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Sample records for factor attachment protein

  1. Protein Attachment on Nanodiamonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chung-Lun; Lin, Cheng-Huang; Chang, Huan-Cheng; Su, Meng-Chih

    2015-07-16

    A recent advance in nanotechnology is the scale-up production of small and nonaggregated diamond nanoparticles suitable for biological applications. Using detonation nanodiamonds (NDs) with an average diameter of ∼4 nm as the adsorbents, we have studied the static attachment of three proteins (myoglobin, bovine serum albumin, and insulin) onto the nanoparticles by optical spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, and dynamic light scattering, and electrophoretic zeta potential measurements. Results show that the protein surface coverage is predominantly determined by the competition between protein-protein and protein-ND interactions, giving each protein a unique and characteristic structural configuration in its own complex. Specifically, both myoglobin and bovine serum albumin show a Langmuir-type adsorption behavior, forming 1:1 complexes at saturation, whereas insulin folds into a tightly bound multimer before adsorption. The markedly different adsorption patterns appear to be independent of the protein concentration and are closely related to the affinity of the individual proteins for the NDs. The present study provides a fundamental understanding for the use of NDs as a platform for nanomedical drug delivery.

  2. Factor H and factor H-related protein 1 bind to human neutrophils via complement receptor 3, mediate attachment to Candida albicans, and enhance neutrophil antimicrobial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losse, Josephine; Zipfel, Peter F; Józsi, Mihály

    2010-01-15

    The host complement system plays an important role in protection against infections. Several human-pathogenic microbes were shown to acquire host complement regulators, such as factor H (CFH), that downregulate complement activation at the microbial surface and protect the pathogens from the opsonic and lytic effects of complement. Because CFH can also bind to host cells, we addressed the role of CFH and CFH-related proteins as adhesion ligands in host-pathogen interactions. We show that the CFH family proteins CFH, CFH-like protein 1 (CFHL1), CFH-related protein (CFHR) 1, and CFHR4 long isoform bind to human neutrophil granulocytes and to the opportunistic human-pathogenic yeast Candida albicans. Two major binding sites, one within the N-terminus and one in the C-terminus of CFH, were found to mediate binding to neutrophils. Complement receptor 3 (CD11b/CD18; alpha(M)beta2 integrin) was identified as the major cellular receptor on neutrophils for CFH, CFHL1, and CFHR1, but not for CFHR4 long isoform. CFH and CFHR1 supported cell migration. Furthermore, CFH, CFHL1, and CFHR1 increased attachment of neutrophils to C. albicans. Adhesion of neutrophils to plasma-opsonized yeasts was reduced when CFH binding was inhibited by specific Abs or when using CFH-depleted plasma. Yeast-bound CFH and CFHR1 enhanced the generation of reactive oxygen species and the release of the antimicrobial protein lactoferrin by human neutrophils, and resulted in a more efficient killing of the pathogen. Thus, CFH and CFHR1, when bound on the surface of C. albicans, enhance antimicrobial activity of human neutrophils.

  3. Syntaxin 7 and VAMP-7 are soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors required for late endosome-lysosome and homotypic lysosome fusion in alveolar macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, D M; Pevsner, J; Scullion, M A; Vaughn, M; Kaplan, J

    2000-07-01

    Endocytosis in alveolar macrophages can be reversibly inhibited, permitting the isolation of endocytic vesicles at defined stages of maturation. Using an in vitro fusion assay, we determined that each isolated endosome population was capable of homotypic fusion. All vesicle populations were also capable of heterotypic fusion in a temporally specific manner; early endosomes, isolated 4 min after internalization, could fuse with endosomes isolated 8 min after internalization but not with 12-min endosomes or lysosomes. Lysosomes fuse with 12-min endosomes but not with earlier endosomes. Using homogenous populations of endosomes, we have identified Syntaxin 7 as a soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) required for late endosome-lysosome and homotypic lysosome fusion in vitro. A bacterially expressed human Syntaxin 7 lacking the transmembrane domain inhibited homotypic late endosome and lysosome fusion as well as heterotypic late endosome-lysosome fusion. Affinity-purified antibodies directed against Syntaxin 7 also inhibited lysosome fusion in vitro but had no affect on homotypic early endosome fusion. Previous work suggested that human VAMP-7 (vesicle-associated membrane protein-7) was a SNARE required for late endosome-lysosome fusion. A bacterially expressed human VAMP-7 lacking the transmembrane domain inhibited both late endosome-lysosome fusion and homotypic lysosome fusion in vitro. These studies indicate that: 1) fusion along the endocytic pathway is a highly regulated process, and 2) two SNARE molecules, Syntaxin 7 and human VAMP-7, are involved in fusion of vesicles in the late endocytic pathway in alveolar macrophages.

  4. Photoswitchable method for the ordered attachment of proteins to surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camarero, Julio A.; De Yoreo, James J.; Kwon, Youngeun

    2010-04-20

    Described herein is a method for the attachment of proteins to any solid support with control over the orientation of the attachment. The method is extremely efficient, not requiring the previous purification of the protein to be attached, and can be activated by UV-light. Spatially addressable arrays of multiple protein components can be generated by using standard photolithographic techniques.

  5. Photoswitchable method for the ordered attachment of proteins to surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camarero, Julio A.; DeYoreo, James J.; Kwon, Youngeun

    2011-07-05

    Described herein is a method for the attachment of proteins to any solid support with control over the orientation of the attachment. The method is extremely efficient, not requiring the previous purification of the protein to be attached, and can be activated by UV-light. Spatially addressable arrays of multiple protein components can be generated by using standard photolithographic techniques.

  6. Syntaxin 7 and VAMP-7 are Soluble N-Ethylmaleimide–sensitive Factor Attachment Protein Receptors Required for Late Endosome–Lysosome and Homotypic Lysosome Fusion in Alveolar Macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Diane McVey; Pevsner, Jonathan; Scullion, Matthew A.; Vaughn, Michael; Kaplan, Jerry

    2000-01-01

    Endocytosis in alveolar macrophages can be reversibly inhibited, permitting the isolation of endocytic vesicles at defined stages of maturation. Using an in vitro fusion assay, we determined that each isolated endosome population was capable of homotypic fusion. All vesicle populations were also capable of heterotypic fusion in a temporally specific manner; early endosomes, isolated 4 min after internalization, could fuse with endosomes isolated 8 min after internalization but not with 12-min endosomes or lysosomes. Lysosomes fuse with 12-min endosomes but not with earlier endosomes. Using homogenous populations of endosomes, we have identified Syntaxin 7 as a soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) required for late endosome–lysosome and homotypic lysosome fusion in vitro. A bacterially expressed human Syntaxin 7 lacking the transmembrane domain inhibited homotypic late endosome and lysosome fusion as well as heterotypic late endosome–lysosome fusion. Affinity-purified antibodies directed against Syntaxin 7 also inhibited lysosome fusion in vitro but had no affect on homotypic early endosome fusion. Previous work suggested that human VAMP-7 (vesicle-associated membrane protein-7) was a SNARE required for late endosome–lysosome fusion. A bacterially expressed human VAMP-7 lacking the transmembrane domain inhibited both late endosome–lysosome fusion and homotypic lysosome fusion in vitro. These studies indicate that: 1) fusion along the endocytic pathway is a highly regulated process, and 2) two SNARE molecules, Syntaxin 7 and human VAMP-7, are involved in fusion of vesicles in the late endocytic pathway in alveolar macrophages. PMID:10888671

  7. Anxious attachment may be a vulnerability factor for developing embitterment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blom, D.; Middendorp, H. van; Geenen, R.

    2012-01-01

    By predisposing to ego-defensive strategies in social situations, a negative attachment history may promote embitterment. The present study identified attachment anxiety - more than attachment avoidance - as a possible vulnerability factor for the development and maintenance of embitterment. This fa

  8. Combined copper/zinc attachment to prion protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodak, Miroslav; Bernholc, Jerry

    2013-03-01

    Misfolding of prion protein (PrP) is responsible for diseases such as ``mad-cow disease'' in cattle and Creutzfeldt-Jacob in humans. Extensive experimental investigation has established that this protein strongly interacts with copper ions, and this ability has been linked to its still unknown function. Attachment of other metal ions (zinc, iron, manganese) have been demonstrated as well, but none of them could outcompete copper. Recent finding, however, indicates that at intermediate concentrations both copper and zinc ions can attach to the PrP at the octarepeat region, which contains high affinity metal binding sites. Based on this evidence, we have performed density functional theory simulations to investigate the combined Cu/Zn attachment. We consider all previously reported binding modes of copper at the octarepeat region and examine a possibility simultaneous Cu/Zn attachment. We find that this can indeed occur for only one of the known binding sites, when copper changes its coordination mode to allow for attachment of zinc ion. The implications of the simultaneous attachment on neural function remain to be explored.

  9. Perinatal Depression and Patterns of Attachment: A Critical Risk Factor?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Meuti

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. This study aims to verify if the presence and severity of perinatal depression are related to any particular pattern of attachment. Methods. The study started with a screening of a sample of 453 women in their third trimester of pregnancy, who were administered a survey data form, the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS and the Experience in Close Relationship (ECR. A clinical group of subjects with perinatal depression (PND, 89 subjects was selected and compared with a control group (C, regarding psychopathological variables and attachment patterns. Results. The ECR showed a prevalence of “Fearful-Avoidant” attachment style in PND group (29.2% versus 1.1%, p<0.001; additionally, the EPDS average score increases with the increasing of ECR dimensions (Avoidance and Anxiety. Conclusion. The severity of depression increases proportionally to attachment disorganization; therefore, we consider attachment as both an important risk factor as well as a focus for early psychotherapeutic intervention.

  10. Multiple roles of genome-attached bacteriophage terminal proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redrejo-Rodríguez, Modesto; Salas, Margarita, E-mail: msalas@cbm.csic.es

    2014-11-15

    Protein-primed replication constitutes a generalized mechanism to initiate DNA or RNA synthesis in linear genomes, including viruses, gram-positive bacteria, linear plasmids and mobile elements. By this mechanism a specific amino acid primes replication and becomes covalently linked to the genome ends. Despite the fact that TPs lack sequence homology, they share a similar structural arrangement, with the priming residue in the C-terminal half of the protein and an accumulation of positively charged residues at the N-terminal end. In addition, various bacteriophage TPs have been shown to have DNA-binding capacity that targets TPs and their attached genomes to the host nucleoid. Furthermore, a number of bacteriophage TPs from different viral families and with diverse hosts also contain putative nuclear localization signals and localize in the eukaryotic nucleus, which could lead to the transport of the attached DNA. This suggests a possible role of bacteriophage TPs in prokaryote-to-eukaryote horizontal gene transfer. - Highlights: • Protein-primed genome replication constitutes a strategy to initiate DNA or RNA synthesis in linear genomes. • Bacteriophage terminal proteins (TPs) are covalently attached to viral genomes by their primary function priming DNA replication. • TPs are also DNA-binding proteins and target phage genomes to the host nucleoid. • TPs can also localize in the eukaryotic nucleus and may have a role in phage-mediated interkingdom gene transfer.

  11. Transition-metal prion protein attachment: Competition with copper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodak, Miroslav; Bernholc, Jerry

    2012-02-01

    Prion protein, PrP, is a protein capable of binding copper ions in multiple modes depending on their concentration. Misfolded PrP is implicated in a group of neurodegenerative diseases, which include ``mad cow disease'' and its human form, variant Creutzfeld-Jacob disease. An increasing amount of evidence suggests that attachment of non-copper metal ions to PrP triggers transformations to abnormal forms similar to those observed in prion diseases. In this work, we use hybrid Kohn-Sham/orbital-free density functional theory simulations to investigate copper replacement by other transition metals that bind to PrP, including zinc, iron and manganese. We consider all known copper binding modes in the N-terminal domain of PrP. Our calculations identify modes most susceptible to copper replacement and reveal metals that can successfully compete with copper for attachment to PrP.

  12. Increased activity of the Vesicular Soluble N-Ethylmaleimide-sensitive Factor Attachment Protein Receptor TI-VAMP/VAMP7 by Tyrosine Phosphorylation in the Longin Domain*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgo, Andrea; Casano, Alessandra M.; Kuster, Aurelia; Arold, Stefan T.; Wang, Guan; Nola, Sébastien; Verraes, Agathe; Dingli, Florent; Loew, Damarys; Galli, Thierry

    2013-01-01

    Vesicular (v)- and target (t)-SNAREs play essential roles in intracellular membrane fusion through the formation of cytoplasmic α-helical bundles. Several v-SNAREs have a Longin N-terminal extension that, by promoting a closed conformation, plays an autoinhibitory function and decreases SNARE complex formation and membrane fusion efficiency. The molecular mechanism leading to Longin v-SNARE activation is largely unknown. Here we find that exocytosis mediated by the Longin v-SNARE TI-VAMP/VAMP7 is activated by tonic treatment with insulin and insulin-like growth factor-1 but not by depolarization and intracellular calcium rise. In search of a potential downstream mechanism, we found that TI-VAMP is phosphorylated in vitro by c-Src kinase on tyrosine 45 of the Longin domain. Accordingly, a mutation of tyrosine 45 into glutamate, but not phenylalanine, activates both t-SNARE binding and exocytosis. Activation of TI-VAMP-mediated exocytosis thus relies on tyrosine phosphorylation. PMID:23471971

  13. Increased activity of the vesicular soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor TI-VAMP/VAMP7 by tyrosine phosphorylation in the Longin domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgo, Andrea; Casano, Alessandra M; Kuster, Aurelia; Arold, Stefan T; Wang, Guan; Nola, Sébastien; Verraes, Agathe; Dingli, Florent; Loew, Damarys; Galli, Thierry

    2013-04-26

    Vesicular (v)- and target (t)-SNAREs play essential roles in intracellular membrane fusion through the formation of cytoplasmic α-helical bundles. Several v-SNAREs have a Longin N-terminal extension that, by promoting a closed conformation, plays an autoinhibitory function and decreases SNARE complex formation and membrane fusion efficiency. The molecular mechanism leading to Longin v-SNARE activation is largely unknown. Here we find that exocytosis mediated by the Longin v-SNARE TI-VAMP/VAMP7 is activated by tonic treatment with insulin and insulin-like growth factor-1 but not by depolarization and intracellular calcium rise. In search of a potential downstream mechanism, we found that TI-VAMP is phosphorylated in vitro by c-Src kinase on tyrosine 45 of the Longin domain. Accordingly, a mutation of tyrosine 45 into glutamate, but not phenylalanine, activates both t-SNARE binding and exocytosis. Activation of TI-VAMP-mediated exocytosis thus relies on tyrosine phosphorylation.

  14. Adult Attachment as a Risk Factor for Intimate Partner Violence : The "Mispairing" of Partners' Attachment Styles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doumas, Diana M.; Pearson, Christine L.; Elgin, Jenna E.; McKinley, Lisa L.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between intimate partner violence and adult attachment in a sample of 70 couples. The attachment style of each partner and the interaction of the partners' attachment styles were examined as predictors of intimate partner violence. Additional analyses were conducted to examine violence reciprocity and to…

  15. Versatile microsphere attachment of GFP-labeled motors and other tagged proteins with preserved functionality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Bugiel

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Microspheres are often used as handles for protein purification or force spectroscopy. For example, optical tweezers apply forces on trapped particles to which motor proteins are attached. However, even though many attachment strategies exist, procedures are often limited to a particular biomolecule and prone to non-specific protein or surface attachment. Such interactions may lead to loss of protein functionality or microsphere clustering. Here, we describe a versatile coupling procedure for GFP-tagged proteins via a polyethylene glycol linker preserving the functionality of the coupled proteins. The procedure combines well-established protocols, is highly reproducible, reliable, and can be used for a large variety of proteins. The coupling is efficient and can be tuned to the desired microsphere-to-protein ratio. Moreover, microspheres hardly cluster or adhere to surfaces. Furthermore, the procedure can be adapted to different tags providing flexibility and a promising attachment strategy for any tagged protein.

  16. Proteins containing an uncleaved signal for glycophosphatidylinositol membrane anchor attachment are retained in a post-ER compartment

    OpenAIRE

    1992-01-01

    Glycophosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored membrane proteins are initially synthesized with a cleavable COOH-terminal extension that signals anchor attachment. Overexpression in COS cells of hGH-DAF fusion proteins containing the GPI signal of decay accelerating factor (DAF) fused to the COOH-terminus of human growth hormone (hGH), produces both GPI-anchored hGH-DAF and uncleaved precursors that retain the GPI signal. Using hGH-DAF fusion proteins containing a mutated, noncleavable GPI signal, ...

  17. Mode of heparin attachment to nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite affects its interaction with bone morphogenetic protein-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goonasekera, Chandhi S; Jack, Kevin S; Bhakta, Gajadhar; Rai, Bina; Luong-Van, Emma; Nurcombe, Victor; Cool, Simon M; Cooper-White, Justin J; Grøndahl, Lisbeth

    2015-12-16

    Heparin has a high affinity for bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2), which is a key growth factor in bone regeneration. The aim of this study was to investigate how the rate of release of BMP-2 was affected when adsorbed to nanosized hydroxyapatite (HAP) particles functionalized with heparin by different methods. Heparin was attached to the surface of HAP, either via adsorption or covalent coupling, via a 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) layer. The chemical composition of the particles was evaluated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and elemental microanalysis, revealing that the heparin grafting densities achieved were dependent on the curing temperature used in the fabrication of APTES-modified HAP. Comparable amounts of heparin were attached via both covalent coupling and adsorption to the APTES-modified particles, but characterization of the particle surfaces by zeta potential and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller measurements indicated that the conformation of the heparin on the surface was dependent on the method of attachment, which in turn affected the stability of heparin on the surface. The release of BMP-2 from the particles after 7 days in phosphate-buffered saline found that 31% of the loaded BMP-2 was released from the APTES-modified particles with heparin covalently attached, compared to 16% from the APTES-modified particles with the heparin adsorbed. Moreover, when heparin was adsorbed onto pure HAP, it was found that the BMP-2 released after 7 days was 5% (similar to that from unmodified HAP). This illustrates that by altering the mode of attachment of heparin to HAP the release profile and total release of BMP-2 can be manipulated. Importantly, the BMP-2 released from all the heparin particle types was found by the SMAD 1/5/8 phosphorylation assay to be biologically active.

  18. Streptococcus agalactiae capsule polymer length and attachment is determined by the proteins CpsABCD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toniolo, Chiara; Balducci, Evita; Romano, Maria Rosaria; Proietti, Daniela; Ferlenghi, Ilaria; Grandi, Guido; Berti, Francesco; Ros, Immaculada Margarit Y; Janulczyk, Robert

    2015-04-10

    The production of capsular polysaccharides (CPS) or secreted exopolysaccharides is ubiquitous in bacteria, and the Wzy pathway constitutes a prototypical mechanism to produce these structures. Despite the differences in polysaccharide composition among species, a group of proteins involved in this pathway is well conserved. Streptococcus agalactiae (group B Streptococcus; GBS) produces a CPS that represents the main virulence factor of the bacterium and is a prime target in current vaccine development. We used this human pathogen to investigate the roles and potential interdependencies of the conserved proteins CpsABCD encoded in the cps operon, by developing knock-out and functional mutant strains. The mutant strains were examined for CPS quantity, size, and attachment to the cell surface as well as CpsD phosphorylation. We observed that CpsB, -C, and -D compose a phosphoregulatory system where the CpsD autokinase phosphorylates its C-terminal tyrosines in a CpsC-dependent manner. These Tyr residues are also the target of the cognate CpsB phosphatase. An interaction between CpsD and CpsC was observed, and the phosphorylation state of CpsD influenced the subsequent action of CpsC. The CpsC extracellular domain appeared necessary for the production of high molecular weight polysaccharides by influencing CpsA-mediated attachment of the CPS to the bacterial cell surface. In conclusion, although having no impact on cps transcription or the synthesis of the basal repeating unit, we suggest that these proteins are fine-tuning the last steps of CPS biosynthesis (i.e. the balance between polymerization and attachment to the cell wall).

  19. Protein mimics by attachment of cyclic peptides to molecular scaffolds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Langemheen, W.

    2014-01-01

    The interaction between proteins is important in all biological functions. In practically every cellular process protein complexes have been identified as essential components. Defects or disturbance in the regulation of protein-protein interactions are responsible for many diseases. Therefore, the

  20. Conjugation of extracellular matrix proteins to basal lamina analogs enhances keratinocyte attachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, Katie A; Downing, Brett R; Walsh, Sarah E; Pins, George D

    2007-02-01

    The dermal-epidermal junction of skin contains extracellular matrix proteins that are involved in initiating and controlling keratinocyte signaling events such as attachment, proliferation, and terminal differentiation. To characterize the relationship between extracellular matrix proteins and keratinocyte attachment, a biomimetic design approach was used to precisely tailor the surface of basal lamina analogs with biochemistries that emulate the native biochemical composition found at the dermal-epidermal junction. A high-throughput screening device was developed by our laboratory that allows for the simultaneous investigation of the conjugation of individual extracellular matrix proteins (e.g. collagen type I, collagen type IV, laminin, or fibronectin) as well as their effect on keratinocyte attachment, on the surface of an implantable collagen membrane. Fluorescence microscopy coupled with quantitative digital image analyses indicated that the extracellular matrix proteins adsorbed to the collagen-GAG membranes in a dose-dependent manner. To determine the relationship between extracellular matrix protein signaling cues and keratinocyte attachment, cells were seeded on protein-conjugated collagen-GAG membranes and a tetrazolium-based colorimetric assay was used to quantify viable keratinocyte attachment. Our results indicate that keratinocyte attachment was significantly enhanced on the surfaces of collagen membranes that were conjugated with fibronectin and type IV collagen. These findings define a set of design parameters that will enhance keratinocyte binding efficiency on the surface of collagen membranes and ultimately improve the rate of epithelialization for dermal equivalents.

  1. Heparan sulfate is a selective attachment factor for the avian coronavirus infectious bronchitis virus Beaudette.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madu, Ikenna G; Chu, Victor C; Lee, Hwajin; Regan, Andrew D; Bauman, Beverley E; Whittaker, Gary R

    2007-03-01

    The avian coronavirus infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) strain Beaudette is an embryo-adapted virus that has extended species tropism in cell culture. In order to understand the acquired tropism of the Beaudette strain, we compared the S protein sequences of several IBV strains. The Beaudette strain was found to contain a putative heparan sulfate (HS)-binding site, indicating that the Beaudette virus may use HS as a selective receptor. To ascertain the requirements of cell-surface HS for Beaudette infectivity, we assayed for infectivity in the presence of soluble heparin as a competitor and determined infectivity in mutant cell lines with no HS or glycosaminoglycan expression. Our results indicate that HS plays a role as an attachment factor for IBV, working in concert with other factors like sialic acid to mediate virus binding to cells, and may explain in part the extended tropism of IBV Beaudette.

  2. New Tools for the site-specific attachment of proteins to surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camarero, J A; Kwon, Y; Coleman, M A

    2005-06-17

    Protein microarrays in which proteins are immobilized to a solid surface are ideal reagents for high-throughput experiments that require very small amounts of analyte. Such protein microarrays ('protein chips') can be used very efficiently to analyze all kind of protein interactions en masse. Although a variety of methods are available for attaching proteins on solid surfaces. Most of them rely on non-specific adsorption methods or on the reaction of chemical groups within proteins (mainly, amino and carboxylic acid groups) with complementary reactive groups. In both cases the protein is attached to the surface in random orientations. The use of recombinant affinity tags addresses the orientation issue, however in most of the cases the interaction of the tags are reversible (e.g., glutathione S-transferase, maltose binding protein and poly-His) and, hence, are not stable over the course of subsequent assays or require large mediator proteins (e.g., biotin-avidin and antigen antibody). The key for the covalent attachment of a protein to a solid support with a total control over the orientation is to introduce two unique and mutually reactive groups on both the protein and the surface. The reaction between these two groups should be highly selective thus behaving like a molecular 'Velcro'.

  3. New Tools for the site-specific attachment of proteins to surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Y; Coleman, M A; Camarero, J A

    2006-06-27

    Protein microarrays in which proteins are immobilized to a solid surface are ideal reagents for high-throughput experiments that require very small amounts of analyte. Such protein microarrays (''protein chips'') can be used very efficiently to analyze all kind of protein interactions en masse. Although a variety of methods are available for attaching proteins on solid surfaces. Most of them rely on non-specific adsorption methods or on the reaction of chemical groups within proteins (mainly, amino and carboxylic acid groups) with complementary reactive groups. In both cases the protein is attached to the surface in random orientations. The use of recombinant affinity tags addresses the orientation issue, however in most of the cases the interaction of the tags are reversible (e.g., glutathione S-transferase, maltose binding protein and poly-His) and, hence, are not stable over the course of subsequent assays or require large mediator proteins (e.g., biotin-avidin and antigen antibody). The key for the covalent attachment of a protein to a solid support with a total control over the orientation is to introduce two unique and mutually reactive groups on both the protein and the surface. The reaction between these two groups should be highly selective thus behaving like a molecular ''velcro''.

  4. Effect of pH, salt and chemical rinses on bacterial attachment to extracellular matrix proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zulfakar, Siti Shahara; White, Jason D; Ross, Tom; Tamplin, Mark

    2013-06-01

    Microbial contamination of carcass surfaces occurs during slaughter and post-slaughter processing steps, therefore interventions are needed to enhance meat safety and quality. Although many studies have been done at the macro-level, little is known about specific processes that influence bacterial attachment to carcass surfaces, particularly the role of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. In the present study, the effect of pH and salt (NaCl, KCl and CaCl2) on attachment of Escherichia coli and Salmonella isolates to dominant ECM proteins: collagen I, fibronectin, collagen IV and laminin were assessed. Also, the effects of three chemical rinses commonly used in abattoirs (2% acetic acid, 2% lactic acid and 10% trisodium phosphate (TSP)) were tested. Within a pH range of 5-9, there was no significant effect on attachment to ECM proteins, whereas the effect of salt type and concentration varied depending on combination of strain and ECM protein. A concentration-dependant effect was observed with NaCl and KCl (0.1-0.85%) on attachment of E. coli M23Sr, but only to collagen I. One-tenth percent CaCl2 produced the highest level of attachment to ECM proteins for E. coli M23Sr and EC614. In contrast, higher concentrations of CaCl2 increased attachment of E. coli EC473 to collagen IV. Rinses containing TSP produced >95% reduction in attachment to all ECM proteins. These observations will assist in the design of targeted interventions to prevent or disrupt contamination of meat surfaces, thus improving meat safety and quality.

  5. New developments for the site-specific attachment of protein to surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camarero, J A

    2005-05-12

    Protein immobilization on surfaces is of great importance in numerous applications in biology and biophysics. The key for the success of all these applications relies on the immobilization technique employed to attach the protein to the corresponding surface. Protein immobilization can be based on covalent or noncovalent interaction of the molecule with the surface. Noncovalent interactions include hydrophobic interactions, hydrogen bonding, van der Waals forces, electrostatic forces, or physical adsorption. However, since these interactions are weak, the molecules can get denatured or dislodged, thus causing loss of signal. They also result in random attachment of the protein to the surface. Site-specific covalent attachment of proteins onto surfaces, on the other hand, leads to molecules being arranged in a definite, orderly fashion and uses spacers and linkers to help minimize steric hindrances between the protein surface. This work reviews in detail some of the methods most commonly used as well as the latest developments for the site-specific covalent attachment of protein to solid surfaces.

  6. Protein Machineries Involved in the Attachment of Heme to Cytochrome c: Protein Structures and Molecular Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Travaglini-Allocatelli

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cytochromes c (Cyt c are ubiquitous heme-containing proteins, mainly involved in electron transfer processes, whose structure and functions have been and still are intensely studied. Surprisingly, our understanding of the molecular mechanism whereby the heme group is covalently attached to the apoprotein (apoCyt in the cell is still largely unknown. This posttranslational process, known as Cyt c biogenesis or Cyt c maturation, ensures the stereospecific formation of the thioether bonds between the heme vinyl groups and the cysteine thiols of the apoCyt heme binding motif. To accomplish this task, prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells have evolved distinctive protein machineries composed of different proteins. In this review, the structural and functional properties of the main maturation apparatuses found in gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria and in the mitochondria of eukaryotic cells will be presented, dissecting the Cyt c maturation process into three functional steps: (i heme translocation and delivery, (ii apoCyt thioreductive pathway, and (iii apoCyt chaperoning and heme ligation. Moreover, current hypotheses and open questions about the molecular mechanisms of each of the three steps will be discussed, with special attention to System I, the maturation apparatus found in gram-negative bacteria.

  7. Insatiable insecurity: maternal obesity as a risk factor for mother-child attachment and child weight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keitel-Korndörfer, Anja; Sierau, Susan; Klein, Annette M; Bergmann, Sarah; Grube, Matthias; von Klitzing, Kai

    2015-01-01

    Childhood obesity has become a rising health problem, and because parental obesity is a basic risk factor for childhood obesity, biological factors have been especially considered in the complex etiology. Aspects of the family interaction, e.g., mother-child attachment, have not been the main focus. Our study tried to fill this gap by investigating whether there is a difference between children of obese and normal weight mothers in terms of mother-child attachment, and whether mother-child attachment predicts child's weight, in a sample of 31 obese and 31 normal weight mothers with children aged 19 to 58 months. Mother-child attachment was measured with the Attachment Q-Set. We found that (1) children of obese mothers showed a lower quality of mother-child attachment than children of normal weight mothers, which indicates that they are less likely to use their mothers as a secure base; (2) the attachment quality predicted child`s BMI percentile; and (3) the mother-child attachment adds incremental validity to the prediction of child's BMI beyond biological parameters (child's BMI birth percentile, BMI of the parents) and mother's relationship status. Implications of our findings are discussed.

  8. Export of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli using ABC transporter with an attached lipase ABC transporter recognition domain (LARD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moon Yuseok

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background ATP binding cassette (ABC transporter secretes the protein through inner and outer membranes simultaneously in gram negative bacteria. Thermostable lipase (TliA of Pseudomonas fluorescens SIK W1 is secreted through the ABC transporter. TliA has four glycine-rich repeats (GGXGXD in its C-terminus, which appear in many ABC transporter-secreted proteins. From a homology model of TliA derived from the structure of P. aeruginosa alkaline protease (AprA, lipase ABC transporter domains (LARDs were designed for the secretion of fusion proteins. Results The LARDs included four glycine-rich repeats comprising a β-roll structure, and were added to the C-terminus of test proteins. Either Pro-Gly linker or Factor Xa site was added between fusion proteins and LARDs. We attached different length of LARDs such as LARD0, LARD1 or whole TliA (the longest LARD to three types of proteins; green fluorescent protein (GFP, epidermal growth factor (EGF and cytoplasmic transduction peptide (CTP. These fusion proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli together with ABC transporter of either P. fluorescens or Erwinia chrysanthemi. Export of fusion proteins with the whole TliA through the ABC transporter was evident on the basis of lipase enzymatic activity. Upon supplementation of E. coli with ABC transporter, GFP-LARDs and EGF-LARDs were excreted into the culture supernatant. Conclusion The LARDs or whole TliA were attached to C-termini of model proteins and enabled the export of the model proteins such as GFP and EGF in E. coli supplemented with ABC transporter. These results open the possibility for the extracellular production of recombinant proteins in Pseudomonas using LARDs or TliA as a C-terminal signal sequence.

  9. Protein histochemistry using coronaviral spike proteins: studying binding profiles and sialic acid requirements for attachment to tissues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ambepitiya Wickramasinghe, I.N.; Verheije, M.H.

    2015-01-01

    Protein histochemistry is a tissue-based technique that enables the analysis of viral attachment patterns as well as the identification of specific viral and host determinants involved in the first step in the infection of a host cell by a virus. Applying recombinantly expressed spike proteins of in

  10. Simultaneous Platinum and Copper Ion Attachment to a Human Copper Chaperone Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodak, Miroslav; Cvitkovic, John; Yu, Corey; Dmitriev, Oleg; Kaminski, George; Bernholc, Jerry

    2015-03-01

    Cisplatin is a potent anti-cancer drug based on a platinum ion. However, its effectiveness is decreased by cellular resistance, which involves cisplatin attaching to copper transport proteins. One of such proteins is Atox1, where cisplatin attaches to the copper binding site. Surprisingly, it was shown that both cisplatin and copper can attach to Atox1 at the same time. To study this double metal ion attachment, we use the KS/FD DFT method, which combines Kohn-Sham DFT with frozen-density DFT to achieve efficient quantum-mechanical description of explicit solvent. Calculations have so far investigated copper ion attachment to CXXC motifs present in Atox1. The addition of the platinum ion and the competition between the two metals is currently being studied. These calculations start from a molecular mechanics (MM) structural model, in which glutathione groups provide additional ligands to the Pt ion. Our goals are to identify possible Cu-Pt structures and to determine whether copper/platinum attachment is competitive, independent, or cooperative. Results will be compared to the 1H, N1 5 -HSQC NMR experiments, in which binding of copper and cisplatin to Atox1 produces distinct secondary chemical shift signatures, allowing for kinetic studies of simultaneous metal binding.

  11. Kinetics of the Attachment of Intrinsic Factor-Bound Cobamides to Ileal Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathan, V. I.; Babior, Bernard M.; Donaldson, Robert M.

    1974-01-01

    To determine whether the molecular configuration of vitamin B12 influences the attachment of intrinsic factor-vitamin B12 complex to ileal microvillous membrane receptor sites, we have examined the kinetics of uptake of intrinsic factor-bound cyanocobalamin by brush borders and microvillous membranes isolated from guinea pig ileum, and have compared this uptake with that of intrinsic factor alone and with that of intrinsic factor complexed with various analogs of cyanocobalamin. We first studied the kinetics of binding of cyanocobalamin and other cobamides to human gastric intrinsic factor. The binding of cyanocobalamin showed saturation kinetics and, at relatively high concentrations of cyanocobalamin, a Scatchard plot of binding was linear. The dissociation constant for the intrinsic factor-cyanocobalamin complex was 0.066 nM. When the binding of various vitamin B12 analogs to intrinsic factor was determined by competition experiments, the analogs could be separated into two categories: those with affinities similar to that of cyanocobalamin and those with affinities much lower than that of cyanocobalamin. The affinity of cyanocobalamin for intrinsic factor was not altered by various substitutions at the -CN position, while removal of a single amido group on the corrin ring of substitution of the dimethylbenzimidazole base greatly reduced affinity. Removal of the base totally abolished binding. These findings, confirming those reported by others, are consistent with the concept that the cyanocobalamin molecule fits into a “pocket” in the intrinsic factor molecule, with the nucleotide base facing inward and the -CN side of the planar corrin ring facing outward. We then investigated the attachment of intrinsic factor-bound cyanocobalamin to ileal receptor. Attachment to microvillous membranes showed saturation kinetics with a dissociation constant of 0.25 nM. Attachment was rapid and was 70% complete within 5 min; the second-order rate constant for attachment

  12. The protective role of attachment to God against eating disorder risk factors: concurrent and prospective evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homan, Kristin J; Boyatzis, Chris J

    2010-01-01

    This short-term longitudinal study explored whether a secure relationship with God would protect young women (N = 231, M = 19.2) from the impact of four risk factors for eating disturbance: pressure to be thin; thin-ideal internalization, body dissatisfaction; and dieting. Analyses showed that women with secure attachment to God experienced reduced levels of each risk factor. Prospective data showed that pressure to be thin and thin-ideal internalization predicted body dissatisfaction only for women with an anxious insecure attachment to God. The data indicate that women who feel loved and accepted by God are buffered from eating disorder risk factors.

  13. Allelic Variation in Outer Membrane Protein A and Its Influence on Attachment of Escherichia coli to Corn Stover

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunyu Liao

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the genetic factors that govern microbe-sediment interactions in aquatic environments is important for water quality management and reduction of waterborne disease outbreaks. Although chemical properties of bacteria have been identified that contribute to initiation of attachment, the outer membrane proteins that contribute to these chemical properties still remain unclear. In this study we explored the attachment of 78 Escherichia coli environmental isolates to corn stover, a representative agricultural residue. Outer membrane proteome analysis led to the observation of amino acid variations, some of which had not been previously described, in outer membrane protein A (OmpA at 10 distinct locations, including each of the four extracellular loops, three of the eight transmembrane segments, the proline-rich linker and the dimerization domain. Some of the polymorphisms within loops 1, 2, and 3 were found to significantly co-occur. Grouping of sequences according to the outer loop polymorphisms revealed five distinct patterns that each occur in at least 5% of our isolates. The two most common patterns, I and II, are encoded by 33.3 and 20.5% of these isolates and differ at each of the four loops. Statistically significant differences in attachment to corn stover were observed among isolates expressing different versions of OmpA and when different versions of OmpA were expressed in the same genetic background. Most notable was the increased corn stover attachment associated with a loop 3 sequence of SNFDGKN relative to the standard SNVYGKN sequence. These results provide further insight into the allelic variation of OmpA and implicate OmpA in contributing to attachment to corn stover.

  14. Chemoselective Attachment of Biologically Active Proteins to Surfaces by Native Chemical Ligation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheung, C L; de Yoreo, J J; Coleman, M; Camarero, J A

    2003-11-22

    The present work describes our ongoing efforts towards the creation of micro and nanoscaled ordered arrays of protein covalently attached to site-specific chemical linkers patterned by different microlithographic techniques. We present a new and efficient solid-phase approach for the synthesis of chemically modified long alkyl-thiols. These compounds can be used to introduce chemoselective reacting groups onto silicon-based surfaces. We show that these modified thiols can be used for creating nano- and micrometric chemical patterns by using different lithographic techniques. We show that these patterns can react chemoselectively with proteins which have been recombinantly modified to contain complementary chemical groups at specific positions thus resulting in the oriented attachment of the protein to the surface.

  15. Proteomics Insights: Proteins related to Larval Attachment and Metamorphosis of Marine Invertebrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KONDETHIMMANAHALLI eCHANDRAMOULI

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The transition in an animal from a pelagic larval stage to a sessile benthic juvenile typically requires major morphological and behavioral changes. Larval competency, attachment and initiation of metamorphosis are thought to be regulated by intrinsic chemical signals and specific sets of proteins. However, the molecular mechanisms that regulate larval attachment and metamorphosis in marine invertebrates have yet to be fully elucidated. Despite the many challenges associated with analysis of the larvae proteome, recent proteomic technologies have been used to address specific questions in larval developmental biology. These and other molecular studies have generated substantial amount of information of the proteins and molecular pathways involved in larval attachment and metamorphosis. Furthermore, the results of these studies have shown that systematic changes in protein expression patterns and post-translational modifications (PTM are crucial for the transition from larva to juvenile. The degeneration of larval tissues is mediated by protein degradation, while the development of juvenile organs may require PTM. In terms of application, the identified proteins may serve as targets for antifouling compounds, and biomarkers for environmental stressors. In this review we highlight the strengths and limitations of proteomic tools in the context of the study of marine invertebrate larval biology.

  16. Proteomics insights: proteins related to larval attachment and metamorphosis of marine invertebrates

    KAUST Repository

    Chandramouli, Kondethimmanahalli

    2014-10-31

    The transition in an animal from a pelagic larval stage to a sessile benthic juvenile typically requires major morphological and behavioral changes. Larval competency, attachment and initiation of metamorphosis are thought to be regulated by intrinsic chemical signals and specific sets of proteins. However, the molecular mechanisms that regulate larval attachment and metamorphosis in marine invertebrates have yet to be fully elucidated. Despite the many challenges associated with analysis of the larvae proteome, recent proteomic technologies have been used to address specific questions in larval developmental biology. These and other molecular studies have generated substantial amount of information of the proteins and molecular pathways involved in larval attachment and metamorphosis. Furthermore, the results of these studies have shown that systematic changes in protein expression patterns and post-translational modifications (PTMs) are crucial for the transition from larva to juvenile. The degeneration of larval tissues is mediated by protein degradation, while the development of juvenile organs may require PTM. In terms of application, the identified proteins may serve as targets for antifouling compounds, and biomarkers for environmental stressors. In this review we highlight the strengths and limitations of proteomic tools in the context of the study of marine invertebrate larval biology.

  17. Discovery of protein complexes with core-attachment structures from Tandem Affinity Purification (TAP) data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Min; Li, Xiao-Li; Kwoh, Chee-Keong; Ng, See-Kiong; Wong, Limsoon

    2012-09-01

    Many cellular functions involve protein complexes that are formed by multiple interacting proteins. Tandem Affinity Purification (TAP) is a popular experimental method for detecting such multi-protein interactions. However, current computational methods that predict protein complexes from TAP data require converting the co-complex relationships in TAP data into binary interactions. The resulting pairwise protein-protein interaction (PPI) network is then mined for densely connected regions that are identified as putative protein complexes. Converting the TAP data into PPI data not only introduces errors but also loses useful information about the underlying multi-protein relationships that can be exploited to detect the internal organization (i.e., core-attachment structures) of protein complexes. In this article, we propose a method called CACHET that detects protein complexes with Core-AttaCHment structures directly from bipartitETAP data. CACHET models the TAP data as a bipartite graph in which the two vertex sets are the baits and the preys, respectively. The edges between the two vertex sets represent bait-prey relationships. CACHET first focuses on detecting high-quality protein-complex cores from the bipartite graph. To minimize the effects of false positive interactions, the bait-prey relationships are indexed with reliability scores. Only non-redundant, reliable bicliques computed from the TAP bipartite graph are regarded as protein-complex cores. CACHET constructs protein complexes by including attachment proteins into the cores. We applied CACHET on large-scale TAP datasets and found that CACHET outperformed existing methods in terms of prediction accuracy (i.e., F-measure and functional homogeneity of predicted complexes). In addition, the protein complexes predicted by CACHET are equipped with core-attachment structures that provide useful biological insights into the inherent functional organization of protein complexes. Our supplementary material can

  18. Active protein aggregates induced by terminally attached self-assembling peptide ELK16 in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Bihong

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In recent years, it has been gradually realized that bacterial inclusion bodies (IBs could be biologically active. In particular, several proteins including green fluorescent protein, β-galactosidase, β-lactamase, alkaline phosphatase, D-amino acid oxidase, polyphosphate kinase 3, maltodextrin phosphorylase, and sialic acid aldolase have been successfully produced as active IBs when fused to an appropriate partner such as the foot-and-mouth disease virus capsid protein VP1, or the human β-amyloid peptide Aβ42(F19D. As active IBs may have many attractive advantages in enzyme production and industrial applications, it is of considerable interest to explore them further. Results In this paper, we report that an ionic self-assembling peptide ELK16 (LELELKLK2 was able to effectively induce the formation of cytoplasmic inclusion bodies in Escherichia coli (E. coli when attached to the carboxyl termini of four model proteins including lipase A, amadoriase II, β-xylosidase, and green fluorescent protein. These aggregates had a general appearance similar to the usually reported cytoplasmic inclusion bodies (IBs under transmission electron microscopy or fluorescence confocal microscopy. Except for lipase A-ELK16 fusion, the three other fusion protein aggregates retained comparable specific activities with the native counterparts. Conformational analyses by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy revealed the existence of newly formed antiparallel beta-sheet structures in these ELK16 peptide-induced inclusion bodies, which is consistent with the reported assembly of the ELK16 peptide. Conclusions This has been the first report where a terminally attached self-assembling β peptide ELK16 can promote the formation of active inclusion bodies or active protein aggregates in E. coli. It has the potential to render E. coli and other recombinant hosts more efficient as microbial cell factories for protein production. Our observation might

  19. Protein attachment onto silica surfaces--a survey of molecular fundamentals, resulting effects and novel preventive strategies in CE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stutz, Hanno

    2009-06-01

    This review addresses the fundamentals governing the adsorption of individual protein molecules onto the surface of fused-silica capillaries, the protein aggregation to adsorbate clusters and their final accretion to monolayers with subsequent stratification to protein multilayers. The attention in CE protein separation has primarily been focused on (i) tuning the BGE including the buffer type, ionic strength, pH and additives, (ii) tailored post-rinse procedures to detach adhered protein residues and (iii) the optimization of capillary wall shielding in order to reduce protein attachment. Improvements in protein separation as well as related adverse effects are mainly discussed on the basis of parameters known to become deteriorated in case of protein adhesion, e.g. repeatability of the EOF and of migration times, peak width, theoretical plate numbers, resolution and asymmetry factor. However, knowledge of the molecular principles controlling protein adsorption onto silica surfaces is indispensable for separation optimization. Furthermore, it facilitates troubleshooting and the interpretation of undesired concomitant phenomena. This review comprehensively discusses protein adsorption models derived from surface chemistry primarily in terms of their relevance for CE, clearly showing that the adsorption process in its complexity is only partially revealed by models, which address single or binary protein solutions. In a further section theoretical concepts and surface models are related to surface phenomena encountered in CE. The final part of the review surveys recent concepts for prevention of protein adhesion, thereby addressing capillary treatment, favorable buffer types, dynamic and adhesive semi-permanent coating strategies covering the literature from 2000-2008.

  20. Biophysical Characterization and Activity of Lymphostatin, a Multifunctional Virulence Factor of Attaching and Effacing Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassady-Cain, Robin L; Blackburn, Elizabeth A; Alsarraf, Husam; Dedic, Emil; Bease, Andrew G; Böttcher, Bettina; Jørgensen, René; Wear, Martin; Stevens, Mark P

    2016-03-11

    Attaching and effacing Escherichia coli cause diarrhea and typically produce lymphostatin (LifA), an inhibitor of mitogen-activated proliferation of lymphocytes and pro-inflammatory cytokine synthesis. A near-identical factor (Efa1) has been reported to mediate adherence of E. coli to epithelial cells. An amino-terminal region of LifA shares homology with the catalytic domain of the large clostridial toxins, which are retaining glycosyltransferases with a DXD motif involved in binding of a metal ion. Understanding the mode(s) of action of lymphostatin has been constrained by difficulties obtaining a stably transformed plasmid expression clone. We constructed a tightly inducible clone of enteropathogenic E. coli O127:H6 lifA for affinity purification of lymphostatin. The purified protein inhibited mitogen-activated proliferation of bovine T lymphocytes in the femtomolar range. It is a monomer in solution and the molecular envelope was determined using both transmission electron microscopy and small-angle x-ray scattering. Domain architecture was further studied by limited proteolysis. The largest proteolytic fragment containing the putative glycosyltransferase domain was tested in isolation for activity against T cells, and was not sufficient for activity. Tryptophan fluorescence studies indicated thatlymphostatin binds uridine diphosphate-N-acetylglucosamine (UDP-GlcNAc) but not UDP-glucose (UDP-Glc). Substitution of the predicted DXD glycosyltransferase motif with alanine residues abolished UDP-GlcNAc binding and lymphostatin activity, although other biophysical properties were unchanged. The data indicate that lymphostatin has UDP-sugar binding potential that is critical for activity, and is a major leap toward identifying the nature and consequences of modifications of host cell factors.

  1. Identification of amino acid substitutions with compensational effects in the attachment protein of canine distemper virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattler, Ursula; Khosravi, Mojtaba; Avila, Mislay; Pilo, Paola; Langedijk, Johannes P; Ader-Ebert, Nadine; Alves, Lisa A; Plattet, Philippe; Origgi, Francesco C

    2014-07-01

    The hemagglutinin (H) gene of canine distemper virus (CDV) encodes the receptor-binding protein. This protein, together with the fusion (F) protein, is pivotal for infectivity since it contributes to the fusion of the viral envelope with the host cell membrane. Of the two receptors currently known for CDV (nectin-4 and the signaling lymphocyte activation molecule [SLAM]), SLAM is considered the most relevant for host susceptibility. To investigate how evolution might have impacted the host-CDV interaction, we examined the functional properties of a series of missense single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) naturally accumulating within the H-gene sequences during the transition between two distinct but related strains. The two strains, a wild-type strain and a consensus strain, were part of a single continental outbreak in European wildlife and occurred in distinct geographical areas 2 years apart. The deduced amino acid sequence of the two H genes differed at 5 residues. A panel of mutants carrying all the combinations of the SNPs was obtained by site-directed mutagenesis. The selected mutant, wild type, and consensus H proteins were functionally evaluated according to their surface expression, SLAM binding, fusion protein interaction, and cell fusion efficiencies. The results highlight that the most detrimental functional effects are associated with specific sets of SNPs. Strikingly, an efficient compensational system driven by additional SNPs appears to come into play, virtually neutralizing the negative functional effects. This system seems to contribute to the maintenance of the tightly regulated function of the H-gene-encoded attachment protein. Importance: To investigate how evolution might have impacted the host-canine distemper virus (CDV) interaction, we examined the functional properties of naturally occurring single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the hemagglutinin gene of two related but distinct strains of CDV. The hemagglutinin gene encodes the

  2. Towards understanding of Nipah virus attachment protein assembly and the role of protein affinity and crowding for membrane curvature events.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stachowiak, Jeanne C.; Hayden, Carl C.; Negrete, Oscar.; Davis, Ryan Wesley; Sasaki, Darryl Y

    2013-10-01

    Pathogenic viruses are a primary threat to our national security and to the health and economy of our world. Effective defense strategies to combat viral infection and spread require the development of understanding of the mechanisms that these pathogens use to invade the host cell. We present in this report results of our research into viral particle recognition and fusion to cell membranes and the role that protein affinity and confinement in lipid domains plays in membrane curvature in cellular fusion and fission events. Herein, we describe 1) the assembly of the G attachment protein of Nipah virus using point mutation studies to define its role in viral particle fusion to the cell membrane, 2) how lateral pressure of membrane bound proteins induce curvature in model membrane systems, and 3) the role of membrane curvature in the selective partitioning of molecular receptors and specific affinity of associated proteins.

  3. Influence of surface wettability on competitive protein adsorption and initial attachment of osteoblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei Jianhua; Liu Baolin [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, School of Stomatology, Fourth Military Medical University, 145 West Changle Road, Xi' an 710032 (China); Igarashi, Toshio [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Kanagawa Dental College, 82 Inaoka-cho, Yokosuka, Kanagawa 238-8580 (Japan); Okumori, Naoto; Igarashi, Takayasu; Maetani, Takashi [Japan Institute for Advanced Dentistry, 1-8-25 Shiba, Minato-ku, Tokyo 105-0014 (Japan); Yoshinari, Masao, E-mail: yosinari@tdc.ac.j [Division of Oral Implants Research and HRC7, Oral Health Science Center, Tokyo Dental College, 1-2-2 Masago, Mihama-ku, Chiba 261-8502 (Japan)

    2009-08-01

    This study investigated the influence of surface wettability on competitive protein adsorption and the initial attachment of osteoblasts. A thin-film coating of hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) and subsequent O{sub 2}-plasma treatment was carried out on substrates with a mirror surface in order to create a wide range of wettabilities. The adsorption behavior of fibronectin (Fn) and albumin (Alb) in both individual and competitive mode, and the initial attachment of mouse osteoblastic cells (MC3T3-E1) over a wide range of wettabilities were investigated. The contact angle of HMDSO coatings without O{sub 2}-plasma treatment against double-distilled water was more than 100{sup 0}, whereas it dramatically decreased after the O{sub 2}-plasma treatment to almost 0{sup 0}, resulting in super-hydrophilicity. Individually, Fn adsorption showed a biphasic inclination, whereas Alb showed greater adsorption to hydrophobic surfaces. In the competitive mode, in a solution containing both Fn and Alb, Fn showed greater adsorption on hydrophilic surfaces, whereas Alb predominantly adsorbed on hydrophobic surfaces. The initial attachment of osteoblastic cells increased with an increase in surface wettability, in particular, on a super-hydrophilic surface, which correlated well with Fn adsorption in the competitive mode. These results suggest that Fn adsorption may be responsible for increasing cell adhesion on hydrophilic surfaces in a body fluid or culture media under physiological conditions.

  4. Individual risk factors for physician boundary violations: the role of attachment style, childhood trauma and maladaptive beliefs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Kai; Sciolla, Andrés F; Folsom, David; Bazzo, David; Searles, Chris; Moutier, Christine; Thomas, Michael L; Borton, Katherine; Norcross, Bill

    2015-01-01

    The assessment and remediation of boundary-challenged healthcare professionals is enhanced through examination of individual risk factors. We assessed three such factors--attachment style, childhood trauma and maladaptive beliefs--in 100 attendees (mostly physicians) of a CME professional boundaries course. We propose a theoretical model which draws a causal arc from childhood maltreatment through insecure attachment and maladaptive beliefs to elevated risk for boundary violations. We administered the Experiences in Close Relationship Questionnaire (ECR-R), Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ), and Young Schema Questionnaire (YSQ) to 100 healthcare professionals (mostly physicians) attending a CME course on professional boundaries. Experts rated participant autobiographies to determine attachment style and early adversities. Correlations and relationships among self- and expert ratings and between different risk factors were examined. Five percent of participants reported CTQ total scores in the moderate to severe range; eleven percent reported moderate to severe emotional neglect or emotional abuse. Average attachment anxiety and attachment avoidance were low, and more than half of participants were rated “secure” by experts. Childhood maltreatment was correlated with attachment anxiety and avoidance and predicted expert-rated insecure attachment and maladaptive beliefs. Our findings support a potential link between childhood adversity and boundary difficulties, partly mediated by insecure attachment and early maladaptive beliefs. Furthermore, these results suggest that boundary education programs and professional wellness programs may be enhanced with a focus on sequelae of childhood maltreatment, attachment and common maladaptive thinking patterns.

  5. Spindle checkpoint proteins and chromosome-microtubule attachment in budding yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillett, Emily S; Espelin, Christopher W; Sorger, Peter K

    2004-02-16

    Accurate chromosome segregation depends on precise regulation of mitosis by the spindle checkpoint. This checkpoint monitors the status of kinetochore-microtubule attachment and delays the metaphase to anaphase transition until all kinetochores have formed stable bipolar connections to the mitotic spindle. Components of the spindle checkpoint include the mitotic arrest defective (MAD) genes MAD1-3, and the budding uninhibited by benzimidazole (BUB) genes BUB1 and BUB3. In animal cells, all known spindle checkpoint proteins are recruited to kinetochores during normal mitoses. In contrast, we show that whereas Saccharomyces cerevisiae Bub1p and Bub3p are bound to kinetochores early in mitosis as part of the normal cell cycle, Mad1p and Mad2p are kinetochore bound only in the presence of spindle damage or kinetochore lesions that interfere with chromosome-microtubule attachment. Moreover, although Mad1p and Mad2p perform essential mitotic functions during every division cycle in mammalian cells, they are required in budding yeast only when mitosis goes awry. We propose that differences in the behavior of spindle checkpoint proteins in animal cells and budding yeast result primarily from evolutionary divergence in spindle assembly pathways. Copyright The Rockefeller University Press

  6. Insecure attachment as a risk factor for psychopathology : The role of stressful events

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pielage, S; Gerlsma, C; Schaap, C

    2000-01-01

    Attachment theory predicts that attachment styles 'learned' in previous relational experiences affect the way people cope with stressful events and, consequently, their mental health. The present study tested two mediational models of the relationships between stressful events, attachment style and

  7. An Investigation of Decision Making Styles and the Five-Factor Personality Traits with Respect to Attachment Styles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deniz, M. Engin

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this research is to investigate if the attachment styles significantly predict the decision self-esteem, decision making styles and five-factor personality traits. Subjects of the study were 567 students in total from different faculties of Selcuk University. The results of the study showed that the attachment styles of the students…

  8. Enzyme directed formation of un-natural side-chains for covalent surface attachment of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hwayoung; Jaworski, Justyn

    2014-10-01

    The covalent immobilization of proteins onto surfaces is an essential aspect of several fields of research, including proteomics, sensing, heterogeneous biocatalysis, and more broadly biotechnology. Site-specific, covalent attachment of proteins has been achieved in recent years by the use of expanded genetic codes to produce proteins with controlled placement of un-natural amino acids bearing bio-orthogonal functional groups. Unfortunately, the complexity of developing such systems is impractical for most laboratories; hence, a less complicated approach to generating un-natural amino acid side-chains has been employed. Utilizing a straightforward reaction with formylglycine generating enzyme, we use the site-specific modification of engineered proteins to yield un-natural amino acid side-chains for protein immobilization. Using this approach, we demonstrate the controlled immobilization of various enzymes onto a variety of amine coated surfaces. Our results reveal reusability of the immobilized enzymes via this strategy, and furthermore, we find the activity of the immobilized enzymes to remain even after a month of use indicating significant stability of the linkage.

  9. Photorhabdus adhesion modification protein (Pam) binds extracellular polysaccharide and alters bacterial attachment

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Jones, Robert T

    2010-05-12

    Abstract Background Photorhabdus are Gram-negative nematode-symbiotic and insect-pathogenic bacteria. The species Photorhabdus asymbiotica is able to infect humans as well as insects. We investigated the secreted proteome of a clinical isolate of P. asymbiotica at different temperatures in order to identify proteins relevant to the infection of the two different hosts. Results A comparison of the proteins secreted by a clinical isolate of P. asymbiotica at simulated insect (28°C) and human (37°C) temperatures led to the identification of a small and highly abundant protein, designated Pam, that is only secreted at the lower temperature. The pam gene is present in all Photorhabdus strains tested and shows a high level of conservation across the whole genus, suggesting it is both ancestral to the genus and probably important to the biology of the bacterium. The Pam protein shows limited sequence similarity to the 13.6 kDa component of a binary toxin of Bacillus thuringiensis. Nevertheless, injection or feeding of heterologously produced Pam showed no insecticidal activity to either Galleria mellonella or Manduca sexta larvae. In bacterial colonies, Pam is associated with an extracellular polysaccharide (EPS)-like matrix, and modifies the ability of wild-type cells to attach to an artificial surface. Interestingly, Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) binding studies revealed that the Pam protein itself has adhesive properties. Although Pam is produced throughout insect infection, genetic knockout does not affect either insect virulence or the ability of P. luminescens to form a symbiotic association with its host nematode, Heterorhabditis bacteriophora. Conclusions We studied a highly abundant protein, Pam, which is secreted in a temperature-dependent manner in P. asymbiotica. Our findings indicate that Pam plays an important role in enhancing surface attachment in insect blood. Its association with exopolysaccharide suggests it may exert its effect through mediation of

  10. Photorhabdus adhesion modification protein (Pam binds extracellular polysaccharide and alters bacterial attachment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joyce Susan A

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Photorhabdus are Gram-negative nematode-symbiotic and insect-pathogenic bacteria. The species Photorhabdus asymbiotica is able to infect humans as well as insects. We investigated the secreted proteome of a clinical isolate of P. asymbiotica at different temperatures in order to identify proteins relevant to the infection of the two different hosts. Results A comparison of the proteins secreted by a clinical isolate of P. asymbiotica at simulated insect (28°C and human (37°C temperatures led to the identification of a small and highly abundant protein, designated Pam, that is only secreted at the lower temperature. The pam gene is present in all Photorhabdus strains tested and shows a high level of conservation across the whole genus, suggesting it is both ancestral to the genus and probably important to the biology of the bacterium. The Pam protein shows limited sequence similarity to the 13.6 kDa component of a binary toxin of Bacillus thuringiensis. Nevertheless, injection or feeding of heterologously produced Pam showed no insecticidal activity to either Galleria mellonella or Manduca sexta larvae. In bacterial colonies, Pam is associated with an extracellular polysaccharide (EPS-like matrix, and modifies the ability of wild-type cells to attach to an artificial surface. Interestingly, Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR binding studies revealed that the Pam protein itself has adhesive properties. Although Pam is produced throughout insect infection, genetic knockout does not affect either insect virulence or the ability of P. luminescens to form a symbiotic association with its host nematode, Heterorhabditis bacteriophora. Conclusions We studied a highly abundant protein, Pam, which is secreted in a temperature-dependent manner in P. asymbiotica. Our findings indicate that Pam plays an important role in enhancing surface attachment in insect blood. Its association with exopolysaccharide suggests it may exert its effect

  11. Cementum attachment protein manifestation is restricted to the mineralized tissue forming cells of the periodontium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bar-Kana, I.; Pitaru, S. [Tel Aviv Univ., Dept. of Oral Biology, Goldschleger School of dental Medicine (Israel); Savion, N. [Tel Aviv Univ., Goldschleger Eye Research Inst. (Israel); Narayanan, A.S. [Univ. of Washington, Dept. of Pathology, Faculty of Medicine (United States)

    1998-08-01

    The mechanisms that regulate cementogenesis are mainly unknown. A specific cementum attachment protein (CAP) has been recently partially characterized and found to be more efficient in supporting the attachment of alveolar bone cells (ABC) and periodontal ligament cells (PLC) than that of gingival fibroblasts (GF). The purpose of this study was to determine the capacity of human periodontal-derived cells to bind an express CAP and to relate these properties to their capacity to express alkaline phosphatase (AlP) and form mineralized tissue (MTF). ABC, PLC and GF were tested. Human stromal bone marrow cells (SBMC) and a cementoma-derived cell line (CC) served as controls. CAP binding was determined using {sup 125}I-CAP. The amount of MTF was assessed by alizarin red staining and image analysis determination of the amount of red-stained material. AlP and CAP expression were examined by histochemistry and immuno-chemistry, respectively. The highest expression of CAP was observed in CC, followed by PLC and ABC in decreasing order, whereas SBMC and GF did not express CAP, SBMC manifested the highest CAP binding capacity followed by CC, ABC, PLC and GF. MTF and AlP manifestation were greatest in SBMC, followed by ABC, PLC and CC. Collectively, the results indicate that CAP binding and secretion are not linked and that CAP manifestation is restricted to periodontal derived cell lineages with the potential of forming mineralized tissues. (au) 39 refs.

  12. Decreased Bacterial Attachment and Protein Adsorption to Coatings Produced by Low Enegy Plasma Polymerization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, T.E.; Kingshott, Peter; Benter, M.

    with a surface less prone to the adsorption of biological matter. In the current study two different hydrophilic nanoscale coatings were produced by low energy plasma polymerization [3] and investigated· f()rl()w ... pr()tein adsorption and bacterial attachment properties. Methods were setup to enable...... and Methods: Coatings: Plasma polymerized poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) (PP-PVP), poly(2-methoxyethyl methacrylate) (PPPMEA) or an inorganic oxide (10) coating were applied onto medical grade silicon rubber sheets (Silopren LSR 2050, Momentive Performance Materials Inc.). Plasma polymerization chamber......-coated crystals were then treated with one of the plasma polymerized coatings. Adsorption of fibrinogen, human serum albumin or immunoglobulin G was measured using a QCM-D instrument [5] (model E4, Q-Sense AB, Vastra Frolunda, Sweden) using a solution of 50llg/1 protein in PBS buffer. Results and Discussion: Our...

  13. Characterization of the fibronectin-attachment protein of Mycobacterium avium reveals a fibronectin-binding motif conserved among mycobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schorey, J S; Holsti, M A; Ratliff, T L; Allen, P M; Brown, E J

    1996-07-01

    Mycobacterium avium is an intracellular pathogen and a major opportunistic infectious agent observed in patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). Evidence suggests that the initial portal of infection by M. avium is often the gastrointestinal tract. However, the mechanism by which the M. avium crosses the epithelial barrier is unclear. A possible mechanism is suggested by the ability of M. avium to bind fibronectin, an extracellular matrix protein that is a virulence factor for several extracellular pathogenic bacteria which bind to mucosal surfaces. To further characterize fibronectin binding by M. avium, we have cloned the M. avium fibronectin-attachment protein (FAP). The M. avium FAP (FAP-A) has an unusually large number of Pro and Ala residues (40% overall) and is 50% identical to FAP of both Mycobacterium leprae and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Using recombinant FAP-A and FAP-A peptides, we show that two non-continuous regions in FAP-A bind fibronectin. Peptides from these regions and homologous sequences from M. leprae FAP inhibit fibronectin binding by both M. avium and Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG). These regions have no homology to eukaryotic fibronectin-binding proteins and are only distantly related to fibronectin-binding peptides of Gram-positive bacteria. Nevertheless, these fibronectin-binding regions are highly conserved among the mycobacterial FAPs, suggesting an essential function for this interaction in mycobacteria infection of their metazoan hosts.

  14. Role of a bacillus Calmette-Guérin fibronectin attachment protein in BCG-induced antitumor activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, W; Schorey, J S; Bong-Mastek, M; Ritchey, J; Brown, E J; Ratliff, T L

    2000-04-01

    Intravesical Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Gu*erin (BCG) is the treatment of choice for superficial bladder cancer. Previous studies showed that attachment of BCG to fibronectin within the bladder was necessary for mediation of the antitumor response. Further studies identified a bacterial receptor, fibronectin attachment protein (FAP), as an important mediator of BCG attachment to fibronectin. In vitro studies showed that a stable BCG/fibronectin interaction was dependent on FAP binding to fibronectin; however, no role for FAP in the attachment of BCG in vivo has been characterized. We now report the cloning of the M. bovis BCG FAP (FAP-B) and demonstrate an important role for FAP in the in vivo attachment of BCG to the bladder wall and in the induction of BCG-mediated antitumor activity. The predicted amino acid sequence for FAP-B shows 61% and 71% homology, respectively, with Mycobacterium avium FAP (FAP-A) and Mycobacterium leprae FAP (FAP-L). Rabbit polyclonal antibodies against Mycobacterium vaccae FAP (FAP-V) reacted with all 3 recombinant FAP proteins on Western blots. Functional studies show FAP-B to bind fibronectin via the highly conserved attachment regions previously identified for FAP-A and FAP-L and also to competitively inhibit attachment of BCG to matrix fibronectin. In vivo studies show FAP to be a necessary protein for the stable attachment of BCG to the bladder wall. Moreover, stable binding of BCG via FAP was shown to be necessary for the expression of BCG-induced antitumor activity. Our results demonstrate a biological role for FAP in the mediation of BCG-induced antitumor activity.

  15. The distribution of lipid attached spin probes in bilayers: application to membrane protein topology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Alexander; Scheidt, Holger A; Huster, Daniel

    2003-09-01

    The distribution of the lipid-attached doxyl electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spin label in 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine membranes has been studied by (1)H and (13)C magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation measurements. The doxyl spin label was covalently attached to the 5th, 10th, and 16th carbons of the sn-2 stearic acid chain of a 1-palmitoyl-2-stearoyl-(5/10/16-doxyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine analog. Due to the unpaired electron of the spin label, (1)H and (13)C lipid relaxation rates are enhanced by paramagnetic relaxation. For all lipid segments the influence of paramagnetic relaxation is observed even at low probe concentrations. Paramagnetic relaxation rates provide a measure for the interaction strength between lipid segments and the doxyl group. Plotted along the membrane director a transverse distribution profile of the EPR probe is obtained. The chain-attached spin labels are broadly distributed in the membrane with a maximum at the approximate chain position of the probe. Both (1)H and (13)C relaxation measurements show these broad distributions of the doxyl group in the membrane indicating that (1)H spin diffusion does not influence the relaxation measurements. The broad distributions of the EPR label result from the high degree of mobility and structural heterogeneity in liquid-crystalline membranes. Knowing the distribution profiles of the EPR probes, their influence on relaxation behavior of membrane inserted peptide and protein segments can be studied by (13)C magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance. As an example, the location of Ala residues positioned at three sites of the transmembrane WALP-16 peptide was investigated. All three doxyl-labeled phospholipid analogs induce paramagnetic relaxation of the respective Ala site. However, for well ordered secondary structures the strongest relaxation enhancement is observed for that doxyl group in the closest proximity to the respective Ala. Thus

  16. Sex, Receptors and Attachment: A Review of Individual Factors Influencing Response to Oxytocin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai S Macdonald

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available As discussed in the larger review in this special issue (MacDonald and Feifel, intranasal oxytocin (IN OT is demonstrating a growing potential as a therapeutic agent in psychiatry. Importantly, research suggests that a variety of individual factors may influence a person’s response to OT. In this mini-review, I provides a review of three: (1 sex and hormonal status; (2 genetic variation in aspects of the OT system (i.e. OT receptors; and (3 attachment history. Each of these factors will be important to monitor as we strive to develop a richer understanding of OT's role in human development, brain-based disease, and the potential for individualized, OT-targeted treatments.

  17. Immunogenicity of recombinant porcine attaching and effacing-associated protein compared with intimin fragment in Escherichia coli O157:H7-infected mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tao; Han, Ran; Wang, Qin; Wang, Shenghan; Fang, Huali; Li, Zhan; Tu, Wei; Wang, Dehui; Wang, Hui

    2013-12-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) causes a wide spectrum of food- and waterborne infectious diseases, including diarrhea, hemorrhagic colitis, and even hemolytic-uremic syndrome. Porcine attaching and effacing-associated protein (Paa) was first identified in a porcine enteropathogenic E. coli strain. It has been proven essential in the attaching and effacing mechanism of EHEC. However, the immunologic function of the Paa protein has yet to be established. In the present study, recombinant Paa protein was overexpressed successfully in engineered E. coli and effectively purified to homogeneity. Comparative experiments were carried out in mice with a known adhesion factor (intimin) as reference to investigate the immunogenicity of Paa. Intraperitoneal immunization of Paa protein in mice elicited significantly high levels of serum immunoglobulin G antibodies via Th2-mediated humoral immune response. In mice challenged with E. coli O157:H7, Paa protein exhibited immunological effectiveness against pathogenic bacteria colonization and excretion in vivo. Compared with the intimin, Paa showed better protective effect against E. coli O157:H7 infection in mice, particularly those challenged with high lethal doses of the pathogen. Seventy percent of the mice challenged with 50 minimal lethal dose (MLD) in the Paa group survived, whereas only 50% survived in the intimin group. This finding is the first description of the immunologic function of the Paa protein. These attributes provide support for the development of Paa-based vaccine, which can be beneficial in treating infectious diseases caused by E. coli O157:H7.

  18. A hybrid toxin from bacteriophage f1 attachment protein and colicin E3 has altered cell receptor specificity.

    OpenAIRE

    Jakes, K S; Davis, N G; Zinder, N D

    1988-01-01

    A hybrid protein was constructed in vitro which consists of the first 372 amino acids of the attachment (gene III) protein of filamentous bacteriophage f1 fused, in frame, to the carboxy-terminal catalytic domain of colicin E3. The hybrid toxin killed cells that had the F-pilus receptor for phage f1 but not F- cells. The activity of the hybrid protein was not dependent upon the presence of the colicin E3 receptor, BtuB protein. The killing activity was colicin E3 specific, since F+ cells expr...

  19. Tight attachment of chitin-binding-domain-tagged proteins to surfaces coated with acetylated chitosan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Michael P; Cao, Donghui; Myers, Rebecca V; Moyle, William R

    2004-04-15

    Several excellent procedures for trapping tagged proteins have been devised, but many of these are expensive, cannot be used outside a limited pH range, fail to work in the presence of chaotropic agents, or are difficult to use. The chitin binding domain (CBD) of Bacillus circulans chitinase, which binds to chitin matrices prepared from inexpensive reagents isolated from crab shells, is an alternative tag that can be used under a variety of pH and denaturing conditions. Kits based on the interaction between the CBD and the chitin beads are available commercially. Here, we show that simultaneous treatment of microtiter plates with chitosan, a deacetylated form of chitin, and acetic anhydride produces a surface-bound film of chitin that also interacts tightly with the CBD. Chitin-coated microtiter well plates captured a CBD-tagged heterodimeric human glycoprotein hormone analog directly from mammalian cell culture media, even when present in trace amounts. Binding to the surface was stable in sodium dodecylsulfate and reversed only partially at low pH or in 8M urea at 37 degrees C. This technique appears well suited to surface attachment and permits biochemical or other analyses of molecules that can be tagged with a CBD.

  20. Investigation of protein adsorption performance of Ni2+-attached diatomite particles embedded in composite monolithic cryogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ünlü, Nuri; Ceylan, Şeyda; Erzengin, Mahmut; Odabaşı, Mehmet

    2011-08-01

    As a low-cost natural adsorbent, diatomite (DA) (2 μm) has several advantages including high surface area, chemical reactivity, hydrophilicity and lack of toxicity. In this study, the protein adsorption performance of supermacroporous composite cryogels embedded with Ni(2+)-attached DA particles (Ni(2+)-ADAPs) was investigated. Supermacroporous poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (PHEMA)-based monolithic composite cryogel column embedded with Ni(2+)-ADAPs was prepared by radical cryo-copolymerization of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) with N,N'-methylene-bis-acrylamide (MBAAm) as cross-linker directly in a plastic syringe for affinity purification of human serum albumin (HSA) both from aqueous solutions and human serum. The chemical composition and surface area of DA was determined by XRF and BET method, respectively. The characterization of composite cryogel was investigated by SEM. The effect of pH, and embedded Ni(2+)-ADAPs amount, initial HSA concentration, temperature and flow rate on adsorption were studied. The maximum amount of HSA adsorption from aqueous solution at pH 8.0 phosphate buffer was very high (485.15 mg/g DA). It was observed that HSA could be repeatedly adsorbed and desorbed to the embedded Ni(2+)-ADAPs in poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) composite cryogel without significant loss of adsorption capacity. The efficiency of albumin adsorption from human serum before and after albumin adsorption was also investigated with SDS-PAGE analyses. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Copper attachment to prion protein at a non-octarepeat site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodak, Miroslav; Bernholc, Jerry

    2011-03-01

    Prion protein (PrP) plays a causative role in a group of neurodegenerative diseases, which include ``mad cow disease'' or its human form variant Creutzfeld-Jacob disease. Normal function of PrP remains unknown, but it is now well established that PrP can efficiently bind copper ions and this ability has been linked to its function. The primary binding sites are located in the so-called octarepeat region located between residues 60-91. While these are by now well characterized, the sites located outside these region remain mostly undetermined. In this work, we investigate the properties of Cu binding site located at His 111 using recently developed hybrid Kohn-Sham/orbital-free density functional simulations. Experimental data indicate that copper is coordinated by either four nitrogens or three nitrogens and one oxygen. We investigate both possibilities, comparing their energetics and attachment geometries. Similarities and differences with other binding sites and implications for PrP function will also be discussed.

  2. Long noncoding RNA PANDA and scaffold-attachment-factor SAFA control senescence entry and exit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puvvula, Pavan Kumar; Desetty, Rohini Devi; Pineau, Pascal; Marchio, Agnés; Moon, Anne; Dejean, Anne; Bischof, Oliver

    2014-11-19

    Cellular senescence is a stable cell cycle arrest that limits the proliferation of pre-cancerous cells. Here we demonstrate that scaffold-attachment-factor A (SAFA) and the long noncoding RNA PANDA differentially interact with polycomb repressive complexes (PRC1 and PRC2) and the transcription factor NF-YA to either promote or suppress senescence. In proliferating cells, SAFA and PANDA recruit PRC complexes to repress the transcription of senescence-promoting genes. Conversely, the loss of SAFA-PANDA-PRC interactions allows expression of the senescence programme. Accordingly, we find that depleting either SAFA or PANDA in proliferating cells induces senescence. However, in senescent cells where PANDA sequesters transcription factor NF-YA and limits the expression of NF-YA-E2F-coregulated proliferation-promoting genes, PANDA depletion leads to an exit from senescence. Together, our results demonstrate that PANDA confines cells to their existing proliferative state and that modulating its level of expression can cause entry or exit from senescence.

  3. Development of a Chemoenzymatic-like and Photoswitchable Method for the Ordered Attachment of Proteins to Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camarero, J A; Kwon, Y; Coleman, M

    2005-02-11

    Protein arrays are the best tool for the rapid analysis of a whole proteome thus helping to identify all the protein/protein interactions in a living cell and they can also be used as powerful biosensors. The objective of this proposal is to develop a new entropically activated ligation method based in the naturally occurring protein trans-splicing process. This method will be used for the generation of spatially addressable arrays of multiple protein components by standard photolithographic techniques. Key to our approach is the use of the protein trans-splicing process. This naturally occurring process will allow us to create a truly generic and highly efficient method for the covalent attachment of proteins through its C-terminus to any solid support.

  4. The repetitive cytoskeletal protein H49 of Trypanosoma cruzi is a calpain-like protein located at the flagellum attachment zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galetović, Alexandra; Souza, Renata T; Santos, Marcia R M; Cordero, Esteban M; Bastos, Izabela M D; Santana, Jaime M; Ruiz, Jeronimo C; Lima, Fabio M; Marini, Marjorie M; Mortara, Renato A; da Silveira, José Franco

    2011-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi has a single flagellum attached to the cell body by a network of specialized cytoskeletal and membranous connections called the flagellum attachment zone. Previously, we isolated a DNA fragment (clone H49) which encodes tandemly arranged repeats of 68 amino acids associated with a high molecular weight cytoskeletal protein. In the current study, the genomic complexity of H49 and its relationships to the T. cruzi calpain-like cysteine peptidase family, comprising active calpains and calpain-like proteins, is addressed. Immunofluorescence analysis and biochemical fractionation were used to demonstrate the cellular location of H49 proteins. All of H49 repeats are associated with calpain-like sequences. Sequence analysis demonstrated that this protein, now termed H49/calpain, consists of an amino-terminal catalytic cysteine protease domain II, followed by a large region of 68-amino acid repeats tandemly arranged and a carboxy-terminal segment carrying the protease domains II and III. The H49/calpains can be classified as calpain-like proteins as the cysteine protease catalytic triad has been partially conserved in these proteins. The H49/calpains repeats share less than 60% identity with other calpain-like proteins in Leishmania and T. brucei, and there is no immunological cross reaction among them. It is suggested that the expansion of H49/calpain repeats only occurred in T. cruzi after separation of a T. cruzi ancestor from other trypanosomatid lineages. Immunofluorescence and immunoblotting experiments demonstrated that H49/calpain is located along the flagellum attachment zone adjacent to the cell body. H49/calpain contains large central region composed of 68-amino acid repeats tandemly arranged. They can be classified as calpain-like proteins as the cysteine protease catalytic triad is partially conserved in these proteins. H49/calpains could have a structural role, namely that of ensuring that the cell body remains attached to the flagellum by

  5. Transcriptional mapping of a late gene coding for the p12 attachment protein of African swine fever virus.

    OpenAIRE

    1993-01-01

    The transcriptional characterization of the gene coding for the p12 attachment protein of the African swine fever virus is presented. The results obtained have been used to generate the first detailed transcriptional map of an African swine fever virus late gene. Novel experimental evidence indicating the existence of major differences between the mechanisms controlling the transcription of late genes in African swine fever virus and poxviruses is provided.

  6. Kank Is an EB1 interacting protein that localises to muscle-tendon attachment sites in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara M R Clohisey

    Full Text Available Little is known about how microtubules are regulated in different cell types during development. EB1 plays a central role in the regulation of microtubule plus ends. It directly binds to microtubule plus ends and recruits proteins which regulate microtubule dynamics and behaviour. We report the identification of Kank, the sole Drosophila orthologue of human Kank proteins, as an EB1 interactor that predominantly localises to embryonic attachment sites between muscle and tendon cells. Human Kank1 was identified as a tumour suppressor and has documented roles in actin regulation and cell polarity in cultured mammalian cells. We found that Drosophila Kank binds EB1 directly and this interaction is essential for Kank localisation to microtubule plus ends in cultured cells. Kank protein is expressed throughout fly development and increases during embryogenesis. In late embryos, it accumulates to sites of attachment between muscle and epidermal cells. A kank deletion mutant was generated. We found that the mutant is viable and fertile without noticeable defects. Further analysis showed that Kank is dispensable for muscle function in larvae. This is in sharp contrast to C. elegans in which the Kank orthologue VAB-19 is required for development by stabilising attachment structures between muscle and epidermal cells.

  7. Oriented Attachment of Recombinant Proteins to Agarose-Coated Magnetic Nanoparticles by Means of a β-Trefoil Lectin Domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acebrón, Iván; Ruiz-Estrada, Amalia G; Luengo, Yurena; Morales, María Del Puerto; Guisán, José Manuel; Mancheño, José Miguel

    2016-11-16

    Design of generic methods aimed at the oriented attachment of proteins at the interfacial environment of magnetic nanoparticles currently represents an active field of research. With this in mind, we have prepared and characterized agarose-coated maghemite nanoparticles to set up a platform for the attachment of recombinant proteins fused to the β-trefoil lectin domain LSL150, a small protein that combines fusion tag properties with agarose-binding capacity. Analysis of the agarose-coated nanoparticles by dynamic light scattering, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric studies shows that decoupling particle formation from agarose coating provides better results in terms of coating efficiency and particle size distribution. LSL150 interacts with these agarose-coated nanoparticles exclusively through the recognition of the sugars of the polymer, forming highly stable complexes, which in turn can be dissociated ad hoc with the competing sugar lactose. Characterization of the complexes formed with the fusion proteins LSL-EGFP (LSL-tagged enhanced green fluorescent protein from Aquorea victoria) and LSL-BTL2 (LSL-tagged lipase from Geobacillus thermocatenolatus) provided evidence supporting a topologically oriented binding of these molecules to the interface of the agarose-coated nanoparticles. This is consistent with the marked polarity of the β-trefoil structure where the sugar-binding sites and the N- and C-terminus ends are at opposed sides. In summary, LSL150 displays topological and functional features expected from a generic molecular adaptor for the oriented attachment of proteins at the interface of agarose-coated nanoparticles.

  8. Pride and prejudice: factors affecting school attachment among lesbian, bisexual, and heterosexual girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Tracey; Taylor, Catherine; Ristock, Janice; Edkins, Tamara

    2015-01-01

    School attachment is often regarded as a key measure in gauging the integration and wellbeing of students. Previous research suggests that levels of school attachment are generally lower among sexual minority students, but most studies focus on between-gender comparisons and do not conduct within-gender analyses. Using data from the First National Climate Survey on Homophobia and Transphobia in Canadian schools, this study set out to empirically analyze what, if any, differences exist among lesbian, bisexual, and heterosexual female students when assessing the relationship between homophobic and gender-negative language, feelings of safety, harassment/direct victimization, and school climate on school attachment. Bivariate and multivariate findings suggest that there are key differences among female students in terms of school attachment.

  9. The B-domain of factor VIII reduces cell membrane attachement to host cells in serum free conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolind, Mille Petersen; Nørby, Peder Lisby; Flintegaard, Thomas Veje

    2010-01-01

    engineered extensively throughout the years to increase the low production yields that initially were obtained from mammalian cell cultures. The scope of this work was to investigate the interaction of rFVIII with the cell membrane surface of the producing cells in serum free medium. We wondered whether...... binding of rFVIII to the cell membrane could be a factor diminishing the production yield. We studied the contribution of the rFVIII B-domain to membrane attachment by transfecting several constructs containing increasing lengths of the B-domain into cells under serum free conditions. We found that 90......% of rFVIII is attached to the cell membrane of the producing cell when the rFVIII variant contains a short B-domain (21 aa). By increasing the length of the B-domain the membrane attached fraction can be reduced to 50% of the total expressed rFVIII. Further, our studies show that the N...

  10. C. elegans PAT-9 is a nuclear zinc finger protein critical for the assembly of muscle attachments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Qian

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Caenorhabditis elegans sarcomeres have been studied extensively utilizing both forward and reverse genetic techniques to provide insight into muscle development and the mechanisms behind muscle contraction. A previous genetic screen investigating early muscle development produced 13 independent mutant genes exhibiting a Pat (paralyzed and arrested elongation at the two-fold length of embryonic development muscle phenotype. This study reports the identification and characterization of one of those genes, pat-9. Results Positional cloning, reverse genetics, and plasmid rescue experiments were used to identify the predicted C. elegans gene T27B1.2 (recently named ztf-19 as the pat-9 gene. Analysis of pat-9 showed it is expressed early in development and within body wall muscle lineages, consistent with a role in muscle development and producing a Pat phenotype. However, unlike most of the other known Pat gene family members, which encode structural components of muscle attachment sites, PAT-9 is an exclusively nuclear protein. Analysis of the predicted PAT-9 amino acid sequence identified one putative nuclear localization domain and three C2H2 zinc finger domains. Both immunocytochemistry and PAT-9::GFP fusion expression confirm that PAT-9 is primarily a nuclear protein and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP experiments showed that PAT-9 is present on certain gene promoters. Conclusions We have shown that the T27B1.2 gene is pat-9. Considering the Pat-9 mutant phenotype shows severely disrupted muscle attachment sites despite PAT-9 being a nuclear zinc finger protein and not a structural component of muscle attachment sites, we propose that PAT-9 likely functions in the regulation of gene expression for some necessary structural or regulatory component(s of the muscle attachment sites.

  11. Systemic factors dominate mammal protein evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinogradov, Alexander E

    2010-05-07

    Proteins encoded by highly expressed genes evolve more slowly. This correlation is thought to arise owing to purifying selection against toxicity of misfolded proteins (that should be more crucial for highly expressed genes). It is now widely accepted that this individual (by-gene) effect is a dominant cause in protein evolution. Here, I show that in mammals, the evolutionary rate of a protein is much more strongly related to the evolutionary rate of coexpressed proteins (and proteins of the same biological pathway) than to the expression level of its encoding gene. The complexity of gene regulation (estimated by the numbers of transcription factor targets and regulatory microRNA targets in the encoding gene) is another important cause, which is much stronger than gene expression level. Proteins encoded by complexly regulated genes evolve more slowly. The intronic length and the ratio of intronic to coding sequence lengths also correlate negatively with protein evolutionary rate (which contradicts the expectation from the negative link between expression level and evolutionary rate). One more important factor, which is much stronger than gene expression level, is evolutionary age. More recent proteins evolve faster, and expression level of an encoding gene becomes quite a minor cause in the evolution of mammal proteins of metazoan origin. These data suggest that, in contrast to a widespread opinion, systemic factors dominate mammal protein evolution.

  12. Integrated Method to Attach DNA Handles and Functionally Select Proteins to Study Folding and Protein-Ligand Interactions with Optical Tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Yuxin; Canavan, Clare; Taylor, Susan S; Maillard, Rodrigo A

    2017-09-07

    Optical tweezers has emerged as a powerful tool to study folding, ligand binding, and motor enzymes. The manipulation of proteins with optical tweezers requires attaching molecular handles to the protein of interest. Here, we describe a novel method that integrates the covalent attachment of DNA handles to target proteins with a selection step for functional and properly folded molecules. In addition, this method enables obtaining protein molecules in different liganded states and can be used with handles of different lengths. We apply this method to study the cAMP binding domain A (CBD-A) of Protein kinase A. We find that the functional selection step drastically improves the reproducibility and homogeneity of the single molecule data. In contrast, without a functional selection step, proteins often display misfolded conformations. cAMP binding stabilizes the CBD-A against a denaturing force, and increases the folded state lifetime. Data obtained with handles of 370 and 70 base pairs are indistinguishable, but at low forces short handles provide a higher spatial resolution. Altogether, this method is flexible, selects for properly folded molecules in different liganded states, and can be readily applicable to study protein folding or protein-ligand interactions with force spectroscopy that require molecular handles.

  13. Diffusely Adhering Escherichia coli Strains Induce Attaching and Effacing Phenotypes and Secrete Homologs of Esp Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Beinke, Christina; Laarmann, Sven; Wachter, Clemens; Karch, Helge; Greune, Lilo; Schmidt, M. Alexander

    1998-01-01

    Recent epidemiological studies indicate that Escherichia coli strains which exhibit the diffuse-adherence phenotype (DAEC strains) represent a potential cause of diarrhea in infants. We investigated the interaction of DAEC strains isolated from diarrhea patients in Brazil and in Germany with epithelial cells in tissue culture. The investigated strains were identified as DAEC strains by (i) their attachment pattern, (ii) presence of genes associated with the Dr family of adhesins, and (iii) la...

  14. Enhanced quality factors and force sensitivity by attaching magnetic beads to cantilevers for atomic force microscopy in liquid

    CERN Document Server

    Hoof, Sebastian; Hoogenboom, Bart W

    2012-01-01

    Dynamic-mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) in liquid remains complicated due to the strong viscous damping of the cantilever resonance. Here we show that a high-quality resonance (Q>20) can be achieved in aqueous solution by attaching a microgram-bead at the end of the nanogram-cantilever. The resulting increase in cantilever mass causes the resonance frequency to drop significantly. However, the force sensitivity --- as expressed via the minimum detectable force gradient --- is hardly affected, because of the enhanced quality factor. Via the enhancement of the quality factor, the attached bead also reduces the relative importance of noise in the deflection detector. It can thus yield an improved signal-to-noise ratio when this detector noise is significant. We describe and analyze these effects for a set-up which includes magnetic actuation of the cantilevers and which can be easily implemented in any AFM system that is compatible with an inverted optical microscope.

  15. Personalized protein coronas : a "key" factor at the nanobiointerface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hajipour, Mohammad J.; Laurent, Sophie; Aghaie, Afsaneh; Rezaee, Farhad; Mahmoudi, Morteza

    2014-01-01

    It is now well known that the primary interactions of biological entities (e. g., tissues and cells) with nano-particles (NPs) are strongly influenced by the protein composition of the "corona" (i. e., the NP surface attached proteins). The composition of the corona strongly depends on the protein s

  16. Adolescent-parent attachment and externalizing behavior: The mediating role of individual and social factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, S.L.A.; Hoeve, M.; Stams, G.J.J.M.; Asscher, J.J.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test whether the associations between adolescent-parent attachment and externalizing problem behavior of adolescents were mediated by adolescent cognitive distortions, self-esteem, parental monitoring and association with deviant peers. A total of 102 adolescents (71 % m

  17. Adolescent-parent attachment and externalizing behavior: the mediating role of individual and social factors.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, L.A.; Hoeve, M.; Stams, G.J.J.M.; Asscher, J.J.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test whether the associations between adolescent-parent attachment and externalizing problem behavior of adolescents were mediated by adolescent cognitive distortions, self-esteem, parental monitoring and association with deviant peers. A total of 102 adolescents (71 % m

  18. Adolescent-parent attachment and externalizing behavior: The mediating role of individual and social factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, S.L.A.; Hoeve, M.; Stams, G.J.J.M.; Asscher, J.J.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test whether the associations between adolescent-parent attachment and externalizing problem behavior of adolescents were mediated by adolescent cognitive distortions, self-esteem, parental monitoring and association with deviant peers. A total of 102 adolescents (71 %

  19. Adolescent-parent attachment and externalizing behavior: the mediating role of individual and social factors.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, L.A.; Hoeve, M.; Stams, G.J.J.M.; Asscher, J.J.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test whether the associations between adolescent-parent attachment and externalizing problem behavior of adolescents were mediated by adolescent cognitive distortions, self-esteem, parental monitoring and association with deviant peers. A total of 102 adolescents (71 %

  20. Adolescent-parent attachment and externalizing behavior: the mediating role of individual and social factors.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, L.A.; Hoeve, M.; Stams, G.J.J.M.; Asscher, J.J.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test whether the associations between adolescent-parent attachment and externalizing problem behavior of adolescents were mediated by adolescent cognitive distortions, self-esteem, parental monitoring and association with deviant peers. A total of 102 adolescents (71 % m

  1. The repetitive cytoskeletal protein H49 of Trypanosoma cruzi is a calpain-like protein located at the flagellum attachment zone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Galetović

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Trypanosoma cruzi has a single flagellum attached to the cell body by a network of specialized cytoskeletal and membranous connections called the flagellum attachment zone. Previously, we isolated a DNA fragment (clone H49 which encodes tandemly arranged repeats of 68 amino acids associated with a high molecular weight cytoskeletal protein. In the current study, the genomic complexity of H49 and its relationships to the T. cruzi calpain-like cysteine peptidase family, comprising active calpains and calpain-like proteins, is addressed. Immunofluorescence analysis and biochemical fractionation were used to demonstrate the cellular location of H49 proteins. METHODS AND FINDINGS: All of H49 repeats are associated with calpain-like sequences. Sequence analysis demonstrated that this protein, now termed H49/calpain, consists of an amino-terminal catalytic cysteine protease domain II, followed by a large region of 68-amino acid repeats tandemly arranged and a carboxy-terminal segment carrying the protease domains II and III. The H49/calpains can be classified as calpain-like proteins as the cysteine protease catalytic triad has been partially conserved in these proteins. The H49/calpains repeats share less than 60% identity with other calpain-like proteins in Leishmania and T. brucei, and there is no immunological cross reaction among them. It is suggested that the expansion of H49/calpain repeats only occurred in T. cruzi after separation of a T. cruzi ancestor from other trypanosomatid lineages. Immunofluorescence and immunoblotting experiments demonstrated that H49/calpain is located along the flagellum attachment zone adjacent to the cell body. CONCLUSIONS: H49/calpain contains large central region composed of 68-amino acid repeats tandemly arranged. They can be classified as calpain-like proteins as the cysteine protease catalytic triad is partially conserved in these proteins. H49/calpains could have a structural role, namely that of

  2. Design of 8-ft-Diameter Barrel Test Article Attachment Rings for Shell Buckling Knockdown Factor Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovejoy, Andrew E.; Hilburger, Mark W.

    2010-01-01

    The Shell Buckling Knockdown Factor (SBKF) project includes the testing of sub-scale cylinders to validate new shell buckling knockdown factors for use in the design of the Ares-I and Ares-V launch vehicles. Test article cylinders represent various barrel segments of the Ares-I and Ares-V vehicles, and also include checkout test articles. Testing will be conducted at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) for test articles having an eight-foot diameter outer mold line (OML) and having lengths that range from three to ten feet long. Both ends of the test articles will be connected to the test apparatus using attachment rings. Three multiple-piece and one single-piece design for the attachment rings were developed and analyzed. The single-piece design was chosen and will be fabricated from either steel or aluminum (Al) depending on the required safety factors (SF) for test hardware. This report summarizes the design and analysis of these attachment ring concepts.

  3. The modular xylanase Xyn10A from Rhodothermus marinus is cell-attached, and its C-terminal domain has several putative homologues among cell-attached proteins within the phylum Bacteroidetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsson, Eva Nordberg; Hachem, Maher Abou; Ramchuran, Santosh

    2004-01-01

    cell attachment. To confirm this theory, R. marinus was grown, and activity assays showed that the major part of the xylanase activity was connected to whole cells. Moreover, immunocytochemical detection using a Xyn10A-specific antibody proved presence of Xyn10A on the R. marinus cell surface......-termini of proteins that were predominantly extra-cellular/cell attached. A primary structure motif of three conserved regions including structurally important glycines and a proline was also identified suggesting a conserved 3D fold. This bioinformatic evidence suggested a possible role of this domain in mediating....... In the light of this, a revision of experimental data present on both Xyn10A and Man26A was performed, and the results all indicate a cell-anchoring role of the domain, suggesting that this domain represents a novel type of module that mediates cell attachment in proteins originating from members of the phylum...

  4. The Coxsackievirus-Adenovirus Receptor Protein Can Function as a Cellular Attachment Protein for Adenovirus Serotypes from Subgroups A, C, D, E, and F

    OpenAIRE

    Roelvink, Peter W.; Lizonova, Alena; Lee, Jennifer G. M.; Li, Yuan; Bergelson, Jeffrey M.; Finberg, Robert W.; Douglas E Brough; Kovesdi, Imre; Wickham, Thomas J.

    1998-01-01

    Attachment of an adenovirus (Ad) to a cell is mediated by the capsid fiber protein. To date, only the cellular fiber receptor for subgroup C serotypes 2 and 5, the so-called coxsackievirus-adenovirus receptor (CAR) protein, has been identified and cloned. Previous data suggested that the fiber of the subgroup D serotype Ad9 also recognizes CAR, since Ad9 and Ad2 fiber knobs cross-blocked each other’s cellular binding. Recombinant fiber knobs and 3H-labeled Ad virions from serotypes representi...

  5. Mutation of praR in Rhizobium leguminosarum enhances root biofilms, improving nodulation competitiveness by increased expression of attachment proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederix, Marijke; Edwards, Anne; Swiderska, Anna; Stanger, Andrew; Karunakaran, Ramakrishnan; Williams, Alan; Abbruscato, Pamela; Sanchez-Contreras, Maria; Poole, Philip S; Downie, J Allan

    2014-08-01

    In Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae, quorum-sensing is regulated by CinR, which induces the cinIS operon. CinI synthesizes an AHL, whereas CinS inactivates PraR, a repressor. Mutation of praR enhanced biofilms in vitro. We developed a light (lux)-dependent assay of rhizobial attachment to roots and demonstrated that mutation of praR increased biofilms on pea roots. The praR mutant out-competed wild-type for infection of pea nodules in mixed inoculations. Analysis of gene expression by microarrays and promoter fusions revealed that PraR represses its own transcription and mutation of praR increased expression of several genes including those encoding secreted proteins (the adhesins RapA2, RapB and RapC, two cadherins and the glycanase PlyB), the polysaccharide regulator RosR, and another protein similar to PraR. PraR bound to the promoters of several of these genes indicating direct repression. Mutations in rapA2, rapB, rapC, plyB, the cadherins or rosR did not affect the enhanced root attachment or nodule competitiveness of the praR mutant. However combinations of mutations in rapA, rapB and rapC abolished the enhanced attachment and nodule competitiveness. We conclude that relief of PraR-mediated repression determines a lifestyle switch allowing the expression of genes that are important for biofilm formation on roots and the subsequent initiation of infection of legume roots.

  6. The fluorescent detection of Paradiplozoon sp. (Monogenea: Diplozoidae attachment clamps' sclerites and integumental proteins : research communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.J. Milne

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available In the genus Paradiplozoon, few hard structures are present therefore most of the taxonomic studies have focused on the unique ultrastructure of the sclerites. Alcohol-fixed specimens were transferred to BSA-saline for 5 min. before staining indefinitely with 5 µl WGA-TRX, 5 µl SYTO 9 and 5 µl of Cal co fluor White M2R. Rhodamine, Fluorescein and DAPI bandpass filters on the microscope enabled selective light wavelength illumination of the three flourochromes by a mercury light source. This method provided an easy and rapid methodology to show the internal sclerites of attachment clamps. It is suitable for alcohol preserved specimens and may have additional applications in other helminth organisms.

  7. Electrocatalytic features of a heme protein attached to polymer-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Sadagopan; Walgama, Charuksha

    2013-12-03

    Direct electron-transfer and electrocatalytic kinetics of covalently attached myoglobin (MB) films on magnetic nanoparticles (MB-MNP(covalent)), in comparison to the corresponding physisorbed films and individual components, are reported for the first time. MB-MNP(covalent) ("-" denotes a covalent linkage) was adsorbed onto a cationic poly(ethyleneimine) layer (PEI) coated high-purity graphite (HPG) electrode. Similarly, films of myoglobin physisorbed on magnetic nanoparticles (MB/MNP(adsorbed), "/" denotes a noncovalent nature), only MB, or only MNP were constructed on HPG/PEI electrodes for comparison. The observed electron-transfer rate constants (k(s), s(-1)) were in the following order: MB-MNP(covalent) (69 ± 6 s(-1)), MB/MNP(adsorbed) (37 ± 2 s(-1)), only MB (27 ± 2 s(-1)), and only MNP (16 ± 3 s(-1)). The electrocatalytic properties of these films were investigated with the aid of tert-butylhydroperoxide as a model reactant, and its reduction kinetics were examined. We observed the following order of catalytic current density: MB-MNP(covalent) > MB/MNP(adsorbed) > only MNP > only MB, in agreement with the electron-transfer (ET) rates of MB-MNP(covalent) and MB/MNP(adsorbed) films. The crucial function of MNP in favorably altering the direct ET and electrocatalytic properties of both covalently bound MB and physisorbed MB molecules are discussed. In addition, the occurrence of a highly enhanced electron-hopping mechanism in the designed covalent MB-MNP(covalent) films over the corresponding physisorbed MB/MNP(adsorbed) film is proposed. The enhanced electron-transfer rates and catalytic current density suggest the advantages of using metalloenzymes covalently attached to polymer-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles for the development of modern highly efficient miniature biosensors and bioreactors.

  8. Protein Synthesis Initiation Factors: Phosphorylation and Regulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karen S. Browning

    2009-06-15

    The initiation of the synthesis of proteins is a fundamental process shared by all living organisms. Each organism has both shared and unique mechanisms for regulation of this vital process. Higher plants provide for a major amount of fixation of carbon from the environment and turn this carbon into food and fuel sources for our use. However, we have very little understanding of how plants regulate the synthesis of the proteins necessary for these metabolic processes. The research carried out during the grant period sought to address some of these unknowns in the regulation of protein synthesis initiation. Our first goal was to determine if phosphorylation plays a significant role in plant initiation of protein synthesis. The role of phosphorylation, although well documented in mammalian protein synthesis regulation, is not well studied in plants. We showed that several of the factors necessary for the initiation of protein synthesis were targets of plant casein kinase and showed differential phosphorylation by the plant specific isoforms of this kinase. In addition, we identified and confirmed the phosphorylation sites in five of the plant initiation factors. Further, we showed that phosphorylation of one of these factors, eIF5, affected the ability of the factor to participate in the initiation process. Our second goal was to develop a method to make initiation factor 3 (eIF3) using recombinant methods. To date, we successfully cloned and expressed 13/13 subunits of wheat eIF3 in E. coli using de novo gene construction methods. The final step in this process is to place the subunits into three different plasmid operons for co-expression. Successful completion of expression of eIF3 will be an invaluable tool to the plant translation community.

  9. Complement factor H related proteins (CFHRs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skerka, Christine; Chen, Qian; Fremeaux-Bacchi, Veronique; Roumenina, Lubka T

    2013-12-15

    Factor H related proteins comprise a group of five plasma proteins: CFHR1, CFHR2, CFHR3, CFHR4 and CFHR5, and each member of this group binds to the central complement component C3b. Mutations, genetic deletions, duplications or rearrangements in the individual CFHR genes are associated with a number of diseases including atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS), C3 glomerulopathies (C3 glomerulonephritis (C3GN), dense deposit disease (DDD) and CFHR5 nephropathy), IgA nephropathy, age related macular degeneration (AMD) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Although complement regulatory functions were attributed to most of the members of the CFHR protein family, the precise role of each CFHR protein in complement activation and the exact contribution to disease pathology is still unclear. Recent publications show that CFHR proteins form homo- as well as heterodimers. Genetic abnormalities within the CFHR gene locus can result in hybrid proteins with affected dimerization or recognition domains which cause defective functions. Here we summarize the recent data about CFHR genes and proteins in order to better understand the role of CFHR proteins in complement activation and in complement associated diseases.

  10. Decreased Bacterial Attachment and Protein Adsorption to Coatings Produced by Low Enegy Plasma Polymerization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, T.E.; Kingshott, Peter; Benter, M.

    Introduction Silicone rubber is among the most biocompatible materials available, exhibiting low levels of extractables, absence of plasticizers and additives and fairly low activation of blood thrombogenesis components. However untreated silicone rubber does not efficiently resist protein...

  11. Use of tritiated thymidine as a marker to compare the effects of matrix proteins on adult human vascular endothelial cell attachment: implications for seeding of vascular prostheses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasson, J.E.; Wiebe, D.H.; Sharefkin, J.B.; D' Amore, P.A.; Abbott, W.M.

    1986-11-01

    We have developed a technique to measure attachment of adult human vascular endothelial cells to test surfaces with tritiated thymidine used as a marker. With this technique, we measured attachment of adult human vascular endothelial cells to a series of extracellular matrix proteins, including fibronectin-coated (10 micrograms/cm/sup 2/), laminin-coated (10 micrograms/cm/sup 2/), and collagen-coated (1% gelatin) surfaces because of the role of these proteins in promoting cell attachment and growth. For a typical experiment, in the presence of serum, initial attachment (at 1 hour) was greatest on fibronectin-coated (63%) and gelatin-coated (60%) tissue culture plastic (polystyrene) and was least on laminin-coated (28%) or untreated polystyrene (18%). The data suggest that fibronectin, either alone, or with a more complex combination of extracellular components may need to be present on prosthetic surfaces to produce maximal cell attachment and subsequent growth to confluence in vivo. The described method of measuring attachment is independent of surface properties, ensures complete recovery of cells, and will allow systematic exploration of those properties that best support human endothelial cell attachment to vascular prosthetic surfaces.

  12. Formation of fluorescent proteins by the attachment of phycoerythrobilin to R-phycoerythrin alpha and beta apo-subunits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isailovic, Dragan; Sultana, Ishrat; Phillips, Gregory J; Yeung, Edward S

    2006-11-01

    Formation of fluorescent proteins was explored after incubation of recombinant apo-subunits of phycobiliprotein R-phycoerythrin with phycoerythrobilin chromophore. Alpha and beta apo-subunit genes of R-phycoerythrin from red algae Polisiphonia boldii were cloned in plasmid pET-21d(+). Hexahistidine-tagged alpha and beta apo-subunits were expressed in Escherichia coli. Although expressed apo-subunits formed inclusion bodies, fluorescent holo-subunits were constituted after incubation of E. coli cells with phycoerythrobilin. Holo-subunits contained both phycoerythrobilin and urobilin chromophores. Fluorescence and differential interference contrast microscopy showed polar location of holo-subunit inclusion bodies in bacterial cells. Cells containing fluorescent holo-subunits were several times brighter than control cells as found by fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. The addition of phycoerythrobilin to cells did not show cytotoxic effects, in contrast to expression of proteins in inclusion bodies. In an attempt to improve solubility, R-phycoerythrin apo-subunits were fused to maltose-binding protein and incubated with phycoerythrobilin both in vitro and in vivo. Highly fluorescent soluble fusion proteins containing phycoerythrobilin as the sole chromophore were formed. Fusion proteins were localized by fluorescence microscopy either throughout E. coli cells or at cell poles. Flow cytometry showed that cells containing fluorescent fusion proteins were up to 10 times brighter than control cells. Results indicate that fluorescent proteins formed by attachment of phycoerythrobilin to expressed apo-subunits of phycobiliproteins can be used as fluorescent probes for analysis of cells by microscopy and flow cytometry. A unique property of these fluorescent reporters is their utility in both properly folded (soluble) subunits and subunits aggregated in inclusion bodies.

  13. Eliminating a Region of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Attachment Protein Allows Induction of Protective Immunity without Vaccine-enhanced Lung Eosinophilia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparer, Tim E.; Matthews, Stephen; Hussell, Tracy; Rae, Aaron J.; Garcia-Barreno, Blanca; Melero, Jose A.; Openshaw, Peter J.M.

    1998-01-01

    In a murine model of respiratory syncytial virus disease, prior sensitization to the attachment glycoprotein (G) leads to pulmonary eosinophilia and enhanced illness. Three different approaches were taken to dissect the region of G responsible for enhanced disease and protection against challenge. First, mutant viruses, containing frameshifts that altered the COOH terminus of the G protein, were used to challenge mice sensitized by scarification with recombinant vaccinia virus (rVV) expressing wild-type G. Second, cDNA expressing these mutated G proteins were expressed by rVV and used to vaccinate mice before challenge with wild-type respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). These studies identified residues 193–205 to be responsible for G-induced weight loss and lung eosinophilia and showed that this region was not was not necessary for induction of protective immunity. Third, mice were sensitized using an rVV that expressed only amino acids 124–203 of the G protein. Upon RSV challenge, mice sensitized with this rVV developed enhanced weight loss and eosinophilia. This is the first time that a region within RSV (amino acids 193–203) has been shown to be responsible for induction of lung eosinophilia and disease enhancement. Moreover, we now show that it is possible to induce protective immunity with an altered G protein without inducing a pathological response. PMID:9607931

  14. Localization of the African swine fever virus attachment protein P12 in the virus particle by immunoelectron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrascosa, A L; Saastre, I; González, P; Viñuela, E

    1993-03-01

    The African swine fever virus attachment protein p12 was localized in the virion by immunoelectron microscopy. Purified virus particles were incubated, before or after different treatments, with p12-specific monoclonal antibody 24BB7 and labeled with protein A-colloidal gold. Untreated virus particles showed labeling only in lateral protrusions that followed the external virus envelope. Mild treatment of African swine fever virions with the nonionic detergent octyl-glucoside or with ethanol onto the electron microscope grid resulted in a heavier and more homogeneous labeling of the virus particles. In contrast, the release of the external virus proteins by either octyl-glucoside or Nonidet-P40 and beta-mercaptoethanol generated a subviral fraction that was not labeled by 24BB7. Preembedding, labeling, and thin-sectioning experiments confirmed that the antigenic determinant recognized by 24BB7 was localized into the external region of the virus particle but required some disruption to make it more accessible. From these results we conclude that protein p12 is situated in a layer above the virus capsid with, at least, one epitope predominantly not exposed in the virion surface; this epitope may not be related to the virus ligand-cell receptor interaction.

  15. SAS-4 Protein in Trypanosoma brucei Controls Life Cycle Transitions by Modulating the Length of the Flagellum Attachment Zone Filament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Huiqing; Zhou, Qing; Li, Ziyin

    2015-12-18

    The evolutionarily conserved centriole/basal body protein SAS-4 regulates centriole duplication in metazoa and basal body duplication in flagellated and ciliated organisms. Here, we report that the SAS-4 homolog in the flagellated protozoan Trypanosoma brucei, TbSAS-4, plays an unusual role in controlling life cycle transitions by regulating the length of the flagellum attachment zone (FAZ) filament, a specialized cytoskeletal structure required for flagellum adhesion and cell morphogenesis. TbSAS-4 is concentrated at the distal tip of the FAZ filament, and depletion of TbSAS-4 in the trypomastigote form disrupts the elongation of the new FAZ filament, generating cells with a shorter FAZ associated with a longer unattached flagellum and repositioned kinetoplast and basal body, reminiscent of epimastigote-like morphology. Further, we show that TbSAS-4 associates with six additional FAZ tip proteins, and depletion of TbSAS-4 disrupts the enrichment of these FAZ tip proteins at the new FAZ tip, suggesting a role of TbSAS-4 in maintaining the integrity of this FAZ tip protein complex. Together, these results uncover a novel function of TbSAS-4 in regulating the length of the FAZ filament to control basal body positioning and life cycle transitions in T. brucei.

  16. MAPK-activated protein kinase 2 is required for mouse meiotic spindle assembly and kinetochore-microtubule attachment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju Yuan

    Full Text Available MAPK-activated protein kinase 2 (MK2, a direct substrate of p38 MAPK, plays key roles in multiple physiological functions in mitosis. Here, we show for the first time the unique distribution pattern of MK2 in meiosis. Phospho-MK2 was localized on bipolar spindle minus ends and along the interstitial axes of homologous chromosomes extending over centromere regions and arm regions at metaphase of first meiosis (MI stage in mouse oocytes. At metaphase of second meiosis (MII stage, p-MK2 was localized on the bipolar spindle minus ends and at the inner centromere region of sister chromatids as dots. Knockdown or inhibition of MK2 resulted in spindle defects. Spindles were surrounded by irregular nondisjunction chromosomes, which were arranged in an amphitelic or syntelic/monotelic manner, or chromosomes detached from the spindles. Kinetochore-microtubule attachments were impaired in MK2-deficient oocytes because spindle microtubules became unstable in response to cold treatment. In addition, homologous chromosome segregation and meiosis progression were inhibited in these oocytes. Our data suggest that MK2 may be essential for functional meiotic bipolar spindle formation, chromosome segregation and proper kinetochore-microtubule attachments.

  17. Genetic and antigenic analysis of the G attachment protein of bovine respiratory syncytial virus strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elvander, M.; Vilcek, S.; Baule, C.;

    1998-01-01

    Antigenic and genetic studies of bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) were made on isolates obtained from three continents over 27 years. Antigenic variation between eight isolates was initially determined using protein G-specific monoclonal antibodies. Four distinct reaction patterns were...... of a 731 nucleotide fragment in the G protein gene. Nine of the BRSV strains were analysed by direct sequencing of RT-PCR amplicons whereas sequences of 18 BRSV and three human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) strains were obtained from GenBank. The analysis revealed similarities of 88-100% among BRSV...

  18. Attachment and Psychopathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Fatih Ustundag

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The type of attachment defined in the early stages of life and thought to be continuous, is a phenomenon that shapes the pattern of how a person makes contact with others. The clinical appearance of every type of attachment is different and each one has prospective and retrospective phenomenological reflections. In all stages of life and in close relationships, it can be observed if a person gets in close contact with someone else and if this relation bears supportive and protective qualities. According to attachment theorists, once it is defined as safe or unsafe during nursing period, it shows little change. Starting from Bowlby’s work, unsafe attachment type is considered as the determining factor of psychopathology in the later periods of life, while safe attachment is considered as in relation with healthy processes. The nature’s original model is safe attachment. Anxious/indecisive attachment, an unsafe attachment type, is associated with anxiety disorders and depressive disorder, while avoidant attachment is associated with behavior disorder and other extroverted pathologies. Disorganized/disoriented attachment is considered to be together with dissociative disorder. The aim of this paper is to review attachment theory and the relation between attachment and psychopathology.

  19. Characterization of the Soluble NSF Attachment Protein gene family identifies two members involved in additive resistance to a plant pathogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakhssassi, Naoufal; Liu, Shiming; Bekal, Sadia; Zhou, Zhou; Colantonio, Vincent; Lambert, Kris; Barakat, Abdelali; Meksem, Khalid

    2017-01-01

    Proteins with Tetratricopeptide-repeat (TPR) domains are encoded by large gene families and distributed in all plant lineages. In this study, the Soluble NSF-Attachment Protein (SNAP) subfamily of TPR containing proteins is characterized. In soybean, five members constitute the SNAP gene family: GmSNAP18, GmSNAP11, GmSNAP14, GmSNAP02, and GmSNAP09. Recently, GmSNAP18 has been reported to mediate resistance to soybean cyst nematode (SCN). Using a population of recombinant inbred lines from resistant and susceptible parents, the divergence of the SNAP gene family is analysed over time. Phylogenetic analysis of SNAP genes from 22 diverse plant species showed that SNAPs were distributed in six monophyletic clades corresponding to the major plant lineages. Conservation of the four TPR motifs in all species, including ancestral lineages, supports the hypothesis that SNAPs were duplicated and derived from a common ancestor and unique gene still present in chlorophytic algae. Syntenic analysis of regions harbouring GmSNAP genes in soybean reveals that this family expanded from segmental and tandem duplications following a tetraploidization event. qRT-PCR analysis of GmSNAPs indicates a co-regulation following SCN infection. Finally, genetic analysis demonstrates that GmSNAP11 contributes to an additive resistance to SCN. Thus, GmSNAP11 is identified as a novel minor gene conferring resistance to SCN. PMID:28338077

  20. Further insight into the roles of the glycans attached to human blood protein C inhibitor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Wei; Parry, Simon; Ubhayasekera, Wimal

    2010-01-01

    or absence of 6 amino acids at the amino-terminus. In this study we have verified that such heterogeneity exists in PCI purified from single individuals, and that individuals of two different ethnicities possess a similar PCI pattern, verifying that the micro-heterogeneity is conserved among humans......Protein C inhibitor (PCI) is a 57-kDa glycoprotein that exists in many tissues and secretions in human. As a member of the serpin superfamily of proteins it displays unusually broad protease specificity. PCI is implicated in the regulation of a wide range of processes, including blood coagulation......, fertilization, prevention of tumors and pathogen defence. It has been reported that PCI isolated from human blood plasma is highly heterogeneous, and that this heterogeneity is caused by differences in N-glycan structures, N-glycosylation occupancy, and the presence of two forms that differ by the presence...

  1. Genetic and antigenic analysis of the G attachment protein of bovine respiratory syncytial virus strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elvander, M.; Vilcek, S.; Baule, C.

    1998-01-01

    Antigenic and genetic studies of bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) were made on isolates obtained from three continents over 27 years. Antigenic variation between eight isolates was initially determined using protein G-specific monoclonal antibodies. Four distinct reaction patterns were...... of a 731 nucleotide fragment in the G protein gene. Nine of the BRSV strains were analysed by direct sequencing of RT-PCR amplicons whereas sequences of 18 BRSV and three human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) strains were obtained from GenBank. The analysis revealed similarities of 88-100% among BRSV...... strains and 38-41 % between BRSV and HRSV. A phylogenetic tree created for BRSV revealed two main branches, one of which divided into five further lineages, each representing a geographic cluster. A correlation was evident between the positions of some strains in the phylogenetic tree and their antigenic...

  2. Heparan sulfate proteoglycan: an arbovirus attachment factor integral to mosquito salivary gland ducts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciano, Kristen A; Saredy, Jason J; Bowers, Doria F

    2014-12-22

    Variants of the prototype Alphavirus, Sindbis (SINV), were used in per os infections of adult female mosquitoes to investigate arbovirus interaction with the salivary gland (SG). Infection of Aedine mosquitoes with AR339, a heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG)-dependent variant, resulted in gross pathology in the SG lateral lobes while infection with TR339, a HSPG-independent variant, resulted in minimal SG pathology. HSPG was detected in the internal ducts of the SG lateral lobes by immunolabeling but not in the median lobe, or beyond the triad structure and external ducts. Reports that human lactoferrin interacts with HSPG, suggested an interference with virus attachment to receptors on vertebrate cells. Pre-incubation of Aedes albopictus cultured C7-10 cells with bovine lactoferrin (bLF) followed by adsorption of SINV resulted in earlier and greater intensity of cytopathic response to TR339 compared with AR339. Following pre-treatment of C7-10 cells with bLF, plaques from tissue culture-adapted high-titer SINVTaV-GFP-TC were observed at 48 h post-infection (p.i.), while plaques from low-titer SINVTaV-GFP-TC were not observed until 120 h p.i. Confocal optics detected this reporter virus at 30 days p.i. in the SG proximal lateral lobe, a region of HSPG-immunolocalization. Altogether these data suggest an association between SINV and HSPG in the host mosquito.

  3. An epifluorescent attachment improves whole-plant digital photography of Arabidopsis thaliana expressing red-shifted green fluorescent protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Stokes S.; Vidican, Cleo B.; Cameron, David S.; Greib, Haittam G.; Jarocki, Christine C.; Setaputri, Andres W.; Spicuzza, Christopher H.; Burr, Aaron A.; Waqas, Meriam A.; Tolbert, Danzell A.

    2012-01-01

    Background and aims Studies have shown that levels of green fluorescent protein (GFP) leaf surface fluorescence are directly proportional to GFP soluble protein concentration in transgenic plants. However, instruments that measure GFP surface fluorescence are expensive. The goal of this investigation was to develop techniques with consumer digital cameras to analyse GFP surface fluorescence in transgenic plants. Methodology Inexpensive filter cubes containing machine vision dichroic filters and illuminated with blue light-emitting diodes (LED) were designed to attach to digital single-lens reflex (SLR) camera macro lenses. The apparatus was tested on purified enhanced GFP, and on wild-type and GFP-expressing arabidopsis grown autotrophically and heterotrophically. Principal findings Spectrum analysis showed that the apparatus illuminates specimens with wavelengths between ∼450 and ∼500 nm, and detects fluorescence between ∼510 and ∼595 nm. Epifluorescent photographs taken with SLR digital cameras were able to detect red-shifted GFP fluorescence in Arabidopsis thaliana leaves and cotyledons of pot-grown plants, as well as roots, hypocotyls and cotyledons of etiolated and light-grown plants grown heterotrophically. Green fluorescent protein fluorescence was detected primarily in the green channel of the raw image files. Studies with purified GFP produced linear responses to both protein surface density and exposure time (H0: β (slope) = 0 mean counts per pixel (ng s mm−2)−1, r2 > 0.994, n = 31, P < 1.75 × 10−29). Conclusions Epifluorescent digital photographs taken with complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor and charge-coupled device SLR cameras can be used to analyse red-shifted GFP surface fluorescence using visible blue light. This detection device can be constructed with inexpensive commercially available materials, thus increasing the accessibility of whole-organism GFP expression analysis to research laboratories and teaching institutions with

  4. Plant-synthesized E. coli CFA/I fimbrial protein protects Caco-2 cells from bacterial attachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jin-Yong; Yu, Jie; Henderson, David; Langridge, William H R

    2004-11-25

    A DNA fragment encoding the cholera toxin A2 subunit (CTA2) linked to the enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) colony forming fimbrial antigen CFA/I was inserted into a plant expression vector containing the cholera toxin B subunit (CTB) fused to the rotavirus enterotoxin 22 amino acid epitope NSP422. Anti-CFA/I antibodies recognized a single band of approximately 72-kDa in transformed potato tuber tissue consistent with CFA/I-CTA2 and CTB-NSP4 fusion protein assembly into a cholera holotoxin-like structure. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (GM1 ELISA) indicated that the CFA/I-CTA2 fusion protein bound specific GM1 ganglioside membrane receptors and made up approximately 0.002% of the total soluble tuber protein. Oral immunization of BALB/c mice with transformed tuber tissues generated anti-CFA/I serum and intestinal IgG and IgA secretory antibodies. Attachment of ETEC H10407 to enterocyte-like Caco-2 human colon carcinoma cells incubated with antiserum from immunized mice was reduced by 15% in comparison with Caco-2 cells incubated with serum from unimmunized mice. Immunogold staining of bacterial preparations revealed deposition of gold particles on E. coli H10407 fimbria incubated with immune serum but not on fimbria treated with sera from unimmunized mice demonstrating the specificity of antibodies in the immune serum for binding to CFA/I protein containing fimbria. The protection against toxic E. coli binding to Caco-2 cells generated by antisera from mice immunized with plant-synthesized CFA/I antigen demonstrates the feasibility of plant-based multi-component vaccine protection against enterotoxigenic E. coli, rotavirus and cholera, three enteric diseases that together exert the highest levels of child morbidity and mortality in economically emerging countries.

  5. Protein kinase C and extracellular signal-regulated kinase regulate movement, attachment, pairing and egg release in Schistosoma mansoni.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarida Ressurreição

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Protein kinases C (PKCs and extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs are evolutionary conserved cell signalling enzymes that coordinate cell function. Here we have employed biochemical approaches using 'smart' antibodies and functional screening to unravel the importance of these enzymes to Schistosoma mansoni physiology. Various PKC and ERK isotypes were detected, and were differentially phosphorylated (activated throughout the various S. mansoni life stages, suggesting isotype-specific roles and differences in signalling complexity during parasite development. Functional kinase mapping in adult worms revealed that activated PKC and ERK were particularly associated with the adult male tegument, musculature and oesophagus and occasionally with the oesophageal gland; other structures possessing detectable activated PKC and/or ERK included the Mehlis' gland, ootype, lumen of the vitellaria, seminal receptacle and excretory ducts. Pharmacological modulation of PKC and ERK activity in adult worms using GF109203X, U0126, or PMA, resulted in significant physiological disturbance commensurate with these proteins occupying a central position in signalling pathways associated with schistosome muscular activity, neuromuscular coordination, reproductive function, attachment and pairing. Increased activation of ERK and PKC was also detected in worms following praziquantel treatment, with increased signalling associated with the tegument and excretory system and activated ERK localizing to previously unseen structures, including the cephalic ganglia. These findings support roles for PKC and ERK in S. mansoni homeostasis, and identify these kinase groups as potential targets for chemotherapeutic treatments against human schistosomiasis, a neglected tropical disease of enormous public health significance.

  6. Role for the A domain of unprocessed accumulation-associated protein (Aap) in the attachment phase of the Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conlon, Brian P; Geoghegan, Joan A; Waters, Elaine M; McCarthy, Hannah; Rowe, Sarah E; Davies, Julia R; Schaeffer, Carolyn R; Foster, Timothy J; Fey, Paul D; O'Gara, James P

    2014-12-01

    The polysaccharide intercellular adhesin or the cell wall-anchored accumulation-associated protein (Aap) mediates cellular accumulation during Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm maturation. Mutation of sortase, which anchors up to 11 proteins (including Aap) to the cell wall, blocked biofilm development by the cerebrospinal fluid isolate CSF41498. Aap was implicated in this phenotype when Western blots and two-dimensional (2D) electrophoresis revealed increased levels of the protein in culture supernatants. Unexpectedly, reduced levels of primary attachment were associated with impaired biofilm formation by CSF41498 srtA and aap mutants. In contrast to previous studies, which implicated Aap proteolytic cleavage and, specifically, the Aap B domains in biofilm accumulation, the CSF41498 Aap protein was unprocessed. Furthermore, aap appeared to play a less important role in the biofilm phenotype of S. epidermidis 1457, in which the Aap protein is processed. Anti-Aap A-domain IgG inhibited primary attachment and biofilm formation in strain CSF41498 but not in strain 1457. The nucleotide sequences of the aap gene A-domain region and cleavage site in strains CSF41498 and 1457 were identical, implicating altered protease activity in the differential Aap processing results in the two strains. These data reveal a new role for the A domain of unprocessed Aap in the attachment phase of biofilm formation and suggest that extracellular protease activity can influence whether Aap contributes to the attachment or accumulation phases of the S. epidermidis biofilm phenotype.

  7. Photolithographically defined deposition of attachment factors as a versatile method for patterning the growth of different cell types in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohr, Stephan; Flückiger-Labrada, Regula; Kucera, Jan P

    2003-04-01

    Spatially defined growth of cells in culture is a useful model for studies ranging from the characterization of cellular motility to the analysis of network behaviour in structurally defined ensembles of excitable cells. Current methodological approaches for obtaining patterned growth include sophisticated modifications of surface chemistry, stamping techniques and microfluidics. The implementation of most of these techniques requires the availability of highly specialized apparatus and some of the methods are specific for certain cell types and/or substrate materials. The goal of the present study was to develop a cell-patterning technique that can be implemented by any laboratory working with cell culture and that is highly adaptable in terms of cell types and substrate materials. The method is based on a photolithographic process that permits the patterned deposition of attachment factors of choice on surfaces previously coated with agar with a spatial resolution (maximal deviation from a straight line) of +/-3 micro m. Because agar efficiently prevents cell adhesion, patterned growth obtained with this technique displays virtually no off-pattern cell attachment. The method permitted the patterning of cardiomyocytes, fibroblasts and HeLa cells on either glass substrates or polymer-coated materials with a spatial resolution of a few micrometers.

  8. Modulated Binding of SATB1, a Matrix Attachment Region Protein, to the AT-Rich Sequence Flanking the Major Breakpoint Region of BCL2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnan, Meera; Liu, Wen-Man; DiCroce, Patricia A.; Posner, Aleza; Zheng, Jian; Kohwi-Shigematsu, Terumi; Krontiris, Theodore G.

    2000-01-01

    The t(14,18) chromosomal translocation that occurs in human follicular lymphoma constitutively activates the BCL2 gene and disrupts control of apoptosis. Interestingly, 70% of the t(14,18) translocations are confined to three 15-bp clusters positioned within a 150-bp region (major breakpoint region or [MBR]) in the untranslated portion of terminal exon 3. We analyzed DNA-protein interactions in the MBR, as these may play some role in targeting the translocation to this region. An 87-bp segment (87MBR) immediately 3′ to breakpoint cluster 3 was essential for DNA-protein interaction monitored with mobility shift assays. We further delineated a core binding region within 87MBR: a 33-bp, very AT-rich sequence highly conserved between the human and mouse BCL2 gene (37MBR). We have purified and identified one of the core factors as the matrix attachment region (MAR) binding protein, SATB1, which is known to bind to AT-rich sequences with a high propensity to unwind. Additional factors in nuclear extracts, which we have not yet characterized further, increased SATB1 affinity for the 37MBR target four- to fivefold. Specific binding activity within 37MBR displayed cell cycle regulation in Jurkat T cells, while levels of SATB1 remained constant throughout the cell cycle. Finally, we demonstrated in vivo binding of SATB1 to the MBR, strongly suggesting the BCL2 major breakpoint region is a MAR. We discuss the potential consequences of our observations for both MBR fragility and regulatory function. PMID:10629043

  9. Relationship between dietary indicators anthropometric-factors in children from 1 to 3 years attached to a child stay in the city of Oaxaca, Mexico.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lizbeth Martínez-López

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Parents and mothers develop an intense working life. They seek a place where they can care for their children safely during the time they go to their working hours. Due to the number of hours children spend in these institutions, one of the services offered is food, which provides at least one hot meal and two snacks, representing more than 50% of the food consumed daily. Objetive: The objective was to evaluate the relationship between anthropometric indicators and dietary factors in children 1 to 3 years attached to a private daycare center in Oaxaca City, Oaxaca, Mexico. Methods: For this evaluation weight and height were registered. Nutritional diagnosis was according to WHO percentiles, while dietary factors to meet a nutritional survey and 24-hour recall was applied. Results: 61% of children had normal weight and 39% presented malnutrition (malnutrition, overweight or obesity. Through a survey the three meals provided by the daycare center were analyzed obtaining an energy average of 637.2 kcal, 55% carbohydrates, 31% lipids and 14% protein. It was found that there is a relationship between the two variables (anthropometric and dietary factors; OR = 4.9. Conclusion: The times of food provided by the daycare center are inadequate in terms of energy and macronutrients for children 1 to 3 years old.

  10. Hypothetical protein Avin_16040 as the S-layer protein of Azotobacter vinelandii and its involvement in plant root surface attachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liew, Pauline Woan Ying; Jong, Bor Chyan; Najimudin, Nazalan

    2015-11-01

    A proteomic analysis of a soil-dwelling, plant growth-promoting Azotobacter vinelandii strain showed the presence of a protein encoded by the hypothetical Avin_16040 gene when the bacterial cells were attached to the Oryza sativa root surface. An Avin_16040 deletion mutant demonstrated reduced cellular adherence to the root surface, surface hydrophobicity, and biofilm formation compared to those of the wild type. By atomic force microscopy (AFM) analysis of the cell surface topography, the deletion mutant displayed a cell surface architectural pattern that was different from that of the wild type. Escherichia coli transformed with the wild-type Avin_16040 gene displayed on its cell surface organized motifs which looked like the S-layer monomers of A. vinelandii. The recombinant E. coli also demonstrated enhanced adhesion to the root surface.

  11. Amblyomma americanum tick saliva insulin-like growth factor binding protein-related protein 1 binds insulin but not insulin-like growth factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radulović, Ž M; Porter, L M; Kim, T K; Bakshi, M; Mulenga, A

    2015-10-01

    Silencing Amblyomma americanum insulin-like growth factor binding protein-related protein 1 (AamIGFBP-rP1) mRNA prevented ticks from feeding to repletion. In this study, we used recombinant (r)AamIGFBP-rP1 in a series of assays to obtain further insight into the role(s) of this protein in tick feeding regulation. Our results suggest that AamIGFBP-1 is an antigenic protein that is apparently exclusively expressed in salivary glands. We found that both males and females secrete AamIGFBP-rP1 into the host during feeding and confirmed that female ticks secrete this protein from within 24-48 h after attachment. Our data suggest that native AamIGFBP-rP1 is a functional insulin binding protein in that both yeast- and insect cell-expressed rAamIGFBP-rP1 bound insulin, but not insulin-like growth factors. When subjected to anti-blood clotting and platelet aggregation assays, rAamIGFBP-rP1 did not have any effect. Unlike human IGFBP-rP1, which is controlled by trypsinization, rAamIGFBP-rP1 is resistant to digestion, suggesting that the tick protein may not be under mammalian host control at the tick feeding site. The majority of tick-borne pathogens are transmitted 48 h after the tick has attached. Thus, the demonstrated antigenicity and secretion into the host within 24-48 h of the tick starting to feed makes AamIGFBP-rP1 an attractive target for antitick vaccine development.

  12. Complete gene sequence of spider attachment silk protein (PySp1) reveals novel linker regions and extreme repeat homogenization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaw, Ro Crystal; Saski, Christopher A; Hayashi, Cheryl Y

    2017-02-01

    Spiders use a myriad of silk types for daily survival, and each silk type has a unique suite of task-specific mechanical properties. Of all spider silk types, pyriform silk is distinct because it is a combination of a dry protein fiber and wet glue. Pyriform silk fibers are coated with wet cement and extruded into "attachment discs" that adhere silks to each other and to substrates. The mechanical properties of spider silk types are linked to the primary and higher-level structures of spider silk proteins (spidroins). Spidroins are often enormous molecules (>250 kDa) and have a lengthy repetitive region that is flanked by relatively short (∼100 amino acids), non-repetitive amino- and carboxyl-terminal regions. The amino acid sequence motifs in the repetitive region vary greatly between spidroin type, while motif length and number underlie the remarkable mechanical properties of spider silk fibers. Existing knowledge of pyriform spidroins is fragmented, making it difficult to define links between the structure and function of pyriform spidroins. Here, we present the full-length sequence of the gene encoding pyriform spidroin 1 (PySp1) from the silver garden spider Argiope argentata. The predicted protein is similar to previously reported PySp1 sequences but the A. argentata PySp1 has a uniquely long and repetitive "linker", which bridges the amino-terminal and repetitive regions. Predictions of the hydrophobicity and secondary structure of A. argentata PySp1 identify regions important to protein self-assembly. Analysis of the full complement of A. argentata PySp1 repeats reveals extreme intragenic homogenization, and comparison of A. argentata PySp1 repeats with other PySp1 sequences identifies variability in two sub-repetitive expansion regions. Overall, the full-length A. argentata PySp1 sequence provides new evidence for understanding how pyriform spidroins contribute to the properties of pyriform silk fibers. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by

  13. Helmet retention system types as a risk factor to properly attach the chin strap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, C A; Furtado, A M; Petterle, R R; Pimentel, S K; Carvalho, F H

    2017-07-31

    This study aimed to determine the factors associated with the incorrect use of a helmet retention system (loose or open) and how often this happens. This was an observational transversal study conducted in Curitiba, Brazil. Trained observers positioned at traffic lights collected information about the helmet fixation mode, the helmet model (full-face, open-face, modular, half), and the helmet retention system model (micrometric, double-D, fast-release). Additional data including position on the motorcycle, gender, and function of the motorcycle (as a work vehicle) were collected. The observers, collection site, and periods were randomly selected by lots. From a total of 3,050 motorcyclists, 1,807 (59.2%) had their helmets fastened correctly, 907 (29.7%) had the retention system fastened loosely, and in 336 (11.0%), the retention system was completely open. Increased odds of incorrect use were observed for the fast-release and double-D buckles compared to the micrometrics buckles, with a fixed odds ratio (OR) of 4.62 (95% confidence interval [CI], 3.89-5.51) and 3.54 (95% CI, 2.46-5.09), respectively (P passengers had a higher incidence of incorrect use of the helmet than drivers (P system. The helmet model and being a passenger had a secondary influence on incorrect use of helmets.

  14. ANXIETY AND ATTACHMENT TO THE MOTHER IN PRESCHOOLERS RECEIVING PSYCHIATRIC CARE: THE FATHER-CHILD ACTIVATION RELATIONSHIP AS A PROTECTIVE FACTOR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaumon, Sébastien; Paquette, Daniel; Cyr, Chantal; Émond-Nakamura, Mutsuko; St-André, Martin

    2016-07-01

    This 49-family study is the first to explore the father-child relationship in a clinical population of preschoolers (at a tertiary care child psychiatry clinic) and to examine its relation to child anxiety and attachment to the mother. A moderation model of the father-child activation relationship on the relation between attachment to the mother and child anxiety was tested and discussed. Analyses confirmed the expected independence between mother-child attachment and father-child activation as well as the association between mother-child attachment and anxiety. The highest levels of anxiety were found in insecure children, and more specifically, in insecure-ambivalent children and insecure disorganized-controlling children of the caregiving subtype. Hypotheses regarding the relation between anxiety and activation were only partially confirmed. Finally, the activation relationship with the father was shown to have a moderating effect on the relation between attachment to the mother and child anxiety; activation by the father may be considered either a protective or a risk factor. Results for this clinical population of young children are discussed in the light of attachment theory and activation relationship theory. The study's findings have the potential to contribute to the development of preventative, diagnostic, and intervention programs that take both parental figures into account.

  15. Product Attachment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mugge, R.

    2007-01-01

    The topic of this doctoral research is the concept of product attachment for ordinary consumer durables. Product attachment is defined as the strength of the emotional bond a consumer experiences with a specific product. Specifically, the research investigated how this bond develops over time and th

  16. Biochemical features of the adhesion G protein-coupled receptor CD97 related to its auto-proteolysis and HeLa cell attachment activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Li-Yun; Liu, Xiao-Fang; Yang, Yang; Yang, Lin-Lin; Liu, Kai-Wen; Tang, Yu-Bo; Zhang, Min; Tan, Min-Jia; Cheng, Shan-Mei; Xu, Ye-Chun; Yang, Huai-Yu; Liu, Zhi-Jie; Song, Gao-Jie; Huang, Wei

    2017-01-01

    CD97 belongs to the adhesion GPCR family characterized by a long ECD linked to the 7TM via a GPCR proteolytic site (GPS) and plays important roles in modulating cell migration and invasion. CD97 (EGF1-5) is a splicing variant of CD97 that recognizes a specific ligand chondroitin sulfate on cell membranes and the extracellular matrix. The aim of this study was to elucidate the extracellular molecular basis of the CD97 EGF1-5 isoform in protein expression, auto-proteolysis and cell adhesion, including epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like domain, GPCR autoproteolysis-inducing (GAIN) domain, as well as GPS mutagenesis and N-glycosylation. Both wild-type (WT) CD97-ECD and its truncated, GPS mutated, PNGase F-deglycosylated, and N-glycosylation site mutated forms were expressed and purified. The auto-proteolysis of the proteins was analyzed with Western blotting and SDS-PAGE. Small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and molecular modeling were used to determine a structural profile of the properly expressed receptor. Potential N-glycosylation sites were identified using MS and were modulated with PNGase F digestion and glyco-site mutations. A flow cytometry-based HeLa cell attachment assay was used for all aforementioned CD97 variants to elucidate the molecular basis of CD97-HeLa interactions. A unique concentration-dependent GPS auto-proteolysis was observed in CD97 EGF1-5 isoform with the highest concentration (4 mg/mL) per sample was self-cleaved much faster than the lower concentration (0.1 mg/mL), supporting an intermolecular mechanism of auto-proteolysis that is distinct to the reported intramolecular mechanism for other CD97 isoforms. N-glycosylation affected the auto-proteolysis of CD97 EGF1-5 isoform in a similar way as the other previously reported CD97 isoforms. SAXS data for WT and deglycosylated CD97ECD revealed a spatula-like shape with GAIN and EGF domains constituting the body and handle, respectively. Structural modeling indicated a potential interaction

  17. The relationship between chronic whiplash-associated disorder and post-traumatic stress: attachment-anxiety may be a vulnerability factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tonny Elmose Andersen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In more than 90% of whiplash accidents a good explanation regarding the association between trauma mechanism, organic pathology, and persistent symptoms has failed to be provided. Objective: We predicted that the severity of chronic whiplash-associated disorder (WAD, measured as number of whiplash symptoms, pain duration, pain-related disability, and degree of somatisation would be associated with the number of post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms (PTSD. Secondly, we expected attachment-anxiety to be a vulnerability factor in relation to both PTSD and WAD. Design: Data were collected from 1,349 women and 360 men suffering from WAD from the Danish Society for Polio, Traffic, and Accident Victims. The PTSD symptoms were measured by the Harvard Trauma Questionnaire. All three core PTSD clusters were included: re-experiencing, avoidance, and hyperarousal. Attachment security was measured along the two dimensions, attachment-anxiety and attachment-avoidance, by the Revised Adult Attachment Scale. Results: PTSD symptoms were significantly related to the severity of WAD. In particular, the PTSD clusters of avoidance and hyperarousal were associated with the number of whiplash symptoms, disability, and somatisation. Attachment-anxiety was significantly related to PTSD symptoms and somatisation but not to pain and disability. A co-morbidity of 38.8% was found between the PTSD diagnosis and WAD, and about 20% of the sample could be characterised as securely attached. Conclusions: The PTSD clusters of avoidance and hyperarousal were significantly associated with severity of WAD. The study emphasises the importance of assessing PTSD symptomatology after whiplash injury. Furthermore, it highlights that attachment theory may facilitate the understanding of why some people are more prone to develop PTSD and WAD than others.For abstract or full text in other languages, please see Supplementary files under Reading Tools online

  18. Human cytomegalovirus IE2 protein interacts with transcription activating factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU; Jinping(徐进平); YE; Linbai(叶林柏)

    2002-01-01

    The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) IE86 Cdna was cloned into Pgex-2T and fusion protein GST-IE86 was expressed in E. Coli. SDS-PAGE and Western blot assay indicated that fusion protein GST-IE86 with molecular weight of 92 ku is soluble in the supernatant of cell lysate. Protein GST and fusion protein GST-IE86 were purified by affinity chromatography. The technology of co-separation and specific affinity chromatography was used to study the interactions of HCMV IE86 protein with some transcriptional regulatory proteins and transcriptional factors. The results indicated that IE86 interacts separately with transcriptional factor TFIIB and promoter DNA binding transcription trans-activating factors SP1, AP1 and AP2 to form a heterogenous protein complex. These transcriptional trans-activating factors, transcriptional factor and IE86 protein were adsorbed and retained in the affinity chromatography simultaneously. But IE86 protein could not interact with NF-Кb, suggesting that the function of IE86 protein that can interact with transcriptional factor and transcriptional trans-activating factors has no relevance to protein glycosylation. IE86 protein probably has two domains responsible for binding transcriptional trans-activating regulatory proteins and transcriptional factors respectively, thus activating the transcription of many genes. The interactions accelerated the assembly of the transcriptional initiation complexes.

  19. A ToF-SIMS and XPS study of protein adsorption and cell attachment across PEG-like plasma polymer films with lateral compositional gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzies, Donna J.; Jasieniak, Marek; Griesser, Hans J.; Forsythe, John S.; Johnson, Graham; McFarland, Gail A.; Muir, Benjamin W.

    2012-12-01

    In this work we report a detailed X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) study of poly(ethylene glycol) PEG-like chemical gradients deposited via plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) at two different load powers using diethylene glycol dimethyl ether (DG) as a monomer. Principal component analysis (PCA) was applied to the ToF-SIMS data both before and after protein adsorption on the plasma polymer thin films. Results of the PCA loadings indicated a higher content of hydrocarbon fragments across the higher load power gradient, which adsorbed higher amounts of proteins. Gradients deposited at a lower load power retained a higher degree of monomer like functionality as did the central region directly underneath the knife edge electrode. Analysis of the adsorption of serum proteins (human serum albumin and fetal bovine serum) was monitored across the gradient films and increased with decreasing ether (PEG-like) film chemistries. The effect of protein incubation time on the levels adsorbed fetal bovine serum on the plasma polymer films was critical, with significantly more protein adsorbing after 24 hour incubation times on both gradient films. The attachment of HeLa cells on the gradients appeared to be dictated not only by the surface chemistry, but also by the adsorption of serum proteins. XPS analysis revealed that at surface ether concentrations of less than 70% in the gradient films, significant increases in protein and cell attachment were observed.

  20. Attachment: Theoretical Development and Critique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, Ruth

    2007-01-01

    Zeanah argues that ethological attachment theory, as outlined by John Bowlby, has provided one of the most important frameworks for understanding crucial risk and protective factors in social and emotional development. However, although attachment theory and the notion of attachment disorders have influenced such initiatives, many psychologists,…

  1. Attachment: Theoretical Development and Critique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, Ruth

    2007-01-01

    Zeanah argues that ethological attachment theory, as outlined by John Bowlby, has provided one of the most important frameworks for understanding crucial risk and protective factors in social and emotional development. However, although attachment theory and the notion of attachment disorders have influenced such initiatives, many psychologists,…

  2. Dairy proteins and soy proteins in infant foods nitrogen-to-protein conversion factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maubois, J-L; Lorient, D

    Protein content of any source is classically determined through the analysis of its nitrogen content done for more 100 years by the Kjeldahl method, and the obtained result is multiplied by a number named nitrogen conversion factor (NCF). The value of NCF is related to the amino acid composition of the protein source and to the eventual presence of side groups covalently bound to some amino acids of the protein chain. Consequently, the value of NCF cannot be identical for all sources of food proteins. The aim of this paper is to review the available knowledge on the two allowed protein sources for infant food formulas, milk and soybean, in order to bring the right scientific basis which should be used for the revision of both European legislation and Codex Standard for Infant Formulas.

  3. Tumor-mimicking large vegetation attached to the tricuspid valve without predisposing factors: A case report on CT and echocardiographic findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Jung Min; Choe, Yeon Hyeon; Hwang, Hye Won; Kim, Jung Sun; Kim, Wook Sung; Peck, Kyong Ran; Park, Sung Ji [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    We report the CT and echocardiographic findings of a tumor-mimicking large vegetation attached to the tricuspid valve (TV) of a 45-year-old man without predisposing factors. Echocardiography revealed a mobile homogeneous echogenic mass attached to the TV. Cardiac CT showed a 4.5 × 2.3 cm irregular low-density mass with scant enhancement in the right ventricle. Based on clinical findings of fever, positive blood culture results for Streptococcus viridans, and pathologic confirmation of the lesion, a diagnosis of infective endocarditis and vegetation was made.

  4. Attachment to parents and peers as a risk factor for adolescent depressive disorders: the mediating role of emotion regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kullik, Angelika; Petermann, Franz

    2013-08-01

    This study examined emotion regulation as a mediator in the relationship of attachment and depression in adolescents. Participants (N girls = 127; M age = 14.50; N boys = 121; M age = 14.31) completed self-report questionnaires of attachment to parents and peers, emotion regulation and depression. Models with dysfunctional emotion regulation as a mediation variable were tested via hierarchical multiple regression analyses and bootstrapping procedure. Results revealed significant relations between attachment to parents and peers, dysfunctional emotion regulation and depression. For girls, internal-dysfunctional emotion regulation was a mediator in the relation of attachment to parents and depression and partly mediated the association of attachment to peers. For boys, internal- and external-dysfunctional emotion regulation acted as partly mediators in association of attachment to parents and depression. Results indicate important mechanisms that contribute to the refinement of conceptual models and provide indications for gender specific prevention and intervention for depressive disorders.

  5. Community structure and controlled factor of attached green algae on thePorphyra yezoensis aquaculture rafts in the Subei Shoal, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yan; XIAO Jie; DING Lanping; WANG Zongling; SONG Wei; FANG Song; FAN Shiliang; LI Ruixiang; ZHANG Xuelei

    2015-01-01

    This study analyzes the community structure, the quantity changes of the algae and the effect of important environmental factors and estimates the total biomass of the attached green algae in the survey areas. The study uses data from surveys of the attached green algae on thePorphyra yezoensis aquaculture rafts and data regarding the environmental factors from October 2010 to April 2011 in the Subei Shoal. The attached green algae on the rafts includedUlva prolifera,Capsosiphon groenlandicus,U.linza,U.intestinalis,U.clathrata, andU.compressa. The biomass changes of the attached green algae exhibited an inverted parabola: the biomass was the highest (14 898 t) in April, and was the second highest (2 034 t) in November; it was lowest in February (only 729 t) and increased sharply from March to April. The species diversity differed significantly among the seasons. In September and October, when theP.yezoensis aquaculture rafts were initially set up, the attached green algae had a high biodiversity, while from December to the next February, a variety of green algae species coexisted on the rafts, although the biomass was low, and from March to April, as the biomass increased sharply, the species diversity dropped to the minimum. During this time,C.groenlandicus was apparently dominant with the maximum biomass proportion up to 80%, while theU.prolifera proportion increased exponentially to 20% to 40%. The water temperature had a direct regulating effect on the biomass and the species succession of the attached green algae. The estimation of the community dynamics and the biomass of the green algae provided the evidence needed to track the origin of the large-scale green tide in the southern Yellow Sea.

  6. Targeted protein footprinting: where different transcription factors bind to RNA polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traviglia, S L; Datwyler, S A; Yan, D; Ishihama, A; Meares, C F

    1999-11-30

    Gene transcription is regulated through the interactions of RNA polymerase (RNAP) with transcription factors, such as the bacterial sigma proteins. We have devised a new strategy that relies on targeted protein footprinting to make an extensive survey of proximity to the protein surface. This involves attaching cutting reagents randomly to lysine residues on the surface of a protein such as sigma. The lysine-labeled sigma protein is then used to cleave the polypeptide backbones of the RNAP proteins at exposed residues adjacent to the sigma binding site. We used targeted protein footprinting to compare the areas near which sigma(70), sigma(54), sigma(38), sigma(E), NusA, GreA, and omega bind to the protein subunits of Escherichia coli RNAP. The sigma proteins and NusA cut sites in similar regions of the two large RNAP subunits, beta and beta', outlining a common surface. GreA cuts a larger set of sites, whereas omega shows no overlap with the others, cutting only the beta' subunit at a unique location.

  7. Risk factors for vulnerable youth in urban townships in South Africa: The potential contribution of reactive attachment disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchett, Rachel; Rochat, Tamsen J; Tomlinson, Mark; Minnis, Helen

    2013-12-01

    Reactive attachment disorder (RAD) is a psychiatric disorder developing in early or middle childhood as a consequence of significant failures in the caregiving environment. RAD results in children failing to relate socially, either by exhibiting markedly inhibited behaviour or by indiscriminate social behaviour and is associated with significant socio-behavioural problems in the longer term. This study examined RAD in South Africa, a setting with high environmental risks. We recruited a sub-sample of 40 10-year-old children from a cohort enrolled during pregnancy for whom early attachment status was known. Children were purposefully selected to represent the four attachment categories using the data available on the strange situation procedure (SSP) at 18 months. The Manchester Child Attachment Story Task (MCAST) assessed current attachment and RAD was diagnosed using a standardised assessment package. A high proportion of the children (5/40% or 12.5%) fulfilled diagnostic criteria for RAD; all were boys and were displaying the disinhibited type. SSP classification at 18 months was not significantly associated with RAD symptoms at age of 10 years, while current MCAST classifications were. This suggests that children in this sample are at much higher risk of RAD than in high-income populations, and despite a fairly typical attachment distribution in this population at 18 months, RAD was evidenced in later childhood and associated with current attachment disorganisation. The strengths of this research include its longitudinal nature and use of diagnostic assessments. Given increasing evidence that RAD is relatively stable over time and introduces longer term socio-behavioural risks; the high rate of RAD in this sample (12.5%) highlights potential developmental threats to children in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Our results should be interpreted with caution given sample size and risk of selection bias. Further research is needed to confirm these findings.

  8. Prediction of Factors Determining Changes in Stability in Protein Mutants

    OpenAIRE

    Parthiban, Vijayarangakannan

    2006-01-01

    Analysing the factors behind protein stability is a key research topic in molecular biology and has direct implications on protein structure prediction and protein-protein docking solutions. Protein stability upon point mutations were analysed using a distance dependant pair potential representing mainly through-space interactions and torsion angle potential representing neighbouring effects as a basic statistical mechanical setup for the analysis. The synergetic effect of accessible surface ...

  9. Incorporation of podoplanin into HIV released from HEK-293T cells, but not PBMC, is required for efficient binding to the attachment factor CLEC-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Münch Jan

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Platelets are associated with HIV in the blood of infected individuals and might modulate viral dissemination, particularly if the virus is directly transmitted into the bloodstream. The C-type lectin DC-SIGN and the novel HIV attachment factor CLEC-2 are expressed by platelets and facilitate HIV transmission from platelets to T-cells. Here, we studied the molecular mechanisms behind CLEC-2-mediated HIV-1 transmission. Results Binding studies with soluble proteins indicated that CLEC-2, in contrast to DC-SIGN, does not recognize the viral envelope protein, but a cellular factor expressed on kidney-derived 293T cells. Subsequent analyses revealed that the cellular mucin-like membranous glycoprotein podoplanin, a CLEC-2 ligand, was expressed on 293T cells and incorporated into virions released from these cells. Knock-down of podoplanin in 293T cells by shRNA showed that virion incorporation of podoplanin was required for efficient CLEC-2-dependent HIV-1 interactions with cell lines and platelets. Flow cytometry revealed no evidence for podoplanin expression on viable T-cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC. Podoplanin was also not detected on HIV-1 infected T-cells. However, apoptotic bystander cells in HIV-1 infected cultures reacted with anti-podoplanin antibodies, and similar results were obtained upon induction of apoptosis in a cell line and in PBMCs suggesting an unexpected link between apoptosis and podoplanin expression. Despite the absence of detectable podoplanin expression, HIV-1 produced in PBMC was transmitted to T-cells in a CLEC-2-dependent manner, indicating that T-cells might express an as yet unidentified CLEC-2 ligand. Conclusions Virion incorporation of podoplanin mediates CLEC-2 interactions of HIV-1 derived from 293T cells, while incorporation of a different cellular factor seems to be responsible for CLEC-2-dependent capture of PBMC-derived viruses. Furthermore, evidence was obtained that

  10. Serotype-specific differences in inhibition of reovirus infectivity by human-milk glycans are determined by viral attachment protein σ1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iskarpatyoti, Jason A; Morse, E Ashley; McClung, R Paul; Ikizler, Miné; Wetzel, J Denise; Contractor, Nikhat; Dermody, Terence S

    2012-11-25

    Human milk contains many bioactive components, including secretory IgA, oligosaccharides, and milk-associated proteins. We assessed the antiviral effects of several components of milk against mammalian reoviruses. We found that glucocerebroside (GCB) inhibited the infectivity of reovirus strain type 1 Lang (T1L), whereas gangliosides GD3 and GM3 and 3'-sialyllactose (3SL) inhibited the infectivity of reovirus strain type 3 Dearing (T3D). Agglutination of erythrocytes mediated by T1L and T3D was inhibited by GD3, GM3, and bovine lactoferrin. Additionally, α-sialic acid, 3SL, 6'-sialyllactose, sialic acid, human lactoferrin, osteopontin, and α-lactalbumin inhibited hemagglutination mediated by T3D. Using single-gene reassortant viruses, we found that serotype-specific differences segregate with the gene encoding the viral attachment protein. Furthermore, GD3, GM3, and 3SL inhibit T3D infectivity by blocking binding to host cells, whereas GCB inhibits T1L infectivity post-attachment. These results enhance an understanding of reovirus cell attachment and define a mechanism for the antimicrobial activity of human milk.

  11. Porphyromonas gingivalis vesicles enhance attachment, and the leucine-rich repeat BspA protein is required for invasion of epithelial cells by "Tannerella forsythia".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inagaki, Satoru; Onishi, Shinsuke; Kuramitsu, Howard K; Sharma, Ashu

    2006-09-01

    The human oral cavity harbors more than 500 species of bacteria. Periodontitis, a bacterially induced inflammatory disease that leads to tooth loss, is believed to result from infection by a select group of gram-negative periodontopathogens that includes Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, and "Tannerella forsythia" (opinion on name change from Tannerella forsythensis pending; formerly Bacteroides forsythus). Epithelial cell invasion by periodontopathogens is considered to be an important virulence mechanism for evasion of the host defense responses. Further, the epithelial cells with invading bacteria also serve as reservoirs important in recurrent infections. The present study was therefore undertaken to address the epithelial cell adherence and invasion properties of T. forsythia and the role of the cell surface-associated protein BspA in these processes. Further, we were interested in determining if P. gingivalis, one of the pathogens frequently found associated in disease, or its outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) could modulate the epithelial cell adherence and invasion abilities of T. forsythia. Here we show that epithelial cell attachment and invasion by T. forsythia are dependent on the BspA protein. In addition, P. gingivalis or its OMVs enhance the attachment and invasion of T. forsythia to epithelial cells. Thus, interactions between these two bacteria may play important roles in virulence by promoting host cell attachment and invasion.

  12. Love attitudes and attachment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Elena Brenlla

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Love styles described by Lee are Eros (passionate love, Ludus (game-pla- ying love, Storge (friendship love, Mania (possessive, dependent love, Pragma (logical, “shopping list” love and Agape (all-giving, selfless love. Based on those types, Hendrick and Hendrick developed a 42-ítem rating questionnaire with 7 items measuring each love style (Love Attitudes Scale. Beside, inform about frequency in love relationships and attachment style. The purpose of this study was analyze the reliability and factor structure of the Love Attitudes Scale and to investigate the association between love attitudes and the attachment style. The results (N=280 participants indicate adequate internal consistency (alfa = 0,73. The items were intercorrelated and factored. The best solution extracted six factors using varimax rotation and all six factors accounted 41% of the total variance. Secure attachment was related positively to eros. 

  13. Internalized Homophobia and Drug Use in a National Cohort of Gay and Bisexual Men: Examining Depression, Sexual Anxiety, and Gay Community Attachment as Mediating Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, Raymond L; Starks, Tyrel J; Grov, Christian; Parsons, Jeffrey T

    2017-06-12

    The minority stress process of internalized homophobia (IH) has been associated with a range of adverse health outcomes among gay and bisexual men (GBM). However, evidence is mixed regarding the effect of IH on drug use, suggesting the potential role of multiple mediated pathways. Researchers have linked depression, sexual anxiety, and gay community attachment with IH. Depression, sexual anxiety, and gay community attachment have also been linked with drug use and drug-related problems suggesting potential mediating roles. A U.S. national sample of 1071 HIV-negative GBM completed at-home surveys, including measures of sociodemographic characteristics, IH, depression, sexual anxiety, gay community attachment, and drug use and associated problems. Adjusting for sociodemographic characteristics, depression mediated the association between IH and recent drug use. IH was positively associated with depression, and depression was positively associated with recent drug use. Gay community attachment partially mediated drug-related problems. IH had a positive direct association with drug-related problems and a negative direct association with gay community attachment. Gay community attachment had a positive association with drug-related problems. IH was positively associated with sexual anxiety, but sexual anxiety was not associated with either drug outcome. Efforts to reduce IH among HIV-negative GBM are likely to have a positive impact on mental health problems, as well as reduce risk for drug use and drug-related problems. Gay communities could provide the social support necessary for reducing IH; however, emphasis on community level interventions that address factors that increase risk for drug-related problems remains important.

  14. IMPACT OF FATHERS' ALCOHOLISM AND ASSOCIATED RISK FACTORS ON PARENT-INFANT ATTACHMENT STABILITY FROM 12 TO 18 MONTHS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Ellen P; Eiden, Rina D; Leonard, Kenneth E

    2004-11-01

    This study examined short-term attachment stability and sought to identify predictors of stability and change within a sample characterized by fathers' alcoholism. Results suggest moderate stability of attachment classifications (60% for mothers, 53% for fathers) from 12 to 18 months. Higher paternal and maternal alcohol symptoms, maternal depression, and maternal antisocial behavior were found in families with stable insecure mother-infant attachment compared to those who were stable secure. Mother-infant stable insecurity was associated with higher levels of maternal negative affect expression during play. Father-infant stable insecurity was associated with lower levels of paternal positive affect expression and decreased sensitivity during play. Stable insecure children also had higher levels of negative affect during parent-infant interactions and higher negative emotionality during other episodes compared to stable secure children. Results indicate that infants who were insecure at both time points had the highest constellation of family risk characteristics.

  15. Aggression And Attachment Security

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prem Verma

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective:The aim of the present study is to examine the factors related aggression in Iranian and Indian school children. Method: Attachment security (dependency, availability, and total considered as the variable. The KSS questionnaire was administrated students in the 5th grade; 300 were Iranian and 300 were Indian consisted of 150 boys and 150 girls. Results: Attachment security demonstrated significant negative correlations with aggression in the boys, girls and the total Iranian sample. The dependency on mothers was the only case with insignificant correlation.In the Indian sample, attachment security was also found to be significantly negatively correlated with aggression. The only exception was the correlation between mother's availability and aggression in girls, which was not significant Conclusion: It is important that parents treat their children in a tender, manner so that a secure attachment develop between them.

  16. 以钙磷骨水泥为载体重组人血管内皮细胞生长因子与重组人骨形态发生蛋白-2复合体对异体脱蛋白骨修复骨关节缺损的促进效应%Calcium phosphate cement attaching with recombinant human vascular endothelial growth factor and recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 promotes deproteinized osteoarticular allograft to repair osteoarticular defect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    瞿向阳; 蒋电明; 安洪

    2007-01-01

    8、12及16周A组血管内皮细胞生长因子和BMP-2的面积积分吸光度值明显高于B、C组,差异有统计学意义(P<0.01).③墨汁灌注微血管分析结果显示A组术后各期移植物内新生血管较多,部分趋向成熟,与B、C组比较均有统计学意义(P<0.01).④术后4周时各组手术侧膝关节较对侧血流量均增高,但A组显著增高,8周时进一步增高,12周时达到顶峰,16周时略有下降,但仍较B、C组高,差异有显著性意义(P<0.01).⑤A组三点抗弯曲应力,强于B、C组(P<0.01).结论:重组脱蛋白骨关节材料具有较强的再血管化和成骨能力,可早期与受体达到骨愈合修复骨关节缺损并最终成为自身组织.%BACKGROUND: Deproteinized bone has three diamensions frame profitting bone cells to adhere to, new capillaries and interstitial cells to enter, osteoblasts to differentiate and extracellular matrix to synthesize. Calcium phosphate cement (CPC) is a new in-ceramic bone cement that can degradate, which has plasticity, no heat production, invariably mechanics intension and porosity.OBJECTIVE: To explore the ability of CPC attaching with human vascular endothelial growth factor (rhVEGF) and recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) in promoting deproteinized osteoarticular allograft to repair osteoarticular defect.DESIGN: Randomly control observation.SETTING: Department of Orthopaedics, the First Affiliated Hospital, Chongqing Medical University.MATERIALS: A total of 42 adult hybridization dogs of both genders and weighing (10±0.5) kg were provided by Animal Center of Chongqing Medical University. RhVEGF was provided by Beijing Boaosen Biotechnology Co., Ltd.; rhBMP-2 by Guangzhou Dahui Biotechnology Co., Ltd.; CPC by Shanghai Ruibang Biotechnology Co., Ltd.METHODS: The experiment was carried out in the Laboratory of Orthopaedics (Municipal Laboratory), Clinical College,Chongqing Medical University from March to September 2006. A total of 36

  17. Reculer Pour Mieux Sauter: A Review of Attachment and Other Developmental Processes Inherent in Identified Risk Factors for Juvenile Delinquency and Juvenile Offending

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dianna T. Kenny

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The task of this paper is to identify the causes of juvenile delinquency and juvenile offending. The French proverb chosen for its title (Step back in order to jump better reflects the inherent challenge in this task; that is, how far back must we step in order to gain a complete understanding of these causes? Do we commence with adolescence, childhood, birth, pregnancy, conception, or the young person’s parents and their life experiences? How wide a net do we cast? Should we focus primarily on intra-individual factors, or the social ecologies in which young delinquents are found? Every story must have a beginning. In this story about young people who fall off the prosocial developmental trajectory, all sign posts point to attachment and the quality of the child’s first attachment experiences. This review will examine, from attachment and other developmental perspectives, how many of the more proximal causes of delinquency and youth offending have their origins in the emotional deficits suffered in early life. We will argue that delinquent and offending behavior represent attempts to redress these deficits. Consequently, interventions that attempt to prevent offending and reduce recidivism that do not address attachment ruptures and other early deficits cannot expect satisfactory outcomes.

  18. A protein phosphatase 1 gamma (PP1γ) of the human protozoan parasite Trichomonas vaginalis is involved in proliferation and cell attachment to the host cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Christian; Pérez, Mauricio; Orrego, Patricio R; Osorio, Luis; Gutiérrez, Bessy; Sagua, Hernán; Castillo, Juan L; Martínez-Oyanedel, Jose; Arroyo, Rossana; Meza-Cervantez, Patricia; da Silveira, Jose Franco; Midlej, Victor; Benchimol, Marlene; Cordero, Esteban; Morales, Patricio; Araya, Jorge E; González, Jorge

    2012-07-01

    In this work, evidence for a critical role of Trichomonas vaginalis protein phosphatase 1 gamma (TvPP1γ) in proliferation and attachment of the parasite to the mammalian cell is provided. Firstly, proliferation and attachment of T. vaginalis parasites to HeLa cells was blocked by calyculin A (CA), a potent PP1 inhibitor. Secondly, it was demonstrated that the enzyme activity of native and recombinant TvPP1γ proteins was inhibited by CA. Thirdly, reverse genetic studies confirmed that antisense oligonucleotides targeted to PP1γ but not PP1α or β inhibited proliferation and attachment of trichomonads CA-treated parasites underwent cytoskeletal modifications, including a lack of axostyle typical labelling, suggesting that cytoskeletal phosphorylation could be regulated by a CA-sensitive phosphatase where the role of PP1γ could not be ruled out. Analysis of subcellular distribution of TvPP1γ by cell fractionation and electron microscopy demonstrated the association between TvPP1γ and the cytoskeleton. The expression of adhesins, AP120 and AP65, at the cell surface was also inhibited by CA. The concomitant inhibition of expression of adhesins and changes in the cytoskeleton in CA-treated parasites suggest a specific role for PP1γ -dependent dephosphorylation in the early stages of the host-parasite interaction. Molecular modelling of TvPP1γ showed the conservation of residues critical for maintaining proper folding into the gross structure common to PP1 proteins. Taken together, these results suggest that TvPP1γ could be considered a potential novel drug target for treatment of trichomoniasis.

  19. Hypothyroidism decreases proinsulin gene expression and the attachment of its mRNA and eEF1A protein to the actin cytoskeleton of INS-1E cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Goulart-Silva

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The actions of thyroid hormone (TH on pancreatic beta cells have not been thoroughly explored, with current knowledge being limited to the modulation of insulin secretion in response to glucose, and beta cell viability by regulation of pro-mitotic and pro-apoptotic factors. Therefore, the effects of TH on proinsulin gene expression are not known. This led us to measure: a proinsulin mRNA expression, b proinsulin transcripts and eEF1A protein binding to the actin cytoskeleton, c actin cytoskeleton arrangement, and d proinsulin mRNA poly(A tail length modulation in INS-1E cells cultured in different media containing: i normal fetal bovine serum - FBS (control; ii normal FBS plus 1 µM or 10 nM T3, for 12 h, and iii FBS depleted of TH for 24 h (Tx. A decrease in proinsulin mRNA content and attachment to the cytoskeleton were observed in hypothyroid (Tx beta cells. The amount of eEF1A protein anchored to the cytoskeleton was also reduced in hypothyroidism, and it is worth mentioning that eEF1A is essential to attach transcripts to the cytoskeleton, which might modulate their stability and rate of translation. Proinsulin poly(A tail length and cytoskeleton arrangement remained unchanged in hypothyroidism. T3 treatment of control cells for 12 h did not induce any changes in the parameters studied. The data indicate that TH is important for proinsulin mRNA expression and translation, since its total amount and attachment to the cytoskeleton are decreased in hypothyroid beta cells, providing evidence that effects of TH on carbohydrate metabolism also include the control of proinsulin gene expression.

  20. The clinical expression of hereditary protein C and protein S deficiency: : a relation to clinical thrombotic risk-factors and to levels of protein C and protein S

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henkens, C. M. A.; van der Meer, J.; Hillege, J. L.; Bom, V. J. J.; Halie, M. R.; van der Schaaf, W.

    We investigated 103 first-degree relatives of 13 unrelated protein C or protein S deficient patients to assess the role of additional thrombotic risk factors and of protein C and protein S levels in the clinical expression of hereditary protein C and protein S deficiency. Fifty-seven relatives were

  1. Protein-Protein Interactions in the Regulation of WRKY Transcription Factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yingjun Chi; Yan Yang; Yuan Zhou; Jie Zhou; Baofang Fan; Jing-Quan Yu; Zhixiang Chen

    2013-01-01

    It has been almost 20 years since the first report of a WRKY transcription factor,SPF1,from sweet potato.Great progress has been made since then in establishing the diverse biological roles of WRKY transcription factors in plant growth,development,and responses to biotic and abiotic stress.Despite the functional diversity,almost all analyzed WRKY proteins recognize the TrGACC/T W-box sequences and,therefore,mechanisms other than mere recognition of the core W-box promoter elements are necessary to achieve the regulatory specificity of WRKY transcription factors.Research over the past several years has revealed that WRKY transcription factors physically interact with a wide range of proteins with roles in signaling,transcription,and chromatin remodeling.Studies of WRKY-interacting proteins have provided important insights into the regulation and mode of action of members of the important family of transcription factors.It has also emerged that the slightly varied WRKY domains and other protein motifs conserved within each of the seven WRKY subfamilies participate in protein-protein interactions and mediate complex functional interactions between WRKY proteins and between WRKY and other regulatory proteins in the modulation of important biological processes.In this review,we summarize studies of protein-protein interactions for WRKY transcription factors and discuss how the interacting partners contribute,at different levels,to the establishment of the complex regulatory and functional network of WRKY transcription factors.

  2. Attachment is a dynamic system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zlatka Cugmas

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of the study of recent scientific literature about the development of attachment, the author answers the following questions: which are the postulates the theory of attachment has about the stability of the patterns of attachment, which level of stability in the patterns of attachment from infancy to adulthood these studies illuminate and which factors significantly influence the (instability of the patterns of attachment in time. The theory of attachment assumes that normal circumstances elicit stability. Changes, however, can be the result of important events influencing the sensitivity of the object of attachment. Agreement has not yet been reached regarding the percentage of stability in the patterns of attachment. There is more agreement regarding attachment in adulthood than that in childhood. The results depend on the size and characteristics of the subjects of the research, the measuring instruments, type of data analysis etc. The author concludes that attachment is a dynamic system influenced by significant changes in life (the cognitive development of the child, external care, parents' divorce, different stressful situations. As the influence of stressful events on the individual person' s quality of attachment is examined, it is necessary to consider also his/her temperamental characteristics, role of other people in their lives, etc.

  3. Role of receptor-attached phosphates in binding of visual and non-visual arrestins to G protein-coupled receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimenez, Luis E; Kook, Seunghyi; Vishnivetskiy, Sergey A; Ahmed, M Rafiuddin; Gurevich, Eugenia V; Gurevich, Vsevolod V

    2012-03-16

    Arrestins are a small family of proteins that regulate G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Arrestins specifically bind to phosphorylated active receptors, terminating G protein coupling, targeting receptors to endocytic vesicles, and initiating G protein-independent signaling. The interaction of rhodopsin-attached phosphates with Lys-14 and Lys-15 in β-strand I was shown to disrupt the interaction of α-helix I, β-strand I, and the C-tail of visual arrestin-1, facilitating its transition into an active receptor-binding state. Here we tested the role of conserved lysines in homologous positions of non-visual arrestins by generating K2A mutants in which both lysines were replaced with alanines. K2A mutations in arrestin-1, -2, and -3 significantly reduced their binding to active phosphorhodopsin in vitro. The interaction of arrestins with several GPCRs in intact cells was monitored by a bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET)-based assay. BRET data confirmed the role of Lys-14 and Lys-15 in arrestin-1 binding to non-cognate receptors. However, this was not the case for non-visual arrestins in which the K2A mutations had little effect on net BRET(max) values for the M2 muscarinic acetylcholine (M2R), β(2)-adrenergic (β(2)AR), or D2 dopamine receptors. Moreover, a phosphorylation-deficient mutant of M2R interacted with wild type non-visual arrestins normally, whereas phosphorylation-deficient β(2)AR mutants bound arrestins at 20-50% of the level of wild type β(2)AR. Thus, the contribution of receptor-attached phosphates to arrestin binding varies depending on the receptor-arrestin pair. Although arrestin-1 always depends on receptor phosphorylation, its role in the recruitment of arrestin-2 and -3 is much greater in the case of β(2)AR than M2R and D2 dopamine receptor.

  4. INTERFACIAL SELF-ASSEMBLY OF A HYDROPHOBIN INTO AN AMPHIPATHIC PROTEIN MEMBRANE MEDIATES FUNGAL ATTACHMENT TO HYDROPHOBIC SURFACES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WOSTEN, HAB; SCHUREN, FHJ; WESSELS, JGH

    1994-01-01

    The SC3p hydrophobin of Schizophyllum commune is a small hydrophobic protein (100-101 amino acids with eight cysteine residues) that self-assembles at a water/air interface and coats aerial hyphae with an SDS-insoluble protein membrane, at the outer side highly hydrophobic and with a typical rodlet

  5. The Sbi protein is a multifunctional immune evasion factor of Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Emma Jane; Visai, Livia; Kerrigan, Steven W; Speziale, Pietro; Foster, Timothy J

    2011-09-01

    The second immunoglobulin-binding protein (Sbi) of Staphylococcus aureus has two N-terminal domains that bind the Fc region of IgG in a fashion similar to that of protein A and two domains that can bind to the complement protein C3 and promote its futile consumption in the fluid phase. It has been proposed that Sbi helps bacteria to avoid innate immune defenses. By comparing a mutant defective in Sbi with mutants defective in protein A, clumping factor A, iron-regulated surface determinant H, and capsular polysaccharide, it was shown that Sbi is indeed an immune evasion factor that promotes bacterial survival in whole human blood and the avoidance of neutrophil-mediated opsonophagocytosis. Sbi is present in the culture supernatant and is also associated with the cell envelope. S. aureus strains that expressed truncates of Sbi lacking N-terminal domains D1 and D2 (D1D2) or D3 and D4 (D3D4) or a C-terminal truncate that was no longer retained in the cell envelope were analyzed. Both the secreted and envelope-associated forms of Sbi contributed to immune evasion. The IgG-binding domains contributed only when Sbi was attached to the cell, while only the secreted C3-binding domains were biologically active.

  6. Factors governing the foldability of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimov, D K; Thirumalai, D

    1996-12-01

    We use a three-dimensional lattice model of proteins to investigate systematically the global properties of the polypeptide chains that determine the folding to the native conformation starting from an ensemble of denatured conformations. In the coarse-grained description, the polypeptide chain is modeled as a heteropolymer consisting of N beads confined to the vertices of a simple cubic lattice. The interactions between the beads are taken from a random gaussian distribution of energies, with a mean value B0 Monte Carlo simulations. The kinetics of approach to the native state for all the sequences was obtained using Monte Carlo simulations. For all sequences we find that there are two intrinsic characteristic temperatures, namely, T theta and Tf. At the temperature T theta the polypeptide chain makes a transition to a collapsed structure, while at Tf the chain undergoes a transition to the native conformation. We show that foldability of sequences can be characterized entirely in terms of these two temperatures. It is shown that fast folding sequences have small values of sigma = (T theta - Tf)/T theta whereas slow folders have larger values of sigma (the range of sigma is 0 sigma sigma. An increase in sigma from 0.1 to 0.7 can result in an increase of 5-6 orders of magnitudes in folding times. In contrast, we demonstrate that there is no useful correlation between folding times and the energy gap between the native conformation and the first excited state at any N for any value of B0. In particular, in the parameter space of the model, many sequences with varying energy gaps, all with roughly the same folding time, can be easily engineered. Folding sequences in this model, therefore, can be classified based solely on the value of sigma. Fast folders have small values of sigma (typically less than about 0.1), moderate folders have values of sigma in the approximate range between 0.1 and 0.6, while for slow folders sigma exceeds 0.6. The precise boundary between

  7. Effects of Some Dietary Factors on Ruminal Microbial Protein Synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    KARSLI, Mehmet Akif

    2001-01-01

    The effects of some dietary factors, other than source and amount of N and carbohydrate, on the amount and efficiency of microbial protein synthesis are discussed in this review. Specifically, these factors include dry matter intake of animals, forage:concentrate ratio of diets, rate of N and carbohydrate degradation, synchronized release of N and energy from diets, rate of passage, and other factors, such as vitamins and minerals. It seemed that diets containing a mixture of forages and conc...

  8. THE CLINICAL EXPRESSION OF HEREDITARY PROTEIN-C AND PROTEIN-S DEFICIENCY - A RELATION TO CLINICAL THROMBOTIC RISK-FACTORS AND TO LEVELS OF PROTEIN-C AND PROTEIN-S

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HENKENS, CMA; VANDERMEER, J; HILLEGE, JL; BOM, VJJ; HALIE, MR; van der Schaaf, W

    1993-01-01

    We investigated 103 first-degree relatives of 13 unrelated protein C or protein S deficient patients to assess the role of additional thrombotic risk factors and of protein C and protein S levels in the clinical expression of hereditary protein C and protein S deficiency. Fifty-seven relatives were

  9. Covalent heme attachment to the protein in human heme oxygenase-1 with selenocysteine replacing the His25 proximal iron ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yongying; Trnka, Michael J; Medzihradszky, Katalin F; Ouellet, Hugues; Wang, Yongqiang; Ortiz de Montellano, Paul R

    2009-03-01

    To characterize heme oxygenase with a selenocysteine (SeCys) as the proximal iron ligand, we have expressed truncated human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1) His25Cys, in which Cys-25 is the only cysteine, in the Escherichia coli cysteine auxotroph strain BL21(DE3)cys. Selenocysteine incorporation into the protein was demonstrated by both intact protein mass measurement and mass spectrometric identification of the selenocysteine-containing tryptic peptide. One selenocysteine was incorporated into approximately 95% of the expressed protein. Formation of an adduct with Ellman's reagent (DTNB) indicated that the selenocysteine in the expressed protein was in the reduced state. The heme-His25SeCys hHO-1 complex could be prepared by either (a) supplementing the overexpression medium with heme, or (b) reconstituting the purified apoprotein with heme. Under reducing conditions in the presence of imidazole, a covalent bond is formed by addition of the selenocysteine residue to one of the heme vinyl groups. No covalent bond is formed when the heme is replaced by mesoheme, in which the vinyls are replaced by ethyl groups. These results, together with our earlier demonstration that external selenolate ligands can transfer an electron to the iron [Y. Jiang, P.R. Ortiz de Montellano, Inorg. Chem. 47 (2008) 3480-3482 ], indicate that a selenyl radical is formed in the hHO-1 His25SeCys mutant that adds to a heme vinyl group.

  10. Isolation of cDNA clones coding for human tissue factor: primary structure of the protein and cDNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spicer, E.K.; Horton, R.; Bloem, L.; Bach, R.; Williams, K.R.; Guha, A.; Kraus, J.; Lin, T.C.; Nemerson, Y.; Konigsberg, W.H.

    1987-08-01

    Tissue factor is a membrane-bound procoagulant protein that activates the extrinsic pathway of blood coagulation in the presence of factor VII and calcium. lambda Phage containing the tissue factor gene were isolated from a human placental cDNA library. The amino acid sequence deduced from the nucleotide sequence of the cDNAs indicates that tissue factor is synthesized as a higher molecular weight precursor with a leader sequence of 32 amino acids, while the mature protein is a single polypeptide chain composed of 263 residues. The derived primary structure of tissue factor has been confirmed by comparison to protein and peptide sequence data. The sequence of the mature protein suggests that there are three distinct domains: extracellular, residues 1-219; hydrophobic, residues 220-242; and cytoplasmic, residues 243-263. Three potential N-linked carbohydrate attachment sites occur in the extracellular domain. The amino acid sequence of tissue factor shows no significant homology with the vitamin K-dependent serine proteases, coagulation cofactors, or any other protein in the National Biomedical Research Foundation sequence data bank (Washington, DC).

  11. Interaction between non-specific electrostatic forces and humoral factors in haemocyte attachment and encapsulation in the edible cockle, Cerastoderma edule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wootton, Emma C; Dyrynda, Elisabeth A; Ratcliffe, Norman A

    2006-04-01

    In invertebrates, encapsulation is the common immune defence reaction towards foreign bodies, including multicellular parasites, which enter the haemocoel and are too large to be phagocytosed. This immune response has been most extensively studied in insects, in which it is highly complex, involving a diversity of cellular and molecular processes, but little is known of this process in bivalve molluscs. Non-specific physicochemical properties are known to influence parasite-haemocyte interactions in many invertebrates, and these may provide the common basis of encapsulation on which highly specific biochemical interactions are imposed. The present study uses synthetic beads and thread to mimic inactive metacercarial cysts of trematodes, and thus investigates factors involved in the basic, non-specific mechanisms of cell attachment and encapsulation in the edible cockle, Cerastoderma edule. Results showed that positively charged targets stimulated the most vigorous response, and further detailed experiments revealed that non-specific electrostatic forces and humoral plasma factors have a synergistic role in haemocyte attachment and the encapsulation response of C. edule.

  12. A comparative molecular force spectroscopy study of homophilic JAM-A interactions and JAM-A interactions with reovirus attachment protein sigma1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedula, Sri Ram Krishna; Lim, Tong Seng; Kirchner, Eva; Guglielmi, Kristen M; Dermody, Terence S; Stehle, Thilo; Hunziker, Walter; Lim, Chwee Teck

    2008-01-01

    JAM-A belongs to a family of immunoglobulin-like proteins called junctional adhesion molecules (JAMs) that localize at epithelial and endothelial intercellular tight junctions. JAM-A is also expressed on dendritic cells, neutrophils, and platelets. Homophilic JAM-A interactions play an important role in regulating paracellular permeability and leukocyte transmigration across epithelial monolayers and endothelial cell junctions, respectively. In addition, JAM-A is a receptor for the reovirus attachment protein, sigma1. In this study, we used single molecular force spectroscopy to compare the kinetics of JAM-A interactions with itself and sigma1. A chimeric murine JAM-A/Fc fusion protein and the purified sigma1 head domain were used to probe murine L929 cells, which express JAM-A and are susceptible to reovirus infection. The bond half-life (t(1/2)) of homophilic JAM-A interactions was found to be shorter (k(off)(o) = 0.688 +/- 0.349 s(-1)) than that of sigma1/JAM-A interactions (k(off)(o) = 0.067 +/- 0.041 s(-1)). These results are in accordance with the physiological functions of JAM-A and sigma1. A short bond lifetime imparts a highly dynamic nature to homophilic JAM-A interactions for regulating tight junction permeability while stable interactions between sigma1 and JAM-A likely anchor the virus to the cell surface and facilitate viral entry.

  13. Sequence motifs in MADS transcription factors responsible for specificity and diversification of protein-protein interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aalt D J van Dijk

    Full Text Available Protein sequences encompass tertiary structures and contain information about specific molecular interactions, which in turn determine biological functions of proteins. Knowledge about how protein sequences define interaction specificity is largely missing, in particular for paralogous protein families with high sequence similarity, such as the plant MADS domain transcription factor family. In comparison to the situation in mammalian species, this important family of transcription regulators has expanded enormously in plant species and contains over 100 members in the model plant species Arabidopsis thaliana. Here, we provide insight into the mechanisms that determine protein-protein interaction specificity for the Arabidopsis MADS domain transcription factor family, using an integrated computational and experimental approach. Plant MADS proteins have highly similar amino acid sequences, but their dimerization patterns vary substantially. Our computational analysis uncovered small sequence regions that explain observed differences in dimerization patterns with reasonable accuracy. Furthermore, we show the usefulness of the method for prediction of MADS domain transcription factor interaction networks in other plant species. Introduction of mutations in the predicted interaction motifs demonstrated that single amino acid mutations can have a large effect and lead to loss or gain of specific interactions. In addition, various performed bioinformatics analyses shed light on the way evolution has shaped MADS domain transcription factor interaction specificity. Identified protein-protein interaction motifs appeared to be strongly conserved among orthologs, indicating their evolutionary importance. We also provide evidence that mutations in these motifs can be a source for sub- or neo-functionalization. The analyses presented here take us a step forward in understanding protein-protein interactions and the interplay between protein sequences and

  14. Activated protein C resistance testing for factor V Leiden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadauke, Stephan; Khor, Bernard; Van Cott, Elizabeth M

    2014-12-01

    Activated protein C resistance assays can detect factor V Leiden with high accuracy, depending on the method used. Factor Xa inhibitors such as rivaroxaban and direct thrombin inhibitors including dabigatran, argatroban, and bivalirudin can cause falsely normal results. Lupus anticoagulants can cause incorrect results in most current assays. Assays that include dilution into factor V-deficient plasma are needed to avoid interference from factor deficiencies or elevations, which can arise from a wide variety of conditions such as warfarin, liver dysfunction, or pregnancy. The pros and cons of the currently available assays are discussed. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Factors influencing gelation properties of corn germ proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiang Dong; Shi, Dan; Lan, Yu; Yao, Xin Miao; Zhang, Rui Ying; Zhang, Ying Lei; Su, Ping; Shan, Hong

    2017-03-07

    As a by-product of the oil industry, corn germ meal is mainly applied as a high-protein ingredient in animal feeds, without any application of the specific functional properties of corn germ protein (CGP). Factors influencing the gelation properties of CGP in relation to its dynamic rheology are still unclear owing to limited information. CGP concentrate was recovered by the isoelectric precipitation method, and factors affecting its gelation properties were investigated using a rheometer. A weak gel formed at natural pH with 0.3 mol L(-1) NaCl, and the minimum gel-forming concentration was observed at 150 g kg(-1) . Higher CGP protein concentrations induced stiffer gels, and linear relationships were found between protein concentration and gel stiffness (G') as well as between protein concentration and gel viscosity (G″). Lower heating and cooling rate promoted the formation of stiffer gels. CGP gelation was both NaCl- and pH-dependent. Sodium tripolyphosphate significantly increased gel stiffness with increasing concentration. No difference in gel elasticity (tanδ) was observed with the inclusion of various concentrations of sodium tripolyphosphate or sodium polyphosphate. Heating and cooling rate, NaCl, protein concentration, pH and phosphates all impact the gel-forming ability of CGP concentrate. Desired gel properties can be obtained through adjustment of these factors. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  16. The effects of whey protein on cardiometabolic risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Sebely; Radavelli-Bagatini, Simone

    2013-04-01

    Obesity has reached epidemic proportions worldwide. The health consequences of obesity are more dangerous when associated with the metabolic syndrome and its components. Studies show that whey protein and its bioactive components can promote greater benefits compared to other protein sources such as egg and casein. The aim of this paper is to review the effects of whey protein on cardiometabolic risk factors. Using PubMed as the database, a review was conducted to identify current scientific literature on whey protein and the components of the metabolic syndrome published between 1970 and 2012. Consumption of whey protein seems to play an anti-obesity and muscle-protective role during dieting by increasing thermogenesis and maintaining lean mass. In addition, whey protein has been shown to improve glucose levels and insulin response, promote a reduction in blood pressure and arterial stiffness, and improve lipid profile. The collective view of current scientific literature indicates that the consumption of whey protein may have beneficial effects on some symptoms of the metabolic syndrome as well as a reduction in cardiovascular risk factors.

  17. Roles of a novel Crp/Fnr family transcription factor Lmo0753 in soil survival, biofilm production and surface attachment to fresh produce of Listeria monocytogenes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joelle K Salazar

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes is a foodborne bacterial pathogen and the causative agent of an infectious disease, listeriosis. L. monocytogenes is ubiquitous in nature and has the ability to persist in food processing environments for extended periods of time by forming biofilms and resisting industrial sanitization. Human listeriosis outbreaks are commonly linked to contaminated dairy products, ready-to-eat meats, and in recent years, fresh produce such as lettuce and cantaloupes. We identified a putative Crp/Fnr family transcription factor Lmo0753 that is highly specific to human-associated genetic lineages of L. monocytogenes. Lmo0753 possesses two conserved functional domains similar to the major virulence regulator PrfA in L. monocytogenes. To determine if Lmo0753 is involved in environmental persistence-related mechanisms, we compared lmo0753 deletion mutants with respective wild type and complementation mutants of two fully sequenced L. monocytogenes genetic lineage II strains 10403S and EGDe for the relative ability of growth under different nutrient availability and temperatures, soil survival, biofilm productivity and attachment to select fresh produce surfaces including romaine lettuce leaves and cantaloupe rinds. Our results collectively suggested that Lmo0753 plays an important role in L. monocytogenes biofilm production and attachment to fresh produce, which may contribute to the environmental persistence and recent emergence of this pathogen in human listeriosis outbreaks linked to fresh produce.

  18. Microsequencing of proteins and peptides in the Knauer sequencer with and without covalent attachment to polyvinylidene difluoride membranes by the wet-phase degradation technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herfurth, E; Pilling, U; Wittmann-Liebold, B

    1991-05-01

    Proteins and large peptides were degraded with phenylisothiocyanate (PITC) in the horizontal flow-through-reactor of the Modular Knauer Sequencer (Fischer, S., Reimann, F. & Wittmann-Liebold, B. (1989) in Methods in Protein Sequence Analysis (Wittmann-Liebold, B., ed.) Springer-Verlag, Berlin, pp. 98-107) by the wet-phase filter technique (Wittmann-Liebold, B. (1988) J. Prot. Chem. 7, 224-225) employing polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) membranes without polybrene. In order to prevent losses of small peptides during solvent washes at the degradation, 1.4-phenylene diisothiocyanate (DITC) derivatized PVDF support (MilliGen, Burlington, MA) was used to covalently attach the peptide via its lysine groups in situ within the cross-flow reaction chamber onto this membrane (Herfurth, E., Pilling, U. & Wittmann-Liebold, B. (1990) J. Prot. Chem. 9, 267). We found these membranes very suitable for peptide degradations in the Knauer sequencer. In almost all cases we were able to identify the amino-acid residues of the peptide up to its last covalent fixation point to the membrane.

  19. Factor H-related proteins determine complement-activating surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Józsi, Mihály; Tortajada, Agustin; Uzonyi, Barbara; Goicoechea de Jorge, Elena; Rodríguez de Córdoba, Santiago

    2015-06-01

    Complement factor H-related proteins (FHRs) are strongly associated with different diseases involving complement dysregulation, which suggests a major role for these proteins regulating complement activation. Because FHRs are evolutionarily and structurally related to complement inhibitor factor H (FH), the initial assumption was that the FHRs are also negative complement regulators. Whereas weak complement inhibiting activities were originally reported for these molecules, recent developments indicate that FHRs may enhance complement activation, with important implications for the role of these proteins in health and disease. We review these findings here, and propose that FHRs represent a complex set of surface recognition molecules that, by competing with FH, provide improved discrimination of self and non-self surfaces and play a central role in determining appropriate activation of the complement pathway.

  20. Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy region gene-1 (FRG-1) is an actin-bundling protein associated with muscle-attachment sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qian; Jones, Takako Iida; Tang, Vivian W; Brieher, William M; Jones, Peter L

    2010-04-01

    In vertebrates, overexpression of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) region gene 1 (FRG1) recapitulates the pathophysiology exhibited by FSHD patients, although the role of FRG1 in FSHD remains controversial and no precise function for FRG1 has been described in any organism. To gain insight into the function and potential role of FRG1 in FSHD, we analyzed the highly conserved Caenorhabditis elegans ortholog, frg-1. C. elegans body-wall muscles contain two distinct subcellular pools of FRG-1: nuclear FRG-1, concentrated in the nucleoli; and cytoplasmic FRG-1, associated with the Z-disk and costamere-like structures known as dense bodies. Functionally, we demonstrate that FRG-1 is an F-actin-bundling protein, consistent with its localization to dense bodies; this activity is conserved in human FRG1. This is particularly intriguing because it places FRG-1 along side the list of dense-body components whose vertebrate orthologs are involved in the myriad myopathies associated with disrupted costameres and Z-disks. Interestingly, overexpressed FRG-1 preferentially accumulates in the nucleus and, when overexpressed specifically from the frg-1 promoter, disrupts the adult ventral muscle structure and organization. Together, these data further support a role for FRG1 overexpression in FSHD pathophysiology and reveal the previously unsuspected direct involvement of FRG-1 in muscle structure and integrity.

  1. Premature Activation of the Paramyxovirus Fusion Protein before Target Cell Attachment with Corruption of the Viral Fusion Machinery*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farzan, Shohreh F.; Palermo, Laura M.; Yokoyama, Christine C.; Orefice, Gianmarco; Fornabaio, Micaela; Sarkar, Aurijit; Kellogg, Glen E.; Greengard, Olga; Porotto, Matteo; Moscona, Anne

    2011-01-01

    Paramyxoviruses, including the childhood pathogen human parainfluenza virus type 3, enter host cells by fusion of the viral and target cell membranes. This fusion results from the concerted action of its two envelope glycoproteins, the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) and the fusion protein (F). The receptor-bound HN triggers F to undergo conformational changes that render it competent to mediate fusion of the viral and cellular membranes. We proposed that, if the fusion process could be activated prematurely before the virion reaches the target host cell, infection could be prevented. We identified a small molecule that inhibits paramyxovirus entry into target cells and prevents infection. We show here that this compound works by an interaction with HN that results in F-activation prior to receptor binding. The fusion process is thereby prematurely activated, preventing fusion of the viral membrane with target cells and precluding viral entry. This first evidence that activation of a paramyxovirus F can be specifically induced before the virus contacts its target cell suggests a new strategy with broad implications for the design of antiviral agents. PMID:21799008

  2. Glycan structure of Gc Protein-derived Macrophage Activating Factor as revealed by mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Chad R; Rehder, Douglas S

    2016-09-15

    Disagreement exists regarding the O-glycan structure attached to human vitamin D binding protein (DBP). Previously reported evidence indicated that the O-glycan of the Gc1S allele product is the linear core 1 NeuNAc-Gal-GalNAc-Thr trisaccharide. Here, glycan structural evidence is provided from glycan linkage analysis and over 30 serial glycosidase-digestion experiments which were followed by analysis of the intact protein by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Results demonstrate that the O-glycan from the Gc1F protein is the same linear trisaccharide found on the Gc1S protein and that the hexose residue is galactose. In addition, the putative anti-cancer derivative of DBP known as Gc Protein-derived Macrophage Activating Factor (GcMAF, which is formed by the combined action of β-galactosidase and neuraminidase upon DBP) was analyzed intact by ESI-MS, revealing that the activating E. coli β-galactosidase cleaves nothing from the protein-leaving the glycan structure of active GcMAF as a Gal-GalNAc-Thr disaccharide, regardless of the order in which β-galactosidase and neuraminidase are applied. Moreover, glycosidase digestion results show that α-N-Acetylgalactosamindase (nagalase) lacks endoglycosidic function and only cleaves the DBP O-glycan once it has been trimmed down to a GalNAc-Thr monosaccharide-precluding the possibility of this enzyme removing the O-glycan trisaccharide from cancer-patient DBP in vivo.

  3. Clumping factor A, von Willebrand factor-binding protein and von Willebrand factor anchor Staphylococcus aureus to the vessel wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claes, J; Liesenborghs, L; Peetermans, M; Veloso, T R; Missiakas, D; Schneewind, O; Mancini, S; Entenza, J M; Hoylaerts, M F; Heying, R; Verhamme, P; Vanassche, T

    2017-02-09

    Essentials Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) binds to endothelium via von Willebrand factor (VWF). Secreted VWF-binding protein (vWbp) mediates S. aureus adhesion to VWF under shear stress. vWbp interacts with VWF and the Sortase A-dependent surface protein Clumping factor A (ClfA). VWF-vWbp-ClfA anchor S. aureus to vascular endothelium under shear stress.

  4. Paternal Attachment, Parenting Beliefs and Children's Attachment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Kimberly S.

    2010-01-01

    Relationships between fathers' romantic attachment style, parenting beliefs and father-child attachment security and dependence were examined in a diverse sample of 72 fathers of young children. Paternal romantic attachment style was coded based on fathers' endorsement of a particular style represented in the Hazan and Shaver Three-Category…

  5. Protein interactions of the transcription factor Hoxa1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lambert Barbara

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hox proteins are transcription factors involved in crucial processes during animal development. Their mode of action remains scantily documented. While other families of transcription factors, like Smad or Stat, are known cell signaling transducers, such a function has never been squarely addressed for Hox proteins. Results To investigate the mode of action of mammalian Hoxa1, we characterized its interactome by a systematic yeast two-hybrid screening against ~12,200 ORF-derived polypeptides. Fifty nine interactors were identified of which 45 could be confirmed by affinity co-purification in animal cell lines. Many Hoxa1 interactors are proteins involved in cell-signaling transduction, cell adhesion and vesicular trafficking. Forty-one interactions were detectable in live cells by Bimolecular Fluorescence Complementation which revealed distinctive intracellular patterns for these interactions consistent with the selective recruitment of Hoxa1 by subgroups of partner proteins at vesicular, cytoplasmic or nuclear compartments. Conclusions The characterization of the Hoxa1 interactome presented here suggests unexplored roles for Hox proteins in cell-to-cell communication and cell physiology.

  6. TALE factors poise promoters for activation by Hox proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choe, Seong-Kyu; Ladam, Franck; Sagerström, Charles G

    2014-01-27

    Hox proteins form complexes with TALE cofactors from the Pbx and Prep/Meis families to control transcription, but it remains unclear how Hox:TALE complexes function. Examining a Hoxb1b:TALE complex that regulates zebrafish hoxb1a transcription, we find maternally deposited TALE proteins at the hoxb1a promoter already during blastula stages. These TALE factors recruit histone-modifying enzymes to promote an active chromatin profile at the hoxb1a promoter and also recruit RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) and P-TEFb. However, in the presence of TALE factors, RNAPII remains phosphorylated on serine 5 and hoxb1a transcription is inefficient. By gastrula stages, Hoxb1b binds together with TALE factors to the hoxb1a promoter. This triggers P-TEFb-mediated transitioning of RNAPII to the serine 2-phosphorylated form and efficient hoxb1a transcription. We conclude that TALE factors access promoters during early embryogenesis to poise them for activation but that Hox proteins are required to trigger efficient transcription.

  7. C4b-binding protein protects coagulation factor Va from inactivation by activated protein C

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Poel, RHL; Meijers, JCM; Rosing, J; Tans, G; Bouma, Bonno N.

    2000-01-01

    We investigated the effect of C4BP on APC-mediated inactivation of factor Va (FVa) in the absence and presence of protein S. FVa inactivation was biphasic (k(506) = 4.4 x 10(8) M-1 s(-1), k(306) = 2.7 x 10(7) M-1 s(-1)), and protein S accelerated Arg(306) cleavage approximately 10-fold.

  8. Regulation of growth factor receptor degradation by ADP-ribosylation factor domain protein (ARD) 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meza-Carmen, Victor; Pacheco-Rodriguez, Gustavo; Kang, Gi Soo; Kato, Jiro; Donati, Chiara; Zhang, Chun-Yi; Vichi, Alessandro; Payne, D Michael; El-Chemaly, Souheil; Stylianou, Mario; Moss, Joel; Vaughan, Martha

    2011-06-28

    ADP-ribosylation factor domain protein 1 (ARD1) is a 64-kDa protein containing a functional ADP-ribosylation factor (GTP hydrolase, GTPase), GTPase-activating protein, and E3 ubiquitin ligase domains. ARD1 activation by the guanine nucleotide-exchange factor cytohesin-1 was known. GTPase and E3 ligase activities of ARD1 suggest roles in protein transport and turnover. To explore this hypothesis, we used mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) from ARD1-/- mice stably transfected with plasmids for inducible expression of wild-type ARD1 protein (KO-WT), or ARD1 protein with inactivating mutations in E3 ligase domain (KO-E3), or containing persistently active GTP-bound (KO-GTP), or inactive GDP-bound (KO-GDP) GTPase domains. Inhibition of proteasomal proteases in mifepristone-induced KO-WT, KO-GDP, or KO-GTP MEFs resulted in accumulation of these ARD1 proteins, whereas KO-E3 accumulated without inhibitors. All data were consistent with the conclusion that ARD1 regulates its own steady-state levels in cells by autoubiquitination. Based on reported growth factor receptor-cytohesin interactions, EGF receptor (EGFR) was investigated in induced MEFs. Amounts of cell-surface and total EGFR were higher in KO-GDP and lower in KO-GTP than in KO-WT MEFs, with levels in both mutants greater (p = 0.001) after proteasomal inhibition. Significant differences among MEF lines in content of TGF-β receptor III were similar to those in EGFR, albeit not as large. Differences in amounts of insulin receptor mirrored those in EGFR, but did not reach statistical significance. Overall, the capacity of ARD1 GTPase to cycle between active and inactive forms and its autoubiquitination both appear to be necessary for the appropriate turnover of EGFR and perhaps additional growth factor receptors.

  9. Adult attachment processes: individual and couple perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartholomew, K

    1997-09-01

    This paper overviews a new approach to understanding the range of difficulties experienced in close attachment relationships in adulthood. Drawing on the work of Bowlby, four prototypic adult attachment patterns are defined in terms of the intersection of two underlying dimensions, the positivity of the person's self-image and the positivity of the person's image of others (Bartholomew, 1990; Bartholomew & Horowitz, 1991). The distinct interpersonal difficulties associated with each attachment pattern are described. Findings are presented indicating that individual differences in attachment have implications for the quality of adults' romantic relationships, and that attachment theory may be helpful in understanding violent spousal relationships. Five current issues in the study of adult attachment are addressed: the stability of attachment patterns, the associations between attachment and general personality factors, the relative merits of categorical and prototype assessments of attachment, the identification of multiple attachments in adulthood, and the specificity of adult attachment patterns. It is suggested that the four-category model of adult attachment is especially sensitive to the range and complexity of attachment-related difficulties experienced in adulthood.

  10. Electron-attachment processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christophorou, L. G.; McCorkle, D. L.; Christodoulides, A. A.

    Topics covered include: modes of production of negative ions, techniques for the study of electron attachment processes, dissociative electron attachment to ground state molecules, dissociative electron attachment to hot molecules (effects of temperature on dissociative electron attachment), molecular parent negative ions, and negative ions formed by ion pair processes and by collisions of molecules with ground state and Rydberg atoms.

  11. Attachment behavior in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sigling, H.O.

    2009-01-01

    This thesis describes studies into the rat as an animal model for attachment, along the lines of Bowlby's attachment theory. First, the relation between attachment and human psychopathology is reviewed. The conclusion is that psychopathology is more frequent in insecure attached persons and that the

  12. Attachment at work and performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neustadt, Elizabeth A; Chamorro-Premuzic, Tomas; Furnham, Adrian

    2011-09-01

    This paper examines the relations between self-reported attachment orientation at work and personality, self-esteem, trait emotional intelligence (aka emotional self-efficacy), and independently assessed career potential and job performance. Self-report data were collected from 211 managers in an international business in the hospitality industry; independent assessments of these managers' job performance and career potential were separately obtained from the organization. A self-report measure of romantic attachment was adapted for application in the work context; a two-factor solution was found for this measure. Secure/autonomous attachment orientation at work was positively related to self-esteem, trait emotional intelligence, extraversion, agreeableness, and conscientiousness, and also to job performance. Not only was secure/autonomous attachment orientation at work statistically predictive of job performance, but the new measure also made a distinct contribution, beyond conscientiousness, to this prediction.

  13. Depression and attachment problems.

    OpenAIRE

    Pettem, O; M. West; Mahoney, A; Keller, A.

    1993-01-01

    This study investigated the characteristics related to attachment of 42 depressed psychiatric patients and 42 non-depressed psychiatric controls. The depressed subjects demonstrated an anxious pattern of attachment, characterized by either intense care-seeking in relation to their attachment figure or angry withdrawal from their attachment figure when their desire for security was frustrated. The results are discussed in terms of Bowlby's attachment construct.

  14. Fission yeast CSL proteins function as transcription factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Oravcová

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Transcription factors of the CSL (CBF1/RBP-Jk/Suppressor of Hairless/LAG-1 family are key regulators of metazoan development and function as the effector components of the Notch receptor signalling pathway implicated in various cell fate decisions. CSL proteins recognize specifically the GTG[G/A]AA sequence motif and several mutants compromised in their ability to bind DNA have been reported. In our previous studies we have identified a number of novel putative CSL family members in fungi, organisms lacking the Notch pathway. It is not clear whether these represent genuine CSL family members. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using a combination of in vitro and in vivo approaches we characterized the DNA binding properties of Cbf11 and Cbf12, the antagonistic CSL paralogs from the fission yeast, important for the proper coordination of cell cycle events and the regulation of cell adhesion. We have shown that a mutation of a conserved arginine residue abolishes DNA binding in both CSL paralogs, similar to the situation in mouse. We have also demonstrated the ability of Cbf11 and Cbf12 to activate gene expression in an autologous fission yeast reporter system. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results indicate that the fission yeast CSL proteins are indeed genuine family members capable of functioning as transcription factors, and provide support for the ancient evolutionary origin of this important protein family.

  15. Adult attachment styles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maša Žvelc

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Theory of attachment primarily described early relationships between a child and his caretakers. In the last twenty years there is a growing interest in adult attachment research. Theories and research findings of adult attachment stem from two different methodological approaches. The first approach measures adult attachment through Adult Attachment Interview (AAI; Main, 1991 where the attachment is assessed through the narratives of adult people of their early child experiences with their primary caretakers. The second approach measures adult attachment with the help of self-evaluative questionnaires, developed by (a Hazan and Shaver (1987 who started this approach in the field of personality and social psychology, and (b Bartholomew and Horowitz (1991. Research shows that there is significant correlation between early and adult attachment style. Attachment styles are passed from generation to generation. Basic adult attachment styles are: securely attached, preoccupied, fearful-avoidant, dismissing-avoidant and disorganized. Previous research using Barholomew and Horowitz (1991 Relationship Questionnaire on 176 Slovenian students showed that 48% students are securely attached, 29% are fearful-avoidant, 10% are dismissing-avoidant, and 13% have preoccupied attachment style. Theory of attachment is very useful for understanding the behavior and subjective experiences of children and adults. It is applicable to different contexts (psychotherapy, counseling, education .... The paper proposes further research focused on integration of adult attachment styles and types of object relations measured by Test of object relations (Žvelc, 1998 and Pictorial test of Separation and Individuation (Žvelc, 2003.

  16. The development of protein microarrays and their applications in DNA-protein and protein-protein interaction analyses of Arabidopsis transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Wei; He, Kun; Covington, Mike; Dinesh-Kumar, S P; Snyder, Michael; Harmer, Stacey L; Zhu, Yu-Xian; Deng, Xing Wang

    2008-01-01

    We used our collection of Arabidopsis transcription factor (TF) ORFeome clones to construct protein microarrays containing as many as 802 TF proteins. These protein microarrays were used for both protein-DNA and protein-protein interaction analyses. For protein-DNA interaction studies, we examined AP2/ERF family TFs and their cognate cis-elements. By careful comparison of the DNA-binding specificity of 13 TFs on the protein microarray with previous non-microarray data, we showed that protein microarrays provide an efficient and high throughput tool for genome-wide analysis of TF-DNA interactions. This microarray protein-DNA interaction analysis allowed us to derive a comprehensive view of DNA-binding profiles of AP2/ERF family proteins in Arabidopsis. It also revealed four TFs that bound the EE (evening element) and had the expected phased gene expression under clock-regulation, thus providing a basis for further functional analysis of their roles in clock regulation of gene expression. We also developed procedures for detecting protein interactions using this TF protein microarray and discovered four novel partners that interact with HY5, which can be validated by yeast two-hybrid assays. Thus, plant TF protein microarrays offer an attractive high-throughput alternative to traditional techniques for TF functional characterization on a global scale.

  17. Epitope mapping on the dendritic cell-specific ICAM-3-grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN) pathogen-attachment factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra-Filardi, Elena; Estecha, Ana; Samaniego, Rafael; Fernández-Ruiz, Elena; Colmenares, María; Sánchez-Mateos, Paloma; Steinman, Ralph M; Granelli-Piperno, Angela; Corbí, Angel L

    2010-01-01

    DC-SIGN (dendritic cell-specific ICAM-3-grabbing non-integrin) is a myeloid pathogen-attachment factor C-type lectin which recognizes mannose- and fucose-containing oligosaccharide ligands on clinically relevant pathogens. Intracellular signaling initiated upon ligand engagement of DC-SIGN interferes with TLR-initiated signals, and modulates the T cell activating and polarizing ability of antigen-presenting cells. The C-terminal carbohydrate-recognition domain (CRD) of DC-SIGN is preceded by a neck domain composed of eight 23-residue repeats which mediate molecule multimerization, and whose polymorphism correlates with altered susceptibility to SARS and HIV infection. Naturally occurring isoforms and chimaeric molecules, in combination with established recognition properties, were used to define seven structural and functional epitopes on DC-SIGN. Three epitopes mapped to the CRD, one of which is multimerization-dependent and only exposed on DC-SIGN monomers. Epitopes within the neck domain were conformation-independent and unaltered upon molecule multimerization, but were differentially affected by neck domain truncations. Although neck-specific antibodies exhibited lower function-blocking ability, they were more efficient at inducing molecule internalization. Moreover, crosslinking of the different epitopes resulted in distinct levels of microclustering on the cell surface. The identification of independent epitopes on the DC-SIGN molecule might facilitate the design of reagents that modulate the T cell activating and polarizing ability of DC-SIGN-expressing cells without preventing its antigen- and pathogen-recognition capacities.

  18. Myocardin-related transcription factor regulates Nox4 protein expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rozycki, Matthew; Bialik, Janne Folke; Speight, Pam

    2016-01-01

    TGFβ-induced expression of the NADPH oxidase Nox4 is essential for fibroblast-myofibroblast transition. Rho has been implicated in Nox4 regulation, but the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. Myocardin-related transcription factor (MRTF), a Rho/actin polymerization-controlled coactivator...... translocation of MRTF. Because the Nox4 promoter harbors a serum response factor/MRTF cis-element (CC(A/T)6GG box), we asked if MRTF (and thus cytoskeleton organization) could regulate Nox4 expression. We show that Nox4 protein is robustly induced in kidney tubular cells exclusively by combined application...... of contact uncoupling and TGFβ. Nox4 knockdown abrogates epithelial-myofibroblast transition-associated reactive oxygen species production. Laser capture microdissection reveals increased Nox4 expression in the tubular epithelium also during obstructive nephropathy. MRTF down-regulation/inhibition suppresses...

  19. [Activated protein C resistance and factor V Leiden: clinical interest].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guermazi, S; Znazen, R

    2011-10-01

    Activated protein C resistance (APCR) is a coagulation abnormality often linked to FV Leiden mutation, a single nucleotide G1691A substitution resulting in arginine 506→glutamine missense factor V mutation. FV Leiden has a frequency of 20 to 30% in groups of patients with venous thrombosis while it is of 4 to 10% in normal subjects. FV Leiden is considered as a weak risk factor of thrombosis except in homozygote. FV Leiden is implicated in deep venous thrombosis occurrence. Duration of oral anticoagulant treatment is six months in patients developing a first venous thrombosis except in patients with combined defects or a clinical context suggesting a high risk of severe relapse. Detection of APCR by coagulation methods is often used in first intention with a high specificity if plasmas tested are diluted in factor V deficient plasma. Genotyping study is essential to establish the heterozygote or homozygote statute and certain teams perform it directly. Nevertheless, APCR not related to FV Leiden could be an independent thrombosis risk factor. APCR and FV Leiden are included in laboratory investigations of thrombophilic markers in patients less than 50 years with venous thrombosis. In arterial thrombosis, FV Leiden implication is weak or absent. FV Leiden increases the risk of thrombosis in other situations as in patients with cancer. An association with recurrent miscarriages and other vasculoplacental complications is also reported in many studies but the data concerning the efficacy of antithrombotic treatment to prevent recurrence are currently insufficient. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Lengths of Orthologous Prokaryotic Proteins Are Affected by Evolutionary Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Tatarinova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Proteins of the same functional family (for example, kinases may have significantly different lengths. It is an open question whether such variation in length is random or it appears as a response to some unknown evolutionary driving factors. The main purpose of this paper is to demonstrate existence of factors affecting prokaryotic gene lengths. We believe that the ranking of genomes according to lengths of their genes, followed by the calculation of coefficients of association between genome rank and genome property, is a reasonable approach in revealing such evolutionary driving factors. As we demonstrated earlier, our chosen approach, Bubble-sort, combines stability, accuracy, and computational efficiency as compared to other ranking methods. Application of Bubble Sort to the set of 1390 prokaryotic genomes confirmed that genes of Archaeal species are generally shorter than Bacterial ones. We observed that gene lengths are affected by various factors: within each domain, different phyla have preferences for short or long genes; thermophiles tend to have shorter genes than the soil-dwellers; halophiles tend to have longer genes. We also found that species with overrepresentation of cytosines and guanines in the third position of the codon (GC3 content tend to have longer genes than species with low GC3 content.

  1. Thioredoxin interacting protein inhibits hypoxia-inducible factor transcriptional activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Michael R; Rogers, Lynette K; Liu, Yusen; Welty, Stephen E; Tipple, Trent E

    2010-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is required for proper lung development and is transcriptionally regulated in alveolar epithelial cells by hypoxia inducible factor (HIF). Previous findings in a newborn mouse model of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) suggest that thioredoxin interacting protein (Txnip) is a novel regulator of VEGF expression. The present studies were designed to test the hypothesis that Txnip negatively regulates VEGF through effects on HIF-mediated gene expression. To test this hypothesis, we first examined the levels of VEGF and Txnip protein in the lungs of 1 day-old newborn and E19 embryos and detected a significant inverse correlation. To elucidate the mechanisms underlying this relationship, we studied the effects of Txnip overexpression on HIF-mediated transcription using murine lung epithelial (MLE-12) cells. Overexpression of Txnip inhibited HIF-mediated reporter activity in both hypoxia and room air. Suppression of HIF activity by Txnip appeared to be independent of the ability of Txnip to bind to thioredoxin. Thus, our studies support a model in which Txnip is a potentially critical regulator of HIF-mediated gene transcription in the murine lung. Alterations in Txnip expression could alter lung VEGF expression in prematurely born human infants and contribute to the development of BPD. PMID:20692333

  2. Reactive Attachment Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Reactive Attachment Disorder and Disinhibited Social Engagement Disorder. Reactive Attachment Disorder (RAD) Children with RAD are less likely to interact with other people because of negative experiences with adults in their early years. They have difficulty calming ...

  3. Pseudomonas aeruginosa cells attached to a surface display a typical proteome early as 20 minutes of incubation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crouzet, Marc; Claverol, Stéphane; Lomenech, Anne-Marie; Le Sénéchal, Caroline; Costaglioli, Patricia; Barthe, Christophe; Garbay, Bertrand; Bonneu, Marc; Vilain, Sébastien

    2017-01-01

    Biofilms are present in all environments and often result in negative effects due to properties of the biofilm lifestyle and especially antibiotics resistance. Biofilms are associated with chronic infections. Controlling bacterial attachment, the first step of biofilm formation, is crucial for fighting against biofilm and subsequently preventing the persistence of infection. Thus deciphering the underlying molecular mechanisms involved in attachment could allow discovering molecular targets from it would be possible to develop inhibitors against bacterial colonization and potentiate antibiotherapy. To identify the key components and pathways that aid the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa in attachment we performed for the first time a proteomic analysis as early as after 20 minutes of incubation using glass wool fibers as a surface. We compared the protein contents of the attached and unattached bacteria. Using mass spectrometry, 3043 proteins were identified. Our results showed that, as of 20 minutes of incubation, using stringent quantification criteria 616 proteins presented a modification of their abundance in the attached cells compared to their unattached counterparts. The attached cells presented an overall reduced gene expression and characteristics of slow-growing cells. The over-accumulation of outer membrane proteins, periplasmic folding proteins and O-antigen chain length regulators was also observed, indicating a profound modification of the cell envelope. Consistently the sigma factor AlgU required for cell envelope homeostasis was highly over-accumulated in attached cells. In addition our data suggested a role of alarmone (p)ppGpp and polyphosphate during the early attachment phase. Furthermore, almost 150 proteins of unknown function were differentially accumulated in the attached cells. Our proteomic analysis revealed the existence of distinctive biological features in attached cells as early as 20 minutes of incubation. Analysis of

  4. Coagulation factor V mediates inhibition of tissue factor signaling by activated protein C in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Hai Po H; Kerschen, Edward J; Basu, Sreemanti; Hernandez, Irene; Zogg, Mark; Jia, Shuang; Hessner, Martin J; Toso, Raffaella; Rezaie, Alireza R; Fernández, José A; Camire, Rodney M; Ruf, Wolfram; Griffin, John H; Weiler, Hartmut

    2015-11-19

    The key effector molecule of the natural protein C pathway, activated protein C (aPC), exerts pleiotropic effects on coagulation, fibrinolysis, and inflammation. Coagulation-independent cell signaling by aPC appears to be the predominant mechanism underlying its highly reproducible therapeutic efficacy in most animal models of injury and infection. In this study, using a mouse model of Staphylococcus aureus sepsis, we demonstrate marked disease stage-specific effects of the anticoagulant and cell signaling functions of aPC. aPC resistance of factor (f)V due to the R506Q Leiden mutation protected against detrimental anticoagulant effects of aPC therapy but also abrogated the anti-inflammatory and mortality-reducing effects of the signaling-selective 5A-aPC variant that has minimal anticoagulant function. We found that procofactor V (cleaved by aPC at R506) and protein S were necessary cofactors for the aPC-mediated inhibition of inflammatory tissue-factor signaling. The anti-inflammatory cofactor function of fV involved the same structural features that govern its cofactor function for the anticoagulant effects of aPC, yet its anti-inflammatory activities did not involve proteolysis of activated coagulation factors Va and VIIIa. These findings reveal a novel biological function and mechanism of the protein C pathway in which protein S and the aPC-cleaved form of fV are cofactors for anti-inflammatory cell signaling by aPC in the context of endotoxemia and infection.

  5. Attachment Without Fear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, David C

    2009-12-01

    John Bowlby hypothesized an attachment system that interacts with caregiving, exploration, and fear systems in the brain, with a particular emphasis on fear. Neurobiological research confirms many of his hypotheses and also raises some new questions. A psychological model based on this neurobiological research is presented here. The model extends conventional attachment theory by describing additional attachment processes independent of fear. In this model, the attachment elements of trust, openness, and dependence interact with the caregiving elements of caring, empathy, and responsibility.

  6. Attachment Without Fear

    OpenAIRE

    Bell, David C.

    2009-01-01

    John Bowlby hypothesized an attachment system that interacts with caregiving, exploration, and fear systems in the brain, with a particular emphasis on fear. Neurobiological research confirms many of his hypotheses and also raises some new questions. A psychological model based on this neurobiological research is presented here. The model extends conventional attachment theory by describing additional attachment processes independent of fear. In this model, the attachment elements of trust, o...

  7. Belt attachment and system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Abraham D.; Davidson, Erick M.

    2016-02-02

    Disclosed herein is a belt assembly including a flexible belt with an improved belt attachment. The belt attachment includes two crossbars spaced along the length of the belt. The crossbars retain bearings that allow predetermined movement in six degrees of freedom. The crossbars are connected by a rigid body that attaches to the bearings. Implements that are attached to the rigid body are simply supported but restrained in pitching rotation.

  8. Deduced sequences of the membrane fusion and attachment proteins of canine distemper viruses isolated from dogs and wild animals in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Chae-Wun; Lee, Joong-Bok; Park, Seung-Yong; Song, Chang-Seon; Lee, Nak-Hyung; Seo, Kun-Ho; Kang, Young-Sun; Park, Choi-Kyu; Choi, In-Soo

    2013-08-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) causes highly contagious respiratory, gastrointestinal, and neurological diseases in wild and domestic animal species. Despite a broad vaccination campaign, the disease is still a serious problem worldwide. In this study, six field CDV strains were isolated from three dogs, two raccoon dogs, and one badger in Korea. The full sequence of the genes encoding fusion (F) and hemagglutinin (H) proteins were compared with those of other CDVs including field and vaccine strains. The phylogenetic analysis for the F and H genes indicated that the two CDV strains isolated from dogs were most closely related to Chinese strains in the Asia-1 genotype. Another four strains were closely related to Japanese strains in the Asia-2 genotype. The six currently isolated strains shared 90.2-92.1% and 88.2-91.8% identities with eight commercial vaccine strains in their nucleotide and amino acid sequences of the F protein, respectively. They also showed 90.1-91.4% and 87.8-90.7% identities with the same vaccine strains in their nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences of the H protein, respectively. Different N-linked glycosylation sites were identified in the F and H genes of the six isolates from the prototype vaccine strain Onderstepoort. Collectively, these results demonstrate that at least two different CDV genotypes currently exist in Korea. The considerable genetic differences between the vaccine strains and wild-type isolates would be a major factor of the incomplete protection of dogs from CDV infections.

  9. The Development of Protein Microarrays and Their Applications in DNA-Protein and Protein-Protein Interaction Analyses of Arabidopsis Transcription Factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Gong; Kun He; Mike Covington; S.R Dinesh-Kumar; Michael Snyder; Stacey L.Harmer; Yu-Xian Zhu; Xing Wang Deng

    2008-01-01

    We used our collection of Arabidopsis transcription factor (TF) ORFeome clones to constructprotein microarrays containing as many as 802 TF proteins. These protein microarrays were used for both protein-DNA and proteinprotein interaction analyses. For protein-DNA interaction studies, we examined AP2/ERF family TFs and their cognate cis-elements. By careful comparison of the DNA-binding specificity of 13 TFs on the protein microarray with previous non-microarray data, we showed that protein microarrays provide an efficient and high throughput tool for genome-wide analysis of TF-DNA interactions. This microarray protein-DNA interaction analysis allowed us to derive a comprehensive view of DNA-binding profiles of AP2/ERF family proteins in Arabidopsis. It also revealed four TFs that bound the EE (evening element) and had the expected phased gene expression under clock-regulation, thus providing a basis for further functional analysis of their roles in clock regulation of gene expression. We also developed procedures for detecting protein interactions using this TF protein microarray and discovered four novel partners that interact with HY5, which can be validated by yeast two-hybrid assays. Thus, plant TF protein microarrays offer an attractive high-throughput alternative to traditional techniques for TF functional characterization on a global scale.

  10. Attachment over Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Michael; Feiring, Candice; Rosenthal, Saul

    2000-01-01

    Examined continuity in attachment classification from infancy through adolescence and related it to autobiographical memories of childhood, divorce, and maladjustment in white middle-class children. Found no continuity in attachment classification from 1 to 18 years and no relation between infant attachment status and adolescent adjustment.…

  11. Protein anticoagulants targeting factor VIIa-tissue factor complex: a comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Karna; Bayoumi, Riad; Banerjee, Yajnavalka

    2013-01-01

    Anticoagulants are pivotal for the treatment of debilitating thromboembolic and associated disorders. Current anticoagulants such as heparin and warfarin are non-specific and have a narrow therapeutic window. These limitations have provided the impetus to develop new anticoagulant therapies/strategies that target specific factors in the blood coagulation cascade, ideally those located upstream in the clotting process. Factor VIIa (FVIIa) presents an attractive target as it, in complex with tissue factor (TF), acts as the prima ballerina for the formation of blood clot. A comprehensive review delineating the structure-activity relationship of protein/peptide anticoagulants targeting FVIIa or TF-FVIIa complex is absent in the literature. In this article, we have addressed this deficit by appraising the peptide/protein anticoagulants that target FVIIa/TF-FVIIa complex. Further, the current status of these anticoagulants, with regard to their performance in different clinical trials has also been presented. Lastly, the unexplored domains of these unique proteins have also been highlighted, which will facilitate further translational research in this paradigm, to improve strategies to counter and treat thromboembolic disorders.

  12. Arabidopsis sigma factor binding proteins are activators of the WRKY33 transcription factor in plant defense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Zhibing; Li, Ying; Wang, Fei; Cheng, Yuan; Fan, Baofang; Yu, Jing-Quan; Chen, Zhixiang

    2011-10-01

    Necrotrophic pathogens are important plant pathogens that cause many devastating plant diseases. Despite their impact, our understanding of the plant defense response to necrotrophic pathogens is limited. The WRKY33 transcription factor is important for plant resistance to necrotrophic pathogens; therefore, elucidation of its functions will enhance our understanding of plant immunity to necrotrophic pathogens. Here, we report the identification of two WRKY33-interacting proteins, nuclear-encoded SIGMA FACTOR BINDING PROTEIN1 (SIB1) and SIB2, which also interact with plastid-encoded plastid RNA polymerase SIGMA FACTOR1. Both SIB1 and SIB2 contain an N-terminal chloroplast targeting signal and a putative nuclear localization signal, suggesting that they are dual targeted. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation indicates that WRKY33 interacts with SIBs in the nucleus of plant cells. Both SIB1 and SIB2 contain a short VQ motif that is important for interaction with WRKY33. The two VQ motif-containing proteins recognize the C-terminal WRKY domain and stimulate the DNA binding activity of WRKY33. Like WRKY33, both SIB1 and SIB2 are rapidly and strongly induced by the necrotrophic pathogen Botrytis cinerea. Resistance to B. cinerea is compromised in the sib1 and sib2 mutants but enhanced in SIB1-overexpressing transgenic plants. These results suggest that dual-targeted SIB1 and SIB2 function as activators of WRKY33 in plant defense against necrotrophic pathogens.

  13. Human pathogenic Borrelia spielmanii sp. nov. resists complement-mediated killing by direct binding of immune regulators factor H and factor H-like protein 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzberger, Pia; Siegel, Corinna; Skerka, Christine; Fingerle, Volker; Schulte-Spechtel, Ulrike; van Dam, Alje; Wilske, Bettina; Brade, Volker; Zipfel, Peter F; Wallich, Reinhard; Kraiczy, Peter

    2007-10-01

    Borrelia spielmanii sp. nov. has recently been shown to be a novel human pathogenic genospecies that causes Lyme disease in Europe. In order to elucidate the immune evasion mechanisms of B. spielmanii, we compared the abilities of isolates obtained from Lyme disease patients and tick isolate PC-Eq17 to escape from complement-mediated bacteriolysis. Using a growth inhibition assay, we show that four B. spielmanii isolates, including PC-Eq17, are serum resistant, whereas a single isolate, PMew, was more sensitive to complement-mediated lysis. All isolates activated complement in vitro, as demonstrated by covalent attachment of C3 fragments; however, deposition of the later activation products C6 and C5b-9 was restricted to the moderately serum-resistant isolate PMew and the serum-sensitive B. garinii isolate G1. Furthermore, serum adsorption experiments revealed that all B. spielmanii isolates acquired the host alternative pathway regulators factor H and factor H-like protein (FHL-1) from human serum. Both complement regulators retained their factor I-mediated C3b inactivation activities when bound to spirochetes. In addition, two distinct factor H and FHL-1 binding proteins, BsCRASP-1 and BsCRASP-2, were identified, which we estimated to be approximately 23 to 25 kDa in mass. A further factor H binding protein, BsCRASP-3, was found exclusively in the tick isolate, PC-Eq17. This is the first report describing an immune evasion mechanism utilized by B. spielmanii sp. nov., and it demonstrates the capture of human immune regulators to resist complement-mediated killing.

  14. Histo-blood group antigens act as attachment factors of rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus infection in a virus strain-dependent manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina Nyström

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Rabbit Hemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV, a calicivirus of the Lagovirus genus, and responsible for rabbit hemorrhagic disease (RHD, kills rabbits between 48 to 72 hours post infection with mortality rates as high as 50-90%. Caliciviruses, including noroviruses and RHDV, have been shown to bind histo-blood group antigens (HBGA and human non-secretor individuals lacking ABH antigens in epithelia have been found to be resistant to norovirus infection. RHDV virus-like particles have previously been shown to bind the H type 2 and A antigens. In this study we present a comprehensive assessment of the strain-specific binding patterns of different RHDV isolates to HBGAs. We characterized the HBGA expression in the duodenum of wild and domestic rabbits by mass spectrometry and relative quantification of A, B and H type 2 expression. A detailed binding analysis of a range of RHDV strains, to synthetic sugars and human red blood cells, as well as to rabbit duodenum, a likely gastrointestinal site for viral entrance was performed. Enzymatic cleavage of HBGA epitopes confirmed binding specificity. Binding was observed to blood group B, A and H type 2 epitopes in a strain-dependent manner with slight differences in specificity for A, B or H epitopes allowing RHDV strains to preferentially recognize different subgroups of animals. Strains related to the earliest described RHDV outbreak were not able to bind A, whereas all other genotypes have acquired A binding. In an experimental infection study, rabbits lacking the correct HBGA ligands were resistant to lethal RHDV infection at low challenge doses. Similarly, survivors of outbreaks in wild populations showed increased frequency of weak binding phenotypes, indicating selection for host resistance depending on the strain circulating in the population. HBGAs thus act as attachment factors facilitating infection, while their polymorphism of expression could contribute to generate genetic resistance to RHDV at the

  15. Factores de crecimiento II: factores insulinoides de crecimiento Growth factors II: insuline-like growth binging proteins (GFBPs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Guillermo Maldonado E.

    1996-03-01

    Full Text Available Se revisan los Factores Insulinoides de Crecimiento, también denominados ";Factores de Crecimiento Similares a la Insulina";, sobre los cuales se dispone de abundante información. Se sintetizan conocimientos recientes sobre dichos factores con énfasis en los siguientes aspectos: estructura bioquímica, concentraciones y sus cambios en los líquidos biológicos, proteínas fijadoras, receptores, mecanismos de acción y efectos biológicos. This review summarizes recent knowledge concerning Insulin.like growth factors I and II, with emphasis on their biochemical structure, concentrations, binding proteins, receptors, mechanisms of action, biological effects, and alterations of their concentrations in biological fluids.

  16. Insulin-like growth factor binding proteins 4-6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, Leon A

    2015-10-01

    Insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs) 4-6 have important roles as modulators of IGF actions. IGFBP-4 and IGFBP-6 predominantly inhibit IGF actions, whereas IGFBP-5 may enhance these actions under some circumstances. IGFBP-6 is unique among the IGFBPs for its marked IGF-II binding preference. IGFBPs 4-6 are found in the circulation as binary complexes with IGFs that can enter tissues. Additionally, about half of the circulating IGFBP-5 is found in ternary complexes with IGFs and an acid labile subunit; this high molecular complex cannot leave the circulation and acts as an IGF reservoir. IGFBPs 4-6 also have IGF-independent actions. These IGFBPs are regulated in a cell-specific manner and their dysregulation may play a role in a range of diseases including cancer. However, there is no clear clinical indication for measuring serum levels of these IGFBPs at present. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. 老人院老年人孤独感与依恋的现状及其影响因素研究%Research on status quo of loneliness and attachment of the elderly at retirement home and its influencing factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张倩倩; 张青; 陈秋杏; 王亚楠; 傅涵涵; 龚雪; 黄毅

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To analyze the status quo of loneliness and attachment of the elderly at retirement home and its influencing factors and probe into the relationship between loneliness and attachment of the elderly at re-tirement home.Methods:A survey was conducted on A total of 150 elderly people were drew out in retirement home in Wuhan city and were investigated with Intimacy Experience Scale and elderly loneliness questionnaires. Results:Gender,with or without children,monthly income and self care ability were the influencing factors of the elderly’s loneliness.Education level and monthly income were the influencing factors of the elderly’s attach-ment anxiety.Attachment avoidance and attachment anxiety were positively correlated with loneliness.Conclu-sion:Retirement home should make measures based on the influencing factors of the elderly’s loneliness,so as to reduce the elderly's attachment avoidance and medical anxiety and improve their mental health level.%[目的]分析老人院老年人孤独感和依恋的现状及其影响因素,探讨老人院老年人孤独感与依恋的关系。[方法]抽取141名武汉市老人院老年人,采用亲密关系体验量表和老年人孤独感问卷进行问卷调查。[结果]性别、有无子女、月收入、自我照顾能力是老年人孤独感的影响因素,受教育程度和月收入是老年人依恋焦虑的影响因素;依恋回避、依恋焦虑与孤独感呈正相关。[结论]老人院应针对老年人孤独感的影响因素制定策略,减轻老年人的依恋回避和依恋焦虑,提高其心理健康水平。

  18. Factors influencing protein tyrosine nitration--structure-based predictive models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayden, Alexander S; Yakovlev, Vasily A; Graves, Paul R; Mikkelsen, Ross B; Kellogg, Glen E

    2011-03-15

    Models for exploring tyrosine nitration in proteins have been created based on 3D structural features of 20 proteins for which high-resolution X-ray crystallographic or NMR data are available and for which nitration of 35 total tyrosines has been experimentally proven under oxidative stress. Factors suggested in previous work to enhance nitration were examined with quantitative structural descriptors. The role of neighboring acidic and basic residues is complex: for the majority of tyrosines that are nitrated the distance to the heteroatom of the closest charged side chain corresponds to the distance needed for suspected nitrating species to form hydrogen bond bridges between the tyrosine and that charged amino acid. This suggests that such bridges play a very important role in tyrosine nitration. Nitration is generally hindered for tyrosines that are buried and for those tyrosines for which there is insufficient space for the nitro group. For in vitro nitration, closed environments with nearby heteroatoms or unsaturated centers that can stabilize radicals are somewhat favored. Four quantitative structure-based models, depending on the conditions of nitration, have been developed for predicting site-specific tyrosine nitration. The best model, relevant for both in vitro and in vivo cases, predicts 30 of 35 tyrosine nitrations (positive predictive value) and has a sensitivity of 60/71 (11 false positives). Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Attachment Security and Pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Tonny Elmose; Lahav, Yael; Defrin, Ruth;

    2015-01-01

    The present study assesses for the first time, the possible disruption effect of posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTSS) with regard to the protective role of attachment on pain, among ex-POWs. While secure attachment seems to serve as a buffer, decreasing the perception of pain, this function may...... be disrupted by PTSS. The study sample included 104 subjects who were combat veterans of the 1973 Yom Kippur War comprising of 60 male ex-prisoners of war (ex-POWs) and 44 comparable male combat veterans. Both attachment and pain were investigated experimentally in the laboratory and via questionnaires. We...... found that ex-POWs showed higher levels of clinical pain and attachment insecurities compared to controls. Moreover, attachment avoidance and soothing effect of attachment (SEA) were both associated with lower levels of clinical pain. Most importantly, PTSS moderated the associations between attachment...

  20. Covalent attachment and dissociative loss of sinapinic acid to/from cysteine-containing proteins from bacterial cell lysates analyzed by MALDI-TOF-TOF mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portions of this work were presented earlier as an oral presentation on June 2nd 2009 at the 57th American Society of Mass Spectrometry Conference (May 31-June 4, 2009, Philadelphia, PA). We report covalent attachment via a thiol ester linkage of 3,5-dimethoxy-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (sinapinic acid...

  1. Association Between Insecure Attachment and ADHD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storebo, Ole Jakob; Darling Rasmussen, Pernille; Simonsen, Erik

    2016-01-01

    styles than reported in the general population. Conclusion: There seems to be a clear association between ADHD and insecure attachment. It is likely that early intervention in the form of parent training and pharmacological treatment may prevent development of attachment problems. But such studies have......INFO, Medline, and EMBASE databases. Results: Twenty-nine studies were included in the review. Overall, the studies showed that parental attachment problems and environmental mediating factors were significantly associated with childhood ADHD. Adults with ADHD had a much higher incidence of insecure attachment...

  2. Sequence Motifs in MADS Transcription Factors Responsible for Specificity and Diversification of Protein-Protein Interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, van A.D.J.; Morabito, G.; Fiers, M.A.; Ham, van R.C.H.J.; Angenent, G.C.; Immink, R.G.H.

    2010-01-01

    Protein sequences encompass tertiary structures and contain information about specific molecular interactions, which in turn determine biological functions of proteins. Knowledge about how protein sequences define interaction specificity is largely missing, in particular for paralogous protein famil

  3. Blade attachment assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Crespo, Andres Jose; Delvaux, John McConnell; Miller, Diane Patricia

    2016-05-03

    An assembly and method for affixing a turbomachine rotor blade to a rotor wheel are disclosed. In an embodiment, an adaptor member is provided disposed between the blade and the rotor wheel, the adaptor member including an adaptor attachment slot that is complementary to the blade attachment member, and an adaptor attachment member that is complementary to the rotor wheel attachment slot. A coverplate is provided, having a coverplate attachment member that is complementary to the rotor wheel attachment slot, and a hook for engaging the adaptor member. When assembled, the coverplate member matingly engages with the adaptor member, and retains the blade in the adaptor member, and the assembly in the rotor wheel.

  4. Insulinlike growth factor-binding protein proteolysis an emerging paradigm in insulinlike growth factor physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowlkes, J L

    1997-10-01

    In biologic fluids, insulinlike growth factors (IGF-I and IGF-II) are bound to high-affinity insulinlike growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs) of which seven have now been identified (IGFBPs 1-7). In a variety of biologic fluids, several IGFBPs undergo proteolytic degradation. Such degradation can lead to increased IGF bioavailability at the cell surface, facilitating receptor interactions. Herein, recent data identifying several IGFBP-degrading proteinases and their effects on IGF bioactivity is reviewed, and how IGFBP proteolysis is regulated by IGFs and IGFBPs, as well as how IGFBP cleavage analysis provides insights into the structure and function of IGFBPs, is explored. (Trends Endocrinol Metab 1997;8:299-306). (c) 1997, Elsevier Science Inc.

  5. The Neuroprotective Functions of Transforming Growth Factor Beta Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gábor Lovas

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β proteins are multifunctional cytokines whose neural functions are increasingly recognized. The machinery of TGF-β signaling, including the serine kinase type transmembrane receptors, is present in the central nervous system. However, the 3 mammalian TGF-β subtypes have distinct distributions in the brain suggesting different neural functions. Evidence of their involvement in the development and plasticity of the nervous system as well as their functions in peripheral organs suggested that they also exhibit neuroprotective functions. Indeed, TGF-β expression is induced following a variety of types of brain tissue injury. The neuroprotective function of TGF-βs is most established following brain ischemia. Damage in experimental animal models of global and focal ischemia was shown to be attenuated by TGF-βs. In addition, support for their neuroprotective actions following trauma, sclerosis multiplex, neurodegenerative diseases, infections, and brain tumors is also accumulating. The review will also describe the potential mechanisms of neuroprotection exerted by TGF-βs including anti-inflammatory, -apoptotic, -excitotoxic actions as well as the promotion of scar formation, angiogenesis, and neuroregeneration. The participation of these mechanisms in the neuroprotective effects of TGF-βs during different brain lesions will also be discussed.

  6. Dietary factors affecting hindgut protein fermentation in broilers: a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qaisrani, S.N.; Krimpen, van M.M.; Kwakkel, R.P.; Verstegen, M.W.A.; Hendriks, W.H.

    2015-01-01

    High growth rates in modern-day broilers require diets concentrated in digestible protein and energy. In addition to affecting feed conversion efficiency, it is important to prevent surplus dietary protein because of greater amounts of undigested protein entering the hindgut that may be fermented by

  7. Attachment characteristics and their interrelated factors during toddlers aged 1 ~ 2 years old%1~2岁幼儿依恋特征及有关影响因素的探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张艳; 何守森; 丁丽丽; 王静; 周倩; 倪晨曦; 安祥美; 周亚平; 邹晓慧

    2012-01-01

    [目的]了解128名1~2岁幼儿依恋特征及母亲敏感性、气质等基本因素对其影响作用. [方法]采用陌生情境试验和现场观察对儿童依恋状况和儿童母亲敏感性进行测评,并由母亲填写家庭一般人口学资料和幼儿气质问卷. [结果]128名幼儿中,安全型依恋99人(77.3%),回避型24人(18.8%),抗拒型5人(3.9%),未发现混乱型.不同依恋类型儿童母亲的敏感性得分差异显著;趋避性、心境、持久性、注意分散等气质维度与儿童某些依恋行为呈现明显相关关系. [结论]济南市城区幼儿依恋安全型比例较高;母亲敏感性是影响儿童依恋重要因素之一;儿童气质对依恋类型不产生直接影响,但某些气质维度影响儿童特定情景下的依恋行为表现.%[Objective] To explore the attachment characteristics and their interrelated factors include maternal sensitivity and children's temperament during 128 toddlers aged 1~2 years old. [Methods] The strange situation procedure (SSP) and maternal sensitivity scales were performed to assess the characters of toddler attachment and maternal sensitivities. And the families demographic data and toddler temperament scale were filled by their mothers. [Results] Among 128 infants, there were 99 secure-attachment, 24 avoidant-attachment, and 5 resistant-attachment, no disorganized- attachment. And there were significant differences of maternal sensitivities between toddler's attachment types. There were a significant correlation between the approach-withdrawal, persistence, mood and distractive dimension of toddler temperament and some attachment behavior such as the proximity,maintain contact and avoidance. [Conclusions] There is a higher ratio of secure attachment during 128 toddlers from Jinan city than in other studies. Maternal sensitivities play an important role in child attachment development and the temperament doesn't impact the attachment types directly, but some

  8. Attachment style and interpersonal trauma in refugees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morina, Naser; Schnyder, Ulrich; Schick, Matthis; Nickerson, Angela; Bryant, Richard A

    2016-12-01

    Refugees can suffer many experiences that threaten their trust in others. Although models of refugee mental health have postulated that attachment securities may be damaged by refugee experiences, this has yet to be empirically tested. This study aimed to understand the relationship between the nature of traumatic experiences sustained by refugees and attachment styles. In a cross-sectional study, treatment-seeking refugees (N = 134) were assessed for traumatic exposure using the Harvard Trauma Questionnaire and Posttraumatic Diagnostic Scale. Attachment style was assessed using the Experiences in Close Relationship Scale. Whereas gender and severity of interpersonal traumatic events predicted avoidant attachment style (accounting for 11% of the variance), neither these factors nor non-interpersonal trauma predicted anxious attachment. Exposure to interpersonal traumatic events, including torture, is associated with enduring avoidant attachment tendencies in refugees. This finding accords with attachment theories that prior adverse interpersonal experiences can undermine secure attachment systems, and may promote avoidance of attachment seeking. This finding may point to an important process maintaining poor psychological health in refugees affected by interpersonal trauma. © The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2016.

  9. Temperament and Attachment Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeanah, Charles H.; Fox, Nathan A.

    2004-01-01

    Reviewed in this article is research on children with reactive attachment disorder (RAD) who exhibit specific patterns of socially aberrant behavior resulting from being maltreated or having limited opportunities to form selective attachments. There are no data explaining why 2 different patterns of the disorder, an emotionally withdrawn-inhibited…

  10. Reactive Attachment Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Sue

    2002-01-01

    Written by a British parent, this case study tells the story of an adopted child who experienced many difficulties adjusting to life at home and school. It describes attachment disorder, possible causes of attachment difficulties, the bonding cycle, therapeutic parenting, and how schools can support the re-nurturing process. (Contains references.)…

  11. Attachment and psychosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korver, N.

    2014-01-01

    The main goal of this thesis was to further our understanding of current psychosocial models by introducing attachment as a relevant developmental framework. Firstly, attachment theory provides a psychosocial model for a developmental pathway to psychosis. Secondly, after expression of psychotic sym

  12. Attachment Theory and Mindfulness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Rose; Shapiro, Shauna; Treleaven, David

    2012-01-01

    We initiate a dialog between two central areas in the field of psychology today: attachment theory/research and mindfulness studies. The impact of the early mother-infant relationship on child development has been well established in the literature, with attachment theorists having focused on the correlation between a mother's capacity for…

  13. Adolescent attachment and psychopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenstein, D S; Horowitz, H A

    1996-04-01

    The relationships among attachment classification, psychopathology, and personality traits were examined in a group of 60 psychiatrically hospitalized adolescents. The concordance of attachment classification was examined in 27 adolescent-mother pairs. Both adolescent and maternal attachment status were overwhelmingly insecure and were highly concordant. Adolescents showing a dismissing attachment organization were more likely to have a conduct or substance abuse disorder, narcissistic or antisocial personality disorder, and self-reported narcissistic, antisocial, and paranoid personality traits. Adolescents showing a preoccupied attachment organization were more likely to have an affective disorder, obsessive-compulsive, histrionic, borderline or schizotypal personality disorder, and self-reported avoidant, anxious, and dysthymic personality traits. The results support a model of development of psychopathology based partially on relational experiences with parents.

  14. Factors that contribute to the immmunogenicity of therapeutic recombinant human proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukovozov, Ilya; Sabljic, Thomas; Hortelano, Gonzalo; Ofosu, Frederick A

    2008-05-01

    Use of recombinant human proteins has revolutionized medicine by providing over 200 highly purified hormones and proteins that effectively treat many inherited and acquired peptide hormone and protein deficiencies. With the exception of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies, these biological medicines are synthesized by cultured cells using DNA sequences that would yield proteins with identical amino acid sequences as endogenous human proteins. Therefore, there was the broad expectation that recombinant human biological medicines would be non-immunogenic in patients capable of synthesizing even sub-optimal levels of these therapeutic proteins to which they are innately tolerant. However, the widespread clinical use of recombinant human proteins has demonstrated that nearly all of them are immunogenic. This observation suggests that factors additional to differences in amino acid sequences of endogenous and biotherapeutic proteins contribute to the immunogenicity of therapeutic proteins. The main aim of this review is to summarize some of the factors that are known to contribute to the immunogenicity of recombinant therapeutic proteins.

  15. 婴幼儿对母亲的依恋性质及其影响因素%Analysis of infant-mother attachment and the related influencing factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李秀红; 静进; 杨德胜; 蔡小梅; 陈学彬; 苏晓梅

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Attachment reflects the early social experience of infant, which plays an important role in later child development. Although most of the attachment develops between infant and mother, some may occur between infant and care giver or others who have close relationship with it.OBJECTIVE: To analyze the infant-mother attachment patterns and the factors related to infant attachment.DESIGN: It was a sampling investigation.SETTING: Department of Maternal and Child Health, School of Public Health, Sun Yat-sen University.PARTICIPANTS: Totally 75 infants and their mother were selected randomly for this study in the Department of Child Health in Guangdong Maternal and Child Health Hospital from August to October 2002.METHODS: Strange situation test (SST) was performed by 6 researchers who were trained systematically. They watched the videos collectively and classified the patterns of infant attschment based on their performance. The internal consistency coefficient was 0.90. For those inconsistent assessments, the video should be reviewed and discussed to get an accordant conclusion. In addition, a self-designed maternal questionnaire was used to investigate the general condition of the infant and the familial information.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: ①Distribution of infant attachment patterns. ②Analysis of the risk factors related to infant attachment.RESULTS: All the 75 infants and their mother entered the statistical analysis. ①Distribution of the infant attachment patterns: In 75 infants, secure attachment was 65% and insecure attachment was 35%, among which,insecure-indifferent type was 18%, insecure-importunate type was 13%,and insecure-disorganized type was 4%. ②Analysis of the risk factors related to infant attachment Those infants with a younger age, a poor approachability (the response to strangers, new environment and objects), a closer relationship with caregiver and a more inconsistent education from the family members, are prone to develop

  16. Late-life attachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Mélanie; Rahioui, Hassan

    2017-03-01

    Old age is likely to cause a crisis in one's life because of the vulnerabilities it brings up, acting as stressful elements disrupting the elder's feeling of security. It leads to the activation of what is called his attachment system, consisting in attachment styles and interpersonal emotional regulation strategies. To recover a higher sense of safety, the elder would refer to his attachment figures, that is to say closed people paying attention to him, showing towards him availability and consideration. However older adults particularly see their tolerance threshold lowered, regarding an accumulation of losses (true or symbolic) and stressful events within their lifetime. In a psychological and organic exhaustion phenomenon, the risk is to wear out the interpersonal emotional regulation strategies. These are as much vulnerabilities that may increase psychiatric decompensation, including depression. To resolve the tension of this period and to found a necessary secure feeling, the elder will have to redesign the attachment links previously settled and proceed to adjustments to this new context. The need of relational closeness comes back in the elders' attachment behaviour, counting on attachment figures not only to help their loneliness or dependency, but essentially to support them in a narcissist and affective way. That is why attachment theory enlightens the late life period, such as the new challenges older adults have to face. Many studies recognize its value in understanding the transition to old age, but without proposing conceptualization. We aim first to focus on attachment conception to say how much it is relevant with elderly, and then to describe specific terms of attachment within this population in order to better understand those patients. To finish, we must think about new therapeutic proposals taking into consideration the attachment perspective for a better understanding of old age transition.

  17. 团体依恋的概念与测量:项目因子分析方法的应用%Calibrating Group Attachment Scale: An Application of Item Factor Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李同归; 刘飏

    2012-01-01

    In accordance with Smith et al.'s (1999) paradigm of developing group attachment measurements, the current research developed the group attachment scale (GAS) based on the experience of close relationship inventory which was widely considered as standard measurement of dyadic attachment. To confirm such conjecture, GAS with several criterion scales were tested in a sample of 1571 employees. Data analysis incorporated item factor analysis (IFA) modeling instead of using traditional confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) based on linear regression. Within the framework of structural equation modeling (SEM), IFA could be formalized as a CFA model with latent response indicator which was supposed to be the underlying score externally manifested by categorical response, so it was also called as categorical confirmatory factor analysis (CCFA). The current research applied maximum likelihood estimator to fit a two-factor non-orthogonal CCFA model for GAS. In terms of univariate standardized Pearson residuals, the CCFA model fitted well to the empirical data. However, item and test information still had much to be desired. Validity analysis showed that group attachment moderately correlated with dyadic attachment, which probably indicated their common antecedent attachment theory. Besides, group attachment avoidance had stronger association than group attachment anxiety with group identification measures, but unexpectedly stronger with the sum-score of Rosenberg self-esteem scale. Possible reasons for such observations were further discussed.%在从依恋理论出发,基于Smith等(1999)的研究,论述团体的功能以及可作为个体依恋对象的原因,介绍团体依恋的概念,并以亲密关系经历量表为基础编制了“团体依恋量表”(GAS)。对1571名企业员工进行GAS测量,用组织认同、集体自尊、Rosenberg自尊量表等作为效标考察其信效度。采用项目因子分析(IFA)进行数

  18. Tumor suppressor protein DAB2IP participates in chromosomal stability maintenance through activating spindle assembly checkpoint and stabilizing kinetochore-microtubule attachments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lan; Shang, Zeng-Fu; Abdisalaam, Salim; Lee, Kyung-Jong; Gupta, Arun; Hsieh, Jer-Tsong; Asaithamby, Aroumougame; Chen, Benjamin P.C.; Saha, Debabrata

    2016-01-01

    Defects in kinetochore-microtubule (KT-MT) attachment and the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) during cell division are strongly associated with chromosomal instability (CIN). CIN has been linked to carcinogenesis, metastasis, poor prognosis and resistance to cancer therapy. We previously reported that the DAB2IP is a tumor suppressor, and that loss of DAB2IP is often detected in advanced prostate cancer (PCa) and is indicative of poor prognosis. Here, we report that the loss of DAB2IP results in impaired KT-MT attachment, compromised SAC and aberrant chromosomal segregation. We discovered that DAB2IP directly interacts with Plk1 and its loss inhibits Plk1 kinase activity, thereby impairing Plk1-mediated BubR1 phosphorylation. Loss of DAB2IP decreases the localization of BubR1 at the kinetochore during mitosis progression. In addition, the reconstitution of DAB2IP enhances the sensitivity of PCa cells to microtubule stabilizing drugs (paclitaxel, docetaxel) and Plk1 inhibitor (BI2536). Our findings demonstrate a novel function of DAB2IP in the maintenance of KT-MT structure and SAC regulation during mitosis which is essential for chromosomal stability. PMID:27568005

  19. Dissociative Electron Attachment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arreola, Esmeralda; Esmeralda Arreola Collaboration; Leigh Hargreaves Collaboration

    Since the pioneering work of Boudiaffa et al., it has been understood that electrons, even with energies near or below the ionization threshold, are capable of initiating strand-breaks in human DNA. This discovery raised important questions for cancer treatments, since sub-ionizing electrons are known to be the most copiously produced secondary product of radiation therapy. But even to date these factors are largely excluded from dosimetry calculations. This lack of inclusion is, at least in part, certainly due to the dearth of fundamental data describing low-energy electron interactions with nucleotide molecules that form the basis of DNA. Understanding of how such slow electrons are able to damage DNA remains incomplete, but the strongly peaked nature of Boudiaffa et al.'s data gives strong hints at resonantly driven collision processes. DNA damage is therefore most likely driven by ``dissociative electron attachment'' (DEA). DEA is a rather complicated process to model due to the coupling of electronic and nuclear degrees of freedom in the molecule. At the California State University Fullerton, we are currently commissioning a new spectrometer to study dissociation channels, reaction rates and orientation effects in DEA collisions between slow electrons and nucleotide molecules. At the meeting we will present design parameters and commissioning data for this new apparatus.

  20. Genetic factors and analysis of protein misfolding in vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holmberg, Mats

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s, Huntington’s and Parkinson’s disease belong to a group of disorders caused by misfolded proteins that are known to stick together in a specific manner forming long fibrils made up of thousands of individual proteins. These fibrils are known as amyloids. It is still unclear which part of

  1. Nuclear transport factor directs localization of protein synthesis during mitosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogaart, Geert van den; Meinema, Anne C.; Krasnikov, Viktor; Veenhoff, Liesbeth M.; Poolman, Bert

    Export of messenger RNA from the transcription site in the nucleus and mRNA targeting to the translation site in the cytoplasm are key regulatory processes in protein synthesis. In yeast, the mRNA-binding proteins Nab2p and Nab4p/Hrp1p accompany transcripts to their translation site, where the

  2. Attachment-related psychodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaver, Phillip R; Mikulincer, Mario

    2002-09-01

    Because there has been relatively little communication and cross-fertilization between the two major lines of research on adult attachment, one based on coded narrative assessments of defensive processes, the other on simple self-reports of 'attachment style' in close relationships, we here explain and review recent work based on a combination of self-report and other kinds of method, including behavioral observations and unconscious priming techniques. The review indicates that considerable progress has been made in testing central hypotheses derived from attachment theory and in exploring unconscious, psychodynamic processes related to affect-regulation and attachment-system activation. The combination of self-report assessment of attachment style and experimental manipulation of other theoretically pertinent variables allows researchers to test causal hypotheses. We present a model of normative and individual-difference processes related to attachment and identify areas in which further research is needed and likely to be successful. One long-range goal is to create a more complete theory of personality built on attachment theory and other object relations theories.

  3. Attachment to groups: theory and measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, E R; Murphy, J; Coats, S

    1999-07-01

    Aspects of people's identification with groups may be understood by borrowing theoretical ideas and measurement strategies from research on attachment in close relationships. People have mental models of the self as a group member and of groups as sources of identity and esteem. These models affect thoughts, emotions, and behaviors related to group membership. Three studies show that two dimensions of attachment to groups, attachment anxiety and avoidance, can be assessed with good reliability, validity, and over-time stability. These factors are distinct from relationship attachment and from other measures of group identification. Group attachment predicts several important outcomes, including emotions concerning the group, time and activities shared with a group, social support, collective self-esteem, and ways of resolving conflict. This conceptualization provides new insights into the nature of people's psychological ties to groups.

  4. Structural and functional analysis of VQ motif-containing proteins in Arabidopsis as interacting proteins of WRKY transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yuan; Zhou, Yuan; Yang, Yan; Chi, Ying-Jun; Zhou, Jie; Chen, Jian-Ye; Wang, Fei; Fan, Baofang; Shi, Kai; Zhou, Yan-Hong; Yu, Jing-Quan; Chen, Zhixiang

    2012-06-01

    WRKY transcription factors are encoded by a large gene superfamily with a broad range of roles in plants. Recently, several groups have reported that proteins containing a short VQ (FxxxVQxLTG) motif interact with WRKY proteins. We have recently discovered that two VQ proteins from Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), SIGMA FACTOR-INTERACTING PROTEIN1 and SIGMA FACTOR-INTERACTING PROTEIN2, act as coactivators of WRKY33 in plant defense by specifically recognizing the C-terminal WRKY domain and stimulating the DNA-binding activity of WRKY33. In this study, we have analyzed the entire family of 34 structurally divergent VQ proteins from Arabidopsis. Yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) two-hybrid assays showed that Arabidopsis VQ proteins interacted specifically with the C-terminal WRKY domains of group I and the sole WRKY domains of group IIc WRKY proteins. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we identified structural features of these two closely related groups of WRKY domains that are critical for interaction with VQ proteins. Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction revealed that expression of a majority of Arabidopsis VQ genes was responsive to pathogen infection and salicylic acid treatment. Functional analysis using both knockout mutants and overexpression lines revealed strong phenotypes in growth, development, and susceptibility to pathogen infection. Altered phenotypes were substantially enhanced through cooverexpression of genes encoding interacting VQ and WRKY proteins. These findings indicate that VQ proteins play an important role in plant growth, development, and response to environmental conditions, most likely by acting as cofactors of group I and IIc WRKY transcription factors.

  5. The neurobiology of attachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insel, T R; Young, L J

    2001-02-01

    It is difficult to think of any behavioural process that is more intrinsically important to us than attachment. Feeding, sleeping and locomotion are all necessary for survival, but humans are, as Baruch Spinoza famously noted, "a social animal" and it is our social attachments that we live for. Over the past decade, studies in a range of vertebrates, including humans, have begun to address the neural basis of attachment at a molecular, cellular and systems level. This review describes some of the important insights from this work.

  6. Adult attachment and anxiety

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sara Kerstine Kaya; Lønfeldt, Nicole Nadine; Wolitzky-Taylor, Kate

    2017-01-01

    Although there is substantial evidence for the role of emotion regulation in the etiology and maintenance of anxiety disorders, knowledge about what contributes to emotion dysregulation is sparse. Attachment style is related to emotion regulation and anxiety symptoms, but these variables have...... rarely been examined together. Examining emotion dysregulation within the context of anxiety disorders through an attachment theory framework will lead to a better understanding of the etiology and maintenance of anxiety disorders. In the present study we combined theoretically and empirically derived...... knowledge to examine the mediating role of emotion regulation between attachment dimensions (avoidance and anxiety) and anxiety symptoms....

  7. Agoraphobia and anxious-ambivalent attachment: an integrative review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Ruiter, C.; van IJzendoorn, M.H.

    1992-01-01

    Attachment theory proposes that internal working models of attachment, that is, mental representations of attachment relationships, are shaped in childhood experiences with primary caregivers. It is hypothesized that an anxious-ambivalent internal working model of attechment is a risk factor for the

  8. Adult Attachment and Disordered Eating in Undergraduate Men and Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgin, Jenna; Pritchard, Mary

    2006-01-01

    Previous research on gender differences between males and females on the risk factors leading to disordered eating is sparse, especially on males and eating disorders using attachment theory. This study examined the relationship between adult attachment style and disordered eating in men and women. Secure attachment scores were significantly…

  9. Parental Attachment, Interparental Conflict, and Young Adults' Emotional Adjustment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Jennifer; Fuertes, Jairo

    2010-01-01

    This study extends Engels et al.'s model of emotional adjustment to young adults and includes the constructs of interparental conflict and conflict resolution. Results indicate that parental attachment is better conceived as a two-factor construct of mother and father attachment and that although attachment to both mothers and fathers directly…

  10. Parental Attachment, Interparental Conflict, and Young Adults' Emotional Adjustment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Jennifer; Fuertes, Jairo

    2010-01-01

    This study extends Engels et al.'s model of emotional adjustment to young adults and includes the constructs of interparental conflict and conflict resolution. Results indicate that parental attachment is better conceived as a two-factor construct of mother and father attachment and that although attachment to both mothers and fathers directly…

  11. Agoraphobia and anxious-ambivalent attachment: an integrative review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Ruiter, C.; van IJzendoorn, M.H.

    1992-01-01

    Attachment theory proposes that internal working models of attachment, that is, mental representations of attachment relationships, are shaped in childhood experiences with primary caregivers. It is hypothesized that an anxious-ambivalent internal working model of attechment is a risk factor for the

  12. Advances in Study on Scaffold/matrix Attachment Region Binding Protein 1%核基质结合区结合蛋白质1研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗金波; 乔炜

    2012-01-01

    Change of nuclear matrix associated protein is one of the major phenotypes of malignant tumor cells leading to alteration in chromatin folding, the change of fidelity of genome replication and gene expression. Aberrant expression of matrix attachment region (MAR) binding proteins (MARBPs) modulates the chromatin constitution and disruption of transcriptional network that leads to oncogenesis. Some of these proteins are expressed specifically in tumor tissue and could be served as promising diagnostic or prognostic markers. Scaffold/matrix attachment region binding protein 1 (SMAR1) expression is drastically down-regulated in breast cancer. This article reviewed the roles of SMAR1 in cell growth, apoptosis and tumorigenesis.%核基质相关蛋白改变是恶性肿瘤细胞的主要表现形式,可使染色质发生折叠、基因复制保真度和基因表达发生改变.核基质结合区(MAR)结合蛋白(MARBPs)表达异常可影响染色质构成、干扰转录调控程序,致肿瘤形成.某些MARBPs特异性表达于肿瘤组织,是肿瘤诊断和预后的指标.核基质结合区结合蛋白质1(SMAR1)在乳腺癌中的表达急剧下调.本文就SMAR1在细胞生长、凋亡和肿瘤形成中的作用作一综述.

  13. Pleiotropic virulence factor - Streptococcus pyogenes fibronectin-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Masaya; Terao, Yutaka; Kawabata, Shigetada

    2013-04-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes causes a broad spectrum of infectious diseases, including pharyngitis, skin infections and invasive necrotizing fasciitis. The initial phase of infection involves colonization, followed by intimate contact with the host cells, thus promoting bacterial uptake by them. S. pyogenes recognizes fibronectin (Fn) through its own Fn-binding proteins to obtain access to epithelial and endothelial cells in host tissue. Fn-binding proteins bind to Fn to form a bridge to α5 β1 -integrins, which leads to rearrangement of cytoskeletal actin in host cells and uptake of invading S. pyogenes. Recently, several structural analyses of the invasion mechanism showed molecular interactions by which Fn converts from a compact plasma protein to a fibrillar component of the extracellular matrix. After colonization, S. pyogenes must evade the host innate immune system to spread into blood vessels and deeper organs. Some Fn-binding proteins contribute to evasion of host innate immunity, such as the complement system and phagocytosis. In addition, Fn-binding proteins have received focus as non-M protein vaccine candidates, because of their localization and conservation among different M serotypes.Here, we review the roles of Fn-binding proteins in the pathogenesis and speculate regarding possible vaccine antigen candidates. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. Protein engineering,expression,and activity of a novel fusion protein possessing keratinocyte growth factor 2 and fibronectin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wonmo Kang; Junhyeog Jang

    2009-01-01

    Growth factor-induced proliferation and differentiation often require adhesion of cells to the extracellular matrix proteins such as fibronectin(FN).In this study,we aimed to investigate the effect of protein engineering of the keratinocyte growth factor 2(KGF2)fused to the FN on the mitogenic activity of KGF2.The fusion protein(KGF2-FN10),which was expressed in Escherichia coli,showed significantly enhanced mitogenic activity of KGF2 on human keratinocytes.Moreover,KGF2-FN10 fusion protein showed significantly increased activity to differentiate keratinocytes from native KGF2.In conclusion,these results suggest that KGF2-FN10 fusion protein has certain advantages over native KGF2 and may offer a novel strategy to potentiate the therapeutic effect of KGF2.

  15. Effects of antinutritional factors on protein digestibility and amino acid availability in foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilani, G Sarwar; Cockell, Kevin A; Sepehr, Estatira

    2005-01-01

    Digestibility of protein in traditional diets from developing countries such as India, Guatemala, and Brazil is considerably lower compared to that of protein in typical North American diets (54-78 versus 88-94%). The presence of less digestible protein fractions, high levels of insoluble fiber, and high concentrations of antinutritional factors in the diets of developing countries, which are based on less refined cereals and grain legumes as major sources of protein, are responsible for poor digestibility of protein. The effects of the presence of some of the important antinutritional factors on protein and amino digestibilities of food and feed products are reviewed in this chapter. Food and feed products may contain a number of antinutritional factors that may adversely affect protein digestibility and amino acid availability. Antinutritional factors may occur naturally, such as glucosinolates in mustard and rapeseed protein products, trypsin inhibitors and hemagglutinins in legumes, tannins in legumes and cereals, phytates in cereals and oilseeds, and gossypol in cottonseed protein products. Antinutritional factors may also be formed during heat/alkaline processing of protein products, yielding Maillard compounds, oxidized forms of sulfur amino acids, D-amino acids, and lysinoalanine (LAL, an unnatural amino acid derivative). The presence of high levels of dietary trypsin inhibitors from soybeans, kidney beans, or other grain legumes can cause substantial reductions in protein and amino acid digestibilities (up to 50%) in rats and pigs. Similarly, the presence of high levels of tannins in cereals, such as sorghum, and grain legumes, such as fababean (Vicia faba L.), can result in significantly reduced protein and amino acid digestibilities (up to 23%) in rats, poultry, and pigs. Studies involving phytase supplementation of production rations for swine or poultry have provided indirect evidence that normally encountered levels of phytates in cereals and legumes

  16. socio-economic risk factors for severe protein energy malnutrition ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hi-tech

    2000-09-01

    Sep 1, 2000 ... Request for reprints to: Professor J. K. Tumwine, Department of Paediatrics and Child Health, ... severe forms of protein energy malnutrition among children ... were administered to the mothers or caretakers by one of us.

  17. MALDI/MS peptide mass fingerprinting for proteome analysis: identification of hydrophobic proteins attached to eucaryote keratinocyte cytoplasmic membrane using different matrices in concert

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waksman Gilles

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MALDI-TOF-MS has become an important analytical tool in the identification of proteins and evaluation of their role in biological processes. A typical protocol consists of sample purification, separation of proteins by 2D-PAGE, enzymatic digestion and identification of proteins by peptide mass fingerprint. Unfortunately, this approach is not appropriate for the identification of membrane or low or high pI proteins. An alternative technique uses 1D-PAGE, which results in a mixture of proteins in each gel band. The direct analysis of the proteolytic digestion of this mixture is often problematic because of poor peptide detection and consequent poor sequence coverage in databases. Sequence coverage can be improved through the combination of several matrices. Results The aim of this study was to trust the MALDI analysis of complex biological samples, in order to identify proteins that interact with the membrane network of keratinocytes. Peptides obtained from protein trypsin digestions may have either hydrophobic or hydrophilic sections, in which case, the direct analysis of such a mixture by MALDI does not allow desorbing of all peptides. In this work, MALDI/MS experiments were thus performed using four different matrices in concert. The data were analysed with three algorithms in order to test each of them. We observed that the use of at least two matrices in concert leads to a twofold increase of the coverage of each protein. Considering data obtained in this study, we recommend the use of HCCA in concert with the SA matrix in order to obtain a good coverage of hydrophilic proteins, and DHB in concert with the SA matrix to obtain a good coverage of hydrophobic proteins. Conclusion In this work, experiments were performed directly on complex biological samples, in order to see systematic comparison between different matrices for real-life samples and to show a correlation that will be applicable to similar studies. When 1D gel

  18. Attachment to land

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Rozin

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available This is a first study on attachment to national and sacred land and land as a protected value. A measure of attachment to the land of Israel is developed and administered to two groups, Jewish college students in Israel and the United States. Levels of land attachment are high and not significantly different in the two groups, with a great deal of variation. Land may become more important through being inhabited by a group over centuries. This is a positive contagion effect, and is opposed in some cases by negative contagion produced when the ``enemies'' live on the land for some period of time. We demonstrate a significant correlation of positive contagion sensitivity with attachment to the land of Israel. Unlike many other cases of the interaction of positive and negative contagion, negative contagion does not overwhelm positive contagion in the domain of land attachment. We also present evidence for linkages between political positions, religiosity, importance of Israel, Arab aversion, and vulnerability of Israel with attachment to land, but these do not fully account for the contagion effects. A number of significant differences between Israelis and Americans are described.

  19. Transcription factors do it together : the hows and whys of studying protein-protein interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Immink, R.G.H.; Angenent, G.C.

    2002-01-01

    Protein–protein interactions are intrinsic to virtually every cellular process. Recent breakthroughs in techniques to study protein-interaction and the availability of fully sequenced plant genomes have attracted many plant scientists to undertake the first steps in the field of protein

  20. Transcription factors do it together : the hows and whys of studying protein-protein interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Immink, R.G.H.; Angenent, G.C.

    2002-01-01

    Protein–protein interactions are intrinsic to virtually every cellular process. Recent breakthroughs in techniques to study protein-interaction and the availability of fully sequenced plant genomes have attracted many plant scientists to undertake the first steps in the field of protein interactions

  1. Personality disorders, attachment and psychodynamic psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Lissa; Perez-Rodriguez, M Mercedes; Siever, Larry

    2014-01-01

    While attachment has been a fruitful and critical concept in understanding enduring individual templates for interpersonal relationships, it does not have a well-understood relationship to personality disorders, where impairment of interpersonal functioning is paramount. Despite the recognition that attachment disturbances do not simply reflect nonoptimal caretaking environments, the relationship of underlying temperamental factors to these environmental insults has not been fully explored. In this paper we provide an alternate model for the role of neurobiological temperamental factors, including brain circuitry and neuropeptide modulation, in mediating social cognition and the internalization and maintenance of attachment patterns. The implications of these altered attachment patterns on personality disorders and their neurobiological and environmental roots for psychoanalytically based treatment models designed to ameliorate difficulties in interpersonal functioning through the medium of increased access to mature forms of mentalization is discussed.

  2. Distribution of a 69-kD laminin-binding protein in aortic and microvascular endothelial cells: modulation during cell attachment, spreading, and migration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yannariello-Brown, J; Wewer, U; Liotta, L;

    1988-01-01

    Affinity chromatography and immunolocalization techniques were used to investigate the mechanism(s) by which endothelial cells interact with the basement membrane component laminin. Bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) membranes were solubilized and incubated with a laminin-Sepharose affinity...... column. SDS-PAGE analysis of the eluted proteins identified a 69-kD band as the major binding protein, along with minor components migrating at 125, 110, 92, 85, 75, 55, and 30 kD. Polyclonal antibodies directed against a peptide sequence of the 69-kD laminin-binding protein isolated from human tumor......, with a granular perinuclear distribution and in linear arrays throughout the cell. During migration a redistribution from diffuse to predominanately linear arrays that co-distributed with actin microfilaments was noted in double-label experiments. The 69-kD laminin-binding protein colocalized with actin filaments...

  3. Detection and properties of A-factor-binding protein from Streptomyces griseus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyake, K.; Horinouchi, S.; Yoshida, M.; Chiba, N.; Mori, K.; Nogawa, N.; Morikawa, N.; Beppu, T. (Univ. of Tokyo (Japan))

    1989-08-01

    The optically active form of tritium-labeled A-factor (2-isocapryloyl-3R-hydroxymethyl-gamma-butyrolactone), a pleiotropic autoregulator responsible for streptomycin production, streptomycin resistance, and sporulation in Streptomyces griseus, was chemically synthesized. By using the radioactive A-factor, a binding protein for A-factor was detected in the cytoplasmic fraction of this organism. The binding protein had an apparent molecular weight of approximately 26,000, as determined by gel filtration. Scatchard analysis suggested that A-factor bound the protein in the molar ratio of 1:1 with a binding constant, Kd, of 0.7 nM. The number of the binding protein was roughly estimated to be 37 per genome. The inducing material virginiae butanolide C (VB-C), which has a structure very similar to that of A-factor and is essential for virginiamycin production in Streptomyces virginiae, did not inhibit binding. In addition, no protein capable of specifically binding {sup 3}H-labeled VB-C was found in S. griseus. Together with the observation that VB-C had almost no biological activity on the restoration of streptomycin production or sporulation in an A-factor-deficient mutant of S. griseus, these results indicated that the binding protein had a strict ligand specificity. Examination for an A-factor-binding protein in Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) and Streptomyces lividans showed the absence of any specifically binding protein.

  4. Investigation and optimization of the factors influencing sorghum protein extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seok-Ho; Bean, Scott Roger

    2003-11-19

    To optimize the extraction of sorghum proteins, several variables were examined: sample-to-solvent ratio, detergent type and concentration, reducing agent type and concentration, extraction time, and buffer pH and concentration. Samples were quantified and characterized by RP-HPLC, FZCE, and nitrogen analysis. These studies revealed that pH, detergent type, reducing agent type, and sample-to-solvent ratio all had significant effects on the levels of protein extracted. Increasing SDS concentration (2%) and solvent-to-flour ratio (20:1) with multiple 5 min extracts reduced extraction time by 35-80% while still extracting the same levels of total protein relative to the control methodology. Reproducibility using the multiple extractions was found to be excellent with relative standard deviations of extractions.

  5. Factors of importance for a successful delivery system for proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van de Weert, Marco; Jorgensen, Lene; Horn Moeller, Eva

    2005-01-01

    Protein pharmaceuticals have matured into an important class of drugs, now comprising one in three novel drugs introduced on the market. However, significant gains are still to be made in reducing the costs of production, ensuring proper pharmacokinetics and efficacy, increasing patient compliance...

  6. Endosomal cholesterol trafficking: protein factors at a glance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ximing Du; Hongyuan Yang

    2013-01-01

    The delivery of low-density lipoprotein-derived cholesterol (LDL-C) from endosomal compartments to the plasma membrane and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is an important yet poorly understood cellular process.NiemannPick C1 (NPC1),a multi-pass integral membrane protein on the limiting membranes of late endosomes (LE)/lysosomes (Ly),is known to insert lumenal LDL-C to the limiting membrane of LE/Ly.Recent progress has identified novel cytoplasmic proteins that regulate the exit of LDL-C from LE/Ly,such as ORP5,a member of the oxysterolbinding protein-related protein (ORPs) family,and Hrs/VPS27,a well-established regulator of the endosomal sorting complex required for transport pathway.Whereas ORP5/ORPs may serve as cytosolic cholesterol carriers and deliver cholesterol in a non-vesicular manner,how Hrs/VPS27 regulate endosomal cholesterol sorting remains enigmatic.We discuss the functional relationship between NPC1,Hrs,and ORP5,and formulate possible schemes on how LDL-C may be moved from endosomal compartments to other cellular organelles.

  7. Attachment Quality and Influential Factors in 2-6 Years Old Children with Autism%孤独症2~6岁患儿亲子依恋状况及影响因素

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钟鑫琪; 崔其亮; 邹小兵

    2011-01-01

    Objective To understand the attachment quality of autism children between 2-6 years and explore the possible influential factors, such as family environment, parent character and feeling atmosphere. Methods Drawing -off 55 autism children (49 male and 6 female) who visited the Third Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat - Sen University from Jan. To Jun. 2007. The Attachment Q - Sort was used to test the attachment quality. Professional testers guidance parents to give scores in 9 grades based on according degree of children actual behavior and card content, 90 cards were divided into 9 groups, from the most difference to the most accord,constitute the distribution of each group of 10. Each test child would receive a group of 90 original score. Then,testers calculated the relation coefficient between autism children and normal children of the same period. The children whose relation coefficient were greater than 33 percent of normal children would be diagnosed with security attachment. Conversely, children would be diagnosed with no security attachment. Self - designed questionnaire about family environment, parent character and feeling atmosphere was used to explore attachment influence factors. Results For 55 autism children aged 2 -6 years, 16 cases (29. \\% ) of them had security attachment and 39 cases (70. 9% ) of them had unsure attachment. Earlier autism children took part in school, more likely they were diagnosed with security attachment ( OR = 0. 87, 95 % CI = 0.76 - 0.99 ). The better they had fa-mily atmosphere feeling, more likely they were diagnosed with security attachment(P = 0. 03). Conclusion Most oil -6 years old autism children have unsure attachment and children's scholar age and feeling atmosphere are influences factors.%目的 了解2~6岁孤独症患儿的亲子依恋特征,从家庭特征、父母特征和情感氛围等方面探讨孤独症患儿亲子依恋关系的可能影响因素.方法 以2007年1-6月在中山大学第三附属医院

  8. The characteristics of anxiety disorders of attachment patterns and its related factors%焦虑障碍患者依恋模式及相关因素分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王敏; 季益富

    2015-01-01

    Objective To explore the characteristics of attachment and the effects of childhood trauma,emotional autonomy and parental rearing style of anxiety disorders.Methods 38 outpatients and hospital patients in Anhui Mental Health Center with anxiety were recruited as the study group,and 39 age-,gender-,and educationmatched adult college students or medical staff were screened as the control group.The study group and control group were assessed with adult attachment questionnaire3.1 (AAQ3.1),parental bonding instrument (PBI),childhood trauma questionnaire 28item short form (CTQ-SF) and emotional autonomy scale (EAS).Results ①Higher levels of insecure adult attachment (84.2%) were reported in the anxiety disorders group compared with the normal controls(10.3%),and the attachment type of two groups had statistical significance(x2 =42.28,P<0.01).② The attachment of anxiety disorders,emotional autonomy,childhood trauma and the way of parenting was related to different degree.Attachment,childhood trauma and parenting were significantly increased in the anxiety disorders group compared with the normal controls(P<0.05).The mother attachment factors were significantly correlated with individualized (r=0.405,P<0.405),mother love (r=0.358,P<0.358),mother control (r=0.467,P<0.467),father control (r=0.460,P<0.01),emotional abuse (r=0.473,P<0.473) and sexual abuse (r=0.494,P<0.01).The father attachment factors were significantly correlated with individualized (r=0.520,P<0.01),emotional abuse (r=0.339,P<0.339) and sexual abuse (r=0.378,P<0.05).And individualized,mother love,parental control,emotional and physical abuse could be employed to predict attachment factor.Conclusion The attachment pattern is insecure in the anxiety disorders.Emotional autonomy,childhood trauma and parenting have a significant influence on attachment patterns of anxiety disorders.%目的 探讨焦虑障碍患者的依恋模式特点及与儿童期创伤、情感自主性、父

  9. Oxidation as an important factor of protein damage: Implications for Maillard reaction

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    L Trnková; J Dršata; I Boušová

    2015-06-01

    Protein oxidation, the process caused especially by reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, is thought to play a major role in various oxidative processes within cells and is implicated in the development of many human diseases. This review provides a brief overview of the protein oxidation with the emphasis on the types of oxidation (oxidation of protein backbone and amino acid residues side chains, site-specific metal-catalysed protein oxidation), oxidation-dependent generation of protein hydroperoxides, carbonyl derivatives and protein–protein cross-linkages. Non-enzymatic glycoxidation (also known as Maillard reaction) as an important factor of protein damage, consequences of oxidative protein impairment and related diseases as well as means of monitoring and assessment of protein modifications are discussed.

  10. Attachment and coercive sexual behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smallbone, S W; Dadds, M R

    2000-01-01

    This study examined the relationships between childhood attachment and coercive sexual behavior. One hundred sixty-two male undergraduate students completed self-report measures of childhood maternal attachment, childhood paternal attachment, adult attachment, antisociality, aggression, and coercive sexual behavior. As predicted, insecure childhood attachment, especially insecure paternal attachment, was associated with antisociality, aggression, and coercive sexual behavior. Moreover, childhood attachment independently predicted coercive sexual behavior after antisociality and aggression were statistically controlled. The hypothesis that paternal avoidant attachment would predict coercive sexual behavior independently of its relationship with aggression and antisociality was also supported. Posthoc analysis indicated that maternal anxious attachment was associated with antisociality and that paternal avoidant attachment was associated with both antisociality and coercive sexual behavior. These results are consistent with criminological and psychological research linking adverse early family experiences with offending and lend support to an attachment-theoretical framework for understanding offending behavior in general and sexual offending behavior in particular.

  11. Anti-tumor activity and immunological modification of ribosome-inactivating protein (RIP) from Momordica charantia by covalent attachment of polyethylene glycol

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mengen Li; Yiwen Chen; Zhongyu Liu; Fubing Shen; Xiaoxiao Bian; Yanfa Meng

    2009-01-01

    Ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) are a family of enzymes that depurinate rRNA and inhibit protein biosynthesis. Here we report the purification, apoptosis-inducing activity, and polyethylene glycol (PEG) modification of RIP from the bitter melon seeds. The protein has a homogenous N-terminal sequence of N-Asp-Val-Ser-Phe-Arg. Moreover, the RIP displayed strong apoptosis-inducing activity and suppressed cancer cell growth. This might be attributed to the acti-vation of caspases-3. To make it available for in vivo application, the immunogenicity of RIP was reduced by chemical modification with 20 kDa (mPEG)2-Lys-NHS. The inhibition activity of both PEGylated and non-PEGylated RIP against cancer cells was much stronger than against normal cells, and the antigenicity of PEGylated RIP was reduced significantly. Our results suggested that the PEGylated RIP might be potentially developed as anti-cancer drug.

  12. An attachment research perspective on ADHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kissgen, Ruediger; Franke, Sebastian

    2016-06-01

    Since the beginning of clinical attachment research in the mid-1980s the number of research projects in this area has been continuously increasing. The research questions so far can be allocated to numerous medical disciplines such as psychosomatic medicine, adult psychiatry or child and adolescent psychiatry. Recently, children with ADHD and their families have also become subjects of this branch of research. Their specific behavioral characteristics from early childhood on constitute unique challenges on the parent-child interaction. If these interactions develop in a suboptimal way, children may develop an insecure or even a disorganized attachment quality. The latter represents a risk factor for a clinically significant psychopathological development.This article initially presents basic principles of attachment theory and discusses the relevance of the cardinal symptoms of ADHD for clinical attachment research. Subsequently, it outlines and discusses the main results of existing research regarding attachment and ADHD. It concludes with a perspective on research questions that need to be addressed in the future with regard to a transgenerational model that highlights the importance of parental attachment representations to the development of children's attachment quality.

  13. Microparticulation of whey protein: related factors affecting the solubility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieske, B; Konrad, G

    1994-10-01

    Solubility of Simplesse 100, the only whey-based fat substitute, was found to be good, considering the fact that technology for preparation of Simplesse 100 is a sequence of thermal steps. To characterize this phenomen, gel chromatography on Sephadex G-100, Sephacryl S-1000 and SDS-PAGE were used, supported by high-speed separation, UV studies and analytical procedures. Results show that the unusual solubility characteristic of microparticulated whey protein is related to two molecular effects: (1) optimal defolding of protein molecules and (2) stabilization of the defolded status by carbohydrate. Both effects were considered to favour non-covalent bonds, which contribute to the outstanding physico-functional and nutritive properties of microparticles.

  14. Pain, Affect, and Attachment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl Eduard Scheidt

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Various psychodynamic processes may underlie the development of psychogenic pain disorder such as conversion, the displacement of affect, or narcissistic defenses. However, many of the processes suggested are related to a disorder of affect regulation. The term affect regulation in psychoanalytic literature refers to phenomena which are often described by the concept of alexithymia. Empirical observations suggest that alexithymia is correlated to insecure attachment, especially an insecure dismissing representation of attachment. Psychodynamic psychotherapy in psychogenic pain disorder should focus on the reintegration of split-off affects which may provoke intensive counter-transference and which in order to be used therapeutically must be linked to attachment experiences within and outside of the therapeutic relationship.

  15. Attachment Theory in Tourism

    OpenAIRE

    Korstanje, Maximiliano

    2007-01-01

    The following work is intended to a revision on attachment theory. The postulates of the theory of the sure base point that the system of exploration meets in narrow relation the system of conducts of attachment and the figure of the keepers. The conducts that characterize and symbolize the relation of the adult with the environment are carried back to the early age, in the moment in which the child develops the affective capacity. What difference does exist between someone who decides to jou...

  16. Ladder attachment platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swygert,; Richard, W [Springfield, SC

    2012-08-28

    A ladder attachment platform is provided that includes a base for attachment to a ladder that has first and second side rails and a plurality of rungs that extend between in a lateral direction. Also included is a user platform for having a user stand thereon that is carried by the base. The user platform may be positioned with respect to the ladder so that it is not located between a first plane that extends through the first side rail and is perpendicular to the lateral direction and a second plane that extends through the second side rail and is perpendicular to the lateral direction.

  17. Attachment and Women's Faith Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joung, Eun Sim

    2006-01-01

    This article explores the relationship between human attachment and God attachment, particularly in Christian women's experiences of faith. It is based on the attachment perspective as a conceptual framework. The main aim was to evolve an attachment-theoretical approach to women's faith development and to offer a complementary path to interpret…

  18. Binding Mode Analysis of Zerumbone to Key Signal Proteins in the Tumor Necrosis Factor Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayesha Fatima

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the second most common cancer among women worldwide. Several signaling pathways have been implicated as causative and progression agents. The tumor necrosis factor (TNF α protein plays a dual role in promoting and inhibiting cancer depending largely on the pathway initiated by the binding of the protein to its receptor. Zerumbone, an active constituent of Zingiber zerumbet, Smith, is known to act on the tumor necrosis factor pathway upregulating tumour necrosis factor related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL death receptors and inducing apoptosis in cancer cells. Zerumbone is a sesquiterpene that is able to penetrate into the hydrophobic pockets of proteins to exert its inhibiting activity with several proteins. We found a good binding with the tumor necrosis factor, kinase κB (IKKβ and the Nuclear factor κB (NF-κB component proteins along the TNF pathway. Our results suggest that zerumbone can exert its apoptotic activities by inhibiting the cytoplasmic proteins. It inhibits the IKKβ kinase that activates the NF-κB and also binds to the NF-κB complex in the TNF pathway. Blocking both proteins can lead to inhibition of cell proliferating proteins to be downregulated and possibly ultimate induction of apoptosis.

  19. Insulin-like growth factors, insulin-like growth factor-binding proteins, insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-3 protease, and growth hormone-binding protein in lipodystrophic human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haugaard, Steen B; Andersen, Ove; Hansen, Birgitte Rønde;

    2004-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-lipodystrophy is associated with impaired growth hormone (GH) secretion. It remains to be elucidated whether insulin-like growth factors (IGFs), IGF-binding proteins (IGFBPs), IGFBP-3 protease, and GH-binding protein (GHBP) are abnormal in HIV-lipodystrophy....... These parameters were measured in overnight fasting serum samples from 16 Caucasian males with HIV-lipodystrophy (LIPO) and 15 Caucasian HIV-infected males without lipodystrophy (NONLIPO) matched for age, weight, duration of HIV infection, and antiretroviral therapy. In LIPO, abdominal fat mass and insulin...... of bioactive IGF-I in HIV-lipodystrophy....

  20. Yin Yang 1: a multifaceted protein beyond a transcription factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Zhiyong; Cao, Paul; Wan, Mei Mei; Sui, Guangchao

    2010-01-01

    As a transcription factor, Yin Yang 1 (YY1) regulates the transcription of a dazzling list of genes and the number of its targets still mounts. Recent studies revealed that YY1 possesses functions independent of its DNA binding activity and its regulatory role in tumorigenesis has started to emerge.

  1. Green-fluorescent protein+ Astrocytes Attach to beta-Amyloid Plaques in an Alzheimer Mouse Model and GFPare Sensitive for Clasmatodendrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian eHumpel

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD is pathologically characterized by beta-amyloid (Aβ plaques and Tau pathology. It is well-established that Aβ plaques are surrounded by reactive astrocytes, highly expressing glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP. In order to study the cellular interaction of reactive astrocytes with Aβ plaques, we crossbred mice overexpressing amyloid precursor protein (APP with the Swedish-Dutch-Iowa mutations (APP-SweDI with mice expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP under the GFAP-promotor. Three-dimensional confocal microscopy revealed a tight association and intense sprouting of astrocytic fine branched processes towards Aβ plaques in 12 month old mice. In order to study phagocytosis, 110 µm thick brain slices from 12 month old crossbred mice were cultured overnight, however, we found that the GFP fluorescence faded away, distal processes degenerated and a complete loss of astrocytic morphology was seen (clasmatodendrosis. In summary, our data show that GFP+ reactive astrocytes make intense contact with Aβ plaques but these cells are highly vulnerable for degeneration.

  2. Electron microscopic imaging revealed the flexible filamentous structure of the cell attachment protein P2 of Rice dwarf virus located around the icosahedral 5-fold axes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Naoyuki; Higashiura, Akifumi; Higashiura, Tomoko; Akita, Fusamichi; Hibino, Hiroyuki; Omura, Toshihiro; Nakagawa, Atsushi; Iwasaki, Kenji

    2016-02-01

    The minor outer capsid protein P2 of Rice dwarf virus (RDV), a member of the genus Phytoreovirus in the family Reoviridae, is essential for viral cell entry. Here, we clarified the structure of P2 and the interactions to host insect cells. Negative stain electron microscopy (EM) showed that P2 proteins are monomeric and flexible L-shaped filamentous structures of ∼20 nm in length. Cryo-EM structure revealed the spatial arrangement of P2 in the capsid, which was prescribed by the characteristic virion structure. The P2 proteins were visualized as partial rod-shaped structures of ∼10 nm in length in the cryo-EM map and accommodated in crevasses on the viral surface around icosahedral 5-fold axes with hydrophobic interactions. The remaining disordered region of P2 assumed to be extended to the radial direction towards exterior. Electron tomography clearly showed that RDV particles were away from the cellular membrane at a uniform distance and several spike-like densities, probably corresponding to P2, connecting a viral particle to the host cellular membrane during cell entry. By combining the in vitro and in vivo structural information, we could gain new insights into the detailed mechanism of the cell entry of RDV.

  3. Simplified Method for Predicting a Functional Class of Proteins in Transcription Factor Complexes

    KAUST Repository

    Piatek, Marek J.

    2013-07-12

    Background:Initiation of transcription is essential for most of the cellular responses to environmental conditions and for cell and tissue specificity. This process is regulated through numerous proteins, their ligands and mutual interactions, as well as interactions with DNA. The key such regulatory proteins are transcription factors (TFs) and transcription co-factors (TcoFs). TcoFs are important since they modulate the transcription initiation process through interaction with TFs. In eukaryotes, transcription requires that TFs form different protein complexes with various nuclear proteins. To better understand transcription regulation, it is important to know the functional class of proteins interacting with TFs during transcription initiation. Such information is not fully available, since not all proteins that act as TFs or TcoFs are yet annotated as such, due to generally partial functional annotation of proteins. In this study we have developed a method to predict, using only sequence composition of the interacting proteins, the functional class of human TF binding partners to be (i) TF, (ii) TcoF, or (iii) other nuclear protein. This allows for complementing the annotation of the currently known pool of nuclear proteins. Since only the knowledge of protein sequences is required in addition to protein interaction, the method should be easily applicable to many species.Results:Based on experimentally validated interactions between human TFs with different TFs, TcoFs and other nuclear proteins, our two classification systems (implemented as a web-based application) achieve high accuracies in distinguishing TFs and TcoFs from other nuclear proteins, and TFs from TcoFs respectively.Conclusion:As demonstrated, given the fact that two proteins are capable of forming direct physical interactions and using only information about their sequence composition, we have developed a completely new method for predicting a functional class of TF interacting protein partners

  4. Hydrophobic environment is a key factor for the stability of thermophilic proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gromiha, M Michael; Pathak, Manish C; Saraboji, Kadhirvel; Ortlund, Eric A; Gaucher, Eric A

    2013-04-01

    The stability of thermophilic proteins has been viewed from different perspectives and there is yet no unified principle to understand this stability. It would be valuable to reveal the most important interactions for designing thermostable proteins for such applications as industrial protein engineering. In this work, we have systematically analyzed the importance of various interactions by computing different parameters such as surrounding hydrophobicity, inter-residue interactions, ion-pairs and hydrogen bonds. The importance of each interaction has been determined by its predicted relative contribution in thermophiles versus the same contribution in mesophilic homologues based on a dataset of 373 protein families. We predict that hydrophobic environment is the major factor for the stability of thermophilic proteins and found that 80% of thermophilic proteins analyzed showed higher hydrophobicity than their mesophilic counterparts. Ion pairs, hydrogen bonds, and interaction energy are also important and favored in 68%, 50%, and 62% of thermophilic proteins, respectively. Interestingly, thermophilic proteins with decreased hydrophobic environments display a greater number of hydrogen bonds and/or ion pairs. The systematic elimination of mesophilic proteins based on surrounding hydrophobicity, interaction energy, and ion pairs/hydrogen bonds, led to correctly identifying 95% of the thermophilic proteins in our analyses. Our analysis was also applied to another, more refined set of 102 thermophilic-mesophilic pairs, which again identified hydrophobicity as a dominant property in 71% of the thermophilic proteins. Further, the notion of surrounding hydrophobicity, which characterizes the hydrophobic behavior of residues in a protein environment, has been applied to the three-dimensional structures of elongation factor-Tu proteins and we found that the thermophilic proteins are enriched with a hydrophobic environment. The results obtained in this work highlight the

  5. New functional assays to selectively quantify the activated protein C- and tissue factor pathway inhibitor-cofactor activities of protein S in plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshaikh, N A; Rosing, J; Thomassen, M C L G D; Castoldi, E; Simioni, P; Hackeng, T M

    2017-02-17

    Essentials Protein S is a cofactor of activated protein C (APC) and tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI). There are no assays to quantify separate APC and TFPI cofactor activities of protein S in plasma. We developed assays to measure the APC- and TFPI-cofactor activities of protein S in plasma. The assays were sensitive to protein S deficiency, and not affected by the Factor V Leiden mutation.

  6. Functional and structural properties of a novel protein and virulence factor (Protein sHIP) in Streptococcus pyogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisniewska, Magdalena; Happonen, Lotta; Kahn, Fredrik; Varjosalo, Markku; Malmström, Lars; Rosenberger, George; Karlsson, Christofer; Cazzamali, Giuseppe; Pozdnyakova, Irina; Frick, Inga-Maria; Björck, Lars; Streicher, Werner; Malmström, Johan; Wikström, Mats

    2014-06-27

    Streptococcus pyogenes is a significant bacterial pathogen in the human population. The importance of virulence factors for the survival and colonization of S. pyogenes is well established, and many of these factors are exposed to the extracellular environment, enabling bacterial interactions with the host. In the present study, we quantitatively analyzed and compared S. pyogenes proteins in the growth medium of a strain that is virulent to mice with a non-virulent strain. Particularly, one of these proteins was present at significantly higher levels in stationary growth medium from the virulent strain. We determined the three-dimensional structure of the protein that showed a unique tetrameric organization composed of four helix-loop-helix motifs. Affinity pull-down mass spectrometry analysis in human plasma demonstrated that the protein interacts with histidine-rich glycoprotein (HRG), and the name sHIP (streptococcal histidine-rich glycoprotein-interacting protein) is therefore proposed. HRG has antibacterial activity, and when challenged by HRG, sHIP was found to rescue S. pyogenes bacteria. This and the finding that patients with invasive S. pyogenes infection respond with antibody production against sHIP suggest a role for the protein in S. pyogenes pathogenesis.

  7. Day Care and Attachment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portnoy, Fern C.; Simmons, Carolyn H.

    1978-01-01

    The attachment behavior of 35 white, middle-class 3 1/2- to 4-year-olds who had experienced different rearing histories was observed through a series of standardized episodes involving separations and reunions with the mother and a stranger. (Author/JMB)

  8. Attachment and Personality Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Preeti; Sharan, Pratap

    2007-01-01

    Personality disorders (PDs) arise from core psychopathology of interpersonal relationships and understanding of self and others. The distorted representations of self and others, as well as unhealthy relationships that characterize persons with various PDs, indicate the possibility that persons with PDs have insecure attachment. Insecure…

  9. Sequence Analysis of Hypothetical Proteins from 26695 to Identify Potential Virulence Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Abu Turab Naqvi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori is a Gram-negative bacteria that is responsible for gastritis in human. Its spiral flagellated body helps in locomotion and colonization in the host environment. It is capable of living in the highly acidic environment of the stomach with the help of acid adaptive genes. The genome of H. pylori 26695 strain contains 1,555 coding genes that encode 1,445 proteins. Out of these, 340 proteins are characterized as hypothetical proteins (HP. This study involves extensive analysis of the HPs using an established pipeline which comprises various bioinformatics tools and databases to find out probable functions of the HPs and identification of virulence factors. After extensive analysis of all the 340 HPs, we found that 104 HPs are showing characteristic similarities with the proteins with known functions. Thus, on the basis of such similarities, we assigned probable functions to 104 HPs with high confidence and precision. All the predicted HPs contain representative members of diverse functional classes of proteins such as enzymes, transporters, binding proteins, regulatory proteins, proteins involved in cellular processes and other proteins with miscellaneous functions. Therefore, we classified 104 HPs into aforementioned functional groups. During the virulence factors analysis of the HPs, we found 11 HPs are showing significant virulence. The identification of virulence proteins with the help their predicted functions may pave the way for drug target estimation and development of effective drug to counter the activity of that protein.

  10. Sequence Analysis of Hypothetical Proteins from Helicobacter pylori 26695 to Identify Potential Virulence Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naqvi, Ahmad Abu Turab; Anjum, Farah; Khan, Faez Iqbal; Islam, Asimul; Ahmad, Faizan

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a Gram-negative bacteria that is responsible for gastritis in human. Its spiral flagellated body helps in locomotion and colonization in the host environment. It is capable of living in the highly acidic environment of the stomach with the help of acid adaptive genes. The genome of H. pylori 26695 strain contains 1,555 coding genes that encode 1,445 proteins. Out of these, 340 proteins are characterized as hypothetical proteins (HP). This study involves extensive analysis of the HPs using an established pipeline which comprises various bioinformatics tools and databases to find out probable functions of the HPs and identification of virulence factors. After extensive analysis of all the 340 HPs, we found that 104 HPs are showing characteristic similarities with the proteins with known functions. Thus, on the basis of such similarities, we assigned probable functions to 104 HPs with high confidence and precision. All the predicted HPs contain representative members of diverse functional classes of proteins such as enzymes, transporters, binding proteins, regulatory proteins, proteins involved in cellular processes and other proteins with miscellaneous functions. Therefore, we classified 104 HPs into aforementioned functional groups. During the virulence factors analysis of the HPs, we found 11 HPs are showing significant virulence. The identification of virulence proteins with the help their predicted functions may pave the way for drug target estimation and development of effective drug to counter the activity of that protein. PMID:27729842

  11. Association of family factors and parent-child attachment with aggressive behaviors in middle school students%家庭因素及亲子依恋与中学生攻击行为的关系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    顾璇; 姚荣英; 袁长江; 李克勤

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To explore the correlation between family factors together with parent-child attachment and the aggressive behaviors in middle school students so as to provide basis for prevention of the behavior. Methods: Two thousand six hundred and twenty-six students from 4 middle schools in Bengbu were investigated with stratified and random cluster sampling method. All the students were surveyed by a self-designed questionnaire, Aggressive Questionnaire and Inventory of Parents. Results: The students' grade, gender, parental occupation, rearing pattern, attitude and parent-child attachment all affected the aggressive behavior of the middle school students to some extent(P <0. 05 to P <0. 01) . Multiple linear regression analysis indicated that the main influential factors for middle school students' aggressive behaviors were parental alienation(P <0. 01). Conclusions:The middle school students' aggressive behaviors are related with family factors, and the degree of parent-child attachment and parental alienation are risk factors for the aggressive behaviors of middle school students.%目的:探讨家庭因素及亲子依恋与中学生攻击行为的相关性,为预防和减少中学生攻击行为的发生提供参考依据.方法:采用多阶段分层整群抽样方法抽取蚌埠市4所中学在校学生2 626名,进行问卷调查,调查内容包括自编一般情况调查表、攻击问卷和父母依恋量表.结果:年级、性别、父母的职业、管教方式、教育态度及亲子依恋对中学生攻击行为的发生均有一定影响(P<0.05~P<0.01).多元线性回归分析显示:中学生攻击行为的主要影响因素为母子疏离和父子疏离(P<0.01).结论:中学生攻击性行为与家庭因素及亲子依恋程度均具有一定关系,其中母子疏离和父子疏离为中学生攻击行为的危险因素.

  12. Attachment of cells to basement membrane collagen type IV

    OpenAIRE

    1986-01-01

    Of ten different cell lines examined, three showed distinct attachment and spreading on collagen IV substrates, and neither attachment nor spreading was enhanced by adding soluble laminin or fibronectin. This reaction was not inhibited by cycloheximide or antibodies to laminin, indicating a direct attachment to collagen IV without the need of mediator proteins. Cell-binding sites were localized to the major triple-helical domain of collagen IV and required an intact triple helical conformatio...

  13. HSF transcription factor family, heat shock response, and protein intrinsic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerheide, Sandy D; Raynes, Rachel; Powell, Chase; Xue, Bin; Uversky, Vladimir N

    2012-02-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins are highly abundant in all kingdoms of life, and several protein functional classes, such as transcription factors, transcriptional regulators, hub and scaffold proteins, signaling proteins, and chaperones are especially enriched in intrinsic disorder. One of the unique cellular reactions to protein damaging stress is the so-called heat shock response that results in the upregulation of heat shock proteins including molecular chaperones. This molecular protective mechanism is conserved from prokaryotes to eukaryotes and allows an organism to respond to various proteotoxic stressors, such as heat shock, oxidative stress, exposure to heavy metals, and drugs. The heat shock response- related proteins can be expressed during normal conditions (e.g., during the cell growth and development) or can be induced by various pathological conditions, such as infection, inflammation, and protein conformation diseases. The initiation of the heat shock response is manifested by the activation of the heat shock transcription factors HSF 1, part of a family of related HSF transcription factors. This review analyzes the abundance and functional roles of intrinsic disorder in various heat shock transcription factors and clearly shows that the heat shock response requires HSF flexibility to be more efficient. © 2012 Bentham Science Publishers

  14. Fasting-induced adipose factor/angiopoietin-like protein 4: a potential target for dyslipidemia?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zandbergen, F.J.; Dijk, van S.; Müller, M.R.; Kersten, A.H.

    2006-01-01

    Recently, several proteins with homology to angiopoietins have been discovered. Three members of this new group, designated angiopoietin-like proteins (ANGPTLs), have been linked to regulation of energy metabolism. This review will focus on the fasting-induced adipose factor (FIAF)/ANGPTL4 as an

  15. The Disulfide Bond Pattern of Transforming Growth Factor Beta-Induced protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lukassen, Marie V; Scavenius, Carsten; Thøgersen, Ida B;

    2016-01-01

    Transforming growth factor beta-induced protein (TGFBIp) is an extracellular matrix protein composed of an NH2-terminal cysteine-rich domain (CRD) annotated as an emilin (EMI) domain, and four fasciclin-1 (FAS1-1 to FAS1-4) domains. Mutations in the gene cause corneal dystrophies, a group...

  16. God attachment, mother attachment, and father attachment in early and middle adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Tick Ngee; Yow, Amanda Shixian

    2011-06-01

    The present study examined the interplay of attachment to God, attachment to mother, and attachment to father with respect to adjustment (hope, self-esteem, depression) for 130 early and 106 middle adolescents in Singapore. Results showed that the parental attachments were generally linked (in expected directions) to adjustment. God attachment, however, had unique results. At the bivariate level, God attachment was only linked to early adolescents' self-esteem. When considered together with parental attachments (including interactions), God attachment did not emerge as the key moderator in attachment interactions and yielded some unexpected results (e.g., being positively linked to depression). These results are discussed viz-a-viz the secure base and safe haven functions that God and parental attachments may play during adolescence.

  17. Insulin-like growth factors, insulin-like growth factor-binding proteins, insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-3 protease, and growth hormone-binding protein in lipodystrophic human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haugaard, Steen B; Andersen, Ove; Hansen, Birgitte R;

    2004-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-lipodystrophy is associated with impaired growth hormone (GH) secretion. It remains to be elucidated whether insulin-like growth factors (IGFs), IGF-binding proteins (IGFBPs), IGFBP-3 protease, and GH-binding protein (GHBP) are abnormal in HIV-lipodystrophy. The......Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-lipodystrophy is associated with impaired growth hormone (GH) secretion. It remains to be elucidated whether insulin-like growth factors (IGFs), IGF-binding proteins (IGFBPs), IGFBP-3 protease, and GH-binding protein (GHBP) are abnormal in HIV......-lipodystrophy. These parameters were measured in overnight fasting serum samples from 16 Caucasian males with HIV-lipodystrophy (LIPO) and 15 Caucasian HIV-infected males without lipodystrophy (NONLIPO) matched for age, weight, duration of HIV infection, and antiretroviral therapy. In LIPO, abdominal fat mass and insulin...... study groups, including suppressed GH, and increased GHBP in LIPO, argue against GH resistance of GH-sensitive tissues in LIPO compared with NONLIPO; however, this notion awaits examination in dose-response studies. Furthermore, our data suggest that IGFBP-3 protease is a significant regulator...

  18. [Determination and analysis of protein profile of different transfer factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidos-Fogelbach, Guillermo Arturo; Paredes-Aguilar, Jorge Antonio; Colín-Martínez, Nayeli Montserrat; Rojo-Gutiérrez, María Isabel; López-Hidalgo, Marisol; Reyes-López, César Augusto Sandino

    2016-01-01

    Introducción: El factor de transferencia (FT) es el extracto dializable de leucocitos con propiedades de transferencia de inmunidad celular. Su uso se ha extendido en el tratamiento de una amplia gama de padecimientos inmunológicos, infecciosos y como coadyuvante de padecimientos oncológicos. A pesar de ello, no se conocen completamente aspectos importantes de su perfil proteico, concentraciones de componentes y mecanismos de acción. Objetivos: Analizar los perfiles proteicos de diferentes factores de transferencia comercializados en México. Métodos: Se obtuvieron y analizaron 6 FT comercializados en México. Se realizó la cuantificación de proteínas por el método de Bradford, cromatografía líquida de alta resolución (HPLC) y electroforesis en geles de poliacrilamida (SDS-PAGE). Todas las muestras fueron analizadas por duplicado. Resultados: Las concentraciones de proteínas totales de todos los FT analizados fueron menores de 0.2 mg/mL. Los perfiles cromatográficos mostraron diferencias en algunos FT. La concentración de proteínas resultó de 6 hasta casi mil veces más baja en comparación con lo informado por algunos fabricantes. Conclusión: Casi la totalidad de los factores de transferencia comercializados en México carecen de un etiquetado y registro sanitario que cumpla con las normas oficiales vigentes.

  19. Quantitative Proteomics Identifies Serum Response Factor Binding Protein 1 as a Host Factor for Hepatitis C Virus Entry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisa Gerold

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV enters human hepatocytes through a multistep mechanism involving, among other host proteins, the virus receptor CD81. How CD81 governs HCV entry is poorly characterized, and CD81 protein interactions after virus binding remain elusive. We have developed a quantitative proteomics protocol to identify HCV-triggered CD81 interactions and found 26 dynamic binding partners. At least six of these proteins promote HCV infection, as indicated by RNAi. We further characterized serum response factor binding protein 1 (SRFBP1, which is recruited to CD81 during HCV uptake and supports HCV infection in hepatoma cells and primary human hepatocytes. SRFBP1 facilitates host cell penetration by all seven HCV genotypes, but not of vesicular stomatitis virus and human coronavirus. Thus, SRFBP1 is an HCV-specific, pan-genotypic host entry factor. These results demonstrate the use of quantitative proteomics to elucidate pathogen entry and underscore the importance of host protein-protein interactions during HCV invasion.

  20. Topographic patterns of vascular disease: HOX proteins as determining factors?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Richard; P; Visconti; Alexander; Awgulewitsch

    2015-01-01

    Steadily increasing evidence supports the idea that genetic diversities in the vascular bed are, in addition to hemodynamic influences, a major contributing factor in determining region-specific cardiovascular disease susceptibility. Members of the phylogenetically highly conserved Hox gene family of developmental regulators have to be viewed as prime candidates for determining these regional genetic differences in the vasculature. During embryonic patterning, the regionally distinct and precisely choreographed expression patterns of HOX transcription factors are essential for the correct specification of positional identities. Apparently, these topographic patterns are to some degree retained in certain adult tissues, including the circulatory system. While an understanding of the functional significance of these localized Hox activities in adult blood vessels is only beginning to emerge, an argument can be made for a role of Hox genes in the maintenance of vessel wall homeostasis and functional integrity on the one hand, and in regulating the development and progression of regionally restricted vascular pathologies, on the other. Initial functional studies in animal models, as well as data from clinical studies provide some level of support for this view. The data suggest that putative genetic regulatory networks of Hox-dependent cardiovascular disease processes include genes of diverse functional categories(extracellular matrix remodeling, transmembrane signaling, cell cycle control, inflammatory response, transcriptional control, etc.), as potential targets in both vascular smooth muscle and endothelial cells, as well as cell populations residing in the adventitia.

  1. Deep Proteomics of Mouse Skeletal Muscle Enables Quantitation of Protein Isoforms, Metabolic Pathways, and Transcription Factors*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshmukh, Atul S.; Murgia, Marta; Nagaraj, Nagarjuna; Treebak, Jonas T.; Cox, Jürgen; Mann, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle constitutes 40% of individual body mass and plays vital roles in locomotion and whole-body metabolism. Proteomics of skeletal muscle is challenging because of highly abundant contractile proteins that interfere with detection of regulatory proteins. Using a state-of-the art MS workflow and a strategy to map identifications from the C2C12 cell line model to tissues, we identified a total of 10,218 proteins, including skeletal muscle specific transcription factors like myod1 and myogenin and circadian clock proteins. We obtain absolute abundances for proteins expressed in a muscle cell line and skeletal muscle, which should serve as a valuable resource. Quantitation of protein isoforms of glucose uptake signaling pathways and in glucose and lipid metabolic pathways provides a detailed metabolic map of the cell line compared with tissue. This revealed unexpectedly complex regulation of AMP-activated protein kinase and insulin signaling in muscle tissue at the level of enzyme isoforms. PMID:25616865

  2. Identification of two substrates of FTS_1067 protein - An essential virulence factor of Francisella tularensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spidlova, Petra; Senitkova, Iva; Link, Marek; Stulik, Jiri

    2016-11-15

    Francisella tularensis is a highly virulent intracellular pathogen with the capacity to infect a variety of hosts including humans. One of the most important proteins involved in F. tularensis virulence and pathogenesis is the protein DsbA. This protein is annotated as a lipoprotein with disulfide oxidoreductase/isomerase activity. Therefore, its interactions with different substrates, including probable virulence factors, to assist in their proper folding are anticipated. We aimed to use the immunopurification approach to find DsbA (gene locus FTS_1067) interacting partners in F. tularensis subsp. holarctica strain FSC200 and compare the identified substrates with proteins which were found in our previous comparative proteome analysis. As a result of our work two FTS_1067 substrates, D-alanyl-D-alanine carboxypeptidase family protein and HlyD family secretion protein, were identified. Bacterial two-hybrid systems were further used to test their relevance in confirming FTS_1067 protein interactions.

  3. Genetic variability of attachment (G and Fusion (F protein genes of human metapneumovirus strains circulating during 2006-2009 in Kolkata, Eastern India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chawla-Sarkar Mamta

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human metapneumovirus (hMPV is associated with the acute respiratory tract infection (ARTI in all the age groups. However, there is limited information on prevalence and genetic diversity of human metapneumovirus (hMPV strains circulating in India. Objective To study prevalence and genomic diversity of hMPV strains among ARTI patients reporting in outpatient departments of hospitals in Kolkata, Eastern India. Methods Nasal and/or throat swabs from 2309 patients during January 2006 to December 2009, were screened for the presence of hMPV by RT-PCR of nucleocapsid (N gene. The G and F genes of representative hMPV positive samples were sequenced. Results 118 of 2309 (5.11% clinical samples were positive for hMPV. The majority (≈80% of the positive cases were detected during July−November all through the study period. Genetic analysis revealed that 77% strains belong to A2 subgroup whereas rest clustered in B1 subgroup. G sequences showed higher diversity at the nucleotide and amino acid level. In contrast, less than 10% variation was observed in F gene of representative strains of all four years. Sequence analysis also revealed changes in the position of stop codon in G protein, which resulted in variable length (217-231 aa polypeptides. Conclusion The study suggests that approximately 5% of ARTI in the region were caused by hMPV. This is the first report on the genetic variability of G and F gene of hMPV strains from India which clearly shows that the G protein of hMPV is continuously evolving. Though the study partially fulfills lacunae of information, further studies from other regions are necessary for better understanding of prevalence, epidemiology and virus evolution in Indian subcontinent.

  4. GATA Factor-G-Protein-Coupled Receptor Circuit Suppresses Hematopoiesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Gao

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs originate from hemogenic endothelium within the aorta-gonad-mesonephros (AGM region of the mammalian embryo. The relationship between genetic circuits controlling stem cell genesis and multi-potency is not understood. A Gata2 cis element (+9.5 enhances Gata2 expression in the AGM and induces the endothelial to HSC transition. We demonstrated that GATA-2 rescued hematopoiesis in +9.5−/− AGMs. As G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs are the most common targets for FDA-approved drugs, we analyzed the GPCR gene ensemble to identify GATA-2-regulated GPCRs. Of the 20 GATA-2-activated GPCR genes, four were GATA-1-activated, and only Gpr65 expression resembled Gata2. Contrasting with the paradigm in which GATA-2-activated genes promote hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell genesis/function, our mouse and zebrafish studies indicated that GPR65 suppressed hematopoiesis. GPR65 established repressive chromatin at the +9.5 site, restricted occupancy by the activator Scl/TAL1, and repressed Gata2 transcription. Thus, a Gata2 cis element creates a GATA-2-GPCR circuit that limits positive regulators that promote hematopoiesis.

  5. Stabilization of Penicillin G Acylase from Escherichia coli: Site-Directed Mutagenesis of the Protein Surface To Increase Multipoint Covalent Attachment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abian, Olga; Grazú, Valeria; Hermoso, Juan; González, Ramón; García, José Luis; Fernández-Lafuente, Roberto; Guisán, José Manuel

    2004-01-01

    Three mutations on the penicillin acylase surface (increasing the number of Lys in a defined area) were performed. They did not alter the enzyme's stability and kinetic properties; however, after immobilization on glyoxyl-agarose, the mutant enzyme showed improved stability under all tested conditions (e.g., pH 2.5 at 4°C, pH 5 at 60°C, pH 7 at 55°C, or 60% dimethylformamide), with stabilization factors ranging from 4 to 11 compared with the native enzyme immobilized on glyoxyl-agarose. PMID:14766616

  6. Personality and Attachment in Transsexual Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingiardi, Vittorio; Giovanardi, Guido; Fortunato, Alexandro; Nassisi, Valentina; Speranza, Anna Maria

    2017-02-16

    The main aim of this study was to investigate the associations between personality features and attachment patterns in transsexual adults. We explored mental representations of attachment, assessed personality traits, and possible personality disorders. Forty-four individuals diagnosed with gender identity disorder (now gender dysphoria), 28 male-to-female and 16 female-to-male, were evaluated using the Shedler-Westen assessment procedure-200 (SWAP-200) to assess personality traits and disorders; the adult attachment interview was used to evaluate their attachment state-of-mind. With respect to attachment, our sample differed both from normative samples because of the high percentage of disorganized states of mind (50% of the sample), and from clinical samples for the conspicuous percentage of secure states of mind (37%). Furthermore, we found that only 16% of our sample presented a personality disorder, while 50% showed a high level of functioning according to the SWAP-200 scales. In order to find latent subgroups that shared personality characteristics, we performed a Q-factor analysis. Three personality clusters then emerged: Healthy Functioning (54% of the sample); Depressive/Introverted (32%) and Histrionic/Extroverted (14%). These data indicate that in terms of personality and attachment, GD individuals are a heterogeneous sample and show articulate and diverse types with regard to these constructs.

  7. Attachment of Adolescents to Parents: Turkey Profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turkan Dogan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study aims to determine the attachment of adolescents to their parents according to geographical regions in Turkey and gender. The research group consisted of 6061 adolescents. With an age average of 15.53 years. The Inventory of Attachment to Parents and Friends- Brief Form (EABE was used as data acquisition tool. The results of the study indicated significant difference between the scores of students regarding the inventory of attachment to parents according to regions. Evaluating the findings regarding attachment to father and mother together, the findings were similar, and the attachment levels of adolescents in Middle Anatolia, Eastern Anatolia and Black Sea Region were found to be higher than the ones in other regions. This result may be related with socioeconomic, geographical and cultural structures of the regions. Examining the finding according to gender variable, the scores of male students are significantly lower than the scores of female students. As a result according to the data gained from a wide sample group; the main factors for the attachment of adolescents to their parents in Turkey are the geographical regions in Turkey and the gender. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2016; 8(4.000: 406-419

  8. The extracellular adherence protein (Eap) of Staphylococcus aureus acts as a proliferation and migration repressing factor that alters the cell morphology of keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenbeis, Janina; Peisker, Henrik; Backes, Christian S; Bur, Stephanie; Hölters, Sebastian; Thewes, Nicolas; Greiner, Markus; Junker, Christian; Schwarz, Eva C; Hoth, Markus; Junker, Kerstin; Preissner, Klaus T; Jacobs, Karin; Herrmann, Mathias; Bischoff, Markus

    2017-02-01

    Staphyloccocus aureus is a major human pathogen and a common cause for superficial and deep seated wound infections. The pathogen is equipped with a large arsenal of virulence factors, which facilitate attachment to various eukaryotic cell structures and modulate the host immune response. One of these factors is the extracellular adherence protein Eap, a member of the "secretable expanded repertoire adhesive molecules" (SERAM) protein family that possesses adhesive and immune modulatory properties. The secreted protein was previously shown to impair wound healing by interfering with host defense and neovascularization. However, its impact on keratinocyte proliferation and migration, two major steps in the re-epithelialization process of wounds, is not known. Here, we report that Eap affects the proliferation and migration capacities of keratinocytes by altering their morphology and adhesive properties. In particular, treatment of non-confluent HaCaT cell cultures with Eap resulted in cell morphology changes as well as a significant reduction in cell proliferation and migration. Eap-treated HaCaT cells changed their appearance from an oblong via a trapezoid to an astral-like shape, accompanied by decreases in cell volume and cell stiffness, and exhibited significantly increased cell adhesion. Eap had a similar influence on endothelial and cancer cells, indicative for a general effect of Eap on eukaryotic cell morphology and functions. Specifically, Eap was found to interfere with growth factor-stimulated activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway that is known to be responsible for cell shape modulation, induction of proliferation and migration of epithelial cells. Western blot analyses revealed that Eap blocked the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (Erk1/2) in keratinocyte growth factor (KGF)-stimulated HaCaT cells. Together, these data add another antagonistic mechanism of Eap in wound healing, whereby the

  9. Pseudomonas fluorescens filamentous hemagglutinin, an iron-regulated protein, is an important virulence factor that modulates bacterial pathogenicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-yuan Sun

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas fluorescens is a common bacterial pathogen to a wide range of aquaculture animals including various species of fish. In this study, we employed proteomic analysis and identified filamentous hemagglutinin (FHA as an iron-responsive protein secreted by TSS, a pathogenic P. fluorescens isolate. In vitro study showed that compared to the wild type, the fha mutant TSSfha (i exhibited a largely similar vegetative growth profile but significantly retarded in the ability of biofilm growth and producing extracellular matrix, (ii displayed no apparent flagella and motility, (iii was defective in the attachment to host cells and unable to form self-aggregation, (iv displayed markedly reduced capacity of hemagglutination and surviving in host serum. In vivo infection analysis revealed that TSSfha was significantly attenuated in the ability of dissemination in fish tissues and inducing host mortality, and that antibody blocking of the natural FHA produced by the wild type TSS impaired the infectivity of the pathogen. Furthermore, when introduced into turbot as a subunit vaccine, recombinant FHA elicited a significant protection against lethal TSS challenge. Taken together, these results indicate for the first time that P. fluorescens FHA is a key virulence factor essential to multiple biological processes associated with pathogenicity.

  10. A decay-accelerating factor-binding strain of coxsackievirus B3 requires the coxsackievirus-adenovirus receptor protein to mediate lytic infection of rhabdomyosarcoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafren, D R; Williams, D T; Barry, R D

    1997-12-01

    The composition of the cellular receptor complex for coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) has been an area of much contention for the last 30 years. Recently, two individual components of a putative CVB3 cellular receptor complex have been identified as (i) decay-accelerating factor (DAF) and (ii) the coxsackievirus-adenovirus receptor protein (CAR). The present study elucidates the individual roles of DAF and CAR in cell entry of CVB3 Nancy. First, we confirm that the DAF-binding phenotype of CVB3 correlates to the presence of key amino acids located in the viral capsid protein, VP2. Second, using antibody blockade, we show that complete protection of permissive cells from infection by high input multiplicities of CVB3 requires a combination of both anti-DAF and anti-CAR antibodies. Finally, it is shown that expression of the CAR protein on the surface of nonpermissive DAF-expressing RD cells renders them highly susceptible to CVB3-mediated lytic infection. Therefore, although the majority of CVB3 Nancy attaches to the cell via DAF, only virus directly interacting with the CAR protein mediates lytic infection. The role of DAF in CVB3 cell infection may be analogous to that recently described for coxsackievirus A21 (D. R. Shafren, D. J. Dorahy, R. A. Ingham, G. F. Burns, and R. D. Barry, J. Virol. 71:4736-4743, 1997), in that DAF may act as a CVB3 sequestration site, enhancing viral presentation to the functional CAR protein.

  11. Fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 protein is overexpressed in oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koole, Koos; van Kempen, Pauline M W; Swartz, Justin E; Peeters, Ton; van Diest, Paul J; Koole, Ron; van Es, Robert J. J.; Willems, Stefan M

    Fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) is a member of the fibroblast growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase family. It has been identified as a promising therapeutic target in multiple types of cancer. We have investigated FGFR3 protein expression and FGFR3 gene copy-numbers in a single

  12. Molecular interactions between coagulation factor IX and low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rohlena, Jakub

    2004-01-01

    Factor IX is an essential blood haemostatic protein, which is apparent from the observation that the absence of functional FIX is associated with the severe bleeding disorder haemophilia B. To achieve its full enzymatic activity, the serine protease precursor factor IX must first be activated into

  13. Detection of Intracellular Factor VIII Protein in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells by Flow Cytometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gouri Shankar Pandey

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Flow cytometry is widely used in cancer research for diagnosis, detection of minimal residual disease, as well as immune monitoring and profiling following immunotherapy. Detection of specific host proteins for diagnosis predominantly uses quantitative PCR and western blotting assays. In this study, we optimized a flow cytometry-based detection assay for Factor VIII protein in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs. An indirect intracellular staining (ICS method was standardized using monoclonal antibodies to different domains of human Factor VIII protein. The FVIII protein expression level was estimated by calculating the mean and median fluorescence intensities (MFI values for each monoclonal antibody. ICS staining of transiently transfected cell lines supported the method's specificity. Intracellular FVIII protein expression was also detected by the monoclonal antibodies used in the study in PBMCs of five blood donors. In summary, our data suggest that intracellular FVIII detection in PBMCs of hemophilia A patients can be a rapid and reliable method to detect intracellular FVIII levels.

  14. Trefoil factors: Gastrointestinal-specific proteins associated with gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Ping; Ling, Hui; Lan, Gang; Liu, Jiao; Hu, Haobin; Yang, Ruirui

    2015-10-23

    Trefoil factor family (TFF), composed of TFF1, TFF2, and TFF3, is a cluster of secreted peptides characterized by trefoil domain (s) and C-terminal dimerization domain. TFF1, a gastric tumor suppressor, is a single trefoil peptide originally detected in breast cancer cell lines but expressed mainly in the stomach; TFF2, a candidate of gastric cancer suppressor with two trefoil domains, is abundant in the stomach and duodenal Brunner's glands; and TFF3 is another single trefoil peptide expressed throughout the intestine which can promote the development of gastric carcinoma. According to multiple studies, TFFs play a regulatory function in the mammals' digestive system, namely in mucosal protection and epithelial cell reconstruction, tumor suppression or promotion, signal transduction and the regulation of proliferation and apoptosis. Action mechanisms of TFFs remain unresolved, but the recent demonstration of a GKN (gastrokine) 2-TFF1 heterodimer implicates structural and functional interplay with gastrokines. This review aims to encapsulate the structural and biological characteristics of TFF.

  15. Pharmacological manipulation of transcription factor protein-protein interactions: opportunities and obstacles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Fontaine

    2015-01-01

    As more attempts at modulating transcription factor activity are undertaken, valuable knowledge will be accumulated on the modality of action required to modulate transcription and how these findings can be applied to developing transcription factor drugs. Key discoveries will spawn into new therapeutic approaches not only as anticancer targets but also for other indications, such as those with an inflammatory component including neurodegenerative disorders, diabetes, and chronic liver and kidney diseases.

  16. Sperm and spermatids contain different proteins and bind distinct egg factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teperek, Marta; Miyamoto, Kei; Simeone, Angela; Feret, Renata; Deery, Michael J; Gurdon, John B; Jullien, Jerome

    2014-09-19

    Spermatozoa are more efficient at supporting normal embryonic development than spermatids, their immature, immediate precursors. This suggests that the sperm acquires the ability to support embryonic development during spermiogenesis (spermatid to sperm maturation). Here, using Xenopus laevis as a model organism, we performed 2-D Fluorescence Difference Gel Electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) and mass spectrometry analysis of differentially expressed proteins between sperm and spermatids in order to identify factors that could be responsible for the efficiency of the sperm to support embryonic development. Furthermore, benefiting from the availability of egg extracts in Xenopus, we also tested whether the chromatin of sperm could attract different egg factors compared to the chromatin of spermatids. Our analysis identified: (1) several proteins which were present exclusively in sperm; but not in spermatid nuclei and (2) numerous egg proteins binding to the sperm (but not to the spermatid chromatin) after incubation in egg extracts. Amongst these factors we identified many chromatin-associated proteins and transcriptional repressors. Presence of transcriptional repressors binding specifically to sperm chromatin could suggest its preparation for the early embryonic cell cycles, during which no transcription is observed and suggests that sperm chromatin has a unique protein composition, which facilitates the recruitment of egg chromatin remodelling factors. It is therefore likely that the acquisition of these sperm-specific factors during spermiogenesis makes the sperm chromatin suitable to interact with the maternal factors and, as a consequence, to support efficient embryonic development.

  17. Homeodomain Protein Transforming Growth Factor Beta-Induced Factor 2 Like, X-Linked Function in Colon Adenocarcinoma Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbari, Abolfazl; Agah, Shahram; Heidari, Mansour; Mobini, Gholam Reza; Faghihloo, Ebrahim; Sarveazad, Arash; Mirzaei, Alireza

    2017-08-27

    Background: TGIF2LX (transforming growth factor beta-induced factor 2 like, X-linked) is a homeodomain (HD) protein that has been implicated in the negative regulation of cell signaling pathways. The aim of this study was to investigate the possible functions of TGIF2LX in colon adenocarcinoma cells. Methods: The human SW48 cell line was transfected with cDNA for the wild-type TGIF2LX gene and gene/protein over-expression was confirmed by microscopic analysis, real time RT-PCR and Western blotting techniques. In vitro cell proliferation was evaluated by MTT and BrdU assays. After developing a colon tumor model in nude mice, immunohistochemical (IHC) staining of tumor tissue was carried out for Ki-67 (proliferation) and CD34 (angiogenesis) markers. To predict potential protein partners of TGIF2LX, in-silico analysis was also conducted. Results: Obtained results showed over-expression of TGIF2LX as a potential transcription factor could inhibit either proliferation or angiogenesis (P<0.05) in colon tumors. In-silico results predicted interaction of TGIF2LX with other proteins considered important for cellular development. Conclusions: Our findings provided evidence of molecular mechanisms by which TGIF2LX could act as a tumor suppressor in colon adenocarcinoma cells. Thus, this gene may potentially be a promising option for colon cancer gene-based therapeutic strategies. Creative Commons Attribution License

  18. Eukaryotic initiation factor 4D, the hypusine-containing protein, is conserved among eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, E D; Mora, R; Meredith, S C; Lee, C; Lindquist, S L

    1987-12-05

    When mammalian cells are grown in medium containing [3H]spermidine, a single major tritiated protein identical to eukaryotic initiation factor 4D becomes labeled. This protein contains 1 residue/molecule of tritiated hypusine (N epsilon-(4-amino-2-hydroxybutyl)lysine), a rare amino acid which has been found in no other protein. In order to investigate the conservation of this protein, we examined two nonmammalian eukaryotes, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the insect Drosophila melanogaster, and the eubacterial prokaryote Escherichia coli for the presence of the hypusine-containing protein. When the eukaryotic cells were grown in the presence of [3H]spermidine, electrophoretic analysis revealed a single labeled protein. In each case, the apparent molecular weight was near 18,000 and the relative pI was approximately 5.2, similar to the hypusine-containing protein of mammals. Amino acid analysis confirmed the presence of tritiated hypusine in each case, and silver staining of two-dimensional polyacrylamide gels demonstrated that, in yeast and fruit flies as in mammals, the protein is relatively abundant. In the eubacterium E. coli, one tritiated protein was predominant, but its molecular weight was 24,000 and we found no evidence that it contained tritiated hypusine. We found no evidence for the existence of the hypusine-containing protein in the archaebacterium Methanococcus voltae. These data suggest that the hypusine-containing protein is conserved among eukaryotes.

  19. TcoF-DB: dragon database for human transcription co-factors and transcription factor interacting proteins

    KAUST Repository

    Schaefer, Ulf

    2010-10-21

    The initiation and regulation of transcription in eukaryotes is complex and involves a large number of transcription factors (TFs), which are known to bind to the regulatory regions of eukaryotic DNA. Apart from TF-DNA binding, protein-protein interaction involving TFs is an essential component of the machinery facilitating transcriptional regulation. Proteins that interact with TFs in the context of transcription regulation but do not bind to the DNA themselves, we consider transcription co-factors (TcoFs). The influence of TcoFs on transcriptional regulation and initiation, although indirect, has been shown to be significant with the functionality of TFs strongly influenced by the presence of TcoFs. While the role of TFs and their interaction with regulatory DNA regions has been well-studied, the association between TFs and TcoFs has so far been given less attention. Here, we present a resource that is comprised of a collection of human TFs and the TcoFs with which they interact. Other proteins that have a proven interaction with a TF, but are not considered TcoFs are also included. Our database contains 157 high-confidence TcoFs and additionally 379 hypothetical TcoFs. These have been identified and classified according to the type of available evidence for their involvement in transcriptional regulation and their presence in the cell nucleus. We have divided TcoFs into four groups, one of which contains high-confidence TcoFs and three others contain TcoFs which are hypothetical to different extents. We have developed the Dragon Database for Human Transcription Co-Factors and Transcription Factor Interacting Proteins (TcoF-DB). A web-based interface for this resource can be freely accessed at http://cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/tcof/ and http://apps.sanbi.ac.za/tcof/. © The Author(s) 2010.

  20. Attachment mental states and inferred pathways of development in borderline personality disorder: a study using the Adult Attachment Interview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barone, Lavinia; Fossati, Andrea; Guiducci, Valentina

    2011-09-01

    We report the outcome of an investigation on how specific attachment states of mind and corresponding risk factors related to different DSM Axis I comorbidities in subjects with BPD. Mental representations of attachment in four BPD sub-groups (BPD and Anxiety/Mood Disorders, BPD and Substance Use and Abuse Disorders, BPD and Alcohol Use and Abuse Disorders, and BPD and Eating Disorders) were assessed in 140 BPD subjects using the Adult Attachment Interview (AAI). In addition to the global attachment picture in which Insecure organized (Dismissing 51% and Enmeshed 35%) and Insecure disorganized categories (40%) were overrepresented, significant differences in attachment category were found between the four BPD sub-groups. Axis I comorbidities corresponded with attachment features on the internalizing/externalizing functioning dimension of the disorder. Furthermore, specific constellations of inferred developmental antecedents and attachment states of mind corresponded differentially with the BPD sub-groups. Implications for developmental research and clinical nosology are discussed.

  1. Effects of an exogenous enzyme preparation on microbial protein synthesis, enzyme activity and attachment to feed in the Rumen Simulation Technique (Rusitec).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y; McAllister, T A; Rode, L M; Beauchemin, K A; Morgavi, D P; Nsereko, V L; Iwaasa, A D; Yang, W

    2001-03-01

    The effects of an exogenous enzyme preparation, the application method and feed type on ruminal fermentation and microbial protein synthesis were investigated using the rumen simulation technique (Rusitec). Steam-rolled barley grain and chopped alfalfa hay were sprayed with water (control, C), an enzyme preparation with a predominant xylanase activity (EF), or autoclaved enzyme (AEF) 24 h prior to feeding, or the enzyme was supplied in the buffer infused into the Rusitec (EI). Microbial N incorporation was measured using (15NH4)2SO4 in the buffer. Spent feed bags were pummelled mechanically in buffer to segregate the feed particle-associated (FPA) and feed particle-bound (FPB) bacterial fractions. Enzymes applied to feed reduced neutral-detergent fibre content, and increased the concentration of reducing sugars in barley grain, but not alfalfa hay. Ruminal cellulolytic bacteria were more numerous with EF than with C. Disappearance of DM from barley grain was higher with EF than with C, but alfalfa was unaffected by EF. Treatment EF increased incorporation of 15N into FPA and FPB fractions at 24 and 48 h. In contrast, AEF reduced the 24 h values, relative to C; AEF and C were similar at 48 h. Infused enzyme (EI) did not affect 15N incorporation. Xylanase activity in effluent was increased by EF and EI, compared to C, but not by AEF. Xylanase activity in FPA was higher at 48 h than at 24 h with all treatments; it was higher with EF than C at 24 and 48 h, but was not altered by AEF or EI. Applying enzymes onto feeds before feeding was more effective than dosing directly into the artificial rumen for increasing ruminal fibrolytic activity.

  2. S100B protein, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor in human milk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruisong Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human milk contains a wide variety of nutrients that contribute to the fulfillment of its functions, which include the regulation of newborn development. However, few studies have investigated the concentrations of S100B protein, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF in human milk. The associations of the concentrations of S100B protein, BDNF, and GDNF with maternal factors are not well explored. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To investigate the concentrations of S100B protein, BDNF, and GDNF in human milk and characterize the maternal factors associated with their levels in human milk, human milk samples were collected at days 3, 10, 30, and 90 after parturition. Levels of S100B protein, BDNF, and GDNF, and their mRNAs in the samples were detected. Then, these concentrations were compared with lactation and other maternal factors. S100B protein levels in human milk samples collected at 3, 10, 30, and 90 d after parturition were 1249.79±398.10, 1345.05±539.16, 1481.83±573.30, and 1414.39±621.31 ng/L, respectively. On the other hand, the BDNF concentrations in human milk samples were 10.99±4.55, 13.01±5.88, 13.35±6.43, and 2.83±5.47 µg/L, while those of GDNF were 10.90±1.65, 11.38±1., 11.29±3.10, and 11.40±2.21 g/L for the same time periods. Maternal post-pregnancy body mass index was positively associated with S100B levels in human milk (r = 0.335, P = 0.030<0.05. In addition, there was a significant correlation between the levels of S100B protein and BDNF (z = 2.09, P = 0.037<0.05. Delivery modes were negatively associated with the concentration of GDNF in human milk. CONCLUSIONS: S100B protein, BDNF, and GDNF are present in all samples of human milk, and they may be responsible for the long term effects of breast feeding.

  3. Adhesion properties of Lactobacillus rhamnosus mucus-binding factor to mucin and extracellular matrix proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Keita; Nakamata, Koichi; Ueno, Shintaro; Terao, Akari; Aryantini, Ni Putu Desy; Sujaya, I Nengah; Fukuda, Kenji; Urashima, Tadasu; Yamamoto, Yuji; Mukai, Takao

    2015-01-01

    We previously described potential probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus strains, isolated from fermented mare milk produced in Sumbawa Island, Indonesia, which showed high adhesion to porcine colonic mucin (PCM) and extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. Recently, mucus-binding factor (MBF) was found in the GG strain of L. rhamnosus as a mucin-binding protein. In this study, we assessed the ability of recombinant MBF protein from the FSMM22 strain, one of the isolates of L. rhamnosus from fermented Sumbawa mare milk, to adhere to PCM and ECM proteins by overlay dot blot and Biacore assays. MBF bound to PCM, laminin, collagen IV, and fibronectin with submicromolar dissociation constants. Adhesion of the FSMM22 mbf mutant strain to PCM and ECM proteins was significantly less than that of the wild-type strain. Collectively, these results suggested that MBF contribute to L. rhamnosus host colonization via mucin and ECM protein binding.

  4. The Potyviral P3 Protein Targets Eukaryotic Elongation Factor 1A to Promote the Unfolded Protein Response and Viral Pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Hexiang; Shine, M B; Cui, Xiaoyan; Chen, Xin; Ma, Na; Kachroo, Pradeep; Zhi, Haijan; Kachroo, Aardra

    2016-09-01

    The biochemical function of the potyviral P3 protein is not known, although it is known to regulate virus replication, movement, and pathogenesis. We show that P3, the putative virulence determinant of soybean mosaic virus (SMV), targets a component of the translation elongation complex in soybean. Eukaryotic elongation factor 1A (eEF1A), a well-known host factor in viral pathogenesis, is essential for SMV virulence and the associated unfolded protein response (UPR). Silencing GmEF1A inhibits accumulation of SMV and another ER-associated virus in soybean. Conversely, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-inducing chemicals promote SMV accumulation in wild-type, but not GmEF1A-knockdown, plants. Knockdown of genes encoding the eEF1B isoform, which is important for eEF1A function in translation elongation, has similar effects on UPR and SMV resistance, suggesting a link to translation elongation. P3 and GmEF1A promote each other's nuclear localization, similar to the nuclear-cytoplasmic transport of eEF1A by the Human immunodeficiency virus 1 Nef protein. Our results suggest that P3 targets host elongation factors resulting in UPR, which in turn facilitates SMV replication and place eEF1A upstream of BiP in the ER stress response during pathogen infection.

  5. Adopting Children with Attachment Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Daniel A.

    1999-01-01

    Notes that attachment behavior in infants is a facet of normal child development, and that children with attachment problems require special attention during and after the adoption process. Presents actions needed to increase the probability that such children can be successfully adopted, detailed attachment patterns, and parenting strategies and…

  6. Attachment Theory: Retrospect and Prospect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bretherton, Inge

    1985-01-01

    Provides overview of attachment theory as parented by John Bowlby in "Attachment and Loss". Uses two major concepts from this work to interpret refinements and elaborations of attachment theory attibuted to Mary Ainsworth. Considers how recent insights into development of socioemotional understanding and development of event…

  7. Attachment Theory: Retrospect and Prospect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bretherton, Inge

    1985-01-01

    Provides overview of attachment theory as parented by John Bowlby in "Attachment and Loss". Uses two major concepts from this work to interpret refinements and elaborations of attachment theory attibuted to Mary Ainsworth. Considers how recent insights into development of socioemotional understanding and development of event…

  8. Attachment Theory: Retrospect and Prospect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bretherton, Inge

    1985-01-01

    Provides overview of attachment theory as parented by John Bowlby in "Attachment and Loss". Uses two major concepts from this work to interpret refinements and elaborations of attachment theory attibuted to Mary Ainsworth. Considers how recent insights into development of socioemotional understanding and development of event representation can be…

  9. "Parallel factor analysis of multi-excitation ultraviolet resonance Raman spectra for protein secondary structure determination".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshokoya, Olayinka O; JiJi, Renee D

    2015-09-10

    Protein secondary structural analysis is important for understanding the relationship between protein structure and function, or more importantly how changes in structure relate to loss of function. The structurally sensitive protein vibrational modes (amide I, II, III and S) in deep-ultraviolet resonance Raman (DUVRR) spectra resulting from the backbone C-O and N-H vibrations make DUVRR a potentially powerful tool for studying secondary structure changes. Experimental studies reveal that the position and intensity of the four amide modes in DUVRR spectra of proteins are largely correlated with the varying fractions of α-helix, β-sheet and disordered structural content of proteins. Employing multivariate calibration methods and DUVRR spectra of globular proteins with varying structural compositions, the secondary structure of a protein with unknown structure can be predicted. A disadvantage of multivariate calibration methods is the requirement of known concentration or spectral profiles. Second-order curve resolution methods, such as parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC), do not have such a requirement due to the "second-order advantage." An exceptional feature of DUVRR spectroscopy is that DUVRR spectra are linearly dependent on both excitation wavelength and secondary structure composition. Thus, higher order data can be created by combining protein DUVRR spectra of several proteins collected at multiple excitation wavelengths to give multi-excitation ultraviolet resonance Raman data (ME-UVRR). PARAFAC has been used to analyze ME-UVRR data of nine proteins to resolve the pure spectral, excitation and compositional profiles. A three factor model with non-negativity constraints produced three unique factors that were correlated with the relative abundance of helical, β-sheet and poly-proline II dihedral angles. This is the first empirical evidence that the typically resolved "disordered" spectrum represents the better defined poly-proline II type structure.

  10. [Mechanisms underlying physiological functions of food factors via non-specific interactions with biological proteins].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Akira

    2015-01-01

      We previously reported that zerumbone, a sesquiterpene found in Zingiber zerumbet SMITH, showed notable cancer preventive effects in various organs of experimental rodents. This agent up-regulated nuclear factor-E2-related factor (Nrf2)-dependent expressions of anti-oxidative and xenobiotics-metabolizing enzymes, leading to an increased self-defense capacity. On the other hand, zerumbone markedly suppressed the expression of cyclooxygenase-2, an inducible pro-inflammatory enzyme, by disrupting mRNA stabilizing processes. Binding experiments using a biotin derivative of zerumbone demonstrated that Keap1, an Nrf2 repressive protein, is one of its major binding proteins that promotes their dissociation for inducing Nrf2 transactivation. We then generated a specific antibody against zerumbone-modified proteins and found that zerumbone modified numerous cellular proteins in a non-specific manner, with global distribution of the modified proteins seen not only in cytoplasm but also the nucleus. Based on those observations, zerumbone was speculated to cause proteo-stress, a notion supported by previous findings that it increased the C-terminus of Hsc70 interacting protein-dependent protein ubiquitination and also promoted aggresome formation. Interestingly, zerumbone counteracted proteo-stress and heat stress via up-regulation of the protein quality control systems (PQCs), e.g., heat shock proteins (HSPs), ubiquitin-proteasome, and autophagy. Meanwhile, several phytochemicals, including ursolic acid and curcumin, were identified as marked HSP70 inducers, whereas most nutrients tested were scarcely active. Recent studies have revealed that PQCs play important roles in the prevention of many lifestyle related diseases, such as cancer, thus non-specific binding of phytochemicals to cellular proteins may be a novel and unique mechanism underlying their physiological activities.

  11. Hypnosis, attachment, and oxytocin:an integrative perspective (1.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelinka, Vladimir; Cojan, Yann; Desseilles, Martin

    2014-01-01

    This article considers links between clinical hypnosis, attachment theory, and oxytocin. First, it proposes that commonalities between clinical hypnosis and attachment theory may improve our understanding of the hypnotherapeutic process. Then, it suggests that an integrative model unifying clinical hypnosis and attachment theory may constitute a link between clinical hypnosis and a neurobiological factor such as oxytocin. Finally, it discusses the implications of these hypotheses for clinical practice and future researches.

  12. Hypnosis, attachment, and oxytocin:an integrative perspective (1.).

    OpenAIRE

    Zelinka, Vladimir; Cojan, Yann; Desseilles, Martin

    2014-01-01

    This article considers links between clinical hypnosis, attachment theory, and oxytocin. First, it proposes that commonalities between clinical hypnosis and attachment theory may improve our understanding of the hypnotherapeutic process. Then, it suggests that an integrative model unifying clinical hypnosis and attachment theory may constitute a link between clinical hypnosis and a neurobiological factor such as oxytocin. Finally, it discusses the implications of these hypotheses for clinical...

  13. Associations between Adult Attachment Dimensions And Attitudes Toward Pain Behaviour

    OpenAIRE

    McWilliams, Lachlan A; Paul DJ Murphy; S Jeffrey Bailey

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite the important role positive reinforcement of pain behaviour is believed to play in chronic pain, there is a paucity of research regarding factors that influence the provision of such reinforcement. Attachment theory suggests that individuals high in attachment avoidance view the pain behaviour of others in a negative manner and would, therefore, provide little reinforcement of pain behaviour. As an initial step in evaluating this model, relationships between attachment dim...

  14. The mammalian hypusine-containing protein, eukaryotic initiation factor 4D. Structural homology of this protein from several species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, M H; Chung, S I; Cooper, H L; Folk, J E

    1984-04-10

    A single cellular protein of Mr approximately 18,000 and pI near 5.1, recently identified as eukaryotic translation initiation factor eIF-4D, contains the unusual amino acid hypusine [N epsilon-(4-amino--2-hydroxybutyl)lysine] formed post-translationally from lysine with a structural contribution from the polyamine spermidine. When the 3H-labeled hypusine-containing protein isolated from Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells that were grown with radioactive polyamine is digested with trypsin and the digest is subjected to two-dimensional separation, a single radioactive peptide is seen. A labeled peptide that occupies this same position is found in a digest of the [3H]hypusine protein from human lymphocytes and the single hypusine-containing tryptic peptide from purified rabbit reticulocyte eIF-4D also moves to this identical position. Stepwise Edman degradation of the tryptic digest of CHO cell hypusine-protein releases the radioactivity as a single peak in accordance with our earlier evidence for a single hypusine residue per molecule of eIF-4D. The similar patterns of radioactive peptides obtained from tryptic digests of radioiodinated eIF-4D from CHO cells, human lymphocytes, and rabbit reticulocytes suggest a highly conserved primary structure for this protein.

  15. In Silico Analysis of Tumor Necrosis Factor α-Induced Protein 8-Like-1 (TIPE1 Protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei Shen

    Full Text Available Tumor necrosis factor α-induced protein 8 (TNFAIP8-like protein 1 (TIPE1 was a member of TNFAIP8 family. Previous studies have shown that TIPE1 could induce apoptosis in hepatocellular carcinoma. In this study, we attempted to predict its potential structure. Bioinformatic analysis of TIPE1 was performed to predict its potential structure using the bioinfomatic web services or softwares. The results showed that the amino acid sequences of TIPE1 were well conserved in mammals. No signal peptide and no transmembrane domain existed in human TIPE1. The aliphatic index of TIPE1 was 100.75 and the theoretical pI was 9.57. TIPE1 was a kind of stable protein and its grand average of hydropathicity was -0.108. Various post-translational modifications were also speculated to exist in TIPE1. In addition, the results of Swiss-Model Server and Swiss-Pdb Viewer program revealed that the predicted three-dimensional structure of TIPE1 protein was stable and it may accord with the rule of stereochemistry. TIPE1 was predicted to interact with FBXW5, caspase8 and so on. In conclusion, TIPE1 may be a stable protein with no signal peptide and no transmembrane domain. The bioinformatic analysis of TIPE1 will provide the basis for the further study on the function of TIPE1.

  16. A common site within factor H SCR 7 responsible for binding heparin, C-reactive protein and streptococcal M protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannakis, Eleni; Jokiranta, T Sakari; Male, Dean A; Ranganathan, Shoba; Ormsby, Rebecca J; Fischetti, Vince A; Mold, Carolyn; Gordon, David L

    2003-04-01

    The complement inhibitor factor H (fH) interacts via its seventh short consensus repeat (SCR) domain with multiple ligands including heparin, streptococcal M protein and C-reactive protein (CRP). The aim of this study was to localize the residues in SCR 7 required for these interactions. We initially built a homology model of fH SCR 6-7 using the averaged NMR structures of fH SCR 15-16 and vaccinia control protein SCR 3-4 as templates. Electrostatic potentials of the model's surface demonstrated a co-localization of three clusters of positively charged residues on SCR 7, labeled site A (R369 and K370), site B (R386 and K387) and site C (K392). These residues, localized to the linker region preceding SCR 7 and to the end of a "hypervariable loop" in SCR 7, were systematically replaced with uncharged alanine residues in an fH construct containing SCR 1-7. The resulting proteins were expressed in the methylotrophic yeast, Pichia pastoris. By ELISA analysis we demonstrated: first, that substituting site A inhibited heparin and CRP binding; secondly, that substituting site B inhibited binding to heparin, CRP and M protein; and thirdly, that substituting site C clearly inhibited only heparin binding.

  17. Report of the APSAC task force on attachment therapy, reactive attachment disorder, and attachment problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaffin, Mark; Hanson, Rochelle; Saunders, Benjamin E; Nichols, Todd; Barnett, Douglas; Zeanah, Charles; Berliner, Lucy; Egeland, Byron; Newman, Elana; Lyon, Tom; LeTourneau, Elizabeth; Miller-Perrin, Cindy

    2006-02-01

    Although the term attachment disorder is ambiguous, attachment therapies are increasingly used with children who are maltreated, particularly those in foster care or adoptive homes. Some children described as having attachment disorders show extreme disturbances. The needs of these children and their caretakers are real. How to meet their needs is less clear. A number of attachment-based treatment and parenting approaches purport to help children described as attachment disordered. Attachment therapy is a young and diverse field, and the benefits and risks of many treatments remain scientifically undetermined. Controversies have arisen about potentially harmful attachment therapy techniques used by a subset of attachment therapists. In this report, the Task Force reviews the controversy and makes recommendations for assessment, treatment, and practices. The report reflects American Professional Society on the Abuse of Children's (APSAC) position and also was endorsed by the American Psychological Association's Division 37 and the Division 37 Section on Child Maltreatment.

  18. Picturing Urban Green Attachments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blok, Anders; Meilvang, Marie Leth

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we explore the cultural-political tensions and ambiguities of urban ecology, by way of following how activists move and translate between ‘familiar’ and ‘public’ engagements in the green city. Empirically, we locate our exploration in and around Nordhavnen (The North Harbor...... in the plural’ in the city. In particular, we stress the role assumed in such engagements by various image-making practices, as means for activists to express, share and render publicly visible a range of embodied urban attachments. Pragmatic sociology, we conclude, may contribute to a novel understanding...

  19. [Chlamydia trachomatis proteasome protein as one of the significant pathogenicity factors of exciter].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davydov, D Iu; Zigangirova, N A

    2014-01-01

    Sex-related infections are a global problem. Such infections may lead to acute or chronic diseases. Chlamydia trachomatis is a dangerous and widespread pathogenicity factor that is not sensitive to conventional drugs and has no obvious symptoms. Protein CPAF is leading factor of pathogenesis. This protein inhibits the signaling pathways of host cell and supports long survival of the pathogen in the host cell. The goal of this work was to review general properties of the proteasome Chlamydia protein CPAF, its functions, and role in pathology. The role of protein CPAF in the anti-chlamydia immune reaction is discussed. The prospects of the development of promising anti-chlamydia vaccine, as well as new effective anti-chlamydia drugs are also discussed.

  20. Dimerization of complement factor H-related proteins modulates complement activation in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goicoechea de Jorge, Elena; Caesar, Joseph J E; Malik, Talat H; Patel, Mitali; Colledge, Matthew; Johnson, Steven; Hakobyan, Svetlana; Morgan, B Paul; Harris, Claire L; Pickering, Matthew C; Lea, Susan M

    2013-03-19

    The complement system is a key component regulation influences susceptibility to age-related macular degeneration, meningitis, and kidney disease. Variation includes genomic rearrangements within the complement factor H-related (CFHR) locus. Elucidating the mechanism underlying these associations has been hindered by the lack of understanding of the biological role of CFHR proteins. Here we present unique structural data demonstrating that three of the CFHR proteins contain a shared dimerization motif and that this hitherto unrecognized structural property enables formation of both homodimers and heterodimers. Dimerization confers avidity for tissue-bound complement fragments and enables these proteins to efficiently compete with the physiological complement inhibitor, complement factor H (CFH), for ligand binding. Our data demonstrate that these CFHR proteins function as competitive antagonists of CFH to modulate complement activation in vivo and explain why variation in the CFHRs predisposes to disease.

  1. Assembly of neuronal connectivity by neurotrophic factors and leucine-rich repeat proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Ledda

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Proper function of the nervous system critically relies on sophisticated neuronal networks interconnected in a highly specific pattern. The architecture of these connections arises from sequential developmental steps such as axonal growth and guidance, dendrite development, target determination, synapse formation and plasticity. Leucine-rich repeat (LRR transmembrane proteins have been involved in cell-type specific signaling pathways that underlie these developmental processes. The members of this superfamily of proteins execute their functions acting as trans-synaptic cell adhesion molecules involved in target specificity and synapse formation or working in cis as cell-intrinsic modulators of neurotrophic factor receptor trafficking and signaling. In this review, we will focus on novel physiological mechanisms through which LRR proteins regulate neurotrophic factor receptor signaling, highlighting the importance of these modulatory events for proper axonal extension and guidance, tissue innervation and dendrite morphogenesis. Additionally, we discuss few examples linking this set of LRR proteins to neurodevelopmental and psychiatric disorders.

  2. [ADHD and attachment processes: are they related?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franc, N; Maury, M; Purper-Ouakil, D

    2009-06-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is defined on the basis of developmentally inappropriate inattention, motor activity and impulsivity that emerges early in development and causes impairment in social and academic functioning. ADHD is described as a multifactorial disease, with a well studied genetic vulnerability, and early environmental factors also playing an important role in the development and course of the disorder. Current aetiological models emphasize interaction between genes and environment. The concept of attachment, as proposed by John Bowlby, reflects quality of early interactions, and should therefore be considered as an early developmental factor. First, clinical findings emphasize similitude between both disorders; emotional dysregulation is an important feature in reactive attachment disorder as well as in ADHD. Emotion regulation is highly related to attachment security in young children and could play a part in the development of early attention processes. Moreover, difficult temperament is associated with higher risk for ADHD on the one hand, and can disturb the process of attachment on the other. Parental caregiving - including maternal sensitivity, positive parenting practices - is a main factor involved in the development of attachment, and has shown to be associated with better outcomes in ADHD children, especially with less oppositional/conduct disorders. Second, the aim of our review is to present clinical studies that have looked for a link between ADHD and attachment: the type of attachment could play a part in the course of the disorder: insecure and disorganised attachment types tend to be associated with a higher risk of externalised behaviors in children. For ADHD, this effect seems to be weaker than for other externalised disorders, and has been shown only in populations of at-risk children. Clinical studies also raise the question of possible links between reactive attachment disorder and ADHD. In children suffering

  3. Fas-associated factor 1 interacts with protein kinase CK2 in vivo upon apoptosis induction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guerra, B; Boldyreff, B; Issinger, O G

    2001-01-01

    We show here that in several different cell lines protein kinase CK2 and Fas-associated factor 1 (FAF1) exist together in a complex which is stable to high monovalent salt concentration. The CK2/FAF1 complex formation is significantly increased after induction of apoptosis with various DNA damaging...... the view that protein kinase CK2 plays an important role in certain steps of apoptosis....

  4. Label-free aptasensor for platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Degefa, Tesfaye Hailu [Department of Chemistry, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kwak, Juhyoun [Department of Chemistry, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: Juhyoun_Kwak@kaist.ac.kr

    2008-04-21

    A label-free aptasensor for platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) protein is reported. The aptasensor uses mixed self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) composed of a thiol-modified PDGF binding aptamer and 6-mercaptohexanol (MCH) on a gold electrode. The SAMs were characterized by cyclic voltammetry (CV), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) before and after binding of the protein using [Fe(CN){sub 6}]{sup 3-/4-}, a redox marker ion as an indicator for the formation of a protein-aptamer complex. The CVs at the PDGF modified electrode showed significant differences, such as changes in the peak currents and peak-to-peak separation, before and after binding of the target protein. The EIS spectra, in the form of Nyquist plots, were analyzed with a Randles circuit while the electron transfer resistance R{sub ct} was used to monitor the binding of the target protein. The results showed that, without any modification to the aptamer, the target protein can be recognized effectively at the PDGF binding aptamer SAMs at the electrode surface. Control experiments using non-binding oligonucleotides assembled at the electrode surfaces also confirmed the results and showed that there was no formation of an aptamer-protein complex. The DPV signal at the aptamer functionalized electrode showed a linearly decreased marker ion peak current in a protein concentrations range of 1-40 nM. Thus, label-free detection of PDGF protein at an aptamer modified electrode has been demonstrated.

  5. Attachment Theory in Tourism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maximiliano Korstanje

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The following work is intended to a revision on attachment theory. The postulates of the theory of the sure base point that the system of exploration meets in narrow relation the system of conducts of attachment and the figure of the keepers. The conducts that characterize and symbolize the relation of the adult with the environment are carried back to the early age, in the moment in which the child develops the affective capacity. What difference does exist between someone who decides to journey to England and that one that one decides to travel to Mar del Plata? How it is possible to study this topic of on a manner trustworthy? These three questions were key to begin the investigation. Nevertheless, the matter began to find certain limitations linked to the methodology that had to be in use. It is possible to use careless they on the leisure scope, a theory which still demonstrates certain inconsistencies in its own clinical application?

  6. Interacting factors and cellular localization of SR protein-specific kinase Dsk1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Zhaohua, E-mail: ztang@jsd.claremont.edu [W.M. Keck Science Center, The Claremont Colleges, Claremont, CA 91711 (United States); Luca, Maria; Taggart-Murphy, Laura; Portillio, Jessica; Chang, Cathey; Guven, Ayse [W.M. Keck Science Center, The Claremont Colleges, Claremont, CA 91711 (United States); Lin, Ren-Jang [Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Beckman Research Institute of the City of Hope, Duarte, CA 91010 (United States); Murray, Johanne; Carr, Antony [Genome Damage and Stability Center, University of Sussex, Falmer, BN1 9RQ (United Kingdom)

    2012-10-01

    Schizosaccharomyces pombe Dsk1 is an SR protein-specific kinase (SRPK), whose homologs have been identified in every eukaryotic organism examined. Although discovered as a mitotic regulator with protein kinase activity toward SR splicing factors, it remains largely unknown about what and how Dsk1 contributes to cell cycle and pre-mRNA splicing. In this study, we investigated the Dsk1 function by determining interacting factors and cellular localization of the kinase. Consistent with its reported functions, we found that pre-mRNA processing and cell cycle factors are prominent among the proteins co-purified with Dsk1. The identification of these factors led us to find Rsd1 as a novel Dsk1 substrate, as well as the involvement of Dsk1 in cellular distribution of poly(A){sup +} RNA. In agreement with its role in nuclear events, we also found that Dsk1 is mainly localized in the nucleus during G{sub 2} phase and at mitosis. Furthermore, we revealed the oscillation of Dsk1 protein in a cell cycle-dependent manner. This paper marks the first comprehensive analysis of in vivo Dsk1-associated proteins in fission yeast. Our results reflect the conserved role of SRPK family in eukaryotic organisms, and provide information about how Dsk1 functions in pre-mRNA processing and cell-division cycle.

  7. Chiasmata Promote Monopolar Attachment of Sister Chromatids and Their Co-Segregation toward the Proper Pole during Meiosis I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohba, Tatsunori; Hinohara, Yumi; Matsuhara, Hirotada; Yoshida, Masashi; Itabashi, Yuta; Murakami, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Ayumu

    2011-01-01

    The chiasma is a structure that forms between a pair of homologous chromosomes by crossover recombination and physically links the homologous chromosomes during meiosis. Chiasmata are essential for the attachment of the homologous chromosomes to opposite spindle poles (bipolar attachment) and their subsequent segregation to the opposite poles during meiosis I. However, the overall function of chiasmata during meiosis is not fully understood. Here, we show that chiasmata also play a crucial role in the attachment of sister chromatids to the same spindle pole and in their co-segregation during meiosis I in fission yeast. Analysis of cells lacking chiasmata and the cohesin protector Sgo1 showed that loss of chiasmata causes frequent bipolar attachment of sister chromatids during anaphase. Furthermore, high time-resolution analysis of centromere dynamics in various types of chiasmate and achiasmate cells, including those lacking the DNA replication checkpoint factor Mrc1 or the meiotic centromere protein Moa1, showed the following three outcomes: (i) during the pre-anaphase stage, the bipolar attachment of sister chromatids occurs irrespective of chiasma formation; (ii) the chiasma contributes to the elimination of the pre-anaphase bipolar attachment; and (iii) when the bipolar attachment remains during anaphase, the chiasmata generate a bias toward the proper pole during poleward chromosome pulling that results in appropriate chromosome segregation. Based on these results, we propose that chiasmata play a pivotal role in the selection of proper attachments and provide a backup mechanism that promotes correct chromosome segregation when improper attachments remain during anaphase I. PMID:21423721

  8. Chiasmata promote monopolar attachment of sister chromatids and their co-segregation toward the proper pole during meiosis I.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukinobu Hirose

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The chiasma is a structure that forms between a pair of homologous chromosomes by crossover recombination and physically links the homologous chromosomes during meiosis. Chiasmata are essential for the attachment of the homologous chromosomes to opposite spindle poles (bipolar attachment and their subsequent segregation to the opposite poles during meiosis I. However, the overall function of chiasmata during meiosis is not fully understood. Here, we show that chiasmata also play a crucial role in the attachment of sister chromatids to the same spindle pole and in their co-segregation during meiosis I in fission yeast. Analysis of cells lacking chiasmata and the cohesin protector Sgo1 showed that loss of chiasmata causes frequent bipolar attachment of sister chromatids during anaphase. Furthermore, high time-resolution analysis of centromere dynamics in various types of chiasmate and achiasmate cells, including those lacking the DNA replication checkpoint factor Mrc1 or the meiotic centromere protein Moa1, showed the following three outcomes: (i during the pre-anaphase stage, the bipolar attachment of sister chromatids occurs irrespective of chiasma formation; (ii the chiasma contributes to the elimination of the pre-anaphase bipolar attachment; and (iii when the bipolar attachment remains during anaphase, the chiasmata generate a bias toward the proper pole during poleward chromosome pulling that results in appropriate chromosome segregation. Based on these results, we propose that chiasmata play a pivotal role in the selection of proper attachments and provide a backup mechanism that promotes correct chromosome segregation when improper attachments remain during anaphase I.

  9. Attachment relationships as determinants of physical health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maunder, Robert G; Hunter, Jonathan J

    2008-01-01

    Childhood adversity alters the relational world of the child and inhibits the development of secure attachment bonds. The purpose of this article is to survey recent evidence that attachment insecurity has the potential to impair physical health throughout the lifespan. It is proposed that attachment insecurity contributes to disease risk through a range of mechanisms which include (1) disturbances in arousal and recovery within physiological systems that respond to stress; (2) physiological links between the mediators of social relationships, stress, and immunity; (3) links between relationship style and various health behaviors; and (4) disease risk factors that serve as external regulators of dysphoric affect, such as nicotine and alcohol. The evidence for these mechanisms, particularly the evidence that has accumulated since the model was first proposed in 2000, is presented and discussed.

  10. Novel Burkholderia mallei Virulence Factors Linked to Specific Host-Pathogen Protein Interactions*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memišević, Vesna; Zavaljevski, Nela; Pieper, Rembert; Rajagopala, Seesandra V.; Kwon, Keehwan; Townsend, Katherine; Yu, Chenggang; Yu, Xueping; DeShazer, David; Reifman, Jaques; Wallqvist, Anders

    2013-01-01

    Burkholderia mallei is an infectious intracellular pathogen whose virulence and resistance to antibiotics makes it a potential bioterrorism agent. Given its genetic origin as a commensal soil organism, it is equipped with an extensive and varied set of adapted mechanisms to cope with and modulate host-cell environments. One essential virulence mechanism constitutes the specialized secretion systems that are designed to penetrate host-cell membranes and insert pathogen proteins directly into the host cell's cytosol. However, the secretion systems' proteins and, in particular, their host targets are largely uncharacterized. Here, we used a combined in silico, in vitro, and in vivo approach to identify B. mallei proteins required for pathogenicity. We used bioinformatics tools, including orthology detection and ab initio predictions of secretion system proteins, as well as published experimental Burkholderia data to initially select a small number of proteins as putative virulence factors. We then used yeast two-hybrid assays against normalized whole human and whole murine proteome libraries to detect and identify interactions among each of these bacterial proteins and host proteins. Analysis of such interactions provided both verification of known virulence factors and identification of three new putative virulence proteins. We successfully created insertion mutants for each of these three proteins using the virulent B. mallei ATCC 23344 strain. We exposed BALB/c mice to mutant strains and the wild-type strain in an aerosol challenge model using lethal B. mallei doses. In each set of experiments, mice exposed to mutant strains survived for the 21-day duration of the experiment, whereas mice exposed to the wild-type strain rapidly died. Given their in vivo role in pathogenicity, and based on the yeast two-hybrid interaction data, these results point to the importance of these pathogen proteins in modulating host ubiquitination pathways, phagosomal escape, and actin

  11. Future Protein Supply and Demand: Strategies and Factors Influencing a Sustainable Equilibrium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maeve Henchion

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available A growing global population, combined with factors such as changing socio-demographics, will place increased pressure on the world’s resources to provide not only more but also different types of food. Increased demand for animal-based protein in particular is expected to have a negative environmental impact, generating greenhouse gas emissions, requiring more water and more land. Addressing this “perfect storm” will necessitate more sustainable production of existing sources of protein as well as alternative sources for direct human consumption. This paper outlines some potential demand scenarios and provides an overview of selected existing and novel protein sources in terms of their potential to sustainably deliver protein for the future, considering drivers and challenges relating to nutritional, environmental, and technological and market/consumer domains. It concludes that different factors influence the potential of existing and novel sources. Existing protein sources are primarily hindered by their negative environmental impacts with some concerns around health. However, they offer social and economic benefits, and have a high level of consumer acceptance. Furthermore, recent research emphasizes the role of livestock as part of the solution to greenhouse gas emissions, and indicates that animal-based protein has an important role as part of a sustainable diet and as a contributor to food security. Novel proteins require the development of new value chains, and attention to issues such as production costs, food safety, scalability and consumer acceptance. Furthermore, positive environmental impacts cannot be assumed with novel protein sources and care must be taken to ensure that comparisons between novel and existing protein sources are valid. Greater alignment of political forces, and the involvement of wider stakeholders in a governance role, as well as development/commercialization role, is required to address both sources of

  12. Growth Factor Tethering to Protein Nanoparticles via Coiled-Coil Formation for Targeted Drug Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assal, Yasmine; Mizuguchi, Yoshinori; Mie, Masayasu; Kobatake, Eiry

    2015-08-19

    Protein-based nanoparticles are attractive carriers for drug delivery because they are biodegradable and can be genetically designed. Moreover, modification of protein-based nanoparticles with cell-specific ligands allows for active targeting abilities. Previously, we developed protein nanoparticles comprising genetically engineered elastin-like polypeptides (ELPs) with fused polyaspartic acid tails (ELP-D). Epidermal growth factor (EGF) was displayed on the surface of the ELP-D nanoparticles via genetic design to allow for active cell-targeting abilities. Herein, we focused on the coiled-coil structural motif as a means for noncovalent tethering of growth factor to ELP-D. Specifically, two peptides known to form a heterodimer via a coiled-coil structural motif were fused to ELP-D and single-chain vascular endothelial growth factor (scVEGF121), to facilitate noncovalent tethering upon formation of the heterodimer coiled-coil structure. Drug-loaded growth factor-tethered ELP-Ds were found to be effective against cancer cells by provoking cell apoptosis. These results demonstrate that tethering growth factor to protein nanoparticles through coiled-coil formation yields a promising biomaterial candidate for targeted drug delivery.

  13. Parental incarceration, attachment and child psychopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Joseph; Murray, Lynne

    2010-07-01

    Theory and evidence relating parental incarceration, attachment, and psychopathology are reviewed. Parental incarceration is a strong risk factor for long-lasting psychopathology, including antisocial and internalizing outcomes. Parental incarceration might threaten children's attachment security because of parent-child separation, confusing communication about parental absence, restricted contact with incarcerated parents, and unstable caregiving arrangements. Parental incarceration can also cause economic strain, reduced supervision, stigma, home and school moves, and other negative life events for children. Thus, there are multiple possible mechanisms whereby parental incarceration might increase risk for child psychopathology. Maternal incarceration tends to cause more disruption for children than paternal incarceration and may lead to greater risk for insecure attachment and psychopathology. Children's prior attachment relations and other life experiences are likely to be of great importance for understanding children's reactions to parental incarceration. Several hypotheses are presented about how prior insecure attachment and social adversity might interact with parental incarceration and contribute to psychopathology. Carefully designed longitudinal studies, randomized controlled trials, and cross-national comparative research are required to test these hypotheses.

  14. Relationships between attachment and marital satisfaction in married couples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Gallerová

    2016-01-01

    four selfrepot questionnaires. The childhood attachment was measured by Attachment History Paragraphs (Granqvist & Kirkpatrick, 2004, adult attachment was measured by The Experiences in Close Relationships Questionnaire (Brennan, Clark, & Shaver, 1998 and satisfaction in marriage was measuredby two measures: Quality Marriage Index (Norton, 1983 and Kansas Marital Satisfaction Scale (Schumm, Bollman, & Jurich, 1997.The research sample consisted of 78 heterosexual married couple, together 156 people. The average length of marriages is 20.76 years. Participants were instructed to complete the questionnaires independently. The relations between variables were examined by correlation analysis and cluster analysis. People with a secure attachment style and their partners were most satisfied with their marriages. Our study showed relation between dismissive attachment style and low level of marital satisfaction for the individual, and for the partner of the examined one. The results of our study did not suggest any relationship between childhood attachment and marital satisfaction. The results indicate that secure attachment style is related to higher level of relationship satisfaction, in spite of stressful situation or demanding changes which are occurring in marriage. People with insecure attachment style devote a lot of effort to reinforce marital and couple relationship stability during difficult situations in relationship. Connection between marital satisfaction and childhood attachment has not been proven. The reason may be that childhood attachment is not always totally stable and it can be changed by life experience or personal characteristics of the individual. Our research confirmed that attachment is related to satisfaction in marriage. Research of relationship between attachment and factors affecting marriage is very beneficial, because new finding in this topic can help in clinical practice.

  15. Effects of (-)-Epigallocatechin gallate on some protein factors involved in the epidermal growth factor receptor signaling pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yinjiu Huang; Ruiqing Xu; Baoan Song; Song Yang; Li Zhao; Shouwei Wua

    2009-01-01

    (-)-Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), a major polyphenolic constituent of green tea, can inhibit activity of specific receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) and related downstream signal transduction pathways, resulting in the control of unwanted cell proliferation. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling pathway is one of the most important pathways that regulates growth, survival, proliferation and differentiation in mammalian cells. This review addresses the effects of EGCG on some protein factors involved in the EGFR signaling pathway in a direct or indirect manner. Based on our understanding of the interaction between EGCG and these factors, and based on their structures, EGCG could be used as a lead compound for designing and synthesizing novel drugs with significant biological activity.

  16. Associations between Adult Attachment Dimensions And Attitudes Toward Pain Behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lachlan A McWilliams

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Despite the important role positive reinforcement of pain behaviour is believed to play in chronic pain, there is a paucity of research regarding factors that influence the provision of such reinforcement. Attachment theory suggests that individuals high in attachment avoidance view the pain behaviour of others in a negative manner and would, therefore, provide little reinforcement of pain behaviour. As an initial step in evaluating this model, relationships between attachment dimensions and attitudes toward pain behaviour were examined. Attachment avoidance was hypothesized to be negatively associated with accepting attitudes toward pain behaviour.

  17. Aging, Neighborhood Attachment, and Fear of Crime: Testing Reciprocal Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Joong-Hwan; Kim, Sangmoon

    2009-01-01

    This study attempts to examine the reciprocal effects between fear of crime and neighborhood attachment because aging is a critical factor in both discussions of fear of crime and neighborhood attachment (friendship, neighboring, social cohesion and trust, informal social control, and participation in neighborhood watch program). Using data from…

  18. Secondary traumatization and attachment among wives of former POWs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lahav, Yael; Kanat-Maymon, Yaniv; Solomon, Zahava

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the directionality of the association between post-traumatic stress symptoms (PTSS) and attachment insecurities across time among indirect trauma survivors. Wives of former prisoners of war (ex-POWs), with and without post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD...... that attachment anxiety might act as a risk factor for secondary traumatic reactions....

  19. Local dynamics of proteins and DNA evaluated from crystallographic B factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, Bohdan, E-mail: bohdan.schneider@gmail.com [Institute of Biotechnology AS CR, Videnska 1083, 142 20 Prague (Czech Republic); Gelly, Jean-Christophe; Brevern, Alexandre G. de [INSERM, U1134, DSIMB, 75739 Paris (France); Université Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, UMR-S 1134, 75739 Paris (France); Institut National de la Transfusion Sanguine (INTS), 75739 Paris (France); Laboratoire d’Excellence GR-Ex, 75739 Paris (France); Černý, Jiří [Institute of Biotechnology AS CR, Videnska 1083, 142 20 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2014-09-01

    Distributions of scaled B factors from 704 protein–DNA complexes reflect primarily the neighbourhood of amino-acid and nucleotide residues: their flexibility grows from the protein core to protein–protein and protein–DNA interfaces, to solvent-exposed residues. Some of the findings clearly observed at higher resolution structures can no longer be observed for structures at low resolution indicating problems in refinement protocols. The dynamics of protein and nucleic acid structures is as important as their average static picture. The local molecular dynamics concealed in diffraction images is expressed as so-called B factors. To find out how the crystal-derived B factors represent the dynamic behaviour of atoms and residues of proteins and DNA in their complexes, the distributions of scaled B factors from a carefully curated data set of over 700 protein–DNA crystal structures were analyzed [Schneider et al. (2014 ▶), Nucleic Acids Res.42, 3381–3394]. Amino acids and nucleotides were categorized based on their molecular neighbourhood as solvent-accessible, solvent-inaccessible (i.e. forming the protein core) or lying at protein–protein or protein–DNA interfaces; the backbone and side-chain atoms were analyzed separately. The B factors of two types of crystal-ordered water molecules were also analyzed. The analysis confirmed several expected features of protein and DNA dynamics, but also revealed surprising facts. Solvent-accessible amino acids have B factors that are larger than those of residues at the biomolecular interfaces, and core-forming amino acids are the most restricted in their movement. A unique feature of the latter group is that their side-chain and backbone atoms are restricted in their movement to the same extent; in all other amino-acid groups the side chains are more floppy than the backbone. The low values of the B factors of water molecules bridging proteins with DNA and the very large fluctuations of DNA phosphates are

  20. Platelet factor 4 impairs the anticoagulant activity of activated protein C.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Preston, Roger J S

    2009-02-27

    Platelet factor 4 (PF4) is an abundant platelet alpha-granule chemokine released following platelet activation. PF4 interacts with thrombomodulin and the gamma-carboxyglutamic acid (Gla) domain of protein C, thereby enhancing activated protein C (APC) generation by the thrombin-thrombomodulin complex. However, the protein C Gla domain not only mediates protein C activation in vivo, but also plays a critical role in modulating the diverse functional properties of APC once generated. In this study we demonstrate that PF4 significantly inhibits APC anti-coagulant activity. PF4 inhibited both protein S-dependent APC anticoagulant function in plasma and protein S-dependent factor Va (FVa) proteolysis 3- to 5-fold, demonstrating that PF4 impairs protein S cofactor enhancement of APC anticoagulant function. Using recombinant factor Va variants FVa-R506Q\\/R679Q and FVa-R306Q\\/R679Q, PF4 was shown to impair APC proteolysis of FVa at position Arg(306) by 3-fold both in the presence and absence of protein S. These data suggest that PF4 contributes to the poorly understood APC resistance phenotype associated with activated platelets. Finally, despite PF4 binding to the APC Gla domain, we show that APC in the presence of PF4 retains its ability to initiate PAR-1-mediated cytoprotective signaling. In summary, we propose that PF4 acts as a critical regulator of APC generation, but also differentially targets APC toward cytoprotective, rather than anticoagulant function at sites of vascular injury with concurrent platelet activation.

  1. Platelet factor 4 impairs the anticoagulant activity of activated protein C.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Preston, Roger J S

    2012-02-01

    Platelet factor 4 (PF4) is an abundant platelet alpha-granule chemokine released following platelet activation. PF4 interacts with thrombomodulin and the gamma-carboxyglutamic acid (Gla) domain of protein C, thereby enhancing activated protein C (APC) generation by the thrombin-thrombomodulin complex. However, the protein C Gla domain not only mediates protein C activation in vivo, but also plays a critical role in modulating the diverse functional properties of APC once generated. In this study we demonstrate that PF4 significantly inhibits APC anti-coagulant activity. PF4 inhibited both protein S-dependent APC anticoagulant function in plasma and protein S-dependent factor Va (FVa) proteolysis 3- to 5-fold, demonstrating that PF4 impairs protein S cofactor enhancement of APC anticoagulant function. Using recombinant factor Va variants FVa-R506Q\\/R679Q and FVa-R306Q\\/R679Q, PF4 was shown to impair APC proteolysis of FVa at position Arg(306) by 3-fold both in the presence and absence of protein S. These data suggest that PF4 contributes to the poorly understood APC resistance phenotype associated with activated platelets. Finally, despite PF4 binding to the APC Gla domain, we show that APC in the presence of PF4 retains its ability to initiate PAR-1-mediated cytoprotective signaling. In summary, we propose that PF4 acts as a critical regulator of APC generation, but also differentially targets APC toward cytoprotective, rather than anticoagulant function at sites of vascular injury with concurrent platelet activation.

  2. Sulindac sulfide inhibits colon cancer cell growth and downregulates specificity protein transcription factors

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Xi; Pathi, Satya S.; Safe, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Background Specificity protein (Sp) transcription factors play pivotal roles in maintaining the phenotypes of many cancers. We hypothesized that the antineoplastic effects of sulindac and its metabolites were due, in part, to targeting downregulation of Sp transcription factors. Methods The functional effects of sulindac, sulindac sulfone and sulindac sulfide on colon cancer cell proliferation were determined by cell counting. Effects of these compounds on expression of Sp1, Sp3, Sp4 and pro-...

  3. Recent Insights into Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Protein 2 Transcriptional Regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Shin, Minsang; Kang, Hye Suk; Park, Jae-Hyung; Bae, Jae-Hoon; Song, Dae-Kyu; Im, Seung-Soon

    2017-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs) are major regulators of insulin-like growth factor bioavailability and activity in metabolic signaling. Seven IGFBP family isoforms have been identified. Recent studies have shown that IGFBPs play a pivotal role in metabolic signaling and disease, including the pathogenesis of obesity, diabetes, and cancer. Although many studies have documented the various roles played by IGFBPs, transcriptional regulation of IGFBPs is not well understood. ...

  4. microProtein Prediction Program (miP3) : A Software for Predicting microProteins and Their Target Transcription Factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Klein, Niek; Magnani, Enrico; Banf, Michael; Rhee, Seung Yon

    2015-01-01

    An emerging concept in transcriptional regulation is that a class of truncated transcription factors (TFs), called microProteins (miPs), engages in protein-protein interactions with TF complexes and provides feedback controls. A handful of miP examples have been described in the literature but the e

  5. Tissue interactions of avian viral attachment proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ambepitiya Wickramasinghe, I.N.

    2015-01-01

    Viruses can infect a wide range of hosts; varying from bacteria and plants to animals and humans. While many viral infections may pass unnoticed, some are of major importance due to their implications on health and welfare of plants, animals and/or humans. In particular, viruses that can infect avia

  6. Conflicting pressures on romantic relationship commitment for anxiously attached individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joel, Samantha; MacDonald, Geoff; Shimotomai, Atsushi

    2011-02-01

    Anxious attachment predicts strong desires for intimacy and stability in romantic relationships, yet the relation between anxious attachment and romantic commitment is unclear. We propose that extant literature has failed to find a consistent relation because anxiously attached individuals experience conflicting pressures on commitment. Data from Australia (N=137) show that relationship satisfaction and felt security each act as suppressors of a positive relation between anxious attachment and commitment. Data from Japan (N=159) replicate the suppression effect of felt security and also demonstrate that the residual positive relation between anxious attachment and commitment can be partly explained by dependence on the partner. These findings suggest that anxiously attached individuals may be ambivalent about commitment. Dissatisfaction and worries about negative evaluation appear to exert downward pressure on commitment, counteracting the upward pressure that is exerted by factors such as relational dependency. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Personality © 2011, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Association between the Serotonin Transporter Promoter Polymorphism (5-HTTLPR) and Adult Unresolved Attachment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caspers, Kristin M.; Paradiso, Sergio; Yucuis, Rebecca; Troutman, Beth; Arndt, Stephan; Philibert, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Research on antecedents of organized attachment has focused on the quality of caregiving received during childhood. In recent years, research has begun to examine the influence of genetic factors on quality of infant attachment. However, no published studies report on the association between specific genetic factors and adult attachment. This…

  8. Dauricine inhibits insulin-like growth factor-Ⅰ-induced hypoxia inducible factorprotein accumulation and vascular endothelial growth factor expression in human breast cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu-dong TANG; Xin ZHOU; Ke-yuan ZHOU

    2009-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the effects of dauricine (Dau) on insulin-like growth factor-Ⅰ (IGF-Ⅰ)-induced hypoxia inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in human breast cancer cells (MCF-7).Methods: Serum-starved MCF-7 cells were pretreated for 1 h with different concentrations of Dau, followed by incubation with IGF-Ⅰ for 6 h. HIF-1α and VEGF protein expression levels were analyzed by Western blotting and ELISA, respectively.HIF-1α and VEGF mRNA levels were determined by real-time PCR. In vitro angiogenesis was observed via the human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) tube formation assay. An in vitro invasion assay on HUVECs was performed.Results: Dau significantly inhibited IGF-Ⅰ-induced HIF-1α protein expression but had no effect on HIF-1α mRNA expression. However, Dau remarkably suppressed VEGF expression at both protein and mRNA levels in response to IGF-Ⅰ.Mechanistically, Dau suppressed IGF-Ⅰ-induced HIF-1α and VEGF protein expression mainly by blocking the activation of PI-3K/AKT/mTOR signaling pathway. In addition, Dan reduced IGF-Ⅰ-induced HIF-1α protein accumulation by inhibiting its synthesis as well as by promoting its degradation. Functionally, Dau inhibited angiogenesis in vitro. Moreover, Dau had a direct effect on IGF-Ⅰ-induced invasion of HUVECs.Conclusion: Dau inhibits human breast cancer angiogenesis by suppressing HIF-1α protein accumulation and VEGF expression, which may provide a novel potential mechanism for the anticancer activities of Dau in human breast cancer.

  9. Synergistic inhibition of the intrinsic factor X activation by protein S and C4b-binding protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koppelman, S.J.

    1995-01-01

    The complement protein C4b-binding protein plays an important role in the regulation of the protein C anticoagulant pathway. C4b-binding protein can bind to protein S, thereby inhibiting the cofactor activity of protein S for activated protein C. In this report, we describe a new role for

  10. Synergistic inhibition of the intrinsic factor X activation by protein S and C4b-binding protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koppelman, S.J.

    1995-01-01

    The complement protein C4b-binding protein plays an important role in the regulation of the protein C anticoagulant pathway. C4b-binding protein can bind to protein S, thereby inhibiting the cofactor activity of protein S for activated protein C. In this report, we describe a new role for C4b-bindin

  11. Insulin-like growth factor-I and insulin-like growth factor-binding proteins in the nephrotic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feld, S M; Hirschberg, R

    1996-06-01

    Similar to findings in the nephrotic syndrome in humans, rats with the doxorubicin-induced nephrotic syndrome (which resembles minimal change disease) have reduced serum levels of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I). This is mainly caused by glomerular ultrafiltration of IGF-I-containing binding protein complexes, primarily of a molecular weight of approximately 50 kilodaltons, and urinary losses of the peptide. Despite urinary excretion of IGF-binding protein (IGFBP)-2, serum levels are increased more than twofold in the nephrotic syndrome compared with controls, because of increased synthesis of this binding protein by the liver. In contrast, the liver synthesis of IGFBP-3, the predominant binding protein in normal serum, is unchanged in the nephrotic syndrome. However, binding and serum levels of IGFBP-3 are reduced in nephrotic rat serum, apparently due to proteolytic degradation of IGFBP-3. The glomerular ultrafiltration of IGF-I, which leads to biologically significant IGF-I concentrations of about 1.35 nM in proximal tubule fluid, may have metabolic consequences, such as increased tubular phosphate absorption. Hypothetically, tubule fluid IGF-I may also contribute to progressive tubulointerstitial fibrosis which is sometimes present in protractive nephrotic glomerulopathies. The profound changes in the IGF-I/IGFBP system in the nephrotic syndrome may also contribute to systemic metabolic abnormalities and growth failure.

  12. Relationship between attachment styles and happiness in medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzyeh Moghadam

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Attachment theory is one of the most important achievements of contemporary psychology. Role of medical students in the community health is important, so we need to know about the situation of happiness and attachment style in these students. Objectives: This study was aimed to assess the relationship between medical students′ attachment styles and demographic characteristics. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on randomly selected students of Medical Sciences in Kurdistan University, in 2012. To collect data, Hazan and Shaver′s attachment style measure and the Oxford Happiness Questionnaire were used. The results were analyzed using the  SPSS software version 16 (IBM, Chicago IL, USA and statistical analysis was performed via t-test, Chi-square test, and multiple regression tests. Results: Secure attachment style was the most common attachment style and the least common was ambivalent attachment style. Avoidant attachment style was more common among single persons than married people (P = 0.03. No significant relationship was observed between attachment style and gender and grade point average of the studied people. The mean happiness score of students was 62.71. In multivariate analysis, the variables of secure attachment style (P = 0.001, male gender (P = 0.005, and scholar achievement (P = 0.047 were associated with higher happiness score. Conclusion: The most common attachment style was secure attachment style, which can be a positive prognostic factor in medical students, helping them to manage stress. Higher frequency of avoidant attachment style among single persons, compared with married people, is mainly due to their negative attitude toward others and failure to establish and maintain relationships with others.

  13. Complement factor H, vitronectin, and opticin are tyrosine-sulfated proteins of the retinal pigment epithelium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yogita Kanan

    Full Text Available Lack of tyrosine sulfation of ocular proteins results in disorganized photoreceptor structure and drastically reduced visual function, demonstrating the importance of this post-translational modification to vision. To understand the role that tyrosine sulfation plays in the function of ocular proteins, we identified some tyrosine-sulfated proteins in the retinal pigment epithelium using two independent methods, immuno-affinity column purification with an anti-sulfotyrosine specific antibody and computer-based sequence analysis of retinal pigment epithelium secretome by means of the prediction program Sulfinator. Radioactive labeling followed by thin layer electrophoresis revealed that three proteins, vitronectin, opticin, and complement factor H (CFH, were post-translationally modified by tyrosine sulfation. The identification of vitronectin and CFH as tyrosine-sulfated proteins is significant, since both are deposited in drusen in the eyes of patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD. Furthermore, mutations in CFH have been determined to be a major risk factor in the development of AMD. Future studies that seek to understand the role of CFH in the development of AMD should take into account the role that tyrosine sulfation plays in the interaction of this protein with its partners, and examine whether modulating sulfation provides a potential therapeutic target.

  14. The six insulin-like growth factor binding proteins : developmental expression and structural aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.G.P. Schuller (Alwin)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractInsulin-like growth factors (IGF-I and IGF-II) are single chain polypeptides mediating many of the growth promoting effects of growth hormone, as stated in the "somatomedin hypothesis" (Daughaday et al., 1972). IGF-I is a basic protein and consists of 70 AA with a predicted molecular

  15. Insulin-like growth factor binding protein-I-6 expression in activated microglia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chesik, D.; Glazenburg, K.; Wilczak, N.; Geeraedts, Felix; De Keyser, J.

    2004-01-01

    In the CNS insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) enhances survival of neurons, promotes myelin synthesis and acts as a mitogen for microglia. The effects of IGF-1 are regulated by a family of 6 IGF binding proteins (IGFBPs). We investigated mRNA expression patterns of IGFBPs in primary rat microglia

  16. Binding of von Willebrand factor and plasma proteins to the eggshell of Schistosoma mansoni

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dewalick, Saskia; Hensbergen, Paul J; Bexkens, Michiel L; Grosserichter-Wagener, Christina; Hokke, Cornelis H; Deelder, André M; de Groot, Philip G; Tielens, Aloysius G M; van Hellemond, Jaap J

    2014-01-01

    Schistosoma mansoni eggs have to cross the endothelium and intestinal wall to leave the host and continue the life cycle. Mechanisms involved in this essential step are largely unknown. Here we describe direct binding to the S. mansoni eggshell of von Willebrand factor and other plasma proteins invo

  17. Binding of von Willebrand factor and plasma proteins to the eggshell of Schistosoma mansoni

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dewalick, Saskia; Hensbergen, Paul J; Bexkens, Michiel L; Grosserichter-Wagener, Christina; Hokke, Cornelis H; Deelder, André M; de Groot, Philip G; Tielens, Aloysius G M; van Hellemond, Jaap J

    Schistosoma mansoni eggs have to cross the endothelium and intestinal wall to leave the host and continue the life cycle. Mechanisms involved in this essential step are largely unknown. Here we describe direct binding to the S. mansoni eggshell of von Willebrand factor and other plasma proteins

  18. The six insulin-like growth factor binding proteins : developmental expression and structural aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.G.P. Schuller (Alwin)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractInsulin-like growth factors (IGF-I and IGF-II) are single chain polypeptides mediating many of the growth promoting effects of growth hormone, as stated in the "somatomedin hypothesis" (Daughaday et al., 1972). IGF-I is a basic protein and consists of 70 AA with a predicted molecular wei

  19. Regulation of the Contribution of Integrin to Cell Attachment on Poly(2-Methoxyethyl Acrylate (PMEA Analogous Polymers for Attachment-Based Cell Enrichment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Hoshiba

    Full Text Available Cell enrichment is currently in high demand in medical engineering. We have reported that non-blood cells can attach to a blood-compatible poly(2-methoxyethyl acrylate (PMEA substrate through integrin-dependent and integrin-independent mechanisms because the PMEA substrate suppresses protein adsorption. Therefore, we assumed that PMEA analogous polymers can change the contribution of integrin to cell attachment through the regulation of protein adsorption. In the present study, we investigated protein adsorption, cell attachment profiles, and attachment mechanisms on PMEA analogous polymer substrates. Additionally, we demonstrated the possibility of attachment-based cell enrichment on PMEA analogous polymer substrates. HT-1080 and MDA-MB-231 cells started to attach to poly(butyl acrylate (PBA and poly(tetrahydrofurfuryl acrylate (PTHFA, on which proteins could adsorb well, within 1 h. HepG2 cells started to attach after 1 h. HT-1080, MDA-MB-231, and HepG2 cells started to attach within 30 min to PMEA, poly(2-(2-methoxyethoxy ethyl acrylate-co-butyl acrylate (30:70 mol%, PMe2A and poly(2-(2-methoxyethoxy ethoxy ethyl acrylate-co-butyl acrylate (30:70 mol%, PMe3A, which suppress protein adsorption. Moreover, the ratio of attached cells from a cell mixture can be changed on PMEA analogous polymers. These findings suggested that PMEA analogous polymers can be used for attachment-based cell enrichment.

  20. Insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 in inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirman, Irena; Whelan, Richard Larry; Jain, Suvinit;

    2005-01-01

    Epithelial cell growth regulation has been reported to be altered in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients. The cell growth regulatory factor, insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 (IGFBP-3), may be partly responsible for this phenomenon. So far, IGFBP-3 levels have been assessed...... as values of total protein, which is a sum of bioactive intact 43- to 45-kDa protein and its inactive proteolytic cleavage fragments. We aimed to assess the levels of intact IGFBP-3 and its cleaving protease MMP-9 in IBD. Patients with IBD and controls were included. Total plasma IGFBP-3 concentration...... and MMP-9 levels were determined in ELISA. The concentration of intact IGFBP-3 was significantly decreased in patients with moderate to severe IBD activity compared to those in remission or controls. Of note, a dramatic depletion of intact IGFBP-3 was found in 7.4% of patients with IBD. Zymography...

  1. Differential requirement of the epidermal growth factor receptor for G protein-mediated activation of transcription factors by lysophosphatidic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dent Paul

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The role of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR and other receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs in provoking biological actions of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs has been one of the most disputed subjects in the field of GPCR signal transduction. The purpose of the current study is to identify EGFR-mediated mechanisms involved in activation of G protein cascades and the downstream transcription factors by lysophosphatidic acid (LPA. Results In ovarian cancer cells highly responsive to LPA, activation of AP-1 by LPA was suppressed by inhibition of EGFR, an effect that could be reversed by co-stimulation of another receptor tyrosine kinase c-Met with hepatocyte growth factor, indicating that LPA-mediated activation of AP-1 requires activity of a RTK, not necessarily EGFR. Induction of AP-1 components by LPA lied downstream of Gi, G12/13, and Gq. Activation of the effectors of Gi, but not Gq or G12/13 was sensitive to inhibition of EGFR. In contrast, LPA stimulated another prominent transcription factor NF-κB via the Gq-PKC pathway in an EGFR-independent manner. Consistent with the importance of Gi-elicited signals in a plethora of biological processes, LPA-induced cytokine production, cell proliferation, migration and invasion require intact EGFR. Conclusions An RTK activity is required for activation of the AP-1 transcription factor and other Gi-dependent cellular responses to LPA. In contrast, activation of G12/13, Gq and Gq-elicited NF-κB by LPA is independent of such an input. These results provide a novel insight into the role of RTK in GPCR signal transduction and biological functions.

  2. Mapping and measuring place attachment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brown, Greg; Raymond, Christopher Mark; Corcoran, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    The concept of place attachment has been studied extensively across multiple disciplines but only recently with empirical measurement using public participation GIS (PPGIS) and related crowd-sourcing mapping methods. This research trialed a spatially explicit method for identifying place attachment......-based measures. The area of place attachment is influenced by occupational roles such as farming or conservation, as well as home location, especially in coastal versus non-coastal contexts. The spatial distribution of mapped landscape values or values home range is related to, but not identical to mapped place...... attachment across participants in the region showed similar spatial intensity to aggregated values home range, but area-based assessment of place attachment and values home range are distorted by edge effects such as a coastline. To further develop the mapping of place attachment in PPGIS, we identify...

  3. Borderline disorder and attachment pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, M; Keller, A; Links, P; Patrick, J

    1993-02-01

    In this paper, the authors investigate the theoretical and empirical association between dysfunctions of the attachment system and borderline personality disorder. Attachment theory focuses on the maintenance of a sense of safety and security through a close personal relationship with a particular person. Based on a biological behavioural system, functional attachment relationships in adulthood rely on experiences and expectations of security within the relationship. These issues are also important to the definition and dynamics of borderline personality disorder. The dimensions and patterns of reciprocal attachment were compared with other scales measuring components of psychopathology and interpersonal relationships. In a sample of 85 female outpatients, only four of the attachment scales--feared loss, secure base, compulsive care-seeking and angry withdrawal--identified patients with high scores on a measure of borderline disorder. Of these four scales, feared loss had the predominant effect. These empirical results support the hypothesized relationship between dysfunctions of the attachment system and borderline disorder.

  4. Attachment and Outcomes in Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neslim Guvendeger Doksat

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The term and ldquo;attachment and rdquo; is used to imply the bonding between mother and child or the relationship between parents and child. Establishment of secure attachment is the healthiest way for the mental and physical development of the child. Secure attachment system constitutes a protection mechanism from high levels of stress. Insecurely attached children are presented with mental and physical developmental delays and problems in identity formation and personality in the future. To avoid all these, all the requirements of the child by means of affection, nutrition, protection, shelter and health are required to be met in a consistent and healthy way by the caregiver. This review article discuss the term attachment; features associated with insecure attachment and its negative influences in adulthood. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2016; 25(4.000: 489-501

  5. Sentence-Level Attachment Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albakour, M.-Dyaa; Kruschwitz, Udo; Lucas, Simon

    Attachment prediction is the task of automatically identifying email messages that should contain an attachment. This can be useful to tackle the problem of sending out emails but forgetting to include the relevant attachment (something that happens all too often). A common Information Retrieval (IR) approach in analyzing documents such as emails is to treat the entire document as a bag of words. Here we propose a finer-grained analysis to address the problem. We aim at identifying individual sentences within an email that refer to an attachment. If we detect any such sentence, we predict that the email should have an attachment. Using part of the Enron corpus for evaluation we find that our finer-grained approach outperforms previously reported document-level attachment prediction in similar evaluation settings.

  6. Promiscuous stimulation of ParF protein polymerization by heterogeneous centromere binding factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machón, Cristina; Fothergill, Timothy J G; Barillà, Daniela; Hayes, Finbarr

    2007-11-16

    The segrosome is the nucleoprotein complex that mediates accurate segregation of bacterial plasmids. The segrosome of plasmid TP228 comprises ParF and ParG proteins that assemble on the parH centromere. ParF, which exemplifies one clade of the ubiquitous ParA superfamily of segregation proteins, polymerizes extensively in response to ATP binding. Polymerization is modulated by the ParG centromere binding factor (CBF). The segrosomes of plasmids pTAR, pVT745 and pB171 include ParA homologues of the ParF subgroup, as well as diverse homodimeric CBFs with no primary sequence similarity to ParG, or each other. Centromere binding by these analogues is largely specific. Here, we establish that the ParF homologues of pTAR and pB171 filament modestly with ATP, and that nucleotide hydrolysis is not required for this polymerization, which is more prodigious when the cognate CBF is also present. By contrast, the ParF homologue of plasmid pVT745 did not respond appreciably to ATP alone, but polymerized extensively in the presence of both its cognate CBF and ATP. The co-factors also stimulated nucleotide-independent polymerization of cognate ParF proteins. Moreover, apart from the CBF of pTAR, the disparate ParG analogues promoted polymerization of non-cognate ParF proteins suggesting that filamentation of the ParF proteins is enhanced by a common mechanism. Like ParG, the co-factors may be modular, possessing a centromere-specific interaction domain linked to a flexible region containing determinants that promiscuously stimulate ParF polymerization. The CBFs appear to function as bacterial analogues of formins, microtubule-associated proteins or related ancillary factors that regulate eucaryotic cytoskeletal dynamics.

  7. Interleukin-1β,Tumor Necrosis Factor-α and Lipopolysaccharide Induce Expression of Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein-1 in Calf Aortic Smooth Muscle Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MENG Feng; DENG Zhongduan; NI Juan

    2000-01-01

    To investigate whether interleukin-1β(IL-1β), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induce expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1)mRNA and protein in calf aortic smooth muscle cells(SMCs), calf aortic SMCs were cultured by a substrate-attached explant method. The cultured SMCs were used between the third to the fifth passage. After the cells became confluent, the SMCs were exposed to 2 ng/ml IL- 1β, 20 ng/mlTNF-lα and 100 ng/ml LPS respectively, and the total RNA of SMCs which were incubated for 4h at 37℃ were extracted from the cells by using guanidinium isothiocyanate method. The expression of MCP-1 mRNA in SMCs was detected by using dot blotting analysis using a probe of γ-32p-end-labelled 35-mer oligonucleotide. After a 24-h incubation, the media conditioned by the cultured SMCs were collected. The MCP-1 protein content in the conditioned media was determined by using sandwich ELISA. The results were as follows: Dot blotting analysis showed that the cultured SMCs could express MCP-1 mRNA. After a 4-h exposure to IL-Iβ, TNF-α and LPS, the MCP-1 mRNA expression in SMCs was increased (3.6-fold, 2.3-fold and 1.6-fold, respectively).ELISA showed that the levels of MCP-1 protein in the conditioned media were also increased (2.9-fold, 1.7-fold and 1.1-fold, respectively ). The results suggest that calf aortic SMCs could express MCP-1 mRNA and protein. IL-1β and TNF-α can induce strong expression of MCP- 1mRNA and protein, and the former is more effective than the latter.

  8. Adult attachment and psychosocial functioning

    OpenAIRE

    Pielage, Suzanne Brenda

    2006-01-01

    In the trilogy Attachment, Separation and Loss (1969, 1973, 1980), Bowlby theorized that early experiences with caregivers affect the quality of individuals’ later (romantic) relationships and, consequently, their mental health. The current thesis set out to examine the relationships between adult attachment and psychosocial functioning, predominately in the realm of close relationships. In the first part of the thesis, the focus lay on the assessment of the adult attachment construct. In Cha...

  9. Core Binding Factor β Protects HIV, Type 1 Accessory Protein Viral Infectivity Factor from MDM2-mediated Degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Yusuke; Shindo, Keisuke; Nagata, Kayoko; Yoshinaga, Noriyoshi; Shirakawa, Kotaro; Kobayashi, Masayuki; Takaori-Kondo, Akifumi

    2016-11-25

    HIV, type 1 overcomes host restriction factor apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing enzyme catalytic polypeptide-like 3 (APOBEC3) proteins by organizing an E3 ubiquitin ligase complex together with viral infectivity factor (Vif) and a host transcription cofactor core binding factor β (CBFβ). CBFβ is essential for Vif to counteract APOBEC3 by enabling the recruitment of cullin 5 to the complex and increasing the steady-state level of Vif protein; however, the mechanisms by which CBFβ up-regulates Vif protein remains unclear. Because we have reported previously that mouse double minute 2 homolog (MDM2) is an E3 ligase for Vif, we hypothesized that CBFβ might protect Vif from MDM2-mediated degradation. Co-immunoprecipitation analyses showed that Vif mutants that do not bind to CBFβ preferentially interact with MDM2 and that overexpression of CBFβ disrupts the interaction between MDM2 and Vif. Knockdown of CBFβ reduced the steady-state level of Vif in MDM2-proficient cells but not in MDM2-null cells. Cycloheximide chase analyses revealed that Vif E88A/W89A, which does not interact with CBFβ, degraded faster than wild-type Vif in MDM2-proficient cells but not in MDM2-null cells, suggesting that Vif stabilization by CBFβ is mainly caused by impairing MDM2-mediated degradation. We identified Vif R93E as a Vif variant that does not bind to MDM2, and the virus with this substitution mutation was more resistant to APOBEC3G than the parental virus. Combinatory substitution of Vif residues required for CBFβ binding and MDM2 binding showed full recovery of Vif steady-state levels, supporting our hypothesis. Our data provide new insights into the mechanism of Vif augmentation by CBFβ.

  10. Assessing Attachment in Psychotherapy: Validation of the Patient Attachment Coding System (PACS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talia, Alessandro; Miller-Bottome, Madeleine; Daniel, Sarah I F

    2017-01-01

    The authors present and validate the Patient Attachment Coding System (PACS), a transcript-based instrument that assesses clients' in-session attachment based on any session of psychotherapy, in multiple treatment modalities. One-hundred and sixty clients in different types of psychotherapy (cognitive-behavioural, cognitive-behavioural-enhanced, psychodynamic, relational, supportive) and from three different countries were administered the Adult Attachment Interview (AAI) prior to treatment, and one session for each client was rated with the PACS by independent coders. Results indicate strong inter-rater reliability, and high convergent validity of the PACS scales and classifications with the AAI. These results present the PACS as a practical alternative to the AAI in psychotherapy research and suggest that clinicians using the PACS can assess clients' attachment status on an ongoing basis by monitoring clients' verbal activity. These results also provide information regarding the ways in which differences in attachment status play out in therapy sessions and further the study of attachment in psychotherapy from a pre-treatment client factor to a process variable. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Reduction of Factor VIII Inhibitor Titers During Immune Tolerance Induction With Recombinant Factor VIII-Fc Fusion Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groomes, Charles L; Gianferante, David M; Crouch, Gary D; Parekh, Dina S; Scott, David W; Lieuw, Kenneth

    2016-05-01

    The development of inhibitors toward factor VIII (FVIII) is a common and serious complication of hemophilia A (HA) therapy. Patients with hemophilia who develop inhibitors often undergo time- and resource-intensive immune tolerance induction (ITI) protocols. We report a 15-month-old male with severe HA and a high-titer inhibitor that occurred while receiving prophylactic treatment with recombinant FVIII (rFVIII), in whom significant inhibitor titer reduction was achieved with thrice weekly infusions of a new, prolonged half-life rFVIII-Fc fusion protein product (trade name Eloctate). Further studies are warranted to explore the potential of Eloctate in ITI protocols.

  12. Deep proteomics of mouse skeletal muscle enables quantitation of protein isoforms, metabolic pathways, and transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshmukh, Atul S; Murgia, Marta; Nagaraj, Nagarjuna; Treebak, Jonas T; Cox, Jürgen; Mann, Matthias

    2015-04-01

    Skeletal muscle constitutes 40% of individual body mass and plays vital roles in locomotion and whole-body metabolism. Proteomics of skeletal muscle is challenging because of highly abundant contractile proteins that interfere with detection of regulatory proteins. Using a state-of-the art MS workflow and a strategy to map identifications from the C2C12 cell line model to tissues, we identified a total of 10,218 proteins, including skeletal muscle specific transcription factors like myod1 and myogenin and circadian clock proteins. We obtain absolute abundances for proteins expressed in a muscle cell line and skeletal muscle, which should serve as a valuable resource. Quantitation of protein isoforms of glucose uptake signaling pathways and in glucose and lipid metabolic pathways provides a detailed metabolic map of the cell line compared with tissue. This revealed unexpectedly complex regulation of AMP-activated protein kinase and insulin signaling in muscle tissue at the level of enzyme isoforms. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. Adult attachment in the clinical management of borderline personality disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fossati, Andrea

    2012-05-01

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is a common psychiatric disorder associated with severe functional impairment, high rates of suicide and comorbid psychiatric illness, intensive use of treatment, and high costs to society. The etiology and pathogenesis of BPD are still uncertain, although an interaction between biological and psychosocial factors has been proposed to explain how the condition develops. Attachment disturbances represent one of the developmental risk factors that have been most consistently found to be associated with BPD, with a number of studies reporting a significant strong association between insecure attachment and BPD, notwithstanding the variety of measures and attachment types employed in these studies. In this article, the author first reviews clinical descriptions and research findings concerning the association between attachment disturbances and BPD and then discusses how attachment theory may help clinicians who work with patients with BPD better understand the psychopathology of the illness and plan treatment.

  14. Attachment disorganization in different clinical groups: What underpins unresolved attachment?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juen Florian

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper summarizes findings and clinical implications of research on attachment disorganization in diverse clinical groups. Disorganized/unresolved attachment is overrepresented in these groups compared to healthy control participants, but disorder specific characteristics of this attachment pattern are still poorly understood. The focus of this study was to explore defensive processes in participants whose narratives were classified as disorganized/unresolved using the Adult Attachment Projective Picture System (AAP. Besides the predominance of disorganized attachment, clinical participants demonstrated more “segregated system material” especially in stories representing aloneness and more “Personal Experience material” compared to healthy individuals. Within the disorganized/ unresolved clinical individuals, BPD and PTSD patients showed the highest proportion of attachment disorganization and were less able to use other attachment-related defenses to maintain organized. Furthermore, PTSD patients were emotionally overwhelmed by the projective attachment scenes compared to the other clinical groups as indexed by an incapacity to complete sections of the AAP. BPD and addicted patients were characterized by a high degree of self-other boundary confusion. Depressive and schizophrenic patients showed a high overall defensive intensity to remain organized.

  15. From security to attachment : Mary Ainsworth's contribution to attachment theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosmalen, Lenette (Lenny) van

    2015-01-01

    Even though John Bowlby (1907-1990) is generally regarded as the founder of attachment theory, Mary Ainsworth’s (1913-1999) contribution is considerable and goes beyond the design of the Strange Situation Procedure and the introduction of maternal sensitivity as decisive for a secure attachment

  16. Inhibition of the intrinsic factor X activating complex by protein S: evidence for a specific binding of protein S to factor VIII

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koppelman, S.J.

    1995-01-01

    Protein S is a vitamin K-dependent nonenzymatic anticoagulant protein that acts as a cofactor to activated protein C. Recently it was shown that protein S inhibits the prothrombinase reaction independent of activated protein C. In this study, we show that protein S can also inhibit the intrinsic

  17. Inhibition of the intrinsic factor X activating complex by protein S: evidence for a specific binding of protein S to factor VIII

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koppelman, S.J.

    1995-01-01

    Protein S is a vitamin K-dependent nonenzymatic anticoagulant protein that acts as a cofactor to activated protein C. Recently it was shown that protein S inhibits the prothrombinase reaction independent of activated protein C. In this study, we show that protein S can also inhibit the intrinsic fac

  18. Attaching Importance to "Soft Power" Factor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Xiaoming

    2004-01-01

    @@ Generally Speaking, the importance of a state on the international arena largely depends on its power. Though it is difficult to make an assessment of the power of a country since analysts cannot do that job in an absolutely objective and exact way, it seems that very few people deny that the United States, today or even in the foreseeable future, will remain the strongest power or the only superpower in the world.

  19. Nitrogen-to-Protein Conversion Factors for Three Edible Insects: Tenebrio molitor, Alphitobius diaperinus, and Hermetia illucens

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Insects are considered a nutritionally valuable source of alternative proteins, and their efficient protein extraction is a prerequisite for large-scale use. The protein content is usually calculated from total nitrogen using the nitrogen-to-protein conversion factor (Kp) of 6.25. This factor overestimates the protein content, due to the presence of nonprotein nitrogen in insects. In this paper, a specific Kp of 4.76 ± 0.09 was calculated for larvae from Tenebrio molitor, Alphitobius diaperinus, and Hermetia illucens, using amino acid analysis. After protein extraction and purification, a Kp factor of 5.60 ± 0.39 was found for the larvae of three insect species studied. We propose to adopt these Kp values for determining protein content of insects to avoid overestimation of the protein content. PMID:28252948

  20. A simple DNA handle attachment method for single molecule mechanical manipulation experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Duyoung; Arbing, Mark A; Jefferson, Robert E; Bowie, James U

    2016-08-01

    Manipulating single molecules and systems of molecules with mechanical force is a powerful technique to examine their physical properties. Applying force requires attachment of the target molecule to larger objects using some sort of molecular tether, such as a strand of DNA. DNA handle attachment often requires difficult manipulations of the target molecule, which can preclude attachment to unstable, hard to obtain, and/or large, complex targets. Here we describe a method for covalent DNA handle attachment to proteins that simply requires the addition of a preprepared reagent to the protein and a short incubation. The handle attachment method developed here provides a facile approach for studying the biomechanics of biological systems.

  1. Modulation of NF-кB transcription factor activation by Molluscum contagiosum virus proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justyna Struzik

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Molluscum contagiosum virus is a human and animal dermatotropic pathogen, which causes a severe disease in immunocompromised individuals. MCV belongs to the Poxviridae family whose members exert immunomodulatory effects on the host antiviral response. Poxviruses interfere with cell signaling pathways that lead to the activation of nuclear factor кB, a pleiotropic transcription factor which is crucial for regulation of the immune response, the cell cycle and apoptosis. In resting cells, NF-κB is present in the cytoplasm, where it is associated with inhibitor κB. Upon stimulation by activators, such as proinflammatory cytokines and bacterial or viral products, the inhibitory protein undergoes phosphorylation and proteasomal degradation. NF-κB, in turn, translocates to the nucleus, where it regulates the transcription of various genes that are essential for processes mentioned above. Since poxviruses replicate exclusively in the cell cytoplasm, NF-кB became a good target for poxviral immunomodulation. MCV encodes various proteins which interfere with the signaling pathways that lead to the activation of NF-κB. Ligand inhibitor encoded by MCV, MC54, binds interleukin-18 and inhibits interferon-γ production. Other MCV proteins, MC159 and MC160, belong to intracellular inhibitors of NF-κB and are members of viral FLICE-inhibitory proteins (vFLIPs. MC159 protein encoded by MCV was shown to inhibit apoptosis of virus-infected cells. Such interactions serve immune evasion and are responsible for the persistence of MCV.

  2. Role of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-4 in prevention of colon cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seifalian Alexander M

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Insulin-like growth factors (IGFs are important for the proliferation of cancer cells. One of their binding proteins, known as insulin-like growth factor binding protein -4 (IGFBP-4 is well known for its inhibitory action on IGFs in vitro. We assessed the effect of IGFBP-4 in prevention of development of colon cancer in vivo. Methods Nude mice were subcutaneously inoculated with HT-29 colon cancer cells and they were also simultaneously injected either gene construct containing mammalian expression vector pcDNA3 with or without IGFBP-4 gene or phosphate buffered saline. The effect was assessed 4 weeks later by evaluating the tumours for mitosis, necrosis, apoptosis, and expressions of IGFBP-4, Bcl-2 and Bax proteins. Results The results showed that the IGFBP-4 gene therapy did not prevent the tumour establishment but it increased the tumour apoptosis which was associated with an increase in Bcl-2 and Bax expressions. The IGFBP-4 protein was low in tumours which received IGFBP-4 gene construct which may be due to a feed back mechanism of IGFBP-4 upon its own cells. Conclusion IGFBP-4 gene therapy in the form localised gene transfer did not prevent colon cancer initiation and establishment but it resulted in increased apoptosis and Bax protein expression and a decrease in tumour cellular mitosis

  3. Systemic delivery of factor IX messenger RNA for protein replacement therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaswamy, Suvasini; Tonnu, Nina; Tachikawa, Kiyoshi; Limphong, Pattraranee; Vega, Jerel B.; Karmali, Priya P.; Chivukula, Pad; Verma, Inder M.

    2017-01-01

    Safe and efficient delivery of messenger RNAs for protein replacement therapies offers great promise but remains challenging. In this report, we demonstrate systemic, in vivo, nonviral mRNA delivery through lipid nanoparticles (LNPs) to treat a Factor IX (FIX)-deficient mouse model of hemophilia B. Delivery of human FIX (hFIX) mRNA encapsulated in our LUNAR LNPs results in a rapid pulse of FIX protein (within 4–6 h) that remains stable for up to 4–6 d and is therapeutically effective, like the recombinant human factor IX protein (rhFIX) that is the current standard of care. Extensive cytokine and liver enzyme profiling showed that repeated administration of the mRNA–LUNAR complex does not cause any adverse innate or adaptive immune responses in immune-competent, hemophilic mice. The levels of hFIX protein that were produced also remained consistent during repeated administrations. These results suggest that delivery of long mRNAs is a viable therapeutic alternative for many clotting disorders and for other hepatic diseases where recombinant proteins may be unaffordable or unsuitable. PMID:28202722

  4. Overexpression of the transcription factor Yap1 modifies intracellular redox conditions and enhances recombinant protein secretion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marizela Delic

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative folding of secretory proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER is a redox active process, which also impacts the redox conditions in the cytosol. As the transcription factor Yap1 is involved in the transcriptional response to oxidative stress, we investigate its role upon the production of secretory proteins, using the yeast Pichia pastoris as model, and report a novel important role of Yap1 during oxidative protein folding. Yap1 is needed for the detoxification of reactive oxygen species (ROS caused by increased oxidative protein folding. Constitutive co-overexpression of PpYAP1 leads to increased levels of secreted recombinant protein, while a lowered Yap1 function leads to accumulation of ROS and strong flocculation. Transcriptional analysis revealed that more than 150 genes were affected by overexpression of YAP1, in particular genes coding for antioxidant enzymes or involved in oxidation-reduction processes. By monitoring intracellular redox conditions within the cytosol and the ER using redox-sensitive roGFP1 variants, we could show that overexpression of YAP1 restores cellular redox conditions of protein-secreting P. pastoris by reoxidizing the cytosolic redox state to the levels of the wild type. These alterations are also reflected by increased levels of oxidized intracellular glutathione (GSSG in the YAP1 co-overexpressing strain. Taken together, these data indicate a strong impact of intracellular redox balance on the secretion of (recombinant proteins without affecting protein folding per se. Re-establishing suitable redox conditions by tuning the antioxidant capacity of the cell reduces metabolic load and cell stress caused by high oxidative protein folding load, thereby increasing the secretion capacity.

  5. Nuclear translocation of doublecortin-like protein kinase and phosphorylation of a transcription factor JDP2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagamine, Tadashi; Nomada, Shohgo; Onouchi, Takashi; Kameshita, Isamu; Sueyoshi, Noriyuki, E-mail: sueyoshi@ag.kagawa-u.ac.jp

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • Doublecortin-like protein kinase (DCLK) is a microtubule-associated protein kinase. • In living cells, DCLK was cleaved into two functional fragments. • zDCLK(kinase) was translocated into the nucleus by osmotic stresses. • Jun dimerization protein 2 (JDP2) was identified as zDCLK(kinase)-binding protein. • JDP2 was efficiently phosphorylated by zDCLK(kinase) only when histone was present. - Abstract: Doublecortin-like protein kinase (DCLK) is a microtubule-associated protein kinase predominantly expressed in brain. In a previous paper, we reported that zebrafish DCLK2 (zDCLK) was cleaved into two functional fragments; the N-terminal zDCLK(DC + SP) with microtubule-binding activity and the C-terminal zDCLK(kinase) with a Ser/Thr protein kinase activity. In this study, we demonstrated that zDCLK(kinase) was widely distributed in the cytoplasm and translocated into the nucleus when the cells were treated under hyperosmotic conditions with NaCl or mannitol. By two-hybrid screening using the C-terminal domain of DCLK, Jun dimerization protein 2 (JDP2), a nuclear transcription factor, was identified as zDCLK(kinase)-binding protein. Furthermore, JDP2 served as an efficient substrate for zDCLK(kinase) only when histone was present. These results suggest that the kinase fragment of DCLK is translocated into the nucleus upon hyperosmotic stresses and that the kinase efficiently phosphorylates JDP2, a possible target in the nucleus, with the aid of histones.

  6. Biliprotein maturation: the chromophore attachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheer, H; Zhao, K-H

    2008-04-01

    Biliproteins are a widespread group of brilliantly coloured photoreceptors characterized by linear tetrapyrrolic chromophores, bilins, which are covalently bound to the apoproteins via relatively stable thioether bonds. Covalent binding stabilizes the chromoproteins and is mandatory for phycobilisome assembly; and, it is also important in biliprotein applications such as fluorescence labelling. Covalent binding has, on the other hand, also considerably hindered biliprotein research because autocatalytic chromophore additions are rare, and information on enzymatic addition by lyases was limited to a single example, an EF-type lyase attaching phycocyanobilin to cysteine-alpha84 of C-phycocyanin. The discovery of new activities for the latter lyases, and of new types of lyases, have reinvigorated research activities in the subject. So far, work has mainly concentrated on cyanobacterial phycobiliproteins. Methodological advances in the process, however, as well as the finding of often large numbers of homologues, opens new possibilities for research on the subsequent assembly/disassembly of the phycobilisome in cyanobacteria and red algae, on the assembly and organization of the cryptophyte light-harvesting system, on applications in basic research such as protein folding, and on the use of phycobiliproteins for labelling.

  7. Adult attachment security and college student substance use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassel, Jon D; Wardle, Margaret; Roberts, John E

    2007-06-01

    Previous research has demonstrated strong links between quality of adult attachment styles and various forms of psychological distress. A burgeoning literature further points to a relationship between insecure attachment and drug use, particularly alcohol consumption. In the present study, we expanded upon the existing literature by examining the relationship between adult attachment style and use of cigarettes, alcohol, and marijuana in a sample of 212 college students. Moreover, based on our previous work [Hankin, B.L., Kassel, J.D., and Abela, J.R.Z. (2005). Adult attachment dimensions and specificity of emotional distress symptoms: prospective investigations of cognitive risk and interpersonal stress generation as mediating mechanisms. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 31, 136-151.], we proposed a conceptual model positing that adult attachment style influences both frequency of drug use and stress-motivated drug use through its impact on dysfunctional attitudes and self-esteem. Initial correlational analyses indicated significant (positive) associations between anxious attachment (tapping neediness and fear of abandonment) and both drug use frequency and stress-motivated drug use. Simultaneous regression analyses revealed that, for drug use frequency, the influence of anxious attachment operated primarily through its effect on dysfunctional attitudes and self-esteem. Regarding drug use attributable to negative affect reduction, anxious attachment demonstrated direct, independent effects on both cigarette smoking and alcohol use. These findings highlight the potential importance of adult attachment styles as a risk factor for drug use among college students.

  8. Attachment icebergs: Maternal and child health nurses' evaluation of infant-caregiver attachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Edith; Ridgway, Lael; Lucas, Sandra

    2016-05-01

    Secure attachment of infants to their caregiver is important when promoting the emotional wellbeing and mental health of infants. Maternal and child health (MCH) nurses are well positioned to observe the quality of interactions between infants and caregivers and to assess and intervene. However, as yet there are no approved methods to assess the emotional and mental health of infants in community settings. A qualitative descriptive study of 12 MCH nurses in Victoria, Australia, using semi-structured interviews, was thematically analysed. The data revealed that nurses used many skills to identify and manage attachment difficulties. Key among these were observations of interactions, collaboration with caregivers and reflective practice. Assessments and interventions are also influenced by nurses' emotions, attitudes and workplace factors. An unexpected finding was that attachment markers can be likened to an 'iceberg': warning indicators at the tip can be easily observed by the nurse, while the less obvious underlying factors need to be explored in order to support attachment and improve infant mental health outcomes. Education for nurses should include concepts of attachment and link behaviours with emotional wellbeing.

  9. Genetic factors explain half of all variance in serum eosinophil cationic protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmose, C; Sverrild, A; van der Sluis, S; Kyvik, K O; Backer, V; Thomsen, S F

    2014-12-01

    Eosinophil cationic protein (ECP) is one of four basic proteins of the secretory granules of eosinophils. It has a variety of functions associated with inflammatory responses. Little is known about the causes for variation in serum ECP levels. To identify factors associated with variation in serum ECP and to determine the relative proportion of the variation in ECP due to genetic and non-genetic factors, in an adult twin sample. A sample of 575 twins, selected through a proband with self-reported asthma, had serum ECP, lung function, airway responsiveness to methacholine, exhaled nitric oxide, and skin test reactivity, measured. Linear regression analysis and variance component models were used to study factors associated with variation in ECP and the relative genetic influence on ECP levels. Sex (regression coefficient = -0.107, P variance component model, genetic factors accounted for 57% (CI: 42-72%, P variance in ECP levels, whereas the remainder (43%) was ascribable to non-shared environmental factors. The genetic correlation between ECP and airway responsiveness to methacholine was statistically non-significant (r = -0.11, P = 0.50). Around half of all variance in serum ECP is explained by genetic factors. Serum ECP is influenced by sex, BMI, and airway responsiveness. Serum ECP and airway responsiveness seem not to share genetic variance. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Identification and characterization of a novel regulatory factor: IgA-inducing protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Amy S; Haas, Karen M; Naugler, Sasha M; Bajer, Anna A; Garcia-Tapia, David; Estes, D Mark

    2003-08-01

    IgA is the predominant Ig isotype in mucosal secretions and thus plays a pivotal role in host defense. The mechanisms by which IgA expression is regulated may differ among species and involve multiple pathways. Various cytokines and costimulators have been identified which regulate expression of this isotype, including IL-10, IL-2, vasoactive intestinal peptide, and TGF-beta. We have tested a wide array of known factors, but only under very limited conditions do these factors mediate substantial IgA production in vitro from bovine B cells. In response to these findings, we generated a cDNA library in a mammalian expression vector from activated cells derived from bovine gut-associated lymphoid tissues (Peyer's patch and mesenteric lymph node cells) as a source of soluble factor(s) that may regulate IgA production. We have identified a novel factor, IgA-inducing protein, which stimulates relatively high levels of IgA production in vitro following CD40 stimulation in coculture with IL-2. Our data suggest that IgA-inducing protein regulates IgA by acting as a switch or differentiation factor and is expressed in a variety of lymphoid and nonlymphoid tissues.

  11. Multiple factors confer specific Cdc42 and Rac protein activation by dedicator of cytokinesis (DOCK) nucleotide exchange factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Kiran; Yang, Jing; Zhang, Ziguo; Barford, David

    2011-07-15

    DOCK (dedicator of cytokinesis) guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) activate the Rho-family GTPases Rac and Cdc42 to control cell migration, morphogenesis, and phagocytosis. The DOCK A and B subfamilies activate Rac, whereas the DOCK D subfamily activates Cdc42. Nucleotide exchange is catalyzed by a conserved DHR2 domain (DOCK(DHR2)). Although the molecular basis for DOCK(DHR2)-mediated GTPase activation has been elucidated through structures of a DOCK9(DHR2)-Cdc42 complex, the factors determining recognition of specific GTPases are unknown. To understand the molecular basis for DOCK-GTPase specificity, we have determined the crystal structure of DOCK2(DHR2) in complex with Rac1. DOCK2(DHR2) and DOCK9(DHR2) exhibit similar tertiary structures and homodimer interfaces and share a conserved GTPase-activating mechanism. Multiple structural differences between DOCK2(DHR2) and DOCK9(DHR2) account for their selectivity toward Rac1 and Cdc42. Key determinants of selectivity of Cdc42 and Rac for their cognate DOCK(DHR2) are a Phe or Trp residue within β3 (residue 56) and the ability of DOCK proteins to exploit differences in the GEF-induced conformational changes of switch 1 dependent on a divergent residue at position 27. DOCK proteins, therefore, differ from DH-PH GEFs that select their cognate GTPases through recognition of structural differences within the β2/β3 strands.

  12. SOME FACTORS' EFFECTS ON THE SOLUBILITY OF PROTEIN FROM YELLOW MEALWORM ( TENEBRIO MOLITOR L) LARVAE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Studies were conducted to investigate the effects of pH value, extraction time, extraction temper- ature, ratio of material to extraction medium and salt concentration on the solubility of yellow mealworm larvae protein, Tne results showed that pH value greatly influenced the solubility, minimum solubility was found at pH 5.8 and a maximum at pH 10 - 12. Salt ion could increase the solubility at the iso-electric point pH and slightly decreased the solubility at the pH value higher than that of the iso-electric point. Other factors did not significantly affect the solubility of the protein.

  13. Deletion of Corticotropin-releasing Factor Binding Protein Selectively Impairs Maternal, but not Intermale Aggression

    OpenAIRE

    Gammie, Stephen C.; Seasholtz, Audrey F.; Stevenson, Sharon A.

    2008-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) binding protein (CRF-BP) is a secreted protein that acts to bind and limit the activity of the neuropeptides, CRF and urocortin (Ucn) 1. We previously selected for high maternal defense (protection of offspring) in mice and found CRF-BP to be elevated in the CNS of selected mice. We also previously determined that both CRF and Ucn 1 are potent inhibitors of offspring protection when administered centrally. Thus, elevated CRF-BP could promote defense by lim...

  14. Nitrogen-to-Protein Conversion Factors for Crop Residues and Animal Manure Common in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xueli; Zhao, Guanglu; Zhang, Yang; Han, Lujia; Xiao, Weihua

    2017-10-02

    Accurately determining protein content is essential in exploiting biomass as feed and fuel. A survey of biomass samples in China indicated protein contents from 2.65 to 3.98 % for crop residues and from 6.07 to 10.24 % for animal manure. Conversion factors based on amino acid nitrogen (kA) ranged from 5.42 to 6.00 for the former and from 4.78 to 5.36 for the latter, indicating that the traditional factor of 6.25 is not suitable for biomass samples. On the other hand, conversion factors from Kjeldahl nitrogen (kP) ranged from 3.97 to 4.57 and from 2.76 to 4.31 for crop residues and animal manure, respectively. Of note, conversion factors were strongly affected by amino acid composition and levels of nonprotein nitrogen. Thus, kP values of 4.23 for crop residues, 4.11 for livestock manure, and 3.11 for poultry manure are recommended to better estimate protein content from total nitrogen.

  15. Adiponectin stimulates Wnt inhibitory factor-1 expression through epigenetic regulations involving the transcription factor specificity protein 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; Lam, Janice B B; Chow, Kim H M; Xu, Aimin; Lam, Karen S L; Moon, Randall T; Wang, Yu

    2008-11-01

    Adiponectin (ADN) is an adipokine possessing growth inhibitory activities against various types of cancer cells. Our previous results demonstrated that ADN could impede Wnt/beta-catenin-signaling pathways in MDA-MB-231 human breast carcinoma cells [Wang,Y. et al. (2006) Adiponectin modulates the glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta/beta-catenin signaling pathway and attenuates mammary tumorigenesis of MDA-MB-231 cells in nude mice. Cancer Res., 66, 11462-11470]. Here, we extended our studies to elucidate the effects of ADN on regulating the expressions of Wnt inhibitory factor-1 (WIF1), a Wnt antagonist frequently silenced in human breast tumors. Our results showed that ADN time dependently stimulated WIF1 gene and protein expressions in MDA-MB-231 cells. Overexpression of WIF1 exerted similar inhibitory effects to those of ADN on cell proliferations, nuclear beta-catenin activities, cyclin D1 expressions and serum-induced phosphorylations of Akt and glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta. Blockage of WIF1 activities significantly attenuated the suppressive effects of ADN on MDA-MB-231 cell growth. Furthermore, our in vivo studies showed that both supplementation of recombinant ADN and adenovirus-mediated overexpression of this adipokine substantially enhanced WIF1 expressions in MDA-MB-231 tumors implanted in nude mice. More interestingly, we found that ADN could alleviate methylation of CpG islands located within the proximal promoter region of WIF1, possibly involving the specificity protein 1 (Sp1) transcription factor and its downstream target DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1). Upon ADN treatment, the protein levels of both Sp1 and DNMT1 were significantly decreased. Using silencing RNA approaches, we confirmed that downregulation of Sp1 resulted in an increased expression of WIF1 and decreased methylation of WIF1 promoter. Taken together, these data suggest that ADN might elicit its antitumor activities at least partially through promoting WIF1 expressions.

  16. Design of meningococcal factor H binding protein mutant vaccines that do not bind human complement factor H.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajon, Rolando; Beernink, Peter T; Granoff, Dan M

    2012-08-01

    Meningococcal factor H binding protein (fHbp) is a human species-specific ligand for the complement regulator, factor H (fH). In recent studies, fHbp vaccines in which arginine at position 41 was replaced by serine (R41S) had impaired fH binding. The mutant vaccines elicited bactericidal responses in human fH transgenic mice superior to those elicited by control fHbp vaccines that bound human fH. Based on sequence similarity, fHbp has been classified into three variant groups. Here we report that although R41 is present in fHbp from variant groups 1 and 2, the R41S substitution eliminated fH binding only in variant group 1 proteins. To identify mutants in variant group 2 with impaired fH binding, we generated fHbp structural models and predicted 63 residues influencing fH binding. From these, we created 11 mutants with one or two amino acid substitutions in a variant group 2 protein and identified six that decreased fH binding. Three of these six mutants retained conformational epitopes recognized by all six anti-fHbp monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) tested and elicited serum complement-mediated bactericidal antibody titers in wild-type mice that were not significantly different from those obtained with the control vaccine. Thus, fHbp amino acid residues that affect human fH binding differ across variant groups. This result suggests that fHbp sequence variation induced by immune selection also affects fH binding motifs via coevolution. The three new fHbp mutants from variant group 2, which do not bind human fH, retained important epitopes for eliciting bactericidal antibodies and may be promising vaccine candidates.

  17. Attachment, caring and prosocial behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erez, Ayelet

    2007-01-01

    The thesis focuses on 5 studies examining the role of adult attachment in volunteering by defining volunteerism as a form of caregiving. By that we suggest an effect of one behavioral system, attachment, on another, caring or prosocial behaviors in individual or group settings. Studies 1 and 2 ex

  18. Mitochondrial Bol1 and Bol3 function as assembly factors for specific iron-sulfur proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzarska, Marta A; Nasta, Veronica; Weiler, Benjamin D; Spantgar, Farah; Ciofi-Baffoni, Simone; Saviello, Maria Rosaria; Gonnelli, Leonardo; Mühlenhoff, Ulrich; Banci, Lucia; Lill, Roland

    2016-01-01

    Assembly of mitochondrial iron-sulfur (Fe/S) proteins is a key process of cells, and defects cause many rare diseases. In the first phase of this pathway, ten Fe/S cluster (ISC) assembly components synthesize and insert [2Fe-2S] clusters. The second phase is dedicated to the assembly of [4Fe-4S] proteins, yet this part is poorly understood. Here, we characterize the BOLA family proteins Bol1 and Bol3 as specific mitochondrial ISC assembly factors that facilitate [4Fe-4S] cluster insertion into a subset of mitochondrial proteins such as lipoate synthase and succinate dehydrogenase. Bol1-Bol3 perform largely overlapping functions, yet cannot replace the ISC protein Nfu1 that also participates in this phase of Fe/S protein biogenesis. Bol1 and Bol3 form dimeric complexes with both monothiol glutaredoxin Grx5 and Nfu1. Complex formation differentially influences the stability of the Grx5-Bol-shared Fe/S clusters. Our findings provide the biochemical basis for explaining the pathological phenotypes of patients with mutations in BOLA3. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16673.001 PMID:27532772

  19. 14-3-3 Proteins Participate in Light Signaling through Association with PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTORs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eri Adams

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available 14-3-3 proteins are regulatory proteins found in all eukaryotes and are known to selectively interact with phosphorylated proteins to regulate physiological processes. Through an affinity purification screening, many light-related proteins were recovered as 14-3-3 candidate binding partners. Yeast two-hybrid analysis revealed that the 14-3-3 kappa isoform (14-3-3κ could bind to PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR3 (PIF3 and CONSTITUTIVE PHOTOMORPHOGENIC1 (COP1. Further analysis by in vitro pull-down assay confirmed the interaction between 14-3-3κ and PIF3. Interruption of putative phosphorylation sites on the 14-3-3 binding motifs of PIF3 was not sufficient to inhibit 14-3-3κ from binding or to disturb nuclear localization of PIF3. It was also indicated that 14-3-3κ could bind to other members of the PIF family, such as PIF1 and PIF6, but not to LONG HYPOCOTYL IN FAR-RED1 (HFR1. 14-3-3 mutants, as well as the PIF3 overexpressor, displayed longer hypocotyls, and a pif3 mutant displayed shorter hypocotyls than the wild-type in red light, suggesting that 14-3-3 proteins are positive regulators of photomorphogenesis and function antagonistically with PIF3. Consequently, our results indicate that 14-3-3 proteins bind to PIFs and initiate photomorphogenesis in response to a light signal.

  20. Immunotherapy for Prostate Cancer with Gc Protein-Derived Macrophage-Activating Factor, GcMAF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Nobuto; Suyama, Hirofumi; Yamamoto, Nobuyuki

    2008-07-01

    Serum Gc protein (known as vitamin D(3)-binding protein) is the precursor for the principal macrophage-activating factor (MAF). The MAF precursor activity of serum Gc protein of prostate cancer patients was lost or reduced because Gc protein was deglycosylated by serum alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase (Nagalase) secreted from cancerous cells. Therefore, macrophages of prostate cancer patients having deglycosylated Gc protein cannot be activated, leading to immunosuppression. Stepwise treatment of purified Gc protein with immobilized beta-galactosidase and sialidase generated the most potent MAF (termed GcMAF) ever discovered, which produces no adverse effect in humans. Macrophages activated by GcMAF develop a considerable variation of receptors that recognize the abnormality in malignant cell surface and are highly tumoricidal. Sixteen nonanemic prostate cancer patients received weekly administration of 100 ng of GcMAF. As the MAF precursor activity increased, their serum Nagalase activity decreased. Because serum Nagalase activity is proportional to tumor burden, the entire time course analysis for GcMAF therapy was monitored by measuring the serum Nagalase activity. After 14 to 25 weekly administrations of GcMAF (100 ng/week), all 16 patients had very low serum Nagalase levels equivalent to those of healthy control values, indicating that these patients are tumor-free. No recurrence occurred for 7 years.

  1. Conformational characterization of human eukaryotic initiation factor 2alpha: a single tryptophan protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreejith, R K; Yadav, Viveka Nand; Varshney, Nishant K; Berwal, Sunil K; Suresh, C G; Gaikwad, Sushama M; Pal, Jayanta K

    2009-12-11

    The alpha-subunit of the human eukaryotic initiation factor 2 (heIF2alpha), a GTP binding protein, plays a major role in the initiation of protein synthesis. During various cytoplasmic stresses, eIF2alpha gets phosphorylated by eIF2alpha-specific kinases resulting in inhibition of protein synthesis. The cloned and over expressed heIF2alpha, a protein with a single tryptophan (trp) residue was examined for its conformational characteristics using steady-state and time-resolved tryptophan fluorescence, circular dichroism (CD) and hydrophobic dye binding. The steady-state fluorescence spectrum, fluorescence lifetimes (tau(1)=1.13ns and tau(2)=4.74ns) and solute quenching studies revealed the presence of trp conformers in hydrophobic and differential polar environment at any given time. Estimation of the alpha-helix and beta-sheet content showed: (i) more compact structure at pH 2.0, (ii) distorted alpha-helix and rearranged beta-sheet in presence of 4M guanidine hydrochloride and (iii) retention of more than 50% ordered structure at 95 degrees C. Hydrophobic dye binding to the protein with loosened tertiary structure was observed at pH 2.0 indicating the existence of a molten globule-like structure. These observations indicate the inherent structural stability of the protein under various denaturing conditions.

  2. Ric-8A, a Gα protein guanine nucleotide exchange factor potentiates taste receptor signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire J Fenech

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Taste receptors for sweet, bitter and umami tastants are G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs. While much effort has been devoted to understanding G-protein-receptor interactions and identifying the components of the signalling cascade downstream of these receptors, at the level of the G-protein the modulation of receptor signal transduction remains relatively unexplored. In this regard a taste-specific regulator of G-protein signaling (RGS, RGS21, has recently been identified. To study whether guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs are involved in the transduction of the signal downstream of the taste GPCRs we investigated the expression of Ric-8A and Ric-8B in mouse taste cells and their interaction with G-protein subunits found in taste buds. Mammalian Ric-8 proteins were initially identified as potent GEFs for a range of Gα subunits and Ric-8B has recently been shown to amplify olfactory signal transduction. We find that both Ric-8A and Ric-8B are expressed in a large portion of taste bud cells and that most of these cells contain IP3R-3 a marker for sweet, umami and bitter taste receptor cells. Ric-8A interacts with Gα-gustducin and Gαi2 through which it amplifies the signal transduction of hTas2R16, a receptor for bitter compounds. Overall, these findings are consistent with a role for Ric-8 in mammalian taste signal transduction.

  3. Expression and Protein Interaction Analyses Reveal Combinatorial Interactions of LBD Transcription Factors During Arabidopsis Pollen Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mirim; Kim, Min-Jung; Pandey, Shashank; Kim, Jungmook

    2016-11-01

    LATERAL ORGAN BOUNDARIES DOMAIN (LBD) transcription factor gene family members play key roles in diverse aspects of plant development. LBD10 and LBD27 have been shown to be essential for pollen development in Arabidopsis thaliana. From the previous RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) data set of Arabidopsis pollen, we identified the mRNAs of LBD22, LBD25 and LBD36 in addition to LBD10 and LBD27 in Arabidopsis pollen. Here we conducted expression and cellular analysis using GFP:GUS (green fluorescent protein:β-glucuronidase) reporter gene and subcellular localization assays using LBD:GFP fusion proteins expressed under the control of their own promoters in Arabidopsis. We found that these LBD proteins display spatially and temporally distinct and overlapping expression patterns during pollen development. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation and GST (glutathione S-transferase) pull-down assays demonstrated that protein-protein interactions occur among the LBDs exhibiting overlapping expression during pollen development. We further showed that LBD10, LBD22, LBD25, LBD27 and LBD36 interact with each other to form heterodimers, which are localized to the nucleus in Arabidopsis protoplasts. Taken together, these results suggest that combinatorial interactions among LBD proteins may be important for their function in pollen development in Arabidopsis.

  4. Modification of the protein corona-nanoparticle complex by physiological factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Nicholas J; DeBrosse, Madeleine C; Hussain, Saber M; Comfort, Kristen K

    2016-07-01

    Nanoparticle (NP) effects in a biological system are driven through the formation and structure of the protein corona-NP complex, which is dynamic by nature and dependent upon factors from both the local environment and NP physicochemical parameters. To date, considerable data has been gathered regarding the structure and behavior of the protein corona in blood, plasma, and traditional cell culture medium. However, there exists a knowledge gap pertaining to the protein corona in additional biological fluids and following incubation in a dynamic environment. Using 13nm gold NPs (AuNPs), functionalized with either polyethylene glycol or tannic acid, we demonstrated that both particle characteristics and the associated protein corona were altered when exposed to artificial physiological fluids and under dynamic flow. Furthermore, the magnitude of observed behavioral shifts were dependent upon AuNP surface chemistry. Lastly, we revealed that exposure to interstitial fluid produced protein corona modifications, reshaping of the nano-cellular interface, modified AuNP dosimetry, and induction of previously unseen cytotoxicity. This study highlights the need to elucidate both NP and protein corona behavior in biologically representative environments in an effort to increase accurate interpretation of data and transfer of this knowledge to efficacy, behavior, and safety of nano-based applications.

  5. Attachment styles in alcoholic inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Rick, Ann; Vanheule, Stijn

    2007-01-01

    Despite the fact that addiction has often been identified as an attachment disorder, empirical studies on this topic are rather scarce. In our study we explore attachment style (secure vs. insecure) in alcoholic inpatients and its relationship with perceived parenting and alcohol-related and psychiatric problems in a sample of 101 alcoholic inpatients (Belgium). Our results reveal that in comparison to the securely-attached group, insecurely-attached alcoholic inpatients perceived their mother as more controlling, reported more severe psychiatric problems in the European Addiction Severity Index, had higher scores on the Beck Depression Inventory, showed more schizotypal and depressive personality traits and had more difficulties with communicating emotions (alexithymia). We argue that it makes sense to differentiate alcoholic inpatients on the basis of attachment style and that both groups (secure/insecure) need different treatment approaches.

  6. Modification of the protein corona–nanoparticle complex by physiological factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braun, Nicholas J.; DeBrosse, Madeleine C.; Hussain, Saber M. [Molecular Bioeffects Branch, Bioeffects Division, Human Effectiveness Directorate, 711 Human Performance Wing, Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright Patterson AFB, 2729 R. St, Bldg 837, Dayton, OH, 45433 (United States); Comfort, Kristen K., E-mail: kcomfort1@udayton.edu [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Dayton, 524 Kettering Laboratories, 300 College Park, Dayton, OH 45469 (United States)

    2016-07-01

    Nanoparticle (NP) effects in a biological system are driven through the formation and structure of the protein corona–NP complex, which is dynamic by nature and dependent upon factors from both the local environment and NP physicochemical parameters. To date, considerable data has been gathered regarding the structure and behavior of the protein corona in blood, plasma, and traditional cell culture medium. However, there exists a knowledge gap pertaining to the protein corona in additional biological fluids and following incubation in a dynamic environment. Using 13 nm gold NPs (AuNPs), functionalized with either polyethylene glycol or tannic acid, we demonstrated that both particle characteristics and the associated protein corona were altered when exposed to artificial physiological fluids and under dynamic flow. Furthermore, the magnitude of observed behavioral shifts were dependent upon AuNP surface chemistry. Lastly, we revealed that exposure to interstitial fluid produced protein corona modifications, reshaping of the nano-cellular interface, modified AuNP dosimetry, and induction of previously unseen cytotoxicity. This study highlights the need to elucidate both NP and protein corona behavior in biologically representative environments in an effort to increase accurate interpretation of data and transfer of this knowledge to efficacy, behavior, and safety of nano-based applications. - Highlights: • Dynamic flow increased the size of the gold nanoparticle protein corona. • Exposure to biological fluids altered protein corona size and composition. • Interstitial fluid modified the nano-cellular interface and deposition efficiency. • Tannic acid coated nanoparticles induced toxicity in an interstitial environment.

  7. Maybe you should blame your parents: Parental attachment, gender, and problematic Internet use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Ronnie; Jia, Heather H

    2016-09-01

    Background and aims Prior research has generally established parental attachment as a predictor of problematic Internet use (PIU). However, findings across studies are inconsistent as to which factor(s) of attachment style (i.e., attachment anxiety and attachment avoidance) contributes to PIU. Another gap in the literature is that as most studies highlight the importance of maternal (over paternal) attachment security in inhibiting PIU, little research has examined the possibility of a gender difference, where maternal and paternal attachment securities may exert different influences on males and females. Methods An anonymous survey was completed by 243 undergraduate students in a public university in the U.S. Midwest. In addition to demographic information, the survey contained measurement scales to assess PIU and parental attachment (both maternal and paternal). Results Survey data show that (a) attachment anxiety, but not attachment avoidance, is significantly related to PIU and (b) gender significantly moderates this relationship, where paternal attachment anxiety leads to PIU in female students while maternal attachment anxiety contributes to PIU in male students. Conclusions This study deepens our understanding in the relationship between family upbringing, particularly parental attachment, and PIU. More specifically, attachment anxiety is found to be a significant predictor of PIU, but attachment avoidance is not. Also, contributing to the research literature is the finding of a significant gender effect in this relationship.

  8. STAT3-Interacting Proteins as Modulators of Transcription Factor Function: Implications to Targeted Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Jennifer E; Frank, David A

    2016-04-19

    The oncogenic transcription factor STAT3 is inappropriately activated in multiple hematopoietic and solid malignancies, in which it drives the expression of genes involved in cell proliferation, differentiation, survival, and angiogenesis. Thus far, strategies to inhibit the function of STAT3 have focused on blocking the function of its activating kinases or sequestering its DNA binding ability. A less well-explored aspect of STAT3 function is its interaction with other proteins, which can modulate the oncogenic activity of STAT3 via its subcellular localization, DNA binding ability, and recruitment of transcriptional machinery. Herein we summarize what is currently known about STAT3-interacting proteins and describe the utility of a proteomics-based approach for successfully identifying and characterizing novel STAT3-interacting proteins that affect STAT3 transcriptional activity and oncogenic function.

  9. [Purification of recombinant proteins with an example of tumor necrosis factor thymosin-alpha1].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorov, T V; Korobov, V I; Nazarov, V G; Smolkina, A E; Shmelev, V A

    2010-01-01

    Hybrid protein, cancer necrosis factor thymosin-alpha1 (CNF-T), when synthesizing in strain-producer of Escherichia coli SG200-50 with plasmid pThy315, was a part of "inclusion bodies" mostly in the form of a high-molecular complex with other proteins due to the S-S bonds formation. An approach of purification of CNF-T has been proposed, which is based on the destruction of the complex in the presence of sodium dodecylsulfate (DDS-NA) and dithiotreitol (DDT) followed by gel-filtration on Sephadex G-100 and renaturation by ultrafiltration on hollow fibers. The method allows the isolation of electrophoretically homogeneous CNF-T containing no DDS-Na and having high cytotoxic activity against cancer cells of mouse adenocarcinome L-929. The yield of CNF-T achieved 80% relative its content in biomass and 30% relative the total protein.

  10. pipsqueak Encodes a Factor Essential for Sequence-Specific Targeting of a Polycomb Group Protein Complex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Der-HwaHuang; Yuh-LongChang; Chih-ChaoYang; I-ChingPan; BalasKing

    2005-01-01

    The Polycomb (Pc) group (Pc-G) of repressors is essential for transcriptional silencing of homeotic genes that determine the axial development of metazoan animals. It is generally believed that the multimeric complexes formed by these proteins nucleate certain chromatin structures to silence promoter activity upon binding to Pc-G response elements (PRE). Little is known, however, about the molecular mechanism involved in sequence-specific binding of these complexes. Here, we show that an immunoa ffinity-purified Pc protein complex contains a DNA binding activity specific to the (GA), motif in a PRE from the bithoraxoid region. We found that this activity can be attributed primarily to the large protein isoform encoded by pipsqueak (psq) instead of to the well-characterized GAGA factor. The functional relevance ofpsq to the silencing mechanismis strongly supported by its synergistic interactions with a subset of Pc-G that cause misexpression of homeotic genes.

  11. A highly versatile adaptor protein for the tethering of growth factors to gelatin-based biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addi, Cyril; Murschel, Frédéric; Liberelle, Benoît; Riahi, Nesrine; De Crescenzo, Gregory

    2017-03-01

    In the field of tissue engineering, the tethering of growth factors to tissue scaffolds in an oriented manner can enhance their activity and increase their half-life. We chose to investigate the capture of the basic Fibroblast Growth Factor (bFGF) and the Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF) on a gelatin layer, as a model for the functionalization of collagen-based biomaterials. Our strategy relies on the use of two high affinity interactions, that is, the one between two distinct coil peptides as well as the one occurring between a collagen-binding domain (CBD) and gelatin. We expressed a chimeric protein to be used as an adaptor that comprises one of the coil peptides and a CBD derived from the human fibronectin. We proved that it has the ability to bind simultaneously to a gelatin substrate and to form a heterodimeric coiled-coil domain with recombinant growth factors being tagged with the complementary coil peptide. The tethering of the growth factors was characterized by ELISA and surface plasmon resonance-based biosensing. The bioactivity of the immobilized bFGF and EGF was evaluated by a human umbilical vein endothelial cell proliferation assay and a vascular smooth muscle cell survival assay. We found that the tethering of EGF preserved its mitogenic and anti-apoptotic activity. In the case of bFGF, when captured via our adaptor protein, changes in its natural mode of interaction with gelatin were observed.

  12. Elucidating biological risk factors in suicide: role of protein kinase A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwivedi, Yogesh; Pandey, Ghanshyam N

    2011-06-01

    Suicide is a major public health concern. Although there have been several studies of suicidal behavior that focused on the roles of psychosocial and sociocultural factors, these factors are of too little predictive value to be clinically useful. Therefore, research on the biological perspective of suicide has gained a stronghold and appears to provide a promising approach to identify biological risk factors associated with suicidal behavior. Recent studies demonstrate that an alteration in synaptic and structural plasticity is key to affective illnesses and suicide. Signal transduction molecules play an important role in such plastic events. Protein kinase A (PKA) is a crucial enzyme in the adenylyl cyclase signal transduction pathway and is involved in regulating gene transcription, cell survival, and plasticity. In this review, we critically and comprehensively discuss the role of PKA in suicidal behavior. Because stress is an important component of suicide, we also discuss whether stress affects PKA and how this may be associated with suicidal behavior. In addition, we also discuss the functional significance of the findings regarding PKA by describing the role of important PKA substrates (i.e., Rap1, cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element binding protein, and target gene brain-derived neurotrophic factor). These studies suggest the interesting possibility that PKA and related signaling molecules may serve as important neurobiological factors in suicide and may be relevant in target-specific therapeutic interventions for these disorders.

  13. Protein trans-splicing based dual-vector delivery of the coagulation factor Ⅷ gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    A dual-vector system was explored for the delivery of the coagulation factor VIII gene,using intein-mediated protein trans-splicing as a means to produce intact functional factor VIII post-translationally.A pair of eukaryotic expression vectors,expressing Ssp DnaB intein-fused heavy and light chain genes of B-domain deleted factor VIII (BDD-FVIII),was constructed.With transient co-transfection of the two vectors into 293 and COS-7 cells,the culture supernatants contained (137±23) and (109±22) ng mL–1 spliced BDD-FVIII antigen with an activity of (1.05±0.16) and (0.79±0.23) IU mL–1 for 293 and COS-7 cells,respectively.The spliced BDD-FVIII was also detected in supernatants from a mixture of cells transfected with inteinfused heavy and light chain genes.The spliced BDD-FVIII protein bands from cell lysates were visualized by Western blotting.The data demonstrated that intein could be used to transfer the split factor VIII gene and provided valuable information on factor VIII gene delivery by dual-adeno-associated virus in hemophilia A gene therapy.

  14. Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1 Is an Inductor of Transcription Factor Activating Protein 2 Epsilon Expression during Chondrogenic Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Niebler

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The transcription factor AP-2ε (activating enhancer-binding protein epsilon is expressed in cartilage of humans and mice. However, knowledge about regulatory mechanisms influencing AP-2ε expression is limited. Using quantitative real time PCR, we detected a significant increase in AP-2ε mRNA expression comparing initial and late stages of chondrogenic differentiation processes in vitro and in vivo. Interestingly, in these samples the expression pattern of the prominent hypoxia marker gene angiopoietin-like 4 (Angptl4 strongly correlated with that of AP-2ε suggesting that hypoxia might represent an external regulator of AP-2ε expression in mammals. In order to show this, experiments directly targeting the activity of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF1, the complex mediating responses to oxygen deprivation, were performed. While the HIF1-activating compounds 2,2′-dipyridyl and desferrioxamine resulted in significantly enhanced mRNA concentration of AP-2ε, siRNA against HIF1α led to a significantly reduced expression rate of AP-2ε. Additionally, we detected a significant upregulation of the AP-2ε mRNA level after oxygen deprivation. In sum, these different experimental approaches revealed a novel role for the HIF1 complex in the regulation of the AP-2ε gene in cartilaginous cells and underlined the important role of hypoxia as an important external regulatory stimulus during chondrogenic differentiation modulating the expression of downstream transcription factors.

  15. Cycle modulation of insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 1 in human endometrium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corleta H.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Endometrium is one of the fastest growing human tissues. Sex hormones, estrogen and progesterone, in interaction with several growth factors, control its growth and differentiation. Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1 interacts with cell surface receptors and also with specific soluble binding proteins. IGF-binding proteins (IGF-BP have been shown to modulate IGF-1 action. Of six known isoforms, IGF-BP-1 has been characterized as a marker produced by endometrial stromal cells in the late secretory phase and in the decidua. In the current study, IGF-1-BP concentration and affinity in the proliferative and secretory phase of the menstrual cycle were measured. Endometrial samples were from patients of reproductive age with regular menstrual cycles and taking no steroid hormones. Cytosolic fractions were prepared and binding of 125I-labeled IGF-1 performed. Cross-linking reaction products were analyzed by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (7.5% followed by autoradiography. 125I-IGF-1 affinity to cytosolic proteins was not statistically different between the proliferative and secretory endometrium. An approximately 35-kDa binding protein was identified when 125I-IGF-1 was cross-linked to cytosol proteins. Secretory endometrium had significantly more IGF-1-BP when compared to proliferative endometrium. The specificity of the cross-linking process was evaluated by the addition of 100 nM unlabeled IGF-1 or insulin. Unlabeled IGF-1 totally abolished the radioactivity from the band, indicating specific binding. Insulin had no apparent effect on the intensity of the labeled band. These results suggest that IGF-BP could modulate the action of IGF-1 throughout the menstrual cycle. It would be interesting to study this binding protein in other pathologic conditions of the endometrium such as adenocarcinomas and hyperplasia.

  16. Hepatoma-derived growth factor-related protein 2 promotes DNA repair by homologous recombination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baude, Annika; Aaes, Tania Løve; Zhai, Beibei; Al-Nakouzi, Nader; Oo, Htoo Zarni; Daugaard, Mads; Rohde, Mikkel; Jäättelä, Marja

    2016-01-01

    We have recently identified lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF/p75, also known as PSIP1) as a component of the homologous recombination DNA repair machinery. Through its Pro-Trp-Trp-Pro (PWWP) domain, LEDGF/p75 binds to histone marks associated with active transcription and promotes DNA end resection by recruiting DNA endonuclease retinoblastoma-binding protein 8 (RBBP8/CtIP) to broken DNA ends. Here we show that the structurally related PWWP domain-containing protein, hepatoma-derived growth factor-related protein 2 (HDGFRP2), serves a similar function in homologous recombination repair. Its depletion compromises the survival of human U2OS osteosarcoma and HeLa cervix carcinoma cells and impairs the DNA damage-induced phosphorylation of replication protein A2 (RPA2) and the recruitment of DNA endonuclease RBBP8/CtIP to DNA double strand breaks. In contrast to LEDGF/p75, HDGFRP2 binds preferentially to histone marks characteristic for transcriptionally silent chromatin. Accordingly, HDGFRP2 is found in complex with the heterochromatin-binding chromobox homologue 1 (CBX1) and Pogo transposable element with ZNF domain (POGZ). Supporting the functionality of this complex, POGZ-depleted cells show a similar defect in DNA damage-induced RPA2 phosphorylation as HDGFRP2-depleted cells. These data suggest that HDGFRP2, possibly in complex with POGZ, recruits homologous recombination repair machinery to damaged silent genes or to active genes silenced upon DNA damage. PMID:26721387

  17. Evolutionarily conserved binding of translationally controlled tumor protein to eukaryotic elongation factor 1B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Huiwen; Gong, Weibin; Yao, Xingzhe; Wang, Jinfeng; Perrett, Sarah; Feng, Yingang

    2015-04-03

    Translationally controlled tumor protein (TCTP) is an abundant protein that is highly conserved in eukaryotes. However, its primary function is still not clear. Human TCTP interacts with the metazoan-specific eukaryotic elongation factor 1Bδ (eEF1Bδ) and inhibits its guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) activity, but the structural mechanism remains unknown. The interaction between TCTP and eEF1Bδ was investigated by NMR titration, structure determination, paramagnetic relaxation enhancement, site-directed mutagenesis, isothermal titration calorimetry, and HADDOCK docking. We first demonstrated that the catalytic GEF domain of eEF1Bδ is not responsible for binding to TCTP but rather a previously unnoticed central acidic region (CAR) domain in eEF1Bδ. The mutagenesis data and the structural model of the TCTP-eEF1Bδ CAR domain complex revealed the key binding residues. These residues are highly conserved in eukaryotic TCTPs and in eEF1B GEFs, including the eukaryotically conserved eEF1Bα, implying the interaction may be conserved in all eukaryotes. Interactions were confirmed between TCTP and the eEF1Bα CAR domain for human, fission yeast, and unicellular photosynthetic microalgal proteins, suggesting that involvement in protein translation through the conserved interaction with eEF1B represents a primary function of TCTP. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. Personal style of the therapist, attachment style and personality trait

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Genise

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to analyze the relationship between the personal style of the therapist, attachment style and personality trait. It was used the personal style of the therapist questionnaire (PST – Q, the Argentinean attachment inventory and the big five inventory. The study sample consisted of 120 psychotherapists average age of 36.28 years (SD = 9.65, and the average years of experience was 7.90 years (SD = 8.04. The analysis of the results showed that there is a positive, significant and low intensity between the personality factor of openness to experience and personal style of involvement, a negative correlation, significant and of medium intensity between low extraversion factor correlation and mode not anxious romantic attachment and a significant positive relationship between the low–intensity factor neuroticism personality and how anxious romantic attachment

  19. Transfer of attachment functions and adjustment among young adults in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong; Chan, Darius K-S; Teng, Fei

    2011-01-01

    This study was designed to examine the process of attachment transfer from parents to peers, as well as factors related to this transfer process among Mainland Chinese. A total of 147 Chinese college students (with a mean age of 21.44) completed questionnaires that measured attachment style, attachment transfer, attachment support from various figures, loneliness, positive/negative affects, and self-esteem. Major findings of the current study include the following: (a) Hazan and Shaver's sequential model of attachment transfer was generalized to the Chinese sample; (b) the extent of attachment transfer was found to be associated with participants' emotional states (loneliness and positive affect) and was a significant predictor of these emotional states beyond the effects of attachment style and attachment support. As one of the first studies exploring the phenomenon of attachment transfer among young Chinese adults, conceptual and applied implications of these findings are discussed.

  20. Clinical disturbances of attachment in infancy and early childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boris, N W; Zeanah, C H

    1998-08-01

    The development of the attachment behavioral system in infancy has been the focus of a wide range of research in the past 30 years. The clinical significance of disturbances in this area of development is currently a major focus for this research. Research on patterns of attachment in infancy has informed understanding of the development of psychopathology in later childhood; insecure-disorganized attachment is recognized as an important risk factor in this regard. The clinical features of reactive attachment disorder in early childhood are also becoming more clear. Finally, knowledge about the intersection between attachment and various risk conditions is growing and should inform clinical judgement about infants and young children requiring intervention. Primary care physicians can use these findings to identify children in need of intervention.

  1. Attachment and Health-Related Physiological Stress Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietromonaco, Paula R.; Powers, Sally I.

    2015-01-01

    People who are more securely attached to close partners show health benefits, but the mechanisms underlying this link are not well specified. We focus on physiological pathways that are potential mediators of the connection between attachment in childhood and adulthood and health and disease outcomes. Growing evidence indicates that attachment insecurity (vs. security) is associated with distinctive physiological responses to stress, including responses involving the HPA, SAM and immune systems, but these responses vary with type of stressor (e.g., social/nonsocial) and contextual factors (e.g., partner’s attachment style). Taking this more nuanced perspective will be important for understanding the conditions under which attachment shapes health-related physiological processes as well as downstream health and disease consequences. PMID:25729755

  2. Universal geometrical factor of protein conformations as a consequence of energy minimization

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Ming-Chya; Ma, Wen-Jong; Kouza, Maksim; Hu, Chin-Kun; 10.1209/0295-5075/96/68005

    2012-01-01

    The biological activity and functional specificity of proteins depend on their native three-dimensional structures determined by inter- and intra-molecular interactions. In this paper, we investigate the geometrical factor of protein conformation as a consequence of energy minimization in protein folding. Folding simulations of 10 polypeptides with chain length ranging from 183 to 548 residues manifest that the dimensionless ratio (V/(A)) of the van der Waals volume V to the surface area A and average atomic radius of the folded structures, calculated with atomic radii setting used in SMMP [Eisenmenger F., et. al., Comput. Phys. Commun., 138 (2001) 192], approach 0.49 quickly during the course of energy minimization. A large scale analysis of protein structures show that the ratio for real and well-designed proteins is universal and equal to 0.491\\pm0.005. The fractional composition of hydrophobic and hydrophilic residues does not affect the ratio substantially. The ratio also holds for intrinsically disorde...

  3. Reliability of a Tissue Microarray in Detecting Thyroid Transcription Factor-1 Protein in Lung Carcinomas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaoyan Bai; Hong Shen

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To compare the expression of the thyroid transcription factor-1 (TTF-1) in human normal adult type Ⅱ alveolar epithelial cells,embryonic pneumocytes and cancer cells of lung carcinoma and metastatic lymph nodes using a tissue microarray (TMA) along with paired conventional full sections.and to jnvestigate the reliability of tissue microarrays in detecting protein expression in lung carcinoma.METHODS A lung carcinoma TMA including 765 cores was constructed.TTF-1 protein expression in both TMA and paired conventional full sections were detected by yhe immunohistochemical SP method using a monoclonal antibody to TTF-1.A PU (Positive Unit) of TTF-1 protein was assessed quantitatively by the Leica Q500MC image analysis system with results from the paired conventional full sections as controls.RESULTS There was no signifcance between TMA and paired conven tional full sections in TTF-1 expression in difierent nuclei of the lung tissue.CONCLUSION TTF-1 protein expression in lung carcinoma detected by TMA was highly concordanl with that of paired full sections.TMA is a reliable method in detecting protein expression.

  4. Dynamic structure factor of vibrating fractals: Proteins as a case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuveni, Shlomi; Klafter, Joseph; Granek, Rony

    2012-01-01

    We study the dynamic structure factor S(k,t) of proteins at large wave numbers k, kRg≫1, where Rg is the gyration radius. At this regime measurements are sensitive to internal dynamics, and we focus on vibrational dynamics of folded proteins. Exploiting the analogy between proteins and fractals, we perform a general analytic calculation of the displacement two-point correlation functions, . We confront the derived expressions with numerical evaluations that are based on protein data bank (PDB) structures and the Gaussian network model (GNM) for a few proteins and for the Sierpinski gasket as a controlled check. We use these calculations to evaluate S(k,t) with arrested rotational and translational degrees of freedom, and show that the decay of S(k,t) is dominated by the spatially averaged mean-square displacement of an amino acid. The latter has been previously shown to evolve subdiffusively in time, ˜tν, where ν is the anomalous diffusion exponent that depends on the spectral dimension ds and fractal dimension df. As a result, for wave numbers obeying k2≳1, S(k,t) effectively decays as a stretched exponential S(k,t)≃S(k)e-(Γkt)β with β≃ν, where the relaxation rate is Γk˜(kBT/mωo2)1/βk2/β, T is the temperature, and mωo2 the GNM effective spring constant describing the interaction between neighboring amino acids. The static structure factor is dominated by the fractal character of the native fold, S(k)˜k-df, with negligible to marginal influence of vibrations. The analytical expressions are first confronted with numerically based calculations on the Sierpinski gasket, and very good agreement is found between simulations and theory. We then perform PDB-GNM-based numerical calculations for a few proteins, and an effective stretched exponential decay of the dynamic structure factor is found, albeit their relatively small size. However, when rotational and translational diffusion are added, we find that their contribution is never negligible due to

  5. Neurobiology of secure infant attachment and attachment despite adversity: a mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, T L; Raineki, C; Salstein, L; Perry, R; Sullivan-Wilson, T A; Sloan, A; Lalji, B; Hammock, E; Wilson, D A; Levitt, P; Okutani, F; Kaba, H; Sullivan, R M

    2013-10-01

    Attachment to an abusive caregiver has wide phylogenetic representation, suggesting that animal models are useful in understanding the neural basis underlying this phenomenon and subsequent behavioral outcomes. We previously developed a rat model, in which we use classical conditioning to parallel learning processes evoked during secure attachment (odor-stroke, with stroke mimicking tactile stimulation from the caregiver) or attachment despite adversity (odor-shock, with shock mimicking maltreatment). Here we extend this model to mice. We conditioned infant mice (postnatal day (PN) 7-9 or 13-14) with presentations of peppermint odor and either stroking or shock. We used (14) C 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG) to assess olfactory bulb and amygdala metabolic changes following learning. PN7-9 mice learned to prefer an odor following either odor-stroke or shock conditioning, whereas odor-shock conditioning at PN13-14 resulted in aversion/fear learning. 2-DG data indicated enhanced bulbar activity in PN7-9 preference learning, whereas significant amygdala activity was present following aversion learning at PN13-14. Overall, the mouse results parallel behavioral and neural results in the rat model of attachment, and provide the foundation for the use of transgenic and knockout models to assess the impact of both genetic (biological vulnerabilities) and environmental factors (abusive) on attachment-related behaviors and behavioral development.

  6. Exploring attachment to the "homeland" and its association with heritage culture identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferenczi, Nelli; Marshall, Tara C

    2013-01-01

    Conceptualisations of attachment to one's nation of origin reflecting a symbolic caregiver can be found cross-culturally in literature, art, and language. Despite its prevalence, the relationship with one's nation has not been investigated empirically in terms of an attachment theory framework. Two studies employed an attachment theory approach to investigate the construct validity of symbolic attachment to one's nation of origin, and its association with acculturation (operationalized as heritage and mainstream culture identification). Results for Study 1 indicated a three-factor structure of nation attachment; the factors were labelled secure-preoccupied, fearful, and dismissive nation attachment. Hierarchical linear modelling was employed to control for differing cultures across participants. Secure-preoccupied nation attachment was a significant predictor of increased heritage culture identification for participants residing in their country of birth, whilst dismissive nation attachment was a significant predictor of decreased heritage culture identification for international migrants. Secure-preoccupied nation attachment was also associated with higher levels of subjective-wellbeing. Study 2 further confirmed the validity of the nation attachment construct through confirmatory factor analysis; the three-factor model adequately fit the data. Similar to the results of Study 1, secure-preoccupied nation attachment was associated with increased levels of heritage culture identification and psychological well-being. Implications of the tripartite model of nation attachment for identity and well-being will be discussed.

  7. Exploring attachment to the "homeland" and its association with heritage culture identification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelli Ferenczi

    Full Text Available Conceptualisations of attachment to one's nation of origin reflecting a symbolic caregiver can be found cross-culturally in literature, art, and language. Despite its prevalence, the relationship with one's nation has not been investigated empirically in terms of an attachment theory framework. Two studies employed an attachment theory approach to investigate the construct validity of symbolic attachment to one's nation of origin, and its association with acculturation (operationalized as heritage and mainstream culture identification. Results for Study 1 indicated a three-factor structure of nation attachment; the factors were labelled secure-preoccupied, fearful, and dismissive nation attachment. Hierarchical linear modelling was employed to control for differing cultures across participants. Secure-preoccupied nation attachment was a significant predictor of increased heritage culture identification for participants residing in their country of birth, whilst dismissive nation attachment was a significant predictor of decreased heritage culture identification for international migrants. Secure-preoccupied nation attachment was also associated with higher levels of subjective-wellbeing. Study 2 further confirmed the validity of the nation attachment construct through confirmatory factor analysis; the three-factor model adequately fit the data. Similar to the results of Study 1, secure-preoccupied nation attachment was associated with increased levels of heritage culture identification and psychological well-being. Implications of the tripartite model of nation attachment for identity and well-being will be discussed.

  8. Attachment Problems and Disorders in Infants and Young Children: Identification, Assessment, and Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Jane R.

    2002-01-01

    This article discusses attachment problems and disorders among infants and young children, the consequences of attachment problems in child development, and factors leading to attachment problems. It provides the current status of diagnostic criteria and classification systems means of assessment and available empirically supported interventions.…

  9. Homologous Transcription Factors DUX4 and DUX4c Associate with Cytoplasmic Proteins during Muscle Differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugénie Ansseau

    Full Text Available Hundreds of double homeobox (DUX genes map within 3.3-kb repeated elements dispersed in the human genome and encode DNA-binding proteins. Among these, we identified DUX4, a potent transcription factor that causes facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD. In the present study, we performed yeast two-hybrid screens and protein co-purifications with HaloTag-DUX fusions or GST-DUX4 pull-down to identify protein partners of DUX4, DUX4c (which is identical to DUX4 except for the end of the carboxyl terminal domain and DUX1 (which is limited to the double homeodomain. Unexpectedly, we identified and validated (by co-immunoprecipitation, GST pull-down, co-immunofluorescence and in situ Proximal Ligation Assay the interaction of DUX4, DUX4c and DUX1 with type III intermediate filament protein desmin in the cytoplasm and at the nuclear periphery. Desmin filaments link adjacent sarcomere at the Z-discs, connect them to sarcolemma proteins and interact with mitochondria. These intermediate filament also contact the nuclear lamina and contribute to positioning of the nuclei. Another Z-disc protein, LMCD1 that contains a LIM domain was also validated as a DUX4 partner. The functionality of DUX4 or DUX4c interactions with cytoplasmic proteins is underscored by the cytoplasmic detection of DUX4/DUX4c upon myoblast fusion. In addition, we identified and validated (by co-immunoprecipitation, co-immunofluorescence and in situ Proximal Ligation Assay as DUX4/4c partners several RNA-binding proteins such as C1QBP, SRSF9, RBM3, FUS/TLS and SFPQ that are involved in mRNA splicing and translation. FUS and SFPQ are nuclear proteins, however their cytoplasmic translocation was reported in neuronal cells where they associated with ribonucleoparticles (RNPs. Several other validated or identified DUX4/DUX4c partners are also contained in mRNP granules, and the co-localizations with cytoplasmic DAPI-positive spots is in keeping with such an association. Large muscle RNPs

  10. Everything You Want To Know about Attachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honig, Alice Sterling

    This paper discusses infant attachment, which it defines as a long-lasting emotional bond revealed when a child under stress seeks out and tries to stay close to a specific figure. The paper addresses: (1) What is attachment? Who are the pioneers in attachment theory?; (2) How do we notice attachment in action?; (3) Is attachment the only…

  11. Pluripotency factors and Polycomb Group proteins repress aryl hydrocarbon receptor expression in murine embryonic stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-I Ko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR is a transcription factor and environmental sensor that regulates expression of genes involved in drug-metabolism and cell cycle regulation. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses, Ahr ablation in mice and studies with orthologous genes in invertebrates suggest that AHR may also play a significant role in embryonic development. To address this hypothesis, we studied the regulation of Ahr expression in mouse embryonic stem cells and their differentiated progeny. In ES cells, interactions between OCT3/4, NANOG, SOX2 and Polycomb Group proteins at the Ahr promoter repress AHR expression, which can also be repressed by ectopic expression of reprogramming factors in hepatoma cells. In ES cells, unproductive RNA polymerase II binds at the Ahr transcription start site and drives the synthesis of short abortive transcripts. Activation of Ahr expression during differentiation follows from reversal of repressive marks in Ahr promoter chromatin, release of pluripotency factors and PcG proteins, binding of Sp factors, establishment of histone marks of open chromatin, and engagement of active RNAPII to drive full-length RNA transcript elongation. Our results suggest that reversible Ahr repression in ES cells holds the gene poised for expression and allows for a quick switch to activation during embryonic development.

  12. Pluripotency factors and Polycomb Group proteins repress aryl hydrocarbon receptor expression in murine embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Chia-I; Wang, Qin; Fan, Yunxia; Xia, Ying; Puga, Alvaro

    2014-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is a transcription factor and environmental sensor that regulates expression of genes involved in drug-metabolism and cell cycle regulation. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses, Ahr ablation in mice and studies with orthologous genes in invertebrates suggest that AHR may also play a significant role in embryonic development. To address this hypothesis, we studied the regulation of Ahr expression in mouse embryonic stem cells and their differentiated progeny. In ES cells, interactions between OCT3/4, NANOG, SOX2 and Polycomb Group proteins at the Ahr promoter repress AHR expression, which can also be repressed by ectopic expression of reprogramming factors in hepatoma cells. In ES cells, unproductive RNA polymerase II binds at the Ahr transcription start site and drives the synthesis of short abortive transcripts. Activation of Ahr expression during differentiation follows from reversal of repressive marks in Ahr promoter chromatin, release of pluripotency factors and PcG proteins, binding of Sp factors, establishment of histone marks of open chromatin, and engagement of active RNAPII to drive full-length RNA transcript elongation. Our results suggest that reversible Ahr repression in ES cells holds the gene poised for expression and allows for a quick switch to activation during embryonic development.

  13. Prediction of Protein-Peptide Interactions: Application of the XPairIT to Anthrax Lethal Factor and Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Prediction of Protein-Peptide Interactions: Application of the XPairIt API to Anthrax Lethal Factor and Substrates by Margaret M. Hurley and...Peptide Interactions: Application of the XPairIt API to Anthrax Lethal Factor and Substrates Margaret M. Hurley and Michael S. Sellers Weapons and...Prediction of Protein-Peptide Interactions: Application of the XPairIt API to Anthrax Lethal Factor and Substrates 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER ORAUW911QX-04-C

  14. Computational Simulations to Predict Creatine Kinase-Associated Factors: Protein-Protein Interaction Studies of Brain and Muscle Types of Creatine Kinases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Jiang Hu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Creatine kinase (CK; EC 2.7.3.2 is related to several skin diseases such as psoriasis and dermatomyositis. CK is important in skin energy homeostasis because it catalyzes the reversible transfer of a phosphoryl group from MgATP to creatine. In this study, we predicted CK binding proteins via the use of bioinformatic tools such as protein-protein interaction (PPI mappings and suggest the putative hub proteins for CK interactions. We obtained 123 proteins for brain type CK and 85 proteins for muscle type CK in the interaction networks. Among them, several hub proteins such as NFKB1, FHL2, MYOC, and ASB9 were predicted. Determination of the binding factors of CK can further promote our understanding of the roles of CK in physiological conditions.

  15. Regulation of vascular endothelial growth factor expression by homeodomain-interacting protein kinase-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D'Orazi Gabriella

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Homeodomain-interacting protein kinase-2 (HIPK2 plays an essential role in restraining tumor progression as it may regulate, by itself or within multiprotein complexes, many proteins (mainly transcription factors involved in cell growth and apoptosis. This study takes advantage of the recent finding that HIPK2 may repress the β-catenin transcription activity. Thus, we investigated whether HIPK2 overexpression may down-regulate vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF levels (a β-catenin target gene and the role of β-catenin in this regulation, in order to consider HIPK2 as a tool for novel anti-tumoral therapeutical approaches. Methods The regulation of VEGF expression by HIPK2 was evaluated by using luciferase assay with VEGF reporter construct, after overexpression of the β-catenin transcription factor. Relative quantification of VEGF and β-catenin mRNAs were assessed by reverse-transcriptase-PCR (RT-PCR analyses, following HIPK2 overexpression, while β-catenin protein levels were evaluated by western immunoblotting. Results HIPK2 overexpression in tumor cells downregulated VEGF mRNA levels and VEGF promoter activity. The VEGF downregulation was partly depending on HIPK2-mediated β-catenin regulation. Thus, HIPK2 could induce β-catenin protein degradation that was prevented by cell treatment with proteasome inhibitor MG132. The β-catenin degradation was dependent on HIPK2 catalytic activity and independent of p53 and glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK-3β activities. Conclusion These results suggest that VEGF might be a target of HIPK2, at least in part, through regulation of β-catenin activity. These findings support the function of HIPK2 as tumor suppressor and hypothesise a role for HIPK2 as antiangiogenic tool in tumor therapy approaches.

  16. Insulin-like growth factor-I, soy protein intake, and breast cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanderson, Maureen; Shu, Xiao Ou; Yu, Herbert; Dai, Qi; Malin, Alecia S; Gao, Yu-Tang; Zheng, Wei

    2004-01-01

    Previous studies have found that estrogen enhances the effect of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) levels on breast cancer cell growth. Participants in the Shanghai Breast Cancer Study (SBCS) consumed large amounts of soy that was high in isoflavones, which act as weak estrogens and as anti-estrogens. We assessed whether soy protein intake modified the effect of IGF-I levels on breast cancer risk. The SBCS is a population-based case-control study of breast cancer among women aged 25-64 conducted between 1996 and 1998 in urban Shanghai. In-person interviews were completed with 1,459 incident breast cancer cases ascertained through a population-based cancer registry and 1,556 controls randomly selected from the general population (with respective response rates of 91% and 90%). This analysis is restricted to the 397 cases and 397 matched controls for whom information on IGF-I levels was available. For premenopausal breast cancer, we found nearly significant interactions between soy protein intake and IGF-I levels (P = 0.080) and insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) levels (P = 0.057). The direction of the interaction appeared to be negative for IGF-I levels but was positive for IGFBP-3 levels. No interaction was evident between soy protein intake and IGF-I or IGFBP-3 levels among postmenopausal women. Our results suggest that soy protein intake may negatively modulate the effect of IGF-I and may positively modulate the effect of IGFBP-3 levels on premenopausal breast cancer risk. Further studies are needed to confirm our finding and to understand the biological mechanisms of these potential interactions.

  17. Attachment styles at work: Measurement, collegial relationships, and burnout

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael P. Leiter

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Although the potential deleterious effects of negative social interactions at work have been well established in the literature, the impact of personal factors in forming work relationships has been relatively neglected. Therefore, using a survey of 1624 Canadian healthcare providers, we examined the extent to which attachment styles at work were associated with the quality of social relationships. We found support for a new measure of attachment styles at work that differentiated between anxiety and avoidance attachment. Avoidance was negatively correlated with positive social constructs (civility, psychological safety, and trust and with the efficacy dimension of burnout. Overall, compared to attachment avoidance, attachment anxiety was more strongly correlated with experienced and instigated workplace incivility, exhaustion, and cynicism. Attachment avoidance was negatively correlated with positive social constructs (civility, psychological safety, and trust and with the efficacy dimension of burnout. Adding these two attachment dimensions to a model of burnout as a function of workload, value congruence, and coworker incivility significantly improved its fit. This study suggests that employees with high attachment anxiety tend to be more closely involved in work relationships and processes, but this closeness comes at a cost in that they experience more strain when participating in social encounters.

  18. [Attachment Representation and Emotion Regulation in Patients with Burnout Syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Söllner, Wolfgang; Behringer, Johanna; Böhme, Stephanie; Stein, Barbara; Reiner, Iris; Spangler, Gottfried

    2016-06-01

    Burnout describes a syndrome of exhaustion resulting from insufficient coping with work-related distress. We investigated if patients that are being clinically treated for burnout show insecure and unresolved attachment representation more often compared with healthy controls. 50 out of 60 consecutive burnout patients participated in the study. Mental representation of attachment was measured by using the Adult Attachment Interview. Additionally, we administered the Self Report Questionnaire to Assess Emotional Experience and Emotion Regulation and several burnout specific questionnaires. A population sample was used as control group. Burnout patients were classified as insecurely attached significantly more often than controls. Unresolved attachment status concerning loss or trauma was found significantly more often within the burnout sample. Patients with insecure attachment representation reported a lower subjective significance of work. Patients with avoidant insecure attachment showed more depersonalisation. Patients with unresolved loss/trauma reported less social support. They showed more passive-negative emotion experience and emotion regulation characterized by externalization. The results of the study suggest that an insecure or unresolved attachment representation might constitute an intrapersonal risk factor for the development of burnout syndrome. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  19. Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Food Service Resources Additional Resources About FAQ Contact Protein Protein is found throughout the body—in muscle, ... the heart and respiratory system, and death. All Protein Isn’t Alike Protein is built from building ...

  20. Polymorphisms at activated protein C cleavage sites of factor V: Are they important in the absence of factor V Leiden?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehsan Kheradmand

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Activated protein C (APC inactivates factor V (FV by cleavage of its heavy chain at Arg306, Arg506, Arg679, and Lys994. Mutational changes, which abolish APC cleavage sites, may predispose thrombosis by altering the inactivation process of FV. FV Leiden (FVL (Arg506Glu has been demonstrated as a strong risk factor for thrombosis. In the current study, we have studied whether mutations in the cleavage sites of FV for APC, not due to FVL, would have a role in presenting APC resistance (APCR and initiation of a cerebral thrombotic event.Methods: A group of 22 patients with a history of cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT, who were not carriers of FVL enrolled in the study. The patients who had conditions associated with acquired APCR were excluded from the study. APCR test was performed on the remaining 16 patients, which showed APCR in 4 plasma samples. DNA sequencing was performed on four exons of FV of APCR patients, encoding Arg306, Arg506, Arg679, and Lys994.Results: Mutations were not found within nucleotides encoding the cleavage sites; neither was found within their close upstream and downstream sequences.Conclusion: Our results show that polymorphisms affecting cleavage sites of FV other than Arg506Glu it would be less likely to be the basis for APCR and its increased thrombosis susceptibility. In addition, it emphasizes on the importance of screening for APCR in the patients diagnosed with CVT.

  1. Adoptive parents can be unprepared for the challenges in caring for children with reactive attachment disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyke, Anna T

    2015-04-01

    Implications for practice and research: Adoptive parents experience significant challenges in caring for children diagnosed with reactive attachment disorder. Informing prospective adoptive parents about attachment issues and providing concrete assistance to develop healthy attachment relationships may decrease some of the frustration experienced by parents and children affected with the disorder. Future research could address factors contributing to the diagnosis of reactive attachment disorder as well as best practices for ameliorating the disorder.

  2. Voluntary exercise protects against stress-induced decreases in brain-derived neurotrophic factor protein expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adlard, P A; Cotman, C W

    2004-01-01

    Exercise is increasingly recognized as an intervention that can reduce CNS dysfunctions such as cognitive decline, depression and stress. Previously we have demonstrated that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is increased in the hippocampus following exercise. In this study we tested the hypothesis that exercise can counteract a reduction in hippocampal BDNF protein caused by acute immobilization stress. Since BDNF expression is suppressed by corticosterone (CORT), circulating CORT levels were also monitored. In animals subjected to 2 h immobilization stress, CORT was elevated immediately following, and at 1 h after the cessation of stress, but remained unchanged from baseline up to 24 h post-stress. The stress protocol resulted in a reduction in BDNF protein at 5 and 10 h post-stress that returned to baseline at 24 h. To determine if exercise could prevent this stress-induced reduction in BDNF protein, animals were given voluntary access to running wheels for 3 weeks prior to the stress. Stressed animals, in the absence of exercise, again demonstrated an initial elevation in CORT (at 0 h) and a subsequent decrease in hippocampal BDNF at the 10 h time point. Exercising animals, both non-stressed and stressed, demonstrated circulating CORT and hippocampal BDNF protein levels that were significantly elevated above control values at both time points examined (0 and 10 h post-stress). Thus, the persistently high CORT levels in exercised animals did not affect the induction of BDNF with exercise, and the effect of immobilization stress on BDNF protein was overcome. To examine the role of CORT in the stress-related regulation of BDNF protein, experiments were carried out in adrenalectomized (ADX) animals. BDNF protein was not downregulated as a result of immobilization stress in ADX animals, while there continued to be an exercise-induced upregulation of BDNF. This study demonstrates that CORT modulates stress-related alterations in BDNF protein. Further, exercise

  3. Electron attachment to Cl 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCorkle, D. L.; Christodoulides, A. A.; Christophorou, L. G.

    1984-08-01

    The electron attachment rate constant for Cl 2 as a function of the mean electron energy (0.04-0.78 eV) and temperature (213-323 K) has been measured and is reported; it shows a maximum at near thermal energy and is attributed to dissociative electron attachment via the ground state 2Σ u+ of Cl 2- from the ground state 1Σ g+ of Cl 2.

  4. Attachment Narratives in Refugee Children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Haene, L.; Dalgård, Nina Thorup; Montgomery, E.

    2013-01-01

    J Trauma Stress. 2013 Jun;26(3):413-7. doi: 10.1002/jts.21820. Attachment narratives in refugee children: interrater reliability and qualitative analysis in pilot findings from a two-site study.......J Trauma Stress. 2013 Jun;26(3):413-7. doi: 10.1002/jts.21820. Attachment narratives in refugee children: interrater reliability and qualitative analysis in pilot findings from a two-site study....

  5. Rhoptry protein 5 (ROP5) Is a Key Virulence Factor in Neospora caninum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Lei; Liu, Jing; Li, Muzi; Fu, Yong; Zhang, Xiao; Liu, Qun

    2017-01-01

    Neospora caninum, of the Apicomplexa phylum, is a common cause of abortions in cattle and nervous system dysfunction in dogs. Rhoptry proteins of Apicomplexa play an important role in virulence. The objectives of this study were to study functions of NcROP5 in N. caninum by deleting the NcROP5 gene from the wild Nc-1 strain. We selected NcROP5 in ToxoDB and successfully constructed an NcROP5 gene-deleted vector, pTCR-NcROP5-CD KO. Then we screened the NcROP5 knockout strains (ΔNcROP5) at the gene, protein and transcription levels. Plaque assay, host cell invasion assay and intracellular proliferation test showed that the ΔNcROP5 strain had less plaque space, weakened invasion capacity and slower intracellular growth. Animal testing showed significantly lower cerebral load of ΔNcROP5 than the load of the Nc-1 strain, as well as a loss of virulence for the ΔNcROP5 strains. Phenotypic analyses using the label-free LC-MS/MS assay-based proteomic method and KEGG pathway enrichment analysis showed a reduction of NcGRA7 transcription and altered expression of multiple proteins including the apicomplexan family of binding proteins. The present study indicated that ROP5 is a key virulence factor in N. caninum in mice. The proteomic profiling of Nc-1 and ΔNcROP5 provided some data on differential proteins. These data provide a foundation for future research of protein functions in N. caninum. PMID:28326073

  6. Strong negative self regulation of prokaryotic transcription factors increases the intrinsic noise of protein expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stekel, Dov J; Jenkins, Dafyd J

    2008-01-18

    Many prokaryotic transcription factors repress their own transcription. It is often asserted that such regulation enables a cell to homeostatically maintain protein abundance. We explore the role of negative self regulation of transcription in regulating the variability of protein abundance using a variety of stochastic modeling techniques. We undertake a novel analysis of a classic model for negative self regulation. We demonstrate that, with standard approximations, protein variance relative to its mean should be independent of repressor strength in a physiological range. Consequently, in that range, the coefficient of variation would increase with repressor strength. However, stochastic computer simulations demonstrate that there is a greater increase in noise associated with strong repressors than predicted by theory. The discrepancies between the mathematical analysis and computer simulations arise because with strong repressors the approximation that leads to Michaelis-Menten-like hyperbolic repression terms ceases to be valid. Because we observe that strong negative feedback increases variability and so is unlikely to be a mechanism for noise control, we suggest instead that negative feedback is evolutionarily favoured because it allows the cell to minimize mRNA usage. To test this, we used in silico evolution to demonstrate that while negative feedback can achieve only a modest improvement in protein noise reduction compared with the unregulated system, it can achieve good improvement in protein response times and very substantial improvement in reducing mRNA levels. Strong negative self regulation of transcription may not always be a mechanism for homeostatic control of protein abundance, but instead might be evolutionarily favoured as a mechanism to limit the use of mRNA. The use of hyperbolic terms derived from quasi-steady-state approximation should also be avoided in the analysis of stochastic models with strong repressors.

  7. Strong negative self regulation of Prokaryotic transcription factors increases the intrinsic noise of protein expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenkins Dafyd J

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many prokaryotic transcription factors repress their own transcription. It is often asserted that such regulation enables a cell to homeostatically maintain protein abundance. We explore the role of negative self regulation of transcription in regulating the variability of protein abundance using a variety of stochastic modeling techniques. Results We undertake a novel analysis of a classic model for negative self regulation. We demonstrate that, with standard approximations, protein variance relative to its mean should be independent of repressor strength in a physiological range. Consequently, in that range, the coefficient of variation would increase with repressor strength. However, stochastic computer simulations demonstrate that there is a greater increase in noise associated with strong repressors than predicted by theory. The discrepancies between the mathematical analysis and computer simulations arise because with strong repressors the approximation that leads to Michaelis-Menten-like hyperbolic repression terms ceases to be valid. Because we observe that strong negative feedback increases variability and so is unlikely to be a mechanism for noise control, we suggest instead that negative feedback is evolutionarily favoured because it allows the cell to minimize mRNA usage. To test this, we used in silico evolution to demonstrate that while negative feedback can achieve only a modest improvement in protein noise reduction compared with the unregulated system, it can achieve good improvement in protein response times and very substantial improvement in reducing mRNA levels. Conclusion Strong negative self regulation of transcription may not always be a mechanism for homeostatic control of protein abundance, but instead might be evolutionarily favoured as a mechanism to limit the use of mRNA. The use of hyperbolic terms derived from quasi-steady-state approximation should also be avoided in the analysis of stochastic

  8. Transfection of influenza A virus nuclear export protein induces the expression of tumor necrosis factor alpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara-Sampablo, Alejandra; Flores-Alonso, Juan Carlos; De Jesús-Ortega, Nereyda; Santos-López, Gerardo; Vallejo-Ruiz, Verónica; Rosas-Murrieta, Nora; Reyes-Carmona, Sandra; Herrera-Camacho, Irma; Reyes-Leyva, Julio

    2014-06-24

    Influenza A virus genomic segments eight codes for non-structural 1 (NS1) protein that is involved in evasion of innate antiviral response, and nuclear export protein (NEP) that participates in the export of viral ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complexes, transcription and replication. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) is highly expressed during influenza virus infections and is considered an anti-infective cytokine. NS1 and NEP proteins were overexpressed and their role on TNF-α expression was evaluated. Both TNF-α mRNA and protein increased in cells transfected with NEP but not with NS1. We further investigate if NS1 or NEP regulates the activity of TNF-α promoter. In the presence of NEP the activity of TNF-α promoter increased significantly compared with the control (83.5±2.9 vs. 30.9±2.8, respectively; p=0.001). This effect decreased 15-fold when the TNF-α promoter distal region was deleted, suggesting the involvement of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) and NF-kB response elements. This was corroborated by testing the effect produced on TNF-α promoter by the treatment with Raf/MEK/ERK (U0126), NF-kB (Bay-11-7082) and PI3K (Ly294-002) cell signaling inhibitors. Treatment with U0126 and Bay-117082 reduced the activity of TNF-α promoter mediated by NEP (41.5±3.2, 70% inhibition; and 80.6±7.4, 35% inhibition, respectively) compared to mock-treated control. The results suggest a new role for NEP protein that participates in the transcriptional regulation of human TNF-α expression.

  9. Signal peptide of eosinophil cationic protein upregulates transforming growth factor-alpha expression in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hao-Teng; Kao, Yu-Lin; Wu, Chia-Mao; Fan, Tan-Chi; Lai, Yiu-Kay; Huang, Kai-Ling; Chang, Yuo-Sheng; Tsai, Jaw-Ji; Chang, Margaret Dah-Tsyr

    2007-04-01

    Eosinophil cationic protein (ECP) is a major component of eosinophil granule protein that is used as a clinical bio-marker for asthma and allergic inflammatory diseases. Previously, it has been reported that the signal peptide of human ECP (ECPsp) inhibits the cell growth of Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Pichia pastoris (P. pastoris), but not mammalian A431 cells. The inhibitory effect is due to the lack of human signal peptide peptidase (hSPP), a protease located on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane, in the lower organisms. In this study, we show that the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is upregulated by the exogenous ECPsp-eGFP as a result of the increased expression of the transforming growth factor-alpha (TGF-alpha) at both transcriptional and translational levels in A431 and HL-60 clone 15 cell lines. Furthermore, the N-terminus of ECPsp fragment generated by the cleavage of hSPP (ECPspM1-G17) gives rise to over threefold increase of TGF-alpha protein expression, whereas another ECPsp fragment (ECPspL18-A27) and the hSPP-resistant ECPsp (ECPspG17L) do not show similar effect. Our results indicate that the ECPspM1-G17 plays a crucial role in the upregulation of TGF-alpha, suggesting that the ECPsp not only directs the secretion of mature ECP, but also involves in the autocrine system.

  10. The human mitochondrial transcription factor A is a versatile G-quadruplex binding protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyonnais, Sébastien; Tarrés-Soler, Aleix; Rubio-Cosials, Anna; Cuppari, Anna; Brito, Reicy; Jaumot, Joaquim; Gargallo, Raimundo; Vilaseca, Marta; Silva, Cristina; Granzhan, Anton; Teulade-Fichou, Marie-Paule; Eritja, Ramon; Solà, Maria

    2017-01-01

    The ability of the guanine-rich strand of the human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) to form G-quadruplex structures (G4s) has been recently highlighted, suggesting potential functions in mtDNA replication initiation and mtDNA stability. G4 structures in mtDNA raise the question of their recognition by factors associated with the mitochondrial nucleoid. The mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM), a high-mobility group (HMG)-box protein, is the major binding protein of human mtDNA and plays a critical role in its expression and maintenance. HMG-box proteins are pleiotropic sensors of DNA structural alterations. Thus, we investigated and uncovered a surprising ability of TFAM to bind to DNA or RNA G4 with great versatility, showing an affinity similar than to double-stranded DNA. The recognition of G4s by endogenous TFAM was detected in mitochondrial extracts by pull-down experiments using a G4-DNA from the mtDNA conserved sequence block II (CSBII). Biochemical characterization shows that TFAM binding to G4 depends on both the G-quartets core and flanking single-stranded overhangs. Additionally, it shows a structure-specific binding mode that differs from B-DNA, including G4-dependent TFAM multimerization. These TFAM-G4 interactions suggest functional recognition of G4s in the mitochondria. PMID:28276514

  11. Roles for transforming growth factor beta superfamily proteins in early folliculogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trombly, Daniel J; Woodruff, Teresa K; Mayo, Kelly E

    2009-01-01

    Primordial follicle formation and the subsequent transition of follicles to the primary and secondary stages encompass the early events during folliculogenesis in mammals. These processes establish the ovarian follicle pool and prime follicles for entry into subsequent growth phases during the reproductive cycle. Perturbations during follicle formation can affect the size of the primordial follicle pool significantly, and alterations in follicle transition can cause follicles to arrest at immature stages or result in premature depletion of the follicle reserve. Determining the molecular events that regulate primordial follicle formation and early follicle growth may lead to the development of new fertility treatments. Over the last decade, many of the growth factors and signaling proteins that mediate the early stages of folliculogenesis have been identified using mouse genetic models, in vivo injection studies, and ex vivo organ culture approaches. These studies reveal important roles for the transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) superfamily of proteins in the ovary. This article reviews these roles for TGF-beta family proteins and focuses in particular on work from our laboratories on the functions of activin in early folliculogenesis.

  12. β-amylase-like proteins function as transcription factors in Arabidopsis, controlling shoot growth and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhold, Heike; Soyk, Sebastian; Simková, Klára; Hostettler, Carmen; Marafino, John; Mainiero, Samantha; Vaughan, Cara K; Monroe, Jonathan D; Zeeman, Samuel C

    2011-04-01

    Plants contain β-amylase-like proteins (BAMs; enzymes usually associated with starch breakdown) present in the nucleus rather than targeted to the chloroplast. They possess BRASSINAZOLE RESISTANT1 (BZR1)-type DNA binding domains--also found in transcription factors mediating brassinosteroid (BR) responses. The two Arabidopsis thaliana BZR1-BAM proteins (BAM7 and BAM8) bind a cis-regulatory element that both contains a G box and resembles a BR-responsive element. In protoplast transactivation assays, these BZR1-BAMs activate gene expression. Structural modeling suggests that the BAM domain's glucan binding cleft is intact, but the recombinant proteins are at least 1000 times less active than chloroplastic β-amylases. Deregulation of BZR1-BAMs (the bam7bam8 double mutant and BAM8-overexpressing plants) causes altered leaf growth and development. Of the genes upregulated in plants overexpressing BAM8 and downregulated in bam7bam8 plants, many carry the cis-regulatory element in their promoters. Many genes that respond to BRs are inversely regulated by BZR1-BAMs. We propose a role for BZR1-BAMs in controlling plant growth and development through crosstalk with BR signaling. Furthermore, we speculate that BZR1-BAMs may transmit metabolic signals by binding a ligand in their BAM domain, although diurnal changes in the concentration of maltose, a candidate ligand produced by chloroplastic β-amylases, do not influence their transcription factor function.

  13. A Comparison of Blood Factor XII Autoactivation in Buffer, Protein Cocktail, Serum, and Plasma Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golas, Avantika; Yeh, Chyi-Huey Josh; Pitakjakpipop, Harit; Siedlecki, Christopher A.; Vogler, Erwin A.

    2012-01-01

    Activation of blood plasma coagulation in vitro by contact with material surfaces is demonstrably dependent on plasma-volume-to-activator-surface-area ratio. The only plausible explanation consistent with current understanding of coagulation-cascade biochemistry is that procoagulant stimulus arising from the activation complex of the intrinsic pathway is dependent on activator surface area. And yet, it is herein shown that activation of the blood zymogen factor XII (Hageman factor, FXII) dissolved in buffer, protein cocktail, heat-denatured serum, and FXI deficient plasma does not exhibit activator surface-area dependence. Instead, a highly-variable burst of procoagulant-enzyme yield is measured that exhibits no measurable kinetics, sensitivity to mixing, or solution-temperature dependence. Thus, FXII activation in both buffer and protein-containing solutions does not exhibit characteristics of a biochemical reaction but rather appears to be a “mechanochemical” reaction induced by FXII molecule interactions with hydrophilic activator particles that do not formally adsorb blood proteins from solution. Results of this study strongly suggest that activator surface-area dependence observed in contact activation of plasma coagulation does not solely arise at the FXII activation step of the intrinsic pathway. PMID:23117212

  14. Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha Induced Protein 3 Interacting Protein 1 Gene Polymorphisms and Pustular Psoriasis in Chinese Han Population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Wen Han; Yong Wang; Chulu Alateng; Hong-Bin Li; Yun-Hua Bai; Xin-Xiang Lyu; Rina Wu

    2016-01-01

    Background:Psoriasis is a common immune-mediated inflammatory dermatosis.Generalized pustular psoriasis (GPP) is the severe and rare type of psoriasis.The association between tumor necrosis factor-alpha induced protein 3 interacting protein 1 (TNIP1) gene and psoriasis was confirmed in people with multiple ethnicities.This study was to investigate the association between TNIP1 gene polymorphisms and pustular psoriasis in Chinese Han population.Methods:Seventy-three patients with GPP,67 patients with palmoplantar pustulosis (PPP),and 476 healthy controls were collected from Chinese Han population.Six single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the TNIP1 gene,namely rs3805435,rs3792798,rs3792797,rs869976,rs17728338,and rs999011 were genotyped by using polymerase chain reaction-ligase detection reaction.Statistical analyses were performed using the PLINK 1.07 package.Allele frequencies and genotyping frequencies for six SNPs were compared by using Chi-square test,odd ratio (OR) (including 95% confidence interval) were calculated.The haplotype analysis was conducted by Haploview software.Results:The frequencies of alleles of five SNPs were significantly different between the GPP group and the control group (P≤ 7.22 × 10-3),especially in the GPP patients without psoriasis vulgaris (PsV).In the haplotype analysis,the most significantly different haplotype was H4:ACGAAC,with 13.1% frequency in the GPP group but only 3.4% in the control group (OR =4.16,P =4.459 × 10-7).However,no significant difference in the allele frequencies was found between the PPP group and control group for each of the six SNPs (P > 0.05).Conclusions:Polymorphisms in TNIP1 are associated with GPP in Chinese Han population.However,no association with PPP was found.These findings suggest that TNIP1 might be a susceptibility gene for GPP.

  15. Porcine dentin sialoprotein glycosylation and glycosaminoglycan attachments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamakoshi Fumiko

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dentin sialophosphoprotein (Dspp is a multidomain, secreted protein that is critical for the formation of tooth dentin. Mutations in DSPP cause inherited dentin defects categorized as dentin dysplasia type II and dentinogenesis imperfecta type II and type III. Dentin sialoprotein (Dsp, the N-terminal domain of dentin sialophosphoprotein (Dspp, is a highly glycosylated proteoglycan, but little is known about the number, character, and attachment sites of its carbohydrate moieties. Results To identify its carbohydrate attachment sites we isolated Dsp from developing porcine molars and digested it with endoproteinase Glu-C or pronase, fractionated the digestion products, identified fractions containing glycosylated peptides using a phenol sulfuric acid assay, and characterized the glycopeptides by N-terminal sequencing, amino acid analyses, or LC/MSMS. To determine the average number of sialic acid attachments per N-glycosylation, we digested Dsp with glycopeptidase A, labeled the released N-glycosylations with 2-aminobenzoic acid, and quantified the moles of released glycosylations by comparison to labeled standards of known concentration. Sialic acid was released by sialidase digestion and quantified by measuring β-NADH reduction of pyruvic acid, which was generated stoichiometrically from sialic acid by aldolase. To determine its forms, sialic acid released by sialidase digestion was labeled with 1,2-diamino-4,5-methyleneoxybenzene (DMB and compared to a DMB-labeled sialic acid reference panel by RP-HPLC. To determine the composition of Dsp glycosaminoglycan (GAG attachments, we digested Dsp with chondroitinase ABC and compared the chromotagraphic profiles of the released disaccharides to commercial standards. N-glycosylations were identified at Asn37, Asn77, Asn136, Asn155, Asn161, and Asn176. Dsp averages one sialic acid per N-glycosylation, which is always in the form of N-acetylneuraminic acid. O-glycosylations were

  16. Over-expression and purification strategies for recombinant multi-protein oligomers: a case study of Mycobacterium tuberculosis σ/anti-σ factor protein complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Krishan Gopal; Jaiswal, Ravi Kumar; Shukla, Jinal K; Praveena, T; Gopal, B

    2010-12-01

    The function of a protein in a cell often involves coordinated interactions with one or several regulatory partners. It is thus imperative to characterize a protein both in isolation as well as in the context of its complex with an interacting partner. High resolution structural information determined by X-ray crystallography and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance offer the best route to characterize protein complexes. These techniques, however, require highly purified and homogenous protein samples at high concentration. This requirement often presents a major hurdle for structural studies. Here we present a strategy based on co-expression and co-purification to obtain recombinant multi-protein complexes in the quantity and concentration range that can enable hitherto intractable structural projects. The feasibility of this strategy was examined using the σ factor/anti-σ factor protein complexes from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The approach was successful across a wide range of σ factors and their cognate interacting partners. It thus appears likely that the analysis of these complexes based on variations in expression constructs and procedures for the purification and characterization of these recombinant protein samples would be widely applicable for other multi-protein systems.

  17. A comprehensive resource of interacting protein regions for refining human transcription factor networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etsuko Miyamoto-Sato

    Full Text Available Large-scale data sets of protein-protein interactions (PPIs are a valuable resource for mapping and analysis of the topological and dynamic features of interactome networks. The currently available large-scale PPI data sets only contain information on interaction partners. The data presented in this study also include the sequences involved in the interactions (i.e., the interacting regions, IRs suggested to correspond to functional and structural domains. Here we present the first large-scale IR data set obtained using mRNA display for 50 human transcription factors (TFs, including 12 transcription-related proteins. The core data set (966 IRs; 943 PPIs displays a verification rate of 70%. Analysis of the IR data set revealed the existence of IRs that interact with multiple partners. Furthermore, these IRs were preferentially associated with intrinsic disorder. This finding supports the hypothesis that intrinsically disordered regions play a major role in the dynamics and diversity of TF networks through their ability to structurally adapt to and bind with multiple partners. Accordingly, this domain-based interaction resource represents an important step in refining protein interactions and networks at the domain level and in associating network analysis with biological structure and function.

  18. Characterization of the insulin-like growth factor binding protein family in Xenopus tropicalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haramoto, Yoshikazu; Oshima, Tomomi; Takahashi, Shuji; Ito, Yuzuru

    2014-01-01

    The insulin-like growth factor binding protein (Igfbp) family consists of six members designated Igfbp1-6. Igfbps are involved in many vital biological functions. They physically interact with IGFs (IGF1 and IGF2) and act as carriers, thereby protecting IGFs from proteolytic degradation. Thus, they function as modulators of IGF activity. Furthermore, Igfbps have been reported to have IGF-independent activities. They interact with other proteins, including cell surface proteins, extra-cellular matrix proteins, and potentially intracellular molecules. In Xenopus tropicalis (X. tropicalis), only four igfbp genes (igfbp1, igfbp2, igfbp4, and igfbp5) have been identified, and their expression is not well characterized. We report that X. tropicalis genome lacks the igfbp3 and igfbp6 genes based on synteny analyses. We also examined the spatio-temporal expression patterns of igfbp genes in early X. tropicalis development. Expression analyses indicated that they are differentially expressed during early development. Each igfbp gene showed a characteristic spatial expression pattern. Except for igfbp5, they demonstrated overlapping expression in the pronephros. The Xenopus pronephros is composed of four domains (i.e., the proximal tubule, intermediate tubule, distal tubule, and connecting tubule). Our results showed that at least two igfbp genes are co-expressed in all pronephric domains, suggesting that redundant functions of igfbp genes are required in early pronephric kidney development.

  19. Expression, refolding, and characterization of recombinant thrombopoietin/stem cell factor fusion protein in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Yuhui; Zhang, Xu; Jiang, Xiaoling; Li, Haoran; Zhu, Jie; Zhang, Chi; Peng, Wei; Qin, Junchuan

    2007-03-01

    Thrombopoietin/stem cell factor (TPO/SCF) is a novel fusion protein that combines the complementary biological effects of TPO and SCF into a single molecule. In this study, TPO/SCF gene was cloned into pET32a and expressed as a thioredoxin (Trx) fusion protein with a C-terminal 6His-tag in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) under the control of T7 promoter. Trx-TPO/SCF protein approximately accounted for 20% of the total bacterial proteins and was found to accumulate in inclusion bodies. Inclusion bodies were separated from cellular debris, washed with buffer containing 2 M urea, and solubilized with 8 M urea. The refolding of Trx-TPO/SCF was then carried out by an on-column method. Soluble Trx-TPO/SCF was characterized for its dose-dependent effects on promoting cells proliferation in both TF1 and Mo7e cell lines. rhTPO/SCF was released by thrombin digestion and further purified by Ni(2+) affinity chromatography. Western blot analysis confirmed the identities of Trx-TPO/SCF and rhTPO/SCF.

  20. Protein Adsorption Patterns and Analysis on IV Nanoemulsions—The Key Factor Determining the Organ Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirko Jansch

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Intravenous nanoemulsions have been on the market for parenteral nutrition since the 1950s; meanwhile, they have also been used successfully for IV drug delivery. To be well tolerable, the emulsions should avoid uptake by the MPS cells of the body; for drug delivery, they should be target-specific. The organ distribution is determined by the proteins adsorbing them after injection from the blood (protein adsorption pattern, typically analyzed by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, 2-D PAGE. The article reviews the 2-D PAGE method, the analytical problems to be faced and the knowledge available on how the composition of emulsions affects the protein adsorption patterns, e.g., the composition of the oil phase, stabilizer layer and drug incorporation into the interface or oil core. Data were re-evaluated and compared, and the implications for the in vivo distribution are discussed. Major results are that the interfacial composition of the stabilizer layer is the main determining factor and that this composition can be modulated by simple processes. Drug incorporation affects the pattern depending on the localization of the drug (oil core versus interface. The data situation regarding in vivo effects is very limited; mainly, it has to be referred to in the in vivo data of polymeric nanoparticles. As a conclusion, determination of the protein adsorption patterns can accelerate IV nanoemulsion formulation development regarding optimized organ distribution and related pharmacokinetics.

  1. Regulation of WRKY46 transcription factor function by mitogen-activated protein kinases in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arsheed Hussain Sheikh

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available AbstractMitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK cascades are central signalling pathways activated in plants after sensing internal developmental and external stress cues. Knowledge about the downstream substrate proteins of MAPKs is still limited in plants. We screened Arabidopsis WRKY transcription factors as potential targets downstream of MAPKs, and concentrated on characterizing WRKY46 as a substrate of the MAPK, MPK3. Mass spectrometry revealed in vitro phosphorylation of WRKY46 at amino acid position S168 by MPK3. However, mutagenesis studies showed that a second phosphosite, S250, can also be phosphorylated. Elicitation with pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs, such as the bacterial flagellin-derived flg22 peptide led to in vivo destabilization of WRKY46 in Arabidopsis protoplasts. Mutation of either phosphorylation site reduced the PAMP-induced degradation of WRKY46. Furthermore, the protein for the double phosphosite mutant is expressed at higher levels compared to wild-type proteins or single phosphosite mutants. In line with its nuclear localization and predicted function as a transcriptional activator, overexpression of WRKY46 in protoplasts raised basal plant defence as reflected by the increase in promoter activity of the PAMP-responsive gene, NHL10, in a MAPK-dependent manner. Thus, MAPK-mediated regulation of WRKY46 is a mechanism to control plant defence.

  2. Effects of Nerve Growth Factor on Bcl-2 Protein after Spinal Cord Injury in Rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汤长华; 曹晓建; 王道新

    2002-01-01

    Objective To explore the protective mechanisms of nerve growth factor( NGF) ou spinal cord injury(SCI) and provide theoretical basis for its clinical application. MethodsThe SCI of Wistar rats was done by Allens weight dropping way by a 10 g × 2.5 cm impact on theposterior of spinal cord T8 NGF ( 3 g/L, 20d) or normal saline was injected to treatment group ratsthrough catheter into subarachnoid space at 0,2,4,8,12 and 24 h after SCI. The expression of bcl-2 protein levels in rat spinal cord was detected by immunohistoclemistry. Results The strong expres-sion sequence of bcl-2 protein was found in spinal cord of normal rat group. The levels of bcl-2 pro-tein after SCI in NGF treatment group increased more significantly than those in normal saline treatmentgroup (P<0. 01). Conclusion NGF could protect injured spinal cord by stimulating bcl-2 pro-tein expression and suppressing apoptosis after SCI.

  3. Relationships among changes in C-reactive protein and cardiovascular disease risk factors with lifestyle interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, D; Camhi, S; Wu, T; Hagberg, J; Stefanick, M

    2013-09-01

    Inflammation plays a role in the development of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Elevated levels of the inflammatory marker, C-reactive protein (CRP), are cross-sectionally associated with traditional CVD risk factors and are being considered as an emerging CVD risk factor. In a secondary data analysis, we examined changes in CRP and several CVD risk factors after one-year diet and physical activity interventions to assess whether CRP changed concurrently with other risk factors, or was independent of the traditional risk factors. Data were analyzed from 143 men and 133 women with dyslipidemia who were randomized to one-year interventions of low-fat diet only, physical activity only, diet plus physical activity, or control. Plasma high-sensitivity CRP, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides (TG), fasting and 2-hr blood glucose and insulin, blood pressure (BP), and waist circumference were obtained at baseline and follow-up. Multiple linear regression models were used to predict CRP change based on other risk factor changes, controlling for age, race, alcohol intake, and hormone replacement therapy. Treatment groups were combined for analysis. Baseline mean (SD) CRP levels were 1.3 ± 1.3 (men) and 1.9 ± 1.8 mg/L (women), with mean changes of -0.11 ± 1.3 and -0.17 ± 1.5 mg/L, respectively. Plasma CRP change was negatively associated with TG change in men (p = 0.003) and women (p = 0.05), positively associated with change in systolic BP in men (p = 0.01), but was not associated with changes in the other risk factors. Dietary and/or physical activity induced changes in CRP may be largely independent of traditional CVD risk factors in persons with dyslipidemia. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Plant NAC-type transcription factor proteins contain a NARD domain for repression of transcriptional activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Yu-Jun; Song, Qing-Xin; Chen, Hao-Wei; Zou, Hong-Feng; Wei, Wei; Kang, Xu-Sheng; Ma, Biao; Zhang, Wan-Ke; Zhang, Jin-Song; Chen, Shou-Yi

    2010-10-01

    Plant-specific transcription factor NAC proteins play essential roles in many biological processes such as development, senescence, morphogenesis, and stress signal transduction pathways. In the NAC family, some members function as transcription activators while others act as repressors. In the present study we found that though the full-length GmNAC20 from soybean did not have transcriptional activation activity, the carboxy-terminal activation domain of GmNAC20 had high transcriptional activation activity in the yeast assay system. Deletion experiments revealed an active repression domain with 35 amino acids, named NARD (NAC Repression Domain), in the d subdomain of NAC DNA-binding domain. NARD can reduce the transcriptional activation ability of diverse transcription factors when fused to either the amino-terminal or the carboxy-terminal of the transcription factors. NARD-like sequences are also present in other NAC family members and they are functional repression domain when fused to VP16 in plant protoplast assay system. Mutation analysis of conserved amino acid residues in NARD showed that the hydrophobic LVFY motif may partially contribute to the repression function. It is hypothesized that the interactions between the repression domain NARD and the carboxy-terminal activation domain may finally determine the ability of NAC family proteins to regulate downstream gene expressions.

  5. Testing For Measurement Invariance of Attachment Across Chinese and American Adolescent Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Ling; Zhao, Jihong Solomon; He, Ni Phil; Marshall, Ineke Haen; Zhang, Hongwei; Zhao, Ruohui; Jin, Cheng

    2016-06-01

    Adolescent attachment to formal and informal institutions has emerged as a major focus of criminological theories since the publication of Hirschi's work in 1969. This study attempts to examine the psychometric equivalence of the factorial structure of attachment measures across nations reflecting Western and Eastern cultures. Twelve manifest variables are used tapping the concepts of adolescent attachment to parents, school, and neighborhood. Confirmatory factor analysis is used to conduct invariance test across approximately 3,000 Chinese and U.S. adolescents. Results provide strong support for a three-factor model; the multigroup invariance tests reveal mixed results. While the family attachment measure appears invariant between the two samples, significant differences in the coefficients of the factor loadings are detected in the school attachment and neighborhood attachment measures. The results of regression analyses lend support to the predictive validity of three types of attachment. Finally, the limitations of the study are discussed.

  6. The Key Factors Affecting Tuber Development of Potato in vitro and the Relation with Protein Fractions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Da-yong; LIAN Yong; ZHU De-wei

    2002-01-01

    According to previous analysis, some properties bounding up with tuber yield were investigated.The results showed that tuber average weight, plastid Mg2+ -ATPase activity, plastid Ca2+ -ATPase activity,mitochondria Mg2+-ATPase activity, total soluble protein content, tuber average diameter, and Q-enzyme activity were important factors determining the tuber yield. The linear regression equation was:Y = 0.5211 +0.0595X(1) + 0.8389X(2) + 0.0882X(3) - 0. 0073X(4) + 0. 1449X(5) + 0. 3510X(6) + 0. 0031X(7) -0.00003X(8) + 0.3412X(9)+ 0.0127X(10) + 0.2904X(11) + 0.0570X(12) + 0.0159X(13) + 0.3585X(14)+ 0.0134X(15) -0.1012X(16). At the same time, the relation between several important properties and soluble protein fractions were analyzed.

  7. Association of coatomer proteins with the beta-receptor for platelet-derived growth factor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Klaus; Rönnstrand, L; Rorsman, C

    1997-01-01

    of intracellular vesicle transport. In order to explore the functional significance of the interaction between alpha- and beta'-COP and the PDGF receptor, a receptor mutant was made in which the conserved histidine residue 928 was mutated to an alanine residue. The mutant receptor, which was unable to bind alpha......The nonreceptor tyrosine kinase Src binds to and is activated by the beta-receptor for platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF). The interaction leads to Src phosphorylation of Tyr934 in the kinase domain of the receptor. In the course of the functional characterization of this phosphorylation, we...... noticed that components of 136 and 97 kDa bound to a peptide from this region of the receptor in a phosphorylation-independent manner. These components have now been purified and identified as alpha- and beta'-coatomer proteins (COPs), respectively. COPs are a family of proteins involved in the regulation...

  8. Vascular endothelial growth factor A protein level and gene expression in intracranial meningiomas with brain edema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nassehi, Damoun; Dyrbye, Henrik; Andresen, Morten;

    2011-01-01

    Meningiomas are the second most common primary intracranial tumors in adults. Although meningiomas are mostly benign, more than 50% of patients with meningioma develop peritumoral brain edema (PTBE), which may be fatal because of increased intracranial pressure. Vascular endothelial growth factor....... Forty-three patients had primary, solitary, supratentorial meningiomas with PTBE. In these, correlations in PTBE, edema index, VEGF-A protein, VEGF gene expression, capillary length, and tumor water content were investigated. DNA-branched hybridization was used for measuring VEGF gene expression...... in tissue homogenates prepared from frozen tissue samples. The method for VEGF-A analysis resembled an ELISA assay, but was based on chemiluminescence. The edema index was positively correlated to VEGF-A protein (p = 0.014) and VEGF gene expression (p

  9. Protein interaction network of alternatively spliced isoforms from brain links genetic risk factors for autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corominas, Roser; Yang, Xinping; Lin, Guan Ning; Kang, Shuli; Shen, Yun; Ghamsari, Lila; Broly, Martin; Rodriguez, Maria; Tam, Stanley; Trigg, Shelly A; Fan, Changyu; Yi, Song; Tasan, Murat; Lemmens, Irma; Kuang, Xingyan; Zhao, Nan; Malhotra, Dheeraj; Michaelson, Jacob J; Vacic, Vladimir; Calderwood, Michael A; Roth, Frederick P; Tavernier, Jan; Horvath, Steve; Salehi-Ashtiani, Kourosh; Korkin, Dmitry; Sebat, Jonathan; Hill, David E; Hao, Tong; Vidal, Marc; Iakoucheva, Lilia M

    2014-04-11

    Increased risk for autism spectrum disorders (ASD) is attributed to hundreds of genetic loci. The convergence of ASD variants have been investigated using various approaches, including protein interactions extracted from the published literature. However, these datasets are frequently incomplete, carry biases and are limited to interactions of a single splicing isoform, which may not be expressed in the disease-relevant tissue. Here we introduce a new interactome mapping approach by experimentally identifying interactions between brain-expressed alternatively spliced variants of ASD risk factors. The Autism Spliceform Interaction Network reveals that almost half of the detected interactions and about 30% of the newly identified interacting partners represent contribution from splicing variants, emphasizing the importance of isoform networks. Isoform interactions greatly contribute to establishing direct physical connections between proteins from the de novo autism CNVs. Our findings demonstrate the critical role of spliceform networks for translating genetic knowledge into a better understanding of human diseases.

  10. [Factors to be considered in the production and introduction of high-quality protein foods].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chávez, J F

    1980-03-01

    A wide variety of factors can influence the development, production and introduction of high-quality protein foods in a given country. Such factors can be grouped in three main areas: I. Factors depending upon the country itself. II. Factors related with the identity of the food and III. Factors inherent to the consumer. The role of the food industry and of the government are discussed in area I, and such aspects as improvement of staples, availability of raw materials, health programs and energy crisis are briefly commented. Area II covers product identity in relation to used ingredients. Nutritional quality and requirements as well as the danger of increasing the price of the product after being in the market are briefly discussed. The consumer's attitude, preferences and personal reactions towards the presentation of the food are covered in area III. Also marketing approach, promotion, labels and possible influence of the name are discussed. The launching of "incaparina" in Venezuela in 1964 and the reasons for its failure are commented from the different points of view covered in the above sections.

  11. Factors contributing to decreased protein stability when aspartic acid residues are in {beta}-sheet regions.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pokkuluri, P. R.; Cai, X.; Raffen, R.; Gu, M.; Stevens, F. J.; Schiffer, M.

    2002-07-01

    Asp residues are significantly under represented in {beta}-sheet regions of proteins, especially in the middle of {beta}-strands, as found by a number of studies using statistical, modeling, or experimental methods. To further understand the reasons for this under representation of Asp, we prepared and analyzed mutants of a {beta}-domain. Two Gln residues of the immunoglobulin light-chain variable domain (V{sub L}) of protein Len were replaced with Asp, and then the effects of these changes on protein stability and protein structure were studied. The replacement of Q38D, located at the end of a {beta}-strand, and that of Q89D, located in the middle of a {beta}-strand, reduced the stability of the parent immunoglobulin VL domain by 2.0 kcal/mol and 5.3 kcal/mol, respectively. Because the Q89D mutant of the wild-type V{sub L}-Len domain was too unstable to be expressed as a soluble protein, we prepared the Q89D mutant in a triple mutant background, V{sub L}-Len M4L/Y27dD/T94H, which was 4.2 kcal/mol more stable than the wild-type V{sub L}-Len domain. The structures of mutants V{sub L}-Len Q38D and V{sub L}-Len Q89D/M4L/Y27dD/T94H were determined by X-ray diffraction at 1.6 A resolution. We found no major perturbances in the structures of these QD mutant proteins relative to structures of the parent proteins. The observed stability changes have to be accounted for by cumulative effects of the following several factors: (1) by changes in main-chain dihedral angles and in side-chain rotomers, (2) by close contacts between some atoms, and, most significantly, (3) by the unfavorable electrostatic interactions between the Asp side chain and the carbonyls of the main chain. We show that the Asn side chain, which is of similar size but neutral, is less destabilizing. The detrimental effect of Asp within a {beta}-sheet of an immunoglobulin-type domain can have very serious consequences. A somatic mutation of a {beta}-strand residue to Asp could prevent the expression of the

  12. Molecular cloning and characterization of growth factor receptor bound-protein in Clonorchis sinensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuelian Bai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Clonorchis sinensis causes clonorchiasis, a potentially serious disease. Growth factor receptor-bound protein 2 (Grb2 is a cytosolic protein conserved among animals and plays roles in cellular functions such as meiosis, organogenesis and energy metabolism. In the present study, we report first molecular characters of growth factor receptor bound-protein (CsGrb2 from C. sinensis as counter part of Grb2 from animals and its possible functions in development and organogenesis of C. sinensis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A CsGrb2 cDNA clone retrieved from the C. sinensis transcriptome encoded a polypeptide with a SH3-SH2-SH3 structure. Recombinant CsGrb2 was bacterially produced and purified to homogeneity. Native CsGrb2 with estimated molecular weight was identified from C. sinensis adult extract by western blotting using a mouse immune serum to recombinant CsGrb2. CsGrb2 transcripts was more abundant in the metacercariae than in the adults. Immunohistochemical staining showed that CsGrb2 was localized to the suckers, mesenchymal tissues, sperms in seminal receptacle and ovary in the adults, and abundantly expressed in most organs of the metacercariae. Recombinant CsGrb2 was evaluated to be little useful as a serodiagnostic reagent for C. sinesis human infections. CONCLUSION: Grb2 protein found in C. sinensis was conserved among animals and suggested to play a role in the organogenesis, energy metabolism and mitotic spermatogenesis of C. sinensis. These findings from C. sinensis provide wider understanding on diverse function of Grb2 in lower animals such as platyhelminths.

  13. Vascular endothelial growth factor induces multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 overexpression through phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase/protein kinase B signaling pathway and transcription factor specificity protein 1 in BGC823 cell line

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Juan Li; Xiaojun Wu; Jinling Gong; Jing Yang; Jiayan Leng; Qiaoyun Chen; Wenlin Xu

    2013-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is one of the most important causes of chemotherapy failure and carcinoma recurrence.But the roles of the MDR-associated protein MRP1 in MDR remain poorly understood.Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF),one of the most active and specific vascular growth factors,plays a significant role in proliferation,differentiation,and metastasis of cancers.To explore the effect of VEGF on the expression of MRP1,we used recombinant human VEGF to stimulate K562 and BGC-823 cell lines.Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis showed that the expression of MRP1 at both mRNA and protein levels was increased.3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide results also showed that VEGF significantly enhanced the ICs0 of the cells treated with adriamycin.To explore the underlying regulatory mechanisms,we constructed MRP1 promoter and the luciferase reporter gene recombinant vector.The luciferase reporter gene assay showed that the activity of the MRP1 promoter was markedly increased by VEGF stimulation,while LY294002,an inhibitor of the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (Akt) signaling pathway,reduced this effect.Transcription factor specificity protein 1 (SP1) binding site mutation partially blocked the up-regulation of MRP1 promoter activity by VEGF.In summary,our results demonstrated that VEGF enhanced the expression of MRP1,and the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway and SP1 may be involved in this modulation.

  14. Biocompatible implants and methods of making and attaching the same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowley, Adrian P; Laude, Lucien D; Humayun, Mark S; Weiland, James D; Lotfi, Atoosa; Markland, Jr., Francis S

    2014-10-07

    The invention provides a biocompatible silicone implant that can be securely affixed to living tissue through interaction with integral membrane proteins (integrins). A silicone article containing a laser-activated surface is utilized to make the implant. One example is an implantable prosthesis to treat blindness caused by outer retinal degenerative diseases. The device bypasses damaged photoreceptors and electrically stimulates the undamaged neurons of the retina. Electrical stimulation is achieved using a silicone microelectrode array (MEA). A safe, protein adhesive is used in attaching the MEA to the retinal surface and assist in alleviating focal pressure effects. Methods of making and attaching such implants are also provided.

  15. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α induces multidrug resistance protein in colon cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lv Y

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Yingqian Lv, Shan Zhao, Jinzhu Han, Likang Zheng, Zixin Yang, Li Zhao Department of Oncology, The Second Hospital, Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang, Hebei Province, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Multidrug resistance is the major cause of chemotherapy failure in many solid tumors, including colon cancer. Hypoxic environment is a feature for all solid tumors and is important for the development of tumor resistance to chemotherapy. Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF-1α is the key transcription factor that mediates cellular response to hypoxia. HIF-1α has been shown to play an important role in tumor resistance; however, the mechanism is still not fully understood. Here, we found that HIF-1α and the drug resistance-associated gene multidrug resistance associated protein 1 (MRP1 were induced by treatment of colon cancer cells with the hypoxia-mimetic agent cobalt chloride. Inhibition of HIF-1α by RNA interference and dominant-negative protein can significantly reduce the induction of MRP1 by hypoxia. Bioinformatics analysis showed that a hypoxia response element is located at -378 to -373 bp upstream of the transcription start site of MRP1 gene. Luciferase reporter assay combined with mutation analysis confirmed that this element is essential for hypoxia-mediated activation of MRP gene. Furthermore, RNA interference revealed that HIF-1α is necessary for this hypoxia-driven activation of MRP1 promoter. Importantly, chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis demonstrated that HIF-1α could directly bind to this HRE site in vivo. Together, these data suggest that MRP1 is a downstream target gene of HIF-1α, which provides a potential novel mechanism for HIF-1α-mediated drug resistance in colon cancer and maybe other solid tumors as well. Keywords: hypoxia, hypoxia-inducible factor-1α, multidrug resistance associated protein, transcriptional regulation, chemotherapy tolerance

  16. The connection between adult partner attachment and parenting styles

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    The child-mother relation in infancy was found very important not only as a predictor of a child's social adaptation, personality predisposition and capacity development, but also as a prototype of establishing contacts with others later in life (Bowlby, 1975). These early attachment bondings with the child's mother are the basis for all close relationships with potential partners later in life. The survey covers the attachment factors of two parents (30 to 60 years old) and their sty...

  17. Attachment to Caregivers and Type 1 Diabetes in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drobnič Radobuljac, Maja; Shmueli-Goetz, Yael

    2015-06-01

    Attachment is a behavioral and physiological system, which enables individual's dynamic adaptation to its environment. Attachment develops in close interaction between an infant and his/her mother, plays an important role in the development of the infant's brain, and influences the quality of interpersonal relationships throughout life. Security of attachment is believed to influence individual response to stress, exposing insecurely organized individuals to deregulated autonomic nervous system and exaggerated hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal activity, which, in turn, produces increased and prolonged exposure to stress-hormones. Such stress responses may have considerable implications for the development of diverse health-risk conditions, such as insulin resistance and hyperlipidemia, shown by numerous studies. Although the mechanisms are not yet fully understood, there is compelling evidence highlighting the role of psychological stress in the development of type 1 diabetes (T1D). One of the possible contributing factors for the development of T1D may be the influence of attachment security on individual stress reactivity. Thus, the suggestion is that insecurely attached individuals are more prone to experience increased and prolonged influence of stress hormones and other mechanisms causing pancreatic beta-cell destruction. The present paper opens with a short overview of the field of attachment in children, the principal attachment classifications and their historic development, describes the influence of attachment security on individual stress-reactivity and the role of the latter in the development of T1D. Following is a review of recent literature on the attachment in patients with T1D with a conclusion of a proposed role of attachment organization in the etiology of T1D.

  18. Protein S testing in patients with protein S deficiency, factor V Leiden, and rivaroxaban by North American Specialized Coagulation Laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smock, Kristi J; Plumhoff, Elizabeth A; Meijer, Piet; Hsu, Peihong; Zantek, Nicole D; Heikal, Nahla M; Van Cott, Elizabeth M

    2016-07-04

    In 2010-2012, the North American Specialized Coagulation Laboratory Association (NASCOLA) distributed 12 proficiency testing challenges to evaluate laboratory testing for protein S (PS). Results were analysed to assess the performance of PS activity, PS free antigen, and PS total antigen testing. Statistical analysis was performed on the numeric results and qualitative classification submitted for each method. There were 2,106 total results: 716 results from PS activity assays, 833 results from PS free antigen assays, and 557 results from PS total antigen assays. The three assay types performed well in the classification of five normal samples and nine abnormal samples, although certain PS activity methods were more likely to classify normal samples as abnormal and one PS total antigen assay was more likely to classify abnormal samples as normal. PS activity methods were affected by interfering substances such as heterozygous or homozygous factor V Leiden mutation (underestimation) and the anticoagulant drug rivaroxaban (overestimation). In conclusion, NASCOLA laboratories using a variety of PS assays performed well in the classification of clearly normal and abnormal samples. Laboratories performing PS activity assays should be aware of potential interferences in samples positive for FV Leiden or containing certain anticoagulant medications.

  19. Protein-based biofilm matrices in Staphylococci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro eSpeziale

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis are the most important etiological agents of biofilm associated-infections on indwelling medical devices. Biofilm infections may also develop independently of indwelling devices, e.g. in native valve endocarditis, bone tissue and open wounds. After attachment to tissue or indwelling medical devices that have been conditioned with host plasma proteins, staphylococcal biofilms grow and produce a specific environment which provides the conditions for cell-cell interaction and formation of multicellular communities. Bacteria living in biofilms express a variety of macromolecules, including exopolysaccharides, proteins, extracellular eDNA and other polymers. The S. aureus surface protein C and G (SasC and SasG, clumping factor B (ClfB, serine aspartate repeat protein (SdrC, the biofilm-associated protein (Bap and the fibronectin/fibrinogen-binding proteins (FnBPA and FnBPB are individually implicated in biofilm matrix formation. In S. epidermidis, a protein named accumulation-associated protein (Aap contributes to both the primary attachment phase and the establishment of intercellular connections by forming fibrils on the cell surface. In S. epidermidis proteinaceous biofilm formation can also be mediated by the extracellular matrix binding protein (Embp and S. epidermidis surface protein C (SesC. Additionally, multifunctional proteins such as extracellular adherence protein (Eap and extracellular matrix protein binding protein (Emp of S. aureus and the iron-regulated surface determinant protein C (IsdC of S. lugdunensis can promote biofilm formation in iron-depleted conditions. This multitude of proteins intervene at different stages of biofilm formation with certain proteins contributing to biofilm accumulation and others mediating primary attachment to surfaces. This review examines the contribution of proteins to biofilm formation in staphylococci. The potential to develop vaccines to prevent

  20. Thermal compaction of the intrinsically disordered protein tau: entropic, structural, and hydrophobic factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battisti, Anna; Ciasca, Gabriele; Grottesi, Alessandro; Tenenbaum, Alexander

    2017-03-28

    Globular denatured proteins have structural properties similar to those of random coils. Experiments on denatured proteins have shown that when the temperature is increased thermal compaction may take place, resulting in a reduction of their radius of gyration Rg to range between 5% and 35% of its initial value. This phenomenon has been attributed to various causes, namely entropic, hydrophobic, and structural factors. The intrinsically disordered protein tau, which helps in nucleating and stabilizing microtubules in the axons of the neurons, also undergoes a relevant compaction process: when its temperature is increased from 293 K to 333 K its gyration radius decreases by 18%. We have performed an atomistic simulation of this molecule, at the lowest and highest temperatures of the mentioned interval, using both standard molecular dynamics and metadynamics, in parallel with small-angle X-ray scattering experiments. Using the fit of the experimental data and a genetic algorithm to select the most probable configurations among those produced in both atomistic simulations (standard MD and metadynamics), we were able to compute relevant changes, related to the temperature increase, in the average angles between residues, in the transient secondary structures, in the solvent accessible surface area, and in the number of intramolecular H-bonds. The analysis of the data showed how to decompose the compaction phenomenon into three contributions. An estimate of the entropic contribution to the compaction was obtained using the changes in the mean values of the angles between contiguous residues. The computation of the solvent accessible surface at the two temperatures allowed an estimation of the second factor contributing to the compaction, namely the increase in the hydrophobic interaction. We also measured the change in the average number of residues temporarily being in α-helices, 3-helices, PP II helices, β-sheets and β-turns. Those changes in the secondary

  1. Liver-type fatty acid binding protein interacts with hepatocyte nuclear factor

    OpenAIRE

    McIntosh, Avery L.; Petrescu, Anca D.; Hostetler, Heather A.; Kier, Ann B.; Schroeder, Friedhelm

    2013-01-01

    Hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α (HNF4α) regulates liver type fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP) gene expression. Conversely as shown herein, L-FABP structurally and functionally also interacts with HNF4α. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between Cy3-HNF4α (donor) and Cy5-L-FABP (acceptor) as well as FRET microscopy detected L-FABP in close proximity (~80 Å) to HNF4α, binding with high affinity Kd ~250–300 nM. Circular dichroism (CD) determined that the HNF4α/L-FABP interaction alte...

  2. Rooting for the root of elongation factor-like protein phylogeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamikawa, Ryoma; Sakaguchi, Miako; Matsumoto, Takuya; Hashimoto, Tetsuo; Inagaki, Yuji

    2010-09-01

    Lateral gene transfer (LGT) may play a pivotal role in the evolution of elongation factor-like (EFL) genes in eukaryotes. To date, numbers of putative cases for lateral transfer of EFL genes have been postulated based on unrooted EFL phylogenies. Nevertheless, the root position in EFL phylogeny is important to validate lateral EFL gene transfer: for instance, a clade of two EFL homologs from distantly related organisms in an unrooted EFL tree does not necessarily confirm the LGT, since the possibility that the root may locate in this clade cannot be excluded. Cocquyt et al. (2009, p. 39) recently demonstrated that a putative case of lateral EFL gene transfer, which was originally proposed based on an unrooted phylogeny, could not be endorsed by the corresponding rooted analysis. Although rooting EFL phylogeny is indispensable to elucidate various aspects in EFL gene evolution, we suspected that the outgroup clade comprised of EF-1alpha and eukaryote-specific EF-1alpha paralogs erroneously attached to long EFL branches in Cocquyt et al. (2009) - a typical long branch attraction (LBA) artifact. Here, we systematically assessed the putative LBA artifact between the branch leading to the outgroup clade and long ingroup branches by analyzing the original dataset used in Cocquyt et al. (2009) with and without modifying ingroup-sequence sampling. A series of the rooted EFL analyses indicated that the root inference was highly susceptible to presence and absence of long-branched ingroup-sequences, suggesting that the rooted EFL phylogenies cannot be free from severe LBA artifact. We also discussed a new aspect in EFL gene evolution in stramenopiles identified in the course of the EFL analyses described above. Finally, the relative timing of the first emergence of EFL gene in eukaryotes was contemplated based on the current EF-1alpha/EFL distribution.

  3. Correlations of health behaviors and factors with high sensitivity C-reactive protein in diabetic population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-hong HOU

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective To explore the correlations of ideal cardiovascular health behaviors and factors with the level of high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP in diabetic population. Methods A cross-sectional method was used in present study. Seven thousand eight hundred and sixty-nine workers with diabetes were recruited who participated in the 2006-2007 Kailuan health examination without history of cerebral and myocardial infarction and without data incompleted. All the information was obtained from the unified questionnaire and measurement of blood biochemistry. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to analyze the effects of ideal cardiovascular health behaviors and factors on the level of hsCRP. Results The hsCRP concentrations decreased with the increasing numbers of ideal cardiovascular health behaviors and factors, the medians of hsCRP concentrations were 1.16mg/L, 1.11mg/L, 0.90mg/L and 0.76mg/L in 0-1, 2, 3 and 4-6 ideal cardiovascular health groups, respectively (P<0.01. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that, after adjustment by age, gender, triglyceride, low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C and high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C, the risk of hsCRP level exceeding 3mg/L in the subjects having 3 and 4-6 ideal cardiovascular health behaviors and factors was 0.60 times (95%CI 0.50-0.72 and 0.45 times (95%CI 0.34-0.61, respectively, than those having 0-1 ideal cardiovascular health behaviors and factors. Conclusion The hsCRP concentrations decreased with increasing numbers of ideal cardiovascular health behaviors and factors; the risk of hsCRP exceeding 3mg/L can be reduced by ideal cardiovascular health behaviors and factors. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2013.10.013

  4. Cellular, particle and environmental parameters influencing attachment in surface waters: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, C; Liang, X; Soupir, M L; Jarboe, L R

    2015-08-01

    Effective modelling of the fate and transport of water-borne pathogens is needed to support federally required pollution-reduction plans, for water quality improvement planning, and to protect public health. Lack of understanding of microbial-particle interactions in water bodies has sometimes led to the assumption that bacteria move in surface waters not associated with suspended mineral and organic particles, despite a growing body of evidence suggesting otherwise. Limited information exists regarding the factors driving interactions between micro-organisms and particles in surface waters. This review discusses cellular, particle and environmental factors potentially influencing interactions and in-stream transport. Bacterial attachment in the aquatic environment can be influenced by properties of the cell such as genetic predisposition and physiological state, surface structures such as flagella and fimbriae, the hydrophobicity and electrostatic charge of the cell surface, and the presence of outer-membrane proteins and extracellular polymeric substances. The mechanisms and degree of attachment are also affected by characteristics of mineral and organic particles including the size, surface area, charge and hydrophobicity. Environmental conditions such as the solution chemistry and temperature are also known to play an important role. Just as the size and surface of chemical particles can be highly variable, bacterial attachment mechanisms are also diverse.

  5. The effect of milk and milk proteins on risk factors of metabolic syndrome in overweight adolecents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnberg, Karina

    of type-2 diabetes and atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases. Overweight children have higher concentrations of the metabolic syndrome risk factors than normal weight children and the pathological condition underlying cardiovascular diseases, called atherosclerosis, seems to start in childhood. A well...... in the adolescents. The analyses showed that increased physical activity was related to an improved arterial function whereas central adiposity and a high protein intake were related to increased arterial stiffness. In the intervention study, the adolescents with habitual low milk intakes were randomized to drink 1L...... factors than children having a high milk intake. The aim of the intervention study was to examine whether it is beneficial for overweight adolescents with a habitual low milk intake to increase the consumption of low fat milk and whether a potential beneficial effect is caused by whey or casein. The data...

  6. Regulatory roles of tumor necrosis factor alpha-induced proteins (TNFAIPs) 3 and 9 in arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Isao; Inoue, Asuka; Takai, Chinatsu; Umeda, Naoto; Tanaka, Yuki; Kurashima, Yuko; Sumida, Takayuki

    2014-07-01

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) have proved to be important in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) because the outcome of RA has greatly improved with the recent availability of biologics targeting them. It is well accepted that these cytokines are involved in the activation of the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling pathway, but our understanding of the dependency of these pro-inflammatory cytokines and the link between them in RA is currently limited. Recently, we and others proved the importance of TNFα-induced protein (TNFAIP), due to the spontaneous development of arthritis in deficient animals that are dependent on IL-6. To date, nine TNFAIPs have been identified, and TNFAIP3 and TNFAIP9 were found to be clearly associated with mouse and human arthritis. In this review, we compare and discuss recent TNFAIP topics, especially focusing on TNFAIP3 and TNFAIP9 in autoimmune arthritis in mice and humans.

  7. Complement factor H-related proteins CFHR2 and CFHR5 represent novel ligands for the infection-associated CRASP proteins of Borrelia burgdorferi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corinna Siegel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: One virulence property of Borrelia burgdorferi is its resistance to innate immunity, in particular to complement-mediated killing. Serum-resistant B. burgdorferi express up to five distinct complement regulator-acquiring surface proteins (CRASP which interact with complement regulator factor H (CFH and factor H-like protein 1 (FHL1 or factor H-related protein 1 (CFHR1. In the present study we elucidate the role of the infection-associated CRASP-3 and CRASP-5 protein to serve as ligands for additional complement regulatory proteins as well as for complement resistance of B. burgdorferi. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To elucidate whether CRASP-5 and CRASP-3 interact with various human proteins, both borrelial proteins were immobilized on magnetic beads. Following incubation with human serum, bound proteins were eluted and separated by Glycine-SDS-PAGE. In addition to CFH and CFHR1, complement regulators CFHR2 and CFHR5 were identified as novel ligands for both borrelial proteins by employing MALDI-TOF. To further assess the contributions of CRASP-3 and CRASP-5 to complement resistance, a serum-sensitive B. garinii strain G1 which lacks all CFH-binding proteins was used as a valuable model for functional analyses. Both CRASPs expressed on the B. garinii outer surface bound CFH as well as CFHR1 and CFHR2 in ELISA. In contrast, live B. garinii bound CFHR1, CFHR2, and CFHR5 and only miniscute amounts of CFH as demonstrated by serum adsorption assays and FACS analyses. Further functional analysis revealed that upon NHS incubation, CRASP-3 or CRASP-5 expressing borreliae were killed by complement. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In the absence of CFH and the presence of CFHR1, CFHR2 and CFHR5, assembly and integration of the membrane attack complex was not efficiently inhibited indicating that CFH in co-operation with CFHR1, CFHR2 and CFHR5 supports complement evasion of B. burgdorferi.

  8. Expression, biosynthesis and release of preadipocyte factor-1/ delta-like protein/fetal antigen-1 in pancreatic -cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friedrichsen, B N; Carlsson, C; Møldrup, A

    2003-01-01

    Preadipocyte factor-1 (Pref-1)/delta-like protein/fetal antigen-1 (FA1) is a member of the epidermal growth factor-like family. It is widely expressed in embryonic tissues, whereas in adults it is confined to the adrenal gland, the anterior pituitary, the endocrine pancreas, the testis and the ov......Preadipocyte factor-1 (Pref-1)/delta-like protein/fetal antigen-1 (FA1) is a member of the epidermal growth factor-like family. It is widely expressed in embryonic tissues, whereas in adults it is confined to the adrenal gland, the anterior pituitary, the endocrine pancreas, the testis...

  9. Novel polymeric scaffolds using protein microbubbles as porogen and growth factor carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Ashwin; Thevenot, Paul; Dey, Jagannath; Shen, Jinhui; Sun, Man-Wu; Yang, Jian; Tang, Liping

    2010-02-01

    Polymeric tissue engineering scaffolds prepared by conventional techniques like salt leaching and phase separation are greatly limited by their poor biomolecule-delivery abilities. Conventional methods of incorporation of various growth factors, proteins, and/or peptides on or in scaffold materials via different crosslinking and conjugation techniques are often tedious and may affect scaffold's physical, chemical, and mechanical properties. To overcome such deficiencies, a novel two-step porous scaffold fabrication procedure has been created in which bovine serum albumin microbubbles (henceforth MB) were used as porogen and growth factor carriers. Polymer solution mixed with MB was phase separated and then lyophilized to create porous scaffold. MB scaffold triggered substantially lesser inflammatory responses than salt-leached and conventional phase-separated scaffolds in vivo. Most importantly, the same technique was used to produce insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1)-eluting porous scaffolds, simply by incorporating IGF-1-loaded MB (MB-IGF-1) with polymer solution before phase separation. In vitro such MB-IGF-1 scaffolds were able to promote cell growth to a much greater extent than scaffold soaked in IGF-1, confirming the bioactivity of the released IGF-1. Further, such MB-IGF-1 scaffolds elicited IGF-1-specific collagen production in the surrounding tissue in vivo. This novel growth factor-eluting scaffold fabrication procedure can be used to deliver a range of single or combination of bioactive biomolecules to substantially promote cell growth and function in degradable scaffold.

  10. Human factor H-related protein 2 (CFHR2 regulates complement activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannes U Eberhardt

    Full Text Available Mutations and deletions within the human CFHR gene cluster on chromosome 1 are associated with diseases, such as dense deposit disease, CFHR nephropathy or age-related macular degeneration. Resulting mutant CFHR proteins can affect complement regulation. Here we identify human CFHR2 as a novel alternative pathway complement regulator that inhibits the C3 alternative pathway convertase and terminal pathway assembly. CFHR2 is composed of four short consensus repeat domains (SCRs. Two CFHR2 molecules form a dimer through their N-terminal SCRs, and each of the two C-terminal ends can bind C3b. C3b bound CFHR2 still allows C3 convertase formation but the CFHR2 bound convertases do not cleave the substrate C3. Interestingly CFHR2 hardly competes off factor H from C3b. Thus CFHR2 likely acts in concert with factor H, as CFHR2 inhibits convertases while simultaneously allowing factor H assisted degradation by factor I.

  11. Identification of the blood coagulation factor interacting sequences in staphylococcal superantigen-like protein 10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Saotomo; Takii, Takemasa; Onozaki, Kikuo; Tsuji, Tsutomu; Hida, Shigeaki

    2017-03-25

    Staphylococcal superantigen-like proteins (SSLs) are a family of exoproteins of Staphylococcus aureus. We have shown that SSL10 binds to vitamin K-dependent coagulation factors and inhibits blood coagulation induced by recalcification of citrated plasma. SSL10 was revealed to bind to coagulation factors via their γ-carboxyglutamic acid (Gla) domain. In this study we attempted to identify the responsible sequence of SSL10 for the interaction with coagulation factors. We prepared a series of domain swap mutants between SSL10 and its paralog SSL7 that does not interact with coagulation factors, and examined their binding activity to immobilized prothrombin using ELISA-like binding assay. The domain swap mutants that contained SSL10β1-β3 ((23)MEMKN ISALK HGKNN LRFKF RGIKI QVL(60)) bound to immobilized prothrombin, and mutants that contained SSL10β10-β12 ((174)SFYNL DLRSK LKFKY MGEVI ESKQI KDIEV NLK(207)) also retained the binding activity. On the other hand, mutants that lacked these two regions did not bind to prothrombin. These sequences, each alone, bound to prothrombin as 33 amino acid length polypeptides. These results suggest that SSL10 has two responsible sequences for the binding to prothrombin. These prothrombin-binding peptides would contribute to the development of new anticoagulants.

  12. Functional assay, expression of growth factors and proteins modulating bone-arrangement in human osteoblasts seeded on an anorganic bovine bone biomaterial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O Trubiani

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The basic aspects of bone tissue engineering include chemical composition and geometry of the scaffold design, because it is very important to improve not only cell attachment and growth but especially osteodifferentiation, bone tissue formation, and vascularization. Geistlich Bio-Oss® (GBO is a xenograft consisting of deproteinized, sterilized bovine bone, chemically and physically identical to the mineral phase of human bone.In this study, we investigated the growth behaviour and the ability to form focal adhesions on the substrate, using vinculin, a cytoskeletal protein, as a marker. Moreover, the expression of bone specific proteins and growth factors such as type I collagen, osteopontin, bone sialoprotein, bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2, BMP-7 and de novo synthesis of osteocalcin in normal human osteoblasts (NHOst seeded on xenogenic GBO were evaluated. Our observations suggest that after four weeks of culture in differentiation medium, the NHOst showed a high affinity for the three dimensional biomaterial; in fact, cellular proliferation, migration and colonization were clearly evident. The osteogenic differentiation process, as demonstrated by morphological, histochemical, energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis and biochemical analysis was mostly obvious in the NHOst grown on three-dimensional inorganic bovine bone biomaterial. Functional studies displayed a clear and significant response to calcitonin when the cells were differentiated. In addition, the presence of the biomaterial improved the response, suggesting that it could drive the differentiation of these cells towards a more differentiated osteogenic phenotype. These results encourage us to consider GBO an adequate biocompatible three-dimensional biomaterial, indicating its potential use for the development of tissue-engineering techniques.

  13. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor enhances the basal rate of protein synthesis by increasing active eukaryotic elongation factor 2 levels and promoting translation elongation in cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takei, Nobuyuki; Kawamura, Mihoko; Ishizuka, Yuta; Kakiya, Naomasa; Inamura, Naoko; Namba, Hisaaki; Nawa, Hiroyuki

    2009-09-25

    Th