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Sample records for factor binding regions

  1. Structural Fingerprints of Transcription Factor Binding Site Regions

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    Peter Willett

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Fourier transforms are a powerful tool in the prediction of DNA sequence properties, such as the presence/absence of codons. We have previously compiled a database of the structural properties of all 32,896 unique DNA octamers. In this work we apply Fourier techniques to the analysis of the structural properties of human chromosomes 21 and 22 and also to three sets of transcription factor binding sites within these chromosomes. We find that, for a given structural property, the structural property power spectra of chromosomes 21 and 22 are strikingly similar. We find common peaks in their power spectra for both Sp1 and p53 transcription factor binding sites. We use the power spectra as a structural fingerprint and perform similarity searching in order to find transcription factor binding site regions. This approach provides a new strategy for searching the genome data for information. Although it is difficult to understand the relationship between specific functional properties and the set of structural parameters in our database, our structural fingerprints nevertheless provide a useful tool for searching for function information in sequence data. The power spectrum fingerprints provide a simple, fast method for comparing a set of functional sequences, in this case transcription factor binding site regions, with the sequences of whole chromosomes. On its own, the power spectrum fingerprint does not find all transcription factor binding sites in a chromosome, but the results presented here show that in combination with other approaches, this technique will improve the chances of identifying functional sequences hidden in genomic data.

  2. Transcription Factors Bind Thousands of Active and InactiveRegions in the Drosophila Blastoderm

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    Li, Xiao-Yong; MacArthur, Stewart; Bourgon, Richard; Nix, David; Pollard, Daniel A.; Iyer, Venky N.; Hechmer, Aaron; Simirenko, Lisa; Stapleton, Mark; Luengo Hendriks, Cris L.; Chu, Hou Cheng; Ogawa, Nobuo; Inwood, William; Sementchenko, Victor; Beaton, Amy; Weiszmann, Richard; Celniker, Susan E.; Knowles, David W.; Gingeras, Tom; Speed, Terence P.; Eisen, Michael B.; Biggin, Mark D.

    2008-01-10

    Identifying the genomic regions bound by sequence-specific regulatory factors is central both to deciphering the complex DNA cis-regulatory code that controls transcription in metazoans and to determining the range of genes that shape animal morphogenesis. Here, we use whole-genome tiling arrays to map sequences bound in Drosophila melanogaster embryos by the six maternal and gap transcription factors that initiate anterior-posterior patterning. We find that these sequence-specific DNA binding proteins bind with quantitatively different specificities to highly overlapping sets of several thousand genomic regions in blastoderm embryos. Specific high- and moderate-affinity in vitro recognition sequences for each factor are enriched in bound regions. This enrichment, however, is not sufficient to explain the pattern of binding in vivo and varies in a context-dependent manner, demonstrating that higher-order rules must govern targeting of transcription factors. The more highly bound regions include all of the over forty well-characterized enhancers known to respond to these factors as well as several hundred putative new cis-regulatory modules clustered near developmental regulators and other genes with patterned expression at this stage of embryogenesis. The new targets include most of the microRNAs (miRNAs) transcribed in the blastoderm, as well as all major zygotically transcribed dorsal-ventral patterning genes, whose expression we show to be quantitatively modulated by anterior-posterior factors. In addition to these highly bound regions, there are several thousand regions that are reproducibly bound at lower levels. However, these poorly bound regions are, collectively, far more distant from genes transcribed in the blastoderm than highly bound regions; are preferentially found in protein-coding sequences; and are less conserved than highly bound regions. Together these observations suggest that many of these poorly-bound regions are not involved in early

  3. Transcription factors bind thousands of active and inactive regions in the Drosophila blastoderm.

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    Xiao-yong Li

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Identifying the genomic regions bound by sequence-specific regulatory factors is central both to deciphering the complex DNA cis-regulatory code that controls transcription in metazoans and to determining the range of genes that shape animal morphogenesis. We used whole-genome tiling arrays to map sequences bound in Drosophila melanogaster embryos by the six maternal and gap transcription factors that initiate anterior-posterior patterning. We find that these sequence-specific DNA binding proteins bind with quantitatively different specificities to highly overlapping sets of several thousand genomic regions in blastoderm embryos. Specific high- and moderate-affinity in vitro recognition sequences for each factor are enriched in bound regions. This enrichment, however, is not sufficient to explain the pattern of binding in vivo and varies in a context-dependent manner, demonstrating that higher-order rules must govern targeting of transcription factors. The more highly bound regions include all of the over 40 well-characterized enhancers known to respond to these factors as well as several hundred putative new cis-regulatory modules clustered near developmental regulators and other genes with patterned expression at this stage of embryogenesis. The new targets include most of the microRNAs (miRNAs transcribed in the blastoderm, as well as all major zygotically transcribed dorsal-ventral patterning genes, whose expression we show to be quantitatively modulated by anterior-posterior factors. In addition to these highly bound regions, there are several thousand regions that are reproducibly bound at lower levels. However, these poorly bound regions are, collectively, far more distant from genes transcribed in the blastoderm than highly bound regions; are preferentially found in protein-coding sequences; and are less conserved than highly bound regions. Together these observations suggest that many of these poorly bound regions are not involved in

  4. ECRbase: Database of Evolutionary Conserved Regions, Promoters, and Transcription Factor Binding Sites in Vertebrate Genomes

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    Loots, G; Ovcharenko, I

    2006-08-08

    Evolutionary conservation of DNA sequences provides a tool for the identification of functional elements in genomes. We have created a database of evolutionary conserved regions (ECRs) in vertebrate genomes entitled ECRbase that is constructed from a collection of pairwise vertebrate genome alignments produced by the ECR Browser database. ECRbase features a database of syntenic blocks that recapitulate the evolution of rearrangements in vertebrates and a collection of promoters in all vertebrate genomes presented in the database. The database also contains a collection of annotated transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) in all ECRs and promoter elements. ECRbase currently includes human, rhesus macaque, dog, opossum, rat, mouse, chicken, frog, zebrafish, and two pufferfish genomes. It is freely accessible at http://ECRbase.dcode.org.

  5. A Novel DNA Binding Mechanism for maf Basic Region-Leucine Zipper Factors Inferred from a MafA-DNA Complex Structure and Binding Specificities

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    Lu, Xun; Guanga, Gerald P; Wan, Cheng; Rose, Robert B [Z; (W Elec.); (NCSU)

    2012-11-13

    MafA is a proto-oncoprotein and is critical for insulin gene expression in pancreatic β-cells. Maf proteins belong to the AP1 superfamily of basic region-leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factors. Residues in the basic helix and an ancillary N-terminal domain, the Extended Homology Region (EHR), endow maf proteins with unique DNA binding properties: binding a 13 bp consensus site consisting of a core AP1 site (TGACTCA) flanked by TGC sequences and binding DNA stably as monomers. To further characterize maf DNA binding, we determined the structure of a MafA–DNA complex. MafA forms base-specific hydrogen bonds with the flanking G–5C–4 and central C0/G0 bases, but not with the core-TGA bases. However, in vitro binding studies utilizing a pulse–chase electrophoretic mobility shift assay protocol revealed that mutating either the core-TGA or flanking-TGC bases dramatically increases the binding off rate. Comparing the known maf structures, we propose that DNA binding specificity results from positioning the basic helix through unique phosphate contacts. The EHR does not contact DNA directly but stabilizes DNA binding by contacting the basic helix. Collectively, these results suggest a novel multistep DNA binding process involving a conformational change from contacting the core-TGA to contacting the flanking-TGC bases.

  6. Predicting sequence and structural specificities of RNA binding regions recognized by splicing factor SRSF1

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    Wang Xin

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RNA-binding proteins (RBPs play diverse roles in eukaryotic RNA processing. Despite their pervasive functions in coding and noncoding RNA biogenesis and regulation, elucidating the sequence specificities that define protein-RNA interactions remains a major challenge. Recently, CLIP-seq (Cross-linking immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput sequencing has been successfully implemented to study the transcriptome-wide binding patterns of SRSF1, PTBP1, NOVA and fox2 proteins. These studies either adopted traditional methods like Multiple EM for Motif Elicitation (MEME to discover the sequence consensus of RBP's binding sites or used Z-score statistics to search for the overrepresented nucleotides of a certain size. We argue that most of these methods are not well-suited for RNA motif identification, as they are unable to incorporate the RNA structural context of protein-RNA interactions, which may affect to binding specificity. Here, we describe a novel model-based approach--RNAMotifModeler to identify the consensus of protein-RNA binding regions by integrating sequence features and RNA secondary structures. Results As an example, we implemented RNAMotifModeler on SRSF1 (SF2/ASF CLIP-seq data. The sequence-structural consensus we identified is a purine-rich octamer 'AGAAGAAG' in a highly single-stranded RNA context. The unpaired probabilities, the probabilities of not forming pairs, are significantly higher than negative controls and the flanking sequence surrounding the binding site, indicating that SRSF1 proteins tend to bind on single-stranded RNA. Further statistical evaluations revealed that the second and fifth bases of SRSF1octamer motif have much stronger sequence specificities, but weaker single-strandedness, while the third, fourth, sixth and seventh bases are far more likely to be single-stranded, but have more degenerate sequence specificities. Therefore, we hypothesize that nucleotide specificity and

  7. Dynamic changes in binding of immunoglobulin heavy chain 3' regulatory region to protein factors during class switching.

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    Chatterjee, Sanjukta; Ju, Zhongliang; Hassan, Rabih; Volpi, Sabrina A; Emelyanov, Alexander V; Birshtein, Barbara K

    2011-08-19

    The 3' regulatory region (3' RR) of the Igh locus works at long distances on variable region (V(H)) and switch region (I) region promoters to initiate germ line (non-coding) transcription (GT) and promote class switch recombination (CSR). The 3' RR contains multiple elements, including enhancers (hs3a, hs1.2, hs3b, and hs4) and a proposed insulator region containing CTCF (CCCTC-binding factor) binding sites, i.e. hs5/6/7 and the downstream region ("38"). Notably, deletion of each individual enhancer (hs3a-hs4) has no significant phenotypic consequence, suggesting that the 3' RR has considerable structural flexibility in its function. To better understand how the 3' RR functions, we identified transcription factor binding sites and used chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays to monitor their occupancy in splenic B cells that initiate GT and undergo CSR (LPS±IL4), are deficient in GT and CSR (p50(-/-)), or do not undergo CSR despite efficient GT (anti-IgM+IL4). Like 3' RR enhancers, hs5-7 and the 38 region were observed to contain multiple Pax5 binding sites (in addition to multiple CTCF sites). We found that the Pax5 binding profile to the 3' RR dynamically changed during CSR independent of the specific isotype to which switching was induced, and binding focused on hs1.2, hs4, and hs7. CTCF-associated and CTCF-independent cohesin interactions were also identified. Our observations are consistent with a scaffold model in which a platform of active protein complexes capable of facilitating GT and CSR can be formed by varying constellations of 3' RR elements.

  8. Similarities in transcription factor IIIC subunits that bind to the posterior regions of internal promoters for RNA polymerase III

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    Matsutani Sachiko

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In eukaryotes, RNA polymerase III (RNAP III transcribes the genes for small RNAs like tRNAs, 5S rRNA, and several viral RNAs, and short interspersed repetitive elements (SINEs. The genes for these RNAs and SINEs have internal promoters that consist of two regions. These two regions are called the A and B blocks. The multisubunit transcription factor TFIIIC is required for transcription initiation of RNAP III; in transcription of tRNAs, the B-block binding subunit of TFIIIC recognizes a promoter. Although internal promoter sequences are conserved in eukaryotes, no evidence of homology between the B-block binding subunits of vertebrates and yeasts has been reported previously. Results Here, I reported the results of PSI-BLAST searches using the B-block binding subunits of human and Shizosacchromyces pombe as queries, showing that the same Arabidopsis proteins were hit with low E-values in both searches. Comparison of the convergent iterative alignments obtained by these PSI-BLAST searches revealed that the vertebrate, yeast, and Arabidopsis proteins have similarities in their N-terminal one-third regions. In these regions, there were three domains with conserved sequence similarities, one located in the N-terminal end region. The N-terminal end region of the B-block binding subunit of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is tentatively identified as a HMG box, which is the DNA binding motif. Although I compared the alignment of the N-terminal end regions of the B-block binding subunits, and their homologs, with that of the HMG boxes, it is not clear whether they are related. Conclusion Molecular phylogenetic analyses using the small subunit rRNA and ubiquitous proteins like actin and α-tubulin, show that fungi are more closely related to animals than either is to plants. Interestingly, the results obtained in this study show that, with respect to the B-block binding subunits of TFIIICs, animals appear to be evolutionarily closer to plants

  9. Structured and disordered regions cooperatively mediate DNA-binding autoinhibition of ETS factors ETV1, ETV4 and ETV5

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    Currie, Simon L.; Lau, Desmond K. W.; Doane, Jedediah J.; Whitby, Frank G.; Okon, Mark; McIntosh, Lawrence P.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Autoinhibition enables spatial and temporal regulation of cellular processes by coupling protein activity to surrounding conditions, often via protein partnerships or signaling pathways. We report the molecular basis of DNA-binding autoinhibition of ETS transcription factors ETV1, ETV4 and ETV5, which are often overexpressed in prostate cancer. Inhibitory elements that cooperate to repress DNA binding were identified in regions N- and C-terminal of the ETS domain. Crystal structures of these three factors revealed an α-helix in the C-terminal inhibitory domain that packs against the ETS domain and perturbs the conformation of its DNA-recognition helix. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy demonstrated that the N-terminal inhibitory domain (NID) is intrinsically disordered, yet utilizes transient intramolecular interactions with the DNA-recognition helix of the ETS domain to mediate autoinhibition. Acetylation of selected lysines within the NID activates DNA binding. This investigation revealed a distinctive mechanism for DNA-binding autoinhibition in the ETV1/4/5 subfamily involving a network of intramolecular interactions not present in other ETS factors. These distinguishing inhibitory elements provide a platform through which cellular triggers, such as protein–protein interactions or post-translational modifications, may specifically regulate the function of these oncogenic proteins. PMID:28161714

  10. Nucleosome free regions in yeast promoters result from competitive binding of transcription factors that interact with chromatin modifiers.

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    Evgeniy A Ozonov

    Full Text Available Because DNA packaging in nucleosomes modulates its accessibility to transcription factors (TFs, unraveling the causal determinants of nucleosome positioning is of great importance to understanding gene regulation. Although there is evidence that intrinsic sequence specificity contributes to nucleosome positioning, the extent to which other factors contribute to nucleosome positioning is currently highly debated. Here we obtained both in vivo and in vitro reference maps of positions that are either consistently covered or free of nucleosomes across multiple experimental data-sets in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We then systematically quantified the contribution of TF binding to nucleosome positioning using a rigorous statistical mechanics model in which TFs compete with nucleosomes for binding DNA. Our results reconcile previous seemingly conflicting results on the determinants of nucleosome positioning and provide a quantitative explanation for the difference between in vivo and in vitro positioning. On a genome-wide scale, nucleosome positioning is dominated by the phasing of nucleosome arrays over gene bodies, and their positioning is mainly determined by the intrinsic sequence preferences of nucleosomes. In contrast, larger nucleosome free regions in promoters, which likely have a much more significant impact on gene expression, are determined mainly by TF binding. Interestingly, of the 158 yeast TFs included in our modeling, we find that only 10-20 significantly contribute to inducing nucleosome-free regions, and these TFs are highly enriched for having direct interactions with chromatin remodelers. Together our results imply that nucleosome free regions in yeast promoters results from the binding of a specific class of TFs that recruit chromatin remodelers.

  11. Nucleosome free regions in yeast promoters result from competitive binding of transcription factors that interact with chromatin modifiers.

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    Ozonov, Evgeniy A; van Nimwegen, Erik

    2013-01-01

    Because DNA packaging in nucleosomes modulates its accessibility to transcription factors (TFs), unraveling the causal determinants of nucleosome positioning is of great importance to understanding gene regulation. Although there is evidence that intrinsic sequence specificity contributes to nucleosome positioning, the extent to which other factors contribute to nucleosome positioning is currently highly debated. Here we obtained both in vivo and in vitro reference maps of positions that are either consistently covered or free of nucleosomes across multiple experimental data-sets in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We then systematically quantified the contribution of TF binding to nucleosome positioning using a rigorous statistical mechanics model in which TFs compete with nucleosomes for binding DNA. Our results reconcile previous seemingly conflicting results on the determinants of nucleosome positioning and provide a quantitative explanation for the difference between in vivo and in vitro positioning. On a genome-wide scale, nucleosome positioning is dominated by the phasing of nucleosome arrays over gene bodies, and their positioning is mainly determined by the intrinsic sequence preferences of nucleosomes. In contrast, larger nucleosome free regions in promoters, which likely have a much more significant impact on gene expression, are determined mainly by TF binding. Interestingly, of the 158 yeast TFs included in our modeling, we find that only 10-20 significantly contribute to inducing nucleosome-free regions, and these TFs are highly enriched for having direct interactions with chromatin remodelers. Together our results imply that nucleosome free regions in yeast promoters results from the binding of a specific class of TFs that recruit chromatin remodelers.

  12. Functional interaction of CCAAT/enhancer-binding-protein-α basic region mutants with E2F transcription factors and DNA.

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    Kowenz-Leutz, Elisabeth; Schuetz, Anja; Liu, Qingbin; Knoblich, Maria; Heinemann, Udo; Leutz, Achim

    2016-07-01

    The transcription factor CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein α (C/EBPα) regulates cell cycle arrest and terminal differentiation of neutrophils and adipocytes. Mutations in the basic leucine zipper domain (bZip) of C/EBPα are associated with acute myeloid leukemia. A widely used murine transforming C/EBPα basic region mutant (BRM2) entails two bZip point mutations (I294A/R297A). BRM2 has been discordantly described as defective for DNA binding or defective for interaction with E2F. We have separated the two BRM2 mutations to shed light on the intertwined reciprocity between C/EBPα-E2F-DNA interactions. Both, C/EBPα I294A and R297A retain transactivation capacity and interaction with E2F-DP. The C/EBPα R297A mutation destabilized DNA binding, whereas the C/EBPα I294A mutation enhanced binding to DNA. The C/EBPα R297A mutant, like BRM2, displayed enhanced interaction with E2F-DP but failed to repress E2F-dependent transactivation although both mutants were readily suppressed by E2F1 for transcription through C/EBP cis-regulatory sites. In contrast, the DNA binding enhanced C/EBPα I294A mutant displayed increased repression of E2F-DP mediated transactivation and resisted E2F-DP mediated repression. Thus, the efficient repression of E2F dependent S-phase genes and the activation of differentiation genes reside in the balanced DNA binding capacity of C/EBPα.

  13. Factor H binds to the hypervariable region of many Streptococcus pyogenes M proteins but does not promote phagocytosis resistance or acute virulence

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    Gustafsson, Caj Ulrik Mattias; Lannergård, Jonas; Nilsson, Olof Rickard;

    2013-01-01

    Many pathogens express a surface protein that binds the human complement regulator factor H (FH), as first described for Streptococcus pyogenes and the antiphagocytic M6 protein. It is commonly assumed that FH recruited to an M protein enhances virulence by protecting the bacteria against...... immunochemical analysis indicated that FH binds solely to the hypervariable region (HVR) of an M protein, suggesting that selection has favored the ability of certain HVRs to bind FH. These FH-binding HVRs could be studied as isolated polypeptides that retain ability to bind FH, implying that an FH-binding HVR...... represents a distinct ligand-binding domain. The isolated HVRs specifically interacted with FH among all human serum proteins, interacted with the same region in FH and showed species specificity, but exhibited little or no antigenic cross-reactivity. Although these findings suggested that FH recruited...

  14. Different papillomaviruses have different repertoires of transcription factor binding sites: convergence and divergence in the upstream regulatory region

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    Alonso Ángel

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Papillomaviruses (PVs infect stratified squamous epithelia in warm-blooded vertebrates and have undergone a complex evolutionary process. The control of the expression of the early ORFs in PVs depends on the binding of cellular and viral transcription factors to the upstream regulatory region (URR of the virus. It is believed that there is a core of transcription factor binding sites (TFBS common to all PVs, with additional individual differences, although most of the available information focuses only on a handful of viruses. Results We have studied the URR of sixty-one PVs, covering twenty different hosts. We have predicted the TFBS present in the URR and analysed these results by principal component analysis and genetic algorithms. The number and nature of TFBS in the URR might be much broader than thus far described, and different PVs have different repertoires of TFBS. Conclusion There are common fingerprints in the URR in PVs that infect primates, although the ancestors of these viruses diverged a long time ago. Additionally, there are obvious differences between the URR of alpha and beta PVs, despite these PVs infect similar histological cell types in the same host, i.e. human. A thorough analysis of the TFBS in the URR might provide crucial information about the differential biology of cancer-associated PVs.

  15. Molecular dissection of the intrinsic factor-vitamin B12 receptor, cubilin, discloses regions important for membrane association and ligand binding.

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    Kristiansen, M; Kozyraki, R; Jacobsen, C; Nexø, E; Verroust, P J; Moestrup, S K

    1999-07-16

    Cubilin, the receptor for intrinsic factor-vitamin B12, is a novel type of high molecular weight receptor consisting of a 27 CUB (complement components C1r/C1s, Uegf, and bone morphogenic protein-1) domain cluster preceded by 8 epidermal growth factor repeats and a short N-terminal sequence. In addition to binding the vitamin B12-carrier complex, cubilin also binds receptor-associated protein. To delineate the structures for membrane association and ligand binding we established a panel of stable transfected Chinese hamster ovary cells expressing overlapping segments of rat cubilin. Analysis of conditioned media and cell extracts of transfected cells revealed that the N-terminal cubilin region conveys membrane association. Helical plotting of this region demonstrated a conserved amphipathic helix pattern (Lys74-Glu109) as a candidate site for hydrophobic interactions. Ligand affinity chromatography and surface plasmon resonance analysis of the secreted cubilin fragments showed ligand binding in the CUB domain region. Further dissection of binding-active fragments localized the binding site for intrinsic factor-vitamin B12 to CUB domains 5-8 and a receptor-associated protein-binding site to CUB domains 13-14. In conclusion, the N-terminal cubilin region seems crucial for membrane association, whereas the CUB domain cluster harbors distinct sites for ligand binding.

  16. Developmental roles of 21 Drosophila transcription factors are determined by quantitative differences in binding to an overlapping set of thousands of genomic regions

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    MacArthur, Stewart; Li, Xiao-Yong; Li, Jingyi; Brown, James B.; Chu, Hou Cheng; Zeng, Lucy; Grondona, Brandi P.; Hechmer, Aaron; Simirenko, Lisa; Keranen, Soile V.E.; Knowles, David W.; Stapleton, Mark; Bickel, Peter; Biggin, Mark D.; Eisen, Michael B.

    2009-05-15

    BACKGROUND: We previously established that six sequence-specific transcription factors that initiate anterior/posterior patterning in Drosophila bind to overlapping sets of thousands of genomic regions in blastoderm embryos. While regions bound at high levels include known and probable functional targets, more poorly bound regions are preferentially associated with housekeeping genes and/or genes not transcribed in the blastoderm, and are frequently found in protein coding sequences or in less conserved non-coding DNA, suggesting that many are likely non-functional. RESULTS: Here we show that an additional 15 transcription factors that regulate other aspects of embryo patterning show a similar quantitative continuum of function and binding to thousands of genomic regions in vivo. Collectively, the 21 regulators show a surprisingly high overlap in the regions they bind given that they belong to 11 DNA binding domain families, specify distinct developmental fates, and can act via different cis-regulatory modules. We demonstrate, however, that quantitative differences in relative levels of binding to shared targets correlate with the known biological and transcriptional regulatory specificities of these factors. CONCLUSIONS: It is likely that the overlap in binding of biochemically and functionally unrelated transcription factors arises from the high concentrations of these proteins in nuclei, which, coupled with their broad DNA binding specificities, directs them to regions of open chromatin. We suggest that most animal transcription factors will be found to show a similar broad overlapping pattern of binding in vivo, with specificity achieved by modulating the amount, rather than the identity, of bound factor.

  17. Defining the Binding Region in Factor H to Develop a Therapeutic Factor H-Fc Fusion Protein against Non-Typeable Haemophilus influenzae.

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    Wong, Sandy M; Shaughnessy, Jutamas; Ram, Sanjay; Akerley, Brian J

    2016-01-01

    Non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) cause a range of illnesses including otitis media, sinusitis, and exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, infections that contribute to the problem of antibiotic resistance and are themselves often intractable to standard antibiotic treatment regimens. We investigated a strategy to exploit binding of the complement inhibitor Factor H (FH) to NTHi as a functional target for an immunotherapeutic containing the NTHi binding domain of FH fused to the Fc domain of IgG1. Chimeric proteins containing the regions that most FH-binding bacteria use to engage human FH, domains 6 and 7 (FH6,7/Fc) and/or 18 through 20 (FH18-20/Fc), were evaluated for binding to NTHi. FH6,7/Fc bound strongly to each of seven NTHi clinical isolates tested and efficiently promoted complement-mediated killing by normal human serum. FH18-20/Fc bound weakly to three of the strains but did not promote complement dependent killing. Outer-membrane protein P5 has been implicated in FH binding by NTHi, and FH6,7/Fc binding was greatly diminished in five of seven P5 deficient isogenic mutant strains tested, implicating an alternative FH binding protein in some strains. Binding of FH18-20/Fc was decreased in the P5 mutant of one strain. A murine model was used to evaluate potential therapeutic application of FH6,7/Fc. FH6,7/Fc efficiently promoted binding of C3 to NTHi exposed to mouse serum, and intranasal delivery of FH6,7/Fc resulted in significantly enhanced clearance of NTHi from the lung. Moreover, a P5 deficient mutant was attenuated for survival in the lung model, suggesting that escape mutants lacking P5 would be less likely to replace strains susceptible to FH6,7/Fc. These results provide evidence for the potential utility of FH6,7/Fc as a therapeutic against NTHi lung infection. FH binding is a common property of many respiratory tract pathogens and FH/Fc chimeras may represent promising alternative or adjunctive therapeutics against such

  18. Defining the binding region in factor H to develop a therapeutic factor H-Fc fusion protein against nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae

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    Sandy M. Wong

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi cause a range of illnesses including otitis media, sinusitis, and exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, infections that contribute to the problem of antibiotic resistance and are themselves often intractable to standard antibiotic treatment regimens. We investigated a strategy to exploit binding of the complement inhibitor Factor H (FH to NTHi as a functional target for an immunotherapeutic containing the NTHi binding domain of FH fused to the Fc domain of IgG1. Chimeric proteins containing the regions that most FH-binding bacteria use to engage human FH, domains 6 and 7 (FH6,7/Fc and/or 18 through 20 (FH18-20/Fc, were evaluated for binding to NTHi. FH6,7/Fc bound strongly to each of seven NTHi clinical isolates tested and efficiently promoted complement-mediated killing by normal human serum. FH18-20/Fc bound weakly to three of the strains but did not promote complement dependent killing. Outer-membrane protein P5 has been implicated in FH binding by NTHi, and FH6,7/Fc binding was greatly diminished in five of seven P5 deficient isogenic mutant strains tested, implicating an alternative FH binding protein in some strains. Binding of FH18-20/Fc was decreased in the P5 mutant of one strain. A murine model was used to evaluate potential therapeutic application of FH6,7/Fc. FH6,7/Fc efficiently promoted binding of C3 to NTHi exposed to mouse serum, and intranasal delivery of FH6,7/Fc resulted in significantly enhanced clearance of NTHi from the lung. Moreover, a P5 deficient mutant was attenuated for survival in the lung model, suggesting that escape mutants lacking P5 would be less likely to replace strains susceptible to FH6,7/Fc. These results provide evidence for the potential utility of FH6,7/Fc as a therapeutic against NTHi lung infection. FH binding is a common property of many respiratory tract pathogens and FH/Fc chimeras may represent promising alternative or adjunctive

  19. Factor H binds to the hypervariable region of many Streptococcus pyogenes M proteins but does not promote phagocytosis resistance or acute virulence.

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    Mattias C U Gustafsson

    Full Text Available Many pathogens express a surface protein that binds the human complement regulator factor H (FH, as first described for Streptococcus pyogenes and the antiphagocytic M6 protein. It is commonly assumed that FH recruited to an M protein enhances virulence by protecting the bacteria against complement deposition and phagocytosis, but the role of FH-binding in S. pyogenes pathogenesis has remained unclear and controversial. Here, we studied seven purified M proteins for ability to bind FH and found that FH binds to the M5, M6 and M18 proteins but not the M1, M3, M4 and M22 proteins. Extensive immunochemical analysis indicated that FH binds solely to the hypervariable region (HVR of an M protein, suggesting that selection has favored the ability of certain HVRs to bind FH. These FH-binding HVRs could be studied as isolated polypeptides that retain ability to bind FH, implying that an FH-binding HVR represents a distinct ligand-binding domain. The isolated HVRs specifically interacted with FH among all human serum proteins, interacted with the same region in FH and showed species specificity, but exhibited little or no antigenic cross-reactivity. Although these findings suggested that FH recruited to an M protein promotes virulence, studies in transgenic mice did not demonstrate a role for bound FH during acute infection. Moreover, phagocytosis tests indicated that ability to bind FH is neither sufficient nor necessary for S. pyogenes to resist killing in whole human blood. While these data shed new light on the HVR of M proteins, they suggest that FH-binding may affect S. pyogenes virulence by mechanisms not assessed in currently used model systems.

  20. Transcription factor AP1 binds the functional region of the promoter and regulates gene expression of human PPARdelta in LoVo cell.

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    Jiang, Xiaogang; Yang, Xudong; Han, Yan; Lu, Shemin

    2013-12-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor δ gene (PPARδ) is correlated with carcinogenesis of colorectal cancer, but the regulation of its gene transcription remains unclear. We herein report that AP1 binds the promoter and regulates PPARδ gene expression. With a luciferase reporter system, we identified a functional promoter region of 30 bp of PPARδ gene by deletion and electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA). Using site-directed mutagenesis and decoy analyses, we demonstrated that AP1 bound the functional transcriptional factor binding site in a region extending from -176 to -73 of the PPARδ promoter, which was confirmed using EMSA and supershift assays. Consequently, inhibition of the AP1 binding site led to decreased PPARδ mRNA. Our study demonstrated that AP1 is the transcriptional factor that contributes to PPARδ expression in LoVo cells.

  1. Global MYCN transcription factor binding analysis in neuroblastoma reveals association with distinct E-box motifs and regions of DNA hypermethylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek M Murphy

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Neuroblastoma, a cancer derived from precursor cells of the sympathetic nervous system, is a major cause of childhood cancer related deaths. The single most important prognostic indicator of poor clinical outcome in this disease is genomic amplification of MYCN, a member of a family of oncogenic transcription factors. METHODOLOGY: We applied MYCN chromatin immunoprecipitation to microarrays (ChIP-chip using MYCN amplified/non-amplified cell lines as well as a conditional knockdown cell line to determine the distribution of MYCN binding sites within all annotated promoter regions. CONCLUSION: Assessment of E-box usage within consistently positive MYCN binding sites revealed a predominance for the CATGTG motif (p<0.0016, with significant enrichment of additional motifs CATTTG, CATCTG, CAACTG in the MYCN amplified state. For cell lines over-expressing MYCN, gene ontology analysis revealed enrichment for the binding of MYCN at promoter regions of numerous molecular functional groups including DNA helicases and mRNA transcriptional regulation. In order to evaluate MYCN binding with respect to other genomic features, we determined the methylation status of all annotated CpG islands and promoter sequences using methylated DNA immunoprecipitation (MeDIP. The integration of MYCN ChIP-chip and MeDIP data revealed a highly significant positive correlation between MYCN binding and DNA hypermethylation. This association was also detected in regions of hemizygous loss, indicating that the observed association occurs on the same homologue. In summary, these findings suggest that MYCN binding occurs more commonly at CATGTG as opposed to the classic CACGTG E-box motif, and that disease associated over expression of MYCN leads to aberrant binding to additional weaker affinity E-box motifs in neuroblastoma. The co-localization of MYCN binding and DNA hypermethylation further supports the dual role of MYCN, namely that of a classical transcription

  2. Global MYCN transcription factor binding analysis in neuroblastoma reveals association with distinct E-box motifs and regions of DNA hypermethylation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, Derek M

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Neuroblastoma, a cancer derived from precursor cells of the sympathetic nervous system, is a major cause of childhood cancer related deaths. The single most important prognostic indicator of poor clinical outcome in this disease is genomic amplification of MYCN, a member of a family of oncogenic transcription factors. METHODOLOGY: We applied MYCN chromatin immunoprecipitation to microarrays (ChIP-chip) using MYCN amplified\\/non-amplified cell lines as well as a conditional knockdown cell line to determine the distribution of MYCN binding sites within all annotated promoter regions. CONCLUSION: Assessment of E-box usage within consistently positive MYCN binding sites revealed a predominance for the CATGTG motif (p<0.0016), with significant enrichment of additional motifs CATTTG, CATCTG, CAACTG in the MYCN amplified state. For cell lines over-expressing MYCN, gene ontology analysis revealed enrichment for the binding of MYCN at promoter regions of numerous molecular functional groups including DNA helicases and mRNA transcriptional regulation. In order to evaluate MYCN binding with respect to other genomic features, we determined the methylation status of all annotated CpG islands and promoter sequences using methylated DNA immunoprecipitation (MeDIP). The integration of MYCN ChIP-chip and MeDIP data revealed a highly significant positive correlation between MYCN binding and DNA hypermethylation. This association was also detected in regions of hemizygous loss, indicating that the observed association occurs on the same homologue. In summary, these findings suggest that MYCN binding occurs more commonly at CATGTG as opposed to the classic CACGTG E-box motif, and that disease associated over expression of MYCN leads to aberrant binding to additional weaker affinity E-box motifs in neuroblastoma. The co-localization of MYCN binding and DNA hypermethylation further supports the dual role of MYCN, namely that of a classical transcription factor affecting the

  3. Adaptive evolution of transcription factor binding sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berg Johannes

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The regulation of a gene depends on the binding of transcription factors to specific sites located in the regulatory region of the gene. The generation of these binding sites and of cooperativity between them are essential building blocks in the evolution of complex regulatory networks. We study a theoretical model for the sequence evolution of binding sites by point mutations. The approach is based on biophysical models for the binding of transcription factors to DNA. Hence we derive empirically grounded fitness landscapes, which enter a population genetics model including mutations, genetic drift, and selection. Results We show that the selection for factor binding generically leads to specific correlations between nucleotide frequencies at different positions of a binding site. We demonstrate the possibility of rapid adaptive evolution generating a new binding site for a given transcription factor by point mutations. The evolutionary time required is estimated in terms of the neutral (background mutation rate, the selection coefficient, and the effective population size. Conclusions The efficiency of binding site formation is seen to depend on two joint conditions: the binding site motif must be short enough and the promoter region must be long enough. These constraints on promoter architecture are indeed seen in eukaryotic systems. Furthermore, we analyse the adaptive evolution of genetic switches and of signal integration through binding cooperativity between different sites. Experimental tests of this picture involving the statistics of polymorphisms and phylogenies of sites are discussed.

  4. A stage—specific protein factor binding to a CACCC motif in both human β—globin gene promoter and 5‘—HS2 region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUNTONG; YADICHEN; 等

    1994-01-01

    The DNaseI hypersensitive site 2 (HS2) of human β-globin locus control region(LCR) is required for the high level expression of human β-globin genes.In the present study,a stage-specific protein factor (LPF-β) was identified in the nuclear extract prepared from mouse fetal liver at d 18 of gestation,which could bind to the HS2 region of human β-globin LCR.We also found that the shift band of LPF-β factor could be competed by human β-globin promoter.However,it couldn't be competed by human ε-globin promoter or by human Aγ-globin promoter.Furthermore,our data demonstrated that the binding-sequence of LPF-β factor is 5'CACACCCTA 3',which is located at the HS2 region of β-LCR(from-10845 to-10853 bp)and human β-globin promoter(from-92 to -84 bp).We speculated that these regions containing the CACCC box in both the human β-globin promoter and HS2 might function as stage selector elements in the regulation of human β-globin switching and the LPF-β factor might be a stage-specific protein factor involved in the regulation of human β-globin gene expression.

  5. Two residues in the basic region of the yeast transcription factor Yap8 are crucial for its DNA-binding specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, Catarina; Pimentel, Catarina; Matos, Rute G; Arraiano, Cecília M; Matzapetakis, Manolis; Rodrigues-Pousada, Claudina

    2013-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the transcription factor Yap8 is a key determinant in arsenic stress response. Contrary to Yap1, another basic region-leucine zipper (bZIP) yeast regulator, Yap8 has a very restricted DNA-binding specificity and only orchestrates the expression of ACR2 and ACR3 genes. In the DNA-binding basic region, Yap8 has three distinct amino acids residues, Leu26, Ser29 and Asn31, at sites of highly conserved positions in the other Yap family of transcriptional regulators and Pap1 of Schizosaccharomyces pombe. To evaluate whether these residues are relevant to Yap8 specificity, we first built a homology model of the complex Yap8bZIP-DNA based on Pap1-DNA crystal structure. Several Yap8 mutants were then generated in order to confirm the contribution of the residues predicted to interact with DNA. Using bioinformatics analysis together with in vivo and in vitro approaches, we have identified several conserved residues critical for Yap8-DNA binding. Moreover, our data suggest that Leu26 is required for Yap8 binding to DNA and that this residue together with Asn31, hinder Yap1 response element recognition by Yap8, thus narrowing its DNA-binding specificity. Furthermore our results point to a role of these two amino acids in the stability of the Yap8-DNA complex.

  6. Crystal structure of the functional region of Uro-adherence factor A from Staphylococcus saprophyticus reveals participation of the B domain in ligand binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, Eriko; Tanaka, Yoshikazu; Kuroda, Makoto; Shouji, Yuko; Ohta, Toshiko; Tanaka, Isao; Yao, Min

    2011-02-01

    Staphylococci use cell wall-anchored proteins as adhesins to attach to host tissues. Staphylococcus saprophyticus, a uropathogenic species, has a unique cell wall-anchored protein, uro-adherence factor A (UafA), which shows erythrocyte binding activity. To investigate the mechanism of adhesion by UafA, we determined the crystal structure of the functional region of UafA at 1.5 Å resolution. The structure was composed of three domains, designated as the N2, N3, and B domains, arranged in a triangular relative configuration. Hemagglutination inhibition assay with domain-truncated mutants indicated that both N and B domains were necessary for erythrocyte binding. Based on these results, a novel manner of ligand binding in which the B domain acts as a functional domain was proposed as the adhesion mechanism of S. saprophyticus.

  7. A sequence-specific DNA-binding factor (VF1) from Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 vegetative cells binds to three adjacent sites in the xisA upstream region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chastain, C J; Brusca, J S; Ramasubramanian, T S; Wei, T F; Golden, J W

    1990-01-01

    A DNA-binding factor (VF1) partially purified from Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 vegetative cell extracts by heparin-Sepharose chromatography was found to have affinity for the xisA upstream region. The xisA gene is required for excision of an 11-kilobase element from the nifD gene during heterocyst differentiation. Previous studies of the xisA upstream sequences demonstrated that deletion of this region is required for the expression of xisA from heterologous promoters in vegetative cells. Mobility shift assays with a labeled 250-base-pair fragment containing the binding sites revealed three distinct DNA-protein complexes. Competition experiments showed that VF1 also bound to the upstream sequences of the rbcL and glnA genes, but the rbcL and glnA fragments showed only single complexes in mobility shift assays. The upstream region of the nifH gene formed a weak complex with VF1. DNase footprinting and deletion analysis of the xisA binding site mapped the binding to a 66-base-pair region containing three repeats of the consensus recognition sequence ACATT. Images PMID:2118506

  8. Peptide affinity analysis of proteins that bind to an unstructured NH2-terminal region of the osmoprotective transcription factor NFAT5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuMond, Jenna F; Ramkissoon, Kevin; Zhang, Xue; Izumi, Yuichiro; Wang, Xujing; Eguchi, Koji; Gao, Shouguo; Mukoyama, Masashi; Burg, Maurice B; Ferraris, Joan D

    2016-04-01

    NFAT5 is an osmoregulated transcription factor that particularly increases expression of genes involved in protection against hypertonicity. Transcription factors often contain unstructured regions that bind co-regulatory proteins that are crucial for their function. The NH2-terminal region of NFAT5 contains regions predicted to be intrinsically disordered. We used peptide aptamer-based affinity chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry to identify protein preys pulled down by one or more overlapping 20 amino acid peptide baits within a predicted NH2-terminal unstructured region of NFAT5. We identify a total of 467 unique protein preys that associate with at least one NH2-terminal peptide bait from NFAT5 in either cytoplasmic or nuclear extracts from HEK293 cells treated with elevated, normal, or reduced NaCl concentrations. Different sets of proteins are pulled down from nuclear vs. cytoplasmic extracts. We used GeneCards to ascertain known functions of the protein preys. The protein preys include many that were previously known, but also many novel ones. Consideration of the novel ones suggests many aspects of NFAT5 regulation, interaction and function that were not previously appreciated, for example, hypertonicity inhibits NFAT5 by sumoylating it and the NFAT5 protein preys include components of the CHTOP complex that desumoylate proteins, an action that should contribute to activation of NFAT5.

  9. Peptide affinity analysis of proteins that bind to an unstructured region containing the transactivating domain of the osmoprotective transcription factor NFAT5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuMond, Jenna F; Zhang, Xue; Izumi, Yuichiro; Ramkissoon, Kevin; Wang, Guanghui; Gucek, Marjan; Wang, Xujing; Burg, Maurice B; Ferraris, Joan D

    2016-10-07

    NFAT5 is a transcription factor originally identified because it is activated by hypertonicity and that activation increases expression of genes that protect against the adverse effects of the hypertonicity. However, its targets also include genes not obviously related to tonicity. The transactivating domain of NFAT5 is contained in its c-terminal region, which is predicted to be unstructured. Unstructured regions are common in transcription factors particularly in transactivating domains where they can bind co-regulatory proteins essential to their function. To identify potential binding partners of NFAT5 from either cytoplasmic or nuclear HEK293 cell extracts, we used peptide affinity chromatography followed by mass spectrometry. Peptide aptamer-baits consisted of overlapping 20 amino acid peptides within the predicted c-terminal unstructured region of NFAT5. We identify a total of 351 unique protein preys that associate with at least one c-terminal peptide bait from NFAT5 in either cytoplasmic or nuclear extracts from cells incubated at various tonicities (NaCl varied). In addition to finding many proteins already known to associate with NFAT5, we found many new ones whose function suggest novel aspects of NFAT5 regulation, interaction and function. Relatively few of the proteins pulled down by peptide baits from NFAT5 are generally involved in transcription and most, therefore, are likely to be specifically related to the regulation of NFAT5 or its function. The novel associated proteins are involved with cancer, effects of hypertonicity on chromatin, development, splicing of mRNA, transcription and vesicle trafficking. Copyright © 2016, Physiological Genomics.

  10. The binding of bovine factor XII to kaolin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, E P; McDevitt, P J

    1983-04-01

    Purified bovine factor XII was radiolabeled with iodine-125 and its binding to kaolin studied. Binding was rapid and was not readily reversible upon adding unlabeled factor XII. The optimum pH for binding was in the region of pH 5-7. The isoelectric point of factor XII was pH 5.7. High concentrations of urea or increasing the ionic strength of the medium did not inhibit binding. Polyvalent macromolecules, such as Polybrene and polylysine, were effective inhibitors of factor XII binding to kaolin. Polylysine caused the release of factor XII that had bound to the kaolin surface.

  11. Synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pena, Louis A.; Zamora, Paul; Lin, Xinhua; Glass, John D.

    2007-01-23

    The invention provides synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs having at least one peptide chain that binds a heparin-binding growth factor receptor, covalently bound to a hydrophobic linker, which is in turn covalently bound to a non-signaling peptide that includes a heparin-binding domain. The synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs are useful as soluble biologics or as surface coatings for medical devices.

  12. Integration Host Factor (IHF binds to the promoter region of the phtD operon involved in phaseolotoxin synthesis in P. syringae pv. phaseolicola NPS3121

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Álvarez-Morales Ariel

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola, the causal agent of halo blight disease in beans, produces a toxin known as phaseolotoxin, in whose synthesis participate a group of genes organized within the genome in a region known as the "Pht cluster". This region, which is thought to have been acquired by horizontal gene transfer, includes 5 transcriptional units, two monocistronic (argK, phtL and three polycistronic (phtA, phtD, phtM, whose expression is temperature dependent. So far, the regulatory mechanisms involved in phaseolotoxin synthesis have not been elucidated and the only well-established fact is the requirement of low temperatures for its synthesis. In this work, we searched for regulatory proteins that could be involved in phaseolotoxin synthesis, focusing on the regulation of the phtD operon. Results In this study we identified the global regulator IHF (Integration Host Factor, which binds to the promoter region of the phtD operon, exerting a negative effect on the expression of this operon. This is the first regulatory protein identified as part of the phaseolotoxin synthesis system. Our findings suggest that the Pht cluster was similarly regulated in the ancestral cluster by IHF or similar protein, and integrated into the global regulatory mechanism of P. syringae pv. phaseolicola, after the horizontal gene transfer event by using the host IHF protein. Conclusion This study identifies the IHF protein as one element involved in the regulation of phaseolotoxin synthesis in P. syringae pv. phaseolicola NPS3121 and provides new insights into the regulatory mechanisms involved in phaseolotoxin production.

  13. Regions outside the DNA-binding domain are critical for proper in vivo specificity of an archetypal zinc finger transcription factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdach, Jon; Funnell, Alister P W; Mak, Ka Sin; Artuz, Crisbel M; Wienert, Beeke; Lim, Wooi F; Tan, Lit Yeen; Pearson, Richard C M; Crossley, Merlin

    2014-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) are often regarded as being composed of a DNA-binding domain (DBD) and a functional domain. The two domains are considered separable and autonomous, with the DBD directing the factor to its target genes and the functional domain imparting transcriptional regulation. We examined an archetypal zinc finger (ZF) TF, Krüppel-like factor 3 with an N-terminal domain that binds the corepressor CtBP and a DBD composed of three ZFs at its C-terminus. We established a system to compare the genomic occupancy profile of wild-type Krüppel-like factor 3 with two mutants affecting the N-terminal functional domain: a mutant unable to contact the cofactor CtBP and a mutant lacking the entire N-terminal domain, but retaining the ZFs intact. Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by sequencing was used to assess binding across the genome in murine embryonic fibroblasts. Unexpectedly, we observe that mutations in the N-terminal domain generally reduced binding, but there were also instances where binding was retained or even increased. These results provide a clear demonstration that the correct localization of TFs to their target genes is not solely dependent on their DNA-contact domains. This informs our understanding of how TFs operate and is of relevance to the design of artificial ZF proteins.

  14. Predicting distinct organization of transcription factor binding sites on the promoter regions: a new genome-based approach to expand human embryonic stem cell regulatory network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseinpour, Batool; Bakhtiarizadeh, Mohammad Reza; Khosravi, Pegah; Ebrahimie, Esmaeil

    2013-12-01

    Self-proliferation and differentiation into distinct cell types have been made stem cell as a promising target for regenerative medicine. Several key genes can regulate self-renewal and pluripotency of embryonic stem cells (hESCs). They work together and build a transcriptional hierarchy. Coexpression and coregulation of genes control by common regulatory elements on the promoter regions. Consequently, distinct organization and combination of transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs modules) on promoter regions, in view of order and distance, lead to a common specific expression pattern within a set of genes. To gain insights into transcriptional regulation of hESCs, we selected promoter regions of eleven common expressed hESC genes including SOX2, LIN28, STAT3, NANOG, LEFTB, TDGF1, POU5F1, FOXD3, TERF1, REX1 and GDF3 to predict activating regulatory modules on promoters and discover key corresponding transcription factors. Then, promoter regions in human genome were explored for modules and 328 genes containing the same modules were detected. Using microarray data, we verified that 102 of 328 genes commonly upregulate in hESCs. Also, using output data of DNA-protein interaction assays, we found that 42 of all predicted genes are targets of SOX2, NANOG and POU5F1. Additionally, a protein interaction network of hESC genes was constructed based on biological processes, and interestingly, 126 downregulated genes along with upregulated ones identified by promoter analysis were predicted in the network. Based on the results, we suggest that the identified genes, coregulating with common hESC genes, represent a novel approach for gene discovery based on whole genome promoter analysis irrespective of gene expression. Altogether, promoter profiling can be used to expand hESC transcriptional regulatory circuitry by analysis of shared functional sequences between genes. This approach provides a clear image on underlying regulatory mechanism of gene expression profile and

  15. Two mutations in the locus control region hypersensitivity site-2 (5' HS-2) of haplotype 19 beta s chromosomes alter binding of trans-acting factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, J C; Scott, D F; Lanclos, K D

    1996-01-01

    There are five major haplotypes associated with sickle cell anemia (SS). Individuals homozygous for haplotypes 3 (Senegal) and 31 (Saudi Arabian) have high fetal hemoglobin (HbF) levels (15 to 30% of total hemoglobin) whereas individuals homozygous for haplotypes 17 (Cameroon), 19 (Benin), and 20 (Bantu) have low HbF levels (1 to 10%). We previously identified several point mutations in the LCR 5'HS-2 that were specific for haplotype 19 beta s chromosomes (compared to the GenBank HUMHBB reference sequence, T-->G at position 8580, A-->G at position 8598, and A-->T at position 9114). We postulated that one or more of these mutations may alter the binding of specific trans-acting factors and ultimately affect the expression of HbF in these sickle cell patients. We performed gel mobility shift assays using 32P-end-labeled double-stranded 19mers corresponding to each of the LCR 5'HS-2 normal (GenBank) and mutant sequences. Nuclear extracts prepared from HeLa and HEL cells were used in our experiments and neither the normal nor mutant sequence at position 8580 bound trans-acting factors in either nuclear extract. The 8598 mutant increased binding of Sp1; using purified protein and both nuclear extracts. HEL extracts were used to quantify the increase in Sp1 binding to the 8598 mutation and we found an increase in binding of 66 and 47%, respectively, in two shifted bands. The 9114 mutation sharply decreased binding of an unknown trans-acting factor by 74%. This factor was present in both HeLa and HEL nuclear extracts.

  16. Synthetic heparin-binding factor analogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pena, Louis A.; Zamora, Paul O.; Lin, Xinhua; Glass, John D.

    2010-04-20

    The invention provides synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs having at least one peptide chain, and preferably two peptide chains branched from a dipeptide branch moiety composed of two trifunctional amino acid residues, which peptide chain or chains bind a heparin-binding growth factor receptor and are covalently bound to a non-signaling peptide that includes a heparin-binding domain, preferably by a linker, which may be a hydrophobic linker. The synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs are useful as pharmaceutical agents, soluble biologics or as surface coatings for medical devices.

  17. A region of the N-terminal domain of meningococcal factor H-binding protein that elicits bactericidal antibody across antigenic variant groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beernink, Peter T; LoPasso, Carla; Angiolillo, Antonella; Felici, Franco; Granoff, Dan

    2009-05-01

    Meningococcal factor H-binding protein (fHbp) is a promising vaccine antigen. Previous studies described three fHbp antigenic variant groups and identified amino acid residues between 100 and 255 as important targets of variant-specific bactericidal antibodies. We investigated residues affecting expression of an epitope recognized by a murine IgG2a anti-fHbp mAb, designated JAR 4, which cross-reacted with fHbps in variant group 1 or 2 (95% of strains), and elicited human complement-mediated, cooperative bactericidal activity with other non-bactericidal anti-fHbp mAbs with epitopes involving residues between 121 and 216. From filamentous bacteriophage libraries containing random peptides that were recognized by JAR 4, we identified a consensus tripeptide, DHK that matched residues 25-27 in the N-terminal domain of fHbp. Since DHK was present in both JAR 4-reactive and non-reactive fHbps, the tripeptide was necessary but not sufficient for reactivity. Based on site-directed mutagenesis studies, the JAR 4 epitope could either be knocked out of a reactive variant 1 fHbp, or introduced into a non-reactive variant 3 protein. Collectively, the data indicated that the JAR 4 epitope was discontinuous and involved DHK residues beginning at position 25; YGN residues beginning at position 57; and a KDN tripeptide that was present in variant 3 proteins beginning at position 67 that negatively affected expression of the epitope. Thus, the region of fHbp encompassing residues 25-59 in the N-terminal domain is important for eliciting antibodies that can cooperate with other anti-fHbp antibodies for cross-reactive bactericidal activity against strains expressing fHbp from different antigenic variant groups.

  18. Statistics for Transcription Factor Binding Sites

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) play a key role in gene regulation. They interact with specific binding sites or motifs on the DNA sequence and regulate expression of genes downstream of these binding sites. In silico prediction of potential binding of a TF to a binding site is an important task in computational biology. From a statistical point of view, the DNA sequence is a long text consisting of four different letters ('A','C','G', and 'T'). The binding of a TF to the sequence corresponds to ...

  19. Genome Binding and Gene Regulation by Stem Cell Transcription Factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.H. Brandsma (Johan)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractNearly all cells of an individual organism contain the same genome. However, each cell type transcribes a different set of genes due to the presence of different sets of cell type-specific transcription factors. Such transcription factors bind to regulatory regions such as promoters

  20. A DNA-binding protein factor in K562 nuclear extract interacts with positive control region (PCR) in the 5'-flanking sequence of human β-globin gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUYULONG; YADICHEN; TONGSUN; RUOLANQIAN

    1993-01-01

    It has been known that there are at least three regulatory regions (NCR1. NCR2 and PCR) in the 5'-flanking sequence (from -610 bp to +1 bp) of human β-glohin geneand that the function of PCR is unique to the human erythroleukemia (Ksfi2) ceils. Here we have detected a DNA-binding protein factor (termed NFEa) in K562 ceils. which can bind specifically to the PCR of human β-globin gene. The sequence of the binding site is 5'ACTGATG3' (between -222 bp and -216 bp). The NFEa is erythroidspecific and perhaps specific for K562 cells. It seemed that this factor differed from the erythroid-specific transcriptional factor (NFE-1) ,nsing competition assay. The presence of the NFEa further supported that the funciton of the cis-acting element PCR was specitic for K562 cells. and helps us to understand the mechauism of the regulation of the expression of lmman β-globin gene in the human K562 cells.

  1. Factor VIIa binding and internalization in hepatocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjortoe, G; Sorensen, B B; Petersen, L C

    2005-01-01

    The liver is believed to be the primary clearance organ for coagulation proteases, including factor VIIa (FVIIa). However, at present, clearance mechanisms for FVIIa in liver are unknown. To obtain information on the FVIIa clearance mechanism, we investigated the binding and internalization...

  2. Identifying differential transcription factor binding in ChIP-seq

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dai-Ying eWu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available ChIP seq is a widely used assay to measure genome-wide protein binding. The decrease in costs associated with sequencing has led to a rise in the number of studies that investigate protein binding across treatment conditions or cell lines. In addition to the identification of binding sites, new studies evaluate the variation in protein binding between conditions. A number of approaches to study differential transcription factor binding have recently been developed. Several of these methods build upon established methods from RNA-seq to quantify differences in read counts. We compare how these new approaches perform on different data sets from the ENCODE project to illustrate the impact of data processing pipelines under different study designs. The performance of normalization methods for differential ChIP-seq depends strongly on the variation in total amount of protein bound between conditions, with total read count outperforming effective library size, or variants thereof, when a large variation in binding was studied. Use of input subtraction to correct for non-specific binding showed a relatively modest impact on the number of differential peaks found and the fold change accuracy to biological validation, however a larger impact might be expected for samples with more extreme copy number variations between them. Still, it did identify a small subset of novel differential regions while excluding some differential peaks in regions with high background signal.These results highlight proper scaling for between-sample data normalization as critical for differential transcription factor binding analysis and suggest bioinformaticians need to know about the variation in level of total protein binding between conditions to select the best analysis method. At the same time, validation using fold-change estimates from qRT-PCR suggests there is still room for further method improvement.

  3. Identifying differential transcription factor binding in ChIP-seq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dai-Ying; Bittencourt, Danielle; Stallcup, Michael R; Siegmund, Kimberly D

    2015-01-01

    ChIP seq is a widely used assay to measure genome-wide protein binding. The decrease in costs associated with sequencing has led to a rise in the number of studies that investigate protein binding across treatment conditions or cell lines. In addition to the identification of binding sites, new studies evaluate the variation in protein binding between conditions. A number of approaches to study differential transcription factor binding have recently been developed. Several of these methods build upon established methods from RNA-seq to quantify differences in read counts. We compare how these new approaches perform on different data sets from the ENCODE project to illustrate the impact of data processing pipelines under different study designs. The performance of normalization methods for differential ChIP-seq depends strongly on the variation in total amount of protein bound between conditions, with total read count outperforming effective library size, or variants thereof, when a large variation in binding was studied. Use of input subtraction to correct for non-specific binding showed a relatively modest impact on the number of differential peaks found and the fold change accuracy to biological validation, however a larger impact might be expected for samples with more extreme copy number variations between them. Still, it did identify a small subset of novel differential regions while excluding some differential peaks in regions with high background signal. These results highlight proper scaling for between-sample data normalization as critical for differential transcription factor binding analysis and suggest bioinformaticians need to know about the variation in level of total protein binding between conditions to select the best analysis method. At the same time, validation using fold-change estimates from qRT-PCR suggests there is still room for further method improvement.

  4. Comparison of Transcription Factor Binding Site Models

    KAUST Repository

    Bhuyan, Sharifulislam

    2012-05-01

    Modeling of transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) and TFBS prediction on genomic sequences are important steps to elucidate transcription regulatory mechanism. Dependency of transcription regulation on a great number of factors such as chemical specificity, molecular structure, genomic and epigenetic characteristics, long distance interaction, makes this a challenging problem. Different experimental procedures generate evidence that DNA-binding domains of transcription factors show considerable DNA sequence specificity. Probabilistic modeling of TFBSs has been moderately successful in identifying patterns from a family of sequences. In this study, we compare performances of different probabilistic models and try to estimate their efficacy over experimental TFBSs data. We build a pipeline to calculate sensitivity and specificity from aligned TFBS sequences for several probabilistic models, such as Markov chains, hidden Markov models, Bayesian networks. Our work, containing relevant statistics and evaluation for the models, can help researchers to choose the most appropriate model for the problem at hand.

  5. The C-terminal and beta-wing regions of ammodytoxin A, a neurotoxic phospholipase A2 from Vipera ammodytes ammodytes, are critical for binding to factor Xa and for anticoagulant effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prijatelj, Petra; Charnay, Marlène; Ivanovski, Gabriela; Jenko, Zala; Pungercar, Joze; Krizaj, Igor; Faure, Grazyna

    2006-01-01

    Ammodytoxin A (AtxA) from the venom of Vipera ammodytes ammodytes belongs to group IIA secreted phospholipase A2 (sPLA2), for which the major pathologic activity is presynaptic neurotoxicity. We show here that this toxin also affects hemostasis because it exhibits strong anticoagulant activity. AtxA binds directly to human coagulation factor Xa (FXa) with Kdapp of 32 nM, thus inhibiting the activity of the prothrombinase complex with an IC50 of 20 nM. To map the FXa-interaction site on AtxA, various mutants of AtxA produced by site-directed mutagenesis and expressed in Escherichia coli were tested in the study. In surface plasmon resonance (SPR) measurements, with FXa covalently attached to the sensor chip, we show that the FXa-binding site on AtxA includes several basic amino acid residues at the C-terminal and beta-wing regions of the molecule. Applying an in vitro biological test for inhibition of prothrombinase activity, we further demonstrate that the same residues are also very important for the anticoagulant activity of AtxA. We conclude that the anticoagulant site of AtxA is located in the C-terminal and beta-wing regions of this phospholipase A2. Synthetic peptides comprising residues of the deduced anticoagulant site of AtxA provide a basis to synthesize novel anticoagulant drugs.

  6. Microbes bind complement inhibitor factor H via a common site.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Meri

    Full Text Available To cause infections microbes need to evade host defense systems, one of these being the evolutionarily old and important arm of innate immunity, the alternative pathway of complement. It can attack all kinds of targets and is tightly controlled in plasma and on host cells by plasma complement regulator factor H (FH. FH binds simultaneously to host cell surface structures such as heparin or glycosaminoglycans via domain 20 and to the main complement opsonin C3b via domain 19. Many pathogenic microbes protect themselves from complement by recruiting host FH. We analyzed how and why different microbes bind FH via domains 19-20 (FH19-20. We used a selection of FH19-20 point mutants to reveal the binding sites of several microbial proteins and whole microbes (Haemophilus influenzae, Bordetella pertussis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Streptococcus pneumonia, Candida albicans, Borrelia burgdorferi, and Borrelia hermsii. We show that all studied microbes use the same binding region located on one side of domain 20. Binding of FH to the microbial proteins was inhibited with heparin showing that the common microbial binding site overlaps with the heparin site needed for efficient binding of FH to host cells. Surprisingly, the microbial proteins enhanced binding of FH19-20 to C3b and down-regulation of complement activation. We show that this is caused by formation of a tripartite complex between the microbial protein, FH, and C3b. In this study we reveal that seven microbes representing different phyla utilize a common binding site on the domain 20 of FH for complement evasion. Binding via this site not only mimics the glycosaminoglycans of the host cells, but also enhances function of FH on the microbial surfaces via the novel mechanism of tripartite complex formation. This is a unique example of convergent evolution resulting in enhanced immune evasion of important pathogens via utilization of a "superevasion site."

  7. Molecular dissection of the intrinsic factor-vitamin B12 receptor, cubilin, discloses regions important for membrane association and ligand binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, M; Kozyraki, R; Jacobsen, Christian

    1999-01-01

    Cubilin, the receptor for intrinsic factor-vitamin B12, is a novel type of high molecular weight receptor consisting of a 27 CUB (complement components C1r/C1s, Uegf, and bone morphogenic protein-1) domain cluster preceded by 8 epidermal growth factor repeats and a short N-terminal sequence. In a...

  8. SCOWLP classification: Structural comparison and analysis of protein binding regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anders Gerd

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Detailed information about protein interactions is critical for our understanding of the principles governing protein recognition mechanisms. The structures of many proteins have been experimentally determined in complex with different ligands bound either in the same or different binding regions. Thus, the structural interactome requires the development of tools to classify protein binding regions. A proper classification may provide a general view of the regions that a protein uses to bind others and also facilitate a detailed comparative analysis of the interacting information for specific protein binding regions at atomic level. Such classification might be of potential use for deciphering protein interaction networks, understanding protein function, rational engineering and design. Description Protein binding regions (PBRs might be ideally described as well-defined separated regions that share no interacting residues one another. However, PBRs are often irregular, discontinuous and can share a wide range of interacting residues among them. The criteria to define an individual binding region can be often arbitrary and may differ from other binding regions within a protein family. Therefore, the rational behind protein interface classification should aim to fulfil the requirements of the analysis to be performed. We extract detailed interaction information of protein domains, peptides and interfacial solvent from the SCOWLP database and we classify the PBRs of each domain family. For this purpose, we define a similarity index based on the overlapping of interacting residues mapped in pair-wise structural alignments. We perform our classification with agglomerative hierarchical clustering using the complete-linkage method. Our classification is calculated at different similarity cut-offs to allow flexibility in the analysis of PBRs, feature especially interesting for those protein families with conflictive binding regions

  9. The Paired-box Homeodomain Transcription Factor Pax6 Binds to the Upstream Region of the TRAP Gene Promoter and Suppresses Receptor Activator of NF-κB Ligand (RANKL)-induced Osteoclast Differentiation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogawa, Masakazu; Hisatake, Koji; Atkins, Gerald J.; Findlay, David M.; Enoki, Yuichiro; Sato, Tsuyoshi; Gray, Peter C.; Kanesaki-Yatsuka, Yukiko; Anderson, Paul H.; Wada, Seiki; Kato, Naoki; Fukuda, Aya; Katayama, Shigehiro; Tsujimoto, Masafumi; Yoda, Tetsuya; Suda, Tatsuo; Okazaki, Yasushi; Matsumoto, Masahito

    2013-01-01

    Osteoclast formation is regulated by balancing between the receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL) expressed in osteoblasts and extracellular negative regulatory cytokines such as interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and interferon-β (IFN-β), which can suppress excessive bone destruction. However, relatively little is known about intrinsic negative regulatory factors in RANKL-mediated osteoclast differentiation. Here, we show the paired-box homeodomain transcription factor Pax6 acts as a negative regulator of RANKL-mediated osteoclast differentiation. Electrophoretic mobility shift and reporter assays found that Pax6 binds endogenously to the proximal region of the tartrate acid phosphatase (TRAP) gene promoter and suppresses nuclear factor of activated T cells c1 (NFATc1)-induced TRAP gene expression. Introduction of Pax6 retrovirally into bone marrow macrophages attenuates RANKL-induced osteoclast formation. Moreover, we found that the Groucho family member co-repressor Grg6 contributes to Pax6-mediated suppression of the TRAP gene expression induced by NFATc1. These results suggest that Pax6 interferes with RANKL-mediated osteoclast differentiation together with Grg6. Our results demonstrate that the Pax6 pathway constitutes a new aspect of the negative regulatory circuit of RANKL-RANK signaling in osteoclastogenesis and that the augmentation of Pax6 might therefore represent a novel target to block pathological bone resorption. PMID:23990468

  10. Mapping functional regions of transcription factor TFIIIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrana, K E; Churchill, M E; Tullius, T D; Brown, D D

    1988-04-01

    Functional deletion mutants of the trans-acting factor TFIIIA, truncated at both ends of the molecule, have been expressed by in vitro transcription of a cDNA clone and subsequent cell-free translation of the synthetic mRNAs. A region of TFIIIA 19 amino acids or less, near the carboxyl terminus, is critical for maximal transcription and lies outside the DNA-binding domain. The elongated protein can be aligned over the internal control region (ICR) of the Xenopus 5S RNA gene with its carboxyl terminus oriented toward the 5' end of the gene and its amino terminus oriented toward the 3' end of the gene. The nine "zinc fingers" and the linkers that separate them comprise 80% of the protein mass and correspond to the DNA-binding domain of TFIIIA. The zinc fingers near the amino terminus of the protein contribute more to the overall binding energy of the protein to the ICR than do the zinc fingers near the carboxyl end. The most striking feature of TFIIIA is its modular structure. This is demonstrated by the fact that each zinc finger binds to just one of three short nucleotide sequences within the ICR.

  11. Identification and characterization of two distinct ligand binding regions of cubilin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yammani, R R; Seetharam, S; Seetharam, B

    2001-11-30

    Using polymerase chain reaction-amplified fragments of cubilin, an endocytic receptor of molecular mass 460 kDa, we have identified two distinct ligand binding regions. Region 1 of molecular mass 71 kDa, which included the 113-residue N terminus along with the eight epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like repeats and CUB domains 1 and 2, and region 2 of molecular mass 37 kDa consisting of CUB domains 6-8 bound both intrinsic factor-cobalamin (vitamin B(12); Cbl) (IF-Cbl) and albumin. Within these two regions, the binding of both ligands was confined to a 110-115-residue stretch that encompassed either the 113-residue N terminus or CUB domain 7 and 8. Ca(2+) dependence of ligand binding or the ability of cubilin antiserum to inhibit ligand binding to the 113-residue N terminus was 60-65%. However, a combination of CUB domains 7 and 8 or 6-8 was needed to demonstrate significant Ca(2+) dependence or inhibition of ligand binding by cubilin antiserum. Antiserum to EGF inhibited albumin but not IF-Cbl binding to the N-terminal cubilin fragment that included the eight EGF-like repeats. While the presence of excess albumin had no effect on binding to IF-Cbl, IF-Cbl in excess was able to inhibit albumin binding to both regions of cubilin. Reductive alkylation of the 113-residue N terminus or CUB 6-8, CUB 7, or CUB 8 domain resulted in the abolishment of ligand binding. These results indicate that (a) cubilin contains two distinct regions that bind both IF-Cbl and albumin and that (b) binding of both IF-Cbl and albumin to each of these regions can be distinguished and is regulated by the nonassisted formation of local disulfide bonds.

  12. RNA-binding region of Macrobrachium rosenbergii nodavirus capsid protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Zee Hong; Mohd, Nur Azmina Syakirin; Tan, Soon Guan; Bhassu, Subha; Tan, Wen Siang

    2014-09-01

    White tail disease (WTD) kills prawn larvae and causes drastic losses to the freshwater prawn (Macrobrachium rosenbergii) industry. The main causative agent of WTD is Macrobrachium rosenbergii nodavirus (MrNV). The N-terminal end of the MrNV capsid protein is very rich in positively charged amino acids and is postulated to interact with RNA molecules. N-terminal and internal deletion mutagenesis revealed that the RNA-binding region is located at positions 20-29, where 80 % of amino acids are positively charged. Substitution of all these positively charged residues with alanine abolished the RNA binding. Mutants without the RNA-binding region still assembled into virus-like particles, suggesting that this region is not a part of the capsid assembly domain. This paper is, to the best of our knowledge, the first to report the specific RNA-binding region of MrNV capsid protein.

  13. An N-terminal Region of Mot-2 Binds to p53 In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil C. Kaul

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The mouse mot-2 protein was earlier shown to bind to the tumor suppressor protein, p53. The mot-2 binding site of p53 was mapped to C-terminal amino acid residues 312–352, which includes the cytoplasmic sequestration domain. In the present study, we have found that both mot-1 and mot-2 bind to p53 in vitro. By using His-tagged deletion mutant proteins, the p53-binding domain of mot-2 was mapped to its Nterminal amino acid residues 253–282, which are identical in mot-1 and mot-2 proteins. Some peptides containing the p53-binding region of mot-2 were able to compete with the full-length protein for p53 binding. The data provided rationale for in vitro binding of mot-1 and mot-2 proteins to p53 and supported the conclusion that inability of mot-1 protein to bind p53 in vivo depends on secondary structure or its binding to other cellular factors. Most interestingly, the p53-binding region of mot-2 was common to its MKT-077, a cationic dye that exhibits antitumor activity, binding region. Therefore it is most likely that MKT-077-induced nuclear translocation and restoration of wild-type p53 function in transformed cells takes place by a competitional mechanism.

  14. The human enhancer blocker CTC-binding factor interacts with the transcription factor Kaiso.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defossez, Pierre-Antoine; Kelly, Kevin F; Filion, Guillaume J P; Pérez-Torrado, Roberto; Magdinier, Frédérique; Menoni, Hervé; Nordgaard, Curtis L; Daniel, Juliet M; Gilson, Eric

    2005-12-30

    CTC-binding factor (CTCF) is a DNA-binding protein of vertebrates that plays essential roles in regulating genome activity through its capacity to act as an enhancer blocker. We performed a yeast two-hybrid screen to identify protein partners of CTCF that could regulate its activity. Using full-length CTCF as bait we recovered Kaiso, a POZ-zinc finger transcription factor, as a specific binding partner. The interaction occurs through a C-terminal region of CTCF and the POZ domain of Kaiso. CTCF and Kaiso are co-expressed in many tissues, and CTCF was specifically co-immunoprecipitated by several Kaiso monoclonal antibodies from nuclear lysates. Kaiso is a bimodal transcription factor that recognizes methylated CpG dinucleotides or a conserved unmethylated sequence (TNGCAGGA, the Kaiso binding site). We identified one consensus unmethylated Kaiso binding site in close proximity to the CTCF binding site in the human 5' beta-globin insulator. We found, in an insulation assay, that the presence of this Kaiso binding site reduced the enhancer-blocking activity of CTCF. These data suggest that the Kaiso-CTCF interaction negatively regulates CTCF insulator activity.

  15. Single base mismatches in the mRNA target site allow specific seed region-mediated off-target binding of siRNA targeting human coagulation factor 7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravon, Morgane; Berrera, Marco; Ebeling, Martin; Certa, Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    We have analyzed the off-target activity of two siRNAs (F7-1, F7-2) that knock-down human blood coagulation factor 7 mRNA. F7-1 modulates a significant number of non-target transcripts while F7-2 shows high selectivity for the target transcript under various experimental conditions. The 3'-UTRs of all F7-1 off-target genes show statistically significant enrichment of the reverse complement of the F7-1 siRNA seed region located in the guide strand. Seed region enrichment was confirmed in off-target transcripts modulated by siRNA targeting the glucocorticoid receptor. To investigate how these sites contribute to off-target recognition of F7-1, we employed CXCL5 transcript as model system because it contains five F7-1 seed sequence motifs with single base mismatches. We show by transient transfection of reporter gene constructs into HEK293 cells that three out of five sites located in the 3'-UTR region are required for F7-1 off-target activity. For further mechanistic dissection, the sequences of these sites were synthesized and inserted either individually or joined in dimeric or trimeric constructs. Only the fusion constructs were silenced by F7-1 while the individual sites had no off-target activity. Based on F7-1 as a model, a single mismatch between the siRNA seed region and mRNA target sites is tolerated for target recognition and the CXCL5 data suggest a requirement for binding to multiple target sites in off-target transcripts.

  16. Identification of clustered YY1 binding sites in Imprinting Control Regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J D; Hinz, A; Bergmann, A; Huang, J; Ovcharenko, I; Stubbs, L; Kim, J

    2006-04-19

    Mammalian genomic imprinting is regulated by Imprinting Control Regions (ICRs) that are usually associated with tandem arrays of transcription factor binding sites. In the current study, the sequence features derived from a tandem array of YY1 binding sites of Peg3-DMR (differentially methylated region) led us to identify three additional clustered YY1 binding sites, which are also localized within the DMRs of Xist, Tsix, and Nespas. These regions have been shown to play a critical role as ICRs for the regulation of surrounding genes. These ICRs have maintained a tandem array of YY1 binding sites during mammalian evolution. The in vivo binding of YY1 to these regions is allele-specific and only to the unmethylated active alleles. Promoter/enhancer assays suggest that a tandem array of YY1 binding sites function as a potential orientation-dependent enhancer. Insulator assays revealed that the enhancer-blocking activity is detected only in the YY1 binding sites of Peg3-DMR but not in the YY1 binding sites of other DMRs. Overall, our identification of three additional clustered YY1 binding sites in imprinted domains suggests a significant role for YY1 in mammalian genomic imprinting.

  17. Physical factors affecting chloroquine binding to melanin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, R L; Pendleton, P; Gerber, J P

    2015-10-01

    Chloroquine is an antimalarial drug but is also prescribed for conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis. Long-term users risk toxic side effects, including retinopathy, thought to be caused by chloroquine accumulation on ocular melanin. Although the binding potential of chloroquine to melanin has been investigated previously, our study is the first to demonstrate clear links between chloroquine adsorption by melanin and system factors including temperature, pH, melanin type, and particle size. In the current work, two Sepia melanins were compared with bovine eye as a representative mammalian melanin. Increasing the surface anionic character due to a pH change from 4.7 to 7.4 increased each melanin's affinity for chloroquine. Although the chloroquine isotherms exhibited an apparently strong interaction with each melanin, isosteric heat analysis indicated a competitive interaction. Buffer solution cations competed effectively at low surface coverage; chloroquine adsorption occurs via buffer cation displacement and is promoted by temperature-influenced secondary structure swelling.

  18. Distinct binding properties of TIAR RRMs and linker region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Henry S; Headey, Stephen J; Yoga, Yano M K; Scanlon, Martin J; Gorospe, Myriam; Wilce, Matthew C J; Wilce, Jacqueline A

    2013-04-01

    The RNA-binding protein TIAR is an mRNA-binding protein that acts as a translational repressor, particularly important under conditions of cellular stress. It binds to target mRNA and DNA via its RNA recognition motif (RRM) domains and is involved in both splicing regulation and translational repression via the formation of "stress granules." TIAR has also been shown to bind ssDNA and play a role in the regulation of transcription. Here we show, using surface plasmon resonance and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, specific roles of individual TIAR domains for high-affinity binding to RNA and DNA targets. We confirm that RRM2 of TIAR is the major RNA- and DNA-binding domain. However, the strong nanomolar affinity binding to U-rich RNA and T-rich DNA depends on the presence of the six amino acid residues found in the linker region C-terminal to RRM2. On its own, RRM1 shows preferred binding to DNA over RNA. We further characterize the interaction between RRM2 with the C-terminal extension and an AU-rich target RNA sequence using NMR spectroscopy to identify the amino acid residues involved in binding. We demonstrate that TIAR RRM2, together with its C-terminal extension, is the major contributor for the high-affinity (nM) interactions of TIAR with target RNA sequences.

  19. A systems biology approach to transcription factor binding site prediction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Zhou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The elucidation of mammalian transcriptional regulatory networks holds great promise for both basic and translational research and remains one the greatest challenges to systems biology. Recent reverse engineering methods deduce regulatory interactions from large-scale mRNA expression profiles and cross-species conserved regulatory regions in DNA. Technical challenges faced by these methods include distinguishing between direct and indirect interactions, associating transcription regulators with predicted transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs, identifying non-linearly conserved binding sites across species, and providing realistic accuracy estimates. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We address these challenges by closely integrating proven methods for regulatory network reverse engineering from mRNA expression data, linearly and non-linearly conserved regulatory region discovery, and TFBS evaluation and discovery. Using an extensive test set of high-likelihood interactions, which we collected in order to provide realistic prediction-accuracy estimates, we show that a careful integration of these methods leads to significant improvements in prediction accuracy. To verify our methods, we biochemically validated TFBS predictions made for both transcription factors (TFs and co-factors; we validated binding site predictions made using a known E2F1 DNA-binding motif on E2F1 predicted promoter targets, known E2F1 and JUND motifs on JUND predicted promoter targets, and a de novo discovered motif for BCL6 on BCL6 predicted promoter targets. Finally, to demonstrate accuracy of prediction using an external dataset, we showed that sites matching predicted motifs for ZNF263 are significantly enriched in recent ZNF263 ChIP-seq data. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Using an integrative framework, we were able to address technical challenges faced by state of the art network reverse engineering methods, leading to significant improvement in direct

  20. Mechanisms of in vivo binding site selection of the hematopoietic master transcription factor PU.1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Thu-Hang; Minderjahn, Julia; Schmidl, Christian; Hoffmeister, Helen; Schmidhofer, Sandra; Chen, Wei; Längst, Gernot; Benner, Christopher; Rehli, Michael

    2013-07-01

    The transcription factor PU.1 is crucial for the development of many hematopoietic lineages and its binding patterns significantly change during differentiation processes. However, the 'rules' for binding or not-binding of potential binding sites are only partially understood. To unveil basic characteristics of PU.1 binding site selection in different cell types, we studied the binding properties of PU.1 during human macrophage differentiation. Using in vivo and in vitro binding assays, as well as computational prediction, we show that PU.1 selects its binding sites primarily based on sequence affinity, which results in the frequent autonomous binding of high affinity sites in DNase I inaccessible regions (25-45% of all occupied sites). Increasing PU.1 concentrations and the availability of cooperative transcription factor interactions during lineage differentiation both decrease affinity thresholds for in vivo binding and fine-tune cell type-specific PU.1 binding, which seems to be largely independent of DNA methylation. Occupied sites were predominantly detected in active chromatin domains, which are characterized by higher densities of PU.1 recognition sites and neighboring motifs for cooperative transcription factors. Our study supports a model of PU.1 binding control that involves motif-binding affinity, PU.1 concentration, cooperativeness with neighboring transcription factor sites and chromatin domain accessibility, which likely applies to all PU.1 expressing cells.

  1. Joint Binding of OTX2 and MYC in Promotor Regions Is Associated with High Gene Expression in Medulloblastoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bunt, J.; Hasselt, N.E.; Zwijnenburg, D.A.; Koster, J.; Versteeg, R.; Kool, M.

    2011-01-01

    Both OTX2 and MYC are important oncogenes in medulloblastoma, the most common malignant brain tumor in childhood. Much is known about MYC binding to promoter regions, but OTX2 binding is hardly investigated. We used ChIP-on-chip data to analyze the binding patterns of both transcription factors in D

  2. Dual chain synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamora, Paul O.; Pena, Louis A.; Lin, Xinhua

    2009-10-06

    The invention provides synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs having two peptide chains each branched from a branch moiety, such as trifunctional amino acid residues, the branch moieties separated by a first linker of from 3 to about 20 backbone atoms, which peptide chains bind a heparin-binding growth factor receptor and are covalently bound to a non-signaling peptide that includes a heparin-binding domain, preferably by a second linker, which may be a hydrophobic second linker. The synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs are useful as pharmaceutical agents, soluble biologics or as surface coatings for medical devices.

  3. Dual chain synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zamora, Paul O. (Gaithersburg, MD); Pena, Louis A. (Poquott, NY); Lin, Xinhua (Plainview, NY)

    2012-04-24

    The invention provides synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs having two peptide chains each branched from a branch moiety, such as trifunctional amino acid residues, the branch moieties separated by a first linker of from 3 to about 20 backbone atoms, which peptide chains bind a heparin-binding growth factor receptor and are covalently bound to a non-signaling peptide that includes a heparin-binding domain, preferably by a second linker, which may be a hydrophobic second linker. The synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs are useful as pharmaceutical agents, soluble biologics or as surface coatings for medical devices.

  4. Binding site turnover produces pervasive quantitative changes in transcription factor binding between closely related Drosophila species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert K Bradley

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Changes in gene expression play an important role in evolution, yet the molecular mechanisms underlying regulatory evolution are poorly understood. Here we compare genome-wide binding of the six transcription factors that initiate segmentation along the anterior-posterior axis in embryos of two closely related species: Drosophila melanogaster and Drosophila yakuba. Where we observe binding by a factor in one species, we almost always observe binding by that factor to the orthologous sequence in the other species. Levels of binding, however, vary considerably. The magnitude and direction of the interspecies differences in binding levels of all six factors are strongly correlated, suggesting a role for chromatin or other factor-independent forces in mediating the divergence of transcription factor binding. Nonetheless, factor-specific quantitative variation in binding is common, and we show that it is driven to a large extent by the gain and loss of cognate recognition sequences for the given factor. We find only a weak correlation between binding variation and regulatory function. These data provide the first genome-wide picture of how modest levels of sequence divergence between highly morphologically similar species affect a system of coordinately acting transcription factors during animal development, and highlight the dominant role of quantitative variation in transcription factor binding over short evolutionary distances.

  5. The bZip transcription factor vitellogenin-binding protein is post transcriptional down regulated in chicken liver

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smidt, MP; Snippe, L; Van Keulen, G; Ab, G

    1998-01-01

    The vitellogenin-binding protein (VBP) is a member of the proline and acidic-region rich (PAR) family of bZip transcription factors. PAR is located N-terminally to the DNA-binding domain. VBP binds to specific sites within the 300-bp 5'-flanking region of the chicken-liver-specific estrogen-dependen

  6. High resolution genome wide binding event finding and motif discovery reveals transcription factor spatial binding constraints.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuchun Guo

    Full Text Available An essential component of genome function is the syntax of genomic regulatory elements that determine how diverse transcription factors interact to orchestrate a program of regulatory control. A precise characterization of in vivo spacing constraints between key transcription factors would reveal key aspects of this genomic regulatory language. To discover novel transcription factor spatial binding constraints in vivo, we developed a new integrative computational method, genome wide event finding and motif discovery (GEM. GEM resolves ChIP data into explanatory motifs and binding events at high spatial resolution by linking binding event discovery and motif discovery with positional priors in the context of a generative probabilistic model of ChIP data and genome sequence. GEM analysis of 63 transcription factors in 214 ENCODE human ChIP-Seq experiments recovers more known factor motifs than other contemporary methods, and discovers six new motifs for factors with unknown binding specificity. GEM's adaptive learning of binding-event read distributions allows it to further improve upon previous methods for processing ChIP-Seq and ChIP-exo data to yield unsurpassed spatial resolution and discovery of closely spaced binding events of the same factor. In a systematic analysis of in vivo sequence-specific transcription factor binding using GEM, we have found hundreds of spatial binding constraints between factors. GEM found 37 examples of factor binding constraints in mouse ES cells, including strong distance-specific constraints between Klf4 and other key regulatory factors. In human ENCODE data, GEM found 390 examples of spatially constrained pair-wise binding, including such novel pairs as c-Fos:c-Jun/USF1, CTCF/Egr1, and HNF4A/FOXA1. The discovery of new factor-factor spatial constraints in ChIP data is significant because it proposes testable models for regulatory factor interactions that will help elucidate genome function and the

  7. High resolution genome wide binding event finding and motif discovery reveals transcription factor spatial binding constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yuchun; Mahony, Shaun; Gifford, David K

    2012-01-01

    An essential component of genome function is the syntax of genomic regulatory elements that determine how diverse transcription factors interact to orchestrate a program of regulatory control. A precise characterization of in vivo spacing constraints between key transcription factors would reveal key aspects of this genomic regulatory language. To discover novel transcription factor spatial binding constraints in vivo, we developed a new integrative computational method, genome wide event finding and motif discovery (GEM). GEM resolves ChIP data into explanatory motifs and binding events at high spatial resolution by linking binding event discovery and motif discovery with positional priors in the context of a generative probabilistic model of ChIP data and genome sequence. GEM analysis of 63 transcription factors in 214 ENCODE human ChIP-Seq experiments recovers more known factor motifs than other contemporary methods, and discovers six new motifs for factors with unknown binding specificity. GEM's adaptive learning of binding-event read distributions allows it to further improve upon previous methods for processing ChIP-Seq and ChIP-exo data to yield unsurpassed spatial resolution and discovery of closely spaced binding events of the same factor. In a systematic analysis of in vivo sequence-specific transcription factor binding using GEM, we have found hundreds of spatial binding constraints between factors. GEM found 37 examples of factor binding constraints in mouse ES cells, including strong distance-specific constraints between Klf4 and other key regulatory factors. In human ENCODE data, GEM found 390 examples of spatially constrained pair-wise binding, including such novel pairs as c-Fos:c-Jun/USF1, CTCF/Egr1, and HNF4A/FOXA1. The discovery of new factor-factor spatial constraints in ChIP data is significant because it proposes testable models for regulatory factor interactions that will help elucidate genome function and the implementation of combinatorial

  8. Discovery and information-theoretic characterization of transcription factor binding sites that act cooperatively

    CERN Document Server

    Clifford, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Transcription factor binding to the surface of DNA regulatory regions is one of the primary causes of regulating gene expression levels. A probabilistic approach to model protein-DNA interactions at the sequence level is through Position Weight Matrices (PWMs) that estimate the joint probability of a DNA binding site sequence by assuming positional independence within the DNA sequence. Here we construct conditional PWMs that depend on the motif signatures in the flanking DNA sequence, by conditioning known binding site loci on the presence or absence of additional binding sites in the flanking sequence of each site's locus. Pooling known sites with similar flanking sequence patterns allows for the estimation of the conditional distribution function over the binding site sequences. We apply our model to the Dorsal transcription factor binding sites active in patterning the Dorsal-Ventral axis of Drosophila development. We find that those binding sites that cooperate with nearby Twist sites on average contain a...

  9. In vitro binding of Sorghum bicolor transcription factors ABI4 and ABI5 to a conserved region of a GA 2-OXIDASE promoter: possible role of this interaction in the expression of seed dormancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantoro, Renata; Crocco, Carlos Daniel; Benech-Arnold, Roberto Luis; Rodríguez, María Verónica

    2013-12-01

    The precise adjustment of the timing of dormancy release according to final grain usage is still a challenge for many cereal crops. Grain sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench] shows wide intraspecific variability in dormancy level and susceptibility to pre-harvest sprouting (PHS). Both embryo sensitivity to abscisic acid (ABA) and gibberellin (GA) metabolism play an important role in the expression of dormancy of the developing sorghum grain. In previous works, it was shown that, simultaneously with a greater embryo sensitivity to ABA and higher expression of SbABA-INSENSITIVE 4 (SbABI4) and SbABA-INSENSITIVE 5 (SbABI5), dormant grains accumulate less active GA4 due to a more active GA catabolism. In this work, it is demonstrated that the ABA signalling components SbABI4 and SbABI5 interact in vitro with a fragment of the SbGA 2-OXIDASE 3 (SbGA2ox3) promoter containing an ABA-responsive complex (ABRC). Both transcription factors were able to bind the promoter, although not simultaneously, suggesting that they might compete for the same cis-acting regulatory sequences. A biological role for these interactions in the expression of dormancy of sorghum grains is proposed: either SbABI4 and/or SbABI5 activate transcription of the SbGA2ox3 gene in vivo and promote SbGA2ox3 protein accumulation; this would result in active degradation of GA4, thus preventing germination of dormant grains. A comparative analysis of the 5'-regulatory region of GA2oxs from both monocots and dicots is also presented; conservation of the ABRC in closely related GA2oxs from Brachypodium distachyon and rice suggest that these species might share the same regulatory mechanism as proposed for grain sorghum.

  10. Modeling regionalized volumetric differences in protein-ligand binding cavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Brian Y; Bandyopadhyay, Soutir

    2012-06-21

    Identifying elements of protein structures that create differences in protein-ligand binding specificity is an essential method for explaining the molecular mechanisms underlying preferential binding. In some cases, influential mechanisms can be visually identified by experts in structural biology, but subtler mechanisms, whose significance may only be apparent from the analysis of many structures, are harder to find. To assist this process, we present a geometric algorithm and two statistical models for identifying significant structural differences in protein-ligand binding cavities. We demonstrate these methods in an analysis of sequentially nonredundant structural representatives of the canonical serine proteases and the enolase superfamily. Here, we observed that statistically significant structural variations identified experimentally established determinants of specificity. We also observed that an analysis of individual regions inside cavities can reveal areas where small differences in shape can correspond to differences in specificity.

  11. Mutations and binding sites of human transcription factors

    KAUST Repository

    Kamanu, Frederick Kinyua

    2012-06-01

    Mutations in any genome may lead to phenotype characteristics that determine ability of an individual to cope with adaptation to environmental challenges. In studies of human biology, among the most interesting ones are phenotype characteristics that determine responses to drug treatments, response to infections, or predisposition to specific inherited diseases. Most of the research in this field has been focused on the studies of mutation effects on the final gene products, peptides, and their alterations. Considerably less attention was given to the mutations that may affect regulatory mechanism(s) of gene expression, although these may also affect the phenotype characteristics. In this study we make a pilot analysis of mutations observed in the regulatory regions of 24,667 human RefSeq genes. Our study reveals that out of eight studied mutation types, insertions are the only one that in a statistically significant manner alters predicted transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs). We also find that 25 families of TFBSs have been altered by mutations in a statistically significant manner in the promoter regions we considered. Moreover, we find that the related transcription factors are, for example, prominent in processes related to intracellular signaling; cell fate; morphogenesis of organs and epithelium; development of urogenital system, epithelium, and tube; neuron fate commitment. Our study highlights the significance of studying mutations within the genes regulatory regions and opens way for further detailed investigations on this topic, particularly on the downstream affected pathways. 2012 Kamanu, Medvedeva, Schaefer, Jankovic, Archer and Bajic.

  12. Structural Basis for Negative Cooperativity in Growth Factor Binding to an EGF Receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarado, Diego; Klein, Daryl E.; Lemmon, Mark A. (UPENN-MED)

    2010-09-27

    Transmembrane signaling by the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) involves ligand-induced dimerization and allosteric regulation of the intracellular tyrosine kinase domain. Crystallographic studies have shown how ligand binding induces dimerization of the EGFR extracellular region but cannot explain the high-affinity and low-affinity classes of cell-surface EGF-binding sites inferred from curved Scatchard plots. From a series of crystal structures of the Drosophila EGFR extracellular region, we show here how Scatchard plot curvature arises from negatively cooperative ligand binding. The first ligand-binding event induces formation of an asymmetric dimer with only one bound ligand. The unoccupied site in this dimer is structurally restrained, leading to reduced affinity for binding of the second ligand, and thus negative cooperativity. Our results explain the cell-surface binding characteristics of EGF receptors and suggest how individual EGFR ligands might stabilize distinct dimeric species with different signaling properties.

  13. Competitiveness of the region : content, factors, policies

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    The article describes a framework conception of regional competitiveness. The notion of regional competitiveness as well as approaches to the classification of competi-tiveness factors are considered in detail. The author elaborates a set of indicators of re-gional competitiveness. The article also dis-cusses three groups of factors which can influence the competitiveness of any region.

  14. Effects of the binding of a dextran derivative on fibroblast growth factor 2: secondary structure and receptor-binding studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittoun, P; Bagheri-Yarmand, R; Chaubet, F; Crépin, M; Jozefonvicz, J; Fermandjian, S

    1999-06-15

    CMDB (carboxymethyldextran-benzylamide) are dextrans statistically substituted with carboxymethyl and benzylamide groups which can mimick some of the biological properties of heparin. It has previously been shown that CMDB inhibit autocrine growth of breast tumor cells (Bagheri-Yarmand et al., Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 239: 424-428, 1997) and selectively displace fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2) from its receptor. Here, we used circular dichroism and fluorescence anisotropy measurements to show that the conformation of FGF-2 was significantly altered upon its binding to CMDB and to short CMDB fragments prepared within this study. CMDB and fragments formed a stable 1:1 complex with FGF-2, with affinities being estimated as 20+/-10 nM from fluorescence anisotropy analysis. No such a complex was formed with insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1) or epidermal growth factor (EGF). CMDB competed with the FGF-2 receptor for binding to FGF-2 but did not disturb the binding of IGF-1 and EGF to their receptors. Thus, our results highlight the selectivity of CMDB and their fragments towards FGF-2. Heparin, however, competes with CMDB and their fragments for binding to FGF-2. The carboxymethyl and benzylamide groups of these molecules likely interact directly with a heparin-binding region of FGF-2. The resulting change in conformation disturbs the binding of FGF-2 to its receptor and consecutively its mitogenic activity.

  15. DNA-binding specificities of human transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolma, Arttu; Yan, Jian; Whitington, Thomas; Toivonen, Jarkko; Nitta, Kazuhiro R; Rastas, Pasi; Morgunova, Ekaterina; Enge, Martin; Taipale, Mikko; Wei, Gonghong; Palin, Kimmo; Vaquerizas, Juan M; Vincentelli, Renaud; Luscombe, Nicholas M; Hughes, Timothy R; Lemaire, Patrick; Ukkonen, Esko; Kivioja, Teemu; Taipale, Jussi

    2013-01-17

    Although the proteins that read the gene regulatory code, transcription factors (TFs), have been largely identified, it is not well known which sequences TFs can recognize. We have analyzed the sequence-specific binding of human TFs using high-throughput SELEX and ChIP sequencing. A total of 830 binding profiles were obtained, describing 239 distinctly different binding specificities. The models represent the majority of human TFs, approximately doubling the coverage compared to existing systematic studies. Our results reveal additional specificity determinants for a large number of factors for which a partial specificity was known, including a commonly observed A- or T-rich stretch that flanks the core motifs. Global analysis of the data revealed that homodimer orientation and spacing preferences, and base-stacking interactions, have a larger role in TF-DNA binding than previously appreciated. We further describe a binding model incorporating these features that is required to understand binding of TFs to DNA.

  16. Modulation of DNA binding by gene-specific transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleif, Robert F

    2013-10-01

    The transcription of many genes, particularly in prokaryotes, is controlled by transcription factors whose activity can be modulated by controlling their DNA binding affinity. Understanding the molecular mechanisms by which DNA binding affinity is regulated is important, but because forming definitive conclusions usually requires detailed structural information in combination with data from extensive biophysical, biochemical, and sometimes genetic experiments, little is truly understood about this topic. This review describes the biological requirements placed upon DNA binding transcription factors and their consequent properties, particularly the ways that DNA binding affinity can be modulated and methods for its study. What is known and not known about the mechanisms modulating the DNA binding affinity of a number of prokaryotic transcription factors, including CAP and lac repressor, is provided.

  17. Transcription factor binding site positioning in yeast: proximal promoter motifs characterize TATA-less promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erb, Ionas; van Nimwegen, Erik

    2011-01-01

    The availability of sequence specificities for a substantial fraction of yeast's transcription factors and comparative genomic algorithms for binding site prediction has made it possible to comprehensively annotate transcription factor binding sites genome-wide. Here we use such a genome-wide annotation for comprehensively studying promoter architecture in yeast, focusing on the distribution of transcription factor binding sites relative to transcription start sites, and the architecture of TATA and TATA-less promoters. For most transcription factors, binding sites are positioned further upstream and vary over a wider range in TATA promoters than in TATA-less promoters. In contrast, a group of 6 'proximal promoter motifs' (GAT1/GLN3/DAL80, FKH1/2, PBF1/2, RPN4, NDT80, and ROX1) occur preferentially in TATA-less promoters and show a strong preference for binding close to the transcription start site in these promoters. We provide evidence that suggests that pre-initiation complexes are recruited at TATA sites in TATA promoters and at the sites of the other proximal promoter motifs in TATA-less promoters. TATA-less promoters can generally be classified by the proximal promoter motif they contain, with different classes of TATA-less promoters showing different patterns of transcription factor binding site positioning and nucleosome coverage. These observations suggest that different modes of regulation of transcription initiation may be operating in the different promoter classes. In addition we show that, across all promoter classes, there is a close match between nucleosome free regions and regions of highest transcription factor binding site density. This close agreement between transcription factor binding site density and nucleosome depletion suggests a direct and general competition between transcription factors and nucleosomes for binding to promoters.

  18. Transcription factor binding site positioning in yeast: proximal promoter motifs characterize TATA-less promoters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ionas Erb

    Full Text Available The availability of sequence specificities for a substantial fraction of yeast's transcription factors and comparative genomic algorithms for binding site prediction has made it possible to comprehensively annotate transcription factor binding sites genome-wide. Here we use such a genome-wide annotation for comprehensively studying promoter architecture in yeast, focusing on the distribution of transcription factor binding sites relative to transcription start sites, and the architecture of TATA and TATA-less promoters. For most transcription factors, binding sites are positioned further upstream and vary over a wider range in TATA promoters than in TATA-less promoters. In contrast, a group of 6 'proximal promoter motifs' (GAT1/GLN3/DAL80, FKH1/2, PBF1/2, RPN4, NDT80, and ROX1 occur preferentially in TATA-less promoters and show a strong preference for binding close to the transcription start site in these promoters. We provide evidence that suggests that pre-initiation complexes are recruited at TATA sites in TATA promoters and at the sites of the other proximal promoter motifs in TATA-less promoters. TATA-less promoters can generally be classified by the proximal promoter motif they contain, with different classes of TATA-less promoters showing different patterns of transcription factor binding site positioning and nucleosome coverage. These observations suggest that different modes of regulation of transcription initiation may be operating in the different promoter classes. In addition we show that, across all promoter classes, there is a close match between nucleosome free regions and regions of highest transcription factor binding site density. This close agreement between transcription factor binding site density and nucleosome depletion suggests a direct and general competition between transcription factors and nucleosomes for binding to promoters.

  19. A peptide derived from the CD loop-D helix region of ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) induces neuronal differentiation and survival by binding to the leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) receptor and common cytokine receptor chain gp130

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rathje, Mette; Pankratova, Stanislava; Nielsen, Janne;

    2011-01-01

    been suggested to be important for the cytokine interaction with LIFR. We designed a peptide, termed cintrofin, that encompasses this region. Surface plasmon resonance analysis demonstrated that cintrofin bound to LIFR and gp130, but not to CNTFRa, with apparent K(D) values of 35nM and 1.1n......M, respectively. Cintrofin promoted the survival of cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs), in which cell death was induced either by potassium withdrawal or H(2)O(2) treatment. Cintrofin induced neurite outgrowth from CGNs, and this effect was inhibited by specific antibodies against both gp130 and LIFR, indicating...... and LIF had no neuritogenic effect but were able to inhibit cintrofin-induced neuronal differentiation, indicating that cintrofin and cytokines compete for the same receptors. In addition, cintrofin induced the phosphorylation of STAT3, Akt, and ERK, indicating that it exerts cell signaling properties...

  20. Tenascin C promiscuously binds growth factors via its fifth fibronectin type III-like domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura De Laporte

    Full Text Available Tenascin C (TNC is an extracellular matrix protein that is upregulated during development as well as tissue remodeling. TNC is comprised of multiple independent folding domains, including 15 fibronectin type III-like (TNCIII domains. The fifth TNCIII domain (TNCIII5 has previously been shown to bind heparin. Our group has shown that the heparin-binding fibronectin type III domains of fibronectin (FNIII, specifically FNIII12-14, possess affinity towards a large number of growth factors. Here, we show that TNCIII5 binds growth factors promiscuously and with high affinity. We produced recombinant fragments of TNC representing the first five TNCIII repeats (TNCIII1-5, as well as subdomains, including TNCIII5, to study interactions with various growth factors. Multiple growth factors of the platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF family, the fibroblast growth factor (FGF family, the transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β superfamily, the insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGF-BPs, and neurotrophins were found to bind with high affinity to this region of TNC, specifically to TNCIII5. Surface plasmon resonance was performed to analyze the kinetics of binding of TNCIII1-5 with TGF-β1, PDGF-BB, NT-3, and FGF-2. The promiscuous yet high affinity of TNC for a wide array of growth factors, mediated mainly by TNCIII5, may play a role in multiple physiological and pathological processes involving TNC.

  1. Regional differences in lectin binding patterns of vestibular hair cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Richard A.; Schuff, N. R.; Bancroft, J.

    1994-01-01

    Surface glycoconjugates of hair cells and supporting cells in the vestibular endorgans of the bullfrog were identified using biotinylated lectins with different carbohydrate specificities. Lectin binding in hair cells was consistent with the presence of glucose and mannose (CON A), galactose (RCA-I), N-acetylgalactosamine (VVA), but not fucose (UEA-I) residues. Hair cells in the bullfrog sacculus, unlike those in the utriculus and semicircular canals, did not stain for N-acetylglucosamine (WGA) or N-acetylgalactosamine (VVA). By contrast, WGA and, to a lesser extent, VVA, differentially stained utricular and semicircular canal hair cells, labeling hair cells located in peripheral, but not central, regions. In mammals, WGA uniformly labeled Type 1 hair cells while labeling, as in the bullfrog, Type 2 hair cells only in peripheral regions. These regional variations were retained after enzymatic digestion. We conclude that vestibular hair cells differ in their surface glycoconjugates and that differences in lectin binding patterns can be used to identify hair cell types and to infer the epithelial origin of isolated vestibular hair cells.

  2. Genome-scale study of the importance of binding site context for transcription factor binding and gene regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronne Hans

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The rate of mRNA transcription is controlled by transcription factors that bind to specific DNA motifs in promoter regions upstream of protein coding genes. Recent results indicate that not only the presence of a motif but also motif context (for example the orientation of a motif or its location relative to the coding sequence is important for gene regulation. Results In this study we present ContextFinder, a tool that is specifically aimed at identifying cases where motif context is likely to affect gene regulation. We used ContextFinder to examine the role of motif context in S. cerevisiae both for DNA binding by transcription factors and for effects on gene expression. For DNA binding we found significant patterns of motif location bias, whereas motif orientations did not seem to matter. Motif context appears to affect gene expression even more than it affects DNA binding, as biases in both motif location and orientation were more frequent in promoters of co-expressed genes. We validated our results against data on nucleosome positioning, and found a negative correlation between preferred motif locations and nucleosome occupancy. Conclusion We conclude that the requirement for stable binding of transcription factors to DNA and their subsequent function in gene regulation can impose constraints on motif context.

  3. Discovery and information-theoretic characterization of transcription factor binding sites that act cooperatively.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifford, Jacob; Adami, Christoph

    2015-09-02

    Transcription factor binding to the surface of DNA regulatory regions is one of the primary causes of regulating gene expression levels. A probabilistic approach to model protein-DNA interactions at the sequence level is through position weight matrices (PWMs) that estimate the joint probability of a DNA binding site sequence by assuming positional independence within the DNA sequence. Here we construct conditional PWMs that depend on the motif signatures in the flanking DNA sequence, by conditioning known binding site loci on the presence or absence of additional binding sites in the flanking sequence of each site's locus. Pooling known sites with similar flanking sequence patterns allows for the estimation of the conditional distribution function over the binding site sequences. We apply our model to the Dorsal transcription factor binding sites active in patterning the Dorsal-Ventral axis of Drosophila development. We find that those binding sites that cooperate with nearby Twist sites on average contain about 0.5 bits of information about the presence of Twist transcription factor binding sites in the flanking sequence. We also find that Dorsal binding site detectors conditioned on flanking sequence information make better predictions about what is a Dorsal site relative to background DNA than detection without information about flanking sequence features.

  4. rVISTA for Comparative Sequence-Based Discovery of Functional Transcription Factor Binding Sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loots, Gabriela G.; Ovcharenko, Ivan; Pachter, Lior; Dubchak, Inna; Rubin, Edward M.

    2002-03-08

    Identifying transcriptional regulatory elements represents a significant challenge in annotating the genomes of higher vertebrates. We have developed a computational tool, rVISTA, for high-throughput discovery of cis-regulatory elements that combines transcription factor binding site prediction and the analysis of inter-species sequence conservation. Here, we illustrate the ability of rVISTA to identify true transcription factor binding sites through the analysis of AP-1 and NFAT binding sites in the 1 Mb well-annotated cytokine gene cluster1 (Hs5q31; Mm11). The exploitation of orthologous human-mouse data set resulted in the elimination of 95 percent of the 38,000 binding sites predicted upon analysis of the human sequence alone, while it identified 87 percent of the experimentally verified binding sites in this region.

  5. Quantitative models of the mechanisms that control genome-wide patterns of transcription factor binding during early Drosophila development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tommy Kaplan

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Transcription factors that drive complex patterns of gene expression during animal development bind to thousands of genomic regions, with quantitative differences in binding across bound regions mediating their activity. While we now have tools to characterize the DNA affinities of these proteins and to precisely measure their genome-wide distribution in vivo, our understanding of the forces that determine where, when, and to what extent they bind remains primitive. Here we use a thermodynamic model of transcription factor binding to evaluate the contribution of different biophysical forces to the binding of five regulators of early embryonic anterior-posterior patterning in Drosophila melanogaster. Predictions based on DNA sequence and in vitro protein-DNA affinities alone achieve a correlation of ∼0.4 with experimental measurements of in vivo binding. Incorporating cooperativity and competition among the five factors, and accounting for spatial patterning by modeling binding in every nucleus independently, had little effect on prediction accuracy. A major source of error was the prediction of binding events that do not occur in vivo, which we hypothesized reflected reduced accessibility of chromatin. To test this, we incorporated experimental measurements of genome-wide DNA accessibility into our model, effectively restricting predicted binding to regions of open chromatin. This dramatically improved our predictions to a correlation of 0.6-0.9 for various factors across known target genes. Finally, we used our model to quantify the roles of DNA sequence, accessibility, and binding competition and cooperativity. Our results show that, in regions of open chromatin, binding can be predicted almost exclusively by the sequence specificity of individual factors, with a minimal role for protein interactions. We suggest that a combination of experimentally determined chromatin accessibility data and simple computational models of transcription

  6. Frequent gain and loss of functional transcription factor binding sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott W Doniger

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Cis-regulatory sequences are not always conserved across species. Divergence within cis-regulatory sequences may result from the evolution of species-specific patterns of gene expression or the flexible nature of the cis-regulatory code. The identification of functional divergence in cis-regulatory sequences is therefore important for both understanding the role of gene regulation in evolution and annotating regulatory elements. We have developed an evolutionary model to detect the loss of constraint on individual transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs. We find that a significant fraction of functionally constrained binding sites have been lost in a lineage-specific manner among three closely related yeast species. Binding site loss has previously been explained by turnover, where the concurrent gain and loss of a binding site maintains gene regulation. We estimate that nearly half of all loss events cannot be explained by binding site turnover. Recreating the mutations that led to binding site loss confirms that these sequence changes affect gene expression in some cases. We also estimate that there is a high rate of binding site gain, as more than half of experimentally identified S. cerevisiae binding sites are not conserved across species. The frequent gain and loss of TFBSs implies that cis-regulatory sequences are labile and, in the absence of turnover, may contribute to species-specific patterns of gene expression.

  7. Position specific variation in the rate of evolution intranscription factor binding sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moses, Alan M.; Chiang, Derek Y.; Kellis, Manolis; Lander, EricS.; Eisen, Michael B.

    2003-08-28

    The binding sites of sequence specific transcription factors are an important and relatively well-understood class of functional non-coding DNAs. Although a wide variety of experimental and computational methods have been developed to characterize transcription factor binding sites, they remain difficult to identify. Comparison of non-coding DNA from related species has shown considerable promise in identifying these functional non-coding sequences, even though relatively little is known about their evolution. Here we analyze the genome sequences of the budding yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae, S. bayanus, S. paradoxus and S. mikataeto study the evolution of transcription factor binding sites. As expected, we find that both experimentally characterized and computationally predicted binding sites evolve slower than surrounding sequence, consistent with the hypothesis that they are under purifying selection. We also observe position-specific variation in the rate of evolution within binding sites. We find that the position-specific rate of evolution is positively correlated with degeneracy among binding sites within S. cerevisiae. We test theoretical predictions for the rate of evolution at positions where the base frequencies deviate from background due to purifying selection and find reasonable agreement with the observed rates of evolution. Finally, we show how the evolutionary characteristics of real binding motifs can be used to distinguish them from artifacts of computational motif finding algorithms. As has been observed for protein sequences, the rate of evolution in transcription factor binding sites varies with position, suggesting that some regions are under stronger functional constraint than others. This variation likely reflects the varying importance of different positions in the formation of the protein-DNA complex. The characterization of the pattern of evolution in known binding sites will likely contribute to the effective use of comparative

  8. Design of meningococcal factor H binding protein mutant vaccines that do not bind human complement factor H.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajon, Rolando; Beernink, Peter T; Granoff, Dan M

    2012-08-01

    Meningococcal factor H binding protein (fHbp) is a human species-specific ligand for the complement regulator, factor H (fH). In recent studies, fHbp vaccines in which arginine at position 41 was replaced by serine (R41S) had impaired fH binding. The mutant vaccines elicited bactericidal responses in human fH transgenic mice superior to those elicited by control fHbp vaccines that bound human fH. Based on sequence similarity, fHbp has been classified into three variant groups. Here we report that although R41 is present in fHbp from variant groups 1 and 2, the R41S substitution eliminated fH binding only in variant group 1 proteins. To identify mutants in variant group 2 with impaired fH binding, we generated fHbp structural models and predicted 63 residues influencing fH binding. From these, we created 11 mutants with one or two amino acid substitutions in a variant group 2 protein and identified six that decreased fH binding. Three of these six mutants retained conformational epitopes recognized by all six anti-fHbp monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) tested and elicited serum complement-mediated bactericidal antibody titers in wild-type mice that were not significantly different from those obtained with the control vaccine. Thus, fHbp amino acid residues that affect human fH binding differ across variant groups. This result suggests that fHbp sequence variation induced by immune selection also affects fH binding motifs via coevolution. The three new fHbp mutants from variant group 2, which do not bind human fH, retained important epitopes for eliciting bactericidal antibodies and may be promising vaccine candidates.

  9. The genome-wide binding profile of the Sulfolobus solfataricus transcription factor Ss-LrpB shows binding events beyond direct transcription regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen-Duc, Trong; van Oeffelen, Liesbeth; Song, Ningning; Hassanzadeh-Ghassabeh, Gholamreza; Muyldermans, Serge; Charlier, Daniel; Peeters, Eveline

    2013-11-25

    Gene regulatory processes are largely resulting from binding of transcription factors to specific genomic targets. Leucine-responsive Regulatory Protein (Lrp) is a prevalent transcription factor family in prokaryotes, however, little information is available on biological functions of these proteins in archaea. Here, we study genome-wide binding of the Lrp-like transcription factor Ss-LrpB from Sulfolobus solfataricus. Chromatin immunoprecipitation in combination with DNA microarray analysis (ChIP-chip) has revealed that Ss-LrpB interacts with 36 additional loci besides the four previously identified local targets. Only a subset of the newly identified binding targets, concentrated in a highly variable IS-dense genomic region, is also bound in vitro by pure Ss-LrpB. There is no clear relationship between the in vitro measured DNA-binding specificity of Ss-LrpB and the in vivo association suggesting a limited permissivity of the crenarchaeal chromatin for transcription factor binding. Of 37 identified binding regions, 29 are co-bound by LysM, another Lrp-like transcription factor in S. solfataricus. Comparative gene expression analysis in an Ss-lrpB mutant strain shows no significant Ss-LrpB-mediated regulation for most targeted genes, with exception of the CRISPR B cluster, which is activated by Ss-LrpB through binding to a specific motif in the leader region. The genome-wide binding profile presented here implies that Ss-LrpB is associated at additional genomic binding sites besides the local gene targets, but acts as a specific transcription regulator in the tested growth conditions. Moreover, we have provided evidence that two Lrp-like transcription factors in S. solfataricus, Ss-LrpB and LysM, interact in vivo.

  10. In Vitro Whole Genome DNA Binding Analysis of the Bacterial Replication Initiator and Transcription Factor DnaA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet L Smith

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available DnaA, the replication initiation protein in bacteria, is an AAA+ ATPase that binds and hydrolyzes ATP and exists in a heterogeneous population of ATP-DnaA and ADP-DnaA. DnaA binds cooperatively to the origin of replication and several other chromosomal regions, and functions as a transcription factor at some of these regions. We determined the binding properties of Bacillus subtilis DnaA to genomic DNA in vitro at single nucleotide resolution using in vitro DNA affinity purification and deep sequencing (IDAP-Seq. We used these data to identify 269 binding regions, refine the consensus sequence of the DnaA binding site, and compare the relative affinity of binding regions for ATP-DnaA and ADP-DnaA. Most sites had a slightly higher affinity for ATP-DnaA than ADP-DnaA, but a few had a strong preference for binding ATP-DnaA. Of the 269 sites, only the eight strongest binding ones have been observed to bind DnaA in vivo, suggesting that other cellular factors or the amount of available DnaA in vivo restricts DnaA binding to these additional sites. Conversely, we found several chromosomal regions that were bound by DnaA in vivo but not in vitro, and that the nucleoid-associated protein Rok was required for binding in vivo. Our in vitro characterization of the inherent ability of DnaA to bind the genome at single nucleotide resolution provides a backdrop for interpreting data on in vivo binding and regulation of DnaA, and is an approach that should be adaptable to many other DNA binding proteins.

  11. Cell-type specificity of ChIP-predicted transcription factor binding sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Håndstad Tony

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Context-dependent transcription factor (TF binding is one reason for differences in gene expression patterns between different cellular states. Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput sequencing (ChIP-seq identifies genome-wide TF binding sites for one particular context—the cells used in the experiment. But can such ChIP-seq data predict TF binding in other cellular contexts and is it possible to distinguish context-dependent from ubiquitous TF binding? Results We compared ChIP-seq data on TF binding for multiple TFs in two different cell types and found that on average only a third of ChIP-seq peak regions are common to both cell types. Expectedly, common peaks occur more frequently in certain genomic contexts, such as CpG-rich promoters, whereas chromatin differences characterize cell-type specific TF binding. We also find, however, that genotype differences between the cell types can explain differences in binding. Moreover, ChIP-seq signal intensity and peak clustering are the strongest predictors of common peaks. Compared with strong peaks located in regions containing peaks for multiple transcription factors, weak and isolated peaks are less common between the cell types and are less associated with data that indicate regulatory activity. Conclusions Together, the results suggest that experimental noise is prevalent among weak peaks, whereas strong and clustered peaks represent high-confidence binding events that often occur in other cellular contexts. Nevertheless, 30-40% of the strongest and most clustered peaks show context-dependent regulation. We show that by combining signal intensity with additional data—ranging from context independent information such as binding site conservation and position weight matrix scores to context dependent chromatin structure—we can predict whether a ChIP-seq peak is likely to be present in other cellular contexts.

  12. Experimental strategies for studying transcription factor-DNA binding specificities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geertz, Marcel; Maerkl, Sebastian J

    2010-12-01

    Specific binding of transcription factors (TFs) determines in a large part the connectivity of gene regulatory networks as well as the quantitative level of gene expression. A multiplicity of both experimental and computational methods is currently used to discover and characterize the underlying TF-DNA interactions. Experimental methods can be further subdivided into in vitro- and in vivo-based approaches, each accenting different aspects of TF-binding events. In this review we summarize the flexibility and performance of a selection of both types of experimental methods. In conclusion, we argue that a serial combination of methods with different throughput and data type constitutes an optimal experimental strategy.

  13. Combining transcription factor binding affinities with open-chromatin data for accurate gene expression prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Florian; Gasparoni, Nina; Gasparoni, Gilles; Gianmoena, Kathrin; Cadenas, Cristina; Polansky, Julia K; Ebert, Peter; Nordström, Karl; Barann, Matthias; Sinha, Anupam; Fröhler, Sebastian; Xiong, Jieyi; Dehghani Amirabad, Azim; Behjati Ardakani, Fatemeh; Hutter, Barbara; Zipprich, Gideon; Felder, Bärbel; Eils, Jürgen; Brors, Benedikt; Chen, Wei; Hengstler, Jan G; Hamann, Alf; Lengauer, Thomas; Rosenstiel, Philip; Walter, Jörn; Schulz, Marcel H

    2017-01-09

    The binding and contribution of transcription factors (TF) to cell specific gene expression is often deduced from open-chromatin measurements to avoid costly TF ChIP-seq assays. Thus, it is important to develop computational methods for accurate TF binding prediction in open-chromatin regions (OCRs). Here, we report a novel segmentation-based method, TEPIC, to predict TF binding by combining sets of OCRs with position weight matrices. TEPIC can be applied to various open-chromatin data, e.g. DNaseI-seq and NOMe-seq. Additionally, Histone-Marks (HMs) can be used to identify candidate TF binding sites. TEPIC computes TF affinities and uses open-chromatin/HM signal intensity as quantitative measures of TF binding strength. Using machine learning, we find low affinity binding sites to improve our ability to explain gene expression variability compared to the standard presence/absence classification of binding sites. Further, we show that both footprints and peaks capture essential TF binding events and lead to a good prediction performance. In our application, gene-based scores computed by TEPIC with one open-chromatin assay nearly reach the quality of several TF ChIP-seq data sets. Finally, these scores correctly predict known transcriptional regulators as illustrated by the application to novel DNaseI-seq and NOMe-seq data for primary human hepatocytes and CD4+ T-cells, respectively.

  14. Combining transcription factor binding affinities with open-chromatin data for accurate gene expression prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Florian; Gasparoni, Nina; Gasparoni, Gilles; Gianmoena, Kathrin; Cadenas, Cristina; Polansky, Julia K.; Ebert, Peter; Nordström, Karl; Barann, Matthias; Sinha, Anupam; Fröhler, Sebastian; Xiong, Jieyi; Dehghani Amirabad, Azim; Behjati Ardakani, Fatemeh; Hutter, Barbara; Zipprich, Gideon; Felder, Bärbel; Eils, Jürgen; Brors, Benedikt; Chen, Wei; Hengstler, Jan G.; Hamann, Alf; Lengauer, Thomas; Rosenstiel, Philip; Walter, Jörn; Schulz, Marcel H.

    2017-01-01

    The binding and contribution of transcription factors (TF) to cell specific gene expression is often deduced from open-chromatin measurements to avoid costly TF ChIP-seq assays. Thus, it is important to develop computational methods for accurate TF binding prediction in open-chromatin regions (OCRs). Here, we report a novel segmentation-based method, TEPIC, to predict TF binding by combining sets of OCRs with position weight matrices. TEPIC can be applied to various open-chromatin data, e.g. DNaseI-seq and NOMe-seq. Additionally, Histone-Marks (HMs) can be used to identify candidate TF binding sites. TEPIC computes TF affinities and uses open-chromatin/HM signal intensity as quantitative measures of TF binding strength. Using machine learning, we find low affinity binding sites to improve our ability to explain gene expression variability compared to the standard presence/absence classification of binding sites. Further, we show that both footprints and peaks capture essential TF binding events and lead to a good prediction performance. In our application, gene-based scores computed by TEPIC with one open-chromatin assay nearly reach the quality of several TF ChIP-seq data sets. Finally, these scores correctly predict known transcriptional regulators as illustrated by the application to novel DNaseI-seq and NOMe-seq data for primary human hepatocytes and CD4+ T-cells, respectively. PMID:27899623

  15. Spatial distribution of predicted transcription factor binding sites in Drosophila ChIP peaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettie, Kade P; Dresch, Jacqueline M; Drewell, Robert A

    2016-08-01

    In the development of the Drosophila embryo, gene expression is directed by the sequence-specific interactions of a large network of protein transcription factors (TFs) and DNA cis-regulatory binding sites. Once the identity of the typically 8-10bp binding sites for any given TF has been determined by one of several experimental procedures, the sequences can be represented in a position weight matrix (PWM) and used to predict the location of additional TF binding sites elsewhere in the genome. Often, alignments of large (>200bp) genomic fragments that have been experimentally determined to bind the TF of interest in Chromatin Immunoprecipitation (ChIP) studies are trimmed under the assumption that the majority of the binding sites are located near the center of all the aligned fragments. In this study, ChIP/chip datasets are analyzed using the corresponding PWMs for the well-studied TFs; CAUDAL, HUNCHBACK, KNIRPS and KRUPPEL, to determine the distribution of predicted binding sites. All four TFs are critical regulators of gene expression along the anterio-posterior axis in early Drosophila development. For all four TFs, the ChIP peaks contain multiple binding sites that are broadly distributed across the genomic region represented by the peak, regardless of the prediction stringency criteria used. This result suggests that ChIP peak trimming may exclude functional binding sites from subsequent analyses.

  16. Variable structure motifs for transcription factor binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, John E; Evans, Kenneth J; Dyer, Nigel; Wernisch, Lorenz; Ott, Sascha

    2010-01-14

    Classically, models of DNA-transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) have been based on relatively few known instances and have treated them as sites of fixed length using position weight matrices (PWMs). Various extensions to this model have been proposed, most of which take account of dependencies between the bases in the binding sites. However, some transcription factors are known to exhibit some flexibility and bind to DNA in more than one possible physical configuration. In some cases this variation is known to affect the function of binding sites. With the increasing volume of ChIP-seq data available it is now possible to investigate models that incorporate this flexibility. Previous work on variable length models has been constrained by: a focus on specific zinc finger proteins in yeast using restrictive models; a reliance on hand-crafted models for just one transcription factor at a time; and a lack of evaluation on realistically sized data sets. We re-analysed binding sites from the TRANSFAC database and found motivating examples where our new variable length model provides a better fit. We analysed several ChIP-seq data sets with a novel motif search algorithm and compared the results to one of the best standard PWM finders and a recently developed alternative method for finding motifs of variable structure. All the methods performed comparably in held-out cross validation tests. Known motifs of variable structure were recovered for p53, Stat5a and Stat5b. In addition our method recovered a novel generalised version of an existing PWM for Sp1 that allows for variable length binding. This motif improved classification performance. We have presented a new gapped PWM model for variable length DNA binding sites that is not too restrictive nor over-parameterised. Our comparison with existing tools shows that on average it does not have better predictive accuracy than existing methods. However, it does provide more interpretable models of motifs of variable

  17. Variable structure motifs for transcription factor binding sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wernisch Lorenz

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Classically, models of DNA-transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs have been based on relatively few known instances and have treated them as sites of fixed length using position weight matrices (PWMs. Various extensions to this model have been proposed, most of which take account of dependencies between the bases in the binding sites. However, some transcription factors are known to exhibit some flexibility and bind to DNA in more than one possible physical configuration. In some cases this variation is known to affect the function of binding sites. With the increasing volume of ChIP-seq data available it is now possible to investigate models that incorporate this flexibility. Previous work on variable length models has been constrained by: a focus on specific zinc finger proteins in yeast using restrictive models; a reliance on hand-crafted models for just one transcription factor at a time; and a lack of evaluation on realistically sized data sets. Results We re-analysed binding sites from the TRANSFAC database and found motivating examples where our new variable length model provides a better fit. We analysed several ChIP-seq data sets with a novel motif search algorithm and compared the results to one of the best standard PWM finders and a recently developed alternative method for finding motifs of variable structure. All the methods performed comparably in held-out cross validation tests. Known motifs of variable structure were recovered for p53, Stat5a and Stat5b. In addition our method recovered a novel generalised version of an existing PWM for Sp1 that allows for variable length binding. This motif improved classification performance. Conclusions We have presented a new gapped PWM model for variable length DNA binding sites that is not too restrictive nor over-parameterised. Our comparison with existing tools shows that on average it does not have better predictive accuracy than existing methods. However, it does

  18. An AP1 binding site upstream of the kappa immunoglobulin intron enhancer binds inducible factors and contributes to expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schanke, J T; Marcuzzi, A; Podzorski, R P; Van Ness, B

    1994-01-01

    Expression of the kappa immunoglobulin light chain gene requires developmental- and tissue-specific regulation by trans-acting factors which interact with two distinct enhancer elements. A new protein-DNA interaction has been identified upstream of the intron enhancer, within the matrix-associated region of the J-C intron. The binding activity is greatly inducible in pre-B cells by bacterial lipopolysaccharide and interleukin-1 but specific complexes are found at all stages of B cell development tested. The footprinted binding site is homologous to the consensus AP1 motif. The protein components of this complex are specifically competed by an AP1 consensus motif and were shown by supershift to include c-Jun and c-Fos, suggesting that this binding site is an AP1 motif and that the Jun and Fos families of transcription factors play a role in the regulation of the kappa light chain gene. Mutation of the AP1 motif in the context of the intron enhancer was shown to decrease enhancer-mediated activation of the promoter in both pre-B cells induced with LPS and constitutive expression in mature B cells. Images PMID:7816634

  19. Leveraging cross-species transcription factor binding site patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Claussnitzer, Melina; Dankel, Simon N; Klocke, Bernward

    2014-01-01

    to disease susceptibility. We show that integrative computational analysis of phylogenetic conservation with a complexity assessment of co-occurring transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) can identify cis-regulatory variants and elucidate their mechanistic role in disease. Analysis of established type 2...... diabetes risk loci revealed a striking clustering of distinct homeobox TFBS. We identified the PRRX1 homeobox factor as a repressor of PPARG2 expression in adipose cells and demonstrate its adverse effect on lipid metabolism and systemic insulin sensitivity, dependent on the rs4684847 risk allele...... that triggers PRRX1 binding. Thus, cross-species conservation analysis at the level of co-occurring TFBS provides a valuable contribution to the translation of genetic association signals to disease-related molecular mechanisms....

  20. The Role of Genome Accessibility in Transcription Factor Binding in Bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio L C Gomes

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ChIP-seq enables genome-scale identification of regulatory regions that govern gene expression. However, the biological insights generated from ChIP-seq analysis have been limited to predictions of binding sites and cooperative interactions. Furthermore, ChIP-seq data often poorly correlate with in vitro measurements or predicted motifs, highlighting that binding affinity alone is insufficient to explain transcription factor (TF-binding in vivo. One possibility is that binding sites are not equally accessible across the genome. A more comprehensive biophysical representation of TF-binding is required to improve our ability to understand, predict, and alter gene expression. Here, we show that genome accessibility is a key parameter that impacts TF-binding in bacteria. We developed a thermodynamic model that parameterizes ChIP-seq coverage in terms of genome accessibility and binding affinity. The role of genome accessibility is validated using a large-scale ChIP-seq dataset of the M. tuberculosis regulatory network. We find that accounting for genome accessibility led to a model that explains 63% of the ChIP-seq profile variance, while a model based in motif score alone explains only 35% of the variance. Moreover, our framework enables de novo ChIP-seq peak prediction and is useful for inferring TF-binding peaks in new experimental conditions by reducing the need for additional experiments. We observe that the genome is more accessible in intergenic regions, and that increased accessibility is positively correlated with gene expression and anti-correlated with distance to the origin of replication. Our biophysically motivated model provides a more comprehensive description of TF-binding in vivo from first principles towards a better representation of gene regulation in silico, with promising applications in systems biology.

  1. PCR mutagenesis identifies a polymerase-binding sequence of sigma 54 that includes a sigma 70 homology region.

    OpenAIRE

    Tintut, Y; Gralla, J D

    1995-01-01

    Sigma 54 is a minor bacterial sigma factor that is not a member of the sigma 70 family of proteins but binds the same core RNA polymerase. Previously, we identified a region of sigma 54 that is important for binding core polymerase. In this work, PCR mutagenesis was used to identify specific amino acids important for this binding. The results show that important residues are clustered most closely in a short sequence that was previously speculated to be potentially homologous to a sequence in...

  2. Cooperative binding of transcription factors promotes bimodal gene expression response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo S Gutierrez

    Full Text Available In the present work we extend and analyze the scope of our recently proposed stochastic model for transcriptional regulation, which considers an arbitrarily complex cis-regulatory system using only elementary reactions. Previously, we determined the role of cooperativity on the intrinsic fluctuations of gene expression for activating transcriptional switches, by means of master equation formalism and computer simulation. This model allowed us to distinguish between two cooperative binding mechanisms and, even though the mean expression levels were not affected differently by the acting mechanism, we showed that the associated fluctuations were different. In the present generalized model we include other regulatory functions in addition to those associated to an activator switch. Namely, we introduce repressive regulatory functions and two theoretical mechanisms that account for the biphasic response that some cis-regulatory systems show to the transcription factor concentration. We have also extended our previous master equation formalism in order to include protein production by stochastic translation of mRNA. Furthermore, we examine the graded/binary scenarios in the context of the interaction energy between transcription factors. In this sense, this is the first report to show that the cooperative binding of transcription factors to DNA promotes the "all-or-none" phenomenon observed in eukaryotic systems. In addition, we confirm that gene expression fluctuation levels associated with one of two cooperative binding mechanism never exceed the fluctuation levels of the other.

  3. Comprehensive human transcription factor binding site map for combinatory binding motifs discovery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnoldo J Müller-Molina

    Full Text Available To know the map between transcription factors (TFs and their binding sites is essential to reverse engineer the regulation process. Only about 10%-20% of the transcription factor binding motifs (TFBMs have been reported. This lack of data hinders understanding gene regulation. To address this drawback, we propose a computational method that exploits never used TF properties to discover the missing TFBMs and their sites in all human gene promoters. The method starts by predicting a dictionary of regulatory "DNA words." From this dictionary, it distills 4098 novel predictions. To disclose the crosstalk between motifs, an additional algorithm extracts TF combinatorial binding patterns creating a collection of TF regulatory syntactic rules. Using these rules, we narrowed down a list of 504 novel motifs that appear frequently in syntax patterns. We tested the predictions against 509 known motifs confirming that our system can reliably predict ab initio motifs with an accuracy of 81%-far higher than previous approaches. We found that on average, 90% of the discovered combinatorial binding patterns target at least 10 genes, suggesting that to control in an independent manner smaller gene sets, supplementary regulatory mechanisms are required. Additionally, we discovered that the new TFBMs and their combinatorial patterns convey biological meaning, targeting TFs and genes related to developmental functions. Thus, among all the possible available targets in the genome, the TFs tend to regulate other TFs and genes involved in developmental functions. We provide a comprehensive resource for regulation analysis that includes a dictionary of "DNA words," newly predicted motifs and their corresponding combinatorial patterns. Combinatorial patterns are a useful filter to discover TFBMs that play a major role in orchestrating other factors and thus, are likely to lock/unlock cellular functional clusters.

  4. Binding of vitronectin and Factor H to Hic contributes to immune evasion of Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Sylvia; Hallström, Teresia; Singh, Birendra; Riesbeck, Kristian; Spartà, Giuseppina; Zipfel, Peter F; Hammerschmidt, Sven

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 3 strains are highly resistant to opsonophagocytosis due to recruitment of the complement inhibitor Factor H via Hic, a member of the pneumococcal surface protein C (PspC) family. In this study, we demonstrated that Hic also interacts with vitronectin, a fluid-phase regulator involved in haemostasis, angiogenesis, and the terminal complement cascade as well as a component of the extracellular matrix. Blocking of Hic by specific antiserum or genetic deletion significantly reduced pneumococcal binding to soluble and immobilised vitronectin and to Factor H, respectively. In parallel, ectopic expression of Hic on the surface of Lactococcus lactis conferred binding to soluble and immobilised vitronectin as well as Factor H. Molecular analyses with truncated Hic fragments narrowed down the vitronectin-binding site to the central core of Hic (aa 151-201). This vitronectin-binding region is separate from that of Factor H, which binds to the N-terminus of Hic (aa 38-92). Binding of pneumococcal Hic was localised to the C-terminal heparin-binding domain (HBD3) of vitronectin. However, an N-terminal region to HBD3 was further involved in Hic-binding to immobilised vitronectin. Finally, vitronectin bound to Hic was functionally active and inhibited formation of the terminal complement complex. In conclusion, Hic interacts with vitronectin and simultaneously with Factor H, and both human proteins may contribute to colonisation and invasive disease caused by serotype 3 pneumococci.

  5. Incorporating evolution of transcription factor binding sites into annotated alignments

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abha S Bais; Steffen Grossmann; Martin Vingron

    2007-08-01

    Identifying transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) is essential to elucidate putative regulatory mechanisms. A common strategy is to combine cross-species conservation with single sequence TFBS annotation to yield ``conserved TFBSs”. Most current methods in this field adopt a multi-step approach that segregates the two aspects. Again, it is widely accepted that the evolutionary dynamics of binding sites differ from those of the surrounding sequence. Hence, it is desirable to have an approach that explicitly takes this factor into account. Although a plethora of approaches have been proposed for the prediction of conserved TFBSs, very few explicitly model TFBS evolutionary properties, while additionally being multi-step. Recently, we introduced a novel approach to simultaneously align and annotate conserved TFBSs in a pair of sequences. Building upon the standard Smith-Waterman algorithm for local alignments, SimAnn introduces additional states for profiles to output extended alignments or annotated alignments. That is, alignments with parts annotated as gaplessly aligned TFBSs (pair-profile hits) are generated. Moreover, the pair-profile related parameters are derived in a sound statistical framework. In this article, we extend this approach to explicitly incorporate evolution of binding sites in the SimAnn framework. We demonstrate the extension in the theoretical derivations through two position-specific evolutionary models, previously used for modelling TFBS evolution. In a simulated setting, we provide a proof of concept that the approach works given the underlying assumptions, as compared to the original work. Finally, using a real dataset of experimentally verified binding sites in human-mouse sequence pairs, we compare the new approach (eSimAnn) to an existing multi-step tool that also considers TFBS evolution. Although it is widely accepted that binding sites evolve differently from the surrounding sequences, most comparative TFBS identification

  6. PCR mutagenesis identifies a polymerase-binding sequence of sigma 54 that includes a sigma 70 homology region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tintut, Y; Gralla, J D

    1995-10-01

    Sigma 54 is a minor bacterial sigma factor that is not a member of the sigma 70 family of proteins but binds the same core RNA polymerase. Previously, we identified a region of sigma 54 that is important for binding core polymerase. In this work, PCR mutagenesis was used to identify specific amino acids important for this binding. The results show that important residues are clustered most closely in a short sequence that was previously speculated to be potentially homologous to a sequence in sigma 70. The mutagenesis also identifies important residues in the flanking hydrophobic-acidic region of sigma 54, which is absent in sigma 70. Overall, the data indicate that sigma 54 binds core polymerase through a sequence homologous to that of sigma 70 but in addition uses unique motifs to modify this interaction.

  7. Transcription factor binding sites are highly enriched within microRNA precursor sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piriyapongsa Jittima

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transcription factors are thought to regulate the transcription of microRNA genes in a manner similar to that of protein-coding genes; that is, by binding to conventional transcription factor binding site DNA sequences located in or near promoter regions that lie upstream of the microRNA genes. However, in the course of analyzing the genomics of human microRNA genes, we noticed that annotated transcription factor binding sites commonly lie within 70- to 110-nt long microRNA small hairpin precursor sequences. Results We report that about 45% of all human small hairpin microRNA (pre-miR sequences contain at least one predicted transcription factor binding site motif that is conserved across human, mouse and rat, and this rises to over 75% if one excludes primate-specific pre-miRs. The association is robust and has extremely strong statistical significance; it affects both intergenic and intronic pre-miRs and both isolated and clustered microRNA genes. We also confirmed and extended this finding using a separate analysis that examined all human pre-miR sequences regardless of conservation across species. Conclusions The transcription factor binding sites localized within small hairpin microRNA precursor sequences may possibly regulate their transcription. Transcription factors may also possibly bind directly to nascent primary microRNA gene transcripts or small hairpin microRNA precursors and regulate their processing. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Guillaume Bourque (nominated by Jerzy Jurka, Dmitri Pervouchine (nominated by Mikhail Gelfand, and Yuriy Gusev.

  8. Imputation for transcription factor binding predictions based on deep learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Qian

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the cell-specific binding patterns of transcription factors (TFs) is fundamental to studying gene regulatory networks in biological systems, for which ChIP-seq not only provides valuable data but is also considered as the gold standard. Despite tremendous efforts from the scientific community to conduct TF ChIP-seq experiments, the available data represent only a limited percentage of ChIP-seq experiments, considering all possible combinations of TFs and cell lines. In this study, we demonstrate a method for accurately predicting cell-specific TF binding for TF-cell line combinations based on only a small fraction (4%) of the combinations using available ChIP-seq data. The proposed model, termed TFImpute, is based on a deep neural network with a multi-task learning setting to borrow information across transcription factors and cell lines. Compared with existing methods, TFImpute achieves comparable accuracy on TF-cell line combinations with ChIP-seq data; moreover, TFImpute achieves better accuracy on TF-cell line combinations without ChIP-seq data. This approach can predict cell line specific enhancer activities in K562 and HepG2 cell lines, as measured by massively parallel reporter assays, and predicts the impact of SNPs on TF binding. PMID:28234893

  9. Understanding variation in transcription factor binding by modeling transcription factor genome-epigenome interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chieh-Chun Chen

    Full Text Available Despite explosive growth in genomic datasets, the methods for studying epigenomic mechanisms of gene regulation remain primitive. Here we present a model-based approach to systematically analyze the epigenomic functions in modulating transcription factor-DNA binding. Based on the first principles of statistical mechanics, this model considers the interactions between epigenomic modifications and a cis-regulatory module, which contains multiple binding sites arranged in any configurations. We compiled a comprehensive epigenomic dataset in mouse embryonic stem (mES cells, including DNA methylation (MeDIP-seq and MRE-seq, DNA hydroxymethylation (5-hmC-seq, and histone modifications (ChIP-seq. We discovered correlations of transcription factors (TFs for specific combinations of epigenomic modifications, which we term epigenomic motifs. Epigenomic motifs explained why some TFs appeared to have different DNA binding motifs derived from in vivo (ChIP-seq and in vitro experiments. Theoretical analyses suggested that the epigenome can modulate transcriptional noise and boost the cooperativity of weak TF binding sites. ChIP-seq data suggested that epigenomic boost of binding affinities in weak TF binding sites can function in mES cells. We showed in theory that the epigenome should suppress the TF binding differences on SNP-containing binding sites in two people. Using personal data, we identified strong associations between H3K4me2/H3K9ac and the degree of personal differences in NFκB binding in SNP-containing binding sites, which may explain why some SNPs introduce much smaller personal variations on TF binding than other SNPs. In summary, this model presents a powerful approach to analyze the functions of epigenomic modifications. This model was implemented into an open source program APEG (Affinity Prediction by Epigenome and Genome, http://systemsbio.ucsd.edu/apeg.

  10. Understanding variation in transcription factor binding by modeling transcription factor genome-epigenome interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chieh-Chun; Xiao, Shu; Xie, Dan; Cao, Xiaoyi; Song, Chun-Xiao; Wang, Ting; He, Chuan; Zhong, Sheng

    2013-01-01

    Despite explosive growth in genomic datasets, the methods for studying epigenomic mechanisms of gene regulation remain primitive. Here we present a model-based approach to systematically analyze the epigenomic functions in modulating transcription factor-DNA binding. Based on the first principles of statistical mechanics, this model considers the interactions between epigenomic modifications and a cis-regulatory module, which contains multiple binding sites arranged in any configurations. We compiled a comprehensive epigenomic dataset in mouse embryonic stem (mES) cells, including DNA methylation (MeDIP-seq and MRE-seq), DNA hydroxymethylation (5-hmC-seq), and histone modifications (ChIP-seq). We discovered correlations of transcription factors (TFs) for specific combinations of epigenomic modifications, which we term epigenomic motifs. Epigenomic motifs explained why some TFs appeared to have different DNA binding motifs derived from in vivo (ChIP-seq) and in vitro experiments. Theoretical analyses suggested that the epigenome can modulate transcriptional noise and boost the cooperativity of weak TF binding sites. ChIP-seq data suggested that epigenomic boost of binding affinities in weak TF binding sites can function in mES cells. We showed in theory that the epigenome should suppress the TF binding differences on SNP-containing binding sites in two people. Using personal data, we identified strong associations between H3K4me2/H3K9ac and the degree of personal differences in NFκB binding in SNP-containing binding sites, which may explain why some SNPs introduce much smaller personal variations on TF binding than other SNPs. In summary, this model presents a powerful approach to analyze the functions of epigenomic modifications. This model was implemented into an open source program APEG (Affinity Prediction by Epigenome and Genome, http://systemsbio.ucsd.edu/apeg).

  11. LASAGNA: A novel algorithm for transcription factor binding site alignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Scientists routinely scan DNA sequences for transcription factor (TF) binding sites (TFBSs). Most of the available tools rely on position-specific scoring matrices (PSSMs) constructed from aligned binding sites. Because of the resolutions of assays used to obtain TFBSs, databases such as TRANSFAC, ORegAnno and PAZAR store unaligned variable-length DNA segments containing binding sites of a TF. These DNA segments need to be aligned to build a PSSM. While the TRANSFAC database provides scoring matrices for TFs, nearly 78% of the TFs in the public release do not have matrices available. As work on TFBS alignment algorithms has been limited, it is highly desirable to have an alignment algorithm tailored to TFBSs. Results We designed a novel algorithm named LASAGNA, which is aware of the lengths of input TFBSs and utilizes position dependence. Results on 189 TFs of 5 species in the TRANSFAC database showed that our method significantly outperformed ClustalW2 and MEME. We further compared a PSSM method dependent on LASAGNA to an alignment-free TFBS search method. Results on 89 TFs whose binding sites can be located in genomes showed that our method is significantly more precise at fixed recall rates. Finally, we described LASAGNA-ChIP, a more sophisticated version for ChIP (Chromatin immunoprecipitation) experiments. Under the one-per-sequence model, it showed comparable performance with MEME in discovering motifs in ChIP-seq peak sequences. Conclusions We conclude that the LASAGNA algorithm is simple and effective in aligning variable-length binding sites. It has been integrated into a user-friendly webtool for TFBS search and visualization called LASAGNA-Search. The tool currently stores precomputed PSSM models for 189 TFs and 133 TFs built from TFBSs in the TRANSFAC Public database (release 7.0) and the ORegAnno database (08Nov10 dump), respectively. The webtool is available at http://biogrid.engr.uconn.edu/lasagna_search/. PMID:23522376

  12. Insulin-like growth factor binding proteins 4-6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, Leon A

    2015-10-01

    Insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs) 4-6 have important roles as modulators of IGF actions. IGFBP-4 and IGFBP-6 predominantly inhibit IGF actions, whereas IGFBP-5 may enhance these actions under some circumstances. IGFBP-6 is unique among the IGFBPs for its marked IGF-II binding preference. IGFBPs 4-6 are found in the circulation as binary complexes with IGFs that can enter tissues. Additionally, about half of the circulating IGFBP-5 is found in ternary complexes with IGFs and an acid labile subunit; this high molecular complex cannot leave the circulation and acts as an IGF reservoir. IGFBPs 4-6 also have IGF-independent actions. These IGFBPs are regulated in a cell-specific manner and their dysregulation may play a role in a range of diseases including cancer. However, there is no clear clinical indication for measuring serum levels of these IGFBPs at present. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Characterization of Binding Sites of Eukaryotic Transcription Factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiang Qian; Jimmy Lin; Donald J. Zack

    2006-01-01

    To explore the nature of eukaryotic transcription factor (TF) binding sites and determine how they differ from surrounding DNA sequences, we examined four features associated with DNA binding sites: G+C content, pattern complexity,palindromic structure, and Markov sequence ordering. Our analysis of the regulatory motifs obtained from the TRANSFAC database, using yeast intergenic sequences as background, revealed that these four features show variable enrichment in motif sequences. For example, motif sequences were more likely to have palindromic structure than were background sequences. In addition, these features were tightly localized to the regulatory motifs, indicating that they are a property of the motif sequences themselves and are not shared by the general promoter "environment" in which the regulatory motifs reside. By breaking down the motif sequences according to the TF classes to which they bind, more specific associations were identified. Finally, we found that some correlations, such as G+C content enrichment, were species-specific, while others, such as complexity enrichment, were universal across the species examined. The quantitative analysis provided here should increase our understanding of protein-DNA interactions and also help facilitate the discovery of regulatory motifs through bioinformatics.

  14. PhyloScan: identification of transcription factor binding sites using cross-species evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Newberg Lee A

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background When transcription factor binding sites are known for a particular transcription factor, it is possible to construct a motif model that can be used to scan sequences for additional sites. However, few statistically significant sites are revealed when a transcription factor binding site motif model is used to scan a genome-scale database. Methods We have developed a scanning algorithm, PhyloScan, which combines evidence from matching sites found in orthologous data from several related species with evidence from multiple sites within an intergenic region, to better detect regulons. The orthologous sequence data may be multiply aligned, unaligned, or a combination of aligned and unaligned. In aligned data, PhyloScan statistically accounts for the phylogenetic dependence of the species contributing data to the alignment and, in unaligned data, the evidence for sites is combined assuming phylogenetic independence of the species. The statistical significance of the gene predictions is calculated directly, without employing training sets. Results In a test of our methodology on synthetic data modeled on seven Enterobacteriales, four Vibrionales, and three Pasteurellales species, PhyloScan produces better sensitivity and specificity than MONKEY, an advanced scanning approach that also searches a genome for transcription factor binding sites using phylogenetic information. The application of the algorithm to real sequence data from seven Enterobacteriales species identifies novel Crp and PurR transcription factor binding sites, thus providing several new potential sites for these transcription factors. These sites enable targeted experimental validation and thus further delineation of the Crp and PurR regulons in E. coli. Conclusion Better sensitivity and specificity can be achieved through a combination of (1 using mixed alignable and non-alignable sequence data and (2 combining evidence from multiple sites within an intergenic

  15. Cryptic DNA-binding domain in the C terminus of RNA polymerase II general transcription factor RAP30.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, S; Garrett, K P; Conaway, R C; Conaway, J W

    1994-10-11

    The C terminus of mammalian transcription factor RAP30 has been found to be a cryptic DNA-binding domain strikingly similar to the C-terminal DNA-binding domain present in conserved region 4 of members of the sigma 70 family of bacterial sigma factors. This RAP30 domain shares strongest sequence similarity with the DNA-binding domain present in region 4 of Bacillus subtilis sporulation-specific sigma K. Like the region 4 DNA-binding activity of Escherichia coli sigma 70, the RAP30 C-terminal DNA binding activity is masked in intact RAP30 but is readily detectable when the RAP30 C terminus is expressed as a fusion protein. Consistent with a role for RAP30 DNA-binding activity in transcription, mutations that abolish DNA binding also abolish transcription. Therefore, RAP30 may function at least in part through the action of an evolutionarily ancient DNA-binding domain that first appeared prior to the divergence of bacteria and eukaryotes.

  16. A Common Structural Motif in the Binding of Virulence Factors to Bacterial Secretion Chaperones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lilic,M.; Vujanac, M.; Stebbins, C.

    2006-01-01

    Salmonella invasion protein A (SipA) is translocated into host cells by a type III secretion system (T3SS) and comprises two regions: one domain binds its cognate type III secretion chaperone, InvB, in the bacterium to facilitate translocation, while a second domain functions in the host cell, contributing to bacterial uptake by polymerizing actin. We present here the crystal structures of the SipA chaperone binding domain (CBD) alone and in complex with InvB. The SipA CBD is found to consist of a nonglobular polypeptide as well as a large globular domain, both of which are necessary for binding to InvB. We also identify a structural motif that may direct virulence factors to their cognate chaperones in a diverse range of pathogenic bacteria. Disruption of this structural motif leads to a destabilization of several chaperone-substrate complexes from different species, as well as an impairment of secretion in Salmonella.

  17. Molecular cloning of rhamnose-binding lectin gene and its promoter region from snakehead Channa argus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, W Z; Shang, N; Guo, Q L

    2010-09-01

    Lectins are sugar-binding proteins that mediate pathogen recognition and cell-cell interactions. A rhamnose-binding lectin (RBL) gene and its promoter region have been cloned and characterized from snakehead Channa argus. From the transcription initiation site, snakehead rhamnose-binding lectin (SHL) gene extends 2,382 bp to the end of the 3' untranslated region (UTR), and contains nine exons and eight introns. The open reading frame (ORF) of the SHL transcript has 675 bp which encodes 224 amino acids. The molecular structure of SHL is composed of two tandem repeat carbohydrate recognition domains (CRD) with 35% internal identity. Analysis of the gene organization of SHL indicates that the ancestral gene of RBL may diverge and evolve by exon shuffling and gene duplication, producing new forms to play their own roles in various organisms. The characteristics of SHL gene 5' flanking region are the presence of consensus nuclear factor of interleukin 6 (NF-IL6) and IFN-gamma activation (GAS) sites. The results provide indirect evidence that up-regulation of SHL expression may be induced in response to inflammatory stimuli, such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS), interleukin 6 (IL-6), and interferon gamma (IFN-gamma). The transcript of SHL mRNA was expressed in the head kidney, posterior kidney, spleen, liver, intestine, heart, muscle, and ovary. No tissue-specific expressive pattern is different from reported STLs, WCLs, and PFLs, suggesting that different types of RBLs exist in species-specific fish that have evolved and adapted to their surroundings.

  18. A simple method for eliminating fixed-region interference of aptamer binding during SELEX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouellet, Eric; Lagally, Eric T; Cheung, Karen C; Haynes, Charles A

    2014-11-01

    Standard libraries for systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) typically utilize flanking regions that facilitate amplification of aptamers recovered from each selection round. Here, we show that these flanking sequences can bias the selection process, due in part to their ability to interfere with the fold or function of aptamers localized within the random region of the library sequence. We then address this problem by investigating the use of complementary oligonucleotides as a means to block aptamer interference by each flanking region. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) studies are combined with fold predictions to both define the various interference mechanisms and assess the ability of added complementary oligonucleotides to ameliorate them. The proposed blocking strategy is thereby refined and then applied to standard library forms of benchmark aptamers against human α-thrombin, streptavidin, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). In each case, ITC data show that the new method effectively removes fixed-region mediated interference effects so that the natural binding affinity of the benchmark aptamer is completely restored. We further show that the binding affinities of properly functioning aptamers within a selection library are not affected by the blocking protocol, and that the method can be applied to various common library formats comprised of different flanking region sequences. Finally, we present a rapid and inexpensive qPCR-based method for determining the mean binding affinity of retained aptamer pools and use it to show that introduction of the pre-blocking method into the standard SELEX protocol results in retention of high-affinity aptamers that would otherwise be lost during the first round of selection. Significant enrichment of the available pool of high-affinity aptamers is thereby achieved in the first few rounds of selection. By eliminating single-strand (aptamer-like) structures within or involving

  19. The genome landscape of ER{alpha}- and ER{beta}-binding DNA regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Yawen; Gao, Hui; Marstrand, Troels Torben

    2008-01-01

    In this article, we have applied the ChIP-on-chip approach to pursue a large scale identification of ERalpha- and ERbeta-binding DNA regions in intact chromatin. We show that there is a high degree of overlap between the regions identified as bound by ERalpha and ERbeta, respectively, but there a......In this article, we have applied the ChIP-on-chip approach to pursue a large scale identification of ERalpha- and ERbeta-binding DNA regions in intact chromatin. We show that there is a high degree of overlap between the regions identified as bound by ERalpha and ERbeta, respectively...... with regions that are bound by ERbeta. ERbeta-bound regions are, as a group, located more closely to transcription start sites. ERalpha- and ERbeta-bound regions differ in sequence properties, with ERalpha-bound regions having an overrepresentation of TA-rich motifs including forkhead binding sites and ERbeta...

  20. Clumping factor A, von Willebrand factor-binding protein and von Willebrand factor anchor Staphylococcus aureus to the vessel wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claes, J; Liesenborghs, L; Peetermans, M; Veloso, T R; Missiakas, D; Schneewind, O; Mancini, S; Entenza, J M; Hoylaerts, M F; Heying, R; Verhamme, P; Vanassche, T

    2017-02-09

    Essentials Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) binds to endothelium via von Willebrand factor (VWF). Secreted VWF-binding protein (vWbp) mediates S. aureus adhesion to VWF under shear stress. vWbp interacts with VWF and the Sortase A-dependent surface protein Clumping factor A (ClfA). VWF-vWbp-ClfA anchor S. aureus to vascular endothelium under shear stress.

  1. Modulated Binding of SATB1, a Matrix Attachment Region Protein, to the AT-Rich Sequence Flanking the Major Breakpoint Region of BCL2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnan, Meera; Liu, Wen-Man; DiCroce, Patricia A.; Posner, Aleza; Zheng, Jian; Kohwi-Shigematsu, Terumi; Krontiris, Theodore G.

    2000-01-01

    The t(14,18) chromosomal translocation that occurs in human follicular lymphoma constitutively activates the BCL2 gene and disrupts control of apoptosis. Interestingly, 70% of the t(14,18) translocations are confined to three 15-bp clusters positioned within a 150-bp region (major breakpoint region or [MBR]) in the untranslated portion of terminal exon 3. We analyzed DNA-protein interactions in the MBR, as these may play some role in targeting the translocation to this region. An 87-bp segment (87MBR) immediately 3′ to breakpoint cluster 3 was essential for DNA-protein interaction monitored with mobility shift assays. We further delineated a core binding region within 87MBR: a 33-bp, very AT-rich sequence highly conserved between the human and mouse BCL2 gene (37MBR). We have purified and identified one of the core factors as the matrix attachment region (MAR) binding protein, SATB1, which is known to bind to AT-rich sequences with a high propensity to unwind. Additional factors in nuclear extracts, which we have not yet characterized further, increased SATB1 affinity for the 37MBR target four- to fivefold. Specific binding activity within 37MBR displayed cell cycle regulation in Jurkat T cells, while levels of SATB1 remained constant throughout the cell cycle. Finally, we demonstrated in vivo binding of SATB1 to the MBR, strongly suggesting the BCL2 major breakpoint region is a MAR. We discuss the potential consequences of our observations for both MBR fragility and regulatory function. PMID:10629043

  2. Effect of positional dependence and alignment strategy on modeling transcription factor binding sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quader Saad

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many consensus-based and Position Weight Matrix-based methods for recognizing transcription factor binding sites (TFBS are not well suited to the variability in the lengths of binding sites. Besides, many methods discard known binding sites while building the model. Moreover, the impact of Information Content (IC and the positional dependence of nucleotides within an aligned set of TFBS has not been well researched for modeling variable-length binding sites. In this paper, we propose ML-Consensus (Mixed-Length Consensus: a consensus model for variable-length TFBS which does not exclude any reported binding sites. Methods We consider Pairwise Score (PS as a measure of positional dependence of nucleotides within an alignment of TFBS. We investigate how the prediction accuracy of ML-Consensus is affected by the incorporation of IC and PS with a particular binding site alignment strategy. We perform cross-validations for datasets of six species from the TRANSFAC public database, and analyze the results using ROC curves and the Wilcoxon matched-pair signed-ranks test. Results We observe that the incorporation of IC and PS in ML-Consensus results in statistically significant improvement in the prediction accuracy of the model. Moreover, the existence of a core region among the known binding sites (of any length is witnessed by the pairwise coexistence of nucleotides within the core length. Conclusions These observations suggest the possibility of an efficient multiple sequence alignment algorithm for aligning TFBS, accommodating known binding sites of any length, for optimal (or near-optimal TFBS prediction. However, designing such an algorithm is a matter of further investigation.

  3. Heterogeneity in rhesus macaque complement factor H binding to meningococcal factor H binding protein (FHbp) informs selection of primates to assess immunogenicity of FHbp-based vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beernink, Peter T; Shaughnessy, Jutamas; Stefek, Heather; Ram, Sanjay; Granoff, Dan M

    2014-11-01

    Neisseria meningitidis causes disease only in humans. An important mechanism underlying this host specificity is the ability of the organism to resist complement by recruiting the complement downregulator factor H (FH) to the bacterial surface. In previous studies, binding of FH to one of the major meningococcal FH ligands, factor H binding protein (FHbp), was reported to be specific for human FH. Here we report that sera from 23 of 73 rhesus macaques (32%) tested had high FH binding to FHbp. Similar to human FH, binding of macaque FH to the meningococcal cell surface inhibited the complement alternative pathway by decreasing deposition of C3b. FH contains 20 domains (or short consensus repeats), with domains 6 and 7 being responsible for binding of human FH to FHbp. DNA sequence analyses of FH domains 6 and 7 from macaques with high or low FH binding showed a polymorphism at residue 352 in domain 6, with Tyr being associated with high binding and His with low binding. A recombinant macaque FH 6,7/Fc fragment with Tyr352 showed higher binding to FHbp than the corresponding fragment with His352. In previous studies in human FH transgenic mice, binding of FH to FHbp vaccines decreased protective antibody responses, and mutant FHbp vaccines with decreased FH binding elicited serum antibodies with greater protective activity. Thus, macaques with high FH binding to FHbp represent an attractive nonhuman primate model to investigate further the effects of FH binding on the immunogenicity of FHbp vaccines.

  4. Allelic mutations in noncoding genomic sequences construct novel transcription factor binding sites that promote gene overexpression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Erming; Børset, Magne; Sawyer, Jeffrey R; Brede, Gaute; Våtsveen, Thea K; Hov, Håkon; Waage, Anders; Barlogie, Bart; Shaughnessy, John D; Epstein, Joshua; Sundan, Anders

    2015-11-01

    The growth and survival factor hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is expressed at high levels in multiple myeloma (MM) cells. We report here that elevated HGF transcription in MM was traced to DNA mutations in the promoter alleles of HGF. Sequence analysis revealed a previously undiscovered single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and crucial single-nucleotide variants (SNVs) in the promoters of myeloma cells that produce large amounts of HGF. The allele-specific mutations functionally reassembled wild-type sequences into the motifs that affiliate with endogenous transcription factors NFKB (nuclear factor kappa-B), MZF1 (myeloid zinc finger 1), and NRF-2 (nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2). In vitro, a mutant allele that gained novel NFKB-binding sites directly responded to transcriptional signaling induced by tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) to promote high levels of luciferase reporter. Given the recent discovery by genome-wide sequencing (GWS) of numerous non-coding mutations in myeloma genomes, our data provide evidence that heterogeneous SNVs in the gene regulatory regions may frequently transform wild-type alleles into novel transcription factor binding properties to aberrantly interact with dysregulated transcriptional signals in MM and other cancer cells.

  5. Prediction of nucleosome positioning based on transcription factor binding sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianfu Yi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The DNA of all eukaryotic organisms is packaged into nucleosomes, the basic repeating units of chromatin. The nucleosome consists of a histone octamer around which a DNA core is wrapped and the linker histone H1, which is associated with linker DNA. By altering the accessibility of DNA sequences, the nucleosome has profound effects on all DNA-dependent processes. Understanding the factors that influence nucleosome positioning is of great importance for the study of genomic control mechanisms. Transcription factors (TFs have been suggested to play a role in nucleosome positioning in vivo. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, the minimum redundancy maximum relevance (mRMR feature selection algorithm, the nearest neighbor algorithm (NNA, and the incremental feature selection (IFS method were used to identify the most important TFs that either favor or inhibit nucleosome positioning by analyzing the numbers of transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs in 53,021 nucleosomal DNA sequences and 50,299 linker DNA sequences. A total of nine important families of TFs were extracted from 35 families, and the overall prediction accuracy was 87.4% as evaluated by the jackknife cross-validation test. CONCLUSIONS: Our results are consistent with the notion that TFs are more likely to bind linker DNA sequences than the sequences in the nucleosomes. In addition, our results imply that there may be some TFs that are important for nucleosome positioning but that play an insignificant role in discriminating nucleosome-forming DNA sequences from nucleosome-inhibiting DNA sequences. The hypothesis that TFs play a role in nucleosome positioning is, thus, confirmed by the results of this study.

  6. A conformationally constrained peptidomimetic binds to the extracellular region of HER2 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banappagari, Sashikanth; Ronald, Sharon; Satyanarayanajois, Seetharama D

    2010-12-01

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) is a member of the human epidermal growth factor receptor kinases (other members include EGFR or HER1, HER3, and HER4) that are involved in signaling cascades for cell growth and differentiation. It is well established that HER2-mediated heterodimerization has important implications in cancer. Deregulation of signaling pathways and overexpression of HER2 is known to occur in cancer cells, indicating a role of HER2 in tumorigenesis. Therefore, blocking HER2-mediated signaling has potential therapeutic value. We have designed several peptidomimetics to inhibit HER2-mediated signaling for cell growth. One of the compounds (HERP5, Arg-beta Naph-Phe) exhibited antiproliferative activity with IC(50) values in the micromolar-to-nanomolar range in breast cancer cell lines. Binding of fluorescently labeled HERP5 to HER2 protein was evaluated by fluorescence assay, microscopy, and circular dichroism spectroscopy. Results indicated that HERP5 binds to the extracellular region of the HER2 protein. Structure of the peptidomimetic HERP5 was studied by NMR and molecular dynamics simulations. Based on these results a model was proposed for HER2-EGFR dimerization and possible blocking by HERP5 peptidomimetic using a protein-protein docking method.

  7. Heterogeneity in Rhesus Macaque Complement Factor H Binding to Meningococcal Factor H Binding Protein (FHbp) Informs Selection of Primates To Assess Immunogenicity of FHbp-Based Vaccines

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Neisseria meningitidis causes disease only in humans. An important mechanism underlying this host specificity is the ability of the organism to resist complement by recruiting the complement downregulator factor H (FH) to the bacterial surface. In previous studies, binding of FH to one of the major meningococcal FH ligands, factor H binding protein (FHbp), was reported to be specific for human FH. Here we report that sera from 23 of 73 rhesus macaques (32%) tested had high FH binding to FHbp....

  8. Effects of cytosine methylation on transcription factor binding sites

    KAUST Repository

    Medvedeva, Yulia A

    2014-03-26

    Background: DNA methylation in promoters is closely linked to downstream gene repression. However, whether DNA methylation is a cause or a consequence of gene repression remains an open question. If it is a cause, then DNA methylation may affect the affinity of transcription factors (TFs) for their binding sites (TFBSs). If it is a consequence, then gene repression caused by chromatin modification may be stabilized by DNA methylation. Until now, these two possibilities have been supported only by non-systematic evidence and they have not been tested on a wide range of TFs. An average promoter methylation is usually used in studies, whereas recent results suggested that methylation of individual cytosines can also be important.Results: We found that the methylation profiles of 16.6% of cytosines and the expression profiles of neighboring transcriptional start sites (TSSs) were significantly negatively correlated. We called the CpGs corresponding to such cytosines " traffic lights" We observed a strong selection against CpG " traffic lights" within TFBSs. The negative selection was stronger for transcriptional repressors as compared with transcriptional activators or multifunctional TFs as well as for core TFBS positions as compared with flanking TFBS positions.Conclusions: Our results indicate that direct and selective methylation of certain TFBS that prevents TF binding is restricted to special cases and cannot be considered as a general regulatory mechanism of transcription. 2013 Medvedeva et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  9. Role of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF)-neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) interactions in induction of neurite outgrowth and identification of a binding site for NCAM in the heel region of GDNF

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Janne; Gotfryd, Kamil; Li, Shizhong

    2009-01-01

    The formation of appropriate neuronal circuits is an essential part of nervous system development and relies heavily on the outgrowth of axons and dendrites and their guidance to their respective targets. This process is governed by a large array of molecules, including glial cell line......-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) and the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM), the interaction of which induce neurite outgrowth. In the present study the requirements for NCAM-mediated GDNF-induced neurite outgrowth were investigated in cultures of hippocampal neurons, which do not express Ret. We demonstrate...

  10. Trigger Factor Binds to Ribosome-Signal-Recognition Particle (SRP) Complexes and Is Excluded by Binding of the SRP Receptor

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Iwona Buskiewicz; Elke Deuerling; Shan-Qing Gu; Johannes Jöckel; Marina V. Rodnina; Bernd Bukau; Wolfgang Wintermeyer; Thomas A. Steitz

    2004-01-01

    Trigger factor (TF) and signal recognition particle (SRP) bind to the bacterial ribosome and are both crosslinked to protein L23 at the peptide exit, where they interact with emerging nascent peptide chains...

  11. MONKEY: Identifying conserved transcription-factor binding sitesin multiple alignments using a binding site-specific evolutionarymodel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moses, Alan M.; Chiang, Derek Y.; Pollard, Daniel A.; Iyer, VenkyN.; Eisen, Michael B.

    2004-10-28

    We introduce a method (MONKEY) to identify conserved transcription-factor binding sites in multispecies alignments. MONKEY employs probabilistic models of factor specificity and binding site evolution, on which basis we compute the likelihood that putative sites are conserved and assign statistical significance to each hit. Using genomes from the genus Saccharomyces, we illustrate how the significance of real sites increases with evolutionary distance and explore the relationship between conservation and function.

  12. The constant region affects antigen binding of antibodies to DNA by altering secondary structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yumin; Janda, Alena; Eryilmaz, Ertan; Casadevall, Arturo; Putterman, Chaim

    2013-11-01

    We previously demonstrated an important role of the constant region in the pathogenicity of anti-DNA antibodies. To determine the mechanisms by which the constant region affects autoantibody binding, a panel of isotype-switch variants (IgG1, IgG2a, IgG2b) was generated from the murine PL9-11 IgG3 autoantibody. The affinity of the PL9-11 antibody panel for histone was measured by surface plasmon resonance (SPR). Tryptophan fluorescence was used to determine wavelength shifts of the antibody panel upon binding to DNA and histone. Finally, circular dichroism spectroscopy was used to measure changes in secondary structure. SPR analysis revealed significant differences in histone binding affinity between members of the PL9-11 panel. The wavelength shifts of tryptophan fluorescence emission were found to be dependent on the antibody isotype, while circular dichroism analysis determined that changes in antibody secondary structure content differed between isotypes upon antigen binding. Thus, the antigen binding affinity is dependent on the particular constant region expressed. Moreover, the effects of antibody binding to antigen were also constant region dependent. Alteration of secondary structures influenced by constant regions may explain differences in fine specificity of anti-DNA antibodies between antibodies with similar variable regions, as well as cross-reactivity of anti-DNA antibodies with non-DNA antigens.

  13. Number of active transcription factor binding sites is essential for the Hes7 oscillator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Angelis Martin

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is commonly accepted that embryonic segmentation of vertebrates is regulated by a segmentation clock, which is induced by the cycling genes Hes1 and Hes7. Their products form dimers that bind to the regulatory regions and thereby repress the transcription of their own encoding genes. An increase of the half-life of Hes7 protein causes irregular somite formation. This was shown in recent experiments by Hirata et al. In the same work, numerical simulations from a delay differential equations model, originally invented by Lewis, gave additional support. For a longer half-life of the Hes7 protein, these simulations exhibited strongly damped oscillations with, after few periods, severely attenuated the amplitudes. In these simulations, the Hill coefficient, a crucial model parameter, was set to 2 indicating that Hes7 has only one binding site in its promoter. On the other hand, Bessho et al. established three regulatory elements in the promoter region. Results We show that – with the same half life – the delay system is highly sensitive to changes in the Hill coefficient. A small increase changes the qualitative behaviour of the solutions drastically. There is sustained oscillation and hence the model can no longer explain the disruption of the segmentation clock. On the other hand, the Hill coefficient is correlated with the number of active binding sites, and with the way in which dimers bind to them. In this paper, we adopt response functions in order to estimate Hill coefficients for a variable number of active binding sites. It turns out that three active transcription factor binding sites increase the Hill coefficient by at least 20% as compared to one single active site. Conclusion Our findings lead to the following crucial dichotomy: either Hirata's model is correct for the Hes7 oscillator, in which case at most two binding sites are active in its promoter region; or at least three binding sites are active, in which

  14. The actinobacterial transcription factor RbpA binds to the principal sigma subunit of RNA polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabib-Salazar, Aline; Liu, Bing; Doughty, Philip; Lewis, Richard A; Ghosh, Somadri; Parsy, Marie-Laure; Simpson, Peter J; O'Dwyer, Kathleen; Matthews, Steve J; Paget, Mark S

    2013-06-01

    RbpA is a small non-DNA-binding transcription factor that associates with RNA polymerase holoenzyme and stimulates transcription in actinobacteria, including Streptomyces coelicolor and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. RbpA seems to show specificity for the vegetative form of RNA polymerase as opposed to alternative forms of the enzyme. Here, we explain the basis of this specificity by showing that RbpA binds directly to the principal σ subunit in these organisms, but not to more diverged alternative σ factors. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy revealed that, although differing in their requirement for structural zinc, the RbpA orthologues from S. coelicolor and M. tuberculosis share a common structural core domain, with extensive, apparently disordered, N- and C-terminal regions. The RbpA-σ interaction is mediated by the C-terminal region of RbpA and σ domain 2, and S. coelicolor RbpA mutants that are defective in binding σ are unable to stimulate transcription in vitro and are inactive in vivo. Given that RbpA is essential in M. tuberculosis and critical for growth in S. coelicolor, these data support a model in which RbpA plays a key role in the σ cycle in actinobacteria.

  15. High-throughput prediction of RNA, DNA and protein binding regions mediated by intrinsic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Zhenling; Kurgan, Lukasz

    2015-10-15

    Intrinsically disordered proteins and regions (IDPs and IDRs) lack stable 3D structure under physiological conditions in-vitro, are common in eukaryotes, and facilitate interactions with RNA, DNA and proteins. Current methods for prediction of IDPs and IDRs do not provide insights into their functions, except for a handful of methods that address predictions of protein-binding regions. We report first-of-its-kind computational method DisoRDPbind for high-throughput prediction of RNA, DNA and protein binding residues located in IDRs from protein sequences. DisoRDPbind is implemented using a runtime-efficient multi-layered design that utilizes information extracted from physiochemical properties of amino acids, sequence complexity, putative secondary structure and disorder and sequence alignment. Empirical tests demonstrate that it provides accurate predictions that are competitive with other predictors of disorder-mediated protein binding regions and complementary to the methods that predict RNA- and DNA-binding residues annotated based on crystal structures. Application in Homo sapiens, Mus musculus, Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster proteomes reveals that RNA- and DNA-binding proteins predicted by DisoRDPbind complement and overlap with the corresponding known binding proteins collected from several sources. Also, the number of the putative protein-binding regions predicted with DisoRDPbind correlates with the promiscuity of proteins in the corresponding protein-protein interaction networks. Webserver: http://biomine.ece.ualberta.ca/DisoRDPbind/.

  16. Reconstruction of adenovirus replication origins with a human nuclear factor I binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhya, S; Shneidman, P S; Hurwitz, J

    1986-03-05

    Nuclear factor I is a host-coded DNA-binding protein that stimulates initiation of adenovirus DNA replication. To understand the mechanism of action of nuclear factor I, we have constructed, by recombinant DNA techniques, origins of replication in which the adenovirus type 5 nuclear factor I binding site (FIB site) has been replaced by a FIB site isolated from human genomic DNA (Gronostajski, R. M., Nagata, K., and Hurwitz, J. (1984) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 81, 4013-4017). Assays of such recombinants for initiation and elongation in vitro showed that nuclear factor I was active only when the FIB site was relatively close to the DNA terminus, i.e. the FIB site was centered at nucleotides 30-36 from the end of the DNA. Nuclear factor I was active in either orientation within this distance range. The presence of one or two additional FIB sites in the downstream region had no effect. The implications of these results for the mechanism of nuclear factor I action are discussed.

  17. Factor XII binding to endothelial cells depends on caveolae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schousboe, Inger; Thomsen, Peter; van Deurs, Bo

    2004-01-01

    to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) has never been shown to be localized to these specialized membrane structures. Using microscopical techniques, we here report that FXII binds to specific patches of the HUVEC plasma membrane with a high density of caveolae. Further investigations of FXII...... lipid rafts. Accordingly, cholesterol-depleted cells were found to bind significantly reduced amounts of FXII. These observations, combined with the presence of a minority of u-PAR in caveolae concomitant with FXII binding, indicate that FXII binding to u-PAR may be secondary and depends upon...... the structural elements within caveolae. Thus, FXII binding to HUVEC depends on intact caveolae on the cellular surface....

  18. Identification and therapeutic potential of a vitronectin binding region of meningococcal msf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Darryl J; Griffiths, Natalie J; Borodina, Elena; Andreae, Clio A; Sessions, Richard B; Virji, Mumtaz

    2015-01-01

    The human pathogen Neisseria meningitides (Nm) attains serum resistance via a number of mechanisms, one of which involves binding to the host complement regulator protein vitronectin. We have shown previously that the Meningococcal surface fibril (Msf), a trimeric autotransporter, binds to the activated form of vitronectin (aVn) to increase Nm survival in human serum. In this study, we aimed to identify the aVn-binding region of Msf to assess its potential as an antigen which can elicit antibodies that block aVn binding and/or possess bactericidal properties. Using several recombinant Msf fragments spanning its surface-exposed region, the smallest aVn-binding recombinants were found to span residues 1-86 and 39-124. The use of further deletion constructs and overlapping recombinant Msf fragments suggested that a region of Msf comprising residues 39-82 may be primarily important for aVn binding and that other regions may also be involved but to a lesser extent. Molecular modelling implicated K66 and K68, conserved in all available Msf sequences, to be involved in the interaction. Recombinant fragments which bound to aVn were able to reduce the survival advantage conveyed by aVn-interaction in serum bactericidal assays. Antibodies raised against one such fragment inhibited aVn binding to Msf. In addition, the antibodies enhanced specific killing of Msf-expressing Nm in a dose-dependent manner. Overall, this study identifies an aVn-binding region of Msf, an adhesin known to impart serum resistance properties to the pathogen; and shows that this region of Msf can elicit antibodies with dual properties which reduce pathogen survival within the host and thus has potential as a vaccine antigen.

  19. Identification and therapeutic potential of a vitronectin binding region of meningococcal msf.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darryl J Hill

    Full Text Available The human pathogen Neisseria meningitides (Nm attains serum resistance via a number of mechanisms, one of which involves binding to the host complement regulator protein vitronectin. We have shown previously that the Meningococcal surface fibril (Msf, a trimeric autotransporter, binds to the activated form of vitronectin (aVn to increase Nm survival in human serum. In this study, we aimed to identify the aVn-binding region of Msf to assess its potential as an antigen which can elicit antibodies that block aVn binding and/or possess bactericidal properties. Using several recombinant Msf fragments spanning its surface-exposed region, the smallest aVn-binding recombinants were found to span residues 1-86 and 39-124. The use of further deletion constructs and overlapping recombinant Msf fragments suggested that a region of Msf comprising residues 39-82 may be primarily important for aVn binding and that other regions may also be involved but to a lesser extent. Molecular modelling implicated K66 and K68, conserved in all available Msf sequences, to be involved in the interaction. Recombinant fragments which bound to aVn were able to reduce the survival advantage conveyed by aVn-interaction in serum bactericidal assays. Antibodies raised against one such fragment inhibited aVn binding to Msf. In addition, the antibodies enhanced specific killing of Msf-expressing Nm in a dose-dependent manner. Overall, this study identifies an aVn-binding region of Msf, an adhesin known to impart serum resistance properties to the pathogen; and shows that this region of Msf can elicit antibodies with dual properties which reduce pathogen survival within the host and thus has potential as a vaccine antigen.

  20. Gains and Losses of Transcription Factor Binding Sites in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces paradoxus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefke, Bernhard; Wang, Tzi-Yuan; Wang, Chuen-Yi; Li, Wen-Hsiung

    2015-07-27

    Gene expression evolution occurs through changes in cis- or trans-regulatory elements or both. Interactions between transcription factors (TFs) and their binding sites (TFBSs) constitute one of the most important points where these two regulatory components intersect. In this study, we investigated the evolution of TFBSs in the promoter regions of different Saccharomyces strains and species. We divided the promoter of a gene into the proximal region and the distal region, which are defined, respectively, as the 200-bp region upstream of the transcription starting site and as the 200-bp region upstream of the proximal region. We found that the predicted TFBSs in the proximal promoter regions tend to be evolutionarily more conserved than those in the distal promoter regions. Additionally, Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains used in the fermentation of alcoholic drinks have experienced more TFBS losses than gains compared with strains from other environments (wild strains, laboratory strains, and clinical strains). We also showed that differences in TFBSs correlate with the cis component of gene expression evolution between species (comparing S. cerevisiae and its sister species Saccharomyces paradoxus) and within species (comparing two closely related S. cerevisiae strains).

  1. Oxidative stress effect on progesterone-induced blocking factor (PIBF) binding to PIBF-receptor in lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Haba, Carlos; Palacio, José R; Palkovics, Tamas; Szekeres-Barthó, Júlia; Morros, Antoni; Martínez, Paz

    2014-01-01

    Receptor-ligand binding is an essential interaction for biological function. Oxidative stress can modify receptors and/or membrane lipid dynamics, thus altering cell physiological functions. The aim of this study is to analyze how oxidative stress may alter receptor-ligand binding and lipid domain distribution in the case of progesterone-induced blocking factor/progesterone-induced blocking factor-receptor. For membrane fluidity regionalization analysis of MEC-1 lymphocytes, two-photon microscopy was used in individual living cells. Lymphocytes were also double stained with AlexaFluor647/progesterone-induced blocking factor and Laurdan to evaluate -induced blocking factor/progesterone-induced blocking factor-receptor distribution in the different membrane domains, under oxidative stress. A new procedure has been developed which quantitatively analyzes the regionalization of a membrane receptor among the lipid domains of different fluidity in the plasma membrane. We have been able to establish a new tool which detects and evaluates lipid raft clustering from two-photon microscopy images of individual living cells. We show that binding of progesterone-induced blocking factor to progesterone-induced blocking factor-receptor causes a rigidification of plasma membrane which is related to an increase of lipid raft clustering. However, this clustering is inhibited under oxidative stress conditions. In conclusion, oxidative stress decreases membrane fluidity, impairs receptor-ligand binding and reduces lipid raft clustering.

  2. DNA-binding mechanism of the Hippo pathway transcription factor TEAD4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Z; He, F; Chen, M; Hua, L; Wang, W; Jiao, S; Zhou, Z

    2017-07-27

    TEA domain (TEAD) family transcription factors are key regulators in development, tissue homeostasis and cancer progression. TEAD4 acts as a critical downstream effector of the evolutionarily conserved Hippo signaling pathway. The well-studied oncogenic protein YAP forms a complex with TEAD4 to regulate gene transcription; so does the tumor suppressor VGLL4. Although it is known that TEAD proteins can bind promoter regions of target genes through the TEA domain, the specific and detailed mechanism of DNA recognition by the TEA domain remains partially understood. Here, we report the crystal structure of TEAD4 TEA domain in complex with a muscle-CAT DNA element. The structure revealed extensive interactions between the TEA domain and the DNA duplex involving both the major and minor grooves of DNA helix. The DNA recognition helix, α3 helix, determines the specificity of the TEA domain binding to DNA sequence. Structure-guided biochemical analysis identified two major binding sites on the interface of the TEA domain-DNA complex. Mutation of TEAD4 at either site substantially decreases its occupancy on the promoter region of target genes, and largely impaired YAP-induced TEAD4 transactivation and target gene transcription, leading to inhibition of growth and colony formation of gastric cancer cell HGC-27. Collectively, our work provides a structural basis for understanding the regulatory mechanism of TEAD-mediated gene transcription.

  3. Chlamydial entry involves TARP binding of guanine nucleotide exchange factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Josh Lane

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Chlamydia trachomatis attachment to cells induces the secretion of the elementary body-associated protein TARP (Translocated Actin Recruiting Protein. TARP crosses the plasma membrane where it is immediately phosphorylated at tyrosine residues by unknown host kinases. The Rac GTPase is also activated, resulting in WAVE2 and Arp2/3-dependent recruitment of actin to the sites of chlamydia attachment. We show that TARP participates directly in chlamydial invasion activating the Rac-dependent signaling cascade to recruit actin. TARP functions by binding two distinct Rac guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs, Sos1 and Vav2, in a phosphotyrosine-dependent manner. The tyrosine phosphorylation profile of the sequence YEPISTENIYESI within TARP, as well as the transient activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-K, appears to determine which GEF is utilized to activate Rac. The first and second tyrosine residues, when phosphorylated, are utilized by the Sos1/Abi1/Eps8 and Vav2, respectively, with the latter requiring the lipid phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-triphosphate. Depletion of these critical signaling molecules by siRNA resulted in inhibition of chlamydial invasion to varying degrees, owing to a possible functional redundancy of the two pathways. Collectively, these data implicate TARP in signaling to the actin cytoskeleton remodeling machinery, demonstrating a mechanism by which C.trachomatis invades non-phagocytic cells.

  4. A family of insulin-like growth factor II mRNA-binding proteins represses translation in late development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, J; Christiansen, J; Lykke-Andersen, J;

    1999-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) is a major fetal growth factor. The IGF-II gene generates multiple mRNAs with different 5' untranslated regions (5' UTRs) that are translated in a differential manner during development. We have identified a human family of three IGF-II mRNA-binding proteins.......5 followed by a decline towards birth, and, similar to IGF-II, IMPs are especially expressed in developing epithelia, muscle, and placenta in both mouse and human embryos. The results imply that cytoplasmic 5' UTR-binding proteins control IGF-II biosynthesis during late mammalian development....

  5. Using RNase sequence specificity to refine the identification of RNA-protein binding regions

    OpenAIRE

    Wang Xinguo; Li Lang; Shen Changyu; Wang Guohua; Wang Xin; Mooney Sean D; Edenberg Howard J; Sanford Jeremy R; Liu Yunlong

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Massively parallel pyrosequencing is a high-throughput technology that can sequence hundreds of thousands of DNA/RNA fragments in a single experiment. Combining it with immunoprecipitation-based biochemical assays, such as cross-linking immunoprecipitation (CLIP), provides a genome-wide method to detect the sites at which proteins bind DNA or RNA. In a CLIP-pyrosequencing experiment, the resolutions of the detected protein binding regions are partially determined by the length of the...

  6. Characterization of transcriptional activation and DNA-binding functions in the hinge region of the vitamin D receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Paul L; McDonnell, Donald P; Gewirth, Daniel T

    2005-02-22

    The vitamin D receptor (VDR) is a ligand-responsive transcription factor that forms active, heterodimeric complexes with the 9-cis retinoic acid receptor (RXR) on vitamin D response elements (VDREs). Both proteins consist of an N-terminal DNA-binding domain, a C-terminal ligand-binding domain, and an intervening hinge region. The length requirements of the hinge for both transcriptional regulation and DNA binding have not been studied to date for any member of the steroid hormone superfamily. We have generated a series of internal deletion mutants of the VDR hinge and found that deletion of as few as five amino acids from the C-terminus of the hinge significantly reduces transcriptional activation in vivo. Replacing deleted residues in the C-terminus of the hinge with alanines restored activity, indicating that this section of the hinge acts as a sequence-independent spacer. The hinge region of VDR forms a long helix, and the geometric consequences of this structure may explain the requirement of the hinge region for transcriptional activity. Interestingly, all of the deletion mutants, even those that do not activate transcription, bind VDREs with equal and high affinity, indicating that the defect in these mutants is not their ability to bind VDREs. In contrast to VDR, constructs of RXR containing deletions of up to 14 amino acids in the hinge region exhibit near wild-type transcriptional activity. The ability to delete more of the RXR hinge may be related to the additional plasticity required by its role as the common heterodimer partner for nuclear receptors on differing DNA elements.

  7. Wide-scale analysis of human functional transcription factor binding reveals a strong bias towards the transcription start site.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuval Tabach

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Transcription factors (TF regulate expression by binding to specific DNA sequences. A binding event is functional when it affects gene expression. Functionality of a binding site is reflected in conservation of the binding sequence during evolution and in over represented binding in gene groups with coherent biological functions. Functionality is governed by several parameters such as the TF-DNA binding strength, distance of the binding site from the transcription start site (TSS, DNA packing, and more. Understanding how these parameters control functionality of different TFs in different biological contexts is a must for identifying functional TF binding sites and for understanding regulation of transcription. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We introduce a novel method to screen the promoters of a set of genes with shared biological function (obtained from the functional Gene Ontology (GO classification against a precompiled library of motifs, and find those motifs which are statistically over-represented in the gene set. More than 8,000 human (and 23,000 mouse genes, were assigned to one of 134 GO sets. Their promoters were searched (from 200 bp downstream to 1,000 bp upstream the TSS for 414 known DNA motifs. We optimized the sequence similarity score threshold, independently for every location window, taking into account nucleotide heterogeneity along the promoters of the target genes. The method, combined with binding sequence and location conservation between human and mouse, identifies with high probability functional binding sites for groups of functionally-related genes. We found many location-sensitive functional binding events and showed that they clustered close to the TSS. Our method and findings were tested experimentally. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We identified reliably functional TF binding sites. This is an essential step towards constructing regulatory networks. The promoter region proximal to the TSS is of central

  8. Factors Affecting the Binding of a Recombinant Heavy Metal-Binding Domain (CXXC motif Protein to Heavy Metals

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    Kamala Boonyodying

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A number of heavy metal-binding proteins have been used to study bioremediation. CXXC motif, a metal binding domain containing Cys-X-X-Cys motif, has been identified in various organisms. These proteins are capable of binding various types of heavy metals. In this study, heavy metal binding domain (CXXC motif recombinant protein encoded from mcsA gene of S. aureus were cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The factors involved in the metal-binding activity were determined in order to analyze the potential of recombinant protein for bioremediation. A recombinant protein can be bound to Cd2+, Co2+, Cu2+ and Zn2+. The thermal stability of a recombinant protein was tested, and the results showed that the metal binding activity to Cu2+ and Zn2+ still exist after treating the protein at 85ºC for 30 min. The temperature and pH that affected the metal binding activity was tested and the results showed that recombinant protein was still bound to Cu2+ at 65ºC, whereas a pH of 3-7 did not affect the metal binding E. coli harboring a pRset with a heavy metal-binding domain CXXC motif increased the resistance of heavy metals against CuCl2 and CdCl2. This study shows that metal binding domain (CXXC motif recombinant protein can be effectively bound to various types of heavy metals and may be used as a potential tool for studying bioremediation.

  9. Probabilistic inference of transcription factor binding from multiple data sources.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harri Lähdesmäki

    Full Text Available An important problem in molecular biology is to build a complete understanding of transcriptional regulatory processes in the cell. We have developed a flexible, probabilistic framework to predict TF binding from multiple data sources that differs from the standard hypothesis testing (scanning methods in several ways. Our probabilistic modeling framework estimates the probability of binding and, thus, naturally reflects our degree of belief in binding. Probabilistic modeling also allows for easy and systematic integration of our binding predictions into other probabilistic modeling methods, such as expression-based gene network inference. The method answers the question of whether the whole analyzed promoter has a binding site, but can also be extended to estimate the binding probability at each nucleotide position. Further, we introduce an extension to model combinatorial regulation by several TFs. Most importantly, the proposed methods can make principled probabilistic inference from multiple evidence sources, such as, multiple statistical models (motifs of the TFs, evolutionary conservation, regulatory potential, CpG islands, nucleosome positioning, DNase hypersensitive sites, ChIP-chip binding segments and other (prior sequence-based biological knowledge. We developed both a likelihood and a Bayesian method, where the latter is implemented with a Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm. Results on a carefully constructed test set from the mouse genome demonstrate that principled data fusion can significantly improve the performance of TF binding prediction methods. We also applied the probabilistic modeling framework to all promoters in the mouse genome and the results indicate a sparse connectivity between transcriptional regulators and their target promoters. To facilitate analysis of other sequences and additional data, we have developed an on-line web tool, ProbTF, which implements our probabilistic TF binding prediction method using multiple

  10. Assessment of algorithms for inferring positional weight matrix motifs of transcription factor binding sites using protein binding microarray data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaron Orenstein

    Full Text Available The new technology of protein binding microarrays (PBMs allows simultaneous measurement of the binding intensities of a transcription factor to tens of thousands of synthetic double-stranded DNA probes, covering all possible 10-mers. A key computational challenge is inferring the binding motif from these data. We present a systematic comparison of four methods developed specifically for reconstructing a binding site motif represented as a positional weight matrix from PBM data. The reconstructed motifs were evaluated in terms of three criteria: concordance with reference motifs from the literature and ability to predict in vivo and in vitro bindings. The evaluation encompassed over 200 transcription factors and some 300 assays. The results show a tradeoff between how the methods perform according to the different criteria, and a dichotomy of method types. Algorithms that construct motifs with low information content predict PBM probe ranking more faithfully, while methods that produce highly informative motifs match reference motifs better. Interestingly, in predicting high-affinity binding, all methods give far poorer results for in vivo assays compared to in vitro assays.

  11. Aging-induced changes in brain regional serotonin receptor binding: Effect of Carnosine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, S; Poddar, M K

    2016-04-05

    Monoamine neurotransmitter, serotonin (5-HT) has its own specific receptors in both pre- and post-synapse. In the present study the role of carnosine on aging-induced changes of [(3)H]-5-HT receptor binding in different brain regions in a rat model was studied. The results showed that during aging (18 and 24 months) the [(3)H]-5-HT receptor binding was reduced in hippocampus, hypothalamus and pons-medulla with a decrease in their both Bmax and KD but in cerebral cortex the [(3)H]-5-HT binding was increased with the increase of its only Bmax. The aging-induced changes in [(3)H]-5-HT receptor binding with carnosine (2.0 μg/kg/day, intrathecally, for 21 consecutive days) attenuated in (a) 24-month-aged rats irrespective of the brain regions with the attenuation of its Bmax except hypothalamus where both Bmax and KD were significantly attenuated, (b) hippocampus and hypothalamus of 18-month-aged rats with the attenuation of its Bmax, and restored toward the [(3)H]-5-HT receptor binding that observed in 4-month-young rats. The decrease in pons-medullary [(3)H]-5-HT binding including its Bmax of 18-month-aged rats was promoted with carnosine without any significant change in its cerebral cortex. The [(3)H]-5-HT receptor binding with the same dosages of carnosine in 4-month-young rats (a) increased in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus with the increase in their only Bmax whereas (b) decreased in hypothalamus and pons-medulla with a decrease in their both Bmax and KD. These results suggest that carnosine treatment may (a) play a preventive role in aging-induced brain region-specific changes in serotonergic activity (b) not be worthy in 4-month-young rats in relation to the brain regional serotonergic activity.

  12. The C-terminal region of laminin beta chains modulates the integrin binding affinities of laminins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Yukimasa; Ido, Hiroyuki; Sanzen, Noriko; Hayashi, Maria; Sato-Nishiuchi, Ryoko; Futaki, Sugiko; Sekiguchi, Kiyotoshi

    2009-03-20

    Laminins are major cell-adhesive proteins in basement membranes that are capable of binding to integrins. Laminins consist of three chains (alpha, beta, and gamma), in which three laminin globular modules in the alpha chain and the Glu residue in the C-terminal tail of the gamma chain have been shown to be prerequisites for binding to integrins. However, it remains unknown whether any part of the beta chain is involved in laminin-integrin interactions. We compared the binding affinities of pairs of laminin isoforms containing the beta1 or beta2 chain toward a panel of laminin-binding integrins, and we found that beta2 chain-containing laminins (beta2-laminins) bound more avidly to alpha3beta1 and alpha7X2beta1 integrins than beta1 chain-containing laminins (beta1-laminins), whereas alpha6beta1, alpha6beta4, and alpha7X1beta1 integrins did not show any preference toward beta2-laminins. Because alpha3beta1 contains the "X2-type" variable region in the alpha3 subunit and alpha6beta1 and alpha6beta4 contain the "X1-type" region in the alpha6 subunit, we hypothesized that only integrins containing the X2-type region were capable of discriminating between beta1-laminins and beta2-laminins. In support of this possibility, a putative X2-type variant of alpha6beta1 was produced and found to bind preferentially to beta2-laminins. Production of a series of swap mutants between the beta1 and beta2 chains revealed that the C-terminal 20 amino acids in the coiled-coil domain were responsible for the enhanced integrin binding by beta2-laminins. Taken together, the results provide evidence that the C-terminal region of beta chains is involved in laminin recognition by integrins and modulates the binding affinities of laminins toward X2-type integrins.

  13. Transcriptome Profiling of Pediatric Core Binding Factor AML.

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    Chih-Hao Hsu

    Full Text Available The t(8;21 and Inv(16 translocations disrupt the normal function of core binding factors alpha (CBFA and beta (CBFB, respectively. These translocations represent two of the most common genomic abnormalities in acute myeloid leukemia (AML patients, occurring in approximately 25% pediatric and 15% of adult with this malignancy. Both translocations are associated with favorable clinical outcomes after intensive chemotherapy, and given the perceived mechanistic similarities, patients with these translocations are frequently referred to as having CBF-AML. It remains uncertain as to whether, collectively, these translocations are mechanistically the same or impact different pathways in subtle ways that have both biological and clinical significance. Therefore, we used transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq to investigate the similarities and differences in genes and pathways between these subtypes of pediatric AMLs. Diagnostic RNA from patients with t(8;21 (N = 17, Inv(16 (N = 14, and normal karyotype (NK, N = 33 were subjected to RNA-seq. Analyses compared the transcriptomes across these three cytogenetic subtypes, using the NK cohort as the control. A total of 1291 genes in t(8;21 and 474 genes in Inv(16 were differentially expressed relative to the NK controls, with 198 genes differentially expressed in both subtypes. The majority of these genes (175/198; binomial test p-value < 10(-30 are consistent in expression changes among the two subtypes suggesting the expression profiles are more similar between the CBF cohorts than in the NK cohort. Our analysis also revealed alternative splicing events (ASEs differentially expressed across subtypes, with 337 t(8;21-specific and 407 Inv(16-specific ASEs detected, the majority of which were acetylated proteins (p = 1.5 x 10(-51 and p = 1.8 x 10(-54 for the two subsets. In addition to known fusions, we identified and verified 16 de novo fusions in 43 patients, including three fusions involving NUP98 in six

  14. Promiscuous stimulation of ParF protein polymerization by heterogeneous centromere binding factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machón, Cristina; Fothergill, Timothy J G; Barillà, Daniela; Hayes, Finbarr

    2007-11-16

    The segrosome is the nucleoprotein complex that mediates accurate segregation of bacterial plasmids. The segrosome of plasmid TP228 comprises ParF and ParG proteins that assemble on the parH centromere. ParF, which exemplifies one clade of the ubiquitous ParA superfamily of segregation proteins, polymerizes extensively in response to ATP binding. Polymerization is modulated by the ParG centromere binding factor (CBF). The segrosomes of plasmids pTAR, pVT745 and pB171 include ParA homologues of the ParF subgroup, as well as diverse homodimeric CBFs with no primary sequence similarity to ParG, or each other. Centromere binding by these analogues is largely specific. Here, we establish that the ParF homologues of pTAR and pB171 filament modestly with ATP, and that nucleotide hydrolysis is not required for this polymerization, which is more prodigious when the cognate CBF is also present. By contrast, the ParF homologue of plasmid pVT745 did not respond appreciably to ATP alone, but polymerized extensively in the presence of both its cognate CBF and ATP. The co-factors also stimulated nucleotide-independent polymerization of cognate ParF proteins. Moreover, apart from the CBF of pTAR, the disparate ParG analogues promoted polymerization of non-cognate ParF proteins suggesting that filamentation of the ParF proteins is enhanced by a common mechanism. Like ParG, the co-factors may be modular, possessing a centromere-specific interaction domain linked to a flexible region containing determinants that promiscuously stimulate ParF polymerization. The CBFs appear to function as bacterial analogues of formins, microtubule-associated proteins or related ancillary factors that regulate eucaryotic cytoskeletal dynamics.

  15. Predicting Polymerase Ⅱ Core Promoters by Cooperating Transcription Factor Binding Sites in Eukaryotic Genes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Tu MA; Min-Ping QIAN; Hai-Xu TANG

    2004-01-01

    Several discriminate functions for predicting core promoters that based on the potential cooperation between transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) are discussed. It is demonstrated that the promoter predicting accuracy is improved when the cooperation among TFBSs is taken into consideration.The core promoter region of a newly discovered gene CKLFSF1 is predicted to locate more than 1.5 kb far away from the 5′ end of the transcript and in the last intron of its upstream gene, which is experimentally confirmed later. The core promoters of 3402 human RefSeq sequences, obtained by extending the mRNAs in human genome sequences, are predicted by our algorithm, and there are about 60% of the predicted core promoters locating within the ± 500 bp region relative to the annotated transcription start site.

  16. Detection and properties of A-factor-binding protein from Streptomyces griseus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyake, K.; Horinouchi, S.; Yoshida, M.; Chiba, N.; Mori, K.; Nogawa, N.; Morikawa, N.; Beppu, T. (Univ. of Tokyo (Japan))

    1989-08-01

    The optically active form of tritium-labeled A-factor (2-isocapryloyl-3R-hydroxymethyl-gamma-butyrolactone), a pleiotropic autoregulator responsible for streptomycin production, streptomycin resistance, and sporulation in Streptomyces griseus, was chemically synthesized. By using the radioactive A-factor, a binding protein for A-factor was detected in the cytoplasmic fraction of this organism. The binding protein had an apparent molecular weight of approximately 26,000, as determined by gel filtration. Scatchard analysis suggested that A-factor bound the protein in the molar ratio of 1:1 with a binding constant, Kd, of 0.7 nM. The number of the binding protein was roughly estimated to be 37 per genome. The inducing material virginiae butanolide C (VB-C), which has a structure very similar to that of A-factor and is essential for virginiamycin production in Streptomyces virginiae, did not inhibit binding. In addition, no protein capable of specifically binding {sup 3}H-labeled VB-C was found in S. griseus. Together with the observation that VB-C had almost no biological activity on the restoration of streptomycin production or sporulation in an A-factor-deficient mutant of S. griseus, these results indicated that the binding protein had a strict ligand specificity. Examination for an A-factor-binding protein in Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) and Streptomyces lividans showed the absence of any specifically binding protein.

  17. Using TESS to predict transcription factor binding sites in DNA sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schug, Jonathan

    2008-03-01

    This unit describes how to use the Transcription Element Search System (TESS). This Web site predicts transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) in DNA sequence using two different kinds of models of sites, strings and positional weight matrices. The binding of transcription factors to DNA is a major part of the control of gene expression. Transcription factors exhibit sequence-specific binding; they form stronger bonds to some DNA sequences than to others. Identification of a good binding site in the promoter for a gene suggests the possibility that the corresponding factor may play a role in the regulation of that gene. However, the sequences transcription factors recognize are typically short and allow for some amount of mismatch. Because of this, binding sites for a factor can typically be found at random every few hundred to a thousand base pairs. TESS has features to help sort through and evaluate the significance of predicted sites.

  18. Pleiotropic virulence factor - Streptococcus pyogenes fibronectin-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Masaya; Terao, Yutaka; Kawabata, Shigetada

    2013-04-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes causes a broad spectrum of infectious diseases, including pharyngitis, skin infections and invasive necrotizing fasciitis. The initial phase of infection involves colonization, followed by intimate contact with the host cells, thus promoting bacterial uptake by them. S. pyogenes recognizes fibronectin (Fn) through its own Fn-binding proteins to obtain access to epithelial and endothelial cells in host tissue. Fn-binding proteins bind to Fn to form a bridge to α5 β1 -integrins, which leads to rearrangement of cytoskeletal actin in host cells and uptake of invading S. pyogenes. Recently, several structural analyses of the invasion mechanism showed molecular interactions by which Fn converts from a compact plasma protein to a fibrillar component of the extracellular matrix. After colonization, S. pyogenes must evade the host innate immune system to spread into blood vessels and deeper organs. Some Fn-binding proteins contribute to evasion of host innate immunity, such as the complement system and phagocytosis. In addition, Fn-binding proteins have received focus as non-M protein vaccine candidates, because of their localization and conservation among different M serotypes.Here, we review the roles of Fn-binding proteins in the pathogenesis and speculate regarding possible vaccine antigen candidates. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Transcription factor binding sites are genetic determinants of retroviral integration in the human genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Felice

    Full Text Available Gamma-retroviruses and lentiviruses integrate non-randomly in mammalian genomes, with specific preferences for active chromatin, promoters and regulatory regions. Gene transfer vectors derived from gamma-retroviruses target at high frequency genes involved in the control of growth, development and differentiation of the target cell, and may induce insertional tumors or pre-neoplastic clonal expansions in patients treated by gene therapy. The gene expression program of the target cell is apparently instrumental in directing gamma-retroviral integration, although the molecular basis of this phenomenon is poorly understood. We report a bioinformatic analysis of the distribution of transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs flanking >4,000 integrated proviruses in human hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic cells. We show that gamma-retroviral, but not lentiviral vectors, integrate in genomic regions enriched in cell-type specific subsets of TFBSs, independently from their relative position with respect to genes and transcription start sites. Analysis of sequences flanking the integration sites of Moloney leukemia virus (MLV- and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-derived vectors carrying mutations in their long terminal repeats (LTRs, and of HIV vectors packaged with an MLV integrase, indicates that the MLV integrase and LTR enhancer are the viral determinants of the selection of TFBS-rich regions in the genome. This study identifies TFBSs as differential genomic determinants of retroviral target site selection in the human genome, and suggests that transcription factors binding the LTR enhancer may synergize with the integrase in tethering retroviral pre-integration complexes to transcriptionally active regulatory regions. Our data indicate that gamma-retroviruses and lentiviruses have evolved dramatically different strategies to interact with the host cell chromatin, and predict a higher risk in using gamma-retroviral vs. lentiviral vectors for human

  20. Arabidopsis sigma factor binding proteins are activators of the WRKY33 transcription factor in plant defense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Zhibing; Li, Ying; Wang, Fei; Cheng, Yuan; Fan, Baofang; Yu, Jing-Quan; Chen, Zhixiang

    2011-10-01

    Necrotrophic pathogens are important plant pathogens that cause many devastating plant diseases. Despite their impact, our understanding of the plant defense response to necrotrophic pathogens is limited. The WRKY33 transcription factor is important for plant resistance to necrotrophic pathogens; therefore, elucidation of its functions will enhance our understanding of plant immunity to necrotrophic pathogens. Here, we report the identification of two WRKY33-interacting proteins, nuclear-encoded SIGMA FACTOR BINDING PROTEIN1 (SIB1) and SIB2, which also interact with plastid-encoded plastid RNA polymerase SIGMA FACTOR1. Both SIB1 and SIB2 contain an N-terminal chloroplast targeting signal and a putative nuclear localization signal, suggesting that they are dual targeted. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation indicates that WRKY33 interacts with SIBs in the nucleus of plant cells. Both SIB1 and SIB2 contain a short VQ motif that is important for interaction with WRKY33. The two VQ motif-containing proteins recognize the C-terminal WRKY domain and stimulate the DNA binding activity of WRKY33. Like WRKY33, both SIB1 and SIB2 are rapidly and strongly induced by the necrotrophic pathogen Botrytis cinerea. Resistance to B. cinerea is compromised in the sib1 and sib2 mutants but enhanced in SIB1-overexpressing transgenic plants. These results suggest that dual-targeted SIB1 and SIB2 function as activators of WRKY33 in plant defense against necrotrophic pathogens.

  1. Furin proteolytically processes the heparin-binding region of extracellular superoxide dismutase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bowler, Russell P; Nicks, Mike; Olsen, Dorte Aa

    2002-01-01

    . (1999) J. Biol. Chem. 274, 14818-14822). By using mammalian cell lines, we have now determined that removal of the heparin-binding region occurs after passage through the Golgi network but before being secreted into the extracellular space. Specific protease inhibitors and overexpression...

  2. A deeper look into transcription regulatory code by preferred pair distance templates for transcription factor binding sites

    KAUST Repository

    Kulakovskiy, Ivan V.

    2011-08-18

    Motivation: Modern experimental methods provide substantial information on protein-DNA recognition. Studying arrangements of transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) of interacting transcription factors (TFs) advances understanding of the transcription regulatory code. Results: We constructed binding motifs for TFs forming a complex with HIF-1α at the erythropoietin 3\\'-enhancer. Corresponding TFBSs were predicted in the segments around transcription start sites (TSSs) of all human genes. Using the genome-wide set of regulatory regions, we observed several strongly preferred distances between hypoxia-responsive element (HRE) and binding sites of a particular cofactor protein. The set of preferred distances was called as a preferred pair distance template (PPDT). PPDT dramatically depended on the TF and orientation of its binding sites relative to HRE. PPDT evaluated from the genome-wide set of regulatory sequences was used to detect significant PPDT-consistent binding site pairs in regulatory regions of hypoxia-responsive genes. We believe PPDT can help to reveal the layout of eukaryotic regulatory segments. © The Author 2011. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.

  3. Analysis of the DNA-binding and dimerization activities of Neurospora crassa transcription factor NUC-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peleg, Y; Metzenberg, R L

    1994-12-01

    NUC-1, a positive regulatory protein of Neurospora crassa, controls the expression of several unlinked target genes involved in phosphorus acquisition. The carboxy-terminal end of the NUC-1 protein has sequence similarity to the helix-loop-helix family of transcription factors. Bacterially expressed and in vitro-synthesized proteins, which consist of the carboxy-terminal portion of NUC-1, bind specifically to upstream sequences of two of its target genes, pho2+ and pho-4+. These upstream sequences contain the core sequence, CACGTG, a target for many helix-loop-helix proteins. A large loop region (47 amino acids) separates the helix I and helix II domains. Mutations and deletion within the loop region did not interfere with the in vitro or in vivo functions of the protein. Immediately carboxy-proximal to the helix II domain, the NUC-1 protein contains an atypical zipper domain which is essential for function. This domain consists of a heptad repeat of alanine and methionine rather than leucine residues. Analysis of mutant NUC-1 proteins suggests that the helix II and the zipper domains are essential for the protein dimerization, whereas the basic and the helix I domains are involved in DNA binding. The helix I domain, even though likely to participate in dimer formation while NUC-1 is bound to DNA, is not essential for in vitro dimerization.

  4. Insulinlike growth factor-binding protein proteolysis an emerging paradigm in insulinlike growth factor physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowlkes, J L

    1997-10-01

    In biologic fluids, insulinlike growth factors (IGF-I and IGF-II) are bound to high-affinity insulinlike growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs) of which seven have now been identified (IGFBPs 1-7). In a variety of biologic fluids, several IGFBPs undergo proteolytic degradation. Such degradation can lead to increased IGF bioavailability at the cell surface, facilitating receptor interactions. Herein, recent data identifying several IGFBP-degrading proteinases and their effects on IGF bioactivity is reviewed, and how IGFBP proteolysis is regulated by IGFs and IGFBPs, as well as how IGFBP cleavage analysis provides insights into the structure and function of IGFBPs, is explored. (Trends Endocrinol Metab 1997;8:299-306). (c) 1997, Elsevier Science Inc.

  5. Photoaffinity labeling of cytochrome P4501A1 with azidocumene: identification of cumene hydroperoxide binding region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cvrk, T; Strobel, H W

    1998-01-01

    Cumene hydroperoxide can support cytochrome P450-catalyzed reactions in the absence of molecular oxygen, NADPH, and cytochrome P450-NADPH oxidoreductase. Its binding at the cytochrome P450 active site is governed by the structure of the cumene hydroperoxide binding region. In order to define the region of cytochrome P4501A1 at which cumene hydroperoxide binds, we prepared an analog of cumene hydroperoxide for use as a photoaffinity label. p-Azido-isopro-pylbenzene (azidocumene) and its tritiated derivative were photolyzed in water solution by uv light with a half-life of 29 s. The 7-ethoxycoumarin deethylatation catalyzed by P450 using the cumene hydroperoxide-supported system was strongly inhibited by the presence of the label. Covalent binding to the protein after photoactivation was blocked by 50% in the presence of cumene hydroperoxide. HPLC analysis after trypsin digestion of the labeled protein showed that [3H]-azidocumene was attached covalently to the peptide VDMTPAYGLTLK corresponding to residues 492-503 in the 1A1 sequence. The radioactivity level of this fraction was reduced by 50% when the labeling was carried out in the presence of cumene hydroperoxide. To confirm the identified region the labeled protein was cleaved by cyanogen bromide. HPLC separation of the CNBr digest showed two peaks with a high level of radioactivity. The SDS/Tricine PAGE analysis of the radioactive fraction with an elution time of 43 min revealed a 2.4-kDa peptide carrying a high level of covalently bound radioactivity. The N-terminal sequence identified the labeled peptide to be a fragment generated by CNBr corresponding to residues 494-512. The N-terminal sequence of the labeled peptide with elution time of 27 min, TLKH, matches amino acid residues 501-504 in the P4501A1 sequence. We can conclude that in the overlapping region of all three identified peptides, T501-L502-K503, is the site where azidocumene covalently binds to P4501A1. The sequence alignment of cytochrome P4501A

  6. Evolutionarily conserved binding of translationally controlled tumor protein to eukaryotic elongation factor 1B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Huiwen; Gong, Weibin; Yao, Xingzhe; Wang, Jinfeng; Perrett, Sarah; Feng, Yingang

    2015-04-03

    Translationally controlled tumor protein (TCTP) is an abundant protein that is highly conserved in eukaryotes. However, its primary function is still not clear. Human TCTP interacts with the metazoan-specific eukaryotic elongation factor 1Bδ (eEF1Bδ) and inhibits its guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) activity, but the structural mechanism remains unknown. The interaction between TCTP and eEF1Bδ was investigated by NMR titration, structure determination, paramagnetic relaxation enhancement, site-directed mutagenesis, isothermal titration calorimetry, and HADDOCK docking. We first demonstrated that the catalytic GEF domain of eEF1Bδ is not responsible for binding to TCTP but rather a previously unnoticed central acidic region (CAR) domain in eEF1Bδ. The mutagenesis data and the structural model of the TCTP-eEF1Bδ CAR domain complex revealed the key binding residues. These residues are highly conserved in eukaryotic TCTPs and in eEF1B GEFs, including the eukaryotically conserved eEF1Bα, implying the interaction may be conserved in all eukaryotes. Interactions were confirmed between TCTP and the eEF1Bα CAR domain for human, fission yeast, and unicellular photosynthetic microalgal proteins, suggesting that involvement in protein translation through the conserved interaction with eEF1B represents a primary function of TCTP. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. Thyroid hormone receptors bind to defined regions of the growth hormone and placental lactogen genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlow, J W; Voz, M L; Eliard, P H; Mathy-Harter, M; De Nayer, P; Economidis, I V; Belayew, A; Martial, J A; Rousseau, G G

    1986-12-01

    The intracellular receptor for thyroid hormone is a protein found in chromatin. Since thyroid hormone stimulates transcription of the growth hormone gene through an unknown mechanism, the hypothesis that the thyroid hormone-receptor complex interacts with defined regions of this gene has been investigated in a cell-free system. Nuclear extracts from human lymphoblastoid IM-9 cells containing thyroid hormone receptors were incubated with L-3,5,3'-tri[125I]iodothyronine and calf thymus DNA-cellulose. Restriction fragments of the human growth hormone gene were added to determine their ability to inhibit labeled receptor binding to DNA-cellulose. These fragments encompassed nucleotide sequences from about three kilobase pairs upstream to about four kilobase pairs downstream from the transcription initiation site. The thyroid hormone-receptor complex bound preferentially to the 5'-flanking sequences of the growth hormone gene in a region between nucleotide coordinates -290 and -129. The receptor also bound to an analogous promoter region in the human placental lactogen gene, which has 92% nucleotide sequence homology with the growth hormone gene. These binding regions appear to be distinct from those that are recognized by the receptor for glucocorticoids, which stimulate growth hormone gene expression synergistically with thyroid hormone. The presence of thyroid hormone was required for binding of its receptor to the growth hormone gene promoter, suggesting that thyroid hormone renders the receptor capable of recognizing specific gene regions.

  8. The response regulator SsrB activates transcription and binds to a region overlapping OmpR binding sites at Salmonella pathogenicity island 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xiuhong; Walthers, Don; Oropeza, Ricardo; Kenney, Linda J

    2004-11-01

    OmpR activates expression of the two-component regulatory system located on Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 (SPI-2) that controls the expression of a type III secretion system, as well as many other genes required for systemic infection in mice. Measurements of SsrA and SsrB protein levels under different growth conditions indicate that expression of these two components is uncoupled, i.e. SsrB is produced in the absence of ssrA and vice versa. This result was suggested from our previous studies, in which two promoters at ssrA/B were identified. The isolated C-terminus of SsrB binds to DNA and protects regions upstream of ssrA, ssrB and srfH from DNase I digestion. Furthermore, the C-terminus of SsrB alone is capable of activating transcription in the absence of the N-terminus. Results from beta-galactosidase assays indicate that the N-terminal phosphorylation domain inhibits the C-terminal effector domain. A previous study from our laboratory reported that ssrA-lacZ and ssrB-lacZ transcriptional fusions were substantially reduced in an ssrB null strain. Results from DNase I protection assays provide direct evidence that SsrB binds at ssrA and ssrB, although the binding sites lie within the transcribed regions. Additional regulators clearly affect gene expression at this important locus, and here we provide evidence that SlyA, a transcription factor that contributes to Salmonella virulence, also affects ssrA/B gene expression.

  9. Antibodies to left-handed Z-DNA bind to interband regions of Drosophila polytene chromosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordheim, Alfred; Pardue, Mary Lou; Lafer, Eileen M.; Möller, Achim; Stollar, B. David; Rich, Alexander

    1981-12-01

    Antibodies which are specific to the Z-DNA conformation have been purified and characterized on the basis of their binding to three different DNA polymers which can form this left-handed helix. These antibodies bind specifically to polytene chromosomes of Drosophila melanogaster as visualized by fluorescent staining. The staining is found in the interband regions and its intensity varies among different interbands in a reproducible manner. This is the first identification of the Z-DNA conformation in material of biological origin.

  10. CLK-1 protein has DNA binding activity specific to O(L) region of mitochondrial DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorbunova, Vera; Seluanov, Andrei

    2002-04-10

    Mutations in the clk-1 gene of Caenorhabditis elegans extend worm life span and slow down a variety of physiological processes. Here we report that C. elegans CLK-1 as well as its mouse homologue have DNA binding activity that is specific to the O(L) region of mitochondrial DNA. DNA binding activity of CLK-1 is inhibited by ADP, and is altered by mutations that extend nematode life span. Our results suggest that, in addition to its enzymatic function in ubiquinone biosynthesis, CLK-1 is involved in the regulation of mtDNA replication or transcription.

  11. A comparison of circulating and regional growth hormone-binding protein in cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, S; Fisker, S; Becker, U;

    2001-01-01

    The growth hormone (GH)/insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) axis is disturbed in cirrhosis, with elevated basal GH and low IGF-I levels relating to liver function and prognosis. In plasma, GH is bound to a high-affinity GH-binding protein (GHBP), which has been found to be slightly reduced...

  12. An Allosteric Pathway Revealed in the Ribosome Binding Stress Factor BipA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makanji, H.; deLivron, M; Robinson, V

    2009-01-01

    BipA is a highly conserved prokaryotic GTPase that functions as a master regulator of stress and virulence processes in bacteria. It is a member of the translational factor family of GTPases along with EF-G, IF-2 and LepA. Structural and biochemical data suggest that ribosome binding specificity for each member of this family lies in an effector domain. As with other bacterial GTPases, the ribosome binding and GTPase activities of this protein are tightly coupled. However, the mechanism by which this occurs is still unknown. A series of experiments have been designed to probe structural features of the protein to see if we can pinpoint specific areas of BipA, perhaps even individual residues, which are important to its association with the ribosome. Included in the list are the C-terminal effector domain of the protein, which is distinct to the BipA family of proteins, and amino acid residues in the switch I and II regions of the G domain. Using sucrose density gradients, we have shown that the C-terminal domain is required in order for BipA to bind to the ribosome. Moreover, deletion of this domain increases the GTP hydrolysis rates of the protein, likely through relief of inhibitory contacts. Additional evidence has revealed an allosteric connection between the conformationally flexible switch II region and the C-terminal domain of BipA. Site directed mutagenesis, sucrose gradients and malachite green assays are being used to elucidate the details of this coupling.

  13. REGIONAL FACTORS OF SMALL AGRICULTURAL ORGANIZATIONS DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisovskaya R. N.

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The article says that small agricultural farms (SAF play a significant role in import substitution of food, which is aimed at replacing imported agricultural commodities and finished products to domestic security. SAF subjects of Krasnodar region made a significant contribution to the increase of efficiency of regional economy. The share of small agricultural farms is 29% of regional production of grain and meat, 36% of milk, 47% of egg, 10% of sugar beet, 30% of sunflower and 95% of potatoes, 70% of vegetables, and 29% of grapes which makes a significant contribution to the process of import substitution. In addition, the SAF showed a large positive impact on the sustainability of farming, the development dynamics of the entire rural economy, increase the competitiveness of the whole field due to the increase in segment sales, improving market sales in the infrastructure. Today SAF perform a priority vector of development of regional agrarian policy. However, when the share of regional agricultural production segment is more than 35%, a small management gets only 10% of the sum of all sources of state support. In recent years, stimulation measures of subjects of small agrarian farms aimed at increasing the size of the land, the abolition of the standards concerning the number of animals, improving lending conditions, facilitating the starting of economic conditions, union efforts to organize sales channels and other programs. However, the situation with crediting SAF is improving too slowly due to lack of sufficient collateral, and only a small part of them can use loans. Besides, the bureaucratic and departmental barriers are still saved. They still face trade discrimination in the retail markets and great difficulties due to the new requirements of the construction markets, the endowment channels marketing of products etc. All this dictates the need for further improvement of the economic mechanism of regulation of small agricultural

  14. A general pairwise interaction model provides an accurate description of in vivo transcription factor binding sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Santolini

    Full Text Available The identification of transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs on genomic DNA is of crucial importance for understanding and predicting regulatory elements in gene networks. TFBS motifs are commonly described by Position Weight Matrices (PWMs, in which each DNA base pair contributes independently to the transcription factor (TF binding. However, this description ignores correlations between nucleotides at different positions, and is generally inaccurate: analysing fly and mouse in vivo ChIPseq data, we show that in most cases the PWM model fails to reproduce the observed statistics of TFBSs. To overcome this issue, we introduce the pairwise interaction model (PIM, a generalization of the PWM model. The model is based on the principle of maximum entropy and explicitly describes pairwise correlations between nucleotides at different positions, while being otherwise as unconstrained as possible. It is mathematically equivalent to considering a TF-DNA binding energy that depends additively on each nucleotide identity at all positions in the TFBS, like the PWM model, but also additively on pairs of nucleotides. We find that the PIM significantly improves over the PWM model, and even provides an optimal description of TFBS statistics within statistical noise. The PIM generalizes previous approaches to interdependent positions: it accounts for co-variation of two or more base pairs, and predicts secondary motifs, while outperforming multiple-motif models consisting of mixtures of PWMs. We analyse the structure of pairwise interactions between nucleotides, and find that they are sparse and dominantly located between consecutive base pairs in the flanking region of TFBS. Nonetheless, interactions between pairs of non-consecutive nucleotides are found to play a significant role in the obtained accurate description of TFBS statistics. The PIM is computationally tractable, and provides a general framework that should be useful for describing and predicting

  15. Regional increases in [{sup 11}C]flumazenil binding after epilepsy surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savic, I. [Huddinge Hospital, Dept. of Neurology (Sweden); Blomqvist, G. [Karolinska Hospital, Dept. of Clinical Neurophysiology, Stockholm (Sweden); Halldin, C. [Karolinska Hospital, Dept. of Psychiatry, Stockholm (Sweden); Litton, J.E. [Karolinska Hospital, Dept. of Psychology, Stockholm (Sweden); Gulyas, B. [Karolinska Institute, Div. of Human Brain Research (Sweden)

    1998-05-01

    Introduction - Animal experiments suggest that epileptic seizures alter the expression of mRNA for neuro-receptors. PET measurements with [{sup 11}C]flumazenil show that patients with partial seizures have a reduced density of benzodiazepine (BZ) receptors in the epileptogenic regions (ER) and some of the target areas for seizure activity, the so called projection areas. Recent data suggest that the degree of BZ receptor reduction in ER is correlated to seizure frequency. We therefore hypothesized that seizure activity can alter the BZ receptor binding, and that some of these changes could normalize when the seizures disappeared. Methods - In 4 patients whose seizures were generated by mesial temporal lobe structures, BZ receptor density was measured with [{sup 11}C]flumazenil PET before, and 1 year after the epilepsy surgery and cessation of seizures. By use of a computerized anatomical brain atlas the same regions were analyzed in both PET scans, and the results related to data from 7 healthy controls. Results - Presurgical PET scans showed reductions in BZ receptor density in the epileptogenic regions and some of its primary projection areas. Other cortical regions had normal values. Postsurgically, the calculated BZ receptor density normalized (29{+-}17% increase) in several of the affected projection areas, whereas the values in other cortical regions remained unaltered. Conclusion - Regional reductions in BZ receptor density may be dynamic and related to seizures. The present preliminary observations encourage further studies on seizure-related changes in regional receptor binding in humans. (au) 41 refs.

  16. The Drosophila tissue-specific factor Grainyhead contains novel DNA-binding and dimerization domains which are conserved in the human protein CP2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uv, A E; Thompson, C R; Bray, S J

    1994-06-01

    We have mapped the regions in the Drosophila melanogaster tissue-specific transcription factor Grainyhead that are required for DNA binding and dimerization. These functional domains correspond to regions conserved between Grainyhead and the vertebrate transcription factor CP2, which we show has similar activities. The identified DNA-binding domain is large (263 amino acids) but contains a smaller core that is able to interact with DNA at approximately 400-fold lower affinity. The major dimerization domain is located in a separate region of the protein and is required to stabilize the interactions with DNA. Our data also suggest that Grainyhead activity can be modulated by an N-terminal inhibitory domain.

  17. The role of CTCF binding sites in the 3' immunoglobulin heavy chain regulatory region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birshtein, Barbara K

    2012-01-01

    The immunoglobulin heavy chain locus undergoes a series of DNA rearrangements and modifications to achieve the construction and expression of individual antibody heavy chain genes in B cells. These events affect variable regions, through VDJ joining and subsequent somatic hypermutation, and constant regions through class switch recombination (CSR). Levels of IgH expression are also regulated during B cell development, resulting in high levels of secreted antibodies from fully differentiated plasma cells. Regulation of these events has been attributed primarily to two cis-elements that work from long distances on their target sequences, i.e., an ∼1 kb intronic enhancer, Eμ, located between the V region segments and the most 5' constant region gene, Cμ; and an ∼40 kb 3' regulatory region (3' RR) that is located downstream of the most 3' C(H) gene, Cα. The 3' RR is a candidate for an "end" of B cell-specific regulation of the Igh locus. The 3' RR contains several B cell-specific enhancers associated with DNase I hypersensitive sites (hs1-4), which are essential for CSR and for high levels of IgH expression in plasma cells. Downstream of this enhancer-containing region is a region of high-density CTCF binding sites, which extends through hs5, 6, and 7 and further downstream. CTCF, with its enhancer-blocking activities, has been associated with all mammalian insulators and implicated in multiple chromosomal interactions. Here we address the 3' RR CTCF-binding region as a potential insulator of the Igh locus, an independent regulatory element and a predicted modulator of the activity of 3' RR enhancers. Using chromosome conformation capture technology, chromatin immunoprecipitation, and genetic approaches, we have found that the 3' RR with its CTCF-binding region interacts with target sequences in the V(H), Eμ, and C(H) regions through DNA looping as regulated by protein binding. This region impacts on B cell-specific Igh processes at different stages of B cell

  18. The role of CTCF binding sites in the 3’ immunoglobulin heavy chain regulatory region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara K Birshtein

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The immunoglobulin heavy chain locus undergoes a series of DNA rearrangements and modifications to achieve the construction and expression of individual antibody heavy chain genes in B cells. These events affect variable regions, through VDJ joining and subsequent somatic hypermutation, and constant regions through class switch recombination. Levels of IgH expression are also regulated during B cell development, resulting in high levels of secreted antibodies from fully-differentiated plasma cells. Regulation of these events has been attributed primarily to two cis-elements that work from long distances on their target sequences, i.e., an ~1 kb intronic enhancer, Eμ, located between the V region segments and the most 5′ constant region gene, Cμ; and an ~40 kb 3′ regulatory region (3′ RR that is located downstream of the most 3′ CH gene, Cα. The 3′ RR is a candidate for an end of B cell-specific regulation of the Igh locus. The 3′ RR contains several B cell-specific enhancers associated with DNase I hypersensitive sites (hs1-4, which are essential for class switch recombination and for high levels of IgH expression in plasma cells. Downstream of this enhancer-containing region is a region of high-density CTCF binding sites, which extends through hs5, 6, and 7 and further downstream. CTCF, with its enhancer-blocking activities, has been associated with all mammalian insulators and implicated in multiple chromosomal interactions. Here we address the 3′ RR CTCF-binding region as a potential insulator of the Igh locus, an independent regulatory element and a predicted modulator of the activity of 3’ RR enhancers. Using chromosome conformation capture technology, chromatin immunoprecipitation and genetic approaches, we have found that the 3’ RR with its CTCF binding region interacts with target sequences in the VH, Eμ and CH regions through DNA looping as regulated by protein binding. This region impacts on B cell-specific Igh

  19. Recombinant human nerve growth factor is biologically active and labels novel high-affinity binding sites in rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altar, C.A.; Burton, L.E.; Bennett, G.L.; Dugich-Djordjevic, M. (Genentech, Inc., South San Francisco, CA (USA))

    1991-01-01

    Iodinated recombinant human nerve growth factor (125I-rhNGF) stimulated neurite formation in PC12 cell cultures with a half-maximal potency of 35-49 pg/ml, compared with 39-52 pg/ml for rhNGF. In quantitative ligand autoradiography, the in vitro equilibrium binding of 125I-rhNGF to brain sections showed a 10-fold regional variation in density and was saturable, reversible, and specifically displaced by up to 74% with rhNGF or murine NGF (muNGF). At equilibrium, 125I-rhNGF bound to these sites with high affinity and low capacity (Bmax less than or equal to 13.2 fmol/mg of protein). Calculation of 125I-rhNGF binding affinity by kinetic methods gave average Kd values of 24 and 31 pM. Computer-generated maps revealed binding in brain regions not identified previously with 125I-muNGF, including hippocampus; dentate gyrus; amygdala; paraventricular thalamus; frontal, parietal, occipital, and cingulate cortices; nucleus accumbens; olfactory tubercle; subiculum; pineal gland; and medial geniculate nucleus. NGF binding sites were distributed in a 2-fold increasing medial-lateral gradient in the caudate-putamen and a 2-fold lateral-medial gradient in the nucleus accumbens. 125I-rhNGF binding sites were also found in most areas labeled by 125I-muNGF, including the interpedunucular nucleus, cerebellum, forebrain cholinergic nuclei, caudoventral caudate-putamen, and trigeminal nerve nucleus. 125I-rhNGF binding sites were absent from areas replete with low-affinity NGF binding sites, including circumventricular organs, myelinated fiber bundles, and choroid plexus. The present analysis provides an anatomical differentiation of high-affinity 125I-rhNGF binding sites and greatly expands the number of brain structures that may respond to endogenous NGF or exogenously administered rhNGF.

  20. Protein-ligand binding region prediction (PLB-SAVE) based on geometric features and CUDA acceleration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Ying-Tsang; Wang, Hsin-Wei; Pai, Tun-Wen; Tzou, Wen-Shoung; Hsu, Hui-Huang; Chang, Hao-Teng

    2013-01-01

    Protein-ligand interactions are key processes in triggering and controlling biological functions within cells. Prediction of protein binding regions on the protein surface assists in understanding the mechanisms and principles of molecular recognition. In silico geometrical shape analysis plays a primary step in analyzing the spatial characteristics of protein binding regions and facilitates applications of bioinformatics in drug discovery and design. Here, we describe the novel software, PLB-SAVE, which uses parallel processing technology and is ideally suited to extract the geometrical construct of solid angles from surface atoms. Representative clusters and corresponding anchors were identified from all surface elements and were assigned according to the ranking of their solid angles. In addition, cavity depth indicators were obtained by proportional transformation of solid angles and cavity volumes were calculated by scanning multiple directional vectors within each selected cavity. Both depth and volume characteristics were combined with various weighting coefficients to rank predicted potential binding regions. Two test datasets from LigASite, each containing 388 bound and unbound structures, were used to predict binding regions using PLB-SAVE and two well-known prediction systems, SiteHound and MetaPocket2.0 (MPK2). PLB-SAVE outperformed the other programs with accuracy rates of 94.3% for unbound proteins and 95.5% for bound proteins via a tenfold cross-validation process. Additionally, because the parallel processing architecture was designed to enhance the computational efficiency, we obtained an average of 160-fold increase in computational time. In silico binding region prediction is considered the initial stage in structure-based drug design. To improve the efficacy of biological experiments for drug development, we developed PLB-SAVE, which uses only geometrical features of proteins and achieves a good overall performance for protein-ligand binding

  1. Personality factors correlate with regional cerebral perfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Gorman, R L; Kumari, V; Williams, S C R; Zelaya, F O; Connor, S E J; Alsop, D C; Gray, J A

    2006-06-01

    There is an increasing body of evidence pointing to a neurobiological basis of personality. The purpose of this study was to investigate the biological bases of the major dimensions of Eysenck's and Cloninger's models of personality using a noninvasive magnetic resonance perfusion imaging technique in 30 young, healthy subjects. An unbiased voxel-based analysis was used to identify regions where the regional perfusion demonstrated significant correlation with any of the personality dimensions. Highly significant positive correlations emerged between extraversion and perfusion in the basal ganglia, thalamus, inferior frontal gyrus and cerebellum and between novelty seeking and perfusion in the cerebellum, cuneus and thalamus. Strong negative correlations emerged between psychoticism and perfusion in the basal ganglia and thalamus and between harm avoidance and perfusion in the cerebellar vermis, cuneus and inferior frontal gyrus. These observations suggest that personality traits are strongly associated with resting cerebral perfusion in a variety of cortical and subcortical regions and provide further evidence for the hypothesized neurobiological basis of personality. These results may also have important implications for functional neuroimaging studies, which typically rely on the modulation of cerebral hemodynamics for detection of task-induced activation since personality effects may influence the intersubject variability for both task-related activity and resting cerebral perfusion. This technique also offers a novel approach for the exploration of the neurobiological correlates of human personality.

  2. Functional comparison of the binding of factor H short consensus repeat 6 (SCR 6) to factor H binding protein from Neisseria meningitidis and the binding of factor H SCR 18 to 20 to Neisseria gonorrhoeae porin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaughnessy, Jutamas; Lewis, Lisa A; Jarva, Hanna; Ram, Sanjay

    2009-05-01

    Both Neisseria meningitidis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae recruit the alternative pathway complement inhibitory protein factor H (fH) to their surfaces to evade complement-dependent killing. Meningococci bind fH via fH binding protein (fHbp), a surface-exposed lipoprotein that is subdivided into three variant families based on one classification scheme. Chimeric proteins that comprise contiguous domains of fH fused to murine Fc were used to localize the binding site for all three fHbp variants on fH to short consensus repeat 6 (SCR 6). As expected, fH-like protein 1 (FHL-1), which contains fH SCR 6, also bound to fHbp-expressing meningococci. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we identified histidine 337 and histidine 371 in SCR 6 as important for binding to fHbp. These findings may provide the molecular basis for recent observations that demonstrated human-specific fH binding to meningococci. Differences in the interactions of fHbp variants with SCR 6 were evident. Gonococci bind fH via their porin (Por) molecules (PorB.1A or PorB.1B); sialylation of lipooligosaccharide enhances fH binding. Both sialylated PorB.1B- and (unsialylated) PorB.1A-bearing gonococci bind fH through SCR 18 to 20; PorB.1A can also bind SCR 6, but only weakly, as evidenced by a low level of binding of FHL-1 relative to that of fH. Using isogenic strains expressing either meningococcal fHbp or gonococcal PorB.1B, we discovered that strains expressing gonococcal PorB.1B in the presence of sialylated lipooligosaccharide bound more fH, more effectively limited C3 deposition, and were more serum resistant than their isogenic counterparts expressing fHbp. Differences in fH binding to these two related pathogens may be important for modulating their individual responses to host immune attack.

  3. Insulin-like growth factors, insulin-like growth factor-binding proteins, insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-3 protease, and growth hormone-binding protein in lipodystrophic human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haugaard, Steen B; Andersen, Ove; Hansen, Birgitte Rønde;

    2004-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-lipodystrophy is associated with impaired growth hormone (GH) secretion. It remains to be elucidated whether insulin-like growth factors (IGFs), IGF-binding proteins (IGFBPs), IGFBP-3 protease, and GH-binding protein (GHBP) are abnormal in HIV-lipodystrophy....... These parameters were measured in overnight fasting serum samples from 16 Caucasian males with HIV-lipodystrophy (LIPO) and 15 Caucasian HIV-infected males without lipodystrophy (NONLIPO) matched for age, weight, duration of HIV infection, and antiretroviral therapy. In LIPO, abdominal fat mass and insulin...... of bioactive IGF-I in HIV-lipodystrophy....

  4. Allele frequencies of variants in ultra conserved elements identify selective pressure on transcription factor binding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toomas Silla

    Full Text Available Ultra-conserved genes or elements (UCGs/UCEs in the human genome are extreme examples of conservation. We characterized natural variations in 2884 UCEs and UCGs in two distinct populations; Singaporean Chinese (n = 280 and Italian (n = 501 by using a pooled sample, targeted capture, sequencing approach. We identify, with high confidence, in these regions the abundance of rare SNVs (MAF5% are more often found in relatively less-conserved nucleotides within UCEs, compared to rare variants. Moreover, prevalent variants are less likely to overlap transcription factor binding site. Using SNPfold we found no significant influence of RNA secondary structure on UCE conservation. All together, these results suggest UCEs are not under selective pressure as a stretch of DNA but are under differential evolutionary pressure on the single nucleotide level.

  5. Computational identification of transcription factor binding sites by functional analysis of sets of genes sharing overrep-resented upstream motifs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silengo Lorenzo

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transcriptional regulation is a key mechanism in the functioning of the cell, and is mostly effected through transcription factors binding to specific recognition motifs located upstream of the coding region of the regulated gene. The computational identification of such motifs is made easier by the fact that they often appear several times in the upstream region of the regulated genes, so that the number of occurrences of relevant motifs is often significantly larger than expected by pure chance. Results To exploit this fact, we construct sets of genes characterized by the statistical overrepresentation of a certain motif in their upstream regions. Then we study the functional characterization of these sets by analyzing their annotation to Gene Ontology terms. For the sets showing a statistically significant specific functional characterization, we conjecture that the upstream motif characterizing the set is a binding site for a transcription factor involved in the regulation of the genes in the set. Conclusions The method we propose is able to identify many known binding sites in S. cerevisiae and new candidate targets of regulation by known transcritpion factors. Its application to less well studied organisms is likely to be valuable in the exploration of their regulatory interaction network.

  6. The DNA-binding factor Ctcf critically controls gene expression in macrophages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Nikolic (Tatjana); D. Movita (Dowty); M.E.H. Lambers (Margaretha); C. Ribeiro de Almeida (Claudia); P.J. Biesta (Paula); K. Kreefft (Kim); M.J.W. de Bruijn (Marjolein); I.M. Bergen (Ingrid); N.J. Galjart (Niels); P.A. Boonstra (André); R.W. Hendriks (Rudi)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractMacrophages play an important role in immunity and homeostasis. Upon pathogen recognition via specific receptors, they rapidly induce inflammatory responses. This process is tightly controlled at the transcriptional level. The DNA binding zinc-finger protein CCCTC-binding factor (Ctcf) i

  7. CRITERIA FOR AN UPDATED CLASSIFICATION OF HUMAN TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR DNA-BINDING DOMAINS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wingender, Edgar

    2013-01-01

    By binding to cis-regulatory elements in a sequence-specific manner, transcription factors regulate the activity of nearby genes. Here, we discuss the criteria for a comprehensive classification of human TFs based on their DNA-binding domains. In particular, classification of basic leucine zipper (b

  8. CRITERIA FOR AN UPDATED CLASSIFICATION OF HUMAN TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR DNA-BINDING DOMAINS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wingender, Edgar

    By binding to cis-regulatory elements in a sequence-specific manner, transcription factors regulate the activity of nearby genes. Here, we discuss the criteria for a comprehensive classification of human TFs based on their DNA-binding domains. In particular, classification of basic leucine zipper

  9. DNA-binding specificity and molecular functions of NAC transcription factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Addie Nina; Ernst, Heidi Asschenfeldt; Lo Leggio, Leila;

    2005-01-01

    The family of NAC (NAM/ATAF1,2/CUC2) transcription factors has been implicated in a wide range of plant processes, but knowledge on the DNA-binding properties of the family is limited. Using a reiterative selection procedure on random oligonucleotides, we have identified consensus binding sites f...

  10. Evolving Transcription Factor Binding Site Models From Protein Binding Microarray Data

    KAUST Repository

    Wong, Ka-Chun

    2016-02-02

    Protein binding microarray (PBM) is a high-throughput platform that can measure the DNA binding preference of a protein in a comprehensive and unbiased manner. In this paper, we describe the PBM motif model building problem. We apply several evolutionary computation methods and compare their performance with the interior point method, demonstrating their performance advantages. In addition, given the PBM domain knowledge, we propose and describe a novel method called kmerGA which makes domain-specific assumptions to exploit PBM data properties to build more accurate models than the other models built. The effectiveness and robustness of kmerGA is supported by comprehensive performance benchmarking on more than 200 datasets, time complexity analysis, convergence analysis, parameter analysis, and case studies. To demonstrate its utility further, kmerGA is applied to two real world applications: 1) PBM rotation testing and 2) ChIP-Seq peak sequence prediction. The results support the biological relevance of the models learned by kmerGA, and thus its real world applicability.

  11. Protection of nonself surfaces from complement attack by factor H-binding peptides: implications for therapeutic medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, You-Qiang; Qu, Hongchang; Sfyroera, Georgia; Tzekou, Apostolia; Kay, Brian K; Nilsson, Bo; Nilsson Ekdahl, Kristina; Ricklin, Daniel; Lambris, John D

    2011-04-01

    Exposure of nonself surfaces such as those of biomaterials or transplanted cells and organs to host blood frequently triggers innate immune responses, thereby affecting both their functionality and tolerability. Activation of the alternative pathway of complement plays a decisive role in this unfavorable reaction. Whereas previous studies demonstrated that immobilization of physiological regulators of complement activation (RCA) can attenuate this foreign body-induced activation, simple and efficient approaches for coating artificial surfaces with intact RCA are still missing. The conjugation of small molecular entities that capture RCA with high affinity is an intriguing alternative, as this creates a surface with autoregulatory activity upon exposure to blood. We therefore screened two variable cysteine-constrained phage-displayed peptide libraries for factor H-binding peptides. We discovered three peptide classes that differed with respect to their main target binding areas. Peptides binding to the broad middle region of factor H (domains 5-18) were of particular interest, as they do not interfere with either regulatory or binding activities. One peptide in this group (5C6) was further characterized and showed high factor H-capturing activity while retaining its functional integrity. Most importantly, when 5C6 was coated to a model polystyrene surface and exposed to human lepirudin-anticoagulated plasma, the bound peptide captured factor H and substantially inhibited complement activation by the alternative pathway. Our study therefore provides a promising and novel approach to produce therapeutic materials with enhanced biocompatibility.

  12. A conserved proline-rich region of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae cyclase-associated protein binds SH3 domains and modulates cytoskeletal localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, N L; Lila, T; Mintzer, K A; Chen, Z; Pahk, A J; Ren, R; Drubin, D G; Field, J

    1996-02-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae cyclase-associated protein (CAP or Srv2p) is multifunctional. The N-terminal third of CAP binds to adenylyl cyclase and has been implicated in adenylyl cyclase activation in vivo. The widely conserved C-terminal domain of CAP binds to monomeric actin and serves an important cytoskeletal regulatory function in vivo. In addition, all CAP homologs contain a centrally located proline-rich region which has no previously identified function. Recently, SH3 (Src homology 3) domains were shown to bind to proline-rich regions of proteins. Here we report that the proline-rich region of CAP is recognized by the SH3 domains of several proteins, including the yeast actin-associated protein Abp1p. Immunolocalization experiments demonstrate that CAP colocalizes with cortical actin-containing structures in vivo and that a region of CAP containing the SH3 domain binding site is required for this localization. We also demonstrate that the SH3 domain of yeast Abp1p and that of the yeast RAS protein guanine nucleotide exchange factor Cdc25p complex with adenylyl cyclase in vitro. Interestingly, the binding of the Cdc25p SH3 domain is not mediated by CAP and therefore may involve direct binding to adenylyl cyclase or to an unidentified protein which complexes with adenylyl cyclase. We also found that CAP homologous from Schizosaccharomyces pombe and humans bind SH3 domains. The human protein binds most strongly to the SH3 domain from the abl proto-oncogene. These observations identify CAP as an SH3 domain-binding protein and suggest that CAP mediates interactions between SH3 domain proteins and monomeric actin.

  13. Molecular mechanisms of cooperative binding of transcription factors Runx1-CBFβ-Ets1 on the TCRα gene enhancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasahara, Kota; Shiina, Masaaki; Fukuda, Ikuo; Ogata, Kazuhiro; Nakamura, Haruki

    2017-01-01

    Ets1 is an essential transcription factor (TF) for several important physiological processes, including cell proliferation and differentiation. Its recognition of the enhancer region of the TCRα gene is enhanced by the cooperative binding of the Runx1-CBFβ heterodimer, with the cancelation of phosphorylation-dependent autoinhibition. The detailed mechanism of this interesting cooperativity between Ets1 and the Runx1-CBFβ heterodimer is still largely unclear. Here, we investigated the molecular mechanisms of this cooperativity, by using molecular dynamics simulations. Consequently, we detected high flexibility of the loop region between the HI2 and H1 helices of Ets1. Upon Runx1-CBFβ heterodimer binding, this loop transiently adopts various sub-stable conformations in its interactions with the DNA. In addition, a network analysis suggested an allosteric pathway in the molecular assembly and identified some key residues that coincide with previous experimental studies. Our simulations suggest that the cooperative binding of Ets1 and the Runx1-CBFβ heterodimer alters the DNA conformation and induces sub-stable conformations of the HI2-H1 loop of Ets1. This phenomenon increases the flexibility of the regulatory module, including the HI2 helix, and destabilizes the inhibitory form of this module. Thus, we hypothesize that this effect facilitates Ets1-DNA binding and prevents the phosphorylation-dependent DNA binding autoinhibition.

  14. A preferred region for recombinational patch repair in the 5' untranslated region of primer binding site-impaired murine leukemia virus vectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, J G; Lund, Anders Henrik; Kristensen, K D;

    1996-01-01

    with that of the wild-type vector. Thirty-two of 60 transduced proviruses analyzed harbored a primer binding site sequence matching a glutamine tRNA primer. Sequence analysis of the regions flanking the glutamine tRNA primer binding site revealed a distinct pattern of nucleotide differences from the Akv-based vector...... at or around the glutamine tRNA primer binding site. We propose that the forced recombination of primer binding site mutants involves initial priming on endogenous viral sequences and requires template switching during minus-strand synthesis in the region between the neo gene and the mutated primer binding......, suggesting the involvement of a specific endogenous virus-like sequence in patch repair rescue of the primer binding site mutants. The putative recombination partner RNA was found in virions from psi-2 cells as detected by analysis of glutamine tRNA-initiated cDNA and by sequence analysis of regions...

  15. Excitatory amino acid binding sites in the hippocampal region of Alzheimer's disease and other dementias.

    OpenAIRE

    1990-01-01

    Quantitative receptor autoradiography was used to measure muscarinic cholinergic, benzodiazepine, kainate, phencyclidine (PCP), N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) (measured in Tris acetate), quisqualate-sensitive, non-quisqualate-sensitive and total glutamate (measured in Tris chloride buffer) binding sites in adjacent sections of the hippocampal region of 10 Alzheimer's disease, nine control, and six demented, non-Alzheimer's disease postmortem human brains. The measurements were compared to the nu...

  16. Statistical Mechanics of Transcription-Factor Binding Site Discovery Using Hidden Markov Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Pankaj; Schwab, David J.; Sengupta, Anirvan M.

    2011-04-01

    Hidden Markov Models (HMMs) are a commonly used tool for inference of transcription factor (TF) binding sites from DNA sequence data. We exploit the mathematical equivalence between HMMs for TF binding and the "inverse" statistical mechanics of hard rods in a one-dimensional disordered potential to investigate learning in HMMs. We derive analytic expressions for the Fisher information, a commonly employed measure of confidence in learned parameters, in the biologically relevant limit where the density of binding sites is low. We then use techniques from statistical mechanics to derive a scaling principle relating the specificity (binding energy) of a TF to the minimum amount of training data necessary to learn it.

  17. New Insights into Cooperative Binding of Homeodomain Transcription Factors PREP1 and PBX1 to DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucchelli, Chiara; Ferrari, Elena; Blasi, Francesco; Musco, Giovanna; Bruckmann, Chiara

    2017-01-01

    PREP1 and PBX1 are homeodomain (HD) transcription factors that play crucial roles in embryonic development. Here, we present the first biophysical characterization of a PREP1 HD, and the NMR spectroscopic study of its DNA binding pocket. The data show that residues flanking the HD participate in DNA binding. The kinetic parameters for DNA binding of individual PREP1 and PBX1 HDs, and of their combination, show that isolated PREP1 and PBX1 HDs bind to DNA in a cooperative manner. A novel PREP1 motif, flanking the HD at the C-terminus, is required for cooperativity. PMID:28094776

  18. Statistical Mechanics of Transcription-Factor Binding Site Discovery Using Hidden Markov Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Pankaj; Schwab, David J; Sengupta, Anirvan M

    2011-04-01

    Hidden Markov Models (HMMs) are a commonly used tool for inference of transcription factor (TF) binding sites from DNA sequence data. We exploit the mathematical equivalence between HMMs for TF binding and the "inverse" statistical mechanics of hard rods in a one-dimensional disordered potential to investigate learning in HMMs. We derive analytic expressions for the Fisher information, a commonly employed measure of confidence in learned parameters, in the biologically relevant limit where the density of binding sites is low. We then use techniques from statistical mechanics to derive a scaling principle relating the specificity (binding energy) of a TF to the minimum amount of training data necessary to learn it.

  19. Frontolimbic serotonin 2A receptor binding in healthy subjects is associated with personality risk factors for affective disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frokjaer, Vibe G.; Mortensen, Erik L.; Nielsen, Finn Årup

    2008-01-01

    Background: Serotonergic dysfunction has been associated with affective disorders. High trait neuroticism, as measured on personality inventories, is a risk factor for major depression. In this study we investigated whether neuroticism is associated with serotonin 2A receptor binding in brain...... regions of relevance for affective disorders. Methods: Eighty-three healthy volunteers completed the standardized personality questionnaire NEO-PI-R (Revised NEO Personality Inventory) and underwent [F-18]altanserin positron emission tomography imaging for assessment of serotonin 2A receptor binding...... remained significant after correction for multiple comparisons (r = .35, p = .009). Conclusions: In healthy subjects the personality dimension neuroticism and particularly its constituent trait, vulnerability, are positively associated with frontolimbic serotonin 2A binding. Our findings point...

  20. The TRA-1 transcription factor binds TRA-2 to regulate sexual fates in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shanping; Kimble, Judith

    2001-01-01

    The tra-1 and tra-2 sex-determining genes promote female fates in Caenorhabditis elegans. Classical genetic studies placed tra-1 as the terminal regulator of the pathway with tra-2 acting upstream as a regulator of regulators of tra-1. Here we report the surprising result that the TRA-1 transcription factor binds the intracellular domain of the TRA-2 membrane protein. This binding is dependent on the MX regulatory domain, a region of the TRA-2 intracellular domain shown previously to be critical for the onset of hermaphrodite spermatogenesis. The functional importance of the TRA-1–TRA-2 physical interaction is supported by genetic interactions between tra-1(0) and tra-2(mx) mutations: a reduction of tra-1 gene dose from two copies to one copy enhances the tra-2(mx) feminization phenotype, but has no apparent somatic effect. In Caenorhabditis briggsae, we also find an MX-dependent interaction between Cb-TRA-1 and Cb-TRA-2, but intriguingly, no cross-species interactions are seen. The conservation of the TRA-1– TRA-2 interaction underscores its importance in sex determination. PMID:11250902

  1. Bidirectional Transcription Arises from Two Distinct Hubs of Transcription Factor Binding and Active Chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scruggs, Benjamin S; Gilchrist, Daniel A; Nechaev, Sergei; Muse, Ginger W; Burkholder, Adam; Fargo, David C; Adelman, Karen

    2015-06-18

    Anti-sense transcription originating upstream of mammalian protein-coding genes is a well-documented phenomenon, but remarkably little is known about the regulation or function of anti-sense promoters and the non-coding RNAs they generate. Here we define at nucleotide resolution the divergent transcription start sites (TSSs) near mouse mRNA genes. We find that coupled sense and anti-sense TSSs precisely define the boundaries of a nucleosome-depleted region (NDR) that is highly enriched in transcription factor (TF) motifs. Notably, as the distance between sense and anti-sense TSSs increases, so does the size of the NDR, the level of signal-dependent TF binding, and gene activation. We further discover a group of anti-sense TSSs in macrophages with an enhancer-like chromatin signature. Interestingly, this signature identifies divergent promoters that are activated during immune challenge. We propose that anti-sense promoters serve as platforms for TF binding and establishment of active chromatin to further regulate or enhance sense-strand mRNA expression.

  2. Targeted protein footprinting: where different transcription factors bind to RNA polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traviglia, S L; Datwyler, S A; Yan, D; Ishihama, A; Meares, C F

    1999-11-30

    Gene transcription is regulated through the interactions of RNA polymerase (RNAP) with transcription factors, such as the bacterial sigma proteins. We have devised a new strategy that relies on targeted protein footprinting to make an extensive survey of proximity to the protein surface. This involves attaching cutting reagents randomly to lysine residues on the surface of a protein such as sigma. The lysine-labeled sigma protein is then used to cleave the polypeptide backbones of the RNAP proteins at exposed residues adjacent to the sigma binding site. We used targeted protein footprinting to compare the areas near which sigma(70), sigma(54), sigma(38), sigma(E), NusA, GreA, and omega bind to the protein subunits of Escherichia coli RNAP. The sigma proteins and NusA cut sites in similar regions of the two large RNAP subunits, beta and beta', outlining a common surface. GreA cuts a larger set of sites, whereas omega shows no overlap with the others, cutting only the beta' subunit at a unique location.

  3. Insulin-like growth factors, insulin-like growth factor-binding proteins, insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-3 protease, and growth hormone-binding protein in lipodystrophic human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haugaard, Steen B; Andersen, Ove; Hansen, Birgitte R;

    2004-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-lipodystrophy is associated with impaired growth hormone (GH) secretion. It remains to be elucidated whether insulin-like growth factors (IGFs), IGF-binding proteins (IGFBPs), IGFBP-3 protease, and GH-binding protein (GHBP) are abnormal in HIV-lipodystrophy. The......Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-lipodystrophy is associated with impaired growth hormone (GH) secretion. It remains to be elucidated whether insulin-like growth factors (IGFs), IGF-binding proteins (IGFBPs), IGFBP-3 protease, and GH-binding protein (GHBP) are abnormal in HIV......-lipodystrophy. These parameters were measured in overnight fasting serum samples from 16 Caucasian males with HIV-lipodystrophy (LIPO) and 15 Caucasian HIV-infected males without lipodystrophy (NONLIPO) matched for age, weight, duration of HIV infection, and antiretroviral therapy. In LIPO, abdominal fat mass and insulin...... study groups, including suppressed GH, and increased GHBP in LIPO, argue against GH resistance of GH-sensitive tissues in LIPO compared with NONLIPO; however, this notion awaits examination in dose-response studies. Furthermore, our data suggest that IGFBP-3 protease is a significant regulator...

  4. Binding specificities and potential roles of isoforms of eukaryotic initiation factor 4E in Leishmania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoffe, Yael; Zuberek, Joanna; Lerer, Asaf; Lewdorowicz, Magdalena; Stepinski, Janusz; Altmann, Michael; Darzynkiewicz, Edward; Shapira, Michal

    2006-12-01

    The 5' cap structure of trypanosomatid mRNAs, denoted cap 4, is a complex structure that contains unusual modifications on the first four nucleotides. We examined the four eukaryotic initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) homologues found in the Leishmania genome database. These proteins, denoted LeishIF4E-1 to LeishIF4E-4, are located in the cytoplasm. They show only a limited degree of sequence homology with known eIF4E isoforms and among themselves. However, computerized structure prediction suggests that the cap-binding pocket is conserved in each of the homologues, as confirmed by binding assays to m(7)GTP, cap 4, and its intermediates. LeishIF4E-1 and LeishIF4E-4 each bind m(7)GTP and cap 4 comparably well, and only these two proteins could interact with the mammalian eIF4E binding protein 4EBP1, though with different efficiencies. 4EBP1 is a translation repressor that competes with eIF4G for the same residues on eIF4E; thus, LeishIF4E-1 and LeishIF4E-4 are reasonable candidates for serving as translation factors. LeishIF4E-1 is more abundant in amastigotes and also contains a typical 3' untranslated region element that is found in amastigote-specific genes. LeishIF4E-2 bound mainly to cap 4 and comigrated with polysomal fractions on sucrose gradients. Since the consensus eIF4E is usually found in 48S complexes, LeishIF4E-2 could possibly be associated with the stabilization of trypanosomatid polysomes. LeishIF4E-3 bound mainly m(7)GTP, excluding its involvement in the translation of cap 4-protected mRNAs. It comigrates with 80S complexes which are resistant to micrococcal nuclease, but its function is yet unknown. None of the isoforms can functionally complement the Saccharomyces cerevisiae eIF4E, indicating that despite their structural conservation, they are considerably diverged.

  5. Conformational changes in dopamine transporter intracellular regions upon cocaine binding and dopamine translocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehnes, Yvette; Shan, Jufang; Beuming, Thijs; Shi, Lei; Weinstein, Harel; Javitch, Jonathan A

    2014-07-01

    The dopamine transporter (DAT), a member of the neurotransmitter:sodium symporter family, mediates the reuptake of dopamine at the synaptic cleft. DAT is the primary target for psychostimulants such as cocaine and amphetamine. We previously demonstrated that cocaine binding and dopamine transport alter the accessibility of Cys342 in the third intracellular loop (IL3). To study the conformational changes associated with the functional mechanism of the transporter, we made cysteine substitution mutants, one at a time, from Phe332 to Ser351 in IL3 of the background DAT construct, X7C, in which 7 endogenous cysteines were mutated. The accessibility of the 20 engineered cysteines to polar charged sulfhydryl reagents was studied in the absence and presence of cocaine or dopamine. Of the 11 positions that reacted with methanethiosulfonate ethyl ammonium, as evidenced by inhibition of ligand binding, 5 were protected against this inhibition by cocaine and dopamine (S333C, S334C, N336C, M342C and T349C), indicating that reagent accessibility is affected by conformational changes associated with inhibitor and substrate binding. In some of the cysteine mutants, transport activity is disrupted, but can be rescued by the presence of zinc, most likely because the distribution between inward- and outward-facing conformations is restored by zinc binding. The experimental data were interpreted in the context of molecular models of DAT in both the inward- and outward-facing conformations. Differences in the solvent accessible surface area for individual IL3 residues calculated for these states correlate well with the experimental accessibility data, and suggest that protection by ligand binding results from the stabilization of the outward-facing configuration. Changes in the residue interaction networks observed from the molecular dynamics simulations also revealed the critical roles of several positions during the conformational transitions. We conclude that the IL3 region of DAT

  6. ProteDNA: a sequence-based predictor of sequence-specific DNA-binding residues in transcription factors

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    This article presents the design of a sequence-based predictor named ProteDNA for identifying the sequence-specific binding residues in a transcription factor (TF). Concerning protein–DNA interactions, there are two types of binding mechanisms involved, namely sequence-specific binding and nonspecific binding. Sequence-specific bindings occur between protein sidechains and nucleotide bases and correspond to sequence-specific recognition of genes. Therefore, sequence-specific bindings are esse...

  7. Nucleon Form Factors in the Space- and Timelike Regions

    CERN Document Server

    Hammer, H W

    2001-01-01

    Dispersion relations provide a powerful tool to describe the electromagnetic form factors of the nucleon both in the spacelike and timelike regions with constraints from unitarity and perturbative QCD. We give a brief introduction into dispersion theory for nucleon form factors and present results from a recent form factor analysis. Particular emphasis is given to the form factors in the timelike region. Furthermore, some recent results for the spacelike form factors at low momentum transfer from a ChPT calculation by Kubis and Meissner are discussed.

  8. PeakXus: comprehensive transcription factor binding site discovery from ChIP-Nexus and ChIP-Exo experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartonen, Tuomo; Sahu, Biswajyoti; Dave, Kashyap; Kivioja, Teemu; Taipale, Jussi

    2016-09-01

    Transcription factor (TF) binding can be studied accurately in vivo with ChIP-exo and ChIP-Nexus experiments. Only fraction of TF binding mechanisms are yet fully understood and accurate knowledge of binding locations and patterns of TFs is key to understanding binding that is not explained by simple positional weight matrix models. ChIP-exo/Nexus experiments can also offer insight on the effect of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) at TF binding sites on expression of the target genes. This is an important mechanism of action for disease-causing SNPs at non-coding genomic regions. We describe a peak caller PeakXus that is specifically designed to leverage the increased resolution of ChIP-exo/Nexus and developed with the aim of making as few assumptions of the data as possible to allow discoveries of novel binding patterns. We apply PeakXus to ChIP-Nexus and ChIP-exo experiments performed both in Homo sapiens and in Drosophila melanogaster cell lines. We show that PeakXus consistently finds more peaks overlapping with a TF-specific recognition sequence than published methods. As an application example we demonstrate how PeakXus can be coupled with unique molecular identifiers (UMIs) to measure the effect of a SNP overlapping with a TF binding site on the in vivo binding of the TF. Source code of PeakXus is available at https://github.com/hartonen/PeakXus tuomo.hartonen@helsinki.fi or jussi.taipale@ki.se. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. The Association of Myosin IB with Actin Waves in Dictyostelium Requires Both the Plasma Membrane-Binding Site and Actin-Binding Region in the Myosin Tail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzeska, Hanna; Pridham, Kevin; Chery, Godefroy; Titus, Margaret A.; Korn, Edward D.

    2014-01-01

    F-actin structures and their distribution are important determinants of the dynamic shapes and functions of eukaryotic cells. Actin waves are F-actin formations that move along the ventral cell membrane driven by actin polymerization. Dictyostelium myosin IB is associated with actin waves but its role in the wave is unknown. Myosin IB is a monomeric, non-filamentous myosin with a globular head that binds to F-actin and has motor activity, and a non-helical tail comprising a basic region, a glycine-proline-glutamine-rich region and an SH3-domain. The basic region binds to acidic phospholipids in the plasma membrane through a short basic-hydrophobic site and the Gly-Pro-Gln region binds F-actin. In the current work we found that both the basic-hydrophobic site in the basic region and the Gly-Pro-Gln region of the tail are required for the association of myosin IB with actin waves. This is the first evidence that the Gly-Pro-Gln region is required for localization of myosin IB to a specific actin structure in situ. The head is not required for myosin IB association with actin waves but binding of the head to F-actin strengthens the association of myosin IB with waves and stabilizes waves. Neither the SH3-domain nor motor activity is required for association of myosin IB with actin waves. We conclude that myosin IB contributes to anchoring actin waves to the plasma membranes by binding of the basic-hydrophobic site to acidic phospholipids in the plasma membrane and binding of the Gly-Pro-Gln region to F-actin in the wave. PMID:24747353

  10. Photochemically enhanced binding of small molecules to the tumor necrosis factor receptor-1 inhibits the binding of TNF-[alpha

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, Percy H.; Scherle, Peggy A.; Muckelbauer, Jodi K.; Voss, Matthew E.; Liu, Rui-qin; Thompson III, Lorin A.; Xu, Meizhong; Lo, Yvonne C.; Li, Zhong; Strzemienski, Paul; Yang, Gengjie; Falahatpishen, Nikoo; Farrow, Neil A.; Tebben, Andrew J.; Underwood, Denis; Trzaskos, James M.; Friedman, Steven M.; Newton, Robert C.; Decicco, Carl P. (DuPont)

    2010-03-05

    The binding of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-{alpha}) to the type-1 TNF receptor (TNFRc1) plays an important role in inflammation. Despite the clinical success of biologics (antibodies, soluble receptors) for treating TNF-based autoimmune conditions, no potent small molecule antagonists have been developed. Our screening of chemical libraries revealed that N-alkyl 5-arylidene-2-thioxo-1,3-thiazolidin-4-ones were antagonists of this protein-protein interaction. After chemical optimization, we discovered IW927, which potently disrupted the binding of TNF-{alpha} to TNFRc1 (IC{sub 50} = 50 nM) and also blocked TNF-stimulated phosphorylation of I{kappa}-B in Ramos cells (IC{sub 50} = 600 nM). This compound did not bind detectably to the related cytokine receptors TNFRc2 or CD40, and did not display any cytotoxicity at concentrations as high as 100 {micro}M. Detailed evaluation of this and related molecules revealed that compounds in this class are 'photochemically enhanced' inhibitors, in that they bind reversibly to the TNFRc1 with weak affinity (ca. 40-100 mM) and then covalently modify the receptor via a photochemical reaction. We obtained a crystal structure of IV703 (a close analog of IW927) bound to the TNFRc1. This structure clearly revealed that one of the aromatic rings of the inhibitor was covalently linked to the receptor through the main-chain nitrogen of Ala-62, a residue that has already been implicated in the binding of TNF-{alpha} to the TNFRc1. When combined with the fact that our inhibitors are reversible binders in light-excluded conditions, the results of the crystallography provide the basis for the rational design of nonphotoreactive inhibitors of the TNF-{alpha}-TNFRc1 interaction.

  11. Photochemically enhanced binding of small molecules to the tumor necrosis factor receptor-1 inhibits the binding of TNF-alpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, P H; Scherle, P A; Muckelbauer, J K; Voss, M E; Liu, R Q; Thompson, L A; Tebben, A J; Solomon, K A; Lo, Y C; Li, Z; Strzemienski, P; Yang, G; Falahatpisheh, N; Xu, M; Wu, Z; Farrow, N A; Ramnarayan, K; Wang, J; Rideout, D; Yalamoori, V; Domaille, P; Underwood, D J; Trzaskos, J M; Friedman, S M; Newton, R C; Decicco, C P; Muckelbauer, J A

    2001-10-09

    The binding of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) to the type-1 TNF receptor (TNFRc1) plays an important role in inflammation. Despite the clinical success of biologics (antibodies, soluble receptors) for treating TNF-based autoimmune conditions, no potent small molecule antagonists have been developed. Our screening of chemical libraries revealed that N-alkyl 5-arylidene-2-thioxo-1,3-thiazolidin-4-ones were antagonists of this protein-protein interaction. After chemical optimization, we discovered IW927, which potently disrupted the binding of TNF-alpha to TNFRc1 (IC(50) = 50 nM) and also blocked TNF-stimulated phosphorylation of Ikappa-B in Ramos cells (IC(50) = 600 nM). This compound did not bind detectably to the related cytokine receptors TNFRc2 or CD40, and did not display any cytotoxicity at concentrations as high as 100 microM. Detailed evaluation of this and related molecules revealed that compounds in this class are "photochemically enhanced" inhibitors, in that they bind reversibly to the TNFRc1 with weak affinity (ca. 40-100 microM) and then covalently modify the receptor via a photochemical reaction. We obtained a crystal structure of IV703 (a close analog of IW927) bound to the TNFRc1. This structure clearly revealed that one of the aromatic rings of the inhibitor was covalently linked to the receptor through the main-chain nitrogen of Ala-62, a residue that has already been implicated in the binding of TNF-alpha to the TNFRc1. When combined with the fact that our inhibitors are reversible binders in light-excluded conditions, the results of the crystallography provide the basis for the rational design of nonphotoreactive inhibitors of the TNF-alpha-TNFRc1 interaction.

  12. Identification and positional distribution analysis of transcription factor binding sites for genes from the wheat fl-cDNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhen-Yong; Guo, Xiao-Jiang; Chen, Zhong-Xu; Chen, Wei-Ying; Wang, Ji-Rui

    2017-06-01

    The binding sites of transcription factors (TFs) in upstream DNA regions are called transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs). TFBSs are important elements for regulating gene expression. To date, there have been few studies on the profiles of TFBSs in plants. In total, 4,873 sequences with 5' upstream regions from 8530 wheat fl-cDNA sequences were used to predict TFBSs. We found 4572 TFBSs for the MADS TF family, which was twice as many as for bHLH (1951), B3 (1951), HB superfamily (1914), ERF (1820), and AP2/ERF (1725) TFs, and was approximately four times higher than the remaining TFBS types. The percentage of TFBSs and TF members showed a distinct distribution in different tissues. Overall, the distribution of TFBSs in the upstream regions of wheat fl-cDNA sequences had significant difference. Meanwhile, high frequencies of some types of TFBSs were found in specific regions in the upstream sequences. Both TFs and fl-cDNA with TFBSs predicted in the same tissues exhibited specific distribution preferences for regulating gene expression. The tissue-specific analysis of TFs and fl-cDNA with TFBSs provides useful information for functional research, and can be used to identify relationships between tissue-specific TFs and fl-cDNA with TFBSs. Moreover, the positional distribution of TFBSs indicates that some types of wheat TFBS have different positional distribution preferences in the upstream regions of genes.

  13. Amino Terminal Region of Dengue Virus NS4A Cytosolic Domain Binds to Highly Curved Liposomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Yu-Fu; Schwarten, Melanie; Hoffmann, Silke; Willbold, Dieter; Sklan, Ella H; Koenig, BerndW

    2015-07-21

    Dengue virus (DENV) is an important human pathogen causing millions of disease cases and thousands of deaths worldwide. Non-structural protein 4A (NS4A) is a vital component of the viral replication complex (RC) and plays a major role in the formation of host cell membrane-derived structures that provide a scaffold for replication. The N-terminal cytoplasmic region of NS4A(1-48) is known to preferentially interact with highly curved membranes. Here, we provide experimental evidence for the stable binding of NS4A(1-48) to small liposomes using a liposome floatation assay and identify the lipid binding sequence by NMR spectroscopy. Mutations L6E;M10E were previously shown to inhibit DENV replication and to interfere with the binding of NS4A(1-48) to small liposomes. Our results provide new details on the interaction of the N-terminal region of NS4A with membranes and will prompt studies of the functional relevance of the curvature sensitive membrane anchor at the N-terminus of NS4A.

  14. Crystal structure of the DNA-binding domain of Myelin-gene Regulatory Factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhen, Xiangkai; Li, Bowen; Hu, Fen; Yan, Shufeng; Meloni, Gabriele; Li, Huiliang; Shi, Ning

    2017-06-16

    Myelin-gene Regulatory Factor (MyRF) is one of the master transcription factors controlling myelin formation and development in oligodendrocytes which is crucial for the powerful brain functions. The N-terminal of MyRF, which contains a proline-rich region and a DNA binding domain (DBD), is auto-cleaved from the ER membrane, and then enters the nucleus to participate in transcription regulation of the myelin genes. Here we report the crystal structure of MyRF DBD. It shows an Ig-fold like architecture which consists of two antiparallel β-sheets with 7 main strands, packing against each other, forming a β-sandwich. Compared to its homolog, Ndt80, MyRF has a smaller and less complex DBD lacking the helices and the big loops outside the core. Structural alignment reveals that MyRF DBD possess less interaction sites with DNA than Ndt80 and may bind only at the major groove of DNA. Moreover, the structure reveals a trimeric assembly, agreeing with the previous report that MyRF DBD functions as a trimer. The mutant that we designed based on the structure disturbed trimer formation, but didn't affect the auto-cleavage reaction. It demonstrates that the activation of self-cleavage reaction of MyRF is independent of the presence of its N-terminal DBD homotrimer. The structure reported here will help to understand the molecular mechanism underlying the important roles of MyRF in myelin formation and development.

  15. Kinetic properties of a single nucleotide binding site on chloroplast coupling factor 1 (CF1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günther, S; Huchzermeyer, B

    1998-12-01

    The kinetics of nucleotide binding to spinach chloroplast coupling factor CF1 in a fully inhibited state were investigated by stopped-flow experiments using the fluorescent trinitrophenyl analogue (NO2)3Ph-ADP. The CF1 was in a state in which two of the three binding sites on the beta subunits were irreversibly blocked with ADP, Mg2+ and fluoroaluminate, while the three binding sites on the alpha subunits were occupied by nucleotides [Garin, J., Vincon, M., Gagnon, J. & Vignais, P. V. (1994) Biochemistry 33, 3772-3777)]. Thus, it was possible to characterise a single nucleotide-binding site without superimposed nucleotide exchange or binding to an additional site. (NO2)3Ph-ADP binding to the remaining site on the third beta subunit was characterised by a high dissociation rate of 15 s(-1), leading to a very low affinity (dissociation constant higher than 150 microM). Subsequent to isolation, CF1 preparations contained two endogenously bound nucleotides. Pre-loading with ATP yielded CF1 with five tightly bound nucleotides and one free nucleotide-binding site on a beta subunit. Pre-loading with ADP, however, resulted in a CF1 preparation containing four tightly bound nucleotides and two free nucleotide binding sites. One of the two free binding sites was located on a beta subunit, while the other was probably located on an alpha subunit.

  16. Multiplexed massively parallel SELEX for characterization of human transcription factor binding specificities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolma, Arttu; Kivioja, Teemu; Toivonen, Jarkko; Cheng, Lu; Wei, Gonghong; Enge, Martin; Taipale, Mikko; Vaquerizas, Juan M.; Yan, Jian; Sillanpää, Mikko J.; Bonke, Martin; Palin, Kimmo; Talukder, Shaheynoor; Hughes, Timothy R.; Luscombe, Nicholas M.; Ukkonen, Esko; Taipale, Jussi

    2010-01-01

    The genetic code—the binding specificity of all transfer-RNAs—defines how protein primary structure is determined by DNA sequence. DNA also dictates when and where proteins are expressed, and this information is encoded in a pattern of specific sequence motifs that are recognized by transcription factors. However, the DNA-binding specificity is only known for a small fraction of the ∼1400 human transcription factors (TFs). We describe here a high-throughput method for analyzing transcription factor binding specificity that is based on systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) and massively parallel sequencing. The method is optimized for analysis of large numbers of TFs in parallel through the use of affinity-tagged proteins, barcoded selection oligonucleotides, and multiplexed sequencing. Data are analyzed by a new bioinformatic platform that uses the hundreds of thousands of sequencing reads obtained to control the quality of the experiments and to generate binding motifs for the TFs. The described technology allows higher throughput and identification of much longer binding profiles than current microarray-based methods. In addition, as our method is based on proteins expressed in mammalian cells, it can also be used to characterize DNA-binding preferences of full-length proteins or proteins requiring post-translational modifications. We validate the method by determining binding specificities of 14 different classes of TFs and by confirming the specificities for NFATC1 and RFX3 using ChIP-seq. Our results reveal unexpected dimeric modes of binding for several factors that were thought to preferentially bind DNA as monomers. PMID:20378718

  17. Electromobility Shift Assay Reveals Evidence in Favor of Allele-Specific Binding of RUNX1 to the 5' Hypersensitive Site 4-Locus Control Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehghani, Hossein; Ghobakhloo, Sepideh; Neishabury, Maryam

    2016-08-01

    In our previous studies on the Iranian β-thalassemia (β-thal) patients, we identified an association between the severity of the β-thal phenotype and the polymorphic palindromic site at the 5' hypersensitive site 4-locus control region (5'HS4-LCR) of the β-globin gene cluster. Furthermore, a linkage disequilibrium was observed between this region and XmnI-HBG2 in the patient population. Based on this data, it was suggested that the well-recognized phenotype-ameliorating role assigned to positive XmnI could be associated with its linked elements in the LCR. To investigate the functional significance of polymorphisms at the 5'HS4-LCR, we studied its influence on binding of transcription factors. Web-based predictions of transcription factor binding revealed a binding site for runt-related transcription factor 1 (RUNX1), when the allele at the center of the palindrome (TGGGG(A/G)CCCCA) was A but not when it was G. Furthermore, electromobility shift assay (EMSA) presented evidence in support of allele-specific binding of RUNX1 to 5'HS4. Considering that RUNX1 is a well-known regulator of hematopoiesis, these preliminary data suggest the importance of further studies to confirm this interaction and consequently investigate its functional and phenotypical relevance. These studies could help us to understand the molecular mechanism behind the phenotype modifying role of the 5'HS4-LCR polymorphic palindromic region (rs16912979), which has been observed in previous studies.

  18. Receptor binding and adenylate cyclase activities of glucagon analogues modified in the N-terminal region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKee, R.L.; Pelton, J.T.; Trivedi, D.; Johnson, D.G.; Coy, D.H.; Sueiras-Diaz, J.; Hruby, V.J.

    1986-04-08

    In this study, we determined the ability of four N-terminally modified derivatives of glucagon, (3-Me-His1,Arg12)-, (Phe1,Arg12)-, (D-Ala4,Arg12)-, and (D-Phe4)glucagon, to compete with 125I-glucagon for binding sites specific for glucagon in hepatic plasma membranes and to activate the hepatic adenylate cyclase system, the second step involved in producing many of the physiological effects of glucagon. Relative to the native hormone, (3-Me-His1,Arg12)glucagon binds approximately twofold greater to hepatic plasma membranes but is fivefold less potent in the adenylate cyclase assay. (Phe1,Arg12)glucagon binds threefold weaker and is also approximately fivefold less potent in adenylate cyclase activity. In addition, both analogues are partial agonists with respect to adenylate cyclase. These results support the critical role of the N-terminal histidine residue in eliciting maximal transduction of the hormonal message. (D-Ala4,Arg12)glucagon and (D-Phe4)glucagon, analogues designed to examine the possible importance of a beta-bend conformation in the N-terminal region of glucagon for binding and biological activities, have binding potencies relative to glucagon of 31% and 69%, respectively. (D-Ala4,Arg12)glucagon is a partial agonist in the adenylate cyclase assay system having a fourfold reduction in potency, while the (D-Phe4) derivative is a full agonist essentially equipotent with the native hormone. These results do not necessarily support the role of an N-terminal beta-bend in glucagon receptor recognition. With respect to in vivo glycogenolysis activities, all of the analogues have previously been reported to be full agonists.

  19. Differential requirements for HIV-1 Vif-mediated APOBEC3G degradation and RUNX1-mediated transcription by core binding factor beta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Juan; Zhao, Ke; Rui, Yajuan; Li, Peng; Zhou, Xiaohong; Zhang, Wenyan; Yu, Xiao-Fang

    2013-02-01

    Core binding factor beta (CBFβ), a transcription regulator through RUNX binding, was recently reported critical for Vif function. Here, we mapped the primary functional domain important for Vif function to amino acids 15 to 126 of CBFβ. We also revealed that different lengths and regions are required for CBFβ to assist Vif or RUNX. The important interaction domains that are uniquely required for Vif but not RUNX function represent novel targets for the development of HIV inhibitors.

  20. Prediction of DNA binding motifs from 3D models of transcription factors; identifying TLX3 regulated genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pujato, Mario; Kieken, Fabien; Skiles, Amanda A; Tapinos, Nikos; Fiser, Andras

    2014-12-16

    Proper cell functioning depends on the precise spatio-temporal expression of its genetic material. Gene expression is controlled to a great extent by sequence-specific transcription factors (TFs). Our current knowledge on where and how TFs bind and associate to regulate gene expression is incomplete. A structure-based computational algorithm (TF2DNA) is developed to identify binding specificities of TFs. The method constructs homology models of TFs bound to DNA and assesses the relative binding affinity for all possible DNA sequences using a knowledge-based potential, after optimization in a molecular mechanics force field. TF2DNA predictions were benchmarked against experimentally determined binding motifs. Success rates range from 45% to 81% and primarily depend on the sequence identity of aligned target sequences and template structures, TF2DNA was used to predict 1321 motifs for 1825 putative human TF proteins, facilitating the reconstruction of most of the human gene regulatory network. As an illustration, the predicted DNA binding site for the poorly characterized T-cell leukemia homeobox 3 (TLX3) TF was confirmed with gel shift assay experiments. TLX3 motif searches in human promoter regions identified a group of genes enriched in functions relating to hematopoiesis, tissue morphology, endocrine system and connective tissue development and function. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  1. Having it both ways: transcription factors that bind DNA and RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassiday, Laura A; Maher, L James

    2002-10-01

    Multifunctional proteins challenge the conventional 'one protein-one function' paradigm. Here we note apparent multifunctional proteins with nucleic acid partners, tabulating eight examples. We then focus on eight additional cases of transcription factors that bind double-stranded DNA with sequence specificity, but that also appear to lead alternative lives as RNA-binding proteins. Exemplified by the prototypic Xenopus TFIIIA protein, and more recently by mammalian p53, this list of transcription factors includes WT-1, TRA-1, bicoid, the bacterial sigma(70) subunit, STAT1 and TLS/FUS. The existence of transcription factors that bind both DNA and RNA provides an interesting puzzle. Little is known concerning the biological roles of these alternative protein-nucleic acid interactions, and even less is known concerning the structural basis for dual nucleic acid specificity. We discuss how these natural examples have motivated us to identify artificial RNA sequences that competitively inhibit a DNA-binding transcription factor not known to have a natural RNA partner. The identification of such RNAs raises the possibility that RNA binding by DNA-binding proteins is more common than currently appreciated.

  2. DNA-MATRIX: a tool for constructing transcription factor binding sites Weight matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandra Prakash Singh,

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite considerable effort to date, DNA transcription factor binding sites prediction in whole genome remains a challenge for the researchers. Currently the genome wide transcription factor binding sites prediction tools required either direct pattern sequence or weight matrix. Although there are known transcription factor binding sites pattern databases and tools for genome level prediction but no tool for weight matrix construction. Considering this, we developed a DNA-MATRIX tool for searching putative transcription factor binding sites in genomic sequences. DNA-MATRIX uses the simple heuristic approach for weight matrix construction, which can be transformed into different formats as per the requirement of researcher’s for further genome wide prediction and therefore provides the possibility to identify the conserved known DNA binding sites in the coregulated genes and also to search for a great variety of different regulatory binding patterns. The user may construct and save specific weight or frequency matrices in different formats derived through user selected set of known motif sequences.

  3. Binding of factor VIII to von willebrand factor is enabled by cleavage of the von Willebrand factor propeptide and enhanced by formation of disulfide-linked multimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendetowicz, A V; Morris, J A; Wise, R J; Gilbert, G E; Kaufman, R J

    1998-07-15

    von Willebrand factor (vWF) is a multimeric adhesive glycoprotein with one factor VIII binding site/subunit. Prior reports suggest that posttranslational modifications of vWF, including formation of N-terminal intersubunit disulfide bonds and subsequent cleavage of the propeptide, influence availability and/or affinity of factor VIII binding sites. We found that deletion of the vWF propeptide produced a dimeric vWF molecule lacking N-terminal intersubunit disulfide bonds. This molecule bound fluorescein-labeled factor VIII with sixfold lower affinity than multimeric vWF in an equilibrium flow cytometry assay (approximate KDs, 5 nmol/L v 0.9 nmol/L). Coexpression of propeptide-deleted vWF with the vWF propeptide in trans yielded multimeric vWF that displayed increased affinity for factor VIII. Insertion of an alanine residue at the N-terminus of the mature vWF subunit destroyed binding to factor VIII, indicating that the native mature N-terminus is required for factor VIII binding. The requirement for vWF propeptide cleavage was shown by (1) a point mutation of the vWF propeptide cleavage site yielding pro-vWF that was defective in factor VIII binding and (2) correlation between efficiency of intracellular propeptide cleavage and factor VIII binding. Furthermore, in a cell-free system, addition of the propeptide-cleaving enzyme PACE/furin enabled factor VIII binding in parallel with propeptide cleavage. Our results indicate that high-affinity factor VIII binding sites are located on N-terminal disulfide-linked vWF subunits from which the propeptide has been cleaved.

  4. Effects of calmodulin on DNA-binding activity of heat shock transcription factor in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The DNA-binding activity of heat shock transcription factor (HSF) was induced by heat shock (HS) of a whole cell extract. Addition of antiserum, specific to CaM, to a whole cell extract reduced bind of the HSF to the heat shock element (HSE) with maize, and the re-addition of CaM to the sample restored the activity of the HSF for binding to HSE. In addition, DNA-binding activity of the HSF was also induced by directly adding CaM to a whole cell extract at non-HS temperature with maize. Similar results were obtained with wheat and tomato. Our observations provide the first example of the involvement of CaM in regulation of the DNA-binding activity of the HSF.

  5. Context differences reveal insulator and activator functions of a Su(Hw binding region.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexey A Soshnev

    Full Text Available Insulators are DNA elements that divide chromosomes into independent transcriptional domains. The Drosophila genome contains hundreds of binding sites for the Suppressor of Hairy-wing [Su(Hw] insulator protein, corresponding to locations of the retroviral gypsy insulator and non-gypsy binding regions (BRs. The first non-gypsy BR identified, 1A-2, resides in cytological region 1A. Using a quantitative transgene system, we show that 1A-2 is a composite insulator containing enhancer blocking and facilitator elements. We discovered that 1A-2 separates the yellow (y gene from a previously unannotated, non-coding RNA gene, named yar for y-achaete (ac intergenic RNA. The role of 1A-2 was elucidated using homologous recombination to excise these sequences from the natural location, representing the first deletion of any Su(Hw BR in the genome. Loss of 1A-2 reduced yar RNA accumulation, without affecting mRNA levels from the neighboring y and ac genes. These data indicate that within the 1A region, 1A-2 acts an activator of yar transcription. Taken together, these studies reveal that the properties of 1A-2 are context-dependent, as this element has both insulator and enhancer activities. These findings imply that the function of non-gypsy Su(Hw BRs depends on the genomic environment, predicting that Su(Hw BRs represent a diverse collection of genomic regulatory elements.

  6. A 31-residue peptide induces aggregation of tau's microtubule-binding region in cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stöhr, Jan; Wu, Haifan; Nick, Mimi; Wu, Yibing; Bhate, Manasi; Condello, Carlo; Johnson, Noah; Rodgers, Jeffrey; Lemmin, Thomas; Acharya, Srabasti; Becker, Julia; Robinson, Kathleen; Kelly, Mark J. S.; Gai, Feng; Stubbs, Gerald; Prusiner, Stanley B.; Degrado, William F.

    2017-09-01

    The self-propagation of misfolded conformations of tau underlies neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's. There is considerable interest in discovering the minimal sequence and active conformational nucleus that defines this self-propagating event. The microtubule-binding region, spanning residues 244-372, reproduces much of the aggregation behaviour of tau in cells and animal models. Further dissection of the amyloid-forming region to a hexapeptide from the third microtubule-binding repeat resulted in a peptide that rapidly forms fibrils in vitro. We show that this peptide lacks the ability to seed aggregation of tau244-372 in cells. However, as the hexapeptide is gradually extended to 31 residues, the peptides aggregate more slowly and gain potent activity to induce aggregation of tau244-372 in cells. X-ray fibre diffraction, hydrogen-deuterium exchange and solid-state NMR studies map the beta-forming region to a 25-residue sequence. Thus, the nucleus for self-propagating aggregation of tau244-372 in cells is packaged in a remarkably small peptide.

  7. Trp[superscript 2313]-His[superscript 2315] of Factor VIII C2 Domain Is Involved in Membrane Binding Structure of a Complex Between the C[subscript 2] Domain and an Inhibitor of Membrane Binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Zhuo; Lin, Lin; Yuan, Cai; Nicolaes, Gerry A.F.; Chen, Liqing; Meehan, Edward J.; Furie, Bruce; Furie, Barbara; Huang, Mingdong (Harvard-Med); (UAH); (Maastricht); (Chinese Aca. Sci.)

    2010-11-03

    Factor VIII (FVIII) plays a critical role in blood coagulation by forming the tenase complex with factor IXa and calcium ions on a membrane surface containing negatively charged phospholipids. The tenase complex activates factor X during blood coagulation. The carboxyl-terminal C2 domain of FVIII is the main membrane-binding and von Willebrand factor-binding region of the protein. Mutations of FVIII cause hemophilia A, whereas elevation of FVIII activity is a risk factor for thromboembolic diseases. The C2 domain-membrane interaction has been proposed as a target of intervention for regulation of blood coagulation. A number of molecules that interrupt FVIII or factor V (FV) binding to cell membranes have been identified through high throughput screening or structure-based design. We report crystal structures of the FVIII C2 domain under three new crystallization conditions, and a high resolution (1.15 {angstrom}) crystal structure of the FVIII C2 domain bound to a small molecular inhibitor. The latter structure shows that the inhibitor binds to the surface of an exposed {beta}-strand of the C2 domain, Trp{sup 2313}-His{sup 2315}. This result indicates that the Trp{sup 2313}-His{sup 2315} segment is an important constituent of the membrane-binding motif and provides a model to understand the molecular mechanism of the C2 domain membrane interaction.

  8. Oct4/Sox2 binding sites contribute to maintaining hypomethylation of the maternal igf2/h19 imprinting control region.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David L Zimmerman

    Full Text Available A central question in genomic imprinting is how parental-specific DNA methylation of imprinting control regions (ICR is established during gametogenesis and maintained after fertilization. At the imprinted Igf2/H19 locus, CTCF binding maintains the unmethylated state of the maternal ICR after the blastocyst stage. In addition, evidence from Beckwith-Wiedemann patients and cultured mouse cells suggests that two Sox-Oct binding motifs within the Igf2/H19 ICR also participate in maintaining hypomethylation of the maternal allele. We found that the Sox and octamer elements from both Sox-Oct motifs were required to drive hypomethylation of integrated transgenes in mouse embryonic carcinoma cells. Oct4 and Sox2 showed cooperative binding to the Sox-Oct motifs, and both were present at the endogenous ICR. Using a mouse with mutations in the Oct4 binding sites, we found that maternally transmitted mutant ICRs acquired partial methylation in somatic tissues, but there was little effect on imprinted expression of H19 and Igf2. A subset of mature oocytes also showed partial methylation of the mutant ICR, which suggested that the Sox-Oct motifs provide some protection from methylation during oogenesis. The Sox-Oct motifs, however, were not required for erasure of paternal methylation in primordial germ cells, which indicated that the oocyte methylation was acquired post-natally. Maternally inherited mutant ICRs were unmethylated in blastocysts, which suggested that at least a portion of the methylation in somatic tissues occurred after implantation. These findings provide evidence that Sox-Oct motifs contribute to ICR hypomethylation in post-implantation embryos and maturing oocytes and link imprinted DNA methylation with key stem cell/germline transcription factors.

  9. Transcription of the human beta enolase gene (ENO-3) is regulated by an intronic muscle-specific enhancer that binds myocyte-specific enhancer factor 2 proteins and ubiquitous G-rich-box binding factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feo, S; Antona, V; Barbieri, G; Passantino, R; Calì, L; Giallongo, A

    1995-01-01

    To provide evidence for the cis-regulatory DNA sequences and trans-acting factors involved in the complex pattern of tissue- and stage-specific expression of the beta enolase gene, constructs containing fragments of the gene fused to the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene were used in transient-transfection assays of C2C12 myogenic cells. Deletion analysis revealed the presence of four major regions: two negative regions in the 5'-flanking sequence, a basal promoter region which directs expression at low levels in proliferating and differentiated muscle cells, and a positive region within the first intron that confers cell-type-specific and differentiation-induced expression. This positive regulatory element is located in the 3'-proximal portion of the first intron (nucleotides +504 to +637) and acts as an enhancer irrespective of orientation and position from the homologous beta enolase promoter or the heterologous thymidine kinase promoter, conferring in both cases muscle-specific expression to the linked reporter gene. Deletion of a putative myocyte-specific enhancer factor 1 (MEF-1) binding site, containing a canonical E-box motif, had no effects on muscle-specific transcription, indicating that this site is not required for the activity of the enhancer. Gel mobility shift assays, competition analysis, DNase I footprinting, and mutagenesis studies indicated that this element interacts through an A/T-rich box with a MEF-2 protein(s) and through a G-rich box with a novel ubiquitous factor(s). Mutation of either the G-rich box or the A/T-rich box resulted in a significantly reduced activity of the enhancer in transient-transfection assays. These data indicate that MEF-2 and G-rich-box binding factors are each necessary for tissue-specific expression of the beta enolase gene in skeletal muscle cells. PMID:7565752

  10. SELEX-Seq: A Method to Determine DNA Binding Specificities of Plant Transcription Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smaczniak, Cezary; Angenent, Gerco C; Kaufmann, Kerstin

    2017-01-01

    Systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) is a method that allows isolating specific nucleotide sequences that interact with a DNA binding protein of choice. By using a transcription factor (TF) and a randomized pool of double-stranded DNA, this technique can be used to characterize TF DNA binding specificities and affinities. The method is based on protein-DNA complex immunoprecipitation with protein-specific antibodies and subsequent DNA selection and amplification. Application of massively parallel sequencing (-seq) at each cycle of SELEX allows determining the relative affinities to any DNA sequence for any transcription factor or TF complex. The resulting TF DNA binding motifs can be used to predict potential DNA binding sites in genomes and thereby direct target genes of TFs.

  11. The conformational activation of antithrombin. A 2.85-A structure of a fluorescein derivative reveals an electrostatic link between the hinge and heparin binding regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntington, J A; McCoy, A; Belzar, K J; Pei, X Y; Gettins, P G; Carrell, R W

    2000-05-19

    Antithrombin is unique among the serpins in that it circulates in a native conformation that is kinetically inactive toward its target proteinase, factor Xa. Activation occurs upon binding of a specific pentasaccharide sequence found in heparin that results in a rearrangement of the reactive center loop removing constraints on the active center P1 residue. We determined the crystal structure of an activated antithrombin variant, N135Q S380C-fluorescein (P14-fluorescein), in order to see how full activation is achieved in the absence of heparin and how the structural effects of the substitution in the hinge region are translated to the heparin binding region. The crystal structure resembles native antithrombin except in the hinge and heparin binding regions. The absence of global conformational change allows for identification of specific interactions, centered on Glu(381) (P13), that are responsible for maintenance of the solution equilibrium between the native and activated forms and establishes the existence of an electrostatic link between the hinge region and the heparin binding region. A revised model for the mechanism of the allosteric activation of antithrombin is proposed.

  12. Enhanced optical magnetism for reversed optical binding forces between silicon nanoparticles in the visible region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Taka-Aki; Tsuchimoto, Yuta; Zaccaria, Remo Proietti; Toma, Andrea; Portela, Alejandro; Hara, Masahiko

    2017-01-09

    We perform a comprehensive numerical analysis on the optical binding forces of a multiple-resonant silicon nanodimer induced by the normal illumination of a plane wave in the visible region. The silicon nanodimer provides either repulsive or attractive forces in water while providing only attractive forces in air. The enhancement of the magnetic dipole mode is attributed to the generation of repulsive forces. The sign (attractive/repulsive) and the amplitude of the optical forces are controlled by incident polarization and separation distance between the silicon nanoparticles. These optomechanical effects demonstrate a key step toward the optical sorting and assembly of silicon nanoparticles.

  13. Binding of the Lactococcal Drug Dependent Transcriptional Regulator LmrR to Its Ligands and Responsive Promoter Regions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Pieter van der Berg

    Full Text Available The heterodimeric ABC transporter LmrCD from Lactococcus lactis is able to extrude several different toxic compounds from the cell, fulfilling a role in the intrinsic and induced drug resistance. The expression of the lmrCD genes is regulated by the multi-drug binding repressor LmrR, which also binds to its own promoter to autoregulate its own expression. Previously, we reported the crystal structure of LmrR in the presence and absence of the drugs Hoechst 33342 and daunomycin. Analysis of the mechanism how drugs control the repressor activity of LmrR is impeded by the fact that these drugs also bind to DNA. Here we identified, using X-ray crystallography and fluorescence, that riboflavin binds into the drug binding cavity of LmrR, adopting a similar binding mode as Hoechst 33342 and daunomycin. Microscale thermophoresis was employed to quantify the binding affinity of LmrR to its responsive promoter regions and to evaluate the cognate site of LmrR in the lmrCD promoter region. Riboflavin reduces the binding affinity of LmrR for the promoter regions. Our results support a model wherein drug binding to LmrR relieves the LmrR dependent repression of the lmrCD genes.

  14. Effects of Heat Stress on Yeast Heat Shock Factor-Promoter Binding In Vivo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ning LI; Le-Min ZHANG; Ke-Qin ZHANG; Jing-Shi DENG; Ralf PR(A)NDL; Fritz SCH(O)FFL

    2006-01-01

    Heat shock factor-DNA interaction is critical for understanding the regulatory mechanisms of stress-induced gene expression in eukaryotes. In this study, we analyzed the in vivo binding of yeast heat shock factor (HSF) to the promoters of target genes ScSSA1, ScSSA4, HSP30 and HSP104, using chromatin immunoprecipitation. Previous work suggested that yeast HSF is constitutively bound to DNA at all temperatures. Expression of HSF target genes is regulated at the post-transcriptional level. However, our results indicated that HSF does not bind to the promoters of ScSSA4 and HSP30 at normal temperature (23 ℃). Binding to these promoters is rapidly induced by heat stress at 39 ℃. HSF binds to ScSSA1 and HSP104 promoters under non-stress conditions, but at a low level. Heat stress rapidly leads to a notable increase in the binding of HSF to these two genes. The kinetics of the level of HSF-promoter binding correlate well with the expression of target genes, suggesting that the expression of HSF target genes is at least partially the result of HSF-promoter binding stability and subsequent transcription stimulation.

  15. Growth factors induce monocyte binding to vascular smooth muscle cells: implications for monocyte retention in atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Qiangjun; Lanting, Linda; Natarajan, Rama

    2004-09-01

    Adhesive interactions between monocytes and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) may contribute to subendothelial monocyte-macrophage retention in atherosclerosis. We investigated the effects of angiotensin II (ANG II) and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB on VSMC-monocyte interactions. Treatment of human aortic VSMC (HVSMC) with ANG II or PDGF-BB significantly increased binding to human monocytic THP-1 cells and to peripheral blood monocytes. This was inhibited by antibodies to monocyte beta(1)- and beta(2)-integrins. The binding was also attenuated by blocking VSMC arachidonic acid (AA) metabolism by inhibitors of 12/15-lipoxygenase (12/15-LO) or cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). Conversely, binding was enhanced by overexpression of 12/15-LO or COX-2. Direct treatment of HVSMC with AA or its metabolites also increased binding. Furthermore, VSMC derived from 12/15-LO knockout mice displayed reduced binding to mouse monocytic cells relative to genetic control mice. Using specific signal transduction inhibitors, we demonstrated the involvement of Src, phosphoinositide 3-kinase, and MAPKs in ANG II- or PDGF-BB-induced binding. Interestingly, after coculture with HVSMC, THP-1 cell surface expression of the scavenger receptor CD36 was increased. These results show for the first time that growth factors may play additional roles in atherosclerosis by increasing monocyte binding to VSMC via AA metabolism and key signaling pathways. This can lead to monocyte subendothelial retention, CD36 expression, and foam cell formation.

  16. Statistical Mechanics of Transcription-Factor Binding Site Discovery Using Hidden Markov Models

    OpenAIRE

    Mehta, Pankaj; Schwab, David J.; Sengupta, Anirvan M.

    2011-01-01

    Hidden Markov Models (HMMs) are a commonly used tool for inference of transcription factor (TF) binding sites from DNA sequence data. We exploit the mathematical equivalence between HMMs for TF binding and the "inverse" statistical mechanics of hard rods in a one-dimensional disordered potential to investigate learning in HMMs. We derive analytic expressions for the Fisher information, a commonly employed measure of confidence in learned parameters, in the biologically relevant limit where th...

  17. An information transmission model for transcription factor binding at regulatory DNA sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Mingfeng; Yu, Dong; Jin, Yuan; Dou, Lei; Li, Beiping; Wang, Yuelan; Yue, Junjie; Liang, Long

    2012-06-06

    Computational identification of transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) is a rapid, cost-efficient way to locate unknown regulatory elements. With increased potential for high-throughput genome sequencing, the availability of accurate computational methods for TFBS prediction has never been as important as it currently is. To date, identifying TFBSs with high sensitivity and specificity is still an open challenge, necessitating the development of novel models for predicting transcription factor-binding regulatory DNA elements. Based on the information theory, we propose a model for transcription factor binding of regulatory DNA sites. Our model incorporates position interdependencies in effective ways. The model computes the information transferred (TI) between the transcription factor and the TFBS during the binding process and uses TI as the criterion to determine whether the sequence motif is a possible TFBS. Based on this model, we developed a computational method to identify TFBSs. By theoretically proving and testing our model using both real and artificial data, we found that our model provides highly accurate predictive results. In this study, we present a novel model for transcription factor binding regulatory DNA sites. The model can provide an increased ability to detect TFBSs.

  18. Receptor binding sites for atrial natriuretic factor are expressed by brown adipose tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacay, A.C.; Mantyh, C.R.; Vigna, S.R.; Mantyh, P.W. (Wadsworth VA Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (USA))

    1988-09-01

    To explore the possibility that atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) is involved in thermoregulation we used quantitative receptor autoradiography and homogenate receptor binding assays to identify ANF bindings sites in neonatal rat and sheep brown adipose tissue, respectively. Using quantitative receptor autoradiography were were able to localize high levels of specific binding sites for {sup 125}I-rat ANF in neonatal rat brown adipose tissue. Homogenate binding assays on sheep brown fat demonstrated that the radioligand was binding to the membrane fraction and that the specific binding was not due to a lipophilic interaction between {sup 125}I-rat ANF and brown fat. Specific binding of {sup 125}I-rat ANF to the membranes of brown fat cells was inhibited by unlabeled rat ANF with a Ki of 8.0 x 10(-9) M, but not by unrelated peptides. These studies demonstrate that brown fat cells express high levels of ANF receptor binding sites in neonatal rat and sheep and suggest that ANF may play a role in thermoregulation.

  19. Systematic dissection of genomic features determining transcription factor binding and enhancer function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Sharon R.; Zhang, Xiaolan; Wang, Li; Engreitz, Jesse; Melnikov, Alexandre; Rogov, Peter; Tewhey, Ryan; Isakova, Alina; Deplancke, Bart; Bernstein, Bradley E.; Mikkelsen, Tarjei S.; Lander, Eric S.

    2017-01-01

    Enhancers regulate gene expression through the binding of sequence-specific transcription factors (TFs) to cognate motifs. Various features influence TF binding and enhancer function—including the chromatin state of the genomic locus, the affinities of the binding site, the activity of the bound TFs, and interactions among TFs. However, the precise nature and relative contributions of these features remain unclear. Here, we used massively parallel reporter assays (MPRAs) involving 32,115 natural and synthetic enhancers, together with high-throughput in vivo binding assays, to systematically dissect the contribution of each of these features to the binding and activity of genomic regulatory elements that contain motifs for PPARγ, a TF that serves as a key regulator of adipogenesis. We show that distinct sets of features govern PPARγ binding vs. enhancer activity. PPARγ binding is largely governed by the affinity of the specific motif site and higher-order features of the larger genomic locus, such as chromatin accessibility. In contrast, the enhancer activity of PPARγ binding sites depends on varying contributions from dozens of TFs in the immediate vicinity, including interactions between combinations of these TFs. Different pairs of motifs follow different interaction rules, including subadditive, additive, and superadditive interactions among specific classes of TFs, with both spatially constrained and flexible grammars. Our results provide a paradigm for the systematic characterization of the genomic features underlying regulatory elements, applicable to the design of synthetic regulatory elements or the interpretation of human genetic variation. PMID:28137873

  20. ChIP-exo signal associated with DNA-binding motifs provides insight into the genomic binding of the glucocorticoid receptor and cooperating transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starick, Stephan R; Ibn-Salem, Jonas; Jurk, Marcel; Hernandez, Céline; Love, Michael I; Chung, Ho-Ryun; Vingron, Martin; Thomas-Chollier, Morgane; Meijsing, Sebastiaan H

    2015-06-01

    The classical DNA recognition sequence of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) appears to be present at only a fraction of bound genomic regions. To identify sequences responsible for recruitment of this transcription factor (TF) to individual loci, we turned to the high-resolution ChIP-exo approach. We exploited this signal by determining footprint profiles of TF binding at single-base-pair resolution using ExoProfiler, a computational pipeline based on DNA binding motifs. When applied to our GR and the few available public ChIP-exo data sets, we find that ChIP-exo footprints are protein- and recognition sequence-specific signatures of genomic TF association. Furthermore, we show that ChIP-exo captures information about TFs other than the one directly targeted by the antibody in the ChIP procedure. Consequently, the shape of the ChIP-exo footprint can be used to discriminate between direct and indirect (tethering to other DNA-bound proteins) DNA association of GR. Together, our findings indicate that the absence of classical recognition sequences can be explained by direct GR binding to a broader spectrum of sequences than previously known, either as a homodimer or as a heterodimer binding together with a member of the ETS or TEAD families of TFs, or alternatively by indirect recruitment via FOX or STAT proteins. ChIP-exo footprints also bring structural insights and locate DNA:protein cross-link points that are compatible with crystal structures of the studied TFs. Overall, our generically applicable footprint-based approach uncovers new structural and functional insights into the diverse ways of genomic cooperation and association of TFs. © 2015 Starick et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  1. The heparin-binding site in tetranectin is located in the N-terminal region and binding does not involve the carbohydrate recognition domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorentsen, R H; Graversen, Jonas Heilskov; Caterer, N R

    2000-01-01

    in three exons. Exon 3 encodes the carbohydrate recognition domain, which binds to kringle 4 in plasminogen at low levels of Ca(2+). Exon 2 encodes an alpha-helix, which is necessary and sufficient to govern the trimerization of tetranectin by assembling into a triple-helical coiled-coil structural element......Tetranectin is a homotrimeric plasma and extracellular-matrix protein that binds plasminogen and complex sulphated polysaccharides including heparin. In terms of primary and tertiary structure, tetranectin is related to the collectin family of Ca(2+)-binding C-type lectins. Tetranectin is encoded....... Here we show that the heparin-binding site in tetranectin resides not in the carbohydrate recognition domain but within the N-terminal region, comprising the 16 amino acid residues encoded by exon 1. In particular, the lysine residues in the decapeptide segment KPKKIVNAKK (tetranectin residues 6...

  2. Identification of transcription factor AML-1 binding site upstream of human cytomegalovirus UL111A gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoqun Zheng

    Full Text Available Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV interleukin-10 (hcmvIL-10, encoded by HCMV UL111A gene, is a homolog of human IL-10. It exerts immunomodulatory effects that allow HCMV to evade host defense mechanisms. However, the exact mechanism underlying the regulation of hcmvIL-10 expression is not well understood. The transcription factor acute myeloid leukemia 1 (AML-1 plays an important role in the regulation of various genes involved in the differentiation of hematopoietic lineages. A putative AML-1 binding site is present within the upstream regulatory region (URR of UL111A gene. To provide evidence that AML-1 is involved in regulating UL111A gene expression, we examined the interaction of AML-1 with the URR of UL111A in HCMV-infected human monocytic THP-1 cells using a chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. HcmvIL-10 transcription was detected in differentiated THP-1 cells, but not in undifferentiated ones. Furthermore, the URR of UL111A showed a higher intensity of AML-1 binding, a higher level of histone H3 acetyl-K9, but a lower level of histone H3 dimethyl-K9 in differentiated THP-1 cells than undifferentiated cells. Down-regulation of AML1 by RNA interference decreased the expression of the UL111A gene. Our results suggest that AML-1 may contribute to the epigenetic regulation of UL111A gene via histone modification in HCMV-infected differentiated THP-1 cells. This finding could be useful for the development of new anti-viral therapies.

  3. Pituitary tumor transforming gene binding factor: a new gene in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Rachel J; Read, Martin L; Smith, Vicki E; Sharma, Neil; Reynolds, Gary M; Buckley, Laura; Doig, Craig; Campbell, Moray J; Lewy, Greg; Eggo, Margaret C; Loubiere, Laurence S; Franklyn, Jayne A; Boelaert, Kristien; McCabe, Christopher J

    2010-05-01

    Pituitary tumor transforming gene (PTTG) binding factor (PBF; PTTG1IP) is a relatively uncharacterized oncoprotein whose function remains obscure. Because of the presence of putative estrogen response elements (ERE) in its promoter, we assessed PBF regulation by estrogen. PBF mRNA and protein expression were induced by both diethylstilbestrol and 17beta-estradiol in estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha)-positive MCF-7 cells. Detailed analysis of the PBF promoter showed that the region -399 to -291 relative to the translational start site contains variable repeats of an 18-bp sequence housing a putative ERE half-site (gcccctcGGTCAcgcctc). Sequencing the PBF promoter from 122 normal subjects revealed that subjects may be homozygous or heterozygous for between 1 and 6 repeats of the ERE. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and oligonucleotide pull-down assays revealed ERalpha binding to the PBF promoter. PBF expression was low or absent in normal breast tissue but was highly expressed in breast cancers. Subjects with greater numbers of ERE repeats showed higher PBF mRNA expression, and PBF protein expression positively correlated with ERalpha status. Cell invasion assays revealed that PBF induces invasion through Matrigel, an action that could be abrogated both by siRNA treatment and specific mutation. Furthermore, PBF is a secreted protein, and loss of secretion prevents PBF inducing cell invasion. Given that PBF is a potent transforming gene, we propose that estrogen treatment in postmenopausal women may upregulate PBF expression, leading to PBF secretion and increased cell invasion. Furthermore, the number of ERE half-sites in the PBF promoter may significantly alter the response to estrogen treatment in individual subjects.

  4. FACTORS OF STEADY AND BALANCED DEVELOPMENT OF REGIONAL ECONOMIC SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polidi A. A.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The article proves the need of identification and classification of the most relevant factors of the sustainable balanced development of the regional economic system (RES. Substantial filling of the category "sustainable balanced development" which is accepted within the real research is designated. On the basis of the analysis of the classifications of factors of the sustainable balanced development of economy of the region presented in scientific literature their discrepancy modern is established to conditions of globalization of the economy causing increase of a role of foreign economic activity of territorial subjects of the Russian Federation in ensuring their long-term competitiveness. Proceeding from the last, within the classification of factors of the sustainable balanced development of RES offered by authors the following their groups are allocated: global, national, regional. For each of the designated groups we substantiated the set of relevant factors

  5. Rational Mutagenesis of Cyclodextrin Glucanotransferase at the Calcium Binding Regions for Enhancement of Thermostability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kian Mau Goh

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Studies related to the engineering of calcium binding sites of CGTase are limited. The calcium binding regions that are known for thermostability function were subjected to site-directed mutagenesis in this study. The starting gene-protein is a variant of CGTase Bacillus sp. G1, reported earlier and denoted as “parent CGTase” herein. Four CGTase variants (S182G, S182E, N132R and N28R were constructed. The two variants with a mutation at residue 182, located adjacent to the Ca-I site and the active site cleft, possessed an enhanced thermostability characteristic. The activity half-life of variant S182G at 60 °C was increased to 94 min, while the parent CGTase was only 22 min. This improvement may be attributed to the formation of a shorter α-helix and the alleviation of unfavorable steric strains by glycine at the corresponding region. For the variant S182E, an extra ionic interaction at the A/B domain interface increased the half-life to 31 min, yet it reduced CGTase activity. The introduction of an ionic interaction at the Ca-I site via the mutation N132R disrupted CGTase catalytic activity. Conversely, the variant N28R, which has an additional ionic interaction at the Ca-II site, displayed increased cyclization activity. However, thermostability was not affected.

  6. Rational mutagenesis of cyclodextrin glucanotransferase at the calcium binding regions for enhancement of thermostability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Poh Hong; Illias, Rosli Md; Goh, Kian Mau

    2012-01-01

    Studies related to the engineering of calcium binding sites of CGTase are limited. The calcium binding regions that are known for thermostability function were subjected to site-directed mutagenesis in this study. The starting gene-protein is a variant of CGTase Bacillus sp. G1, reported earlier and denoted as "parent CGTase" herein. Four CGTase variants (S182G, S182E, N132R and N28R) were constructed. The two variants with a mutation at residue 182, located adjacent to the Ca-I site and the active site cleft, possessed an enhanced thermostability characteristic. The activity half-life of variant S182G at 60 °C was increased to 94 min, while the parent CGTase was only 22 min. This improvement may be attributed to the formation of a shorter α-helix and the alleviation of unfavorable steric strains by glycine at the corresponding region. For the variant S182E, an extra ionic interaction at the A/B domain interface increased the half-life to 31 min, yet it reduced CGTase activity. The introduction of an ionic interaction at the Ca-I site via the mutation N132R disrupted CGTase catalytic activity. Conversely, the variant N28R, which has an additional ionic interaction at the Ca-II site, displayed increased cyclization activity. However, thermostability was not affected.

  7. Functional diversification of paralogous transcription factors via divergence in DNA binding site motif and in expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larry N Singh

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Gene duplication is a major driver of evolutionary innovation as it allows for an organism to elaborate its existing biological functions via specialization or diversification of initially redundant gene paralogs. Gene function can diversify in several ways. Transcription factor gene paralogs in particular, can diversify either by changes in their tissue-specific expression pattern or by changes in the DNA binding site motif recognized by their protein product, which in turn alters their gene targets. The relationship between these two modes of functional diversification of transcription factor paralogs has not been previously investigated, and is essential for understanding adaptive evolution of transcription factor gene families. FINDINGS: Based on a large set of human paralogous transcription factor pairs, we show that when the DNA binding site motifs of transcription factor paralogs are similar, the expressions of the genes that encode the paralogs have diverged, so in general, at most one of the paralogs is highly expressed in a tissue. Moreover, paralogs with diverged DNA binding site motifs tend to be diverged in their function. Conversely, two paralogs that are highly expressed in a tissue tend to have dissimilar DNA binding site motifs. We have also found that in general, within a paralogous family, tissue-specific decrease in gene expression is more frequent than what is expected by chance. CONCLUSIONS: While previous investigations of paralogous gene diversification have only considered coding sequence divergence, by explicitly quantifying divergence in DNA binding site motif, our work presents a new paradigm for investigating functional diversification. Consistent with evolutionary expectation, our quantitative analysis suggests that paralogous transcription factors have survived extinction in part, either through diversification of their DNA binding site motifs or through alterations in their tissue-specific expression

  8. Access to the Genome: A Study of Transcription Factor Binding Within Nucleosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brehove, Matthew

    All the DNA in a cell's nucleus is packaged into a material called chromatin consisting of DNA and DNA-associated proteins. The basic unit of chromatin is the nucleosome which consists of 147 bases of DNA wrapped around a protein core composed of two copies each of histones H2A, H2B, H3, and H4. DNA wrapped into a nucleosome is inaccessible to most DNA processing machinery. This machinery needs access to the DNA to perform processes such as transcription, replication, and repair. The cell uses many mechanisms to modulate this protection including nucleosome unwrapping, sliding, remodeling, disassembly, and chemical modification. This work used transcription factors along with fluorescent methods to probe the accessibility of DNA near the ends of the nucleosome. The DNA in this entry-exit region can spontaneously unwrap to provide transient access to DNA binding factors such as transcription factors. We studied the effect of histone post-translational modifications on the accessibility of DNA in the entry-exit region. We found that the phosphorylation at H3Y41ph increased DNA accessibility in vitro by 3-fold, which is similar in size to the effect of a previously studied modification H3K56ac. Since both of these modifications are associated with active genes and could occur together, we studied nucleosomes with both modifications and they showed a 17+/-5-fold increase in accessibility. This indicates that the cell could use multiple modifications in the entry-exit region to adjust the accessibility of nucleosomal DNA by over an order of magnitude. We also studied the effects of the removal of one H2A/H2B dimer. These partially formed nucleosomes, called hexasomes, are a component of chromatin that has been largely unstudied. Our results have shown that hexasomes have DNA accessibility similar to that of fully-formed nucleosomes on the side with the remaining H2A/H2B dimer. However, on the side without the dimer, our results showed the DNA remains permanently

  9. Discovery and validation of information theory-based transcription factor and cofactor binding site motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ruipeng; Mucaki, Eliseos J; Rogan, Peter K

    2016-11-28

    Data from ChIP-seq experiments can derive the genome-wide binding specificities of transcription factors (TFs) and other regulatory proteins. We analyzed 765 ENCODE ChIP-seq peak datasets of 207 human TFs with a novel motif discovery pipeline based on recursive, thresholded entropy minimization. This approach, while obviating the need to compensate for skewed nucleotide composition, distinguishes true binding motifs from noise, quantifies the strengths of individual binding sites based on computed affinity and detects adjacent cofactor binding sites that coordinate with the targets of primary, immunoprecipitated TFs. We obtained contiguous and bipartite information theory-based position weight matrices (iPWMs) for 93 sequence-specific TFs, discovered 23 cofactor motifs for 127 TFs and revealed six high-confidence novel motifs. The reliability and accuracy of these iPWMs were determined via four independent validation methods, including the detection of experimentally proven binding sites, explanation of effects of characterized SNPs, comparison with previously published motifs and statistical analyses. We also predict previously unreported TF coregulatory interactions (e.g. TF complexes). These iPWMs constitute a powerful tool for predicting the effects of sequence variants in known binding sites, performing mutation analysis on regulatory SNPs and predicting previously unrecognized binding sites and target genes.

  10. Pipeline for Efficient Mapping of Transcription Factor Binding Sites and Comparison of Their Models

    KAUST Repository

    Ba alawi, Wail

    2011-06-01

    The control of genes in every living organism is based on activities of transcription factor (TF) proteins. These TFs interact with DNA by binding to the TF binding sites (TFBSs) and in that way create conditions for the genes to activate. Of the approximately 1500 TFs in human, TFBSs are experimentally derived only for less than 300 TFs and only in generally limited portions of the genome. To be able to associate TF to genes they control we need to know if TFs will have a potential to interact with the control region of the gene. For this we need to have models of TFBS families. The existing models are not sufficiently accurate or they are too complex for use by ordinary biologists. To remove some of the deficiencies of these models, in this study we developed a pipeline through which we achieved the following: 1. Through a comparison analysis of the performance we identified the best models with optimized thresholds among the four different types of models of TFBS families. 2. Using the best models we mapped TFBSs to the human genome in an efficient way. The study shows that a new scoring function used with TFBS models based on the position weight matrix of dinucleotides with remote dependency results in better accuracy than the other three types of the TFBS models. The speed of mapping has been improved by developing a parallelized code and shows a significant speed up of 4x when going from 1 CPU to 8 CPUs. To verify if the predicted TFBSs are more accurate than what can be expected with the conventional models, we identified the most frequent pairs of TFBSs (for TFs E4F1 and ATF6) that appeared close to each other (within the distance of 200 nucleotides) over the human genome. We show unexpectedly that the genes that are most close to the multiple pairs of E4F1/ATF6 binding sites have a co-expression of over 90%. This indirectly supports our hypothesis that the TFBS models we use are more accurate and also suggests that the E4F1/ATF6 pair is exerting the

  11. Territory brand as a factor of region competitiveness (on the example of Penza region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Medushevskaya Inna

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the brand of territory as a factor of the region competitiveness. The examples of territory brands from the world and Russian practice are analyzed. The possible options for the brand for Penza region are proposed.

  12. rVISTA 2.0: Evolutionary Analysis of Transcription Factor Binding Sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loots, G G; Ovcharenko, I

    2004-01-28

    Identifying and characterizing the patterns of DNA cis-regulatory modules represents a challenge that has the potential to reveal the regulatory language the genome uses to dictate transcriptional dynamics. Several studies have demonstrated that regulatory modules are under positive selection and therefore are often conserved between related species. Using this evolutionary principle we have created a comparative tool, rVISTA, for analyzing the regulatory potential of noncoding sequences. The rVISTA tool combines transcription factor binding site (TFBS) predictions, sequence comparisons and cluster analysis to identify noncoding DNA regions that are highly conserved and present in a specific configuration within an alignment. Here we present the newly developed version 2.0 of the rVISTA tool that can process alignments generated by both zPicture and PipMaker alignment programs or use pre-computed pairwise alignments of seven vertebrate genomes available from the ECR Browser. The rVISTA web server is closely interconnected with the TRANSFAC database, allowing users to either search for matrices present in the TRANSFAC library collection or search for user-defined consensus sequences. rVISTA tool is publicly available at http://rvista.dcode.org/.

  13. Genome-wide conserved consensus transcription factor binding motifs are hyper-methylated

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Down Thomas A

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA methylation can regulate gene expression by modulating the interaction between DNA and proteins or protein complexes. Conserved consensus motifs exist across the human genome ("predicted transcription factor binding sites": "predicted TFBS" but the large majority of these are proven by chromatin immunoprecipitation and high throughput sequencing (ChIP-seq not to be biological transcription factor binding sites ("empirical TFBS". We hypothesize that DNA methylation at conserved consensus motifs prevents promiscuous or disorderly transcription factor binding. Results Using genome-wide methylation maps of the human heart and sperm, we found that all conserved consensus motifs as well as the subset of those that reside outside CpG islands have an aggregate profile of hyper-methylation. In contrast, empirical TFBS with conserved consensus motifs have a profile of hypo-methylation. 40% of empirical TFBS with conserved consensus motifs resided in CpG islands whereas only 7% of all conserved consensus motifs were in CpG islands. Finally we further identified a minority subset of TF whose profiles are either hypo-methylated or neutral at their respective conserved consensus motifs implicating that these TF may be responsible for establishing or maintaining an un-methylated DNA state, or whose binding is not regulated by DNA methylation. Conclusions Our analysis supports the hypothesis that at least for a subset of TF, empirical binding to conserved consensus motifs genome-wide may be controlled by DNA methylation.

  14. Expression and purification of full length mouse metal response element binding transcription factor-1 using Pichia pastoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huyck, Ryan W; Keightley, Andrew; Laity, John H

    2012-09-01

    The metal response element binding transcription factor-1 (MTF-1) is an important stress response, heavy metal detoxification, and zinc homeostasis factor in eukaryotic organisms from Drosophila to humans. MTF-1 transcriptional regulation is primarily mediated by elevated levels of labile zinc, which direct MTF-1 to bind the metal response element (MRE). This process involves direct zinc binding to the MTF-1 zinc fingers, and zinc dependent interaction of the MTF-1 acidic region with the p300 coactivator protein. Here, the first recombinant expression system for mutant and wild type (WT) mouse MTF-1 (mMTF-1) suitable for biochemical and biophysical studies in vitro is reported. Using the methyltropic yeast Pichia pastoris, nearly half-milligram recombinant WT and mutant mMTF-1 were produced per liter of P. pastoris cell culture, and purified by a FLAG-tag epitope. Using a first pass ammonium sulfate purification, followed by anti-FLAG affinity resin, mMTF-1 was purified to >95% purity. This recombinant mMTF-1 was then assayed for direct protein-protein interactions with p300 by co-immunoprecipitation. Surface plasmon resonance studies on mMTF-1 provided the first quantitative DNA binding affinity measurements to the MRE promotor element (K(d)=5±3 nM). Both assays demonstrated the functional activity of the recombinant mMTF-1, while elucidating the molecular basis for mMTF-1-p300 functional synergy, and provided new insights into the mMTF-1 domain specific roles in DNA binding. Overall, this production system provides accessibility for the first time to a multitude of in vitro studies using recombinant mutant and WT mMTF-1, which greatly facilitates new approaches to understanding the complex and varied functions of this protein.

  15. Construction of TNF-binding proteins by grafting hypervariable regions of F10 antibody on human fibronectin domain scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrovskaya, L E; Shingarova, L N; Kryukova, E A; Boldyreva, E F; Yakimov, S A; Guryanova, S V; Novoseletsky, V N; Dolgikh, D A; Kirpichnikov, M P

    2012-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) plays a key role in the pathogenesis of various diseases. To study the possibility of constructing TNF-binding proteins by grafting hypervariable regions of immunoglobulins (CDR), we have replaced amino acid sequences of loops from the tenth type III domain of human fibronectin ((10)Fn3) by amino acid sequences of CDR from the light and heavy chains of the anti-TNF antibody F10. The assessment of TNF-binding properties of the resulting proteins by ELISA has revealed the highest activity of Hd3 containing sequences CDR-H1 and CDR-H2 of the antibody F10 and of Hd2 containing sequences CDR-H1 and CDR-H3. The proteins constructed by us on the fibronectin domain scaffold specifically bound TNF during Western blotting and also weakened its cytotoxic effect on L929 line cells. The highest neutralizing activity was demonstrated by the proteins Hd2 and Hd3, which induced, respectively, 10- and 50-fold increase in the EC(50) of TNF.

  16. Biological sex influences learning strategy preference and muscarinic receptor binding in specific brain regions of prepubertal rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grissom, Elin M; Hawley, Wayne R; Hodges, Kelly S; Fawcett-Patel, Jessica M; Dohanich, Gary P

    2013-04-01

    According to the theory of multiple memory systems, specific brain regions interact to determine how the locations of goals are learned when rodents navigate a spatial environment. A number of factors influence the type of strategy used by rodents to remember the location of a given goal in space, including the biological sex of the learner. We recently found that prior to puberty male rats preferred a striatum-dependent stimulus-response strategy over a hippocampus-dependent place strategy when solving a dual-solution task, while age-matched females showed no strategy preference. Because the cholinergic system has been implicated in learning strategy and is known to be sexually dimorphic prior to puberty, we explored the relationship between learning strategy and muscarinic receptor binding in specific brain regions of prepubertal males and female rats. We confirmed our previous finding that at 28 days of age a significantly higher proportion of prepubertal males preferred a stimulus-response learning strategy than a place strategy to solve a dual-solution visible platform water maze task. Equal proportions of prepubertal females preferred stimulus-response or place strategies. Profiles of muscarinic receptor binding as assessed by autoradiography varied according to strategy preference. Regardless of biological sex, prepubertal rats that preferred stimulus-response strategy exhibited lower ratios of muscarinic receptor binding in the hippocampus relative to the dorsolateral striatum compared to rats that preferred place strategy. Importantly, much of the variance in this ratio was related to differences in the ventral hippocampus to a greater extent than the dorsal hippocampus. The ratios of muscarinic receptors in the hippocampus relative to the basolateral amygdala also were lower in rats that preferred stimulus-response strategy over place strategy. Results confirm that learning strategy preference varies with biological sex in prepubertal rats with males

  17. Fringe-mediated extension of O-linked fucose in the ligand-binding region of Notch1 increases binding to mammalian Notch ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Paul; Takeuchi, Hideyuki; Sheppard, Devon; Chillakuri, Chandramouli; Lea, Susan M; Haltiwanger, Robert S; Handford, Penny A

    2014-05-20

    The Notch signaling pathway is essential for many aspects of development, cell fate determination, and tissue homeostasis. Notch signaling can be modulated by posttranslational modifications to the Notch receptor, which are known to alter both ligand binding and receptor activation. We have modified the ligand-binding region (EGF domains 11-13) of human Notch1 (hN1) with O-fucose and O-glucose glycans and shown by flow cytometry and surface plasmon resonance that the Fringe-catalyzed addition of GlcNAc to the O-fucose at T466 in EGF12 substantially increases binding to Jagged1 and Delta-like 1 (DLL1) ligands. We have subsequently determined the crystal structures of EGF domains 11-13 of hN1 modified with either the O-fucose monosaccharide or the GlcNAc-fucose disaccharide at T466 of EGF12 and observed no change in backbone structure for each variant. Collectively, these data demonstrate a role for GlcNAc in modulating the ligand-binding site in hN1 EGF12, resulting in an increased affinity of this region for ligands Jagged1 and DLL1. We propose that this finding explains the Fringe-catalyzed enhancement of Notch-Delta signaling observed in flies and humans, but suggest that the inhibitory effect of Fringe on Jagged/Serrate mediated signaling involves other regions of Notch.

  18. Proton Form Factors Measurements in the Time-Like Region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anulli, F.; /Frascati

    2007-10-22

    I present an overview of the measurement of the proton form factors in the time-like region. BABAR has recently measured with great accuracy the e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} p{bar p} reaction from production threshold up to an energy of {approx} 4.5 GeV, finding evidence for a ratio of the electric to magnetic form factor greater than unity, contrary to expectation. In agreement with previous measurements, BABAR confirmed the steep rise of the magnetic form factor close to the p{bar p} mass threshold, suggesting the possible presence of an under-threshold N{bar N} vector state. These and other open questions related to the nucleon form factors both in the time-like and space-like region, wait for more data with different experimental techniques to be possibly solved.

  19. Specific binding of /sup 125/I-salmon calcitonin to rat brain. Regional variation and calcitonin specificity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamuta, H.; Furukawa, S.; Koida, M. (Nagasaki Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences); Yajima, H.; Orlowski, R.C.

    1981-02-01

    Rat brain particulate fraction was found to contain binding sites for /sup 125/I-Salmon Calcitonin-I (/sup 125/I-SCT). Maximum binding occurred in the physiological pH range of 7.25 - 7.5. The binding reaction proceeded in a temperature-dependent manner. Binding sites were broadly distributed among the various rat brain regions and considerable regional differences existed in the affinity and density as detected by Scatchard analysis. The highest affinity was recorded in the case of the hypothalamus and the lowest in the case of the cerebellum. The KD (nM) and Bmax (pmole/mg protein) estimated for the binding to four regions were as follows: hypothalamus: 1.4 and 0.19, midbrain, hippocampus plus striatum: 1.5 and 0.08, pon plus medulla oblongata: 3.0 and 0.15 and cerebellum: 8.3 and 0.20. Using a particulate fraction of rat brain void of cerebellum and cortices, a binding assay for calcitonins was developed. Binding of /sup 125/I-SCT was inhibited by unlabeled salmon, (Asu sup(1,7))-eel and porcine calcitonins in a dose-dependent manner and the IC50s were 2.0, 8.0 and 30 nM, respectively. The IC50s were comparable to those estimated using a kidney particulate fraction. Human calcitonin, ..beta..-endorphin and substance P were weak inhibitors of the binding. Other peptides, drugs and putative neurotransmitters tested (totally 23 substances) failed to inhibit the binding at concentrations of 1.0 ..mu..M. The physiological significance of brain binding sites for calcitonin, with the possibility that the brain may possess endogenous ligands for these sites are discussed.

  20. Genome-wide profiling of H3K56 acetylation and transcription factor binding sites in human adipocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kinyui Alice Lo

    Full Text Available The growing epidemic of obesity and metabolic diseases calls for a better understanding of adipocyte biology. The regulation of transcription in adipocytes is particularly important, as it is a target for several therapeutic approaches. Transcriptional outcomes are influenced by both histone modifications and transcription factor binding. Although the epigenetic states and binding sites of several important transcription factors have been profiled in the mouse 3T3-L1 cell line, such data are lacking in human adipocytes. In this study, we identified H3K56 acetylation sites in human adipocytes derived from mesenchymal stem cells. H3K56 is acetylated by CBP and p300, and deacetylated by SIRT1, all are proteins with important roles in diabetes and insulin signaling. We found that while almost half of the genome shows signs of H3K56 acetylation, the highest level of H3K56 acetylation is associated with transcription factors and proteins in the adipokine signaling and Type II Diabetes pathways. In order to discover the transcription factors that recruit acetyltransferases and deacetylases to sites of H3K56 acetylation, we analyzed DNA sequences near H3K56 acetylated regions and found that the E2F recognition sequence was enriched. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput sequencing, we confirmed that genes bound by E2F4, as well as those by HSF-1 and C/EBPα, have higher than expected levels of H3K56 acetylation, and that the transcription factor binding sites and acetylation sites are often adjacent but rarely overlap. We also discovered a significant difference between bound targets of C/EBPα in 3T3-L1 and human adipocytes, highlighting the need to construct species-specific epigenetic and transcription factor binding site maps. This is the first genome-wide profile of H3K56 acetylation, E2F4, C/EBPα and HSF-1 binding in human adipocytes, and will serve as an important resource for better understanding adipocyte

  1. Insulin-like growth factor binding protein-I-6 expression in activated microglia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chesik, D.; Glazenburg, K.; Wilczak, N.; Geeraedts, Felix; De Keyser, J.

    2004-01-01

    In the CNS insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) enhances survival of neurons, promotes myelin synthesis and acts as a mitogen for microglia. The effects of IGF-1 are regulated by a family of 6 IGF binding proteins (IGFBPs). We investigated mRNA expression patterns of IGFBPs in primary rat microglia

  2. Structural Basis for DNA Binding Specificity by the Auxin-Dependent ARF Transcription Factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, D.R.; Freire Rios, A.; Berg, van den W.A.M.; Saaki, T.; Manfield, I.W.; Kepinski, S.; López-Vidrieo, I.; Franco-Zorilla, J.M.; Vries, de S.C.; Solano, R.; Weijers, D.; Coll, M.

    2014-01-01

    Auxin regulates numerous plant developmental processes by controlling gene expression via a family of functionally distinct DNA-binding auxin response factors (ARFs), yet the mechanistic basis for generating specificity in auxin response is unknown. Here, we address this question by solving

  3. The neural cell adhesion molecule binds to fibroblast growth factor receptor 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Claus; Lauridsen, Jes B; Berezin, Vladimir;

    2006-01-01

    The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) can bind to and activate fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1). However, there are four major FGFR isoforms (FGFR1-FGFR4), and it is not known whether NCAM also interacts directly with the other three FGFR isoforms. In this study, we show by surface...

  4. Binding of the Covalent Flavin Assembly Factor to the Flavoprotein Subunit of Complex II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maklashina, Elena; Rajagukguk, Sany; Starbird, Chrystal A; McDonald, W Hayes; Koganitsky, Anna; Eisenbach, Michael; Iverson, Tina M; Cecchini, Gary

    2016-02-05

    Escherichia coli harbors two highly conserved homologs of the essential mitochondrial respiratory complex II (succinate:ubiquinone oxidoreductase). Aerobically the bacterium synthesizes succinate:quinone reductase as part of its respiratory chain, whereas under microaerophilic conditions, the quinol:fumarate reductase can be utilized. All complex II enzymes harbor a covalently bound FAD co-factor that is essential for their ability to oxidize succinate. In eukaryotes and many bacteria, assembly of the covalent flavin linkage is facilitated by a small protein assembly factor, termed SdhE in E. coli. How SdhE assists with formation of the covalent flavin bond and how it binds the flavoprotein subunit of complex II remain unknown. Using photo-cross-linking, we report the interaction site between the flavoprotein of complex II and the SdhE assembly factor. These data indicate that SdhE binds to the flavoprotein between two independently folded domains and that this binding mode likely influences the interdomain orientation. In so doing, SdhE likely orients amino acid residues near the dicarboxylate and FAD binding site, which facilitates formation of the covalent flavin linkage. These studies identify how the conserved SdhE assembly factor and its homologs participate in complex II maturation.

  5. JASPAR 2010: the greatly expanded open-access database of transcription factor binding profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Portales-Casamar, Elodie; Thongjuea, Supat; Kwon, Andrew T

    2009-01-01

    JASPAR (http://jaspar.genereg.net) is the leading open-access database of matrix profiles describing the DNA-binding patterns of transcription factors (TFs) and other proteins interacting with DNA in a sequence-specific manner. Its fourth major release is the largest expansion of the core database...

  6. Binding of von Willebrand factor and plasma proteins to the eggshell of Schistosoma mansoni

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dewalick, Saskia; Hensbergen, Paul J; Bexkens, Michiel L; Grosserichter-Wagener, Christina; Hokke, Cornelis H; Deelder, André M; de Groot, Philip G; Tielens, Aloysius G M; van Hellemond, Jaap J

    2014-01-01

    Schistosoma mansoni eggs have to cross the endothelium and intestinal wall to leave the host and continue the life cycle. Mechanisms involved in this essential step are largely unknown. Here we describe direct binding to the S. mansoni eggshell of von Willebrand factor and other plasma proteins invo

  7. Mapping Escherichia coli elongation factor Tu residues involved in binding of aminoacyl-tRNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiborg, Ove; Andersen, C; Knudsen, Charlotte Rohde

    1996-01-01

    -tRNA, which suggested an important role of Lys-89 and Asn-90 in tRNA binding. Furthermore, our results indicate helix B to be an important target site for nucleotide exchange factor EF-Ts. Also the mutants His-66 to Ala and His-118 to either Ala or Glu were characterized in an in vitro translation assay...

  8. Binding of von Willebrand factor and plasma proteins to the eggshell of Schistosoma mansoni

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dewalick, Saskia; Hensbergen, Paul J; Bexkens, Michiel L; Grosserichter-Wagener, Christina; Hokke, Cornelis H; Deelder, André M; de Groot, Philip G; Tielens, Aloysius G M; van Hellemond, Jaap J

    Schistosoma mansoni eggs have to cross the endothelium and intestinal wall to leave the host and continue the life cycle. Mechanisms involved in this essential step are largely unknown. Here we describe direct binding to the S. mansoni eggshell of von Willebrand factor and other plasma proteins

  9. NMR studies of the GTP/GDP binding domain of translation initiation factor IF2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tishchenko, Evgeny Vladimirovich

    2005-01-01

    Translation Initiation Factor 2 (IF2) plays an important role in the initiation stage of bacterial protein biosynthesis. This protein binds both fMet-tRNA and 30S ribosomal subunit in the presence of GTP, and it stimulates the formation of the 70S initiation complex. The NMR samples of the 15N-, 15N

  10. Conformational Dynamics and the Binding of Specific and Nonspecific DNA by the Autoinhibited Transcription Factor Ets-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desjardins, Geneviève; Okon, Mark; Graves, Barbara J; McIntosh, Lawrence P

    2016-07-26

    The affinity of the Ets-1 transcription factor for DNA is autoinhibited by an intrinsically disordered serine-rich region (SRR) and a helical inhibitory module (IM) appended to its winged helix-turn-helix ETS domain. Using NMR spectroscopy, we investigated how Ets-1 recognizes specific versus nonspecific DNA, with a focus on the roles of protein dynamics and autoinhibition in these processes. Upon binding either DNA, the two marginally stable N-terminal helices of the IM predominantly unfold, but still sample partially ordered conformations. Also, on the basis of amide chemical shift perturbation mapping, Ets-1 associates with both specific and nonspecific DNA through the same canonical ETS domain interface. These interactions are structurally independent of the SRR, and thus autoinhibition does not impart DNA-binding specificity. However, relative to the pronounced NMR spectroscopic changes in Ets-1 resulting from specific DNA binding, the spectra of the nonspecific DNA complexes showed conformational exchange broadening and lacked several diagnostic amide and indole signals attributable to hydrogen bonding interactions seen in reported X-ray crystallographic structures of this transcription factor with its cognate DNA sequences. Such differences are highlighted by the chemical shift and relaxation properties of several interfacial lysine and arginine side chains. Collectively, these data support a general model in which Ets-1 interacts with nonspecific DNA via dynamic electrostatic interactions, whereas hydrogen bonding drives the formation of well-ordered complexes with specific DNA.

  11. Conformational change upon ligand binding and dynamics of the PDZ domain from leukemia-associated Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiangxin; Zhang, Jiahai; Yang, Yinshan; Huang, Hongda; Shen, Weiqun; Hu, Qi; Wang, Xingsheng; Wu, Jihui; Shi, Yunyu

    2008-06-01

    Leukemia-associated Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor (LARG) is a RhoA-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) that can activate RhoA. The PDZ (PSD-95/Disc-large/ZO-1 homology) domain of LARG interacts with membrane receptors, which can relay extracellular signals to RhoA signal transduction pathways. Until now there is no structural and dynamic information about these interactions. Here we report the NMR structures of the LARG PDZ in the apo form and in complex with the plexin-B1 C-terminal octapeptide. Unobservable resonances of the residues in betaB/betaC and betaE/alphaB loops in apo state were observed in the complex state. A distinct region of the binding groove in the LARG PDZ was found to undergo conformational change compared with other PDZs. Analysis of the (15)N relaxation data using reduced spectral density mapping shows that the apo LARG PDZ (especially its ligand-binding groove) is flexible and exhibits internal motions on both picosecond to nanosecond and microsecond to millisecond timescales. Mutagenesis and thermodynamic studies indicate that the conformation of the betaB/betaC and betaE/alphaB loops affects the PDZ-peptide interaction. It is suggested that the conformational flexibility could facilitate the change of structures upon ligand binding.

  12. Shiga toxin activates complement and binds factor H: evidence for an active role of complement in hemolytic uremic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orth, Dorothea; Khan, Abdul Basit; Naim, Asma; Grif, Katharina; Brockmeyer, Jens; Karch, Helge; Joannidis, Michael; Clark, Simon J; Day, Anthony J; Fidanzi, Sonja; Stoiber, Heribert; Dierich, Manfred P; Zimmerhackl, Lothar B; Würzner, Reinhard

    2009-05-15

    Infections with enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) are a major cause of hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). Shiga toxins (Stxs), especially Stx2, are believed to represent major virulence factors of EHEC, contributing to HUS pathogenesis. Beside EHEC-associated HUS, there are hereditary atypical forms of HUS, which are mostly caused by mutations of complement regulators. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether or not complement is also involved in the pathogenesis of EHEC-induced typical HUS, by being activated either directly or indirectly by involvement of its inhibitors. Purified Stx2 markedly activated complement via the alternative pathway and was found to bind to factor H (FH), however, only when it was active. No apparent cleavage or destruction of FH was visible, and cofactor activity in fluid phase was unaffected, but clearly delayed for surface-attached FH, where it is essential for host cell protection. Binding studies using FH constructs revealed that Stx2 binds to short consensus repeats (SCRs) 6-8 and SCRs18-20, but not to SCRs16-17, i.e., to regions involved in the surface recognition function of FH. In conclusion, complement, and in particular FH, not only plays an important role in atypical HUS, but most probably also in EHEC-induced HUS.

  13. Evolution of the insulin-like growth factor binding protein (IGFBP) family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daza, Daniel Ocampo; Sundström, Görel; Bergqvist, Christina A; Duan, Cunming; Larhammar, Dan

    2011-06-01

    The evolution of the IGF binding protein (IGFBP) gene family has been difficult to resolve. Both chromosomal and serial duplications have been suggested as mechanisms for the expansion of this gene family. We have identified and annotated IGFBP sequences from a wide selection of vertebrate species as well as Branchiostoma floridae and Ciona intestinalis. By combining detailed sequence analysis with sequence-based phylogenies and chromosome information, we arrive at the following scenario: the ancestral chordate IGFBP gene underwent a local gene duplication, resulting in a gene pair adjacent to a HOX cluster. Subsequently, the gene family expanded in the two basal vertebrate tetraploidization (2R) resulting in the six IGFBP types that are presently found in placental mammals. The teleost fish ancestor underwent a third tetraploidization (3R) that further expanded the IGFBP repertoire. The five sequenced teleost fish genomes retain 9-11 of IGFBP genes. This scenario is supported by the phylogenies of three adjacent gene families in the HOX gene regions, namely the epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFR) and the Ikaros and distal-less (DLX) transcription factors. Our sequence comparisons show that several important structural components in the IGFBPs are ancestral vertebrate features that have been maintained in all orthologs, for instance the integrin interaction motif Arg-Gly-Asp in IGFBP-2. In contrast, the Arg-Gly-Asp motif in IGFBP-1 has arisen independently in mammals. The large degree of retention of IGFBP genes after the ancient expansion of the gene family strongly suggests that each gene evolved distinct and important functions early in vertebrate evolution.

  14. Recent Insights into Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Protein 2 Transcriptional Regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Shin, Minsang; Kang, Hye Suk; Park, Jae-Hyung; Bae, Jae-Hoon; Song, Dae-Kyu; Im, Seung-Soon

    2017-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs) are major regulators of insulin-like growth factor bioavailability and activity in metabolic signaling. Seven IGFBP family isoforms have been identified. Recent studies have shown that IGFBPs play a pivotal role in metabolic signaling and disease, including the pathogenesis of obesity, diabetes, and cancer. Although many studies have documented the various roles played by IGFBPs, transcriptional regulation of IGFBPs is not well understood. ...

  15. Mutations in the ligand-binding domain of the androgen receptor gene cluster in two regions of the gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPhaul, M J; Marcelli, M; Zoppi, S; Wilson, C M; Griffin, J E; Wilson, J D

    1992-11-01

    We have analyzed the nucleotide sequence of the androgen receptor from 22 unrelated subjects with substitution mutations of the hormone-binding domain. Eleven had the phenotype of complete testicular feminization, four had incomplete testicular feminization, and seven had Reifenstein syndrome. The underlying functional defect in cultured skin fibroblasts included individuals with absent, qualitative, or quantitative defects in ligand binding. 19 of the 21 substitution mutations (90%) cluster in two regions that account for approximately 35% of the hormone-binding domain, namely, between amino acids 726 and 772 and between amino acids 826 and 864. The fact that one of these regions is homologous to a region of the human thyroid hormone receptor (hTR-beta) which is a known cluster site for mutations that cause thyroid hormone resistance implies that this localization of mutations is not a coincidence. These regions of the androgen receptor may be of particular importance for the formation and function of the hormone-receptor complex.

  16. Conversion of MyoD to a Neurogenic Factor: Binding Site Specificity Determines Lineage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abraham P. Fong

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available MyoD and NeuroD2, master regulators of myogenesis and neurogenesis, bind to a “shared” E-box sequence (CAGCTG and a “private” sequence (CAGGTG or CAGATG, respectively. To determine whether private-site recognition is sufficient to confer lineage specification, we generated a MyoD mutant with the DNA-binding specificity of NeuroD2. This chimeric mutant gained binding to NeuroD2 private sites but maintained binding to a subset of MyoD-specific sites, activating part of both the muscle and neuronal programs. Sequence analysis revealed an enrichment for PBX/MEIS motifs at the subset of MyoD-specific sites bound by the chimera, and point mutations that prevent MyoD interaction with PBX/MEIS converted the chimera to a pure neurogenic factor. Therefore, redirecting MyoD binding from MyoD private sites to NeuroD2 private sites, despite preserved binding to the MyoD/NeuroD2 shared sites, is sufficient to change MyoD from a master regulator of myogenesis to a master regulator of neurogenesis.

  17. Arsenic Directly Binds to and Activates the Yeast AP-1-Like Transcription Factor Yap8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Nallani Vijay; Yang, Jianbo; Pillai, Jitesh K.; Rawat, Swati; Solano, Carlos; Kumar, Abhay; Grøtli, Morten; Stemmler, Timothy L.; Rosen, Barry P.; Tamás, Markus J.

    2015-12-28

    The AP-1-like transcription factor Yap8 is critical for arsenic tolerance in the yeastSaccharomyces cerevisiae. However, the mechanism by which Yap8 senses the presence of arsenic and activates transcription of detoxification genes is unknown. Here we demonstrate that Yap8 directly binds to trivalent arsenite [As(III)]in vitroandin vivoand that approximately one As(III) molecule is bound per molecule of Yap8. As(III) is coordinated by three sulfur atoms in purified Yap8, and our genetic and biochemical data identify the cysteine residues that form the binding site as Cys132, Cys137, and Cys274. As(III) binding by Yap8 does not require an additional yeast protein, and Yap8 is regulated neither at the level of localization nor at the level of DNA binding. Instead, our data are consistent with a model in which a DNA-bound form of Yap8 acts directly as an As(III) sensor. Binding of As(III) to Yap8 triggers a conformational change that in turn brings about a transcriptional response. Thus, As(III) binding to Yap8 acts as a molecular switch that converts inactive Yap8 into an active transcriptional regulator. This is the first report to demonstrate how a eukaryotic protein couples arsenic sensing to transcriptional activation.

  18. A Potential Structural Switch for Regulating DNA-Binding by TEAD Transcription Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong-Sun; Vonrhein, Clemens; Albarado, Diana; Raman, C S; Veeraraghavan, Sudha

    2016-06-19

    TEA domain (TEAD) transcription factors are essential for the normal development of eukaryotes and are the downstream effectors of the Hippo tumor suppressor pathway. Whereas our earlier work established the three-dimensional structure of the highly conserved DNA-binding domain using solution NMR spectroscopy, the structural basis for regulating the DNA-binding activity remains unknown. Here, we present the X-ray crystallographic structure and activity of a TEAD mutant containing a truncated L1 loop, ΔL1 TEAD DBD. Unexpectedly, the three-dimensional structure of the ΔL1 TEAD DBD reveals a helix-swapped homodimer wherein helix 1 is swapped between monomers. Furthermore, each three-helix bundle in the domain-swapped dimer is a structural homolog of MYB-like domains. Our investigations of the DNA-binding activity reveal that although the formation of the three-helix bundle by the ΔL1 TEAD DBD is sufficient for binding to an isolated M-CAT-like DNA element, multimeric forms are deficient for cooperative binding to tandemly duplicated elements, indicating that the L1 loop contributes to the DNA-binding activity of TEAD. These results suggest that switching between monomeric and domain-swapped forms may regulate DNA selectivity of TEAD proteins. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Sequence2Vec: A novel embedding approach for modeling transcription factor binding affinity landscape

    KAUST Repository

    Dai, Hanjun

    2017-07-26

    Motivation: An accurate characterization of transcription factor (TF)-DNA affinity landscape is crucial to a quantitative understanding of the molecular mechanisms underpinning endogenous gene regulation. While recent advances in biotechnology have brought the opportunity for building binding affinity prediction methods, the accurate characterization of TF-DNA binding affinity landscape still remains a challenging problem. Results: Here we propose a novel sequence embedding approach for modeling the transcription factor binding affinity landscape. Our method represents DNA binding sequences as a hidden Markov model (HMM) which captures both position specific information and long-range dependency in the sequence. A cornerstone of our method is a novel message passing-like embedding algorithm, called Sequence2Vec, which maps these HMMs into a common nonlinear feature space and uses these embedded features to build a predictive model. Our method is a novel combination of the strength of probabilistic graphical models, feature space embedding and deep learning. We conducted comprehensive experiments on over 90 large-scale TF-DNA data sets which were measured by different high-throughput experimental technologies. Sequence2Vec outperforms alternative machine learning methods as well as the state-of-the-art binding affinity prediction methods.

  20. Crystal Structure of a Fibroblast Growth Factor Homologous Factor (FHF) Defines a Conserved Surface on FHFs for Binding and Modulation of Voltage-gated Sodium Channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goetz, R.; Dover, K; Laezza, F; Shtraizent, N; Huang, X; Tchetchik, D; Eliseenkova, A; Goldfarb, M; Mohammadi, M; et. al.

    2009-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (Nav) produce sodium currents that underlie the initiation and propagation of action potentials in nerve and muscle cells. Fibroblast growth factor homologous factors (FHFs) bind to the intracellular C-terminal region of the Nav alpha subunit to modulate fast inactivation of the channel. In this study we solved the crystal structure of a 149-residue-long fragment of human FHF2A which unveils the structural features of the homology core domain of all 10 human FHF isoforms. Through analysis of crystal packing contacts and site-directed mutagenesis experiments we identified a conserved surface on the FHF core domain that mediates channel binding in vitro and in vivo. Mutations at this channel binding surface impaired the ability of FHFs to co-localize with Navs at the axon initial segment of hippocampal neurons. The mutations also disabled FHF modulation of voltage-dependent fast inactivation of sodium channels in neuronal cells. Based on our data, we propose that FHFs constitute auxiliary subunits for Navs.

  1. Insulin-like growth factor-I and insulin-like growth factor-binding proteins in the nephrotic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feld, S M; Hirschberg, R

    1996-06-01

    Similar to findings in the nephrotic syndrome in humans, rats with the doxorubicin-induced nephrotic syndrome (which resembles minimal change disease) have reduced serum levels of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I). This is mainly caused by glomerular ultrafiltration of IGF-I-containing binding protein complexes, primarily of a molecular weight of approximately 50 kilodaltons, and urinary losses of the peptide. Despite urinary excretion of IGF-binding protein (IGFBP)-2, serum levels are increased more than twofold in the nephrotic syndrome compared with controls, because of increased synthesis of this binding protein by the liver. In contrast, the liver synthesis of IGFBP-3, the predominant binding protein in normal serum, is unchanged in the nephrotic syndrome. However, binding and serum levels of IGFBP-3 are reduced in nephrotic rat serum, apparently due to proteolytic degradation of IGFBP-3. The glomerular ultrafiltration of IGF-I, which leads to biologically significant IGF-I concentrations of about 1.35 nM in proximal tubule fluid, may have metabolic consequences, such as increased tubular phosphate absorption. Hypothetically, tubule fluid IGF-I may also contribute to progressive tubulointerstitial fibrosis which is sometimes present in protractive nephrotic glomerulopathies. The profound changes in the IGF-I/IGFBP system in the nephrotic syndrome may also contribute to systemic metabolic abnormalities and growth failure.

  2. Total-factor energy efficiency of regions in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Honma, Satoshi [Faculty of Economics, Kyushu Sangyo University, 2-3-1 Matsukadai, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 813-8503 (Japan); Hu, Jin-Li [Institute of Business and Management, National Chiao Tung University (China)

    2008-02-15

    This study computes the regional total-factor energy efficiency (TFEE) in Japan by employing the data envelopment analysis (DEA). A dataset of 47 prefectures in Japan for the period 1993-2003 is constructed. There are 14 inputs, including three production factors (labor employment, private, and public capital stocks) and 11 energy sources (electric power for commercial and industrial use, electric power for residential use, gasoline, kerosene, heavy oil, light oil, city gas, butane gas, propane gas, coal, and coke). GDP is the sole output. Following Fukao and Yue [2000. Regional factor inputs and convergence in Japan - how much can we apply closed economy neoclassical growth models? Economic Review 51, 136-151 (in Japanese)], data on private and public capital stocks are extended. All the nominal variables are transformed into real variables, taking into consideration the 1995 price level. For kerosene, gas oil, heavy oil, butane gas, coal, and coke, there are a few prefectures with TFEEs less than 0.7. The five most inefficient prefectures are Niigata, Wakayama, Hyogo, Chiba, and Yamaguchi. Inland regions and most regions along the Sea of Japan are efficient in energy use. Most of the inefficient prefectures that are developing mainly upon energy-intensive industries are located along the Pacific Belt Zone. A U-shaped relation similar to the environmental Kuznets curve (EKC) is discovered between energy efficiency and per capita income for the regions in Japan. (author)

  3. Interaction of a rhizobial DNA-binding protein with the promoter region of a plant leghemoglobin gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welters, P.; Metz, B.; Felix, G.; Palme, K. (Max Planck Insitut fur Zuchtungsforschung, Koeln (Germany)); Szczyglowski, K. (Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)); Bruijn, F.J. de (Max Planck Institut fur Zuchtungsforschung, Koeln (Germany) Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States))

    1993-08-01

    A nucleotide sequence was identified approximately 650 bp upstream of the Sesbania rostrata leghemoglobin gene Srglb3 start codon, which interacts specifically with a proteinaceous DNA-binding factor found in nodule extracts but not in extracts from leaves or root. The binding site for this factor was delimited using footprinting techniques. The DNA-binding activity of this factor was found to be heat stable, dependent on divalent cations, and derived from the (infecting) Azorhizobium caulinodans bacteria or bacteroids (A. caulinodans bacterial binding factor 1, AcBBF1). A 9- to 10-kD protein was isolated from a free-living culture of A. caulinodans that co-purifies with the DNA-binding activity (A. caulinodans bacterial binding protein 1, AcBBP1) and interacts specifically with its target (S. rostrata bacterial binding site 1, SrBBS1). The amino acid sequence of the N-terminal 27 residues of AcBBP1 was determined and was found to share significant similarity (46% identity; 68% similarity) with a domain of the herpes simplex virus major DNA-binding protein infected cell protein 8(ICP8). An insertion mutation in the SrBBS1 was found to result in a substantial reduction of the expression of a Srglb3-gus reporter gene fusion in nodules of transgenic Lotus corniculatus plants, suggesting a role for this element in Srglb3 promoter activity. Based on these results, the authors propose that (a) bacterial transacting factor(s) may play a role in infected cell-specific expression of the symbiotically induced plant lb genes. 70 refs., 11 figs.

  4. Core Binding Factor β Protects HIV, Type 1 Accessory Protein Viral Infectivity Factor from MDM2-mediated Degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Yusuke; Shindo, Keisuke; Nagata, Kayoko; Yoshinaga, Noriyoshi; Shirakawa, Kotaro; Kobayashi, Masayuki; Takaori-Kondo, Akifumi

    2016-11-25

    HIV, type 1 overcomes host restriction factor apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing enzyme catalytic polypeptide-like 3 (APOBEC3) proteins by organizing an E3 ubiquitin ligase complex together with viral infectivity factor (Vif) and a host transcription cofactor core binding factor β (CBFβ). CBFβ is essential for Vif to counteract APOBEC3 by enabling the recruitment of cullin 5 to the complex and increasing the steady-state level of Vif protein; however, the mechanisms by which CBFβ up-regulates Vif protein remains unclear. Because we have reported previously that mouse double minute 2 homolog (MDM2) is an E3 ligase for Vif, we hypothesized that CBFβ might protect Vif from MDM2-mediated degradation. Co-immunoprecipitation analyses showed that Vif mutants that do not bind to CBFβ preferentially interact with MDM2 and that overexpression of CBFβ disrupts the interaction between MDM2 and Vif. Knockdown of CBFβ reduced the steady-state level of Vif in MDM2-proficient cells but not in MDM2-null cells. Cycloheximide chase analyses revealed that Vif E88A/W89A, which does not interact with CBFβ, degraded faster than wild-type Vif in MDM2-proficient cells but not in MDM2-null cells, suggesting that Vif stabilization by CBFβ is mainly caused by impairing MDM2-mediated degradation. We identified Vif R93E as a Vif variant that does not bind to MDM2, and the virus with this substitution mutation was more resistant to APOBEC3G than the parental virus. Combinatory substitution of Vif residues required for CBFβ binding and MDM2 binding showed full recovery of Vif steady-state levels, supporting our hypothesis. Our data provide new insights into the mechanism of Vif augmentation by CBFβ.

  5. Complete dissociation of the HIV-1 gp41 ectodomain and membrane proximal regions upon phospholipid binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roche, Julien; Louis, John M.; Aniana, Annie [National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, Laboratory of Chemical Physics (United States); Ghirlando, Rodolfo [National Institutes of Health, Laboratory of Molecular Biology, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (United States); Bax, Ad, E-mail: bax@nih.gov [National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, Laboratory of Chemical Physics (United States)

    2015-04-15

    The envelope glycoprotein gp41 mediates the process of membrane fusion that enables entry of the HIV-1 virus into the host cell. Strong lipid affinity of the ectodomain suggests that its heptad repeat regions play an active role in destabilizing membranes by directly binding to the lipid bilayers and thereby lowering the free-energy barrier for membrane fusion. In such a model, immediately following the shedding of gp120, the N-heptad and C-heptad helices dissociate and melt into the host cell and viral membranes, respectively, pulling the destabilized membranes into juxtaposition, ready for fusion. Post-fusion, reaching the final 6-helix bundle (6HB) conformation then involves competition between intermolecular interactions needed for formation of the symmetric 6HB trimer and the membrane affinity of gp41’s ectodomain, including its membrane-proximal regions. Our solution NMR study of the structural and dynamic properties of three constructs containing the ectodomain of gp41 with and without its membrane-proximal regions suggests that these segments do not form inter-helical interactions until the very late steps of the fusion process. Interactions between the polar termini of the heptad regions, which are not associating with the lipid surface, therefore may constitute the main driving force initiating formation of the final post-fusion states. The absence of significant intermolecular ectodomain interactions in the presence of dodecyl phosphocholine highlights the importance of trimerization of gp41’s transmembrane helix to prevent complete dissociation of the trimer during the course of fusion.

  6. Liver-type fatty acid binding protein interacts with hepatocyte nuclear factor

    OpenAIRE

    McIntosh, Avery L.; Petrescu, Anca D.; Hostetler, Heather A.; Kier, Ann B.; Schroeder, Friedhelm

    2013-01-01

    Hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α (HNF4α) regulates liver type fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP) gene expression. Conversely as shown herein, L-FABP structurally and functionally also interacts with HNF4α. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between Cy3-HNF4α (donor) and Cy5-L-FABP (acceptor) as well as FRET microscopy detected L-FABP in close proximity (~80 Å) to HNF4α, binding with high affinity Kd ~250–300 nM. Circular dichroism (CD) determined that the HNF4α/L-FABP interaction alte...

  7. Complement factor H binds malondialdehyde epitopes and protects from oxidative stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weismann, David; Hartvigsen, Karsten; Lauer, Nadine

    2011-01-01

    peroxidation product that accumulates in many pathophysiological processes, including AMD. Here we identify complement factor H (CFH) as a major MDA-binding protein that can block both the uptake of MDA-modified proteins by macrophages and MDA-induced proinflammatory effects in vivo in mice. The CFH...... polymorphism H402, which is strongly associated with AMD, markedly reduces the ability of CFH to bind MDA, indicating a causal link to disease aetiology. Our findings provide important mechanistic insights into innate immune responses to oxidative stress, which may be exploited in the prevention of and therapy...

  8. Deletion of Corticotropin-releasing Factor Binding Protein Selectively Impairs Maternal, but not Intermale Aggression

    OpenAIRE

    Gammie, Stephen C.; Seasholtz, Audrey F.; Stevenson, Sharon A.

    2008-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) binding protein (CRF-BP) is a secreted protein that acts to bind and limit the activity of the neuropeptides, CRF and urocortin (Ucn) 1. We previously selected for high maternal defense (protection of offspring) in mice and found CRF-BP to be elevated in the CNS of selected mice. We also previously determined that both CRF and Ucn 1 are potent inhibitors of offspring protection when administered centrally. Thus, elevated CRF-BP could promote defense by lim...

  9. Site-specific chromatin immunoprecipitation: a selective method to individually analyze neighboring transcription factor binding sites in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuch, Ronaldo; Agelopoulos, Konstantin; Neumann, Anna; Brandt, Burkhard; Bürger, Horst; Korsching, Eberhard

    2012-02-20

    Transcription factors (TFs) and their binding sites (TFBSs) play a central role in the regulation of gene expression. It is therefore vital to know how the allocation pattern of TFBSs affects the functioning of any particular gene in vivo. A widely used method to analyze TFBSs in vivo is the chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP). However, this method in its present state does not enable the individual investigation of densely arranged TFBSs due to the underlying unspecific DNA fragmentation technique. This study describes a site-specific ChIP which aggregates the benefits of both EMSA and in vivo footprinting in only one assay, thereby allowing the individual detection and analysis of single binding motifs. The standard ChIP protocol was modified by replacing the conventional DNA fragmentation, i. e. via sonication or undirected enzymatic digestion (by MNase), through a sequence specific enzymatic digestion step. This alteration enables the specific immunoprecipitation and individual examination of occupied sites, even in a complex system of adjacent binding motifs in vivo. Immunoprecipitated chromatin was analyzed by PCR using two primer sets - one for the specific detection of precipitated TFBSs and one for the validation of completeness of the enzyme digestion step. The method was established exemplary for Sp1 TFBSs within the egfr promoter region. Using this site-specific ChIP, we were able to confirm four previously described Sp1 binding sites within egfr promoter region to be occupied by Sp1 in vivo. Despite the dense arrangement of the Sp1 TFBSs the improved ChIP method was able to individually examine the allocation of all adjacent Sp1 TFBS at once. The broad applicability of this site-specific ChIP could be demonstrated by analyzing these SP1 motifs in both osteosarcoma cells and kidney carcinoma tissue. The ChIP technology is a powerful tool for investigating transcription factors in vivo, especially in cancer biology. The established site-specific enzyme

  10. Site-specific chromatin immunoprecipitation: a selective method to individually analyze neighboring transcription factor binding sites in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schuch Ronaldo

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transcription factors (TFs and their binding sites (TFBSs play a central role in the regulation of gene expression. It is therefore vital to know how the allocation pattern of TFBSs affects the functioning of any particular gene in vivo. A widely used method to analyze TFBSs in vivo is the chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP. However, this method in its present state does not enable the individual investigation of densely arranged TFBSs due to the underlying unspecific DNA fragmentation technique. This study describes a site-specific ChIP which aggregates the benefits of both EMSA and in vivo footprinting in only one assay, thereby allowing the individual detection and analysis of single binding motifs. Findings The standard ChIP protocol was modified by replacing the conventional DNA fragmentation, i. e. via sonication or undirected enzymatic digestion (by MNase, through a sequence specific enzymatic digestion step. This alteration enables the specific immunoprecipitation and individual examination of occupied sites, even in a complex system of adjacent binding motifs in vivo. Immunoprecipitated chromatin was analyzed by PCR using two primer sets - one for the specific detection of precipitated TFBSs and one for the validation of completeness of the enzyme digestion step. The method was established exemplary for Sp1 TFBSs within the egfr promoter region. Using this site-specific ChIP, we were able to confirm four previously described Sp1 binding sites within egfr promoter region to be occupied by Sp1 in vivo. Despite the dense arrangement of the Sp1 TFBSs the improved ChIP method was able to individually examine the allocation of all adjacent Sp1 TFBS at once. The broad applicability of this site-specific ChIP could be demonstrated by analyzing these SP1 motifs in both osteosarcoma cells and kidney carcinoma tissue. Conclusions The ChIP technology is a powerful tool for investigating transcription factors in vivo, especially

  11. Fibronectin Growth Factor-Binding Domains Are Required for Fibroblast Survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Fubao; Ren, Xiang-Dong; Pan, Zhi; Macri, Lauren; Zong, Wei-Xing; Tonnesen, Marcia G.; Rafailovich, Miriam; Bar-Sagi, Dafna; Clark, Richard A.F.

    2011-01-01

    Fibronectin (FN) is required for embryogenesis, morphogenesis, and wound repair, and its Arg–Gly–Asp-containing central cell-binding domain (CCBD) is essential for mesenchymal cell survival and growth. Here, we demonstrate that FN contains three growth factor-binding domains (FN-GFBDs) that bind platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB), a potent fibroblast survival and mitogenic factor. These sites bind PDGF-BB with dissociation constants of 10–100 nm. FN-null cells cultured on recombinant CCBD (FNIII8–11) without a FN-GFBD demonstrated minimal metabolism and underwent autophagy at 24 hours, followed by apoptosis at 72 hours, even in the presence of PDGF-BB. In contrast, FN-null cells plated on FNIII8–11 contiguous with FN-GFBD survived without, and proliferated with, PDGF-BB. FN-null cell survival on FNIII8–11 and noncontiguous arrays of FN-GFBDs required these domains to be adsorbed on the same surface, suggesting the existence of a mesenchymal cell-extracellular matrix synapse. Thus, fibroblast survival required GF stimulation in the presence of a FN-GFBD, as well as adhesion to FN through the CCBD. The findings that fibroblast survival is dependent on FN-GFBD underscore the critical importance of pericellular matrix for cell survival and have significant implications for cutaneous wound healing and regeneration. PMID:20811396

  12. Energy-dependent fitness: a quantitative model for the evolution of yeast transcription factor binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustonen, Ville; Kinney, Justin; Callan, Curtis G; Lässig, Michael

    2008-08-26

    We present a genomewide cross-species analysis of regulation for broad-acting transcription factors in yeast. Our model for binding site evolution is founded on biophysics: the binding energy between transcription factor and site is a quantitative phenotype of regulatory function, and selection is given by a fitness landscape that depends on this phenotype. The model quantifies conservation, as well as loss and gain, of functional binding sites in a coherent way. Its predictions are supported by direct cross-species comparison between four yeast species. We find ubiquitous compensatory mutations within functional sites, such that the energy phenotype and the function of a site evolve in a significantly more constrained way than does its sequence. We also find evidence for substantial evolution of regulatory function involving point mutations as well as sequence insertions and deletions within binding sites. Genes lose their regulatory link to a given transcription factor at a rate similar to the neutral point mutation rate, from which we infer a moderate average fitness advantage of functional over nonfunctional sites. In a wider context, this study provides an example of inference of selection acting on a quantitative molecular trait.

  13. Identification and characterization of four novel peptide motifs that recognize distinct regions of the transcription factor CP2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Ho Chul; Chung, Bo Mee; Chae, Ji Hyung; Yang, Sung-Il; Kim, Chan Gil; Kim, Chul Geun

    2005-03-01

    Although ubiquitously expressed, the transcriptional factor CP2 also exhibits some tissue- or stage-specific activation toward certain genes such as globin in red blood cells and interleukin-4 in T helper cells. Because this specificity may be achieved by interaction with other proteins, we screened a peptide display library and identified four consensus motifs in numerous CP2-binding peptides: HXPR, PHL, ASR and PXHXH. Protein-database searching revealed that RE-1 silencing factor (REST), Yin-Yang1 (YY1) and five other proteins have one or two of these CP2-binding motifs. Glutathione S-transferase pull-down and coimmunoprecipitation assays showed that two HXPR motif-containing proteins REST and YY1 indeed were able to bind CP2. Importantly, this binding to CP2 was almost abolished when a double amino acid substitution was made on the HXPR sequence of REST and YY1 proteins. The suppressing effect of YY1 on CP2's transcriptional activity was lost by this point mutation on the HXPR sequence of YY1 and reduced by an HXPR-containing peptide, further supporting the interaction between CP2 and YY1 via the HXPR sequence. Mapping the sites on CP2 for interaction with the four distinct CP2-binding motifs revealed at least three different regions on CP2. This suggests that CP2 recognizes several distinct binding motifs by virtue of employing different regions, thus being able to interact with and regulate many cellular partners.

  14. G =  MAT: linking transcription factor expression and DNA binding data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantin Tretyakov

    Full Text Available Transcription factors are proteins that bind to motifs on the DNA and thus affect gene expression regulation. The qualitative description of the corresponding processes is therefore important for a better understanding of essential biological mechanisms. However, wet lab experiments targeted at the discovery of the regulatory interplay between transcription factors and binding sites are expensive. We propose a new, purely computational method for finding putative associations between transcription factors and motifs. This method is based on a linear model that combines sequence information with expression data. We present various methods for model parameter estimation and show, via experiments on simulated data, that these methods are reliable. Finally, we examine the performance of this model on biological data and conclude that it can indeed be used to discover meaningful associations. The developed software is available as a web tool and Scilab source code at http://biit.cs.ut.ee/gmat/.

  15. G = MAT: Linking Transcription Factor Expression and DNA Binding Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tretyakov, Konstantin; Laur, Sven; Vilo, Jaak

    2011-01-01

    Transcription factors are proteins that bind to motifs on the DNA and thus affect gene expression regulation. The qualitative description of the corresponding processes is therefore important for a better understanding of essential biological mechanisms. However, wet lab experiments targeted at the discovery of the regulatory interplay between transcription factors and binding sites are expensive. We propose a new, purely computational method for finding putative associations between transcription factors and motifs. This method is based on a linear model that combines sequence information with expression data. We present various methods for model parameter estimation and show, via experiments on simulated data, that these methods are reliable. Finally, we examine the performance of this model on biological data and conclude that it can indeed be used to discover meaningful associations. The developed software is available as a web tool and Scilab source code at http://biit.cs.ut.ee/gmat/. PMID:21297945

  16. G =  MAT: linking transcription factor expression and DNA binding data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tretyakov, Konstantin; Laur, Sven; Vilo, Jaak

    2011-01-31

    Transcription factors are proteins that bind to motifs on the DNA and thus affect gene expression regulation. The qualitative description of the corresponding processes is therefore important for a better understanding of essential biological mechanisms. However, wet lab experiments targeted at the discovery of the regulatory interplay between transcription factors and binding sites are expensive. We propose a new, purely computational method for finding putative associations between transcription factors and motifs. This method is based on a linear model that combines sequence information with expression data. We present various methods for model parameter estimation and show, via experiments on simulated data, that these methods are reliable. Finally, we examine the performance of this model on biological data and conclude that it can indeed be used to discover meaningful associations. The developed software is available as a web tool and Scilab source code at http://biit.cs.ut.ee/gmat/.

  17. Binding Mode Analysis of Zerumbone to Key Signal Proteins in the Tumor Necrosis Factor Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayesha Fatima

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the second most common cancer among women worldwide. Several signaling pathways have been implicated as causative and progression agents. The tumor necrosis factor (TNF α protein plays a dual role in promoting and inhibiting cancer depending largely on the pathway initiated by the binding of the protein to its receptor. Zerumbone, an active constituent of Zingiber zerumbet, Smith, is known to act on the tumor necrosis factor pathway upregulating tumour necrosis factor related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL death receptors and inducing apoptosis in cancer cells. Zerumbone is a sesquiterpene that is able to penetrate into the hydrophobic pockets of proteins to exert its inhibiting activity with several proteins. We found a good binding with the tumor necrosis factor, kinase κB (IKKβ and the Nuclear factor κB (NF-κB component proteins along the TNF pathway. Our results suggest that zerumbone can exert its apoptotic activities by inhibiting the cytoplasmic proteins. It inhibits the IKKβ kinase that activates the NF-κB and also binds to the NF-κB complex in the TNF pathway. Blocking both proteins can lead to inhibition of cell proliferating proteins to be downregulated and possibly ultimate induction of apoptosis.

  18. Crystal structures of the ligand-binding region of uPARAP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yuan, Cai; Jürgensen, Henrik J; Engelholm, Lars H

    2016-01-01

    remodelling through interaction with its ligands, including collagens and urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR). We report the crystal structures of the first four domains of uPARAP (also named the ligand-binding region, LBR) at pH 7.4 in Ca(2+)-bound and Ca(2+)-free forms. The first domain......The proteins of the mannose receptor (MR) family share a common domain organization and have a broad range of biological functions. Urokinase plasminogen activator receptor-associated protein (uPARAP) (or Endo180) is a member of this family and plays an important role in extracellular matrix...... (cysteine-rich or CysR domain) folds into a new and unique conformation different from the β-trefoil fold of typical CysR domains. The so-called long loop regions (LLRs) of the C-type lectin-like domain (CTLD) 1 and 2 (the third and fourth domain) mediate the direct contacts between these domains...

  19. NMDA receptor binding is reduced within mesocorticolimbic regions following chronic inhalation of toluene in adolescent rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, Alec Lindsay Ward; Pooters, Tine; Gibbs, Sarah; Giles, Emma; Qama, Ashleigh; Lawrence, Andrew John; Duncan, Jhodie Rubina

    2015-10-22

    The purposeful inhalation of volatile solvents, such as toluene, to induce self-intoxication is prevalent, particularly within adolescent populations. Chronic misuse results in cognitive and neurobiological impairments, as well as an increased risk for addictive behaviours in adulthood. Toluene-induced neuroadaptations within mesocorticolimbic circuitry are thought, in part, to mediate some of the adverse outcomes of toluene misuse, however our understanding of the neuroadaptive processes remains equivocal. An understanding of these processes is particularly important relative to exposure that occurs during adolescence and at concentrations that reflect various patterns of use. Therefore, we exposed male adolescent Wistar rats (postnatal day [PN] 27) to either air or low or high concentrations of inhaled toluene in a chronic and intermittent fashion (CIT, 3,000 or 10,000ppm) for 1 h/day, 3-5 times per week for 4 weeks to model different patterns of human inhalant abuse. Brains were subsequently analysed using autoradiography, qPCR and immunohistochemistry 3 days following the exposure period to investigate toluene-induced neuroadaptations within mesocorticolimbic circuitry. In CIT-exposed rats binding to N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors containing the GluN2B subunit, as determined using [(3)H]-ifenprodil, was decreased in a concentration-related manner in the caudal cingulate cortex, dorsal striatum and accumbens; however, this was not associated with changes in GluN2B protein expression. There were no differences in [(3)H]-epibatidine binding to heteromeric neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine (nACh) receptors. Relative expression of mRNA transcripts encoding NMDA, nACh, γ-aminobutyric acid type-A (GABAA) and dopamine receptor subunits was unchanged in all regions assessed following CIT. Our data suggest that adolescent CIT exposure impacts NMDA receptors within regions of corticostriatal circuitry, possibly via post-translational mechanisms. Dysfunctional

  20. The spt5 C-terminal region recruits yeast 3' RNA cleavage factor I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Andreas; Schreieck, Amelie; Lidschreiber, Michael; Leike, Kristin; Martin, Dietmar E; Cramer, Patrick

    2012-04-01

    During transcription elongation, RNA polymerase II (Pol II) binds the general elongation factor Spt5. Spt5 contains a repetitive C-terminal region (CTR) that is required for cotranscriptional recruitment of the Paf1 complex (D. L. Lindstrom et al., Mol. Cell. Biol. 23:1368-1378, 2003; Z. Zhang, J. Fu, and D. S. Gilmour, Genes Dev. 19:1572-1580, 2005). Here we report a new role of the Spt5 CTR in the recruitment of 3' RNA-processing factors. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) revealed that the Spt5 CTR is required for normal recruitment of pre-mRNA cleavage factor I (CFI) to the 3' ends of Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes. RNA contributes to CFI recruitment, as RNase treatment prior to ChIP further decreases CFI ChIP signals. Genome-wide ChIP profiling detected occupancy peaks of CFI subunits around 100 nucleotides downstream of the polyadenylation (pA) sites of genes. CFI recruitment to this defined region may result from simultaneous binding to the Spt5 CTR, to nascent RNA containing the pA sequence, and to the elongating Pol II isoform that is phosphorylated at serine 2 (S2) residues in its C-terminal domain (CTD). Consistent with this model, the CTR interacts with CFI in vitro but is not required for pA site recognition and transcription termination in vivo.

  1. The repertoire of DNA-binding transcription factors in prokaryotes: functional and evolutionary lessons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Rueda, Ernesto; Martinez-Nuñez, Mario Alberto

    2012-01-01

    The capabilities of organisms to contend with environmental changes depend on their genes and their ability to regulate their expression. DNA-binding transcription factors (TFs) play a central role in this process, because they regulate gene expression positively and/or negatively, depending on the operator context and ligand-binding status. In this review, we summarise recent findings regarding the function and evolution of TFs in prokaryotes. We consider the abundance of TFs in bacteria and archaea, the role of DNA-binding domains and their partner domains, and the effects of duplication events in the evolution of regulatory networks. Finally, a comprehensive picture for how regulatory networks have evolved in prokaryotes is provided.

  2. Identification and Structural Basis of Binding to Host Lung Glycogen by Streptococcal Virulence Factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lammerts van Bueren,A.; Higgins, M.; Wang, D.; Burke, R.; Boraston, A.

    2007-01-01

    The ability of pathogenic bacteria to recognize host glycans is often essential to their virulence. Here we report structure-function studies of previously uncharacterized glycogen-binding modules in the surface-anchored pullulanases from Streptococcus pneumoniae (SpuA) and Streptococcus pyogenes (PulA). Multivalent binding to glycogen leads to a strong interaction with alveolar type II cells in mouse lung tissue. X-ray crystal structures of the binding modules reveal a novel fusion of tandem modules into single, bivalent functional domains. In addition to indicating a structural basis for multivalent attachment, the structure of the SpuA modules in complex with carbohydrate provides insight into the molecular basis for glycogen specificity. This report provides the first evidence that intracellular lung glycogen may be a novel target of pathogenic streptococci and thus provides a rationale for the identification of the streptococcal {alpha}-glucan-metabolizing machinery as virulence factors.

  3. Adhesion properties of Lactobacillus rhamnosus mucus-binding factor to mucin and extracellular matrix proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Keita; Nakamata, Koichi; Ueno, Shintaro; Terao, Akari; Aryantini, Ni Putu Desy; Sujaya, I Nengah; Fukuda, Kenji; Urashima, Tadasu; Yamamoto, Yuji; Mukai, Takao

    2015-01-01

    We previously described potential probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus strains, isolated from fermented mare milk produced in Sumbawa Island, Indonesia, which showed high adhesion to porcine colonic mucin (PCM) and extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. Recently, mucus-binding factor (MBF) was found in the GG strain of L. rhamnosus as a mucin-binding protein. In this study, we assessed the ability of recombinant MBF protein from the FSMM22 strain, one of the isolates of L. rhamnosus from fermented Sumbawa mare milk, to adhere to PCM and ECM proteins by overlay dot blot and Biacore assays. MBF bound to PCM, laminin, collagen IV, and fibronectin with submicromolar dissociation constants. Adhesion of the FSMM22 mbf mutant strain to PCM and ECM proteins was significantly less than that of the wild-type strain. Collectively, these results suggested that MBF contribute to L. rhamnosus host colonization via mucin and ECM protein binding.

  4. Regional variations in quinolone use in France and associated factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallini, A; Taboulet, F; Bourrel, R

    2012-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate geographic variations in the use of quinolones in France and their associated factors. All reimbursement claims of antimicrobials were collected for 90 % of the French population for the year 2007. Dispensed quantities were then converted into defined daily doses (DDD) and adjusted for the age structure of the national population. Correlations between quinolone use and total antimicrobial use and some morbidity and socio-economic factors were studied using Spearman's rank correlation coefficients. On average, 2.05 DDD of quinolones per 1,000 inhabitants per day (DID) were dispensed in 2007 in France, accounting for 10.2 % of the total antimicrobial consumption in adults. A 40 % variation was observed between the regions with the lowest (1.73 DID) and the highest use (2.44 DID). This variation was more important for anti-pneumococcal quinolones than for quinolones directed against urinary tract infections (coefficients of variation: 26 vs. 6 %). Quinolone use was correlated with some regional socio-economic factors (unemployment, growth domestic product, health expenditures) and physician density, but was independent of the total antimicrobial use. After adjustment for age, large variations in quantitative and qualitative quinolone use were observed across French regions, especially for anti-pneumococcal fluoroquinolones. These results, though not controlled for potential epidemics variations, argue in favour of a possible improvement in quinolone prescribing to be achieved in some regions.

  5. Cycle modulation of insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 1 in human endometrium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corleta H.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Endometrium is one of the fastest growing human tissues. Sex hormones, estrogen and progesterone, in interaction with several growth factors, control its growth and differentiation. Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1 interacts with cell surface receptors and also with specific soluble binding proteins. IGF-binding proteins (IGF-BP have been shown to modulate IGF-1 action. Of six known isoforms, IGF-BP-1 has been characterized as a marker produced by endometrial stromal cells in the late secretory phase and in the decidua. In the current study, IGF-1-BP concentration and affinity in the proliferative and secretory phase of the menstrual cycle were measured. Endometrial samples were from patients of reproductive age with regular menstrual cycles and taking no steroid hormones. Cytosolic fractions were prepared and binding of 125I-labeled IGF-1 performed. Cross-linking reaction products were analyzed by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (7.5% followed by autoradiography. 125I-IGF-1 affinity to cytosolic proteins was not statistically different between the proliferative and secretory endometrium. An approximately 35-kDa binding protein was identified when 125I-IGF-1 was cross-linked to cytosol proteins. Secretory endometrium had significantly more IGF-1-BP when compared to proliferative endometrium. The specificity of the cross-linking process was evaluated by the addition of 100 nM unlabeled IGF-1 or insulin. Unlabeled IGF-1 totally abolished the radioactivity from the band, indicating specific binding. Insulin had no apparent effect on the intensity of the labeled band. These results suggest that IGF-BP could modulate the action of IGF-1 throughout the menstrual cycle. It would be interesting to study this binding protein in other pathologic conditions of the endometrium such as adenocarcinomas and hyperplasia.

  6. Molecular determinants of epidermal growth factor binding: a molecular dynamics study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey M Sanders

    Full Text Available The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR is a member of the receptor tyrosine kinase family that plays a role in multiple cellular processes. Activation of EGFR requires binding of a ligand on the extracellular domain to promote conformational changes leading to dimerization and transphosphorylation of intracellular kinase domains. Seven ligands are known to bind EGFR with affinities ranging from sub-nanomolar to near micromolar dissociation constants. In the case of EGFR, distinct conformational states assumed upon binding a ligand is thought to be a determining factor in activation of a downstream signaling network. Previous biochemical studies suggest the existence of both low affinity and high affinity EGFR ligands. While these studies have identified functional effects of ligand binding, high-resolution structural data are lacking. To gain a better understanding of the molecular basis of EGFR binding affinities, we docked each EGFR ligand to the putative active state extracellular domain dimer and 25.0 ns molecular dynamics simulations were performed. MM-PBSA/GBSA are efficient computational approaches to approximate free energies of protein-protein interactions and decompose the free energy at the amino acid level. We applied these methods to the last 6.0 ns of each ligand-receptor simulation. MM-PBSA calculations were able to successfully rank all seven of the EGFR ligands based on the two affinity classes: EGF>HB-EGF>TGF-α>BTC>EPR>EPG>AR. Results from energy decomposition identified several interactions that are common among binding ligands. These findings reveal that while several residues are conserved among the EGFR ligand family, no single set of residues determines the affinity class. Instead we found heterogeneous sets of interactions that were driven primarily by electrostatic and Van der Waals forces. These results not only illustrate the complexity of EGFR dynamics but also pave the way for structure-based design of

  7. Measurement of immunotargeted plasmonic nanoparticles' cellular binding: a key factor in optimizing diagnostic efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Kun; Sun, Jiantang; Bickford, Lissett R.; Lin, Alex W. H.; Halas, Naomi J.; Yu, Tse-Kuan; Drezek, Rebekah A.

    2008-01-01

    In this study, we use polarized light scattering to study immunotargeted plasmonic nanoparticles which bind to live SK-BR-3 human breast carcinoma cells. Gold nanoparticles can be conjugated to various biomolecules in order to target specific molecular signatures of disease. This specific targeting provides enhanced contrast in scattering-based optical imaging techniques. While there are papers which report the number of antibodies that bind per nanoparticle, there are almost no reports of the key factor which influences diagnostic or therapeutic efficacy using nanoparticles: the number of targeted nanoparticles that bind per cell. To achieve this goal, we have developed a 'negative' method of determining the binding concentration of those antibody/nanoparticle bioconjugates which are targeted specifically to breast cancer cells. Unlike previously reported methods, we collected unbound nanoparticle bioconjugates and measured the light scattering from dilute solutions of these particles so that quantitative binding information can be obtained. By following this process, the interaction effects of adjacent bound nanoparticles on the cell membrane can be avoided simply by measuring the light scattering from the unbound nanoparticles. Specifically, using nanoshells of two different sizes, we compared the binding concentrations of anti-HER2/nanoshell and anti-IgG/nanoshell bioconjugates targeted to HER2-positive SK-BR-3 breast cancer cells. The results indicate that, for anti-HER2/nanoshell bioconjugates, there are approximately 800-1600 nanoshells bound per cell; for anti-IgG/nanoshell bioconjugates, the binding concentration is significantly lower at nearly 100 nanoshells bound per cell. These results are also supported by dark-field microscopy images of the cells labeled with anti-HER2/nanoshell and anti-IgG/nanoshell bioconjugates.

  8. Measurement of immunotargeted plasmonic nanoparticles' cellular binding: a key factor in optimizing diagnostic efficacy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu Kun [Department of Bioengineering, Rice University, 6100 Main Street, MS-142, Houston, TX 77005 (United States); Sun Jiantang [Department of Bioengineering, Rice University, 6100 Main Street, MS-142, Houston, TX 77005 (United States); Bickford, Lissett R [Department of Bioengineering, Rice University, 6100 Main Street, MS-142, Houston, TX 77005 (United States); Lin, Alex W H [Department of Bioengineering, Rice University, 6100 Main Street, MS-142, Houston, TX 77005 (United States); Halas, Naomi J [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Rice University, 6100 Main Street, MS-142, Houston, TX 77005 (United States); Yu, T-K [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas, M D Anderson Cancer Center, Box 1202, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Drezek, Rebekah A [Department of Bioengineering, Rice University, 6100 Main Street, MS-142, Houston, TX 77005 (United States)

    2008-01-30

    In this study, we use polarized light scattering to study immunotargeted plasmonic nanoparticles which bind to live SK-BR-3 human breast carcinoma cells. Gold nanoparticles can be conjugated to various biomolecules in order to target specific molecular signatures of disease. This specific targeting provides enhanced contrast in scattering-based optical imaging techniques. While there are papers which report the number of antibodies that bind per nanoparticle, there are almost no reports of the key factor which influences diagnostic or therapeutic efficacy using nanoparticles: the number of targeted nanoparticles that bind per cell. To achieve this goal, we have developed a 'negative' method of determining the binding concentration of those antibody/nanoparticle bioconjugates which are targeted specifically to breast cancer cells. Unlike previously reported methods, we collected unbound nanoparticle bioconjugates and measured the light scattering from dilute solutions of these particles so that quantitative binding information can be obtained. By following this process, the interaction effects of adjacent bound nanoparticles on the cell membrane can be avoided simply by measuring the light scattering from the unbound nanoparticles. Specifically, using nanoshells of two different sizes, we compared the binding concentrations of anti-HER2/nanoshell and anti-IgG/nanoshell bioconjugates targeted to HER2-positive SK-BR-3 breast cancer cells. The results indicate that, for anti-HER2/nanoshell bioconjugates, there are approximately 800-1600 nanoshells bound per cell; for anti-IgG/nanoshell bioconjugates, the binding concentration is significantly lower at nearly 100 nanoshells bound per cell. These results are also supported by dark-field microscopy images of the cells labeled with anti-HER2/nanoshell and anti-IgG/nanoshell bioconjugates.

  9. Binding of insulin-like growth factors to Tera-2 human embryonal carcinoma cells during differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleck, J F; Sledge, G W; Benenati, S V; Frolik, C A; Roth, B J; Hirsch, K S

    1991-08-15

    Differentiation of Tera-2 human embryonal carcinoma cells by exposure to 2.1 mM alpha-difluoromethylornithine resulted in changes in morphology, a decrease in growth rate, and changes in the expression of SSEA-1 differentiation antigen. While the binding of 125I-insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) remained relatively constant during differentiation, binding of 125I-IGF-II increased 2-3-fold. Further, the binding of IGF-II was 87 times greater than IGF-I in both undifferentiated and differentiated cells. Undifferentiated Tera-2 cells exhibited a single class of binding sites for both IGF-I (KD = 1.2 nM, 7.0 x 10(3) sites/cell) and IGF-II (KD = 8.3 nM, 3.4 x 10(5) sites/cell). Following differentiation, IGF-I continued to bind to a single class of binding sites (KD 1.0 nM, 6.7 x 10(3) sites/cell) whereas IGF-II bound to both high-affinity sites (KDH 0.3 nM, 2.2 x 10(5) sites/cell) and low-affinity sites (KDL 15.1 nM, 1.6 x 10(7) sites/cell). The binding of iodinated IGF-II was blocked by unlabeled IGF-II but not IGF-I. In contrast, 125I-IGF-I binding was prevented by either IGF-I or IGF-II. Affinity cross-linking experiments demonstrated the presence of both type I and type II IGF receptors along with a number of IGF binding proteins. IGF-I failed to stimulate the incorporation of [3H]thymidine in both undifferentiated and differentiated cells. Although IGF-II caused a significant increase in [3H]thymidine incorporation in both undifferentiated and differentiated Tera-2 cells, the magnitude of the response and the sensitivity of the cells to IGF-II stimulation was diminished following differentiation. The observed changes in IGF-II binding, which occur in conjunction with cellular differentiation, may be an important feature of the expression of the differentiated phenotype by human germ cell tumors.

  10. FACTORS DETERMINING THE INVESTMENT ATTRACTIVENESS OF THE REGION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. I. Avtsinov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary.In the article we can see relevance of the research aimed at creating a favorable investment climate in the country and its regions, as a necessary condition for solving the problems of modernization of industrial production, the introduction of scientific and technological progress in all spheres of public life, the implementation of large-scale social and productive programs. In the study we justify the theoretical principles and reveal the essence of the relationship concepts: investment climate, investment attractiveness and investment activity. It is proved that the investment attractiveness should be considered as a sign of factorial and important component of the investment climate in the region, and investment activity as a sign score. In the study we can see a wide range of factors shaping favorable conditions for investment activities. The author focuses on the importance of non-traditional factors shaping the investment attractiveness of such as reducing the time to connect to power grid, information communication, improvement of tax reporting procedures, clarity of customs work, the introduction of regulations for obtaining permits for construction of facilities and reducing the number of required documents. This article analyzes of the indices and the key factors of investment attractiveness of the Voronezh region, which attract investment, exceeding the national average. The main ones are the development of new industrial parks with good transport, engineering, business infrastructure. Investors in the region have favorable conditions to carry on business on the prepared sites with painted communications, junctions, allowing them to reduce production costs, while correspondingly increasing the investment attractiveness of the area. Success of the attracting investment in the Voronezh region is largely due to the introduction standard of the executive bodies of state power, including 15 documents designed to make the

  11. Identification of amino acids in the Dr adhesin required for binding to decay-accelerating factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Loy, Cristina P; Sokurenko, Evgeni V; Samudrala, Ram; Moseley, Steve L

    2002-07-01

    Members of the Dr family of adhesins of Escherichia coli recognize as a receptor the Dr(a) blood-group antigen present on the complement regulatory and signalling molecule, decay-accelerating factor (DAF). One member of this family, the Dr haemagglutinin, also binds to a second receptor, type IV collagen. Structure/function information regarding these adhesins has been limited and domains directly involved in the interaction with DAF have not been determined. We devised a strategy to identify amino acids in the Dr haemagglutinin that are specifically involved in the interaction with DAF. The gene encoding the adhesive subunit, draE, was subjected to random mutagenesis and used to complement a strain defective for its expression. The resulting mutants were enriched and screened to obtain those that do not bind to DAF, but retain binding to type IV collagen. Individual amino acid changes at positions 10, 63, 65, 75, 77, 79 and 131 of the mature DraE sequence significantly reduced the ability of the DraE adhesin to bind DAF, but not collagen. Over half of the mutants obtained had substitutions within amino acids 63-81. Analysis of predicted structures of DraE suggest that these proximal residues may cluster to form a binding domain for DAF.

  12. Heparin binding preference and structures in the fibroblast growth factor family parallel their evolutionary diversification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Chao; Wilkinson, Mark C.

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of a large number of extracellular proteins with heparan sulfate (HS) regulates their transport and effector functions, but the degree of molecular specificity underlying protein–polysaccharide binding is still debated. The 15 paracrine fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) are one of the paradigms for this interaction. Here, we measure the binding preferences of six FGFs (FGF3, FGF4, FGF6, FGF10, FGF17, FGF20) for a library of modified heparins, representing structures in HS, and model glycosaminoglycans, using differential scanning fluorimetry. This is complemented by the identification of the lysine residues in the primary and secondary binding sites of the FGFs by a selective labelling approach. Pooling these data with previous sets provides good coverage of the FGF phylogenetic tree, deduced from amino acid sequence alignment. This demonstrates that the selectivity of the FGFs for binding structures in sulfated polysaccharides and the pattern of secondary binding sites on the surface of FGFs follow the phylogenetic relationship of the FGFs, and so are likely to be the result of the natural selection pressures that led to the expansion of the FGF family in the course of the evolution of more complex animal body plans. PMID:27030175

  13. Mxi1 regulates cell proliferation through insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Je Yeong; Yoo, Kyung Hyun [Department of Biological Science, Sookmyung Women' s University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Han-Woong [Department of Biochemistry, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jong Hoon, E-mail: parkjh@sookmyung.ac.kr [Department of Biological Science, Sookmyung Women' s University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-11-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mxi1 regulates cell proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Expression of IGFBP-3 is regulated by Mxi1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inactivation of Mxi1 reduces IGFBP-3 expression in vitro and in vivo. -- Abstract: Mxi1, a member of the Myc-Max-Mad network, is an antagonist of the c-Myc oncogene and is associated with excessive cell proliferation. Abnormal cell proliferation and tumorigenesis are observed in organs of Mxi1-/- mice. However, the Mxi1-reltaed mechanism of proliferation is unclear. The present study utilized microarray analysis using Mxi1 mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) to identify genes associated with cell proliferation. Among these genes, insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) was selected as a candidate gene for real-time PCR to ascertain whether IGFBP-3 expression is regulated by Mxi1. Expression of IGFBP-3 was decreased in Mxi1-/- MEFs and Mxi1-/- mice, and the gene was regulated by Mxi1 in Mxi1 MEFs. Furthermore, proliferation pathways related to IGFBP-3 were regulated in Mxi1-/- mice compared to Mxi1+/+ mice. To determine the effect of Mxi1 inactivation on the induction of cell proliferation, a proliferation assay is performed in both Mxi1 MEFs and Mxi1 mice. Cell viability was regulated by Mxi1 in Mxi1 MEFs and number of PCNA-positive cells was increased in Mxi1-/- mice compared to Mxi1+/+ mice. Moreover, the IGFBP-3 level was decreased in proliferation defect regions in Mxi1-/- mice. The results support the suggestion that inactivation of Mxi1 has a positive effect on cell proliferation by down-regulating IGFBP-3.

  14. JASPAR 2016: a major expansion and update of the open-access database of transcription factor binding profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathelier, Anthony; Fornes, Oriol; Arenillas, David J;

    2016-01-01

    JASPAR (http://jaspar.genereg.net) is an open-access database storing curated, non-redundant transcription factor (TF) binding profiles representing transcription factor binding preferences as position frequency matrices for multiple species in six taxonomic groups. For this 2016 release, we...

  15. The human mitochondrial transcription factor A is a versatile G-quadruplex binding protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyonnais, Sébastien; Tarrés-Soler, Aleix; Rubio-Cosials, Anna; Cuppari, Anna; Brito, Reicy; Jaumot, Joaquim; Gargallo, Raimundo; Vilaseca, Marta; Silva, Cristina; Granzhan, Anton; Teulade-Fichou, Marie-Paule; Eritja, Ramon; Solà, Maria

    2017-01-01

    The ability of the guanine-rich strand of the human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) to form G-quadruplex structures (G4s) has been recently highlighted, suggesting potential functions in mtDNA replication initiation and mtDNA stability. G4 structures in mtDNA raise the question of their recognition by factors associated with the mitochondrial nucleoid. The mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM), a high-mobility group (HMG)-box protein, is the major binding protein of human mtDNA and plays a critical role in its expression and maintenance. HMG-box proteins are pleiotropic sensors of DNA structural alterations. Thus, we investigated and uncovered a surprising ability of TFAM to bind to DNA or RNA G4 with great versatility, showing an affinity similar than to double-stranded DNA. The recognition of G4s by endogenous TFAM was detected in mitochondrial extracts by pull-down experiments using a G4-DNA from the mtDNA conserved sequence block II (CSBII). Biochemical characterization shows that TFAM binding to G4 depends on both the G-quartets core and flanking single-stranded overhangs. Additionally, it shows a structure-specific binding mode that differs from B-DNA, including G4-dependent TFAM multimerization. These TFAM-G4 interactions suggest functional recognition of G4s in the mitochondria. PMID:28276514

  16. SNP2TFBS – a database of regulatory SNPs affecting predicted transcription factor binding site affinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sunil; Ambrosini, Giovanna; Bucher, Philipp

    2017-01-01

    SNP2TFBS is a computational resource intended to support researchers investigating the molecular mechanisms underlying regulatory variation in the human genome. The database essentially consists of a collection of text files providing specific annotations for human single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), namely whether they are predicted to abolish, create or change the affinity of one or several transcription factor (TF) binding sites. A SNP's effect on TF binding is estimated based on a position weight matrix (PWM) model for the binding specificity of the corresponding factor. These data files are regenerated at regular intervals by an automatic procedure that takes as input a reference genome, a comprehensive SNP catalogue and a collection of PWMs. SNP2TFBS is also accessible over a web interface, enabling users to view the information provided for an individual SNP, to extract SNPs based on various search criteria, to annotate uploaded sets of SNPs or to display statistics about the frequencies of binding sites affected by selected SNPs. Homepage: http://ccg.vital-it.ch/snp2tfbs/. PMID:27899579

  17. A common site within factor H SCR 7 responsible for binding heparin, C-reactive protein and streptococcal M protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannakis, Eleni; Jokiranta, T Sakari; Male, Dean A; Ranganathan, Shoba; Ormsby, Rebecca J; Fischetti, Vince A; Mold, Carolyn; Gordon, David L

    2003-04-01

    The complement inhibitor factor H (fH) interacts via its seventh short consensus repeat (SCR) domain with multiple ligands including heparin, streptococcal M protein and C-reactive protein (CRP). The aim of this study was to localize the residues in SCR 7 required for these interactions. We initially built a homology model of fH SCR 6-7 using the averaged NMR structures of fH SCR 15-16 and vaccinia control protein SCR 3-4 as templates. Electrostatic potentials of the model's surface demonstrated a co-localization of three clusters of positively charged residues on SCR 7, labeled site A (R369 and K370), site B (R386 and K387) and site C (K392). These residues, localized to the linker region preceding SCR 7 and to the end of a "hypervariable loop" in SCR 7, were systematically replaced with uncharged alanine residues in an fH construct containing SCR 1-7. The resulting proteins were expressed in the methylotrophic yeast, Pichia pastoris. By ELISA analysis we demonstrated: first, that substituting site A inhibited heparin and CRP binding; secondly, that substituting site B inhibited binding to heparin, CRP and M protein; and thirdly, that substituting site C clearly inhibited only heparin binding.

  18. Risk factors control in patients with cardiovascular diseases in Ivanovo region: possibilities of a regional registry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belova O.A.

    2016-03-01

    Conclusion ― In primary care units of Ivanovo region in 2015 patients were insufficiently asked about their lifestyle (smoking, physical activity, eating habits, as well as their body weight was measured. If a patient had a risk factor he usually receive a proper advice. For BP, weight and blood lipids the goals were achieved rare.

  19. Asap: a framework for over-representation statistics for transcription factor binding sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marstrand, Troels T; Frellsen, Jes; Moltke, Ida

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In studies of gene regulation the efficient computational detection of over-represented transcription factor binding sites is an increasingly important aspect. Several published methods can be used for testing whether a set of hypothesised co-regulated genes share a common regulatory...... promoter sequences. Controlling all aspects of our input data we are able to identify the optimal statistics across multiple threshold values and for sequence sets containing different distributions of transcription factor binding sites. CONCLUSIONS: We show that our implementation is significantly faster...... than more naïve scanning algorithms when searching with many weight matrices in large sequence sets. When comparing the various statistics, we show that those based on binomial over-representation and Fisher's exact test performs almost equally good and better than the others. An online server...

  20. Realistic Models for Filling Factors in HII Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spangler, Steven R.; Costa, Allison H.; Bergerud, Brandon M.; Beauchamp, Kara M.

    2017-01-01

    One of the parameters used to describe HII regions and other ionized parts of the interstellar medium is the filling factor, defined as the volume fraction of an HII region occupied by matter. The best observational evidence for the existence of a filling factor less than unity is a discrepancy between the electron density derived from density-sensitive line ratios and the root mean square density obtained from emission measure measurements. Following the early, influential study by Osterbrock and Flather (ApJ 129, 26, 1959), most investigations of HII regions envision these objects as a group of isolated cells of high gas density embedded in a vacuum. This picture is at serious odds with more direct measurements of other astrophysical plasmas like the solar wind, where the density follows a less extreme probability distribution function (pdf) such as an exponential or lognormal. We have carried out a set of simulations in which model HII regions are created with different density pdfs such as exponential and lognormal as well as the extreme case of two delta functions. We calculate the electron density as inferred from spectroscopic line ratios and emission measures for all lines of sight through the model nebulas. In the cases of exponential and lognormal pdfs, the spectroscopically derived densities are higher than those obtained by the emission measures by factors of 20 to 100 percent. These are considerably smaller than values often reported in the literature, which can be an order of magnitude or greater. We will discuss possible ways to reconcile realistic density pdfs such as measured in space and laboratory plasmas with the results from astronomical spectroscopic measurements. Finally, we point out that for the Orion Nebula, the density discrepancy is due to geometry, not filling factor (O'Dell, ARAA 39, 99, 2001).

  1. Transcription Factor Zbtb20 Controls Regional Specification of Mammalian Archicortex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenthal, Eva Helga

    2010-01-01

    Combinatorial expression of sets of transcription factors (TFs) along the mammalian cortex controls its subdivision into functional areas. Unlike neocortex, only few recent data suggest genetic mechanisms controlling the regionalization of the archicortex. TF Emx2 plays a crucial role in patterning...... later on becoming restricted exclusively to postmitotic neurons of hippocampus (Hi) proper, dentate gyrus (DG), and two transitory zones, subiculum (S) and retrosplenial cortex (Rsp). Analysis of Zbtb20-/- mice revealed altered cortical patterning at the border between neocortex and archicortex...

  2. Local and regional factors influencing bacterial community assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindström, Eva S; Langenheder, Silke

    2012-02-01

    The classical view states that microbial biogeography is not affected by dispersal barriers or historical events, but only influenced by the local contemporary habitat conditions (species sorting). This has been challenged during recent years by studies suggesting that also regional factors such as mass effect, dispersal limitation and neutral assembly are important for the composition of local bacterial communities. Here we summarize results from biogeography studies in different environments, i.e. in marine, freshwater and soil as well in human hosts. Species sorting appears to be the most important mechanism. However, this result might be biased since this is the mechanism that is easiest to measure, detect and interpret. Hence, the importance of regional factors may have been underestimated. Moreover, our survey indicates that different assembly mechanisms might be important for different parts of the total community, differing, for example, between generalists and specialists, and between taxa of different dispersal ability and motility. We conclude that there is a clear need for experimental studies, first, to clearly separate regional and local factors in order to study their relative importance, and second, to test whether there are differences in assembly mechanisms depending on different taxonomic or functional groups.

  3. Combination of native and denaturing PAGE for the detection of protein binding regions in long fragments of genomic DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Metsis Madis

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In a traditional electrophoresis mobility shift assay (EMSA a 32P-labeled double-stranded DNA oligonucleotide or a restriction fragment bound to a protein is separated from the unbound DNA by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE in nondenaturing conditions. An extension of this method uses the large population of fragments derived from long genomic regions (approximately 600 kb for the identification of fragments containing protein binding regions. With this method, genomic DNA is fragmented by restriction enzymes, fragments are amplified by PCR, radiolabeled, incubated with nuclear proteins and the resulting DNA-protein complexes are separated by two-dimensional PAGE. Shifted DNA fragments containing protein binding sites are identified by using additional procedures, i. e. gel elution, PCR amplification, cloning and sequencing. Although the method allows simultaneous analysis of a large population of fragments, it is relatively laborious and can be used to detect only high affinity protein binding sites. Here we propose an alternative and straightforward strategy which is based on a combination of native and denaturing PAGE. This strategy allows the identification of DNA fragments containing low as well as high affinity protein binding regions, derived from genomic DNA ( Results We have combined an EMSA-based selection step with subsequent denaturing PAGE for the localization of protein binding regions in long (up to10 kb fragments of genomic DNA. Our strategy consists of the following steps: digestion of genomic DNA with a 4-cutter restriction enzyme (AluI, BsuRI, TruI, etc, separation of low and high molecular weight fractions of resultant DNA fragments, 32P-labeling with Klenow polymerase, traditional EMSA, gel elution and identification of the shifted bands (or smear by denaturing PAGE. The identification of DNA fragments containing protein binding sites is carried out by running the gel-eluted fragments alongside

  4. New Insights into the Functions of Transcription Factors that Bind the RNA Polymerase Secondary Channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenkin, Nikolay; Yuzenkova, Yulia

    2015-06-25

    Transcription elongation is regulated at several different levels, including control by various accessory transcription elongation factors. A distinct group of these factors interacts with the RNA polymerase secondary channel, an opening at the enzyme surface that leads to its active center. Despite investigation for several years, the activities and in vivo roles of some of these factors remain obscure. Here, we review the recent progress in understanding the functions of the secondary channel binding factors in bacteria. In particular, we highlight the surprising role of global regulator DksA in fidelity of RNA synthesis and the resolution of RNA polymerase traffic jams by the Gre factor. These findings indicate a potential link between transcription fidelity and collisions of the transcription and replication machineries.

  5. New Insights into the Functions of Transcription Factors that Bind the RNA Polymerase Secondary Channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolay Zenkin

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Transcription elongation is regulated at several different levels, including control by various accessory transcription elongation factors. A distinct group of these factors interacts with the RNA polymerase secondary channel, an opening at the enzyme surface that leads to its active center. Despite investigation for several years, the activities and in vivo roles of some of these factors remain obscure. Here, we review the recent progress in understanding the functions of the secondary channel binding factors in bacteria. In particular, we highlight the surprising role of global regulator DksA in fidelity of RNA synthesis and the resolution of RNA polymerase traffic jams by the Gre factor. These findings indicate a potential link between transcription fidelity and collisions of the transcription and replication machineries.

  6. Identification of human IgG1 variant with enhanced FcRn binding and without increased binding to rheumatoid factor autoantibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Atsuhiko; Iwayanagi, Yuki; Haraya, Kenta; Tachibana, Tatsuhiko; Nakamura, Genki; Nambu, Takeru; Esaki, Keiko; Hattori, Kunihiro; Igawa, Tomoyuki

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Various studies have demonstrated that Fc engineering to enhance neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) binding is effective for elongating half-life or increasing cellular uptake of IgG. A previous study has shown that a N434H mutation to enhance FcRn binding resulted in increased binding to rheumatoid factor (RF) autoantibody, which is not desirable for therapeutic use in autoimmune disease. In this study, we first showed that all the existing Fc variants with enhanced FcRn binding also show increased RF binding, and then identified specific mutations that could be introduced to those Fc variants to reduce the RF binding. Furthermore, we generated novel Fc variants that do not increase RF binding and show half-lives of 45 d in cynomolgus monkey, which is longer than those of previously reported Fc variants. In addition, we generated novel Fc variants with antigen sweeping activity that do not increase RF binding. We expect that these novel Fc variants will be useful as antibody therapeutics against autoimmune diseases. PMID:28387635

  7. Sperm and spermatids contain different proteins and bind distinct egg factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teperek, Marta; Miyamoto, Kei; Simeone, Angela; Feret, Renata; Deery, Michael J; Gurdon, John B; Jullien, Jerome

    2014-09-19

    Spermatozoa are more efficient at supporting normal embryonic development than spermatids, their immature, immediate precursors. This suggests that the sperm acquires the ability to support embryonic development during spermiogenesis (spermatid to sperm maturation). Here, using Xenopus laevis as a model organism, we performed 2-D Fluorescence Difference Gel Electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) and mass spectrometry analysis of differentially expressed proteins between sperm and spermatids in order to identify factors that could be responsible for the efficiency of the sperm to support embryonic development. Furthermore, benefiting from the availability of egg extracts in Xenopus, we also tested whether the chromatin of sperm could attract different egg factors compared to the chromatin of spermatids. Our analysis identified: (1) several proteins which were present exclusively in sperm; but not in spermatid nuclei and (2) numerous egg proteins binding to the sperm (but not to the spermatid chromatin) after incubation in egg extracts. Amongst these factors we identified many chromatin-associated proteins and transcriptional repressors. Presence of transcriptional repressors binding specifically to sperm chromatin could suggest its preparation for the early embryonic cell cycles, during which no transcription is observed and suggests that sperm chromatin has a unique protein composition, which facilitates the recruitment of egg chromatin remodelling factors. It is therefore likely that the acquisition of these sperm-specific factors during spermiogenesis makes the sperm chromatin suitable to interact with the maternal factors and, as a consequence, to support efficient embryonic development.

  8. Complement factor H binds malondialdehyde epitopes and protects from oxidative stress

    OpenAIRE

    Weismann, David; Hartvigsen, Karsten; Lauer, Nadine; Keiryn L Bennett; Scholl, Hendrik P N; Issa, Peter Charbel; Cano, Marisol; Brandstätter, Hubert; Tsimikas, Sotirios; Skerka, Christine; Superti-Furga, Giulio; Handa, James T.; Zipfel, Peter F.; Witztum, Joseph L.; Binder, Christoph J.

    2011-01-01

    Oxidative stress and enhanced lipid peroxidation are linked to many chronic inflammatory diseases, including age-related macular degeneration (AMD). AMD is the leading cause of blindness in Western societies, but its aetiology remains largely unknown. Malondialdehyde (MDA) is a common lipid peroxidation product that accumulates in many pathophysiological processes, including AMD. Here we identify complement factor H (CFH) as a major MDA-binding protein that can block both the uptake of MDA-mo...

  9. Quantitative Proteomics Identifies Serum Response Factor Binding Protein 1 as a Host Factor for Hepatitis C Virus Entry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisa Gerold

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV enters human hepatocytes through a multistep mechanism involving, among other host proteins, the virus receptor CD81. How CD81 governs HCV entry is poorly characterized, and CD81 protein interactions after virus binding remain elusive. We have developed a quantitative proteomics protocol to identify HCV-triggered CD81 interactions and found 26 dynamic binding partners. At least six of these proteins promote HCV infection, as indicated by RNAi. We further characterized serum response factor binding protein 1 (SRFBP1, which is recruited to CD81 during HCV uptake and supports HCV infection in hepatoma cells and primary human hepatocytes. SRFBP1 facilitates host cell penetration by all seven HCV genotypes, but not of vesicular stomatitis virus and human coronavirus. Thus, SRFBP1 is an HCV-specific, pan-genotypic host entry factor. These results demonstrate the use of quantitative proteomics to elucidate pathogen entry and underscore the importance of host protein-protein interactions during HCV invasion.

  10. Structural basis of human transcription factor Sry-related box 17 binding to DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Nana; Jiang, Wei; Gao, Hai; Cheng, Zhong; Qian, Huolian; Si, Shuyi; Xie, Yong

    2013-04-01

    Sry-related box (Sox) transcription factors share a conserved high-mobility-group box domain (HMG-domain) that binds DNA in the minor groove and bends DNA for further assembly of transcriptional machineries. During organogenesis, each member of the Sox family triggers a specific cell lineage differentiation, indicating that their interactions with DNA are different from each other. Therefore, investigating structural rearrangement of each Sox transcription factor HMG-domain upon binding to DNA would help to elucidate the distinctive molecular mechanism by which they interact with DNA. Previous studies have determined the crystal structures of Sox2 HMG-domain/DNA, Sox4 HMGdomain/ DNA, Sox9 HMG-domain/DNA and Sox17 HMG-domain/DNA complexes. However, major gaps remain in the structural information on the Sox transcription factor HMG-domains. Here, we report the crystal structure of the human Sox17 HMG-domain alone at 2.4 A resolution. Comparing this structure and the structure of the mouse Sox17 HMGdomain/ DNA complex provides structural understanding of the mechanism of Sox17 binding to DNA. Specifically, after electrostatic interactions attract Sox17 to DNA, Asn73, Ser99, and Trp106 form hydrogen bonds with DNA, Arg70, Lys80, Arg83, His94, and Asn95 on Sox17 undergo conformational changes and form hydrogen bonds with DNA, contributing to the electrostatic interaction between Sox17 and DNA.

  11. FF domains of CA150 bind transcription and splicing factors through multiple weak interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Matthew J; Kulkarni, Sarang; Pawson, Tony

    2004-11-01

    The human transcription factor CA150 modulates human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gene transcription and contains numerous signaling elements, including six FF domains. Repeated FF domains are present in several transcription and splicing factors and can recognize phosphoserine motifs in the C-terminal domain (CTD) of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII). Using mass spectrometry, we identify a number of nuclear binding partners for the CA150 FF domains and demonstrate a direct interaction between CA150 and Tat-SF1, a protein involved in the coupling of splicing and transcription. CA150 FF domains recognize multiple sites within the Tat-SF1 protein conforming to the consensus motif (D/E)(2/5)-F/W/Y-(D/E)(2/5). Individual FF domains are capable of interacting with Tat-SF1 peptide ligands in an equivalent and noncooperative manner, with affinities ranging from 150 to 500 microM. Repeated FF domains therefore appear to bind their targets through multiple weak interactions with motifs comprised of negatively charged residues flanking aromatic amino acids. The RNAPII CTD represents a consensus FF domain-binding site, contingent on generation of the requisite negative charges by phosphorylation of serines 2 and 5. We propose that CA150, through the dual recognition of acidic motifs in proteins such as Tat-SF1 and the phosphorylated CTD, could mediate the recruitment of transcription and splicing factors to actively transcribing RNAPII.

  12. Amblyomma americanum tick saliva insulin-like growth factor binding protein-related protein 1 binds insulin but not insulin-like growth factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radulović, Ž M; Porter, L M; Kim, T K; Bakshi, M; Mulenga, A

    2015-10-01

    Silencing Amblyomma americanum insulin-like growth factor binding protein-related protein 1 (AamIGFBP-rP1) mRNA prevented ticks from feeding to repletion. In this study, we used recombinant (r)AamIGFBP-rP1 in a series of assays to obtain further insight into the role(s) of this protein in tick feeding regulation. Our results suggest that AamIGFBP-1 is an antigenic protein that is apparently exclusively expressed in salivary glands. We found that both males and females secrete AamIGFBP-rP1 into the host during feeding and confirmed that female ticks secrete this protein from within 24-48 h after attachment. Our data suggest that native AamIGFBP-rP1 is a functional insulin binding protein in that both yeast- and insect cell-expressed rAamIGFBP-rP1 bound insulin, but not insulin-like growth factors. When subjected to anti-blood clotting and platelet aggregation assays, rAamIGFBP-rP1 did not have any effect. Unlike human IGFBP-rP1, which is controlled by trypsinization, rAamIGFBP-rP1 is resistant to digestion, suggesting that the tick protein may not be under mammalian host control at the tick feeding site. The majority of tick-borne pathogens are transmitted 48 h after the tick has attached. Thus, the demonstrated antigenicity and secretion into the host within 24-48 h of the tick starting to feed makes AamIGFBP-rP1 an attractive target for antitick vaccine development.

  13. The relationship between transcription initiation RNAs and CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF localization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taft Ryan J

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transcription initiation RNAs (tiRNAs are nuclear localized 18 nucleotide RNAs derived from sequences immediately downstream of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII transcription start sites. Previous reports have shown that tiRNAs are intimately correlated with gene expression, RNA polymerase II binding and behaviors, and epigenetic marks associated with transcription initiation, but not elongation. Results In the present work, we show that tiRNAs are commonly found at genomic CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF binding sites in human and mouse, and that CTCF sites that colocalize with RNAPII are highly enriched for tiRNAs. To directly investigate the relationship between tiRNAs and CTCF we examined tiRNAs originating near the intronic CTCF binding site in the human tumor suppressor gene, p21 (cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1A gene, also known as CDKN1A. Inhibition of CTCF-proximal tiRNAs resulted in increased CTCF localization and increased p21 expression, while overexpression of CTCF-proximal tiRNA mimics decreased CTCF localization and p21 expression. We also found that tiRNA-regulated CTCF binding influences the levels of trimethylated H3K27 at the alternate upstream p21 promoter, and affects the levels of alternate p21 (p21alt transcripts. Extending these studies to another randomly selected locus with conserved CTCF binding we found that depletion of tiRNA alters nucleosome density proximal to sites of tiRNA biogenesis. Conclusions Taken together, these data suggest that tiRNAs modulate local epigenetic structure, which in turn regulates CTCF localization.

  14. Insulin-like growth factor binding proteins increase intracellular calcium levels in two different cell lines.

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    Danielle Seurin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs are six related secreted proteins that share IGF-dependent and -independent functions. If the former functions begin to be well described, the latter are somewhat more difficult to investigate and to characterize. At the cellular level, IGFBPs were shown to modulate numerous processes including cell growth, differentiation and apoptosis. However, the molecular mechanisms implicated remain largely unknown. We previously demonstrated that IGFBP-3, but not IGFBP-1 or IGFBP-5, increase intracellular calcium concentration in MCF-7 cells (Ricort J-M et al. (2002 FEBS lett 527: 293-297. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We perform a global analysis in which we studied, by two different approaches, the binding of each IGFBP isoform (i.e., IGFBP-1 to -6 to the surface of two different cellular models, MCF-7 breast adenocarcinoma cells and C2 myoblast proliferative cells, as well as the IGFBP-induced increase of intracellular calcium concentration. Using both confocal fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry analysis, we showed that all IGFBPs bind to MCF-7 cell surface. By contrast, only four IGFBPs can bind to C2 cell surface since neither IGFBP-2 nor IGFBP-4 were detected. Among the six IGFBPs tested, only IGFBP-1 did not increased intracellular calcium concentration whatever the cellular model studied. By contrast, IGFBP-2, -3, -4 and -6, in MCF-7 cells, and IGFBP-3, -5 and -6, in C2 proliferative cells, induce a rapid and transient increase in intracellular free calcium concentration. Moreover, IGFBP-2 and -3 (in MCF-7 cells and IGFBP-5 (in C2 cells increase intracellular free calcium concentration by a pertussis toxin sensitive signaling pathway. CONCLUSIONS: Our results demonstrate that IGFBPs are able to bind to cell surface and increase intracellular calcium concentration. By characterizing the IGFBPs-induced cell responses and intracellular couplings, we highlight the cellular

  15. Modulation of Re-initiation of Measles Virus Transcription at Intergenic Regions by PXD to NTAIL Binding Strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloyet, Louis-Marie; Brunel, Joanna; Dosnon, Marion; Hamon, Véronique; Erales, Jenny; Gruet, Antoine; Lazert, Carine; Bignon, Christophe; Roche, Philippe; Longhi, Sonia; Gerlier, Denis

    2016-12-01

    Measles virus (MeV) and all Paramyxoviridae members rely on a complex polymerase machinery to ensure viral transcription and replication. Their polymerase associates the phosphoprotein (P) and the L protein that is endowed with all necessary enzymatic activities. To be processive, the polymerase uses as template a nucleocapsid made of genomic RNA entirely wrapped into a continuous oligomer of the nucleoprotein (N). The polymerase enters the nucleocapsid at the 3'end of the genome where are located the promoters for transcription and replication. Transcription of the six genes occurs sequentially. This implies ending and re-initiating mRNA synthesis at each intergenic region (IGR). We explored here to which extent the binding of the X domain of P (XD) to the C-terminal region of the N protein (NTAIL) is involved in maintaining the P/L complex anchored to the nucleocapsid template during the sequential transcription. Amino acid substitutions introduced in the XD-binding site on NTAIL resulted in a wide range of binding affinities as determined by combining protein complementation assays in E. coli and human cells and isothermal titration calorimetry. Molecular dynamics simulations revealed that XD binding to NTAIL involves a complex network of hydrogen bonds, the disruption of which by two individual amino acid substitutions markedly reduced the binding affinity. Using a newly designed, highly sensitive dual-luciferase reporter minigenome assay, the efficiency of re-initiation through the five measles virus IGRs was found to correlate with NTAIL/XD KD. Correlatively, P transcript accumulation rate and F/N transcript ratios from recombinant viruses expressing N variants were also found to correlate with the NTAIL to XD binding strength. Altogether, our data support a key role for XD binding to NTAIL in maintaining proper anchor of the P/L complex thereby ensuring transcription re-initiation at each intergenic region.

  16. Despite WT1 binding sites in the promoter region of human and mouse nucleoporin glycoprotein 210, WT1 does not influence expression of GP210

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Licht Jonathan D

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glycoprotein 210 (GP210 is a transmembrane component of the nuclear pore complex of metazoans, with a short carboxyterminus protruding towards the cytoplasm. Its function is unknown, but it is considered to be a major structural component of metazoan nuclear pores. Yet, our previous findings showed pronounced differences in expression levels in embryonic mouse tissues and cell lines. In order to identify factors regulating GP210, the genomic organization of human GP210 was analyzed in silico. Results The human gene was mapped to chromosome 3 and consists of 40 exons spread over 102 kb. The deduced 1887 amino acid showed a high degree of alignment homology to previously reported orthologues. Experimentally we defined two transcription initiation sites, 18 and 29 bp upstream of the ATG start codon. The promoter region is characterized by a CpG island and several consensus binding motifs for gene regulatory transcription factors, including clustered sites associated with Sp1 and the Wilms' tumor suppressor gene zinc finger protein (WT1. In addition, distal to the translation start we found a (GTn repetitive sequence, an element known for its ability to bind WT1. Homologies for these motifs could be identified in the corresponding mouse genomic region. However, experimental tetracycline dependent induction of WT1 in SAOS osteosarcoma cells did not influence GP210 transcription. Conclusion Although mouse GP210 was identified as an early response gene during induced metanephric kidney development, and WT1 binding sites were identified in the promoter region of the human GP210 gene, experimental modulation of WT1 expression did not influence expression of GP210. Therefore, WT1 is probably not regulating GP210 expression. Instead, we suggest that the identified Sp binding sites are involved.

  17. Storage of factor VIII variants with impaired von Willebrand factor binding in Weibel-Palade bodies in endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maartje van den Biggelaar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Point mutations resulting in reduced factor VIII (FVIII binding to von Willebrand factor (VWF are an important cause of mild/moderate hemophilia A. Treatment includes desmopressin infusion, which concomitantly increases VWF and FVIII plasma levels, apparently from storage pools containing both proteins. The source of these VWF/FVIII co-storage pools and the mechanism of granule biogenesis are not fully understood. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We studied intracellular trafficking of FVIII variants implicated in mild/moderate hemophilia A together with VWF in HEK293 cells and primary endothelial cells. The role of VWF binding was addressed using FVIII variants displaying reduced VWF interaction. Binding studies using purified FVIII proteins revealed moderate (Arg2150His, Del2201, Pro2300Ser to severe (Tyr1680Phe, Ser2119Tyr VWF binding defects. Expression studies in HEK293 cells and primary endothelial cells revealed that all FVIII variants were present within VWF-containing organelles. Quantitative studies showed that the relative amount of FVIII storage was independent of various mutations. Substantial amounts of FVIII variants are co-stored in VWF-containing storage organelles, presumably by virtue of their ability to interact with VWF at low pH. CONCLUSIONS: Our data suggest that the potential of FVIII co-storage with VWF is not affected in mild/moderate hemophilia A caused by reduced FVIII/VWF interaction in the circulation. These data support the hypothesis that Weibel-Palade bodies comprise the desmopressin-releasable FVIII storage pool in vivo.

  18. The nuclear factor YY1 suppresses the human gamma interferon promoter through two mechanisms: inhibition of AP1 binding and activation of a silencer element.

    OpenAIRE

    1996-01-01

    Our group has previously reported that the nuclear factor Yin-Yang 1 (YY1), a ubiquitous DNA-binding protein, is able to interact with a silencer element (BE) in the gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) promoter region. In this study, we demonstrated that YY1 can directly inhibit the activity of the IFN-gamma promoter by interacting with multiple sites in the promoter. In cotransfection assays, a YY1 expression vector significantly inhibited IFN-gamma promoter activity. Mutation of the YY1 binding si...

  19. Examination of the transcription factor NtcA-binding motif by in vitro selection of DNA sequences from a random library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, F; Wisén, S; Widersten, M; Bergman, B; Mannervik, B

    2000-08-25

    A recursive in vitro selection among random DNA sequences was used for analysis of the cyanobacterial transcription factor NtcA-binding motifs. An eight-base palindromic sequence, TGTA-(N(8))-TACA, was found to be the optimal NtcA-binding sequence. The more divergent the binding sequences, compared to this consensus sequence, the lower the NtcA affinity. The second and third bases in each four-nucleotide half of the consensus sequence were crucial for NtcA binding, and they were in general highly conserved. The most frequently occurring sequence in the middle weakly conserved region was similar to that of the NtcA-binding motif of the Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 glnA gene, previously known to have high affinity for NtcA. This indicates that the middle sequences were selected for high NtcA affinity. Analysis of natural NtcA-binding motifs showed that these could be classified into two groups based on differences in recognition consensus sequences. It is suggested that NtcA naturally recognizes different DNA-binding motifs, or has differential affinities to these sequences under different physiological conditions.

  20. RGS12 interacts with the SNARE-binding region of the Cav2.2 calcium channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richman, Ryan W; Strock, Jesse; Hains, Melinda D; Cabanilla, Nory Jun; Lau, King-Kei; Siderovski, David P; Diversé-Pierluissi, María

    2005-01-14

    Activation of GABAB receptors in chick dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons inhibits the Cav2.2 calcium channel in both a voltage-dependent and voltage-independent manner. The voltage-independent inhibition requires activation of a tyrosine kinase that phosphorylates the alpha1 subunit of the channel and thereby recruits RGS12, a member of the "regulator of G protein signaling" (RGS) proteins. Here we report that RGS12 binds to the SNARE-binding or "synprint" region (amino acids 726-985) in loop II-III of the calcium channel alpha1 subunit. A recombinant protein encompassing the N-terminal PTB domain of RGS12 binds to the synprint region in protein overlay and surface plasmon resonance binding assays; this interaction is dependent on tyrosine phosphorylation and yet is within a sequence that differs from the canonical NPXY motif targeted by other PTB domains. In electrophysiological experiments, microinjection of DRG neurons with synprint-derived peptides containing the tyrosine residue Tyr-804 altered the rate of desensitization of neurotransmitter-mediated inhibition of the Cav2.2 calcium channel, whereas peptides centered about a second tyrosine residue, Tyr-815, were without effect. RGS12 from a DRG neuron lysate was precipitated using synprint peptides containing phosphorylated Tyr-804. The high degree of conservation of Tyr-804 in the SNARE-binding region of Cav2.1 and Cav2.2 calcium channels suggests that this region, in addition to the binding of SNARE proteins, is also important for determining the time course of the modulation of calcium current via tyrosine phosphorylation.

  1. The Xis2d protein of CTnDOT binds to the intergenic region between the mob and tra operons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopp, Crystal M; Gardner, Jeffrey F; Salyers, Abigail A

    2015-09-01

    CTnDOT is a 65kbp integrative and conjugative element (ICE) that carries genes encoding both tetracycline and erythromycin resistances. The excision operon of this element encodes Xis2c, Xis2d, and Exc proteins involved in the excision of CTnDOT from host chromosomes. These proteins are also required in the complex transcriptional regulation of the divergently transcribed transfer (tra) and mobilization (mob) operons of CTnDOT. Transcription of the tra operon is positively regulated by Xis2c and Xis2d, whereas, transcription of the mob operon is positively regulated by Xis2d and Exc. Xis2d is the only protein that is involved in the excision reaction, as well as the transcriptional regulation of both the mob and tra operons. This paper helps establish how Xis2d binds the DNA in the mob and tra region. Unlike other excisionase proteins, Xis2d binds a region of dyad symmetry. The binding site is located in the intergenic region between the mob and tra promoters, and once bound Xis2d induces a bend in the DNA. Xis2d binding to this region could be the preliminary step for the activation of both operons. Then the other proteins, like Exc, can interact with Xis2d and form higher order complexes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. TdaA Regulates Tropodithietic Acid Synthesis by Binding to the tdaC Promoter Region ▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Geng, Haifeng; Belas, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Silicibacter sp. TM1040, a member of the marine Roseobacter clade, produces the antibiotic and quorum signaling molecule tropodithietic acid (TDA), encoded by tdaABCDEF. Here, we showed that an LysR-type transcriptional regulator, TdaA, is a positive regulator of tdaCDE gene expression and binds to the tdaC promoter region.

  3. Interaction of a nodule specific, trans-acting factor with distinct DNA elements in the soybean leghaemoglobin Ibc(3) 5' upstream region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Erik Østergaard; Marcker, Kjeld A; Schell, J;

    1988-01-01

    Nuclear extracts from soybean nodules, leaves and roots were used to investigate protein-DNA interactions in the 5' upstream (promoter) region of the soybean leghaemoglobin lbc(3) gene. Two distinct regions were identified which strongly bind a nodule specific factor. A Bal31 deletion analysis de...

  4. Repression of CIITA by the Epstein-Barr virus transcription factor Zta is independent of its dimerization and DNA binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balan, Nicolae; Osborn, Kay; Sinclair, Alison J

    2016-03-01

    Repression of the cellular CIITA gene is part of the immune evasion strategy of the γherpes virus Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) during its lytic replication cycle in B-cells. In part, this is mediated through downregulation of MHC class II gene expression via the targeted repression of CIITA, the cellular master regulator of MHC class II gene expression. This repression is achieved through a reduction in CIITA promoter activity, initiated by the EBV transcription and replication factor, Zta (BZLF1, EB1, ZEBRA). Zta is the earliest gene expressed during the lytic replication cycle. Zta interacts with sequence-specific elements in promoters, enhancers and the replication origin (ZREs), and also modulates gene expression through interaction with cellular transcription factors and co-activators. Here, we explore the requirements for Zta-mediated repression of the CIITA promoter. We find that repression by Zta is specific for the CIITA promoter and can be achieved in the absence of other EBV genes. Surprisingly, we find that the dimerization region of Zta is not required to mediate repression. This contrasts with an obligate requirement of this region to correctly orientate the DNA contact regions of Zta to mediate activation of gene expression through ZREs. Additional support for the model that Zta represses the CIITA promoter without direct DNA binding comes from promoter mapping that shows that repression does not require the presence of a ZRE in the CIITA promoter.

  5. SELMAP - SELEX affinity landscape MAPping of transcription factor binding sites using integrated microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dana; Orenstein, Yaron; Golodnitsky, Rada; Pellach, Michal; Avrahami, Dorit; Wachtel, Chaim; Ovadia-Shochat, Avital; Shir-Shapira, Hila; Kedmi, Adi; Juven-Gershon, Tamar; Shamir, Ron; Gerber, Doron

    2016-09-15

    Transcription factors (TFs) alter gene expression in response to changes in the environment through sequence-specific interactions with the DNA. These interactions are best portrayed as a landscape of TF binding affinities. Current methods to study sequence-specific binding preferences suffer from limited dynamic range, sequence bias, lack of specificity and limited throughput. We have developed a microfluidic-based device for SELEX Affinity Landscape MAPping (SELMAP) of TF binding, which allows high-throughput measurement of 16 proteins in parallel. We used it to measure the relative affinities of Pho4, AtERF2 and Btd full-length proteins to millions of different DNA binding sites, and detected both high and low-affinity interactions in equilibrium conditions, generating a comprehensive landscape of the relative TF affinities to all possible DNA 6-mers, and even DNA10-mers with increased sequencing depth. Low quantities of both the TFs and DNA oligomers were sufficient for obtaining high-quality results, significantly reducing experimental costs. SELMAP allows in-depth screening of hundreds of TFs, and provides a means for better understanding of the regulatory processes that govern gene expression.

  6. Macrolevel factors of influence on industry competitiveness of Ukrainian regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.M. Tkach

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the article is to identify processes and phenomena of macro level, which form current conditions of the industry competitiveness of Ukraine for working out practical recommendations of its innovation increasing. The results of the analysis. The influence of macro-environment on the industry competitiveness is shown. The main factors of industry competitiveness influence which issue on the national level (political, legal, economic, institutional, commercial, etc. are outlined. These factors are synergistically intertwined and form conditions of the industry competitiveness of regions. Considering the analysis of the results of international competitiveness rankings the author found out the following factors of lowering the competitive position of Ukraine: corruption, problematic access to business finance, inflation, political instability, tax burden, inefficient government bureaucracy and unstable exchange rate. On the basis of this, the trends of factors are explored over the past five years (2011-2015 and reasons of them are identified. The particular attention is paid to institutional factors as public-private partnership, state support of industrial development, features of the development of industrial parks in Ukraine and others. Moreover, the features of foreign policy of Ukraine and structure of exports of industrial goods are explored. The study demonstrated key macro threats in Ukraine. Practical recommendations of industry competitiveness increasing are given. Conclusions and directions of further researches. The development of Ukraine for the past five years (2011-2015 characterized by dynamic changes in all spheres of life. This affected the competitiveness of the country in general and its industry in particular. Macro-level influencing factors, which created unfavorable conditions for the formation of industrial competitiveness, are: macroeconomic instability and high levels of bureaucracy, corruption, lack of

  7. The negatively charged regions of lactoferrin binding protein B, an adaptation against anti-microbial peptides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ari Morgenthau

    Full Text Available Lactoferrin binding protein B (LbpB is a bi-lobed membrane bound lipoprotein that is part of the lactoferrin receptor complex in a variety of Gram-negative pathogens. Despite high sequence diversity among LbpBs from various strains and species, a cluster of negatively charged amino acids is invariably present in the protein's C-terminal lobe in all species except Moraxella bovis. The function of LbpB in iron acquisition has yet to be experimentally demonstrated, whereas in vitro studies have shown that LbpB confers protection against lactoferricin, a short cationic antimicrobial peptide released from the N- terminus of lactoferrin. In this study we demonstrate that the negatively charged regions can be removed from the Neisseria meningitidis LbpB without compromising stability, and this results in the inability of LbpB to protect against the bactericidal effects of lactoferricin. The release of LbpB from the cell surface by the autotransporter NalP reduces the protection against lactoferricin in the in vitro killing assay, attributed to removal of LbpB during washing steps, but is unlikely to have a similar impact in vivo. The protective effect of the negatively charged polysaccharide capsule in the killing assay was less than the protection conferred by LbpB, suggesting that LbpB plays a major role in protection against cationic antimicrobial peptides in vivo. The selective release of LbpB by NalP has been proposed to be a mechanism for evading the adaptive immune response, by reducing the antibody binding to the cell surface, but may also provide insights into the primary function of LbpB in vivo. Although TbpB and LbpB have been shown to be major targets of the human immune response, the selective release of LbpB suggests that unlike TbpB, LbpB may not be essential for iron acquisition, but important for protection against cationic antimicrobial peptides.

  8. The negatively charged regions of lactoferrin binding protein B, an adaptation against anti-microbial peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgenthau, Ari; Beddek, Amanda; Schryvers, Anthony B

    2014-01-01

    Lactoferrin binding protein B (LbpB) is a bi-lobed membrane bound lipoprotein that is part of the lactoferrin receptor complex in a variety of Gram-negative pathogens. Despite high sequence diversity among LbpBs from various strains and species, a cluster of negatively charged amino acids is invariably present in the protein's C-terminal lobe in all species except Moraxella bovis. The function of LbpB in iron acquisition has yet to be experimentally demonstrated, whereas in vitro studies have shown that LbpB confers protection against lactoferricin, a short cationic antimicrobial peptide released from the N- terminus of lactoferrin. In this study we demonstrate that the negatively charged regions can be removed from the Neisseria meningitidis LbpB without compromising stability, and this results in the inability of LbpB to protect against the bactericidal effects of lactoferricin. The release of LbpB from the cell surface by the autotransporter NalP reduces the protection against lactoferricin in the in vitro killing assay, attributed to removal of LbpB during washing steps, but is unlikely to have a similar impact in vivo. The protective effect of the negatively charged polysaccharide capsule in the killing assay was less than the protection conferred by LbpB, suggesting that LbpB plays a major role in protection against cationic antimicrobial peptides in vivo. The selective release of LbpB by NalP has been proposed to be a mechanism for evading the adaptive immune response, by reducing the antibody binding to the cell surface, but may also provide insights into the primary function of LbpB in vivo. Although TbpB and LbpB have been shown to be major targets of the human immune response, the selective release of LbpB suggests that unlike TbpB, LbpB may not be essential for iron acquisition, but important for protection against cationic antimicrobial peptides.

  9. The Negatively Charged Regions of Lactoferrin Binding Protein B, an Adaptation against Anti-Microbial Peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgenthau, Ari; Beddek, Amanda; Schryvers, Anthony B.

    2014-01-01

    Lactoferrin binding protein B (LbpB) is a bi-lobed membrane bound lipoprotein that is part of the lactoferrin receptor complex in a variety of Gram-negative pathogens. Despite high sequence diversity among LbpBs from various strains and species, a cluster of negatively charged amino acids is invariably present in the protein’s C-terminal lobe in all species except Moraxella bovis. The function of LbpB in iron acquisition has yet to be experimentally demonstrated, whereas in vitro studies have shown that LbpB confers protection against lactoferricin, a short cationic antimicrobial peptide released from the N- terminus of lactoferrin. In this study we demonstrate that the negatively charged regions can be removed from the Neisseria meningitidis LbpB without compromising stability, and this results in the inability of LbpB to protect against the bactericidal effects of lactoferricin. The release of LbpB from the cell surface by the autotransporter NalP reduces the protection against lactoferricin in the in vitro killing assay, attributed to removal of LbpB during washing steps, but is unlikely to have a similar impact in vivo. The protective effect of the negatively charged polysaccharide capsule in the killing assay was less than the protection conferred by LbpB, suggesting that LbpB plays a major role in protection against cationic antimicrobial peptides in vivo. The selective release of LbpB by NalP has been proposed to be a mechanism for evading the adaptive immune response, by reducing the antibody binding to the cell surface, but may also provide insights into the primary function of LbpB in vivo. Although TbpB and LbpB have been shown to be major targets of the human immune response, the selective release of LbpB suggests that unlike TbpB, LbpB may not be essential for iron acquisition, but important for protection against cationic antimicrobial peptides. PMID:24465982

  10. TGF-β Signaling Cooperates with AT Motif-Binding Factor-1 for Repression of the α-Fetoprotein Promoter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuo Sakata

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available α-Fetoprotein (AFP is known to be highly produced in fetal liver despite its barely detectable level in normal adult liver. On the other hand, hepatocellular carcinoma often shows high expression of AFP. Thus, AFP seems to be an oncogenic marker. In our present study, we investigated how TGF-β signaling cooperates with AT motif-binding factor-1 (ATBF1 to inhibit AFP transcription. Indeed, the expression of AFP mRNA in HuH-7 cells was negatively regulated by TGF-β signaling. To further understand how TGF-β suppresses the transcription of the AFP gene, we analyzed the activity of the AFP promoter in the presence of TGF-β. We found that the TGF-β signaling and ATBF1 suppressed AFP transcription through two ATBF1 binding elements (AT-motifs. Using a heterologous reporter system, both AT-motifs were required for transcriptional repression upon TGF-β stimulation. Furthermore, Smads were found to interact with ATBF1 at both its N-terminal and C-terminal regions. Since the N-terminal (ATBF1N and C-terminal regions of ATBF1 (ATBF1C lack the ability of DNA binding, both truncated mutants rescued the cooperative inhibitory action by the TGF-β signaling and ATBF1 in a dose-dependent manner. Taken together, these findings indicate that TGF-β signaling can act in concert with ATBF1 to suppress the activity of the AFP promoter through direct interaction of ATBF1 with Smads.

  11. The human Ago2 MC region does not contain an eIF4E-like mRNA cap binding motif

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grishin Nick V

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Argonaute (Ago proteins interact with small regulatory RNAs to mediate gene regulatory pathways. A recent report by Kiriakidou et al. 1 describes an MC sequence region identified in Ago2 that displays similarity to the cap-binding motif in translation initiation factor 4E (eIF4E. In a cap-bound eIF4E structure, two important aromatic residues of the motif stack on either side of a 7-methylguanosine 5'-triphosphate (m7Gppp base. The corresponding Ago2 aromatic residues (F450 and F505 were hypothesized to perform the same cap-binding function. However, the detected similarity between the MC sequence and the eIF4E cap-binding motif was questionable. Results A number of sequence-based and structure-based bioinformatics methods reveal the reported similarity between the Ago2 MC sequence region and the eIF4E cap-binding motif to be spurious. Alternatively, the MC sequence region is confidently assigned to the N-terminus of the Ago piwi module, within the mid domain of experimentally determined prokaryotic Ago structures. Confident mapping of the Ago2 MC sequence region to the piwi mid domain results in a homology-based structure model that positions the identified aromatic residues over 20 Å apart, with one of the aromatic side chains (F450 contributing instead to the hydrophobic core of the domain. Conclusion Correct functional prediction based on weak sequence similarity requires substantial evolutionary and structural support. The evolutionary context of the Ago mid domain suggested by multiple sequence alignment is limited to a conserved hydrophobicity profile required for the fold and a motif following the MC region that binds guide RNA. Mapping of the MC sequence to the mid domain structure reveals Ago2 aromatics that are incompatible with eIF4E-like mRNA cap-binding, yet display some limited local structure similarities that cause the chance sequence match to eIF4E. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Arcady Mushegian

  12. Latent transforming growth factor β-binding protein 4 is downregulated in esophageal cancer via promoter methylation.

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    Insa Bultmann

    Full Text Available Latent transforming growth factor β-binding protein 4 (LTBP4 is an extracellular matrix molecule that is a member of important connective tissue networks and is needed for the correct folding and the secretion of TGF-β1. LTBP4 is downregulated in carcinomas of various tissues. Here we show that LTBP4 is also downregulated in adenocarcinomas and squamous cell carcinomas of the esophagus in vitro and in vivo. Re-expression of LTBP4 in esophageal cancer cell lines reduced cell migration ability, whereas cell viability and cell proliferation remained unchanged. Hypermethylation of the promoter regions of the two main human LTBP4 transcriptional forms, LTBP4L and LTBP4S, was found to be involved in LTBP4 silencing. Detailed investigations of the methylation patterns of the promoter regions of LTBP4L and LTBP4S identified GATA1, SP1, E2F4 and SMAD3 as potential transcription factors involved in LTBP4 expression. In in vitro transcription factor activity studies we discovered E2F4 as novel powerful regulator for LTBP4S expression.

  13. Trans—acting factors from the human fetal liver binding to the human ε—globin gene silencer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANZHIJIANG; CHUJIANG; 等

    1997-01-01

    The developmental stage-specific silencing of the human ε-globin gene during embryonic life is controlled,in part,by the silencer (-392bp- -177bp) upstream of this gene.In order to elucidate its role,the nuclear extract from the human fetal liver has been prepared and the interactions between trans-acting factors and this silencer element have been examined.By using DNaseI footprinting assay,a major protected region from -278bp to -235bp within this silencer element was identified.Furthermore,we found in gel mobility shift assay and Southwestern blotting assay that there were at least four trans-acting factors (MV≈32,28,26 and 22kD) in the nuclear extract isolated from the human fetal liver,which could specifically bind to this region.Our results suggested that these trans-acting factors might play an important role in silencing the human embryonic ε-globin gene expression at the fetal stage through the interactions with this silencer.

  14. HSA21 Single-Minded 2 (Sim2 Binding Sites Co-Localize with Super-Enhancers and Pioneer Transcription Factors in Pluripotent Mouse ES Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audrey Letourneau

    Full Text Available The HSA21 encoded Single-minded 2 (SIM2 transcription factor has key neurological functions and is a good candidate to be involved in the cognitive impairment of Down syndrome. We aimed to explore the functional capacity of SIM2 by mapping its DNA binding sites in mouse embryonic stem cells. ChIP-sequencing revealed 1229 high-confidence SIM2-binding sites. Analysis of the SIM2 target genes confirmed the importance of SIM2 in developmental and neuronal processes and indicated that SIM2 may be a master transcription regulator. Indeed, SIM2 DNA binding sites share sequence specificity and overlapping domains of occupancy with master transcription factors such as SOX2, OCT4 (Pou5f1, NANOG or KLF4. The association between SIM2 and these pioneer factors is supported by co-immunoprecipitation of SIM2 with SOX2, OCT4, NANOG or KLF4. Furthermore, the binding of SIM2 marks a particular sub-category of enhancers known as super-enhancers. These regions are characterized by typical DNA modifications and Mediator co-occupancy (MED1 and MED12. Altogether, we provide evidence that SIM2 binds a specific set of enhancer elements thus explaining how SIM2 can regulate its gene network in neuronal features.

  15. Expression, fermentation and purification of a predicted intrinsically disordered region of the transcription factor, NFAT5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuMond, Jenna F; He, Yi; Burg, Maurice B; Ferraris, Joan D

    2015-11-01

    Hypertonicity stimulates Nuclear Factor of Activated T-cells 5 (NFAT5) nuclear localization and transactivating activity. Many transcription factors are known to contain intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs) which become more structured with local environmental changes such as osmolality, temperature and tonicity. The transactivating domain of NFAT5 is predicted to be intrinsically disordered under normal tonicity, and under high NaCl, the activity of this domain is increased. To study the binding of co-regulatory proteins at IDRs a cDNA construct expressing the NFAT5 TAD was created and transformed into Escherichia coli cells. Transformed E. coli cells were mass produced by fermentation and extracted by cell lysis to release the NFAT5 TAD. The NFAT5 TAD was subsequently purified using a His-tag column, cation exchange chromatography as well as hydrophobic interaction chromatography and then characterized by mass spectrometry (MS). Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. A structural-based strategy for recognition of transcription factor binding sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beisi Xu

    Full Text Available Scanning through genomes for potential transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs is becoming increasingly important in this post-genomic era. The position weight matrix (PWM is the standard representation of TFBSs utilized when scanning through sequences for potential binding sites. However, many transcription factor (TF motifs are short and highly degenerate, and methods utilizing PWMs to scan for sites are plagued by false positives. Furthermore, many important TFs do not have well-characterized PWMs, making identification of potential binding sites even more difficult. One approach to the identification of sites for these TFs has been to use the 3D structure of the TF to predict the DNA structure around the TF and then to generate a PWM from the predicted 3D complex structure. However, this approach is dependent on the similarity of the predicted structure to the native structure. We introduce here a novel approach to identify TFBSs utilizing structure information that can be applied to TFs without characterized PWMs, as long as a 3D complex structure (TF/DNA exists. This approach utilizes an energy function that is uniquely trained on each structure. Our approach leads to increased prediction accuracy and robustness compared with those using a more general energy function. The software is freely available upon request.

  17. Identification of potential nuclear reprogramming and differentiation factors by a novel selection method for cloning chromatin-binding proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiuWang; AihuaZheng; LingYi; ChongrenXu; MingxiaoDing; HongkuiDeng

    2005-01-01

    Nuclear reprogramming is critical for animal cloning and stem cell creation through nuclear transfer, which requires extensive remodeling of chromosomal architecture involving dramatic changes in chromatin-binding proteins. To understand the mechanism of nuclear reprogramming, it is critical to identify chromatin-binding factors specify the reprogramming process. In this report, we have developed a high-throughput selection method, based on T7 phage display and chromatin immunoprecipitation, to isolate chromatin-binding factors expressed in mouse embryonic stem cells using primary mouse embryonic fibroblast chromatin. Seven chromatin-binding proteins have been isolated by this method. We have also isolated several chromatin-binding proteins involved in hepatocyte differentiation. Our method provides a powerful tool to rapidly and selectively identify chromatin-binding proteins. The method can be used to study epigenetic modification of chromatin during nuclear reprogramming, cell differentiation, and transdifferentiation.

  18. Effects of single-base substitutions within the acanthamoeba castellanii rRNA promoter on transcription and on binding of transcription initiation factor and RNA polymerase I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kownin, P.; Bateman, E.; Paule, M.R.

    1988-02-01

    Single-point mutations were introduced into the promoter region of the Acanthamoeba castellanii rRNA gene by chemical mutagen treatment of a single-stranded clone in vitro, followed by reverse transcription and cloning of the altered fragment. The promoter mutants were tested for transcription initiation factor (TIF) binding by a template commitment assay plus DNase I footprinting and for transcription by an in vitro runoff assay. Point mutations within the previously identified TIF interaction region (between -20 and -47, motifs A and B) indicated that TIF interacts most strongly with a sequence centered at -29 and less tightly with sequences upstream and downstream. Some alterations of the base sequence closer to the transcription start site (and outside the TIF-protected site) also significantly decrease specific RNA synthesis in vitro. These were within the region which is protected from DNAse I digestion by polymerase I, but these mutations did not detectably affect the binding of polymerase to the promoter.

  19. Divergence of Pumilio/fem-3 mRNA binding factor (PUF) protein specificity through variations in an RNA-binding pocket.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Chen; Kershner, Aaron; Wang, Yeming; Holley, Cynthia P; Wilinski, Daniel; Keles, Sunduz; Kimble, Judith; Wickens, Marvin; Hall, Traci M Tanaka

    2012-02-24

    mRNA control networks depend on recognition of specific RNA sequences. Pumilio-fem-3 mRNA binding factor (PUF) RNA-binding proteins achieve that specificity through variations on a conserved scaffold. Saccharomyces cerevisiae Puf3p achieves specificity through an additional binding pocket for a cytosine base upstream of the core RNA recognition site. Here we demonstrate that this chemically simple adaptation is prevalent and contributes to the diversity of RNA specificities among PUF proteins. Bioinformatics analysis shows that mRNAs associated with Caenorhabditis elegans fem-3 mRNA binding factor (FBF)-2 in vivo contain an upstream cytosine required for biological regulation. Crystal structures of FBF-2 and C. elegans PUF-6 reveal binding pockets structurally similar to that of Puf3p, whereas sequence alignments predict a pocket in PUF-11. For Puf3p, FBF-2, PUF-6, and PUF-11, the upstream pockets and a cytosine are required for maximal binding to RNA, but the quantitative impact on binding affinity varies. Furthermore, the position of the upstream cytosine relative to the core PUF recognition site can differ, which in the case of FBF-2 originally masked the identification of this consensus sequence feature. Importantly, other PUF proteins lack the pocket and so do not discriminate upstream bases. A structure-based alignment reveals that these proteins lack key residues that would contact the cytosine, and in some instances, they also present amino acid side chains that interfere with binding. Loss of the pocket requires only substitution of one serine, as appears to have occurred during the evolution of certain fungal species.

  20. Analysis of the VMD2 promoter and implication of E-box binding factors in its regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esumi, Noriko; Oshima, Yuji; Li, Yuanyuan; Campochiaro, Peter A; Zack, Donald J

    2004-04-30

    The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is crucial for the normal development and function of retinal photo-receptors, and mutations in several genes that are preferentially expressed in the RPE have been shown to cause retinal degeneration. We analyzed the 5'-up-stream region of human VMD2, a gene that is preferentially expressed in the RPE and, when mutated, causes Best macular dystrophy. Transgenic mouse studies with VMD2 promoter/lacZ constructs demonstrated that a-253 to +38 bp fragment is sufficient to direct RPE-specific expression in the eye. Transient transfection assays using the D407 human RPE cell line with VMD2 promoter/luciferase reporter constructs identified two positive regulatory regions, -585 to -541 bp for high level expression and -56 to -42 bp for low level expression. Mutation of a canonical E-box located in the -56 to -42 bp region greatly diminished luciferase expression in D407 cells and abolished the bands shifted with bovine RPE nuclear extract in electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Independently a candidate approach was used to select microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) for testing because it is expressed in the RPE and associated with RPE abnormalities when mutated. MITF-M significantly increased luciferase expression in D407 cells in an E-box-dependent manner. These studies define the VMD2 promoter region sufficient to drive RPE-specific expression in the eye, identify positive regulatory regions in vitro, and suggest that MITF as well as other E-box binding factors may act as positive regulators of VMD2 expression.

  1. Replication protein of tobacco mosaic virus cotranslationally binds the 5′ untranslated region of genomic RNA to enable viral replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura-Nagaya, Kazue; Ishibashi, Kazuhiro; Huang, Ying-Ping; Miyashita, Shuhei; Ishikawa, Masayuki

    2014-01-01

    Genomic RNA of positive-strand RNA viruses replicate via complementary (i.e., negative-strand) RNA in membrane-bound replication complexes. Before replication complex formation, virus-encoded replication proteins specifically recognize genomic RNA molecules and recruit them to sites of replication. Moreover, in many of these viruses, selection of replication templates by the replication proteins occurs preferentially in cis. This property is advantageous to the viruses in several aspects of viral replication and evolution, but the underlying molecular mechanisms have not been characterized. Here, we used an in vitro translation system to show that a 126-kDa replication protein of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV), a positive-strand RNA virus, binds a 5′-terminal ∼70-nucleotide region of TMV RNA cotranslationally, but not posttranslationally. TMV mutants that carried nucleotide changes in the 5′-terminal region and showed a defect in the binding were unable to synthesize negative-strand RNA, indicating that this binding is essential for template selection. A C-terminally truncated 126-kDa protein, but not the full-length 126-kDa protein, was able to posttranslationally bind TMV RNA in vitro, suggesting that binding of the 126-kDa protein to the 70-nucleotide region occurs during translation and before synthesis of the C-terminal inhibitory domain. We also show that binding of the 126-kDa protein prevents further translation of the bound TMV RNA. These data provide a mechanistic explanation of how the 126-kDa protein selects replication templates in cis and how fatal collision between translating ribosomes and negative-strand RNA-synthesizing polymerases on the genomic RNA is avoided. PMID:24711385

  2. SELEX-seq, a method for characterizing the complete repertoire of binding site preferences for transcription factor complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Todd R.; Slattery, Matthew; Abe, Namiko; Rastogi, Chaitanya; Mann, Richard; Bussemaker, Harmen

    2014-01-01

    Summary The closely related members of the Hox family of homeodomain transcription factors have similar DNA-binding preferences as monomers, yet carry out distinct functions in vivo. Transcription factors often bind DNA as multiprotein complexes, raising the possibility that complex formation might modify their DNA binding specificities. To test this hypothesis we developed a new experimental and computational platform, termed SELEX-seq, to characterize DNA binding specificities of Hox-based multiprotein complexes. We found that complex formation with the same cofactor reveals latent specificities that are not observed for monomeric Hox factors. The findings from this in vitro platform are consistent with in vivo data, and the ‘latent specificity’ concept serves as a precedent for how the specificities of similar transcription factors might be distinguished in vivo. Importantly, the SELEX-seq platform is flexible and can be used to determine the relative affinities to any DNA sequence for any transcription factor or multiprotein complex. PMID:25151169

  3. Pro-region engineering for improved yeast display and secretion of brain derived neurotrophic factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Michael L; Malott, Thomas M; Metcalf, Kevin J; Puguh, Arthya; Chan, Jonah R; Shusta, Eric V

    2016-03-01

    Brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a promising therapeutic candidate for a variety of neurological diseases. However, it is difficult to produce as a recombinant protein. In its native mammalian context, BDNF is first produced as a pro-protein with subsequent proteolytic removal of the pro-region to yield mature BDNF protein. Therefore, in an attempt to improve yeast as a host for heterologous BDNF production, the BDNF pro-region was first evaluated for its effects on BDNF surface display and secretion. Addition of the wild-type pro-region to yeast BDNF production constructs improved BDNF folding both as a surface-displayed and secreted protein in terms of binding its natural receptors TrkB and p75, but titers remained low. Looking to further enhance the chaperone-like functions provided by the pro-region, two rounds of directed evolution were performed, yielding mutated pro-regions that further improved the display and secretion properties of BDNF. Subsequent optimization of the protease recognition site was used to control whether the produced protein was in pro- or mature BDNF forms. Taken together, we have demonstrated an effective strategy for improving BDNF compatibility with yeast protein engineering and secretion platforms.

  4. The CUGBP2 splicing factor regulates an ensemble of branchpoints from perimeter binding sites with implications for autoregulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill A Dembowski

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Alternative pre-mRNA splicing adjusts the transcriptional output of the genome by generating related mRNAs from a single primary transcript, thereby expanding protein diversity. A fundamental unanswered question is how splicing factors achieve specificity in the selection of target substrates despite the recognition of information-poor sequence motifs. The CUGBP2 splicing regulator plays a key role in the brain region-specific silencing of the NI exon of the NMDA R1 receptor. However, the sequence motifs utilized by this factor for specific target exon selection and its role in splicing silencing are not understood. Here, we use chemical modification footprinting to map the contact sites of CUGBP2 to GU-rich motifs closely positioned at the boundaries of the branch sites of the NI exon, and we demonstrate a mechanistic role for this specific arrangement of motifs for the regulation of branchpoint formation. General support for a branch site-perimeter-binding model is indicated by the identification of a group of novel target exons with a similar configuration of motifs that are silenced by CUGBP2. These results reveal an autoregulatory role for CUGBP2 as indicated by its direct interaction with functionally significant RNA motifs surrounding the branch sites upstream of exon 6 of the CUGBP2 transcript itself. The perimeter-binding model explains how CUGBP2 can effectively embrace the branch site region to achieve the specificity needed for the selection of exon targets and the fine-tuning of alternative splicing patterns.

  5. DNA-binding factor CTCF and long-range gene interactions in V(D)J recombination and oncogene activation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Ribeiro de Almeida (Claudia); R. Stadhouders (Ralph); S. Thongjuea (Supat); E. Soler (Eric); R.W. Hendriks (Rudi)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractRegulation of V(D)J recombination events at immunoglobulin (Ig) and T-cell receptor loci in lymphoid cells is complex and achieved via changes in substrate accessibility. Various studies over the last year have identified the DNA-binding zinc-finger protein CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) as

  6. Dwarfism and impaired gut development in insulin-like growth factor II mRNA-binding protein 1-deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas V O; Hammer, Niels A; Nielsen, Jacob

    2004-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor II mRNA-binding protein 1 (IMP1) belongs to a family of RNA-binding proteins implicated in mRNA localization, turnover, and translational control. Mouse IMP1 is expressed during early development, and an increase in expression occurs around embryonic day 12.5 (E12.5). T...

  7. The nucleotide-binding site of bacterial translation initiation factor 2 (IF2) as a metabolic sensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Milon, P.; Tischenko, E.V.; Tomsic, J.; Caserta, E.; Folkers, G.E.; La Teana, A.; Rodnina, M.V.; Pon, C.L.; Boelens, R.; Gualerzi, C.O.

    2006-01-01

    Translational initiation factor 2 (IF2) is a guanine nucleotide-binding protein that can bind guanosine 3′,5′-(bis) diphosphate (ppGpp), an alarmone involved in stringent response in bacteria. In cells growing under optimal conditions, the GTP concentration is very high, and that of ppGpp very low.

  8. Molecular mechanisms of cooperative binding of transcription factors Runx1–CBFβ–Ets1 on the TCRα gene enhancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasahara, Kota; Shiina, Masaaki; Fukuda, Ikuo; Ogata, Kazuhiro; Nakamura, Haruki

    2017-01-01

    Ets1 is an essential transcription factor (TF) for several important physiological processes, including cell proliferation and differentiation. Its recognition of the enhancer region of the TCRα gene is enhanced by the cooperative binding of the Runx1–CBFβ heterodimer, with the cancelation of phosphorylation-dependent autoinhibition. The detailed mechanism of this interesting cooperativity between Ets1 and the Runx1–CBFβ heterodimer is still largely unclear. Here, we investigated the molecular mechanisms of this cooperativity, by using molecular dynamics simulations. Consequently, we detected high flexibility of the loop region between the HI2 and H1 helices of Ets1. Upon Runx1–CBFβ heterodimer binding, this loop transiently adopts various sub-stable conformations in its interactions with the DNA. In addition, a network analysis suggested an allosteric pathway in the molecular assembly and identified some key residues that coincide with previous experimental studies. Our simulations suggest that the cooperative binding of Ets1 and the Runx1–CBFβ heterodimer alters the DNA conformation and induces sub-stable conformations of the HI2–H1 loop of Ets1. This phenomenon increases the flexibility of the regulatory module, including the HI2 helix, and destabilizes the inhibitory form of this module. Thus, we hypothesize that this effect facilitates Ets1–DNA binding and prevents the phosphorylation-dependent DNA binding autoinhibition. PMID:28231333

  9. Regulation of Nucleosome Architecture and Factor Binding Revealed by Nuclease Footprinting of the ESC Genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hainer, Sarah J; Fazzio, Thomas G

    2015-10-06

    Functional interactions between gene regulatory factors and chromatin architecture have been difficult to directly assess. Here, we use micrococcal nuclease (MNase) footprinting to probe the functions of two chromatin-remodeling complexes. By simultaneously quantifying alterations in small MNase footprints over the binding sites of 30 regulatory factors in mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs), we provide evidence that esBAF and Mbd3/NuRD modulate the binding of several regulatory proteins. In addition, we find that nucleosome occupancy is reduced at specific loci in favor of subnucleosomes upon depletion of esBAF, including sites of histone H2A.Z localization. Consistent with these data, we demonstrate that esBAF is required for normal H2A.Z localization in ESCs, suggesting esBAF either stabilizes H2A.Z-containing nucleosomes or promotes subnucleosome to nucleosome conversion by facilitating H2A.Z deposition. Therefore, integrative examination of MNase footprints reveals insights into nucleosome dynamics and functional interactions between chromatin structure and key gene-regulatory factors.

  10. Regulation of Nucleosome Architecture and Factor Binding Revealed by Nuclease Footprinting of the ESC Genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah J. Hainer

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Functional interactions between gene regulatory factors and chromatin architecture have been difficult to directly assess. Here, we use micrococcal nuclease (MNase footprinting to probe the functions of two chromatin-remodeling complexes. By simultaneously quantifying alterations in small MNase footprints over the binding sites of 30 regulatory factors in mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs, we provide evidence that esBAF and Mbd3/NuRD modulate the binding of several regulatory proteins. In addition, we find that nucleosome occupancy is reduced at specific loci in favor of subnucleosomes upon depletion of esBAF, including sites of histone H2A.Z localization. Consistent with these data, we demonstrate that esBAF is required for normal H2A.Z localization in ESCs, suggesting esBAF either stabilizes H2A.Z-containing nucleosomes or promotes subnucleosome to nucleosome conversion by facilitating H2A.Z deposition. Therefore, integrative examination of MNase footprints reveals insights into nucleosome dynamics and functional interactions between chromatin structure and key gene-regulatory factors.

  11. GTRD: a database of transcription factor binding sites identified by ChIP-seq experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yevshin, Ivan; Sharipov, Ruslan; Valeev, Tagir; Kel, Alexander; Kolpakov, Fedor

    2017-01-01

    GTRD—Gene Transcription Regulation Database (http://gtrd.biouml.org)—is a database of transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) identified by ChIP-seq experiments for human and mouse. Raw ChIP-seq data were obtained from ENCODE and SRA and uniformly processed: (i) reads were aligned using Bowtie2; (ii) ChIP-seq peaks were called using peak callers MACS, SISSRs, GEM and PICS; (iii) peaks for the same factor and peak callers, but different experiment conditions (cell line, treatment, etc.), were merged into clusters; (iv) such clusters for different peak callers were merged into metaclusters that were considered as non-redundant sets of TFBSs. In addition to information on location in genome, the sets contain structured information about cell lines and experimental conditions extracted from descriptions of corresponding ChIP-seq experiments. A web interface to access GTRD was developed using the BioUML platform. It provides: (i) browsing and displaying information; (ii) advanced search possibilities, e.g. search of TFBSs near the specified gene or search of all genes potentially regulated by a specified transcription factor; (iii) integrated genome browser that provides visualization of the GTRD data: read alignments, peaks, clusters, metaclusters and information about gene structures from the Ensembl database and binding sites predicted using position weight matrices from the HOCOMOCO database. PMID:27924024

  12. Natural capital as a factor in regional competitiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasztelan Armand

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Environmental resources and values (natural capital should be seen as a key factor in regional competitiveness. However, little attention has been paid so far to the role of natural capital in the process of achieving competitive advantage from the territorial perspective. Therefore, the main purpose of this paper is to present the results of a study on the environmental competitiveness of Polish regions. The author’s contribution to the theory is the use of taxonomic metrics for research purposes. Based on certain predefined criteria the environmental potential of each voivodship was assessed in 2004 and 2012. For research purposes, 26 indicators of state, pressure, and environmental protection were proposed. Owing to the fact that the subset of diagnostic variables (indicators contained elements that could not be directly aggregated, their unification was achieved using standardization formulas. The methodology proposed by the author might be used to assess environmental competitiveness in different regions or countries. The results of the performed analyses indicated that the Subcarpathian province scored highest in terms of environmental competitiveness, while Swiętokrzyskie province scored lowest.

  13. GTP Binding and Oncogenic Mutations May Attenuate Hypervariable Region (HVR)-Catalytic Domain Interactions in Small GTPase K-Ras4B, Exposing the Effector Binding Site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Shaoyong; Banerjee, Avik; Jang, Hyunbum; Zhang, Jian; Gaponenko, Vadim; Nussinov, Ruth

    2015-11-27

    K-Ras4B, a frequently mutated oncogene in cancer, plays an essential role in cell growth, differentiation, and survival. Its C-terminal membrane-associated hypervariable region (HVR) is required for full biological activity. In the active GTP-bound state, the HVR interacts with acidic plasma membrane (PM) headgroups, whereas the farnesyl anchors in the membrane; in the inactive GDP-bound state, the HVR may interact with both the PM and the catalytic domain at the effector binding region, obstructing signaling and nucleotide exchange. Here, using molecular dynamics simulations and NMR, we aim to figure out the effects of nucleotides (GTP and GDP) and frequent (G12C, G12D, G12V, G13D, and Q61H) and infrequent (E37K and R164Q) oncogenic mutations on full-length K-Ras4B. The mutations are away from or directly at the HVR switch I/effector binding site. Our results suggest that full-length wild-type GDP-bound K-Ras4B (K-Ras4B(WT)-GDP) is in an intrinsically autoinhibited state via tight HVR-catalytic domain interactions. The looser association in K-Ras4B(WT)-GTP may release the HVR. Some of the oncogenic mutations weaken the HVR-catalytic domain association in the K-Ras4B-GDP/-GTP bound states, which may facilitate the HVR disassociation in a nucleotide-independent manner, thereby up-regulating oncogenic Ras signaling. Thus, our results suggest that mutations can exert their effects in more than one way, abolishing GTP hydrolysis and facilitating effector binding.

  14. Regulatory elements in the promoter region of the rat gene encoding the acyl-CoA-binding protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elholm, M; Bjerking, G; Knudsen, J

    1996-01-01

    Acyl-CoA-binding protein (ACBP) is an ubiquitously expressed 10-kDa protein which is present in high amounts in cells involved in solute transport or secretion. Rat ACBP is encoded by a gene containing the typical hallmarks of a housekeeping gene. Analysis of the promoter region of the rat ACBP...... gene by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) revealed specific binding of proteins from rat liver nuclear extracts to potential recognition sequences of NF-1/CTF, Sp1, AP-1, C/EBP and HNF-3. In addition, specific binding to a DR-1 type element was observed. By using in vitro translated...... for the ACBP DR-1 element. Addition of peroxisome proliferators (PP) to H4IIEC3 rat hepatoma cells led to an increase in the ACBP mRNA level, indicating that the DR-1 element could be a functional peroxisome proliferator responsive element (PPRE). Analysis of the ACBP promoter by transient transfection showed...

  15. Platelet-activating factor (PAF) receptor-binding antagonist activity of Malaysian medicinal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jantan, I; Rafi, I A A; Jalil, J

    2005-01-01

    Forty-nine methanol extracts of 37 species of Malaysian medicinal plants were investigated for their inhibitory effects on platelet-activating factor (PAF) binding to rabbit platelets, using 3H-PAF as a ligand. Among them, the extracts of six Zingiberaceae species (Alpinia galanga Swartz., Boesenbergia pandurata Roxb., Curcuma ochorrhiza Val., C. aeruginosa Roxb., Zingiber officinale Rosc. and Z. zerumbet Koenig.), two Cinnamomum species (C. altissimum Kosterm. and C. pubescens Kochummen.), Goniothalamus malayanus Hook. f. Momordica charantia Linn. and Piper aduncum L. are potential sources of new PAF antagonists, as they showed significant inhibitory effects with IC50 values ranging from 1.2 to 18.4 microg ml(-1).

  16. Treatment strategies in patients with core-binding factor acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solis, Erick Crespo

    2011-10-01

    Core-binding factor acute myeloid leukemias (CBF AML) are characterized by sensitivity to high-dose cytarabine. Due to good prognosis in CBF AML patients, it is important to determine the optimal treatment. Long-term RFS (relapse-free survival) is reported among 40-60%. Experience with FA/FLAG vs. IA/IAG as front-line chemotherapy has been reported by some authors. Other studies, regarding treatment strategies such as high-dose daunorubicin, do not determine survival curves in this precise subgroup of patients. Preliminary data with gemtuzumab ozogamicin plus FLAG has been reported. There are not studies with FLAG using oral fludarabine in acute leukemia patients.

  17. Nuclear respiratory factor 1 mediates the transcription initiation of insulin-degrading enzyme in a TATA box-binding protein-independent manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lang Zhang

    Full Text Available CpG island promoters often lack canonical core promoter elements such as the TATA box, and have dispersed transcription initiation sites. Despite the prevalence of CpG islands associated with mammalian genes, the mechanism of transcription initiation from CpG island promoters remains to be clarified. Here we investigate the mechanism of transcription initiation of the CpG island-associated gene, insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE. IDE is ubiquitously expressed, and has dispersed transcription initiation sites. The IDE core promoter locates within a 32-bp region, which contains three CGGCG repeats and a nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF-1 binding motif. Sequential mutation analysis indicates that the NRF-1 binding motif is critical for IDE transcription initiation. The NRF-1 binding motif is functional, because NRF-1 binds to this motif in vivo and this motif is required for the regulation of IDE promoter activity by NRF-1. Furthermore, the NRF-1 binding site in the IDE promoter is conserved among different species, and dominant negative NRF-1 represses endogenous IDE expression. Finally, TATA-box binding protein (TBP is not associated with the IDE promoter, and inactivation of TBP does not abolish IDE transcription, suggesting that TBP is not essential for IDE transcription initiation. Our studies indicate that NRF-1 mediates IDE transcription initiation in a TBP-independent manner, and provide insights into the potential mechanism of transcription initiation for other CpG island-associated genes.

  18. Structural basis for the selective vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A) binding to neuropilin-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, Matthew W.; Xu, Ping; Li, Xiaobo; Vander Kooi, Craig W. (Kentucky)

    2012-07-25

    Neuropilin-1 (Nrp1) is an essential receptor for angiogenesis that binds to VEGF-A. Nrp1 binds directly to VEGF-A with high affinity, but the nature of their selective binding has remained unclear. Nrp1 was initially reported to bind to the exon 7-encoded region of VEGF-A and function as an isoform-specific receptor for VEGF-A164/165. Recent data have implicated exon 8-encoded residues, which are found in all proangiogenic VEGF-A isoforms, in Nrp binding. We have determined the crystal structure of the exon 7/8-encoded VEGF-A heparin binding domain in complex with the Nrp1-b1 domain. This structure clearly demonstrates that residues from both exons 7 and 8 physically contribute to Nrp1 binding. Using an in vitro binding assay, we have determined the relative contributions of exon 7- and 8-encoded residues. We demonstrate that the exon 8-encoded C-terminal arginine is essential for the interaction of VEGF-A with Nrp1 and mediates high affinity Nrp binding. Exon 7-encoded electronegative residues make additional interactions with the L1 loop of Nrp1. Although otherwise conserved, the primary sequences of Nrp1 and Nrp2 differ significantly in this region. We further show that VEGF-A{sub 164} binds 50-fold more strongly to Nrp1 than Nrp2. Direct repulsion between the electronegative exon 7-encoded residues of the heparin binding domain and the electronegative L1 loop found only in Nrp2 is found to significantly contribute to the observed selectivity. The results reveal the basis for the potent and selective binding of VEGF-A{sub 164} to Nrp1.

  19. HOCOMOCO: A comprehensive collection of human transcription factor binding sites models

    KAUST Repository

    Kulakovskiy, Ivan V.

    2012-11-21

    Transcription factor (TF) binding site (TFBS) models are crucial for computational reconstruction of transcription regulatory networks. In existing repositories, a TF often has several models (also called binding profiles or motifs), obtained from different experimental data. Having a single TFBS model for a TF is more pragmatic for practical applications. We show that integration of TFBS data from various types of experiments into a single model typically results in the improved model quality probably due to partial correction of source specific technique bias. We present the Homo sapiens comprehensive model collection (HOCOMOCO, http://autosome.ru/HOCOMOCO/, http://cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/ hocomoco/) containing carefully hand-curated TFBS models constructed by integration of binding sequences obtained by both low- and high-throughput methods. To construct position weight matrices to represent these TFBS models, we used ChIPMunk software in four computational modes, including newly developed periodic positional prior mode associated with DNA helix pitch. We selected only one TFBS model per TF, unless there was a clear experimental evidence for two rather distinct TFBS models. We assigned a quality rating to each model. HOCOMOCO contains 426 systematically curated TFBS models for 401 human TFs, where 172 models are based on more than one data source. The Author(s) 2012.

  20. Selective influence of Sox2 on POU transcription factor binding in embryonic and neural stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mistri, Tapan Kumar; Devasia, Arun George; Chu, Lee Thean; Ng, Wei Ping; Halbritter, Florian; Colby, Douglas; Martynoga, Ben; Tomlinson, Simon R; Chambers, Ian; Robson, Paul; Wohland, Thorsten

    2015-09-01

    Embryonic stem cell (ESC) identity is orchestrated by co-operativity between the transcription factors (TFs) Sox2 and the class V POU-TF Oct4 at composite Sox/Oct motifs. Neural stem cells (NSCs) lack Oct4 but express Sox2 and class III POU-TFs Oct6, Brn1 and Brn2. This raises the question of how Sox2 interacts with POU-TFs to transcriptionally specify ESCs versus NSCs. Here, we show that Oct4 alone binds the Sox/Oct motif and the octamer-containing palindromic MORE equally well. Sox2 binding selectively increases the affinity of Oct4 for the Sox/Oct motif. In contrast, Oct6 binds preferentially to MORE and is unaffected by Sox2. ChIP-Seq in NSCs shows the MORE to be the most enriched motif for class III POU-TFs, including MORE subtypes, and that the Sox/Oct motif is not enriched. These results suggest that in NSCs, co-operativity between Sox2 and class III POU-TFs may not occur and that POU-TF-driven transcription uses predominantly the MORE cis architecture. Thus, distinct interactions between Sox2 and POU-TF subclasses distinguish pluripotent ESCs from multipotent NSCs, providing molecular insight into how Oct4 alone can convert NSCs to pluripotency.

  1. Mitochondrial transcription termination factor 2 binds to entire mitochondrial DNA and negatively regulates mitochondrial gene expression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weiwei Huang; Min Yu; Yang Jiao; Jie Ma; Mingxing Ma; Zehua Wang; Hong Wu; Deyong Tan

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondrial transcription termination factor 2 (mTERF2) is a mitochondriai matrix protein that binds to the mitochondriai DNA.Previous studies have shown that overexpression of mTERF2 can inhibit cell proliferation, but the mechanism has not been well defined so far.This study aimed to present the binding pattern of mTERF2 to the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in vivo, and investigated the biological function of mTERF2 on the replication of mtDNA, mRNA transcription, and protein translation.The mTERF2 binding to entire mtDNA was identified via the chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis.The mtDNA replication efficiency and expression levels of mitochondria genes were significantly inhibited when the mTERF2 was overexpressed in HeLa cells.The inhibition level of mtDNA content was the same with the decreased levels of mRNA and mitochondrial protein expression.Overall, the mTERF2 might be a cell growth inhibitor based on its negative effect on mtDNA replication, which eventually own-regulated all of the oxidative phosphorylation components in the mitochondria that were essential for the cell's energy metabolism.

  2. The Influence of Adnectin Binding on the Extracellular Domain of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacob, Roxana E.; Chen, Guodong; Ahn, Joomi; Houel, Stephane; Wei, Hui; Mo, Jingjie; Tao, Li; Cohen, Daniel; Xie, Dianlin; Lin, Zheng; Morin, Paul E.; Doyle, Michael L.; Tymiak, Adrienne A.; Engen, John R.

    2014-12-01

    The precise and unambiguous elucidation and characterization of interactions between a high affinity recognition entity and its cognate protein provides important insights for the design and development of drugs with optimized properties and efficacy. In oncology, one important target protein has been shown to be the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) through the development of therapeutic anticancer antibodies that are selective inhibitors of EGFR activity. More recently, smaller protein derived from the 10th type III domain of human fibronectin termed an adnectin has also been shown to inhibit EGFR in clinical studies. The mechanism of EGFR inhibition by either an adnectin or an antibody results from specific binding of the high affinity protein to the extracellular portion of EGFR (exEGFR) in a manner that prevents phosphorylation of the intracellular kinase domain of the receptor and thereby blocks intracellular signaling. Here, the structural changes induced upon binding were studied by probing the solution conformations of full length exEGFR alone and bound to a cognate adnectin through hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX MS). The effects of binding in solution were identified and compared with the structure of a bound complex determined by X-ray crystallography.

  3. A chemokine-binding domain in the tumor necrosis factor receptor from variola (smallpox) virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alejo, Alí; Ruiz-Argüello, M Begoña; Ho, Yin; Smith, Vincent P; Saraiva, Margarida; Alcami, Antonio

    2006-04-11

    Variola virus (VaV) is the causative agent of smallpox, one of the most devastating diseases encountered by man, that was eradicated in 1980. The deliberate release of VaV would have catastrophic consequences on global public health. However, the mechanisms that contribute to smallpox pathogenesis are poorly understood at the molecular level. The ability of viruses to evade the host defense mechanisms is an important determinant of viral pathogenesis. Here we show that the tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) homologue CrmB encoded by VaV functions not only as a soluble decoy TNFR but also as a highly specific binding protein for several chemokines that mediate recruitment of immune cells to mucosal surfaces and the skin, sites of virus entry and viral replication at late stages of smallpox. CrmB binds chemokines through its C-terminal domain, which is unrelated to TNFRs, was named smallpox virus-encoded chemokine receptor (SECRET) domain and uncovers a family of poxvirus chemokine inhibitors. An active SECRET domain was found in another viral TNFR (CrmD) and three secreted proteins encoded by orthopoxviruses. These findings identify a previously undescribed chemokine-binding and inhibitory domain unrelated to host chemokine receptors and a mechanism of immune modulation in VaV that may influence smallpox pathogenesis.

  4. Self-assembly and DNA binding of the blocking factor in x chromosome inactivation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Nicodemi

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available X chromosome inactivation (XCI is the phenomenon occurring in female mammals whereby dosage compensation of X-linked genes is obtained by transcriptional silencing of one of their two X chromosomes, randomly chosen during early embryo development. The earliest steps of random X-inactivation, involving counting of the X chromosomes and choice of the active and inactive X, are still not understood. To explain "counting and choice," the longstanding hypothesis is that a molecular complex, a "blocking factor" (BF, exists. The BF is present in a single copy and can randomly bind to just one X per cell which is protected from inactivation, as the second X is inactivated by default. In such a picture, the missing crucial step is to explain how the molecular complex is self-assembled, why only one is formed, and how it binds only one X. We answer these questions within the framework of a schematic Statistical Physics model, investigated by Monte Carlo computer simulations. We show that a single complex is assembled as a result of a thermodynamic process relying on a phase transition occurring in the system which spontaneously breaks the symmetry between the X's. We discuss, then, the BF interaction with X chromosomes. The thermodynamics of the mechanism that directs the two chromosomes to opposite fates could be, thus, clarified. The insights on the self-assembling and X binding properties of the BF are used to derive a quantitative scenario of biological implications describing current experimental evidences on "counting and choice."

  5. HOCOMOCO: a comprehensive collection of human transcription factor binding sites models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulakovskiy, Ivan V.; Medvedeva, Yulia A.; Schaefer, Ulf; Kasianov, Artem S.; Vorontsov, Ilya E.; Bajic, Vladimir B.; Makeev, Vsevolod J.

    2013-01-01

    Transcription factor (TF) binding site (TFBS) models are crucial for computational reconstruction of transcription regulatory networks. In existing repositories, a TF often has several models (also called binding profiles or motifs), obtained from different experimental data. Having a single TFBS model for a TF is more pragmatic for practical applications. We show that integration of TFBS data from various types of experiments into a single model typically results in the improved model quality probably due to partial correction of source specific technique bias. We present the Homo sapiens comprehensive model collection (HOCOMOCO, http://autosome.ru/HOCOMOCO/, http://cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/hocomoco/) containing carefully hand-curated TFBS models constructed by integration of binding sequences obtained by both low- and high-throughput methods. To construct position weight matrices to represent these TFBS models, we used ChIPMunk software in four computational modes, including newly developed periodic positional prior mode associated with DNA helix pitch. We selected only one TFBS model per TF, unless there was a clear experimental evidence for two rather distinct TFBS models. We assigned a quality rating to each model. HOCOMOCO contains 426 systematically curated TFBS models for 401 human TFs, where 172 models are based on more than one data source. PMID:23175603

  6. Theory on the mechanisms of combinatorial binding of transcription factors with DNA

    CERN Document Server

    Murugan, R

    2016-01-01

    We develop a theoretical framework on the mechanism of combinatorial binding of transcription factors (TFs) with their specific binding sites on DNA. We consider three possible mechanisms viz. monomer, hetero-oligomer and coordinated recruitment pathways. In the monomer pathway, combinatorial TFs search for their targets in an independent manner and the protein-protein interactions among them will be insignificant. The protein-protein interactions are very strong so that the hetero-oligomer complex of TFs as a whole searches for the cognate sites in case of hetero-oligomer pathway. The TF which arrived first will recruit the adjacent TFs in a sequential manner in the recruitment pathway. The free energy released from the protein-protein interactions among TFs will be in turn utilized to stabilize the TFs-DNA complex. Such coordinated binding of TFs in fact emerges as the cooperative effect. Monomer and hetero-oligomer pathways are efficient only when few TFs are involved in the combinatorial regulation. Detai...

  7. Mapping of a region of dengue virus type-2 glycoprotein required for binding by a neutralizing monoclonal antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trirawatanapong, T; Chandran, B; Putnak, R; Padmanabhan, R

    1992-07-15

    Envelope glycoprotein E of flaviviruses is exposed at the surface of the virion, and is responsible for eliciting a neutralizing antibody (Ab) response, as well as protective immunity in the host. In this report, we describe a method for the fine mapping of a linear sequence of the E protein of dengue virus type-2 (DEN-2), recognized by a type-specific and neutralizing monoclonal Ab (mAb), 3H5. First, an Escherichia coli expression vector containing a heat-inducible lambda pL promoter was used to synthesize several truncated, and near-full length E polypeptides. Reactivities of these polypeptides with polyclonal mouse hyperimmune sera, as well as the 3H5 mAb revealed the location of the 3H5-binding site to be within a region of 166 amino acids (aa) between aa 255 and 422. For fine mapping, a series of targeted deletions were made inframe within this region using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The hydrophilicity pattern of this region was used as a guide to systematically delete the regions encoding the various groups of surface aa residues within the context of a near-full-length E polypeptide by using PCR. The 3H5-binding site was thus precisely mapped to a region encoding 12 aa (between aa 386 and 397). A synthetic peptide containing this sequence was able to bind to the 3H5 mAb specifically, as shown by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In addition, we show that rabbit Abs raised against the synthetic peptide of 12 aa were able to bind to the authentic E protein, and to neutralize DEN-2 virus in a plaque reduction assay.

  8. Free energy simulations of a GTPase: GTP and GDP binding to archaeal initiation factor 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satpati, Priyadarshi; Clavaguéra, Carine; Ohanessian, Gilles; Simonson, Thomas

    2011-05-26

    Archaeal initiation factor 2 (aIF2) is a protein involved in the initiation of protein biosynthesis. In its GTP-bound, "ON" conformation, aIF2 binds an initiator tRNA and carries it to the ribosome. In its GDP-bound, "OFF" conformation, it dissociates from tRNA. To understand the specific binding of GTP and GDP and its dependence on the ON or OFF conformational state of aIF2, molecular dynamics free energy simulations (MDFE) are a tool of choice. However, the validity of the computed free energies depends on the simulation model, including the force field and the boundary conditions, and on the extent of conformational sampling in the simulations. aIF2 and other GTPases present specific difficulties; in particular, the nucleotide ligand coordinates a divalent Mg(2+) ion, which can polarize the electronic distribution of its environment. Thus, a force field with an explicit treatment of electronic polarizability could be necessary, rather than a simpler, fixed charge force field. Here, we begin by comparing a fixed charge force field to quantum chemical calculations and experiment for Mg(2+):phosphate binding in solution, with the force field giving large errors. Next, we consider GTP and GDP bound to aIF2 and we compare two fixed charge force fields to the recent, polarizable, AMOEBA force field, extended here in a simple, approximate manner to include GTP. We focus on a quantity that approximates the free energy to change GTP into GDP. Despite the errors seen for Mg(2+):phosphate binding in solution, we observe a substantial cancellation of errors when we compare the free energy change in the protein to that in solution, or when we compare the protein ON and OFF states. Finally, we have used the fixed charge force field to perform MDFE simulations and alchemically transform GTP into GDP in the protein and in solution. With a total of about 200 ns of molecular dynamics, we obtain good convergence and a reasonable statistical uncertainty, comparable to the force

  9. ICAT Inhibits beta-Catenin Binding to Tcf/Lef-Family Transcription Factors and in the General Coactivator p300 Using Independent Structural Modules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniels, D. L.

    2002-01-01

    In the canonical Wnt signaling pathway, {beta}-catenin activates target genes through its interactions with Tcf/Lef-family transcription factors and additional transcriptional coactivators. The crystal structure of ICAT, an inhibitor of {beta}-catenin-mediated transcription, bound to the armadillo repeat domain of {beta}-catenin, has been determined. ICAT contains an N-terminal helilical domain that binds to repeats 11 and 12 of {beta}-catenin, and an extended C-terminal region that binds to repeats 5-10 in a manner similar that of Tcfs and other {beta}-catenin ligands. Full-length ICAT dissociates complexes of {beta}-catenin, Lef-1, and the transcriptional coactivator p300, whereas the helical domain alone selectively blocks binding to p300. The C-terminal armadillo repeats of {beta}-catenin may be an attractive target for compounds designed to disrupt aberrant {beta}-catenin-mediated transcription associated with various cancers.

  10. Computational identification of conserved transcription factor binding sites upstream of genes induced in rat brain by transient focal ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulliam, John V K; Xu, Zhenfeng; Ford, Gregory D; Liu, Cuimei; Li, Yonggang; Stovall, Kyndra C; Cannon, Virginetta S; Tewolde, Teclemichael; Moreno, Carlos S; Ford, Byron D

    2013-02-07

    Microarray analysis has been used to understand how gene regulation plays a critical role in neuronal injury, survival and repair following ischemic stroke. To identify the transcriptional regulatory elements responsible for ischemia-induced gene expression, we examined gene expression profiles of rat brains following focal ischemia and performed computational analysis of consensus transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) in the genes of the dataset. In this study, rats were sacrificed 24 h after middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) stroke and gene transcription in brain tissues following ischemia/reperfusion was examined using Affymetrix GeneChip technology. The CONserved transcription FACtor binding site (CONFAC) software package was used to identify over-represented TFBS in the upstream promoter regions of ischemia-induced genes compared to control datasets. CONFAC identified 12 TFBS that were statistically over-represented from our dataset of ischemia-induced genes, including three members of the Ets-1 family of transcription factors (TFs). Microarray results showed that mRNA for Ets-1 was increased following tMCAO but not pMCAO. Immunohistochemical analysis of Ets-1 protein in rat brains following MCAO showed that Ets-1 was highly expressed in neurons in the brain of sham control animals. Ets-1 protein expression was virtually abolished in injured neurons of the ischemic brain but was unchanged in peri-infarct brain areas. These data indicate that TFs, including Ets-1, may influence neuronal injury following ischemia. These findings could provide important insights into the mechanisms that lead to brain injury and could provide avenues for the development of novel therapies. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Automated discovery of tissue-targeting enhancers and transcription factors from binding motif and gene function data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geetu Tuteja

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Identifying enhancers regulating gene expression remains an important and challenging task. While recent sequencing-based methods provide epigenomic characteristics that correlate well with enhancer activity, it remains onerous to comprehensively identify all enhancers across development. Here we introduce a computational framework to identify tissue-specific enhancers evolving under purifying selection. First, we incorporate high-confidence binding site predictions with target gene functional enrichment analysis to identify transcription factors (TFs likely functioning in a particular context. We then search the genome for clusters of binding sites for these TFs, overcoming previous constraints associated with biased manual curation of TFs or enhancers. Applying our method to the placenta, we find 33 known and implicate 17 novel TFs in placental function, and discover 2,216 putative placenta enhancers. Using luciferase reporter assays, 31/36 (86% tested candidates drive activity in placental cells. Our predictions agree well with recent epigenomic data in human and mouse, yet over half our loci, including 7/8 (87% tested regions, are novel. Finally, we establish that our method is generalizable by applying it to 5 additional tissues: heart, pancreas, blood vessel, bone marrow, and liver.

  12. Multiple DNA-binding modes for the ETS family transcription factor PU.1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esaki, Shingo; Evich, Marina G; Erlitzki, Noa; Germann, Markus W; Poon, Gregory M K

    2017-09-29

    The eponymous DNA-binding domain of ETS (E26 transformation-specific) transcription factors binds a single sequence-specific site as a monomer over a single helical turn. Following our previous observation by titration calorimetry that the ETS member PU.1 dimerizes sequentially at a single sequence-specific DNA-binding site to form a 2:1 complex, we have carried out an extensive spectroscopic and biochemical characterization of site-specific PU.1 ETS complexes. Whereas 10 bp of DNA was sufficient to support PU.1 binding as a monomer, additional flanking bases were required to invoke sequential dimerization of the bound protein. NMR spectroscopy revealed a marked loss of signal intensity in the 2:1 complex, and mutational analysis implicated the distal surface away from the bound DNA as the dimerization interface. Hydroxyl radical DNA footprinting indicated that the site-specifically bound PU.1 dimers occupied an extended DNA interface downstream from the 5'-GGAA-3' core consensus relative to its 1:1 counterpart, thus explaining the apparent site size requirement for sequential dimerization. The site-specifically bound PU.1 dimer resisted competition from nonspecific DNA and showed affinities similar to other functionally significant PU.1 interactions. As sequential dimerization did not occur with the ETS domain of Ets-1, a close structural homolog of PU.1, 2:1 complex formation may represent an alternative autoinhibitory mechanism in the ETS family at the protein-DNA level. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. Identification of factors in human urine that inhibit the binding of Escherichia coli adhesins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkkinen, J; Virkola, R; Korhonen, T K

    1988-10-01

    Earlier studies on the binding of Escherichia coli adhesins to the human urinary tract have indicated that the ability to recognize binding sites on the urinary tract epithelial cells is not a characteristic for P fimbriae only, but is also shared by some other adhesins that are not associated with pyelonephritis, especially S fimbriae. In the present study we have investigated whether human urine contains inhibitors of the binding of E. coli adhesins. Normal human urine was found to inhibit hemagglutination by S and type 1 fimbriae but not P fimbriae. The major inhibitor of S fimbriae in normal urine was identified as Tamm-Horsfall glycoprotein, and the interaction with S fimbriae is probably mediated by its sialyloligosaccharide chains. No significant variation was observed in the inhibitory effect of T-H glycoprotein preparations originating from different individuals. In contrast to S fimbriae, the major inhibitors of type 1 fimbriae in urine were identified as low-molecular-weight compounds. Gel filtration and ion-exchange chromatography and alpha-mannosidase treatment indicated that they were neutral alpha-mannosides, probably manno-oligosaccharides with three to five saccharides. Studies of urine samples collected from several individuals indicated the common occurrence of these inhibitory alpha-mannosides. Type 1 fimbriae bound to immobilized T-H glycoprotein, but, unlike S fimbriae, their binding was poorly inhibited by soluble T-H glycoprotein. Some urine samples were also found to contain low-molecular-weight inhibitors for the O75X adhesin of E. coli. These results emphasize that to function as a virulence factor in human urinary tract infections, an adhesin must evidently recognize such receptor structures at the infection sites that are not excreted in soluble form in urine. This prerequisite is filled by P fimbriae but not by type 1 or S fimbriae.

  14. Translational regulation of viral secretory proteins by the 5' coding regions and a viral RNA-binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordholm, Johan; Petitou, Jeanne; Östbye, Henrik; da Silva, Diogo V; Dou, Dan; Wang, Hao; Daniels, Robert

    2017-08-07

    A primary function of 5' regions in many secretory protein mRNAs is to encode an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) targeting sequence. In this study, we show how the regions coding for the ER-targeting sequences of the influenza glycoproteins NA and HA also function as translational regulatory elements that are controlled by the viral RNA-binding protein (RBP) NS1. The translational increase depends on the nucleotide composition and 5' positioning of the ER-targeting sequence coding regions and is facilitated by the RNA-binding domain of NS1, which can associate with ER membranes. Inserting the ER-targeting sequence coding region of NA into different 5' UTRs confirmed that NS1 can promote the translation of secretory protein mRNAs based on the nucleotides within this region rather than the resulting amino acids. By analyzing human protein mRNA sequences, we found evidence that this mechanism of using 5' coding regions and particular RBPs to achieve gene-specific regulation may extend to human-secreted proteins. © 2017 Nordholm et al.

  15. The inactivating factor of glutamine synthetase IF17 is an intrinsically disordered protein, which folds upon binding to its target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saelices, Lorena; Galmozzi, Carla V; Florencio, Francisco J; Muro-Pastor, M Isabel; Neira, José L

    2011-11-15

    In cyanobacteria, ammonium is incorporated into carbon skeletons by the sequential action of glutamine synthetase and glutamate synthase (GOGAT). The activity of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 glutamine synthetase type I (GS) is controlled by a post-transcriptional process involving protein-protein interactions with two inactivating factors: the 65-residue-long protein (IF7) and the 149-residue-long one (IF17). The sequence of the C terminus of IF17 is similar to IF7; IF7 is an intrinsically disordered protein (IDP). In this work, we study the structural propensities and affinity for GS of IF17 and a chimera protein, IF17N/IF7 (constructed by fusing the first 82 residues of IF17 with the whole IF7) by fluorescence, CD, and NMR. IF17 and IF17N/IF7 are IDPs with residual non-hydrogen-bonded structure, probably formed by α-helical, turn-like, and PPII conformations; several theoretical predictions support these experimental findings. IF17 seems to fold upon binding to GS, as suggested by CD thermal denaturations and steady-state far-UV spectra. The apparent affinity of IF17 for GS, as measured by fluorescence, is slightly smaller (K(D) ~1 μM) than that measured for IF7 (~0.3 μM). The K(D)s determined by CD are similar to those measured by fluorescence, but slightly larger, suggesting possible conformational rearrangements in the IFs and/or GS upon binding. Further, the results with IFN17/IF7 suggest that (i) binding of IF17 to the GS is modulated not only by its C-terminal region but also by its N-terminus and (ii) there are weakly structured (that is, "fuzzy") complexes in the ternary GS-IF system.

  16. Interactions between the R2R3-MYB transcription factor, AtMYB61, and target DNA binding sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael B Prouse

    Full Text Available Despite the prominent roles played by R2R3-MYB transcription factors in the regulation of plant gene expression, little is known about the details of how these proteins interact with their DNA targets. For example, while Arabidopsis thaliana R2R3-MYB protein AtMYB61 is known to alter transcript abundance of a specific set of target genes, little is known about the specific DNA sequences to which AtMYB61 binds. To address this gap in knowledge, DNA sequences bound by AtMYB61 were identified using cyclic amplification and selection of targets (CASTing. The DNA targets identified using this approach corresponded to AC elements, sequences enriched in adenosine and cytosine nucleotides. The preferred target sequence that bound with the greatest affinity to AtMYB61 recombinant protein was ACCTAC, the AC-I element. Mutational analyses based on the AC-I element showed that ACC nucleotides in the AC-I element served as the core recognition motif, critical for AtMYB61 binding. Molecular modelling predicted interactions between AtMYB61 amino acid residues and corresponding nucleotides in the DNA targets. The affinity between AtMYB61 and specific target DNA sequences did not correlate with AtMYB61-driven transcriptional activation with each of the target sequences. CASTing-selected motifs were found in the regulatory regions of genes previously shown to be regulated by AtMYB61. Taken together, these findings are consistent with the hypothesis that AtMYB61 regulates transcription from specific cis-acting AC elements in vivo. The results shed light on the specifics of DNA binding by an important family of plant-specific transcriptional regulators.

  17. Tuftsin binds neuropilin-1 through a sequence similar to that encoded by exon 8 of vascular endothelial growth factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Wronski, Mathew A; Raju, Natarajan; Pillai, Radhakrishna; Bogdan, Nancy J; Marinelli, Edmund R; Nanjappan, Palaniappa; Ramalingam, Kondareddiar; Arunachalam, Thangavel; Eaton, Steve; Linder, Karen E; Yan, Feng; Pochon, Sibylle; Tweedle, Michael F; Nunn, Adrian D

    2006-03-03

    Tuftsin, Thr-Lys-Pro-Arg (TKPR), is an immunostimulatory peptide with reported nervous system effects as well. We unexpectedly found that tuftsin and a higher affinity antagonist, TKPPR, bind selectively to neuropilin-1 and block vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) binding to that receptor. Dimeric and tetrameric forms of TKPPR had greatly increased affinity for neuropilin-1 based on competition binding experiments. On endothelial cells tetrameric TKPPR inhibited the VEGF(165)-induced autophosphorylation of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR-2) even though it did not directly inhibit VEGF binding to VEGFR-2. Homology between exon 8 of VEGF and TKPPR suggests that the sequence coded for by exon 8 may stabilize VEGF binding to neuropilin-1 to facilitate signaling through VEGFR-2. Given the overlap between processes involving neuropilin-1 and tuftsin, we propose that at least some of the previously reported effects of tuftsin are mediated through neuropilin-1.

  18. Promoter-proximal transcription factor binding is transcriptionally active when coupled with nucleosome repositioning in immediate vicinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Vinod Kumar; Thakur, Ram Krishna; Eckloff, Bruce; Baral, Aradhita; Singh, Ankita; Halder, Rashi; Kumar, Akinchan; Alam, Mohammad Parwez; Kundu, Tapas K.; Pandita, Raj; Pandita, Tej K.; Wieben, Eric D.; Chowdhury, Shantanu

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have analyzed patterns of transcription, transcription factor (TF) binding or mapped nucleosome occupancy across the genome. These suggest that the three aspects are genetically connected but the cause and effect relationships are still unknown. For example, physiologic TF binding studies involve many TFs, consequently, it is difficult to assign nucleosome reorganization to the binding site occupancy of any particular TF. Therefore, several aspects remain unclear: does TF binding influence nucleosome (re)organizations locally or impact the chromatin landscape at a more global level; are all or only a fraction of TF binding a result of reorganization in nucleosome occupancy and do all TF binding and associated changes in nucleosome occupancy result in altered gene expression? With these in mind, following characterization of two states (before and after induction of a single TF of choice) we determined: (i) genomic binding sites of the TF, (ii) promoter nucleosome occupancy and (iii) transcriptome profiles. Results demonstrated that promoter-proximal TF binding influenced expression of the target gene when it was coupled to nucleosome repositioning at or close to its binding site in most cases. In contrast, only in few cases change in target gene expression was found when TF binding occurred without local nucleosome reorganization. PMID:25081206

  19. Insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 in inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirman, Irena; Whelan, Richard Larry; Jain, Suvinit;

    2005-01-01

    Epithelial cell growth regulation has been reported to be altered in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients. The cell growth regulatory factor, insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 (IGFBP-3), may be partly responsible for this phenomenon. So far, IGFBP-3 levels have been assessed...... as values of total protein, which is a sum of bioactive intact 43- to 45-kDa protein and its inactive proteolytic cleavage fragments. We aimed to assess the levels of intact IGFBP-3 and its cleaving protease MMP-9 in IBD. Patients with IBD and controls were included. Total plasma IGFBP-3 concentration...... and MMP-9 levels were determined in ELISA. The concentration of intact IGFBP-3 was significantly decreased in patients with moderate to severe IBD activity compared to those in remission or controls. Of note, a dramatic depletion of intact IGFBP-3 was found in 7.4% of patients with IBD. Zymography...

  20. Discovery, optimization and validation of an optimal DNA-binding sequence for the Six1 homeodomain transcription factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yubing; Nandi, Soumyadeep; Martel, André; Antoun, Alen; Ioshikhes, Ilya; Blais, Alexandre

    2012-09-01

    The Six1 transcription factor is a homeodomain protein involved in controlling gene expression during embryonic development. Six1 establishes gene expression profiles that enable skeletal myogenesis and nephrogenesis, among others. While several homeodomain factors have been extensively characterized with regards to their DNA-binding properties, relatively little is known of the properties of Six1. We have used the genomic binding profile of Six1 during the myogenic differentiation of myoblasts to obtain a better understanding of its preferences for recognizing certain DNA sequences. DNA sequence analyses on our genomic binding dataset, combined with biochemical characterization using binding assays, reveal that Six1 has a much broader DNA-binding sequence spectrum than had been previously determined. Moreover, using a position weight matrix optimization algorithm, we generated a highly sensitive and specific matrix that can be used to predict novel Six1-binding sites with highest accuracy. Furthermore, our results support the idea of a mode of DNA recognition by this factor where Six1 itself is sufficient for sequence discrimination, and where Six1 domains outside of its homeodomain contribute to binding site selection. Together, our results provide new light on the properties of this important transcription factor, and will enable more accurate modeling of Six1 function in bioinformatic studies.

  1. HOCOMOCO: expansion and enhancement of the collection of transcription factor binding sites models

    KAUST Repository

    Kulakovskiy, Ivan V.

    2015-11-19

    Models of transcription factor (TF) binding sites provide a basis for a wide spectrum of studies in regulatory genomics, from reconstruction of regulatory networks to functional annotation of transcripts and sequence variants. While TFs may recognize different sequence patterns in different conditions, it is pragmatic to have a single generic model for each particular TF as a baseline for practical applications. Here we present the expanded and enhanced version of HOCOMOCO (http://hocomoco.autosome.ru and http://www.cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/hocomoco10), the collection of models of DNA patterns, recognized by transcription factors. HOCOMOCO now provides position weight matrix (PWM) models for binding sites of 601 human TFs and, in addition, PWMs for 396 mouse TFs. Furthermore, we introduce the largest up to date collection of dinucleotide PWM models for 86 (52) human (mouse) TFs. The update is based on the analysis of massive ChIP-Seq and HT-SELEX datasets, with the validation of the resulting models on in vivo data. To facilitate a practical application, all HOCOMOCO models are linked to gene and protein databases (Entrez Gene, HGNC, UniProt) and accompanied by precomputed score thresholds. Finally, we provide command-line tools for PWM and diPWM threshold estimation and motif finding in nucleotide sequences.

  2. Dynamic nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of an Arabidopsis SR splicing factor: role of the RNA-binding domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rausin, Glwadys; Tillemans, Vinciane; Stankovic, Nancy; Hanikenne, Marc; Motte, Patrick

    2010-05-01

    Serine/arginine-rich (SR) proteins are essential nuclear-localized splicing factors. We have investigated the dynamic subcellular distribution of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) RSZp22 protein, a homolog of the human 9G8 SR factor. Little is known about the determinants underlying the control of plant SR protein dynamics, and so far most studies relied on ectopic transient overexpression. Here, we provide a detailed analysis of the RSZp22 expression profile and describe its nucleocytoplasmic shuttling properties in specific cell types. Comparison of transient ectopic- and stable tissue-specific expression highlights the advantages of both approaches for nuclear protein dynamic studies. By site-directed mutagenesis of RSZp22 RNA-binding sequences, we show that functional RNA recognition motif RNP1 and zinc-knuckle are dispensable for the exclusive protein nuclear localization and speckle-like distribution. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer imaging also revealed that these motifs are implicated in RSZp22 molecular interactions. Furthermore, the RNA-binding motif mutants are defective for their export through the CRM1/XPO1/Exportin-1 receptor pathway but retain nucleocytoplasmic mobility. Moreover, our data suggest that CRM1 is a putative export receptor for mRNPs in plants.

  3. Role of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-4 in prevention of colon cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seifalian Alexander M

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Insulin-like growth factors (IGFs are important for the proliferation of cancer cells. One of their binding proteins, known as insulin-like growth factor binding protein -4 (IGFBP-4 is well known for its inhibitory action on IGFs in vitro. We assessed the effect of IGFBP-4 in prevention of development of colon cancer in vivo. Methods Nude mice were subcutaneously inoculated with HT-29 colon cancer cells and they were also simultaneously injected either gene construct containing mammalian expression vector pcDNA3 with or without IGFBP-4 gene or phosphate buffered saline. The effect was assessed 4 weeks later by evaluating the tumours for mitosis, necrosis, apoptosis, and expressions of IGFBP-4, Bcl-2 and Bax proteins. Results The results showed that the IGFBP-4 gene therapy did not prevent the tumour establishment but it increased the tumour apoptosis which was associated with an increase in Bcl-2 and Bax expressions. The IGFBP-4 protein was low in tumours which received IGFBP-4 gene construct which may be due to a feed back mechanism of IGFBP-4 upon its own cells. Conclusion IGFBP-4 gene therapy in the form localised gene transfer did not prevent colon cancer initiation and establishment but it resulted in increased apoptosis and Bax protein expression and a decrease in tumour cellular mitosis

  4. Insulin-like Growth Factor Binding Protein 7 Mediates Glioma Cell Growth and Migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Jiang

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Insulin-like growth factor binding protein 7 (IGFBP-7 is the only member of the IGFBP superfamily that binds strongly to insulin, suggesting that IGFBP-7 may have different functions from other IGFBPs. Unlike other IGFBPs, the expression and functions of IGFBP-7 in glioma tumors have not been reported. Using cDNA microarray analysis, we found that expression of IGFBP-7 correlated with the grade of glioma tumors and the overall patient survival. This finding was further validated by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis. We used RNAi to examine the role of IGFBP-7 in glioma cells, inhibiting IGFBP-7 expression by short interfering RNA transfection. Cell proliferation was suppressed after IGFBP-7 expression was inhibited for 5 days, and glioma cell growth was stimulated consistently by the addition of recombinant IGFBP-7 protein. Moreover, glioma cell migration was attenuated by IGFBP-7 depletion but enhanced by IGFBP-7 overexpression and addition. Overexpression of AKT1 in IGFBP-7-overxpressed cells attenuated the IGFBP-7-promoted migration and further enhanced inhibition of IGFBP-7 depletion on the migration. Phosphorylation of AKT and Erk1/2 was also inversely regulated by IGFBP-7 expression. These two factors together suggest that IGFBP-7 can regulate glioma cell migration through the AKT-ERK pathway, thereby playing an important role in glioma growth and migration.

  5. Alpha-bungarotoxin binding to hippocampal interneurons: immunocytochemical characterization and effects on growth factor expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, R; Wetmore, C; Strömberg, I; Leonard, S; Olson, L

    1993-05-01

    The nicotinic cholinergic antagonist alpha-bungarotoxin (alpha-BT) binds throughout the rat hippocampal formation. The binding is displaceable by d-tubocurarine. The most heavily labeled cells are GABA-containing interneurons in the dentate and in Ammon's horn. These neurons have several different morphologies and contain several neuropeptides. alpha-BT-labeled interneurons in the dentate are small cells between the granular and molecular layers that often contain neuropeptide Y. alpha-BT-labeled interneurons in CA1 are medium-sized interneurons, occasionally found in stratum pyramidale, but more often found in stratum radiatum and stratum lacunosum moleculare. These neurons often contain cholecystokinin. The largest alpha-BT-labeled interneurons are found in CA3, in both stratum radiatum and stratum lucidum. These neurons are multipolar and frequently are autofluorescent. They often contain somatostatin or cholecystokinin. These large interneurons have been found to receive medial septal innervation and may also have projections that provide inhibitory feedback directly to the medial septal nucleus. The cholinergic innervation of the hippocampus from the medial septal nucleus is under the trophic regulation of NGF and brain-derived neurotrophic factor, even in adult life. Expression of mRNA for both these factors is increased in CA3 and the dentate after intraventricular administration of alpha-BT, but not after administration of the muscarinic antagonist atropine. alpha-BT-sensitive cholinergic receptors on inhibitory interneurons may be critical to medial septal regulation of the hippocampal activity, including the habituation of response to sensory input.

  6. Human vascular smooth muscle cells both express and respond to heparin-binding growth factor I (endothelial cell growth factor)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winkles, J.A.; Friesel, R.; Burgess, W.H.; Howk, R.; Mehlman, T.; Weinstein, R.; Maciag, T.

    1987-10-01

    The control of vascular endothelial and muscle cell proliferation is important in such processes as tumor angiogenesis, wound healing, and the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Class I heparin-binding growth factor (HBGF-I) is a potent mitogen and chemoattractant for human endothelial cells in vitro and will induce angiogenesis in vivo. RNA gel blot hybridization experiments demonstrate that cultured human vascular smooth muscle cells, but not human umbilical cells also synthesize an HBGF-I mRNA. Smooth muscle cells also synthesize an HBGF-I-like polypeptide since (i) extract prepared from smooth muscle cells will compete with /sup 125/I-labeled HBGF-I for binding to the HBGF-I cell surface receptor, and (ii) the competing ligand is eluted from heparin-Sepharose affinity resin at a NaCl concentration similar to that required by purified bovine brain HBGF-I and stimulates endothelial cell proliferation in vitro. Furthermore, like endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells possess cell-surface-associated HBGF-I receptors and respond to HBGF-I as a mitogen. These results indicate the potential for an additional autocrine component of vascular smooth muscle cell growth control and establish a vessel wall source of HBGF-I for endothelial cell division in vivo.

  7. Backbone resonance assignments of the micro-RNA precursor binding region of human TRBP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit, Matthieu P M H; Plevin, Michael J

    2013-10-01

    TAR-RNA binding protein (TRBP) is a multidomain human protein involved in micro-RNA (miRNA) biogenesis. TRBP is a component of both the Dicer complex, which processes precursor miRNAs, and the RNA-induced silencing complex-loading complex. In addition, TRBP is implicated in the human immunodeficiency virus replication cycle and interferon-protein kinase R activity. TRBP contains 3 double-stranded RNA binding domains the first two of which have been shown to interact with miRNA precursors. Here we present the backbone resonance assignments and secondary structure of residues 19-228 of human TRBP2.

  8. DPI-ELISA: a fast and versatile method to specify the binding of plant transcription factors to DNA in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaban Christina

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background About 10% of all genes in eukaryote genomes are predicted to encode transcription factors. The specific binding of transcription factors to short DNA-motifs influences the expression of neighbouring genes. However, little is known about the DNA-protein interaction itself. To date there are only a few suitable methods to characterise DNA-protein-interactions, among which the EMSA is the method most frequently used in laboratories. Besides EMSA, several protocols describe the effective use of an ELISA-based transcription factor binding assay e.g. for the analysis of human NFκB binding to specific DNA sequences. Results We provide a unified protocol for this type of ELISA analysis, termed DNA-Protein-Interaction (DPI-ELISA. Qualitative analyses with His-epitope tagged plant transcription factors expressed in E. coli revealed that EMSA and DPI-ELISA result in comparable and reproducible data. The binding of AtbZIP63 to the C-box and AtWRKY11 to the W2-box could be reproduced and validated by both methods. We next examined the physical binding of the C-terminal DNA-binding domains of AtWRKY33, AtWRKY50 and AtWRKY75 to the W2-box. Although the DNA-binding domain is highly conserved among the WRKY proteins tested, the use of the DPI-ELISA discloses differences in W2-box binding properties between these proteins. In addition to these well-studied transcription factor families, we applied our protocol to AtBPC2, a member of the so far uncharacterised plant specific Basic Pentacysteine transcription factor family. We could demonstrate binding to GA/TC-dinucleotide repeat motifs by our DPI-ELISA protocol. Different buffers and reaction conditions were examined. Conclusions We successfully applied our DPI-ELISA protocol to investigate the DNA-binding specificities of three different classes of transcription factors from Arabidopsis thaliana. However, the analysis of the binding affinity of any DNA-binding protein to any given DNA

  9. Corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) binding protein: a novel regulator of CRF and related peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behan, D P; De Souza, E B; Lowry, P J; Potter, E; Sawchenko, P; Vale, W W

    1995-10-01

    A 37-kDa corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) binding protein (CRF-BP) was purified from human plasma by repeated affinity purification and subsequently sequenced and cloned. The human and rat CRF-BP cDNAs encode proteins of 322 amino acids with one putative signal sequence, one N-glycosylation site, and 10 conserved cysteines. Human CRF-BP binds human CRF with high affinity but has low affinity for the ovine peptide. In contrast, sheep CRF-BP binds human and ovine CRF with high affinity. The CRF-BP gene consists of seven exons and six introns and is located on chromosome 13 and loci 5q of the mouse and human genomes, respectively. CRF-BP inhibits the adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) releasing properties of CRF in vitro. CRF-BP dimerizes after binding CRF and clears the peptide from blood. This clearance mechanism protects the maternal pituitary gland from elevated plasma CRF levels found during the third trimester of human pregnancy. CRF-BP is expressed in the brains of all species so far tested but is uniquely expressed in human liver and placenta. In brain, CRF-BP is membrane associated and is predominantly expressed in the cerebral cortex and subcortical limbic structures. In some brain areas CRF-BP colocalizes with CRF and CRF receptors. The protein is also present in pituitary corticotropes, where it is under positive glucocorticoid control, and is likely to locally modulate CRF-induced ACTH secretion. The ligand requirements of the CRF receptor and the CRF-BP can be distinguished in that central human CRF fragments, such as CRF (6-33) and CRF (9-33), have high affinity for CRF-BP but low affinity for the CRF receptor. The binding protein's ability to inhibit CRF-induced ACTH secretion can be reversed by CRF (6-33) and CRF (9-33), suggesting that ligand inhibitors may have utility in elevating free CRF levels in disease states associated with decreased CRF. Thus, by controlling the amount of free CRF which activates CRF receptors, it is likely that the CRF

  10. Host factor I, Hfq, binds to Escherichia coli ompA mRNA in a growth rate-dependent fashion and regulates its stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vytvytska, O; Jakobsen, J S; Balcunaite, G

    1998-01-01

    The stability of the ompA mRNA depends on the bacterial growth rate. The 5' untranslated region is the stability determinant of this transcript and the target of the endoribonuclease, RNase E, the key player of mRNA degradation. An RNA-binding protein with affinity for the 5' untranslated region...... ompA was purified and identified as Hfq, a host factor initially recognized for its function in phage Qbeta replication. The ompA RNA-binding activity parallels the amount of Hfq, which is elevated in bacteria cultured at slow growth rate, a condition leading to facilitated degradation of the ompA m...... no affinity for the lpp transcript whose degradation, like that of bulk mRNA, is not affected by bacterial growth rate. Compatible with our results, we found that the intracellular concentration of RNase E and its associated degradosome components is independent of bacterial growth rate. Thus our results...

  11. Impaired binding of the age-related macular degeneration-associated complement factor H 402H allotype to Bruch's membrane in human retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Simon J; Perveen, Rahat; Hakobyan, Svetlana; Morgan, B Paul; Sim, Robert B; Bishop, Paul N; Day, Anthony J

    2010-09-24

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the predominant cause of blindness in the industrialized world where destruction of the macula, i.e. the central region of the retina, results in loss of vision. AMD is preceded by the formation of deposits in the macula, which accumulate between the Bruch's membrane and the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). These deposits are associated with complement-mediated inflammation and perturb retinal function. Recent genetic association studies have demonstrated that a common allele (402H) of the complement factor H (CFH) gene is a major risk factor for the development of AMD; CFH suppresses complement activation on host tissues where it is believed to bind via its interaction with polyanionic structures. We have shown previously that this coding change (Y402H; from a tyrosine to histidine residue) alters the binding of the CFH protein to sulfated polysaccharides. Here we demonstrate that the AMD-associated polymorphism profoundly affects CFH binding to sites within human macula. Notably, the AMD-associated 402H variant binds less well to heparan sulfate and dermatan sulfate glycosaminoglycans within Bruch's membrane when compared with the 402Y form; both allotypes exhibit a similar level of binding to the RPE. We propose that the impaired binding of the 402H variant to Bruch's membrane results in an overactivation of the complement pathway leading to local chronic inflammation and thus contributes directly to the development and/or progression of AMD. These studies therefore provide a putative disease mechanism and add weight to the genetic association studies that implicate the 402H allele as an important risk factor in AMD.

  12. A TRAF2 binding independent region of TNFR2 is responsibl for TRAF2 depletion and enhancement of cytotoxicity driven b TNFR1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabal-Hierro, Lucía; Noelia, Artime; Iglesias, Julián; Miguel A., Prado; Ugarte-Gil, Lore; Pedro, Casado; Fernández-García, Belén; Darnay, Bryant G.; Lazo, Pedro S.

    2014-01-01

    Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) interacts with two receptors known as TNFR1 and TNFR2. TNFR1 activation may result in either cell proliferation or cell death. TNFR2 activates Nuclear Factor-kappaB (NF-kB) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) which lead to transcriptional activation of genes related to cell proliferation and survival. This depends on the binding of TNF Receptor Associated Factor 2 (TRAF2) to the receptor. TNFR2 also induces TRAF2 degradation. In this work we have investigated the structural features of TNFR2 responsible for inducing TRAF2 degradation and have studied the biological consequences of this activity. We show that when TNFR1 and TNFR2 are co-expressed, TRAF2 depletion leads to an enhanced TNFR1 cytotoxicity which correlates with the inhibition of NF-kB. NF-kB activation and TRAF2 degradation depend of different regions of the receptor since TNFR2 mutants at amino acids 343-349 fail to induce TRAF2 degradation and have lost their ability to enhance TNFR1-mediated cell death but are still able to activate NF-kB. Moreover, whereas NF-kB activation requires TRAF2 binding to the receptor, TRAF2 degradation appears independent of TRAF2 binding. Thus, TNFR2 mutants unable to bind TRAF2 are still able to induce its degradation and to enhance TNFR1-mediated cytotoxicity. To test further this receptor crosstalk we have developed a system stably expressing in cells carrying only endogenous TNFR1 the chimeric receptor RANK-TNFR2, formed by the extracellular region of RANK (Receptor activator of NF-kB) and the intracellular region of TNFR2.This has made possible to study independently the signals triggered by TNFR1 and TNFR2. In these cells TNFR1 is selectively activated by soluble TNF (sTNF) while RANK-TNFR2 is selectively activated by RANKL. Treatment of these cells with sTNF and RANKL leads to an enhanced cytotoxicity. PMID:24318359

  13. Analysis of Specific Binding and Subcellular Localization of Wheat ERF Transcription Factor W17

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Yun-xiang; LIU Pei; XU Zhao-shi; CHEN Ming; LI Lian-cheng; CHEN Yao-feng; XIONG Xiang-jin; MA You-zhi

    2008-01-01

    The study aims to detect the subcellular localization of ERF (ethylene-responsive element binding factor) transcription factor W17 protein, the interaction between W17 and cis-acting regulatory elements GCC-box and DRE in vitro, the binding and transactivating ability in vivo, and the role of W17 in higher plant stress-signal pathway. Recombinant plasmid W17/163hGFP was introduced into onion epidermal cells by the particle bombardment method with a PDS1000/He. Transformed cells were incubated for 24h at 22℃ in the dark and green fluorescence was monitored under a confocal microscope. The gene W17 was fused N-terminus of GST (glutathione-S-transferase) in prokaryotic expression vector pGEX-4T-1 and then transformed into E. coli strain BL21 (DE3). IPTG (0.5mmol L-1) was added to induce the expression of recombinant GST/W17 for 3h. The fused proteins were purified by GST purification columns, and then subjected to gel retardation assay with a 32P-labeled GCC or DRE sequence. The different reporter and effector plasmids were introduced into tobacco leaves through agroinfiltration, then transformed leaves stained by X-Gluc, faded with 75% alcohol and monitored under a Stereozooming microscope. The GFP fused with W17 protein was localized in the nuclei; SDS-PAGE assay demonstrated that the fused protein GST/W17 could be induced and purified with molecular weight at around 42.2kD under the induction of IPTG. Purified fused protein was able to specifically bind to both the wild-type GCC-box and DRE element, but had no interaction with either the mutant DRE or GCC-box; W17 protein can bind to GCC-box and transactive downstream GUS gene in vivo. W17 can localize into the nuclei, and it may be involved not only in biotic stresses controlled by GCC-box, but also in abiotic stresses (e. g., salt-) induced signaling pathway.

  14. Probabilistic Inference on Multiple Normalized Signal Profiles from Next Generation Sequencing: Transcription Factor Binding Sites

    KAUST Repository

    Wong, Ka-Chun

    2015-04-20

    With the prevalence of chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) with sequencing (ChIP-Seq) technology, massive ChIP-Seq data has been accumulated. The ChIP-Seq technology measures the genome-wide occupancy of DNA-binding proteins in vivo. It is well-known that different DNA-binding protein occupancies may result in a gene being regulated in different conditions (e.g. different cell types). To fully understand a gene\\'s function, it is essential to develop probabilistic models on multiple ChIP-Seq profiles for deciphering the gene transcription causalities. In this work, we propose and describe two probabilistic models. Assuming the conditional independence of different DNA-binding proteins\\' occupancies, the first method (SignalRanker) is developed as an intuitive method for ChIP-Seq genome-wide signal profile inference. Unfortunately, such an assumption may not always hold in some gene regulation cases. Thus, we propose and describe another method (FullSignalRanker) which does not make the conditional independence assumption. The proposed methods are compared with other existing methods on ENCODE ChIP-Seq datasets, demonstrating its regression and classification ability. The results suggest that FullSignalRanker is the best-performing method for recovering the signal ranks on the promoter and enhancer regions. In addition, FullSignalRanker is also the best-performing method for peak sequence classification. We envision that SignalRanker and FullSignalRanker will become important in the era of next generation sequencing. FullSignalRanker program is available on the following website: http://www.cs.toronto.edu/∼wkc/FullSignalRanker/ © 2015 IEEE.

  15. SENSITIVE TO PROTON RHIZOTOXICITY1, CALMODULIN BINDING TRANSCRIPTION ACTIVATOR2, and other transcription factors are involved in ALUMINUM-ACTIVATED MALATE TRANSPORTER1 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokizawa, Mutsutomo; Kobayashi, Yuriko; Saito, Tatsunori; Kobayashi, Masatomo; Iuchi, Satoshi; Nomoto, Mika; Tada, Yasuomi; Yamamoto, Yoshiharu Y; Koyama, Hiroyuki

    2015-03-01

    In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) the root apex is protected from aluminum (Al) rhizotoxicity by excretion of malate, an Al chelator, by ALUMINUM-ACTIVATED MALATE TRANSPORTER1 (AtALMT1). AtALMT1 expression is fundamentally regulated by the SENSITIVE TO PROTON RHIZOTOXICITY1 (STOP1) zinc finger protein, but other transcription factors have roles that enable Al-inducible expression with a broad dynamic range. In this study, we characterized multiple cis-elements in the AtALMT1 promoter that interact with transcription factors. In planta complementation assays of AtALMT1 driven by 5' truncated promoters of different lengths showed that the promoter region between -540 and 0 (the first ATG) restored the Al-sensitive phenotype of atalm1 and thus contains cis-elements essential for AtALMT1 expression for Al tolerance. Computation of overrepresented octamers showed that eight regions in this promoter region contained potential cis-elements involved in Al induction and STOP1 regulation. Mutation in a position around -297 from the first ATG completely inactivated AtALMT1 expression and Al response. In vitro binding assays showed that this region contained the STOP1 binding site, which accounted for the recognition by four zinc finger domains of the protein. Other positions were characterized as cis-elements that regulated expression by repressors and activators and a transcription factor that determines root tip expression of AtALMT1. From the consensus of known cis-elements, we identified CALMODULIN-BINDING TRANSCRIPTION ACTIVATOR2 to be an activator of AtALMT1 expression. Al-inducible expression of AtALMT1 changed transcription starting sites, which increased the abundance of transcripts with a shortened 5' untranslated region. The present analyses identified multiple mechanisms that regulate AtALMT1 expression.

  16. Influence of the hinge region and its adjacent domains on binding and signaling patterns of the thyrotropin and follitropin receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jörg Schaarschmidt

    Full Text Available Glycoprotein hormone receptors (GPHR have a large extracellular domain (ECD divided into the leucine rich repeat (LRR domain for binding of the glycoprotein hormones and the hinge region (HinR, which connects the LRR domain with the transmembrane domain (TMD. Understanding of the activation mechanism of GPHRs is hindered by the unknown interaction of the ECD with the TMD and the structural changes upon ligand binding responsible for receptor activation. Recently, our group showed that the HinR of the thyrotropin receptor (TSHR can be replaced by those of the follitropin (FSHR and lutropin receptor (LHCGR without effects on surface expression and hTSH signaling. However, differences in binding characteristics for bovine TSH at the various HinRs were obvious. To gain further insights into the interplay between LRR domain, HinR and TMD we generated chimeras between the TSHR and FSHR. Our results obtained by the determination of cell surface expression, ligand binding and G protein activation confirm the similar characteristics of GPHR HinRs but they also demonstrate an involvement of the HinR in ligand selectivity indicated by the observed promiscuity of some chimeras. While the TSHR HinR contributes to specific binding of TSH and its variants, no such contribution is observed for FSH and its analog TR4401 at the HinR of the FSHR. Furthermore, the charge distribution at the poorly characterized LRR domain/HinR transition affected ligand binding and signaling even though this area is not in direct contact with the ligand. In addition our results also demonstrate the importance of the TMD/HinR interface. Especially the combination of the TSHR HinR with the FSHR-TMD resulted in a loss of cell surface expression of the respective chimeras. In conclusion, the HinRs of GPHRs do not only share similar characteristics but also behave as ligand specific structural and functional entities.

  17. Comparison of experimental and theoretical binding and transition energies in the actinide region. [Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krause, M.O.; Nestor, C.W. Jr.

    1977-01-01

    The status of experimental and theoretical binding and transition energy determinations is reviewed extending the comparison between experiment and theory to encompass representative series of data for all actinides. This comprehensive comparison reveals areas where improvements may be indicated, showing whether theoretical treatments including all known contributions to the lowest order would be adequate in all instances. 45 references. (JFP)

  18. Identification of glycosaminoglycan binding regions in the Plasmodium falciparum encoded placental sequestration ligand, VAR2CSA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Resende, Mafalda; Nielsen, Morten A.; Dahlbaeck, Madeleine

    2008-01-01

    Background: Pregnancy malaria is caused by Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes binding the placental receptor chondroitin sulfate A (CSA). This results in accumulation of parasites in the placenta with severe clinical consequences for the mother and her unborn child. Women become resistan...

  19. Mapping of IgE-binding regions on recombinant Cyn d 1, a major allergen from Bermuda Grass Pollen (BGP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhalla Prem L

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bermuda grass (Cynodon dactylon; subfamily Chloridoideae is an important source of seasonal aeroallergens in warm tropical and sub-tropical areas worldwide. Improved approaches to diagnosis and therapy of allergic diseases require a thorough understanding of the structure and epitopes on the allergen molecule that are crucial for the antigen-antibody interaction. This study describes the localization of the human IgE-binding regions of the major group 1 pollen allergen Cyn d 1 from Bermuda grass. Methods A cDNA library was constructed from Bermuda grass pollen (BGP using a Lambda gt11 expression vector. The gene encoding the Cyn d 1 allergen was isolated by screening the library with a mouse monoclonal antibody raised against grass group 1 allergen. In order to characterize the IgE epitopes on Cyn d 1, seven overlapping fragments and three deletion mutants were cloned and over-expressed in E. coli. The recombinant fragments and deletion mutants were evaluated for their comparative IgE reactivity with sera of non atopic individuals and grass pollen allergic patients by ELISA and a dot-blot assay. Results Analysis of IgE binding regions by overlapping fragments and deletion mutants identified two major allergenic regions corresponding to amino acids 120–170 and 224–244. Deletion of either or both regions led to a significant reduction in IgE binding, emphasizing the importance of the C-terminal region on Cyn d 1 in epitope-IgE interaction. Conclusion Anti-Cyn d 1 IgE antibodies from allergic human sera recognize two epitopes located at the C-terminal end of the molecule. These data will enable the design of improved diagnostic and therapeutic approaches for BGP hypersensitivity.

  20. Lyso-Sulfatide Binds Factor Xa and Inhibits Thrombin Generation by the Prothrombinase Complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subramanian Yegneswaran

    Full Text Available Blood coagulation reactions are strongly influenced by phospholipids, but little is known about the influence of sphingolipids on coagulation mechanisms. Lysosulfatide (lyso-SF (sulfogalactosyl sphingosine prolonged factor Xa (fXa 1-stage plasma clotting assays, showing it had robust anticoagulant activity. In studies using purified clotting factors, lyso-SF inhibited >90% of prothrombin (II activation for reaction mixtures containing fXa/factor Va (fVa/II, and also inhibited II activation generation by fXa/ phospholipids and by Gla-domainless-fXa/fVa/phospholipids. When lyso-SF analogs were tested, results showed that N-acetyl-sulfatide was not anticoagulant, implying that the free amine group was essential for the anticoagulant effects of lyso-SF. Lyso-SF did not inhibit fXa enzymatic hydrolysis of small peptide substrates, showing it did not directly inhibit the fXa activity. In surface plasmon resonance studies, lyso-SF bound to immobilized inactivated fXa as well as inactivated Gla-domainless-fXa. Confirming this lyso-SF:fXa interaction, fluorescence studies showed that fluorescently-labeled-fXa in solution bound to lyso-SF. Thus, lyso-SF is an anticoagulant lipid that inhibits fXa when this enzyme is bound to either phospholipids or to fVa. Mechanisms for inhibition of procoagulant activity are likely to involve lyso-SF binding to fXa domain(s that are distinct from the fXa Gla domain. This suggests that certain sphingolipids, including lyso-SF and some of its analogs, may down-regulate fXa activity without inhibiting the enzyme's active site or binding to the fXa Gla domain.

  1. Recognition rules for binding of Zn-Cys2His2 transcription factors to operator DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polozov, R V; Sivozhelezov, V S; Chirgadze, Yu N; Ivanov, V V

    2015-01-01

    The molecules of Zn-finger transcription factors consist of several similar small protein units. We analyzed the crystal structures 46 basic units of 22 complexes of Zn-Cys2His2 family with the fragments of operator DNA. We showed that the recognition of DNA occurs via five protein contacts. The canonical binding positions of the recognizing α-helix were -1, 3, 6, and 7, which make contacts with the tetra-nucleotide sequence ZXYZ of the coding DNA strand; here the canonical binding triplet is underlined. The non-coding DNA strand forms only one contact at α-helix position 2. We have discovered that there is a single highly conservative contact His7α with the phosphate group of nucleotide Z, which precedes each triplet XYZ of the coding DNA chain. This particular contact is invariant for the all Zn-Cys2His2 family with high frequency of occurrence 83%, which we considered as an invariant recognition rule. We have also selected a previously unreported Zn-Cys2His2-Arg subfamily of 21 Zn-finger units bound with DNA triplets, which make two invariant contacts with residues Arg6α and His7α with the coding DNA chain. These contacts show frequency of occurrence 100 and 90%, and are invariant recognition rule. Three other variable protein-DNA contacts are formed mainly with the bases and specify the recognition patterns of individual factor units. The revealed recognition rules are inherent for the Zn-Cys2His2 family and Zn-Cys2His2-Arg subfamily of different taxonomic groups and can distinguish members of these families from any other family of transcription factors.

  2. The core microprocessor component DiGeorge syndrome critical region 8 (DGCR8) is a nonspecific RNA-binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Braden M; Ishimaru, Daniella; Hennig, Mirko

    2013-09-13

    MicroRNA (miRNA) biogenesis follows a conserved succession of processing steps, beginning with the recognition and liberation of an miRNA-containing precursor miRNA hairpin from a large primary miRNA transcript (pri-miRNA) by the Microprocessor, which consists of the nuclear RNase III Drosha and the double-stranded RNA-binding domain protein DGCR8 (DiGeorge syndrome critical region protein 8). Current models suggest that specific recognition is driven by DGCR8 detection of single-stranded elements of the pri-miRNA stem-loop followed by Drosha recruitment and pri-miRNA cleavage. Because countless RNA transcripts feature single-stranded-dsRNA junctions and DGCR8 can bind hundreds of mRNAs, we explored correlations between RNA binding properties of DGCR8 and specific pri-miRNA substrate processing. We found that DGCR8 bound single-stranded, double-stranded, and random hairpin transcripts with similar affinity. Further investigation of DGCR8/pri-mir-16 interactions by NMR detected intermediate exchange regimes over a wide range of stoichiometric ratios. Diffusion analysis of DGCR8/pri-mir-16 interactions by pulsed field gradient NMR lent further support to dynamic complex formation involving free components in exchange with complexes of varying stoichiometry, although in vitro processing assays showed exclusive cleavage of pri-mir-16 variants bearing single-stranded flanking regions. Our results indicate that DGCR8 binds RNA nonspecifically. Therefore, a sequential model of DGCR8 recognition followed by Drosha recruitment is unlikely. Known RNA substrate requirements are broad and include 70-nucleotide hairpins with unpaired flanking regions. Thus, specific RNA processing is likely facilitated by preformed DGCR8-Drosha heterodimers that can discriminate between authentic substrates and other hairpins.

  3. FISim: A new similarity measure between transcription factor binding sites based on the fuzzy integral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cano Carlos

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Regulatory motifs describe sets of related transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs and can be represented as position frequency matrices (PFMs. De novo identification of TFBSs is a crucial problem in computational biology which includes the issue of comparing putative motifs with one another and with motifs that are already known. The relative importance of each nucleotide within a given position in the PFMs should be considered in order to compute PFM similarities. Furthermore, biological data are inherently noisy and imprecise. Fuzzy set theory is particularly suitable for modeling imprecise data, whereas fuzzy integrals are highly appropriate for representing the interaction among different information sources. Results We propose FISim, a new similarity measure between PFMs, based on the fuzzy integral of the distance of the nucleotides with respect to the information content of the positions. Unlike existing methods, FISim is designed to consider the higher contribution of better conserved positions to the binding affinity. FISim provides excellent results when dealing with sets of randomly generated motifs, and outperforms the remaining methods when handling real datasets of related motifs. Furthermore, we propose a new cluster methodology based on kernel theory together with FISim to obtain groups of related motifs potentially bound by the same TFs, providing more robust results than existing approaches. Conclusion FISim corrects a design flaw of the most popular methods, whose measures favour similarity of low information content positions. We use our measure to successfully identify motifs that describe binding sites for the same TF and to solve real-life problems. In this study the reliability of fuzzy technology for motif comparison tasks is proven.

  4. Cloning and structure of a yeast gene encoding a general transcription initiation factor TFIID that binds to the TATA box.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horikoshi, M; Wang, C K; Fujii, H; Cromlish, J A; Weil, P A; Roeder, R G

    1989-09-28

    The TATA sequence-binding factor TFIID plays a central role both in promoter activation by RNA polymerase II and other common initiation factors, and in promoter regulation by gene-specific factors. The sequence of yeast TFIID, which seems to be encoded by a single gene, contains interesting structural motifs that are possibly involved in these functions, and is similar to sequences of bacterial sigma factors.

  5. msCentipede: Modeling Heterogeneity across Genomic Sites and Replicates Improves Accuracy in the Inference of Transcription Factor Binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, Anil; Shim, Heejung; Gilad, Yoav; Pritchard, Jonathan K; Stephens, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Understanding global gene regulation depends critically on accurate annotation of regulatory elements that are functional in a given cell type. CENTIPEDE, a powerful, probabilistic framework for identifying transcription factor binding sites from tissue-specific DNase I cleavage patterns and genomic sequence content, leverages the hypersensitivity of factor-bound chromatin and the information in the DNase I spatial cleavage profile characteristic of each DNA binding protein to accurately infer functional factor binding sites. However, the model for the spatial profile in this framework fails to account for the substantial variation in the DNase I cleavage profiles across different binding sites. Neither does it account for variation in the profiles at the same binding site across multiple replicate DNase I experiments, which are increasingly available. In this work, we introduce new methods, based on multi-scale models for inhomogeneous Poisson processes, to account for such variation in DNase I cleavage patterns both within and across binding sites. These models account for the spatial structure in the heterogeneity in DNase I cleavage patterns for each factor. Using DNase-seq measurements assayed in a lymphoblastoid cell line, we demonstrate the improved performance of this model for several transcription factors by comparing against the Chip-seq peaks for those factors. Finally, we explore the effects of DNase I sequence bias on inference of factor binding using a simple extension to our framework that allows for a more flexible background model. The proposed model can also be easily applied to paired-end ATAC-seq and DNase-seq data. msCentipede, a Python implementation of our algorithm, is available at http://rajanil.github.io/msCentipede.

  6. msCentipede: Modeling Heterogeneity across Genomic Sites and Replicates Improves Accuracy in the Inference of Transcription Factor Binding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil Raj

    Full Text Available Understanding global gene regulation depends critically on accurate annotation of regulatory elements that are functional in a given cell type. CENTIPEDE, a powerful, probabilistic framework for identifying transcription factor binding sites from tissue-specific DNase I cleavage patterns and genomic sequence content, leverages the hypersensitivity of factor-bound chromatin and the information in the DNase I spatial cleavage profile characteristic of each DNA binding protein to accurately infer functional factor binding sites. However, the model for the spatial profile in this framework fails to account for the substantial variation in the DNase I cleavage profiles across different binding sites. Neither does it account for variation in the profiles at the same binding site across multiple replicate DNase I experiments, which are increasingly available. In this work, we introduce new methods, based on multi-scale models for inhomogeneous Poisson processes, to account for such variation in DNase I cleavage patterns both within and across binding sites. These models account for the spatial structure in the heterogeneity in DNase I cleavage patterns for each factor. Using DNase-seq measurements assayed in a lymphoblastoid cell line, we demonstrate the improved performance of this model for several transcription factors by comparing against the Chip-seq peaks for those factors. Finally, we explore the effects of DNase I sequence bias on inference of factor binding using a simple extension to our framework that allows for a more flexible background model. The proposed model can also be easily applied to paired-end ATAC-seq and DNase-seq data. msCentipede, a Python implementation of our algorithm, is available at http://rajanil.github.io/msCentipede.

  7. Interactions outside the proteinase-binding loop contribute significantly to the inhibition of activated coagulation factor XII by its canonical inhibitor from corn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korneeva, Vera A; Trubetskov, Mikhail M; Korshunova, Alena V; Lushchekina, Sofya V; Kolyadko, Vladimir N; Sergienko, Olga V; Lunin, Vladimir G; Panteleev, Mikhail A; Ataullakhanov, Fazoil I

    2014-05-16

    Activated factor XII (FXIIa) is selectively inhibited by corn Hageman factor inhibitor (CHFI) among other plasma proteases. CHFI is considered a canonical serine protease inhibitor that interacts with FXIIa through its protease-binding loop. Here we examined whether the protease-binding loop alone is sufficient for the selective inhibition of serine proteases or whether other regions of a canonical inhibitor are involved. Six CHFI mutants lacking different N- and C-terminal portions were generated. CHFI-234, which lacks the first and fifth disulfide bonds and 11 and 19 amino acid residues at the N and C termini, respectively, exhibited no significant changes in FXIIa inhibition (Ki = 3.2 ± 0.4 nm). CHFI-123, which lacks 34 amino acid residues at the C terminus and the fourth and fifth disulfide bridges, inhibited FXIIa with a Ki of 116 ± 16 nm. To exclude interactions outside the FXIIa active site, a synthetic cyclic peptide was tested. The peptide contained residues 20-45 (Protein Data Bank code 1BEA), and a C29D substitution was included to avoid unwanted disulfide bond formation between unpaired cysteines. Surprisingly, the isolated protease-binding loop failed to inhibit FXIIa but retained partial inhibition of trypsin (Ki = 11.7 ± 1.2 μm) and activated factor XI (Ki = 94 ± 11 μm). Full-length CHFI inhibited trypsin with a Ki of 1.3 ± 0.2 nm and activated factor XI with a Ki of 5.4 ± 0.2 μm. Our results suggest that the protease-binding loop is not sufficient for the interaction between FXIIa and CHFI; other regions of the inhibitor also contribute to specific inhibition.

  8. Probing the electrostatics and pharmacological modulation of sequence-specific binding by the DNA-binding domain of the ETS family transcription factor PU.1: a binding affinity and kinetics investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munde, Manoj; Poon, Gregory M K; Wilson, W David

    2013-05-27

    Members of the ETS family of transcription factors regulate a functionally diverse array of genes. All ETS proteins share a structurally conserved but sequence-divergent DNA-binding domain, known as the ETS domain. Although the structure and thermodynamics of the ETS-DNA complexes are well known, little is known about the kinetics of sequence recognition, a facet that offers potential insight into its molecular mechanism. We have characterized DNA binding by the ETS domain of PU.1 by biosensor-surface plasmon resonance (SPR). SPR analysis revealed a striking kinetic profile for DNA binding by the PU.1 ETS domain. At low salt concentrations, it binds high-affinity cognate DNA with a very slow association rate constant (≤10(5)M(-)(1)s(-)(1)), compensated by a correspondingly small dissociation rate constant. The kinetics are strongly salt dependent but mutually balance to produce a relatively weak dependence in the equilibrium constant. This profile contrasts sharply with reported data for other ETS domains (e.g., Ets-1, TEL) for which high-affinity binding is driven by rapid association (>10(7)M(-)(1)s(-)(1)). We interpret this difference in terms of the hydration properties of ETS-DNA binding and propose that at least two mechanisms of sequence recognition are employed by this family of DNA-binding domain. Additionally, we use SPR to demonstrate the potential for pharmacological inhibition of sequence-specific ETS-DNA binding, using the minor groove-binding distamycin as a model compound. Our work establishes SPR as a valuable technique for extending our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of ETS-DNA interactions as well as developing potential small-molecule agents for biotechnological and therapeutic purposes.

  9. Intronic rs2147363 variant in ATP7B transcription factor-binding site associated with Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucossi, Serena; Polimanti, Renato; Ventriglia, Mariacarla; Mariani, Stefania; Siotto, Mariacristina; Ursini, Francesca; Trotta, Laura; Scrascia, Federica; Callea, Antonio; Vernieri, Fabrizio; Squitti, Rosanna

    2013-01-01

    Copper homeostasis abnormalities have been shown to be associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD), possibly by accelerating amyloid-β toxicity and plaque formation. The ATP7B gene plays a key role in controlling body copper balance. Our previous studies showed an association between ATP7B variants and AD risk. Among these variants, an intronic single nucleotide polymorphism, rs2147363, was associated with AD risk. In order to understand this intronic association, we screened a population of 286 AD patients and 283 healthy controls, and verified the presence of other functional coding variants in linkage disequilibrium (LD). Then we searched for a regulatory function region close to rs2147363. An LD analysis revealed the presence of an LD between rs2147363 and a Wilson's disease-causing variant, rs7334118. However, this mutation did not explain the observed genetic association. Conversely, in silico analyses of rs2147363 functionality highlighted that this variant is located in a binding site of a transcription factor, and is, consequently, associated with regulatory function. These data suggest that the genetic variation in cis-regulatory elements located in non-coding regions can have a role in determining ATP7B functionality and account for some of the AD missing hereditability.

  10. In vitro RNA-binding assay for studying trans-factors for RNA editing in chloroplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shikanai, Toshiharu; Okuda, Kenji

    2011-01-01

    In plant organelles, specific C residues are modified to U by RNA editing. Short RNA sequences surrounding the target site (i.e., cis-elements) are recognized by trans-factors, which were recently shown to be pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins. PPR proteins consist of tandem arrays of a highly degenerate unit of 35 (pentatrico) amino acids, and PPR motifs are believed to recognize specific RNA sequences. In Arabidopsis thaliana, more than 450 sites are edited in mitochondria and plastids, and a similar number of PPR proteins are encoded in the nuclear genome. To study how the tandem array of a PPR motif facilitates the recognition of RNA sequences, an efficient biochemical strategy is an in vitro binding assay of recombinant PPR proteins with target RNA. This analysis is especially powerful with a combination of in vivo analyses based on the phenotypes of mutants and transgenic plants. In this chapter, we describe methods for the expression of recombinant PPR proteins in Escherichia coli, preparation of probe RNAs, and RNA gel shift assays. These methods can also be utilized for other RNA-binding proteins.

  11. Effects of hyperthermia on binding, internalization, and degradation of epidermal growth factor. [/sup 125/I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magun, B.E.; Fennie, C.W.

    1981-04-01

    /sup 125/I-epidermal growth factor was used as a molecular probe to study the effects of hyperthermia and local anesthetics on cultured Rat-1 cells. Heating cells at 45/sup 0/C for times up to 1 h caused a continuous decrease in EGF binding. Scatchard analysis showed that the decreased binding resulted from a decrease in the affinity of the EGF receptors rather than from a decrease in receptor number. Exposure to 42/sup 0/C had no effect on degradation. We compared the effects of heat to those caused by the local anesthetics procaine the lidocaine, which have been shown to prevent EGF degradation. Because procaine and lidocaine have been shown by others to potentiate the killing effects of hyperthermia on tumors and in cultured cells, we suggest that hyperthermia and the local anesthetics may act at the same cellular site. By inhibiting the action of lysosomes, hyperthermia and local anesthetics may permit potentially toxic materials to enter the cell by endocytosis, where they would accumulate and induce lethal damage.

  12. Neuroplastin-55 binds to and signals through the fibroblast growth factor receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Owczarek, Sylwia; Kiryushko, Darya; Hald Larsen, Marianne

    2010-01-01

    Neuroplastin (Np) is a glycoprotein belonging to the immunoglobulin superfamily of cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) and existing in two isoforms, Np55 and Np65, named according to their molecular weights. The extracellular part of Np65 contains three immunoglobulin (Ig)-like modules (Ig1, Ig2, and Ig......3), whereas Np55 lacks the Ig1 module. Of these two isoforms, only Np65 is involved in homophilic interactions resulting in cell adhesion, whereas the role of Np55 is poorly understood. The present study reports for the first time the crystal structure of the ectodomain of Np55 at 1.95-A resolution...... and demonstrates that Np55 binds to and activates the fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1). Furthermore, we identify a sequence motif in the Ig2 module of Np55 interacting with FGFR1 and show that a synthetic peptide encompassing this motif, termed narpin, binds to and activates FGFR1. We show that both Np...

  13. Composite organization of the cobalamin binding and cubilin recognition sites of intrinsic factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedosov, Sergey N; Fedosova, Natalya U; Berglund, Lars; Moestrup, Søren K; Nexø, Ebba; Petersen, Torben E

    2005-03-08

    Intrinsic factor (IF(50)) is a cobalamin (Cbl)-transporting protein of 50 kDa, which can be cleaved into two fragments: the 30 kDa N-terminal peptide IF(30) and the 20 kDa C-terminal glycopeptide IF(20). Experiments on binding of Cbl to IF(30), IF(20), and IF(50) revealed comparable association rate constants (k(+)(Cbl) = 4 x 10(6), 14 x 10(6), and 26 x 10(6) M(-1) s(-1), respectively), but the equilibrium dissociation constants were essentially different (K(Cbl) = 200 microM, 0.2 microM, and cubilin in the presence or absence of Cbl. Neither apo nor holo forms of IF(20) and IF(30) were recognized by the receptor. When two fragments were mixed and incubated with Cbl, they associated into a stable complex, IF(30+20).Cbl, which bound to cubilin as well as the noncleaved IF(50).Cbl complex. We suggest that formation of the cubilin recognition site on IF is caused by assembly of two distant domains, which allows the saturated protein to be recognized by the receptor. The obtained parameters for ligand and receptor binding indicate that both full-length IF(50) and the fragments may be involved in Cbl assimilation.

  14. Using DNA duplex stability information for transcription factor binding site discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordân, Raluca; Hartemink, Alexander J

    2008-01-01

    Transcription factor (TF) binding site discovery is an important step in understanding transcriptional regulation. Many computational tools have already been developed, but their success in detecting TF motifs is still limited. We believe one of the main reasons for the low accuracy of current methods is that they do not take into account the structural aspects of TF-DNA interaction. We have previously shown that knowledge about the structural class of the TF and information about nucleosome occupancy can be used to improve motif discovery. Here, we demonstrate the benefits of using information about the DNA double-helical stability for motif discovery. We notice that, in general, the energy needed to destabilize the DNA double helix is higher at TF binding sites than at random DNA sites. We use this information to derive informative positional priors that we incorporate into a motif finding algorithm. When applied to yeast ChIP-chip data, the new informative priors improve the performance of the motif finder significantly when compared to priors that do not use the energetic stability information.

  15. Identification and in silico analysis of helical lipid binding regions in proteins belonging to the amphitropic protein family

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rob C A Keller

    2014-12-01

    The role of protein–lipid interactions is increasingly recognized to be of importance in numerous biological processes. Bioinformatics is being increasingly used as a helpful tool in studying protein–lipid interactions. Especially recently developed approaches recognizing lipid binding regions in proteins can be implemented. In this study one of those bioinformatics approaches specialized in identifying lipid binding helical regions in proteins is expanded. The approach is explored further by features which can be easily obtained manually. Some interesting examples of members of the amphitropic protein family have been investigated in order to demonstrate the additional features of this bioinformatics approach. The results in this study seem to indicate interesting characteristics of amphitropic proteins and provide insight into the mechanistic functioning and overall understanding of this intriguing class of proteins. Additionally, the results demonstrate that the presented bioinformatics approach might be either an interesting starting point in protein–lipid interactions studies or a good tool for selecting new focus points for more detailed experimental research of proteins with known overall protein–lipid binding abilities.

  16. Cyclic AMP response element binding protein and brain-derived neurotrophic factor: Molecules that modulate our mood?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Nair; V A Vaidya

    2006-09-01

    Depression is the major psychiatric ailment of our times, afflicting ∼20% of the population. Despite its prevalence, the pathophysiology of this complex disorder is not well understood. In addition, although antidepressants have been in existence for the past several decades, the mechanisms that underlie their therapeutic effects remain elusive. Building evidence implicates a role for the plasticity of specific neuro-circuitry in both the pathophysiology and treatment of depression. Damage to limbic regions is thought to contribute to the etiology of depression and antidepressants have been reported to reverse such damage and promote adaptive plasticity. The molecular pathways that contribute to the damage associated with depression and antidepressant-mediated plasticity are a major focus of scientific enquiry. The transcription factor cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB) and the neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) are targets of diverse classes of antidepressants and are known to be regulated in animal models and in patients suffering from depression. Given their role in neuronal plasticity, CREB and BDNF have emerged as molecules that may play an important role in modulating mood. The purpose of this review is to discuss the role of CREB and BDNF in depression and as targets/mediators of antidepressant action.

  17. A DNA-binding-site landscape and regulatory network analysis for NAC transcription factors in Arabidopsis thaliana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindemose, Søren; Jensen, Michael Krogh; de Velde, Jan Van

    2014-01-01

    regulatory networks of 12 NAC transcription factors. Our data offer specific single-base resolution fingerprints for most TFs studied and indicate that NAC DNA-binding specificities might be predicted from their DNA-binding domain's sequence. The developed methodology, including the application...... of complementary functional genomics filters, makes it possible to translate, for each TF, protein binding microarray data into a set of high-quality target genes. With this approach, we confirm NAC target genes reported from independent in vivo analyses. We emphasize that candidate target gene sets together......Target gene identification for transcription factors is a prerequisite for the systems wide understanding of organismal behaviour. NAM-ATAF1/2-CUC2 (NAC) transcription factors are amongst the largest transcription factor families in plants, yet limited data exist from unbiased approaches to resolve...

  18. Replacement of the C-terminal tetrapeptide (314PAPV317 to 314SSSM317) in interferon regulatory factor-2 alters its N-terminal DNA-binding activity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Krishna Prakash; Pramod C Rath

    2010-12-01

    Interferon regulatory factor-2 (IRF-2) is an important transcription factor involved in cell growth regulation, immune response and cancer. IRF-2 can function as a transcriptional repressor and activator depending on its DNA-binding activity and protein–protein interactions. We compared the amino acid sequences of IRF-2 and found a C-terminal tetrapeptide (314PAPV317) of mouse IRF-2 to be different (314SSSM317) from human IRF-2. Recombinant GST-IRF-2 with 314PAPV317 (wild type) and 314SSSM317 (mutant) expressed in Escherichia coli were assessed for DNA-binding activity with 32P-(GAAAGT)4 by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). Wild type- and mutant GST-IRF-2 showed similar expression patterns and immunoreactivities but different DNA-binding activities. Mutant (mt) IRF-2 formed higher-molecular-mass, more and stronger DNA–protein complexes in comparison to wild type (wt) IRF-2. Anti-IRF-2 antibody stabilized the DNA–protein complexes formed by both wt IRF-2 and mt IRF-2, resolving the differences. This suggests that PAPV and SSSM sequences at 314-317 in the C-terminal region of mouse and human IRF-2 contribute to conformation of IRF-2 and influence DNA-binding activity of the N-terminal region, indicating intramolecular interactions. Thus, evolution of IRF-2 from murine to human genome has resulted in subtle differences in C-terminal amino acid motifs, which may contribute to qualitative changes in IRF-2-dependent DNA-binding activity and gene expression.

  19. Novel Strategy for Discrimination of Transcription Factor Binding Motifs Employing Mathematical Neural Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Asuka; Sumi, Takuya; Kang, Jiyoung; Tateno, Masaru

    2017-07-01

    Recognition in biological macromolecular systems, such as DNA-protein recognition, is one of the most crucial problems to solve toward understanding the fundamental mechanisms of various biological processes. Since specific base sequences of genome DNA are discriminated by proteins, such as transcription factors (TFs), finding TF binding motifs (TFBMs) in whole genome DNA sequences is currently a central issue in interdisciplinary biophysical and information sciences. In the present study, a novel strategy to create a discriminant function for discrimination of TFBMs by constituting mathematical neural networks (NNs) is proposed, together with a method to determine the boundary of signals (TFBMs) and noise in the NN-score (output) space. This analysis also leads to the mathematical limitation of discrimination in the recognition of features representing TFBMs, in an information geometrical manifold. Thus, the present strategy enables the identification of the whole space of TFBMs, right up to the noise boundary.

  20. Insulin-like growth factor II: complexity of biosynthesis and receptor binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammeltoft, S; Christiansen, Jan; Nielsen, F C

    1991-01-01

    , Man-6-P induces cellular responses. We have studied rat brain neuronal precursor cells where Man-6-P acted as a mitogen suggesting that phosphomannosylated proteins may act as growth factors via the Man-6-P/IGF-II receptor. In conclusion, the gene expression and mechanism of action of IGF-II is very...... and the mannose-6-phosphate (Man-6-P)/IGF-II receptor. There is consensus that the cellular effects of IGF-II are mediated by the IGF-I receptor via activation of its intrinsic tyrosine kinase. The Man-6-P/IGF-II receptor is involved in endocytosis of lysosomal enzymes and IGF-II. In selected cell types, however...... complex suggesting that its biological actions can be regulated at different levels including the transcription, translation, posttranslational processing, receptor binding and intracellular signalling....

  1. A Nonradioactive Method for Detecting DNA-binding Activity of Nuclear Transcription Factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张宁; 徐永健; 张珍祥; 熊维宁

    2003-01-01

    To determine the feasibility of a nonradioactive electrophoresis mobility shift assay fordetecting nuclear transcription factor, double-stranded oligonucleotides encoding the consensus tar-get sequence of NF-κB were labled with DIG by terminal transferase. After nuclear protein stimula-ted with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) or PMA and pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDT C)electrophoresed on 8 % nondenaturing poliacrylamide gel together with oligeonucleotide probe, theywere electro-blotted nylon membrane positively charged. Anti-DIG-AP antibody catalyzed chemilu-minescent substrate CSPD to image on X-film. The results showed that nuclear proteins binded spe-cifically to the NF-κB consensus sequence in the EMSA by chemiluminescent technique method andthe activity of NF-κB in PMA group was more than that in PMA+PDTC group. It is suggestedthat detection of NF-κB by EMSA with chemiluminescent technique is feasible and simple, whichcan be performed in ordinary laboratories.

  2. BaalChIP: Bayesian analysis of allele-specific transcription factor binding in cancer genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Santiago, Ines; Liu, Wei; Yuan, Ke; O'Reilly, Martin; Chilamakuri, Chandra Sekhar Reddy; Ponder, Bruce A J; Meyer, Kerstin B; Markowetz, Florian

    2017-02-24

    Allele-specific measurements of transcription factor binding from ChIP-seq data are key to dissecting the allelic effects of non-coding variants and their contribution to phenotypic diversity. However, most methods of detecting an allelic imbalance assume diploid genomes. This assumption severely limits their applicability to cancer samples with frequent DNA copy-number changes. Here we present a Bayesian statistical approach called BaalChIP to correct for the effect of background allele frequency on the observed ChIP-seq read counts. BaalChIP allows the joint analysis of multiple ChIP-seq samples across a single variant and outperforms competing approaches in simulations. Using 548 ENCODE ChIP-seq and six targeted FAIRE-seq samples, we show that BaalChIP effectively corrects allele-specific analysis for copy-number variation and increases the power to detect putative cis-acting regulatory variants in cancer genomes.

  3. Pituitary tumor-transforming gene and its binding factor in endocrine cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Vicki E; Franklyn, Jayne A; McCabe, Christopher J

    2010-12-03

    The pituitary tumor-transforming gene (PTTG1) encodes a multifunctional protein (PTTG) that is overexpressed in numerous tumours, including pituitary, thyroid, breast and ovarian carcinomas. PTTG induces cellular transformation in vitro and tumourigenesis in vivo, and several mechanisms by which PTTG contributes to tumourigenesis have been investigated. Also known as the human securin, PTTG is involved in cell cycle regulation, controlling the segregation of sister chromatids during mitosis. This review outlines current information regarding PTTG structure, expression, regulation and function in the pathogenesis of neoplasia. Recent progress concerning the use of PTTG as a prognostic marker or therapeutic target will be considered. In addition, the PTTG binding factor (PBF), identified through its interaction with PTTG, has also been established as a proto-oncogene that is upregulated in several cancers. Current knowledge regarding PBF is outlined and its role both independently and alongside PTTG in endocrine and related cancers is discussed.

  4. Core-binding factor β increases the affinity between human Cullin 5 and HIV-1 Vif within an E3 ligase complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salter, Jason D; Lippa, Geoffrey M; Belashov, Ivan A; Wedekind, Joseph E

    2012-11-06

    HIV-1 Vif masquerades as a receptor for a cellular E3 ligase harboring Elongin B, Elongin C, and Cullin 5 (EloB/C/Cul5) proteins that facilitate degradation of the antiretroviral factor APOBEC3G (A3G). This Vif-mediated activity requires human core-binding factor β (CBFβ) in contrast to cellular substrate receptors. We observed calorimetrically that Cul5 binds tighter to full-length Vif((1-192))/EloB/C/CBFβ (K(d) = 5 ± 2 nM) than to Vif((95-192))/EloB/C (K(d) = 327 ± 40 nM), which cannot bind CBFβ. A comparison of heat capacity changes supports a model in which CBFβ prestabilizes Vif((1-192)) relative to Vif((95-192)), consistent with a stronger interaction of Cul5 with Vif's C-terminal Zn(2+)-binding motif. An additional interface between Cul5 and an N-terminal region of Vif appears to be plausible, which has therapeutic design implications.

  5. Transcription-factor occupancy at HOT regions quantitatively predicts RNA polymerase recruitment in five human cell lines.

    KAUST Repository

    Foley, Joseph W

    2013-10-20

    BACKGROUND: High-occupancy target (HOT) regions are compact genome loci occupied by many different transcription factors (TFs). HOT regions were initially defined in invertebrate model organisms, and we here show that they are a ubiquitous feature of the human gene-regulation landscape. RESULTS: We identified HOT regions by a comprehensive analysis of ChIP-seq data from 96 DNA-associated proteins in 5 human cell lines. Most HOT regions co-localize with RNA polymerase II binding sites, but many are not near the promoters of annotated genes. At HOT promoters, TF occupancy is strongly predictive of transcription preinitiation complex recruitment and moderately predictive of initiating Pol II recruitment, but only weakly predictive of elongating Pol II and RNA transcript abundance. TF occupancy varies quantitatively within human HOT regions; we used this variation to discover novel associations between TFs. The sequence motif associated with any given TF\\'s direct DNA binding is somewhat predictive of its empirical occupancy, but a great deal of occupancy occurs at sites without the TF\\'s motif, implying indirect recruitment by another TF whose motif is present. CONCLUSIONS: Mammalian HOT regions are regulatory hubs that integrate the signals from diverse regulatory pathways to quantitatively tune the promoter for RNA polymerase II recruitment.

  6. Rad52 competes with Ku70/Ku86 for binding to S-region DSB ends to modulate antibody class-switch DNA recombination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zan, Hong; Tat, Connie; Qiu, Zhifang; Taylor, Julia R.; Guerrero, Justin A.; Shen, Tian; Casali, Paolo

    2017-01-01

    Antibody class-switch DNA recombination (CSR) is initiated by AID-introduced DSBs in the switch (S) regions targeted for recombination, as effected by Ku70/Ku86-mediated NHEJ. Ku-deficient B cells, however, undergo (reduced) CSR through an alternative(A)-NHEJ pathway, which introduces microhomologies in S–S junctions. As microhomology-mediated end-joining requires annealing of single-strand DNA ends, we addressed the contribution of single-strand annealing factors HR Rad52 and translesion DNA polymerase θ to CSR. Compared with their Rad52+/+ counterparts, which display normal CSR, Rad52−/− B cells show increased CSR, fewer intra-Sμ region recombinations, no/minimal microhomologies in S–S junctions, decreased c-Myc/IgH translocations and increased Ku70/Ku86 recruitment to S-region DSB ends. Rad52 competes with Ku70/Ku86 for binding to S-region DSB ends. It also facilitates a Ku-independent DSB repair, which favours intra-S region recombination and mediates, particularly in Ku absence, inter-S–S recombination, as emphasized by the significantly greater CSR reduction in Rad52−/− versus Rad52+/+ B cells on Ku86 knockdown. PMID:28176781

  7. Rad52 competes with Ku70/Ku86 for binding to S-region DSB ends to modulate antibody class-switch DNA recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zan, Hong; Tat, Connie; Qiu, Zhifang; Taylor, Julia R; Guerrero, Justin A; Shen, Tian; Casali, Paolo

    2017-02-08

    Antibody class-switch DNA recombination (CSR) is initiated by AID-introduced DSBs in the switch (S) regions targeted for recombination, as effected by Ku70/Ku86-mediated NHEJ. Ku-deficient B cells, however, undergo (reduced) CSR through an alternative(A)-NHEJ pathway, which introduces microhomologies in S-S junctions. As microhomology-mediated end-joining requires annealing of single-strand DNA ends, we addressed the contribution of single-strand annealing factors HR Rad52 and translesion DNA polymerase θ to CSR. Compared with their Rad52(+/+) counterparts, which display normal CSR, Rad52(-/-) B cells show increased CSR, fewer intra-Sμ region recombinations, no/minimal microhomologies in S-S junctions, decreased c-Myc/IgH translocations and increased Ku70/Ku86 recruitment to S-region DSB ends. Rad52 competes with Ku70/Ku86 for binding to S-region DSB ends. It also facilitates a Ku-independent DSB repair, which favours intra-S region recombination and mediates, particularly in Ku absence, inter-S-S recombination, as emphasized by the significantly greater CSR reduction in Rad52(-/-) versus Rad52(+/+) B cells on Ku86 knockdown.

  8. A binding site for the transcription factor Grainyhead/Nuclear transcription factor-1 contributes to regulation of the Drosophila proliferating cell nuclear antigen gene promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Y; Yamagishi, M; Nishimoto, Y; Taguchi, O; Matsukage, A; Yamaguchi, M

    1999-12-03

    The Drosophila proliferating cell nuclear antigen promoter contains multiple transcriptional regulatory elements, including upstream regulatory element (URE), DNA replication-related element, E2F recognition sites, and three common regulatory factor for DNA replication and DNA replication-related element-binding factor genes recognition sites. In nuclear extracts of Drosophila embryos, we detected a protein factor, the URE-binding factor (UREF), that recognizes the nucleotide sequence 5'-AAACCAGTTGGCA located within URE. Analyses in Drosophila Kc cells and transgenic flies revealed that the UREF-binding site plays an important role in promoter activity both in cultured cells and in living flies. A yeast one-hybrid screen using URE as a bait allowed isolation of a cDNA encoding a transcription factor, Grainyhead/nuclear transcription factor-1 (GRH/NTF-1). The nucleotide sequence required for binding to GRH was indistinguishable from that for UREF detected in embryo nuclear extracts. Furthermore, a specific antibody to GRH reacted with UREF in embryo nuclear extracts. From these results we conclude that GRH is identical to UREF. Although GRH has been thought to be involved in regulation of differentiation-related genes, this study demonstrates, for the first time, involvement of a GRH-binding site in regulation of the DNA replication-related proliferating cell nuclear antigen gene.

  9. Regional factors and innovativeness: an empirical analysis of four German industries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broekel, T.; Brenner, T.

    2011-01-01

    A growing body of work emphasizes the importance of regional factors for regional innovativeness. In this paper, about 70 variables approximating the social-economic characteristics of regions are aggregated to 12 regional factors. In four industry-specific set-ups their influence on firms’ innovati

  10. Expression and Critical Role of Interleukin Enhancer Binding Factor 2 in Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaobing Cheng

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Interleukin enhancer binding factor 2 (ILF2, a transcription factor, regulates cell growth by inhibiting the stabilization of mRNA. Currently, its role has gained recognition as a factor in the tumorigenic process. However, until now, little has been known about the detailed role ILF2 plays in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. In this study, we investigated the expression levels of ILF2 in HCC tissue with Western blot and immunohistochemical assays. To examine the effect of ILF2 on liver cancer cell growth and apoptosis, small interfering RNAs (siRNAs targeting ILF2 were recombined to create lentiviral overexpression vectors. Our results showed higher expression levels of ILF2 mRNA and ILF2 protein in HCC tissue compared with matched peritumoral tissue. Expression of ILF2 may regulate cell growth and apoptosis in liver cancer cells via regulation of B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2, Bcl-2 related ovarian killer (Bok, Bcl-2-associated X protein (BAX, and cellular inhibitor of apoptosis 1 (cIAP1. Moreover, we inoculated nude mice with liver cancer cells to investigate the effect of ILF2 on