontal lobe injury and mostly seen in stroke, brain injured, and demented patients, Impulsivity and disinhibition may lead to aggressive behavior and socially inappropriate forms of sexual expression. Judicious administration of psychotherapy drugs, behavioral techniques and short-term hospitalization may be helpful. Altered cognition: is a common feature of many pathological conditions of brain. Attention deficit, slowed information processing, disturbed

  11. [Fournier gangrene: evaluation of prognostic factors in 90 patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina Polo, J; Tejido Sánchez, A; de la Rosa Kehrmann, F; Felip Santamaría, N; Blanco Alvarez, M; Leiva Galvis, O

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluates the risk factors and prognostic variables that affect survival of patients with gangrene of Fournier. The study retrospectively analyzed 90 consecutive patients with gangrene of Fournier treated in our institution between 1975 and 2008. We evaluated the average age, associated systemic diseases, and the source, time of evolution and extent of necrotizing fasciitis. The outcomes were assessed according to whether the patient survived or died. All patients had aggressive surgical debridement, and received parenteral antibiotic therapy. The mortality rate was 34.4%. The mean age was 63.0 years (range 33-95), a statistically significant difference was found between the age of the survivors (median age, 59.84 years) and those who died (median age, 70.20 years) (p = 0.001). Medical comorbidities were identified in 51 patients; the death rate was higher in patients who had any medical disease, especially those who suffered from cancer. Although diabetes mellitus was the most common associated pathology, it was not related to a statistically significant worst prognosis. The source of the infection was identified in 62 patients, who showed a higher mortality (p = 0.015), the mortality rate when a urological source is identified was 50%. Moreover, patients suffering from a more extensive necrotizing infection showed a worst prognosis. The gangrene of Fournier has a high mortality rate. Large series are required to study prognostic variables of this disease. The patient age, the presence of systemic risk factors, especially cancer, a urological source of infection and the extent of the disease have impact on the prognosis of Fournier's gangrene.

  12. [Preliminary investigation of psychologic factors in 76 tinnitus patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Kunhua; Jiang, Wen; Feng, Yong

    2011-08-01

    To study the psychological aspects of tinnitus patients, to analyze the distribution of psychologic obstacle in tinnitus patients, and then to provide information for diagnosing and treating tinnitus clinically. All patients were detected their frequency and loudness of tinnitus. Then they were evaluated by symptom checklist 90 (SCL-90), life satisfaction scale, Pittsburgh sleep quality index (PSQI) and tinnitus handicap inventory (THI). All data were analyzed with statistical software SPSS11.0. (1)There was no straight line correlation between frequency, loudness of tinnitus and the patient's scores from SCL-90, life satisfaction rating scale (LSR), life satisfaction index A (LSIA), LSIB, PSQI, THI. (2) To 76 tinnitus patients, some factors of SCL-90 were higher than internal nom. Compared with internal nom, tinnitus patients' score of LSR, LSIA and LSIB were all lower than it. Many of tinnitus patients had sleep disorder, the ratio was higher than internal nom. (3) Grouping these patients, based on the score of THI. To THI four grade group and THI five grade group, their satisfaction of lives were lower, some factors of SCL-90 were higher than internal nom. To THI five grade group, the ratio about sleep disorder was higher than internal nom. There is no straight line correlation between frequency, loudness of tinnitus and the patient's scores from SCL-90, LSR, LSIA, LSIB, PSQ1, THI. Grouping based on the score of THI, the groups of THI four grade and THI five grade are approved that they have psychologic obstacle obviously, they should be paid close attention.

  13. Cardiometabolic Risk Factors in Patients with Erectile Dysfunction

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    Serhat Tanik

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. There is an increasing interest in the association between erectile dysfunction (ED and cardiovascular risk factor. Epicardial adipose tissue (EAT is associated with insulin resistance, increased cardiometabolic risk, and coronary artery disease. Our aim was to investigate relationships between epicardial fat thickness (EFT as a cardiometabolic risk factor and erectile dysfunction. Method. We selected 30 erectile dysfunction patients without comorbidities and 30 healthy individuals. IIEF-5 score was applied to all patients, and IIEF-5 score below 22 was considered as erectile dysfunction. EFT was measured by echocardiography. Results. Body mass index (BMI was higher in ED patients than those without ED (28.19 ± 4.45 kg/m2 versus 23.84±2.36 kg/m2, P = 0.001, resp.. Waist circumstance (WC was higher in ED patients than those without ED (106.60±5.90 versus 87.86 ± 14.51, P = 0.001, resp.. EFT was higher in ED patients compared to non-ED patients (0.49 ± 0.09 cm versus 0.45 ± 0.03 cm, P = 0.016, resp.. There was positive correlation among BMI, WC, and EFT. There was negative correlation between EFT and IIEF-5 score (r : -0.632, P = 0.001. Conclusion. EAT, BMI, and WC as cardiometabolic risk factors were higher in erectile dysfunction patients.

  14. Factors associated with successful decannulation in pediatric tracheostomy patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Nozomi; Takano, Kenichi; Mitsuzawa, Hiroaki; Kurose, Maokoto; Himi, Tetsuo

    2017-10-01

    To investigate the outcome of pediatric tracheostomy and identify predictive factors for successful decannulation. We performed a retrospective chart review of a series of 42 consecutive patients of less than 24 months of age who underwent a tracheostomy between 2012 and 2015. Successful decannulation was achieved in 11 patients (26%). Thirty-one patients (74%) remained tracheostomy-dependent. Of the 11 patients who were successfully decannulated, 10 (91%) had only structural disorders and nine (82%) were able to walk unassisted; importantly, nine (82%) were able to swallow following decannulation. In contrast, of the 31 patients who did not tolerate decannulation, 21 (68%) had functional disorders and 18 (58%) were unable to walk unassisted; 20 (65%) of the tracheostomy-dependent patients were unable to swallow after undergoing surgery. Following pediatric tracheostomy procedures, patients with solely structural disorders were significantly more likely to be successfully decannulated compared to patients with functional disorders. Furthermore, the capacity to walk unassisted and swallow after surgery is associated with positive outcomes for decannulation. Our results suggest that an objective evaluation of the ability to walk unassisted, and to ingest food, may be useful for predicting the outcome and effects of tracheostomy procedures and decannulation in children.

  15. Factors Influencing Resilience of Burn Patients in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Mi Heui; Park, Jongui; Chong, Mi Kyong; Sok, Sohyune R

    2017-09-01

    To examine and identify the factors influencing the degree of resilience among Korean burn patients. A cross-sectional descriptive design was employed. The study sample consisted of 138 burn patients recovering from the acute phase in H hospital, Seoul. The male patient participants numbered 93 (67.4%) and the female participants numbered 45 (32.6%). The average age of the participants was 46.79 years. Measures used were the Beck Depression Inventory, State Trait Anxiety Inventory, self-esteem scale, family support scale, and resilience scale. The analyses showed that the prediction model for resilience among burn patients was significant (F = 33.94, p resilience among burn patients was self-esteem (β = .35), followed by family support (β = .29). This study provides preliminary evidence that self-esteem is a major and primary predictor of resilience among burn patients, next followed by family support. In the nursing practice, nurses need to pay attention to the burn patient's self-esteem and family support. Concrete interventions and strategies to improve the resilience of burn patients are needed. © 2017 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  16. Differences in Risk Factors for Rotator Cuff Tears between Elderly Patients and Young Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Akihisa; Ono, Qana; Nishigami, Tomohiko; Hirooka, Takahiko; Machida, Hirohisa

    2018-02-01

    It has been unclear whether the risk factors for rotator cuff tears are the same at all ages or differ between young and older populations. In this study, we examined the risk factors for rotator cuff tears using classification and regression tree analysis as methods of nonlinear regression analysis. There were 65 patients in the rotator cuff tears group and 45 patients in the intact rotator cuff group. Classification and regression tree analysis was performed to predict rotator cuff tears. The target factor was rotator cuff tears; explanatory variables were age, sex, trauma, and critical shoulder angle≥35°. In the results of classification and regression tree analysis, the tree was divided at age 64. For patients aged≥64, the tree was divided at trauma. For patients agedrotator cuff tears in this study. However, these risk factors showed different trends according to age group, not a linear relationship.

  17. Successful Pregnancy in a Patient with Combined Deficiency of Factor V and Factor VIII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Adib, Ahmed Ghassan; Majdi, Farah; Dilai, Mohamed Othmane; Asmouki, Hamid; Bassir, Ahlam; Harou, Karam; Soumani, Abderraouf; Younous, Said; Mahmal, Lahoucine

    2014-01-01

    Inherited combined factor V and factor VIII deficiency (F5F8D) is autosomal recessive transmission disorder. Epistaxis, postsurgical bleeding, and menorrhagia are the most common symptoms. The risk of miscarriage and placental abruption is consequent. We report a case of successful pregnancy in a patient with F5F8D. 20-year-old woman, born of consanguineous parents, third gestate, first parity, two miscarriages, admitted for child birth of a spontaneous pregnancy estimated at 38 weeks and was diagnosed with F5F8D. At admission, patient was hemodynamically stable, with good obstetric conditions. The biologic results showed low levels of PT (52%), factor V (7%), and factor VIII (5%), and the activated partial thromboplastin time was prolonged (68,6%). Parturient was admitted in intensive care unit, maternal and fetal monitoring was performed. Fresh frozen plasma (FFP) and factor VIII concentrates were perfused at the induction of labor. Analgesia used fentanyl titration. The delivery gave birth to a newborn male, with Apgar 10/10 and 3000 g. The puerperium was simple without any important bleeding. Laboratory tests for the newborn were acceptable. Little literature is available on this subject and there are no guidelines available concerning pregnancy; we chose to prescribe a combination of factor VIII concentrate and FFP in pre-, per- and postpartum. The same protocol was successfully used in a patient before dental extraction and prostatectomy. Vaginal delivery is possible, as our case. Management by multidisciplinary team is recommended.

  18. Factors predicting hyperkalemia in patients with cirrhosis receiving spironolactone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbas, Z.; Mumtaz, K.; Salam, A.; Jafri, W.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the factors leading to hyperkalemia in patients with cirrhosis receiving spironolactone. Results: Patients with hyperkalemia (K>5 mmol/l) had higher blood urea nitrogen, serum creatinine and bilirubin levels (p=0.004, 0.001 and 0.044 respectively). Their serum sodium and albumin levels were lower (p=0.000 and 0.017 respectively). They had advanced cirrhosis with high Pugh score (p=0.003). These patients were on higher dose of spironolactone (p=0.001). Multivariate analysis showed that dose of spironolactone > 100 mg/day, serum creatinine >1.3 mg/dl, persistence of ascites and edema, and female gender were important predictors of development of hyperkalemia. Conclusion: Patients with cirrhosis receiving high dose of the diuretic, having edema, ascites and high serum creatinine are at the greater risk of developing hyperkalemia during spironolactone therapy. (author)

  19. Patient-based radiographic exposure factor selection: a systematic review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ching, William; Robinson, John; McEntee, Mark, E-mail: mark.mcentee@sydney.edu.au [Discipline of Medical Radiation Sciences, University of Sydney, Lidcombe, New South Wales (Australia)

    2014-09-15

    Digital technology has wider exposure latitude and post-processing algorithms which can mask the evidence of underexposure and overexposure. Underexposure produces noisy, grainy images which can impede diagnosis and overexposure results in a greater radiation dose to the patient. These exposure errors can result from inaccurate adjustment of exposure factors in response to changes in patient thickness. This study aims to identify all published radiographic exposure adaptation systems which have been, or are being, used in general radiography and discuss their applicability to digital systems. Studies in EMBASE, MEDLINE, CINAHL and SCOPUS were systematically reviewed. Some of the search terms used were exposure adaptation, exposure selection, exposure technique, 25% rule, 15% rule, DuPont™ Bit System and radiography. A manual journal-specific search was also conducted in The Radiographer and Radiologic Technology. Studies were included if they demonstrated a system of altering exposure factors to compensate for variations in patients for general radiography. Studies were excluded if they focused on finding optimal exposures for an ‘average’ patient or focused on the relationship between exposure factors and dose. The database search uncovered 11 articles and the journal-specific search uncovered 13 articles discussing systems of exposure adaptation. They can be categorised as simple one-step guidelines, comprehensive charts and computer programs. Only two papers assessed the efficacy of exposure adjustment systems. No literature compares the efficacy of exposure adaptations system for film/screen radiography with digital radiography technology nor is there literature on a digital specific exposure adaptation system.

  20. Patient-based radiographic exposure factor selection: a systematic review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ching, William; Robinson, John; McEntee, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Digital technology has wider exposure latitude and post-processing algorithms which can mask the evidence of underexposure and overexposure. Underexposure produces noisy, grainy images which can impede diagnosis and overexposure results in a greater radiation dose to the patient. These exposure errors can result from inaccurate adjustment of exposure factors in response to changes in patient thickness. This study aims to identify all published radiographic exposure adaptation systems which have been, or are being, used in general radiography and discuss their applicability to digital systems. Studies in EMBASE, MEDLINE, CINAHL and SCOPUS were systematically reviewed. Some of the search terms used were exposure adaptation, exposure selection, exposure technique, 25% rule, 15% rule, DuPont™ Bit System and radiography. A manual journal-specific search was also conducted in The Radiographer and Radiologic Technology. Studies were included if they demonstrated a system of altering exposure factors to compensate for variations in patients for general radiography. Studies were excluded if they focused on finding optimal exposures for an ‘average’ patient or focused on the relationship between exposure factors and dose. The database search uncovered 11 articles and the journal-specific search uncovered 13 articles discussing systems of exposure adaptation. They can be categorised as simple one-step guidelines, comprehensive charts and computer programs. Only two papers assessed the efficacy of exposure adjustment systems. No literature compares the efficacy of exposure adaptations system for film/screen radiography with digital radiography technology nor is there literature on a digital specific exposure adaptation system

  1. Risk Factors of Treatment Failure in Diabetic Foot Ulcer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung Mook Lee

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundSome diabetic feet heal without complication, but others undergo amputation due to progressive wounds. This study investigates the risk factors for amputation of diabetic feet.MethodsA total of 55 patients who visited our institution from 2008 to 2012 were included in the study. The patients with abnormal fasting blood sugar levels, lower leg vascularity, and poor nutrition were excluded from the study group, and the wound states were unified. The patients were categorized into a treatment success group (n=47 and a treatment failure group (n=8, and their hemoglobin A1C (HgA1C, C-reactive protein (CRP, white blood cell count (WBC, and serum creatinine levels were analyzed.ResultsThe initial CRP, WBC, and serum creatinine levels in the treatment failure group were significantly higher than that of the treatment success group, and the initial HgA1C level was significantly higher in the treatment success group. The CRP and WBC levels of both groups changed significantly as time passed, but their serum creatinine levels did not.ConclusionsThe initial CRP, WBC, and serum creatinine levels were considered to be risk factors for amputation. Among them, the serum creatinine level was found to be the most important predictive risk factor. Because serum creatinine represents the renal function, thorough care is needed for the feet of diabetic patients with renal impairment.

  2. Prognostic factors for differentiated thyroid carcinoma in young patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Handkiewicz-Junak, D.; Kalemba, B.; Roskosz, J.; Kukulska, A.; Puch, Z.; Jarzab, B.; Wloch, J.; Lange, D.

    2001-01-01

    Standard therapy of differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) comprises thyroid surgery, radioiodine treatment and L-thyroxine suppressive treatment. However, in the case of young patients the extent of surgery and the need for radioiodine treatment are questioned by some authors on the basis of the overall good prognosis in this group. The aim of the study was to perform a retrospective analysis of prognostic factors for differentiated thyroid cancer in patients in the first three decades of their life. The study included 274 patients who were younger than 28 years at the day of diagnosis of DTC and were observed for a mean time of 5 years. Uni- and multivariate analysis of prognostic factors for disease - free survival was performed with Cox's regression method. The actuarial survival rate was 100%, the 5 and 10-year actuarial disease free survival was 85% and 75%, respectively. In a multivariate analysis lymph node metastases, the extent of surgery and radioiodine therapy were estimated as statistically significant, independent prognostic factors for DTC relapse. Radical treatment of DTC more advanced than pT1NOMO should include total thyroidectomy and postoperative complementary radioiodine therapy. Such procedure is also justified in young patients, as it ensures a decrease of the risk of recurrence. (author)

  3. Risk factors and comorbidities in Brazilian patients with orofacial clefts

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    Heglayne Pereira Vital da Silva

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Considering that environmental risk factors substantially contribute to the etiology of orofacial clefts and that knowledge about the characteristics and comorbidities associated with oral clefts is fundamental to promoting better quality of life, this study aimed to describe the risk factors, main characteristics, and comorbidities of a group of patients with cleft lip and/or cleft palate (CL/P from Rio Grande do Norte (RN, Brazil. Data were obtained from 173 patients with CL/P using a form from the Brazilian database on Orofacial Clefts. Most patients were male with cleft lip and palate and had a normal size and weight at birth; presented few neonatal intercurrent events; and had anemia and respiratory and cardiovascular diseases as main associated comorbidities. They also required timely surgical rehabilitation and multidisciplinary care to stimulate their neuropsychomotor development. In addition, a high frequency of familial recurrence and of parental consanguinity was evidenced in the studied population, especially for the cleft lip and cleft palate type. Other relevant findings were the considerable maternal exposure to alcohol, infections, smoking, and hypertension, as well as low supplementation with vitamins and minerals and deliberate consumption of analgesics, antibiotics, and antihypertensives during pregnancy. Characterization of the CL/P patient profile is essential for the planning of health services and integration among the health professionals involved in the diagnosis and treatment of these malformations. Our results reinforce the need for additional research to confirm the association between environmental factors and the development of orofacial clefts.

  4. Factors Impacting On Patient Compliance with Medical Advice: Empirical Study

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    Krot Katarzyna

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper to identify factors which have a bearing on compliance with medical advice in various age groups. The survey was conducted, using the CAWI method, on a representative sample of 1000 respondents who declared having used healthcare services in the previous six months. Control of competences is one of the strongest factors which is common for the oldest and youngest groups. Interestingly, trust in the integrity and honesty of doctors is significant for the youngest patients, i.e., the higher is the level of trust, the lower is the tendency to non-comply. Another type of trust is related to the benevolence of doctors and is significant to patients of the middle age group. Satisfaction is a significant predictor in the two oldest groups of patients. High levels of satisfaction seem to deter people from non-adherence to recommended treatment regimens. The results of the present study provide knowledge about the nature and diversity of factors behind patient compliance in various age groups.

  5. Risk factors for unscheduled delivery in patients with placenta accreta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Zachary S; Manuck, Tracy A; Eller, Alexandra G; Simons, Marilee; Silver, Robert M

    2014-03-01

    Patients with suspected placenta accreta have improved outcomes with scheduled delivery. Our objective was to identify risk factors for unscheduled delivery in patients with suspected placenta accreta. This was a cohort study of women with antenatally suspected placenta accreta. Women who delivered prior to a planned delivery date were compared with women who had a scheduled delivery. Data were analyzed using a Student t test, χ(2), logistic regression, and survival analyses. Variables included in the analyses were episodes of antenatal vaginal bleeding, preterm premature rupture of membranes (PPROM), uterine contractions, prior cesarean deliveries, interpregnancy interval, parity, and patient demographic factors. A value of P accreta were identified. Thirty-eight (49.4%) had an unscheduled delivery. Demographics were similar between groups. Unscheduled patients delivered earlier (mean 32.3 vs 35.7 weeks, P accreta, those with antenatal vaginal bleeding were more likely to require unscheduled delivery. This risk increases further in the setting of PPROM and/or uterine contractions. These clinical factors should be considered when determining the optimal delivery gestational age for women with placental accreta. Copyright © 2014 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Risk factors for readmission in schizophrenia patients following involuntary admission.

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    Yu-Yuan Hung

    Full Text Available Individuals with schizophrenia who are involuntarily admitted may have poorer prognosis, including higher readmission rates, than those voluntarily admitted. However, little is known about the risk factors for readmission in those schizophrenia patients who are involuntarily admitted.We aim to explore the risk factors for readmission in this population.We enrolled 138 schizophrenia patients with involuntary admission from July 2008 to June 2013 and followed those patients for readmission outcomes at 3 months and at 1 year.The one-year and 3-months readmission rates were 33.3% and 15.2%, respectively. Unmarried status (adjusted odds ratio (aOR = 6.28, 95% CI: 1.48-26.62, previous history of involuntary admission (aOR = 4.08, 95% CI: 1.19-14.02, longer involuntary admission days (aOR = 1.04, 95% CI: 1.01-1.07 and shorter total admission days (aOR = 1.03, 95% CI: 1.01-1.05 were associated with increased risk for 1-year readmission. Younger age (aOR = 1.10, 95% CI 1.02-1.18 was associated with increased risk for 3-months readmission.Unmarried status, prior history of involuntary admission, longer involuntary admission days and shorter total admission days were associated with increased risk for 1-year readmission. Healthcare providers may need to focus on patients with these risk factors to reduce subsequent readmissions.

  7. Risk factors for readmission in schizophrenia patients following involuntary admission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Yu-Yuan; Chan, Hung-Yu; Pan, Yi-Ju

    2017-01-01

    Individuals with schizophrenia who are involuntarily admitted may have poorer prognosis, including higher readmission rates, than those voluntarily admitted. However, little is known about the risk factors for readmission in those schizophrenia patients who are involuntarily admitted. We aim to explore the risk factors for readmission in this population. We enrolled 138 schizophrenia patients with involuntary admission from July 2008 to June 2013 and followed those patients for readmission outcomes at 3 months and at 1 year. The one-year and 3-months readmission rates were 33.3% and 15.2%, respectively. Unmarried status (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = 6.28, 95% CI: 1.48-26.62), previous history of involuntary admission (aOR = 4.08, 95% CI: 1.19-14.02), longer involuntary admission days (aOR = 1.04, 95% CI: 1.01-1.07) and shorter total admission days (aOR = 1.03, 95% CI: 1.01-1.05) were associated with increased risk for 1-year readmission. Younger age (aOR = 1.10, 95% CI 1.02-1.18) was associated with increased risk for 3-months readmission. Unmarried status, prior history of involuntary admission, longer involuntary admission days and shorter total admission days were associated with increased risk for 1-year readmission. Healthcare providers may need to focus on patients with these risk factors to reduce subsequent readmissions.

  8. Serum IL-6 level and associated factors: hemodialysis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seifi S, Mokhtari A

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: The annual amount of mortality in ESRD exceeds the expectation and represents the recent evidences of the inflammation as its etiology. The etiology of inflammation is not clearly known. Chronic inflammation is a dominant occurrence of ESRD which increases the risk of atherosclerosis, malnutrition and peripheral vascular disease. Inflammatory responses are orchestrated by cytokines. Some of the proinflammatory cytokines like IL-6 have a crucial role in this phenomenon. The IL-6 and its receptor activity is up regulated in ESRD patients and the increased level of IL-6 predicts cardiovascular mortality and morbidity in normal and CRF patients. This study devotes itself to determining the serum level of IL-6 and factors affecting it in patients undergoing chronic hemodialysis in Imam Khomeini Hospital which can represent the Iranian Society. By identifying factors affecting the serum level of IL-6 and high-risk patients we can provide treatment possibilities, a decrease in mortality and an improvement in its prognosis. "n"nMethods: In this study 42 patients in Imam Dialysis Center were chosen and their serum IL-6 levels were measured at 2 times at three month interval and at the same time blood sample analysis were done for the following: Alb CPR, Ca, P, PTH, TIBC, Ferritin, TG, Chol, LDL, HDL, Uric Acid, Hb, WBC and urea."n"nResults: The mean serum level of IL-6 in hemodialysis patients was 6.35±4.47pg/ml (minimum: 0.55, maximum: 18.25 with the normal range of 1.3±3.2pg/ml."n"nConclusions: The IL-6 level was higher than normal range in the 52% of the patients. The serum IL-6 level had a significant correlations with CPR, Ferritin, TIBC, WBC and their serum IL-6 level was significantly higher in patients with hypertension, but no significant correlation was observed between other parameters and IL-6

  9. Factors affecting 30-month survival in lung cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahesh, P A; Archana, S; Jayaraj, B S; Patil, Shekar; Chaya, S K; Shashidhar, H P; Sunitha, B S; Prabhakar, A K

    2012-10-01

    Age adjusted incidence rate of lung cancer in India ranges from 7.4 to 13.1 per 100,000 among males and 3.9 to 5.8 per 100,000 among females. The factors affecting survival in lung cancer patients in India are not fully understood. The current study was undertaken to evaluate the factors affecting survival in patients diagnosed with lung cancer attending a tertiary care cancer institute in Bangalore, Karnataka, India. Consecutive patients with primary lung cancer attending Bangalore Institute of Oncology, a tertiary care centre at Bangalore, between 2006 and 2009 were included. Demographic, clinical, radiological data were collected retrospectively from the medical records. A total of 170 consecutive subjects (128 males, 42 females) diagnosed to have lung cancer; 151 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and 19 small cell lung cancer (SCLC) were included. A higher proportion of never-smokers (54.1%) were observed, mostly presenting below the age of 60 yr. Most subjects were in stage IV and III at the time of diagnosis. More than 50 per cent of patients presented with late stage lung cancer even though the duration of symptoms is less than 2 months. The 30-month overall survival rates for smokers and never-smokers were 32 and 49 per cent, respectively. No significant differences were observed in 30 month survival based on age at presentation, gender and type of lung cancer. Cox proportional hazards model identified never-smokers and duration of symptoms less than 1 month as factors adversely affecting survival. Our results showed that lung cancer in Indians involved younger subjects and associated with poorer survival as compared to other ethnic population. Studies on large sample need to be done to evaluate risk factors in lung cancer patients.

  10. CARDIOVASCULAR RISK FACTORS IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC OBSTRUCTIVE PULMONARY DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye. D. Bazdyrev

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to detect previously undiagnosed arterial hypertension in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD as a risk factor for cardiovascular mortality.Materials and methods. 43 patients with stage I–II of COPD and the absence of clinical signs of cardiovascular diseases were examined. Spirometry, body plethysmography and diffusing lung capacity (DLCO were included in the respiratory system assessment. The cardiovascular system was assessed with echocardiography and ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM.Results. Despite the absence of obvious signs of cardiovascular lesions (an increase of office blood pressure, intracardiac hemodynamic changes, the following cardiovascular risk factors were identified: age (58.2 ± 2.0 years, male gender, smoking, hypercholesterolemia and dyslipidemia (total cholesterol 5.9 ± 0.9 mmol / l, low density lipoproteins 3.8 ± 0.5 mmol / l, triglycerides 1.8 ± 0.2 mmol / l. Correlation analysis has revealed the relation between several respiratory parameters and the severity of dyspnea and quality of life in patients with COPD, as well as its relation with lipid levels.Conclusion. The patients with COPD have a large number of risk factors for CVD. According to ABPM data, arterial hypertension was verified in 18 (41.9 % of 43 patients with COPD at normal level of office blood pressure; moreover, 51.2 % of patients demonstrated low reduction of blood pressure during the night-time that nowadays, is considered to be a predictor of cardiovascular disease and sudden death.

  11. Identification of prognostic factors in patients with brain metastases: a review of 1292 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagerwaard, Frank J.; Levendag, Peter C.; Nowak, Peter J.C.M.; Eijkenboom, Wilhelmina M.H.; Hanssens, Patrick E.J.; Schmitz, Paul I.M.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: Prognostic factors in 1292 patients with brain metastases, treated in a single institution were identified in order to determine subgroups of patients suitable for selection in future trials. Materials and Methods: From January 1981 through December 1990, 1292 patients with CT-diagnosed brain metastases were referred to the Department of Radiation Oncology, Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam. The majority of patients were treated with whole brain radiotherapy (84%), the remainder were treated with steroids only or surgery and radiotherapy. Information on potential prognostic factors (age, sex, performance status, number and distribution of brain metastases, site of primary tumor, histology, interval between primary tumor and brain metastases, systemic tumor activity, serum lactate dehydrogenase, response to steroid treatment, and treatment modality) was collected. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to determine significant prognostic factors. Results were compared with literature findings using a review of prognostic factors in 18 published reports. Results: Overall median survival was 3.4 months, with 6-month, 1-year, and 2-year survival percentages of 36%, 12%, and 4% respectively. Survival was statistically significantly different between treatment modalities, with median survival of 1.3 months in patients treated with steroids only, 3.6 months in patients treated with radiotherapy, and 8.9 months in patients treated with neurosurgery followed by radiotherapy (p < 0.0001). Multivariate analysis confirmed literature findings of the major prognostic value of treatment modality on survival of patients with brain metastases. Performance status, response to steroid treatment, systemic tumor activity, and serum lactate dehydrogenase were independent prognostic factors with the strongest impact on survival, second only to treatment modality. Site of primary tumor, age, and number of brain metastases were also identified as prognostic

  12. Lack of bleeding in patients with severe factor VII deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, J Mark; Demel, Kurt C; Mega, Anthony E; Butera, James N; Sweeney, Joseph D

    2005-02-01

    Factor VII deficiency, although rare, is now recognized as the most common autosomal recessive inherited factor deficiency. It is usually considered to be associated with bleeding only in the severely affected subject and heterozygotes (>10%) are not considered at risk. The general recommendation for surgery is to achieve a FVII level in excess of 15% (0.15 1U/mL). We present three cases of severe factor VII deficiency, each of whom appeared hemostatically competent based on clinical history. Subject 1 is a 33 year-old African-American female with a baseline FVII of American female with a factor VII level of 9% who underwent an elective left total hip replacement without any factor replacement and had no excessive bleeding, but who sustained a pulmonary embolism postoperatively. Subject 3 is a 19-year-old African-American male with a baseline FVII of 1% with a history of active participation in football without noticeable injury and who underwent an emergent appendectomy without bleeding. These three cases represent individuals with the severe form of FVII deficiency who did not exhibit excessive bleeding when challenged with surgical procedures. The clinical history would appear the most valuable tool in predicting the likelihood of bleeding in these patients, and we suggest that the presumption that all patients with severe FVII deficiency should receive replacement therapy before surgical procedures may not be valid in all cases. Copyright 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Factors affecting bone mineral density in multiple sclerosis patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayatollahi, Azin; Mohajeri-Tehrani, Mohammad Reza

    2013-01-01

    Background Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a demyelinating disease which can cause many disabilities for the patient. Recent data suggests that MS patients have higher risk for osteoporosis. This study was performed to investigate if the osteoporosis prevalence is higher in MS patients and to determine the possible factors affecting bone mineral density (BMD). Methods 51 definite relapsing-remitting MS patients according to McDonald's criteria (45 females, 6 males aged between 20 and 50 years) participated in this study. The control group included 407 females aged from 20 to 49 years; they were healthy and had no history of the diseases affecting bone metabolism. Femoral and lumbar BMD were measured by Dual Energy X-ray Absorptiometry (DXA). The disability of MS patients was evaluated by Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS). The patient's quality of life was evaluated by the validated Persian version of multiple sclerosis impact scale (MSIS-29). Results Patients’ mean age was 36 ± 3.3 years and their mean disease duration was 8.7 ± 1.7 years. The mean EDSS score and the mean body mass index (BMI) of the patients were 3 ± 0.9 and 23.5 ± 2.3 kg/m2, respectively. 29% of the patients had never been treated by ß-interferon and 6% of them had not received glucocorticoids (GCs) pulses since their MS had been diagnosed. 26% of the patients had a history of fracture.18% of our patients were osteoporotic and 43% of them were osteopenic. Femoral BMD was significantly lower among MS patients than age matched controls (P < 0.001), but lumbar BMD showed no difference. There was no correlation between administration of GCs pulses, interferon and BMD; however, we found a significant correlation between EDSS score, quality of life (QoL), disease duration and BMD of both site. Conclusion As a result of this study, bone loss inevitably occurs in MS patients. The major factor of BMD loss is immobility. Osteoporosis should be managed as part of MS patients’ treatment protocols

  14. [Survival pronostic factors in Mexican patients with multiforme glioblastoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Reyna, Ricardo; Medellín-Sánchez, Roberto; Cerda-Flores, Ricardo M; Calderón-Garcidueñas, Ana Laura

    2010-01-01

    To study the pre- and transoperative factors that influence patients' survival with GM. Clinical and pathological records of all confirmed cases of GM diagnosed between 2000 and 2006 were included. Postoperative survival was divided in less or more than 8 months. χ2 test was used. One hundred and twenty patients (45 women and 75 men) were studied. Age range was from 7 to 85 years, 3.3% were 16 years old or younger and 12.5% were 70 years old or older. Headache was the most frequent complain, 40 patients developed hemiparesia and 6 had parestesias. Predominance of white matter hemispheric lesions was observed: right hemispheric tumors 65 (54%), left lesions 30 (25%) and bilateral tumors 7%. Histologically, 1.6% of GM had a sarcomatous component; 35% of patients survived less than 8 months. A difference between patients survival was the preoperative Karnofsky Performance Scale Score and the degree of cerebral edema during the surgical procedure. Pre-operative Karnofsky evaluation and edema during the surgical procedure were significant prognostic factors for survival.

  15. Risk factors for death in patients with severe asthma

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    Andréia Guedes Oliva Fernandes

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To identify risk factors for death among patients with severe asthma. METHODS: This was a nested case-control study. Among the patients with severe asthma treated between December of 2002 and December of 2010 at the Central Referral Outpatient Clinic of the Bahia State Asthma Control Program, in the city of Salvador, Brazil, we selected all those who died, as well as selecting other patients with severe asthma to be used as controls (at a ratio of 1:4. Data were collected from the medical charts of the patients, home visit reports, and death certificates. RESULTS: We selected 58 cases of deaths and 232 control cases. Most of the deaths were attributed to respiratory causes and occurred within a health care facility. Advanced age, unemployment, rhinitis, symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease, long-standing asthma, and persistent airflow obstruction were common features in both groups. Multivariate analysis showed that male gender, FEV1 pre-bronchodilator < 60% of predicted, and the lack of control of asthma symptoms were significantly and independently associated with mortality in this sample of patients with severe asthma. CONCLUSIONS: In this cohort of outpatients with severe asthma, the deaths occurred predominantly due to respiratory causes and within a health care facility. Lack of asthma control and male gender were risk factors for mortality.

  16. Diabetic Foot Risk Factors in Patients with Diabetes at the

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    R. Hosseini

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives Diabetic foot problems are one of the major causes of mortality and disability in diabetic patients. It is considered one of the costliest conditions for health care systems. This study is designed to identify diabetic foot risk factors in patients with diabetes mellitus at Kamkar Hospital diabetes clinic in Qom, Iran during 2006.MethodsThis study was performed on 140 diabetes mellitus patients at the Kamkar Hospital diabetic clinic. International working Group on the Diabetic Foot (IWGDF guidelines were used for physical exam of diabetic foot in these patients. The physical exam consisted of inspection of foot appearance for deformity, skin keratosis and ulcer, and neurological and arterial pulse exam of the lower extremities of these patients. Patients in this study were divided into four risk groups based on the IWGDF guidelines. ANOVA method was used for analysis and comparison of the results with P<0.05 considered as significant. ResultsMean age of the participants in this study was 52.4±11.2 years old from which 67.1% were female, 37.1% of patients were illiterate, and 10% were active smokers. Mean duration of diabetes in these patients was 8.9 years. Mean body mass index (BMI was 29.4± 4.4 and HbA1C was 9.3 ± 1.9. Percentages of the patients with retinopathy and nephropathy were 33.6% and 17.7% respectively. 95% of the patients did not know the correct way of nail clipping, 95.5% were wearing uncomfortable shoes, and 14.3% of patients had history of foot ulcer. None of the them had any education about foot care. Physical examination with monofilament, ankle reflex and vibration perception were defected in 28.6%, 52.5%, and 32.1% of patients respectively. 37.7% of patients had a decreased lower extremity pulse that was not felt by touch. Based on the IWGDF classifications, 70% of the patients were in the higher-risk group for diabetic foot ulcer. In the high risk group, age, duration of diabetes, illiteracy was

  17. Factors Affecting Hemodialysis Patients' Satisfaction with Their Dialysis Therapy

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    M. Al Eissa

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To assess the degree of satisfaction among hemodialysis patients and the factors influencing this satisfaction. Methods. Patients were recruited from 3 Saudi dialysis centers. Demographic data was collected. Using 1 to 10 Likert scale, the patients were asked to rate the overall satisfaction with, and the overall impact of, their dialysis therapy on their lives and to rate the effect of the dialysis therapy on 15 qualities of life domains. Results. 322 patients were recruited (72.6% of the total eligible patients. The mean age was 51.7 years (±15.4; 58% have been on dialysis for >3 years. The mean Charlson Comorbidity Index was 3.2 (±2, and Kt/V was 1.3 (±0.44. The mean satisfaction score was (7.41 ± 2.75 and the mean score of the impact of the dialysis on the patients' lives was 5.32 ± 2.55. Male patients reported worse effect of dialysis on family life, social life, energy, and appetite. Longer period since the commencement of dialysis was associated with adverse effect on finances and energy. Lower level of education was associated with worse dialysis effect on stress, overall health, sexual life, hobbies, and exercise ability. Conclusion. The level of satisfaction is affected by gender, duration on dialysis, educational level, and standard of care given.

  18. Seizure precipitants (triggering factors) in patients with epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferlisi, Monica; Shorvon, Simon

    2014-04-01

    adult epilepsy clinic population: (a) to identify the frequency of seizure precipitants (triggering factors) and their relative frequency in those with psychiatric disorders, and in those in remission or with active epilepsy, differences in frequency with regard to gender, seizure duration, number of drugs taken; (b) to determine which precipitants patients most commonly report; and (c) to identify differences in the distribution of precipitants among generalized, temporal, and extratemporal epilepsies. Consecutive patients attending a tertiary-care epilepsy clinic were prospectively and an open personal interview to identify and characterize seizure precipitants. Information about the epilepsy and clinical characteristics of patients was collected during the interview and from medical records. Of 104 patients, 97% cited at least one precipitant. Stress, sleep deprivation, and fatigue were the most frequently reported precipitants. Patients with psychological comorbidities reported a greater percentage of seizures with seizure precipitants. Patients with idiopathic generalized epilepsy seemed to be more sensitive to seizures during awakening and sleep deprivation, patients with extratemporal epilepsy reported more frequent seizures during sleep. There were no differences in frequency or type of seizure precipitants with regard to gender, seizure duration or frequency, and the number of antiepileptic drugs taken. The findings may have implications for the better management of epilepsy by increasing a focus on nonpharmacological therapy. The implications of the findings for nosology and causation of epilepsy are also briefly discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Cardiovascular risk factors in hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis patients

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    Helal Imed

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular diseases are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD. The aim of our investigation was the evaluation of an extensive cardiovascular profile in hemodialysis (HD and peritoneal dialysis (PD patients. We studied 74 patients with ESRD (38 males, 36 females, maintained either on chronic HD (n= 50 or chronic PD (n= 24 and age and sex matched 20 healthy subjects as controls. The lipid profile, homo-cysteine (Hcy and C reactive protein (CRP were measured. When compared to a healthy popu-lation, HD patients displayed a marked atherogenic profile, as attested by increased levels of total cholesterol (TC, triglycerides (TG, low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C, apolipoprotein A (Apo A, CRP, Hcy and lower concentrations of high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C, Apo B, albumin (ALB. A significant difference was noted concerning the rates of Apo B, HDL-C, TC, ALB and Hcy. Same biological disorders that those found at HD patients were noted in these PD patients. One also noted lower concentration in Apo A. there were a significant diffe-rence with the reference group concerning the rates of albumin, Apo A, HDL-Cl and Hcy. When compared to PD patients, HD patients had significantly decreased concentration of LDL-C. The peculiar metabolic changes observed in the present study confirm the marked tendency of patients with impaired renal function for developing cardiovascular diseases, irrespectively of the type of dialysis. We suggest including uremia-related risk factors in the panel for evaluation of cardio-vascular risk in dialysis patients.

  20. Risk factors associated with xerostomia in haemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Pintor, R-M; López-Pintor, L; Casañas, E; de Arriba, L; Hernández, G

    2017-03-01

    To determine the prevalence of xerostomia and hyposalivation in Haemodialysis (HD) patients, to clarify risk factors, assess patient's quality of life, and to establish a possible correlation among interdialytic weight gain (IDWG) and xerostomia. This study was performed on a group of 50 HD patients. Data were collected using a questionnaire containing demographic and clinical variables, a visual analogue scale (VAS) for xerostomia, IDWG, and an oral health impact profile questionnaire (OHIP-14). Unstimulated whole saliva (UWS) and stimulated whole saliva (SWS) were collected. A total of 28 HD patients (56%) suffered xerostomia. Dry mouth was associated with hypertension (OR, 5.24; 95% CI, 1.11-24.89) and benzodiazepine consumption (OR, 5.96; 95% CI, 1.05-33.99). The mean xerostomia VAS and OHIP-14 scores were 31.74±14.88 and 24.38±11.98, respectively. No significant correlation was observed between IDWG% and VAS and OHIP total score. Nonetheless, a positive correlation between VAS level of thirst and IDWG% was found (r=0.48 p=0.0001). UWS and SWS means (determined in 30 patients) were 0.16±0.17 and 1.12±0.64, respectively. Decreased values of UWS and SWS were reported in 53.33% and 36.66% of HD patients. Xerostomia in HD has a multifactorial aetiology due to accumulative risks as advanced age, systemic disorders, drugs, fluid intake restriction, and salivary parenchymal fibrosis and atrophy. Therefore, it is important to detect possible xerostomia risk factors to treat correctly dry mouth in HD patients and avoid systemic complications.

  1. Cardiometabolic factors and disease duration in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassani, Erica; Cereda, Emanuele; Barichella, Michela; Madio, Carmen; Cancello, Raffaella; Caccialanza, Riccardo; Zini, Michela; Cilia, Roberto; Pezzoli, Gianni

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have reported that patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) have a favorable cardiometabolic risk profile. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between cardiometabolic risk factors and the duration of disease. One hundred and fifty patients with PD (56.7% men) were studied, measuring body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), body fat percentage (BF%) by impedance, fasting glucose, serum lipids, and transaminases. In sex- and age-adjusted correlation models, duration of PD was inversely related to BMI (r = -0.20; P HDL) levels were positively correlated with disease duration (P HDL-cholesterol ratio was also inversely associated with duration of PD (P HDL levels and total HDL-cholesterol ratio were favorably associated with duration of PD. This factor may contribute to cardiometabolic protection in PD. The mechanisms underlying this association deserve further investigation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Risk factors for mortality in patients with Serratia marcescens bacteremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sun Bean; Jeon, Yong Duk; Kim, Jung Ho; Kim, Jae Kyoung; Ann, Hea Won; Choi, Heun; Kim, Min Hyung; Song, Je Eun; Ahn, Jin Young; Jeong, Su Jin; Ku, Nam Su; Han, Sang Hoon; Choi, Jun Yong; Song, Young Goo; Kim, June Myung

    2015-03-01

    Over the last 30 years, Serratia marcescens (S. marcescens) has emerged as an important pathogen, and a common cause of nosocomial infections. The aim of this study was to identify risk factors associated with mortality in patients with S. marcescens bacteremia. We performed a retrospective cohort study of 98 patients who had one or more blood cultures positive for S. marcescens between January 2006 and December 2012 in a tertiary care hospital in Seoul, South Korea. Multiple risk factors were compared with association with 28-day all-cause mortality. The 28-day mortality was 22.4% (22/98 episodes). In a univariate analysis, the onset of bacteremia during the intensive care unit stay (p=0.020), serum albumin level (p=0.011), serum C-reactive protein level (p=0.041), presence of indwelling urinary catheter (p=0.023), and Sequential Oran Failure Assessment (SOFA) score at the onset of bacteremia (pmarcescens bacteremia.

  3. Factors associated with sustained remission in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martire, María Victoria; Marino Claverie, Lucila; Duarte, Vanesa; Secco, Anastasia; Mammani, Marta

    2015-01-01

    To find out the factors that are associated with sustained remission measured by DAS28 and boolean ACR EULAR 2011 criteria at the time of diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis. Medical records of patients with rheumatoid arthritis in sustained remission according to DAS28 were reviewed. They were compared with patients who did not achieved values of DAS28<2.6 in any visit during the first 3 years after diagnosis. We also evaluated if patients achieved the boolean ACR/EULAR criteria. Variables analyzed: sex, age, smoking, comorbidities, rheumatoid factor, anti-CCP, ESR, CRP, erosions, HAQ, DAS28, extra-articular manifestations, time to initiation of treatment, involvement of large joints, number of tender joints, number of swollen joints, pharmacological treatment. Forty five patients that achieved sustained remission were compared with 44 controls. The variables present at diagnosis that significantly were associated with remission by DAS28 were: lower values of DAS28, HAQ, ESR, NTJ, NSJ, negative CRP, absence of erosions, male sex and absence of involvement of large joints. Only 24.71% achieved the boolean criteria. The variables associated with sustained remission by these criteria were: lower values of DAS28, HAQ, ESR, number of tender joints and number of swollen joints, negative CRP and absence of erosions. The factors associated with sustained remission were the lower baseline disease activity, the low degree of functional disability and lower joint involvement. We consider it important to recognize these factors to optimize treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Factors associated with regular dental visits among hemodialysis patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshioka, Masami; Shirayama, Yasuhiko; Imoto, Issei; Hinode, Daisuke; Yanagisawa, Shizuko; Takeuchi, Yuko; Bando, Takashi; Yokota, Narushi

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate awareness and attitudes about preventive dental visits among dialysis patients; to clarify the barriers to visiting the dentist. METHODS Subjects included 141 dentate outpatients receiving hemodialysis treatment at two facilities, one with a dental department and the other without a dental department. We used a structured questionnaire to interview participants about their awareness of oral health management issues for dialysis patients, perceived oral symptoms and attitudes about dental visits. Bivariate analysis using the χ2 test was conducted to determine associations between study variables and regular dental check-ups. Binominal logistic regression analysis was used to determine factors associated with regular dental check-ups. RESULTS There were no significant differences in patient demographics between the two participating facilities, including attitudes about dental visits. Therefore, we included all patients in the following analyses. Few patients (4.3%) had been referred to a dentist by a medical doctor or nurse. Although 80.9% of subjects had a primary dentist, only 34.0% of subjects received regular dental check-ups. The most common reasons cited for not seeking dental care were that visits are burdensome and a lack of perceived need. Patients with gum swelling or bleeding were much more likely to be in the group of those not receiving routine dental check-ups (χ2 test, P < 0.01). Logistic regression analysis demonstrated that receiving dental check-ups was associated with awareness that oral health management is more important for dialysis patients than for others and with having a primary dentist (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION Dialysis patients should be educated about the importance of preventive dental care. Medical providers are expected to participate in promoting dental visits among dialysis patients. PMID:27648409

  5. What factors determine patients' preference for tumour necrosis factor inhibitors in ankylosing spondylitis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajri, Dessy W; Brand, Caroline A; Dharmage, Shyamali C; Martin, Belinda J; Buchanan, Russell R C; Schachna, Lionel

    2009-05-01

    Tumour necrosis factor inhibitor (TNFi) therapy, either intravenous (IV) or subcutaneous (SQ), demonstrates similar efficacy in ankylosing spondylitis (AS). The objective of this study was to examine factors influencing patient preference of TNFi. Fifty-nine (79.7%) participants were male with mean age 43.9 years and disease duration of 22.0 years. Fifty-nine patients (79.7%) agreed with the statement 'My doctor gave me a choice and I made a decision based on my personal preference'. Patients commenced first on IV TNFi most commonly cited reduced frequency of injections (96.6%), administration by a trained professional (89.7%) and use of infusion time for leisure activities (86.2%). Patients commenced on SQ TNFi cited flexibility with timing of treatment (80%), shortened administration time (73.3%) and the convenience of home therapy (73.3%). Shared clinical decision-making between clinicians and patients may be desirable for AS patients commencing TNFi therapy.

  6. Clinical symptoms and risk factors in cerebral microangiopathy patients.

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    Sandra Okroglic

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Although the clinical manifestation and risk factors of cerebral microangiopathy (CM remain unclear, the number of diagnoses is increasing. Hence, patterns of association among lesion topography and severity, clinical symptoms and demographic and disease risk factors were investigated retrospectively in a cohort of CM patients. METHODS: Patients treated at the Department of Neurology, University of Bonn for CM (n = 223; 98m, 125f; aged 77.32±9.09 from 2005 to 2010 were retrospectively enrolled. Clinical symptoms, blood chemistry, potential risk factors, demographic data and ratings of vascular pathology in the brain based on the Wahlund scale were analyzed using Pearson's chi square test and one-way ANOVA. RESULTS: Progressive cognitive decline (38.1%, gait apraxia (27.8%, stroke-related symptoms and seizures (24.2%, TIA-symptoms (22% and vertigo (17% were frequent symptoms within the study population. Frontal lobe WMLs/lacunar infarcts led to more frequent presentation of progressive cognitive decline, seizures, gait apraxia, stroke-related symptoms, TIA, vertigo and incontinence. Parietooccipital WMLs/lacunar infarcts were related to higher frequencies of TIA, seizures and incontinence. Basal ganglia WMLs/lacunar infarcts were seen in patients with more complaints of gait apraxia, vertigo and incontinence. Age (p = .012, arterial hypertension (p<.000, obesity (p<.000 and cerebral macroangiopathy (p = .018 were positively related to cerebral lesion load. For increased glucose level, homocysteine, CRP and D-Dimers there was no association. CONCLUSION: This underlines the association of CM with neurological symptoms upon admission in a topographical manner. Seizures and vertigo are symptoms of CM which may have been missed in previous studies. In addition to confirming known risk factors such as aging and arterial hypertension, obesity appears to increase the risk as well. Since the incidence of CM is increasing, future

  7. Factors related to orthodontic treatment time in adult patients

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    Ana Camila Esteves de Oliveira Melo

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The length of time that it takes an orthodontist to treat adult patients varies widely. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate how different variables influence treatment time. METHODS: Seventy clinical case reports of successfully treated adult patients were examined. The patients were selected from 4,723 records held by three experienced orthodontists. The influence exerted by the following variables on treatment time was assessed: age, sex, facial pattern, severity of malocclusion (measured by the PAR index, sagittal relationship of canines, type of brackets (ceramic or metal, tooth extractions, missed appointments and orthodontic appliance issues/breakages, the latter being the dependent variable. Assessment was performed by multiple linear regression analysis, followed by the stepwise method with P < 0.05. RESULTS: The number of times a patient missed their appointment (no-show (R² = 14.4%, p < 0.0001 and the number of appliance issues/breakages (R² = 29.71%, p = 0.0037 significantly affected variability in treatment time, and these two variables together can predict 43.75% (R² total of the overall variability in treatment time. Other factors, such as canine relationship at the beginning of treatment, bracket type (metal or ceramic, tooth extractions, age at start of treatment, severity of the initial malocclusion, sex and facial pattern had no significant bearing on treatment time. CONCLUSIONS: The duration of orthodontic treatment in adults, when performed by experienced orthodontists, is mainly influenced by factors related to patient compliance. However, several factors which were not included in this study may contribute to variability in orthodontic treatment time.

  8. Factors influencing botulinum toxin dose instability in spasmodic dysphonia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosow, David E; Pechman, Amanda; Saint-Victor, Sandra; Lo, Kaming; Lundy, Donna S; Casiano, Roy R

    2015-05-01

    Many patients with spasmodic dysphonia (SD) see consistent effects from botulinum toxin (BTX) injections of the same dose, whereas others require dosage changes over time. We sought to determine whether demographics (age and gender) or environmental factors (smoking) affect the long-term stability of BTX dosing in these patients. Retrospective review. Charts of all patients undergoing BTX injection for adductor SD were reviewed. Dosage change, defined as whether there was any difference in total dosage used between two beneficial injections, was used as a measure of dosing stability. Beneficial injections were indicated by a voice rating score of at least three of four and any non-zero duration of improved voice. Logistic regression analysis was performed to determine whether age, gender, smoking status, or duration of treatment correlated with odds of having a dosage change. A total of 211 patients were ultimately included. Age, gender, and smoking status were all found to have no correlative effect on dosing stability. The only factor that was predictive of dose stability was the number of previous beneficial injections, as every additional injection led to decreased odds of a change in dosage for the next injection (odds ratio=0.964; 95% confidence interval=0.947-0.981). Dosage of BTX injections for long-term treatment of SD has a significant propensity to remain stable over time. Factors such as age, gender, and smoking status do not appear to influence the dosage stability. These findings should allow for better patient counseling regarding expectations for their long-term treatment. Copyright © 2015 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Risk factors associated with malnutrition in hospitalized patients

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    Roberta Flores Marquezini FRAGAS

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective To identify factors associated with malnutrition in patients hospitalized in general public hospitals of the city of Manaus, Amazonas, Brazil. Methods This cross-sectional study included 397 patients of both sexes aged more than 18 years, staying at three public hospitals in Manaus, Amazonas. The patients were submitted to anthropometric and subjective global assessments, the latter being the main diagnostic method. For association analyses between malnutrition (dependent variable and other covariates, we used contingency table for variable selection and multiple logistic regression for independent effect test between exposure and outcome. The strength of association between the variables was expressed as odds ratio, with a 95% confidence interval. The analyses were performed by Epi Info 7.0. Results Among the risk factors associated with hospital malnutrition, hospital stays longer than 15 days, when analyzed alone, nearly tripled the odds of malnutrition. However, in the final model, the variables that remained associated were: persistent change in diet, presence of gastrointestinal symptoms, recent weight loss, weight loss in the last six months, cancer, and age higher than 60 years. Conclusion Malnutrition is recurrent in hospitals, and the factors associated with malnutrition can be identified on admission, allowing adequate monitoring during hospital stay. Therefore, a more effective performance of nutritional screening and monitoring programs is critical.

  10. Do Psychosocial Factors Predict Readmission among Diabetic Elderly Patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alavi, Mousa; Baharlooei, Omeleila; AdelMehraban, Marzieh

    2017-01-01

    Despite advances in diabetes treatment, the rate of readmission is still relatively high among these patients, especially in older population. Various factors may predict readmission in these patients; hence, the aim of this study was to assess the role of psychosocial factors in predicting readmission among diabetic elderly hospitalized in selected hospitals of Isfahan. In this cross-sectional study conducted from January to September 2016, 150 diabetic elderly hospitalized in selected hospitals affiliated with Isfahan University of medical sciences were chosen using a convenient sampling method. The initial information was collected by a three-part questionnaire consisting of (a) demographic characteristics, (b) 21-item depression, anxiety, and stress scale (DASS-21), and (c) multidimensional scale of perceived social support (MSPSS). Further information about readmission was gathered 3 months after completing the questionnaires through a phone call follow-up. Descriptive and inferential statistics (discriminant function analysis test) were used to analyze the data. During 3 months after discharge, 44% of hospitalized diabetic elderly were readmitted. Analytical model predicted the readmission status of 109 individuals (of total 150 persons) in the studied units (success rate of 72.2%). Among predicting factors, depression and social support had the most and the least important roles in predicting readmission rate, respectively. Interventions to improve mental status (i.e., decreasing levels of depression, anxiety, and stress) and develop social support are suggested to reduce the risk of readmission among diabetic elderly patients. Nevertheless, future studies are needed to verify the value of such interventions.

  11. A systematic study on factors affecting patient dose, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otsuka, Akiyoshi; Higashida, Yoshiharu; Utsumi, Hiromoto; Ota, Masaji; Nakanishi, Takashi

    1979-01-01

    In the study of possible reduction in irradiation dose to patients during medical treatments, the following two methods can be considered: (1) To obtain absorbed doses for each part of a body in diagnostic X-ray examinations. (2) To obtain data on factors such as the tube voltage which may affect patient dose. There are a number of reports both at home and abroad concerning the above (1), but very few reports are available concerning the above (2). Moreover, most of them are on fragmentary aspects of each factor and no systematic reports have been made. For this reason, we have taken up, as factors affecting the patient dose, the field size, the tube voltage, and by checking them again, we wanted to obtain some systematic data. Our aim has been fully attained by conducting an experiment. In the ICRP's Publ. 26 issued last year, the idea of the critical organ which had not been fully elucidated in the Publ. 9 was abandoned. As a result, assessment of the irradiation doses has become more rational and the total risk for an individual was obtained. In Japan, the idea proposed in the Publ. 9 is adopted. Therefore, in this paper, we will raise some questions regarding the assessment of the irradiation doses, pointing out at the same time the rationality of the idea put forward in Publ. 26. (author)

  12. Prognostic Factors in Tuberculosis Related Mortalities in Hospitalized Patients

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    Ghazal Haque

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Setting. The study was undertaken at the Department of Pulmonology at a public, tertiary care centre in Karachi, Pakistan. Objectives. To evaluate factors concerned with in-hospital deaths in patients admitted with pulmonary tuberculosis (TB. Design. A retrospective case-control audit was performed for 120 patients hospitalised with pulmonary TB. Sixty of those discharged after treatment were compared to sixty who did not survive. Radiological findings, clinical indicators, and laboratory values were compared between the two groups to identify factors related to poor prognosis. Results. Factors concerned with in-hospital mortality listed late presentation of disease (P<0.01, noncompliance to antituberculosis therapy (P<0.01, smoking (P<0.01, longer duration of illness prior to treatment (P<0.01, and low body weight (P<0.01. Most deaths occurred during the first week of admission (P<0.01 indicating late referrals as significant. Immunocompromised status and multi-drug resistance were not implicated in higher mortality. Conclusions. Poor prognosis was associated with noncompliance to therapy resulting in longer duration of illness, late patient referrals to care centres, and development of complications. Early diagnosis, timely referrals, and monitored compliance may help reduce mortality. Adherence to a more radically effective treatment regimen is required to eliminate TB early during disease onset.

  13. Analysis of risk factors of pulmonary embolism in diabetic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Changhui; Ma Zhihai; Zhu Lin; Chi Lianxiang

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To study the related risk factors in diabetic patients with pulmonary embolism (PE). Methods: 58 diabetic cases underwent lower limbs 99m Tc-MAA veins imaging (and/or ultrasonography) and pulmonary perfusion imaging. The related laboratory data [fasting blood glucose (FBG), blood cholesterol, blood long chain triglycerides (LCT)] and clinic information [age, disease courses, chest symptoms (chest pain and short of breathe), lower limbs symptoms (swelling, varicose veins and diabetic foot) and acute complication (diabetic ketoacidosis and hyperosmolar non ketotic diabetic coma)] were collected simultaneously. SPSS was used for χ 2 -test and Logistic regression analysis. Results: (1) 28 patients (48.3%) were showed to be with lower limbs deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and by 99m Tc-MAA imaging, 10 cases (17.2%) with PE. The PE ratios (32.1%) of the patients with DVT was more higher than no DVT (3.3%) (χ 2 =6.53, P 2 ≥4.23, P 2 ≤2.76, P>0.05), respectively. (3) Multiplicity analysis indicated: the related risk factors for PE included chest symptoms (Score=13.316, P=0.000) and lower limbs symptoms (Score=7.780, P=0.005). No significant difference to other factors (Score≤2.494, P>0.114), respectively. Conclusion: The serious DM with chest symptoms, lower limbs symptoms and/or DVT must be controlled as early as possible by all kinds of treatment. It will decrease the PE complication. (authors)

  14. Risk factors for swallowing dysfunction in stroke patients

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    Anna Flávia Ferraz Barros Baroni

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Stroke is a frequent cause of dysphagia. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate in a tertiary care hospital the prevalence of swallowing dysfunction in stroke patients, to analyze factors associated with the dysfunction and to relate swallowing dysfunction to mortality 3 months after the stroke. METHODS: Clinical evaluation of deglutition was performed in 212 consecutive patients with a medical and radiologic diagnosis of stroke. The occurrence of death was determined 3 months after the stroke. RESULTS: It was observed that 63% of the patients had swallowing dysfunction. The variables gender and specific location of the lesion were not associated with the presence or absence of swallowing dysfunction. The patients with swallowing dysfunction had more frequently a previous stroke, had a stroke in the left hemisphere, motor and/or sensitivity alterations, difficulty in oral comprehension, alteration of oral expression, alteration of the level of consciousness, complications such as fever and pneumonia, high indexes on the Rankin scale, and low indexes on the Barthel scale. These patients had a higher mortality rate. CONCLUSIONS: Swallowing evaluation should be done in all patients with stroke, since swallowing dysfunction is associated with complications and an increased risk of death.

  15. Evaluation of some psychological factors in psoriatic patients.

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    Pedram Noormohammadpour

    2015-03-01

    vulnerability score.PASI score as a representing factor of skin involvement has a limited role in predicting the effect of psoriasis on mental status and illness perception of psoriatic patients. Psychological vulnerability of the patients is the main predicting factor of illness perception and coping strategies (representing patients approach to their disease or their treatment beliefs.

  16. Factors associated with therapy noncompliance in type-2 diabetes patients

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    Hernández-Ronquillo Lizbeth

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To identify the frequency and factors associated with therapy noncompliance in type-2 diabetes mellitus patients. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A cross-sectional study was carried out in 79 patients with type-2 diabetes mellitus seen in major hospitals of Mexico City. Patients were visited at home, from March 1998 to August 1999, to measure compliance with prescribed therapy. Complying patients were defined as those taking at least 80% of their pills or 80% of their corresponding insulin dose. The degree of compliance with therapy components (diet, amount of exercise, and keeping appointments was measured. RESULTS: The average age of study subjects was 59 years (SD 11 years; 73% (n=58 were female subjects. The overall frequency of noncompliance was 39%. Noncompliance rates were: 62% for dietary recommendations, 85% for exercise, 17% for intake of oral hypoglycemic medication, 13% for insulin application, and 3% for appointment keeping. Hypertension plus obesity was the only factor significantly associated with noncompliance (OR 4.58, CI 95% 1.0, 22.4, p=0.02. CONCLUSIONS: The frequency of therapy noncompliance was very high, especially for diet and exercise.

  17. Risk factors for pulmonary cavitation in tuberculosis patients from China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liqun; Pang, Yu; Yu, Xia; Wang, Yufeng; Lu, Jie; Gao, Mengqiu; Huang, Hairong; Zhao, Yanlin

    2016-10-12

    Pulmonary cavitation is one of the most frequently observed clinical characteristics in tuberculosis (TB). The objective of this study was to investigate the potential risk factors associated with cavitary TB in China. A total of 385 smear-positive patients were enrolled in the study, including 192 (49.9%) patients with cavitation as determined by radiographic findings. Statistical analysis revealed that the distribution of patients with diabetes in the cavitary group was significantly higher than that in the non-cavitary group (adjusted odds ratio (OR) (95% confidence interval (CI)):12.08 (5.75-25.35), Ptuberculosis strains, 330 strains (85.7%) were classified as the Beijing genotype, which included 260 strains that belonged to the modern Beijing sublineage and 70 to the ancient Beijing sublineage. In addition, there were 80 and 31 strains belonging to large and small clusters, respectively. Statistical analysis revealed that cavitary disease was observed more frequently among the large clusters than the small clusters (P=0.037). In conclusion, our findings demonstrate that diabetes and multidrug resistance are risk factors associated with cavitary TB. In addition, there was no significant difference in the cavitary presentation between patients infected with the Beijing genotype strains and those infected with the non-Beijing genotype strains.

  18. Potential risk factors for psychiatric disorders in patients with headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimnuan, Chaichana; Asawavichienjinda, Thanin; Srikiatkhachorn, Anan

    2012-01-01

    Psychiatric comorbidities are common among patients with headache. These can compromise the quality of life of patients and may affect the result of treatment. No available systematic study concerning this problem has been conducted in Thailand. The study aimed to determine the prevalence and risk factors of psychiatric disorders in patients with headache in tertiary care facility. The study was conducted at the Headache Clinic, King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital in Bangkok, Thailand. One hundred and thirteen patients were enrolled. Diagnosis of headache was made based on International Classification of Headache Disorders II system. Mental disorders were assessed using Primary Care Evaluation of Mental Disorders. Other possible risk factors were extracted using significant physical symptoms count and accumulated risk for mental disorder. Of the 113 samples analyzed, the prevalence of depression, anxiety, and somatoform disorder was found to be 29.2%, 9.7%, and 27.4%, respectively. No definite relationship between headache types and mental disorders was observed. High number of significant physical complaints and health concerns significantly increased the risk for depression (OR = 4.6, 95% CI = 1.6 to 13.5) while the level of possible risk for mental disorder was associated with an increased risk for somatoform disorder (OR = 1.6, 95% CI = 1.2 to 2.2). The study confirmed high prevalence of psychiatric comorbidities in patients with headache. The results of this study will raise the awareness of physicians to possible underlying mental disorders in patients with headache and facilitate appropriate treatment or psychiatric referral. © 2011 American Headache Society.

  19. Postoperative delirium in intensive care patients: risk factors and outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veiga, Dalila; Luis, Clara; Parente, Daniela; Fernandes, Vera; Botelho, Miguela; Santos, Patricia; Abelha, Fernando

    2012-07-01

    Postoperative delirium (POD) in Surgical Intensive Care patients is an important independent outcome determinant. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the incidence and determinants of POD. Prospective cohort study conducted during a period of 10 months in a Post-Anesthesia Care Unit (PACU) with five intensive care beds. All consecutive adult patients submitted to major surgery were enrolled. Demographic data, perioperative variables, length of stay (LOS) and the mortality at PACU, hospital and at 6-months follow-up were recorded. Postoperative delirium was evaluated using the Intensive Care Delirium Screening Checklist (ICDSC). Descriptive analyses were conducted and the Mann-Whitney test, Chi-square test or Fisher's exact test were used for comparisons. Logistic regression analysis evaluated the determinants of POD with calculation of odds ratio (OR) and its confidence interval 95% (95% CI). There were 775 adult PACU admissions and 95 patients had exclusion criteria. Of the remaining 680 patients, 128 (18.8%) developed POD. Independent determinants of POD identified were age, ASA-PS, emergency surgery and total amount of fresh frozen plasma administered during surgery. Patients with delirium had higher mortality rates, were more severely ill and stayed longer at the PACU and in the hospital. POD was an independent risk factor for hospital mortality There was a high incidence of delirium had a high incidence in intensive care surgical patients. POD was associated with worse severity of disease scores, longer LOS in hospital, and in PACU and higher mortality rates. The independent risk factors for POD were age, ASAPS, emergency surgery and the amount of plasma administered during surgery. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  20. [The Role of Resilience Factors in Informal Caregivers of Dementia Patients - A Review on Selected Factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunzler, Angela; Skoluda, Nadine; Nater, Urs

    2018-01-01

    In the face of demographic change, the informal care of dementia patients is becoming increasingly important. However, due to dementia symptoms as well as persisting care demands, this subgroup of informal caregivers is confronted with a large number of stressors resulting in chronic stress and impaired physical and mental health in many caregivers. Based on the current research on resilience (i. e., maintaining or regaining health despite stress and adversities), there is increasing interest in identifying resilience factors that may serve as resources to cope with informal care and protect caregivers against health problems. The review discusses the role of resilience factors in the association between ongoing caregiving stress and health. In analyzing the current state of research on resilience factors for dementia caregivers, we focus on the factors self-efficacy, relationship quality, and social support. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  1. Factors affecting experiences of intensive care patients in Turkey: patient outcomes in critical care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, Yurdanur; Korhan, Esra Akin; Eser, Ismet; Khorshid, Leyla

    2013-07-01

    To determine the factors affecting a patient's intensive care experience. The descriptive study was conducted at an intensive care unit in the Aegean Region of Turkey, and comprised 158 patients who spent at least 48 hours at the unit between June and November 2009. A questionnaire form and the Intensive Care Experience Scale were used as data collection tools. SPSS 11.5 was used for statistical analysis of the data. Of the total, 86 (54.4%) patients related to the surgical unit, while 72 (45.5%) spent time at the intensive care unit. Most of the subjects (n=113; 71.5%) reported that they constantly experienced pain during hospitalisation. Patients receiving mechanical ventilation support and patients reporting no pain had significantly higher scores on the intensive care experience scale. Patients who reported pain remembered their experiences less than those having no pain. Interventions are needed to make the experiences of patients in intensive care more positive.

  2. Lactose intolerance in prostate cancer patients: incidence and associated factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Mayank Mohan; Rana, Satyavati V; Mandal, Arup Kumar; Malhotra, Sunita; Khandelwal, Niranjan; Kumar, Santosh; Acharya, Naveen Chandra; Singh, Shrawan Kumar

    2008-03-01

    Osteoporosis is common in prostate cancer (CaP) patients both before and after institution of androgen deprivation therapy and is associated with significant morbidity. Lactose intolerance (LI) can affect bone mass but has not been studied in this group of patients. The objective of this study was to compare the incidence of LI in CaP patients with that in the general population and to identify factors affecting lactose intolerance in CaP patients. Fifty-five men with CaP planned for bilateral orchidectomy were enrolled in the study and their baseline characteristics including age, weight, height, body mass index (BMI), prostate-specific antigen, serum calcium profile, lactose tolerance status, physical activity, alcohol intake and smoking, bone mineral density and calcium intake were registered. The data on lactose tolerance in these patients were compared with those of 81 age-matched controls (data taken from the available database). The incidence of LI in CaP patients was significantly less than that in the control group (36.2% and 58.3%, respectively, p = 0.027). A significantly greater number of CaP patients in the lactose-tolerant group had a calcium intake of >1500 mg/day (p = 0.03) and that of milk >500 ml/day (p = 0.05) than those in the intolerant group. Age >70 years, BMI 163 cm, lower physical activity and co-abuse of alcohol and smoking significantly correlated with the presence of LI (p 25 kg/m2 and weight >65 kg. The incidence of LI in CaP patients is less than that in the general population despite a higher incidence of osteoporosis, indicating a complex etiology of CaP-related osteoporosis. Certain physical characteristics and personal habits are important in determining lactose-tolerant status.

  3. [Lobular invasive breast cancer prognostic factors: About 940 patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauffret, C; Houvenaeghel, G; Classe, J-M; Garbay, J-R; Giard, S; Charitansky, H; Cohen, M; Bélichard, C; Faure, C; Darai, É; Hudry, D; Azuar, P; Villet, R; Gimbergues, P; Tunon de Lara, C; Martino, M; Coutant, C; Dravet, F; Chauvet, M-P; Chéreau Ewald, E; Penault-Llorca, F; Goncalves, A; Lambaudie, É

    2015-11-01

    To assess the prognostic factors of T1 and T2 infiltrating lobular breast cancers, and to investigate predictive factors of axillary lymph node involvement. This is a retrospective multicentric study, conducted from 1999 to 2008, among 13 french centers. All data concerning patients with breast cancer who underwent a primary surgical treatment including a sentinel lymph node procedure have been collected (tumors was stage T1 or T2). Patients underwent partial or radical mastectomy. Axillary lymph node dissection was done systematically (at the time of sentinel procedure evaluation), or in case of sentinel lymph node involvement. Among all the 8100 patients, 940 cases of lobular infiltrating tumors were extracted. Univariate analysis was done to identify significant prognosis factors, and then a Cox regression was applied. Analysis interested factors that improved disease free survival, overall survival and factors that influenced the chemotherapy indication. Different factors that may be related with lymph node involvement have been tested with univariate than multivariate analysis, to highlight predictive factors of axillary involvement. Median age was 60 years (27-89). Most of patients had tumours with a size superior to 10mm (n=676, 72%), with a minority of high SBR grade (n=38, 4%), and a majority of positive hormonal status (n = 880, 93, 6%). The median duration of follow-up was 59 months (1-131). Factors significantly associated with decreased disease free survival was histological grade 3 (hazard ratio [HR]: 3,85, IC 1,21-12,21), tumour size superior to 2cm (HR: 2,85, IC: 1,43-5,68) and macrometastatic lymph node status (HR: 3,11, IC: 1,47-6,58). Concerning overall survival, multivariate analysis demonstrated a significant impact of age less than 50 years (HR: 5,2, IC: 1,39-19,49), histological grade 3 (HR: 5,03, IC: 1,19-21,25), tumour size superior to 2cm (HR: 2,53, IC: 1,13-5,69). Analysis concerning macrometastatic lymph node status nearly reached

  4. Analysis of Hepatitis B Transmission Risk Factors in HIV Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iman Ghasemzadeh

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Co-infection with Hepatitis B (HBV virus and HIV is common due to similarity of their transmission methods. However, the prevalence of concurrent infection in different societies, shows the crucial role of various risk factors in different populations. Therefore, the present study was performed to examine risk factors of transmission of HBV in patients with HIV in a care center for AIDS patients in Rasht City. This case-control study was carried out on 60 HIV positive patients, who visited the Infectious Diseases Center of Razi Hospital of Rasht from November, 2015 to March, 2016. Participants were assigned to two 30-member experiment and control groups. They were adjusted in terms of age group (18-30, 30-40, 40-50, and 50-60, gender (male and female, and marital status (married, single, divorced, and widowed and visited by an infectious diseases specialist according to routine examinations. Data was recorded in a questionnaire for each subject. The mean age for the experimental group was 35±6.1, and for control group was 36.6± 5.7 years. Both univariate and multivariate analyses of development of HBV infection and variables including Illegitimate sexual intercourse, use of intravenous injection drugs, positive history of imprisonment, and tattooing (p value < 0.05 showed existence of significant relationships. Injection of illegal intravenous drugs, history of imprisonment, illegitimate sexual intercourse, and tattooing are four important risk factors for transmission of HBV infection to HIV patients. In addition, the master risk reduction program may include provision of clean disposable tools for intravenous injection of drugs and tattooing.

  5. Patient perceptions of factors leading to spasmodic dysphonia: a combined clinical experience of 350 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childs, Lesley; Rickert, Scott; Murry, Thomas; Blitzer, Andrew; Sulica, Lucian

    2011-10-01

    Spasmodic dysphonia (SD) is an idiopathic voice disorder that is characterized by either a strained, strangled voice quality or a breathy voice with aphonic segments of connected speech. It has been suggested that environmental factors play a role in triggering the onset. Clinical observation suggests that some patients associate onset with specific events or factors while others do not. The purpose of this study was to examine a large database of SD patients to determine if specific triggers are associated with the onset of SD. Retrospective chart review. A total of 350 charts of patients with SD were identified and were categorized as either "sudden onset" or "gradual onset." One hundred sixty-nine recalled their circumstances surrounding onset. Forty-five percent of these patients described the onset as sudden. Patient perceptions of inciting events in the sudden onset group were identified 77% of the time and 2% of the time in the gradual onset group. The most common factors identified were stress (42%), upper respiratory infection (33%), and pregnancy and parturition (10%). Thirty-five percent of SD patients perceive their disorder to have a sudden onset with identified inciting events. This prevalence raises questions regarding possible behavioral and environmental factors surrounding the onset of this disorder. Copyright © 2011 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.

  6. Intellectual factors in false memories of patients with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Bi; Chen, Chuansheng; Loftus, Elizabeth F; Dong, Qi; Lin, Chongde; Li, Jun

    2018-07-01

    The current study explored the intellectual factors in false memories of 139 patients with schizophrenia, using a recognition task and an IQ test. The full-scale IQ score of the participants ranged from 57 to 144 (M = 100, SD = 14). The full IQ score had a negative correlation with false recognition in patients with schizophrenia, and positive correlations with high-confidence true recognition and discrimination rates. Further analyses with the subtests' scores revealed that false recognition was negatively correlated with scores of performance IQ (and one of its subtests: picture arrangement), whereas true recognition was positively correlated with scores of verbal IQ (and two of its subtests: information and digit span). High-IQ patients had less false recognition (overall or high-confidence false recognition), more high-confidence true recognition, and higher discrimination abilities than those with low IQ. These findings contribute to a better understanding of the cognitive mechanism in false memory of patients with schizophrenia, and are of practical relevance to the evaluation of memory reliability in patients with different intellectual levels. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Risk factors for fatigue in patients with epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Song; Wu, Yuanbin; Deng, Yanchun; Liu, Yonghong; Zhao, Jingjing; Ma, Lei

    2016-11-01

    Fatigue is highly prevalent in patients with epilepsy and has a major impact on quality of life, but little data is available on its effects and management in epilepsy. To identify the incidence and risk factors of fatigue in patients with epilepsy, 105 epilepsy patients (45 women and 60 men) were enrolled in our study. Demographic and clinical data were collected and psychological variables including fatigue, sleep quality, excess daytime sleepiness, anxiety, and depression were measured by Fatigue Severity Scale, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, Epworth Sleepiness Scale, and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, respectively. Of 105 patients, 29.5% exhibited fatigue (FSS score ⩾4). We found no correlation between the occurrence of fatigue and any of our demographic or clinical variables. Fatigue is correlated with low sleep quality, anxiety, and depression, but not with excess daytime sleepiness. Thus, we concluded that fatigue is highly prevalent in patients with epilepsy, and that low sleep quality, anxiety, and depression are significantly correlated with fatigue in epileptics, while excess daytime sleepiness not. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Associated factors and prevalence of erectile dysfunction in hemodialysis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcio Rodrigues Costa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The proposal of this study was to determine the prevalence and the associated factors of erectile dysfunction (ED among hemodialysis (HD patients. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study based on data collected from HD male patients. Clinical, demographic and laboratory data of all patients were collected in three HD clinics from December 2010 to June 2011. Patients answered questions of erectile function domain from International Index of Erectile Function. Data were evaluated by descriptive analysis and by univariate (ULRA and multivariate logistic regression analysis (MLRA. Results: Three hundred and five patients participated of the study. The prevalence of ED was 68.19%. ED was associated with diabetes (DM, benign prostatic hyperplasia, glomerulonephritis as cause of chronic renal failure (CRF, smoking habits, lower creatinine levels (ULRA, use of calcium channel blocker (MLRA, aging, lower education level, alcohol consumption, DM (as cause of CRF and coronary insufficiency (ULRA and MLRA. Conclusions: ED was highly prevalent in the HD men. It was independently associated with aging, current use of alcohol, long alcohol use (even for those who do not drink more, lower education level, diabetes as cause of CRF, coronary insufficiency and use of channel blockers calcium.

  9. Factors associated with physicians’ perception of physician-patient relationship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnny Francisco Casanova Saldarriaga

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the factors associated in the perception of physician-patient relationship by physicians who work at the Hospital Nacional Edgardo Rebagliati Martins, 2015. Materials and methods: An observational, prospective, cross-sectional, analytic, non-experimental study. The study population consisted of all the physicians who work at the Head and Neck Surgery Department, which includes the Otolaryngology (15 physicians, Ophthalmology (25 physicians, and Head and Neck (14 physicians Specialty Areas. The research instrument was a self-administered survey based on three topics: 1 Influence of technology and specialization in dehumanizing physician-patient relationship. 2 Influence of judicialization of medicine. 3 Respect and confidence of patients. Eighteen questions based on the three main topics were asked, and physician’s sociodemographic, educational and cultural data were collected. The instrument was validated by a team of experts, at a confidence level of 0.92 (Cronbach’s Alpha score. Besides the survey, physicians underwent a personal interview, in order to find out their personal opinion about their physician-patient relationship. Data were analyzed using IBM SPSS Statistics statistical software. Statistical analysis was conducted using chi-square test, with a significance level of 5%. Results: The research assessed 30 specialty physicians with a mean age of 53.57 years: 83.3% of the interviewed physicians were male, 43% majored in ophthalmology, 36.7% were born in Lima, 43.3% finished high school at a public school, 66.7% studied medicine at a public university, 93.3% pursued major studies at a public university, 46.7% stated that their mother was born in the Peruvian highlands, 63.3% stated that their father was born in the Peruvian highlands, 87% were Catholics, 83% said that they chose to study medicine by vocation, 90% practiced medicine in the private sector, 43% volunteered in social support programs for low

  10. Risk and Protective Factors for Suicide in Patients with Alcoholism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leo Sher

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Alcoholism is associated with a high risk for suicidal behavior. Up to 40% of persons with alcoholism attempt suicide at some time and 7% end their lives by committing suicide. Risk factors include being male, older than 50 years of age, living alone, being unemployed, poor social support, interpersonal losses, continued drinking, consumption of a greater amount of alcohol when drinking, a recent alcohol binge, previous alcohol treatment, a family history of alcoholism, a history of comorbid substance abuse (especially cocaine, a major depressive episode, serious medical illness, suicidal communication, and prior suicidal behavior. Suicidal behavior is especially frequent in patients with comorbid alcoholism and major depression. However, all patients with alcoholism should be evaluated for suicide risk. Understanding of risk and vulnerability to suicidal behavior in alcoholism still outweighs our knowledge of protective factors and resilience. Knowledge of protective factors for suicide may help to prevent and/or predict suicidal behavior. Protective factors for suicide in alcoholism are quite varied and include an individual's biological and behavioral characteristics, as well as attributes of the environment and culture. Protective factors include effective clinical care for psychiatric (including alcoholism and drug abuse and physical disorders, easy access to a variety of clinical interventions and support for seeking help, restricted access to highly lethal means of suicide, strong connections to family and community support, skills in problem solving and conflict resolution, cultural and religious beliefs that discourage suicide and support self-preservation. Future studies are necessary to determine which interventions may reduce suicidal behavior in alcoholism.

  11. [Factors related to patient satisfaction with hospital emergency services].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra Hidalgo, Pedro; Bermejo Alegría, Rosa María; Más Castillo, Adelia; Hidalgo Montesinos, María Dolores; Gomis Cebrián, Rafael; Calle Urra, José Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    To determine the perceived quality variables related to satisfaction and to identify the influence of sociodemographic factors on user satisfaction with hospital emergencies. A telephone survey was conducted with a specifically designed questionnaire for use in a sample of 3,600 users of hospital emergency services in nine public hospitals in 2008 and 2009. The adjusted model including all perceived quality and sociodemographic variables explained 47.1% of the variance (adjusted R(2)). Of all the independent variables included, only eight were significant in predicting the level of patient satisfaction. These variables were related to the patient's opinion of the relationship with medical staff (p = 0.041), nurses' and porters' professionalism (p = 0.010 and 0.022), infrastructure (cleanliness and comfort) (p = 0.033 and 0.008), information received at discharge (p = 0.000), waiting time in the emergency department (p = 0.000) and the perception of treatment-diagnosis without failure (p = 0.028). The variables influencing emergency patients' satisfaction were determined, allowing areas where corrective action could be introduced to be identified. In addition, possible confounding factors that should be controlled for when comparing results among distinct hospitals were identified. The emergency satisfaction questionnaire is a useful instrument to evaluate and improve quality of care. Copyright © 2011 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  12. Using qualitative methods to understand factors contributing to patient satisfaction among dermatology patients: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, Caitlin; Singh, Sanminder; Gibbons, Brittany; Clark, Caitlin; Torres, Josefina; Cheng, Michelle Y; Wang, Elizabeth A; Armstrong, April W

    2018-05-01

    In this systematic review, we aimed to synthesize data that identify factors contributing to patient satisfaction in dermatology care using qualitative methods. We performed a comprehensive search of the literature using the PubMed database for articles published between January 1, 2000 and February 9, 2015. The initial search yielded 186 articles, of which 13 were included after applying inclusion and exclusion criteria. The systematic review of 13 articles included a total of 330 patients. Using in-field observations and semistructured interviews, studies found that qualitative methods and analysis increased the provider's sensitivity to patient needs and enhanced patient care. Analyses using qualitative methods found increased patient satisfaction in their healthcare provider is associated with (1) confidence in the provider's diagnosis, (2) perception of patient-centered, individualized recommendations and (3) quality of patient education and provider explanation during a visit. Patient satisfaction is measured using either quantitative or qualitative methods. Quantitative methods result in standardized data that often does not capture the nuances of patient experience. In contrast, qualitative methodology is integral to gathering patient perspectives on patient care and satisfaction and should be included in future research models.

  13. Patient adherence to antihypertensive therapy and its individual psychological factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidia Trachuk

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background. In the treatment of chronic, especially asymptomatic pathology one of the main problem is the adherence to therapy. Patients with arterial hypertension need long-term, often lifelong medication, and how strictly they adhere to prescriptions often determines the course of the disease and the medical measures effectiveness. According to statistics, more than half of patients with hypertension are characterized by low compliance, which leads to complications of this disease. The objective of the research is to identify and analize the individual psychological factors that determine patient adherence to antihypertensive therapy. Methods and materials. This study was conducted during 2011-2013 at the cardiology departments of the Kyiv Alexander Hospital, polyclinics number 2 Shevchenko district in Kyiv, Desnyanskiy clinic №3 district in Kyiv, medical center "Adonis plus". We examined 203 patients with arterial hypertension (average age 53,5 ± 4,5 years. Methods: socio-demographic, clinical, clinical and psychological, psychodiagnostical, mathematical and statistical methods. Psychodiagnostical method included: 8-item Morisky medical adherence scale (Morisky D. E., 2008; self-assessment anxiety scale Charles D. Spielberger – Y.L Hanin (A.V. Batarshev, 2005; the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory questionnaire (MMRI (F.B. Berezin, 1994; "The level of subjective control" (A.A. Rean, 2001; "Index of attitudes to health" (S.D. Deryabo, VA Yasvin, 2000. Results. According to the results of 8-item Morisky medical adherence scale patients were divided into 3 groups according to the level of compliance - with high (26.11%, average (24.14% and low (49.75% levels of adherence to antihypertensive therapy. The individual-psychological predictors of poor adherence to antihypertensive therapy include the following personal characteristics of patients: a low level of intensity of attitude to health, internal type of subjective control, a

  14. [Pulmonary hypertension in hemodialysis patients: Prevalence and associated factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reque, Javier; Quiroga, Borja; Ruiz, Caridad; Villaverde, Maria Teresa; Vega, Almudena; Abad, Soraya; Panizo, Nayara; López-Gómez, J Manuel

    2016-02-19

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a progressive disorder that can be caused by several underlying conditions or an intrinsic alteration of the pulmonary vasculature. Chronic increased pressure in the pulmonary vasculature leads to changes in the architecture of the vessels that can perpetuate PH and produce right ventricular dysfunction. These structural and functional alterations can decrease survival and quality of life of patients on hemodialysis; however, there is a lack of evidence about this problem in this population. The aim of this study is to establish the prevalence of PH in patients on hemodialysis and its association with specific factors related to this patient population. We included 202 prevalent patients on hemodialysis for at least 6 months and who were clinically stable. We collected demographic data, routine laboratory parameters and data of 2D Doppler-echocardiography. PH was defined as a systolic pulmonary artery pressure (SPAP) estimated by Doppler ultrasound above 35mmHg. Hydration status was assessed by determining the plasma concentration of N-terminal pro brain natriuretic peptide (Nt-proBNP). PH prevalence was 37.1% (75 patients). The average SPAP in the entire study population was 32±12mmHg and in the group with PH it was 45±11mmHg. We found a direct and statistically significant correlation between the presence of PH and age (P=.001), time on renal replacement therapy (P=.04), the presence of systolic dysfunction (P=.007), diastolic dysfunction (P= 01), mitral valve disease (P=.01) and double mitral and aortic disease (P=.007). Volume overload was closely associated with PH, as demonstrated by the correlation between the SPAP and Nt-proBNP levels (P=.001). We conclude that prevalence of PH in hemodialysis patients is high. And one of the most important associated factors is volume overload. More studies are needed to establish the impact of PH on morbidity and mortality of patients and to assess whether a better volume control improves

  15. Frequency of sarcopenia and associated factors among hospitalized elderly patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Bruno Prata; Batista, Anne Karine Menezes Santos; Gomes, Isabela Barboza; Olivieri, Flávia Milholo; Camelier, Fernanda Warken Rosa; Camelier, Aquiles Assunção

    2015-05-06

    Sarcopenia is an important public health problem that affects mainly elders, and has negative consequences, such as disability and even death. Due to the lack of studies evaluating sarcopenia in elderly persons hospitalized in Brazil, the aim of the present study was to describe the frequency of sarcopenia and associated factors among elders in a hospital in the city of Salvador-Brazil. This cross-sectional study included 110 hospitalized elderly patients in a multi-specialty hospital in Salvador-BA, Brazil. Inclusion criteria: were elders aged ≥60 years between the first and fifth day of hospitalization; who were able to walk without external assistance; with medical permission to walk, and who did not take vasoactive and inotropic drugs. The diagnosis of sarcopenia was determined by combining the reduction in skeletal muscle mass with muscle weakness (women, sarcopenia was described in percentages with their respective confidence intervals and logistic regression was performed for multivariate analysis of factors associated with sarcopenia. Among the 110 patients included, the frequency of sarcopenia was 21.8%, with 10.0% being of the severe type. There was a predominance of clinical profile (59.1%), such as heart disease (20.0%), pneumonia (13.6%) and skin infections (9.1%), with a Charlson index of 5.4 ± 1.8. The factors associated with sarcopenia were age (OR = 1.14; 95% CI = 1.06 to 1.23), clinical profile on admission (OR = 5.15; 95% CI = 1.16-22.9) and smoking (OR = 7.8; 95% CI = 1.53-39.9). The frequency of sarcopenia in elderly hospitalized patients was high (1 in 5 elderly) and anthropometric equation can be a viable and inexpensive alternative to screening and programming intervention in this population.

  16. Quantifying cardiovascular disease risk factors in patients with psoriasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, I M; Skaaby, T; Ellervik, C

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In a previous meta-analysis on categorical data we found an association between psoriasis and cardiovascular disease and associated risk factors. OBJECTIVES: To quantify the level of cardiovascular disease risk factors in order to provide additional data for the clinical management...... of the increased risk. METHODS: This was a meta-analysis of observational studies with continuous outcome using random-effects statistics. A systematic search of studies published before 25 October 2012 was conducted using the databases Medline, EMBASE, International Pharmaceutical Abstracts, PASCAL and BIOSIS......·65 mmol L(-1) )] and a higher HbA1c [1·09 mmol mol(-1) , 95% CI 0·87-1·31, P controls are significant, and therefore relevant to the clinical management of patients with psoriasis....

  17. A holistic approach to factors affecting depression in haemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerogianni, Georgia; Kouzoupis, Anastasios; Grapsa, Eirini

    2018-05-19

    Depression in dialysis populations is affected by co-morbid diseases, such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and immune dysfunction, and it also includes high suicide risk and frequent hospitalizations. Depressive disorders have a close association with malnutrition and chronic inflammation, as well as with cognitive impairment. Impaired cognitive function may be manifested as low adherence to dialysis treatment, leading to malnutrition. Additionally, chronic pain and low quality of sleep lead to high rates of depressive symptoms in haemodialysis patients, while an untreated depression can cause sleep disturbances and increased mortality risk. Depression can also lead to sexual dysfunction and non-adherence, while unemployment can cause depressive disorders, due to patients' feelings of being a financial burden on their family. The present review provides a holistic approach to the factors affecting depression in haemodialysis, offering significant knowledge to renal professionals.

  18. Risk factors for hazardous events in olfactory-impaired patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pence, Taylor S; Reiter, Evan R; DiNardo, Laurence J; Costanzo, Richard M

    2014-10-01

    Normal olfaction provides essential cues to allow early detection and avoidance of potentially hazardous situations. Thus, patients with impaired olfaction may be at increased risk of experiencing certain hazardous events such as cooking or house fires, delayed detection of gas leaks, and exposure to or ingestion of toxic substances. To identify risk factors and potential trends over time in olfactory-related hazardous events in patients with impaired olfactory function. Retrospective cohort study of 1047 patients presenting to a university smell and taste clinic between 1983 and 2013. A total of 704 patients had both clinical olfactory testing and a hazard interview and were studied. On the basis of olfactory function testing results, patients were categorized as normosmic (n = 161), mildly hyposmic (n = 99), moderately hyposmic (n = 93), severely hyposmic (n = 142), and anosmic (n = 209). Patient evaluation including interview, examination, and olfactory testing. Incidence of specific olfaction-related hazardous events (ie, burning pots and/or pans, starting a fire while cooking, inability to detect gas leaks, inability to detect smoke, and ingestion of toxic substances or spoiled foods) by degree of olfactory impairment. The incidence of having experienced any hazardous event progressively increased with degree of impairment: normosmic (18.0%), mildly hyposmic (22.2%), moderately hyposmic (31.2%), severely hyposmic (32.4%), and anosmic (39.2%). Over 3 decades there was no significant change in the overall incidence of hazardous events. Analysis of demographic data (age, sex, race, smoking status, and etiology) revealed significant differences in the incidence of hazardous events based on age (among 397 patients hazardous event, vs 31 of 146 patients ≥65 years [21.3%]; P hazardous event, vs 73 of 265 men [27.6%]; P = .009), and race (among 98 African Americans, 41 [41.8%] with hazardous event, vs 134 of 434 whites [30.9%]; P = .04

  19. Assessment of patients' awareness and factors influencing patients' demands for sedation in endodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huh, Yoo Kyeom; Montagnese, Thomas A; Harding, Jarrod; Aminoshariae, Anita; Mickel, Andre

    2015-02-01

    Endodontic therapy is perceived by many as a procedure to be feared. Many studies have reported that fear and anxiety are major deterrents to seeking dental care in general, but only a few deal with the use of sedation in endodontic therapies. The purpose of this study was to assess patients' awareness of and factors influencing the potential demand for sedation in endodontics. We hypothesized that there is an association between demographic factors and the demand for sedation in endodontics. A survey consisting of 24 questions was given to patients 18 years and older who presented to the graduate endodontic clinic. Results were collected and statistically analyzed. Thirty-six percent of patients reported that their perception of sedation was being put to sleep, and 27% perceived it as related to or reducing pain. Concerns associated with endodontic therapy were the fear of pain (35%), fear of needles (16%), difficulty getting numb (10%), and anxiety (7%). The 2 major demographic factors that influenced the demand for sedation were cost and the level of anxiety (P endodontic therapy if the option of sedation was available. The demand for sedation in endodontics is high. Patients' understanding of sedation varies. More patients would consider having endodontic procedures if sedation was available. The provision of sedation by endodontists could result in more patients accepting endodontic therapies. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Risk Factors for Postoperative Cognitive Dysfunctions in Elderly Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Yu. Ibragimov

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study the impact of a wide spectrum of factors on the development of postoperative delirium in elderly patients in relation to the changes in their cognitive functions depending on the type of anesthesia and period after surgery. Subjects and methods. The study covered 100 patients aged 65—90 years who had been electively operated on under general, regional, and combined anesthesia. Their cognitive status was elevated before and 1, 4, and 7 days after surgery, by using the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE schedule. The diagnosis was postoperatively established on the basis of interviews, by applying the diagnostic criteria of ICD-10 and DSM-IV (American Psychiatric Association, 1994 and verified by a psychiatrist’s consultation. Results. Seventeen patients developed delirium within the first two days following surgery. Elevated plasma sodium (p<0.000001, leukocytosis (p<0.00002, and postoperative analgesia mode (p<0.02 proved to be statistically significant risk factors for delirium. Worse results of MMSE tests at all postoperative stages than those obtained prior to surgery were significant (p<0.05. Comparing the results obtained on days 1, 4, and 7 showed a significant cognitive improvement. Analysis indicated no significant differences in MMSE changes between the groups of general, regional, and combined anesthesia at all study stages. Conclusion. In elderly patients, surgery and anesthesia lead to a considerable deterioration of cognitive functions even if the development of delirium can be avoided. There is a significant correlation of the development of delirium with leukocytosis, hypernatremia, and postoperative analgesia mode. Key words: anesthesia, postoperative delirium, cognitive status, MMSE, elderly age.

  1. Patient Factors Used by Pediatricians to Assign Asthma Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okelo, Sande O.; Patino, Cecilia M.; Riekert, Kristin A.; Merriman, Barry; Bilderback, Andrew; Hansel, Nadia N.; Thompson, Kathy; Thompson, Jennifer; Quartey, Ruth; Rand, Cynthia S.; Diette, Gregory B.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Although asthma is often inappropriately treated in children, little is known about what information pediatricians use to adjust asthma therapy. The purpose of this work was to assess the importance of various dimensions of patient asthma status as the basis of pediatrician treatment decisions. PATIENTS AND METHODS We conducted a cross-sectional, random-sample survey, between November 2005 and May 2006, of 500 members of the American Academy of Pediatrics using standardized case vignettes. Vignettes varied in regard to (1) acute health care use (hospitalized 6 months ago), (2) bother (parent bothered by the child’s asthma status), (3) control (frequency of symptoms and albuterol use), (4) direction (qualitative change in symptoms), and (5) wheezing during physical examination. Our primary outcome was the proportion of pediatricians who would adjust treatment in the presence or absence of these 5 factors. RESULTS Physicians used multiple dimensions of asthma status other than symptoms to determine treatment. Pediatricians were significantly more likely to increase treatment for a recently hospitalized patient (45% vs 18%), a bothered parent (67% vs 18%), poorly controlled symptoms (4–5 times per week; 100% vs 18%), or if there was wheezing on examination (45% vs 18%) compared with patients who only had well-controlled symptoms. Pediatricians were significantly less likely to decrease treatment for a child with well-controlled symptoms and recent hospitalization (28%), parents who reported being bothered (43%), or a child whose symptoms had worsened since the last doctor visit (10%) compared with children with well-controlled symptoms alone. CONCLUSIONS Pediatricians treat asthma on the basis of multiple dimensions of asthma status, including hospitalization, bother, symptom frequency, direction, and wheezing but use these factors differently to increase and decrease treatment. Tools that systematically assess multiple dimensions of asthma may be useful

  2. Factors influencing obstacle crossing performance in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Yi Liao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tripping over obstacles is the major cause of falls in community-dwelling patients with Parkinson's disease (PD. Understanding the factors associated with the obstacle crossing behavior may help to develop possible training programs for crossing performance. This study aimed to identify the relationships and important factors determining obstacle crossing performance in patients with PD. METHODS: Forty-two idiopathic patients with PD (Hoehn and Yahr stages I to III participated in this study. Obstacle crossing performance was recorded by the Liberty system, a three-dimensional motion capture device. Maximal isometric strength of the lower extremity was measured by a handheld dynamometer. Dynamic balance and sensory integration ability were assessed using the Balance Master system. Movement velocity (MV, maximal excursion (ME, and directional control (DC were obtained during the limits of stability test to quantify dynamic balance. The sum of sensory organization test (SOT scores was used to quantify sensory organization ability. RESULTS: Both crossing stride length and stride velocity correlated significantly with lower extremity muscle strength, dynamic balance control (forward and sideward, and sum of SOT scores. From the regression model, forward DC and ankle dorsiflexor strength were identified as two major determinants for crossing performance (R(2 = .37 to.41 for the crossing stride length, R(2 = .43 to.44 for the crossing stride velocity. CONCLUSIONS: Lower extremity muscle strength, dynamic balance control and sensory integration ability significantly influence obstacle crossing performance. We suggest an emphasis on muscle strengthening exercises (especially ankle dorsiflexors, balance training (especially forward DC, and sensory integration training to improve obstacle crossing performance in patients with PD.

  3. Risk Factors of the Hip Fractures in Elderly Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Reza Nik-Tab'e

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The hip fractures are the most frequent cause of traumatic death after the age of 75 years, occurring more frequently in women that will make a negative impact of the patient's life style. The purpose of this research was to evaluate the risk factors of the hip fractures in elderly hospitalized in centers of education and treatment of Kerman and Rafsanjan cities in 1998-2000. Methods and Materials & Methods: This study was a descriptive method of sampling during 27 months (from 19 April 1998 to 21 July 2000 in hospitalized patients of orthopedic wards of Ali ebne Abitaleb hospital of Rafsanjan and Shahid bahonar hospital of Kerman. 257 patients who were afflicted with hip fracture were evaluated by a questionnaire with 20 statements (risk factors of hip fractures that was used to recorded information about this study: This risk factors were including age, sex, type of fracture, osteoporosis, milk consumption, muscle atrophy, environmental hazards, body mass index diseases, diabetes, previous fracture, smoking, antidepressant and anti convulsion drugs, heart disease, low mobility and activity perception disorders, age of menopause, impaired visual and nonuse external hip protector (padding. Results: The results of this study showed that many of above risk factors were effective (>50% than others. These factors were including environmental hazards (81.7%, muscle atrophy (72.8%, previous fractures (52.1%, low mobility and activity (70.8%, low milk consumption (100%, low BMI (79.8%, osteoporosis (52.1% and nonuse external hip protector (100%. Conclusion: The results of this study recommend that environmental hazards of elderly should be modified (e.g. well lighted, stair case with secure hand rail to prevent from falling Exercise and faradic current prevent muscle atrophy and improve physical fitness, muscle strength, balance and coordination. Treatment of impaired visual is important because risk of falling is decreased. Regular load

  4. Patient satisfaction with ambulatory care in Germany: effects of patient- and medical practice-related factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auras, Silke; Ostermann, Thomas; de Cruppé, Werner; Bitzer, Eva-Maria; Diel, Franziska; Geraedts, Max

    2016-12-01

    The study aimed to illustrate the effect of the patients' sex, age, self-rated health and medical practice specialization on patient satisfaction. Secondary analysis of patient survey data using multilevel analysis (generalized linear mixed model, medical practice as random effect) using a sequential modelling strategy. We examined the effects of the patients' sex, age, self-rated health and medical practice specialization on four patient satisfaction dimensions: medical practice organization, information, interaction, professional competence. The study was performed in 92 German medical practices providing ambulatory care in general medicine, internal medicine or gynaecology. In total, 9888 adult patients participated in a patient survey using the validated 'questionnaire on satisfaction with ambulatory care-quality from the patient perspective [ZAP]'. We calculated four models for each satisfaction dimension, revealing regression coefficients with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for all independent variables, and using Wald Chi-Square statistic for each modelling step (model validity) and LR-Tests to compare the models of each step with the previous model. The patients' sex and age had a weak effect (maximum regression coefficient 1.09, CI 0.39; 1.80), and the patients' self-rated health had the strongest positive effect (maximum regression coefficient 7.66, CI 6.69; 8.63) on satisfaction ratings. The effect of medical practice specialization was heterogeneous. All factors studied, specifically the patients' self-rated health, affected patient satisfaction. Adjustment should always be considered because it improves the comparability of patient satisfaction in medical practices with atypically varying patient populations and increases the acceptance of comparisons. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press in association with the International Society for Quality in Health Care. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  5. Factors associated with outcomes in ruptured aneurysmal patients: Clinical Study of 80 Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfotih Gobran Taha Ahmed

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Due to insufficient data in the literature, the optimal timing for surgical intervention for ruptured intracranial aneurysms is still controversial. Some practitioners advocate early surgery, but others not. It is important to identify other factors that can be used to predict poor prognosis in ruptured intracranial aneurysm patients. Objective: To determine the influence of timing of clipping surgery, and other factors on the outcomes of ruptured intracranial aneurysms in Hunt & Hess I~III grade patients. Method: We have performed a retrospective study involving 80 patients who were surgically treated for ruptured intracranial aneurysm between 2007 and 2012. The patient population consisted of 50(62.5% females and 30(37.5% males, with an age range of 12 to 75 years old, mean age 52.33 ± 10.63 years. We measured association between the Glasgow Outcome Scores and Sex, timing of clipping surgery, aneurysm location and pre-operative patient's neurological condition using famous Hunt and Hess grade system. Results: We did not find any correlation between the outcomes of ruptured intracranial aneurysm patients and timing (early, intermediate, late stage of clipping, sex, aneurysm location. Whereas there is a significant correlation between patients outcomes and pre-operative patient neurological condition (Hunt & Hess grade. Conclusion: Timing of Surgery (early, intermediate, late does not affect outcomes in low Hunt and Hess grade patients I~III. Whereas neurological condition (Hunt & Hess has strong impact on postoperative outcomes. Others factors like sex, Age, Aneurysm location have no effect on outcomes in ruptured intracranial aneurysms.

  6. Recurrens Rates and Affecting Factors in Patients Operated for Endometrioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cüneyt Eftal Taner

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Our aim was to investigate reurrens rates and affecting factors in patients operated for endometrioma.\tMATERIAL-METHOD: The cases operated for over cyst diagnosis and pathologically endometrioma diagnosis between the years 2000-2004 has been reviewed retrospectively. Cases’s age, cyst diameter, endometriosis stage and operation procedure have been recorded and the cases that have recurrence and factors affecting recurrence are evaluated.\tRESULTS: Results: 51 of 137 (37.3% cases with endometrioma that have average age of 29.1 in course of operation ± 5.4 had left side, 37 of 137(27% had right side and 49 of 137 (35.7% had bilateral endometrioma. Average diameter of endometriomas was 5.1 ±1.9 cm (1-1.5 cm. After average 3.3±1.8 years from first operation time in 42 cases(30.6% had recurrence. in the left over recurrence rate was signifciantly high (10.8% to 41.2% than right over. For recurrence rate There were no significiant diference between the 102 cases that had laparoscopy and 35 cases that had laparotomy according to cyst diameter, case ages and type of operation.\tWhen the cases were reviewed according to endometriozis staging, There were significiantly high recurrence rate at stage III (28.9% and stage IV(46.0%. With respect to the operation type, patients that had one-sided ooferektomi,relapse is not seen. Patients that had fenestration and ablation as operation, relapse rate is 52.9% significiantly higher than patients that had kistektomi (26.9%.Despite decrease in preoperative complaints (dysmenorrhea, dyspareunia, chronic pelvic pain in early postoperative period, they recurred in late postoperative period. 47(56% of 84 patients who have fertility desire gave live birth unfortunately 12(14.3% of them.\tCONCLUSION: Recurrence rates were signifiantly higher in cases with lift sided endometrioma, advanced stafe of endometriosis and in patient udergone fenestration and ablation for treatment.

  7. Risk factors of refeeding syndrome in malnourished older hospitalized patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourhassan, Maryam; Cuvelier, Ingeborg; Gehrke, Ilse; Marburger, Christian; Modreker, Mirja Katrin; Volkert, Dorothee; Willschrei, Hans-Peter; Wirth, Rainer

    2017-06-10

    Despite the high prevalence of malnutrition among older hospitalized persons, it is unknown how many of these malnourished patients are at risk of developing the refeeding syndrome (RFS). In this study, we sought to compare the prevalence and severity of malnutrition among older hospitalized patients with prevalence of known risk factors of RFS. This cross-sectional multicenter-study investigated older participants who were consecutively admitted to the geriatric acute care ward. Malnutrition screening was conducted using Nutritional Risk Screening (NRS-2002), Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool (MUST) and Mini Nutritional Assessment-Short Form (MNA-SF). The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) criteria were applied for assessing patients at risk of RFS. Weight and height were measured. Degree of weight loss (WL) was obtained by interview. Serum phosphate, magnesium, potassium, sodium, calcium, creatinine and urea were analyzed according to standard procedures. The study group comprised 342 participants (222 females) with a mean age of 83.1 ± 6.8 and BMI range of 14.7-43.6 kg/m 2 . More participants were assessed at risk of malnutrition using NRS-2002 (n = 253, 74.0%) compared to MUST (n = 170, 49.7%) and MNA-SF (n = 191, 55.8%). Of total participants, 239 (69.9%; 157 females) were considered to be at risk of RFS. Based on NRS-2002, 75.9% (n = 192) of patients at risk of malnutrition are at risk of RFS whereas according to MUST and MNA-SF, 85.9% (n = 146) and 69.1% (n = 132) of patients at risk of malnutrition are exposed to high risk of RFS, respectively. In addition, the prevalence of risk of RFS is significantly increased with higher score of NRS-2002 and MUST and lower score of MNA-SF. In a stepwise multiple regression analysis, disease severity (38.2%), WL in 3 months (20.3%) and BMI (33.3%) mainly explained variance in NRS-2002, MUST and MNA-SF scores, respectively, in patients with risk of RFS. Nearly three

  8. Pre-hospital intubation factors and pneumonia in trauma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Heather L; Warner, Keir; Bulger, Eileen M; Sharar, Sam R; Maier, Ronald V; Cuschieri, Joseph

    2011-10-01

    We reported similar rates of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) previously in trauma patients intubated either in a pre-hospital (PH) venue or the emergency department. A subset of PH intubations with continuous quality assessment was re-examined to identify the intubation factors associated with VAP. The subgroup was derived from an existing data set of consecutive adult trauma patients intubated prior to Level I trauma center admission July 2007-July 2008. Intubation details recorded included bag-valve mask ventilation (BVM) and the presence of material in the airway. The diagnosis of VAP was made preferentially by quantitative bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cultures (≥ 10⁴ colony-forming units indicating infection). Baseline data, injury characteristics, and circumstances of intubation of patients with and without VAP were compared by univariable analysis. Detailed data were available for 197 patients; 32 (16.2%) developed VAP, on average 6.0±0.7 days after admission. Baseline characteristics were similar in the groups, but diabetes mellitus was more common in the VAP group (4 [12.5%] vs. 5 [3.0%]; p=0.02). There was a higher rate of blunt injury in the VAP patients (28 [87.5%] vs. 106 [64.2%]; p=0.01) and higher injury severity scores (33.1±2.8 vs. 23.0±1.0; p=0.0002) and chest Abbreviated Injury Scores (2.6±0.3 vs. 1.5±0.1; p=0.002). Lower Glasgow Coma Scale scores (7.9±0.9 vs. 9.9±0.4; p=0.04) and greater use of BVM (18 [56.3%] vs. 56 [34.0%]; p=0.02) were observed in patients who developed VAP. Among aspirations, 10 (31.3%) of patients with emesis developed VAP compared with only 4 (12.5%) with blood in the airway (p=0.003). Aspiration, along with depressed consciousness and greater injury severity, may predispose trauma patients to VAP. Prospective studies should focus on the quality and timing of aspiration relative to intubation to determine if novel interventions can prevent aspiration or decrease the risk of VAP after aspiration.

  9. Psychological factors in patients with peptic ulcerand functional dyspepsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faramarzi, Mahbobeh; Kheirkhah, Farzan; Shokri-Shirvani, Javad; Mosavi, Shokofeh; Zarini, Soroush

    2014-01-01

    The role of psychological factors in peptic ulcer disease (PUD) and functional dyspepsia (FD) has not been clearly determined. In this study the role of conflict management styles, psychiatric symptoms, and alexithymia were assessed in patients with PUD and FD and in the healthy individuals. Ninety subjects [30 PUD (15 women, 15 men), 30 FD (15 women, 15 men), and 30 healthy individuals (15 women, 15 men)] in two endoscopy wards of Babol University of Medical Sciences were evaluated. Three groups were matched with regard to demographic variables. Conflict management styles, psychiatric symptoms, and alexithymia were evaluated by appropriate questionnaires. The patients with PUD reported less mean scores on psychiatric symptoms than the FD patients (depression 12.6±7.5 vs 28±9.5, anxiety 8.2±5.9 vs 18.7±6. obsessive-compulsive disorder 15.7±7.5 vs 21.8±8.4, interpersonal sensitivity 9.5±7.4 vs 16±7, psychoticism 8.03±4.5 vs 14.3±6.3, somatization 12.5±10.8 vs 20.7±8.1, and the total score of psychiatric symptoms 94.4±49.9 vs 160.1±46.6). The mean scores use of unconstructive conflict management styles in PUD patients were lower than FD (dominating 17.7±3.5 vs 20.2±2.7, avoiding 17.5±3 vs 23.8±4.4). Alexithymia symptoms were higher in FD patients than PUD individuals (difficulty in identifying feelings 23.5±6.3 vs 27.8±3.9, difficulty in describing feeling 16.5±4.4 vs 17.3±3.6). The PUD and FD patients had higher scores regarding these variables than the healthy subjects. The results show that both PUD and FD patients experienced more psychiatric symptoms, unconstructive conflict management styles, and alexithymia than the healthy subjects. FD patients had worse psychiatric problems than PUD.

  10. Prognostic factors for return to work in patients with sciatica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grøvle, Lars; Haugen, Anne J; Keller, Anne; Ntvig, Bård; Brox, Jens I; Grotle, Margreth

    2013-12-01

    Little is known about the prognostic factors for work-related outcomes of sciatica caused by disc herniation. To identify the prognostic factors for return to work (RTW) during a 2-year follow-up among sciatica patients referred to secondary care. Multicenter prospective cohort study including 466 patients. Administrative data from the National Sickness Benefit Register were accessed for 227 patients. Two samples were used. Sample A comprised patients who at the time of inclusion in the cohort reported being on partial sick leave or complete sick leave or were undergoing rehabilitation because of back pain/sciatica. Sample B comprised patients who, according to the sickness benefit register, at the time of inclusion received sickness benefits or rehabilitation allowances because of back pain/sciatica. In Sample A, the outcome was self-reported return to full-time work at the 2-year follow-up. In Sample B, the outcome was time to first sustained RTW, defined as the first period of more than 60 days without receiving benefits from the register. Significant baseline predictors of self-reported RTW at 2 years (Analysis A) were identified by multivariate logistic regression. Significant predictors of time to sustained RTW (Analysis B) were identified by multivariate Cox proportional hazard modeling. Both analyses included adjustment for age and sex. To assess the effect of surgery on the probability of RTW, analyses similar to A and B were performed, including the variable surgery (yes/no). One-fourth of the patients were still out of work at the 2-year follow-up. In Sample A (n=237), younger age, better general health, lower baseline sciatica bothersomeness, less fear-avoidance work, and a negative straight-leg-raising test result were significantly associated with a higher probability of RTW at the 2-year follow-up. Surgery was not significantly associated with the outcome. In Sample B (n=125), history of sciatica, duration of the current sciatica episode more than 3

  11. Factors associated with furry pet ownership among patients with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downes, Martin J; Roy, Angkana; McGinn, Thomas G; Wisnivesky, Juan P

    2010-09-01

    Exposure to indoor allergens is an established risk factor for poor asthma control. Current guidelines recommend removing pets from the home of patients with asthma. This cross-sectional study was conducted to determine the prevalence of furry pet ownership in asthmatics compared to non-asthmatics and to identify factors associated with furry pet ownership among those with asthma. Secondary analysis assessed characteristics among asthmatics that might be associated with allowing a furry pet into the bedroom. Using data from The National Asthma Survey collected from 2003 to 2004, we carried out univariate and multiple regression analyses, in 2009, to identify independent predictors of furry pet ownership in asthma sufferers after controlling for potential confounders. Overall, asthmatics were more likely to own a furry pet than nonasthmatic individuals in the general population (49.9% versus 44.8%, p ownership among asthmatics. Additionally, 68.7% of patients with asthma who own a furry pet allowed them into their bedroom. Higher income and carrying out ownership is equally or more common among asthmatics compared to those without asthma. The majority of asthmatics with furry pets allow them into the bedroom. Recognizing and addressing these problems may help decrease asthma morbidity.

  12. [Influencing factors of reproduction status of patients undergoing laparoscopic myomectomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Guang-hui; Zhang, Song-ying; Li, Bai-jia; Wei, Wei; Huang, Dong; Lin, Xiao-na; Lou, Hong-ying

    2013-09-17

    To explore the influencing factors of reproduction status in women undergoing laparoscopic myomectomy (LM). A total of 278 LM patients were recruited.We retrospectively reviewed the reproduction status of 87 pregnant cases after LM. The correlations of their pregnancy outcomes and such clinical profiles as age, operative techniques, biological characteristics of fibroids (number, type, size and location) were analyzed.No uterine rupture occurred during the gestation period. None of them switched to open surgery due to laparoscopic difficulties. However, one patient had a laparoscopic suture for secondary bleeding of uterine incision. At 3 months post-operation, sonography showed no heterogeneous echo, effusion and hematoma in uterine incision.Incision through uterine cavity occurred intraoperatively in 8 cases, but no intrauterine adhesion was found on hysteroscopy 3 months later. And 87 women became pregnant and the postoperative fertilization time was from 2 months to 5 years. Age influenced the postoperative pregnancy rate.Other factors such as location, number and size of fibroid had no impact on fertility. For achieving a high conception rate and guaranteeing the safety of pregnant women, a clinician should select reasonable surgical approaches, perform accurate anatomical restoration, apply strict hemostasis and choose a right time of conception.

  13. Urinary incontinence in hospital patients: prevalence and associated factors

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    Jaqueline Betteloni Junqueira

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objectives: to analyze the prevalence of urinary incontinence and its associated factors in hospital patients. Method: this is a cross-sectional epidemiological study whose data were collected using the instruments Sociodemographic and Clinical Data, Characteristics of Urinary Leakage and International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire - Short Form. Prevalence was surveyed on a single day for four consecutive months. Data were analyzed using Chi-square test, Fisher’s exact test, Student t-test, Mann-Whitney test and logistic regression (forward stepwise. Results: the final sample consisted of 319 hospital adults (57.1% female, mean age of 47.9 years (SD=21.1. The prevalence of urinary incontinence was 22.9% (28% in women and 16.1% in men and the associated factors were: female sex (OR=3.89, age (OR=1.03, asthma (OR=3.66, use of laxatives (OR=3.26, use of diaper during the evaluation (OR=2.75, use of diaper at home (OR=10.29, and use of diaper at some point during the hospital stay (OR=6.74. Conclusion: the findings of this study differ from those found in the scarce existing literature on the subject in hospital patients. There is a need for previous studies such as this before proposing the implementation of preventive and therapeutic actions during the hospital stay.

  14. Risk factors for sudden cardiac death among patients with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Ping-Yi; Hung, Galen Chin-Lun; Jhong, Jia-Rong; Tsai, Shang-Ying; Chen, Chiao-Chicy; Kuo, Chian-Jue

    2015-10-01

    Patients with schizophrenia suffer from excessive premature mortality, and sudden cardiac death (SCD) is receiving growing attention as a potential cause. The present study investigated the incidence of SCD and its risk factors in a large schizophrenia cohort. We enrolled a consecutive series of 8264 patients diagnosed with schizophrenia (according to DSM-III-R and DSM-IV criteria) who were admitted to a psychiatric center in northern Taiwan from January 1, 1985 through December 31, 2008. By linking with national mortality database, 64 cases of SCD were identified. The standardized mortality ratio (SMR) for SCD was estimated. The cases were matched with controls randomly selected using risk-set sampling in a 1:2 ratio. A standardized chart review process was used to collect socio-demographic and clinical characteristics and the prescribed drugs for each study subject. Multivariate conditional logistic regression analysis was used to identify correlates of SCD at the index admission and the latest admission. The SMR for SCD was 4.5. For the clinical profiles at the index admission, physical disease (adjusted risk ratio [aRR]=2.91, Prisk of SCD. Regarding the latest admission, electrocardiographic abnormalities (aRR=5.46, Prisk for SCD. Consistently, aggressive behaviors (aRR=3.26, Prisk as well. Apart from cardiovascular profiles and antipsychotics, physical aggression is a crucial risk factor that deserves ongoing work for clarifying the mechanisms mediating SCD in schizophrenia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Factors associated with falls in older patients with diffuse polyneuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, James K

    2002-11-01

    To identify clinical factors associated with falls by older persons with polyneuropathy (PN). A cross-sectional study of 82 subjects aged 50 to 85 with clinical and electrodiagnostic evidence of PN. Electrodiagnostic and biomechanical research laboratories. Patients referred to the electrodiagnostic laboratory. History and physical examination, including semiquantitative methods of peripheral nerve function, and clinical balance testing. Falls were defined by retrospective self-report over a 2-year period. Forty (48.8%), 28 (34.1%), and 18 (22.0%) subjects reported a history of at least one fall, multiple falls, and injurious falls, respectively. Factors associated with single and multiple falls were similar, so only results for multiple and injurious falls are reported. Bivariate analysis showed that an increased body mass index (BMI) and more severe PN (as determined by the Michigan Diabetes Neuropathy Score) were associated with both fall categories. Men reporting falls also demonstrated a decreased unipedal stance time. Age, sex, nerve conduction study parameters, Romberg testing, medications, and comorbidities were not consistently associated with either fall category. Logistic regression demonstrated that multiple and injurious falls were associated with an increased BMI and more severe PN, controlling for age, sex, medications, and comorbidities (pseudo R2 = 0.458 and 0.484, respectively). Although previous work has demonstrated that all older persons with PN are at increased risk for falls, patients with increased BMI and more severe PN are at particularly high risk and should be targeted for intervention.

  16. Cardiovascular risk factors in patients with subclinical hypothyroidism

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    Pešić Milica

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims. Overt hypothyroidism is disease associated with accelerated arteriosclerosis and coronary heart disease. Whether subclinical hypothyroidism (SH is associated with increased cardiovascular risk is contraversial. As SH is a high prevalence thyroid dysfunction, specially in older women, it is important to evaluate cardiovascular risk factors in these patients and that was the aim of this study. Methods. We examined 30 patients with SH and 20 healthy controls. Subclinical hypothireoidism was defined as an elevated thyrotropin (TSH (> 4.5 mU/L and normal free thyroxine (FT4 level. In all the participants we determined body mass index (BMI, blood pressure, TSH, FT4, antibodies to thyroid peroxidase, antibodies to thyroglobulin, total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein (HDL cholesterol, low density lipoprotein (LDL cholesterol, triglicerides, total cholesterol/HDL cholesterol ratio and LDL/HDL cholesterol ratio. Results. Mean BMI in patients with SH was significantly higher (p < 0.05, as well as diastolic blood pressure (p < 0.01 compared with the controls. Average levels of total cholesterol (5.40±0.62 vs 5.06±0.19 mmol/l, p < 0.01 and triglycerides (2.16±0.56 vs 1.89±0.24 mmol/l, p < 0.05 were also significantly higher in the group with SH. Individual analysis revealed that the percentage of patients with SH having borderline elevated total cholesterol (63.33%, hypertrigliceridemia (43.33% and elevated total cholesterol/HDL cholesterol ratio (26.67% were significantly higher than the percentage in the controls. No significant correlation between TSH and lipid parameters was detected. Conclusion. Subclinical hypothyroidism was associated with higher BMI, diastolic hypertension, higher total cholesterol and triglicerides levels and higher total cholesterol/HDL cholesterols ratio. This might increase the risk of accelerated arteriosclerosis in patients with SH.

  17. Longitudinal study of prognostic factors in established periodontitis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machtei, E E; Dunford, R; Hausmann, E; Grossi, S G; Powell, J; Cummins, D; Zambon, J J; Genco, R J

    1997-02-01

    Numerous indicators for disease progression have been described in the last decade. The purpose of this study was to examine, longitudinally, a large battery of clinical, microbiological, and immunological indicators, to try to determine whether the presence of one or a combination of these parameters at baseline, would correlate positively with increased attachment and or bone loss (true prognostic factors). Following initial screening, 79 patients with established periodontitis were monitored longitudinally for one year. Whole mouth clinical measurements, plaque gingival and calculus indices, together with pocket depth and attachment level measurements, were repeated every three months. Full mouth radiographic survey, performed at baseline and 12 months, served to determine changes in crestal bone height using an image enhancement technique. Subgingival plaque samples were taken at baseline and every 3 months. Immunofluorescence assays were performed for the a battery of target microorganisms. Serum and GCF samples for IgG subclasses analysis were obtained at each visit and assayed using ELISA techniques. Likewise blood, samples were also drawn at each visit for a quantitative analysis of serum cotinine level. The overall mean attachment loss (AL) and bone loss (BL) were almost identical (0.159 mm and 0.164 mm, respectively). Individual patients variation was large (-0.733 to +1.004 mm). An overall 6.89% of sites were active; individual patients' means ranged from 0-28.9%. Mean pocket depth (PD) showed minimal change over the study period (-0.033 mm) thus suggesting that most if not all the AL was accompained by concomitant gingival recession. Smokers exhibited greater AL and radiographic BL compared to non-smokers. Likewise, patients' cotinine level showed direct correlation with outcomes of progressive periodontal breakdown. Past severity of periodontal involvement, as reflected in the patients baseline PD, AL and crestal bone height, showed good correlation

  18. Prevalence, Predictive Factors, and Characteristics of Osteoporosis in Hyperthyroid Patients

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    Ayotunde O. Ale

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The osteoporosis in thyroid disorder has the lowest report especially in sub-Saharan Africa. This study aims to determine the prevalence, predictive factors, and characteristics of osteoporosis in hyperthyroid patients. Method. Forty (40 hyperthyroid patients and healthy controls ages 21–50 years were recruited in this study. Questionnaires were administered to capture bio- and clinical data. Biochemical tests included blood, thyroid functions, intact parathyroid hormone, corrected calcium, and 25-hydroxyvitamin D tests. Bone mineral density (BMD was also evaluated. Data were analyzed using the SPSS 21. A p value < 0.05 was regarded as significant. Results. Osteoporosis was observed in 18 (45% of study subjects, 13 (72.2% females and 5 (27.8% males, respectively. The BMD of the hyperthyroid patients had a negative correlation with free triiodothyronine, FT3 (r=−0.49, p=0.005, FT4 (r=−0.33, p=0.009, corrected calcium (r=−0.31, p=0.039, alkaline phosphatase (r=−0.53, p<0.001, and osteocalcin (r=−0.61, p<0.001. Conversely, a positive association with thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH (r=0.54, p<0.001 was observed. Multiple regression showed osteocalcin (p<0.001 and TSH (p=0.015 as independent predictors of osteoporosis. Conclusion. Thyrotoxicosis is a risk factor for osteoporosis occurrence, and we recommend routine screening for this bone disease in persons over 20 years old with this disorder.

  19. Leprosy among patient contacts: a multilevel study of risk factors.

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    Anna M Sales

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: This study aimed to evaluate the risk factors associated with developing leprosy among the contacts of newly-diagnosed leprosy patients. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A total of 6,158 contacts and 1,201 leprosy patients of the cohort who were diagnosed and treated at the Leprosy Laboratory of Fiocruz from 1987 to 2007 were included. The contact variables analyzed were sex; age; educational and income levels; blood relationship, if any, to the index case; household or non-household relationship; length of time of close association with the index case; receipt of bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BGG vaccine and presence of BCG scar. Index cases variables included sex, age, educational level, family size, bacillary load, and disability grade. Multilevel logistic regression with random intercept was applied. Among the co-prevalent cases, the leprosy-related variables that remained associated with leprosy included type of household contact, [odds ratio (OR = 1.33, 95% confidence interval (CI: 1.02, 1.73] and consanguinity with the index case, (OR = 1.89, 95% CI: 1.42-2.51. With respect to the index case variables, the factors associated with leprosy among contacts included up to 4 years of schooling and 4 to 10 years of schooling (OR = 2.72, 95% CI: 1.54-4.79 and 2.40, 95% CI: 1.30-4.42, respectively and bacillary load, which increased the chance of leprosy among multibacillary contacts for those with a bacillary index of one to three and greater than three (OR = 1.79, 95% CI: 1.19-2.17 and OR: 4.07-95% CI: 2.73, 6.09, respectively. Among incident cases, household exposure was associated with leprosy (OR = 1.96, 95% CI: 1.29-2.98, compared with non-household exposure. Among the index case risk factors, an elevated bacillary load was the only variable associated with leprosy in the contacts. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Biological and social factors appear to be associated with leprosy among co-prevalent cases, whereas the factors related to the

  20. [Human factors and crisis resource management: improving patient safety].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rall, M; Oberfrank, S

    2013-10-01

    A continuing high number of patients suffer harm from medical treatment. In 60-70% of the cases the sources of harm can be attributed to the field of human factors (HFs) and teamwork; nevertheless, those topics are still neither part of medical education nor of basic and advanced training even though it has been known for many years and it has meanwhile also been demonstrated for surgical specialties that training in human factors and teamwork considerably reduces surgical mortality.Besides the medical field, the concept of crisis resource management (CRM) has already proven its worth in many other industries by improving teamwork and reducing errors in the domain of human factors. One of the best ways to learn about CRM and HFs is realistic simulation team training with well-trained instructors in CRM and HF. The educational concept of the HOTT (hand over team training) courses for trauma room training offered by the DGU integrates these elements based on the current state of science. It is time to establish such training for all medical teams in emergency medicine and operative care. Accompanying safety measures, such as the development of a positive culture of safety in every department and the use of effective critical incident reporting systems (CIRs) should be pursued.

  1. Factors influencing intercultural doctor-patient communication: a realist review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paternotte, Emma; van Dulmen, Sandra; van der Lee, Nadine; Scherpbier, Albert J J A; Scheele, Fedde

    2015-04-01

    Due to migration, doctors see patients from different ethnic backgrounds. This causes challenges for the communication. To develop training programs for doctors in intercultural communication (ICC), it is important to know which barriers and facilitators determine the quality of ICC. This study aimed to provide an overview of the literature and to explore how ICC works. A systematic search was performed to find literature published before October 2012. The search terms used were cultural, communication, healthcare worker. A realist synthesis allowed us to use an explanatory focus to understand the interplay of communication. In total, 145 articles met the inclusion criteria. We found ICC challenges due to language, cultural and social differences, and doctors' assumptions. The mechanisms were described as factors influencing the process of ICC and divided into objectives, core skills and specific skills. The results were synthesized in a framework for the development of training. The quality of ICC is influenced by the context and by the mechanisms. These mechanisms translate into practical points for training, which seem to have similarities with patient-centered communication. Training for improving ICC can be developed as an extension of the existing training for patient-centered communication. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Factor V G1691A (Leiden is a major etiological factor in Egyptian Budd-Chiari syndrome patients

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    Tawhida Y. Abdel Ghaffar

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Budd-Chiari syndrome is a multifactorial disease in which several prothrombotic disorders may predispose patients to the development of thrombosis at this uncommon location (hepatic veins. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and characteristics of inherited thrombophilia in Egyptian Budd-Chiari syndrome patients.Materials and Methods: The study included 47 Budd-Chiari syndrome patients (20 children and 27 adults. Genotyping of Factor V G1691A (Leiden, prothrombin G20210A (PT, and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase C677T were performed using real-time PCR and fluorescence melting curve detection analysis.Results: Factor V Leiden was observed in 29 patients (61.7%. It is the only factor that caused Budd-Chiari syndrome in 18 of the patients and in 5 of the patients with inferior vena cava involvement. Myeloproliferative disease was noted in 12 (25.5% patients, antiphospholipid syndrome in 5 (10.6%, and Behcet’s disease in 3 (6.4%. Interestingly, 3 of the children with Budd-Chiari syndrome had lipid storage disease.Conclusion: Factor V Leiden was a major etiological factor in Egyptian Budd-Chiari syndrome patients, which may have been related to the high frequency of this mutation in the study region. Factor V Leiden was also a strong thrombophilic factor and the leading cause of inferior vena cava thrombosis in these patients. Lipid storage disease should be included as a risk factor for Budd-Chiari syndrome.

  3. Patient and Provider Factors Affecting Clinical Inertia in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes on Metformin Monotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahabaleshwarkar, Rohan; Gohs, Frank; Mulder, Holly; Wilkins, Nick; DeSantis, Andrea; Anderson, William E; Ejzykowicz, Flavia; Rajpathak, Swapnil; Norton, H James

    2017-08-01

    Our aim was to determine the extent of clinical inertia and the associated patient and provider factors in patients with type 2 diabetes on metformin monotherapy (MM) at a large integrated health care system in the United States. The study cohort included patients with type 2 diabetes aged 18 to 85 years, on MM between January 2009 and September 2013, who experienced MM failure (had an uncontrolled glycosylated hemoglobin [HbA 1c ] reading (≥8.0% [64 mmol/mol]) after at least 90 days of MM). Clinical inertia was defined as absence of treatment intensification with an add-on therapy within 180 days after the MM failure (index date). The impact of patient and provider factors on clinical inertia was determined using generalized estimating equations. The study cohort consisted of 996 patients; 58% were men and 59% were white, with a mean age of 53 (11.8) years. Of these, 49.8% experienced clinical inertia. Lower HbA 1c at index date, absence of liver diseases, absence of renal diseases, and greater provider age were associated with clinical inertia. The clinical inertia rate in a secondary analysis considering HbA 1c inertia. Considerable clinical inertia rates were observed in our real-world patient population, suggesting the need of interventions to reduce clinical inertia in clinical practice. Information about patient and provider factors affecting clinical inertia provided by this study could help healthcare policymakers plan and implement such interventions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier HS Journals, Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Transforming growth factor 15 increased in severe aplastic anemia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Yuanyuan; Wang, Honglei; Liu, Chunyan; Cao, Qiuying; Fu, Rong; Wang, Huaquan; Wang, Ting; Qi, Weiwei; Shao, Zonghong

    2017-10-01

    The patients with severe aplastic anemia (SAA) usually rely on red cell transfusion which lead to secondary iron overload. Transforming growth differentiation factor-15 (GDF-15) plays an important role in erythropoiesis and iron regulation. In this study, we investigated the level of GDF-15 and other indexes of iron metabolism in SAA patients to explore the correlation with GDF-15 and iron overload in SAA. The levels of serum GDF-15, hepcidin (Hepc), and erythropoietin (EPO) were determined by ELISA. The levels of serum iron (SI), ferritin, TIBC, and transferrin saturation (TS) were measured by an auto analyzer. Iron staining of bone marrow cells was used for testing extracellular and intracellular iron. The GDF-15 level in the experimental group was higher than that of the case-control group and normal control group (all p < 0.05). The Hepc level in the experimental group and case-control group were both higher than that of healthy controls (all p < 0.05). The Hepc level was significantly lower in the experimental group patients who had excessive GDF-15 (r = -0.766, p = 0.000). There was a positive correlation between the level of GDF15 and EPO in the experimental group (r = 0.68, p < 0.000). The level of GDF15 in SAA patients was positively correlated with SI levels (r = 0.537, p = 0.008), TS levels (r = 0.466, p = 0.025), and sideroblasts (%) (r = 0.463, p = 0.026). Moreover, there was a positive correlation between GDF-15 level and blood transfusion-dependent time (r = 0.739, p = 0.000). Our data indicated that GDF-15 plays an important role in iron metabolism in SAA. GDF-15 might be a novel target for SAA therapy.

  5. Survival in Patients Receiving Prolonged Ventilation: Factors that Influence Outcome

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    A. James Mamary

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Prolonged mechanical ventilation is increasingly common. It is expensive and associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Our objective is to comprehensively characterize patients admitted to a Ventilator Rehabilitation Unit (VRU for weaning and identify characteristics associated with survival. Methods 182 consecutive patients over 3.5 years admitted to Temple University Hospital (TUH VRU were characterized. Data were derived from comprehensive chart review and a prospectively collected computerized database. Survival was determined by hospital records and social security death index and mailed questionnaires. Results Upon admission to the VRU, patients were hypoalbuminemic (albumin 2.3 ± 0.6 g/dL, anemic (hemoglobin 9.6 ± 1.4 g/dL, with moderate severity of illness (APACHE II score 10.7 + 4.1, and multiple comorbidities (Charlson index 4.3 + 2.3. In-hospital mortality (19% was related to a higher Charlson Index score ( P = 0.006; OR 1.08-1.6, and APACHE II score ( P = 0.016; OR 1.03-1.29. In-hospital mortality was inversely related to admission albumin levels ( P = 0.023; OR 0.17-0.9. The presence of COPD as a comorbid illness or primary determinant of respiratory failure and higher VRU admission APACHE II score predicted higher long-term mortality. Conversely, higher VRU admission hemoglobin was associated with better long term survival (OR 0.57-0.90; P = 0.0006. Conclusion Patients receiving prolonged ventilation are hypoalbuminemic, anemic, have moderate severity of illness, and multiple comorbidities. Survival relates to these factors and the underlying illness precipitating respiratory failure, especially COPD.

  6. Risk factors of diabetic retinopathy in type 2 diabetic patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI Xiao-ling; WANG Fang; JI Li-nong

    2006-01-01

    Background Advances in treatment have greatly reduced the risk of blindness from this disease, but because diabetes is so common, diabetic retinopathy remains an important problem. The purpose of this study is to investigate the risk factors of diabetic retinopathy (DR) in Chinese type 2 diabetic patients.Methods Totally 746 type 2 diabetic patients were selected for biochemical and clinical characteristics test and examined by the retina-camera for diabetic retinopathy and the average age was 55.9 years old.Results A total of 526 patients was classified as non-DR, 159 patients as non-proliferative-DR and 61 patients as proliferative-DR. Duration of diabetes [(66.09±72.51) months vs (143.71 ±93.27) months vs (174.30±81.91)months, P=0.00], systolic blood pressure [(131.95±47.20) mmHg vs (138.71 ±21.36) mmHg vs (147.58±24.10)mmHg, P=0.01], urine albumin [(32.79± 122.29) mg/L vs (190.96±455.65) mg/L vs (362.00±552.51) mg/L,P=0.00], glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) [(8.68 ± 2.26)% vs (9.42±1.84)% vs (9.42±1.96)%, P=0.04],C-reactive protein (CRP) [(3.19±7.37) mg/L vs (6.36± 23.59) mg/L vs (3.02±4.34) mg/L, P=0.03],high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) [(1.23±0.37) mmol/L vs (1.33±0.35) mmol/L vs (1.24±0.33)mmol/L, P=0.01], uric acid (UA) [(288.51 ±90.85) mmol/L vs (300.29±101.98) mmol/L vs (337.57±115.09)mmol/L, P=0.00], creatinine (CREA) [(84.22±16.31) μmol/L vs (89.35±27.45) μmol/L vs (103.28±48.64)μmol/L, P=0.00], blood urine nitrogen (BUN) [(5.62± 1.62) mmol/L vs (6.55±2.74) mmol/L vs (8.11±3.60)mmol/L, P=0.00] were statistically different among the three groups. Logistic regression analysis showed that diabetic duration and urine albumin were two independent risk factors of DR (the OR values were 1.010 and 1.003 respectively).Conclusions Diabetic duration and urine albumin are two independent risk factors of diabetic retinopathy in elderly type 2 diabetic patients.

  7. Factors Associated With Patient-perceived Hoarseness in Spasmodic Dysphonia Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Amanda; Hillel, Al; Meyer, Tanya

    2016-11-01

    The American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Clinical Practice Guidelines on Hoarseness distinguishes between hoarseness, which is a symptom perceived by the patient, and dysphonia, which is a diagnosis made by the clinician. Our objective was to determine factors that are associated with patient-perceived hoarseness in spasmodic dysphonia (SD) patients. Retrospective study. Adductor SD patients who presented for botulinum toxin injections from September 2011 to June 2012 were recruited. The main outcome variable, Voice Handicap Index-10 (VHI-10), was used to quantify patient-perceived hoarseness. Clinical data, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), and VHI-10 were collected. Clinician-perceived dysphonia was measured by a speech-language pathologist with Consensus Auditory Perceptual Evaluation of Voice (CAPE-V). Statistical analysis included univariate analyses and multiple linear regression. One hundred thirty-nine SD patients had VHI-10 score of 26.0 ± 7.2 (mean ± standard deviation), disease duration of 10.5 + 7.0 years, CAPE-V overall score of 43.2 ± 21.8, HADS anxiety score of 6.7 ± 3.8, and HADS depression score of 3.6 ± 2.8. In univariate analyses, there were positive correlations (P dysphonia are associated with higher levels of patient-perceived hoarseness in SD patients. Hoarseness is a very personal symptom. Multiple factors determine its self-perception. Copyright © 2016 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Associations between generic substitution and patient-related factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard Rathe, Jette

    Associations between generic substitution and patient-related factors Jette Østergaard Rathe1, Pia V. Larsen1, Morten Andersen2, Janus L. Thomsen3, Maja S. Paulsen1, Jens Søndergaard1 1. Research Unit of General Practice, Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark 2. Centre...... for Pharmacoepidemiology, Karolinska Institutet, Department of Medicine Solna, Stockholm, Sweden 3. Danish Quality Unit of General Practice, Odense, Denmark Background Generic substitution means that chemically equivalent but less expensive drugs are dispensed in place of a brand name product. Although generic medicines...... by definition are bioequivalent to their brand name counterparts there are concerns about whether generic substitution is always accompanied by clinical equivalence in terms of effectiveness and that it may cause concerns and thereby causing some skepticism towards generic substitution. There is, however...

  9. Factors predicting recovery from suicide in attempted suicide patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Fan-Ko; Lu, Chu-Yun; Tseng, Yun Shan; Chiang, Chun-Ying

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the factors predicting suicide recovery and to provide guidance for healthcare professionals when caring for individuals who have attempted suicide. The high rate of suicide is a global health problem. Suicide prevention has become an important issue in contemporary mental health. Most suicide research has focused on suicidal prevention and care. There is a lack of research on the factors predicting suicidal recovery. A cross-sectional design was adopted. A correlational study with a purposive sample of 160 individuals from a suicide prevention centre in southern Taiwan was conducted. The questionnaires included the Brief Symptom Rating Scale-5, Suicidal Recovery Assessment Scale and Beck Hopelessness Scale. Descriptive statistics and linear regressions were used for the analysis. The mean age of the participants was 40.2 years. Many participants were striving to make changes to create a more stable and fulfilling life, had an improved recovery from suicide and had a good ability to adapt or solve problems. The linear regression showed that the Beck Hopelessness Scale scores (ß = -.551, p suicidal behaviour (ß = -.145, p = .008) were significant predictors of individuals' recovery from suicide. They accounted for 57.1% of the variance. Suicidal individuals who have a lower level of hopelessness, a better ability to cope with their mental condition and fewer past suicidal behaviours may better recover from suicide attempts. The nurses could use the results of this study to predict recovery from suicide in patients with attempted suicide. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Factores psicosociales en alcohólicos dependientes Psychological and social factors in dependent alcoholic patients

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    Aurora Revilla Cervantes

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Se presentan 4 casos clínicos de pacientes alcohólicos dependientes no complicados pertenecientes al Consultorio Médico de Familia No. 5 del Policlínico Docente "Frank País García", con vistas a identificar los factores psicosociales que influían en estos. Como principales condicionantes de la conducta adictiva en el grupo estudiado se observaron: la influencia del medio, las tradiciones culturales y la participación de eventos vitales de prevalencia negativa. Además, los afectados mostraron un fuerte arraigo a la conducta alcohólica y el deseo de continuarla.Four case reports of uncomplicated dependent alcoholic patients belonging to the Family Doctor's Office No. 5 from «Frank País García Teaching Polyclinic are presented with the aim of identifying the psychological and social factors influencing on them. As main conditions of the addictive behavior in the studied group there were: the influence of the environment, the cultural traditions and the participation in vital events of negative prevalence. Also, those affected showed a strong dependence on the alcoholic behavior and the desire of continuing it.

  11. Factors Affecting the Outcome of Bronchiectasis in Pediatric Patients

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    Nemat Bilan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Bronchiectasis is a common problem in children and early diagnosis can lead to early treatment and prevent of its complications. This study was aimed to evaluate factors effective on outcome of bronchiectasis in children. Methods: In an analytical cross-sectional study, 347 children with bronchiectasis Underwent the study. the patients were diagnosed based on chronic suppurative cough and CT scan findings. . Results: Disease etiology was asthma in 55.6%, Gastroesophagial reflux (GERD in 7.8%, Cystic fibrosis (CF in 4.8%, other causes in 11.2% and idiopathic in 20.6%. All cases complained of chronic cough. The most common sign was daily sputum production (79.1% and common symptoms were ral/crackle in 47.1% and wheezing in 25.4%. Mean treatment period was 32.82±11.56 months. At the end of follow-up, complete improvement occurred in 35.6%, partial improvement in 40.9% and no improvement in 23.5%. Conclusion: In children with chronic cough and crackle in physical examination, consideration of bronchiectasis could be helpful in early diagnosis and complementary evaluations and treatment initiation. Treating the underlying disease could prevent the occurrence and increase the response to treatment of bronchiectasis.

  12. Factors associated with management of cervical cancer patients at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Forty-seven percent of the cervical cancer patients were referred to Ocean Road Cancer Institute for radiotherapy and or chemotherapy. Patients discharged home for palliative care were 30% and 17% patients died at the hospital. Known HIV positive patients were significantly associated with death and terminal care seen ...

  13. Assessment of the Etiologic Factors of Gingival Recession in a Group of Patients in Northwest Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Lafzi, Ardeshir; Abolfazli, Nader; Eskandari, Amir

    2009-01-01

    Background and aims Gingival recession (GR), a common problem in periodontium, is associated with various etiologic factors. There is controversy over the role and importance of these factors. The aim of this study was to evaluate the etiologic factors of GR in a group of subjects in Northwest Iran. Materials and methods In this case-control study, patients referring to a university clinic (123 patients with GR and 123 patients without GR) were evaluated. Patients were examined by an experien...

  14. Psychosomatic Factors and Psychologic Status in Psoriatic Patients and Approach to the Psoriatic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ertuğrul H. Aydemir

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Even if it has not been completely proven, psychosomatic factors are generally agreed and most of the patients talk about stress and the other emotional traumas at the beginning of disease and at the attacks. Furthermore since it is a difficult to treat disease easily seen on the skin, cause to hopeless, loneliness and isolation senses and they feel theirselves dirty and guilty. Then it leads to an unbreakable vicious circle. It is very important to make an approach with much care and affection. It is very important that to listen, to examine and to touch the dermatologist to the patient with patience and affection. Besides that to take a psychiatric support may also help too much to the treatment of the diseases.

  15. Factors influencing quality of life in patients with active tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marra, Carlo A; Marra, Fawziah; Cox, Victoria C; Palepu, Anita; Fitzgerald, J Mark

    2004-10-20

    With effective treatment strategies, the focus of tuberculosis (TB) management has shifted from the prevention of mortality to the avoidance of morbidity. As such, there should be an increased focus on quality of life (QoL) experienced by individuals being treated for TB. The objective of our study was to identify areas of QoL that are affected by active TB using focus groups and individual interviews. English, Cantonese, and Punjabi-speaking subjects with active TB who were receiving treatment were eligible for recruitment into the study. Gender-based focus group sessions were conducted for the inner city participants but individual interviews were conducted for those who came to the main TB clinic or were hospitalized. Facilitators used open-ended questions and participants were asked to discuss their experiences of being diagnosed with tuberculosis, what impact it had on their lives, issues around adherence to anti-TB medications and information pertaining to their experience with side effects to these medications. All data were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using constant comparative analysis. 39 patients with active TB participated. The mean age was 46.2 years (SD 18.4) and 62% were male. Most were Canadian-born being either Caucasian or Aboriginal. Four themes emerged from the focus groups and interviews. The first describes issues related to the diagnosis of tuberculosis and sub-themes were identified as 'symptoms', 'health care provision', and 'emotional impact'. The second theme discusses TB medication factors and the sub-themes identified were 'adverse effects', 'ease of administration', and 'adherence'. The third theme describes social support and functioning issues for the individuals with TB. The fourth theme describes health behavior issues for the individuals with TB and the identified sub-themes were "behavior modification" and "TB knowledge." Despite the ability to cure TB, there remains a significant impact on QOL. Since much

  16. Factors influencing quality of life in patients with active tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cox Victoria C

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With effective treatment strategies, the focus of tuberculosis (TB management has shifted from the prevention of mortality to the avoidance of morbidity. As such, there should be an increased focus on quality of life (QoL experienced by individuals being treated for TB. The objective of our study was to identify areas of QoL that are affected by active TB using focus groups and individual interviews. Methods English, Cantonese, and Punjabi-speaking subjects with active TB who were receiving treatment were eligible for recruitment into the study. Gender-based focus group sessions were conducted for the inner city participants but individual interviews were conducted for those who came to the main TB clinic or were hospitalized. Facilitators used open-ended questions and participants were asked to discuss their experiences of being diagnosed with tuberculosis, what impact it had on their lives, issues around adherence to anti-TB medications and information pertaining to their experience with side effects to these medications. All data were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using constant comparative analysis. Results 39 patients with active TB participated. The mean age was 46.2 years (SD 18.4 and 62% were male. Most were Canadian-born being either Caucasian or Aboriginal. Four themes emerged from the focus groups and interviews. The first describes issues related to the diagnosis of tuberculosis and sub-themes were identified as 'symptoms', 'health care provision', and 'emotional impact'. The second theme discusses TB medication factors and the sub-themes identified were 'adverse effects', 'ease of administration', and 'adherence'. The third theme describes social support and functioning issues for the individuals with TB. The fourth theme describes health behavior issues for the individuals with TB and the identified sub-themes were "behavior modification" and "TB knowledge." Conclusion Despite the ability to

  17. Clinical Symptoms and Risk Factors in Cerebral Microangiopathy Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Okroglic, S.; Widmann, C.N.; Urbach, H.; Scheltens, P.; Heneka, M.T.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Although the clinical manifestation and risk factors of cerebral microangiopathy (CM) remain unclear, the number of diagnoses is increasing. Hence, patterns of association among lesion topography and severity, clinical symptoms and demographic and disease risk factors were investigated

  18. New risk factors for atherosclerosis and patient risk assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fruchart, Jean-Charles; Nierman, Melchior C.; Stroes, Erik S. G.; Kastelein, John J. P.; Duriez, Patrick

    2004-01-01

    Advances in our understanding of the ways in which the traditional cardiovascular risk factors, including standard lipid (eg, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol) and nonlipid (eg, hypertension) risk factors, interact to initiate

  19. Use of recombinant factor VII for tooth extractions in a patient with severe congenital factor VII deficiency: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstock, Robert J; Onyejiuwa, Andrew; Shnayder, Garry; Clarkson, Earl I

    2015-04-01

    Patients with factor VII deficiency have an increased risk of prolonged perioperative hemorrhage. In this article, the authors present a case of severe factor VII deficiency in a patient who required tooth extraction. A 44-year-old woman with severe congenital factor VII deficiency sought care for a symptomatic, carious, and nonrestorable maxillary right second molar that required extraction. The authors obtained hematologic consultation, and the patient underwent the extraction under general anesthesia in the inpatient setting. Perioperative management included performing relevant laboratory studies, preoperative recombinant factor VII infusion, and postoperative intravenous aminocaproic acid administration. No hemorrhagic complications occurred throughout the perioperative course. The degree of factor VII deficiency correlates poorly with bleeding risk. Perioperative management is variable, requiring preoperative consultation with a hematologist. Copyright © 2015 American Dental Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Symptomatic Resolution Among Chinese Patients With Schizophrenia and Associated Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Ta Li

    2010-05-01

    Conclusion: Consistent with studies of Caucasian patients, one-third of clinically stable Chinese patients met the resolution criteria, as well as having fewer general side effects, better global functioning and subjective well-being.

  1. Factors associated with gastro-duodenal disease in patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    use two weeks preceding endoscopic analysis and patients with oesophageal disease were excluded from further study. Korle-Bu receives out-patient referrals from sever- al primary and specialist centres across Southern Ghana. One hundred ...

  2. Clinical factors and the decision to transfuse chronic dialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitman, Cynthia B; Shreay, Sanatan; Gitlin, Matthew; van Oijen, Martijn G H; Spiegel, Brennan M R

    2013-11-01

    Red blood cell transfusion was previously the principle therapy for anemia in CKD but became less prevalent after the introduction of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents. This study used adaptive choice-based conjoint analysis to identify preferences and predictors of transfusion decision-making in CKD. A computerized adaptive choice-based conjoint survey was administered between June and August of 2012 to nephrologists, internists, and hospitalists listed in the American Medical Association Masterfile. The survey quantified the relative importance of 10 patient attributes, including hemoglobin levels, age, occult blood in stool, severity of illness, eligibility for transplant, iron indices, erythropoiesis-stimulating agents, cardiovascular disease, and functional status. Triggers of transfusions in common dialysis scenarios were studied, and based on adaptive choice-based conjoint-derived preferences, relative importance by performing multivariable regression to identify predictors of transfusion preferences was assessed. A total of 350 providers completed the survey (n=305 nephrologists; mean age=46 years; 21% women). Of 10 attributes assessed, absolute hemoglobin level was the most important driver of transfusions, accounting for 29% of decision-making, followed by functional status (16%) and cardiovascular comorbidities (12%); 92% of providers transfused when hemoglobin was 7.5 g/dl, independent of other factors. In multivariable regression, Veterans Administration providers were more likely to transfuse at 8.0 g/dl (odds ratio, 5.9; 95% confidence interval, 1.9 to 18.4). Although transplant eligibility explained only 5% of decision-making, nephrologists were five times more likely to value it as important compared with non-nephrologists (odds ratio, 5.2; 95% confidence interval, 2.4 to 11.1). Adaptive choice-based conjoint analysis was useful in predicting influences on transfusion decisions. Hemoglobin level, functional status, and cardiovascular comorbidities

  3. Epidemiology of fungal infections and risk factors in newborn patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Manzoni

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of fungal infections among newborn babies is increasing, owing mainly to the in­creased ability to care and make survive immature infants at higher specific risk for fungal infections. The risk is higher in infants with very low and extremely low birth weight, in babies receiving total parenteral nutrition, in neonates with limited barrier effect in the gut, or with central venous catheter or other devices where fungal biofilms can originate. Also neonates receiving broad spectrum antibiotics, born through caesarian section or non-breastfed can feature an increased, specific risk. Most fungal infections in neonatology occur in premature children, are of nosocomial origin, and are due to Candida species. Colonization is a preliminary step, and some factors must be considered for the diagnosis and grading process: the iso­lation site, the number of colonized sites, the intensity of colonization, and the Candida subspecies. The most complicated patients are at greater risk of fungal infections, and prophylaxis or pre-emptive therapy should often be considered. A consistent decisional tree in neonatology is yet to be defined, but some efforts have been made in order to identify characteristics that should guide the prophylaxis or treatment choices. A negative blood culture and the absence of symptoms aren’t enough to rule out the diagnosis of fungal infections in newborn babies. Similarly, laboratory tests have been validated only for adults. The clinical judgement is of utmost importance in the diagnostic process, and should take into account the presence of clinical signs of infection, of a severe clinical deterioration, as well as changes in some laboratory tests, and also the presence and characteristics of a pre-existing fungal colonization.http://dx.doi.org/10.7175/rhc.v14i1S.856

  4. Personal Factors that Affect the Satisfaction of Female Patients Undergoing Esthetic Suture after Typical Thyroidectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyo Young; Kim, Jung Won; Park, Jin Hyung; Kim, Jung Hun; Han, Yea Sik

    2013-07-01

    In esthetic surgery, understanding the factors that influence patient satisfaction is important for successful practice. We hypothesize that the factors that influence patient satisfaction include not only aesthetic and functional outcomes, but also personal factors such as the level of familiarity with factors affecting wound healing and expectations regarding aesthetic outcome. One hundred patients who underwent esthetic closure after thyroidectomy were included in this study. In order to evaluate the individual characteristics of the patients, a preoperative survey was administered to the patients. We estimated the patient satisfaction six months postoperatively and assessed the aesthetic and functional outcomes using the Patient and Observer Scar Assessment Scale. According to the results of correlation analysis, level of familiarity with wound healing factors had a positive correlation with satisfaction. High expectations, pain, itching, and high observer scale score had negative correlations with satisfaction. The factors that were correlated with satisfaction were included in the multiple regression analysis. Level of familiarity with wound healing factors was found to have a positive relationship with satisfaction, while itching and observer scale were found to have a negative relationship with satisfaction. After excluding 10 patients who had hypertrophic scars, only level of familiarity with wound healing factors and expectations affected satisfaction. The level of familiarity with factors affecting wound healing and expectations were found to independently affect satisfaction. Improving patients' level of familiarity with wound healing factors and reducing their expectations by providing suitable preoperative education has the potential to improve patient satisfaction.

  5. Risk factors for asthma exacerbation in patients presenting to an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Asthma exacerbations are caused by a variety of risk factors. Reducing exposure to these risk factors improves the control of asthma and reduces medication needs. Knowledge of the particular risk factors is essential in formulating controlling and treatment protocols. This study set out to determine the risk ...

  6. Factors predicting walking intolerance in patients with peripheral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. To determine which physiological variables conduce to walking intolerance in patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD). Design. The physiological response to a graded treadmill exercise test (GTT) in patients with PAD was characterised. Setting. Patients were recruited from the Department of. Vascular ...

  7. Diabetes mellitus: a risk factor in patients with Graves' orbitopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalmann, R.; Mourits, M. P.

    1999-01-01

    AIMS: To assess the prevalence of dysthyroid optic neuropathy (DON) in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) and Graves' orbitopathy (GO) and to investigate the complications of surgery for GO in these patients. METHODS: The records of 482 consecutive patients with GO referred in a 5 year period were

  8. A path analysis study of factors influencing hospital staff perceptions of quality of care factors associated with patient satisfaction and patient experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leggat, Sandra G; Karimi, Leila; Bartram, Timothy

    2017-11-16

    Hospital staff are interested in information on patient satisfaction and patient experience that can help them improve quality of care. Staff perceptions of quality of care have been identified as useful proxies when patient data are not available. This study explores the organizational factors and staff attitudes that influence staff perceptions of the quality of the care they provide in relation to patient satisfaction and patient experience. Cross sectional survey completed by 258 staff of a large multi-campus, integrated metropolitan hospital in Australia. Structured equation modelling was used to analyse the data. Our data suggest that different perceived organizational factors and staff attitudes contribute to different pathways for patient satisfaction and patient experience indicators. Hospital staff in our sample were more likely to indicate they provided the care that would result in higher patient satisfaction if they felt empowered within a psychologically safe environment. Conversely their views on patient experience were related to their commitment towards their hospital. There was no relationship between the staff perceptions of patient satisfaction and the staff response to the friends and family test. This study provides empirical evidence that staff perceptions of the quality of care they provide that is seen to be related to patient satisfaction and patient experience are enacted through different pathways that reflect differing perceptions of organizational factors and workplace psychological attitudes.

  9. [The concentration of growth factors in patients with inherent and acquired shortenings of limbs bones].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strogov, M V; Luneva, S N; Novikov, K I

    2013-04-01

    The article deals with the results of study of level of growth factors in blood serum of patients with inherent and post-traumatic shortenings of limbs' bones. The detection in blood serum the level of epidermal growth factor insulin-like growth factor I and angiopoetins is proposed to monitor in given patients the reparative bone formation.

  10. Factors influencing time between surgery and radiotherapy : A population based study of breast cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Katik, S.; Gort, M.; Jobsen, Jan J.; Maduro, John H.; Struikmans, H.; Siesling, S.

    2015-01-01

    This study describes variation in the time interval between surgery and radiotherapy in breast cancer (BC) patients and assesses factors at patient, hospital and radiotherapy centre (RTC) level influencing this variation. To do so, the factors were investigated in BC patients using multilevel

  11. A Geriatric Patient: Age Is Not a Factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Klodnitskaya

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. A patient presented to the dental office expressing dissatisfaction with the appearance of his teeth, and as a result, of his smile. Our objective was to satisfy his initial chief complaint: “I don't like how my teeth look when I smile.” Methodology. Upon completing all initial exams and consultations, an esthetic dental treatment plan was formulated and agreed upon by both the practitioners and the patient. Results. The patient received periodontal treatment first to create esthetic gingival margins. Anterior ceramic crowns followed. Conclusion. The results surpassed all patient's expectations.

  12. Evaluation of cardiovascular risk factors in patients with hypertension

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Hypertension is a major health concern in developed and developing countries. Its prevalence is high in Nigeria and accounts for a great percentage of hospital visits and admissions. Hypertension is a chief risk factor for cardiovascular events. Independent risks factors, some of which are implicated in the ...

  13. Factors affecting smoking cessation in patients with cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleni Kokkotou

    2017-05-01

    Smoking cessation in patients with cancer is accompanied by significant success, although this outcome is poorer compared with non-cancer smokers. Cancer patients must follow well-organized smoking cessation programs as soon as diagnosis is made, in order to have a successful and prolong smoking cessation.

  14. Factors affecting patients' ratings of health-care satisfaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thygesen, Marianne K; Fuglsang, Marie; Miiller, Max Mølgaard

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Surveys that include rating scales are commonly used to collect data about patients' experiences. We studied how patients associated their ratings with their experiences of care. METHODS: A survey and a qualitative study were conducted at a Danish hospital. Initially, 19 female pati...

  15. Factors associated with stoma quality of life among stoma patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunli Liao

    2014-06-01

    Conclusion: QOL in patients with a stoma was not ideal. Our findings demonstrate that following stoma implantation, improvements in self-care and inspiring hope in patients played an important role in bettering their stoma-QOL. The strength of our study is that we adopted a stoma-specific questionnaire instead of a general scale such as EORTC C30.

  16. Risk factors for concurrent bacteremia in adult patients with dengue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tun-Linn Thein

    2017-06-01

    Conclusion: Concurrent bacteremia in adult patients with dengue is uncommon but presents atypically and results in more deaths and longer hospital stay. Given the associated mortality, collection of blood cultures and empiric antibiotic therapy may be considered in patients who are critically ill.

  17. Risk factors for nutritional status determination and indications for preventive nutrition therapy in hospitalized gastroenterological patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roganović Branka

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Risk factors for the intrahospital nutritional status worsening (NSW have not been precisely defined in the literature. The objective was defining thoese factors among gastroenterological patients and defining the risk patients requiring a preventive nutritional therapy. Methods. In 650 gastroenterological patients, NSW was evaluated on the basis of reducing of the six parameters: body weight, body mass index (BMI, triceps skinfold thickness (TSF, midupper arm muscle circumference (MAMC, serum albumin level (ALB, and lymphocyte count (LYM. The influence on NSW was tested for 13 factors concerning characteristics of the patient, disease, and diagnostic procedures. Among the factors influencing significantly the NSW, primary and secondary risk factors were selected. After scoring of risk factors had been performed, the risk-score for NSW (RSNSW was defined. The critical value of RSNSW which required preventive nutritional therapy was also calculated. Results. The incidence of NSW was in the range 29.2%−57.9%. The presence of general complications and severe disease activity were considered as primary risk factors, whereas malignant disease, age above 71, hepato-billiary tract involvement, hospitalization longer than 14 days, and mobility worsening were considered as secondary risk factors. The best predictive value for the NSW was proved for the RSNSW ≥ 6. Because of that, preventive nutritional therapy should be indicated in patients presenting with both primary risk factors or in patients presenting with one primary factor combined with three secondary risk factors at least. Conclusion. There are 7 risk factors for NSW in gastroenterological patients, but they are not of the same importance - two primary and five secondary risk factors can be differentiated. Preventive nutritional therapy is indicated only in patients having both primary risk factors or in those presenting with one primary risk factor combined with three

  18. Quality of Life and Associated Factors of Cancer Patients in Malaysia: A review of current literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Husna Ahmad Ainuddin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Measuring quality of life provides information helpful for cancer patients. However, facts about the quality of life and its associated factors among cancer patients in Malaysia are inconclusive. The aim of this review of literature is to evaluate the quality of life of cancer patients and its associated factors. Based on this review of the literature, it identified 24 studies. Associated factors effecting quality of life of cancer patients include socio-demographic, health related, psychological and cancer treatment. In conclusion, there is a need for further research to focus on developing effective interventions to enhance the patients' quality of life.

  19. A review and meta-analysis of the patient factors associated with psychiatric in-patient aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dack, C; Ross, J; Papadopoulos, C; Stewart, D; Bowers, L

    2013-04-01

    To combine the results of earlier comparison studies of in-patient aggression to quantitatively assess the strength of the association between patient factors and i) aggressive behaviour,ii) repetitive aggressive behaviour. A systematic review and meta-analysis of empirical articles and reports of comparison studies of aggression and non-aggression within adult psychiatric in-patient settings. Factors that were significantly associated with in-patient aggression included being younger, male, involuntary admissions, not being married, a diagnosis of schizophrenia, a greater number of previous admissions, a history of violence, a history of self-destructive behaviour and a history of substance abuse. The only factors associated with repeated in-patient aggression were not being male, a history of violence and a history of substance abuse. By comparing aggressive with non-aggressive patients, important differences between the two populations may be highlighted. These differences may help staff improve predictions of which patients might become aggressive and enable steps to be taken to reduce an aggressive incident occurring using actuarial judgements. However, the associations found between these actuarial factors and aggression were small. It is therefore important for staff to consider dynamic factors such as a patient's current state and the context to reduce in-patient aggression. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. Patient factors in referral choice for total joint replacement surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conner-Spady, Barbara L; Marshall, Deborah A; Bohm, Eric; Dunbar, Michael J; Loucks, Lynda; Hennigar, Allan W; Frank, Cy; Noseworthy, Tom W

    2014-04-01

    Although the option of next available surgeon can be found on surgeon referral forms for total joint replacement surgery, its selection varies across surgical practices. Objectives are to assess the determinants of (a) a patient's request for a particular surgeon; and (b) the actual referral to a specific versus the next available surgeon. Questionnaires were mailed to 306 consecutive patients referred to orthopedic surgeons. We assessed quality of life (Oxford Hip and Knee scores, Short Form-12, EuroQol 5D, Pain Visual Analogue Scale), referral experience, and the importance of surgeon choice, surgeon reputation, and wait time. We used logistic regression to build models for the 2 objectives. We obtained 176 respondents (response rate, 58%), 60% female, 65% knee patients, mean age of 65 years, with no significant differences between responders versus nonresponders. Forty-three percent requested a particular surgeon. Seventy-one percent were referred to a specific surgeon. Patients who rated surgeon choice as very/extremely important [adjusted odds ratio (OR), 6.54; 95% confidence interval (CI), 2.57-16.64] and with household incomes of $90,000+ versus <$30,000 (OR, 5.74; 95% CI, 1.56-21.03) were more likely to request a particular surgeon. Hip patients (OR, 3.03; 95% CI, 1.18-7.78), better Physical Component Summary-12 (OR, 1.29; 95% CI, 1.02-1.63), and patients who rated surgeon choice as very/extremely important (OR, 3.88; 95% CI, 1.56-9.70) were more likely to be referred to a specific surgeon. Most patients want some choice in the referral decision. Providing sufficient information is important, so that patients are aware of their choices and can make an informed choice. Some patients prefer a particular surgeon despite longer wait times.

  1. Prognostic factors associated with mortality in patients with septic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asmussen Andreasen, Rikke; Andersen, Nanna Skaarup; Just, Søren Andreas

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the 30-day mortality rate of septic arthritis (SA) in adults in Funen, central Denmark, and to explore whether, at the time of SA presentation, risk factors for the 30-day mortality rate could be revealed. Our secondary objective was to describe the microbiological...... factor for death was liver disease at time of presentation [odds ratio (OR) 40.40, 95% confidence interval (CI) 5.38-303]. The other factors tested such as age > 65 years, elevated temperature, rheumatoid arthritis (RA), prostheses, and diabetes mellitus (DM) did not reach statistical significance...

  2. Genotype and phenotype report on patients with combined deficiency of factor V and factor VIII in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Mehran; Cairo, Andrea; Safarpour, Mohammad M; Haghpanah, Sezaneh; Ekramzadeh, Maryam; Afrasiabi, Abdolreza; Shahriari, Mahdi; Menegatti, Marzia

    2014-06-01

    Combined factor V (FV) and factor VIII (FVIII) deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive bleeding disorder characterized by mild-to-moderate bleeding. Epistaxis, postsurgical bleeding and menorrhagia are the most common symptoms. The aim of this study is to report the phenotype-genotype characterization carried out in patients affected with combined FV and FVIII deficiency from Iran. A cross-sectional study was conducted in Shiraz Hemophilia Center, southern Iran. Twelve cases, seven men and five women coming from eight families were included in our study after taking consent form. Coagulation activity for all patients was measured. All exons and intron-exon junctions of lectin mannose binding protein 1 (LMAN1) gene and multiple coagulation factor deficiency 2 genes were amplified by PCR, and subsequently sequenced by the Sanger method. Patients[Combining Acute Accent] age ranged from 6 to 59 years mean ± SD: 23.8 ± 15.4 years and median: 22 years. No patient presented with severe bleeding symptom. Only one patient had severe FV and FVIII deficiency (both factor levels stop codon. Larger studies are needed to calculate the correlation between factor levels, genetic and bleeding symptoms.

  3. Prevalence and risk factors of anaemia in paediatric patients in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    milestones. Anaemia was not associated with ... contrast to expectation, as the region has seen an overall reduction in malaria burden. .... M. Epidemiological factors that promote the development of severe malaria anaemia in children in ...

  4. Expressions of macrophage migration inhibitory factor in patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-04-11

    Apr 11, 2016 ... Context: Uremic cardiomyopathy is a risk factor of end‑stage renal disease .... immunosuppressive therapy and use of angiotensin‑converting .... Primary diseases .... and tubular kidney diseases as demonstrated by Honda.

  5. Risk factors for asthma exacerbation in patients presenting to an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: Lack of corticosteroid use and upper respiratory tract infections are ... Key words: Asthma, asthma exacerbations, risk factors, corticosteroids ..... recall bias may be a limitation. ... obstructive picture on spirometry were included as.

  6. Factors associated with depression and suicide among patients with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EB

    The presence of depression and suicidal behaviour may worsen the prognosis. Objective: ... has also been noted as a modifiable risk factor whose ..... sample of US young adults and reported that 25.2% .... Fellow Travelers, Researchers Say.

  7. Intercultural comparison of patient satisfaction with physiotherapy care in Australia and Korea: an exploratory factor analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hush, Julia M; Lee, Haejung; Yung, Vivian; Adams, Roger; Mackey, Martin; Wand, Benedict M; Nelson, Roger; Beattie, Paul

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this study was to conduct a cross-cultural comparison of the factors that influence patient satisfaction with musculoskeletal physiotherapy care in Australia and Korea. Prospective studies were conducted in Australia and Korea. Patient satisfaction data were collected using the MedRisk Instrument for Measuring Patient Satisfaction with Physical Therapy Care (MRPS) from a total of 1666 patients who were attending clinics for physiotherapy treatment of a musculoskeletal condition. Exploratory factor analysis was conducted to identify factors determining patient satisfaction in each cohort. A four-factor solution for the MRPS was found for the Australian and Korean data sets, explaining 61 and 55% of the variance respectively. Communication and respect, convenience and quality time and person-focused care were factors common to both countries. One factor unique to Korea was courtesy and propriety. For both cultures, global patient satisfaction was significantly but weakly correlated with the outcome of treatment. The interpersonal aspect of care, namely effective communication and respect from the therapist, appears to be the predominant and universal factor that influences patient satisfaction with physiotherapy care, although other culturally specific factors were identified. Physiotherapists can maximize patient satisfaction with care by addressing those features that uniquely contribute to patient satisfaction in the cultural context in which they are working.

  8. Intercultural comparison of patient satisfaction with physiotherapy care in Australia and Korea: an exploratory factor analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hush, Julia M; Lee, Haejung; Yung, Vivian; Adams, Roger; Mackey, Martin; Wand, Benedict M; Nelson, Roger; Beattie, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to conduct a cross-cultural comparison of the factors that influence patient satisfaction with musculoskeletal physiotherapy care in Australia and Korea. Methods: Prospective studies were conducted in Australia and Korea. Patient satisfaction data were collected using the MedRisk Instrument for Measuring Patient Satisfaction with Physical Therapy Care (MRPS) from a total of 1666 patients who were attending clinics for physiotherapy treatment of a musculoskeletal condition. Exploratory factor analysis was conducted to identify factors determining patient satisfaction in each cohort. Results: A four-factor solution for the MRPS was found for the Australian and Korean data sets, explaining 61 and 55% of the variance respectively. Communication and respect, convenience and quality time and person-focused care were factors common to both countries. One factor unique to Korea was courtesy and propriety. For both cultures, global patient satisfaction was significantly but weakly correlated with the outcome of treatment. Conclusions: The interpersonal aspect of care, namely effective communication and respect from the therapist, appears to be the predominant and universal factor that influences patient satisfaction with physiotherapy care, although other culturally specific factors were identified. Physiotherapists can maximize patient satisfaction with care by addressing those features that uniquely contribute to patient satisfaction in the cultural context in which they are working. PMID:24421620

  9. The relationship between patient-related factors and medication ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-09-03

    Sep 3, 2017 ... Health Outcomes and Pharmacy Practice Division, The University of Texas at Austin College of Pharmacy,. Austin ... medication for life with at as high as 95% adherence for ..... for improving patients' organizational skills.

  10. Avoidable factors associated with pregnant and postpartum patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    skills training on fluid resuscitation and expansion of critical care services. S Afr J Obstet ..... Patient fell to floor from hospital bed owing to poor nursing care. 1. Delayed .... particularly on fluid balance management, should be strengthened.

  11. 5. Factors associated with Outcome in Patients Admitted with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    RICHY

    in-hospital outcomes of Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) ... percentage points lower than an earlier study done at ... Severity of injury; this is determined by use of ..... 10. Management Protocol in head injured patients at. UTH. Neurosurgical unit ...

  12. Patient factors and glycaemic control--associations and explanatory power

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rogvi, S; Tapager, I; Almdal, T P

    2012-01-01

    associated with older age, higher education, higher patient activation, lower diabetes-related emotional distress, better diet and exercise behaviours, lower body mass index, shorter duration of disease and knowledge of HbA(1c) targets (P

  13. Haemorheological factors in diabetes mellitus patients in Obafemi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    . Fifty blood samples were analyzed, comprising of thirty (30) diagnosed diabetes mellitus patients attending chemical pathology Clinic in OAUTH Ile-Ife and twenty (20) from apparently health individuals. The haemorheological parameters ...

  14. A Systematic Review of the Factors that Patients Use to Choose their Surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahanda, Alexander T; Lafaro, Kelly J; Spolverato, Gaya; Pawlik, Timothy M

    2016-01-01

    Given surgery's inherent risks, a patient should be able to make the most informed decisions possible in selecting surgical treatment. However, there is little information on what factors patients deem important when choosing a surgeon. We performed a systematic review of the literature focused on how patients select surgical care, focusing on identification of factors that influence patient choice as well as important sources of information used by patients. A search of all available literature on factors associated with choice of surgeon/surgical care, as well as sources of information used by patients before undergoing surgery, was conducted using the MEDLINE/PubMed electronic database. Of the 2315 publications identified, 86 studies met inclusion criteria. Overall, patients draw upon a wide range of factors when choosing surgical care. Surgeon reputation and competency stood out as the most valued professional attributes. Patients also often selected surgeons based on their interpersonal skills. Many patients chose surgical care using hospital, rather than surgeon, characteristics. For these patients, hospital reputation and hospital distance were factors of primary importance. Importantly, most patients relied on word-of-mouth and physician referrals when choosing a surgeon. Patients also expressed interest in quality information on surgeons, indicating that these data would be useful in decision-making. Patients draw upon a myriad of factors when choosing a surgeon and the circumstances surrounding patients' decisions maybe differ based on sociodemographic, cultural, as well as other factors. Additional information on how patients choose surgeons or hospitals will help providers assist patients in finding their preferred caregivers.

  15. Cognitive, Personality, and Family Factors in Patients with Migraine Headache

    OpenAIRE

    Reza Johari-Fard; Farzad Goli; Amirreza Boroumand

    2014-01-01

    Migraine is a disorder that has debilitating pain, and affects all aspects of life, including the academic, social, and family life of patients. In addition, studies show the effects of migraine on patient's relationships with family members such as spouse, children, and other family members. In addition to physical pain, migraines are tied to significant psychological and economic costs. Migraineurs tend to have high levels of depression and anxiety, and migraine headaches have a profoundly ...

  16. Analysis of the correlative factors for velopharyngeal closure of patients with cleft palate after primary repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qi; Li, Yang; Shi, Bing; Yin, Heng; Zheng, Guang-Ning; Zheng, Qian

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the correlative factors for velopharyngeal closure of patients with cleft palate after primary repair. Ninety-five nonsyndromic patients with cleft palate were enrolled. Two surgical techniques were applied in the patients: simple palatoplasty and combined palatoplasty with pharyngoplasty. All patients were assessed 6 months after the operation. The postoperative velopharyngeal closure (VPC) rate was compared by χ(2) test and the correlative factors were analyzed with logistic regression model. The postoperative VPC rate of young patients was higher than that of old patients, the group with incomplete cleft palate was higher than the group with complete cleft palate, and combined palatoplasty with pharyngoplasty was higher than simple palatoplasty. Operative age, cleft type, and surgical technique were the contributing factors for postoperative VPC rate. Operative age, cleft type, and surgical technique were significant factors influencing postoperative VPC rate of patients with cleft palate. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Factors affecting dental biofilm in patients wearing fixed orthodontic appliances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Li; Chieng, Joyce; Wong, Connie; Benic, Gareth; Farella, Mauro

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the amount and the distribution of biofilm in patients wearing fixed appliances and its relation with age, gender, frequency of tooth brushing, and patient motivation. The sample comprised 52 patients (15.5 ± 3.6 years old, 30 females and 22 males) wearing fixed orthodontic appliances. Dental biofilm was assessed using a modified plaque index (PI). A questionnaire was used to collect patient's information, including gender, age, treatment motivation, and frequency of tooth brushing. Gingival (PI score = 0.9 ± 0.7), mesial (0.8 ± 0.6), and distal (0.8 ± 0.5) areas accumulated more biofilm than occlusal areas (0.3 ± 0.3) (P appliances have the highest biofilm accumulation on the maxillary lateral incisors and maxillary canines, particularly in the gingival area and areas behind arch wires. Less biofilm was observed in female and adult patients and in those who were self-motivated and brushed their teeth more often.

  18. Factors that affect functional capacity in patients with musculoskeletal pain : a Delphi study among scientists, clinicians, and patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jorna-Lakke, Sandra; Wittink, Harriët; Geertzen, Jan H; van der Schans, Cees; Reneman, Michiel F

    OBJECTIVE: To reach consensus on the most important biopsychosocial factors that influence functional capacity results in patients with chronic nonspecific musculoskeletal pain, arranged in the framework of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health. DESIGN: Three-round,

  19. Patient safety risk factors in minimally invasive surgery : A validation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodrigues, S.P.; Ter Kuile, M.; Dankelman, J.; Jansen, F.W.

    2012-01-01

    This study was conducted to adapt and validate a patient safety (PS) framework for minimally invasive surgery (MIS) as a first step in understanding the clinical relevance of various PS risk factors in MIS. Eight patient safety risk factor domains were identified using frameworks from a systems

  20. Prognostic impact of placenta growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor A in patients with breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maae, Else; Olsen, Dorte Aalund; Steffensen, Karina Dahl

    2012-01-01

    such as ischemic heart disease, arthritis and tumor growth. Angiogenesis is a complex process with several growth factors involved. Because PlGF modulates VEGF-A responses, we investigated their mutual relationship and impact on breast cancer prognosis. Quantitative PlGF and VEGF-A levels were measured in 229...... tumor tissue specimen from primarily operated patients with unilateral breast cancer. Non-malignant breast tissue was also dissected near the tumor and quantitative measurements were available for 211 patients. PlGF and VEGF-A protein levels in homogenized tissue lysates were analyzed using the Luminex......Placenta growth factor (PlGF) and vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) are angiogenic growth factors interacting competitively with the same receptors. VEGF-A is essential in both normal and pathologic conditions, but the functions of PlGF seem to be restricted to pathologic conditions...

  1. [Pressure ulcers in surgery patients: incidence and associated factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarlatti, Kelly Cristina; Michel, Jeanne Liliane Marlene; Gamba, Mônica Antar; de Gutiérrez, Maria Gaby Rivero

    2011-12-01

    Pressure ulcers are an important perioperatory care quality indicator This is a longitudinal case series study, performed with the following objectives: to estimate the incidence of pressure ulcers in patients submitted to medium and large surgeries; rate them according to the stage and location; verify the association with the variables: gender, age, body mass index (BMI), co-morbidities, surgical position, duration of surgery, anesthesia type and use of positioning devices, with presence or absence of pressure ulcers. Data collection took place in 2007 in São Paulo, with 199 patients, 20.6% of which presented pressure ulcers, and most (98.6%) in stages I and II, and the main location was the trunk (35.1%). The variables: position, surgery time, general anesthesia, and device use had a statistically significant association. In conclusion, there is a high incidence of pressure ulcers among surgical patients, requiring actions aimed at reducing this type of injury.

  2. Fall Injuries and Related Factors of Elderly Patients at a Medical Center in Taiwan

    OpenAIRE

    Tsai, Li-Yun; Tsay, Shiow-Luan; Hsieh, Ruey-Kuen; Yu, Shu; Tsai, Jung-Mei; Chien, Hui-Hsien; Liu, Shu-Jung

    2014-01-01

    Background: Elderly patients have a high incidence of falls and injuries in hospitals due to various reasons. The aims of this study were to explore the characteristics and factors associated with fall injuries among elderly patients. Methods: A retrospective survey study was conducted. Data were retrieved from the patient safety reporting system of a medical center in Taiwan query for patient fall incidents of elderly patients aged 65 years or older between 2010 and 2012. Statistics were ...

  3. Victimization of patients with severe psychiatric disorders: prevalence, risk factors, protective factors and consequences for mental health. A longitudinal study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Rien

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Victimization among people with a Severe Mental Illness is a common phenomenon. The objectives of this study proposal are: to delineate the extent and kind of victimization in a representative sample of chronic psychiatric patients; to contribute to the development and validation of a set of instruments registering victimization of psychiatric patients; to determine risk factors and protective factors; and to gain insight into the possible consequences of victimization. Methods/Design An extensive data set of 323 patients with Sever Mental Illness (assessed 4 years ago is used. In 2010 a second measurement will be performed, enabling longitudinal research on the predictors and consequences of victimization. Discussion The consequences of (revictimization have barely been subjected to analysis, partially due to the lack of a comprehensive, conceptual model for victimization. This research project will contribute significantly to the scientific development of the conceptual model of victimization in chronic psychiatric patients.

  4. Nontraditional factors influencing the quality of life of hemodialysis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana-Cristina Varela

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The prevalence of CKD patients in advanced stages with dialysis requirement continues to grow. A goal for the medical team, the patient and their caregivers is to provide a treatment that offers an impact on the prognosis and quality of life (QOL. Methods: In 100 patients with CKD on hemodialysis, randomized assigned, the quality of life by SF-36 was assessed, it was evaluated the functional capacity using the Karnofsky, ability to perform basic tasks of daily life through the index Barthel, presence of depression using the Beck test, family functioning through family APGAR, cognitive state through Minimental and presence of comorbidities using the Charlson index correlated with the sum of physical components (PCS and mental components (MCS of the SF-36 in patients in two renal units in Medellín and Bogotá, Colombia. Results: A decrease in QOL in the physical components (PCS Mental components (MCS regarding the general population. A significant correlation between low PCS and diabetes mellitus (-16 p=0.008 95% CI 2.49 was found. Low MCS showed relation with PTH (p=0.046 95% CI 0.000-0.014, Karnofsky index (p=0.034 95% CI 0.244 to 5.984 and Beck depression test (p=0.000 95% CI -13.606 to 6.253. Conclusions: The QOL of hemodialysis patients is affected with more impact on PCS, there is significant relationship between MCS with functional status and depression. To improve QOL in hemodialysis patients, non traditionally-measured variables should be measured and monitored and the therapeutic focus should be optimized addressed to physical rehabilitation, nutritional, functional and psychological state.

  5. Patient and carer identified factors which contribute to safety incidents in primary care: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernan, Andrea L; Giles, Sally J; Fuller, Jeffrey; Johnson, Julie K; Walker, Christine; Dunbar, James A

    2015-09-01

    Patients can have an important role in reducing harm in primary-care settings. Learning from patient experience and feedback could improve patient safety. Evidence that captures patients' views of the various contributory factors to creating safe primary care is largely absent. The aim of this study was to address this evidence gap. Four focus groups and eight semistructured interviews were conducted with 34 patients and carers from south-east Australia. Participants were asked to describe their experiences of primary care. Audio recordings were transcribed verbatim and specific factors that contribute to safety incidents were identified in the analysis using the Yorkshire Contributory Factors Framework (YCFF). Other factors emerging from the data were also ascertained and added to the analytical framework. Thirteen factors that contribute to safety incidents in primary care were ascertained. Five unique factors for the primary-care setting were discovered in conjunction with eight factors present in the YCFF from hospital settings. The five unique primary care contributing factors to safety incidents represented a range of levels within the primary-care system from local working conditions to the upstream organisational level and the external policy context. The 13 factors included communication, access, patient factors, external policy context, dignity and respect, primary-secondary interface, continuity of care, task performance, task characteristics, time in the consultation, safety culture, team factors and the physical environment. Patient and carer feedback of this type could help primary-care professionals better understand and identify potential safety concerns and make appropriate service improvements. The comprehensive range of factors identified provides the groundwork for developing tools that systematically capture the multiple contributory factors to patient safety. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not

  6. Is Adjuvant Chemoradiotherapy Overtreatment in Cervical Cancer Patients With Intermediate Risk Factors?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Sang-Young; Park, Sang-Il; Nam, Byung-Ho; Cho, Chul-Koo; Kim, Kidong; Kim, Beob-Jong; Kim, Moon-Hong; Choi, Seok-Cheol; Lee, Eui-Don; Lee, Kyoung-Hee

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether adjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) improves the outcome of cervical cancer patients with intermediate risk factors. Methods and Materials: Between January 2000 and June 2006, the medical records of 735 patients who had undergone radical surgery for Stage IB-IIA cervical cancer were reviewed retrospectively. Of the 735 patients, 172 with two or more intermediate risk factors (i.e., lymphovascular space involvement, deep stromal invasion, and tumor size ≥2 cm) were grouped as follows according to the adjuvant treatment received: 34 patients, no further treatment; 49 patients, RT; and 89 patients, CRT. The significance of the clinical parameters and recurrence-free survival of each group were analyzed. Results: Of the 172 patients with any of the intermediate risk factors, 137 (79.6%) had two or more intermediate risk factors. Of the 172 patients, 12 developed recurrences (6.4%)->(7.0%), with 6 in the pelvis and 6 in distant sites. All 12 recurrences occurred in those who had two or more intermediate risk factors (sensitivity, 100%); however, only six recurrences were detected in patients who met the Gynecologic Oncology Group criteria for the intermediate-risk group (sensitivity, 50%; Z test, p .05). Conclusion: Postoperative adjuvant CRT can improve the outcome of cervical cancer patients with intermediate risk factors, with low increase in toxicity.

  7. Factors affecting patients' knowledge about dispensed medicines: A Qualitative study of healthcare professionals and patients in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saqib, Anum; Atif, Muhammad; Ikram, Raazeyah; Riaz, Fatima; Abubakar, Muhammad; Scahill, Shane

    2018-01-01

    Patients' knowledge about their prescribed medicines is one of the most important antecedents of successful therapy. Poor knowledge about medicines can lead to serious consequences such as non-adherence and misunderstanding of the significance of adverse events. The objective of this study is to understand the factors that are responsible for a patients' lack of knowledge regarding their medicines, by taking the perspective of the patient as well as that of healthcare professionals. Much of the work in this area has been undertaken in the setting of developed or semi-developed countries, and there is a scarcity of information from developing nations such as Pakistan. This was a large qualitative study set in the hospital outpatient environment in a teaching hospital in the Punjab province of Pakistan. Data were collected from dialogue with patients (n = 19) and healthcare providers (n = 16) i.e., doctors and dispensers (where a dispenser is a person who merely dispenses medicines; i.e. is not a pharmacist) through in-depth semi-structured interviews. Patients having limited knowledge about their dispensed medicines were assessed using a checklist. The healthcare providers were recruited through a convenience sampling strategy, based on their availability and willingness to participate in the study. Based on the objectives of the study, a pilot tested interview protocol was developed, and used to conduct the interviews. The sample size was controlled by using saturation point criteria. All interviews were audio recorded and transcribed verbatim. The data were analyzed to draw conclusions using inductive thematic content analysis. The analysis of data yielded 31 categories (patients = 19, healthcare professionals = 12), 10 subthemes and three themes. The major themes were healthcare professional-related factors, patient-related factors and system-related factors. The health professional related subthemes included: behaviour and attitude and professional liabilities

  8. Comparison of factors affecting orthodontic treatment motivation of Taiwanese and Thai patients in two hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wariya Laothong

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background/purpose: Many factors, including economic, psychosocial statuses and ethnicity, affect patients' decision to seek orthodontic treatment. The present study compared orthodontic patients' motivation, attitude and the factors affecting this motivation in Taiwanese and Thai patients. We investigated the association between the aforementioned variables and patient characteristics. Materials and methods: We enrolled 250 Thai and 250 Taiwanese patients (age ≥ 20 years from Sunprasitthiprasong and Taipei Medical University Hospitals, respectively, by using self-administered questionnaires. Demographic characteristics were analyzed using Pearson's chi-square test, patients' motivation, attitude and the factors affecting this motivation were analyzed using the sample t-test. The association among the variables was investigated by multiple regression analysis. Results: In both hospitals, the main motivation for seeking orthodontic treatment was esthetic concerns; the patients believed that treatment could make them more beautiful. Taiwanese and Thai patients rejected treatment because of high treatment costs and long treatment periods, respectively. A significant association was observed between household income and Thai patients' motivation (p < 0.05. Sex was significantly associated with Thai patients' attitude (p < 0.05. Age, sex, active treatment duration, and marital status were associated with Taiwanese attitude toward treatment (p < 0.05. In addition, age, household income, and information resources were significantly associated with the factors affecting Taiwanese patients' motivation (p < 0.05. Conclusion: Ethnicity influenced patients' motivation. Economic status was the main factor affecting Thai patients, whereas many factors affected Taiwanese patients' decision to seek orthodontic treatment. However, esthetic concerns were a crucial motivation for both groups. Keywords: factors affecting

  9. Prognostic Importance of Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Myocardial Infarction Patients

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Monhart, Z.; Grünfeldová, H.; Zvárová, Jana; Janský, P.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 122, č. 2 (2010), e253 ISSN 0009-7322. [World Congress of Cardiology . 16.06.2010-19.06.2010, Beijing] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : cardiology * risk factors * myocardioal infarction Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Diseases incl. Cardiotharic Surgery

  10. Lifestyle factors associated with obesity among patients attending a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: The study was done to determine the association between lifestyle factors and obesity among the Family Medicine clinic attendees of the University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital (UPTH). It is a well-known fact that there is a global increase in the prevalence of obesity especially in the developing countries.

  11. Magnitude of stroke and associated factors among patients who ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    unhcc

    E-mail address: bducmhs16@gmail.com / muler.hi@gmail.com ... alarming issue and the third leading cause of deaths globally. Stroke was ... alcohol intake and cigarette smoking were identified factors to stroke. ... death in 25 Latin American and Caribbean countries ... Currently, the hospital is also serving as a teaching.

  12. factors influencing choice of oral hygiene products by dental patients

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    16, 17 and coffee consumption.18 Both factors predispose to extrinsic staining, which may lead to the search for possible way(s) of removing the stains and thus the choice of harder texture of toothbrush. About 51% of the participants choose their toothbrush based on dentist advice, which is contrary to previous studies.

  13. Factors affecting mortality of critical care trauma patients | Hefny ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The most common mechanism of injury was road traffic collisions (72.3 %). The overall mortality was 13.9%. A direct logistic regression model has shown that factors that affected mortality were decreased GCS (p < 0.0001), mechanism of injury (p = 0.004) with burns having the highest mortality, increased age (p = 0.004), ...

  14. Prevalence of malaria and human blood factors among patients in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Malaria has been and is still a major protozoan disease affecting the human population. Erythrocyte polymorphisms (mainly in blood groups and genotypes) influence the susceptibility to severe malaria. Aim: This study is aimed at assessing the prevalence malaria in relation to human blood factor and to ...

  15. Factors predicting mortality in elderly patients admitted to a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The median age was 70 years (interquartile range 67 - 75 years). The overall ICU mortality was 44.7%, and 64% of deaths occurred within 5 days of admission. On univariate analysis, the factors predicting mortality were alcohol misuse (p=0.09), pneumonia (p.0.001), shock (p=0.001), dehydration (p=0.007), urine output ...

  16. Cardiovascular risk factors in patients with rheumatoid arthritis at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The prevalence of hypertension among RA patients was 41.3%, diabetes 6.3%, dyslipidemia 71.3%, smoking 5%, obesity 22.5%, abnormal WHR 33.8%, family history of sudden death 5%, no family history of stroke or heart attack was reported. In the control group one hundred and five were screened and twenty five were ...

  17. Prognostic factors in patients hospitalised with diabetic ketoacidosis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine the clinico-laboratory predictors of outcomes of patients hospitalised with diabetic ketoacidosis who were undergoing treatment. Design: Cross-sectional descriptive study. Setting: The accident and emergency department and medical wards of the Kenyatta National Hospital. Subjects: Fifty one ...

  18. risk factors for cardiovascular diseases among diabetic patients

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    uncommon among diabetic patients in Jimma University Specialized Hospital. Type 2 DM was a ... have been to Israel for less than 4 years (5). .... 102 (39.8%) had primary education. Sixty eight ..... Ethiopian immigrants to Israel. Diabetes care ...

  19. Factors Influencing the Outcomes in Extradural Haematoma Patients

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    was recorded for only 30.8% of the patients. Other common symptoms included headaches (32.6%) and nausea (29.5%). Additional neurological symptoms that were encountered were confusion (27.7%), focal limb weakness (26.8%), convulsions (14.7%), memory loss (6.7%), visual disturbances (5%) and sensory deficits ...

  20. Evaluation of ergonomic risk factors in manual patient handling ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    WMSDs among nurses in West Bengal, India, evaluates the postural stresses and analyses manual patient handling risks. Responses were collected from 220 nurses by validated questionnaires. The activity and posture analyses were done through photography and by Rapid Entire Body Assessment (REBA). Results ...

  1. Risk factors for violence among patients with schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bo, Sune; Abu-Akel, Ahmad; Kongerslev, Mickey

    2011-01-01

    with schizophrenia. We identified two different trajectories for violent behavior in schizophrenia: one pertains to patients with no prior history of violence or criminal behavior and for whom positive symptoms appear to explain violent behavior, and another where personality pathology, including psychopathy...

  2. Factors influencing intercultural doctor-patient communication: a realist review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paternotte, E.; Dulmen, S. van; Lee, N. van der; Scherpbier, A.J.J.A.; Scheele, F.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Due to migration, doctors see patients from different ethnic backgrounds. This causes challenges for the communication. To develop training programs for doctors in intercultural communication (ICC), it is important to know which barriers and facilitators determine the quality of ICC. This

  3. and vein factor patIents Comparison between umbilical artery ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    tase (ATPase) of normal blood vessels, red cells and white cells.7. Inhibition of sodium-potassium ATPase and the sodium-potassium pump has also been reported at tissue and cellular levels in patients with low-renin hypertension.7. ,8. Various tissues have been reported to contain DLIF, e.g. extracts of mammalian brain,9 ...

  4. Factors associated with gastro-duodenal disease in patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: There is a high prevalence of gastro-duodenal disease in sub Saharan Africa. Peptic ulcer disease in dyspeptic patients, 24.5%, was comparable to prevalence of gastro-duodenal disease among symptomatic individuals in developed countries (12 – 25%). Limited data exists regarding its associated risk ...

  5. Factors associated with osteoporosis among older patients at the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Osteoporosis is a silent disabling clinical condition often attributed to ageing. It is of public health importance because of its complications and attendant morbidity and mortality. Methods: A cross-sectional study was undertaken of 2401 older patients (60 years and above) at the Geriatric Centre, University ...

  6. Vena porta thrombosis in patient with inherited factor VII deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klovaite, Jolanta; Friis-Hansen, Lennart Jan; Larsen, Fin S

    2010-01-01

    with inherited FVII deficiency and chronic vena porta thrombosis. She presented at 32 weeks of gestation with spontaneously increased international normalized ratio, severe thrombocytopenia and very few unspecific symptoms. The extensive examination of the patient revealed cavernous transformation of the portal...

  7. Factors influencing patient compliance with therapeutic regimens in chronic heart failure: A critical incident technique analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strömberg, A; Broström, A; Dahlström, U; Fridlund, B

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify factors influencing compliance with prescribed treatment in patients with chronic heart failure. A qualitative design with a critical incident technique was used. Incidents were collected through interviews with 25 patients with heart failure strategically selected from a primary health care clinic, a medical ward, and a specialist clinic. Two hundred sixty critical incidents were identified in the interviews and 2 main areas emerged in the analysis: inward factors and outward factors. The inward factors described how compliance was influenced by the personality of the patient, the disease, and the treatment. The outward factors described how compliance was influenced by social activities, social relationships, and health care professionals. By identifying the inward and outward factors influencing patients with chronic heart failure, health care professionals can assess whether intervention is needed to increase compliance.

  8. Risk Factors and Etiology of Young Ischemic Stroke Patients in Estonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siim Schneider

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Reports on young patients with ischemic stroke from Eastern Europe have been scarce. This study aimed to assess risk factors and etiology of first-ever and recurrent stroke among young Estonian patients. Methods. We performed a retrospective study of consecutive ischemic stroke patients aged 18–54 years who were treated in our two hospitals from 2003 to 2012. Results. We identified 741 patients with first-ever stroke and 96 patients with recurrent stroke. Among first-time patients, men predominated in all age groups. The prevalence of well-documented risk factors in first-time stroke patients was 83% and in the recurrent group 91%. The most frequent risk factors were hypertension (53%, dyslipidemia (46%, and smoking (35%. Recurrent stroke patients had fewer less well-documented risk factors compared to first-time stroke patients (19.8 versus 30.0%, P=0.036. Atrial fibrillation was the most common cause of cardioembolic strokes (48% and large-artery atherosclerosis (LAA was the cause in 8% among those aged <35 years. Compared to first-time strokes, recurrent ones were more frequently caused by LAA (14.3 versus 24.0%, P=0.01 and less often by other definite etiology (8.5 versus 1.0%, P=0.01. Conclusions. The prevalence of vascular risk factors among Estonian young stroke patients is high. Premature atherosclerosis is a cause in a substantial part of very young stroke patients.

  9. Case-controlled Study on Risk Factors for the Development of Constipation in Hospitalized Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Ueki, Tetsuya; Nagai, Keiko; Ooe, Nobuharu; Nakashima, Mihoko N.; Nishida, Koyo; Nakamura, Junzo; Nakashima, Mikiro

    2011-01-01

    Constipation is a common problem in hospitalized patients; however, the relative risks of its development with various factors have not been clarified. To clarify the risk factors associated with constipation, we performed a case-controlled study of 165 hospitalized patients who were not laxative users on admission. They were divided into case (n=35) and control (n=130) groups according to laxative administration during hospitalization. Comparison of the patient backgrounds in the two groups ...

  10. Genetic and Non-genetic Factors Associated WithConstipation in Cancer Patients Receiving Opioids

    OpenAIRE

    Laugsand, Eivor Alette; Skorpen, Frank; Kaasa, Stein; Sabatowski, Rainer; Strasser, Florian; Fayers, Peter; Klepstad, Pål

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To examine whether the inter-individual variation in constipation among patients receiving opioids for cancer pain is associated with genetic or non-genetic factors. Methods: Cancer patients receiving opioids were included from 17 centers in 11 European countries. Intensity of constipation was reported by 1,568 patients on a four-point categorical scale. Non-genetic factors were included as covariates in stratified regression analyses on the association between constipation a...

  11. Erectile Dysfunction Among HIV Patients Undergoing Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy: Dyslipidemia as a Main Risk Factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Romero‐Velez, MD

    2014-04-01

    Conclusions: ED is highly prevalent in HIV patients. Dyslipidemia should be considered as a risk factor for ED in HIV patients. Romero‐Velez G, Lisker‐Cervantes A, Villeda‐Sandoval CI, Sotomayor de Zavaleta M, Olvera‐Posada D, Sierra‐Madero JG, Arreguin‐Camacho LO, and Castillejos‐Molina RA. Erectile dysfunction among HIV patients undergoing highly active antiretroviral therapy: Dyslipidemia as a main risk factor. Sex Med 2014;2:24–30.

  12. Course, risk factors, and prognostic factors in elderly primary care patients with mild depression: a two-year observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnil, Maria; Janmarker, Lena; Gunnarsson, Ronny; Björkelund, Cecilia

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to observe course, risk factors, and prognostic factors in a primary care cohort aged > 60 with mild to moderate depression during two-year follow-up. Observational study. Primary care. During an 11-month period all (n = 302) consecutive patients aged 60 and above attending a primary care centre in Gothenburg, Sweden were screened by a nurse for depressive symptoms with the Primary Care Evaluation of Mental Disorders, Patient Questionnaire (PRIME-MD PQ) and the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale, self-rated version (MADRS-S) and by a GP with a patient-centred consultation model. In the second step, the GPs diagnosed depression in screen-positives by use of the PRIME-MD Clinical Evaluation Guide (PRIME-MD CEG). All patients with mild to moderate depression were followed up for two years to assess course with several MADRS-S score assessments. Main outcome measures. Risk factors, prognostic factors, and symptoms at baseline and after two years were tested with logistic regression, using the DSM-IV and MADRS-S (cut-off > 13) respectively. Course patterns were observed and described. A total of 54 patients were diagnosed with depression. Follow-up revealed declining median MADRS-S scores and three course patterns: remitting, stable, and fluctuating. History of depression, significant life events, lacking leisure activities, and use of sedatives were risk factors for depression, all previously known. An important finding was that lacking leisure activities also increased the risk of depressive symptoms after two years (odds ratio 12, confidence interval 1.1-136). It is desirable to identify elderly individuals with less severe depression. Three course patterns were observed; this finding requires further study of the clinical characteristics related to the different patterns. Awareness of risk factors may facilitate identification of those at highest risk of poor prognosis.

  13. Associated risk factors for chronic kidney disease of unknown etiologies in 241 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Xuexue; Lu, Jing; Wang, Zheng

    2015-04-01

    Apart from the well-known etiologies, there are still a high proportion of patients with chronic kidney disease of unknown etiology (CKDu), which has rarely been reported on. In this study, we explored the potential associated risk factors for CKDu and identified those that occur in childhood. 700 patients with CKD we were selected randomly from 4 hospitals in Chengdu and 241 were screened for CKDu. The following clinical information was analyzed: demographic data, life style, personal and family history, nephrotoxic drugs, exposure to poison, allergies, and recurrent respiratory infections in childhood. Among 700 CKD patients, 34.43% (241/700) were CKDu. Of the 241 patients, there were 67.63% (163/241) with at least 1 associated risk factor and 56.44% (92/163) with more than 1. Patients with a personal history of an associated risk factor represented the largest proportion (31.95%, 77/241), while 28.63% (69/241) of the CKDu patients had risk factors appearing in childhood. Logistic regression analysis supported the results. The study demonstrated that most so-called CKDu patients do have an identifiable etiology, and that several associated risk factors contribute to it. Of all the risk factors, age >60 years, nephrotoxic drugs, exposure to poison, and alcohol consumption were the independent significant factors for CKDu. Furthermore, many risk factors that caused kidney injury started in childhood.

  14. Analysis of contributing factors associated to related patients safety incidents in Intensive Care Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín Delgado, M C; Merino de Cos, P; Sirgo Rodríguez, G; Álvarez Rodríguez, J; Gutiérrez Cía, I; Obón Azuara, B; Alonso Ovies, Á

    2015-01-01

    To explore contributing factors (CF) associated to related critical patients safety incidents. SYREC study pos hoc analysis. A total of 79 Intensive Care Departments were involved. The study sample consisted of 1.017 patients; 591 were affected by one or more incidents. The CF were categorized according to a proposed model by the National Patient Safety Agency from United Kingdom that was modified. Type, class and severity of the incidents was analyzed. A total 2,965 CF were reported (1,729 were associated to near miss and 1,236 to adverse events). The CF group more frequently reported were related patients factors. Individual factors were reported more frequently in near miss and task related CF in adverse events. CF were reported in all classes of incidents. The majority of CF were reported in the incidents classified such as less serious, even thought CF patients factors were associated to serious incidents. Individual factors were considered like avoidable and patients factors as unavoidable. The CF group more frequently reported were patient factors and was associated to more severe and unavoidable incidents. By contrast, individual factors were associated to less severe and avoidable incidents. In general, CF most frequently reported were associated to near miss. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  15. Influence of social factors on patient-reported late symptoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, Trille Kristina; Johansen, Christoffer; Andersen, Elo

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The incidence of head and neck cancer and morbidity and mortality after treatment are associated with social factors. Whether social factors also play a role in the prevalence of late-onset symptoms after treatment for head and neck cancer is not clear. METHODS: Three hundred sixty...... ratio [OR] = 3.20; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.18-8.63). For survivors who lived alone, the adjusted ORs were significantly increased for physical functioning (2.17; 95% CI = 1.01-4.68) and trouble with social eating (OR = 2.26; 95% CI = 1.14-4.47). CONCLUSION: Self-reported severe late symptoms...... were more prevalent in survivors with short education and in those living alone, suggesting differences in perception of late symptoms between social groups. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck, 2015....

  16. Factors affecting satisfaction of patients after orthognathic surgery at a University Hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Ahmad, Hazem T.; Al-Omari, Iyad K.; Eldurini, Laila N.; Suleiman, Ahmad A.

    2008-01-01

    The objective was to analyze factors that influence patient's satisfaction with orthognathic treatment and evaluate patient's perception of changes in physical and psychosocial aspects. In a retrospective clinical study conducted at Jordan University Hospital, Amman, Jordan between December 2006 and December 2007, we examined 38 patients who had orthognathic surgery after an average follow-up of 20 months. Examination included evaluation of nerve function and temporomandibular function with Helkimo index. Patients filled out a questionnaire on treatment satisfaction and perception of physical and psychosocial changes after treatment. Patients were generally satisfied with the result, 82% agreed they would undergo treatment again. They were divided into very satisfied n=25 and less satisfied n=13 groups according to satisfaction score, with statistically significant differences found between them concerning diagnosis and follow-up period, with all vertical maxillary excess patients very satisfied and 75% of asymmetrical deformities patients less satisfied, and less satisfaction by patients more than one year postoperatively, p=0.006. Patients perceived improvement oral function, general health, appearance and interpersonal skills. Lower rates of joint and muscular pain and increased mobility of lower jaw correlated with better patient's perception of health and appearance. Although patient's report high satisfaction levels, several factors such as the temporomandibular joint function could affect patient's psychosocial adjustment after treatment. Sufficient information for patient on the treatment course is required to improve satisfaction. Controlling these factors could improve patient's quality of life. (author)

  17. Factors affecting the willingness to pay for implants: A study of patients in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bishi Al Garni

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: The majority of the patients surveyed were willing to pay the median price for an implant. Willingness to pay (WTP is a multifactorial variable which is significantly influenced by the income of the patient, the setting of the clinic and the gender; the most significant factor being the acceptability of the implant to the patient.

  18. Transfer of Patients in a Telestroke Network: What Are the Relevant Factors for Making This Decision?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingner, Carsten M; Brodoehl, Stefan; Funck, Laura; Klingner, Caroline C; Berrouschot, Jörg; Witte, Otto W; Günther, Albrecht

    2018-02-01

    Background/Introduction: Current telestroke network consultations are focused on decision-making in the hyperacute stage of stroke management. The two main questions in telestroke consultations are whether thrombolysis should be initiated and whether the patient should be transferred to a hub hospital. Although guidelines exist for initiating intravenous thrombolytic therapy, the question of whether patients should be transferred is far more elusive. In this study, we investigated the factors involved in the decision to transfer stroke patients to a hub hospital. We were particularly interested in identifying factors that promote or impede the transfer of patients. We enrolled 1,615 cases of telestroke consultation of the University Hospital Jena. The two main factors that independently influenced the probability of transferring a patient were the patient's age and the identification of a proximal vessel occlusion. Interestingly, factors such as the severity of symptoms and the time elapsed from symptom onset were not found to have an independent influence on the decision to transfer a patient. The transfer of most patients was justified by the possibility of performing interventional reperfusion therapy. We discuss the effectiveness of the current decision-making process and possible ways to improve decision-making for a more effective selection of patients who would benefit from transfer. The decision-making process to a transfer patient is not standardized and constitutes a trade-off between the intention to treat all possible patients while avoiding the transfer of patients without treatment options.

  19. Are There Gender-Specific Risk Factors for Suicidal Activity among Patients with Schizophrenia and Depression?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Kalman J.; Harrow, Martin; Faull, Robert N.

    2012-01-01

    Are there gender-specific risk factors for suicidal activity among patients with schizophrenia and depression? A total of 74 schizophrenia patients (51 men, 23 women) and 77 unipolar nonpsychotic depressed patients (26 men, 51 women) from the Chicago Follow-up Study were studied prospectively at 2 years posthospitalization and again at 7.5 years.…

  20. Factors influencing transfusion requirement in patients undergoing first-time, elective coronary artery bypass graft surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ailin Mazuita Mazlan

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: By stratifying patients according to their risk factor for red cell transfusion, the high-risk patients could be recognized and should be enrolled into effective patient blood management program to minimize their risk of exposure to allogeneic blood transfusion.

  1. Severe glandular tularemia in a patient treated with anti-tumour necrosis factor for psoriatic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruxandra Calin

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available A case of severe glandular tularemia in a patient receiving anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF therapy is reported here. The patient required prolonged treatment with doxycycline–ciprofloxacin due to early relapse after ciprofloxacin was stopped. Tularemia may have a more severe course in patients receiving anti-TNF. This may thus be an indication for more aggressive treatment.

  2. Severe bacterial infections in patients with non-transfusion-dependent thalassemia: prevalence and clinical risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nattiya Teawtrakul

    2015-10-01

    Conclusion: The prevalence of bacterial infection in patients with NTDT was found to be moderate. Time after splenectomy >10 years, deferoxamine therapy, and iron overload may be clinical risk factors for severe bacterial infection in patients with NTDT. Bacterial infection should be recognized in splenectomized patients with NTDT, particularly those who have an iron overload.

  3. A review of potential factors relevant to coping in patients with advanced cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Thora G.; Rydahl-Hansen, Susan; Wagner, Lis

    2010-01-01

    The aim was to identify characteristics that are considered to describe coping in patients with advanced cancer, as seen from a patient perspective. Based on the identified characteristics, the second aim was to identify potential factors that are relevant to coping in patients with advanced cancer....

  4. Risk factors and short-term outcome in patients with angiographically negative subarachnoid hemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalbjerg, Sara Maria; Larsen, Carl Christian; Romner, Bertil

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify prognostic factors for clinical outcome in patients with non-traumatic, angiographically negative subarachnoid hemorrhage. Furthermore, the aim was to investigate if patients on anticoagulant therapy may have a more unfavorable outcome than patients...

  5. Risk Factors of Prolonged Hospitalization in Patients with Hyperemesis Gravidarum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Onur Topcu

    2015-03-01

    Conclusion: Number of vomiting per day and maternal serum TSH levels could help physicians to estimate the risk of prolonged hospitalization; however further investigations are needed in large population studies. Identifying the high risk patients is important both for prevention of HEG and beginning appropriate antiemetic treatment to avoid complications to reduce the economic costs. [Cukurova Med J 2015; 40(1.000: 113-118

  6. Level of agreement between physician and patient assessment of non-medical health factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludovic, Casanova; Virginie, Ringa; Sophia, Chatelard; Sylvain, Paquet; Isabelle, Pendola-Luchel; Henri, Panjo; Camille, Bideau; Eric, Deflesselle; Raphaëlle, Delpech; Géraldine, Bloy; Laurent, Rigal

    2018-01-29

    GPs need to consider assorted relevant non-medical factors, such as family or work situations or health insurance coverage, to determine appropriate patient care. If GPs' knowledge of these factors varies according to patients' social position, less advantaged patients might receive poorer care, resulting in the perpetuation of social inequalities in health. To assess social disparities in GPs' knowledge of non-medical factors relevant to patient care. Observational survey of GPs who supervise internships in the Paris metropolitan area. Each of the 52 enrolled GPs randomly selected 70 patients from their patient list. Their knowledge of five relevant factors (coverage by publicly funded free health insurance, or by supplementary health insurance, living with a partner, social support and employment status) was analysed as the agreement between the patients' and GPs' answers to matching questions. Occupational, educational and financial disparities were estimated with multilevel models adjusted for age, sex, chronic disease and GP-patient relationship. Agreement varied according to the factor considered from 66% to 91%. The global agreement score (percentage of agreement for all five factors) was 72%. Social disparities and often gradients, disfavouring the less well-off patients, were observed for each factor considered. Social gradients were most marked according to perceived financial situation and for health insurance coverage. GPs must be particularly attentive toward their least advantaged patients, to be aware of the relevant non-medical factors that affect these patients' health and care, and thus provide management adapted to each individual's personal situation. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Relationship between ABO blood groups and von Willebrand factor, ADAMTS13 and factor VIII in patients undergoing hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rios, Danyelle R A; Fernandes, Ana Paula; Figueiredo, Roberta C; Guimarães, Daniela A M; Ferreira, Cláudia N; Simões E Silva, Ana C; Carvalho, Maria G; Gomes, Karina B; Dusse, Luci Maria Sant' Ana

    2012-05-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that non-O blood groups subjects present an increased VTE risk as compared to those carrying O blood group. The aim of this study was to investigate the ABO blood groups influence on factor VIII (FVIII) activity, von Willebrand factor (VWF), and ADAMTS13 plasma levels in patients undergoing hemodialysis (HD). Patients undergoing HD (N=195) and 80 healthy subjects (control group) were eligible for this cross-sectional study. The ABO blood group phenotyping was performed by the reverse technique. FVIII activity was measured through coagulometric method, and VWF and ADAMTS13 antigens were assessed by ELISA. FVIII activity and VWF levels were significantly higher and ADAMTS13 levels was decreased in HD patients, as compared to healthy subjects (P blood groups showed a significant increase in FVIII activity (P = 0.001) and VWF levels (P blood group. However, no significant difference was observed in ADAMTS13 levels (P = 0.767). In the control group, increased in FVIII activity (P = 0.001) and VWF levels (P = 0.002) and decreased in ADAMTS13 levels (P = 0.005) were observed in subjects carrying non-O blood groups as compared to carriers of O blood group.Our data confirmed that ABO blood group is an important risk factor for increased procoagulant factors in plasma, as FVIII and VWF. Admitting the possible role of kidneys in ADAMTS13 synthesis or on its metabolism, HD patients were not able to increase ADAMTS13 levels in order to compensate the increase of VWF levels mediated by ABO blood groups. Considering that non-O blood groups constitute a risk factor for thrombosis, it is reasonable to admit that A, B and AB HD patients need a careful and continuous follow-up in order to minimize thrombotic events.

  8. Risk Factors of Nicardipine-Related Phlebitis in Acute Stroke Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawada, Kei; Ohta, Tsuyoshi; Tanaka, Koudai; Kadoguchi, Naoto; Yamamoto, Souichi; Morimoto, Masanori

    2016-10-01

    Intravenous nicardipine is generally used to treat hypertension in acute stroke patients but is associated with frequent phlebitis. We aimed to identify the incidence and risk factors of phlebitis in such patients. The incidence and risk factors of phlebitis were investigated in 358 acute stroke patients from July 2014 to June 2015. In total, 138 patients received intravenous nicardipine. Of 45 (12.6%) phlebitis patients in 358 acute stroke patients, 42 (93.3%) were administered nicardipine, which was significantly associated with phlebitis occurrence (P phlebitis of acute stroke patients in univariate analysis were intracerebral hemorrhage (P phlebitis is frequently observed in acute stroke patients and is significantly associated with administration of a maximum concentration of nicardipine greater than 130 µg/mL. Copyright © 2016 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Selected antibacterial factors in the saliva of diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malicka, Barbara; Kaczmarek, Urszula; Skośkiewicz-Malinowska, Katarzyna

    2015-03-01

    Diabetes mellitus leads to many systemic complications, including changes in the morphology, function of the salivary glands, and the composition of saliva. The study comprised a randomly selected 156 adults, of both genders, aged from 21 to 79, out of which patients with diabetes type 1 and 2, and healthy subjects forming two control age- and gender matched to the ill subjects. In unstimulated mixed saliva, total protein, peroxidase, myeloperoxidase and immunoglobulin A were measured as well as salivary flow rate. The periodontal condition was assessed with the use of GI, mSBI and PSR index. The obtained data were analysed with the use of U Mann-Whitney's test, Spearman's rang correlation and Chi-square test at a significant level of p diabetics in comparison to healthy age and gender matched control group had a lower salivary flow rate (p diabetics in comparison to control subjects had a higher level of total protein concentration (p diabetes type 1 and 2 can cause abnormalities in salivary glands function resulting in the diminishing of salivary flow rate and the increase in total protein content. Higher levels of myeloperoxidase and IgA in the saliva can be linked to worse periodontal condition in the diabetic patients. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Non-adherence to life-style modification and its factors among type 2 diabetic patients

    OpenAIRE

    Shirin Jahan Mumu; Farzana Saleh; Ferdous Ara; Fadia Afnan; Liaquat Ali

    2014-01-01

    Non-adherence to preventive and therapeutic life-style recommendations among patients with diabetes is special challenge in the management of these patients. This study aimed to measure the proportion of non-adherence to life-style modification and factors associated with these among a group of Bangladeshi type 2 diabetic patients. Under an analytical cross-sectional design 374 type 2 diabetic patients (age >20 years), diagnosed for at least 1 year, were selected from different health care ce...

  11. Prevalence of hepatic steatosis and associated factors in Iranian patients with chronic hepatitis C

    OpenAIRE

    Poortahmasebi, Vahdat; Emami Aleagha, Mohammad Sajad; Amiri, Mehdi; Qorbani, Mostafa; Farahmand, Mohammad; Asayesh, Hamid; Alavian, Seyed Moayed

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hepatic steatosis is commonly observed in patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC). Many studies indicate a relationship between steatosis and fibrosis progression. The aim of this study was to analyze the prevalence of hepatic steatosis and related factors in Iranian CHC patients. Methods: One hundred and fifteen consecutive patients with CHC were enrolled which were treatment- na?ve. The patients were divided into groups with and without steatosis according to the result of liver...

  12. Factors Influencing communication between the patients with cancer and their nurses in oncology wards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Zamanzadeh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the factors influencing nurse-patient communication in cancer care in Iran. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted with a qualitative conventional content analysis approach in oncology wards of hospitals in Tabriz. Data was collected through purposive sampling by semi-structured deep interviews with nine patients, three family members and five nurses and analyzed simultaneously. Robustness of data analysis was evaluated by the participants and external control. Results: The main theme of the research emerged as "three-factor effects" that demonstrates all the factors related to the patient, nurse, and the organization and includes three categories of "Patient as the center of communication", "Nurse as a human factor", and "Organizational structures". The first category consists of two sub-categories of "Imposed changes by the disease" and "the patient′s particular characteristics". The second category includes sub-categories of "sense of vulnerability" and "perception of professional self: Pre-requisite of patient-centered communication". The third category consists of the sub-categories of "workload and time imbalance", "lack of supervision", and "impose duties in context of neglecting nurse and patient needs". Characteristics of the patients, nurses, and care environment seemed to be the influential factors on the communication. Conclusions: In order to communicate with cancer patients effectively, changes in philosophy and culture of the care environment are essential. Nurses must receive proper trainings which meet their needs and which focus on holistic and patient-centered approach.

  13. Skin problems in ostomy patients: a case-control study of risk factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nybaek, Hanne; Bang Knudsen, Dorte; Nørgaard Laursen, Troels

    2009-01-01

    Skin complications are frequent in ostomy patients and a number of risk factors have been suggested. The data on risk factors have, however, been documented mainly in single-centre studies and the actual importance of the suggested risk factors should therefore be verified in a group of ostomy...... patients broadly selected from the gene-ral population. All patients with permanent ostomies living in Roskilde County, Denmark, were invited to participate in the study. A total of 338 responded and 199 agreed to participate. Forty-five percent of all patients presented a skin problem. Less than half (43......%) of patients with a skin problem were aware of the skin problems, and less than 1 in 5 (16%) had sought treatment for their skin problem. Ileostomies, ostomies with leakage and ostomies in patients with body mass index >30 were associated with skin problems. In conclusion, ileostomy, leakage and obesity...

  14. Factor analysis of the Zarit Burden Interview in family caregivers of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Juyeon; Kim, Jung A

    2018-02-01

    The Zarit Burden Interview has been used in many studies to assess caregiver burden in family caregivers of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, but the factor structure of the Zarit Burden Interview in the caregivers of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients is unknown. The aim of this study was to explore the factor structure of the Zarit Burden Interview in family caregivers of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients using exploratory factor analysis. The exploratory factor analysis was performed using generalized least squares with oblique rotation in a sample of 202 family caregivers. Three factors had an eigenvalue greater than 1 and accounted for 60.33% of the total variance. The three factors were named as follows: (factor 1) "Social restrictions" (items 2, 3, and 10-15); (factor 2) "Self-criticism" (items 20-21); and (factor 3) "Anger and frustration" (items 1, 4-6, 9, and 16-19). The correlation between factors 1 and 3 was much higher (r = 0.79) than that between factors 1 and 2 (r = 0.14) or factors 2 and 3 (r = 0.15). The findings of this study enriched our understanding of several meaningful dimensions of the caregiving burden in caregivers of an amyotrophic lateral sclerosis population and provided opportunities for future intervention.

  15. Factors affecting intellectual outcome in pediatric brain tumor patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellenberg, L.; McComb, J.G.; Siegel, S.E.; Stowe, S.

    1987-01-01

    A prospective study utilizing repeated intellectual testing was undertaken in 73 children with brain tumors consecutively admitted to Childrens Hospital of Los Angeles over a 3-year period to determine the effect of tumor location, extent of surgical resection, hydrocephalus, age of the child, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy on cognitive outcome. Forty-three patients were followed for at least two sequential intellectual assessments and provide the data for this study. Children with hemispheric tumors had the most general cognitive impairment. The degree of tumor resection, adequately treated hydrocephalus, and chemotherapy had no bearing on intellectual outcome. Age of the child affected outcome mainly as it related to radiation. Whole brain radiation therapy was associated with cognitive decline. This was especially true in children below 7 years of age, who experienced a very significant loss of function after whole brain radiation therapy

  16. Prognostic Factors in Patients Hospitalized with Diabetic Ketoacidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avinash Agarwal

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundDiabetic ketoacidosis (DKA is characterized by a biochemical triad of hyperglycemia, acidosis, and ketonemia. This condition is life-threatening despite improvements in diabetic care. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical and biochemical prognostic markers of DKA. We assessed correlations in prognostic markers with DKA-associated morbidity and mortality.MethodsTwo hundred and seventy patients that were hospitalized with DKA over a period of 2 years were evaluated clinically and by laboratory tests. Serial assays of serum electrolytes, glucose, and blood pH were performed, and clinical outcome was noted as either discharged to home or death.ResultsThe analysis indicated that significant predictors included sex, history of type 1 diabetes mellitus or type 2 diabetes mellitus, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, total leukocyte count, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II score, blood urea nitrogen, serum creatinine, serum magnesium, serum phosphate, serum osmolality, serum glutamic oxaloacetic transaminases, serum glutamic pyruvic transaminases, serum albumin, which were further regressed and subjected to multivariate logistic regression (MLR analysis. The MLR analysis indicated that males were 7.93 times more likely to have favorable outcome compared with female patients (odds ratio, 7.93; 95% confidence interval, 3.99 to 13.51, while decreases in mean APACHE II score (14.83 and serum phosphate (4.38 at presentation may lead to 2.86- and 2.71-fold better outcomes, respectively, compared with higher levels (APACHE II score, 25.00; serum phosphate, 6.04.ConclusionSex, baseline biochemical parameters such as APACHE II score, and phosphate level were important predictors of the DKA-associated mortality.

  17. Factors associated with subendocardial ischemia risk in patients on hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Bruno Caldin da; Sanjuan, Adriano; Costa-Hong, Valéria; Reis, Luciene Dos; Graciolli, Fabiana; Consolim-Colombo, Fernanda; Bortolotto, Luiz Aparecido; Moyses, Rosa Maria Affonso; Elias, Rosilene Motta

    2016-01-01

    Bone metabolism disorder (BMD) and vascular dysfunction contribute to excess cardiovascular mortality observed in hemodialysis patients. Vascular dysfunction, a new marker of atherosclerosis, can play a role in this risk. Even though associated with higher mortality in the general population, such vascular evaluation in patients on hemodialysis has not been extensively studied. In this cross-sectional study, hemodialysis patients were submitted to flow-mediated dilation, subendocardial viability ratio (SEVR) and ejection duration index assessment, in order to estimate the impact of BMD markers on vascular dysfunction. A matched cohort of patients with (n = 16) and without (n = 11) severe secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT) was studied. Additionally, time spent under severe SHPT was also evaluated. Patients with severe SHPT had lower SEVR and higher ejection duration index, indicating higher cardiovascular risk. Lower SEVR was also associated to diastolic blood pressure (r = 0.435, p = 0.049), serum 25-Vitamin-D levels (r = 0.479, p = 0.028) and to more time spent under severe secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT), defined as time from PTH > 500pg/ml until parathyroidectomy surgery or end of the study (r = -0.642, p = 0.027). In stepwise multiple regression analysis between SEVR and independent variables, lower SEVR was independently associated to lower serum 25-Vitamin-D levels (p = 0.005), female sex (p = 0.012) and more time spent under severe SHPT (p = 0.001) in a model adjusted for age, serum cholesterol, and blood pressure (adjusted r² = 0.545, p = 0.001). Subendocardial perfusion was lower in patients with BMD, reflecting higher cardiovascular risk in this population. Whether early parathyroidectomy in the course of kidney disease could modify such results still deserves further investigation. Distúrbios do metabolismo ósseo (DMO) e alterações da função vascular contribuem para a elevada mortalidade de pacientes em hemodiálise. A disfunção vascular

  18. Tumor necrosis factor-α and -β genetic polymorphisms as a risk factor in Saudi patients with schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadasah S

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Saeed Kadasah,1 Misbahul Arfin,2 Sadaf Rizvi,2 Mohammed Al-Asmari,2 Abdulrahman Al-Asmari2 1Department of Psychiatry, 2Division of Molecular Biology & Genetics, Scientific Research Center, Prince Sultan Military Medical City, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia Background: Schizophrenia is one of the most common devastating psychiatric disorders that negatively affects the quality of life and psychosocial functions. Its etiology involves the interplay of complex polygenic influences and environmental risk factors. Inflammatory markers are well-known etiological factors for psychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia. Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the association of proinflammatory cytokine genes, tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α (-308G/A and TNF-β (+252A/G polymorphisms with schizophrenia susceptibility. Subjects and methods: TNF-α and TNF-β genes were amplified using amplification refractory mutation system primers in 180 schizophrenia patients and 200 healthy matched controls recruited from the Psychiatry Clinic of Prince Sultan Military Medical City, Riyadh. The frequencies of alleles and genotypes of TNF-α (-308G/A and TNF-β (+252A/G polymorphisms in patients were compared with those in controls. Results: The frequencies of TNF-α (-308 allele A and genotype GA were significantly higher, while those of allele G and genotype GG were lower in schizophrenia patients as compared to controls, indicating that genotype GA and allele A of TNF-α (-308G/A may increase susceptibility to schizophrenia, while genotype GG and allele G may reduce it. On the other hand, the distribution of alleles and genotypes of TNF-β (+252A/G polymorphism does not differ significantly in patients from controls; however, the frequency of genotype GG of TNF-β (+252A/G was significantly higher in male patients than in female patients. The distribution of TNF-α (-308G/A and TNF-β (+252A/G polymorphisms was almost similar in schizophrenia patients with

  19. Factor Structure of the Eating Disorder Examination Interview in Patients With Binge-eating Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grilo, Carlos M.; Crosby, Ross D.; Peterson, Carol B.; Masheb, Robin M.; White, Marney A.; Crow, Scott J.; Wonderlich, Stephen A.; Mitchell, James E.

    2013-01-01

    Despite the widespread use of the Eating Disorder Examination (EDE) as a primary assessment instrument in studies of eating and weight disorders, little is known about the psychometric aspects of this interview measure. The primary purpose of this study was to evaluate the factor structure of the EDE interview in a large series of patients with binge-eating disorder (BED). Participants were 688 treatment-seeking patients with BED who were reliably administered the EDE interview by trained research clinicians at three research centers. Exploratory factor analysis (EFA) performed on EDE interview data from a random split-half of the study group suggested a brief 7-item 3-factor structure. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) performed on the second randomly selected half of the study group supported this brief 3-factor structure of the EDE interview. The three factors were interpreted as Dietary Restraint, Shape/Weight Overvaluation, and Body Dissatisfaction. In this series of patients with BED, factor analysis of the EDE interview did not replicate the original subscales but revealed an alternative factor structure. Future research must further evaluate the psychometric properties, including the factor structure, of the EDE interview in this and other eating-disordered groups. The implications of these factor analytic findings for understanding and assessing the specific psychopathology of patients with BED are discussed. PMID:19798064

  20. Analysis on Risk Factors of Nosocomial Infection in Orthopedic Patients and Research on Nursing Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo Zhitao

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Orthopedic patients mostly comprise traumatic patients and elderly or sick individuals. More patients with emergency surgery suffer from open wounds and serious pollution, and operation time is relatively long. Thus, orthopedic patients with surgical incision infection account for a large proportion of incidence of hospital infection. Orthopedic patients are also bedridden for long periods, and they receive poor bone tissue blood supply. In surgical incision infections, mild cases suffer from delayed wound healing, whereas severe cases can form osteomyelitis. This study reviews progress of research on risk factors of nosocomial infection among orthopedic patients in recent years.

  1. Epidemiology of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis in patients with liver failure: Clinical presentation, risk factors, and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuan; Yang, Meifang; Hu, Jianhua; Zhao, Hong; Li, Lanjuan

    2018-02-01

    Objective Invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA) is a severe and often lethal infection. The possible risk factors, clinical presentation, and treatment of patients with simultaneous liver failure and IPA have received little attention in previous studies. The aim of this study was to investigate the epidemiology of IPA in patients with liver failure in an effort to reduce patient mortality. Methods The patients with liver failure (including acute liver failure , sub-acute liver failure , acute-on-chronic liver failure and chronic liver failure) were recruited from 2011 to 2016. The clinical data of these patients were retrieved for the study. Results In total, 1077 patients with liver failure were included in this study. Of the 1077 patients, 53 (4.9%) had IPA. Forty-four (83%) patients with IPA died. Independent risk factors for IPA were male sex (hazard ratio [HR] = 2.542), hepatorenal syndrome (HR = 2.463), antibiotic use (HR = 4.631), and steroid exposure (HR = 18.615). Conclusions IPA is a fatal complication in patients with liver failure. Male sex, hepatorenal syndrome, antibiotic use, and steroid exposure were independent risk factors for IPA. When patients with liver failure have these risk factors and symptoms of pneumonia such as cough or hemoptysis, clinicians should be cautious about the possibility of IPA.

  2. Predictive Factors of Anxiety and Depression in Patients with Acute Coronary Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altino, Denise Meira; Nogueira-Martins, Luiz Antônio; de Barros, Alba Lucia Bottura Leite; Lopes, Juliana de Lima

    2017-12-01

    To identify the predictive factors of anxiety and depression in patients with acute coronary syndrome. Cross-sectional and retrospective study conducted with 120 patients hospitalized with acute coronary syndrome. Factors interfering with anxiety and depression were assessed. Anxiety was related to sex, stress, years of education, and depression, while depression was related to sex, diabetes mellitus, obesity, years of education, and trait-anxiety. Obesity and anxiety were considered predictive factors for depression, while depression and fewer years of education were considered predictive factors for anxiety. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Human factors and systems engineering approach to patient safety for radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, A Joy; Karsh, Ben-Tzion

    2008-01-01

    The traditional approach to solving patient safety problems in healthcare is to blame the last person to touch the patient. But since the publication of To Err is Human, the call has been instead to use human factors and systems engineering methods and principles to solve patient safety problems. However, an understanding of the human factors and systems engineering is lacking, and confusion remains about what it means to apply their principles. This paper provides a primer on them and their applications to patient safety.

  4. Comparison of cardiovascular risk factors in maintenance hemodialysis patients based on phase angle of bioimpedance analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzasti, R. A.; Lubis, H. R.

    2018-03-01

    Mortality and morbidity rate, especially from cardiovascular disease in hemodialysis patients in Indonesia is still quite high. One of indicator to assess the predictive value of mortality is the phase angle (PhA) of bioimpedance analysis (BIA) scan examination. Determining the comparison of BMI and laboratory data as cardiovascular risk factors in hemodialysis patients based on PhA.A cross-sectional analytical study was done on 155 outpatientsin RasyidaRenal Hospital, Medan in 2016. Patients were two groups, namely PhAcardiovascular risk factors of hemodialysis patients were determined by age, BMI, and hemoglobin.

  5. Human Factors and Systems Engineering Approach to Patient Safety for Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivera, A. Joy; Karsh, Ben-Tzion

    2008-01-01

    The traditional approach to solving patient safety problems in healthcare is to blame the last person to touch the patient. But since the publication of To Err is Human, the call has been instead to use human factors and systems engineering methods and principles to solve patient safety problems. However, an understanding of the human factors and systems engineering is lacking, and confusion remains about what it means to apply their principles. This paper provides a primer on them and their applications to patient safety

  6. Cardiovascular disease and risk factors in patients with psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tobin, Anne-Marie

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVE: Patients with psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis (PsA) have an increased incidence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and cardiovascular risk factors such as smoking, hypertension, and metabolic syndrome compared to the normal population. Patients with psoriasis and PsA may also have increased risk from nonconventional risk factors such as raised levels of homocysteine and excessive alcohol consumption. We conducted a comprehensive review of the literature on CVD and all cardiovascular risk factors in patients with psoriasis and PsA. METHODS: Data sources: All studies identified from a Medline (www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov) search pertaining to CVD, individual risk factors in psoriasis, and PsA were included. Study selection: Studies included a healthy reference population, were published between 1975 and 2009, and were written in English. RESULTS: Our search yielded 14 studies that documented rates of CVD in patients with psoriasis and PsA compared to controls. Substantial evidence points to elevated risk of CVD in patients with psoriasis and PsA. CONCLUSION: It remains difficult to conclude if risk factors are caused by psoriasis or share a common pathogenesis. Physicians treating patients with psoriasis and PsA must be aware of all potential cardiovascular risk factors in their patients.

  7. Medication Adherence and its Related Factors in Patients with Type II Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behzad Gholamaliei

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Low levels of medication adherence in patients with type 2 diabetes is one of the greatest challenges in the treatment and control of diabetes. This study was designed to determine medication adherence and its related factors in patients with type II diabetes. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, a total of 300patients with type 2diabetes records in the health centers of Tuyserkan city were randomly selected in 2015. Data collection instrument was a self-made questionnaire, which consisted of factors related to the medication adherence. Questionnaires were completed after confirmation of validity and reliability, by interviews. To analyze the data, descriptive and inferential statistics (T-test, AnOVA, Simple and multiple linear regression were applied, using SPSS software, version 19. Results: Overall, %26.3 of patients were male and %73.7 were female. Also, %65 of patients were illiterate, %24 had some degree of symptoms, and %59.4 had poor medication adherence. There was a significant relationship between age, education, patient care and treatment expenditure, health care team and health system, therapy-related factors and condition-related factors, beliefs about illness, efficacy, and concerns about drugs and medication adherence (P < 0.05. Conclusions: This study showed that medication adherence in patients with diabetes was not suitable and individual, economical and social factors were influential.Therefore, the role of these factors must be considered when designing intervention programs.

  8. Patient safety in the operating room: an intervention study on latent risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Beuzekom Martie

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patient safety is one of the greatest challenges in healthcare. In the operating room errors are frequent and often consequential. This article describes an approach to a successful implementation of a patient safety program in the operating room, focussing on latent risk factors that influence patient safety. We performed an intervention to improve these latent risk factors (LRFs and increase awareness of patient safety issues amongst OR staff. Methods Latent risk factors were studied using a validated questionnaire applied to the OR staff before and after an intervention. A pre-test/post-test control group design with repeated measures was used to evaluate the effects of the interventions. The staff from one operating room of an university hospital acted as the intervention group. Controls consisted of the staff of the operating room in another university hospital. The outcomes were the changes in LRF scores, perceived incident rate, and changes in incident reports between pre- and post-intervention. Results Based on pre-test scores and participants’ key concerns about organizational factors affecting patient safety in their department the intervention focused on the following LRFs: Material Resources, Training and Staffing Recourses. After the intervention, the intervention operating room - compared to the control operating room - reported significantly fewer problems on Material Resources and Staffing Resources and a significantly lower score on perceived incident rate. The contribution of technical factors to incident causation decreased significantly in the intervention group after the intervention. Conclusion The change of state of latent risk factors can be measured using a patient safety questionnaire aimed at these factors. The change of the relevant risk factors (Material and Staffing resources concurred with a decrease in perceived and reported incident rates in the relevant categories. We conclude that

  9. Peplau's Theory of Interpersonal Relations: An Alternate Factor Structure for Patient Experience Data?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagerty, Thomas A; Samuels, William; Norcini-Pala, Andrea; Gigliotti, Eileen

    2017-04-01

    A confirmatory factor analysis of data from the responses of 12,436 patients to 16 items on the Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems-Hospital survey was used to test a latent factor structure based on Peplau's middle-range theory of interpersonal relations. A two-factor model based on Peplau's theory fit these data well, whereas a three-factor model also based on Peplau's theory fit them excellently and provided a suitable alternate factor structure for the data. Though neither the two- nor three-factor model fit as well as the original factor structure, these results support using Peplau's theory to demonstrate nursing's extensive contribution to the experiences of hospitalized patients.

  10. An examination of the psychosocial factors influencing colorectal cancer patients' communication of colorectal cancer patient risk with their siblings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawsin, Catalina; Duhamel, Katherine; Itzkowitz, Steven; Brown, Karen; Lim, Helen; Jandorf, Lina

    2009-11-01

    This study examined psychosocial factors influencing colorectal cancer (CRC) patients' communication with their first-degree relatives regarding their CRC risk. Among a sample of CRC patients who were members of a colon registry in New York (n = 127), 60% reported discussing CRC risk with their siblings. These discussions were related to the CRC patients' age of diagnosis, such that those diagnosed before age 45 years were more likely to communicate with their siblings about CRC risk. Despite advances made in CRC prevention, compliance with screening recommendations among individuals who may be at familial risk for the disease is low. Perhaps this underrepresentation reflects how CRC patients communicate with their first-degree relatives about their potential risk for the disease. This study examined the psychosocial factors influencing whether CRC patients communicate with their siblings about CRC risk. The sample included CRC patients with siblings who enrolled in a colon disease registry at a NYC metropolitan hospital. Participants completed questionnaires regarding their current psychosocial functioning, perceived risk of sibling's development of CRC, and communication of CRC risk with their siblings. Patients were predominantly Caucasian, with a mean age of 60.4 years. Of the 127 patients, 60% engaged in discussions with their siblings regarding their CRC risk. Patients diagnosed with CRC before the age of 45 years were more likely to discuss the risk of CRC with their siblings (P siblings.

  11. Associations of oxidative stress status parameters with traditional cardiovascular disease risk factors in patients with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidović, Bojana; Stefanović, Aleksandra; Milovanović, Srđan; Ðorđević, Brižita; Kotur-Stevuljević, Jelena; Ivanišević, Jasmina; Miljković, Milica; Spasić, Slavica

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess oxidative stress status parameters and their possible associations with traditional cardiovascular risk factors in patients with schizophrenia, as well as their potential for patient-control discrimination. Fasting glucose, lipid profile and oxidative stress status parameters were assessed in 30 schizophrenic patients with atypical antipsychotic therapy and 60 control subjects. Malondialdehyde (MDA), pro-oxidant/antioxidant balance (PAB) and total anti-oxidant status (TAS) were significantly higher whereas total sulfhydryl (SH) groups were significantly lower in schizophrenic patients vs. control group. Higher serum PAB values showed an independent association with schizophrenia. The addition of PAB to conventional risk factors improved discrimination between healthy control subjects and patients. Increased oxidative stress and changed lipid profile parameters are associated in schizophrenic patients and may indicate risk for atherosclerosis. The serum PAB level may reflect the levels of oxidative stress in schizophrenia and improve discrimination of patients from controls.

  12. Nutritional status and related factors of patients with advanced gastrointestinal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liyan; Lu, Yuhan; Fang, Yu

    2014-04-14

    The scored Patient-Generated Subjective Global Assessment (PG-SGA) is considered to be the most appropriate tool for detecting malnutrition in cancer patients. In particular, malignant tumours derived from the gastrointestinal tract may impair nutrient intake and absorption and cause malnutrition. We carried out a cross-sectional study to assess the nutritional status and related factors of patients with gastrointestinal cancer. Nutritional status was determined using the scored PG-SGA in patients (n 498) with advanced gastrointestinal cancer admitted to the Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology Unit at Beijing Cancer Hospital between 1 August 2012 and 28 February 2013. The possible related factors including age, sex, hospitalisation frequency and pathology were explored. We found that 98% of the patients required nutrition intervention and 54% of the patients required improved nutrition-related symptom management and/or urgent nutritional support (PG-SGA score ≥9). Factors related to malnutrition were age (r 0.103, Pcancer had a lower risk of malnutrition than patients with other types of gastrointestinal cancer (F=35.895, Pnutritional status of gastrointestinal patients, especially those at a higher risk of malnutrition, such as elderly patients, those hospitalised for the first time, male patients and those with other types of gastrointestinal cancer except rectal cancer. The nutritional status of these patients should be evaluated and they should be given proper nutrition education and nutritional support in a timely manner.

  13. Isotypic analysis of antibodies against activated Factor VII in patients with Factor VII deficiency using the x-MAP technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, Caroline; Mathieu-Dupas, Eve; Logghe, Pauline; Lissalde-Lavigne, Géraldine; Balicchi, Julien; Caliskan, Umran; Valentin, Thomas; Laune, Daniel; Molina, Franck; Schved, Jean François; Giansily-Blaizot, Muriel

    2016-05-01

    While the immune response to hemophilic factors in hemophilia has been widely studied, little is known about the development of anti-Factor VII (FVII) antibodies in FVII deficiency. We developed a robust technique based on the x-MAP technology to detect the presence of antibodies against FVII and characterize their isotype and validated this method using blood samples from 100 patients with FVII deficiency (median FVII clotting activity [FVII:C]: 6%) and 95 healthy controls. Anti-FVII antibodies were detected in patients but also in some controls, although the concentration of total immunoglobulin G (IgGt) and IgG1 and IgG4 subclasses was significantly different between groups. The IgG1 subclass concentrations remained significantly different also when only untreated patients were compared with controls. This difference could partially be related to the F7 genotype, particularly in patients harboring the p.Arg139Gln mutation. This x-MAP-based method might be useful for assessing the immunogenicity of novel FVII compounds and of activated FVII (FVIIa) concentrates. Further prospective studies are needed to better understand the clinical relevance of these antibodies in the management of patients with FVII deficiency. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Electronic prescription as contributing factor for hospitalized patients' safety.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gimenes FRE

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available The following study was performed to identify factors related to medication errors in the computerized physician order entry and their advantages and disadvantages according to doctors, nursing team and administrative officers. It is a survey descriptive study carried out at three units of a Brazilian academic hospital in the southeast area. The study was divided in two phases. In the first phase, we analyzed a total of 1,349 prescriptions from general medical unit, surgical and orthopaedic wards during 30 days consecutively. A semi-structured instrument, elaborated by a group of researchers for the study proposals, was used. In the second phase, a semi-structured questionnaire was applied to the health professionals containing closed and open items approaching their opinion about the composition of electronic prescription, the advantages and disadvantages of them, and their suggestions for its improvement. Out of 1,349 prescriptions observed, 17.5% presented deletions, 25.0% medicines written manually and 17.0% of them were incomplete. Some of the advantages pointed by health professionals were its legibility (37.5%, little time spent when elaborating and emitting them (20.5% and the way they are a practical and organized (8%. The disadvantages pointed were repetition of previous prescriptions (34%, typing mistakes (17%, dependence on computers (11% and alterations made manually (7%. We conclude, this way, that the computerized prescription order entry represents a great progress among the strategies used to minimize medication errors caused by prescriptions badly formulated. However, it doesn't eradicate the possibility of medication error occurrences, needing some system modifications.

  15. FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH ODONTOGENIC BACTERAEMIA IN ORTHODONTIC PATIENTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umeh, O D; Sanu, O O; Utomi, I L; Nwaokorie, F O

    2016-01-01

    Various researches have investigated factors associated with the prevalence and intensity of bacteraemia following oral procedures including orthodontic procedures. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of age, gender, plaque and gingival indices on the occurrence of odontogenic bacteraemia following orthodontic treatment procedures. Orthodontic Clinic, Lagos University Teaching Hospital (LUTH), Lagos , Nigeria. Using the consecutive, convenience sampling method, a total of 100 subjects who met the inclusion criteria were recruited for the study and peripheral blood was collected before and again within 2 minutes of completion of orthodontic procedures for microbiologic analysis using the BACTEC automated blood culture system and the lysis filtration methods of blood culturing. The subjects were randomly placed in one of four orthodontic procedures investigated: alginate impression making (Group I), separator placement (Group II), band cementation (Group III) and arch wire change (Group IV). Plaque and gingival indices were assessed using the plaque component of the Simplified Oral Hygiene Index (OHI-S) (Greene & Vermillion) and Modified gingival index (Lobene) respectively before blood collection. Spearman Point bi-serial correlations and logistic regression statistics were used for statistical evaluations at p orthodontic treatment procedures of 16% and 28% were observed respectively using the BACTEC and lysis filtration methods. A statistically significant increase in the prevalence of bateraemia was observed following separator placement (p=0.016). An increase in age, plaque index scores and modified gingival index scores of the subjects were found to be associated with an increase in the prevalence of bacteraemia following orthodontic treatment procedures, with plaque index score showing the strongest correlation. Separator placement was found to induce significantly highest level of bacteraemia. Meticulous oral hygiene practice and the use of 0

  16. Factors that enable nurse-patient communication in a family planning context: a positive deviance study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Mi; Heerey, Michelle; Kols, Adrienne

    2008-10-01

    Family planning programmes in developing countries need a better understanding of nurse-patient communication in order to improve the quality of counselling. To identify factors in the clinic and in the community that enable nurses and patients to communicate effectively with one another. The study explored the personal experiences of nurses and patients who communicate especially effectively during family planning consultations (so-called "positive deviants"). Sixty-four randomly selected public clinics located in East Java, Indonesia. Seven positive deviant nurses and 32 positive deviant patients were identified from among 64 nurses and 768 patients who participated in an earlier patient coaching study. Flooding prevented 5 patients from participating in the study, reducing their number to 27. Investigators conducted: (1) a content analysis of qualitative data collected by structured in-depth interviews and focus-group discussions (FGDs) with positive deviant nurses and patients, and (2) analyses of variance (ANOVA) of quantitative data on clinic, nurse, and patient characteristics. Positive deviant nurses identified four factors, listed in rough order of importance, that helped them communicate effectively: independent study to strengthen their knowledge and skills; communication aids; feedback from colleagues; and motivation stemming from a desire to help people, patients' appreciation, husband's support, and increased income. Positive deviant patients identified five enabling factors: motivation due to their need for a service; confidence in their own communication skills; positive feedback from nurses; belief in patients' right and responsibility to communicate with nurses; and communication aids. Insights from positive deviant nurses and patients suggest that efforts to improve nurse-patient communication should go beyond conventional communication skills training. Managers should consider a mix of clinic-based interventions (such as peer feedback

  17. Continuous infusion of recombinant activated factor VII for bleeding control after lobectomy in a patient with inherited factor VII deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyata, Naoko; Isaka, Mitsuhiro; Kojima, Hideaki; Maniwa, Tomohiro; Takahashi, Shoji; Takamiya, Osamu; Ohde, Yasuhisa

    2016-03-01

    Inherited factor VII (FVII) deficiency is a rare recessive inherited coagulation disorder with limited available information, especially in patients undergoing major thoracic surgery. In addition, an optimal management strategy for the disease has not been defined. We herein report a case involving a 61-year-old man with asymptomatic FVII deficiency who underwent a right middle and lower lobectomy to treat lung cancer. To the best of our knowledge, the present report is the first to describe the use of recombinant activated FVII continuous infusion for bleeding control after a major thoracic surgery in a patient with inherited FVII deficiency.

  18. Risk factors for violence among long-term psychiatric in-patients: a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Previous research has linked aggressive behaviour to certain genetic conditions ... defects – such as impaired social information processing, socio-. Risk factors for ... The complex influence of diagnosis on psychiatric patients' risk of violence ...

  19. THE FACTORS AFFECTING SATISFACTION LEVELS IN HOSPITALIZED PATIENTS: AN APPLICATION IN PUBLIC HOSPITAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neşe ACAR

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to determine the factors that affect the level of satisfaction of services provided by public hospitals. Patients' satisfaction levels were measured by interviewing 156 patients in a public hospital. Factor analysis of the data obtained from the research resulted in five factors called nurses 'behaviors, physical conditions, doctors' behavior, technical staff behaviors, food and beverage. MANOVA analysis was conducted to determine the differences in the perception of factors with respect to the demographic characteristics of the patients and differences were found in terms of profession. It has been seen that it is important that public hospitals have specialist doctors and modern equipment and that they have qualities such as the quality of the health personnel in preferring patients to public hospitals.

  20. Participation restrictions in ambulatory amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients: Physical and psychological factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Groenestijn, Annerieke C; Schröder, Carin D; Kruitwagen-Van Reenen, Esther T; Van Den Berg, Leonard H; Visser-Meily, Johanna M A

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of participation restrictions in ambulatory patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and to identify physical and psychological contributory factors. In this cross-sectional study, self-reported participation restrictions of 72 ambulatory ALS patients were assessed using the social health status dimension (SIPSOC) of the Sickness Impact Profile (SIP-68). Associations between SIPSOC and physical functioning, psychological factors, and demographic factors were analyzed using hierarchical regression analyses. Ninety-two percent of the patients reported participation restrictions; 54.9% could be explained by physical functioning; psychological factors accounted for 8.1% of the variance. Lung capacity, functional mobility, fatigue, and helplessness were independently associated with participation restrictions. Ambulatory ALS patients have participation restrictions, which may be influenced if early ALS care is directed toward lung capacity, functional mobility, fatigue, and feelings of helplessness. Muscle Nerve 56: 912-918, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. The contribution of classical risk factors to cardiovascular disease in familial hypercholesterolaemia: data in 2400 patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, A. C. M.; van Aalst-Cohen, E. S.; Tanck, M. W.; Trip, M. D.; Lansberg, P. J.; Liem, A. H.; van Lennep, H. W. O. Roeters; Sijbrands, E. J. G.; Kastelein, J. J. P.

    2004-01-01

    Objective. To determine the contribution of classical risk factors to the development of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in patients with heterozygous familial hypercholesterolaemia (FH). Design. A retrospective, multi-centre, cohort study. Extensive data were collected by scrutinizing medical records

  2. Insight of patients and their parents into schizophrenia: Exploring agreement and the influence of parental factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macgregor, Alexandra; Norton, Joanna; Bortolon, Catherine; Robichon, Melissa; Rolland, Camille; Boulenger, Jean-Philippe; Raffard, Stéphane; Capdevielle, Delphine

    2015-08-30

    Poor insight is found in up to 80% of schizophrenia patients and has been associated with multiple factors of which cognitive functioning, social and environmental factors. Few studies have explored associations between patient insight and that of their biological parents', and the influence of parental factors. Insight was assessed in 41 patients and their biological parents with Amador's Scale for the assessment of Unawareness of Mental Disorder (SUMD). Parents' knowledge about schizophrenia and critical attitudes were assessed with validated self-report questionnaires. Both groups underwent cognitive assessments for working memory and executive functioning. Insight in patients and their parents was not associated for any of the SUMD dimensions but a significant correlation was found between patient and parent awareness of treatment effect for patient-parent dyads with frequent daily contact. Low parental critical attitude was associated with higher patient awareness of symptoms and a high parental memory task score with high patient insight. Our study is the first to suggest a possible influence of parental factors such as critical attitudes and cognitive performance on patient insight. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Factors associated with Salmonella shedding among equine colic patients at a veterinary teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, L M; Morley, P S; Traub-Dargatz, J L; Salman, M D; Gentry-Weeks, C

    2001-03-01

    To evaluate factors potentially associated with fecal Salmonella shedding among equine patients hospitalized for colic at a veterinary teaching hospital and to determine the effects of probiotic treatment on fecal Salmonella shedding and clinical signs. Longitudinal study and controlled trial. 246 equine colic patients. History and medical information were obtained from patient records. Fecal and environmental samples were submitted for aerobic bacterial culture for Salmonella enterica. Fifty-one patients were treated with a commercially available probiotic; 46 were treated with a placebo. Logistic regression was used to evaluate data. Salmonella organisms were detected in feces from 23 (9%) patients at least once during hospitalization. Patients were more likely to shed Salmonella organisms if diarrhea was evident equine patients hospitalized at a veterinary teaching hospital because of colic and that pathogen monitoring in patients and the hospital environment and use of barrier nursing precautions for equine colic patients are beneficial.

  4. Prognostic factors of male patients with acute coronary syndrome after percutaneous coronary intervention therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Peng; Zhang Gaofeng; Wu Xusheng; Qiao Qi; Yu Liqun

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To study the prognostic risk factors of male patients with coronary heart disease in stent placement era. Methods: One hundred and four patients were enrolled in this study (aged 64.9 ± 9.6 years) including 61 diagnosed as acute myocardial infarction, and 43 as unstable angina with followed up 11.9 ± 8.7 months. All factors including demographic factors, non-interventional work-up, associated clinical complications and results of coronary artery angiography reached a model of Logistic regression analysis. Results: Based on MACE (major adverse cardiac events), as quantitative factors, diseased proximal middle left anterior descending artery was a significant independent variable (P<0.05), and its coefficient was 22.00. Conclusions: Diseased proximal middle left anterior descending coronary artery is the prognostic factor of MACE in male patients with acute coronary syndrome. (authors)

  5. Correlation between Nerve Growth Factor (NGF with Brain Derived Neurotropic Factor (BDNF in Ischemic Stroke Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joko Widodo

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: The neurotrophins nerve growth factor (NGF and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF is a family of polypeptides that play critical role during neuronal development, appear to mediate protective role on neurorepair in ischemic stroke. Naturally in adult brain neurorepair process consist of: angiogenesis, neurogenesis, and neuronal plasticity, it can also be stimulated by endogenous neurorepair. In this study we observed correlation between NGF and BDNF ischemic stroke patient’s onset: 7-30 and over 30 days. Methods: This is cross sectional study on 46 subjects aged 38 – 74 years old with ischemic stroke from The Indonesian Central Hospital of Army Gatot Subroto Jakarta. Diagnosis of ischemic stroke was made using clinical examination and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI by neurologist. Subjects were divided into 2 groups based on stroke onset: 7 – 30 days (Group A: 19 subjects and > 30 days (Group B: 27 Subjects. Serum NGF levels were measured with ELISA method and BDNF levels were measured using multiplex method with Luminex Magpix. Results: Levels of NGF and BDNF were significantly different between onset group A and B (NGF p= 0.022, and BDNF p=0.008, with mean levels NGF in group A higher than group B, indicating that BDNF levels is lower in group A than group B. There was no significant correlation between NGF and BDNF levels in all groups. Conclusion: The variations in neurotrophic factor levels reflect an endogenous attempt at neuroprotection against biochemical and molecular changes after ischemic stroke. NGF represents an early marker of brain injury while BDNF recovery is most prominent during the first 14 days after onsite but continuous for more than 30 days. There is no significant correlation between NGF and BDNF in each group.  

  6. Audiology patient fall statistics and risk factors compared to non-audiology patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criter, Robin E; Honaker, Julie A

    2016-10-01

    To compare fall statistics (e.g. incidence, prevalence), fall risks, and characteristics of patients who seek hearing healthcare from an audiologist to individuals who have not sought such services. Case-control study. Two groups of community-dwelling older adult patients: 25 audiology patients aged 60 years or older (M age: 69.2 years, SD: 4.5, range: 61-77) and a control group (gender- and age-matched ±2 years) of 25 non-audiology patients (M age: 69.6, SD: 4.7, range: 60-77). Annual incidence of falls (most recent 12 months) was higher in audiology patients (68.0%) than non-audiology patients (28.0%; p = .005). Audiology patients reported a higher incidence of multiple recent falls (p =.025) and more chronic health conditions (p = .028) than non-audiology patients. Significantly more audiology patients fall on an annual basis than non-audiology patients, suggesting that falls are a pervasive issue in general hearing clinics. Further action on the part of healthcare professionals providing audiologic services may be necessary to identify individuals at risk for falling.

  7. The effect of sildenafil citrate (Viagra) on cerebral blood flow in patients with cerebrovascular risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorberboym, M; Mena, I; Wainstein, J; Boaz, M; Lampl, Y

    2010-06-01

    Sildenafil citrate is widely used for erectile dysfunction. The present study examined the short-term effects of sildenafil administration in individuals with cerebrovascular risk factors, including patients with a history of stroke. Twenty-five consecutive male patients with erectile dysfunction and vascular risk factors were included in the study. A perfusion brain SPECT study was performed at baseline and 1 h after the oral administration of sildenafil. Associations between any of the risk factors and the perfusion scores were not detected, with the exception of stroke. Stroke patients showed significantly more areas with diminished perfusion after sildenafil administration compared to baseline. In patients with diabetes or hypertension, a dose of 50 mg sildenafil does not appear to produce detrimental effects on cerebral blood flow. However, patients with a history of stroke may be at increased risk of hemodynamic impairment after the use of sildenafil.

  8. Predictive factors for moderate or severe exacerbations in asthma patients receiving outpatient care

    OpenAIRE

    Guti?rrez, Francisco Javier ?lvarez; Galv?n, Marta Ferrer; Gallardo, Juan Francisco Medina; Mancera, Marta Barrera; Romero, Beatriz Romero; Falc?n, Auxiliadora Romero

    2017-01-01

    Background Asthma exacerbations are important events that affect disease control, but predictive factors for severe or moderate exacerbations are not known. The objective was to study the predictive factors for moderate (ME) and severe (SE) exacerbations in asthma patients receiving outpatient care. Methods Patients aged?>?12?years with asthma were included in the study and followed-up at 4-monthly intervals over a 12-month period. Clinical (severity, level of control, asthma control test [AC...

  9. Brain metastases in lung cancer. Impact of prognostic factors on patient survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smrdel, U.; Zwitter, M.; Kovac, V.

    2003-01-01

    Background. Brain metastases are common patterns of dissemination in lung cancer patients. In this paper we would like to assess the pattern of brain metastases in lung cancer patients and the impact of prognostic factors on the survival of lung cancer patients with brain metastases. Patients and methods. In the year 1998 there were 974 registered patients with lung cancer in Slovenia, six hundred and fifteen of them were treated at the Institute of Oncology Ljubljana and we analyzed them. Among 615 patients 137 (22.3 %) of them have had brain metastases during a natural course of disease. Results. For 12 patients presenting with solitary brain metastases (most of them were undertaken metastasectomy) median survival was 7.6 months, while in patients with multiple brain metastases the median survival was 2.8 months (p 0.0018). Of the 137 patients 45 (32.8 %) were small cell lung cancer patients, 43 (31.4 %) were adenocarcinoma patients and 19 (13.9 %) were squamous cell carcinoma patients. Patients with performance status (WHO scale) less than 2 had the median survival time 3.7 months while patients with performance status 2 or more had median survival time 2.7 moths (p=0.0448). Conclusions. Patients with solitary brain metastases had better survival comparing with those who had multiple metastases. It is surprisingly that the portion of brain metastases patients with adenocarcinoma is almost equal to those with small-call lung cancer therefore, the prophylactic cranial radiation becomes actual for both groups of patients. The performance status of patients with brain metastases remains very important prognostic factor. (author)

  10. Safety and tolerability of iobitridol in general and in patients with risk factors: Results in more than 160 000 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maurer, Martin, E-mail: martin.maurer@charite.de [Charite - University Medicine Berlin, Department of Radiology, Augustenburger Platz 1, 13353 Berlin (Germany); Heine, Oliver [Guerbet GmbH, Otto-Vogler-Str. 11, 65843 Sulzbach (Germany); Wolf, Michael [Michael Wolf Information Systems, Viktoriastr. 26, 66346 Puettlingen (Germany); Freyhardt, Patrick; Schnapauff, Dirk; Hamm, Bernd [Charite - University Medicine Berlin, Department of Radiology, Augustenburger Platz 1, 13353 Berlin (Germany)

    2011-11-15

    Objective: To review the safety, the tolerability and the diagnostic effectiveness of iobitridol under daily practice conditions in the general population and at-risk patients in a post-marketing surveillance study. Materials and methods: A total of 160 639 patients (55.1% male, 43.6% female, mean age 58.6 years) were analysed in 555 centers. Patients underwent X-ray examinations using iobitridol (Xenetix, Guerbet, Sulzbach, Germany) as IV contrast medium (mean volume 85.6 ml). 21.8% of all patients had at least one risk factor (e.g., renal impairment), 7.3% were at-risk patients with allergies or who had previously reacted to contrast medium. Antiallergic pretreatment before contrast medium administration was given in 1144 patients (0.7%). Adverse events were documented and the image quality was assessed. Results: A diagnosis was possible in 99.5% of all cases. The image quality was rated good or excellent in 92.2%. The adverse event rate (e.g., nausea, urticaria) observed was 0.6% in all patients, 1.6% in patients with allergies and 6.0% in patients with a previous reaction to contrast medium. Adverse events occurred more often in women than in men (p < 0.001). Pretreatment did not decrease the rate of adverse events. The rate of adverse events was not increased in higher doses of iobitridol, even if administered to high-risk patients. Conclusions: Iobitridol was shown to be a safe and well-tolerated contrast medium with a low incidence of adverse events in patients with and without risk factors resulting in a good or excellent image quality in most patients.

  11. Spider angiomas in patients with liver cirrhosis: Role of vascular endothelial growth factor and basic fibroblast growth factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chung-Pin; Lee, Fa-Yauh; Hwang, Shinn-Jang; Lu, Rei-Hwa; Lee, Wei-Ping; Chao, Yee; Wang, Sung-Sang; Chang, Full-Young; Whang-Peng, Jacqueline; Lee, Shou-Dong

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and basic fibroblastic growth factor (bFGF) are associated with spider angiomas in patients with liver cirrhosis. METHODS: Eighty-six patients with liver cirrhosis were enrolled and the number and size of the spider angiomas were recorded. Fifty-three healthy subjects were selected as controls. Plasma levels of VEGF and bFGF were measured in both the cirrhotics and the controls. RESULTS: Plasma VEGF and bFGF were increased in cirrhotics compared with controls (122 ± 13 vs. 71 ± 11 pg/mL, P = 0.003 for VEGF; 5.1 ± 0.5 vs. 3.4 ± 0.5 pg/mL, P = 0.022 for bFGF). In cirrhotics, plasma VEGF and bFGF were also higher in patients with spider angiomas compared with patients without spider angiomas (185 ± 28 vs. 90 ± 10 pg/mL, P = 0.003 for VEGF; 6.8 ± 1.0 vs. 4.1 ± 0.5 pg/mL, P = 0.017 for bFGF). Multivariate logistic regression showed that young age and increased plasma levels of VEGF and bFGF were the most significant predictors for the presence of spider angiomas in cirrhotic patients (odds ratio [OR] = 6.64, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.02-21.79, P = 0.002; OR = 4.35, 95%CI = 1.35-14.01, P = 0.014; OR = 5.66, 95%CI = 1.72-18.63, P = 0.004, respectively). CONCLUSION: Plasma VEGF and bFGF are elevated in patients with liver cirrhosis. Age as well as plasma levels of VEGF and bFGF are significant predictors for spider angiomas in cirrhotic patients. PMID:14669345

  12. Risk factors associated with early reintubation in trauma patients: a prospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Carlos V R; Daigle, Jacob B; Foulkrod, Kelli H; Brouillette, Brandee; Clark, Adam; Czysz, Clea; Martinez, Marnie; Cooper, Hassie

    2011-07-01

    After mechanical ventilation, extubation failure is associated with poor outcomes and prolonged hospital and intensive care unit (ICU) stays. We hypothesize that specific and unique risk factors exist for failed extubation in trauma patients. The purpose of this study was to identify the risk factors in trauma patients. We performed an 18-month (January 2008-June 2009) prospective, cohort study of all adult (8 years or older) trauma patients admitted to the ICU who required mechanical ventilation. Failure of extubation was defined as reintubation within 24 hours of extubation. Patients who failed extubation (failed group) were compared with those who were successfully extubated (successful group) to identify independent risk factors for failed extubation. A total of 276 patients were 38 years old, 76% male, 84% sustained blunt trauma, with an mean Injury Severity Score = 21, Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score = 7, and systolic blood pressure = 125 mm Hg. Indications for initial intubation included airway (4%), breathing (13%), circulation (2%), and neurologic disability (81%). A total of 17 patients (6%) failed extubation and failures occurred a mean of 15 hours after extubation. Independent risk factors to fail extubation included spine fracture, airway intubation, GCS at extubation, and delirium tremens. Patients who failed extubation spent more days in the ICU (11 vs. 6, p = 0.006) and hospital (19 vs. 11, p = 0.002). Mortality was 6% (n = 1) in the failed group and 0.4% (n = 1) in the successful extubation group. Independent risk factors for trauma patients to fail extubation include spine fracture, initial intubation for airway, GCS at extubation, and delirium tremens. Trauma patients with these four risk factors should be observed for 24 hours after extubation, because the mean time to failure was 15 hours. In addition, increased complications, extended need for mechanical ventilation, and prolonged ICU and hospital stays should be expected for trauma patients

  13. Risk factors and outcome in patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis with persistent biliary candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupp, Christian; Bode, Konrad Alexander; Chahoud, Fadi; Wannhoff, Andreas; Friedrich, Kilian; Weiss, Karl-Heinz; Sauer, Peter; Stremmel, Wolfgang; Gotthardt, Daniel Nils

    2014-10-23

    Candidiasis is commonly observed in patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC), but the clinical risk factors associated with its presence have not been fully investigated. In this study, we aimed to analyse the incidence, risk factors, and transplantation-free survival in primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) patients with persistent biliary candidiasis. We retrospectively analysed patients diagnosed with PSC who were admitted to our department during 2002 to 2012. One-hundred fifty patients whose bile cultures were tested for fungal species were selected, and their clinical and laboratory parameters were investigated. The results of endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERC) and bile cultures were analysed using chart reviews. The cases of biliary candidiasis were sub-classified as transient or persistent. Thirty out of 150 (20.0%) patients had biliary candidiasis. Although all patients demonstrated comparable baseline characteristics, those with biliary candidiasis showed significantly reduced transplantation-free survival (p candidiasis. A subgroup analysis showed reduced survival with a greater necessity for orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) only in patients with persistence of Candida (p = 0.007). The survival in the patients with transient biliary candidiasis was comparable to that in candidiasis-free patients. In a multivariate regression analysis that included Mayo risk score (MRS), sex, age, dominant stenosis, inflammatory bowel disease, autoimmune hepatitis overlap syndrome, and number of times ERC was performed, biliary candidiasis was an independent risk factor for reduced survival (p = 0.008). Risk factors associated with acquisition of biliary candidiasis were age at PSC diagnosis and number of ERCs. The persistence of biliary candidiasis is associated with markedly reduced transplantation-free survival in PSC patients. By contrast, actuarial survival in patients with transient biliary candidiasis approaches that for patients without any

  14. Risk factors for reinsertion of urinary catheter after early removal in thoracic surgical patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, John; Geraci, Travis; Milman, Steven; Maslow, Andrew; Jones, Richard N; Ng, Thomas

    2018-03-08

    To reduce the incidence of urinary tract infection, Surgical Care Improvement Project 9 mandates the removal of urinary catheters within 48 hours postoperatively. In patients with thoracic epidural anesthesia, we sought to determine the rate of catheter reinsertion, the complications of reinsertion, and the factors associated with reinsertion. We conducted a prospective observational study of consecutive patients undergoing major pulmonary or esophageal resection with thoracic epidural analgesia over a 2-year period. As per Surgical Care Improvement Project 9, all urinary catheters were removed within 48 hours postoperatively. Excluded were patients with chronic indwelling catheter, patients with urostomy, and patients requiring continued strict urine output monitoring. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to identify independent risk factors for urinary catheter reinsertion. Thirteen patients met exclusion criteria. Of the 275 patients evaluated, 60 (21.8%) required reinsertion of urinary catheter. There was no difference in the urinary tract infection rate between patients requiring reinsertion (1/60 [1.7%]) versus patients not requiring reinsertion (1/215 [0.5%], P = .389). Urethral trauma during reinsertion was seen in 1 of 60 patients (1.7%). After reinsertion, discharge with urinary catheter was required in 4 of 60 patients (6.7%). Multivariable logistic regression analysis found esophagectomy, lower body mass index, and benign prostatic hypertrophy to be independent risk factors associated with catheter reinsertion after early removal in the presence of thoracic epidural analgesia. When applying Surgical Care Improvement Project 9 to patients undergoing thoracic procedures with thoracic epidural analgesia, consideration to delayed removal of urinary catheter may be warranted in patients with multiple risk factors for reinsertion. Copyright © 2018 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Factors influencing the survival period in Japanese patients with sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, Yasushi; Akagi, Akio; Mimuro, Maya; Kitamoto, Tetsuyuki; Yoshida, Mari

    2015-10-15

    Although Japanese cases of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) generally involve longer survival periods compared to those from other countries, details regarding the factors influencing survival are unclear. To determine the influence of certain factors on survival, we retrospectively assessed 51 Japanese MM1-type sCJD patients with respect to background, clinical course, and disease management. No significant differences were found between men and women, tracheotomy and nontracheotomy patients, or patients treated in public and other types of hospitals. Although the survival period of tube-fed patients was significantly longer than that of patients who were not tube fed, survival of patients fed via a nasal tube did not differ significantly from that of gastrostomy-fed patients. The proportion of tube-fed patients was 68.6% (35/51). Disease duration was not significantly associated with age or year of onset. However, it was associated with time from onset to first recognition of myoclonus, first recognition of periodic sharp-wave complexes on electroencephalogram, and progression to the akinetic mutism state. Mechanical ventilation was not performed for any patient. Because the total disease duration increased in cases with a slowly progressive clinical course as a natural outcome, we concluded that the most crucial factor contributing to the prolonged survival of Japanese sCJD patients was tube feeding once the akinetic mutism state had been reached. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. [Risk factors for skin cancer development in patients after organ transplantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imko-Walczuk, Beata; Piesiaków, Maria Luiza; Okuniewska, Aleksandra; Jaśkiewicz, Janusz; Lizakowski, Sławomir; Dębska-Ślizień, Alicja; Rutkowski, Bolesław

    2012-11-13

    Cancer has become the second most common cause of death in patients after organ transplantation. Among all cancers arising de novo after transplantation skin cancers are the most common, accounting for 95% of all skin neoplasms. Due to the significantly higher morbidity, aggressive, rapid progression of cancer and unfavorable prognosis, the population requires a specific oncological approach. Therefore, special attention should be paid to factors predisposing to the development of cancer, including skin cancer, in patients after organ transplantation. Some of these factors are well understood, while the role of others is still ambiguous. Among the etiological factors mentioned are those that are associated with the recipient. These include genetic factors such as male sex, fair skin and inability to be tanned, and compatibility of the HLA system, and non genetic factors such as patient age, chronic skin ulcers and scars, the type of transplanted organ, immunosuppression, and particularly the type and cumulative doses of drugs. In addition, the pathogenesis of cancer is influenced by environmental factors such as exposure to sunlight and therefore latitude, ionizing radiation, chemical carcinogens and viral infections. Knowledge of etiological factors and mechanisms of etiopathogenesis allow for indication and observation of patients with increased risk of cancer as well as faster healing in these patients.  

  17. Totally implantable central venous access port infections in patients with digestive cancer: incidence and risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touré, Abdoulaye; Vanhems, Philippe; Lombard-Bohas, Catherine; Cassier, Philippe; Péré-Vergé, Denis; Souquet, Jean-Christophe; Ecochard, René; Chambrier, Cécile

    2012-12-01

    Central venous access port-related bloodstream infection (CVAP-BSI) is associated with morbidity and mortality in patients with cancer. This study examined the incidence rates and risk factors for CVAP-BSI in adult patients with digestive cancer. This prospective observational cohort study was performed from 2007 to 2011 in 2 oncology units of a university hospital. Incidence rate was expressed as number of CVAP-BSI per 1,000 catheter-days. A Cox regression model was used to identify risk factors for CVAP-BSI. A total of 315 patients were included. CVAP-BSI occurred in 41 patients (13.0%). The overall incidence rate was 0.76/1,000 catheter-days. The rate was higher in patients with esophageal cancer (1.28. P = .05) and pancreatic cancer (1.24; P = .007). Risk factors independently associated with CVAP-BSI were World Health Organization performance status between 2 and 4, catheter utilization-days in the previous month, pancreatic cancer, and parenteral nutrition. Coagulase-negative Staphylococci and enterobacteria were the main microorganisms isolated. In adult patients with digestive cancer, pancreatic cancer, cumulative catheter utilization-days, World Health Organization performance status, and parenteral nutrition were identified as independent risk factors for CVAP-BSI. Patients with any of these risk factors could be candidates for preventive strategies. Copyright © 2012 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Factors Affecting Patients' Preferences for and Actual Discussions About End-of-Life Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakhri, Shoaib; Engelberg, Ruth A; Downey, Lois; Nielsen, Elizabeth L; Paul, Sudiptho; Lahdya, Alexandria Z; Treece, Patsy D; Curtis, J Randall

    2016-09-01

    Discussions about end-of-life care are often difficult for patients and clinicians, and inadequate communication poses a barrier to patients receiving the care they desire. To understand factors that facilitate end-of-life care discussions that guide interventions to improve care. We examined baseline data from an ongoing randomized trial to evaluate associations between patients' self-reported desire for, and occurrence of, discussions about end-of-life care and factors influencing these discussions. Factors included emotional symptoms and barriers and facilitators to discussions. The sample included patients with serious illness (n = 473) and their primary or specialty care clinicians (n = 128). Regression analyses were adjusted for confounders and clustered patients under clinicians. Patients who endorsed each of three barriers to discussions were less likely to have had a discussion with their clinician (P-values ranging from communication about end-of-life care is associated with patient factors including communication barriers and facilitators and symptoms of depression and anxiety. Understanding these factors may facilitate design of effective communication interventions. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Assessment of the etiologic factors of gingival recession in a group of patients in northwest iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafzi, Ardeshir; Abolfazli, Nader; Eskandari, Amir

    2009-01-01

    Gingival recession (GR), a common problem in periodontium, is associated with various etiologic factors. There is controversy over the role and importance of these factors. The aim of this study was to evaluate the etiologic factors of GR in a group of subjects in Northwest Iran. In this case-control study, patients referring to a university clinic (123 patients with GR and 123 patients without GR) were evaluated. Patients were examined by an experienced periodontist. A checklist assessing the history of systemic disease, smoking, radiotherapy, orthodontic treatment, chemical and mechanical trauma, tooth-brushing method, type of occlusion, axial inclination of tooth, width and thickness of keratinized gingiva, presence of calculus, prosthesis, faulty restorations and food impaction, and frenum pull was completed for each patient. Chi-square test was used for data analysis. Presence of calculus was significantly associated with GR in the evaluated patients (P = 0.000). Low width and thickness of keratinized gingiva, smoking and traumatic tooth brushing were other significant factors (P teeth, existence of prosthesis, high frenal attachment, radiotherapy, systemic diseases and chemical trauma were not significantly associated with GR in the evaluated patients (P > 0.05). Supra- and sub-gingival calculus, inadequate width and thickness of keratinized tissue, and incorrect tooth brushing techniques are most important etiologic factors of GR. Oral hygiene instructions including correct tooth brushing techniques as well as scaling and root planing with periodic recalls can play a significant role in prevention of GR.

  20. Comparison of atherogenic risk factors among poorly controlled and well-controlled adolescent phenylketonuria patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gündüz, Mehmet; Çakar, Sevim; Kuyum, Pınar; Makay, Balahan; Arslan, Nur

    2016-06-01

    Previous studies investigating the known risk factors of atherosclerosis in phenylketonuria patients have shown conflicting results. The primary aim of our study was to investigate the serum atherogenic markers in adolescent classical phenylketonuria patients and compare these parameters with healthy peers. The secondary aim was to compare these atherogenic markers in well-controlled and poorly controlled patients. A total of 59 patients (median age: 12.6 years, range: 11-17 years) and 44 healthy controls (median age: 12.0 years, range: 11-15 years) were enrolled in our study. Phenylketonuria patients were divided into two groups: well-controlled (serum phenylalanine levels below 360 µmol/L; 24 patients) and poorly controlled patients (serum phenylalanine levels higher than 360 µmol/L). The mean high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels of well-controlled patients (1.0±0.2 mmol/L) were significantly lower compared with poorly controlled patients and controls (1.1±0.2 mmol/L, p=0.011 and 1.4±0.2 mmol/L, pphenylketonuria patients. In particular, these changes were more prominent in well-controlled patients. We conclude that phenylketonuria patients might be at risk for atherosclerosis, and therefore screening for atherosclerotic risk factors should be included in the phenylketonuria therapy and follow-up in addition to other parameters.

  1. Factors promoting development of renal tubulointerstitial lesions in patients with diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minara Shamkhalovna Shamkhalova

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To identify profibrogenic mediators, markers of endothelial dysfunction and hemostasis in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM and chronickidney disease (CKD. Materials and methods. The study included 120 patients with DM and 20 age-matched normotensive subjects without DM showing the glomerularfiltration rate (GFR > 60 ml/min/1.73 m3. Four groups of patients were distinguished: 1 - DM2 patients without renal pathology (n=33, 2 - DM2 patients with diabetic nephropathy (n=24, 3 - DM2 patients with ischemic nephropathy (IN (n=33 verified by contrast visualization techniques(multispiral CM of abdominal aorta and renal arteries, abdominal angiography of renal arteries or MR angiography of renal arteries and abdominal aorta, 4 - DM1 patients with DN (n=30. Clinical examination included assessment of complaints, analysis of medical history of the main diseaseand concomitant disorders, determination of the main clinical and biochemical characteristics of blood and urine, measurement of НbА1с and 24-hralbuminuria (AU by standard methods, estimation of GFR by the MDRD formula, ECG, echocardiography, 24-hr AP monitoring, counseling bycardiologist and ophthalmologist (fundal examination by ophthalmoscopy. Standard kits were used to detect profibrogenic mediators and markersof endothelial dysfunction including transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-b, angiotensin II (AT II, monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP-1,regulated on activation normal T cell expressed and secreted (RANTES, adhesion factors (intracellular adhesion molecule (ICAM-1, vascular celladhesion molecule (VCAM-1 vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, interleukin-6 (IL-6, asymmetric dimethylargnine (ADMA, homocysteine(HCYST, metalloproteinases (MMP, von Willebrand factor (vWF, plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI-I. Results. DM patients with CKD had elevated blood profibrogenic cytokine (MCP-1, TGF-1b, IL-6 and extracellular matrix degradation factor(MMP-9 levels compared with

  2. Antioxidant factors, nitric oxide levels, and cellular damage in leprosy patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taysa Ribeiro Schalcher

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The immune response caused by Mycobacterium leprae is a risk factor for the development of oxidative stress (OS in leprosy patients. This study aimed to assess OS in leprosy patients before the use of a multidrug therapy. Methods We evaluated the nitric oxide (NO concentration; antioxidant capacity; levels of malondialdehyde, methemoglobin and reduced glutathione; and the activity of catalase and superoxide dismutase (SOD in leprosy patients. Results We observed lower SOD activity in these leprosy patients; however, the NO levels and antioxidant capacity were increased. Conclusions The infectious process in response to M. leprae could primarily be responsible for the OS observed in these patients.

  3. Factors affecting time of access of in-patient care at Webuye District hospital, Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxwell M. Lodenyo

    2016-10-01

    Conclusion: Ten-year increment in age, perception of a supernatural cause of illness(predisposing factors, having an illness that is considered bearable and belief in the effectiveness of treatment offered in-hospital (need factors affect time of access of in-patient healthcare services in the community served by Webuye District hospital and should inform interventions geared towards improving access.

  4. Restoration Survival: Revisiting Patients' Risk Factors Through a Systematic Literature Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sande, F.H. van de; Collares, K.; Correa, M.B.; Cenci, M.S.; Demarco, F.F.; Opdam, N.J.M.

    2016-01-01

    A literature review was conducted to investigate the influence of patient-related factors on restoration survival in posterior permanent teeth as well as to report the methods used to collect these factors. The selection of articles on longitudinal clinical studies investigating the survival of

  5. Predictive factors of unfavorable prostate cancer in patients who underwent prostatectomy but eligible for active surveillance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seol Ho Choo

    2014-06-01

    Conclusions: A significant proportion of patients who were candidates for active surveillance had unfavorable prostate cancer. Age, PSA density, and two positive cores were independent significant predictive factors for unfavorable prostate cancer. These factors should be considered when performing active surveillance.

  6. Efficacy of recombinant factor VIIa administered by continuous infusion to haemophilia patients with inhibitors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mauser-Bunschoten, EP; Koopman, MMW; Goede-Bolder, ADE; Leebeek, FWG; Van der Meer, J; Kooij, GMV; Van der Linden, PWG

    We have prospectively monitored treatment of haemophilia patients with inhibitors by recombinant factor VIIa (rFVIIa) administered by continuous infusion to obtain more insight in the underlying factors of the clinical efficacy of this administration method. At present, 43 treatment episodes of 14

  7. Vascular endothelial cell function and cardiovascular risk factors in patients with chronic renal failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haaber, A B; Eidemak, I; Jensen, T

    1995-01-01

    Cardiovascular risk factors and markers of endothelial cell function were studied in nondiabetic patients with mild to moderate chronic renal failure. The transcapillary escape rate of albumin and the plasma concentrations of von Willebrand factor, fibrinogen, and plasma lipids were measured in 29...

  8. Some risk factors associated with acid-alcohol-fast bacilli in patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Some risk factors associated with acid-alcohol-fast bacilli in patients with ... EI Bigwan, MC Ohaeri, E David, FD Wakjissa, Z Sheyin ... Statistically the study reveals that some risk factors such as alcoholism, cigarette smoking and number of ...

  9. Physical and Psychosocial Factors Associated With Physical Activity in Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartman, Jorine E.; Boezen, H. Marike; de Greef, Mathieu H.; ten Hacken, Nick H.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To assess physical activity and sitting time in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and to investigate which physical and psychosocial factors are associated with physical activity and sitting time. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Patients were recruited at

  10. Risk factors control in patients with cardiovascular diseases in Ivanovo region: possibilities of a regional registry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belova O.A.

    2016-03-01

    Conclusion ― In primary care units of Ivanovo region in 2015 patients were insufficiently asked about their lifestyle (smoking, physical activity, eating habits, as well as their body weight was measured. If a patient had a risk factor he usually receive a proper advice. For BP, weight and blood lipids the goals were achieved rare.

  11. Serum testosterone as a prognostic factor in patients with advanced prostatic carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, P; Rasmussen, F; Christensen, I J

    1994-01-01

    In 245 patients with previously untreated advanced carcinoma of the prostate, serum concentrations of testosterone have been measured before androgen deprivation therapy, and patients were divided in quartiles according to their serum concentration. Pretreatment level of serum testosterone...... parameters suggest that low serum testosterone merely is a consequence of the advanced malignancy rather than a causative factor in the pathogenesis of prostatic cancer....

  12. Recombinant factor VIIa for variceal bleeding in patients with advanced cirrhosis: A randomized, controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bosch, Jaime; Thabut, Dominique; Albillos, Agustín

    2008-01-01

    A beneficial effect of recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa) in Child-Pugh class B and C patients with cirrhosis who have variceal bleeding has been suggested. This randomized controlled trial assessed the efficacy and safety of rFVIIa in patients with advanced cirrhosis and active variceal...

  13. Impact of Stopping Tumor Necrosis Factor-inhibitors on Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients' Burden of Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghiti Moghadam, Marjan; ten Klooster, Peter M.; Vonkeman, Harald Erwin; Kneepkens, Eva L.; Klaasen, Ruth; Stolk, Jan N.; Tchetverikov, Ilja; Vreugdenhil, Simone A.; van Woerkom, Jan M.; Goekoop-Ruiterman, Yvonne P.M.; Landewé, Robert B.M.; van Riel, Piet L.C.M.; van de Laar, Mart A F J; Jansen, Tim L.

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the impact of stopping tumor necrosis factor inhibitor (TNFi) treatment on patient-reported outcomes (PROs) of physical and mental health status, health utility, pain, disability and fatigue in patients with established rheumatoid arthritis (RA). METHODS: In the pragmatic

  14. Impact of Stopping Tumor Necrosis Factor-inhibitors on Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients' Burden of Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghiti Moghadam, Marjan; ten Klooster, Peter M.; Vonkeman, Harald E.; Kneepkens, Eva L.; Klaasen, Ruth; Stolk, Jan N.; Tchetverikov, Ilja; Vreugdenhil, Simone A.; van Woerkom, Jan M.; Goekoop-Ruiterman, Yvonne P. M.; Landewé, Robert B. M.; van Riel, Piet L. C. M.; van de Laar, Mart A. F. J.; Jansen, Tim L.

    2017-01-01

    To determine the impact of stopping tumor necrosis factor inhibitor (TNFi) treatment on patient-reported outcomes (PROs) of physical and mental health status, health utility, pain, disability and fatigue in patients with established rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In the pragmatic 12-month POET trial,

  15. Social network composition of vascular patients and its associations with health behavior and clinical risk factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijmans, N.; Lieshout, J. van; Wensing, M.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This study aimed to explore linkages of patients' social network composition with health behaviors and clinical risk factors. METHODS/DESIGN: This observational study was embedded in a project aimed at improving cardiovascular risk management (CRVM) in primary care. 657 vascular patients

  16. Patient Factors Associated with Guideline-concordant Treatment of Anxiety and Depression in Primary Care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, Marijn A.; Verhaak, Peter F. M.; Smolders, Mirrian; Laurant, Miranda G. H.; van der Meer, Klaas; Spreeuwenberg, Peter; van Marwijk, Harm W. J.; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.; Bensing, Jozien M.

    To identify associations of patient characteristics (predisposing, enabling and need factors) with guideline-concordant care for anxiety and depression in primary care. Analysis of data from the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA). Seven hundred and twenty-one patients with a current

  17. Impact of Stopping Tumor Necrosis Factor inhibitors on Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients' Burden of Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghiti Moghadam, Marjan; ten Klooster, Peter M.; Vonkeman, Harald Erwin; Kneepkens, Eva L.; Klaasen, Ruth; Stolk, Jan N.; Tchetverikov, Ilja; Vreugdenhil, Simone A.; van Woerkom, Jan M.; Goekoop-Ruiterman, Yvonne P.M.; Landewé, Robert B.M.; van Riel, Piet L.C.M.; van de Laar, Mart A F J; Jansen, Tim L.

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the impact of stopping tumor necrosis factor inhibitor (TNFi) treatment on patient-reported outcomes (PROs) of physical and mental health status, health utility, pain, disability and fatigue in patients with established rheumatoid arthritis (RA). METHODS: In the pragmatic

  18. Patient factors that influence clinicians' decision making in self-management support : A clinical vignette study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos-Touwen, Irene D.; Trappenburg, Jaap C A; Van Der Wulp, Ineke; Schuurmans, Marieke J.; De Wit, Niek J.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIM: Self-management support is an integral part of current chronic care guidelines. The success of self-management interventions varies between individual patients, suggesting a need for tailored self-management support. Understanding the role of patient factors in the current

  19. Factors associated with worse lung function in cystic fibrosis patients with persistent staphylococcus aureus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Junge, S. (Sibylle); Görlich, D. (Dennis); Reijer, M.D. (Martijn Den); B. Wiedemann (Baerbel); B. Tümmler (Burkhard); H. Ellemunter; Dübbers, A. (Angelika); Küster, P. (Peter); M. Ballmann; Koerner-Rettberg, C. (Cordula); Große-Onnebrink, J. (Jörg); Heuer, E. (Eberhardt); Sextro, W. (Wolfgang); Mainz, J.G. (Jochen G.); Hammermann, J. (Jutta); Riethmüller, J. (Joachim); Graepler-Mainka, U.M. (Ute M.); Staab, D. (Doris); Wollschläger, B. (Bettina); Szczepanski, R. (Rüdiger); A. Schuster (Antje); Tegtmeyer, F.-K. (Friedrich-Karl); Sutharsan, S. (Sivagurunathan); Wald, A. (Alexandra); Nofer, J.-R. (Jerzy-Roch); W.J.B. van Wamel (Willem); Becker, K. (Karsten); Peters, G. (Georg); Kahl, B.C. (Barbara C.)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground Staphylococcus aureus is an important pathogen in cystic fibrosis (CF). However, it is not clear which factors are associated with worse lung function in patients with persistent S. aureus airway cultures. Our main hypothesis was that patients with high S. aureus density in

  20. Prognostic value of plasma transforming growth factor-beta in patients with glioblastoma multiforme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulshof, M. C.; Sminia, P.; Barten-van Rijbroek, A. D.; Gonzalez Gonzalez, D.

    2001-01-01

    We investigated whether the postoperative concentration of circulating transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) yields prognostic value in patients with glioblastoma multiforme (gbm). Blood was collected from 20 healthy volunteers and in 28 patients with mainly glioblastoma multiforme (gbm), both

  1. The CAREFALL Triage instrument identifying risk factors for recurrent falls in elderly patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hensbroek, van P. Boele; Dijk, van N.; Breda, van G.F.; Scheffer, A.C.; Cammen, van der T.J.; Lips, P.T.A.M.; Goslings, J.C.; Rooij, S.E.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To validate the CAREFALL Triage Instrument (CTI), a self-administered questionnaire concerning modifiable risk factors for recurrent falls in elderly patients who experienced fall. METHODS: This study in patients 65 years or older who experienced fall was performed at the accident and

  2. The CAREFALL Triage instrument identifying risk factors for recurrent falls in elderly patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boele van Hensbroek, Pieter; van Dijk, Nynke; van Breda, G. Fenna; Scheffer, Alice C.; van der Cammen, Tischa J.; Lips, Paul; Goslings, J. Carel; de Rooij, Sophia E.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To validate the CAREFALL Triage Instrument (CTI), a self-administered questionnaire concerning modifiable risk factors for recurrent falls in elderly patients who experienced fall. Methods: This study in patients 65 years or older who experienced fall was performed at the accident and

  3. Risk factors for violence among long-term psychiatric in-patients: a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study focuses on enduring patient related risk factors of violence, and investigates which long-term patients in Weskoppies Hospital (a specialist psychiatric hospital) are the most likely to commit violent acts. Method: Nursing statistics on violent incidents and other security breaches were collected for 262 long-term ...

  4. Factors influencing the patient with rheumatoid arthritis in their decision to seek podiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, A; Mandy, P J; Stew, G

    2013-12-01

    Despite the level of foot involvement in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and the literature to support early assessment of foot care needs, local referral of patients to podiatry has been occurring too late to instigate certain preventative interventions. Preliminary fieldwork has highlighted that the primary responsibility for the instigation of this lies with the patient. The present study describes the factors that influence the patient with RA in their decision to self-report foot problems. A case study research strategy was employed. Nine patients attending the outpatient rheumatology department participated in the study and data were gathered through semi-structured interviews. This information was analysed using a framework approach. The key themes derived from the data suggested that there are a variety of factors influencing the patient's decision to self-report foot concerns. Some will act to encourage the action and others will act to oppose it. Other factors can influence the decision either way, depending on the individual patient (psychological state, previous experience, body image changes). In addition, age, gender, and cultural and social aspects are also significant. Due to the multitude of factors influencing the individual's decision to seek help, the patient cannot be given sole responsibility for their foot health if we wish to achieve timely and appropriate podiatry, as recommended in the literature. Responsibility should be three-way; the patient, the members of the rheumatology team and, once in the podiatry service, the podiatrist should maintain this. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. [An analysis of clinical characteristic and related risk factors in 208 cirrhotic patients complicated with infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, G H; Wang, M; Wang, L; Wang, X M; Wang, Y; Ou, X J; Jia, J D

    2018-02-01

    Objective: To analyze the clinical features and risk factors of cirrhotic patients complicated with infections. Methods: The clinical and laboratory characteristics of cirrhotic patients complicated with infections hospitalized from April 2014 to June 2017 were retrospectively analyzed. Relevant risk factors for infection and mortality were explored. Results: The overall incidence of infections was 17.6% in 1 670 hospitalized cirrhotic patients. Among the recruited 208 patients in this study, alcoholic, viral hepatitis B or C and autoimmune liver diseases accounted for 29.8% (62/208), 26.0% (54/208), and 22.1% (46/208), respectively. The most common infection site was respiratory tract (70.2%), followed by urinary tract, intestinal and intra-abdomen. Forty-six pathogens were isolated from 32 patients, including 22 (47.8%) Gram negative bacteria, 16 (34.8%) Gram positive bacteria and 2(4.3%) mycobacterium tuberculosis, 5 (10.9%) fungi and 1 (2.2%) mycoplasma. The mortality in patients with nosocomial infections (16.7%,7/42) was higher than that in patients with community-acquired infections (6.0%,10/166, P =0.025). All 17 deaths occurred in decompensated cirrhosis. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that hepatic encephalopathy and prothrombin time were independent risk factors of mortality. Conclusions: Patients with decompensated cirrhosis are more susceptible to infections. Hepatic encephalopathy and prothrombin time are independent risk factors for death.

  6. Risk factors for retinal breaks in patients with symptom of floaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singalavanija, Apichart; Amornrattanapan, Chutiwan; Nitiruangjarus, Kanjanee; Tongsai, Sasima

    2010-06-01

    To identify the risk factors of retinal breaks in patients with the symptom of floaters, and to determine the association between those risk factors and retinal breaks. A retrospective analytic study of 184 patients (55 males and 129 females) that included 220 eyes was conducted. Patient information such as age, symptoms (multiple floaters, flashing), duration of symptom, refractive error, history of cataract surgery, family history of retinal detachment, and complete eye examination were recorded. The patients were divided into two groups, the first group (control group) had symptoms of floaters and no retinal breaks, the second group (retinal breaks group) had symptoms of floaters with retinal breaks. Chi-square test, and the multiple logistic regression were used for statistical analysis. Two hundred twenty eyes, 175 eyes of the control group and 45 eyes of the retinal breaks group were examined and included in this study. The multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that patients with multiple floaters, and floaters and flashing increased the risk of retinal breaks to 5.8 and 4.3 times, respectively, when compared to patients with single floater or floaters alone. Lattice degeneration increased the risk of retinal breaks to 5.9 times when compared to eyes that did not have lattice degeneration. Multiple floaters, flashing and lattice degeneration are risk factors of retinal breaks in patients with symptoms of floaters. Therefore, it is important for the ophthalmologists to be aware of these risk factors and the patients at risk should have follow-up examinations.

  7. Physical factors that influence patients' privacy perception toward a psychiatric behavioral monitoring system: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakaria, Nasriah; Ramli, Rusyaizila

    2018-01-01

    Psychiatric patients have privacy concerns when it comes to technology intervention in the hospital setting. In this paper, we present scenarios for psychiatric behavioral monitoring systems to be placed in psychiatric wards to understand patients' perception regarding privacy. Psychiatric behavioral monitoring refers to systems that are deemed useful in measuring clinical outcomes, but little research has been done on how these systems will impact patients' privacy. We conducted a case study in one teaching hospital in Malaysia. We investigated the physical factors that influence patients' perceived privacy with respect to a psychiatric monitoring system. The eight physical factors identified from the information system development privacy model, a comprehensive model for designing a privacy-sensitive information system, were adapted in this research. Scenario-based interviews were conducted with 25 patients in a psychiatric ward for 3 months. Psychiatric patients were able to share how physical factors influence their perception of privacy. Results show how patients responded to each of these dimensions in the context of a psychiatric behavioral monitoring system. Some subfactors under physical privacy are modified to reflect the data obtained in the interviews. We were able to capture the different physical factors that influence patient privacy.

  8. Factors Associated with Life Expectancy in Patients with Metastatic Spine Disease from Adenocarcinoma of the Lung

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, C. Rory; Khattab, Mohamed H.; Sankey, Eric W.; Elder, Benjamin D.; Kosztowski, Thomas A.; Sarabia-Estrada, Rachel; Bydon, Ali; Witham, Timothy F.; Wolinsky, Jean-Paul; Gokaslan, Ziya L.; Sciubba, Daniel M.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective study. Objective Our objective was to identify preoperative prognostic factors associated with survival in patients with spinal metastasis from lung carcinoma. Methods A retrospective analysis of 26 patients diagnosed with lung carcinoma metastatic to the spinal column was performed to determine factors associated with survival. We used 3 months survival as the clinical cutoff for whether surgical intervention should be performed. We analyzed patients who survived less than 3 months compared with those who survived more than 3 months. Demographic, preoperative, operative, and postoperative factors including functional scores were collected for analysis. Results The median survival for all patients in our study was 3.5 months. We found a statistically significant difference between the group that survived less than 3 months and the group that survived greater than 3 months in terms of extrathoracic metastasis, visceral metastasis, and average postoperative modified Rankin score. Conclusion Determining which patients with lung cancer spinal metastases will benefit from surgical intervention is often dictated by the patient's predicted life expectancy. Factors associated with poorer prognosis include age, functional status, visceral metastases, and extrathoracic metastases. Although the prognosis for patients with lung cancer spinal metastases is poor, some patients may experience long-term benefit from surgical intervention. PMID:26430597

  9. Tuberculosis among HIV-positive patients across Europe: changes over time and risk factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruk, Alexey; Bannister, Wendy; Podlekareva, Daria N.; Chentsova, Nelly P.; Rakhmanova, Aza G.; Horban, Andrzej; Domingo, Perre; Mocroft, Amanda; Lundgren, Jens D.; Kirk, Ole; Losso, M.; Elias, C.; Vetter, N.; Zangerle, R.; Karpov, I.; Vassilenko, A.; Mitsura, V. M.; Suetnov, O.; Clumeck, N.; de Wit, S.; Delforge, M.; Colebunders, R.; Vandekerckhove, L.; Hadziosmanovic, V.; Kostov, K.; Begovac, J.; Machala, L.; Sedlacek, D.; Nielsen, J.; Kronborg, G.; Benfield, T.; Larsen, M.; Gerstoft, J.; Katzenstein, T.; Hansen, A.-B. E.; Skinhøj, P.; Pedersen, C.; Ostergaard, L.; Zilmer, K.; Ristola, M.; Katlama, C.; Viard, J.-P.; Girard, P.-M.; Livrozet, J. M.; Vanhems, P.; Pradier, C.; Dabis, F.; Neau, D.; Rockstroh, J.; Reiss, P.

    2011-01-01

    To describe temporal changes in the incidence rate of tuberculosis (TB) (pulmonary or extrapulmonary) among HIV-positive patients in western Europe and risk factors of TB across Europe. Poisson regression models were used to determine temporal changes in incidence rate of TB among 11,952 patients

  10. ANTIBODIES TO LEUKEMIA DIFFERENTIATION FACTOR (HLDF IN PATIENTS WITH GASTROINTESTINAL CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I. Autenshlus

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Antibodies to leukemia differentiation factor (HLDF in patients with gastrointestinal cancer Abstract. Patients with gastric cancer exhibit higher levels of IgG4-antibodies to human leukemia differentiation factor (HLDF, as compared with healthy individuals, whereas, in patients with colorectal cancer, one may detect high levels of IgA anti-HDLF antibodies, along with lower levels of IgG1 class antibodies against HLDF than in control group. Among patients with gastrointestinal cancer, a positive correlation is revealed between contents of highly differentiated cells in the tumor, and IgM antibodies to HDLF. Meanwhile, a reverse relationship is noted between low differentiation of tumor cells and levels of IgG2 antibodies to HDLF in gastric cancer patients, or IgG3 antibodies to HDLF in patients with colorectal cancer.

  11. Incidence and risk factors of refeeding syndrome in head and neck cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Stine Ostenfeldt; Kristensen, Marianne Boll; Wessel, Irene

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the incidence rates of refeeding phenomena (defined as a decline in p-phosphate) and refeeding syndrome (RFS; defined as development of clinical symptoms in addition to a decline in p-phosphate) in head and neck cancer patients, and to identify risk factors. Fifty......-four head and neck cancer patients referred for surgery were included. Forty-six potential risk factors were registered at the baseline, and p-phosphate was measured at Days 2, 4, and 7. Eleven patients (20%) developed RFS, and twenty-eight (52%) developed refeeding phenomena. At baseline, these patients...... presented a higher prevalence of head and neck pain, eating difficulties, higher p-phosphate levels, lower p-transferrin levels, and, in men, lower b-hemoglobin levels. Patients who developed symptoms had a decline in p-phosphate ≥0.22 mmol/l. At baseline, these patients had higher p-phosphate levels...

  12. The role of genetic factors in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma and iron overload - a prospective series of 234 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funakoshi, Natalie; Chaze, Iphigénie; Alary, Anne-Sophie; Tachon, Gaëlle; Cunat, Séverine; Giansily-Blaizot, Muriel; Bismuth, Michael; Larrey, Dominique; Pageaux, Georges-Philippe; Schved, Jean-François; Donnadieu-Rigole, Hélène; Blanc, Pierre; Aguilar-Martinez, Patricia

    2016-05-01

    Iron overload (IO) in HFE-related hereditary haemochromatosis is associated with increased risk of liver cancer. This study aimed to investigate the role of other genes involved in hereditary IO among patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Patients with HCC diagnosed in our institution were included in this prospective study. Those with ferritin levels ≥300 μg/L (males) or ≥200 μg/L (females) and/or transferrin saturation ≥50% (males) or ≥45% (females) had liver iron concentration (LIC) evaluated by MRI. HFE C282Y and H63D mutations were screened. Genetic analyses of genes involved in hereditary IO (HFE, HJV/HFE2, HAMP, TFR2, SLC40A1, GNPAT) were performed in patients with increased LIC. A total of 234 patients were included; 215 (92%) had common acquired risk factors of HCC (mainly alcoholism or chronic viral hepatitis). 119 patients had abnormal iron parameters. Twelve (5.1%) were C282Y homozygotes, three were compound C282Y/H63D heterozygotes. LIC was measured by MRI in 100 patients. Thirteen patients with a LIC>70 μmol/g were enrolled in further genetic analyses: two unrelated patients bore the HAMP:c.-153C>T mutation at the heterozygous state, which is associated with increased risk of IO and severe haemochromatosis. Specific haplotypes of SLC40A1 were also studied. Additional genetic risk factors of IO were found in 18 patients (7.7%) among a large series of 234 HCC patients. Screening for IO and the associated at-risk genotypes in patients who have developed HCC, is useful for both determining etiologic diagnosis and enabling family screening and possibly primary prevention in relatives. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Restoration Survival: Revisiting Patients' Risk Factors Through a Systematic Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Sande, F H; Collares, K; Correa, M B; Cenci, M S; Demarco, F F; Opdam, Njm

    2016-09-01

    A literature review was conducted to investigate the influence of patient-related factors on restoration survival in posterior permanent teeth as well as to report the methods used to collect these factors. The selection of articles on longitudinal clinical studies investigating the survival of posterior restorations (except full crowns and temporary fillings) and including patient-related factors was performed by applying predefined criteria. The review was organized into two parts, the first describing how patient factors were assessed in the studies (n=45) and the second presenting the statistical significance (n=27) and size of the effect (n=11) of these factors on restoration survival. Patient-related factors mentioned in the studies included age; gender; caries risk; caries activity/severity; decayed, missing, filled teeth; number of restorations; oral hygiene; and bruxism, among others. Sixteen studies included the patient age or age range in the analysis, which was found to be significant in 47% of the studies. Regarding gender, four of 17 reports found a significant effect on survival, showing more failures for men in three studies. The caries risk profile or related variables were included in the analysis of 15 studies, and a significant effect on survival was reported for high-caries-risk individuals (or related variables) in 67% of these studies. Bruxism was also found to influence restoration survival in three of six studies where this variable was investigated. Some issues were found regarding the reporting of methods used to classify patients according to risk and were thoroughly discussed. In view of the information gathered in this review, the assessment of patient factors along with other variables should become part of clinical studies investigating restoration survival, since several of these factors were shown to influence the failure of restorations, regardless of the material type.

  14. Precipitating and Relieving Factors of Migraine Headache in 200 Iraqi Kurdish Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehsan K. Al-Shimmery

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To study the precipitating and relieving factors of migraine headache in a group of Iraqi Kurdish patients including the effect of fasting in Ramadan, and to estimate the percentage of family history of migraine. Methods: A series of 200 migraine cases from different parts of the Kurdistan region in the North of Iraq attending the out-patient Neurology clinic at Rizgary Teaching Hospital and a private Neurology clinic at Erbil City was carried out between October 2007 and May 2008 were reviewed. The precipitating factors and relieving factors for migraine headache were registered and tabulated to be compared with others. Case definition of migraine was based on the International Headache Society (IHS criteria.Results: 33% of the patients were aged between 30-39 years, while 40.5% of patients experienced their first attack aged between 20-29 years. Stress or psychological upset was the commonest triggering factor (80%, followed by increasing physical activity (68%, change in weather (65.5%, and in relation to fasting (65%. Fasting in Ramadan was a triggering factor for headaches in 65% of patients. However, there was no significant association between the triggering factors with regards to sex difference. Relief of migraine in the studied sample was achieved using NSAIDs in 50% of patients, and sleep (45.5%. Hence, 61% of the study population had positive family history of migraine, 32.5% of them reported maternal history of migraine. Conclusion: Psychological upset, stress and excessive physical activity were the commonest triggering factors of migraine headache, while NSAID was the commonest relieving factor of migraine in this population. Family history was present in 61% of migraine patients based mainly from maternal root.

  15. Cardiovascular risk factors among patients with schizophrenia, bipolar, depressive, anxiety, and personality disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Piñar, M; Mathur, R; Foguet, Q; Ayis, S; Robson, J; Ayerbe, L

    2016-05-01

    The evidence informing the management of cardiovascular risk in patients with psychiatric disorders is weak. This cohort study used data from all patients, aged≥30, registered in 140 primary care practices (n=524,952) in London to estimate the risk of developing diabetes, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, tobacco consumption, obesity, and physical inactivity, between 2005 and 2015, for patients with a previous diagnosis of schizophrenia, depression, anxiety, bipolar or personality disorder. The role of antidepressants, antipsychotics and social deprivation in these associations was also investigated. The age at detection of cardiovascular risk factor was compared between patients with and without psychiatric disorders. Variables, for exposures and outcomes, defined from general practitioners records, were analysed using multivariate regression. Patients with psychiatric disorders had an increased risk for cardiovascular risk factors, especially diabetes, with hazard ratios: 2.42 (2.20-2.67) to 1.31 (1.25-1.37), hyperlipidemia, with hazard ratios: 1.78 (1.60-1.97) to 1.25 (1.23-1.28), and obesity. Antidepressants, antipsychotics and social deprivation did not change these associations, except for smoking and physical inactivity. Antidepressants were associated with higher risk of diabetes, hypertension and hyperlipidemia. Antipsychotics were associated with a higher risk of diabetes. Antidepressants and antipsychotics were associated with lower risk of other risk factors. Patients with psychiatric conditions have later detection of cardiovascular risk factors. The interpretation of these results should acknowledge the lower rates of detection of risk factors in mentally ill patients. Cardiovascular risk factors require special clinical attention among patients with psychiatric disorders. Further research could study the effect of antidepressants and antipsychotics on cardiovascular risk factors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Influencing factors affecting the retinal blood vessel morphology in patients with diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Lu Kong

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To analyze the influencing factors affecting retinal blood vessel morphology in patients with diabetes mellitus. METHODS: Totally 312 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in our hospital from January 2012 to September 2016 were selected as study subjects. The patients were examined by fundus photography and related laboratory. As grouping factors in the patients'age, sex, disease duration, smoking, drinking, hypertension, hyperlipidemia or diabetic nephropathy, we compared the incidence of retinal vascular changes in different groups. The meaningful factors were introduced into the Logistic regression equation again. Independent risk factors for retinal vascular changes in patients with diabetes mellitus were screened out. RESULTS:In 312 cases of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus,169 cases were accompanied with retinal vascular abnormalities, and 143 cases were not associated with retinal vascular abnormalities. Univariate analysis showed that age, duration of disease, hypertension, hyperlipidemia or diabetes nephropathy were significantly correlated with retinal vascular morphological changes(PP>0.05. Retinal vascular abnormalities were used as the dependent variable, and the above mentioned factors were grouped as independent variables. By Logistic stepwise regression analysis showed that the course of disease, patients with hypertension or diabetic nephropathy were the independent risk factors of abnormal retinal vascular morphology(PCONCLUSION: The independent risk factors for the occurrence of retinal vascular changes in patients with diabetes mellitus are increased course of disease, hypertension or diabetic nephropathy. Early diagnosis and intervention, to take measures and control blood pressure, reduce kidney damage can reduce the incidence of diabetic retinopathy, and macrovascular disease caused by diabetes, the incidence of adverse cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events.

  17. The diminished expression of proangiogenic growth factors and their receptors in gastric ulcers of cirrhotic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jiing-Chyuan; Peng, Yen-Ling; Hou, Ming-Chih; Huang, Kuang-Wei; Huang, Hui-Chun; Wang, Ying-Wen; Lin, Han-Chieh; Lee, Fa-Yauh; Lu, Ching-Liang

    2013-01-01

    The pathogenesis of the higher occurrence of peptic ulcer disease in cirrhotic patients is complex. Platelets can stimulate angiogenesis and promote gastric ulcer healing. We compared the expressions of proangiogenic growth factors and their receptors in the gastric ulcer margin between cirrhotic patients with thrombocytopenia and those of non-cirrhotic patients to elucidate possible mechanisms. Eligible cirrhotic patients (n = 55) and non-cirrhotic patients (n = 55) who had gastric ulcers were enrolled. Mucosa from the gastric ulcer margin and non-ulcer areas were sampled and the mRNA expressions of the proangiogenic growth factors (vascular endothelial growth factor [VEGF], platelet derived growth factor [PDGF], basic fibroblast growth factor [bFGF]) and their receptors (VEGFR1, VEGFR2, PDGFRA, PDGFRB, FGFR1, FGFR2) were measured and compared. Platelet count and the expressions of these growth factors and their receptors were correlated with each other. The two groups were comparable in terms of gender, ulcer size and infection rate of Helicobacter pylori. However, the cirrhotic group were younger in age, had a lower platelet count than those in the non-cirrhotic group (pexpressions of PDGFB, VEGFR2, FGFR1, and FGFR2 in gastric ulcer margin when compared with those of the non-cirrhotic patients (pexpressions of PDGFB and VEGFR2, FGFR1, and FGFR2 were well correlated with the degree of thrombocytopenia in these cirrhotic patients (ρ>0.5, pimplied that diminished activity of proangiogenic factors and their receptors may contribute to the pathogenesis of gastric ulcers in cirrhotic patients.

  18. Factors affecting patients' knowledge about dispensed medicines: A Qualitative study of healthcare professionals and patients in Pakistan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anum Saqib

    Full Text Available Patients' knowledge about their prescribed medicines is one of the most important antecedents of successful therapy. Poor knowledge about medicines can lead to serious consequences such as non-adherence and misunderstanding of the significance of adverse events. The objective of this study is to understand the factors that are responsible for a patients' lack of knowledge regarding their medicines, by taking the perspective of the patient as well as that of healthcare professionals. Much of the work in this area has been undertaken in the setting of developed or semi-developed countries, and there is a scarcity of information from developing nations such as Pakistan.This was a large qualitative study set in the hospital outpatient environment in a teaching hospital in the Punjab province of Pakistan. Data were collected from dialogue with patients (n = 19 and healthcare providers (n = 16 i.e., doctors and dispensers (where a dispenser is a person who merely dispenses medicines; i.e. is not a pharmacist through in-depth semi-structured interviews. Patients having limited knowledge about their dispensed medicines were assessed using a checklist. The healthcare providers were recruited through a convenience sampling strategy, based on their availability and willingness to participate in the study. Based on the objectives of the study, a pilot tested interview protocol was developed, and used to conduct the interviews. The sample size was controlled by using saturation point criteria. All interviews were audio recorded and transcribed verbatim. The data were analyzed to draw conclusions using inductive thematic content analysis.The analysis of data yielded 31 categories (patients = 19, healthcare professionals = 12, 10 subthemes and three themes. The major themes were healthcare professional-related factors, patient-related factors and system-related factors. The health professional related subthemes included: behaviour and attitude and professional

  19. Fatal infections in older patients with inflammatory bowel disease on anti-tumor necrosis factor therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Way-Seah Lee

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Anti-tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF is highly effective in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD; however, it is associated with an increased risk of infections, particularly in older adults. We reviewed 349 patients with IBD, who were observed over a 12-month period, 74 of whom had received anti-TNF therapy (71 patients were aged <60 years and 3 were aged ≥60 years. All the 3 older patients developed serious infectious complications after receiving anti-TNFs, although all of them were also on concomitant immunosuppressive therapy. One patient developed disseminated tuberculosis, another patient developed cholera diarrhea followed by nosocomial pneumonia, while the third patient developed multiple opportunistic infections (Pneumocystis pneumonia, cryptococcal septicemia and meningitis, Klebsiella septicemia. All 3 patients died within 1 year from the onset of the infection(s. We recommend that anti-TNF, especially when combined with other immunosuppressive therapy, should be used with extreme caution in older adult patients with IBD.

  20. Zika Virus Infection in Patient with No Known Risk Factors, Utah, USA, 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krow-Lucal, Elisabeth R; Novosad, Shannon A; Dunn, Angela C; Brent, Carolyn R; Savage, Harry M; Faraji, Ary; Peterson, Dallin; Dibbs, Andrew; Vietor, Brook; Christensen, Kimberly; Laven, Janeen J; Godsey, Marvin S; Christensen, Bryan; Beyer, Brigette; Cortese, Margaret M; Johnson, Nina C; Panella, Amanda J; Biggerstaff, Brad J; Rubin, Michael; Fridkin, Scott K; Staples, J Erin; Nakashima, Allyn K

    2017-08-01

    In 2016, Zika virus disease developed in a man (patient A) who had no known risk factors beyond caring for a relative who died of this disease (index patient). We investigated the source of infection for patient A by surveying other family contacts, healthcare personnel, and community members, and testing samples for Zika virus. We identified 19 family contacts who had similar exposures to the index patient; 86 healthcare personnel had contact with the index patient, including 57 (66%) who had contact with body fluids. Of 218 community members interviewed, 28 (13%) reported signs/symptoms and 132 (61%) provided a sample. Except for patient A, no other persons tested had laboratory evidence of recent Zika virus infection. Of 5,875 mosquitoes collected, none were known vectors of Zika virus and all were negative for Zika virus. The mechanism of transmission to patient A remains unknown but was likely person-to-person contact with the index patient.

  1. Factors influencing the psychology and quality of life in lung cancer patients

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Bin; Hao, Nan; Zhang, Xun

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the factors closely correlated with the unhealthy psychological status of patients with lung cancer and to ascertain whether the unhealthy psychology adversely affects their quality-of-life (QOL). Methods: Patients newly diagnosed with lung cancer between May 2013 and December 2015 in the Department of Thoracic Surgery, Tianjin 4th Centre Hospital, Tianjin, China were enrolled in this cross-sectional study. Patients were asked to complete the Symptom Checklist 90 (SCL...

  2. RISK FACTORS AND ETIOLOGY OF TRANSIENT ISCHEMIC ATTACKS IN PATIENTS WITH BRAIN INFARCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavian Ghandehari

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available   Abstract INTRODUCTION: Transient ischemic attacks (TIA are warnings of future stroke. There is no difference in risk factors, pathophysiology and prevention between TIA and brain infarction. methods: Consecutive patients with brain infarction admitted to Ghaem Hospital, Mashhad, Northeastern Iran, were enrolled in a prospective study during 2006. Diagnosis of ischemic stroke was established by a neurologist who also obtained history of TIA and vascular risk factors. All of the stroke patients underwent a standard battery of diagnostic investigations and etiology of ischemic stroke was determined by the Practical Iranian Criteria classification. Fisher’s exact test was used for statistical analysis. results: 348 stroke patients (186 women, 162 men were studied. History of TIA was present in 42 patients (29 women, 13 men, i.e. 12% of the stroke patients. TIA was more common in women (df=1, P=0.02. The frequency of hypertension, diabetes and ipsilateral carotid stenosis was not significantly different between patients with history of TIA and other stroke patients (P=0.87, P=0.64 and P=0.61, respectively. Hyper-cholesterolemia and smoking were significantly more frequent in stroke patients with history of TIA (P=0.011 and P=0.014, respectively. The frequency of TIA was not significantly different among patients with lacunar, versus large vessel territory infarcts (df=1, P=0.84. There was no significant difference in the frequency of various stroke etiologies in patients with and without history of TIA (df=4, P=0.61. CONCLUSIONS: Stroke patients with history of TIA have vascular risk factors similar to other stroke patients. A positive history of TIA does not affirm any specific etiology of ischemic stroke.     Keywords: Risk factors, etiology, transient ischemic attacks.

  3. Risk Factors for Pneumonia in Ventilated Trauma Patients with Multiple Rib Fractures

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Hyun Oh; Kang, Dong Hoon; Moon, Seong Ho; Yang, Jun Ho; Kim, Sung Hwan; Byun, Joung Hun

    2017-01-01

    Background: Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is a common disease that may contribute to morbidity and mortality among trauma patients in the intensive care unit (ICU). This study evaluated the associations between trauma factors and the development of VAP in ventilated patients with multiple rib fractures. Methods: We retrospectively and consecutively evaluated 101 patients with multiple rib fractures who were ventilated and managed at our hospital between January 2010 and De...

  4. Prevalence and associated factors of resting electrocardiogram abnormalities among systemic lupus erythematosus patients without cardiovascular disease

    OpenAIRE

    Al Rayes, Hanan; Harvey, Paula J.; Gladman, Dafna D.; Su, Jiandong; Sabapathy, Arthy; Urowitz, Murray B.; Touma, Zahi

    2017-01-01

    Background Electrocardiogram (ECG) cardiovascular disease (CVD) abnormalities (ECG-CVD) are predictive of subsequent CVD events in the general population. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients are vulnerable to CVD. We aimed to determine the prevalence of ECG-CVD in SLE patients and to examine the risk factors associated with ECG-CVD. Methods A 12-lead resting supine ECG was performed on consecutive adult patients attending the clinic. One cardiologist interpreted the ECGs. ECG-CVD were...

  5. Factors associated with worse lung function in cystic fibrosis patients with persistent staphylococcus aureus

    OpenAIRE

    Junge, S. (Sibylle); Görlich, D. (Dennis); Reijer, M.D. (Martijn Den); Wiedemann, Baerbel; Tümmler, Burkhard; Ellemunter, H.; Dübbers, A. (Angelika); Küster, P. (Peter); Ballmann, M.; Koerner-Rettberg, C. (Cordula); Große-Onnebrink, J. (Jörg); Heuer, E. (Eberhardt); Sextro, W. (Wolfgang); Mainz, J.G. (Jochen G.); Hammermann, J. (Jutta)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground Staphylococcus aureus is an important pathogen in cystic fibrosis (CF). However, it is not clear which factors are associated with worse lung function in patients with persistent S. aureus airway cultures. Our main hypothesis was that patients with high S. aureus density in their respiratory specimens would more likely experience worsening of their lung disease than patients with low bacterial loads. Methods Therefore, we conducted an observational prospective longitudi...

  6. Factors Associated with Worse Lung Function in Cystic Fibrosis Patients with Persistent Staphylococcus aureus

    OpenAIRE

    Junge, Sibylle; G?rlich, Dennis; den Reijer, Martijn; Wiedemann, B?rbel; T?mmler, Burkhard; Ellemunter, Helmut; D?bbers, Angelika; K?ster, Peter; Ballmann, Manfred; Koerner-Rettberg, Cordula; Gro?e-Onnebrink, J?rg; Heuer, Eberhardt; Sextro, Wolfgang; Mainz, Jochen G.; Hammermann, Jutta

    2016-01-01

    Background Staphylococcus aureus is an important pathogen in cystic fibrosis (CF). However, it is not clear which factors are associated with worse lung function in patients with persistent S. aureus airway cultures. Our main hypothesis was that patients with high S. aureus density in their respiratory specimens would more likely experience worsening of their lung disease than patients with low bacterial loads. Methods Therefore, we conducted an observational prospective longitudinal multi-ce...

  7. Factors influencing the psychology and quality of life in lung cancer patients

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Bin; Hao, Nan; Zhang, Xun

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the factors closely correlated with the unhealthy psychological status of patients with lung cancer and to ascertain whether the unhealthy psychology adversely affects their quality-of-life (QOL). Methods: Patients newly diagnosed with lung cancer between May 2013 and December 2015 in the Department of Thoracic Surgery, Tianjin 4th Centre Hospital, Tianjin, China were enrolled in this cross-sectional study. Patients were asked to complete the Symptom Checkli...

  8. Influenza and Pneumonia Vaccination Rates and Factors Affecting Vaccination among Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Aka Akt?rk, ?lk?; G?rek Dilekta?l?, Asl?; ?eng?l, Aysun; Musaffa Salep?i, Banu; Oktay, Nuray; D?ger, Mustafa; Ar?k Ta?y?kan, Hale; Durmu? Ko?ak, Nagihan

    2017-01-01

    Background: Influenza and pneumococcal vaccinations are recommended in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients to decrease associated risks at all stages. Although the prevalence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is high in our country, as previously reported, vaccination rates are low. Aims: To assess the vaccination rates of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients and factors that may affect these. Study Design: Multi-centre cross-sectional study. Methods: Patients admi...

  9. Severe glandular tularemia in a patient treated with anti-tumour necrosis factor for psoriatic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calin, Ruxandra; Caumes, Eric; Reibel, Florence; Ali Mohamed, Anzime; Brossier, Florence; Foltz, Violaine; Boussouar, Samia; Fautrel, Bruno; Maurin, Max; Katlama, Christine; Pourcher, Valérie

    2017-07-01

    A case of severe glandular tularemia in a patient receiving anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF) therapy is reported here. The patient required prolonged treatment with doxycycline-ciprofloxacin due to early relapse after ciprofloxacin was stopped. Tularemia may have a more severe course in patients receiving anti-TNF. This may thus be an indication for more aggressive treatment. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  10. Risk factors for persistent airflow limitation: Analysis of 306 patients with asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Lingcheng; Gao, Shuncui; Zhu, Wei; Su, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Objectives : To determine the risk factors associated with persistent airflow limitation in patients with asthma. Method s: This study was designed and carried out in the department of respiratory medicine, fourth People?s Hospital of Jinan City, Shandong province, China between Jan 2012 and Dec 2012. Three hundred and six asthma patients participating in the study were divided into persistent airflow limitation group (PAFL) and no persistent airflow limitation group (NPAFL). The patients par...

  11. Predictive factors for gastroduodenal toxicity based on endoscopy following radiotherapy in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, H. [Sungkyunkwan Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Health Sciences and Technology; Oh, D.; Park, H.C.; Han, Y.; Lim, D.H. [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Kang, S.W. [Korea Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Radiologic Science; Paik, S.W. [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Medicine

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: The aim of this work was to determine predictive factors for gastroduodenal (GD) toxicity in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients who were treated with radiotherapy (RT). Patients and methods: A total of 90 HCC patients who underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) before and after RT were enrolled. RT was delivered as 30-50 Gy (median 37.5 Gy) in 2-5 Gy (median 3.5 Gy) per fraction. All endoscopic findings were reviewed and GD toxicities related to RT were graded by the Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0. The predictive factors for the {>=} grade 2 GD toxicity were investigated. Results: Endoscopic findings showed erosive gastritis in 14 patients (16 %), gastric ulcers in 8 patients (9 %), erosive duodenitis in 15 patients (17 %), and duodenal ulcers in 14 patients (16 %). Grade 2 toxicity developed in 19 patients (21 %) and grade 3 toxicity developed in 8 patients (9 %). V{sub 25} for stomach and V{sub 35} for duodenum (volume receiving a RT dose of more than x Gy) were the most predictive factors for {>=} grade 2 toxicity. The gastric toxicity rate at 6 months was 2.9 % for V{sub 25} {<=} 6.3 % and 57.1 % for V{sub 25} > 6.3 %. The duodenal toxicity rate at 6 months was 9.4 % for V{sub 35} > 5.4 % and 45.9 % for V{sub 35} > 5.4 %. By multivariate analysis including the clinical factors, V{sub 25} for stomach and V{sub 35} for duodenum were the significant factors. Conclusion: EGD revealed that GD toxicity is common following RT for HCC. V{sub 25} for the stomach and V{sub 35} for the duodenum were the significant factors to predict {>=} grade 2 GD toxicity. (orig.)

  12. How does number of risk factors affect prognosis in young patients with ischemic stroke?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putaala, Jukka; Haapaniemi, Elena; Kaste, Markku; Tatlisumak, Turgut

    2012-02-01

    We aimed to explore clinical features of young patients with ischemic stroke with no traditional vascular risk factors and to assess the impact of risk factor counts on outcomes. We included 990 patients aged 15 to 49 years with first-ever ischemic stroke followed for a mean of 9.0 ± 3.8 years (survivors). Risk factors were categorized as well-documented and less well-documented. Outcome measures were unfavorable functional outcome (3-month modified Rankin Scale 2-6); recurrent ischemic stroke; myocardial infarction or other arterial noncerebrovascular event; and death from any cause. Compared with those with at least 1 well-documented risk factor, the 127 (12.8%) patients without risk factors were younger (median age, 37 versus 44 years; Pischemic strokes (4.7% versus 13.6%; log rank P=0.014), noncerebrovascular arterial events (0% versus 6.1%; P=0.008), and lower long-term mortality (3.4% versus 14.3%; P=0.003) than did those with at least 1 risk factor. Adjusted for demographics and stroke etiology, the number of well-documented risk factors was associated with higher risk for noncerebrovascular events. Increasing count of less well-documented risk factors was, in turn, independently associated with higher long-term mortality. In young adults with first-ever ischemic stroke, risk factor counts added independent prognostic information regarding noncerebrovascular events and mortality.

  13. Modifiable factors associated with caregiver burden among family caregivers of terminally ill Korean cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Seok-Joon; Kim, Jong-Sung; Jung, Jin-Gyu; Kim, Sung-Soo; Kim, Samyong

    2014-05-01

    Higher caregiver burden is associated with poor quality of life among family caregivers. However, in Korea, very few studies have examined factors associated with caregiver burden. The present study investigated factors associated with caregiver burden among family caregivers of terminally ill Korean cancer patients, particularly modifiable factors as a potential target of intervention strategies. A cross-sectional study using self-administered questionnaires was performed. Sixty-four family caregivers of terminally ill cancer patients who were admitted to the hospice-palliative care unit of a university hospital in South Korea were included. To identify caregiver burden, the Caregiver Reaction Assessment scale (CRA) was used in this study. Time spent in providing care per day, number of visits per week from other family members, family functioning, and a positive subscale, self-esteem, of the CRA were deemed as modifiable factors. Other sociodemographic, caregiving characteristics of the subjects were non-modifiable factors. Longer time spent providing care per day, fewer weekly visits from other family members, poor family functioning, and low self-esteem were considered as modifiable factors associated with caregiver burden. Low monthly income and the spouse being the family caregiver were non-modifiable factors. Our study has practical significance in that it identifies modifiable factors that can be used to devise intervention strategies. Developing and applying such intervention strategies for alleviating the factors associated with high caregiver burden could be important for improving the quality of life of both patients and their families.

  14. [Pharmacological treatment compliance and a description of its associated factors in patients with myasthenia gravis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idiaquez, J F; Gonzalez, S; Lasso-Penafiel, J; Barnett, C

    2018-01-01

    Medication adherence is a public health problem and this has not been previously studied in myasthenia gravis patients. To determine if patients with myasthenia gravis are adherent to treatment and to describe the clinical factors of patients who are non-adherent to treatment. Cross-sectional study of patients with myasthenia gravis followed at Padre Hurtado Hospital, Santiago de Chile, who received their medication through the hospital and therefore were on the pharmacy's list. Patients' participation was voluntary and anonymous. Medication adherence was assessed with the Morisky-Green-Levine survey (4 items). Patients were assessed for myasthenia gravis severity with the Manual Muscle Test, and myasthenia gravis-related quality of life with the MG-QOL15. Finally, patients were screened for depression with the 12-Item General Health Questionnaire. 26 patients were enrolled and 15 (57.7%) were women. Only 10 (38.5%) of patients were adherent to treatment. Patients who were not adherent to medication had more weakness (p = 0.06), worse quality of life (p = 0.008), were taking a greater number of myasthenia gravis drugs (p = 0.003) and had a higher risk of depression (p = 0.03). In this cohort of myasthenia gravis patients, three out of five patients were not adherent to treatment. These patients tended to have more weakness, worse quality of life and higher risk of depression. Medication adherence should be assessed routinely in patients with myasthenia gravis.

  15. Fever in trauma patients: evaluation of risk factors, including traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengualid, Victoria; Talari, Goutham; Rubin, David; Albaeni, Aiham; Ciubotaru, Ronald L; Berger, Judith

    2015-03-01

    The role of fever in trauma patients remains unclear. Fever occurs as a response to release of cytokines and prostaglandins by white blood cells. Many factors, including trauma, can trigger release of these factors. To determine whether (1) fever in the first 48 hours is related to a favorable outcome in trauma patients and (2) fever is more common in patients with head trauma. Retrospective study of trauma patients admitted to the intensive care unit for at least 2 days. Data were analyzed by using multivariate analysis. Of 162 patients studied, 40% had fever during the first 48 hours. Febrile patients had higher mortality rates than did afebrile patients. When adjusted for severity of injuries, fever did not correlate with mortality. Neither the incidence of fever in the first 48 hours after admission to the intensive care unit nor the number of days febrile in the unit differed between patients with and patients without head trauma (traumatic brain injury). About 70% of febrile patients did not have a source found for their fever. Febrile patients without an identified source of infection had lower peak white blood cell counts, lower maximum body temperature, and higher minimum platelet counts than did febrile patients who had an infectious source identified. The most common infection was pneumonia. No relationship was found between the presence of fever during the first 48 hours and mortality. Patients with traumatic brain injury did not have a higher incidence of fever than did patients without traumatic brain injury. About 30% of febrile patients had an identifiable source of infection. Further studies are needed to understand the origin and role of fever in trauma patients. ©2015 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  16. Multiple constitutional aetiological factors in bone marrow failure syndrome (BMFS) patients from north India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varma, Neelam; Varma, Subhash; Marwaha, Ram Kumar; Malhotra, Pankaj; Bansal, Deepak; Malik, Kiran; Kaur, Sukhdeep; Garewal, Gurjeevan

    2006-07-01

    A large number of patients diagnosed with bone marrow failure syndromes (BMFS), comprising aplastic anaemia (AA) and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), remain aetiologically uncharacterized worldover, especially in resource constrained set up. We carried out this study to identify a few constitutional causes in BMFS patients attending a tertiary care hospital in north India. Peripheral blood lymphocyte cultures were performed (with and without clastogens) in a cohort of 135 consecutive BMFS patients, in order to detect Fanconi anaemia (FA), Down's syndrome (+21), trisomy 8 (+8) and monosomy 7 (-7). Constitutional factors were detected in 17 (12.6%) patients. FA defect was observed in 24.07 percent (13/54), 16.66 percent (1/6) and 2.85 percent (1/35) paediatric aplastic anaemia, paediatric MDS and adult MDS patients respectively. Down's syndrome was detected in 5.00 percent (2/40) adult aplastic anaemia patients. None of the patients revealed trisomy 8 or monosomy 7. Presence of an underlying factor determines appropriate management, prognostication, family screening and genetic counselling of BMFS patients. Special tests required to confirm or exclude constitutional aetiological factors are not available to majority of the patients in our country. Diepoxybutane (DEB) test yielded better results than mitomycin C (MMC) test in our experience.

  17. CLINICOPATHOLOGICAL FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH POSITIVE PREOPERATIVE AXILLARY ULTRASOUND SCANNING IN BREAST CANCER PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lona Jalini

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Axillary lymph node status is the most important breast cancer prognostic factor. Preoperative axillary ultrasound examination (PAUS is used to triage patients for sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB or axillary lymph node dissection (ALND. We assessed the detection rate of lymph node metastases by PAUS in a screening unit and evaluated associations between clinicopathological factors and PAUS positivity. Patients and Methods: This was a single-centre retrospective analysis of data extracted from a hospital breast cancer database and clinical records. Clinical, radiological, and pathological and prognostic indices were compared between PAUS-positive and PAUS-negative patients subsequently found to have lymph node metastases on histopathological analysis. Results: Two hundred and two patients were eligible for analysis. 50.5% of lymph node-positive patients were correctly identified as PAUS positive. Patients with PAUS-positive lymph nodes had less favorable disease characteristics, namely clinically palpable lymph nodes, higher Nottingham prognostic (NPI index, high lymph node burden according to the European Society of Medical Oncology (ESMO group classification, and larger, grade 3 tumors with lymphovascular invasion and extranodal spread. Moreover, PAUS-positive patients had more macrometastases and lymph node involvement than PAUS-negative patients. Conclusion: PAUS-positive patients and PAUS-negative (SLNB-positive patients have different clinicopathological characteristics. The presence of LVI, extranodal spread, grade 3 histology, or large tumors with poor prognostic indices in PAUS-negative patients should be regarded with caution and perhaps prompt second-look ultrasound examination.

  18. Retrospective evaluation of combined modality treatment and prognostic factors in patients with esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neuhof, Dirk; Neumayer, Florian; Debus, Juergen; Einbeck, Wolfgang; Haschemian, Kai; Mai, Sabine K.; Wenz, Frederik; Hochhaus, Andreas; Willeke, Frank; Rudi, Jochen

    2005-01-01

    The influence of prognostic factors and combined modality treatment on survival was evaluated retrospectively for 156 patients with esophageal cancer receiving radiotherapy in different modalities between 1991 and 2001 at the Univ. of Heidelberg and the Universitaetsklinikum Mannheim. Forty-six patients (29.5%) were treated with radiotherapy alone, 74 patients (47.4%) had combined radiochemotherapy and 36 patients (23.1%) were operated on after receiving neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy. The median follow-up time was 10 months. Female patients showed a significantly better overall survival compared with male patients (p=0.031), younger patients (age 60 years) (p=0.02). Patients with hemoglobin concentration>13.4 g/dl before therapy (median hemoglobin concentration) had a significantly better overall survival than patients with lower hemoglobin concentration (p=0.044). Patients who received combined radiochemotherapy (with or without operation) had a survival advantage compared with radiotherapy alone. Overall survival after neoadjuvant treatment followed by operation was significantly better than in the two other groups, median survival times were 20 vs. 9 (RCHT) vs. 8 months (RT) (p=0.003). The data presented show for the first time that hemoglobin concentration in addition to gender and age was a prognostic factor for patients with esophageal cancer. A low hemoglobin value was a negative predictor

  19. Hepatic encephalopathy in patients with non-cirrhotic portal hypertension: Description, prevalence and risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicoletti, Valeria; Gioia, Stefania; Lucatelli, Pierleone; Nardelli, Silvia; Pasquale, Chiara; Nogas Sobrinho, Stefano; Pentassuglio, Ilaria; Greco, Francesca; De Santis, Adriano; Merli, Manuela; Riggio, Oliviero

    2016-09-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a common complication of cirrhosis but it is less studied in patients with non-cirrhotic portal hypertension (NCPH). To describe the prevalence of cognitive impairment (overt and covert HE) in NCPH patients and to identify the risk factors for its development. 51 patients with NCPH, 35 with chronic portal vein thrombosis (PVT) and 16 with idiopathic non-cirrhotic portal hypertension (INCPH), were evaluated for the presence of previous or present overt HE (OHE). The psychometric hepatic encephalopathy score and the SCAN battery were used to detect the presence of covert HE (CHE). 34 compensated cirrhotic patients were used as control. In NCPH patients, abdominal scans were performed to detect the presence of shunts. None of the patients experienced OHE at evaluation while 5.7% of PVT and 12.5% of INCPH patients referred at least one documented episode of previous OHE, similarly to patients with cirrhosis (14.7%). Even if lower than in patients with cirrhosis (64.7%), a considerable proportion of patients with chronic PVT (34.3%) and INCPH (25%) had CHE (p=0.008). The presence of a large portal-systemic shunt was the only factor significantly correlated to cognitive impairment in NCPH patients. HE is a tangible complication of NCPH and is mainly related to the presence of portal-systemic shunts. Copyright © 2016 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Health-related quality of life of patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Which factors are of significance?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linde, L.; Sørensen, J.; Ostergaard, M.

    2008-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease causing joint pain, loss of function and decreased health-related quality of life (HRQoL). HRQoL in RA patients is associated with several risk factors; in this paper the evidence relating to the most important risk factors is reviewed....... Modern medical therapy has improved HRQoL in RA patients, while demographic factors (female sex and older age), low socioeconomic status (in terms of education and position in the work force) and the presence of comorbid conditions appear to be associated with poorer HRQoL Udgivelsesdato: 2008/3/3...

  1. Retrospective cohort study of prognostic factors in patients with oral cavity and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo, José F; Carrillo, Liliana C; Cano, Ana; Ramirez-Ortega, Margarita C; Chanona, Jorge G; Avilés, Alejandro; Herrera-Goepfert, Roberto; Corona-Rivera, Jaime; Ochoa-Carrillo, Francisco J; Oñate-Ocaña, Luis F

    2016-04-01

    Prognostic factors in oral cavity and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) are debated. The purpose of this study was to investigate the association of prognostic factors with oncologic outcomes. Patients with oral cavity and oropharyngeal SCC treated from 1997 to 2012 were included in this retrospective cohort study. Associations of prognostic factors with locoregional recurrence (LRR) or overall survival (OS) were analyzed using the logistic regression and the Cox models. Six hundred thirty-four patients were included in this study; tumor size, surgical margins, and N classification were associated with LRR (p oral cavity and oropharyngeal SCC. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. IMPACT OF MEDICAL AND SOCIAL FACTORS ON SURGICAL OUTCOMES OF PULMONARY TUBERCULOSIS IN HIV POSITIVE PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Аlkаz

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the study of the impact of social and medical factors and bad habits on the outcomes of planned surgery in 95 patients with concurrent respiratory tuberculosis and HIV infection The correlation analysis was performed which discovered the factors providing a positive impact on treatment outcomes The following factors have the strongest association with treatment outcome: patient's regular job, family, no alcohol or nicotine addiction, a form of tuberculosis, and administration of antiretroviral therapy It was noted that surgery outcome could be predicted and potential complications prevented 

  3. Changes in serum growth factors in stroke rehabilitation patients and their relation to hemiparesis improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okazaki, Hideto; Beppu, Hidehiko; Mizutani, Kenmei; Okamoto, Sayaka; Sonoda, Shigeru

    2014-07-01

    Predicting recovery from hemiparesis after stroke is important for rehabilitation. A few recent studies reported that the levels of some growth factors shortly after stroke were positively correlated with the clinical outcomes during the chronic phase. The aim of this study was to examine the relationships between the serum levels of growth factors (vascular endothelial growth factor [VEGF], insulin-like growth factor-I [IGF-I], and hepatocyte growth factor [HGF]) and improvement in hemiparesis in stroke patients who received rehabilitation in a postacute rehabilitation hospital. Subjects were 32 stroke patients (cerebral infarction: 21 and intracerebral hemorrhage [ICH]: 11). We measured serum levels of VEGF, IGF-I, and HGF and 5 items of the Stroke Impairment Assessment Set (SIAS) for hemiparesis on admission and at discharge. Age-matched healthy subjects (n=15) served as controls. Serum levels of VEGF and HGF in cerebral infarct patients on admission were higher than those in control subjects, and the serum levels of IGF-I in stroke patients were lower than those in controls. The level of HGF in ICH patients on admission was negatively correlated with gains in SIAS, and higher outliers in HGF concentration were correlated with lower gains in SIAS. Focusing on the extremely high levels of these factors may be a predictor of the low recovery from hemiparesis after stroke. Copyright © 2014 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Bleeding and asymptomatic overdose in patients under Vitamin K antagonist therapy: Frequency and risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Ben Mbarka

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Vitamin K antagonists are widely used in the treatment and prevention of thromboembolic disease. However, these drugs can cause serious side effects, especially bleeding. This study aims to evaluate frequency and risk factors of both bleeding and asymptomatic overdose in North African patients undergoing Vitamin K antagonist therapy. Methods: We performed a cross-sectional study in patients undergoing Vitamin K antagonist therapy. A statistical analysis has been conducted to identify overdose and bleeding risk factors by using chi-square test (p < .05. Results: One hundred and eleven patients were included. We recorded 14 cases of bleeding and 26 cases of asymptomatic overdose. Advanced age, poor adherence, concomitant use of paracetamol and history of previous bleeding are significant risk factors of over-anticoagulation. An INR value over 6 at admission, a high therapeutic target range for INR, concomitant use of acetylsalicylic acid, lack of information on overdose signs and measures to be taken in case of bleeding were identified as risk factors for bleeding. Conclusion: Most of the risk factors identified in our study seem to be related to patients lack of information and education. These results highlight the importance of creating a therapeutic patient education program. Keywords: Vitamin K antagonist, Bleeding, Risk factor, Overdose

  5. Mapping the Factors Affecting Household Food Security of Tuberculosis Patients in Coastal Region of Surabaya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susilaningrum, D.; Ulama, B. S. S.; Lathifah, R.

    2018-04-01

    Food security is a condition of a person who has access to adequate, safe, and nutritious food to meet the needs of a healthy life. Affordability of food is determined by the aggregate purchasing power. It is also can be measured by the amount of poverty in Indonesia which reached 28,07 million in 2014. According to data from the health department, the largest TB cases in Indonesia were in East Java Province and Surabaya accounted for the largest number, there are 48379 cases in 2015. This study mapping the factors that affect household food security of TB patients in the coastal areas of Surabaya. This study used secondary data sources from 11 clinics i.e. TB patient's addres and primary data source to survey patients about food security. Variables used in this study are variables related to socioeconomic factors and sanitary factors. Those variables will be analyzed descriptively and mapping using biplot analysis. Biplot generated based on socio-economic factors, sanitary factors, and status of households in 11 districts Surabaya that near the beach geographically. The result shows that 64% of TB patient households are food insecure than the left are food secure. More than 50% of TB patient households have a good house physically. From the result of mapping between sub-districts and factors, formed five groups consisting of: 1) Benowo and Mulyorejo; 2) Asemrowo, Gunung Anyar, Sukolilo and Pabean Cantikan; 3) Semampir, Krembangan and Bulak; 4) Kenjeran; and 5) Rungkut.

  6. Environmental factors in a population-based inception cohort of inflammatory bowel disease patients in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burisch, J; Pedersen, Natalia; Cukovic-Cavka, S

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: The incidence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is increasing in Eastern Europe possibly due to changes in environmental factors towards a more "westernised" standard of living. The aim of this study was to investigate differences in exposure to environmental factors prior ...... and Western European patients differed in environmental factors prior to diagnosis. Eastern European patients exhibited higher occurrences of suspected risk factors for IBD included in the Western lifestyle.......BACKGROUND AND AIMS: The incidence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is increasing in Eastern Europe possibly due to changes in environmental factors towards a more "westernised" standard of living. The aim of this study was to investigate differences in exposure to environmental factors prior...... to diagnosis in Eastern and Western European IBD patients. METHODS: The EpiCom cohort is a population-based, prospective inception cohort of 1560 unselected IBD patients from 31 European countries covering a background population of 10.1 million. At the time of diagnosis patients were asked to complete an 87...

  7. Cardiovascular risk factors and TIA characteristics in 19,872 Swedish TIA patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ström, J O; Tavosian, A; Appelros, P

    2016-12-01

    Transient ischemic attack (TIA) constitutes a major risk factor for stroke, making TIA patients an important group for secondary intervention. The aim of this study was to account for risk factor prevalence in TIA patients and analyze the association between TIA characteristics and risk factors. We included 20,871 TIA events in 19,872 patients who were registered in the Swedish Riksstroke registry during the years 2010 through 2012. Data from other Swedish registers were used for comparison. The following variables were analyzed: age, sex, diabetes mellitus, atrial fibrillation (AF), cigarette smoking, and antihypertensive treatment. Compared to the general population (based on data retrieved from Sweden's national public health survey 'Health on equal terms'), TIA patients more often had diabetes mellitus (prevalence ratio, PR = 2.3), AF without oral anticoagulants (OAC) (PR = 2.8), and AF on OAC (PR = 1.6). Blood pressure medication was less prevalent among TIA patients than in the general population (PR = 0.57). Increasing age was associated with longer attacks. The fact that diabetes mellitus, atrial fibrillation, and smoking are more common in TIA patients than in the general population suggests that these factors are risk factors for TIA, even if causal relations cannot be proven. The relation between increasing age and longer attacks possibly reflects an increased proportion of embolic TIAs, or impaired recovery ability. Our results also suggest a significant proportion of untreated hypertension cases in the population. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Risk factors for geriatric patient falls in rehabilitation hospital settings: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Edgar Ramos; Freund-Heritage, Rosalie; da Costa, Bruno R

    2011-09-01

    To review the literature to identify and synthesize the evidence on risk factors for patient falls in geriatric rehabilitation hospital settings. Eligible studies were systematically searched on 16 databases from inception to December 2010. The search strategies used a combination of terms for rehabilitation hospital patients, falls, risk factors and older adults. Cross-sectional, cohort, case-control studies and randomized clinical trials (RCTs) published in English that investigated risks for falls among patients ≥65 years of age in rehabilitation hospital settings were included. Studies that investigated fall risk assessment tools, but did not investigate risk factors themselves or did not report a measure of risk (e.g. odds ratio, relative risk) were excluded. A total of 2,824 references were identified; only eight articles concerning six studies met the inclusion criteria. In these, 1,924 geriatric rehabilitation patients were followed. The average age of the patients ranged from 77 to 83 years, the percentage of women ranged from 56% to 81%, and the percentage of fallers ranged from 15% to 54%. Two were case-control studies, two were RCTs and four were prospective cohort studies. Several intrinsic and extrinsic risk factors for falls were identified. Carpet flooring, vertigo, being an amputee, confusion, cognitive impairment, stroke, sleep disturbance, anticonvulsants, tranquilizers and antihypertensive medications, age between 71 and 80, previous falls, and need for transfer assistance are risk factors for geriatric patient falls in rehabilitation hospital settings.

  9. Causes and risk factors of falls in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudzińska, Monika; Bukowczan, Sylwia; Banaszkiewicz, Krzysztof; Stozek, Joanna; Zajdel, Katarzyna; Szczudlik, Andrzej

    2008-01-01

    Falls are a common and serious problem among Parkinson's disease (PD) patients. However, knowledge about the causes and risk factors of falls is limited. There have been a few attempts to classify the causes of falls. The classification suggested by Olanow seems to be the most comprehensive one. The aim of this study was to analyze retrospectively the causes of falls and risk factors of falls in PD patients. One hundred and four patients with moderately advanced PD were included in the study. The patients were asked to describe the circumstances and consequences of falls which occurred during 12 months preceding the examination. The falls were classified according to the Olanow classification of causes of falls. Fifty-two patients (50%) reported at least one fall during the previous year with a mean number of 1.5 falls per year. The most common causes of falls were environmental factors, sudden falls and postural instability. There were no falls caused by severe dyskinesia, drugs or cardiovascular disorders. The only independent risk factors of the recurrent falls identified in this study were UPDRS part II score (OR 1.17, 95% CI: 1.02-1.37) and Mini Mental State Examination score (OR 0.85, 95% CI: 0.72-0.99). Considering these results we may be able to prevent most falls by means of the education of patients about environmental factors and using adequate rehabilitation techniques concentrating on postural stability and gait.

  10. Risk factors for malignancy in patients with solitary thyroid nodules and their impact on the management

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    Jun D Tai

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Presently it is difficult to differentiate malignancy for thyroid nodules by palpation, ultrasonography and fine-needle aspiration cytology (FNAC at the outpatient department, especially for solitary thyroid nodule (STN. So a great emphasis should be placed on the STN. AIms: The objective of this study was to investigate the predictive clinicopathological risk factors for malignancy in patients with STN and further to provide an appropriate clinical management. Materials and Methods: The records were reviewed from 265 patients with STN who had undergone thyroidectomy in our hospital. All cases were classified as two independent groups in terms of the final pathological results to assess the independent risk factors using a multinomial logistic regression analysis. Results: A multinomial logistic analysis revealed that the male gender, microcalcification and cervical lymphadenopathy were independent risk factors related to malignancy in patients with STN. The incidence of malignancy in patients with 0,1,2,3 risks was 10.71%, 26.6%, 61.43%, and 100%, respectively. Conclusions: Male gender, microcalcification and lymphadenopathy were independent risk factors for predicting the malignancy in patients with STN. Patients with more than two of those risk factors should be subjected to further examination or thyroidectomy. The findings may provide a simple and reasonable management for the STN.

  11. Factors predicting survival in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients on non-invasive ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez Calzada, Nuria; Prats Soro, Enric; Mateu Gomez, Lluis; Giro Bulta, Esther; Cordoba Izquierdo, Ana; Povedano Panades, Monica; Dorca Sargatal, Jordi; Farrero Muñoz, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Non invasive ventilation (NIV) improves quality of life and extends survival in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients. However, few data exist about the factors related to survival. We intended to assess the predictive factors that influence survival in patients after NIV initiation. Patients who started NIV from 2000 to 2014 and were tolerant (compliance ≥ 4 hours) were included; demographic, disease related and respiratory variables at NIV initiation were analysed. Statistical analysis was performed using the Kaplan-Meier test and Cox proportional hazard models. 213 patients were included with median survival from NIV initiation of 13.5 months. In univariate analysis, the identified risk factors for mortality were severity of bulbar involvement (HR 2), Forced Vital Capacity (FVC) % (HR 0.99) and ALSFRS-R (HR 0.97). Multivariate analysis showed that bulbar involvement (HR 1.92) and ALSFRS-R (HR 0.97) were independent predictive factors of survival in patients on NIV. In our study, the two prognostic factors in ALS patients following NIV were the severity of bulbar involvement and ALSFRS-R at the time on NIV initiation. A better assessment of bulbar involvement, including evaluation of the upper airway, and a careful titration on NIV are necessary to optimize treatment efficacy.

  12. Factors that influence the QOL of cancer patients who have undergone radiotherapy as outpatients

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    Senuma, Maiko; Shinoda, Shizuyo; Kitada, Yoko; Takei, Akemi; Kanda, Kiyoko; Seyama, Ruka; Igarashi, Reiko

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to elucidate the factors that influence the QOL of cancer patients who have undergone radiotherapy in the outpatient setting. The patient's quality of life (QOL) was investigated by using the QOL evaluation standard functional assessment of cancer therapy-general (FACT-G) in 73 cancer patients (mean age 64.2±12.2 yrs standard deviation (SD)) who had undergone radiotherapy as outpatients. The mean QOL score was 74.8±17.1 pointy, and a significant difference was seen in about 25 items as a result of examining the factors that influenced the patient's QOL. In addition, a stepwise multiple regression analysis revealed that the factors which influenced the QOL were the operation due to the original disease, social support (excluding the family), tiredness, relapse and the metastasis, performance status (PS), uneasiness of presence in descending order of influence. The results revealed the strong influence of psychological, mental and social factors on the QOL score. From the patient of view of nursing support for cancer patients, screening for these factors may allow earlier detection of any decrease in the QOL, or identify when the QOL has already decreased. Furthermore, support should be initiated at as early a stage as possible. (author)

  13. Studying the Relationship between Individual and Organizational Factors and Nurses' Perception of Patient Safety Culture

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    Farahnaz Abdolahzadeh

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Safety culture is considered as an important factor in improving patient safety. Therefore, identifying individual and organizational factors affecting safety culture is crucial. This study was carried out to determine individual and organizational factors associated with nurses' perception of patient safety culture. Methods: The present descriptive study included 940 nurses working in four training hospitals affiliated with Urmia University of Medical Sciences (Iran. Data was collected through the self-report questionnaire of patient safety culture. Descriptive (number, percent, mean, and standard deviation and inferential (t-test and analysis of variance statistics were used to analyze the data in SPSS. Results: Nurses' perception of patient safety culture was significantly correlated with marital status, workplace, and overtime hours. Conclusion: The results of this study revealed that some individual and organizational factors can impact on nurses' perception of patient safety culture. Nursing authorities should thus pay more attention to factors which promote patient safety culture and ultimately the safety of provided services.

  14. Factors Associated With Higher Caregiver Burden Among Family Caregivers of Elderly Cancer Patients: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Lixia; Mordiffi, Siti Zubaidah

    Caring for elderly cancer patients may cause multidimensional burden on family caregivers. Recognition of factors associated with caregiver burden is important for providing proactive support to caregivers at risk. The aim of this study was to identify factors associated with high caregiver burden among family caregivers of elderly cancer patients. A systematic search of 7 electronic databases was conducted from database inception to October 2014. The identified studies were screened, and full text was further assessed. The quality of included studies was assessed using a checklist, and relevant data were extracted using a predeveloped data extraction form. Best-evidence synthesis model was used for data synthesis. The search yielded a total of 3339 studies, and 7 studies involving 1233 family caregivers were included after screening and full assessment of 116 studies. Moderate evidence supported that younger caregivers, solid tumors, and assistance with patient's activities of daily living were significantly associated with high caregiver burden. Eighteen factors were supported by limited evidence, and 1 was a conflicting factor. The scientific literature to date proved that caregiver burden was commonly experienced by family caregivers of elderly cancer patients. The evidence indicated that family caregivers who were at younger age, caring for solid tumor patients, and providing assistance with patient's activities of daily living reported high caregiver burden. The data provide evidence in identifying family caregivers at high risk of high caregiver burden. More high-quality studies are needed to clarify and determine the estimates of the effects of individual factors.

  15. Percutaneous transluminal forceps biopsy in patients suspected of having malignant biliary obstruction: factors influencing the outcomes of 271 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jung Gu; Jung, Gyoo-Sik; Yun, Jong Hyouk [Kosin University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seo-gu, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Yun, Byung Chul; Lee, Sang Uk; Han, Byung Hoon [Kosin University College of Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Ko, Ji Ho [Busan Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-10-15

    To evaluate predictive factors for false-negative diagnosis of percutaneous forceps biopsies in patients suspected of having a malignant biliary obstruction Two hundred seventy one consecutive patients with obstructive jaundice underwent percutaneous forceps biopsy. In each patient, three to five specimens (mean, 3.5 specimens) were collected from the lesion. The final diagnosis for each patient was confirmed with pathologic findings at surgery, additional histocytologic data, or clinical and radiologic follow-up. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to identify risk factors associated with false-negative diagnosis. One hundred ninety four of 271 biopsies resulted in correct diagnoses of malignancy, while 20 biopsy diagnoses were proved to be true-negative. There were 57 false-negative diagnoses and no false-positive diagnoses. The diagnostic performance of transluminal forceps biopsy in malignant biliary obstructions was as follows: sensitivity, 77.2%; specificity, 100%; and accuracy, 78.9%; positive predictive value, 100%, negative predictive value; 25.9%. Periampullary segment of common bile duct, intrahepatic bile duct and metastatic disease were the significant risk factors of false-negative diagnosis. Percutaneous forceps biopsy provides relatively high accuracy in the diagnosis of malignant biliary obstructions. The predictive factors of false-negative biopsy were determined to be biopsy site and origin of primary tumour. (orig.)

  16. [Risk factors of postoperative meningitis in patients with chiasm-sellar tumors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popugaev, K A; Savin, I A; Ershova, O N; Kurdyumova, N V; Tabasaransky, T F; Oshorov, A V; Kadashev, B A; Kalinin, P L; Kutin, M A

    2014-01-01

    Postoperative intracranial infectious complications are one of the most topical problems of neurosurgical intensive care due to theirs significant capability to impair outcomes of the main disease. To define the risk factors of postoperative meningitis in patients with chiasm-sellar tumors. 1. to define the effect of somatic and intracranial risk factors on occurrence of postoperative meningitis in patients after transsphenoidal and transcranial approaches to the tumor. 2. To define the effect of postoperative meningitis on outcomes of treatment in patients after transsphenoidal and transcranial approaches to the tumor. Somatic and intracranial risk factors of occurrence of postoperative meningitis (pneumonia, urinary tract infection, sepsis, intra-abdominal hypertension, the presence of external ventricular and lumbar drainage, monitoring of intracranial pressure, cerebrospinal fluid, and reoperation) were fixed every day. The study was conducted in the ICU of the Burdenko from October, 2010 to July, 2012. The 34 patients (19 males, 15 females) were included in the study (average age 47.5 years). The patients were divided into two groups; 17 patients each group. The group-1 included patients after transcranial approach to the tumor and the group-2 included patients after transsphenoidal approach. In the group-1 a meningitis occurred in 3 patients (17.6% +/- 9.2%, DI [-0.4 - 35.6]). In the group-2 a meningitis occurred in 7 patients (41.2% +/- 11.9) DI 95% [17.8 - 64.4]. Accumulation of cerebrospinal fluid under the skin flap authentically increased a risk of a meningitis occurrence in patients after transcranial approach to the tumor (p = 0.031). There was no defined statistical significance of other risk factors. But there was defined a trend of the increasing of meningitis occurrence in patients after transsphenoidal approach in case of lumbar drainage or reoperation. Duration of mechanical ventilation and ICU stay in patients with meningitis was authentically

  17. Hemodialysis in a patient with severe hemophilia A and factor VIII inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalakrishnan, Natarajan; Usha, Thiruvengadam; Thopalan, Balasubramaniyan; Dhanapriya, Jeyachandran; Dineshkumar, Thanigachalam; Thirumalvalavan, Kaliaperumal; Sakthirajan, Ramanathan

    2016-10-01

    Hemophilia A is a hereditary X-linked recessive disease caused by mutations in the gene encoding factor VIII (FVIII), occurring in 1 out of 10,000 persons. Life expectancy and quality of life have dramatically improved recently in patients with hemophilia. Chronic kidney disease and need for renal replacement therapy in these patients are rare. The development of inhibitors to FVIII is the most serious complication of hemophilia and makes treatment of bleeds very challenging. We describe here a 28-year-old male patient with severe hemophilia A with presence of factor VIII inhibitor, who had end stage renal disease. Central venous access device was inserted along with infusion of factor eight inhibitor bypass activity before and after the procedure. He is currently on thrice weekly hemodialysis and doing well for 6 months without bleeding episodes. To our knowledge, hemophilia A with factor VIII inhibitor managed with hemodialysis has not been reported so far. © 2016 International Society for Hemodialysis.

  18. Case-controlled study on risk factors for the development of constipation in hospitalized patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueki, Tetsuya; Nagai, Keiko; Ooe, Nobuharu; Nakashima, Mihoko N; Nishida, Koyo; Nakamura, Junzo; Nakashima, Mikiro

    2011-03-01

    Constipation is a common problem in hospitalized patients; however, the relative risks of its development with various factors have not been clarified. To clarify the risk factors associated with constipation, we performed a case-controlled study of 165 hospitalized patients who were not laxative users on admission. They were divided into case (n=35) and control (n=130) groups according to laxative administration during hospitalization. Comparison of the patient backgrounds in the two groups revealed significant differences in the activities of daily living, length of fasting, rest level on admission, cerebrovascular disease, and administration of hypnotics. Multiple logistic regression analysis using these five factors as autonomous variables showed that administration of hypnotics (odds ratio, 2.79; 95% confidence interval, 1.10-7.06; p=0.031) was significantly related to laxative use. Therefore, the administration of hypnotics may be the principal cause of constipation development in hospitalized patients and they should be used with caution.

  19. Nurses' Perceptions of Implementing Fall Prevention Interventions to Mitigate Patient-Specific Fall Risk Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Deleise S; Montie, Mary; Conlon, Paul; Reynolds, Margaret; Ripley, Robert; Titler, Marita G

    2016-08-01

    Evidence-based (EB) fall prevention interventions to mitigate patient-specific fall risk factors are readily available but not routinely used in practice. Few studies have examined nurses' perceptions about both the use of these EB interventions and implementation strategies designed to promote their adoption. This article reports qualitative findings of nurses' perceptions about use of EB fall prevention interventions to mitigate patient-specific fall risks, and implementation strategies to promote use of these interventions. The findings revealed five major themes: before-study fall prevention practices, use of EB fall prevention interventions tailored to patient-specific fall risk factors, beneficial implementation strategies, overall impact on approach to fall prevention, and challenges These findings are useful to guide nurses' engagement and use of EB fall prevention practices tailored to patient-specific fall risk factors. © The Author(s) 2016.

  20. Profile of Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Patients with Coronary Heart Disease, Normal and Impaired Carbohydrate Metabolism

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    І.V. Cherniavska

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of research was to conduct the comparative analysis of the profile of cardiovascular risk factors in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD and normal either impaired carbohydrate metabolism. Materials and methods. One hundred and forty two patients were observed. In order to estimate the rate of different forms of CHD depending on the state of carbohydrate metabolism such groups were formed: the first group consisted of 83 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM, the second group involved 34 patients with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT, the third group consisted of 25 patients with normal carbohydrate metabolism. The ischemic changes of myocardium were detected by ambulatory ECG monitoring with the obligatory achievement of submaximal heart rate during the research. Results. Silent myocardial ischemia was educed in 19 (22.9 % patients with type 2 DM, in 3 (8.8 % persons with IGT and in 2 (8.0 % patients with normal carbohydrate metabolism. Smoking, burdened heredity, violation in the haemostatic system more often occurred in the group of patients with type 2 DM and silent myocardial ischemia in comparison with the patients with type 2 DM without CHD. The profile of general population cardiovascular risk factors in patients with CHD and type 2 DM belongs to the most unfavorable. At the same time for patients with early violations of carbohydrate metabolism and normal carbohydrate metabolism such profile statistically does not differentiate meaningfully. Conclusions. Patients with type 2 DM and silent myocardial ischemia as compared to patients with type 2 DM without CHD have more expressed violations of indexes of general population cardiovascular risk factors for certain.

  1. Association of ABO blood groups with von Willebrand factor, factor VIII and ADAMTS-13 in patients with lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xia; Chen, Xiaogang; Yang, Jiezuan; Guo, Renyong

    2017-09-01

    Coagulative and fibrinolytic disorders appear to be associated with the development of lung cancer. The aim of the present study was to determine plasma levels of von Willebrand factor (VWF) and a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with a thrombospondin type 1 motif 13 (ADAMTS-13), and factor VIII (FVIII) activity, in association with O and non-O blood groups in patients with lung cancer. Plasma levels of VWF and ADAMTS-13, and FVIII activity were measured in 115 patients with lung cancer and 98 healthy subjects. Phenotyping of the ABO blood groups was also performed for the two groups. Significantly increased VWF levels and FVIII activity, as well as significantly decreased ADAMTS-13 levels, were observed in patients with distant metastasis as compared with those without distant metastasis and the healthy controls. Plasma VWF levels and FVIII activity were significantly increased in subjects with non-O type blood compared with those with type O blood in the two groups. However, a significant decrease in ADAMTS-13 levels was observed only in the control group among those with non-O type blood, compared with those with type O blood. The results of the present study indicate that increased VWF and decreased ADAMTS-13 levels facilitate the invasiveness and metastasis of lung cancer. Non-O blood groups constitute a risk factor for increased VWF and FVIII in plasma. Continued monitoring of VWF and ADAMTS-13 levels, and of FVIII activity in patients with lung cancer with distinct blood groups may help to minimize the incidence of thrombotic events and improve assessment of disease progression.

  2. Prognostic factors in patients with node-negative gastric cancer: an Indian experience

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    Ranganathan Rama

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The status of the regional nodes is the most important prognostic factor in gastric cancer. There are subgroups of patients with different prognosis even in node-negative patients of gastric cancer. The aim of this study is to analyze the factors influencing the prognosis in Indian patients with node-negative gastric cancer. Methods This was a retrospective analysis of patients who underwent radical gastrectomy in a tertiary cancer centre in India between1991 and 2007. The study group included only patients with histologically node-negative disease. Various clinical, pathological and treatment related factors in this group of patients were analyzed to determine their prognostic ability by univariate and multivariate analyses. Results Among the 417 patients who underwent gastrectomy during this period, 122 patients had node-negative disease. A major proportion of the patients had advanced gastric cancer. The 5-year overall survival and disease-free survival in all node-negative gastric cancer patients was 68.2% and 67.5% respectively. The overall recurrence rate in this group was 27.3%. On univariate analysis, the factors found to significantly influence the disease-free survival were the size, location and presence or absence of serosal invasion of the primary tumor. However, on multivariate analysis, only tumor size more than 3 cm and serosal invasion were found to be independently associated with an inferior survival. Conclusion Serosal invasion and primary tumor size more than 3 cm independently predict a poor outcome in patients with node-negative gastric cancer.

  3. Genetic and Non-genetic Factors Associated With Constipation in Cancer Patients Receiving Opioids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laugsand, Eivor A; Skorpen, Frank; Kaasa, Stein; Sabatowski, Rainer; Strasser, Florian; Fayers, Peter; Klepstad, Pål

    2015-06-18

    To examine whether the inter-individual variation in constipation among patients receiving opioids for cancer pain is associated with genetic or non-genetic factors. Cancer patients receiving opioids were included from 17 centers in 11 European countries. Intensity of constipation was reported by 1,568 patients on a four-point categorical scale. Non-genetic factors were included as covariates in stratified regression analyses on the association between constipation and 75 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within 15 candidate genes related to opioid- or constipation-signaling pathways (HTR3E, HTR4, HTR2A, TPH1, ADRA2A, CHRM3, TACR1, CCKAR, KIT, ARRB2, GHRL, ABCB1, COMT, OPRM1, and OPRD1). The non-genetic factors significantly associated with constipation were type of laxative, mobility and place of care among patients receiving laxatives (N=806), in addition to Karnofsky performance status and presence of metastases among patients not receiving laxatives (N=762) (Pconstipation. Five SNPs, rs1800532 in TPH1, rs1799971 in OPRM1, rs4437575 in ABCB1, rs10802789 in CHRM3, and rs2020917 in COMT were associated with constipation (Phospitalization, Karnofsky performance status, presence of metastases, and five SNPs within TPH1, OPRM1, ABCB1, CHRM3, and COMT may contribute to the variability in constipation among cancer patients treated with opioids. Knowledge of these factors may help to develop new therapies and to identify patients needing a more individualized approach to treatment.

  4. Contextual factors affecting autonomy for patients in Iranian hospitals: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, Hossein; Sadeghian, Efat; Seyedfatemi, Naeimeh; Mohammadi, Eesa; Crowley, Maureen

    2016-01-01

    Consideration of patient autonomy is an essential element in individualized, patient-centered, ethical care. Internal and external factors associated with patient autonomy are related to culture and it is not clear what they are in Iran. The aim of this study was to explore contextual factors affecting the autonomy of patients in Iranian hospitals. This was a qualitative study using conventional content analysis methods. Thirty-four participants (23 patients, 9 nurses, and 2 doctors) from three Iranian teaching hospitals, selected using purposive sampling, participated in semi-structured interviews. Unstructured observation and filed notes were other methods for data collection. The data were subjected to qualitative content analysis and analyzed using the MAXQDA-10 software. Five categories and sixteen subcategories were identified. The five main categories related to patient autonomy were: Intrapersonal factors, physical health status, supportive family and friends, communication style, and organizational constraints. In summary, this study uncovered contextual factors that the care team, managers, and planners in the health field should target in order to improve patient autonomy in Iranian hospitals.

  5. Contextual factors affecting autonomy for patients in Iranian hospitals: A qualitative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, Hossein; Sadeghian, Efat; Seyedfatemi, Naeimeh; Mohammadi, Eesa; Crowley, Maureen

    2016-01-01

    Background: Consideration of patient autonomy is an essential element in individualized, patient-centered, ethical care. Internal and external factors associated with patient autonomy are related to culture and it is not clear what they are in Iran. The aim of this study was to explore contextual factors affecting the autonomy of patients in Iranian hospitals. Materials and Methods: This was a qualitative study using conventional content analysis methods. Thirty-four participants (23 patients, 9 nurses, and 2 doctors) from three Iranian teaching hospitals, selected using purposive sampling, participated in semi-structured interviews. Unstructured observation and filed notes were other methods for data collection. The data were subjected to qualitative content analysis and analyzed using the MAXQDA-10 software. Results: Five categories and sixteen subcategories were identified. The five main categories related to patient autonomy were: Intrapersonal factors, physical health status, supportive family and friends, communication style, and organizational constraints. Conclusions: In summary, this study uncovered contextual factors that the care team, managers, and planners in the health field should target in order to improve patient autonomy in Iranian hospitals. PMID:27186203

  6. Risk Factors for Pneumonia in Ventilated Trauma Patients with Multiple Rib Fractures

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    Hyun Oh Park

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP is a common disease that may contribute to morbidity and mortality among trauma patients in the intensive care unit (ICU. This study evaluated the associations between trauma factors and the development of VAP in ventilated patients with multiple rib fractures. Methods: We retrospectively and consecutively evaluated 101 patients with multiple rib fractures who were ventilated and managed at our hospital between January 2010 and December 2015, analyzing the associations between VAP and trauma factors in these patients. Trauma factors included sternal fracture, flail chest, diaphragm injury, traumatic aortic dissection, combined cardiac injury, pulmonary contusion, pneumothorax, hemothorax, hemopneumothorax, abbreviated injury scale score, thoracic trauma severity score, and injury severity score. Results: Forty-six patients (45.5% had at least 1 episode of VAP, 10 (21.7% of whom died in the ICU. Of the 55 (54.5% patients who did not have pneumonia, 9 (16.4% died in the ICU. Using logistic regression analysis, we found that VAP was associated with severe lung contusion (odds ratio, 3.07; 95% confidence interval, 1.12 to 8.39; p=0.029. Conclusion: Severe pulmonary contusion (pulmonary lung contusion score 6–12 is an independent risk factor for VAP in ventilated trauma patients with multiple rib fractures.

  7. Differences in cardiovascular disease risk factor management in primary care by sex of physician and patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabenkin, Hava; Eaton, Charles B; Roberts, Mary B; Parker, Donna R; McMurray, Jerome H; Borkan, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate differences in the management of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors based upon the sex of the patient and physician and their interaction in primary care practice. We evaluated CVD risk factor management in 4,195 patients cared for by 39 male and 16 female primary care physicians in 30 practices in southeastern New England. Many of the sex-based differences in CVD risk factor management on crude analysis are lost once adjusted for confounding factors found at the level of the patient, physician, and practice. In multilevel adjusted analyses, styles of CVD risk factor management differed by the sex of the physician, with more female physicians documenting diet and weight loss counseling for hypertension (odds ratio [OR] = 2.22; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.12-4.40) and obesity (OR = 2.14; 95% CI, 1.30-3.51) and more physical activity counseling for obesity (OR = 2.03; 95% CI, 1.30-3.18) and diabetes (OR = 6.55; 95% CI, 2.01-21.33). Diabetes management differed by the sex of the patient, with fewer women receiving glucose-lowering medications (OR = 0.49; 95% CI, 0.25-0.94), angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor therapy (OR = 0.39; 95% CI, 0.22-0.72), and aspirin prophylaxis (OR = 0.30; 95% CI, 0.15-0.58). Quality of care as measured by patients meeting CVD risk factors treatment goals was similar regardless of the sex of the patient or physician. Selected differences were found in the style of CVD risk factor management by sex of physician and patient.

  8. Gross Instability After Hip Arthroscopy: An Analysis of Case Reports Evaluating Surgical and Patient Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Marco; Memon, Muzammil; Simunovic, Nicole; Belzile, Etienne; Philippon, Marc J; Ayeni, Olufemi R

    2016-06-01

    Gross hip instability is a rare complication after hip arthroscopy, and there is limited literature surrounding this topic. This systematic review investigates cases of gross hip instability after arthroscopy and discusses the risk factors associated with this complication. A systematic search was performed in duplicate for studies investigating gross hip instability after hip arthroscopy up to October 2015. Study parameters including sample size, mechanism and type of dislocation, surgical procedure details, patient characteristics, postoperative rehabilitation protocol, and level of evidence were analyzed. The systematic review identified 9 case reports investigating gross hip instability after hip arthroscopy (10 patients). Anterior dislocation occurred in 66.7% of patients, and most injuries occurred with a low-energy mechanism. Common surgical factors cited included unrepaired capsulotomy (77.8%) and iliopsoas release (33.3%), whereas patient factors included female gender (77.8%), acetabular dysplasia (22.2%), and general ligamentous laxity (11.1%). Postoperative restrictions and protocols were variable and inconsistently reported, and their relation to post-arthroscopy instability was difficult to ascertain. This systematic review discussed various patient, surgical, and postoperative risk factors of gross hip instability after arthroscopy. Patient characteristics such as female gender, hip dysplasia, and ligamentous laxity may be risk factors for post-arthroscopy dislocation. Similarly, surgical risk factors for iatrogenic hip instability may include unrepaired capsulotomies and iliopsoas debridement, although the role of capsular closure in iatrogenic instability is not clear. The influences of postoperative restrictions and protocols on dislocation are also unclear in the current literature. Surgeons should be cognizant of these risk factors when performing hip arthroscopy and be mindful that these factors appear to occur in combination. Level IV

  9. The effect of patient-specific factors on radiation-induced regional lung injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garipagaoglu, Melahat; Munley, Michael T.; Hollis, Donna; Poulson, Jean M.; Bentel, Gunilla C.; Sibley, Gregory; Anscher, Mitchell S.; Fan Ming; Jaszczak, Ronald J.; Coleman, R. Edward; Marks, Lawrence B.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the impact of patient-specific factors on radiation (RT)-induced reductions in regional lung perfusion. Methods: Fifty patients (32 lung carcinoma, 7 Hodgkin's disease, 9 breast carcinoma and 2 other thoracic tumors) had pre-RT and ≥24-week post-RT single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) perfusion images to assess the dose dependence of RT-induced reductions in regional lung perfusion. The SPECT data were analyzed using a normalized and non-normalized approach. Furthermore, two different mathematical methods were used to assess the impact of patient-specific factors on the dose-response curve (DRC). First, DRCs for different patient subgroups were generated and compared. Second, in a more formal statistical approach, individual DRCs for regional lung injury for each patient were fit to a linear-quadratic model (reduction = coefficient 1 x dose + coefficient 2 x dose 2 ). Multiple patient-specific factors including tobacco history, pre-RT diffusion capacity to carbon monoxide (DLCO), transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β), chemotherapy exposure, disease type, and mean lung dose were explored in a multivariate analysis to assess their impact on the coefficients. Results: None of the variables tested had a consistent impact on the radiation sensitivity of regional lung (i.e., the slope of the DRC). In the formal statistical analysis, there was a suggestion of a slight increase in radiation sensitivity in the dose range >40 Gy for nonsmokers (vs. smokers) and in those receiving chemotherapy (vs. no chemotherapy). However, this finding was very dependent on the specific statistical and normalization method used. Conclusion: Patient-specific factors do not have a dramatic effect on RT-induced reduction in regional lung perfusion. Additional studies are underway to better clarify this issue. We continue to postulate that patient-specific factors will impact on how the summation of regional injury translates into whole organ injury

  10. Facility-Level Factors Influencing Retention of Patients in HIV Care in East Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachlis, Beth; Bakoyannis, Giorgos; Easterbrook, Philippa; Genberg, Becky; Braithwaite, Ronald Scott; Cohen, Craig R; Bukusi, Elizabeth A; Kambugu, Andrew; Bwana, Mwebesa Bosco; Somi, Geoffrey R; Geng, Elvin H; Musick, Beverly; Yiannoutsos, Constantin T; Wools-Kaloustian, Kara; Braitstein, Paula

    2016-01-01

    Losses to follow-up (LTFU) remain an important programmatic challenge. While numerous patient-level factors have been associated with LTFU, less is known about facility-level factors. Data from the East African International epidemiologic Databases to Evaluate AIDS (EA-IeDEA) Consortium was used to identify facility-level factors associated with LTFU in Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda. Patients were defined as LTFU if they had no visit within 12 months of the study endpoint for pre-ART patients or 6 months for patients on ART. Adjusting for patient factors, shared frailty proportional hazard models were used to identify the facility-level factors associated with LTFU for the pre- and post-ART periods. Data from 77,362 patients and 29 facilities were analyzed. Median age at enrolment was 36.0 years (Interquartile Range: 30.1, 43.1), 63.9% were women and 58.3% initiated ART. Rates (95% Confidence Interval) of LTFU were 25.1 (24.7-25.6) and 16.7 (16.3-17.2) per 100 person-years in the pre-ART and post-ART periods, respectively. Facility-level factors associated with increased LTFU included secondary-level care, HIV RNA PCR turnaround time >14 days, and no onsite availability of CD4 testing. Increased LTFU was also observed when no nutritional supplements were provided (pre-ART only), when TB patients were treated within the HIV program (pre-ART only), and when the facility was open ≤4 mornings per week (ART only). Our findings suggest that facility-based strategies such as point of care laboratory testing and separate clinic spaces for TB patients may improve retention.

  11. Facility-Level Factors Influencing Retention of Patients in HIV Care in East Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beth Rachlis

    Full Text Available Losses to follow-up (LTFU remain an important programmatic challenge. While numerous patient-level factors have been associated with LTFU, less is known about facility-level factors. Data from the East African International epidemiologic Databases to Evaluate AIDS (EA-IeDEA Consortium was used to identify facility-level factors associated with LTFU in Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda. Patients were defined as LTFU if they had no visit within 12 months of the study endpoint for pre-ART patients or 6 months for patients on ART. Adjusting for patient factors, shared frailty proportional hazard models were used to identify the facility-level factors associated with LTFU for the pre- and post-ART periods. Data from 77,362 patients and 29 facilities were analyzed. Median age at enrolment was 36.0 years (Interquartile Range: 30.1, 43.1, 63.9% were women and 58.3% initiated ART. Rates (95% Confidence Interval of LTFU were 25.1 (24.7-25.6 and 16.7 (16.3-17.2 per 100 person-years in the pre-ART and post-ART periods, respectively. Facility-level factors associated with increased LTFU included secondary-level care, HIV RNA PCR turnaround time >14 days, and no onsite availability of CD4 testing. Increased LTFU was also observed when no nutritional supplements were provided (pre-ART only, when TB patients were treated within the HIV program (pre-ART only, and when the facility was open ≤4 mornings per week (ART only. Our findings suggest that facility-based strategies such as point of care laboratory testing and separate clinic spaces for TB patients may improve retention.

  12. Clinical factors affecting the outcome in postradioactive iodine (RAI) therapy patients - Philippine Heart Center experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quinon, A.; Oabel, E.; Jimeno, C.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Clinical factors such as patient's age, duration of the underlying autoimmune thyroid stimulus and anti-thyroid drug therapy may affect the outcome of patients who underwent RAI therapy. Objective: To evaluate the clinical factors affecting the outcome of RAI therapy. Methodology: Patients (n=41) with Graves' disease treated with anti-thyroid drugs were followed up after Radioactive Iodine therapy treatment. Thyroid scan, 2 and 24 hours radioactive iodine uptake were taken to compute for the therapy dose (120 uci) (computed thyroid weight in gms) (24-hour I 131 uptake). Patients were then divided into groups (Group 1= hypothyroid, Group 2= euthyroid, Group 3 hyperthyroid) based on their thyroid function results (FT3, FT4, TSH) after 2, 4, 6, 12 months post-therapy. Clinical and physiologic factors were then correlated with the outcome. Results: The population consisted of 41 patients (male=8, female=33) with an overall incidence of Group 1= 17%, Group 2= 54% and Group 3= 29% posttherapy. Factors such as age, with their means (Groups 134, 2= 39, 3=39 p= 0.42) and gland uptake (24-hour Groups 1= 53, 2= 61 358, p= 0.41) were not associated with the remission rate. Other factors that were related to the length of the disease such as duration of symptoms (Groups 121, 2=24, 3= 29 months p0.68), duration of medicine prior to RAI therapy (Group 1= 10, 2= 15, 3= 18 months p=0.306) and gland weight (Groups 1=40 2=42 3=46 grams p=0.78) tends to have a higher mean values in therapy failure patients. Conclusion: Clinical factors studied showed no significant differences among patients developing hypothyroid, euthyroid or hyperthyroid state. The data suggested that treatment failures in patients with Graves' disease could be improved by lessening the time interval between the diagnosis and radioactive iodine therapy. (author)

  13. Symptoms of delirium: an exploratory factor analytic study among referred patients.

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    Jain, Gaurav; Chakrabarti, Subho; Kulhara, Parmanand

    2011-01-01

    Factor analytic studies of delirium symptoms among patients referred through consultation-liaison psychiatric services are rare. We examined the factor structure of delirium symptoms in referred patients and determined whether combining items from several delirium rating scales influenced the factor structure of delirium symptoms. Eighty-six patients with delirium (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision) referred though the consultation-liaison services were assessed with structured rating scales. Nineteen symptom items extracted from the Delirium Rating Scale-Revised-98 (DRS-R-98), the Memorial Delirium Assessment Scale and the Confusional State Evaluation Scale were subjected to an exploratory (principal component) factor analysis. A second such analysis was conducted on 15 items of the DRS-R-98 for comparison. Compared with prior studies, patients were younger and the majority had hyperactive delirium. Principal components analysis identified two factors: (1) a "cognitive" factor comprising of disturbances in language, thought processes, orientation, attention, short- and long-term memory, visuospatial ability, consciousness (awareness) and perseveration accounted for 28.9% of the variance and (2) a "behavioral" factor consisting of sleep-wake cycle disturbances, delusions, perceptual disturbances, motor agitation, affect-lability, distractibility, irritability and temporal onset accounted for 18.9% of the variance. An identical factor structure was obtained with the DRS-R-98 items. Similar to previous factor analytic studies, the present study supported the existence of two principal dimensions of delirium, cognitive and behavioral. Additionally, it extended the results of earlier investigations to a wider group of patients with delirium, suggesting that these dimensions might provide important clues to the neurobiology of delirium. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Adjuvant chemotherapy for colorectal cancer: age differences in factors influencing patients' treatment decisions

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    Jorgensen ML

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Mikaela L Jorgensen,1,2 Jane M Young,1,2 Michael J Solomon1,31Surgical Outcomes Research Centre (SOuRCe, Sydney School of Public Health, University of Sydney and Sydney Local Health District, NSW, Australia; 2Cancer Epidemiology and Services Research (CESR, Sydney School of Public Health, University of Sydney, NSW, Australia; 3Discipline of Surgery, University of Sydney, NSW, AustraliaPurpose: Older colorectal cancer patients are significantly less likely than younger patients to receive guideline-recommended adjuvant chemotherapy. Previous research has indicated that patient refusal of treatment is a contributing factor. This study aimed to identify potential barriers to adjuvant chemotherapy use in older patients by examining the associations between patient age, factors influencing chemotherapy treatment decisions, and preferences for information and decision-making involvement.Patients and methods: Sixty-eight patients who underwent surgery for colorectal cancer in Sydney, Australia, within the previous 24 months completed a self-administered survey.Results: Fear of dying, health status, age, quality of life, and understanding treatment procedures and effects were significantly more important to older patients (aged ≥65 years than younger patients in deciding whether to accept chemotherapy (all P < 0.05. Reducing the risk of cancer returning and physician trust were important factors for all patients. Practical barriers such as traveling for treatment and cost were rated lowest. Older patients preferred less information and involvement in treatment decision making than younger patients. However, 60% of the older group wanted detailed information about chemotherapy, and 83% wanted some involvement in decision making. Those preferring less information and involvement still rated many factors as important in their decision making, including understanding treatment procedures and effects.Conclusion: A range of factors appears to influence

  15. Physical Trauma and Infection as Precipitating Factors in Patients with Fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Juan; Vincent, Ann; Cha, Stephen S; Luedtke, Connie A; Kim, Chul H; Oh, Terry H

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate both precipitating factors in patients with fibromyalgia and any differences in clinical presentation, symptom severity, and quality-of-life between those with and without precipitating physical trauma or infection. In a retrospective cross-sectional study, the authors compared patient characteristics and fibromyalgia symptom severity and quality-of-life with the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire and the Short Form-36 Health Survey in patients seen in a fibromyalgia treatment program. Of 939 patients, 27% reported precipitating factors (trauma, n = 203; infection, n = 53), with the rest having idiopathic fibromyalgia (n = 683). Patients with precipitating trauma were more likely to have worse Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire physical function than patients with idiopathic onset (P = 0.03). Compared with patients with idiopathic onset and precipitating trauma, patients with precipitating infection were more likely to have worse Short Form-36 Health Survey physical component summary (P = 0.01 and P = 0.003) but better role emotional (P = 0.04 and P = 0.005), mental health index (P = 0.02 and P = 0.007), and mental component summary (P = 0.03 and P = 0.004), respectively. One-fourth of this study's patients with fibromyalgia had precipitating physical trauma or infection. Patients with precipitating infection had different sociodemographic characteristics, clinical presentation, and quality-of-life from the idiopathic and trauma groups. Further studies are needed to look into the relationships between precipitating events and fibromyalgia.

  16. Analysis of Prognostic Factors and Patterns of Recurrence in Patients With Pathologic Stage III Endometrial Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, Samir; Portelance, Lorraine; Gilbert, Lucy; Tan, Leonard; Stanimir, Gerald; Duclos, Marie; Souhami, Luis

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively assess prognostic factors and patterns of recurrence in patients with pathologic Stage III endometrial cancer. Methods and Materials: Between 1989 and 2003, 107 patients with pathologic International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics Stage III endometrial adenocarcinoma confined to the pelvis were treated at our institution. Adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) was delivered to 68 patients (64%). The influence of multiple patient- and treatment-related factors on pelvic and distant control and overall survival (OS) was evaluated. Results: Median follow-up for patients at risk was 41 months. Five-year actuarial OS was significantly improved in patients treated with adjuvant RT (68%) compared with those with resection alone (50%; p = 0.029). Age, histology, grade, uterine serosal invasion, adnexal involvement, number of extrauterine sites, and treatment with adjuvant RT predicted for improved survival in univariate analysis. Multivariate analysis revealed that grade, uterine serosal invasion, and treatment with adjuvant RT were independent predictors of survival. Five-year actuarial pelvic control was improved significantly with the delivery of adjuvant RT (74% vs. 49%; p = 0.011). Depth of myometrial invasion and treatment with adjuvant RT were independent predictors of pelvic control in multivariate analysis. Conclusions: Multiple prognostic factors predicting for the outcome of pathologic Stage III endometrial cancer patients were identified in this analysis. In particular, delivery of adjuvant RT seems to be a significant independent predictor for improved survival and pelvic control, suggesting that pelvic RT should be routinely considered in the management of these patients

  17. Myocardial Expression of Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor in Patients with Heart Failure

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    Julia Pohl

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF is a pleiotropic inflammatory protein and contributes to several different inflammatory and ischemic/hypoxic diseases. MIF was shown to be cardioprotective in experimental myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury and its expression is regulated by the transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF-1α. We here report on MIF expression in the failing human heart and assess myocardial MIF in different types of cardiomyopathy. Myocardial tissue samples from n = 30 patients were analyzed by quantitative Real-Time PCR. MIF and HIF-1α mRNA expression was analyzed in myocardial samples from patients with ischemic (ICM and non-ischemic cardiomyopathy (NICM and from patients after heart transplantation (HTX. MIF expression was elevated in myocardial samples from patients with ICM compared to NICM. Transplanted hearts showed lower MIF levels compared to hearts from patients with ICM. Expression of HIF-1α was analyzed and was shown to be significantly increased in ICM patients compared to patients with NICM. MIF and HIF-1α mRNA is expressed in the human heart. MIF and HIF-1α expression depends on the underlying type of cardiomyopathy. Patients with ICM show increased myocardial MIF and HIF-1α expression.

  18. Obesity and smoking are factors associated with poor prognosis in patients with bacteraemia

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    Vuento Risto

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacteraemia is still a major cause of case fatality in all age groups. Our aim was to identify the major underlying conditions constituting risk factors for case fatality in bacteraemia patients. Methods The study involved 149 patients (79 male and 70 female with bacteraemia caused by Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus (41 patients, Streptococcus pneumoniae (Str. pneumoniae (42 patients, β-hemolytic streptococcae (β-hml str. (23 patients and Eschericia coli (E. coli (43 patients. Underlying diseases, alcohol and tobacco consumption and body mass index (BMI were registered. Laboratory findings and clinical data were registered on admission and 6 consecutive days and on day 10–14. Case fatality was studied within 30 days after positive blood culture. Associations between underlying conditions and case fatality were studied in univariate analysis and in a multivariate model. Results Nineteen patients (12.8% died of bacteraemia. We found obesity (p = 0.002, RR 9.8; 95% CI 2.3 to 41.3, smoking (p Conclusion Our results indicate that obesity and smoking are prominent risk factors for case fatality in bacteraemic patients. Identification of risk factors underlying fatal outcome in bacteraemia may allow targeting of preventive efforts to individuals likely to derive greatest potential benefit.

  19. RISK FACTORS OF THE ERECTILE DYSFUNCTION IN THE PATIENTS WITH CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES

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    E. V. Minakov

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study erectile dysfunction prevalence among out-patients with arterial hypertension (HT and/or coronary heart disease (CHD as well as to study risk factors of erectile dysfunction.Material and methods. The anonymous poll was carried out among 103 male patients with HT and/or CHD. General information about patient, medical history, treatment was analyzed. All patients were examined by cardiologists. Erectile function was assessed with The International Index Erectile Function (IIEF questionnaire.Results. 86 (84% questionnaires were returned. 62 (72% patients from 86 responding had erectile dysfunction. Age, blood pressure level, abdominal obesity, beta-blocker therapy and chronic heart failure affected erectile function.Conclusion. The erectile dysfunction was common disorder among male patients with HT and/or CHD. Early erectile dysfunction diagnosis, prevention and therapy are necessary to provide high level of compliance in patients with cardiovascular diseases.

  20. Transcatheter arterial Chemoembolization for infiltrative hepatocellular carcinoma: Clinical safety and efficacy and factors influencing patient survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Kichang; Kim, Jin Hyoung; Yoon, Hee Mang; Kim, Eun Joung; Gwon, Dong Il; Ko, Gi Young; Yoon, Hyun Ki; Ko, Heung Kyu

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) in patients with infiltrative hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and to identify the prognostic factors associated with patient survival. Fifty two patients who underwent TACE for infiltrative HCC were evaluated between 2007 and 2010. The maximum diameter of the tumors ranged from 7 cm to 22 cm (median 15 cm). Of 46 infiltrative HCC patients with portal vein tumor thrombosis, 32 patients received adjuvant radiation therapy for portal vein tumor thrombosis after TACE. The tumor response by European Association for the Study of the Liver criteria was partial in 18%, stable in 47%, and progressive in 35% of the patients. The median survival time was 5.7 months (Kaplan-Meier analysis). The survival rates were 48% at six months, 25% at one year, and 12% at two years. In the multivariable Cox regression analysis, Child-Pugh class (p = 0.02), adjuvant radiotherapy (p 0.003) and tumor response after TACE (p = 0.004) were significant factors associated with patient survival. Major complications occurred in nine patients. The major complication rate was significantly higher in patients with Child-Pugh B than in patients with Child-Pugh A (p = 0.049, x 2 test). Transcatheter arterial chemoembolization can be a safe treatment option in infiltrative HCC patients with Child Pugh class A. Child Pugh class A, radiotherapy for portal vein tumor thrombosis after TACE and tumor response are good prognostic factors for an increased survival after TACE in patients with infiltrative HCCs.

  1. Clinical features and prognostic factors in patients with intraventricular hemorrhage caused by ruptured arteriovenous malformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Zengpanpan; Ai, Xiaolin; Hu, Xin; Fang, Fang; You, Chao

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) was associated with poor outcomes in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage. IVH had a high incidence in patients with ruptured arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). In this study, we aimed to discuss the clinical features and prognostic factors of outcomes in the patients with AVM-related IVH. From January 2010 to January 2016, we collected the data of the patients with AVM-related IVH retrospectively. The data, including clinical and radiological parameters, were collected to evaluate the clinical features. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to identify the prognostic factors for clinical outcomes (hydrocephalus, 6-month outcomes measured by the modified Rankin scale) in our cohort. A total of 67 eligible patients were included and 19 patients (28%) only presented with IVH. Thirty-three patients (49%) presented hydrocephalus, and 12 patients (18%) presented brain ischemia. Nineteen patients (28%) had a poor outcome after 6 months. In multivariate logistic regression, subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) (P = .028) was associated with hydrocephalus and higher Graeb score (P = .080) tended to increase the risk of hydrocephalus. The high Glasgow coma scale (P = .010), large hematoma volume of parenchyma (P = .006), and high supplemented Spetzler–Martin (sup-SM) score (P = .041) were independent factors of the poor outcome. IVH was common in ruptured AVMs and increased the poor outcomes in patients with the ruptured AVMs. The AVM-related IVH patients had a high incidence of hydrocephalus, which was associated with brain ischemia and SAH. Patients with lower Glasgow coma scale, lower sup-SM score, and smaller parenchymal hematoma had better long-term outcomes. PMID:29137064

  2. Prognostic factors in patients with malignant pleural effusion: Is it possible to predict mortality in patients with good performance status?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrao, Fernando Conrado; Peixoto, Renata D'Alpino; de Abreu, Igor Renato Louro Bruno; Janini, Maria Cláudia; Viana, Geisa Garcia; de Oliveira, Mariana Campello; Younes, Riad Naim

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to identify predictors of mortality only in patients with malignant pleural effusion (MPE) showing good performance status which required pleural palliative procedures. All patients with MPE submitted to pleural palliative procedure were enrolled in a prospective study between 2013 and 2014. Patients with Eastern cooperative oncology group (ECOG) score zero, one, and two were considered with good performance status. The possible prognostic factors were tested for significance using the log-rank test (Kaplan-Meier method) and those with significance on univariate analysis were entered into a multivariable Cox model. A total of 64 patients were included in the analysis. Median follow-up time for surviving patients was 263 days. Median survival for the entire cohort was not reached yet. In the multivariate analysis, gastrointestinal primary site (P = 0.006), low albumin concentration in the pleural fluid (P = 0.017), and high serum NLR (P = 0.007) were associated with mortality. In our cohort of ECOG 0-2 patients with MPE submitted to pleural palliative procedures, gastrointestinal malignancy compared to other sites, low pleural fluid albumin and high NLR were significantly associated with mortality. The identification of these prognostic factors may assist the choice of the optimal palliative technique. J. Surg. Oncol. 2016;113:570-574. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Predictors of relational continuity in primary care: patient, provider and practice factors.

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    Kristjansson, Elizabeth; Hogg, William; Dahrouge, Simone; Tuna, Meltem; Mayo-Bruinsma, Liesha; Gebremichael, Goshu

    2013-05-31

    Continuity is a fundamental tenet of primary care, and highly valued by patients; it may also improve patient outcomes and lower cost of health care. It is thus important to investigate factors that predict higher continuity. However, to date, little is known about the factors that contribute to continuity. The purpose of this study was to analyse practice, provider and patient predictors of continuity of care in a large sample of primary care practices in Ontario, Canada. Another goal was to assess whether there was a difference in the continuity of care provided by different models of primary care. This study is part of the larger a cross-sectional study of 137 primary care practices, their providers and patients. Several performance measures were evaluated; this paper focuses on relational continuity. Four items from the Primary Care Assessment Tool were used to assess relational continuity from the patient's perspective. Multilevel modeling revealed several patient factors that predicted continuity. Older patients and those with chronic disease reported higher continuity, while those who lived in rural areas, had higher education, poorer mental health status, no regular provider, and who were employed reported lower continuity. Providers with more years since graduation had higher patient-reported continuity. Several practice factors predicted lower continuity: number of MDs, nurses, opening on weekends, and having 24 hours a week or less on-call. Analyses that compared continuity across models showed that, in general, Health Service Organizations had better continuity than other models, even when adjusting for patient demographics. Some patients with greater health needs experience greater continuity of care. However, the lower continuity reported by those with mental health issues and those who live in rural areas is concerning. Furthermore, our finding that smaller practices have higher continuity suggests that physicians and policy makers need to consider

  4. Prevalence and risk factors of sleep disordered breathing in patients with rheumatic valvular heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Ning; Ni, Bu-Qing; Zhang, Xi-Long; Huang, Han-Peng; Su, Mei; Zhang, Shi-Jiang; Wang, Hong

    2013-08-15

    Sleep disordered breathing (SDB) is common in patients with chronic heart failure secondary to non-valvular heart disease; however, the prevalence and characteristics of SDB in patients with rheumatic valvular heart disease (RVHD) are unclear. This study was designed to determine the prevalence, characteristics, and risk factors for SDB in RVHD patients. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 260 RVHD patients. The following data were recorded: types of heart valve lesions, electrocardiographic, echocardiographic, arterial blood gas analysis findings, baseline medication, 6-minute walk test (6MWT) distance, and sleep parameters. Compared to patients with single leftsided valve lesions, patients with left- and rightsided valve lesions had a higher prevalence of SDB (46.2% vs. 31.2%, p = 0.013); the increased prevalence of SDB only involved central sleep apnea (CSA) (31.1% vs. 14.1%, p = 0.001). Patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) or CSA were older and had a shorter 6MWT distance, lower left ventricle ejection fraction and PaO₂, a longer lung-to-finger circulation time, and a higher prevalence of atrial fibrillation (AF) and hypertension (all p < 0.05) as compared with patients without SDB. Multinomial logistic regression analysis showed that PaO2 ≤ 85 mm Hg was the only risk factor for OSA. Male gender, AF, 6MWT distance ≤ 300 m, PaO₂ ≤ 85 mmHg, and PaCO₂ ≤ 40 mm Hg were risk factors for CSA. Patients with RVHD had a high prevalence of SDB (predominantly CSA). RVHD patients with SDB, particularly those who had CSA, manifested more severe symptoms and greater impairment of cardiac function. Assessments of clinical manifestations of cardiac dysfunction may be important for predicting the risk factors for SDB.

  5. Use of multiple methods to determine factors affecting quality of care of patients with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khunti, K

    1999-10-01

    The process of care of patients with diabetes is complex; however, GPs are playing a greater role in its management. Despite the research evidence, the quality of care of patients with diabetes is variable. In order to improve care, information is required on the obstacles faced by practices in improving care. Qualitative and quantitative methods can be used for formation of hypotheses and the development of survey procedures. However, to date few examples exist in general practice research on the use of multiple methods using both quantitative and qualitative techniques for hypothesis generation. We aimed to determine information on all factors that may be associated with delivery of care to patients with diabetes. Factors for consideration on delivery of diabetes care were generated by multiple qualitative methods including brainstorming with health professionals and patients, a focus group and interviews with key informants which included GPs and practice nurses. Audit data showing variations in care of patients with diabetes were used to stimulate the brainstorming session. A systematic literature search focusing on quality of care of patients with diabetes in primary care was also conducted. Fifty-four potential factors were identified by multiple methods. Twenty (37.0%) were practice-related factors, 14 (25.9%) were patient-related factors and 20 (37.0%) were organizational factors. A combination of brainstorming and the literature review identified 51 (94.4%) factors. Patients did not identify factors in addition to those identified by other methods. The complexity of delivery of care to patients with diabetes is reflected in the large number of potential factors identified in this study. This study shows the feasibility of using multiple methods for hypothesis generation. Each evaluation method provided unique data which could not otherwise be easily obtained. This study highlights a way of combining various traditional methods in an attempt to overcome the

  6. Referral and Receipt of Treatment for Hepatocellular Carcinoma in United States Veterans: Effect of Patient and Non-Patient Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davila, Jessica A.; Kramer, Jennifer R.; Duan, Zhigang; Richardson, Peter A.; Tyson, Gia L.; Sada, Yvonne H.; Kanwal, Fasiha; El-Serag, Hashem B.

    2014-01-01

    Background The delivery of treatment for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) could be influenced by place of HCC diagnosis (hospitalization vs. outpatient), subspecialty referral following diagnosis, as well as physician and facility factors. We conducted a study to examine the effect of patient and non-patient factors on the place of HCC diagnosis, referral, and treatment in Veterans Administration (VA) hospitals in the United States. Methods Using the VA Hepatitis C Clinical Case Registry, we identified HCV-infected patients who developed HCC during 1998–2006. All cases were verified and staged according to Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer (BCLC) criteria. The main outcomes were place of HCC diagnosis, being seen by a surgeon or oncologist, and treatment. We examined factors related to these outcomes using hierarchical logistic regression. These factors included HCC stage, HCC surveillance, physician specialty, and facility factors, in addition to risk factors, co-morbidity, and liver disease indicators. Results Approximately 37.2% of the 1,296 patients with HCC were diagnosed during hospitalization, 31.0% were seen by a surgeon or oncologist, and 34.3% received treatment. Being seen by a surgeon or oncologist was associated with surveillance (adjusted odds ratio (aOR)=1.47;95%CI:1.20–1.80) and varied by geography (1.74;1.09–2.77). Seeing a surgeon or oncologist was predictive of treatment (aOR=1.43;95%CI:1.24–1.66). There was a significant increase in treatment among patients who received surveillance (aOR=1.37; 95%CI:1.02–1.71), were seen by gastroenterology (1.65;1.21–2.24) or were diagnosed at a transplant facility (1.48;1.15–1.90). Conclusions Approximately 40% of patients were diagnosed during hospitalization. Most patients were not seen by a surgeon or oncologist for treatment evaluation and only 34% received treatment. Only receipt of HCC surveillance was associated with increased likelihood of outpatient diagnosis, being seen by a surgeon or

  7. Factors influencing general practitioners in the referral of elderly cancer patients

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    Demeaux Jean-Louis

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A number of studies have identified advanced age as a barrier to accessing specialised oncological care. Many factors can influence the care provided for elderly patients after a diagnosis of cancer has been established or is suspected. Only one European study has analysed the decision processes leading general practitioners (GPs to refer elderly patients with cancer to oncologists. The objectives of the current study are to describe the factors that influence these decisions and to identify the particular factors and GP characteristics that are associated with systematic referral of these patients in South-West France. Methods This is a cross-sectional study on a representative sample of GPs in Aquitaine, South-West France. Questionnaire items were selected using a Delphi consensus approach and sent by post. Two logistic regression models were constructed to investigate GPs' decisions to refer these patients. Results The response rate obtained was 30%. Half of the general practitioners reported "always" referring their elderly cancer patients to oncologists. More than 75% reported being influenced by patient-related elements (patient and/or family wishes, comorbid factors, unsuitability of invasive investigations, physical and mental autonomy, by cancer-related elements (severity of symptoms, expected side-effects and an organisational element (whether the general practitioner was used to collaborating with oncologists. Logistic regression analysis showed that cancer site and organisational difficulties in patient management were significantly associated with the decision to refer elderly patients with early-stage cancer. For advanced stages, oncology training, patient age, organisational difficulties in patient management and stage of cancer were significantly associated with the decision to refer elderly patients. Conclusions Cancer-linked factors and organisational difficulties have been highlighted as influencing the

  8. Acute respiratory failure in Pakistani patients: risk factors associated with mortality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussain, S.F.; Irfan, M.; Naqi, Y.S.; Islam, M.; Akhtar, W.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To assess the outcome and risk factors associated with mortality in patients with acute respiratory failure (ARF). Design: Observational study. Place and Duration of Study: The Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, between January 1997 and June 2001. Patients and Methods: All adult patients admitted with a medical cause of acute respiratory failure were reviewed. The primary outcome measure was mortality and secondary outcome measures were factors associated with mortality in ARF. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to identify the independent risk factors for mortality. Results: A total of 270 patients were admitted with ARF. Hypercapnic respiratory failure was seen in 186 (69%) and hypoxemic in 84 (31%) cases. Pneumonia and COPD exacerbation were the most common underlying causes of ARF. Ventilator support was required in 93 (34.4%) patients. Hospital mortality was 28%. Chronic renal failure, malignancy, hypokalemia, severe acidosis (pH <7.25), septicemia and ARDS independently correlated with mortality. Mortality rate increased sharply (84%) with the presence of three or more risk factors. Conclusion: Acute respiratory failure has a high mortality rate (28%). Development of ARDS or septicemia was associated with high mortality. Presence of more than one risk factor significantly increased the mortality rate. (author)

  9. Risk factors for parastomal hernia in Japanese patients with permanent colostomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funahashi, Kimihiko; Suzuki, Takayuki; Nagashima, Yasuo; Matsuda, Satoshi; Koike, Junichi; Shiokawa, Hiroyuki; Ushigome, Mitsunori; Arai, Kenichiro; Kaneko, Tomoaki; Kurihara, Akiharu; Kaneko, Hironori

    2014-08-01

    Although the definitive risk factors for parastomal hernia development remain unclear, potential contributing factors have been reported from Western countries. The aim of this study was to identify the risk factors for parastomal hernia in Japanese patients with permanent colostomies. All patients who received abdominoperineal resection or total pelvic exenteration at our institution between December 2004 and December 2011 were reviewed. Patient-related, operation-related and postoperative variables were evaluated, in both univariate and multivariate analyses, to identify the risk factors for parastomal hernia formation. Of the 80 patients who underwent colostomy, 22 (27.5 %) developed a parastomal hernia during a median follow-up period of 953 days (range 15-2792 days). Hernia development was significantly associated with increasing patient age and body mass index, a laparoscopic surgical approach and the transperitoneal route of colostomy formation. In the multivariate analysis, the body mass index (p = 0.022), the laparoscopic approach (p = 0.043) and transperitoneal stoma creation (p = 0.021) retained statistical significance. Our findings in Japanese ostomates match those from Western countries: a higher body mass index, the use of a laparoscopic approach and a transperitoneal colostomy are significant independent risk factors for parastomal hernia formation. The precise role of the stoma creation route remains unclear.

  10. Factor Structure of Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale in Malaysian patients with coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Satpal; Zainal, Nor Zuraida; Low, Wah Yun; Ramasamy, Ravindran; Sidhu, Jaideep Singh

    2015-05-01

    The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) is a common screening instrument used to determine the levels of anxiety and depression experienced by a patient and has been extensively used in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). This study aimed to establish the factor structure of HADS in a Malaysian sample of 189 patients with CAD. Factor analysis of HADS using principal component analysis with varimax rotation yielded 3 factors. Confirmatory factor analysis supported the use of HADS in assessing 3 distinct dimensions of psychological distress--namely, anxiety, anhedonia, and psychomotor retardation. The HADS showed good internal consistency and was found to be a valid measure of psychological distress among Malaysian patients with CAD. However, low mean scores on the original 2 factors--that is, anxiety and depression--and also on the 2 depression subscales--anhedonia and psychomotor retardation--suggests that the recommended cutoff score to screen for psychological distress among CAD patients be reevaluated. Further research to determine the generalizability and consistency for the tridimensional structure of the HADS in Malaysia is recommended. © 2014 APJPH.

  11. Level of inflammatory factors in chronic hemodialysis patients with and without cardiovascular disease

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    Shahram Taheri

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Considering the existence of controversies about the predictive value of inflammatory markers for cardiovascular disease (CVD, we aimed to compare the level of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP and interlukin-6 (IL-6 level in chronic hemodialysis (HD patients with and without CVD. Materials and Methods: In this historical cohort study, HD patients with and without CVD disease were enrolled. The presence of CVD risk factors, level of inflammatory factors including IL-6 and hs-CRP as well as lipid levels, fasting blood sugar, and other biochemical factors were compared in two studied groups. Results: During the study, eighty HD patients with (n = 40 and without (n = 40 CVD were enrolled. Diabetes was more prevalent among HD patients with CVD than those without CVD (P 0.05. Univariate analysis of variance test indicated that there was not any significant relationship between hs-CRP and CVD (P > 0.05. Conclusion: The findings indicated that the level of inflammatory factors including hs-CRP and IL-6 are not significantly different in HD patients with and without CVD. However, for obtaining more definite conclusion in this field and evaluation their predicting role in this field, it is recommended to study other novel inflammatory markers as well as the additive effect of the inflammatory factors with traditional ones in larger sample size and longer follow-up.

  12. Patient comfort from the technologist perspective: factors to consider in mammographic imaging

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    Mendat CC

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Christina C Mendat,1 Dave Mislan,2 Lisa Hession-Kunz2 1Human Factors MD, Charlotte, NC, 2Hologic Inc., Marlborough, MA, USA Abstract: A sample size of 280 certified mammography technologists were surveyed to understand what factors affect patient discomfort during breast imaging. Given mammography technologists’ level of patient involvement, they are uniquely positioned to observe factors that affect patient comfort. The findings suggest that according to technologists, multiple factors, including patient ethnicity, breast density, previous biopsy and lumpectomy experience, as well as psychological factors, impact breast discomfort during mammography. Additionally, with respect to imaging protocols, technologists attributed 80% of moderate-to-extreme discomfort to “length of compression time” (27% and “compression force” (53%. Technologists also attributed “pinching at chest wall” and “hard edges of breast platform” to “very high” discomfort significantly more times (P<0.05 than “coolness and edges of paddle”. These findings confirm some of what has been reported to date and challenge other findings. Given that recent decline in breast cancer mortality has been attributed to improvements in early detection and treatment, approaches to reduce discomfort should be considered in order to promote screening compliance. Although more research is needed, it is apparent that the patient experience of comfort and pain during mammography is an area warranting increased research and solutions. Keywords: mammography, discomfort, pain, density, compliance, breast

  13. Organizational Factors Affecting the Likelihood of Cancer Screening Among VA Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Ann F; Rose, Danielle E; Farmer, Melissa; Canelo, Ismelda; Yano, Elizabeth M

    2015-12-01

    Preventive service delivery, including cancer screenings, continues to pose a challenge to quality improvement efforts. Although many studies have focused on person-level characteristics associated with screening, less is known about organizational influences on cancer screening. This study aims to understand the association between organizational factors and adherence to cancer screenings. This study employed a cross-sectional design using organizational-level, patient-level, and area-level data. Dependent variables included breast, cervical, and colorectal cancer screening. Organizational factors describing resource sufficiency were constructed using factor analyses from a survey of 250 Veterans Affairs primary care directors. We conducted random-effects logistic regression analyses, modeling cancer screening as a function of organizational factors, controlling for patient-level and area-level factors. Overall, 87% of the patients received mammograms, 92% received cervical and 78% had colorectal screening. Quality improvement orientation increased the odds of cervical [odds ratio (OR): 1.27; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.03-1.57] and colorectal cancer screening (OR: 1.10; 95% CI, 1.00-1.20). Authority in determining primary care components increased the odds of mammography screening (OR: 1.23; 95% CI, 1.03-1.51). Sufficiency in clinical staffing increased the odds of mammography and cervical cancer screenings. Several patient-level factors, serving as control variables, were associated with achievement of screenings. Resource sufficiency led to increased odds of screening possibly because they promote excellence in patient care by conveying organizational goals and facilitate goal achievement with resources. Complementary to patient-level factors, our findings identified organizational processes associated with better performance, which offer concrete strategies in which facilities can evaluate their capabilities to implement best practices to foster and

  14. Depression and suicide ideas of cancer patients and influencing factors in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Su Jin; Park, Jong Hyock; Park, Bo Young; Kim, So Young; Lee, Il Hak; Kim, Jong Heun; Koh, Dai Ha; Kim, Chang-Hoon; Park, Jae Hyun; Sohn, Myong Sei

    2014-01-01

    This study compared risk factors for depression and suicidal ideas among cancer patients for comparison with the general population, and identified influencing factors. We analyzed data from 2,472 cancer patients in the National Cancer Center and nine Regional Cancer Centers and frequency-matched data for age and sex from 2,349 members of the general population who completed the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey in 2008. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify factors affecting depression and suicidal ideas. Cancer patients were not likely to have more depression (OR=0.96, 95%CI=0.79-1.18) and were less likely to have suicidal ideas (OR=0.64, 95%CI=0.53-0.79) compared to the general population. Female sex, more stress, and lower quality of life were influencing factors. The additional risk factors for suicidal ideas among cancer patients included income (OR=0.62, 95%CI=0.43-0.91), smoking (OR=1.63, 95% CI=1.06-2.50), recurrence (OR=1.50, 95%CI=1.15-1.95), and chemotherapy (OR=1.66, 95%CI=1.26-2.19). No differences appeared in depression rates between cancer patients and the general population, and cancer patients were less likely to have suicidal ideas. However, cancer patients were likely to have more risk factors than the general population, and those classified as being at high risk of suicide should receive distress management and social economic support, from early in the treatment process.

  15. [Factors associated with hyperhomocysteinemia in inflammatory bowel disease: prospective study in 81 patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roblin, X; Germain, E; Phelip, J M; Ducros, V; Pofelski, J; Heluwaert, F; Oltean, P; Faucheron, J L; Bonaz, B

    2006-02-01

    A high prevalence (52%) of hyperhomocysteinemia is observed in Crohn disease (CD), however it is not well documented in ulcerative colitis (UC). Furthermore, in the different works studying hyperhomocysteinemia the associated factors are different. Prospective evaluation of hyperhomocysteinemia in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients, of the risk factors and the determination of a potential risk of colorectal carcinoma in case of hyperhomocysteinemia. IBD patients followed in our department were prospectively recruited between November 2003-September 2004. To be included patients should have passed a coloscopy in the two years. Patients with kidney failure or drugs supposed, to interfere with homocystéine metabolism (folates, vitamin B12, methotrexate) were excluded from the study. The following parameters were analysed: age, sex, clinical activity indexes (CDAI for Crohn disease and CAI for ulcerative colitis), length-extent and type of the disease (CD or UC), smoking, plasma homocystein concentration, folates and vitamin B12. Eighty-one patients (60 CD, 21 UC, mean age 43.8 +/- 17.3) were included, 30 had an active disease at inclusion and 16 were smokers. The prevalence of high homocystein concentration was 55.6%. In univariate analysis a low rate of folates was the only risk factor for a high homocystein concentration (74 vs. 52.8%; P = 0.018). Smoking was almost an associated factor. In multivariate analysis, a low rate of folate was the only risk factor of hyperhomocysteinemia, OR = 3.59 [1.27-10.17]. Five endoscopic lesions considered as precancerous were described; these patients had all a hyperhomocysteinemia. The prevalence of hyperhomocysteinemia is high in UC and in CD. A low folate rate is the only risk factor observed in our study. There is a possible link between colorectal cancer and hyperhomocysteinemia. A high Plasma homocystein concentration must be search in inflammatory bowel disease patients and a substitutive treatment of folates and

  16. Determination of serum leptin and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) contents in patients with breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Xudong; Jin Wentao; Pan Meizhen

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the serum expression of leptin and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in patients with breast cancer and assess its diagnostic significance. Methods: Thirty-six patients with breast cancer and thirty-one patients with benign breast disorders entered this study. Serum concentration of leptin (with RIA) and VEGF ( with ELISA) were determined in these patients before operation as well as in 56 controls. All the tested subjects were post-menopausal women. Results: The difference between the leptin levels in the controls and patients with benign breast disorders was significantly; 80 was the difference between the leptin levels in controls and patients with breast cancer. Significant difference also existed between the VEGF levels in controls and patients with cancer as well as between the levels in patients with benign breast disease and patients with cancer. Also, the serum leptin and VEGF levels in the cancerous patients with axillary metastasis were significantly higher than those in patients without metastasis. Conclusion: Serum leptin and VEGF might be taken as diagnostic tumor markers for malignanay and metastasis in patients with breast cancer. (authors)

  17. Malignant lymphoma. Prognostic factors and response to treatment of 473 patients at the National Cancer Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, T.; DeVita, V.T. Jr.; Simon, R.M.; Berard, C.W.; Canellos, G.P.; Garvin, A.J.; Young, R.C.

    1982-01-01

    Treatment results were reviewed in 473 consecutively staged and treated patients at the National Cancer Institute over a 22-year period from 1953 to 1975. Responses correlated with histologic pattern and stage of disease. Complete responses to radiotherapy were frequent in nodular lymphoma patients. Similar treatment regimens were less effective in diffuse lymphoma patients. Using chemotherapy or combined modality approaches, complete responses were obtained in a high proportion of advanced nodular disease patients. Patients with nodular lymphoma tend to have higher complete response rates and longer survivals than their counterparts with diffuse histologic types. Patients with nodular lymphocytic lymphoma had a better survival than those with mixed or ''histiocytic'' histologic types. Patients with diffuse well differentiated lymphocytic lymphoma survived significantly longer than patients with other diffuse histologic types. Percentage and prominence of nodularity were not of prognostic significance in those patients with combined nodular and diffuse patterns of disease. When compared by histologic type, patient sex did not appear to be an important prognostic factor. The presence of B-symptoms was associated with a poorer survival in patients with nodular disease and in patients with diffuse disease. Over the years of this study, survival appears to have improved in each histologic subtype except diffuse poorly differentiated lymphoma

  18. Factors Associated With Gastrostomy Tube Removal in Patients With Dysphagia After Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilmskoetter, Janina; Herbert, Teri Lynn; Bonilha, Heather S

    2017-04-01

    Gastrostomy feeding tubes are commonly placed in patients with dysphagia after stroke. The subsequent removal of the tube is a primary goal during rehabilitation. The purpose of our review was to identify predictors and factors associated with gastrostomy tube removal in patients with dysphagia after stroke. We conducted a literature review following the PRISMA statement and included the search databases PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science, and CINAHL. Articles were included in the final analysis per predefined inclusion and exclusion criteria. Our search retrieved a total of 853 results consisting of 416 articles (after eliminating duplicates). Six articles met our final eligibility criteria. The following factors were identified in at least 1 article as being significantly associated with gastrostomy tube removal: reduced age, decreased number of comorbidities, prolonged inpatient rehabilitation stay, absence of bilateral stroke, nonhemorrhagic stroke, reduced dysphagia severity, absence of aspiration, absence of premature bolus loss, and timely initiation of pharyngeal swallow. Aspiration was the only factor that was investigated by 2 studies-both using multiple regression and both showing stable results, with absence of aspiration increasing the chances for tube removal. In conclusion, little is known about factors associated with gastrostomy tube removal in patients with dysphagia after stroke. Most of the identified factors are associated with stroke or disease severity; however, the role of the individual factors remains unclear. The strongest predictor appears to be absence of aspiration on modified barium swallow studies emphasizing the importance of instrumental swallow studies in this patient population.

  19. Cardiovascular risk factors in patients with rheumatoid arthritis in combination with hypertension depending on body weight

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    Sіrenko O.Yu.

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective was to evaluate the frequency of cardiovascular risk factors and hypertension in patients with rheumatoid arthritis depending on body weight. The study involved 100 patients with rheumatoid arthritis and stably selected therapy for more than 6 months at the age from 45 to 65 years (mean age 53,19 ± 5,40 years. Traditional cardiovascular risk was assessed, taking into account risk factors by SCORE scale and amended for patients with RA. The levels of total cholesterol, triglycerides, C-reactive protein, serum creatinine, body mass index, body area index were determined. Arterial hypertension was diagnosed in 41 (41% patients with rheuma¬toid arthritis and was associated with traditional risk factors (age, obesity, rheumatoid factor, hyperuricemia and the duration of glucocorticoid therapy. Obesity and excess body mass occurred in the majority of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, herewith the highest level of inflammation indicators and risk of cardiovascular events was in overweight patients. Obesity was associated with duration of rheumatoid arthritis, the activity of the inflammatory process, the duration of glucocorticoids taking. It is found that the traditional SCORE scale does not fully reflect the risk of cardiovascular events in rheumatoid arthritis. Identification of hypertension and obesity increases the information content of the risk assessment of cardiovascular events in rheumatoid arthritis.

  20. Increased active von Willebrand factor during disease development in the aging diabetic patient population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shuang Feng; Xia, Zuo Li; Han, Ji Ju; Wang, Yi Ting; Wang, Ji Yue; Pan, Shao Dong; Wu, Ya Ping; Zhang, Bin; Li, Guang Yao; Du, Jing Wei; Gao, Hen Qiang; de Groot, Philip G; de Laat, Bas; Hollestelle, Martine J

    2013-02-01

    Type 2 diabetes is known to cause endothelial activation resulting in the secretion of von Willebrand factor (VWF). We have shown that levels of VWF in a glycoprotein Ib-binding conformation are increased in specific clinical settings. The aim of the current study is to investigate whether active VWF levels increase during aging and the development of diabetes within the population of patients suffering from type 2 diabetes. Patients and controls were divided into two groups based on age: older and younger than 60 years of age. VWF antigen, VWF propeptide, VWF activation factor and total active VWF were measured. Patients older than 60 years of age had increased levels of total active VWF, VWF activation factor and VWF propeptide compared to younger patients and controls. All measured VWF parameters were associated with age in diabetic patients. Total active VWF and VWF propeptide correlated with the period of being diagnosed with diabetes. Regression analyses showed that especially the VWF activation factor was strongly associated with diabetes in patients older than 60 years of age. In conclusion, we found that the conformation of VWF could be involved in the disease process of diabetes and that the VWF in a glycoprotein Ib-binding conformation could play a role as risk marker during the development of diabetes in combination with an increase in age. Our study shows that the active quality of VWF was more important than the quantity.

  1. Factors Associated with Severity of Irritable Bowel Syndrome Symptoms in Patients with Endometriosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Caroline E; Yong, Paul J; Williams, Christina; Allaire, Catherine

    2018-02-01

    This study sought to examine factors associated with severity of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) by using the Birmingham IBS symptom scale in patients presenting with endometriosis to a tertiary referral centre. A prospective research cohort of patients presenting to a tertiary referral centre for endometriosis was evaluated for the presence and severity of IBS between December 2013 and April 2015. Patients with endometriosis had a diagnosis of IBS by using the Rome III criteria and were evaluated for severity of IBS symptoms by using the Birmingham IBS symptom scale. Multifactorial variables, including stage of endometriosis at the time of previous surgery, clinical examination findings, mood disorder questionnaire scores, and lifestyle factors, were evaluated using the t test and Spearman rank correlation test. A total of 194 of 373 (52%) women with confirmed endometriosis had a diagnosis of IBS. Factors associated with severity of IBS symptoms in patients with endometriosis included lower-stage endometriosis (P = 0.004), presence of mood disorders (P IBS symptom scale revealed a strong association between the previously identified factors and the pain subscale. Using the Birmingham IBS symptom scale, our study revealed more severe IBS symptoms in patients with lower-stage endometriosis and identified other variables highly associated with severity of IBS. Continued research is required to characterize further the clinical importance of IBS symptoms in patients with endometriosis-associated pelvic pain. Copyright © 2018 Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Frequency of conventional risk factors in patients with acute coronary syndrome in males and females

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butt, Z.; Shahbaz, U.; Hashmi, A.T.; Naseem, T.; Khan, M.M.; Bukhari, M.H.

    2010-01-01

    Background: The frequency of conventional risk factors for acute coronary syndrome differs in women compared to men, both in the general population and in patients with acute coronary syndrome. Objective: To find out the frequency of conventional risk factors in patients with acute coronary syndrome in males and females that exists in Pakistani patient population. Design: Cross-sectional survey. Material and Methods: A total of one hundred patients with acute coronary syndrome who presented in the Cardiology Department, Mayo Hospital Lahore were interviewed between May, 2008 and March 2009. Patients were enquired about the presence of hypertension and diabetes mellitus. Information was also obtained regarding smoking and history of ischemic heart disease in their first degree relatives. Lipid profile was recorded from the investigation chart of every patient. Results: 91% of subjects had at least one risk factor out of four conventional factors. When comparing men and women, more women were hypertensive and diabetic (p = 0.003 and 0.009 respectively). None of the females had ever smoked as compared to 34% of males (P = <0.001). Conclusion: Women with acute coronary syndrome, when compared to men, have more prevalence of diabetes and hyper-tension, and less prevalence of smoking. Further research is needed to better understand the gender differences in various aspects of ischemic heart disease that exist in our population. (author)

  3. Social network composition of vascular patients and its associations with health behavior and clinical risk factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naomi Heijmans

    Full Text Available This study aimed to explore linkages of patients' social network composition with health behaviors and clinical risk factors.This observational study was embedded in a project aimed at improving cardiovascular risk management (CRVM in primary care. 657 vascular patients (227 with cardiovascular disease, 380 at high vascular risk, mean age 72.4 (SD 9.4 years, were recruited as were individuals patients considered important for dealing with their disease, so called alters (n = 487. Network composition was measured with structured patient questionnaires. Both patients and alters completed questionnaires to measure health behavior (habits for physical activity, diet, and smoking. Clinical risk factors (systolic blood pressure, LDL cholesterol level, and body mass index were extracted from patients' medical records. Six logistic regression analyses, using generalized estimating equations, were used to test three hypothesized effects of network composition (having alters with healthful behaviors, without depression, and with specialized knowledge on six outcomes, adjusted for demographic, personal and psychological characteristics.Having alters with overall healthful behavior was related to healthful patient diet (OR 2.14, 95%CI: 1.52-3.02. Having non-smoking alters in networks was related to reduced odds for patient smoking (OR 0.17, 95%CI: 0.05-0.60. No effects of presence of non-depressed alters were found. Presence of alters with specialized knowledge on CVRM was inversely related to healthful diet habits of patients (OR 0.47, 95%CI 0.24-0.89. No significant associations between social network composition and clinical risk factors were found.Diet and smoking, but not physical exercise and clinical risk factors, were associated with social network composition of patients with vascular conditions. In this study of vascular patients, controlling for both personal and psychological factors, fewer network influences were found compared to previous

  4. Cardiovascular risk factors in patients with Addison's disease: a comparative study of South African and Swedish patients.

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    Ian Louis Ross

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Patients with Addison's disease (AD in Scandinavia have an increased risk for premature death due to cardiovascular disease (CVD. Serum lipids are important risk factors for CVD and vascular mortality. Replacement doses of hydrocortisone have historically been higher in Sweden than South Africa. The primary aim was to study the lipid profiles in a large group of patients with AD with the hypothesis that the lipid profile in patients in Sweden would be worse than in South Africa. METHODS: In a cross-sectional study, 110 patients with AD (55 from South Africa, 55 from Sweden matched for age, gender, ethnicity and BMI were studied. Anthropometric measures, blood pressure, lipids, highly sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP and adiponectin were studied. RESULTS: All patients were Caucasian and the majority were women N = 36 (65.5%. Mean (standard deviation; SD ages of the Swedish and South African patients were 52.9 (13.0 and 52.6 (14.4 years and BMI 25.3 (3.2 and 25.8 (4.1 kg/m2, respectively. The mean total daily hydrocortisone dose was greater in the Swedish patients than the South African patients, [33.0 (8.1 versus 24.3 (8.0 mg; p<0.0001]. South African patients had higher median (interquartilerange; IQR triglycerides (TG [1.59 (1.1-2.46 versus 0.96 (0.74-1.6 mmol/l; p<0.001], total cholesterol (TC [6.02(1.50 versus 5.13 (0.87 mmol/l; p<0.001], LDL-C [4.43 (1.44 versus 2.75 (0.80 mmol/l; p<0.001] and median hs-CRP [2.15 (0.93-5.45 versus 0.99 (0.57-2.10 mg/L; p<0.003] and lower HDL-C [0.80 (0.40 versus 1.86 (0.46 mmol/l; p<0.001] than the Swedish patients. Approximately 20% of the patients in both cohorts had hypertension and diabetes mellitus. CONCLUSIONS: South African patients with AD have worse lipid profiles and higher hs-CRP compared to their matched Swedish patients, despite lower doses of hydrocortisone. It is uncertain at this time whether these are due to genetic or environmental factors.

  5. Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Patients with Addison's Disease: A Comparative Study of South African and Swedish Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Ian Louis; Bergthorsdottir, Ragnhildur; Levitt, Naomi; Dave, Joel Alex; Schatz, Desmond; Marais, David; Johannsson, Gudmundur

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients with Addison's disease (AD) in Scandinavia have an increased risk for premature death due to cardiovascular disease (CVD). Serum lipids are important risk factors for CVD and vascular mortality. Replacement doses of hydrocortisone have historically been higher in Sweden than South Africa. The primary aim was to study the lipid profiles in a large group of patients with AD with the hypothesis that the lipid profile in patients in Sweden would be worse than in South Africa. Methods In a cross-sectional study, 110 patients with AD (55 from South Africa, 55 from Sweden) matched for age, gender, ethnicity and BMI were studied. Anthropometric measures, blood pressure, lipids, highly sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and adiponectin were studied. Results All patients were Caucasian and the majority were women N = 36 (65.5%). Mean (standard deviation; SD) ages of the Swedish and South African patients were 52.9 (13.0) and 52.6 (14.4) years and BMI 25.3 (3.2) and 25.8 (4.1) kg/m2, respectively. The mean total daily hydrocortisone dose was greater in the Swedish patients than the South African patients, [33.0 (8.1) versus 24.3 (8.0) mg; p<0.0001]. South African patients had higher median (interquartilerange; IQR) triglycerides (TG) [1.59 (1.1–2.46) versus 0.96 (0.74–1.6) mmol/l; p<0.001], total cholesterol (TC) [6.02(1.50) versus 5.13 (0.87) mmol/l; p<0.001], LDL-C [4.43 (1.44) versus 2.75 (0.80) mmol/l; p<0.001] and median hs-CRP [2.15 (0.93–5.45) versus 0.99 (0.57–2.10) mg/L; p<0.003] and lower HDL-C [0.80 (0.40) versus 1.86 (0.46) mmol/l; p<0.001] than the Swedish patients. Approximately 20% of the patients in both cohorts had hypertension and diabetes mellitus. Conclusions South African patients with AD have worse lipid profiles and higher hs-CRP compared to their matched Swedish patients, despite lower doses of hydrocortisone. It is uncertain at this time whether these are due to genetic or environmental factors. PMID:24603607

  6. Factors affecting the willingness to pay for implants: A study of patients in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Garni, Bishi; Pani, Sharat Chandra; Almaaz, Adel; Al Qeshtaini, Ehsan; Abu-Haimed, Hamad; Al Sharif, Khalid

    2012-11-01

    One of the factors that dissuade patients needing tooth replacement from choosing dental implants is the prohibitive cost. Willingness to pay (WTP) is a useful tool to determine the ideal cost of an expensive procedure. The aim of this study was to study the factors that influence the willingness to pay (WTP) among patients attending a private clinic and compare them to those attending a government setup. A total of 100 patients (38 male, 62 female) who had one or more missing teeth were presented with different cost-benefit scenarios and then asked if they were willing to pay the median cost of a single implant in Riyadh city. The mean WTP price was compared using the one way-ANOVA, factors which could possibly influence patients' WTP were grouped together in a Binomial logistic regression model. Of the 100 individuals surveyed 67% said they would be willing to pay the median price for the placement of an implant. A comparison of socio-demographic factors showed that significant differences were found between gender, income groups and setting of the clinic in the mean WTP price of the patients (P difference in the mean WTP price between groups with regard to the area of the missing tooth, the patients' perception of their oral health and the their desire to want an implant (P pay the median price for an implant. Willingness to pay (WTP) is a multifactorial variable which is significantly influenced by the income of the patient, the setting of the clinic and the gender; the most significant factor being the acceptability of the implant to the patient.

  7. Risk factors for frequent readmissions and barriers to transplantation in patients with cirrhosis.

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    Swaytha Ganesh

    Full Text Available Hospital readmission rate is receiving increasing regulatory scrutiny. Patients with cirrhosis have high hospital readmissions rates but the relationship between frequent readmissions and barriers to transplantation remains unexplored. The goal of this study was to determine risk factors for frequent readmissions among patients with cirrhosis and identify barriers to transplantation in this population.We retrospectively reviewed medical records of 587 patients with a confirmed diagnosis of cirrhosis admitted to a large tertiary care center between May 1, 2008 and May 1, 2009. Demographics, clinical factors, and outcomes were recorded. Multivariate logistic regression was performed to identify risk factors for high readmission rates. Transplant-related factors were assessed for patients in the high readmission group.The 587 patients included in the study had 1557 admissions during the study period. A subset of 87 (15% patients with 5 or more admissions accounted for 672 (43% admissions. The factors associated with frequent admissions were non-white race (OR = 2.45, p = 0.01, diabetes (OR = 2.04, p = 0.01, higher Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD score (OR = 35.10, p30 and younger age (OR = 0.98, p = 0.02. Among the 87 patients with ≥5 admissions, only 14 (16% underwent liver transplantation during the study period. Substance abuse, medical co-morbidities, and low (<15 MELD scores were barriers to transplantation in this group.A small group of patients with cirrhosis account for a disproportionately high number of hospital admissions. Interventions targeting this high-risk group may decrease frequent hospital readmissions and increase access to transplantation.

  8. Factors affecting nebulised medicine adherence in adult patients with cystic fibrosis: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Alice; Bonney, Mary-Ann; Brien, Jo-Anne; Karamy, Rita; Aslani, Parisa

    2015-02-01

    Nebulised medicines contribute to the high treatment burden experienced by patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). This study explored experiences of adult patients with CF when using nebulised medicines, factors impacting on their adherence to nebulised therapy and strategies they used to facilitate adherence. Community setting, in Sydney, Australia. Ten patients with CF were recruited through a CF patient organisation. Semi-structured face-to-face interviews were conducted, addressing the study objectives. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and content analysed for anticipated and emergent themes. Experiences with using nebulised medicines; and barriers and facilitators of adherence to nebulised medicines. Participants' age ranged from 22 to 45 years, with half being male. Four broad themes (with more specific sub-themes) were identified from the interviews: experiences with using nebulised medicines (cleaning nebuliser, time taken to use nebuliser medicine, flexibility in use of nebuliser); feelings about using nebulised medicines (necessary/important, dislike, part of life); factors impacting non-adherence (time consuming therapy, side effects/effects of medicine, work/social demands, lack of perceived importance); factors and strategies facilitating adherence (perceived medicine importance, habit/routine, support, health benefits, technology/medicine dose form, timetabling). Nebulised therapy for cystic fibrosis patients takes a substantial amount of time, with patients trying to alter their routine to incorporate nebulising into their daily lives. However there are still many factors that lead to low adherence, including work/social demands and travelling. Patients balance the necessity for nebulised therapy against the barriers, and engage in intentional non-adherence at times. Future strategies and resources should target and address specific factors identified by patients with CF as being important and impacting their adherence to nebulised

  9. Prevalence and associated factors for decreased appetite among patients with stable heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreae, Christina; Strömberg, Anna; Årestedt, Kristofer

    2016-06-01

    To explore the prevalence of decreased appetite and factors associated with appetite among patients with stable heart failure. Decreased appetite is an important factor for the development of undernutrition among patients with heart failure, but there are knowledge gaps about prevalence and the factors related to appetite in this patient group. Observational, cross-sectional study. A total of 186 patients with mild to severe heart failure were consecutively recruited from three heart failure outpatient clinics. Data were obtained from medical records (heart failure diagnosis, comorbidity and medical treatment) and self-rated questionnaires (demographics, appetite, self-perceived health, symptoms of depression and sleep). Blood samples were taken to determine myocardial stress and nutrition status. Heart failure symptoms and cognitive function were assessed by clinical examinations. The Council on Nutrition Appetite Questionnaire was used to assess self-reported appetite. Bivariate correlations and multivariate linear regression analyses were conducted to explore factors associated with appetite. Seventy-one patients (38%) experienced a loss of appetite with a significant risk of developing weight loss. The final multiple regression model showed that age, symptoms of depression, insomnia, cognitive function and pharmacological treatment were associated with appetite, explaining 27% of the total variance. In this cross-sectional study, a large share of patients with heart failure was affected by decreased appetite, associated with demographic, psychosocial and medical factors. Loss of appetite is a prevalent problem among patients with heart failure that may lead to undernutrition. Health care professionals should routinely assess appetite and discuss patients' experiences of appetite, nutrition intake and body weight and give appropriate nutritional advice with respect to individual needs. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Comparison of risk factors for hepatitis b and c in patients visiting a gastroenterology clinic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shazi, L.; Abbas, Z.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To find out and compare the risk factors for hepatitis Band C infections in patients visiting a gastroenterology clinic. Design: A case-control study. Place and Duration of Study: The Liver Stomach Clinic, Karachi, from July 2004 to September 2004. Patients and Methods: Patients of hepatitis Band C visiting the clinic were interviewed and data were noted on a prescribed form. Patients with dyspeptic symptoms who were negative for both hepatitis Band C were taken as controls. Statistical analysis was done using SPSS package. Results: Total numbers of patients interviewed were 148; 63 with hepatitis C, 41 with hepatitis B and 44 in the control group. These patients hailed from various parts of Pakistan with diverse ethnicity. Comparing hepatitis C with the control group, important risk factors identified were lower level of education, the occupational exposure to the blood and syringes, history of blood transfusions, taking therapeutic injections and intravenous drips, and habit of getting shaved by barbers. Patients of hepatitis B were younger as compared to the control group. Their knowledge about spread of infection was poor. These patients had not received hepatitis B vaccine during childhood. Less number of risk factors could be identified in this group, Shaving from the barber's shop was also found to be a risk factor just like in hepatitis C. Conclusion: There is a need to educate general population about the possible risk factors associated with the spread of hepatitis C and B. Proper screening of blood products and universal precautions against the spread of infections are recommended. Treatment by in drips and getting shaved by barbers should be discouraged. Vaccination against hepatitis B is recommended. (author)

  11. Risk Factors and Dose-Effect Relationship for Mandibular Osteoradionecrosis in Oral and Oropharyngeal Cancer Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ik Jae; Koom, Woong Sub; Lee, Chang Geol; Kim, Yong Bae; Yoo, Sei Whan; Keum, Ki Chang; Kim, Gwi Eon; Choi, Eun Chang; Cha, In Ho

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze risk factors and the dose-effect relationship for osteoradionecrosis (ORN) of the mandible after radiotherapy of oral and oropharyngeal cancers. Materials and Methods: One-hundred ninety-eight patients with oral (45%) and oropharyngeal cancer (55%) who had received external radiotherapy between 1990 and 2000 were retrospectively reviewed. All patients had a dental evaluation before radiotherapy. The median radiation dose was 60 Gy (range, 16-75 Gy), and the median biologically effective dose for late effects (BED late ) in bone was 114 Gy 2 (range, 30-167 Gy 2 ). Results: The frequency of ORN was 13 patients (6.6%). Among patients with mandibular surgery, eight had ORN at the surgical site. Among patients without mandibular surgery, five patients had ORN on the molar area of the mandible. The median time to ORN was 22 months (range, 1-69 months). Univariate analysis revealed that mandibular surgery and Co-60 were significant risk factors for ORN (p = 0.01 and 0.04, respectively). In multivariate analysis, mandibular surgery was the most important factor (p = 0.001). High radiation doses over BED 102.6 Gy 2 (conventional dose of 54 Gy at 1.8 Gy/fraction) were also a significant factor for ORN (p = 0.008) and showed a positive dose-effect relationship in logistic regression (p = 0.04) for patients who had undergone mandibular surgery. Conclusions: Mandibular surgery was the most significant risk factor for ORN of mandible in oral and oropharyngeal cancers patients. A BED of 102.6 Gy 2 or higher to the mandible also significantly increases the risk of ORN.

  12. Factors associated with initiation of antihyperglycaemic medication in UK patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinclair Alan J

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aim To assess the factors associated with antihyperglycaemic medication initiation in UK patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes. Methods In a retrospective cohort study, patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes were identified during the index period of 2003-2005. Eligible patients were ≥ 30 years old at the date of the first observed diabetes diagnosis (referred to as index date and had at least 2 years of follow-up medical history (N = 9,158. Initiation of antihyperglycaemic medication (i.e., treatment was assessed in the 2-year period following the index date. Adjusted Cox regression models were used to examine the association between time to medication initiation and patient age and other factors. Results Mean (SD HbA1c at diagnosis was 8.1% (2.3. Overall, 51% of patients initiated antihyperglycaemic medication within 2 years (65%, 55%, 46% and 40% for patients in the 30- th, 75th percentile time to treatment initiation was 63 (8, 257 days. Of the patients with HbA1c ≥ 7.5% at diagnosis, 87% initiated treatment within 2 years. These patients with a higher HbA1c also had shorter time to treatment initiation (adjusted hazard ratio (HR = 2.44 [95% confidence interval (CI: 1.61, 3.70]; p Conclusions In this UK cohort of patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes, only 51% had antihyperglycaemic medication initiated over a 2-year period following diagnosis. Older patients were significantly less likely to have been prescribed antihyperglycaemic medications. Elevated HbA1c was the strongest factor associated with initiating antihyperglycaemic medication in these patients.